Science.gov

Sample records for muon-nucleus interactions based

  1. Photo nuclear energy loss term for muon-nucleus interactions based on xi scaling model of QCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, R.

    1985-01-01

    Extensive air showers (EMC) experiments discovered a significant deviation of the ratio of structure functions of iron and deuteron from unity. It was established that the quark parton distribution in nuclei are different from the corresponding distribution in the nucleus. It was examined whether these results have an effect on the calculation of photo nucleus energy loss term for muon-nucleus nuclear interaction. Though the EMC and SLAC data were restricted to rather large q sq region it is expected that the derivation would persist even in the low q sq domain. For the ratio of iron and deuteron structure function a rather naive least square fit of the form R(x) = a + bx was taken and it is assumed that the formula is valid for the whole q sq region the absence of any knowledge of R(x) for small q sq.

  2. Recent experimental studies on Hadron showers produced in high energy muon-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Morfin, J.

    1992-05-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron Muon Experiment has analyzed the hadron showers of events resulting from the scattering of a muon beam (< E{sub {mu}} > = 490 GeV) off H{sub 2}, D{sub 2} and Xenon targets. The topics which will be discussed are: (1) space-time evolution of the hadronization process; (2) leading hadron distributions in the shadowing region; (3) rates and characteristics of 3-jet events. 23 refs.

  3. Results-Based Interaction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    Interaction design is a user-centered approach to development in which users and their goals are the driving force behind a project's design. Interaction design principles are fundamental to the design and implementation of effective websites, but they are not sufficient. This article argues that, to reach its full potential, a website should also…

  4. Results-Based Interaction Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    Interaction design is a user-centered approach to development in which users and their goals are the driving force behind a project's design. Interaction design principles are fundamental to the design and implementation of effective websites, but they are not sufficient. This article argues that, to reach its full potential, a website should also…

  5. Adding Interactivity to Web Based Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cafolla, Ralph; Knee, Richard

    Web Based Distance Learning (WBDL) is a form of distance learning based on providing instruction mainly on the World Wide Web. This paradigm has limitations, especially the lack of interactivity inherent in the Web. The purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the technologies the authors have used in their courses at Florida Atlantic…

  6. Interactive Pedagogy in a Literature Based Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Virginia

    1993-01-01

    Preserving a literary-based curriculum, creating a sensitivity to the literature, and encouraging communicative skills relative to the literature are significant goals in foreign language study. Therefore, a program involving strategic interaction and cooperative learning techniques applied to the study of literature fosters communication and…

  7. Interactive analysis of geodata based intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Boris; Eck, Ralf; Unmüessig, Gabriel; Peinsipp-Byma, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    When a spatiotemporal events happens, multi-source intelligence data is gathered to understand the problem, and strategies for solving the problem are investigated. The difficulties arising from handling spatial and temporal intelligence data represent the main problem. The map might be the bridge to visualize the data and to get the most understand model for all stakeholders. For the analysis of geodata based intelligence data, a software was developed as a working environment that combines geodata with optimized ergonomics. The interaction with the common operational picture (COP) is so essentially facilitated. The composition of the COP is based on geodata services, which are normalized by international standards of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The basic geodata are combined with intelligence data from images (IMINT) and humans (HUMINT), stored in a NATO Coalition Shared Data Server (CSD). These intelligence data can be combined with further information sources, i.e., live sensors. As a result a COP is generated and an interaction suitable for the specific workspace is added. This allows the users to work interactively with the COP, i.e., searching with an on board CSD client for suitable intelligence data and integrate them into the COP. Furthermore, users can enrich the scenario with findings out of the data of interactive live sensors and add data from other sources. This allows intelligence services to contribute effectively to the process by what military and disaster management are organized.

  8. Theoretical calculations of base-base interactions in nucleic acids: II. Stacking interactions in polynucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, G; Sasisekharan, V

    1978-01-01

    Base-base interactions were computed for single- and double stranded poly,ucleotides, for all possible base sequences. In each case, both right and left stacking arrangements are energetically possible. The preference of one over the other depends upon the base-sequence and the orientation of the bases with respect to helix-axis. Inverted stacking arrangement is also energetically possible for both single- and double-stranded polynucleotides. Finally, interacting energies of a regular duplex and the alternative structures were compared. It was found that the type II model is energetically more favourable than the rest. PMID:662698

  9. Susceptibility based upon Chemical Interaction with Disease ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One of the challenges facing toxicology and risk assessment is that numerous host and environmental factors may modulate vulnerability and risk. An area of increasing interest is the potential for chemicals to interact with background aging and disease processes, an interaction that may yield cumulative damage, altered chemical potency, and increased disease incidence. This review outlines the interactions possible between chemicals and background disease and identifies the type of information needed to evaluate such interactions. Key among these is the existence of a clinically relevant and easy to measure biomarker of disease risk which allows the identification of vulnerable individuals based upon the level of risk biomarker. The impact of toxic chemicals on this biomarker can then be used to predict how the chemical modifies disease risk as long as related mechanistic and toxicological data are consistent with toxicant effect on the disease process. Several case studies are briefly presented which describe the toxic chemical, the clinical biomarker and the impacted disease including: fine particulate matter/decreased heart rate variability/increased cardiopulmonary events; cadmium/decreased glomerular filtration rate/increased chronic kidney disease; methyl mercury/decreased paraoxonase-1/increased cardiovascular risk; trichloroethylene/increased anti-nuclear antibody/autoimmunity; dioxin/increased CYP1A1/hypertension. These case studies point o

  10. Susceptibility based upon Chemical Interaction with Disease ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One of the challenges facing toxicology and risk assessment is that numerous host and environmental factors may modulate vulnerability and risk. An area of increasing interest is the potential for chemicals to interact with background aging and disease processes, an interaction that may yield cumulative damage, altered chemical potency, and increased disease incidence. This review outlines the interactions possible between chemicals and background disease and identifies the type of information needed to evaluate such interactions. Key among these is the existence of a clinically relevant and easy to measure biomarker of disease risk which allows the identification of vulnerable individuals based upon the level of risk biomarker. The impact of toxic chemicals on this biomarker can then be used to predict how the chemical modifies disease risk as long as related mechanistic and toxicological data are consistent with toxicant effect on the disease process. Several case studies are briefly presented which describe the toxic chemical, the clinical biomarker and the impacted disease including: fine particulate matter/decreased heart rate variability/increased cardiopulmonary events; cadmium/decreased glomerular filtration rate/increased chronic kidney disease; methyl mercury/decreased paraoxonase-1/increased cardiovascular risk; trichloroethylene/increased anti-nuclear antibody/autoimmunity; dioxin/increased CYP1A1/hypertension. These case studies point o

  11. Risk analysis based on hazards interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Lauro; Rudari, Roberto; Trasforini, Eva; De Angeli, Silvia; Becker, Joost

    2017-04-01

    Despite an increasing need for open, transparent, and credible multi-hazard risk assessment methods, models, and tools, the availability of comprehensive risk information needed to inform disaster risk reduction is limited, and the level of interaction across hazards is not systematically analysed. Risk assessment methodologies for different hazards often produce risk metrics that are not comparable. Hazard interactions (consecutive occurrence two or more different events) are generally neglected, resulting in strongly underestimated risk assessment in the most exposed areas. This study presents cases of interaction between different hazards, showing how subsidence can affect coastal and river flood risk (Jakarta and Bandung, Indonesia) or how flood risk is modified after a seismic event (Italy). The analysis of well documented real study cases, based on a combination between Earth Observation and in-situ data, would serve as basis the formalisation of a multi-hazard methodology, identifying gaps and research frontiers. Multi-hazard risk analysis is performed through the RASOR platform (Rapid Analysis and Spatialisation Of Risk). A scenario-driven query system allow users to simulate future scenarios based on existing and assumed conditions, to compare with historical scenarios, and to model multi-hazard risk both before and during an event (www.rasor.eu).

  12. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bellucci, Andrea; Aedo, Ignacio; Díaz, Paloma

    2017-01-01

    Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit. PMID:28241502

  13. ECCE Toolkit: Prototyping Sensor-Based Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Andrea; Aedo, Ignacio; Díaz, Paloma

    2017-02-23

    Building and exploring physical user interfaces requires high technical skills and hours of specialized work. The behavior of multiple devices with heterogeneous input/output channels and connectivity has to be programmed in a context where not only the software interface matters, but also the hardware components are critical (e.g., sensors and actuators). Prototyping physical interaction is hindered by the challenges of: (1) programming interactions among physical sensors/actuators and digital interfaces; (2) implementing functionality for different platforms in different programming languages; and (3) building custom electronic-incorporated objects. We present ECCE (Entities, Components, Couplings and Ecosystems), a toolkit for non-programmers that copes with these issues by abstracting from low-level implementations, thus lowering the complexity of prototyping small-scale, sensor-based physical interfaces to support the design process. A user evaluation provides insights and use cases of the kind of applications that can be developed with the toolkit.

  14. Extended weak bonding interactions in DNA: pi-stacking (base-base), base-backbone, and backbone-backbone interactions.

    PubMed

    Matta, Chérif F; Castillo, Norberto; Boyd, Russell J

    2006-01-12

    We report on several weak interactions in nucleic acids, which, collectively, can make a nonnegligible contribution to the structure and stability of these molecules. Fragments of DNA were obtained from previously determined accurate experimental geometries and their electron density distributions calculated using density functional theory (DFT). The electron densities were analyzed topologically according to the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). A web of closed-shell bonding interactions is shown to connect neighboring base pairs in base-pair duplexes and in dinuleotide steps. This bonding underlies the well-known pi-stacking interaction between adjacent nucleic acid bases and is characterized topologically for the first time. Two less widely appreciated modes of weak closed-shell interactions in nucleic acids are also described: (i) interactions between atoms in the bases and atoms belonging to the backbone (base-backbone) and (ii) interactions among atoms within the backbone itself (backbone-backbone). These interactions include hydrogen bonding, dihydrogen bonding, hydrogen-hydrogen bonding, and several other weak closed-shell X-Y interactions (X, Y = O, N, C). While each individual interaction is very weak and typically accompanied by perhaps 0.5-3 kcal/mol, the sum total of these interactions is postulated to play a role in stabilizing the structure of nucleic acids. The Watson-and-Crick hydrogen bonding is also characterized in detail at the experimental geometries as a prelude to the discussion of the modes of interactions listed in the title.

  15. Defining interaction and strategies to enhance interactions in Web-based courses.

    PubMed

    Thurmond, Veronica A

    2003-01-01

    Designing interaction components in Web-based courses is important to ensure an effective learning environment. The author provides a definition of interaction and describes four types of interactions: learner-content, learner-learner, learner-instructor, and learner-interface. Finally, strategies to enhance the four types of interaction when developing and delivering Web-based course are discussed.

  16. Interactive physically-based sound simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghuvanshi, Nikunj

    The realization of interactive, immersive virtual worlds requires the ability to present a realistic audio experience that convincingly compliments their visual rendering. Physical simulation is a natural way to achieve such realism, enabling deeply immersive virtual worlds. However, physically-based sound simulation is very computationally expensive owing to the high-frequency, transient oscillations underlying audible sounds. The increasing computational power of desktop computers has served to reduce the gap between required and available computation, and it has become possible to bridge this gap further by using a combination of algorithmic improvements that exploit the physical, as well as perceptual properties of audible sounds. My thesis is a step in this direction. My dissertation concentrates on developing real-time techniques for both sub-problems of sound simulation: synthesis and propagation. Sound synthesis is concerned with generating the sounds produced by objects due to elastic surface vibrations upon interaction with the environment, such as collisions. I present novel techniques that exploit human auditory perception to simulate scenes with hundreds of sounding objects undergoing impact and rolling in real time. Sound propagation is the complementary problem of modeling the high-order scattering and diffraction of sound in an environment as it travels from source to listener. I discuss my work on a novel numerical acoustic simulator (ARD) that is hundred times faster and consumes ten times less memory than a high-accuracy finite-difference technique, allowing acoustic simulations on previously-intractable spaces, such as a cathedral, on a desktop computer. Lastly, I present my work on interactive sound propagation that leverages my ARD simulator to render the acoustics of arbitrary static scenes for multiple moving sources and listener in real time, while accounting for scene-dependent effects such as low-pass filtering and smooth attenuation

  17. Learning through Interaction: Improving Practice with Design-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Christian; Swatman, Paula M. C.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the first stage of a design-based research project to introduce case-based learning using existing interactive technologies in a major Australian university. The paper initially outlines the relationship between case-based learning, student interaction and the study of interactions--and includes a review of research into…

  18. Learning through Interaction: Improving Practice with Design-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voigt, Christian; Swatman, Paula M. C.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the first stage of a design-based research project to introduce case-based learning using existing interactive technologies in a major Australian university. The paper initially outlines the relationship between case-based learning, student interaction and the study of interactions--and includes a review of research into…

  19. CABINS: Case-based interactive scheduler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyashita, Kazuo; Sycara, Katia

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the need for interactive factory schedule repair and improvement, and we identify case-based reasoning (CBR) as an appropriate methodology. Case-based reasoning is the problem solving paradigm that relies on a memory for past problem solving experiences (cases) to guide current problem solving. Cases similar to the current case are retrieved from the case memory, and similarities and differences of the current case to past cases are identified. Then a best case is selected, and its repair plan is adapted to fit the current problem description. If a repair solution fails, an explanation for the failure is stored along with the case in memory, so that the user can avoid repeating similar failures in the future. So far we have identified a number of repair strategies and tactics for factory scheduling and have implemented a part of our approach in a prototype system, called CABINS. As a future work, we are going to scale up CABINS to evaluate its usefulness in a real manufacturing environment.

  20. Interactions between space-based and feature-based attention

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Carly J.; Balestreri, Angela; Luck, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Although early research suggested that attention to nonspatial features (i.e., red) was confined to stimuli appearing at an attended spatial location, more recent research has emphasized the global nature of feature-based attention. For example, a distractor sharing a target feature may capture attention even if it occurs at a task-irrelevant location. Such findings have been used to argue that feature-based attention operates independently of spatial attention. However, feature-based attention may nonetheless interact with spatial attention, yielding larger feature-based effects at attended locations than at unattended locations. The present study tested this possibility. In two experiments, participants viewed a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) stream and identified a target letter defined by its color. Target-colored distractors were presented at various task-irrelevant locations during the RSVP stream. We found that feature-driven attentional capture effects were largest when the target-colored distractor was closer to the attended location. These results demonstrate that spatial attention modulates the strength of feature-based attention capture, calling into question the prior evidence that feature-based attention operates in a global manner that is independent of spatial attention. PMID:25285472

  1. Evaluation Novelty in Modeling-Based and Interactive Engagement Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Örnek, Funda

    2007-01-01

    A calculus-based introductory physics course, which is based on the Matter and Interactions curriculum of Chabay and Sherwood (2002), has been taught at Purdue University. Characteristic of this course is its emphasis on modeling. Therefore, I would like to investigate the effects of modeling-based instruction and interactive engagement on…

  2. Problem Solving: Physics Modeling-Based Interactive Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornek, Funda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how modeling-based instruction combined with an interactive-engagement teaching approach promotes students' problem solving abilities. I focused on students in a calculus-based introductory physics course, based on the matter and interactions curriculum of Chabay & Sherwood (2002) at a large state…

  3. Nuclear reaction inputs based on effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, S.; Goriely, S.; Péru, S.; Dubray, N.; Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.

    2016-11-01

    Extensive nuclear structure studies have been performed for decades using effective interactions as sole input. They have shown a remarkable ability to describe rather accurately many types of nuclear properties. In the early 2000s, a major effort has been engaged to produce nuclear reaction input data out of the Gogny interaction, in order to challenge its quality also with respect to nuclear reaction observables. The status of this project, well advanced today thanks to the use of modern computers as well as modern nuclear reaction codes, is reviewed and future developments are discussed.

  4. Genetic interaction mapping with microfluidic-based single cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Haliburton, John R; Shao, Wenjun; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Abate, Adam R

    2017-01-01

    Genetic interaction mapping is useful for understanding the molecular basis of cellular decision making, but elucidating interactions genome-wide is challenging due to the massive number of gene combinations that must be tested. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach to thoroughly map genetic interactions in bacteria using microfluidic-based single cell sequencing. Using single cell PCR in droplets, we link distinct genetic information into single DNA sequences that can be decoded by next generation sequencing. Our approach is scalable and theoretically enables the pooling of entire interaction libraries to interrogate multiple pairwise genetic interactions in a single culture. The speed, ease, and low-cost of our approach makes genetic interaction mapping viable for routine characterization, allowing the interaction network to be used as a universal read out for a variety of biology experiments, and for the elucidation of interaction networks in non-model organisms.

  5. Genetic interaction mapping with microfluidic-based single cell sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Haliburton, John R.; Shao, Wenjun; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Abate, Adam R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic interaction mapping is useful for understanding the molecular basis of cellular decision making, but elucidating interactions genome-wide is challenging due to the massive number of gene combinations that must be tested. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach to thoroughly map genetic interactions in bacteria using microfluidic-based single cell sequencing. Using single cell PCR in droplets, we link distinct genetic information into single DNA sequences that can be decoded by next generation sequencing. Our approach is scalable and theoretically enables the pooling of entire interaction libraries to interrogate multiple pairwise genetic interactions in a single culture. The speed, ease, and low-cost of our approach makes genetic interaction mapping viable for routine characterization, allowing the interaction network to be used as a universal read out for a variety of biology experiments, and for the elucidation of interaction networks in non-model organisms. PMID:28170417

  6. An Interactive Computer-Based Revision Aid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, J. M.; Harris, F. T. C.

    1977-01-01

    A computer-based review system has been developed, based on the multiple-choice technique, at the University of London for medical students. The user can enter an answer or can have a list of questions to take away and enter later. Student response has been favorable. (LBH)

  7. Physically-based interactive Schlieren flow visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Mccormick, Patrick S; Brownlee, Carson S; Pegoraro, Vincent; Shankar, Siddharth; Hansen, Charles D

    2009-01-01

    Understanding fluid flow is a difficult problem and of increasing importance as computational fluid dynamics produces an abundance of simulation data. Experimental flow analysis has employed techniques such as shadowgraph and schlieren imaging for centuries which allow empirical observation of inhomogeneous flows. Shadowgraphs provide an intuitive way of looking at small changes in flow dynamics through caustic effects while schlieren cutoffs introduce an intensity gradation for observing large scale directional changes in the flow. The combination of these shading effects provides an informative global analysis of overall fluid flow. Computational solutions for these methods have proven too complex until recently due to the fundamental physical interaction of light refracting through the flow field. In this paper, we introduce a novel method to simulate the refraction of light to generate synthetic shadowgraphs and schlieren images of time-varying scalar fields derived from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data. Our method computes physically accurate schlieren and shadowgraph images at interactive rates by utilizing a combination of GPGPU programming, acceleration methods, and data-dependent probabilistic schlieren cutoffs. Results comparing this method to previous schlieren approximations are presented.

  8. 3-D interactive physically based micro world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Keith; Wang, SerKuang

    1990-08-01

    This paper describes an approach to synthetic three-dimensional object manipulation using three different haptic I/O devices in a virtual workspace on a graphics superworkstation. The devices involve the operator in unique mode8 of interaction that require positioning a six degree-of-freedom sensor, applying torques to a static ball, or creating interpreted hand ge8tures. With these devices, the user can select, rotate and deposit synthetic virtual objects in the micro world. The micro world is an "artificial reality" in which elementary physical forces of gravity, volume preservation, collision, and external user input may be applied. The techniques developed overcome some of the difficulties experienced with two-dimensional input devices in a three-dimensional space. Furthermore, the ability of the user to continuous modify physical constraints while observing the results in real-time facilitates data interpretation tasks.

  9. Constraint-based interactive assembly planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.E.; Wilson, R.H.; Calton, T.L.

    1997-03-01

    The constraints on assembly plans vary depending on the product, assembly facility, assembly volume, and many other factors. This paper describes the principles and implementation of a framework that supports a wide variety of user-specified constraints for interactive assembly planning. Constraints from many sources can be expressed on a sequencing level, specifying orders and conditions on part mating operations in a number of ways. All constraints are implemented as filters that either accept or reject assembly operations proposed by the planner. For efficiency, some constraints are supplemented with special-purpose modifications to the planner`s algorithms. Replanning is fast enough to enable a natural plan-view-constrain-replan cycle that aids in constraint discovery and documentation. We describe an implementation of the framework in a computer-aided assembly planning system and experiments applying the system to several complex assemblies. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Isoniazid interaction with phosphatidylcholine-based membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Amanda Vicente; Marengo Trindade, Paulo; Marques, Sheylla; Brum, Tainá; Harte, Etienne; Rodrigues, Marieli Oliveira; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; da Silva, Pedro Almeida; Pohlmann, Adriana R.; Alves, Isabel Dantas; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues

    2013-11-01

    Interaction between the anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid (INH) and phosphatidylcholine membranes was investigated in terms of: (i) drug affinity to a lipid bilayer and (ii) drug-induced changes in the dynamic properties of liposomes, such as membrane hydration state, polar head and non-polar acyl chain order and lipid phase transition behavior. These parameters were studied by plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy (PWR), UV-visible, horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. PWR measurements showed an INH membrane dissociation constant value of 0.031 μM to phosphatidylcholine bilayers. INH induced higher membrane perturbation in the plane which is perpendicular to the membrane plane. The INH saturation concentration in phosphatidylcholine liposomes was 170 μM. At this concentration, HATR-FTIR and NMR findings showed that INH may interact with the lipid polar head, increasing the number of hydrogen bonds in the phosphate region and enhancing the choline motional freedom. DSC measurements showed that, at 115 μM, INH was responsible for a decrease in lipid phase transition temperature of approximately 2 °C and had no influence in the lipid enthalpy variation (ΔH). However, at 170 μM, INH induced the reduction of the ΔH by approximately 52%, suggesting that the drug may increase the distance among lipid molecules and enhance the freedom of the lipid acyl chains methylene groups. This paper provides information on the effects of INH on membrane dynamics which is important to understand liposome targeting of the drug and for the development of anti-TB pharmacologic systems that not only are less susceptible to resistance but also have low toxicity.

  11. On Interactive Teaching Model of Translation Course Based on Wechat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Wang

    2017-01-01

    Constructivism is a theory related to knowledge and learning, focusing on learners' subjective initiative, based on which the interactive approach has been proved to play a crucial role in language learning. Accordingly, the interactive approach can also be applied to translation teaching since translation itself is a bilingual transformational…

  12. Current Issues in Interactive Videodisc and Computer-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebner, Donald G.

    1984-01-01

    Presents findings from a literature review on interactive videodisc technology, interactive videodisc-based training, computer-assisted instruction, and their translations into effective instructional applications. Issues in educational development and application, guidelines for using graphics and other video effects, instructor and student…

  13. Web-based Interactive Simulator for Rotating Machinery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirohi, Vijayalaxmi

    1999-01-01

    Baroma (Balance of Rotating Machinery), the Web-based educational engineering interactive software for teaching/learning combines didactical and software ergonomical approaches. The software in tutorial form simulates a problem using Visual Interactive Simulation in graphic display, and animation is brought about through graphical user interface…

  14. Internet-based Interactive Construction Management Learning System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawhney, Anil; Mund, Andre; Koczenasz, Jeremy

    2001-01-01

    Describes a way to incorporate practical content into the construction engineering and management curricula: the Internet-based Interactive Construction Management Learning System, which uses interactive and adaptive learning environments to train students in the areas of construction methods, equipment and processes using multimedia, databases,…

  15. Web-based Interactive Simulator for Rotating Machinery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirohi, Vijayalaxmi

    1999-01-01

    Baroma (Balance of Rotating Machinery), the Web-based educational engineering interactive software for teaching/learning combines didactical and software ergonomical approaches. The software in tutorial form simulates a problem using Visual Interactive Simulation in graphic display, and animation is brought about through graphical user interface…

  16. A Usability Study of Interactive Web-Based Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Girard, Tulay; Pinar, Musa

    2011-01-01

    This research advances the understanding of the usability of marketing case study modules in the area of interactive web-based technologies through the assignment of seven interactive case modules in a Principles of Marketing course. The case modules were provided for marketing students by the publisher, McGraw Hill Irwin, of the…

  17. A web-based protein interaction network visualizer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Interaction between proteins is one of the most important mechanisms in the execution of cellular functions. The study of these interactions has provided insight into the functioning of an organism’s processes. As of October 2013, Homo sapiens had over 170000 Protein-Protein interactions (PPI) registered in the Interologous Interaction Database, which is only one of the many public resources where protein interactions can be accessed. These numbers exemplify the volume of data that research on the topic has generated. Visualization of large data sets is a well known strategy to make sense of information, and protein interaction data is no exception. There are several tools that allow the exploration of this data, providing different methods to visualize protein network interactions. However, there is still no native web tool that allows this data to be explored interactively online. Results Given the advances that web technologies have made recently it is time to bring these interactive views to the web to provide an easily accessible forum to visualize PPI. We have created a Web-based Protein Interaction Network Visualizer: PINV, an open source, native web application that facilitates the visualization of protein interactions (http://biosual.cbio.uct.ac.za/pinv.html). We developed PINV as a set of components that follow the protocol defined in BioJS and use the D3 library to create the graphic layouts. We demonstrate the use of PINV with multi-organism interaction networks for a predicted target from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, its interacting partners and its orthologs. Conclusions The resultant tool provides an attractive view of complex, fully interactive networks with components that allow the querying, filtering and manipulation of the visible subset. Moreover, as a web resource, PINV simplifies sharing and publishing, activities which are vital in today’s research collaborative environments. The source code is freely available for download at

  18. Multiquadric Spline-Based Interactive Segmentation of Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sachin; Surya Prasath, V. B.; Kassim, Yasmin M.; Maude, Richard J.; Glinskii, Olga V.; Glinsky, Vladislav V.; Huxley, Virginia H.; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used drawing tools for interactive image segmentation and labeling include active contours or boundaries, scribbles, rectangles and other shapes. Thin vessel shapes in images of vascular networks are difficult to segment using automatic or interactive methods. This paper introduces the novel use of a sparse set of user-defined seed points (supervised labels) for precisely, quickly and robustly segmenting complex biomedical images. A multiquadric spline-based binary classifier is proposed as a unique approach for interactive segmentation using as features color values and the location of seed points. Epifluorescence imagery of the dura mater microvasculature are difficult to segment for quantitative applications due to challenging tissue preparation, imaging conditions, and thin, faint structures. Experimental results based on twenty epifluorescence images is used to illustrate the benefits of using a set of seed points to obtain fast and accurate interactive segmentation compared to four interactive and automatic segmentation approaches. PMID:28261011

  19. Multiquadric Spline-Based Interactive Segmentation of Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sachin; Surya Prasath, V B; Kassim, Yasmin M; Maude, Richard J; Glinskii, Olga V; Glinsky, Vladislav V; Huxley, Virginia H; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2016-08-01

    Commonly used drawing tools for interactive image segmentation and labeling include active contours or boundaries, scribbles, rectangles and other shapes. Thin vessel shapes in images of vascular networks are difficult to segment using automatic or interactive methods. This paper introduces the novel use of a sparse set of user-defined seed points (supervised labels) for precisely, quickly and robustly segmenting complex biomedical images. A multiquadric spline-based binary classifier is proposed as a unique approach for interactive segmentation using as features color values and the location of seed points. Epifluorescence imagery of the dura mater microvasculature are difficult to segment for quantitative applications due to challenging tissue preparation, imaging conditions, and thin, faint structures. Experimental results based on twenty epifluorescence images is used to illustrate the benefits of using a set of seed points to obtain fast and accurate interactive segmentation compared to four interactive and automatic segmentation approaches.

  20. Interactive Internet Based Pendulum for Learning Mechatronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethson, Magnus R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an Internet based remote experimental setup of a double lined pendulum mechanism for students experiments at the M. Sc. Level. Some of the first year experience using this web-based setup in classes is referred. In most of the courses given at the division of mechanical engineering systems at Linkoeping Institute of Technology we provide experimental setups to enhance the teaching Of M.Sc. students. Many of these experimental setups involve mechatronical systems. Disciplines like fluid power, electronics, and mechanics and also software technologies are used in each experiment. As our campus has recently been split into two different cities some new concepts for distance learning have been studied. The one described here tries to implement remotely controlled mechatronic setups for teaching basic programming of real-time operating systems and analysis of the dynamics of mechanical systems. The students control the regulators for the pendulum through a web interface and get measurement results and a movie back through their email. The present setup uses a double linked pendulum that is controlled by a DC-motor and monitored through both camera and angular position sensors. All software needed is hosted on a double-processor PC running the RedHat 7.1. distribution complemented with real-time scheduling using DIAPM-RTAI 1.7. The Internet site is presented to the students using PHP, Apache and MySQL. All of the used software originates from the open source domain. The experience from integrating these technologies and security issues is discussed together with the web-camera interface. One of the important experiences from this project so far is the need for a good visual feedback. This is both in terms of video speed but also in resolution. It has been noticed that when the students makes misstates and wants to search the failure they want clear, large images with high resolution to support their personal believes in the cause of the failure. Even

  1. Individual versus Interactive Task-Based Performance through Voice-Based Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granena, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Interaction is a necessary condition for second language (L2) learning (Long, 1980, 1996). Research in computer-mediated communication has shown that interaction opportunities make learners pay attention to form in a variety of ways that promote L2 learning. This research has mostly investigated text-based rather than voice-based interaction. The…

  2. Individual versus Interactive Task-Based Performance through Voice-Based Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granena, Gisela

    2016-01-01

    Interaction is a necessary condition for second language (L2) learning (Long, 1980, 1996). Research in computer-mediated communication has shown that interaction opportunities make learners pay attention to form in a variety of ways that promote L2 learning. This research has mostly investigated text-based rather than voice-based interaction. The…

  3. Gallium based low-interaction anions

    DOEpatents

    King, Wayne A.; Kubas, Gregory J.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides: a composition of the formula M.sup.+x (Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.-).sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; a composition of the formula (R).sub.x Q.sup.+ Ga(Y).sub.4.sup.- where Q is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus and oxygen, each R is a ligand selected from the group consisting of alkyl, aryl, and hydrogen, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 3 and 4 depending upon Q, and each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide; an ionic polymerization catalyst composition including an active cationic portion and a gallium based weakly coordinating anion; and bridged anion species of the formula M.sup.+x.sub.y [X(Ga(Y.sub.3).sub.z ].sup.-y.sub.x where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, cesium, calcium, strontium, thallium, and silver, x is an integer selected from the group consisting of 1 or 2, X is a bridging group between two gallium atoms, y is an integer selected from the group consisting 1 and 2, z is an integer of at least 2, each Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl, hydride and halide with the proviso that at least one Y is a ligand selected from the group consisting of aryl, alkyl and halide.

  4. Drug-target interaction prediction from PSSM based evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Khakabimamaghani, Sahand; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The labor-intensive and expensive experimental process of drug-target interaction prediction has motivated many researchers to focus on in silico prediction, which leads to the helpful information in supporting the experimental interaction data. Therefore, they have proposed several computational approaches for discovering new drug-target interactions. Several learning-based methods have been increasingly developed which can be categorized into two main groups: similarity-based and feature-based. In this paper, we firstly use the bi-gram features extracted from the Position Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) of proteins in predicting drug-target interactions. Our results demonstrate the high-confidence prediction ability of the Bigram-PSSM model in terms of several performance indicators specifically for enzymes and ion channels. Moreover, we investigate the impact of negative selection strategy on the performance of the prediction, which is not widely taken into account in the other relevant studies. This is important, as the number of non-interacting drug-target pairs are usually extremely large in comparison with the number of interacting ones in existing drug-target interaction data. An interesting observation is that different levels of performance reduction have been attained for four datasets when we change the sampling method from the random sampling to the balanced sampling.

  5. Learner Attention to Form in ACCESS Task-Based Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dao, Phung; Iwashita, Noriko; Gatbonton, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the potential effects of communicative tasks developed using a reformulation of a task-based language teaching called Automatization in Communicative Contexts of Essential Speech Sequences (ACCESS) that includes automatization of language elements as one of its goals on learner attention to form in task-based interaction. The…

  6. Interacting with Visual Poems through AR-Based Digital Artwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Hao-Chiang Koong; Hsieh, Min-Chai; Liu, Eric Zhi-Feng; Chuang, Tsung-Yen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an AR-based digital artwork called "Mind Log" was designed and evaluated. The augmented reality technique was employed to create digital artwork that would present interactive poems. A digital poem was generated via the interplay between a video film and a text-based poem. This artwork was created following a rigorous design flow,…

  7. User Interaction Design for a Home-Based Telecare System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raptis, Spyros; Tsiakoulis, Pirros; Chalamandaris, Aimilios; Karabetsos, Sotiris

    This paper presents the design of the user-interaction component of a home-based telecare system for congestive heart failure patients. It provides a short overview of the overall system and offers details on the different interaction types supported by the system. Interacting with the user occurs either as part of a scheduled procedure or as a consequence of identifying or predicting a potentially hazardous deterioration of the patients' health state. The overall logic of the interaction is structured around event-scenario associations, where a scenario consists of concrete actions to be performed, some of which may involve the patient. A key objective in this type of interaction that it is very simple, intuitive and short, involving common everyday objects and familiar media such as speech.

  8. Pathway-based discovery of genetic interactions in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen; Xu, Zack Z; Costanzo, Michael; Boone, Charles; Lange, Carol A; Myers, Chad L

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is the second largest cause of cancer death among U.S. women and the leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genetic variants associated with susceptibility to breast cancer, but these still explain less than half of the estimated genetic contribution to the disease. Combinations of variants (i.e. genetic interactions) may play an important role in breast cancer susceptibility. However, due to a lack of statistical power, the current tests for genetic interactions from GWAS data mainly leverage prior knowledge to focus on small sets of genes or SNPs that are known to have an association with breast cancer. Thus, many genetic interactions, particularly among novel variants, remain understudied. Reverse-genetic interaction screens in model organisms have shown that genetic interactions frequently cluster into highly structured motifs, where members of the same pathway share similar patterns of genetic interactions. Based on this key observation, we recently developed a method called BridGE to search for such structured motifs in genetic networks derived from GWAS studies and identify pathway-level genetic interactions in human populations. We applied BridGE to six independent breast cancer cohorts and identified significant pathway-level interactions in five cohorts. Joint analysis across all five cohorts revealed a high confidence consensus set of genetic interactions with support in multiple cohorts. The discovered interactions implicated the glutathione conjugation, vitamin D receptor, purine metabolism, mitotic prometaphase, and steroid hormone biosynthesis pathways as major modifiers of breast cancer risk. Notably, while many of the pathways identified by BridGE show clear relevance to breast cancer, variants in these pathways had not been previously discovered by traditional single variant association tests, or single pathway enrichment analysis that does not consider SNP

  9. Evaluation of an Interactive Case-Based Online Network (ICON) in a Problem Based Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathoo, Arif N.; Goldhoff, Patricia; Quattrochi, James J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study sought to assess the introduction of a web-based innovation in medical education that complements traditional problem-based learning curricula. Utilizing the case method as its fundamental educational approach, the Interactive Case-based Online Network (ICON) allows students to interact with each other, faculty and a virtual…

  10. Cyberpsychology: a human-interaction perspective based on cognitive modeling.

    PubMed

    Emond, Bruno; West, Robert L

    2003-10-01

    This paper argues for the relevance of cognitive modeling and cognitive architectures to cyberpsychology. From a human-computer interaction point of view, cognitive modeling can have benefits both for theory and model building, and for the design and evaluation of sociotechnical systems usability. Cognitive modeling research applied to human-computer interaction has two complimentary objectives: (1) to develop theories and computational models of human interactive behavior with information and collaborative technologies, and (2) to use the computational models as building blocks for the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive technologies. From the perspective of building theories and models, cognitive modeling offers the possibility to anchor cyberpsychology theories and models into cognitive architectures. From the perspective of the design and evaluation of socio-technical systems, cognitive models can provide the basis for simulated users, which can play an important role in usability testing. As an example of application of cognitive modeling to technology design, the paper presents a simulation of interactive behavior with five different adaptive menu algorithms: random, fixed, stacked, frequency based, and activation based. Results of the simulation indicate that fixed menu positions seem to offer the best support for classification like tasks such as filing e-mails. This research is part of the Human-Computer Interaction, and the Broadband Visual Communication research programs at the National Research Council of Canada, in collaboration with the Carleton Cognitive Modeling Lab at Carleton University.

  11. A behavioral biometric system based on human-computer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamboa, Hugo; Fred, Ana

    2004-08-01

    In this paper we describe a new behavioural biometric technique based on human computer interaction. We developed a system that captures the user interaction via a pointing device, and uses this behavioural information to verify the identity of an individual. Using statistical pattern recognition techniques, we developed a sequential classifier that processes user interaction, according to which the user identity is considered genuine if a predefined accuracy level is achieved, and the user is classified as an impostor otherwise. Two statistical models for the features were tested, namely Parzen density estimation and a unimodal distribution. The system was tested with different numbers of users in order to evaluate the scalability of the proposal. Experimental results show that the normal user interaction with the computer via a pointing device entails behavioural information with discriminating power, that can be explored for identity authentication.

  12. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Andrea; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i) conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii) whole mucin microarrays; and (iii) microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments. PMID:27600247

  13. Comparison of ICME Parameters Using Drag Based Model for Interacting and Non-interacting CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna Subramanian, S.; Shanmugaraju, A.; Vrřnak, B.

    It is well known that solar wind drag is an important parameter for propagation of CMEs in the interplanetary space. In the present work, we utilize the Drag Based Model (DBM) developed recently by Vrš}nak et al., (2013) to obtain the travel time of CMEs from the Sun to the Earth and speed of interplanetary CME (ICME) near the Earth using the initial parameters of CMEs near the Sun. For this study, we consider the list of 91 CME-ICME pairs given by Manoharan et al., (2004). These events were observed during the period 1997-2002 and the list includes 66 non-interacting and 25 interacting events. The aim of this study is to compare the observed parameters of CMEs/ICMEs (transit time of CMEs and speed of ICMEs) in interacting and non-interacting events with the parameters derived from the DBM. The results obtained from this analysis are: (i) The CME transit times and ICME speeds derived from the model are nearly consistent with the observations for non-interacting CMEs (correlation coefficient = 0.70). But, they deviate from the model results for interacting CMEs (correlation coefficient = 0.45). (ii) While the deviation in transit times is symmetrical (± 20 hours) for non-interacting events and it is positive asymmetric for interacting CMEs according to its mean transit time values. (iii) The ICME speeds derived from the model for most of the interacting CMEs are slightly higher than the observed values, whereas, they seem to be similar for non-interacting events. (iv) When the transit times and ICME speeds near the Earth are determined for various solar wind speeds, it is seen that the derived and observed values are in agreement for a solar wind speed of 500 km s^{-1}. (v) Also, the percentage of error between the DBM value and observed value (at solar wind speed 400 km s^{-1}) shows that the derived parameters of more than 80% of events have less than 30% error. This analysis is useful to evaluate the forecasting model in general and to compare the interacting

  14. Gene-based interaction analysis shows GABAergic genes interacting with parenting in adolescent depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Van Assche, Evelien; Moons, Tim; Cinar, Ozan; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Van Leeuwen, Karla; Verschueren, Karine; Colpin, Hilde; Lambrechts, Diether; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Goossens, Luc; Claes, Stephan; van Winkel, Ruud

    2017-06-28

    Most gene-environment interaction studies (G × E) have focused on single candidate genes. This approach is criticized for its expectations of large effect sizes and occurrence of spurious results. We describe an approach that accounts for the polygenic nature of most psychiatric phenotypes and reduces the risk of false-positive findings. We apply this method focusing on the role of perceived parental support, psychological control, and harsh punishment in depressive symptoms in adolescence. Analyses were conducted on 982 adolescents of Caucasian origin (Mage (SD) = 13.78 (.94) years) genotyped for 4,947 SNPs in 263 genes, selected based on a literature survey. The Leuven Adolescent Perceived Parenting Scale (LAPPS) and the Parental Behavior Scale (PBS) were used to assess perceived parental psychological control, harsh punishment, and support. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was the outcome. We used gene-based testing taking into account linkage disequilibrium to identify genes containing SNPs exhibiting an interaction with environmental factors yielding a p-value per single gene. Significant results at the corrected p-value of p < 1.90 × 10(-4) were examined in an independent replication sample of Dutch adolescents (N = 1354). Two genes showed evidence for interaction with perceived support: GABRR1 (p = 4.62 × 10(-5) ) and GABRR2 (p = 9.05 × 10(-6) ). No genes interacted significantly with psychological control or harsh punishment. Gene-based analysis was unable to confirm the interaction of GABRR1 or GABRR2 with support in the replication sample. However, for GABRR2, but not GABRR1, the correlation of the estimates between the two datasets was significant (r (46) = .32; p = .027) and a gene-based analysis of the combined datasets supported GABRR2 × support interaction (p = 1.63 × 10(-4) ). We present a gene-based method for gene-environment interactions in a polygenic context and show that genes

  15. Projector-based surgeon-computer interaction on deformable surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kocev, Bojan; Ritter, Felix; Linsen, Lars

    2014-03-01

    Providing intuitive and easy to operate interaction for medical augmented reality is essential for use in the operating room. Commonly, intra-operative navigation information is displayed on an installed monitor, requiring the operating surgeon to change focus from the monitor to the surgical site and vice versa during navigation. Projector-based augmented reality has the potential to alleviate this problem. The aim of our work is to use a projector for visualization and to provide intuitive means for direct interaction with the projected information. A consumer-grade projector is used to visualize preoperatively defined surgical planning data. The projection of the virtual information is possible on any deformable surface, and the surgeon can interact with the presented virtual information. A Microsoft Kinect camera is used to capture both the surgeon interactions and the deformations of the surface over time. After calibration of projector and Kinect camera, the fingertips are localized automatically. A point cloud surface representation is used to determine the surgeon interaction with the projected virtual information. Interaction is detected by estimating the proximity of the surgeon's fingertips to the interaction zone and applying projector-Kinect calibration information. Interaction is performed using multi-touch gestures. In our experimental surgical scenario, the surgeon stands in front of the Microsoft Kinect camera, while relevant medical information is projected on the interaction zone. A hand wave gesture initiates the tracking of the hand. The user can then interact with the projected virtual information according to the defined multi-touch-based gestures. Thus, all information such as preoperative planning data is provided to the surgeon and his/her team intra-operatively in a familiar context. We enabled the projection of the virtual information on an arbitrarily shaped surface and used a Microsoft Kinect camera to capture the interaction zone and

  16. Student Satisfaction in Interactive Engagement-Based Physics Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.; Gaffney, Amy L. Housley

    2016-01-01

    Interactive engagement-based (IE) physics classes have the potential to invigorate and motivate students, but students may resist or oppose the pedagogy. Understanding the major influences on student satisfaction is a key to successful implementation of such courses. In this study, we note that one of the major differences between IE and…

  17. Interactive Video-Based Industrial Training in Basic Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirkin, Barry

    The Wisconsin Foundation for Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education is currently involved in the development, implementation, and distribution of a sophisticated interactive computer and video learning system. Designed to offer trainees an open entry and open exit opportunity to pace themselves through a comprehensive competency-based,…

  18. Web-Based Interactive Writing Environment: Development and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Jie Chi; Ko, Hwa Wei; Chung, I. Ling

    2005-01-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of a web-based interactive writing environment designed for elementary school students. The environment includes three writing themes, "story pass on", "story chameleon" and "thousand ideas", to encourage reading comprehension, creativity and problem-solving skills of…

  19. Interaction in Graduate Nursing Web-based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Diane K.; Wambach, Karen A.

    2001-01-01

    Web-based instruction in graduate nursing courses was built on learner-centered and adult learning philosophies and interaction at several points: precourse, course start-up, course maintenance, and course closure. Students were relatively satisfied, found the courses convenient, were moderately engaged in active learning, and felt prepared for…

  20. Student Satisfaction in Interactive Engagement-Based Physics Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.; Gaffney, Amy L. Housley

    2016-01-01

    Interactive engagement-based (IE) physics classes have the potential to invigorate and motivate students, but students may resist or oppose the pedagogy. Understanding the major influences on student satisfaction is a key to successful implementation of such courses. In this study, we note that one of the major differences between IE and…

  1. Computer-Based Interaction Analysis with DEGREE Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barros, B.; Verdejo, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    We review our research with "DEGREE" and analyse how our work has impacted the collaborative learning community since 2000. Our research is framed within the context of computer-based interaction analysis and the development of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) tools. We identify some aspects of our work which have been…

  2. A dynamics based view of atmosphere-fire interactions

    Treesearch

    Brian E. Potter

    2002-01-01

    Current research on severe fire interactions with the atmosphere focuses largely on examination of correlations between fire growth and various atmospheric properties, and on the development of indices based on these correlations. The author proposes that progress requires understanding the physics and atmospheric dynamics behind the correlations. A conceptual 3-stage...

  3. A Microcomputer-Based Interactive Presentation Development System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Dennis R.; Dominick, Wayne D.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews research and development projects sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) that address microcomputer-based support for instructional activities at the University of Southwestern Louisiana. Highlights include a graphics project, local area networks, and the Interactive Presentation Development System, which is…

  4. Interactive Computer-Based Education for Satellite Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Keith A.; Mitzel, Harold E.

    This paper describes a narrow-band satellite application for facilitating a Computer-Based Education Utility (CBEU). A review of computer uses in education is presented with an emphasis on interactive computer applied to instructional processes. An example of major use of the CBEU focuses on meeting the educational needs of handicapped children,…

  5. Computer-Based Interaction Analysis with DEGREE Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barros, B.; Verdejo, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    We review our research with "DEGREE" and analyse how our work has impacted the collaborative learning community since 2000. Our research is framed within the context of computer-based interaction analysis and the development of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) tools. We identify some aspects of our work which have been…

  6. Interactive Video-Based Industrial Training in Basic Electronics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirkin, Barry

    The Wisconsin Foundation for Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education is currently involved in the development, implementation, and distribution of a sophisticated interactive computer and video learning system. Designed to offer trainees an open entry and open exit opportunity to pace themselves through a comprehensive competency-based,…

  7. Wandering: A Web-Based Platform for the Creation of Location-Based Interactive Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Miri; Ziv, Shani

    2013-01-01

    Wandering is an innovative web-based platform that was designed to facilitate outdoor, authentic, and interactive learning via the creation of location-based interactive learning objects (LILOs). Wandering was integrated as part of a novel environmental education program among middle school students. This paper describes the Wandering platform's…

  8. Potential drug interactions with statins: Estonian register-based study

    PubMed Central

    Volmer, Daisy; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Zharkovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In Estonia, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are widely used to modify lipid levels but there are no current data on additional medicines prescribed alongside the statins. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of potential clinically relevant interactions at a national level among an outpatient population treated with statins between January and June 2008, based on the prescription database of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund. This retrospective prevalence study included 203,646 outpatients aged 50 years or older, of whom 29,367 received statin therapy. The study analysed individuals who had used at least one prescription medicine for a minimum of 7 days concomitantly with statins. Potential drug interactions were analysed using Epocrates online, Stockley’s Drug Interactions, and the drug interaction database developed in Estonia. Statins metabolised by the CYP3A4 isoenzyme were prescribed to 64% of all statin users. Medicines known to have potentially clinically significant interactions with statins were prescribed to 4.6% of patients. The drugs prescribed concomitantly most often with simvastatin were warfarin (5.7%) and amiodarone (3.9%), whereas digoxin (1.2%) and ethinylestradiol (2%) were prescribed with atorvastatin. Potential interactions were not detected in the treatment regimens of rosuvastatin, pravastatin, and fluvastatin users. PMID:28352703

  9. Traffic and Driving Simulator Based on Architecture of Interactive Motion

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Alexander; Veeramisti, Naveen; Khaddar, Romesh; de la Fuente-Mella, Hanns; Modorcea, Luiza

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an architecture for an interactive motion-based traffic simulation environment. In order to enhance modeling realism involving actual human beings, the proposed architecture integrates multiple types of simulation, including: (i) motion-based driving simulation, (ii) pedestrian simulation, (iii) motorcycling and bicycling simulation, and (iv) traffic flow simulation. The architecture has been designed to enable the simulation of the entire network; as a result, the actual driver, pedestrian, and bike rider can navigate anywhere in the system. In addition, the background traffic interacts with the actual human beings. This is accomplished by using a hybrid mesomicroscopic traffic flow simulation modeling approach. The mesoscopic traffic flow simulation model loads the results of a user equilibrium traffic assignment solution and propagates the corresponding traffic through the entire system. The microscopic traffic flow simulation model provides background traffic around the vicinities where actual human beings are navigating the system. The two traffic flow simulation models interact continuously to update system conditions based on the interactions between actual humans and the fully simulated entities. Implementation efforts are currently in progress and some preliminary tests of individual components have been conducted. The implementation of the proposed architecture faces significant challenges ranging from multiplatform and multilanguage integration to multievent communication and coordination. PMID:26491711

  10. Traffic and Driving Simulator Based on Architecture of Interactive Motion.

    PubMed

    Paz, Alexander; Veeramisti, Naveen; Khaddar, Romesh; de la Fuente-Mella, Hanns; Modorcea, Luiza

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an architecture for an interactive motion-based traffic simulation environment. In order to enhance modeling realism involving actual human beings, the proposed architecture integrates multiple types of simulation, including: (i) motion-based driving simulation, (ii) pedestrian simulation, (iii) motorcycling and bicycling simulation, and (iv) traffic flow simulation. The architecture has been designed to enable the simulation of the entire network; as a result, the actual driver, pedestrian, and bike rider can navigate anywhere in the system. In addition, the background traffic interacts with the actual human beings. This is accomplished by using a hybrid mesomicroscopic traffic flow simulation modeling approach. The mesoscopic traffic flow simulation model loads the results of a user equilibrium traffic assignment solution and propagates the corresponding traffic through the entire system. The microscopic traffic flow simulation model provides background traffic around the vicinities where actual human beings are navigating the system. The two traffic flow simulation models interact continuously to update system conditions based on the interactions between actual humans and the fully simulated entities. Implementation efforts are currently in progress and some preliminary tests of individual components have been conducted. The implementation of the proposed architecture faces significant challenges ranging from multiplatform and multilanguage integration to multievent communication and coordination.

  11. WAVE: Interactive Wave-based Sound Propagation for Virtual Environments.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Ravish; Rungta, Atul; Golas, Abhinav; Ming Lin; Manocha, Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    We present an interactive wave-based sound propagation system that generates accurate, realistic sound in virtual environments for dynamic (moving) sources and listeners. We propose a novel algorithm to accurately solve the wave equation for dynamic sources and listeners using a combination of precomputation techniques and GPU-based runtime evaluation. Our system can handle large environments typically used in VR applications, compute spatial sound corresponding to listener's motion (including head tracking) and handle both omnidirectional and directional sources, all at interactive rates. As compared to prior wave-based techniques applied to large scenes with moving sources, we observe significant improvement in runtime memory. The overall sound-propagation and rendering system has been integrated with the Half-Life 2 game engine, Oculus-Rift head-mounted display, and the Xbox game controller to enable users to experience high-quality acoustic effects (e.g., amplification, diffraction low-passing, high-order scattering) and spatial audio, based on their interactions in the VR application. We provide the results of preliminary user evaluations, conducted to study the impact of wave-based acoustic effects and spatial audio on users' navigation performance in virtual environments.

  12. Innovation in preregistration midwifery education: Web based interactive storytelling learning.

    PubMed

    Scamell, Mandie; Hanley, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    through a critical description of the implementation of a web based interactive storytelling learning activity introduced into an undergraduate, preregistration midwifery education programme, this paper will explore how low-cost, low-fidelity online storytelling, designed using Moodle, can be used to enhance students' understanding of compassion and empathy in practice. cross sectional sample of first year undergraduate Midwifery students (n111) METHOD: drawing from both research and audit data collected in an Higher Education Institution in London England, the paper presents the case for using web based technology to create a sustainable model for midwifery education. initial results indicate that it is both the low cost and positive student evaluations of web based interactive storytelling, which make this approach to preregistration midwifery education which suggests that this approach has significant potential for learning and teaching in midwifery education in diverse settings around the world. Or how about: global relevance? . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of Geophysical Data Bases and Models for Spacecraft Interactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-31

    electrons, protons, ions (major species), and measured dose. - Evaluation of magnetic field models (Delta B Model). - Quasi- static Data Bases, Analysis ...AIB4 889 ANALYSIS OF GEOPHYSICRL DATA BASES AND MODELS FOR 1/3 SPACECRAFT INTERACTIONS(U) RADEX INC CARLISLE MA J N BAS ET AL 31 OCT 86 AFGL-TR-86...1114 11116 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATI()NAL BUREAU flE SIANDARD % 43 A oJ P=I -- % AFGL-TR-86-0221 0 00 ANALYSIS OF GEOPHYSICAL DATA BASES

  14. Object information based interactive segmentation for fatty tissue extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Fang; Jiao, Li-Cheng; Li, Ling-Ling; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Gou, Shui-Ping; Wang, Shuang

    2013-10-01

    Lymph nodes are very important factors for diagnosing gastric cancer in clinical use, and are usually distributed within the fatty tissue around the stomach. When extracting fatty tissues whose structures and textures are complicated, automatic extraction is still a challenging task, while manual extraction is time-consuming. Consequently, semi-automatic extraction, which allows introducing interactive operations, appears to be more realistic. Currently, most interactive methods need to indicate the position and main features in both the object and background. However, it is easier for radiologists to only mark object information. Due to this issue, a new Object Information based Interactive Segmentation (OIIS) method is proposed in this paper. Different from the most existing methods, OIIS just needs to input the object information, while the background information is not required. Experimental results and comparative studies show that OIIS is effective for fatty tissue extraction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Web-based Interactive Landform Simulation Model - Grand Canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, W.; Pelletier, J. D.; Duffin, K.; Ormand, C. J.; Hung, W.; Iverson, E. A.; Shernoff, D.; Zhai, X.; Chowdary, A.

    2013-12-01

    Earth science educators need interactive tools to engage and enable students to better understand how Earth systems work over geologic time scales. The evolution of landforms is ripe for interactive, inquiry-based learning exercises because landforms exist all around us. The Web-based Interactive Landform Simulation Model - Grand Canyon (WILSIM-GC, http://serc.carleton.edu/landform/) is a continuation and upgrade of the simple cellular automata (CA) rule-based model (WILSIM-CA, http://www.niu.edu/landform/) that can be accessed from anywhere with an Internet connection. Major improvements in WILSIM-GC include adopting a physically based model and the latest Java technology. The physically based model is incorporated to illustrate the fluvial processes involved in land-sculpting pertaining to the development and evolution of one of the most famous landforms on Earth: the Grand Canyon. It is hoped that this focus on a famous and specific landscape will attract greater student interest and provide opportunities for students to learn not only how different processes interact to form the landform we observe today, but also how models and data are used together to enhance our understanding of the processes involved. The latest development in Java technology (such as Java OpenGL for access to ubiquitous fast graphics hardware, Trusted Applet for file input and output, and multithreaded ability to take advantage of modern multi-core CPUs) are incorporated into building WILSIM-GC and active, standards-aligned curricula materials guided by educational psychology theory on science learning will be developed to accompany the model. This project is funded NSF-TUES program.

  16. Deep-Learning-Based Drug-Target Interaction Prediction.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming; Zhang, Zhimin; Niu, Shaoyu; Sha, Haozhi; Yang, Ruihan; Yun, Yonghuan; Lu, Hongmei

    2017-04-07

    Identifying interactions between known drugs and targets is a major challenge in drug repositioning. In silico prediction of drug-target interaction (DTI) can speed up the expensive and time-consuming experimental work by providing the most potent DTIs. In silico prediction of DTI can also provide insights about the potential drug-drug interaction and promote the exploration of drug side effects. Traditionally, the performance of DTI prediction depends heavily on the descriptors used to represent the drugs and the target proteins. In this paper, to accurately predict new DTIs between approved drugs and targets without separating the targets into different classes, we developed a deep-learning-based algorithmic framework named DeepDTIs. It first abstracts representations from raw input descriptors using unsupervised pretraining and then applies known label pairs of interaction to build a classification model. Compared with other methods, it is found that DeepDTIs reaches or outperforms other state-of-the-art methods. The DeepDTIs can be further used to predict whether a new drug targets to some existing targets or whether a new target interacts with some existing drugs.

  17. Violent Interaction Detection in Video Based on Deep Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Peipei; Ding, Qinghai; Luo, Haibo; Hou, Xinglin

    2017-06-01

    Violent interaction detection is of vital importance in some video surveillance scenarios like railway stations, prisons or psychiatric centres. Existing vision-based methods are mainly based on hand-crafted features such as statistic features between motion regions, leading to a poor adaptability to another dataset. En lightened by the development of convolutional networks on common activity recognition, we construct a FightNet to represent the complicated visual violence interaction. In this paper, a new input modality, image acceleration field is proposed to better extract the motion attributes. Firstly, each video is framed as RGB images. Secondly, optical flow field is computed using the consecutive frames and acceleration field is obtained according to the optical flow field. Thirdly, the FightNet is trained with three kinds of input modalities, i.e., RGB images for spatial networks, optical flow images and acceleration images for temporal networks. By fusing results from different inputs, we conclude whether a video tells a violent event or not. To provide researchers a common ground for comparison, we have collected a violent interaction dataset (VID), containing 2314 videos with 1077 fight ones and 1237 no-fight ones. By comparison with other algorithms, experimental results demonstrate that the proposed model for violent interaction detection shows higher accuracy and better robustness.

  18. An Opinion Interactive Model Based on Individual Persuasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Liu, Liang; Ma, Liang; Qiu, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the formation process of group opinion in real life, we put forward a new opinion interactive model based on Deffuant model and its improved models in this paper because current models of opinion dynamics lack considering individual persuasiveness. Our model has following advantages: firstly persuasiveness is added to individual's attributes reflecting the importance of persuasiveness, which means that all the individuals are different from others; secondly probability is introduced in the course of interaction which simulates the uncertainty of interaction. In Monte Carlo simulation experiments, sensitivity analysis including the influence of randomness, initial persuasiveness distribution, and number of individuals is studied at first; what comes next is that the range of common opinion based on the initial persuasiveness distribution can be predicted. Simulation experiment results show that when the initial values of agents are fixed, no matter how many times independently replicated experiments, the common opinion will converge at a certain point; however the number of iterations will not always be the same; the range of common opinion can be predicted when initial distribution of opinion and persuasiveness are given. As a result, this model can reflect and interpret some phenomena of opinion interaction in realistic society. PMID:26508911

  19. An Opinion Interactive Model Based on Individual Persuasiveness.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Chen, Bin; Liu, Liang; Ma, Liang; Qiu, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the formation process of group opinion in real life, we put forward a new opinion interactive model based on Deffuant model and its improved models in this paper because current models of opinion dynamics lack considering individual persuasiveness. Our model has following advantages: firstly persuasiveness is added to individual's attributes reflecting the importance of persuasiveness, which means that all the individuals are different from others; secondly probability is introduced in the course of interaction which simulates the uncertainty of interaction. In Monte Carlo simulation experiments, sensitivity analysis including the influence of randomness, initial persuasiveness distribution, and number of individuals is studied at first; what comes next is that the range of common opinion based on the initial persuasiveness distribution can be predicted. Simulation experiment results show that when the initial values of agents are fixed, no matter how many times independently replicated experiments, the common opinion will converge at a certain point; however the number of iterations will not always be the same; the range of common opinion can be predicted when initial distribution of opinion and persuasiveness are given. As a result, this model can reflect and interpret some phenomena of opinion interaction in realistic society.

  20. Using Agent Based Modeling (ABM) to Develop Cultural Interaction Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drucker, Nick; Jones, Phillip N.

    2012-01-01

    Today, most cultural training is based on or built around "cultural engagements" or discrete interactions between the individual learner and one or more cultural "others". Often, success in the engagement is the end or the objective. In reality, these interactions usually involve secondary and tertiary effects with potentially wide ranging consequences. The concern is that learning culture within a strict engagement context might lead to "checklist" cultural thinking that will not empower learners to understand the full consequence of their actions. We propose the use of agent based modeling (ABM) to collect, store, and, simulating the effects of social networks, promulgate engagement effects over time, distance, and consequence. The ABM development allows for rapid modification to re-create any number of population types, extending the applicability of the model to any requirement for social modeling.

  1. Student satisfaction in interactive engagement-based physics classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, Jon D. H.; Gaffney, Amy L. Housley

    2016-12-01

    Interactive engagement-based (IE) physics classes have the potential to invigorate and motivate students, but students may resist or oppose the pedagogy. Understanding the major influences on student satisfaction is a key to successful implementation of such courses. In this study, we note that one of the major differences between IE and traditional physics classes lies in the interpersonal relationships between the instructor and students. Therefore, we introduce the interpersonal communication constructs of instructor credibility and facework as possible frameworks for understanding how instructors and students navigate the new space of interactions. By interpreting survey data (N =161 respondents in eight sections of an IE introductory algebra-based physics course), we found both frameworks to be useful in explaining variance in student ratings of their satisfaction in the course, although we are unable to distinguish at this point whether instructor credibility acts as a mediating variable between facework and course satisfaction.

  2. An Integrated Approach for Creating Service-Based Interactive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Marius; Janeiro, Jordan; Nestler, Tobias; Hübsch, Gerald; Jugel, Uwe; Preussner, André; Schill, Alexander

    While the implementation of business logic and business processes based on service-oriented architectures is well-understood and covered by existing development approaches, integrated concepts that empower users to exploit the Internet of Services to create complex interactive applications are missing. In this paper, we present an integrated approach that fills this gap. Our approach builds upon service annotations that add meta-information related to user interface generation, service dependencies, and service composition to existing service descriptions. Services can be composed visually to complex interactive applications based on these annotations without the need to write any code. The application code is generated completely from the service composition description. Our approach is able to support heterogeneous target environments ranging from client/server architectures to mobile platforms.

  3. Structure-based prediction of host-pathogen protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Rachelle; Wuchty, Stefan

    2017-03-16

    The discovery, validation, and characterization of protein-based interactions from different species are crucial for translational research regarding a variety of pathogens, ranging from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to HIV-1. Here, we review recent advances in the prediction of host-pathogen protein interfaces using structural information. In particular, we observe that current methods chiefly perform machine learning on sequence and domain information to produce large sets of candidate interactions that are further assessed and pruned to generate final, highly probable sets. Structure-based studies have also emphasized the electrostatic properties and evolutionary transformations of pathogenic interfaces, supplying crucial insight into antigenic determinants and the ways pathogens compete for host protein binding. Advancements in spectroscopic and crystallographic methods complement the aforementioned techniques, permitting the rigorous study of true positives at a molecular level. Together, these approaches illustrate how protein structure on a variety of levels functions coordinately and dynamically to achieve host takeover.

  4. Uncertainty-Based Design Methods for Flow-Structure Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    07 Final _ 2/01/05 - 01/31/07 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Uncertainty-based Design Methods for Flow- N00014-04-1-0007 Structure ...project is to develop advanced tools for efficient simulations of flow- structure interactions that account for random excitation and uncertain input...with emphasis on realistic three-dimensional nonlinear representatiol of the structures of interest. This capability will set the foundation for the

  5. Role of exchange interaction in nitrogen vacancy center based magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Cong Son; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Chen, Zilong; Krivitsky, Leonid A.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a multilayer device comprising a thin-film-based ferromagnetic heterostructure (FMH) deposited on a diamond layer doped with nitrogen vacancy centers (NVC's). We find that when the NVC's are in close proximity (1-2 nm) to the FMH, the exchange energy is comparable to, and may even surpass, the magnetostatic interaction energy. This calls forth the need to consider and utilize both effects in magnetometry based on NVC's in diamond. As the distance between the FMH and NVC is decreased to the subnanometer scale, the exponential increase in the exchange energy suggests spintronic applications of NVC's beyond magnetometry, such as detection of spin Hall effect or spin currents.

  6. Direct interaction of microtubule- and actin-based transport motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. D.; Brady, S. T.; Richards, B. W.; Stenolen, D.; Resau, J. H.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    The microtubule network is thought to be used for long-range transport of cellular components in animal cells whereas the actin network is proposed to be used for short-range transport, although the mechanism(s) by which this transport is coordinated is poorly understood. For example, in sea urchins long-range Ca2+-regulated transport of exocytotic vesicles requires a microtubule-based motor, whereas an actin-based motor is used for short-range transport. In neurons, microtubule-based kinesin motor proteins are used for long-range vesicular transport but microtubules do not extend into the neuronal termini, where actin filaments form the cytoskeletal framework, and kinesins are rapidly degraded upon their arrival in neuronal termini, indicating that vesicles may have to be transferred from microtubules to actin tracks to reach their final destination. Here we show that an actin-based vesicle-transport motor, MyoVA, can interact directly with a microtubule-based transport motor, KhcU. As would be expected if these complexes were functional, they also contain kinesin light chains and the localization of MyoVA and KhcU overlaps in the cell. These results indicate that cellular transport is, in part, coordinated through the direct interaction of different motor molecules.

  7. Direct interaction of microtubule- and actin-based transport motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. D.; Brady, S. T.; Richards, B. W.; Stenolen, D.; Resau, J. H.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    The microtubule network is thought to be used for long-range transport of cellular components in animal cells whereas the actin network is proposed to be used for short-range transport, although the mechanism(s) by which this transport is coordinated is poorly understood. For example, in sea urchins long-range Ca2+-regulated transport of exocytotic vesicles requires a microtubule-based motor, whereas an actin-based motor is used for short-range transport. In neurons, microtubule-based kinesin motor proteins are used for long-range vesicular transport but microtubules do not extend into the neuronal termini, where actin filaments form the cytoskeletal framework, and kinesins are rapidly degraded upon their arrival in neuronal termini, indicating that vesicles may have to be transferred from microtubules to actin tracks to reach their final destination. Here we show that an actin-based vesicle-transport motor, MyoVA, can interact directly with a microtubule-based transport motor, KhcU. As would be expected if these complexes were functional, they also contain kinesin light chains and the localization of MyoVA and KhcU overlaps in the cell. These results indicate that cellular transport is, in part, coordinated through the direct interaction of different motor molecules.

  8. ANNIE - INTERACTIVE PROCESSING OF DATA BASES FOR HYDROLOGIC MODELS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lumb, Alan M.; Kittle, John L.

    1985-01-01

    ANNIE is a data storage and retrieval system that was developed to reduce the time and effort required to calibrate, verify, and apply watershed models that continuously simulate water quantity and quality. Watershed models have three categories of input: parameters to describe segments of a drainage area, linkage of the segments, and time-series data. Additional goals for ANNIE include the development of software that is easily implemented on minicomputers and some microcomputers and software that has no special requirements for interactive display terminals. Another goal is for the user interaction to be based on the experience of the user so that ANNIE is helpful to the inexperienced user and yet efficient and brief for the experienced user. Finally, the code should be designed so that additional hydrologic models can easily be added to ANNIE.

  9. Point based interactive image segmentation using multiquadrics splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meena, Sachin; Duraisamy, Prakash; Palniappan, Kannappan; Seetharaman, Guna

    2017-05-01

    Multiquadrics (MQ) are radial basis spline function that can provide an efficient interpolation of data points located in a high dimensional space. MQ were developed by Hardy to approximate geographical surfaces and terrain modelling. In this paper we frame the task of interactive image segmentation as a semi-supervised interpolation where an interpolating function learned from the user provided seed points is used to predict the labels of unlabeled pixel and the spline function used in the semi-supervised interpolation is MQ. This semi-supervised interpolation framework has a nice closed form solution which along with the fact that MQ is a radial basis spline function lead to a very fast interactive image segmentation process. Quantitative and qualitative results on the standard datasets show that MQ outperforms other regression based methods, GEBS, Ridge Regression and Logistic Regression, and popular methods like Graph Cut,4 Random Walk and Random Forest.6

  10. Optimization-based interactive segmentation interface for multiregion problems.

    PubMed

    Baxter, John S H; Rajchl, Martin; Peters, Terry M; Chen, Elvis C S

    2016-04-01

    Interactive segmentation is becoming of increasing interest to the medical imaging community in that it combines the positive aspects of both manual and automated segmentation. However, general-purpose tools have been lacking in terms of segmenting multiple regions simultaneously with a high degree of coupling between groups of labels. Hierarchical max-flow segmentation has taken advantage of this coupling for individual applications, but until recently, these algorithms were constrained to a particular hierarchy and could not be considered general-purpose. In a generalized form, the hierarchy for any given segmentation problem is specified in run-time, allowing different hierarchies to be quickly explored. We present an interactive segmentation interface, which uses generalized hierarchical max-flow for optimization-based multiregion segmentation guided by user-defined seeds. Applications in cardiac and neonatal brain segmentation are given as example applications of its generality.

  11. Interactive Reference Point Procedure Based on the Conic Scalarizing Function

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In multiobjective optimization methods, multiple conflicting objectives are typically converted into a single objective optimization problem with the help of scalarizing functions. The conic scalarizing function is a general characterization of Benson proper efficient solutions of non-convex multiobjective problems in terms of saddle points of scalar Lagrangian functions. This approach preserves convexity. The conic scalarizing function, as a part of a posteriori or a priori methods, has successfully been applied to several real-life problems. In this paper, we propose a conic scalarizing function based interactive reference point procedure where the decision maker actively takes part in the solution process and directs the search according to her or his preferences. An algorithmic framework for the interactive solution of multiple objective optimization problems is presented and is utilized for solving some illustrative examples. PMID:24723795

  12. Interactive reference point procedure based on the conic scalarizing function.

    PubMed

    Ustun, Ozden

    2014-01-01

    In multiobjective optimization methods, multiple conflicting objectives are typically converted into a single objective optimization problem with the help of scalarizing functions. The conic scalarizing function is a general characterization of Benson proper efficient solutions of non-convex multiobjective problems in terms of saddle points of scalar Lagrangian functions. This approach preserves convexity. The conic scalarizing function, as a part of a posteriori or a priori methods, has successfully been applied to several real-life problems. In this paper, we propose a conic scalarizing function based interactive reference point procedure where the decision maker actively takes part in the solution process and directs the search according to her or his preferences. An algorithmic framework for the interactive solution of multiple objective optimization problems is presented and is utilized for solving some illustrative examples.

  13. Template-Based Modeling of Protein-RNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jinfang; Kundrotas, Petras J; Vakser, Ilya A; Liu, Shiyong

    2016-09-01

    Protein-RNA complexes formed by specific recognition between RNA and RNA-binding proteins play an important role in biological processes. More than a thousand of such proteins in human are curated and many novel RNA-binding proteins are to be discovered. Due to limitations of experimental approaches, computational techniques are needed for characterization of protein-RNA interactions. Although much progress has been made, adequate methodologies reliably providing atomic resolution structural details are still lacking. Although protein-RNA free docking approaches proved to be useful, in general, the template-based approaches provide higher quality of predictions. Templates are key to building a high quality model. Sequence/structure relationships were studied based on a representative set of binary protein-RNA complexes from PDB. Several approaches were tested for pairwise target/template alignment. The analysis revealed a transition point between random and correct binding modes. The results showed that structural alignment is better than sequence alignment in identifying good templates, suitable for generating protein-RNA complexes close to the native structure, and outperforms free docking, successfully predicting complexes where the free docking fails, including cases of significant conformational change upon binding. A template-based protein-RNA interaction modeling protocol PRIME was developed and benchmarked on a representative set of complexes.

  14. Template-Based Modeling of Protein-RNA Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jinfang; Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-RNA complexes formed by specific recognition between RNA and RNA-binding proteins play an important role in biological processes. More than a thousand of such proteins in human are curated and many novel RNA-binding proteins are to be discovered. Due to limitations of experimental approaches, computational techniques are needed for characterization of protein-RNA interactions. Although much progress has been made, adequate methodologies reliably providing atomic resolution structural details are still lacking. Although protein-RNA free docking approaches proved to be useful, in general, the template-based approaches provide higher quality of predictions. Templates are key to building a high quality model. Sequence/structure relationships were studied based on a representative set of binary protein-RNA complexes from PDB. Several approaches were tested for pairwise target/template alignment. The analysis revealed a transition point between random and correct binding modes. The results showed that structural alignment is better than sequence alignment in identifying good templates, suitable for generating protein-RNA complexes close to the native structure, and outperforms free docking, successfully predicting complexes where the free docking fails, including cases of significant conformational change upon binding. A template-based protein-RNA interaction modeling protocol PRIME was developed and benchmarked on a representative set of complexes. PMID:27662342

  15. Ontology-based interactive information extraction from scientific abstracts.

    PubMed

    Milward, David; Bjäreland, Marcus; Hayes, William; Maxwell, Michelle; Oberg, Lisa; Tilford, Nick; Thomas, James; Hale, Roger; Knight, Sylvia; Barnes, Julie

    2005-01-01

    Over recent years, there has been a growing interest in extracting information automatically or semi-automatically from the scientific literature. This paper describes a novel ontology-based interactive information extraction (OBIIE) framework and a specific OBIIE system. We describe how this system enables life scientists to make ad hoc queries similar to using a standard search engine, but where the results are obtained in a database format similar to a pre-programmed information extraction engine. We present a case study in which the system was evaluated for extracting co-factors from EMBASE and MEDLINE.

  16. Human-computer Interaction System Based on GRBF & HMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juan, Wang

    People have made many researches on computer vision, but the accuracy and speed were not satisfactory. This paper introduced a Human-computer interaction system based on GRBF and HMM. The paper used GRBF Artificial Neural Networks define the position of head, and HMM define the position of fingers. We combined the line of sight and the direction of fingers to ensure the uses' input focus. And the results showed that the recognition accuracy and speed of the system had been increased greatly in this way.

  17. A GDP fluctuation model based on interacting firms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Honggang; Gao, Yan

    2008-09-01

    A distinctive feature of the market economies is the short-run fluctuations in output around the trend of long-run growth over time, and we regard this feature is internal to complex economic systems composed of interacting heterogeneous units. To explore such internal mechanisms of macroeconomic fluctuations, we present a multi-agent Keynesian theory-based model, which can provide a good approximation to the key empirical features of the western business cycles in the 20th Century, such as the structure of the autocorrelation function of overall output growth, correlations between the output growth of individual agents over time, the distribution of recessions, etc.

  18. Investigation into interactive graphics data base exchange via Gerber data

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, R.E.

    1980-03-01

    Data representing the same interactive grahic design vary greatly from one graphics system manufacturer to another. Therefore, translating the data into a common form to effect data base exchange is a difficult problem. This study examines the use of the Gerber language as a common data form through which design data could be exchanged between unlike systems. For this study Applicon Graphic System was used cyclically to check retention or degeneration of the data integrity when the original design was extracted/defined in the Gerber language and reentered into the AGS utilizing various Gerber Interface Programs. The various parts of this study include the transferring of data not only in the 2D environment, but 2D to 3D and 3D to 2D. Even though plots of the files appear very similar, the individual data bases are very dissimilar. Programs, both present and future, that might supply needed information or design aids and characteristics would find it virtually impossible to do so from a data base lacking the sophistication and completeness of the original AGS data base. Man-machine hours required to bring the data base back to original quality would be extensive. The loss of data base integrity shown by this study was restricted to an AGS to AGS transfer. The loss could very easily be magnified if the transfer were between unlike systems. 8 figures. (RWR)

  19. SOLO: An Interactive Microcomputer-Based Bedside Monitor

    PubMed Central

    Comerchero, Harry; Vernia, Michael; Tivig, Gerhard; Kalinsky, David; Miller, Avram; Rackow, Eric C.; Welch, Jim

    1979-01-01

    An interactive, microcomputer-based bedside monitor is described which facilitates continuous on-line monitoring of a given patient's hemodynamic parameters. Used primarily in shock/trauma and intensive care units, the user has easy access to the patient data via a special interactive keypad and video display integrally a part of the bedside monitor. Phasic waveforms are analyzed in order to derive heart rate, arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure, temperature and respiration rate. Special procedure functions are available to facilitate on-line, interactive measurement of Cardiac Output, Pulmonary Wedge Pressure, and Fluid Input/Output. All continuously monitored parameters, as well as specially acquired parameters, can be graphically trended over the last 72 hours. Medication administration and special event markers can be displayed together with trends to correlate such actions with changes in the patient status. The SOLO MONITOR is currently implemented on a Digital Equipment Corporation LSI-11 with 28K words of memory and is commercially available through Mennen Medical Inc. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 11

  20. Accelerated Learning-Based Interactive Image Segmentation using Pairwise Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Sourati, Jamshid; Erdogmus, Deniz; Dy, Jennifer G.; Brooks, Dana H.

    2014-01-01

    Algorithms for fully automatic segmentation of images are often not sufficiently generic with suitable accuracy, and fully manual segmentation is not practical in many settings. There is a need for semi-automatic algorithms which are capable of interacting with the user and taking into account the collected feedback. Typically such methods have simply incorporated user feedback directly. Here we employ active learning of optimal queries to guide user interaction. Our work in this paper is based on constrained spectral clustering that iteratively incorporates user feedback by propagating it through the calculated affinities [17]. The original framework does not scale well to large data sets, and hence is not straightforward to apply to interactive image segmentation. In order to address this issue, we adopt advanced numerical methods for eigen-decomposition implemented over a subsampling scheme. Our key innovation, however, is an active learning strategy that chooses pairwise queries to present to the user in order to increase the rate of learning from the feedback. Performance evaluation is carried out on the Berkeley segmentation and Graz-02 image data sets, confirming that convergence to high accuracy levels is realizable in relatively few iterations. PMID:24860031

  1. A prototype system based on visual interactive SDM called VGC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zelu; Liu, Yaolin; Liu, Yanfang

    2009-10-01

    In many application domains, data is collected and referenced by its geo-spatial location. Spatial data mining, or the discovery of interesting patterns in such databases, is an important capability in the development of database systems. Spatial data mining recently emerges from a number of real applications, such as real-estate marketing, urban planning, weather forecasting, medical image analysis, road traffic accident analysis, etc. It demands for efficient solutions for many new, expensive, and complicated problems. For spatial data mining of large data sets to be effective, it is also important to include humans in the data exploration process and combine their flexibility, creativity, and general knowledge with the enormous storage capacity and computational power of today's computers. Visual spatial data mining applies human visual perception to the exploration of large data sets. Presenting data in an interactive, graphical form often fosters new insights, encouraging the information and validation of new hypotheses to the end of better problem-solving and gaining deeper domain knowledge. In this paper a visual interactive spatial data mining prototype system (visual geo-classify) based on VC++6.0 and MapObject2.0 are designed and developed, the basic algorithms of the spatial data mining is used decision tree and Bayesian networks, and data classify are used training and learning and the integration of the two to realize. The result indicates it's a practical and extensible visual interactive spatial data mining tool.

  2. Teaching Vectors Through an Interactive Game Based Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, James; Sirokman, Gergely

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, science and particularly physics education has been furthered by the use of project based interactive learning [1]. There is a tremendous amount of evidence [2] that use of these techniques in a college learning environment leads to a deeper appreciation and understanding of fundamental concepts. Since vectors are the basis for any advancement in physics and engineering courses the cornerstone of any physics regimen is a concrete and comprehensive introduction to vectors. Here, we introduce a new turn based vector game that we have developed to help supplement traditional vector learning practices, which allows students to be creative, work together as a team, and accomplish a goal through the understanding of basic vector concepts.

  3. Agent Based Modeling of Human Gut Microbiome Interactions and Perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Shashkova, Tatiana; Popenko, Anna; Tyakht, Alexander; Peskov, Kirill; Kosinsky, Yuri; Bogolubsky, Lev; Raigorodskii, Andrei; Ischenko, Dmitry; Alexeev, Dmitry; Govorun, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    Background Intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the human health. It is involved in the digestion and protects the host against external pathogens. Examination of the intestinal microbiome interactions is required for understanding of the community influence on host health. Studies of the microbiome can provide insight on methods of improving health, including specific clinical procedures for individual microbial community composition modification and microbiota correction by colonizing with new bacterial species or dietary changes. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work we report an agent-based model of interactions between two bacterial species and between species and the gut. The model is based on reactions describing bacterial fermentation of polysaccharides to acetate and propionate and fermentation of acetate to butyrate. Antibiotic treatment was chosen as disturbance factor and used to investigate stability of the system. System recovery after antibiotic treatment was analyzed as dependence on quantity of feedback interactions inside the community, therapy duration and amount of antibiotics. Bacterial species are known to mutate and acquire resistance to the antibiotics. The ability to mutate was considered to be a stochastic process, under this suggestion ratio of sensitive to resistant bacteria was calculated during antibiotic therapy and recovery. Conclusion/Significance The model confirms a hypothesis of feedbacks mechanisms necessity for providing functionality and stability of the system after disturbance. High fraction of bacterial community was shown to mutate during antibiotic treatment, though sensitive strains could become dominating after recovery. The recovery of sensitive strains is explained by fitness cost of the resistance. The model demonstrates not only quantitative dynamics of bacterial species, but also gives an ability to observe the emergent spatial structure and its alteration, depending on various feedback mechanisms

  4. Interactive Webmap-Based Science Planning for BepiColombo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, J.; Martinez, S.; Ortiz de Landaluce, I.; de la Fuente, S.

    2015-10-01

    For BepiColombo, ESA's Mission to Mercury, we will build a web-based, map-based interface to the Science Planning System. This interface will allow the mission's science teams to visually define targets for observations and interactively specify what operations will make up the given observation. This will be a radical departure from previous ESA mission planning methods. Such an interface will rely heavily on GIS technologies. This interface will provide footprint coverage of all existing archived data for Mercury, including a set of built-in basemaps. This will allow the science teams to analyse their planned observations and operational constraints with relevant contextual information from their own instrument, other BepiColombo instruments or from previous missions. The interface will allow users to import and export data in commonly used GIS formats, such that it can be visualised together with the latest planning information (e.g. import custom basemaps) or analysed in other GIS software. The interface will work with an object-oriented concept of an observation that will be a key characteristic of the overall BepiColombo scienceplanning concept. Observation templates or classes will be tracked right through the planning-executionprocessing- archiving cycle to the final archived science products. By using an interface that synthesises all relevant available information, the science teams will have a better understanding of the operational environment; it will enhance their ability to plan efficiently minimising or removing manual planning. Interactive 3D visualisation of the planned, scheduled and executed observations, simulation of the viewing conditions and interactive modification of the observation parameters are also being considered.

  5. SMT: a reliability based interactive DTI tractography algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yoldemir, Burak; Acar, Burak; Firat, Zeynep; Kiliçkesmez, Özgür

    2012-10-01

    Tractography refers to the in vivo reconstruction of fiber bundles, e.g., in brain, via the analysis of anisotropic diffusion patterns measured by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI). The data provides a probabilistic model of local diffusion which was shown to correlate with the underlying fibrous structure under certain assumptions. Deterministic tractography suffers from uncertainties at kissing and crossing fibers, at different levels depending on the diffusion model employed (e.g., DTI, HARDI), yet it is easy to interpret and use in clinic. In this study, a novel generic algorithm, split and merge tractography (SMT), is proposed that provides a real-time, interactive and reliability ranked assessment of potential pathways, communicating the true information content of the data without sacrificing the usability of tractography. Specifically, SMT takes in a precomputed set of tracts and the diffusion data (e.g., DTI, HARDI) as its input, generates a set of short (reliable) tracts via splitting at unreliable points and forms quasi-random clusters of short tracts by means of which the space of short tract clusters, representing complete tracts, is sampled. A histogram of thus formed clusters is built in an efficient way and used for real-time, interactive assessment of pathways. The current implementation uses DTI and fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration based streamline tractography as its input. The method is qualitatively assessed on phantom DTI data and real DTI data. Phantom experiments demonstrated that SMT is capable of highlighting the problematic regions and suggesting pathways that are completely overseen by input streamline tractography. Real data experiment results correlate well with known anatomy and also demonstrate that the reliability ranking can efficiently suppress the erroneous tracts interactively. The method is compared to a recent method that also pursues a similar approach, yet in a global optimization based framework. The

  6. Investigating antimalarial drug interactions of emetine dihydrochloride hydrate using CalcuSyn-based interactivity calculations

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Holly; Deakin, Jon; Rajab, May; Idris-Usman, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    The widespread introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy has contributed to recent reductions in malaria mortality. Combination therapies have a range of advantages, including synergism, toxicity reduction, and delaying the onset of resistance acquisition. Unfortunately, antimalarial combination therapy is limited by the depleting repertoire of effective drugs with distinct target pathways. To fast-track antimalarial drug discovery, we have previously employed drug-repositioning to identify the anti-amoebic drug, emetine dihydrochloride hydrate, as a potential candidate for repositioned use against malaria. Despite its 1000-fold increase in in vitro antimalarial potency (ED50 47 nM) compared with its anti-amoebic potency (ED50 26–32 uM), practical use of the compound has been limited by dose-dependent toxicity (emesis and cardiotoxicity). Identification of a synergistic partner drug would present an opportunity for dose-reduction, thus increasing the therapeutic window. The lack of reliable and standardised methodology to enable the in vitro definition of synergistic potential for antimalarials is a major drawback. Here we use isobologram and combination-index data generated by CalcuSyn software analyses (Biosoft v2.1) to define drug interactivity in an objective, automated manner. The method, based on the median effect principle proposed by Chou and Talalay, was initially validated for antimalarial application using the known synergistic combination (atovaquone-proguanil). The combination was used to further understand the relationship between SYBR Green viability and cytocidal versus cytostatic effects of drugs at higher levels of inhibition. We report here the use of the optimised Chou Talalay method to define synergistic antimalarial drug interactivity between emetine dihydrochloride hydrate and atovaquone. The novel findings present a potential route to harness the nanomolar antimalarial efficacy of this affordable natural product. PMID:28257497

  7. The Use of a Web-Based Classroom Interaction System in Introductory Physics Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corpuz, Edgar D.; Corpuz, Ma. Aileen A.; Rosalez, Rolando

    2010-10-01

    A web-based interaction system was used in algebra-based and calculus-based physics classes to enhance students' classroom interaction. The interactive teaching approach primarily incorporated elements of Mazur's Peer Instruction and Interactive Lecture Demonstration. In our implementation, students used personal digital assistants (PDAs) to interact with their instructor during lecture and classroom demonstration. In this paper, we document the perceptions and attitudes of algebra-based and calculus-based physics students towards the interactive teaching approach and likewise present data on how this approach affected students' performance on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI).

  8. Thermoelectric properties of an interacting quantum dot based heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdman, Paolo Andrea; Mazza, Francesco; Bosisio, Riccardo; Benenti, Giuliano; Fazio, Rosario; Taddei, Fabio

    2017-06-01

    We study the thermoelectric properties and heat-to-work conversion performance of an interacting, multilevel quantum dot (QD) weakly coupled to electronic reservoirs. We focus on the sequential tunneling regime. The dynamics of the charge in the QD is studied by means of master equations for the probabilities of occupation. From here we compute the charge and heat currents in the linear response regime. Assuming a generic multiterminal setup, and for low temperatures (quantum limit), we obtain analytical expressions for the transport coefficients which account for the interplay between interactions (charging energy) and level quantization. In the case of systems with two and three terminals we derive formulas for the power factor Q and the figure of merit Z T for a QD-based heat engine, identifying optimal working conditions which maximize output power and efficiency of heat-to-work conversion. Beyond the linear response we concentrate on the two-terminal setup. We first study the thermoelectric nonlinear coefficients assessing the consequences of large temperature and voltage biases, focusing on the breakdown of the Onsager reciprocal relation between thermopower and Peltier coefficient. We then investigate the conditions which optimize the performance of a heat engine, finding that in the quantum limit output power and efficiency at maximum power can almost be simultaneously maximized by choosing appropriate values of electrochemical potential and bias voltage. At last we study how energy level degeneracy can increase the output power.

  9. Graphics processing unit-based alignment of protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiang; Zhou, Zhonghua; Ma, Jin; Xiang, Chaojuan; Nie, Qing; Zhang, Wu

    2015-08-01

    Network alignment is an important bridge to understanding human protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and functions through model organisms. However, the underlying subgraph isomorphism problem complicates and increases the time required to align protein interaction networks (PINs). Parallel computing technology is an effective solution to the challenge of aligning large-scale networks via sequential computing. In this study, the typical Hungarian-Greedy Algorithm (HGA) is used as an example for PIN alignment. The authors propose a HGA with 2-nearest neighbours (HGA-2N) and implement its graphics processing unit (GPU) acceleration. Numerical experiments demonstrate that HGA-2N can find alignments that are close to those found by HGA while dramatically reducing computing time. The GPU implementation of HGA-2N optimises the parallel pattern, computing mode and storage mode and it improves the computing time ratio between the CPU and GPU compared with HGA when large-scale networks are considered. By using HGA-2N in GPUs, conserved PPIs can be observed, and potential PPIs can be predicted. Among the predictions based on 25 common Gene Ontology terms, 42.8% can be found in the Human Protein Reference Database. Furthermore, a new method of reconstructing phylogenetic trees is introduced, which shows the same relationships among five herpes viruses that are obtained using other methods.

  10. Ultrasonic power measurement system based on acousto-optic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Liping; Zhu, Fulong; Chen, Yanming; Duan, Ke; Lin, Xinxin; Pan, Yongjun; Tao, Jiaquan

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonic waves are widely used, with applications including the medical, military, and chemical fields. However, there are currently no effective methods for ultrasonic power measurement. Previously, ultrasonic power measurement has been reliant on mechanical methods such as hydrophones and radiation force balances. This paper deals with ultrasonic power measurement based on an unconventional method: acousto-optic interaction. Compared with mechanical methods, the optical method has a greater ability to resist interference and also has reduced environmental requirements. Therefore, this paper begins with an experimental determination of the acoustic power in water contained in a glass tank using a set of optical devices. Because the light intensity of the diffraction image generated by acousto-optic interaction contains the required ultrasonic power information, specific software was written to extract the light intensity information from the image through a combination of filtering, binarization, contour extraction, and other image processing operations. The power value can then be obtained rapidly by processing the diffraction image using a computer. The results of this work show that the optical method offers advantages that include accuracy, speed, and a noncontact measurement method.

  11. Microscopic positive-energy potential based on the Gogny interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchon, G.; Dupuis, M.; Arellano, H. F.; Vinh Mau, N.

    2015-01-01

    We present a nucleon elastic scattering calculation based on Green's function formalism in the random-phase approximation. For the first time, the finite-range Gogny effective interaction is used consistently throughout the whole calculation to account for the complex, nonlocal, and energy-dependent optical potential. Effects of intermediate single-particle resonances are included and found to play a crucial role in the account for measured reaction cross sections. Double counting of the particle-hole second-order contribution is carefully addressed. The resulting integro-differential Schrödinger equation for the scattering process is solved without localization procedures. The method is applied to neutron and proton elastic scattering from 40Ca. A successful account for differential and integral cross sections, including analyzing powers, is obtained for incident energies up to 30 MeV. Discrepancies at higher energies are related to a much-too-high volume integral of the real potential for large partial waves. This work opens the way to simultaneously assess effective interactions suitable for both nuclear structure and reactions.

  12. RNA-RNA interaction prediction based on multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Li, Andrew X; Marz, Manja; Qin, Jing; Reidys, Christian M

    2011-02-15

    Many computerized methods for RNA-RNA interaction structure prediction have been developed. Recently, O(N(6)) time and O(N(4)) space dynamic programming algorithms have become available that compute the partition function of RNA-RNA interaction complexes. However, few of these methods incorporate the knowledge concerning related sequences, thus relevant evolutionary information is often neglected from the structure determination. Therefore, it is of considerable practical interest to introduce a method taking into consideration both: thermodynamic stability as well as sequence/structure covariation. We present the a priori folding algorithm ripalign, whose input consists of two (given) multiple sequence alignments (MSA). ripalign outputs (i) the partition function, (ii) base pairing probabilities, (iii) hybrid probabilities and (iv) a set of Boltzmann-sampled suboptimal structures consisting of canonical joint structures that are compatible to the alignments. Compared to the single sequence-pair folding algorithm rip, ripalign requires negligible additional memory resource but offers much better sensitivity and specificity, once alignments of suitable quality are given. ripalign additionally allows to incorporate structure constraints as input parameters. The algorithm described here is implemented in C as part of the rip package.

  13. Interaction of vitamin D with membrane-based signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Larriba, María Jesús; González-Sancho, José Manuel; Bonilla, Félix; Muñoz, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Many studies in different biological systems have revealed that 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3) modulates signaling pathways triggered at the plasma membrane by agents such as Wnt, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and others. In addition, 1α,25(OH)2D3 may affect gene expression by paracrine mechanisms that involve the regulation of cytokine or growth factor secretion by neighboring cells. Moreover, post-transcriptional and post-translational effects of 1α,25(OH)2D3 add to or overlap with its classical modulation of gene transcription rate. Together, these findings show that vitamin D receptor (VDR) cannot be considered only as a nuclear-acting, ligand-modulated transcription factor that binds to and controls the transcription of target genes. Instead, available data support the view that much of the complex biological activity of 1α,25(OH)2D3 resides in its capacity to interact with membrane-based signaling pathways and to modulate the expression and secretion of paracrine factors. Therefore, we propose that future research in the vitamin D field should focus on the interplay between 1α,25(OH)2D3 and agents that act at the plasma membrane, and on the analysis of intercellular communication. Global analyses such as RNA-Seq, transcriptomic arrays, and genome-wide ChIP are expected to dissect the interactions at the gene and molecular levels. PMID:24600406

  14. Interactive Web-based tutorials for teaching digital electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Donald G.

    2000-10-01

    With a wide range of student abilities in a class, it is difficult to effectively teach and stimulate all students. A series of web based tutorials was designed to help weaker students and stretch the stronger students. The tutorials consist of a series of HTML web pages with embedded Java applets. This combination is particularly powerful for providing interactive demonstrations because any textual content may be easily provided within the web page. The applet is able to be a compete working program that dynamically illustrates the concept, or provides a working environment for the student to experiment and work through their solution. The applet is dynamic, and responds to the student through both mouse clicks and keyboard entry. These allow the student to adjust parameters, make selections, and affect the way the program is run or information is displayed. Such interaction allows each applet to provide a mini demonstration or experiment to help the student understand a particular concept or technique. The approach taken is illustrated with a tutorial that dynamically shows the relationships between a truth table, Karnaugh amp, logic circuit and Boolean algebra representations of a logic function, and dramatically illustrates the effect of minimization on the resultant circuit. Use of the tutorial has resulted in significant benefits, particularly with weaker students.

  15. CIVILITY: cloud based interactive visualization of tractography brain connectome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puechmaille, Danaële; Styner, Martin; Prieto, Juan C.

    2017-03-01

    Cloud based Interactive Visualization of Tractography Brain Connectome (CIVILITY) is an interactive visualization tool of brain connectome in the cloud. This application submits tasks to remote computing grids were the CIVILITY-tractography pipeline is deployed. The application will list the running tasks for the user and once a task is completed the brain connectome is visualized using Hierarchical Edge Bundling. The analysis pipeline uses FSL tools (bedpostx and probtrackx2) to generate a triangular matrix indicating the connectivity strength between different regions in the brain. This work is motivated by medical applications in which expensive computational tasks such as brain connectivity is needed and to provide a state of the art visualization tool of Brain Connectome. This work does not contribute any novelty with respect to the visualization methodology, is rather a new resource for the neuroimaging community. This work is submitted to the SPIE Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging conference. The source code of this application is available in NITRC∗

  16. Ultrasonic power measurement system based on acousto-optic interaction

    SciTech Connect

    He, Liping; Zhu, Fulong Duan, Ke; Lin, Xinxin; Pan, Yongjun; Tao, Jiaquan; Chen, Yanming

    2016-05-15

    Ultrasonic waves are widely used, with applications including the medical, military, and chemical fields. However, there are currently no effective methods for ultrasonic power measurement. Previously, ultrasonic power measurement has been reliant on mechanical methods such as hydrophones and radiation force balances. This paper deals with ultrasonic power measurement based on an unconventional method: acousto-optic interaction. Compared with mechanical methods, the optical method has a greater ability to resist interference and also has reduced environmental requirements. Therefore, this paper begins with an experimental determination of the acoustic power in water contained in a glass tank using a set of optical devices. Because the light intensity of the diffraction image generated by acousto-optic interaction contains the required ultrasonic power information, specific software was written to extract the light intensity information from the image through a combination of filtering, binarization, contour extraction, and other image processing operations. The power value can then be obtained rapidly by processing the diffraction image using a computer. The results of this work show that the optical method offers advantages that include accuracy, speed, and a noncontact measurement method.

  17. Shape-based interactive three-dimensional medical image segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinshaw, Kevin P.; Brinkley, James F.

    1997-04-01

    Accurate image segmentation continues to be one of the biggest challenges in medical image analysis. Simple, low- level vision techniques have had limited success in this domain because of the visual complexity of medical images. This paper presents a 3-D shape model that uses prior knowledge of an object's structure to guide the search for its boundaries. The shape model has been incorporated into scanner, an interactive software package for image segmentation. We describe a graphical user interface that was developed for finding the surface of the brain and explain how the 3-D model assists with the segmentation process. Preliminary experiments show that with this shape- based approach, a low-resolution boundary for a surface can be found with two-thirds less work for the user than with a comparable manual method.

  18. Interactive brain shift compensation using GPU based programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Steen, Sander; Noordmans, Herke Jan; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf

    2009-02-01

    Processing large images files or real-time video streams requires intense computational power. Driven by the gaming industry, the processing power of graphic process units (GPUs) has increased significantly. With the pixel shader model 4.0 the GPU can be used for image processing 10x faster than the CPU. Dedicated software was developed to deform 3D MR and CT image sets for real-time brain shift correction during navigated neurosurgery using landmarks or cortical surface traces defined by the navigation pointer. Feedback was given using orthogonal slices and an interactively raytraced 3D brain image. GPU based programming enables real-time processing of high definition image datasets and various applications can be developed in medicine, optics and image sciences.

  19. Progress in EEG-Based Brain Robot Interaction Systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengfan; Niu, Linwei; Xian, Bin; Zeng, Ming; Chen, Genshe

    2017-01-01

    The most popular noninvasive Brain Robot Interaction (BRI) technology uses the electroencephalogram- (EEG-) based Brain Computer Interface (BCI), to serve as an additional communication channel, for robot control via brainwaves. This technology is promising for elderly or disabled patient assistance with daily life. The key issue of a BRI system is to identify human mental activities, by decoding brainwaves, acquired with an EEG device. Compared with other BCI applications, such as word speller, the development of these applications may be more challenging since control of robot systems via brainwaves must consider surrounding environment feedback in real-time, robot mechanical kinematics, and dynamics, as well as robot control architecture and behavior. This article reviews the major techniques needed for developing BRI systems. In this review article, we first briefly introduce the background and development of mind-controlled robot technologies. Second, we discuss the EEG-based brain signal models with respect to generating principles, evoking mechanisms, and experimental paradigms. Subsequently, we review in detail commonly used methods for decoding brain signals, namely, preprocessing, feature extraction, and feature classification, and summarize several typical application examples. Next, we describe a few BRI applications, including wheelchairs, manipulators, drones, and humanoid robots with respect to synchronous and asynchronous BCI-based techniques. Finally, we address some existing problems and challenges with future BRI techniques. PMID:28484488

  20. Evolving effective behaviours to interact with tag-based populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, Osman; Crawford, Chad; Sen, Sandip

    2015-07-01

    Tags and other characteristics, externally perceptible features that are consistent among groups of animals or humans, can be used by others to determine appropriate response strategies in societies. This usage of tags can be extended to artificial environments, where agents can significantly reduce cognitive effort spent on appropriate strategy choice and behaviour selection by reusing strategies for interacting with new partners based on their tags. Strategy selection mechanisms developed based on this idea have successfully evolved stable cooperation in games such as the Prisoner's Dilemma game but relies upon payoff sharing and matching methods that limit the applicability of the tag framework. Our goal is to develop a general classification and behaviour selection approach based on the tag framework. We propose and evaluate alternative tag matching and adaptation schemes for a new, incoming individual to select appropriate behaviour against any population member of an existing, stable society. Our proposed approach allows agents to evolve both the optimal tag for the environment as well as appropriate strategies for existing agent groups. We show that these mechanisms will allow for robust selection of optimal strategies by agents entering a stable society and analyse the various environments where this approach is effective.

  1. Interaction Pattern Analysis in cMOOCs Based on the Connectivist Interaction and Engagement Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhijun; Anderson, Terry; Chen, Li; Barbera, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Connectivist learning is interaction-centered learning. A framework describing interaction and cognitive engagement in connectivist learning was constructed using logical reasoning techniques. The framework and analysis was designed to help researchers and learning designers understand and adapt the characteristics and principles of interaction in…

  2. Interaction Pattern Analysis in cMOOCs Based on the Connectivist Interaction and Engagement Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Zhijun; Anderson, Terry; Chen, Li; Barbera, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Connectivist learning is interaction-centered learning. A framework describing interaction and cognitive engagement in connectivist learning was constructed using logical reasoning techniques. The framework and analysis was designed to help researchers and learning designers understand and adapt the characteristics and principles of interaction in…

  3. Using Interactive Simulations in Assessment: The Use of Computer-Based Interactive Simulations in the Assessment of Statistical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Interactive computer-based simulations have been applied in several contexts to teach statistical concepts in university level courses. In this report, the use of interactive simulations as part of summative assessment in a statistics course is described. Students accessed the simulations via the web and completed questions relating to the…

  4. Interactive model evaluation tool based on IPython notebook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balemans, Sophie; Van Hoey, Stijn; Nopens, Ingmar; Seuntjes, Piet

    2015-04-01

    In hydrological modelling, some kind of parameter optimization is mostly performed. This can be the selection of a single best parameter set, a split in behavioural and non-behavioural parameter sets based on a selected threshold or a posterior parameter distribution derived with a formal Bayesian approach. The selection of the criterion to measure the goodness of fit (likelihood or any objective function) is an essential step in all of these methodologies and will affect the final selected parameter subset. Moreover, the discriminative power of the objective function is also dependent from the time period used. In practice, the optimization process is an iterative procedure. As such, in the course of the modelling process, an increasing amount of simulations is performed. However, the information carried by these simulation outputs is not always fully exploited. In this respect, we developed and present an interactive environment that enables the user to intuitively evaluate the model performance. The aim is to explore the parameter space graphically and to visualize the impact of the selected objective function on model behaviour. First, a set of model simulation results is loaded along with the corresponding parameter sets and a data set of the same variable as the model outcome (mostly discharge). The ranges of the loaded parameter sets define the parameter space. A selection of the two parameters visualised can be made by the user. Furthermore, an objective function and a time period of interest need to be selected. Based on this information, a two-dimensional parameter response surface is created, which actually just shows a scatter plot of the parameter combinations and assigns a color scale corresponding with the goodness of fit of each parameter combination. Finally, a slider is available to change the color mapping of the points. Actually, the slider provides a threshold to exclude non behaviour parameter sets and the color scale is only attributed to the

  5. Interactive Multimedia and Model-based Learning in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Barbara C.

    2000-01-01

    Documents a case of model-building in biology through microanalysis of one student's interaction with "Science for Living: The Circulatory System (SFL)", an interactive multimedia resource prototype for research. Describes the student's learning goals, gains, and activities with particular attention to interactions with representations,…

  6. Interactive Multimedia and Model-based Learning in Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Barbara C.

    2000-01-01

    Documents a case of model-building in biology through microanalysis of one student's interaction with "Science for Living: The Circulatory System (SFL)", an interactive multimedia resource prototype for research. Describes the student's learning goals, gains, and activities with particular attention to interactions with representations,…

  7. Catalysis based on reversible covalent interactions of organoboron compounds.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark S

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: An Account of the development of organoboron-catalyzed methods for chemo- or regioselective activation of pyruvic acids, diols, and carbohydrate derivatives is presented. These methods are based on reversible, covalent interactions that have been exploited extensively in host-guest chemistry, but were comparatively underutilized in catalysis. Important differences between the established properties of organboron compounds in molecular recognition and their behavior as catalysts emerged over the course of this work: for instance, borinic acids, which have largely been ignored in molecular recognition, proved to be a particularly useful class of catalysts. Nonetheless, the high selectivity that has enabled applications of organoboron compounds in molecular recognition (e.g., the selective binding of cis-1,2-diol groups in carbohydrates) also appears to play a key role in the outcomes of catalytic reactions. This research program began as a modest, narrowly defined project aimed at developing direct aldol reactions based on established interactions between pyruvic acids and boronic acids. While this goal was achieved, it was unexpected observations related to the nature of the nucleophile in this transformation (a putative tetracoordinate boron enolate) that attracted our attention and pointed toward broader applications in the catalyst-controlled, regioselective functionalization of polyols. This line of research proved to be fruitful: diarylborinic-acid-based precatalysts were found to promote efficient monoalkylations, sulfonylations, and alkylations of a range of diol substrates, as well as cis-1,2-diol motifs in pyranoside-derived triols. Extension of this chemistry to glycosyl donors as electrophiles enabled the regioselective, catalyst-controlled synthesis of disaccharides from readily accessible feedstocks, and was also employed to modify the oligosaccharide component of a complex, glycosylated natural product. Mechanistic studies have played an

  8. Maxwell's equations-based dynamic laser-tissue interaction model.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Elharith M; Barrera, Frederick J; Early, Edward A; Denton, Michael L; Clark, C D; Sardar, Dhiraj K

    2013-12-01

    Since its invention in the early 1960s, the laser has been used as a tool for surgical, therapeutic, and diagnostic purposes. To achieve maximum effectiveness with the greatest margin of safety it is important to understand the mechanisms of light propagation through tissue and how that light affects living cells. Lasers with novel output characteristics for medical and military applications are too often implemented prior to proper evaluation with respect to tissue optical properties and human safety. Therefore, advances in computational models that describe light propagation and the cellular responses to laser exposure, without the use of animal models, are of considerable interest. Here, a physics-based laser-tissue interaction model was developed to predict the dynamic changes in the spatial and temporal temperature rise during laser exposure to biological tissues. Unlike conventional models, the new approach is grounded on the rigorous electromagnetic theory that accounts for wave interference, polarization, and nonlinearity in propagation using a Maxwell's equations-based technique.

  9. Long range interactions on wires: A reciprocal space based formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mináry, Peter; Morrone, Joseph A.; Yarne, Dawn A.; Tuckerman, Mark E.; Martyna, Glenn J.

    2004-12-01

    There are many atomic scale systems in materials, chemistry, and biology that can be effectively modeled as finite in two of the physical spatial dimensions and periodically replicated in the third including nanoscale metallic and semiconducting wires, carbon nanotubes, and DNA. However, it is difficult to design techniques to treat long range forces in these systems without truncation or recourse to slowly convergent supercells or computationally inefficient Poisson solvers. In this paper, a rigorous reciprocal space based formalism which permits long range forces on wires to be evaluated simply and easily via a small modification of existing methods for three dimensional periodicity is derived. The formalism is applied to determine long range interactions both between point particles using an Ewald-like approach and the continuous charge distributions that appear in electronic structure calculations. In this way, both empirical force field calculations and, for example, plane-wave based density functional theory computations on wires can be performed easily. The methodology is tested on model and realistic systems including a lithium doped carbon nanotube.

  10. Photon-Electron Interactions in Graphene-Based Heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangze

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in honeycomb lattice, has been one of the most attractive materials for fundamental and applied research in the past decade. Its unique electronic, optical, thermal, chemical and mechanical properties have lead to the discovery of new physics and many promising applications. In particular, research on photon-electron interaction in graphene-based heterojunctions has revealed a new route to design photoactive devices. In this thesis, I present our work on the synthesis of graphene by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and the study of graphene-based optoelectronic devices. In addition to the conventional synthesis of graphene on copper (Cu) foils, we also present the CVD synthesis of graphene on a new substrate: palladium (Pd). Especially, we performed detailed study of the nucleation, evolution and morphology of graphene growth on Pd substrate. It helps us to understand the growth reaction mechanism and achieve controllable synthesis of graphene from single layer to multiple layers with different morphologies. We then studied the broadband and ultrasensitive photocurrent and photovoltage response of graphene/silicon (Si) Schottky diodes. For the same architecture, we identified a new photoconductive mode with ultra high photoconductive gain, namely "quantum carrier reinvestment (QCR)". A gain exceeding 107 A/W was demonstrated. The underlying physics of photon-electron interactions in these junctions were studied by a combination of optical characterization tools including Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and scanning optical microscopy. The results obtained have been discussed in the framework of the unique electronic band structure, density states, and mobility of graphene, along with the manner in witch photoexcited carrier behave under various externally tuned parameters. We also systematically studied the optimization of performance of graphene/Si and thin transparent graphite/Si junction solar cells and

  11. Interactive vessel-tracking with a hybrid model-based and graph-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Dominik; Beck, Thomas; Scheuering, Michael

    2009-02-01

    For assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral artery disease (PAD) the automatic extraction of vessel centerlines is a crucial technology. In the most common approach two seed points have to be manually placed in the vessel and the centerline is automatically computed between these points. This methodology is appropriate for the quantitative analysis of single vessel segments. However, for an interactive and fast reading of complete datasets a more interactive approach would be beneficial. In this work we introduce an interactive vessel-tracking approach which eases the reading of cardiac and vascular CTA datasets. Starting with a single seed point a local vessel-tracking is initialized and extended in both directions while the user "walks" along the vessel centerline. For a robust tracking of a wide variety of vessel diameters, from coronaries to the aorta, we combine a local A*-graph-search for tiny vessels and a model-based tracking for larger vessels to an hybrid model-based and graph-based approach. In order to further ease the reading of cardiac and vascular CTA datasets, we introduce a subdivision of the interactively acquired centerline into segments that can be approximated by a single plane. This subdivision allows the visualization of the vessel in optimally oriented multi-planar reformations (MPR). The proposed visualization combines the advantage of a curved planar reformation (CPR), showing a large part of the vessel in one view, with the benefits of a MPR, having a non distorted more trustable image.

  12. Ocean interactions with the base of Amery Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellmer, Hartmut H.; Jacobs, Stanley S.

    1992-01-01

    Using a two-dimensional ocean themohaline circulation model, we varied the cavity shape beneath Amery Ice Shelf in an attempt to reproduce the 150-m-thick marine ice layer observed at the 'G1' ice core site. Most simulations caused melting rates which decrease the ice thickness by as much as 400 m between grounding line and G1, but produce only minor accumulation at the ice core site and closer to the ice front. Changes in the sea floor and ice topographies revealed a high sensitivity of the basal mass balance to water column thickness near the grounding line, to submarine sills, and to discontinuities in ice thickness. Model results showed temperature/salinity gradients similar to observations from beneath other ice shelves where ice is melting into seawater. Modeled outflow characteristics at the ice front are in general agreement with oceanographic data from Prydz Bay. We concur with Morgan's inference that the G1 core may have been taken in a basal crevasse filled with marine ice. This ice is formed from water cooled by ocean/ice shelf interactions along the interior ice shelf base.

  13. Optimization Model for Web Based Multimodal Interactive Simulations.

    PubMed

    Halic, Tansel; Ahn, Woojin; De, Suvranu

    2015-07-15

    This paper presents a technique for optimizing the performance of web based multimodal interactive simulations. For such applications where visual quality and the performance of simulations directly influence user experience, overloading of hardware resources may result in unsatisfactory reduction in the quality of the simulation and user satisfaction. However, optimization of simulation performance on individual hardware platforms is not practical. Hence, we present a mixed integer programming model to optimize the performance of graphical rendering and simulation performance while satisfying application specific constraints. Our approach includes three distinct phases: identification, optimization and update. In the identification phase, the computing and rendering capabilities of the client device are evaluated using an exploratory proxy code. This data is utilized in conjunction with user specified design requirements in the optimization phase to ensure best possible computational resource allocation. The optimum solution is used for rendering (e.g. texture size, canvas resolution) and simulation parameters (e.g. simulation domain) in the update phase. Test results are presented on multiple hardware platforms with diverse computing and graphics capabilities to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  14. Optical immunoassay systems based upon evanescent wave interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Douglas A.; Herron, James N.

    1996-04-01

    Immunoassays based upon evanescent wave interactions are finding increased biosensing application. In these devices, the evanescent tail associated with total internal reflection of an incident beam at the substrate/solution interface provides sensitivity for surface-bound protein over bulk molecules, allowing homogeneous assays and real-time measurement of binding dynamics. Among such systems are surface plasmon resonance sensors and a resonant mirror device. Several research groups are also developing fluorescent fiberoptic or planar waveguide sensors for biomedical applications. We describe a second-generation planar waveguide fluoroimmunoassay system being developed in our laboratory which uses a molded polystyrene sensor. The 633-nm beam from a laser diode is focused into the 500 micrometer- thick planar waveguide by an integral lens. Antibodies to the desired analyte (hCG) are immobilized on the waveguide surface and fluorescence from bound analyte/tracer antibodies in a sandwich format is imaged onto the detector. The geometry of the waveguide allows several zones to be detected, providing the capability for on-sensor calibration. This sensor has shown picomolar sensitivity for the detection of hCG.

  15. Quadrupole beam-based alignment in the RHIC interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, J.; Satogata, T.

    2011-03-28

    Continued beam-based alignment (BBA) efforts have provided significant benefit to both heavy ion and polarized proton operations at RHIC. Recent studies demonstrated previously unknown systematic beam position monitor (BPM) offset errors and produced accurate measurements of individual BPM offsets in the experiment interaction regions. Here we describe the algorithm used to collect and analyze data during the 2010 and early 2011 RHIC runs and the results of these measurements. BBA data has been collected over the past two runs for all three of the active experimental IRs at RHIC, updating results from the 2005 run which were taken with incorrectly installed offsets. The technique was successfully applied to expose a systematic misuse of the BPM survey offsets in the control system. This is likely to benefit polarized proton operations as polarization transmission through acceleration ramps depends on RMS orbit control in the arcs, but a quantitative understanding of its impact is still under active investigation. Data taking is ongoing as are refinements to the BBA technique aimed at reducing systematic errors and properly accounting for dispersive effects. Further development may focus on non-triplet BPMs such as those located near snakes, or arc quadrupoles that do not have individually shunted power supplies (a prerequisite for the current method) and as such, will require a modified procedure.

  16. Sensing Landscape History with an Interactive Location Based Service

    PubMed Central

    van Lammeren, Ron; Goossen, Martin; Roncken, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the STEAD approach for interpreting data acquired by a “human sensor”, who uses an informal interactive location-based service (iLBS) to sense cultural-historic facts and anecdotes of, and in the landscape. This user-generated data is collected outdoors and in situ. The approach consists of four related facets (who, what, where, when). Three of the four facets are discussed and illustrated by user generated data collected during a Dutch survey in 2008. These data represent the personal cultural-historic knowledge and anecdotes of 150 people using a customized iLBS for experiencing the cultural history of a landscape. The “who” facet shows three dominant mentality groups (cosmopolitans, modern materialists and post modern hedonists) that generated user content. The “what” facet focuses on three subject types of pictures and four picture framing classes. Pictures of the place type showed to be dominant and foreground framing class was slightly favourite. The “where” facet is explored via density, distribution, and distance of the pictures made. The illustrations of the facets indirectly show the role of the “human sensor” with respect to the domain of interest. The STEAD approach needs further development of the when-facet and of the relations between the four facets. Finally the results of the approach may support data archives of iLBS applications. PMID:22399994

  17. Optimization Model for Web Based Multimodal Interactive Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Halic, Tansel; Ahn, Woojin; De, Suvranu

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for optimizing the performance of web based multimodal interactive simulations. For such applications where visual quality and the performance of simulations directly influence user experience, overloading of hardware resources may result in unsatisfactory reduction in the quality of the simulation and user satisfaction. However, optimization of simulation performance on individual hardware platforms is not practical. Hence, we present a mixed integer programming model to optimize the performance of graphical rendering and simulation performance while satisfying application specific constraints. Our approach includes three distinct phases: identification, optimization and update. In the identification phase, the computing and rendering capabilities of the client device are evaluated using an exploratory proxy code. This data is utilized in conjunction with user specified design requirements in the optimization phase to ensure best possible computational resource allocation. The optimum solution is used for rendering (e.g. texture size, canvas resolution) and simulation parameters (e.g. simulation domain) in the update phase. Test results are presented on multiple hardware platforms with diverse computing and graphics capabilities to demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach. PMID:26085713

  18. Sensing landscape history with an interactive location based service.

    PubMed

    van Lammeren, Ron; Goossen, Martin; Roncken, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces the STEAD approach for interpreting data acquired by a "human sensor", who uses an informal interactive location-based service (iLBS) to sense cultural-historic facts and anecdotes of, and in the landscape. This user-generated data is collected outdoors and in situ. The approach consists of four related facets (who, what, where, when). Three of the four facets are discussed and illustrated by user generated data collected during a Dutch survey in 2008. These data represent the personal cultural-historic knowledge and anecdotes of 150 people using a customized iLBS for experiencing the cultural history of a landscape. The "who" facet shows three dominant mentality groups (cosmopolitans, modern materialists and post modern hedonists) that generated user content. The "what" facet focuses on three subject types of pictures and four picture framing classes. Pictures of the place type showed to be dominant and foreground framing class was slightly favourite. The "where" facet is explored via density, distribution, and distance of the pictures made. The illustrations of the facets indirectly show the role of the "human sensor" with respect to the domain of interest. The STEAD approach needs further development of the when-facet and of the relations between the four facets. Finally the results of the approach may support data archives of iLBS applications.

  19. Evaluating Types of Students' Interactions in a Wiki-Based Collaborative Learning Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokofieva, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Wiki technology has been promoted as a collaborative software platform. This study investigates interactions that occur in a wiki-based collaborative learning project. The study draws on interaction literature and investigates the types of interactions with which students are engaged in wiki-based group projects, clusters that reflect online…

  20. Evaluating Types of Students' Interactions in a Wiki-Based Collaborative Learning Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokofieva, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Wiki technology has been promoted as a collaborative software platform. This study investigates interactions that occur in a wiki-based collaborative learning project. The study draws on interaction literature and investigates the types of interactions with which students are engaged in wiki-based group projects, clusters that reflect online…

  1. Movement-Based Interaction Applied to Physical Rehabilitation Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Penichet, Victor Manuel; Lozano Pérez, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Background Health care environments are continuously improving conditions, especially regarding the use of current technology. In the field of rehabilitation, the use of video games and related technology has helped to develop new rehabilitation procedures. Patients are able to work on their disabilities through new processes that are more motivating and entertaining. However, these patients are required to leave their home environment to complete their rehabilitation programs. Objective The focus of our research interests is on finding a solution to eliminate the need for patients to interrupt their daily routines to attend rehabilitation therapy. We have developed an innovative system that allows patients with a balance disorder to perform a specific rehabilitation exercise at home. Additionally, the system features an assistive tool to complement the work of physiotherapists. Medical staff are thus provided with a system that avoids the need for them to be present during the exercise in specific cases in which patients are under suitable supervision. Methods A movement-based interaction device was used to achieve a reliable system for monitoring rehabilitation exercises performed at home. The system accurately utilizes parameters previously defined by the specialist for correct performance of the exercise. Accordingly, the system gives instructions and corrects the patient’s actions. The data generated during the session are collected for assessment by the specialist to adapt the difficulty of the exercise to the patient’s progress. Results The evaluation of the system was conducted by two experts in balance disorder rehabilitation. They were required to verify the effectiveness of the system, and they also facilitated the simulation of real patient behavior. They used the system freely for a period of time and provided interesting and optimistic feedback. First, they evaluated the system as a tool for real-life rehabilitation therapy. Second, their

  2. Movement-based interaction applied to physical rehabilitation therapies.

    PubMed

    Garrido Navarro, Juan Enrique; Ruiz Penichet, Victor Manuel; Lozano Pérez, María Dolores

    2014-12-09

    Health care environments are continuously improving conditions, especially regarding the use of current technology. In the field of rehabilitation, the use of video games and related technology has helped to develop new rehabilitation procedures. Patients are able to work on their disabilities through new processes that are more motivating and entertaining. However, these patients are required to leave their home environment to complete their rehabilitation programs. The focus of our research interests is on finding a solution to eliminate the need for patients to interrupt their daily routines to attend rehabilitation therapy. We have developed an innovative system that allows patients with a balance disorder to perform a specific rehabilitation exercise at home. Additionally, the system features an assistive tool to complement the work of physiotherapists. Medical staff are thus provided with a system that avoids the need for them to be present during the exercise in specific cases in which patients are under suitable supervision. A movement-based interaction device was used to achieve a reliable system for monitoring rehabilitation exercises performed at home. The system accurately utilizes parameters previously defined by the specialist for correct performance of the exercise. Accordingly, the system gives instructions and corrects the patient's actions. The data generated during the session are collected for assessment by the specialist to adapt the difficulty of the exercise to the patient's progress. The evaluation of the system was conducted by two experts in balance disorder rehabilitation. They were required to verify the effectiveness of the system, and they also facilitated the simulation of real patient behavior. They used the system freely for a period of time and provided interesting and optimistic feedback. First, they evaluated the system as a tool for real-life rehabilitation therapy. Second, their interaction with the system allowed us to obtain

  3. Intermolecular magnetic interactions in stacked DNA base pairs.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Fernando A; Aucar, Gustavo A

    2017-10-09

    The influence of pi-stacking on the magnetic properties of atoms that belong to adenine-thymine and guanine-cytosine pairs in sequences of three and five layers of DNA base pairs was analysed. As probes we used NMR spectroscopic parameters, which are among the most useful tools to learn about the transmission of magnetic interactions in molecules. Four DFT functionals were employed: B3LYP, BHANDLYP, KT2 and KT3, together with the SOPPA method. Besides, given that the number of non-hydrogen atoms of the supramolecular systems studied here is larger than 50 we applied a locally dense basis set scheme. Our results show that the piling up of a few Watson-Crick base pairs above and below a given pair modifies its NMR spectroscopic parameters by an amount that may be measurable and the percentage of variation does not depend on dispersion. We found that magnetic shieldings are more sensitive than J-couplings, and also that some atoms are more sensitive than others. Stacking affects the shielding of non-hydrogen atoms like nitrogens, that are donors in hydrogen bonds, HBs, and the carbons bonded to them. The amount of variation of these shieldings was found to be from 2% to 5% when the pairs are considered first as isolated, and then, placed in the middle of a sequence of three layers of base pairs. Such a variation becomes vanishingly small when the sequence contains more than three layers, showing that the stacking effect on NMR spectroscopic parameters has a local nature. We have also found a pattern for shieldings. First, equivalent atoms of similar monomers (thymine and adenine, or guanine and cytosine) have similar values of absolute shieldings in isolated pairs, and the amount of variation from isolated pairs to aggregates of a few pairs is also similar, meaning that equivalent atoms are affected in a similar manner by pi-stacking. Second, the hydrogen atoms which belong to hydrogen bonds are more sensitive to the piling up than the non-hydrogen atoms.

  4. Dendrimer-protein interactions versus dendrimer-based nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Shcharbin, Dzmitry; Shcharbina, Natallia; Dzmitruk, Volha; Pedziwiatr-Werbicka, Elzbieta; Ionov, Maksim; Mignani, Serge; de la Mata, F Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, Maria Angeles; Majoral, Jean-Pierre; Bryszewska, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Dendrimers are hyperbranched polymers belonging to the huge class of nanomedical devices. Their wide application in biology and medicine requires understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of their interactions with biological systems. Summarizing, electrostatic force plays the predominant role in dendrimer-protein interactions, especially with charged dendrimers. Other kinds of interactions have been proven, such as H-bonding, van der Waals forces, and even hydrophobic interactions. These interactions depend on the characteristics of both participants: flexibility and surface charge of a dendrimer, rigidity of protein structure and the localization of charged amino acids at its surface. pH and ionic strength of solutions can significantly modulate interactions. Ligands and cofactors attached to a protein can also change dendrimer-protein interactions. Binding of dendrimers to a protein can change its secondary structure, conformation, intramolecular mobility and functional activity. However, this strongly depends on rigidity versus flexibility of a protein's structure. In addition, the potential applications of dendrimers to nanomedicine are reviwed related to dendrimer-protein interactions.

  5. Interactive Language Simulation Systems: Technology for a National Language Base.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, A. Allen

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the efforts of the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center to make interactive video an integral part of foreign language instruction. Interactive video is seen as a method which could profoundly alter the old classroom model of language instruction. (Author/SED)

  6. Natural Interaction Based Online Military Boxing Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chenglei; Wang, Lu; Sun, Bing; Yin, Xu; Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Li; Lu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Military boxing, a kind of Chinese martial arts, is widespread and health beneficial. In this paper, the authors introduce a military boxing learning system realized by 3D motion capture, Web3D and 3D interactive technologies. The interactions with the system are natural and intuitive. Users can observe and learn the details of each action of the…

  7. Natural Interaction Based Online Military Boxing Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Chenglei; Wang, Lu; Sun, Bing; Yin, Xu; Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Li; Lu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Military boxing, a kind of Chinese martial arts, is widespread and health beneficial. In this paper, the authors introduce a military boxing learning system realized by 3D motion capture, Web3D and 3D interactive technologies. The interactions with the system are natural and intuitive. Users can observe and learn the details of each action of the…

  8. Internet-based interactive teaching file for neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D J; DeMarco, J K; Parikh, T

    2000-11-01

    Our goal was to implement an interactive neuroradiologic teaching file that can be accessed on the Internet and easily expanded to include radiologic, clinical, and pathologic correlation. Our growing interactive neuroradiologic teaching file is available on the Internet. It provides an easily accessed database of interesting cases to aid in the study or analysis of difficult cases.

  9. Interactive Video and Group Learning: Two Action Enquiry Based Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloke, Chris; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Two evaluations of video programs that involved groups of learners interacting with LaserVision software are presented. One concerns counselling skills for student teachers. The other is a geography simulation program. Program structure, group interaction, and the role of the instructor are discussed. Learners in both studies found the visual…

  10. Anion Recognition Strategies Based on Combined Noncovalent Interactions.

    PubMed

    Molina, Pedro; Zapata, Fabiola; Caballero, Antonio

    2017-08-09

    This review highlights the most significant examples of an emerging field in the design of highly selective anion receptors. To date, there has been remarkable progress in the binding and sensing of anions. This has been driven in part by the discovery of ways to construct effective anion binding receptors using the dominant N-H functional groups and neutral and cationic C-H hydrogen bond donors, as well as underexplored strong directional noncovalent interactions such as halogen-bonding and anion-π interactions. In this review, we will describe a new and promising strategy for constructing anion binding receptors with distinct advantages arising from their elaborate design, incorporating multiple binding sites able to interact cooperatively with anions through these different kinds of noncovalent interactions. Comparisons with control species or solely hydrogen-bonding analogues reveal unique characteristics in terms of strength, selectivity, and interaction geometry, representing important advances in the rising field of supramolecular chemistry.

  11. Interaction Junk: User Interaction-Based Evaluation of Visual Analytic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Endert, Alexander; North, Chris

    2012-10-14

    With the growing need for visualization to aid users in understanding large, complex datasets, the ability for users to interact and explore these datasets is critical. As visual analytic systems have advanced to leverage powerful computational models and data analytics capabilities, the modes by which users engage and interact with the information are limited. Often, users are taxed with directly manipulating parameters of these models through traditional GUIs (e.g., using sliders to directly manipulate the value of a parameter). However, the purpose of user interaction in visual analytic systems is to enable visual data exploration – where users can focus on their task, as opposed to the tool or system. As a result, users can engage freely in data exploration and decision-making, for the purpose of gaining insight. In this position paper, we discuss how evaluating visual analytic systems can be approached through user interaction analysis, where the goal is to minimize the cognitive translation between the visual metaphor and the mode of interaction (i.e., reducing the “Interactionjunk”). We motivate this concept through a discussion of traditional GUIs used in visual analytics for direct manipulation of model parameters, and the importance of designing interactions the support visual data exploration.

  12. Apparatus and method for determining microscale interactions based on compressive sensors such as crystal structures

    DOEpatents

    McAdams, Harley; AlQuraishi, Mohammed

    2015-04-21

    Techniques for determining values for a metric of microscale interactions include determining a mesoscale metric for a plurality of mesoscale interaction types, wherein a value of the mesoscale metric for each mesoscale interaction type is based on a corresponding function of values of the microscale metric for the plurality of the microscale interaction types. A plurality of observations that indicate the values of the mesoscale metric are determined for the plurality of mesoscale interaction types. Values of the microscale metric are determined for the plurality of microscale interaction types based on the plurality of observations and the corresponding functions and compressed sensing.

  13. Characterization of the proteasome interaction network using a QTAX-based tag-team strategy and protein interaction network analysis.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Cortnie; Milenkovic, Tijana; Przulj, Natasa; Kaiser, Peter; Huang, Lan

    2008-09-09

    Quantitative analysis of tandem-affinity purified cross-linked (x) protein complexes (QTAX) is a powerful technique for the identification of protein interactions, including weak and/or transient components. Here, we apply a QTAX-based tag-team mass spectrometry strategy coupled with protein network analysis to acquire a comprehensive and detailed assessment of the protein interaction network of the yeast 26S proteasome. We have determined that the proteasome network is composed of at least 471 proteins, significantly more than the total number of proteins identified by previous reports using proteasome subunits as baits. Validation of the selected proteasome-interacting proteins by reverse copurification and immunoblotting experiments with and without cross-linking, further demonstrates the power of the QTAX strategy for capturing protein interactions of all natures. In addition, >80% of the identified interactions have been confirmed by existing data using protein network analysis. Moreover, evidence obtained through network analysis links the proteasome to protein complexes associated with diverse cellular functions. This work presents the most complete analysis of the proteasome interaction network to date, providing an inclusive set of physical interaction data consistent with physiological roles for the proteasome that have been suggested primarily through genetic analyses. Moreover, the methodology described here is a general proteomic tool for the comprehensive study of protein interaction networks.

  14. In Interactive, Web-Based Approach to Metadata Authoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Janine; Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) serves a growing number of users by assisting the scientific community in the discovery of and linkage to Earth science data sets and related services. The GCMD holds over 8000 data set descriptions in Directory Interchange Format (DIF) and 200 data service descriptions in Service Entry Resource Format (SERF), encompassing the disciplines of geology, hydrology, oceanography, meteorology, and ecology. Data descriptions also contain geographic coverage information, thus allowing researchers to discover data pertaining to a particular geographic location, as well as subject of interest. The GCMD strives to be the preeminent data locator for world-wide directory level metadata. In this vein, scientists and data providers must have access to intuitive and efficient metadata authoring tools. Existing GCMD tools are not currently attracting. widespread usage. With usage being the prime indicator of utility, it has become apparent that current tools must be improved. As a result, the GCMD has released a new suite of web-based authoring tools that enable a user to create new data and service entries, as well as modify existing data entries. With these tools, a more interactive approach to metadata authoring is taken, as they feature a visual "checklist" of data/service fields that automatically update when a field is completed. In this way, the user can quickly gauge which of the required and optional fields have not been populated. With the release of these tools, the Earth science community will be further assisted in efficiently creating quality data and services metadata. Keywords: metadata, Earth science, metadata authoring tools

  15. In Interactive, Web-Based Approach to Metadata Authoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, Janine; Wharton, Stephen W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) serves a growing number of users by assisting the scientific community in the discovery of and linkage to Earth science data sets and related services. The GCMD holds over 8000 data set descriptions in Directory Interchange Format (DIF) and 200 data service descriptions in Service Entry Resource Format (SERF), encompassing the disciplines of geology, hydrology, oceanography, meteorology, and ecology. Data descriptions also contain geographic coverage information, thus allowing researchers to discover data pertaining to a particular geographic location, as well as subject of interest. The GCMD strives to be the preeminent data locator for world-wide directory level metadata. In this vein, scientists and data providers must have access to intuitive and efficient metadata authoring tools. Existing GCMD tools are not currently attracting. widespread usage. With usage being the prime indicator of utility, it has become apparent that current tools must be improved. As a result, the GCMD has released a new suite of web-based authoring tools that enable a user to create new data and service entries, as well as modify existing data entries. With these tools, a more interactive approach to metadata authoring is taken, as they feature a visual "checklist" of data/service fields that automatically update when a field is completed. In this way, the user can quickly gauge which of the required and optional fields have not been populated. With the release of these tools, the Earth science community will be further assisted in efficiently creating quality data and services metadata. Keywords: metadata, Earth science, metadata authoring tools

  16. Interactive, Computer-Based Training Program for Radiological Workers

    SciTech Connect

    Trinoskey, P.A.; Camacho, P.I.; Wells, L.

    2000-01-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is redesigning its Computer-Based Training (CBT) program for radiological workers. The redesign represents a major effort to produce a single, highly interactive and flexible CBT program that will meet the training needs of a wide range of radiological workers--from researchers and x-ray operators to individuals working in tritium, uranium, plutonium, and accelerator facilities. The new CBT program addresses the broad diversity of backgrounds found at a national laboratory. When a training audience is homogeneous in terms of education level and type of work performed, it is difficult to duplicate the effectiveness of a flexible, technically competent instructor who can tailor a course to the express needs and concerns of a course's participants. Unfortunately, such homogeneity is rare. At LLNL, they have a diverse workforce engaged in a wide range of radiological activities, from the fairly common to the quite exotic. As a result, the Laboratory must offer a wide variety of radiological worker courses. These include a general contamination-control course in addition to radioactive-material-handling courses for both low-level laboratory (i.e., bench-top) activities as well as high-level work in tritium, uranium, and plutonium facilities. They also offer training courses for employees who work with radiation-generating devices--x-ray, accelerator, and E-beam operators, for instance. However, even with the number and variety of courses the Laboratory offers, they are constrained by the diversity of backgrounds (i.e., knowledge and experience) of those to be trained. Moreover, time constraints often preclude in-depth coverage of site- and/or task-specific details. In response to this situation, several years ago LLNL began moving toward computer-based training for radiological workers. Today, that CBT effort includes a general radiological safety course developed by the Department of Energy's Hanford facility and a

  17. A reliability measure of protein-protein interactions and a reliability measure-based search engine.

    PubMed

    Park, Byungkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2010-02-01

    Many methods developed for estimating the reliability of protein-protein interactions are based on the topology of protein-protein interaction networks. This paper describes a new reliability measure for protein-protein interactions, which does not rely on the topology of protein interaction networks, but expresses biological information on functional roles, sub-cellular localisations and protein classes as a scoring schema. The new measure is useful for filtering many spurious interactions, as well as for estimating the reliability of protein interaction data. In particular, the reliability measure can be used to search protein-protein interactions with the desired reliability in databases. The reliability-based search engine is available at http://yeast.hpid.org. We believe this is the first search engine for interacting proteins, which is made available to public. The search engine and the reliability measure of protein interactions should provide useful information for determining proteins to focus on.

  18. An Agent-Based Architecture for Generating Interactive Stories

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    other characters, but also directly by the user. The interaction of the user impacts the development of the story, but not at discrete points in...without detailed planning. The underlying agent architecture centers around a mind-body design. The mind is the implementation of a social- psychological ...the plot level. By defining a set of plot events and computer events that will tell the story, interactive input by the user impacts the sequencing

  19. The Development of a Research Agenda and Generic Disc for Computer-Based Interactive Video.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Barbara; Pearson, Robert

    This paper describes the development of a conceptual framework for conducting research using computer based interactive video and a generic disc as research tools. It is argued that computer based interactive video represents the beginnings of a truly computer based learning system. An altered version of the 1984 Grabowski and Whitney conceptual…

  20. The in Silico Insight into Carbon Nanotube and Nucleic Acid Bases Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Ali Asghar; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Tabatabaie, Seyed Saleh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore practical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields the properties of their interaction with biomolecules must be revealed. Recent years, the interaction of CNTs with biomolecules is a subject of research interest for practical applications so that previous research explored that CNTs have complementary structure properties with single strand DNA (ssDNA). Objectives Hence, the quantum mechanics (QM) method based on ab initio was used for this purpose. Therefore values of binding energy, charge distribution, electronic energy and other physical properties of interaction were studied for interaction of nucleic acid bases and SCNT. Materials and Methods In this study, the interaction between nucleic acid bases and a (4, 4) single-walled carbon nanotube (SCNT) were investigated through calculations within quantum mechanics (QM) method at theoretical level of Hartree-Fock (HF) method using 6-31G basis set. Hence, the physical properties such as electronic energy, total dipole moment, charge distributions and binding energy of nucleic acid bases interaction with SCNT were investigated based on HF method. Results It has been found that the guanine base adsorption is bound stronger to the outer surface of nanotube in comparison to the other bases, consistent with the recent theoretical studies. In the other words, the results explored that guanine interaction with SCNT has optimum level of electronic energy so that their interaction is stable. Also, the calculations illustrated that SCNT interact to nucleic acid bases by noncovalent interaction because of charge distribution an electrostatic area is created in place of interaction. Conclusions Consequently, small diameter SCNT interaction with nucleic acid bases is noncovalent. Also, the results revealed that small diameter SCNT interaction especially SCNT (4, 4) with nucleic acid bases can be useful in practical application area of biomedical fields such detection and drug delivery

  1. The in Silico Insight into Carbon Nanotube and Nucleic Acid Bases Interaction.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ali Asghar; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Tabatabaie, Seyed Saleh; Farhadi, Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    To explore practical applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in biomedical fields the properties of their interaction with biomolecules must be revealed. Recent years, the interaction of CNTs with biomolecules is a subject of research interest for practical applications so that previous research explored that CNTs have complementary structure properties with single strand DNA (ssDNA). Hence, the quantum mechanics (QM) method based on ab initio was used for this purpose. Therefore values of binding energy, charge distribution, electronic energy and other physical properties of interaction were studied for interaction of nucleic acid bases and SCNT. In this study, the interaction between nucleic acid bases and a (4, 4) single-walled carbon nanotube (SCNT) were investigated through calculations within quantum mechanics (QM) method at theoretical level of Hartree-Fock (HF) method using 6-31G basis set. Hence, the physical properties such as electronic energy, total dipole moment, charge distributions and binding energy of nucleic acid bases interaction with SCNT were investigated based on HF method. It has been found that the guanine base adsorption is bound stronger to the outer surface of nanotube in comparison to the other bases, consistent with the recent theoretical studies. In the other words, the results explored that guanine interaction with SCNT has optimum level of electronic energy so that their interaction is stable. Also, the calculations illustrated that SCNT interact to nucleic acid bases by noncovalent interaction because of charge distribution an electrostatic area is created in place of interaction. Consequently, small diameter SCNT interaction with nucleic acid bases is noncovalent. Also, the results revealed that small diameter SCNT interaction especially SCNT (4, 4) with nucleic acid bases can be useful in practical application area of biomedical fields such detection and drug delivery.

  2. A Qualitative Examination of Two Year-Olds Interaction with Tablet Based Interactive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geist, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe children naturally interacting with these touch screen devices. Little direct instruction was given to the children on the use of the devices however an adult did assist when needed. The device was introduced to the children as would be any other educational material such as play-dough, new items in the…

  3. A Qualitative Examination of Two Year-Olds Interaction with Tablet Based Interactive Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geist, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe children naturally interacting with these touch screen devices. Little direct instruction was given to the children on the use of the devices however an adult did assist when needed. The device was introduced to the children as would be any other educational material such as play-dough, new items in the…

  4. A Critical Look at Entropy-Based Gene-Gene Interaction Measures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woojoo; Sjölander, Arvid; Pawitan, Yudi

    2016-07-01

    Several entropy-based measures for detecting gene-gene interaction have been proposed recently. It has been argued that the entropy-based measures are preferred because entropy can better capture the nonlinear relationships between genotypes and traits, so they can be useful to detect gene-gene interactions for complex diseases. These suggested measures look reasonable at intuitive level, but so far there has been no detailed characterization of the interactions captured by them. Here we study analytically the properties of some entropy-based measures for detecting gene-gene interactions in detail. The relationship between interactions captured by the entropy-based measures and those of logistic regression models is clarified. In general we find that the entropy-based measures can suffer from a lack of specificity in terms of target parameters, i.e., they can detect uninteresting signals as interactions. Numerical studies are carried out to confirm theoretical findings. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  5. ESL Students' Interaction in Second Life: Task-Based Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jee, Min Jung

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore ESL students' interactions in task-based synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) in Second Life, a virtual environment by which users can interact through representational figures. I investigated Low-Intermediate and High-Intermediate ESL students' interaction patterns before, during, and…

  6. Faculty Choice and Student Perception of Web-Based Technologies for Interaction in Online Economics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Olivia

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated faculty choice of web-based technologies for interaction in online economics courses and students' perception of those technologies. The literature review of online interaction has established the importance of learner-learner, learner-instructor and learner-content interaction in distance learning. However, some…

  7. Faculty Choice and Student Perception of Web-Based Technologies for Interaction in Online Economics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Olivia

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated faculty choice of web-based technologies for interaction in online economics courses and students' perception of those technologies. The literature review of online interaction has established the importance of learner-learner, learner-instructor and learner-content interaction in distance learning. However, some…

  8. Social network extraction and analysis based on multimodal dyadic interaction.

    PubMed

    Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Social interactions are a very important component in people's lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times' Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links' weights are a measure of the "influence" a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network.

  9. Molecular microenvironments: Solvent interactions with nucleic acid bases and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Pohorille, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of reconstructing plausible sequences of events in prebiotic molecular evolution is limited by the lack of fossil remains. However, with hindsight, one goal of molecular evolution was obvious: the development of molecular systems that became constituents of living systems. By understanding the interactions among molecules that are likely to have been present in the prebiotic environment, and that could have served as components in protobiotic molecular systems, plausible evolutionary sequences can be suggested. When stable aggregations of molecules form, a net decrease in free energy is observed in the system. Such changes occur when solvent molecules interact among themselves, as well as when they interact with organic species. A significant decrease in free energy, in systems of solvent and organic molecules, is due to entropy changes in the solvent. Entropy-driven interactioins played a major role in the organization of prebiotic systems, and understanding the energetics of them is essential to understanding molecular evolution.

  10. Molecular microenvironments: Solvent interactions with nucleic acid bases and ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Pohorille, A.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility of reconstructing plausible sequences of events in prebiotic molecular evolution is limited by the lack of fossil remains. However, with hindsight, one goal of molecular evolution was obvious: the development of molecular systems that became constituents of living systems. By understanding the interactions among molecules that are likely to have been present in the prebiotic environment, and that could have served as components in protobiotic molecular systems, plausible evolutionary sequences can be suggested. When stable aggregations of molecules form, a net decrease in free energy is observed in the system. Such changes occur when solvent molecules interact among themselves, as well as when they interact with organic species. A significant decrease in free energy, in systems of solvent and organic molecules, is due to entropy changes in the solvent. Entropy-driven interactioins played a major role in the organization of prebiotic systems, and understanding the energetics of them is essential to understanding molecular evolution.

  11. Social Network Extraction and Analysis Based on Multimodal Dyadic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Escalera, Sergio; Baró, Xavier; Vitrià, Jordi; Radeva, Petia; Raducanu, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    Social interactions are a very important component in people’s lives. Social network analysis has become a common technique used to model and quantify the properties of social interactions. In this paper, we propose an integrated framework to explore the characteristics of a social network extracted from multimodal dyadic interactions. For our study, we used a set of videos belonging to New York Times’ Blogging Heads opinion blog. The Social Network is represented as an oriented graph, whose directed links are determined by the Influence Model. The links’ weights are a measure of the “influence” a person has over the other. The states of the Influence Model encode automatically extracted audio/visual features from our videos using state-of-the art algorithms. Our results are reported in terms of accuracy of audio/visual data fusion for speaker segmentation and centrality measures used to characterize the extracted social network. PMID:22438733

  12. Interactive Image Segmentation Framework Based On Control Theory.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Karasev, Peter; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-02-21

    Segmentation of anatomical structures in medical imagery is a key step in a variety of clinical applications. Designing a generic, automated method that works for various structures and imaging modalities is a daunting task. Instead of proposing a new specific segmentation algorithm, in this paper, we present a general design principle on how to integrate user interactions from the perspective of control theory. In this formulation, Lyapunov stability analysis is employed to design and analyze an interactive segmentation system. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method are demonstrated.

  13. Interactive image segmentation framework based on control theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liangjia; Kolesov, Ivan; Ratner, Vadim; Karasev, Peter; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2015-03-01

    Segmentation of anatomical structures in medical imagery is a key step in a variety of clinical applications. Designing a generic, automated method that works for various structures and imaging modalities is a daunting task. Instead of proposing a new specific segmentation algorithm, in this paper, we present a general design principle on how to integrate user interactions from the perspective of control theory. In this formulation, Lyapunov stability analysis is employed to design an interactive segmentation system. The effectiveness and robustness of the proposed method are demonstrated.

  14. Interactive Learning with Java Applets: Using Interactive, Web-Based Java Applets to Present Science in a Concrete, Meaningful Manner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Science teachers face challenges that affect the quality of instruction. Tight budgets, limited resources, school schedules, and other obstacles limit students' opportunities to experience science that is visual and interactive. Incorporating web-based Java applets into science instruction offers a practical solution to these challenges. The…

  15. Interactive Learning with Java Applets: Using Interactive, Web-Based Java Applets to Present Science in a Concrete, Meaningful Manner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corder, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Science teachers face challenges that affect the quality of instruction. Tight budgets, limited resources, school schedules, and other obstacles limit students' opportunities to experience science that is visual and interactive. Incorporating web-based Java applets into science instruction offers a practical solution to these challenges. The…

  16. Teaching Life Enhancement Skills with Interactive Video-Based Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Philip; White, W. A. T.

    1986-01-01

    The article describes courseware developed by Project LIVE (Learning Through Interactive Video Education), designed to teach generic, cognitive independent living skills to mentally handicapped adolescents. The curriculum focuses on Life Enhancement Skills as content domain, uses multiple teaching strategies (e.g., verbal rehearsal), and…

  17. NMR-based analysis of protein-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Cala, Olivier; Guillière, Florence; Krimm, Isabelle

    2014-02-01

    Physiological processes are mainly controlled by intermolecular recognition mechanisms involving protein-protein and protein-ligand (low molecular weight molecules) interactions. One of the most important tools for probing these interactions is high-field solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) through protein-observed and ligand-observed experiments, where the protein receptor or the organic compounds are selectively detected. NMR binding experiments rely on comparison of NMR parameters of the free and bound states of the molecules. Ligand-observed methods are not limited by the protein molecular size and therefore have great applicability for analysing protein-ligand interactions. The use of these NMR techniques has considerably expanded in recent years, both in chemical biology and in drug discovery. We review here three major ligand-observed NMR methods that depend on the nuclear Overhauser effect-transferred nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, saturation transfer difference spectroscopy and water-ligand interactions observed via gradient spectroscopy experiments-with the aim of reporting recent developments and applications for the characterization of protein-ligand complexes, including affinity measurements and structural determination.

  18. Theory-Based Interactive Videodisc for EFL Learning: Design Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Hsien-Chin

    A discussion of the design of effective instructional materials for English as a Second Language (ESL) focuses on the application of second language learning theories and concepts of instructional design from educational technology to development of interactive video. A number of second language learning models and related research are examined,…

  19. Modeling Collaborative Interaction Patterns in a Simulation-Based Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Jessica J.; Kerr, Deirdre; Mislevy, Robert J.; von Davier, Alina; Hao, Jiangang; Liu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Simulations and games offer interactive tasks that can elicit rich data, providing evidence of complex skills that are difficult to measure with more conventional items and tests. However, one notable challenge in using such technologies is making sense of the data generated in order to make claims about individuals or groups. This article…

  20. Vizic: Jupyter-based interactive visualization tool for astronomical catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Weixiang; Carrasco-Kind, Matias; Brunner, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Vizic is a Python visualization library that builds the connection between images and catalogs through an interactive map of the sky region. The software visualizes catalog data over a custom background canvas using the shape, size and orientation of each object in the catalog and displays interactive and customizable objects in the map. Property values such as redshift and magnitude can be used to filter or apply colormaps, and objects can be selected for further analysis through standard Python functions from inside a Jupyter notebook. Vizic allows custom overlays to be appended dynamically on top of the sky map; included are Voronoi, Delaunay, Minimum Spanning Tree and HEALPix layers, which are helpful for visualizing large-scale structure. Overlays can be generated, added or removed dynamically with one line of code. Catalog data is kept in a non-relational database. The Jupyter Notebook allows the user to create scripts to analyze and plot the data selected/displayed in the interactive map, making Vizic a powerful and flexible interactive analysis tool. Vizic be used for data inspection, clustering analysis, galaxy alignment studies, outlier identification or simply large-scale visualizations.

  1. Explaining Dynamic Interactions in Wiki-Based Collaborative Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mimi; Zhu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    This article reports a case study that examined dynamic patterns of interaction that two small groups (Group A and Group B) of ESL students exemplified when they performed two writing tasks: a research proposal (Task 1) and an annotated bibliography (Task 2) in a wiki site. Group A demonstrated a collective pattern in Task 1, but switched to an…

  2. Physics-Based Visual Characterization of Molecular Interaction Forces.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Pedro; Estrada, Jorge; Guallar, Victor; Ropinski, Timo; Vinacua, Alvar; Vazquez, Pere-Pau

    2017-01-01

    Molecular simulations are used in many areas of biotechnology, such as drug design and enzyme engineering. Despite the development of automatic computational protocols, analysis of molecular interactions is still a major aspect where human comprehension and intuition are key to accelerate, analyze, and propose modifications to the molecule of interest. Most visualization algorithms help the users by providing an accurate depiction of the spatial arrangement: the atoms involved in inter-molecular contacts. There are few tools that provide visual information on the forces governing molecular docking. However, these tools, commonly restricted to close interaction between atoms, do not consider whole simulation paths, long-range distances and, importantly, do not provide visual cues for a quick and intuitive comprehension of the energy functions (modeling intermolecular interactions) involved. In this paper, we propose visualizations designed to enable the characterization of interaction forces by taking into account several relevant variables such as molecule-ligand distance and the energy function, which is essential to understand binding affinities. We put emphasis on mapping molecular docking paths obtained from Molecular Dynamics or Monte Carlo simulations, and provide time-dependent visualizations for different energy components and particle resolutions: atoms, groups or residues. The presented visualizations have the potential to support domain experts in a more efficient drug or enzyme design process.

  3. Attractor Dynamics of Dyadic Interaction: A Recurrence Based Analysis.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Marlenny; Cox, Ralf F A; van Dijk, Marijn; van Geert, Paul

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate interpersonal coordination in young children during dyadic problem solving, by using Cross-Recurrence Quantification Analysis (CRQA). We examined the interactions of seven dyads of children (Mage= 5.1 years) in a longitudinal design (6 sessions) with a sequence of problem-solving tasks increasing in difficulty. An innovative implementation of CRQA is presented in order to study the attractor dynamics of dyadic coordination. The analysis consisted of distinguishing two recurrent states in the relationship between children and the task. In other words, the analysis is focused on how the dyadic interaction oscillates between two stable states that for their recurrent presence are considered to be attractors. The distributed dyadic interaction (DDI) state indicates that both children contribute equally to the solution of the task. The unequal dyadic interaction (UDI) state indicating that only one of the children contributes actively to the solution of the task. Results showed that the DDI was more frequent than the UDI but that the dynamics of these two attractor states were quite similar. The behaviors within these states increased in complexity over time, although they did so in DDI more strongly than UDI. The overall recurrence, which indicates the global level of coordination between the individuals in the dyad across all time points, was moderately correlated with the performance of the children.

  4. 3did: a catalog of domain-based interactions of known three-dimensional structure.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Roberto; Céol, Arnaud; Stein, Amelie; Olivella, Roger; Aloy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The database of 3D interacting domains (3did, available online for browsing and bulk download at http://3did.irbbarcelona.org) is a catalog of protein-protein interactions for which a high-resolution 3D structure is known. 3did collects and classifies all structural templates of domain-domain interactions in the Protein Data Bank, providing molecular details for such interactions. The current version also includes a pipeline for the discovery and annotation of novel domain-motif interactions. For every interaction, 3did identifies and groups different binding modes by clustering similar interfaces into 'interaction topologies'. By maintaining a constantly updated collection of domain-based structural interaction templates, 3did is a reference source of information for the structural characterization of protein interaction networks. 3did is updated every 6 months.

  5. GAIA: a gram-based interaction analysis tool – an approach for identifying interacting domains in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kelvin X; Ouellette, BF Francis

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) play important roles in many biological functions. Protein domains, which are defined as independently folding structural blocks of proteins, physically interact with each other to perform these biological functions. Therefore, the identification of Domain-Domain Interactions (DDIs) is of great biological interests because it is generally accepted that PPIs are mediated by DDIs. As a result, much effort has been put on the prediction of domain pair interactions based on computational methods. Many DDI prediction tools using PPIs network and domain evolution information have been reported. However, tools that combine the primary sequences, domain annotations, and structural annotations of proteins have not been evaluated before. Results In this study, we report a novel approach called Gram-bAsed Interaction Analysis (GAIA). GAIA extracts peptide segments that are composed of fixed length of continuous amino acids, called n-grams (where n is the number of amino acids), from the annotated domain and DDI data set in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) and identifies a list of n-grams that may contribute to DDIs and PPIs based on the frequencies of their appearance. GAIA also reports the coordinate position of gram pairs on each interacting domain pair. We demonstrate that our approach improves on other DDI prediction approaches when tested against a gold-standard data set and achieves a true positive rate of 82% and a false positive rate of 21%. We also identify a list of 4-gram pairs that are significantly over-represented in the DDI data set and may mediate PPIs. Conclusion GAIA represents a novel and reliable way to predict DDIs that mediate PPIs. Our results, which show the localizations of interacting grams/hotspots, provide testable hypotheses for experimental validation. Complemented with other prediction methods, this study will allow us to elucidate the interactome of cells. PMID:19208164

  6. Evaluation of an Interactive Case-based Online Network (ICON) in a problem based learning environment.

    PubMed

    Nathoo, Arif N; Goldhoff, Patricia; Quattrochi, James J

    2005-08-01

    This study sought to assess the introduction of a web-based innovation in medical education that complements traditional problem-based learning curricula. Utilizing the case method as its fundamental educational approach, the Interactive Case-based Online Network (ICON) allows students to interact with each other, faculty and a virtual patient in difficult neurological cases. Given the paucity of available metrics to benchmark online systems, we complement user perceptions with data on system utilization. We describe a case study of distinct, small group tutorials over 2 years as part of the Human Nervous System and Behavior (HNSB) course at the Harvard Medical School. Participating students and faculty were interviewed following completion of the course and their utilization of the system was recorded and examined. Students each spent 3.2+/-1.3 h (mean+/-SD) through 8.6+/-2.8 accessions per week using ICON outside of required tutorial time. Faculty each spent 4.8+/-3.4 h through 16.6+/-8.9 accessions per week on ICON. Students identified real-time engagement, stronger relationships with faculty, increased accountability to the tutorial group and self-selected pace as the most beneficial characteristics of the ICON-based tutorial in comparison to traditional problem based learning (PBL) tutorials. Faculty identified enhanced collaboration with students and more realistic student experiences as the most beneficial characteristics. Both students and faculty reported that limitations of ICON included increased time investment for faculty and increased reliance on good faculty mentorship. This is the first study of the ICON learning system in undergraduate medical education, a platform designed to facilitate collaboration outside of the classroom. Data on user perceptions and system utilization suggest that both faculty and students chose to adopt this online learning system as a means for collaboration. The study also outlines future avenues for research in assessing

  7. Photon-material interaction based on single silt diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goona, Nithin Kumar; Reddy, P. S.; Reddy, G. R. C.; Singh, Priya

    2016-09-01

    Heisenberg's uncertainty principle explains single slit diffraction1 where maximum is always at the centre. The same experiment has been conducted but with transparent walls i.e. the material present on either side of the slit, instead of opaque material. The observed result is a minimum at the centre in between two maximum. It is intuitive that atleast some photons passed through the slit must end up at the centre of the diffraction pattern but the result is different. The diffraction pattern occurs as the photons interact with the material around the slit. While uncertainty principle cannot give quantitative explanation as the photons confined in gap between slits still occupy the same space whether it is passing through a slit or not. This paper discusses various experiments and results by examining the interactions between photons and the material of the wall which makes the slit for better understanding of properties of light.

  8. Non-Native Speaker Interaction Management Strategies in a Network-Based Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the dyad-based communication of two groups of non-native speakers (NNSs) of English involved in real time interaction in a type of text-based computer-mediated communication (CMC) tool known as a MOO. The object of this semester long study was to examine the ways in which the subjects managed their L2 interaction during…

  9. The Reality of Web-Based Interaction in an Egyptian Distance Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadik, Alaa

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study conducted to evaluate the reality of interaction in a web-based distance education course. The learners were Egyptian first-grade secondary school students (15-16 years old) and the learning subject is mathematics. To investigate students' interactions via the Web, a Web-based learning environment was…

  10. Market-based Predictors of Interactivity at Southeast Asian Online Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Brian L.

    2000-01-01

    Market-based and press-freedom variables were tested as predictors of "interactive" online journalism at the Web companions of 17 English-language Asian newspapers. A multidimensional conception of interactivity was used in the analysis. Findings suggest that market-based variables predict only certain facets of an online newspaper's…

  11. Non-Native Speaker Interaction Management Strategies in a Network-Based Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the dyad-based communication of two groups of non-native speakers (NNSs) of English involved in real time interaction in a type of text-based computer-mediated communication (CMC) tool known as a MOO. The object of this semester long study was to examine the ways in which the subjects managed their L2 interaction during…

  12. Interaction of Radiation with Graphene Based Nanomaterials for Sensing Fissile Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    Interaction of Radiation with Graphene Based Nanomaterials for Sensing Fissile Materials Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release...University, West Lafayette IN 47907 Grant#: HDTRA1-09-1-0047 Young Investigator Award “ Interaction of Radiation with Graphene Based Nanomaterials...impact on the development of human resources? What is the impact on physical, institutional, and information resources that form infrastructure? What

  13. Approaches to Interactive Video Anchors in Problem-Based Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, David Devraj

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an invited adaptation of the IEEE Education Society Distinguished Lecture Approaches to Interactive Video Anchors in Problem-Based Science Learning. Interactive video anchors have a cognitive theory base, and they help to enlarge the context of learning with information-rich real-world situations. Carefully selected movie clips and…

  14. Approaches to Interactive Video Anchors in Problem-Based Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, David Devraj

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an invited adaptation of the IEEE Education Society Distinguished Lecture Approaches to Interactive Video Anchors in Problem-Based Science Learning. Interactive video anchors have a cognitive theory base, and they help to enlarge the context of learning with information-rich real-world situations. Carefully selected movie clips and…

  15. Human-Swarm Interactions Based on Managing Attractors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-06

    further claim that using quorum sensing allows a human to manage trade-offs between the scalability of interactions and mitigating the vulnerability...influence can cause the swarm to switch between attractors. We further claim that using quorum sensing allows a human to manage trade- offs between the...attractors of dynamic systems, bio-inspired swarms, quorum sensing 1. INTRODUCTION Swarms provide complex behaviors out of simple agents following simple

  16. A Jupyter-based Interactive Visualization Tool for Astronomical Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Weixiang; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Brunner, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The ever-growing datasets in observational astronomy have challenged scientists in many aspects, including an efficient and interactive data exploration and visualization. Many tools have been developed to confront this challenge. However, they usually focus on displaying the actual images or focus on visualizing patterns within catalogs. Here we present Vizic, a Python visualization library that builds the connection between images and catalogs through an interactive map of the sky region. Vizic visualizes catalog data over a custom background canvas using the shape, size and orientation of each object in the catalog. The displayed objects in the map are highly interactive and customizable comparing to those in the observation images. These objects can be filtered by or colored by their property values, such as redshift and/or magnitude or can be sub-selected using a lasso-like tool. In addition, Vizic also allows custom overlays to be appended dynamically on top of the image. We have implemented a minimum spanning tree overlay and a Voronoi diagram overlay. Both overlays can be generated, added or removed with just a click of a button. All the data is kept in a non relational database, and the interfaces were developed in JavaScript and Python to work on Jupyter notebooks which allows to create custom widgets, user generated scripts to analyze and plot the data selected/displayed in the interactive map.Vizic can be adopted in variety of exercises, for example, data inspection, clustering analysis, galaxy alignment studies or public data release for large surveys.

  17. HIPPIE: Integrating Protein Interaction Networks with Experiment Based Quality Scores

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Martin H.; Fontaine, Jean-Fred; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Porras, Pablo; Wanker, Erich E.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein function is often modulated by protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and therefore defining the partners of a protein helps to understand its activity. PPIs can be detected through different experimental approaches and are collected in several expert curated databases. These databases are used by researchers interested in examining detailed information on particular proteins. In many analyses the reliability of the characterization of the interactions becomes important and it might be necessary to select sets of PPIs of different confidence levels. To this goal, we generated HIPPIE (Human Integrated Protein-Protein Interaction rEference), a human PPI dataset with a normalized scoring scheme that integrates multiple experimental PPI datasets. HIPPIE's scoring scheme has been optimized by human experts and a computer algorithm to reflect the amount and quality of evidence for a given PPI and we show that these scores correlate to the quality of the experimental characterization. The HIPPIE web tool (available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/tools/hippie) allows researchers to do network analyses focused on likely true PPI sets by generating subnetworks around proteins of interest at a specified confidence level. PMID:22348130

  18. Model-based description of environment interaction for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Carlo; Pagello, Enrico; Vianello, Marco

    1999-01-01

    We consider a mobile robot that attempts to accomplish a task by reaching a given goal, and interacts with its environment through a finite set of actions and observations. The interaction between robot and environment is modeled by Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes (POMDP). The robot takes its decisions in presence of uncertainty about the current state, by maximizing its reward gained during interactions with the environment. It is able to self-locate into the environment by collecting actions and perception histories during the navigation. To make the state estimation more reliable, we introduce an additional information in the model without adding new states and without discretizing the considered measures. Thus, we associate to the state transition probabilities also a continuous metric given through the mean and the variance of some significant sensor measurements suitable to be kept under continuous form, such as odometric measurements, showing that also such unreliable data can supply a great deal of information to the robot. The overall control system of the robot is structured as a two-levels layered architecture, where the low level implements several collision avoidance algorithms, while the upper level takes care of the navigation problem. In this paper, we concentrate on how to use POMDP models at the upper level.

  19. TopoAngler: Interactive Topology-based Extraction of Fishes.

    PubMed

    Bock, Alexander; Doraiswamy, Harish; Summers, Adam; Silva, Claudio

    2017-08-29

    We present TopoAngler, a visualization framework that enables an interactive user-guided segmentation of fishes contained in a micro-CT scan. The inherent noise in the CT scan coupled with the often disconnected (and sometimes broken) skeletal structure of fishes makes an automatic segmentation of the volume impractical. To overcome this, our framework combines techniques from computational topology with an interactive visual interface, enabling the human-in-the-loop to effectively extract fishes from the volume. In the first step, the join tree of the input is used to create a hierarchical segmentation of the volume. Through the use of linked views, the visual interface then allows users to interactively explore this hierarchy, and gather parts of individual fishes into a coherent sub-volume, thus reconstructing entire fishes. Our framework was primarily developed for its application to CT scans of fishes, generated as part of the ScanAllFish project, through close collaboration with their lead scientist. However, we expect it to also be applicable in other biological applications where a single dataset contains multiple specimen; a common routine that is now widely followed in laboratories to increase throughput of expensive CT scanners.

  20. Determination of Base Binding Strength and Base Stacking Interaction of DNA Duplex Using Atomic Force Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tian-biao; Zhang, Chang-lin; Dong, Zai-li; Guan, Yi-fu

    2015-01-01

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2 pN and 14.0 ± 0.3 pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1 pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes. PMID:25772017

  1. Determination of base binding strength and base stacking interaction of DNA duplex using atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-biao; Zhang, Chang-lin; Dong, Zai-li; Guan, Yi-fu

    2015-03-16

    As one of the most crucial properties of DNA, the structural stability and the mechanical strength are attracting a great attention. Here, we take advantage of high force resolution and high special resolution of Atom Force Microscope and investigate the mechanical force of DNA duplexes. To evaluate the base pair hydrogen bond strength and base stacking force in DNA strands, we designed two modes (unzipping and stretching) for the measurement rupture forces. Employing k-means clustering algorithm, the ruptured force are clustered and the mean values are estimated. We assessed the influence of experimental parameters and performed the force evaluation for DNA duplexes of pure dG/dC and dA/dT base pairs. The base binding strength of single dG/dC and single dA/dT were estimated to be 20.0 ± 0.2 pN and 14.0 ± 0.3 pN, respectively, and the base stacking interaction was estimated to be 2.0 ± 0.1 pN. Our results provide valuable information about the quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of the DNA duplexes.

  2. Predicting drugs side effects based on chemical-chemical interactions and protein-chemical interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Feng, Kai-Yan; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    A drug side effect is an undesirable effect which occurs in addition to the intended therapeutic effect of the drug. The unexpected side effects that many patients suffer from are the major causes of large-scale drug withdrawal. To address the problem, it is highly demanded by pharmaceutical industries to develop computational methods for predicting the side effects of drugs. In this study, a novel computational method was developed to predict the side effects of drug compounds by hybridizing the chemical-chemical and protein-chemical interactions. Compared to most of the previous works, our method can rank the potential side effects for any query drug according to their predicted level of risk. A training dataset and test datasets were constructed from the benchmark dataset that contains 835 drug compounds to evaluate the method. By a jackknife test on the training dataset, the 1st order prediction accuracy was 86.30%, while it was 89.16% on the test dataset. It is expected that the new method may become a useful tool for drug design, and that the findings obtained by hybridizing various interactions in a network system may provide useful insights for conducting in-depth pharmacological research as well, particularly at the level of systems biomedicine.

  3. Predicting Drugs Side Effects Based on Chemical-Chemical Interactions and Protein-Chemical Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Feng, Kai-Yan; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    A drug side effect is an undesirable effect which occurs in addition to the intended therapeutic effect of the drug. The unexpected side effects that many patients suffer from are the major causes of large-scale drug withdrawal. To address the problem, it is highly demanded by pharmaceutical industries to develop computational methods for predicting the side effects of drugs. In this study, a novel computational method was developed to predict the side effects of drug compounds by hybridizing the chemical-chemical and protein-chemical interactions. Compared to most of the previous works, our method can rank the potential side effects for any query drug according to their predicted level of risk. A training dataset and test datasets were constructed from the benchmark dataset that contains 835 drug compounds to evaluate the method. By a jackknife test on the training dataset, the 1st order prediction accuracy was 86.30%, while it was 89.16% on the test dataset. It is expected that the new method may become a useful tool for drug design, and that the findings obtained by hybridizing various interactions in a network system may provide useful insights for conducting in-depth pharmacological research as well, particularly at the level of systems biomedicine. PMID:24078917

  4. Discovering Pair-Wise Genetic Interactions: An Information Theory-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ignac, Tomasz M.; Skupin, Alexander; Sakhanenko, Nikita A.; Galas, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic variation, including that which underlies health and disease in humans, results in part from multiple interactions among both genetic variation and environmental factors. While diseases or phenotypes caused by single gene variants can be identified by established association methods and family-based approaches, complex phenotypic traits resulting from multi-gene interactions remain very difficult to characterize. Here we describe a new method based on information theory, and demonstrate how it improves on previous approaches to identifying genetic interactions, including both synthetic and modifier kinds of interactions. We apply our measure, called interaction distance, to previously analyzed data sets of yeast sporulation efficiency, lipid related mouse data and several human disease models to characterize the method. We show how the interaction distance can reveal novel gene interaction candidates in experimental and simulated data sets, and outperforms other measures in several circumstances. The method also allows us to optimize case/control sample composition for clinical studies. PMID:24670935

  5. PPI-IRO: a two-stage method for protein-protein interaction extraction based on interaction relation ontology.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan-Xi; Chen, Peng; Wang, Ru-Jing; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Su, Ya-Ru; Li, Jinyan

    2014-01-01

    Mining Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) from the fast-growing biomedical literature resources has been proven as an effective approach for the identification of biological regulatory networks. This paper presents a novel method based on the idea of Interaction Relation Ontology (IRO), which specifies and organises words of various proteins interaction relationships. Our method is a two-stage PPI extraction method. At first, IRO is applied in a binary classifier to determine whether sentences contain a relation or not. Then, IRO is taken to guide PPI extraction by building sentence dependency parse tree. Comprehensive and quantitative evaluations and detailed analyses are used to demonstrate the significant performance of IRO on relation sentences classification and PPI extraction. Our PPI extraction method yielded a recall of around 80% and 90% and an F1 of around 54% and 66% on corpora of AIMed and BioInfer, respectively, which are superior to most existing extraction methods.

  6. Magnetic hysteresis based on dipolar interactions in granular magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allia, Paolo; Coisson, Marco; Knobel, Marcelo; Tiberto, Paola; Vinai, Franco

    1999-11-01

    The magnetic hysteresis of granular magnetic systems is investigated in the high-temperature limit (T>> blocking temperature of magnetic nanoparticles). Measurements of magnetization curves have been performed at room temperature on various samples of granular bimetallic alloys of the family Cu100-xCox (x=5-20 at. %) obtained in ribbon form by planar flow casting in a controlled atmosphere, and submitted to different thermal treatments. The loop amplitude and shape, which are functions of sample composition and thermal history, are studied taking advantage of a novel method of graphical representation, particularly apt to emphasize the features of thin, elongated loops. The hysteresis is explained in terms of the effect of magnetic interactions of the dipolar type among magnetic-metal particles, acting to hinder the response of the system of moments to isothermal changes of the applied field. Such a property is accounted for in a mean-field scheme, by introducing a memory term in the argument of the Langevin function which describes the anhysteretic behavior of an assembly of noninteracting superparamagnetic particles. The rms field arising from the cumulative effect of dipolar interactions is linked by the theory to a measurable quantity, the reduced remanence of a major symmetric hysteresis loop. The theory's self-consistence and adequacy have been properly tested at room temperature on all examined systems. The agreement with experimental results is always striking, indicating that at high temperatures the magnetic hysteresis of granular systems is dominated by interparticle, rather than single-particle, effects. Dipolar interactions seem to fully determine the magnetic hysteresis in the high-temperature limit for low Co content (x<=10). For higher concentrations of magnetic metal, the experimental results indicate that additional hysteretic mechanisms have to be introduced.

  7. Task-Based Learning: The Interaction between Tasks and Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Jacky

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between tasks and learners in task-based learning. Findings suggest that manipulation of task characteristics and conditions may not achieve the intended pedagogic outcomes, and that new ways are needed to focus learners' attention of form without sacrificing the meaning-driven principles of task-based learning.…

  8. Comprehensive characterization of molecular interactions based on nanomechanics.

    PubMed

    Ghatkesar, Murali Krishna; Lang, Hans-Peter; Gerber, Christoph; Hegner, Martin; Braun, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Molecular interaction is a key concept in our understanding of the biological mechanisms of life. Two physical properties change when one molecular partner binds to another. Firstly, the masses combine and secondly, the structure of at least one binding partner is altered, mechanically transducing the binding into subsequent biological reactions. Here we present a nanomechanical micro-array technique for bio-medical research, which not only monitors the binding of effector molecules to their target but also the subsequent effect on a biological system in vitro. This label-free and real-time method directly and simultaneously tracks mass and nanomechanical changes at the sensor interface using micro-cantilever technology. To prove the concept we measured lipid vesicle (approximately 748*10(6) Da) adsorption on the sensor interface followed by subsequent binding of the bee venom peptide melittin (2840 Da) to the vesicles. The results show the high dynamic range of the instrument and that measuring the mass and structural changes simultaneously allow a comprehensive discussion of molecular interactions.

  9. Comprehensive Characterization of Molecular Interactions Based on Nanomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Hans-Peter; Gerber, Christoph; Hegner, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Molecular interaction is a key concept in our understanding of the biological mechanisms of life. Two physical properties change when one molecular partner binds to another. Firstly, the masses combine and secondly, the structure of at least one binding partner is altered, mechanically transducing the binding into subsequent biological reactions. Here we present a nanomechanical micro-array technique for bio-medical research, which not only monitors the binding of effector molecules to their target but also the subsequent effect on a biological system in vitro. This label-free and real-time method directly and simultaneously tracks mass and nanomechanical changes at the sensor interface using micro-cantilever technology. To prove the concept we measured lipid vesicle (∼748*106 Da) adsorption on the sensor interface followed by subsequent binding of the bee venom peptide melittin (2840 Da) to the vesicles. The results show the high dynamic range of the instrument and that measuring the mass and structural changes simultaneously allow a comprehensive discussion of molecular interactions. PMID:18978938

  10. Sculpting Mountains: Interactive Terrain Modeling Based on Subsurface Geology.

    PubMed

    Cordonnier, Guillaume; Cani, Marie-Paule; Benes, Bedrich; Braun, Jean; Galin, Eric

    2017-03-29

    Most mountain ranges are formed by the compression and folding of colliding tectonic plates. Subduction of one plate causes large-scale asymmetry while their layered composition (or stratigraphy) explains the multi-scale folded strata observed on real terrains. We introduce a novel interactive modeling technique to generate visually plausible, large scale terrains that capture these phenomena. Our method draws on both geological knowledge for consistency and on sculpting systems for user interaction. The user is provided hands-on control on the shape and motion of tectonic plates, represented using a new geologically-inspired model for the Earth crust. The model captures their volume preserving and complex folding behaviors under collision, causing mountains to grow. It generates a volumetric uplift map representing the growth rate of subsurface layers. Erosion and uplift movement are jointly simulated to generate the terrain. The stratigraphy allows us to render folded strata on eroded cliffs. We validated the usability of our sculpting interface through a user study, and compare the visual consistency of the earth crust model with geological simulation results and real terrains.

  11. Child second language interaction in science-based tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhail, Cynthia Leigh

    While quasi-experimental in design, this study utilized qualitative data collection and analysis methods to examine the questions of whether students' speech act behavior and language use would vary by linguistic grouping. Second grade Puerto Rican native speakers of Spanish, and native English speakers completed sets of paired, hands-on, science activities. Children were paired in two linguistic groupings: heterogeneous (English native speaker/non-native speaker), and homogeneous (English non-native speaker/non-native speaker, or English native speaker/native speaker). Speech acts and use of target and native language in the two linguistic groupings were compared. Interviews with both the students and their teachers provided further understanding of the speech act behavior. Most prior research has dealt with university level adults learning English. Previous research that has dealt with children and second language interaction has often focused on teacher talk directed to the children, and no child/child interaction studies have attempted to control for variables such as linguistic grouping. Results indicated that linguistically heterogeneous groupings led to higher percentages of English use for non-native speakers. Homogeneous grouping led to higher percentages of native Spanish use. English native speakers' speech act behavior remained consistent in terms of dominance or passivity of behavior regardless of linguistic grouping, but there is the possibility that non-English speakers may behave in a slightly more passive manner when in heterogeneous grouping.

  12. Direct measurement of acid-base interaction energy at solid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Anish; Prasad, Shishir; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2010-12-07

    We have studied acid-base interactions at solid-liquid and solid-solid interfaces using interface-sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. The shift of the sapphire hydroxyl peak in contact with several polar and nonpolar liquids and polymers was used to determine the interaction energy. The trend in the interaction energies cannot be explained by measuring only water contact angles. Molecular rearrangements at the sapphire interface, to maximize the interaction of the acid-base groups, play a dominant role, and these effects are not accounted for in the current theoretical models. These results provide important insights into understanding adhesion, friction, and wetting on solid interfaces.

  13. Interactive applications for sketch-based editable polycube map.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ismael; Xia, Jiazhi; He, Ying; Xin, Shi-Qing; Patow, Gustavo

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a sketch-based editable polycube mapping method that, given a general mesh and a simple polycube that coarsely resembles the shape of the object, plus sketched features indicating relevant correspondences between the two, provides a uniform, regular, and user-controllable quads-only mesh that can be used as a basis structure for subdivision. Large scale models with complex geometry and topology can be processed efficiently with simple, intuitive operations. We show that the simple, intuitive nature of the polycube map is a substantial advantage from the point of view of the interface by demonstrating a series of applications, including kit-basing, shape morphing, painting over the parameterization domain, and GPU-friendly tessellated subdivision displacement, where the user is also able to control the number of patches in the base mesh by the construction of the base polycube.

  14. Protein interaction network constructing based on text mining and reinforcement learning with application to prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Zhang, Xiaofang; Shen, Bairong

    2015-08-01

    Constructing interaction network from biomedical texts is a very important and interesting work. The authors take advantage of text mining and reinforcement learning approaches to establish protein interaction network. Considering the high computational efficiency of co-occurrence-based interaction extraction approaches and high precision of linguistic patterns approaches, the authors propose an interaction extracting algorithm where they utilise frequently used linguistic patterns to extract the interactions from texts and then find out interactions from extended unprocessed texts under the basic idea of co-occurrence approach, meanwhile they discount the interaction extracted from extended texts. They put forward a reinforcement learning-based algorithm to establish a protein interaction network, where nodes represent proteins and edges denote interactions. During the evolutionary process, a node selects another node and the attained reward determines which predicted interaction should be reinforced. The topology of the network is updated by the agent until an optimal network is formed. They used texts downloaded from PubMed to construct a prostate cancer protein interaction network by the proposed methods. The results show that their method brought out pretty good matching rate. Network topology analysis results also demonstrate that the curves of node degree distribution, node degree probability and probability distribution of constructed network accord with those of the scale-free network well.

  15. A global test for gene‐gene interactions based on random matrix theory

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Christopher I.; Moore, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Statistical interactions between markers of genetic variation, or gene‐gene interactions, are believed to play an important role in the etiology of many multifactorial diseases and other complex phenotypes. Unfortunately, detecting gene‐gene interactions is extremely challenging due to the large number of potential interactions and ambiguity regarding marker coding and interaction scale. For many data sets, there is insufficient statistical power to evaluate all candidate gene‐gene interactions. In these cases, a global test for gene‐gene interactions may be the best option. Global tests have much greater power relative to multiple individual interaction tests and can be used on subsets of the markers as an initial filter prior to testing for specific interactions. In this paper, we describe a novel global test for gene‐gene interactions, the global epistasis test (GET), that is based on results from random matrix theory. As we show via simulation studies based on previously proposed models for common diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, type 2 diabetes, and breast cancer, our proposed GET method has superior performance characteristics relative to existing global gene‐gene interaction tests. A glaucoma GWAS data set is used to demonstrate the practical utility of the GET method. PMID:27386793

  16. A global test for gene-gene interactions based on random matrix theory.

    PubMed

    Frost, H Robert; Amos, Christopher I; Moore, Jason H

    2016-12-01

    Statistical interactions between markers of genetic variation, or gene-gene interactions, are believed to play an important role in the etiology of many multifactorial diseases and other complex phenotypes. Unfortunately, detecting gene-gene interactions is extremely challenging due to the large number of potential interactions and ambiguity regarding marker coding and interaction scale. For many data sets, there is insufficient statistical power to evaluate all candidate gene-gene interactions. In these cases, a global test for gene-gene interactions may be the best option. Global tests have much greater power relative to multiple individual interaction tests and can be used on subsets of the markers as an initial filter prior to testing for specific interactions. In this paper, we describe a novel global test for gene-gene interactions, the global epistasis test (GET), that is based on results from random matrix theory. As we show via simulation studies based on previously proposed models for common diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, type 2 diabetes, and breast cancer, our proposed GET method has superior performance characteristics relative to existing global gene-gene interaction tests. A glaucoma GWAS data set is used to demonstrate the practical utility of the GET method.

  17. MINDS: A microcomputer interactive data system for 8086-based controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, J. F.

    1985-01-01

    A microcomputer interactive data system (MINDS) software package for the 8086 family of microcomputers is described. To enhance program understandability and ease of code maintenance, the software is written in PL/M-86, Intel Corporation's high-level system implementation language. The MINDS software is intended to run in residence with real-time digital control software to provide displays of steady-state and transient data. In addition, the MINDS package provides classic monitor capabilities along with extended provisions for debugging an executing control system. The software uses the CP/M-86 operating system developed by Digital Research, Inc., to provide program load capabilities along with a uniform file structure for data and table storage. Finally, a library of input and output subroutines to be used with consoles equipped with PL/M-86 and assembly language is described.

  18. Human-Interaction Challenges in UAV-Based Autonomous Surveillance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Michael; Harris, Robert; Shafto, Michael G.

    2004-01-01

    Autonomous UAVs provide a platform for intelligent surveillance in application domains ranging from security and military operations to scientific information gathering and land management. Surveillance tasks are often long duration, requiring that any approach be adaptive to changes in the environment or user needs. We describe a decision- theoretic model of surveillance, appropriate for use on our autonomous helicopter, that provides a basis for optimizing the value of information returned by the UAV. From this approach arise a range of challenges in making this framework practical for use by human operators lacking specialized knowledge of autonomy and mathematics. This paper describes our platform and approach, then describes human-interaction challenges arising from this approach that we have identified and begun to address.

  19. Nonreciprocity and magnetic-free isolation based on optomechanical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruesink, Freek; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Alù, Andrea; Verhagen, Ewold

    2016-11-01

    Nonreciprocal components, such as isolators and circulators, provide highly desirable functionalities for optical circuitry. This motivates the active investigation of mechanisms that break reciprocity, and pose alternatives to magneto-optic effects in on-chip systems. In this work, we use optomechanical interactions to strongly break reciprocity in a compact system. We derive minimal requirements to create nonreciprocity in a wide class of systems that couple two optical modes to a mechanical mode, highlighting the importance of optically biasing the modes at a controlled phase difference. We realize these principles in a silica microtoroid optomechanical resonator and use quantitative heterodyne spectroscopy to demonstrate up to 10 dB optical isolation at telecom wavelengths. We show that nonreciprocal transmission is preserved for nondegenerate modes, and demonstrate nonreciprocal parametric amplification. These results open a route to exploiting various nonreciprocal effects in optomechanical systems in different electromagnetic and mechanical frequency regimes, including optomechanical metamaterials with topologically non-trivial properties.

  20. Nonreciprocity and magnetic-free isolation based on optomechanical interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ruesink, Freek; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Alù, Andrea; Verhagen, Ewold

    2016-01-01

    Nonreciprocal components, such as isolators and circulators, provide highly desirable functionalities for optical circuitry. This motivates the active investigation of mechanisms that break reciprocity, and pose alternatives to magneto-optic effects in on-chip systems. In this work, we use optomechanical interactions to strongly break reciprocity in a compact system. We derive minimal requirements to create nonreciprocity in a wide class of systems that couple two optical modes to a mechanical mode, highlighting the importance of optically biasing the modes at a controlled phase difference. We realize these principles in a silica microtoroid optomechanical resonator and use quantitative heterodyne spectroscopy to demonstrate up to 10 dB optical isolation at telecom wavelengths. We show that nonreciprocal transmission is preserved for nondegenerate modes, and demonstrate nonreciprocal parametric amplification. These results open a route to exploiting various nonreciprocal effects in optomechanical systems in different electromagnetic and mechanical frequency regimes, including optomechanical metamaterials with topologically non-trivial properties. PMID:27897165

  1. Emerging Supramolecular Therapeutic Carriers Based on Host-Guest Interactions.

    PubMed

    Karim, Anis Abdul; Dou, Qingqing; Li, Zibiao; Loh, Xian Jun

    2016-05-06

    Recent advances in host-guest chemistry have significantly influenced the construction of supramolecular soft biomaterials. The highly selective and non-covalent interactions provide vast possibilities of manipulating supramolecular self-assemblies at the molecular level, allowing a rational design to control the sizes and morphologies of the resultant objects as carrier vehicles in a delivery system. In this Focus Review, the most recent developments of supramolecular self-assemblies through host-guest inclusion, including nanoparticles, micelles, vesicles, hydrogels, and various stimuli-responsive morphology transition materials are presented. These sophisticated materials with diverse functions, oriented towards therapeutic agent delivery, are further summarized into several active domains in the areas of drug delivery, gene delivery, co-delivery and site-specific targeting deliveries. Finally, the possible strategies for future design of multifunctional delivery carriers by combining host-guest chemistry with biological interface science are proposed.

  2. Inquiry and groups: student interactions in cooperative inquiry-based science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods-McConney, Amanda; Wosnitza, Marold; Sturrock, Keryn L.

    2016-03-01

    Science education research has recommended cooperative inquiry based science in the primary science context for more than two decades but after more than 20 years, student achievement in science has not substantially improved. This study, through direct observation and analysis, investigated content-related student interactions in an authentic inquiry based primary science class setting. Thirty-one upper primary students were videotaped working in cooperative inquiry based science activities. Cooperative talk and negotiation of the science content was analysed to identify any high-level group interactions. The data show that while all groups have incidences of high-level content-related group interactions, the frequency and duration of these interactions were limited. No specific pattern of preceding events was identified and no episodes of high-level content-related group interactions were immediately preceded by the teacher's interactions with the groups. This in situ study demonstrated that even without any kind of scaffolding, specific skills in knowing how to implement cooperative inquiry based science, high-level content-related group interactions did occur very briefly. Support for teachers to develop their knowledge and skills in facilitating cooperative inquiry based science learning is warranted to ensure that high-level content-related group interactions and the associated conceptual learning are not left to chance in science classrooms.

  3. Combining region-based and imprecise boundary-based cues for interactive medical image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jonathan-Lee; Xie, Xianghua; Essa, Ehab

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we present an approach combining both region selection and user point selection for user-assisted segmentation as either an enclosed object or an open curve, investigate the method of image segmentation in specific medical applications (user-assisted segmentation of the media-adventitia border in intravascular ultrasound images, and lumen border in optical coherence tomography images), and then demonstrate the method with generic images to show how it could be utilized in other types of medical image and is not limited to the applications described. The proposed method combines point-based soft constraint on object boundary and stroke-based regional constraint. The user points act as attraction points and are treated as soft constraints rather than hard constraints that the segmented boundary has to pass through. The user can also use strokes to specify region of interest. The probabilities of region of interest for each pixel are then calculated, and their discontinuity is used to indicate object boundary. The combinations of different types of user constraints and image features allow flexible and robust segmentation, which is formulated as an energy minimization problem on a multilayered graph and is solved using a shortest path search algorithm. We show that this combinatorial approach allows efficient and effective interactive segmentation, which can be used with both open and closed curves to segment a variety of images in different ways. The proposed method is demonstrated in the two medical applications, that is, intravascular ultrasound and optical coherence tomography images, where image artefacts such as acoustic shadow and calcification are commonplace and thus user guidance is desirable. We carried out both qualitative and quantitative analysis of the results for the medical data; comparing the proposed method against a number of interactive segmentation techniques.

  4. Dynamic Communication of Humanoid Robot with Multiple People Based on Interaction Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasaki, Tsuyoshi; Matsumoto, Shohei; Ohba, Hayato; Yamamoto, Shunichi; Toda, Mitsuhiko; Komatani, Kazunori; Ogata, Tetsuya; Okuno, Hiroshi G.

    Research on human-robot interaction is getting an increasing amount of attention. Since most research has dealt with communication between one robot and one person, quite few researchers have studied communication between a robot and multiple people. This paper presents a method that enables robots to communicate with multiple people using the ``selection priority of the interactive partner'' based on the concept of Proxemics. In this method, a robot changes active sensory-motor modalities based on the interaction distance between itself and a person. Our method was implemented into a humanoid robot, SIG2. SIG2 has various sensory-motor modalities to interact with humans. A demonstration of SIG2 showed that our method selected an appropriate interaction partner during interaction with multiple people.

  5. Atomic interaction mechanism for designing the interface of W/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. K.; Fu, H. M.; Sha, P. F.; Zhu, Z. W.; Wang, A. M.; Li, H.; Zhang, H. W.; Zhang, H. F.; Hu, Z. Q.

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between active element Zr and W damages the W fibers and the interface and decreases the mechanical properties, especially the tensile strength of the W fibers reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs). From the viewpoint of atomic interaction, the W-Zr interaction can be restrained by adding minor elements that have stronger interaction with W into the alloy. The calculation about atomic interaction energy indicates that Ta and Nb preferred to segregate on the W substrate surface. Sessile drop experiment proves the prediction and corresponding in-situ coating appears at the interface. Besides, the atomic interaction mechanism was proven to be effective in many other systems by the sessile drop technique. Considering the interfacial morphology, Nb was added into the alloy to fabricate W/Zr-based BMGCs. As expected, the Nb addition effectively suppressed the W-Zr reaction and damage to W fibers. Both the compressive and tensile properties are improved obviously.

  6. Atomic interaction mechanism for designing the interface of W/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites.

    PubMed

    Li, Z K; Fu, H M; Sha, P F; Zhu, Z W; Wang, A M; Li, H; Zhang, H W; Zhang, H F; Hu, Z Q

    2015-03-11

    The interaction between active element Zr and W damages the W fibers and the interface and decreases the mechanical properties, especially the tensile strength of the W fibers reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs). From the viewpoint of atomic interaction, the W-Zr interaction can be restrained by adding minor elements that have stronger interaction with W into the alloy. The calculation about atomic interaction energy indicates that Ta and Nb preferred to segregate on the W substrate surface. Sessile drop experiment proves the prediction and corresponding in-situ coating appears at the interface. Besides, the atomic interaction mechanism was proven to be effective in many other systems by the sessile drop technique. Considering the interfacial morphology, Nb was added into the alloy to fabricate W/Zr-based BMGCs. As expected, the Nb addition effectively suppressed the W-Zr reaction and damage to W fibers. Both the compressive and tensile properties are improved obviously.

  7. Ontology-based literature mining of E. coli vaccine-associated gene interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Hur, Junguk; Özgür, Arzucan; He, Yongqun

    2017-03-14

    Pathogenic Escherichia coli infections cause various diseases in humans and many animal species. However, with extensive E. coli vaccine research, we are still unable to fully protect ourselves against E. coli infections. To more rational development of effective and safe E. coli vaccine, it is important to better understand E. coli vaccine-associated gene interaction networks. In this study, we first extended the Vaccine Ontology (VO) to semantically represent various E. coli vaccines and genes used in the vaccine development. We also normalized E. coli gene names compiled from the annotations of various E. coli strains using a pan-genome-based annotation strategy. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) includes a hierarchy of various interaction-related keywords useful for literature mining. Using VO, INO, and normalized E. coli gene names, we applied an ontology-based SciMiner literature mining strategy to mine all PubMed abstracts and retrieve E. coli vaccine-associated E. coli gene interactions. Four centrality metrics (i.e., degree, eigenvector, closeness, and betweenness) were calculated for identifying highly ranked genes and interaction types. Using vaccine-related PubMed abstracts, our study identified 11,350 sentences that contain 88 unique INO interactions types and 1,781 unique E. coli genes. Each sentence contained at least one interaction type and two unique E. coli genes. An E. coli gene interaction network of genes and INO interaction types was created. From this big network, a sub-network consisting of 5 E. coli vaccine genes, including carA, carB, fimH, fepA, and vat, and 62 other E. coli genes, and 25 INO interaction types was identified. While many interaction types represent direct interactions between two indicated genes, our study has also shown that many of these retrieved interaction types are indirect in that the two genes participated in the specified interaction process in a required but indirect process. Our centrality analysis of

  8. Literature Mining and Ontology based Analysis of Host-Brucella Gene–Gene Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Karadeniz, İlknur; Hur, Junguk; He, Yongqun; Özgür, Arzucan

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterium that causes chronic brucellosis in humans and various mammals. The identification of host-Brucella interaction is crucial to understand host immunity against Brucella infection and Brucella pathogenesis against host immune responses. Most of the information about the inter-species interactions between host and Brucella genes is only available in the text of the scientific publications. Many text-mining systems for extracting gene and protein interactions have been proposed. However, only a few of them have been designed by considering the peculiarities of host–pathogen interactions. In this paper, we used a text mining approach for extracting host-Brucella gene–gene interactions from the abstracts of articles in PubMed. The gene–gene interactions here represent the interactions between genes and/or gene products (e.g., proteins). The SciMiner tool, originally designed for detecting mammalian gene/protein names in text, was extended to identify host and Brucella gene/protein names in the abstracts. Next, sentence-level and abstract-level co-occurrence based approaches, as well as sentence-level machine learning based methods, originally designed for extracting intra-species gene interactions, were utilized to extract the interactions among the identified host and Brucella genes. The extracted interactions were manually evaluated. A total of 46 host-Brucella gene interactions were identified and represented as an interaction network. Twenty four of these interactions were identified from sentence-level processing. Twenty two additional interactions were identified when abstract-level processing was performed. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) was used to represent the identified interaction types at a hierarchical ontology structure. Ontological modeling of specific gene–gene interactions demonstrates that host–pathogen gene–gene interactions occur at experimental conditions which can be ontologically

  9. Literature Mining and Ontology based Analysis of Host-Brucella Gene-Gene Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Karadeniz, İlknur; Hur, Junguk; He, Yongqun; Özgür, Arzucan

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is an intracellular bacterium that causes chronic brucellosis in humans and various mammals. The identification of host-Brucella interaction is crucial to understand host immunity against Brucella infection and Brucella pathogenesis against host immune responses. Most of the information about the inter-species interactions between host and Brucella genes is only available in the text of the scientific publications. Many text-mining systems for extracting gene and protein interactions have been proposed. However, only a few of them have been designed by considering the peculiarities of host-pathogen interactions. In this paper, we used a text mining approach for extracting host-Brucella gene-gene interactions from the abstracts of articles in PubMed. The gene-gene interactions here represent the interactions between genes and/or gene products (e.g., proteins). The SciMiner tool, originally designed for detecting mammalian gene/protein names in text, was extended to identify host and Brucella gene/protein names in the abstracts. Next, sentence-level and abstract-level co-occurrence based approaches, as well as sentence-level machine learning based methods, originally designed for extracting intra-species gene interactions, were utilized to extract the interactions among the identified host and Brucella genes. The extracted interactions were manually evaluated. A total of 46 host-Brucella gene interactions were identified and represented as an interaction network. Twenty four of these interactions were identified from sentence-level processing. Twenty two additional interactions were identified when abstract-level processing was performed. The Interaction Network Ontology (INO) was used to represent the identified interaction types at a hierarchical ontology structure. Ontological modeling of specific gene-gene interactions demonstrates that host-pathogen gene-gene interactions occur at experimental conditions which can be ontologically represented. Our

  10. ANAP: An Integrated Knowledge Base for Arabidopsis Protein Interaction Network Analysis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congmao; Marshall, Alex; Zhang, Dabing; Wilson, Zoe A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein interactions are fundamental to the molecular processes occurring within an organism and can be utilized in network biology to help organize, simplify, and understand biological complexity. Currently, there are more than 10 publicly available Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protein interaction databases. However, there are limitations with these databases, including different types of interaction evidence, a lack of defined standards for protein identifiers, differing levels of information, and, critically, a lack of integration between them. In this paper, we present an interactive bioinformatics Web tool, ANAP (Arabidopsis Network Analysis Pipeline), which serves to effectively integrate the different data sets and maximize access to available data. ANAP has been developed for Arabidopsis protein interaction integration and network-based study to facilitate functional protein network analysis. ANAP integrates 11 Arabidopsis protein interaction databases, comprising 201,699 unique protein interaction pairs, 15,208 identifiers (including 11,931 The Arabidopsis Information Resource Arabidopsis Genome Initiative codes), 89 interaction detection methods, 73 species that interact with Arabidopsis, and 6,161 references. ANAP can be used as a knowledge base for constructing protein interaction networks based on user input and supports both direct and indirect interaction analysis. It has an intuitive graphical interface allowing easy network visualization and provides extensive detailed evidence for each interaction. In addition, ANAP displays the gene and protein annotation in the generated interactive network with links to The Arabidopsis Information Resource, the AtGenExpress Visualization Tool, the Arabidopsis 1,001 Genomes GBrowse, the Protein Knowledgebase, the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, and the Ensembl Genome Browser to significantly aid functional network analysis. The tool is available open access at http

  11. Classified Bibliography on Bibliographic Data Base Interaction, Compatibility and Standardization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landau, H.B.

    This is the third in a series of eight reports of a research study for the National Agricultural Library (NAL) on the effective utilization of bibliographic data bases in machine-readable form. It consists of about 750 references collected to provide background data for the seven technical tasks of the study. The bibliography is set up to…

  12. Interactive Storybook-Based Intervention Effects on Kindergartners' Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Druten-Frietman, Loes; Strating, Heleen; Denessen, Eddie; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    A dialogic storybook-based intervention integrating dialogic storybook reading with early literacy activities is studied with a longitudinal quasi-experimental study design. The effects of this intervention, in addition to a regular early childhood education (ECE) program, on kindergartners' vocabulary and phonological awareness development are…

  13. Classified Bibliography on Bibliographic Data Base Interaction, Compatibility and Standardization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landau, H.B.

    This is the third in a series of eight reports of a research study for the National Agricultural Library (NAL) on the effective utilization of bibliographic data bases in machine-readable form. It consists of about 750 references collected to provide background data for the seven technical tasks of the study. The bibliography is set up to…

  14. Supporting Language Students' Interactions in Web-Based Conferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamy, Marie-Noelle; Goodfellow, Robin

    1999-01-01

    Looks at on-line tutor strategies for the support of students learning a second language with the help of a Web-based asynchronous textual conference. Looks specifically at strategies used by three tutors who participated in a project with students of French. (Author/VWL)

  15. Inquiry-Based Learning with or without Facilitator Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerasinghe, Thushani Alwis; Ramberg, Robert; Hewagamage, Kamalanath Priyantha

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses findings of a study investigating how students, in four online courses, engaged in inquiry-based learning with and without support from a facilitator. The investigation was conducted by analyzing discussions of the online courses using the community of inquiry model. The results of the study imply that students in online…

  16. Interactive Storybook-Based Intervention Effects on Kindergartners' Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Druten-Frietman, Loes; Strating, Heleen; Denessen, Eddie; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    A dialogic storybook-based intervention integrating dialogic storybook reading with early literacy activities is studied with a longitudinal quasi-experimental study design. The effects of this intervention, in addition to a regular early childhood education (ECE) program, on kindergartners' vocabulary and phonological awareness development are…

  17. EVA: An Interactive Web-Based Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheremetov, Leonid; Arenas, Adolfo Guzman

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a Web-based learning environment developed within the project called Virtual Learning Spaces (EVA, in Spanish) is described. The environment is composed of knowledge, collaboration, consulting and experimentation spaces as a collection of agents and conventional software components working over the knowledge domains. All user…

  18. EVA: An Interactive Web-Based Collaborative Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheremetov, Leonid; Arenas, Adolfo Guzman

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a Web-based learning environment developed within the project called Virtual Learning Spaces (EVA, in Spanish) is described. The environment is composed of knowledge, collaboration, consulting and experimentation spaces as a collection of agents and conventional software components working over the knowledge domains. All user…

  19. Structural and functional bases of laser-microvessels interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Valentine I.; Terman, Oleg A.; Builin, Vitalij; Lebedeva, Natalia A.; Samoilov, Nickolai

    1993-07-01

    Structural and functional microcirculatory changes in tissues and organs (muscles, liver, derma, epinephros, brain cortex) under various dosages and powers of laser irradiation in the red (633 nm) and near infrared (890 nm) spectrum regions have been studied in experiments and clinic. In case of nonsensitized tissues the `photoactivation' range of power densities and doses of laser irradiation has been established. We have identified a short-term reaction of microvessels and a long-term reaction (adaptation). The former consists of intensification of microcirculation and metabolism rise in parenchymatous cells; the latter is connected with neoangiogenesis acceleration. The intensification of the blood microcirculation includes a dilation of microvessels of all orders, an amplification of arteriolar vasomotions and an opening of `reserved' capillaries. Data on the structural reconstruction of myocytes and endotheliocytes have shown that the high differential parenchymatous cells and its membrane structures are sensitive to low energy laser irradiation and, on the other hand, under low energy laser irradiation there is an activation of synthetic processes in the cells. Thus, during the laser-tissue interaction in such complex system as human organism the microcirculation plays the key role among the other systems.

  20. Interactions of NO2 with sewage sludge based composite adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Robert; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2008-06-15

    Interactions of NO2 present in most air were analyzed at room temperature on composite sewage sludge-derived adsorbents. They consist of carbonaceous and inorganic phases with the majority of the latter. The adsorption capacity was evaluated using the dynamic breakthrough experiments. The materials before and after NO2 exposure were characterized using adsorption of nitrogen, thermal analysis and FTIR. The results showed differences in the surface activities of sludge-derived materials towards immobilization and reduction of nitric dioxide. Nitrates and nitrite are the main products of surface reactions. This is linked to the presence of active oxides and hydroxides, which are formed when the surface is exposed to water. The highest activity of the sample pyrolyzed at 650 degrees C is owing to the high content of those species formed as a result of decomposition of inorganic salts (likely chlorides, sulfates and phosphates) during thermal treatment. When sludge is pyrolyzed at 950 degrees C those oxides are engaged in stable mineral phases formed in solid-state reactions, which limits the surface activity towards NO2 retention. The reactivity of the high temperature pyrolyzed samples can be linked to the physical adsorption of water. In a water film nitrous and nitric acid can be formed and they can further react with inorganic and carbonaceous phases to the limited extent.

  1. IP-based streaming technology for interactive MPEG-4 contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Cheol; Jeong, Seyoon; Cha, Jihun; Kim, Kyuheon

    2004-11-01

    In this paper, we present an MPEG-4 contents streaming system and propose MPEG-4 contents streaming scheme by using priority. The presented streaming system which consists of a server and a client supports MPEG-4 contents compliant with ISO/IEC 14496-1 and enables a user to interact with MPEG-4 contents over IP networks. The server consists of GUI, Server Management Layer, Sync Layer, and Delivery Layer. The client supports to display MPEG-4 contents stored in local storage or received through IP networks. Moreover, we propose an MPEG-4 contents streaming scheme that the object a user prefers to watch is sent first by increasing priority and objects with low priority are dropped at a server side when network bandwidth is not enough to transmit all objects that are supposed to appear in the scene. We made experiment of the proposed scheme with the presented MPEG-4 contents streaming system, and the experiment results are shown in this paper. If we use the proposed scheme for MPEG-4 contents streaming, it is possible for a user to watch a video of interest in high quality and video of indifference in low quality.

  2. A Fast Goal Recognition Technique Based on Interaction Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    E-Martin, Yolanda; R-Moreno, Maria D.; Smith, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Goal Recognition is the task of inferring an actor's goals given some or all of the actor's observed actions. There is considerable interest in Goal Recognition for use in intelligent personal assistants, smart environments, intelligent tutoring systems, and monitoring user's needs. In much of this work, the actor's observed actions are compared against a generated library of plans. Recent work by Ramirez and Geffner makes use of AI planning to determine how closely a sequence of observed actions matches plans for each possible goal. For each goal, this is done by comparing the cost of a plan for that goal with the cost of a plan for that goal that includes the observed actions. This approach yields useful rankings, but is impractical for real-time goal recognition in large domains because of the computational expense of constructing plans for each possible goal. In this paper, we introduce an approach that propagates cost and interaction information in a plan graph, and uses this information to estimate goal probabilities. We show that this approach is much faster, but still yields high quality results.

  3. Multivalent interaction based carbohydrate biosensors for signal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Chalagalla, Srinivas; Li, Tiehai; Sun, Xue-long; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Peng; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2010-01-01

    Multivalent interaction between boronic acids immobilized on Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) sensor surface and the carbohydrates modified Au - nanoparticle (AuNP) has been demonstrated for the development of a sensitive carbohydrate biosensor. Briefly, a boronic acid - containing polymer (boropolymer) as multivalent carbohydrate receptor was oriented immobilized on the cysteamine coated electrode through isourea bond formation. Carbohydrates were conjugated to AuNPs to generate a multivalent carbohydrates moiety to amplify the response signal. Thus, the binding of the carbohydrate conjugated AuNPs to the boropolymer surface are multivalent which could simultaneously increase the binding affinity and specificity. We systematically studied the binding between five carbohydrate conjugated AuNPs and the boropolymer. Our studies show that the associate constant (Ka) was in the order of fucose < glucose < mannose < galactose < maltose. A linear response in the range from 23 µM to 3.83 mM was observed for mannose conjugated AuNPs and the boropolymer recognition elements, with the lower detection limit of 1.5 µM for the carbohydrate analytes. Furthermore, the multivalent binding between carbohydrates and boronic acids are reversible and allow the regeneration of boropolymer surface by using 1M acetic acid so as to sequentially capture and release the carbohydrate analytes. PMID:20863680

  4. A sparse matrix based full-configuration interaction algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Rolik, Zoltan; Szabados, Agnes; Surjan, Peter R.

    2008-04-14

    We present an algorithm related to the full-configuration interaction (FCI) method that makes complete use of the sparse nature of the coefficient vector representing the many-electron wave function in a determinantal basis. Main achievements of the presented sparse FCI (SFCI) algorithm are (i) development of an iteration procedure that avoids the storage of FCI size vectors; (ii) development of an efficient algorithm to evaluate the effect of the Hamiltonian when both the initial and the product vectors are sparse. As a result of point (i) large disk operations can be skipped which otherwise may be a bottleneck of the procedure. At point (ii) we progress by adopting the implementation of the linear transformation by Olsen et al. [J. Chem Phys. 89, 2185 (1988)] for the sparse case, getting the algorithm applicable to larger systems and faster at the same time. The error of a SFCI calculation depends only on the dropout thresholds for the sparse vectors, and can be tuned by controlling the amount of system memory passed to the procedure. The algorithm permits to perform FCI calculations on single node workstations for systems previously accessible only by supercomputers.

  5. KBSIM: a system for interactive knowledge-based simulation.

    PubMed

    Hakman, M; Groth, T

    1991-01-01

    The KBSIM system integrates quantitative simulation with symbolic reasoning techniques, under the control of a user interface management system, using a relational database management system for data storage and interprocess communication. The system stores and processes knowledge from three distinct knowledge domains, viz. (i) knowledge about the processes of the system under investigation, expressed in terms of a Continuous System Simulation Language (CSSL); (ii) heuristic knowledge on how to reach the goals of the simulation experiment, expressed in terms of a Rule Description Language (RDL); and (iii) knowledge about the requirements of the intended users, expressed in terms of a User Interface Description Language (UIDL). The user works in an interactive environment controlling the simulation course with use of a mouse and a large screen containing a set of 'live' charts and forms. The user is assisted by an embedded 'expert system' module continuously watching both the system's behavior and the user's action, and producing alerts, alarms, comments and advice. The system was developed on a Hewlett-Packard 9000/350 workstation under the HP-Unix and HP-Windows operating systems, using the MIMER database management system, and Fortran, Prolog/Lisp and C as implementation languages. The KBSIM system has great potentials for supporting problem solving, design of working procedures and teaching related to management of highly dynamic systems.

  6. Kernel method based human model for enhancing interactive evolutionary optimization.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yan; Zhao, Qiangfu; Liu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A fitness landscape presents the relationship between individual and its reproductive success in evolutionary computation (EC). However, discrete and approximate landscape in an original search space may not support enough and accurate information for EC search, especially in interactive EC (IEC). The fitness landscape of human subjective evaluation in IEC is very difficult and impossible to model, even with a hypothesis of what its definition might be. In this paper, we propose a method to establish a human model in projected high dimensional search space by kernel classification for enhancing IEC search. Because bivalent logic is a simplest perceptual paradigm, the human model is established by considering this paradigm principle. In feature space, we design a linear classifier as a human model to obtain user preference knowledge, which cannot be supported linearly in original discrete search space. The human model is established by this method for predicting potential perceptual knowledge of human. With the human model, we design an evolution control method to enhance IEC search. From experimental evaluation results with a pseudo-IEC user, our proposed model and method can enhance IEC search significantly.

  7. Drug-DNA Interaction Studies of Acridone-Based Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Thimmaiah, Kuntebomanahalli; Ugarkar, Apoorva G; Martis, Elvis F; Shaikh, Mushtaque S; Coutinho, Evans C; Yergeri, Mayur C

    2015-01-01

    N10-alkylated 2-bromoacridones are a novel series of potent antitumor compounds. DNA binding studies of these compounds were carried out using spectrophotometric titrations, Circular dichroism (CD) measurements using Calf Thymus DNA (CT DNA). The binding constants were identified at a range of K=0.3 to 3.9×10(5) M(-1) and the percentage of hypochromism from the spectral titrations at 28-54%. This study has identified a compound 9 with the good binding affinity of K=0.39768×10(5) M(-1) with CT DNA. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have investigated the changes in structural and dynamic features of native DNA on binding to the active compound 9. All the synthesized compounds have increased the uptake of Vinblastine in MDR KBChR-8-5 cells to an extent of 1.25- to1.9-fold than standard modulator Verapamil of similar concentration. These findings allowed us to draw preliminary conclusions about the structural features of 2-bromoacridones and further chemical enhancement will improve the binding affinity of the acridone derivatives to CT-DNA for better drug-DNA interaction. The molecular modeling studies have shown mechanism of action and the binding modes of the acridones to DNA.

  8. Interactive virtual endoscopy in coronary arteries based on multimodality fusion.

    PubMed

    Wahle, Andreas; Olszewski, Mark E; Sonka, Milan

    2004-11-01

    A novel approach for platform-independent virtual endoscopy in human coronary arteries is presented in this paper. It incorporates previously developed and validated methodology for multimodality fusion of two X-ray angiographic images with pullback data from intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). These modalities pose inherently different challenges than those present in many tomographic modalities that provide parallel slices. The fusion process results in a three- or four-dimensional (3-D/4-D) model of a coronary artery, specifically of its lumen/plaque and media/adventitia surfaces. The model is used for comprehensive quantitative hemodynamic, morphologic, and functional analyses. The resulting quantitative indexes are then used to supplement the model. Platform-independent visualization is achieved through the use of the ISO/IEC-standardized Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML). The visualization includes an endoscopic fly-through animation that enables the user to interactively select vessel location and fly-through speed, as well as to display image pixel data or quantification results in 3-D. The presented VRML virtual-endoscopy system is used in research studies of coronary atherosclerosis development, quantitative assessment of coronary morphology and function, and vascular interventions.

  9. Uncovering Phosphorylation-Based Specificities through Functional Interaction Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Wagih, Omar; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ishihama, Yasushi; Beltrao, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases are an important class of enzymes involved in the phosphorylation of their targets, which regulate key cellular processes and are typically mediated by a specificity for certain residues around the target phospho-acceptor residue. While efforts have been made to identify such specificities, only ∼30% of human kinases have a significant number of known binding sites. We describe a computational method that utilizes functional interaction data and phosphorylation data to predict specificities of kinases. We applied this method to human kinases to predict substrate preferences for 57% of all known kinases and show that we are able to reconstruct well-known specificities. We used an in vitro mass spectrometry approach to validate four understudied kinases and show that predicted models closely resemble true specificities. We show that this method can be applied to different organisms and can be extended to other phospho-recognition domains. Applying this approach to different types of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and binding domains could uncover specificities of understudied PTM recognition domains and provide significant insight into the mechanisms of signaling networks. PMID:26572964

  10. Kernel Method Based Human Model for Enhancing Interactive Evolutionary Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qiangfu; Liu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A fitness landscape presents the relationship between individual and its reproductive success in evolutionary computation (EC). However, discrete and approximate landscape in an original search space may not support enough and accurate information for EC search, especially in interactive EC (IEC). The fitness landscape of human subjective evaluation in IEC is very difficult and impossible to model, even with a hypothesis of what its definition might be. In this paper, we propose a method to establish a human model in projected high dimensional search space by kernel classification for enhancing IEC search. Because bivalent logic is a simplest perceptual paradigm, the human model is established by considering this paradigm principle. In feature space, we design a linear classifier as a human model to obtain user preference knowledge, which cannot be supported linearly in original discrete search space. The human model is established by this method for predicting potential perceptual knowledge of human. With the human model, we design an evolution control method to enhance IEC search. From experimental evaluation results with a pseudo-IEC user, our proposed model and method can enhance IEC search significantly. PMID:25879050

  11. A sparse matrix based full-configuration interaction algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rolik, Zoltán; Szabados, Agnes; Surján, Péter R

    2008-04-14

    We present an algorithm related to the full-configuration interaction (FCI) method that makes complete use of the sparse nature of the coefficient vector representing the many-electron wave function in a determinantal basis. Main achievements of the presented sparse FCI (SFCI) algorithm are (i) development of an iteration procedure that avoids the storage of FCI size vectors; (ii) development of an efficient algorithm to evaluate the effect of the Hamiltonian when both the initial and the product vectors are sparse. As a result of point (i) large disk operations can be skipped which otherwise may be a bottleneck of the procedure. At point (ii) we progress by adopting the implementation of the linear transformation by Olsen et al. [J. Chem Phys. 89, 2185 (1988)] for the sparse case, getting the algorithm applicable to larger systems and faster at the same time. The error of a SFCI calculation depends only on the dropout thresholds for the sparse vectors, and can be tuned by controlling the amount of system memory passed to the procedure. The algorithm permits to perform FCI calculations on single node workstations for systems previously accessible only by supercomputers.

  12. Systematic analysis of Ca(2+) homoeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae based on chemical-genetic interaction profiles.

    PubMed

    Ghanegolmohammadi, Farzan; Yoshida, Mitsumori; Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Sukegawa, Yuko; Okada, Hiroki; Obara, Keisuke; Kihara, Akio; Suzuki, Kuninori; Kojima, Tetsuya; Yachie, Nozomu; Hirata, Dai; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2017-05-31

    We investigated the global landscape of Ca(2+) homeostasis in the budding yeast based on high-dimensional chemical-genetic interaction profiles. The morphological responses of 62 Ca(2+)-sensitive (cls) mutants were quantitatively analyzed with the image processing program CalMorph following exposure to a high concentration of Ca(2+) After a generalized linear model was applied, an analysis of covariance model was used to detect significant Ca(2+)-cls interactions. We found that high-dimensional, morphological Ca(2+)-cls interactions were mixed with positive (86%) and negative (14%) chemical-genetic interactions, while one-dimensional fitness Ca(2+)-cls interactions were all negative in principle. Clustering analysis with the interaction profiles revealed nine distinct gene groups, six of which were functionally associated. Additionally, characterization of Ca(2+)-cls interactions revealed morphology-based negative interactions are unique signatures of sensitized cellular processes and pathways. Principal component analysis was used to discriminate between suppression and enhancement of the Ca(2+)-sensitive phenotypes triggered by inactivation of calcineurin, a Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase. Finally, similarity of the interaction profiles was used to reveal a connected network among the Ca(2+) homeostasis units acting in different cellular compartments. Thus, our analyses of high-dimensional chemical-genetic interaction profiles have provided novel insights into the intracellular network of yeast Ca(2+) homeostasis. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  13. Virtual-Reality-Based Social Interaction Training for Children with High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ke, Fengfeng; Im, Tami

    2013-01-01

    Employing the multiple-baseline across-subjects design, the authors examined the implementation and potential effect of a virtual-reality-based social interaction program on the interaction and communication performance of children with high functioning autism. The data were collected via behavior observation and analysis, questionnaires, and…

  14. Seven-Step Problem-Based Learning in an Interaction Design Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Nette; Christensen, Hans Peter

    2004-01-01

    The objective in this paper is the implementation of the highly structured seven-step problem-based learning (PBL) procedure as part of the learning process in a human-computer interaction (HCI) design course at the Technical University of Denmark, taking into account the common learning processes in PBL and the interaction design process. These…

  15. Learning with Web-Based Interactive Objects: An Investigation into Student Perceptions of Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salajan, Florin D.; Perschbacher, Susanne; Cash, Mindy; Talwar, Reena; El-Badrawy, Wafa; Mount, Greg J.

    2009-01-01

    In its efforts to continue the modernization of its curriculum, the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto has developed a series of web-based interactive learning applications. This article presents the production cycle of these new interactive learning objects and the preliminary study conducted to measure the students' perception of…

  16. Evaluation of the Interactivity of Web-Based Learning Systems: Principles and Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Chris; Sabry, Khaled

    2003-01-01

    Considers the process of evaluating the interactivity of Web-based learning systems (WBLSs), adapting a heuristic approach usually employed for usability evaluations. Proposes a three-way model of interactivity, reports an evaluation using three different WBLSs, and concludes that heuristic evaluation provides a cheap, intuitive and practical…

  17. Learning with Web-Based Interactive Objects: An Investigation into Student Perceptions of Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salajan, Florin D.; Perschbacher, Susanne; Cash, Mindy; Talwar, Reena; El-Badrawy, Wafa; Mount, Greg J.

    2009-01-01

    In its efforts to continue the modernization of its curriculum, the Faculty of Dentistry at the University of Toronto has developed a series of web-based interactive learning applications. This article presents the production cycle of these new interactive learning objects and the preliminary study conducted to measure the students' perception of…

  18. Virtual-Reality-Based Social Interaction Training for Children with High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ke, Fengfeng; Im, Tami

    2013-01-01

    Employing the multiple-baseline across-subjects design, the authors examined the implementation and potential effect of a virtual-reality-based social interaction program on the interaction and communication performance of children with high functioning autism. The data were collected via behavior observation and analysis, questionnaires, and…

  19. Corrective Feedback and Noticing in Text-Based Second Language Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berglund, Therese Örnberg

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of "noticing" (Schmidt, 1990; cf. Smith, 2010) in relation to text-based second language interaction (instant messaging). Data has been collected at an upper secondary school, where students of English as a foreign language interact with the researcher, providing feedback on language and content. In…

  20. Creative Multimodal Learning Environments and Blended Interaction for Problem-Based Activity in HCI Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannou, Andri; Vasiliou, Christina; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Arh, Tanja; Klobucar, Tomaž; Pipan, Matija

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory case study aims to examine how students benefit from a multimodal learning environment while they engage in collaborative problem-based activity in a Human Computer Interaction (HCI) university course. For 12 weeks, 30 students, in groups of 5-7 each, participated in weekly face-to-face meetings and online interactions.…

  1. Spin current source based on a quantum point contact with local spin-orbit interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nowak, M. P.; Szafran, B.

    2013-11-11

    Proposal for construction of a source of spin-polarized current based on quantum point contact (QPC) with local spin-orbit interaction is presented. We show that spin-orbit interaction present within the narrowing acts like a spin filter. The spin polarization of the current is discussed as a function of the Fermi energy and the width of the QPC.

  2. Virtual Reality Simulations and Animations in a Web-Based Interactive Manufacturing Engineering Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, S. K.; Mannan, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a web-based interactive teaching package that provides a comprehensive and conducive yet dynamic and interactive environment for a module on automated machine tools in the Manufacturing Division at the National University of Singapore. The use of Internet technologies in this teaching tool makes it possible to conjure…

  3. Research on Teachers' Characteristics in Relation to a Cognitive-Learning Based Interactive Videodisc System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Martha B.; Cambre, Marjorie A.

    This pilot study explored teacher characteristics as they influenced the use of "Exploring Nepal," a cognitive learning-based interactive video system for middle school students. Specifically, the study sought to narrow down a variety of teacher characteristics that may influence the quality of their interaction with the videodisk. The…

  4. An Instructional Design Theory for Interactions in Web-Based Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Miyoung; Paulus, Trena

    This study developed and formatively evaluated an instructional design theory to guide designers in selecting when and how to utilize interactions as instructional methods in a Web-based distance learning higher education environment. Research questions asked: What are the types and outcomes of interactions between participants in a Web-based…

  5. Seven-Step Problem-Based Learning in an Interaction Design Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Nette; Christensen, Hans Peter

    2004-01-01

    The objective in this paper is the implementation of the highly structured seven-step problem-based learning (PBL) procedure as part of the learning process in a human-computer interaction (HCI) design course at the Technical University of Denmark, taking into account the common learning processes in PBL and the interaction design process. These…

  6. Creative Multimodal Learning Environments and Blended Interaction for Problem-Based Activity in HCI Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannou, Andri; Vasiliou, Christina; Zaphiris, Panayiotis; Arh, Tanja; Klobucar, Tomaž; Pipan, Matija

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory case study aims to examine how students benefit from a multimodal learning environment while they engage in collaborative problem-based activity in a Human Computer Interaction (HCI) university course. For 12 weeks, 30 students, in groups of 5-7 each, participated in weekly face-to-face meetings and online interactions.…

  7. Virtual Reality Simulations and Animations in a Web-Based Interactive Manufacturing Engineering Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, S. K.; Mannan, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a web-based interactive teaching package that provides a comprehensive and conducive yet dynamic and interactive environment for a module on automated machine tools in the Manufacturing Division at the National University of Singapore. The use of Internet technologies in this teaching tool makes it possible to conjure…

  8. Managing Mutual Orientation in the Absence of Physical Copresence: Multiparty Voice-Based Chat Room Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenks, Christopher Joseph; Brandt, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the interactional work involved in ratifying mutual participation in online, multiparty, voice-based chat rooms. The purpose of this article is to provide a preliminary sketch of how talk and participation is managed in a spoken communication environment that comprises interactants who are not physically copresent but are…

  9. Enhancing L2 Interaction in Avatar-Based Virtual Worlds: Student Teachers' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tseng, Jun-Jie; Tsai, Ya-Hsun; Chao, Rih-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) multi-user virtual environments (3-D MUVEs) have been used to provide language learners with realistic scenarios in which verbal and non-verbal interactions are simulated. However, little is known of the underlying factors that shape interaction in avatar-based virtual worlds. This study examined the perceptions of 38…

  10. Enhancing L2 Interaction in Avatar-Based Virtual Worlds: Student Teachers' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tseng, Jun-Jie; Tsai, Ya-Hsun; Chao, Rih-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3-D) multi-user virtual environments (3-D MUVEs) have been used to provide language learners with realistic scenarios in which verbal and non-verbal interactions are simulated. However, little is known of the underlying factors that shape interaction in avatar-based virtual worlds. This study examined the perceptions of 38…

  11. Text-Based Negotiated Interaction of NNS-NNS and NNS-NS Dyads on Facebook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Sarah Hsueh-Jui

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to determine the difference in text-based negotiated interaction between non-native speakers of English (NNS-NNS) and between non-native and natives (NNS-NS) in terms of the frequency of negotiated instances, successfully resolved instances, and interactional strategy use when the dyads collaborated on Facebook. It involved 10…

  12. Computer-based Approaches for Training Interactive Digital Map Displays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Subject Matter POC: Jean L. Dyer 14. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words): Five computer-based training approaches for learning digital skills...Training assessment Exploratory Learning Guided ExploratoryTraining Guided Discovery SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF 19. LIMITATION OF 20. NUMBER 21...the other extreme of letting Soldiers learn a digital interface on their own. The research reported here examined these two conditions and three other

  13. A Cell-Based Method for Screening RNA-Protein Interactions: Identification of Constitutive Transport Element-Interacting Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Robert L.; Landt, Stephen G.; Mai, Emily; Nejim, Jemiel; Chen, Lily; Frankel, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a mammalian cell-based screening platform to identify proteins that assemble into RNA-protein complexes. Based on Tat-mediated activation of the HIV LTR, proteins that interact with an RNA target elicit expression of a GFP reporter and are captured by fluorescence activated cell sorting. This “Tat-hybrid” screening platform was used to identify proteins that interact with the Mason Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV) constitutive transport element (CTE), a structured RNA hairpin that mediates the transport of unspliced viral mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Several hnRNP-like proteins, including hnRNP A1, were identified and shown to interact with the CTE with selectivity in the reporter system comparable to Tap, a known CTE-binding protein. In vitro gel shift and pull-down assays showed that hnRNP A1 is able to form a complex with the CTE and Tap and that the RGG domain of hnRNP A1 mediates binding to Tap. These results suggest that hnRNP-like proteins may be part of larger export-competent RNA-protein complexes and that the RGG domains of these proteins play an important role in directing these binding events. The results also demonstrate the utility of the screening platform for identifying and characterizing new components of RNA-protein complexes. PMID:23133567

  14. A novel interacting multiple model based network intrusion detection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Ruichi; Venkatasubramanian, Vijay; Leung, Henry

    2006-04-01

    In today's information age, information and network security are of primary importance to any organization. Network intrusion is a serious threat to security of computers and data networks. In internet protocol (IP) based network, intrusions originate in different kinds of packets/messages contained in the open system interconnection (OSI) layer 3 or higher layers. Network intrusion detection and prevention systems observe the layer 3 packets (or layer 4 to 7 messages) to screen for intrusions and security threats. Signature based methods use a pre-existing database that document intrusion patterns as perceived in the layer 3 to 7 protocol traffics and match the incoming traffic for potential intrusion attacks. Alternately, network traffic data can be modeled and any huge anomaly from the established traffic pattern can be detected as network intrusion. The latter method, also known as anomaly based detection is gaining popularity for its versatility in learning new patterns and discovering new attacks. It is apparent that for a reliable performance, an accurate model of the network data needs to be established. In this paper, we illustrate using collected data that network traffic is seldom stationary. We propose the use of multiple models to accurately represent the traffic data. The improvement in reliability of the proposed model is verified by measuring the detection and false alarm rates on several datasets.

  15. Development of StopAdvisor: A theory-based interactive internet-based smoking cessation intervention.

    PubMed

    Michie, Susan; Brown, Jamie; Geraghty, Adam W A; Miller, Sascha; Yardley, Lucy; Gardner, Benjamin; Shahab, Lion; McEwen, Andy; Stapleton, John A; West, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Reviews of internet-based behaviour-change interventions have shown that they can be effective but there is considerable heterogeneity and effect sizes are generally small. In order to advance science and technology in this area, it is essential to be able to build on principles and evidence of behaviour change in an incremental manner. We report the development of an interactive smoking cessation website, StopAdvisor, designed to be attractive and effective across the social spectrum. It was informed by a broad motivational theory (PRIME), empirical evidence, web-design expertise, and user-testing. The intervention was developed using an open-source web-development platform, 'LifeGuide', designed to facilitate optimisation and collaboration. We identified 19 theoretical propositions, 33 evidence- or theory-based behaviour change techniques, 26 web-design principles and nine principles from user-testing. These were synthesised to create the website, 'StopAdvisor' (see http://www.lifeguideonline.org/player/play/stopadvisordemonstration). The systematic and transparent application of theory, evidence, web-design expertise and user-testing within an open-source development platform can provide a basis for multi-phase optimisation contributing to an 'incremental technology' of behaviour change.

  16. Thioarsenides: A case for long-range Lewis acid-base-directed van der Waals interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Wallace, Adam F.; Downs, R. T.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2011-04-01

    Electron density distributions, bond paths, Laplacian and local energy density properties have been calculated for a number of As4Sn (n = 3,4,5) thioarsenide molecular crystals. On the basis of the distributions, the intramolecular As-S and As-As interactions classify as shared bonded interactions and the intermolecular As-S, As-As and S-S interactions classify as closed-shell van der Waals bonded interactions. The bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths link regions of locally concentrated electron density (Lewis base regions) with aligned regions of locally depleted electron density (Lewis acid regions) on adjacent molecules. The paths are comparable with intermolecular paths reported for several other molecular crystals that link aligned Lewis base and acid regions in a key-lock fashion, interactions that classified as long range Lewis acid-base directed van der Waals interactions. As the bulk of the intermolecular As-S bond paths (~70%) link Lewis acid-base regions on adjacent molecules, it appears that molecules adopt an arrangement that maximizes the number of As-S Lewis acid-base intermolecular bonded interactions. The maximization of the number of Lewis acid-base interactions appears to be connected with the close-packed array adopted by molecules: distorted cubic close-packed arrays are adopted for alacránite, pararealgar, uzonite, realgar and β-AsS and the distorted hexagonal close-packed arrays adopted by α- and β-dimorphite. A growth mechanism is proposed for thioarsenide molecular crystals from aqueous species that maximizes the number of long range Lewis acid-base vdW As-S bonded interactions with the resulting directed bond paths structuralizing the molecules as a molecular crystal.

  17. Unusual Base-Pairing Interactions in Monomer–Template Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many high-resolution crystal structures have contributed to our understanding of the reaction pathway for catalysis by DNA and RNA polymerases, but the structural basis of nonenzymatic template-directed RNA replication has not been studied in comparable detail. Here we present crystallographic studies of the binding of ribonucleotide monomers to RNA primer–template complexes, with the goal of improving our understanding of the mechanism of nonenzymatic RNA copying, and of catalysis by polymerases. To explore how activated ribonucleotides recognize and bind to RNA templates, we synthesized an unreactive phosphonate-linked pyrazole analogue of guanosine 5′-phosphoro-2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG), a highly activated nucleotide that has been used extensively to study nonenzymatic primer extension. We cocrystallized this analogue with structurally rigidified RNA primer–template complexes carrying single or multiple monomer binding sites, and obtained high-resolution X-ray structures of these complexes. In addition to Watson–Crick base pairing, we repeatedly observed noncanonical guanine:cytidine base pairs in our crystal structures. In most structures, the phosphate and leaving group moieties of the monomers were highly disordered, while in others the distance from O3′ of the primer to the phosphorus of the incoming monomer was too great to allow for reaction. We suggest that these effects significantly influence the rate and fidelity of nonenzymatic RNA replication, and that even primitive ribozyme polymerases could enhance RNA replication by enforcing Watson–Crick base pairing between monomers and primer–template complexes, and by bringing the reactive functional groups into closer proximity. PMID:28058281

  18. Customizable Computer-Based Interaction Analysis for Coaching and Self-Regulation in Synchronous CSCL Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonchamp, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Computer-based interaction analysis (IA) is an automatic process that aims at understanding a computer-mediated activity. In a CSCL system, computer-based IA can provide information directly to learners for self-assessment and regulation and to tutors for coaching support. This article proposes a customizable computer-based IA approach for a…

  19. A Theoretical Analysis of Social Interactions in Computer-based Learning Environments: Evidence for Reciprocal Understandings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvela, Sanna; Bonk, Curtis Jay; Lehtinen, Erno; Lehti, Sirpa

    1999-01-01

    Presents a theoretical and empirical analysis of social interactions in computer-based learning environments. Explores technology use to support reciprocal understanding between teachers and students based on three technology-based learning environments in Finland and the United States, and discusses situated learning, cognitive apprenticeships,…

  20. An application of fragment interaction analysis based on local MP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Takeshi; Mochizuki, Yuji; Amari, Shinji; Nakano, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Shigenori; Tanaka, Kiyoshi

    2008-09-01

    We have developed a method named 'fragment interaction analysis based on local MP2' (abbreviated as FILM). This method enables us to decompose the interaction energy associated with dispersion interactions into contributions of localized occupied orbitals. In this study, the basis set dependence of the results derived from FILM was examined. The results suggested that the individual ratio of pair correlation energies of selected orbital pairs to the total dispersion interaction was almost independent of the basis set size. As an illustrative example, detailed analysis was performed on the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease complexed with lopinavir molecule.

  1. Development of Novel Random Network Theory-Based Approaches to Identify Network Interactions among Nitrifying Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Cindy

    2015-07-17

    The interactions among different microbial populations in a community could play more important roles in determining ecosystem functioning than species numbers and their abundances, but very little is known about such network interactions at a community level. The goal of this project is to develop novel framework approaches and associated software tools to characterize the network interactions in microbial communities based on high throughput, large scale high-throughput metagenomics data and apply these approaches to understand the impacts of environmental changes (e.g., climate change, contamination) on network interactions among different nitrifying populations and associated microbial communities.

  2. Grandmaster: Interactive text-based analytics of social media

    SciTech Connect

    Fabian, Nathan D.; Davis, Warren Leon,; Raybourn, Elaine M.; Lakkaraju, Kiran; Whetzel, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    People use social media resources like Twitter, Facebook, forums etc. to share and discuss various activities or topics. By aggregating topic trends across many individuals using these services, we seek to construct a richer profile of a person’s activities and interests as well as provide a broader context of those activities. This profile may then be used in a variety of ways to understand groups as a collection of interests and affinities and an individual’s participation in those groups. Our approach considers that much of these data will be unstructured, free-form text. By analyzing free-form text directly, we may be able to gain an implicit grouping of individuals with shared interests based on shared conversation, and not on explicit social software linking them. In this paper, we discuss a proof-of-concept application called Grandmaster built to pull short sections of text, a person’s comments or Twitter posts, together by analysis and visualization to allow a gestalt understanding of the full collection of all individuals: how groups are similar and how they differ, based on their text inputs.

  3. A Study and Taxonomy of Vulnerabilities in Web Based Animation and Interactivity Software

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A STUDY AND TAXONOMY...OF VULNERABILITIES IN WEB BASED ANIMATION AND INTERACTIVITY SOFTWARE by David M. Post September 2010 Thesis Co-Advisors: Chris Eagle...AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Study and Taxonomy of Vulnerabilities in Web Based Animation and Interactivity Software 6

  4. Steady-State and Kinetics-Based Affinity Determination in Effector-Effector Target Interactions.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, André; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Dissecting the functional basis of pathogenicity and resistance in the context of plant innate immunity benefits greatly from detailed knowledge about biomolecular interactions, as both resistance and virulence depend on specific interactions between pathogen and host biomolecules. While in vivo systems provide biological context to host-pathogen interactions, these experiments typically cannot provide quantitative biochemical characterization of biomolecular interactions. However, in many cases, the biological function does not only depend on whether an interaction occurs at all, but rather on the "intensity" of the interaction, as quantified by affinity. Specifically, microbial effector proteins may bind more than one host target to exert virulence functions, and looking at these interactions more closely than would be possible in a purely black-and-white qualitative assay (as classically based on plant or yeast systems) can reveal new insights into the evolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. Recent advances in biomolecular interaction assays that can be performed in vitro allow quantification of binding events with ever greater fidelity and application range. Here, we describe assays based on microscale thermophoresis (MST) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Using these technologies allows affinity determination both in steady-state and in kinetic configurations, providing two conceptually independent pathways to arrive at quantitative affinity data describing the interactions of pathogen and host biomolecules.

  5. Polypyrrole-based conducting polymers and interactions with biological tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ateh, D.D; Navsaria, H.A; Vadgama, P

    2006-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) is a conjugated polymer that displays particular electronic properties including conductivity. In biomedical applications, it is usually electrochemically generated with the incorporation of any anionic species including also negatively charged biological macromolecules such as proteins and polysaccharides to give composite materials. In biomedical research, it has mainly been assessed for its role as a reporting interface in biosensors. However, there is an increasing literature on the application of PPy as a potentially electrically addressable tissue/cell support substrate. Here, we review studies that have considered such PPy based conducting polymers in direct contact with biological tissues and conclude that due to its versatile functional properties, it could contribute to a new generation of biomaterials. PMID:17015302

  6. Use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling for assessment of drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Baneyx, Guillaume; Fukushima, Yumi; Parrott, Neil

    2012-04-01

    Interactions between co-administered medicines can reduce efficacy or lead to adverse effects. Understanding and managing such interactions is essential in bringing safe and effective medicines to the market. Ideally, interaction potential should be recognized early and minimized in compounds that reach late stages of drug development. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic models combine knowledge of physiological factors with compound-specific properties to simulate how a drug behaves in the human body. These software tools are increasingly used during drug discovery and development and, when integrating relevant in vitro data, can simulate drug interaction potential. This article provides some background and presents illustrative examples. Physiologically based models are an integral tool in the discovery and development of drugs, and can significantly aid our understanding and prediction of drug interactions.

  7. CaseWorld™: Interactive, media rich, multidisciplinary case based learning.

    PubMed

    Gillham, David; Tucker, Katie; Parker, Steve; Wright, Victoria; Kargillis, Christina

    2015-11-01

    Nurse educators are challenged to keep up with highly specialised clinical practice, emerging research evidence, regulation requirements and rapidly changing information technology while teaching very large numbers of diverse students in a resource constrained environment. This complex setting provides the context for the CaseWorld project, which aims to simulate those aspects of clinical practice that can be represented by e-learning. This paper describes the development, implementation and evaluation of CaseWorld, a simulated learning environment that supports case based learning. CaseWorld provides nursing students with the opportunity to view unfolding authentic cases presented in a rich multimedia context. The first round of comprehensive summative evaluation of CaseWorld is discussed in the context of earlier formative evaluation, reference group input and strategies for integration of CaseWorld with subject content. This discussion highlights the unique approach taken in this project that involved simultaneous prototype development and large scale implementation, thereby necessitating strong emphasis on staff development, uptake and engagement. The lessons learned provide an interesting basis for further discussion of broad content sharing across disciplines and universities, and the contribution that local innovations can make to global education advancement. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Regime-based analysis of aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryspeerdt, Edward; Stier, Philip

    2012-11-01

    Previous global satellite studies into the indirect aerosol effect have relied on determining the sensitivity of derived Cloud Droplet Number Concentration (Nd) to co-located Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). These studies generally find a positive Nd sensitivity to AOD changes over ocean, but some find a negative sensitivity over land, in contrast to that predicted by models and theory. Here we investigate the Nd sensitivity to AOD in different cloud regimes, determined using a k-means clustering process on retrieved cloud properties. We find the strongest positive Nd sensitivity in the stratiform regimes over both land and ocean, providing the majority of the total sensitivity. The negative sensitivity previously observed over land is generated by the low cloud fraction regimes, suggesting that it is due to the difficulty of retrieving Nd at low cloud fractions. When considering a mean sensitivity, weighted by liquid cloud fraction to account for sampling biases, we find an increased sensitivity over land, in some regions becoming positive. This highlights the importance of regime based analysis when studying aerosol indirect effects.

  9. Image-based interactive device for effective communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, F.; Nielsen, J.; Questa, Paolo; Sandini, Giulio

    1996-12-01

    The main objective of IBIDEM is to develop a video phone useful for speech reading by hearing-impaired people based on a new generation of the space-variant sensor and using standard telephone lines. The space variant nature of the sensor will allow it to have high resolution in the area of interest, lips or fingers, while still maintaining a wide field of view in order to perceive, for example, the facial expression of the interlocutor, but reducing drastically the amount of data to be sent on the line. A second objective if IBIDEM is the use of the same equipment for remote monitoring of health status. The system can be used for obtaining information about the status of a client in the form of images and could be extended to include various physiological parameters like heart rate, blood pressure, etc. The IBIDEM project is constructing a video phone using a camera with the retina-like sensor, a motorized system for moving the point of view of the camera as well as a display for the transmitted images. This video phone will be a high- quality, low-cost aid for the hearing impaired as well as being useful for remote monitoring.

  10. Integrated electronic circuits and devices based on interactive paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Francis

    1997-08-01

    Various organic conjugated materials, e.g. conjugated polymers and short conjugated oligomers, have been up to now proposed as active semiconducting layers in organic-base devices, such as thin film transistors, TFTs, or light emitting diodes. The mode of operation of TFTs shows that a high carrier mobility together with a low conductivity are required for their figure of merit. Experimental results from literature indicate that, whereas conjugated polymers exhibit a low carrier mobility, of the order of 10-4 to 10-5 cm2V-1s-1, conjugated oligomers appear much more promising. It is thus shown that carrier mobility is directly related to the long range structural order in conjugated oligomer films, i.e. to the decrease of grain boundaries, leading to values of the order of 10-1 cm-2V-1s-1, comparable to that of amorphous hydrogenated silicon. Conjugated oligomers are well defined materials, offering various physical and chemical ways for control of the structural organization of thin films made from them. Besides, conductivity in thin films of conjugated oligomers is mainly determined by the purity of the materials, allowing values lower than 10-7 Scm-1, with a high on/off ratio. The low melting and evaporation temperatures of conjugated oligomers, together with the solubility of some of these materials, allows the construction of TFTs by the use of room temperature techniques, following a process compatible with paper technology.

  11. Interactive object modelling based on piecewise planar surface patches☆

    PubMed Central

    Prankl, Johann; Zillich, Michael; Vincze, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Detecting elements such as planes in 3D is essential to describe objects for applications such as robotics and augmented reality. While plane estimation is well studied, table-top scenes exhibit a large number of planes and methods often lock onto a dominant plane or do not estimate 3D object structure but only homographies of individual planes. In this paper we introduce MDL to the problem of incrementally detecting multiple planar patches in a scene using tracked interest points in image sequences. Planar patches are reconstructed and stored in a keyframe-based graph structure. In case different motions occur, separate object hypotheses are modelled from currently visible patches and patches seen in previous frames. We evaluate our approach on a standard data set published by the Visual Geometry Group at the University of Oxford [24] and on our own data set containing table-top scenes. Results indicate that our approach significantly improves over the state-of-the-art algorithms. PMID:24511219

  12. Interactive object modelling based on piecewise planar surface patches.

    PubMed

    Prankl, Johann; Zillich, Michael; Vincze, Markus

    2013-06-01

    Detecting elements such as planes in 3D is essential to describe objects for applications such as robotics and augmented reality. While plane estimation is well studied, table-top scenes exhibit a large number of planes and methods often lock onto a dominant plane or do not estimate 3D object structure but only homographies of individual planes. In this paper we introduce MDL to the problem of incrementally detecting multiple planar patches in a scene using tracked interest points in image sequences. Planar patches are reconstructed and stored in a keyframe-based graph structure. In case different motions occur, separate object hypotheses are modelled from currently visible patches and patches seen in previous frames. We evaluate our approach on a standard data set published by the Visual Geometry Group at the University of Oxford [24] and on our own data set containing table-top scenes. Results indicate that our approach significantly improves over the state-of-the-art algorithms.

  13. Interactive facial caricaturing system based on eye camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Tominaga, Masafumi; Koshimizu, Hiroyasu

    2003-04-01

    Face is the most effective visual media for supporting human interface and communication. We have proposed a typical KANSEI machine vision system to generate the facial caricature so far. The basic principle of this system uses the "mean face assumption" to extract individual features of a given face. This system did not provide for feedback from the gallery of the caricature; therefore, to allow for such feedback, in this paper, we propose a caricaturing system by using the KANSEI visual information acquired from the Eye-camera mounted on the head of a gallery, because it is well know that the gaze distribution represents not only where but also how he is looking at the face. The caricatures created in this way could be based on several measures which are provided from the distribution of the number of fixations to the facial parts, the number of times the gaze came to a particular area of the face, and the matrix of the transitions from a facial region to the other. These measures of the gallery"s KANSEI information were used to create caricatures with feedback from the gallery.

  14. An interactive game-based shoulder wheel system for rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Ming; Chang, Yen-Ching; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Chou, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Background: Increases in the aging population and in the number of accidents have resulted in more people suffering from physical impairments or disabilities. Rehabilitation therapy thus attracts greater attention as a means of helping patients recover and return to a normal life. With the extremely long and tedious nature of traditional rehabilitation, patients are reluctant to continue the entire process, thus the expected effects of the therapy cannot be obtained. Games are well known to help patients improve their concentration and shift their attention away from the discomfort of their injuries during rehabilitation. Thus, incorporating game technology into a rehabilitation program may be a promising approach. Methods: In this study, a gaming system used for shoulder rehabilitation was developed. The mechanical parts and electric circuits were integrated to mimic the functionalities of a shoulder wheel. Several games were also designed to suit the rehabilitation needs of the patients based on the age and gender differences among the individual users, enabling individuals to undergo the rehabilitation process by playing games. Two surveys were conducted to evaluate the satisfaction of the participants regarding the gaming system. Results: The results of the online survey among a larger population coincide with the responses of the hands-on participants through a paper-and-pencil survey. Statistical results suggest that the participants are willing to accept this novel approach. Conclusion: This gaming system can distract a patient from the sensation of pain or anxiety, and increase their motivation to participate in the therapeutic program. Advantages in terms of low-cost and easy setup increase the attractiveness of this new equipment for various potential users. PMID:23226005

  15. 4.1 Web-based interactive learning programmes.

    PubMed

    Nattestad, Anders; Attstrom, Rolf; Mattheos, Nikos; Ramseier, Christoph; Canegallo, Lorenza; Eaton, Ken; Feeney, Luke; Goffin, Guy; Markovska, Neda; Maixner, William; Persson, Rutger; Reynolds, Patricia; Ruotoistenmaki, Juha; Schittek, Martin; Spohn, Eric; Sudzina, Mike

    2002-01-01

    In the future, the training of competent dentists will need to take advantage of up-to-date digital technologies and learning practices. In order to accomplish this, the following goals should be considered: i) the design of 'customizable' web-based curriculum matrices that accommodate the training philosophies and resources of individual dental schools; ii) the development of digital instructional modules that can be incorporated or downloaded into specific parts of a curriculum; iii) the establishment of an e-consortium, which provides peer view and guidance in the design of teaching modules, and which is responsible for the storage, maintenance, and distribution of teaching modules within the consortium; iv) the development of central human and physical resources at each dental school to enable the seamless delivery of instructional modules in a variety of learning environments; and v) the assessment and provision of ICT training to students and faculty with respect to the use of computers and related digital technologies and educational software programmes. These goals should lead to the creation of a 'virtual dental school'. Within this project summative and formative evaluations should be performed during both the production and development of teaching material (e-learning material) and the learning process. During the learning process the following aspects should be measured and evaluated: i) students' behaviour; and ii) effectiveness, retention and the transfer of e-learned material into the clinical situation. To obtain evidence of the efficacy of e-learning material a certain amount of research has to be done in the near future. It is suggested that all parameters currently known have to be implemented during the development of a learning programme. Previous workers have evaluated the following elements with e-learning: i) planning, ii) programming and technical development, iii) learning behaviours, iv) learning outcomes of both the programme and the

  16. PPIevo: protein-protein interaction prediction from PSSM based evolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Zahiri, Javad; Yaghoubi, Omid; Mohammad-Noori, Morteza; Ebrahimpour, Reza; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2013-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions regulate a variety of cellular processes. There is a great need for computational methods as a complement to experimental methods with which to predict protein interactions due to the existence of many limitations involved in experimental techniques. Here, we introduce a novel evolutionary based feature extraction algorithm for protein-protein interaction (PPI) prediction. The algorithm is called PPIevo and extracts the evolutionary feature from Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) of protein with known sequence. The algorithm does not depend on the protein annotations, and the features are based on the evolutionary history of the proteins. This enables the algorithm to have more power for predicting protein-protein interaction than many sequence based algorithms. Results on the HPRD database show better performance and robustness of the proposed method. They also reveal that the negative dataset selection could lead to an acute performance overestimation which is the principal drawback of the available methods.

  17. The Interactions between Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids and Stable Nitroxide Radical Species: A Theoretical Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaoze; Wang, Guimin; Lu, Yunxiang; Zhu, Weiliang; Peng, Changjun; Liu, Honglai

    2016-08-04

    In this work, the interactions between imidazolium-based ionic liquids and some stable radicals based on 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yloxyl (TEMPO) have been systematically investigated using density functional theory calculations at the level of M06-2x. Several different substitutions, such as hydrogen bonding formation substituent (OH) and ionic substituents (N(CH3)3(+) and OSO3(-)), are presented at the 4-position of the spin probe, which leads to additional hydrogen bonds or ionic interactions between these substitutions and ionic liquids. The interactions in the systems of the radicals containing ionic substitutions with ionic liquids are predicted much stronger than those in the systems of neutral radicals, resulting in a significant reduction of the mobility of ionic radicals in ionic liquids. To further understand the nature of these interactions, the natural bond order, atoms in molecules, noncovalent interaction index, electron density difference, energy decomposition analysis, and charge decomposition analysis schemes were employed. The additional ionic interactions between ionic radicals and counterions in ionic liquids are dominantly contributed from the electrostatic term, while the orbital interaction plays a major role in other interactions. The results reported herein are important to understand radical processes in ionic liquids and will be very useful in the design of task-specific ionic liquids to make the processes more efficient.

  18. Protein-protein interactions prediction based on iterative clique extension with gene ontology filtering.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Cliques (maximal complete subnets) in protein-protein interaction (PPI) network are an important resource used to analyze protein complexes and functional modules. Clique-based methods of predicting PPI complement the data defection from biological experiments. However, clique-based predicting methods only depend on the topology of network. The false-positive and false-negative interactions in a network usually interfere with prediction. Therefore, we propose a method combining clique-based method of prediction and gene ontology (GO) annotations to overcome the shortcoming and improve the accuracy of predictions. According to different GO correcting rules, we generate two predicted interaction sets which guarantee the quality and quantity of predicted protein interactions. The proposed method is applied to the PPI network from the Database of Interacting Proteins (DIP) and most of the predicted interactions are verified by another biological database, BioGRID. The predicted protein interactions are appended to the original protein network, which leads to clique extension and shows the significance of biological meaning.

  19. Content Interactivity: The Effect of Higher Levels of Interactivity on Learner Performance Outcomes and Satisfaction in Web-Based Military Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenyon, Peggy L.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of content interactivity on performance outcomes and satisfaction has been studied by researchers who compared the results of Web-based and computer-based learning to classroom learning. Few scholars have compared the effects of the same content produced at different levels (low and high) of interactivity and the resulting effects. The…

  20. Insights into the Fold Organization of TIM Barrel from Interaction Energy Based Structure Networks

    PubMed Central

    Vijayabaskar, M. S.; Vishveshwara, Saraswathi

    2012-01-01

    There are many well-known examples of proteins with low sequence similarity, adopting the same structural fold. This aspect of sequence-structure relationship has been extensively studied both experimentally and theoretically, however with limited success. Most of the studies consider remote homology or “sequence conservation” as the basis for their understanding. Recently “interaction energy” based network formalism (Protein Energy Networks (PENs)) was developed to understand the determinants of protein structures. In this paper we have used these PENs to investigate the common non-covalent interactions and their collective features which stabilize the TIM barrel fold. We have also developed a method of aligning PENs in order to understand the spatial conservation of interactions in the fold. We have identified key common interactions responsible for the conservation of the TIM fold, despite high sequence dissimilarity. For instance, the central beta barrel of the TIM fold is stabilized by long-range high energy electrostatic interactions and low-energy contiguous vdW interactions in certain families. The other interfaces like the helix-sheet or the helix-helix seem to be devoid of any high energy conserved interactions. Conserved interactions in the loop regions around the catalytic site of the TIM fold have also been identified, pointing out their significance in both structural and functional evolution. Based on these investigations, we have developed a novel network based phylogenetic analysis for remote homologues, which can perform better than sequence based phylogeny. Such an analysis is more meaningful from both structural and functional evolutionary perspective. We believe that the information obtained through the “interaction conservation” viewpoint and the subsequently developed method of structure network alignment, can shed new light in the fields of fold organization and de novo computational protein design. PMID:22615547

  1. Modeling of Tool-Tissue Interactions for Computer-Based Surgical Simulation: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Sarthak; Ramesh, K. T.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2009-01-01

    Surgical simulators present a safe and potentially effective method for surgical training, and can also be used in robot-assisted surgery for pre- and intra-operative planning. Accurate modeling of the interaction between surgical instruments and organs has been recognized as a key requirement in the development of high-fidelity surgical simulators. Researchers have attempted to model tool-tissue interactions in a wide variety of ways, which can be broadly classified as (1) linear elasticity-based, (2) nonlinear (hyperelastic) elasticity-based finite element (FE) methods, and (3) other techniques that not based on FE methods or continuum mechanics. Realistic modeling of organ deformation requires populating the model with real tissue data (which are difficult to acquire in vivo) and simulating organ response in real time (which is computationally expensive). Further, it is challenging to account for connective tissue supporting the organ, friction, and topological changes resulting from tool-tissue interactions during invasive surgical procedures. Overcoming such obstacles will not only help us to model tool-tissue interactions in real time, but also enable realistic force feedback to the user during surgical simulation. This review paper classifies the existing research on tool-tissue interactions for surgical simulators specifically based on the modeling techniques employed and the kind of surgical operation being simulated, in order to inform and motivate future research on improved tool-tissue interaction models. PMID:20119508

  2. Modeling of Tool-Tissue Interactions for Computer-Based Surgical Simulation: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sarthak; Ramesh, K T; Okamura, Allison M

    2008-10-01

    Surgical simulators present a safe and potentially effective method for surgical training, and can also be used in robot-assisted surgery for pre- and intra-operative planning. Accurate modeling of the interaction between surgical instruments and organs has been recognized as a key requirement in the development of high-fidelity surgical simulators. Researchers have attempted to model tool-tissue interactions in a wide variety of ways, which can be broadly classified as (1) linear elasticity-based, (2) nonlinear (hyperelastic) elasticity-based finite element (FE) methods, and (3) other techniques that not based on FE methods or continuum mechanics. Realistic modeling of organ deformation requires populating the model with real tissue data (which are difficult to acquire in vivo) and simulating organ response in real time (which is computationally expensive). Further, it is challenging to account for connective tissue supporting the organ, friction, and topological changes resulting from tool-tissue interactions during invasive surgical procedures. Overcoming such obstacles will not only help us to model tool-tissue interactions in real time, but also enable realistic force feedback to the user during surgical simulation. This review paper classifies the existing research on tool-tissue interactions for surgical simulators specifically based on the modeling techniques employed and the kind of surgical operation being simulated, in order to inform and motivate future research on improved tool-tissue interaction models.

  3. Whole Language versus Code-Based Skills and Interactional Patterns in Singapore's Early Literacy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaish, Viniti

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes whole language and code-based skills approaches in early literacy and the specific patterns of interaction present in both approaches. Nineteen hours of video data were coded to analyze the nature of whole language versus code-based skills instruction and document the allocation of time spent on each approach in a reading…

  4. Large-Scale Interaction Strategies for Web-Based Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giguere, Paul J.; Formica, Scott W.; Harding, Wayne M.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses five interaction strategies that can be used in large-scale (more than thirty participants) Web-based training. Evaluation data are presented from seven Web-based continuing education workshops conducted with United States Department of Education Middle School Drug Prevention and School Safety Coordinators (MSCs) that used…

  5. A Computer-Based Interactive Multimedia Program to Reduce HIV Transmission for Women with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, J.; Clark, K. D.; Sarno, K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite recent recognition of the need for preventive sexual health materials for people with intellectual disability (ID), there have been remarkably few health-based interventions designed for people with mild to moderate ID. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computer-based interactive multimedia (CBIM)…

  6. Development of an Interactive Computer-Based Learning Strategy to Assist in Teaching Water Quality Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigic, Sasha; Lemckert, Charles J.

    2007-01-01

    The following paper presents a computer-based learning strategy to assist in introducing and teaching water quality modelling to undergraduate civil engineering students. As part of the learning strategy, an interactive computer-based instructional (CBI) aid was specifically developed to assist students to set up, run and analyse the output from a…

  7. Development of an Interactive Computer-Based Learning Strategy to Assist in Teaching Water Quality Modelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zigic, Sasha; Lemckert, Charles J.

    2007-01-01

    The following paper presents a computer-based learning strategy to assist in introducing and teaching water quality modelling to undergraduate civil engineering students. As part of the learning strategy, an interactive computer-based instructional (CBI) aid was specifically developed to assist students to set up, run and analyse the output from a…

  8. The Effect of Interactive Whiteboard-Based Instruction on Mathematics Performance of English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    A quasi-experimental research study was conducted to investigate the performance of English learners (ELs) on mathematics assessments when using interactive whiteboard (IWB)-based instruction as compared to text-based instruction. A sample of 47 seventh-and eighth-grade EL students from ABC Middle School (name has been changed) was included in…

  9. A Computer-Based Interactive Multimedia Program to Reduce HIV Transmission for Women with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, J.; Clark, K. D.; Sarno, K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite recent recognition of the need for preventive sexual health materials for people with intellectual disability (ID), there have been remarkably few health-based interventions designed for people with mild to moderate ID. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computer-based interactive multimedia (CBIM)…

  10. A Multiple-Sessions Interactive Computer-Based Learning Tool for Ability Cultivation in Circuit Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Q.; Lai, L. L.; Tse, N. C. F.; Ichiyanagi, K.

    2011-01-01

    An interactive computer-based learning tool with multiple sessions is proposed in this paper, which teaches students to think and helps them recognize the merits and limitations of simulation tools so as to improve their practical abilities in electrical circuit simulation based on the case of a power converter with progressive problems. The…

  11. Whole Language versus Code-Based Skills and Interactional Patterns in Singapore's Early Literacy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaish, Viniti

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes whole language and code-based skills approaches in early literacy and the specific patterns of interaction present in both approaches. Nineteen hours of video data were coded to analyze the nature of whole language versus code-based skills instruction and document the allocation of time spent on each approach in a reading…

  12. Collaborative Scaffolding in Online Task-Based Voice Interactions between Advanced Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenning, Marie-Madeleine

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports some of the findings of a distinctive innovative use of audio-conferencing involving a population (campus-based advanced learners) and a type of application (task-based language learning) that have received little attention to date: the use of Wimba Voice Tools to provide additional opportunities for spoken interactions between…

  13. Collaborative Scaffolding in Online Task-Based Voice Interactions between Advanced Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenning, Marie-Madeleine

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports some of the findings of a distinctive innovative use of audio-conferencing involving a population (campus-based advanced learners) and a type of application (task-based language learning) that have received little attention to date: the use of Wimba Voice Tools to provide additional opportunities for spoken interactions between…

  14. Young Foreign Language Learners' Interactions during Task-Based Paired Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Yuko Goto; Zeng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Despite the popularity of task-based language teaching (TBLT) in foreign language (FL) education at elementary school, it remains unclear how young learners' FL abilities can best be evaluated with tasks. The present study seeks to understand developmental differences in interactions among elementary-school students during task-based language…

  15. A Multiple-Sessions Interactive Computer-Based Learning Tool for Ability Cultivation in Circuit Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Q.; Lai, L. L.; Tse, N. C. F.; Ichiyanagi, K.

    2011-01-01

    An interactive computer-based learning tool with multiple sessions is proposed in this paper, which teaches students to think and helps them recognize the merits and limitations of simulation tools so as to improve their practical abilities in electrical circuit simulation based on the case of a power converter with progressive problems. The…

  16. Reciprocity in computer-human interaction: source-based, norm-based, and affect-based explanations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungcheol Austin; Liang, Yuhua Jake

    2015-04-01

    Individuals often apply social rules when they interact with computers, and this is known as the Computers Are Social Actors (CASA) effect. Following previous work, one approach to understand the mechanism responsible for CASA is to utilize computer agents and have the agents attempt to gain human compliance (e.g., completing a pattern recognition task). The current study focuses on three key factors frequently cited to influence traditional notions of compliance: evaluations toward the source (competence and warmth), normative influence (reciprocity), and affective influence (mood). Structural equation modeling assessed the effects of these factors on human compliance with computer request. The final model shows that norm-based influence (reciprocity) increased the likelihood of compliance, while evaluations toward the computer agent did not significantly influence compliance.

  17. FT-IR studies on interactions among components in hexanoyl chitosan-based polymer electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Winie, Tan; Arof, A K

    2006-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic studies have been undertaken to investigate the interactions among components in a system of hexanoyl chitosan-lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiCF(3)SO(3))-diethyl carbonate (DEC)/ethylene carbonate (EC). LiCF(3)SO(3) interacts with the hexanoyl chitosan to form a hexanoyl chitosan-salt complex that results in the shifting of the N(COR)(2), CONHR and OCOR bands to lower wavenumbers. Interactions between EC and DEC with LiCF(3)SO(3) has been noted and discussed. Evidence of interaction between EC and DEC has been obtained experimentally. Studies on polymer-plasticizer spectra suggested that there is no interaction between the polymer host and plasticizers. Competition between plasticizer and polymer on associating with Li(+) ions was observed from the spectral data for gel polymer electrolytes. The obtained spectroscopic data has been correlated with the conductivity performance of hexanoyl chitosan-based polymer electrolytes.

  18. Solvent interaction analysis as a proteomic approach to structure-based biomarker discovery and clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Zaslavsky, Boris Y; Uversky, Vladimir N; Chait, Arnon

    2016-01-01

    Proteins have several measurable features in biological fluids that may change under pathological conditions. The current disease biomarker discovery is mostly based on protein concentration in the sample as the measurable feature. Changes in protein structures, such as post-translational modifications and in protein-partner interactions are known to accompany pathological processes. Changes in glycosylation profiles are well-established for many plasma proteins in various types of cancer and other diseases. The solvent interaction analysis method is based on protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase systems and is highly sensitive to changes in protein structure and protein-protein- and protein-partner interactions while independent of the protein concentration in the biological sample. It provides quantitative index: partition coefficient representing changes in protein structure and interactions with partners. The fundamentals of the method are presented with multiple examples of applications of the method to discover and monitor structural protein biomarkers as disease-specific diagnostic indicators.

  19. Adaptive mesh compression and transmission in Internet-based interactive walkthrough virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2002-07-01

    An Internet-based interactive walkthrough virtual environment is presented in this work to facilitate interactive streaming and browsing of 3D graphic models across the Internet. The models are compressed by the view-dependent progressive mesh compression algorithm to enable the decorrelation of partitions and finer granularity. Following the fundamental framework of mesh representation, an interactive protocol based on the real time streaming protocol (RTSP) is developed to enhance the interaction between the server and the client. Finally, the data of the virtual world is re-organized and transmitted according to the viewer's requests. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm reduces the required transmission bandwidth, and provides an acceptable visual quality even at low bit rates.

  20. Rapid and sensitive MRM-based mass spectrometry approach for systematically exploring ganglioside-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ruijun; Jin, Jing; Taylor, Lorne; Larsen, Brett; Quaggin, Susan E; Pawson, Tony

    2013-04-01

    Gangliosides are ubiquitous components of cell membranes. Their interactions with bacterial toxins and membrane-associated proteins (e.g. receptor tyrosine kinases) have important roles in the regulation of multiple cellular functions. Currently, an effective approach for measuring ganglioside-protein interactions especially in a large-scale fashion is largely missing. To this end, we report a facile MS-based approach to explore gangliosides extracted from cells and measure their interactions with protein of interest globally. We optimized a two-step protocol for extracting total gangliosides from cells within 2 h. Easy-to-use magnetic beads conjugated with a protein of interest were used to capture interacting gangliosides. To measure ganglioside-protein interaction on a global scale, we applied a high-sensitive LC-MS system, containing hydrophilic interaction LC separation and multiple reaction monitoring-based MS for ganglioside detection. Sensitivity for ganglioside GM1 is below 100 pg, and the whole analysis can be done in 20 min with isocratic elution. To measure ganglioside interactions with soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sFlt1), we extracted and readily detected 36 species of gangliosides from perivascular retinal pigment epithelium cells across eight different classes. Twenty-three ganglioside species have significant interactions with sFlt1 as compared with IgG control based on p value cutoff <0.05. These results show that the described method provides a rapid and high-sensitive approach for systematically measuring ganglioside-protein interactions. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A ‘cardiac-specific finger print’ of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a ‘MAS-signalosome’ model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of ‘signalosome’ components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor. PMID

  2. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Tirupula, Kalyan C; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A 'cardiac-specific finger print' of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a 'MAS-signalosome' model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of 'signalosome' components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor.

  3. A unique, interactive and web-based pediatric rheumatology teaching module: residents' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Batthish, Michelle; Bassilious, Ereny; Schneider, Rayfel; Feldman, Brian M; Hyman, Avi; Tse, Shirley Ml

    2013-05-27

    The limited availability of pediatric rheumatologists for teaching in pediatric residency programs negatively impacts resident education about rheumatology. At present, there are no educational websites available for trainees to learn about pediatric rheumatology. We are planning to develop an interactive web-based teaching module to improve resident learning about rheumatology ("POINTER": Pediatric Online INteractive TEaching in Rheumatology). The aim of this study was to perform a needs assessment of pediatric residents who will be using POINTER. Pediatric residents (n = 60) at The Hospital for Sick Children were emailed an online survey. This was designed to assess prior use of online teaching modules, the utility of an online teaching module for rheumatology and which technologies should be included on such a site. Forty-seven residents participated in the survey (78.3% response rate). Ninety-one percent of the respondents thought that an interactive teaching website would enhance their learning and should include case-based teaching modules. Several web-based technologies were felt to be important for inclusion on the teaching modules. These included graphics and animation (86.4%), interactivity (93.2%), pictures (100%), live digital videos (88.9%) and links to articles and research (88.6%). An interactive web-based rheumatology teaching module would be well utilized by pediatric residents. Residents showed preference for case-based teaching modules as well as multimedia modalities for learning a detailed musculoskeletal examination.

  4. Research on gaze-based interaction to 3D display system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Yong-Moo; Jeon, Kyeong-Won; Kim, Sung-Kyu

    2006-10-01

    There have been reported several researches on gaze tracking techniques using monocular camera or stereo camera. The most popular used gaze estimation techniques are based on PCCR (Pupil Center & Cornea Reflection). These techniques are for gaze tracking for 2D screen or images. In this paper, we address the gaze-based 3D interaction to stereo image for 3D virtual space. To the best of our knowledge, our paper first addresses the 3D gaze interaction techniques to 3D display system. Our research goal is the estimation of both of gaze direction and gaze depth. Until now, the most researches are focused on only gaze direction for the application to 2D display system. It should be noted that both of gaze direction and gaze depth should be estimated for the gaze-based interaction in 3D virtual space. In this paper, we address the gaze-based 3D interaction techniques with glassless stereo display. The estimation of gaze direction and gaze depth from both eyes is a new important research topic for gaze-based 3D interaction. We present our approach for the estimation of gaze direction and gaze depth and show experimentation results.

  5. Using computer-based interactive imagery strategies for designing instructional anatomy programs.

    PubMed

    Khalil, M K; Lamar, C H; Johnson, T E

    2005-01-01

    In an effort to design and implement effective anatomy educational programs, this study was conducted to evaluate students' perceptions toward using two computer-based self-directed instructional modules (e.g., digestive system and canine skull) that were designed utilizing interactive imagery strategy for teaching and learning veterinary anatomy. Sixty-eight freshmen veterinary students and one graduate student participated in this study. Open-ended and close-ended questionnaires were administered to evaluate the utilization of computer-based interactive imagery strategy in developing anatomy instructional programs, and to collect data about the students' perceptions toward the use of interactive images in teaching and learning of anatomy. Means and standard deviations were calculated and analyzed for close-ended items. The open-ended questionnaire items were analyzed to identify shared patterns or themes in the students' experience after using the two instructional anatomy modules. Students reported positive attitudes toward the interactive imagery strategy used in the development of computer-based anatomy modules. Based on our findings, this study outlines the characteristics of effective instructional images that will serve as guidelines for the preparation and selection of anatomical images, as well as, how to utilize these images to develop computer-based instructional anatomy programs. Students perceived interactive imagery as an effective design strategy that helped them learn anatomical concepts.

  6. Genetics-based interactions among plants, pathogens, and herbivores define arthropod community structure.

    PubMed

    Busby, Posy E; Lamit, Louis J; Keith, Arthur R; Newcombe, George; Gehring, Catherine A; Whitham, Thomas G; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2015-07-01

    Plant resistance to pathogens or insect herbivores is common, but its potential for indirectly influencing plant-associated communities is poorly known. Here, we test whether pathogens' indirect effects on arthropod communities and herbivory depend on plant resistance to pathogens and/or herbivores, and address the overarching interacting foundation species hypothesis that genetics-based interactions among a few highly interactive species can structure a much larger community. In a manipulative field experiment using replicated genotypes of two Populus species and their interspecific hybrids, we found that genetic variation in plant resistance to both pathogens and insect herbivores modulated the strength of pathogens' indirect effects on arthropod communities and insect herbivory. First, due in part to the pathogens' differential impacts on leaf biomass among the two Populus species and the hybrids, the pathogen most strongly impacted arthropod community composition, richness, and abundance on the pathogen-susceptible tree species. Second, we found similar patterns comparing pathogen-susceptible and pathogen-resistant genotypes within species. Third, within a plant species, pathogens caused a fivefold greater reduction in herbivory on insect-herbivore-susceptible plant genotypes than on herbivore-resistant genotypes, demonstrating that the pathogen-herbivore interaction is genotype dependent. We conclude that interactions among plants, pathogens, and herbivores can structure multitrophic communities, supporting the interacting foundation species hypothesis. Because these interactions are genetically based, evolutionary changes in genetic resistance could result in ecological changes in associated communities, which may in turn feed back to affect plant fitness.

  7. Interaction of cytotoxic agents: a rule-based system for computer-assisted cell survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Gentile, F P; Chiatti, L; Mauro, F; Briganti, G; Floridi, A; Benassi, M

    1992-01-01

    The actual effectiveness of environmental noxious agents or anticancer drugs can be fully determined only by knowing if the effects (in the present case, the cytotoxic effects) induced by a given agent are enhanced by exposure to another (or other) agent(s). Given a certain combination of agents, it is possible to distinguish three types of interaction: (a) zero interaction or additivity; (b) positive interaction or synergism; and (c) negative interaction or antagonism. In this work, the methodological problems involved in evaluating the type and level of interaction between biologically active agents are discussed and an "intelligent" approach to the problem is proposed. In particular, a prototype of a computer-assisted rule based system, named CISA (Cytotoxic Interaction and Survival Analysis), designed in a KES environment (Knowledge Engineering System) and implemented on a personal computer, is described. By constructing isoboles based on experimental cell survival data and taking into account the relative confidence intervals, the system can indicate the appropriate combinations of dosages to be tested and finally determine the type and level of interaction. The system, which represents an attempt to administer "intelligently" the experimental data, is therefore able to identify the best strategy of analysis, to carry out the data processing and to offer suggestions to the investigator about the usefulness of the data and the planning of further experiments.

  8. Web-based interactive visualization in a Grid-enabled neuroimaging application using HTML5.

    PubMed

    Siewert, René; Specovius, Svenja; Wu, Jie; Krefting, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Interactive visualization and correction of intermediate results are required in many medical image analysis pipelines. To allow certain interaction in the remote execution of compute- and data-intensive applications, new features of HTML5 are used. They allow for transparent integration of user interaction into Grid- or Cloud-enabled scientific workflows. Both 2D and 3D visualization and data manipulation can be performed through a scientific gateway without the need to install specific software or web browser plugins. The possibilities of web-based visualization are presented along the FreeSurfer-pipeline, a popular compute- and data-intensive software tool for quantitative neuroimaging.

  9. Three-dimensional human computer interaction based on 3D widgets for medical data visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jian; Tian, Jie; Zhao, Mingchang

    2005-04-01

    Three-dimensional human computer interaction plays an important role in 3-dimensional visualization. It is important for clinicians to accurately use and easily handle the result of medical data visualization in order to assist diagnosis and surgery simulation. A 3D human computer interaction software platform based on 3D widgets has been designed in traditional object-oriented fashion with some common design patterns and implemented by using ANSI C++, including all function modules and some practical widgets. A group of application examples are exhibited as well. The ultimate objective is to provide a flexible, reliable and extensible 3-D interaction platform for medical image processing and analyzing.

  10. The visible touch: in planta visualization of protein-protein interactions by fluorophore-based methods

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Riyaz A; Lahaye, Thomas; Panstruga, Ralph

    2006-01-01

    Non-invasive fluorophore-based protein interaction assays like fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC, also referred to as "split YFP") have been proven invaluable tools to study protein-protein interactions in living cells. Both methods are now frequently used in the plant sciences and are likely to develop into standard techniques for the identification, verification and in-depth analysis of polypeptide interactions. In this review, we address the individual strengths and weaknesses of both approaches and provide an outlook about new directions and possible future developments for both techniques. PMID:16800872

  11. Plant-based antimicrobial studies--methods and approaches to study the interaction between natural products.

    PubMed

    van Vuuren, Sandy; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2011-07-01

    The therapeutic value of synergistic interactions has been known since antiquity, and many different cultural healing systems still rely on this principle in the belief that combination therapy may enhance efficacy. This paper intends to provide an overview, from an antimicrobial perspective, on the research undertaken and interactive principles involved in pharmacognosy studies. Methods used to determine antimicrobial interactions include basic combination studies, the sum of the fractional inhibitory concentration index (ΣFIC), isobole interpretations, and death kinetic (time-kill) assays. The various interactions are discussed with reference to molecules, different plant parts or fractions, different plant species, and combinations with nonbotanical antimicrobial agents. It is recommended for future development in the field of phytosynergy that consideration should be given to the selection criteria for the two inhibitors. A more conservative approach should be adopted when classifying synergy. When examining interactions in plant-based studies, antagonistic interactions should not be ignored. Combinations involving more than two test samples should be examined where applicable, and very importantly, the mechanism of action of synergistic interactions should be given precedence. It is encouraging to observe the upsurge in papers exploring the complex interactions of medicinal plants, and undoubtedly this will become increasingly important in our continued quest to understand the mechanism of action of phytotherapy. The scientific validation of efficacious antimicrobial combinations could lead to patentable entities making research in the field of phytosynergy not only academically rewarding but also commercially relevant.

  12. A Single Kernel-Based Approach to Extract Drug-Drug Interactions from Biomedical Literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yijia; Lin, Hongfei; Yang, Zhihao; Wang, Jian; Li, Yanpeng

    2012-01-01

    When one drug influences the level or activity of another drug this is known as a drug-drug interaction (DDI). Knowledge of such interactions is crucial for patient safety. However, the volume and content of published biomedical literature on drug interactions is expanding rapidly, making it increasingly difficult for DDIs database curators to detect and collate DDIs information manually. In this paper, we propose a single kernel-based approach to extract DDIs from biomedical literature. This novel kernel-based approach can effectively make full use of syntactic structural information of the dependency graph. In particular, our approach can efficiently represent both single subgraph topological information and the relation of two subgraphs in the dependency graph. Experimental evaluations showed that our single kernel-based approach can achieve state-of-the-art performance on the publicly available DDI corpus without exploiting multiple kernels or additional domain resources. PMID:23133662

  13. Poultry production: a model for developing interactive Internet-based distance education.

    PubMed

    Emmert, J L; Shortridge, A M; Sexton, S L

    2003-05-01

    Over the last several decades, many poultry science programs have merged with other departments, but the poultry industry has undergone tremendous expansion worldwide, leading to a growing instructional void with regard to poultry production information. The objective of this project was to address the demand for information by developing two Web-based poultry production courses that cover management of broilers, turkeys, breeders, and layers. The Internet was chosen as the platform because it is asynchronous and may be accessed from any connected site around the world. To be effective, web-based courseware must be theoretically grounded and interactive, but university-level web-based distance education courses often fail to meet these standards. During courseware development, the impact of instructional techniques and technologies on interactivity and learning outcomes was explored. A content expert, an instructional designer, and a graphic artist carefully reviewed a variety of instructional techniques to increase interactivity. Concept mapping was chosen because it has been shown to be a superior learning tool for enhancing the exchange of ideas and knowledge between instructors, students, and content. A unique instructional interface was established that includes threaded e-mail discussion, thought questions, animation, hypertext, rollover interactions, video clips, and concept mapping exercises. Results indicate that the integration of concept mapping into web-based learning environments successfully increased interactivity and learning outcomes.

  14. Interactions of sugar-based bolaamphiphiles with biomimetic systems of plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Crowet, Jean-Marc; Lins, Laurence; Obounou Akong, Firmin; Haudrechy, Arnaud; Bouquillon, Sandrine; Deleu, Magali

    2016-11-01

    Glycolipids constitute a class of molecules with various biological activities. Among them, sugar-based bolaamphiphiles characterized by their biocompatibility, biodegradability and lower toxicity, became interesting for the development of efficient and low cost lipid-based drug delivery systems. Their activity seems to be closely related to their interactions with the lipid components of the plasma membrane of target cells. Despite many works devoted to the chemical synthesis and characterization of sugar-based bolaamphiphiles, their interactions with plasma membrane have not been completely elucidated. In this work, two sugar-based bolaamphiphiles differing only at the level of their sugar residues were chemically synthetized. Their interactions with membranes have been investigated using model membranes containing or not sterol and with in silico approaches. Our findings indicate that the nature of sugar residues has no significant influence for their membrane interacting properties, while the presence of sterol attenuates the interactions of both bolaamphiphiles with the membrane systems. The understanding of this distinct behavior of bolaamphiphiles towards sterol-containing membrane systems could be useful for their applications as drug delivery systems.

  15. Predicting domain-domain interaction based on domain profiles with feature selection and support vector machines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI) plays essential roles in cellular functions. The cost, time and other limitations associated with the current experimental methods have motivated the development of computational methods for predicting PPIs. As protein interactions generally occur via domains instead of the whole molecules, predicting domain-domain interaction (DDI) is an important step toward PPI prediction. Computational methods developed so far have utilized information from various sources at different levels, from primary sequences, to molecular structures, to evolutionary profiles. Results In this paper, we propose a computational method to predict DDI using support vector machines (SVMs), based on domains represented as interaction profile hidden Markov models (ipHMM) where interacting residues in domains are explicitly modeled according to the three dimensional structural information available at the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Features about the domains are extracted first as the Fisher scores derived from the ipHMM and then selected using singular value decomposition (SVD). Domain pairs are represented by concatenating their selected feature vectors, and classified by a support vector machine trained on these feature vectors. The method is tested by leave-one-out cross validation experiments with a set of interacting protein pairs adopted from the 3DID database. The prediction accuracy has shown significant improvement as compared to InterPreTS (Interaction Prediction through Tertiary Structure), an existing method for PPI prediction that also uses the sequences and complexes of known 3D structure. Conclusions We show that domain-domain interaction prediction can be significantly enhanced by exploiting information inherent in the domain profiles via feature selection based on Fisher scores, singular value decomposition and supervised learning based on support vector machines. Datasets and source code are freely available on the web at http

  16. Predicting domain-domain interaction based on domain profiles with feature selection and support vector machines.

    PubMed

    González, Alvaro J; Liao, Li

    2010-10-29

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) plays essential roles in cellular functions. The cost, time and other limitations associated with the current experimental methods have motivated the development of computational methods for predicting PPIs. As protein interactions generally occur via domains instead of the whole molecules, predicting domain-domain interaction (DDI) is an important step toward PPI prediction. Computational methods developed so far have utilized information from various sources at different levels, from primary sequences, to molecular structures, to evolutionary profiles. In this paper, we propose a computational method to predict DDI using support vector machines (SVMs), based on domains represented as interaction profile hidden Markov models (ipHMM) where interacting residues in domains are explicitly modeled according to the three dimensional structural information available at the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Features about the domains are extracted first as the Fisher scores derived from the ipHMM and then selected using singular value decomposition (SVD). Domain pairs are represented by concatenating their selected feature vectors, and classified by a support vector machine trained on these feature vectors. The method is tested by leave-one-out cross validation experiments with a set of interacting protein pairs adopted from the 3DID database. The prediction accuracy has shown significant improvement as compared to InterPreTS (Interaction Prediction through Tertiary Structure), an existing method for PPI prediction that also uses the sequences and complexes of known 3D structure. We show that domain-domain interaction prediction can be significantly enhanced by exploiting information inherent in the domain profiles via feature selection based on Fisher scores, singular value decomposition and supervised learning based on support vector machines. Datasets and source code are freely available on the web at http

  17. Cool but counterproductive: interactive, Web-based risk communications can backfire.

    PubMed

    Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J; Dickson, Mark; Witteman, Holly O

    2011-08-25

    Paper-based patient decision aids generally present risk information using numbers and/or static images. However, limited psychological research has suggested that when people interactively graph risk information, they process the statistics more actively, making the information more available for decision making. Such interactive tools could potentially be incorporated in a new generation of Web-based decision aids. The objective of our study was to investigate whether interactive graphics detailing the risk of side effects of two treatments improve knowledge and decision making over standard risk graphics. A total of 3371 members of a demographically diverse Internet panel viewed a hypothetical scenario about two hypothetical treatments for thyroid cancer. Each treatment had a chance of causing 1 of 2 side effects, but we randomly varied whether one treatment was better on both dimensions (strong dominance condition), slightly better on only one dimension (mild dominance condition), or better on one dimension but worse on the other (trade-off condition) than the other treatment. We also varied whether respondents passively viewed the risk information in static pictograph (icon array) images or actively manipulated the information by using interactive Flash-based animations of "fill-in-the-blank" pictographs. Our primary hypothesis was that active manipulation would increase respondents' ability to recognize dominance (when available) and choose the better treatment. The interactive risk graphic conditions had significantly worse survey completion rates (1110/1695, 65.5% vs 1316/1659, 79.3%, P < .001) than the static image conditions. In addition, respondents using interactive graphs were less likely to recognize and select the dominant treatment option (234/380, 61.6% vs 343/465, 73.8%, P < .001 in the strong dominance condition). Interactivity, however visually appealing, can both add to respondent burden and distract people from understanding relevant

  18. Prediction of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks based on network topology.

    PubMed

    Acencio, Marcio Luis; Bovolenta, Luiz Augusto; Camilo, Esther; Lemke, Ney

    2013-01-01

    Cancer has been increasingly recognized as a systems biology disease since many investigators have demonstrated that this malignant phenotype emerges from abnormal protein-protein, regulatory and metabolic interactions induced by simultaneous structural and regulatory changes in multiple genes and pathways. Therefore, the identification of oncogenic interactions and cancer-related signaling networks is crucial for better understanding cancer. As experimental techniques for determining such interactions and signaling networks are labor-intensive and time-consuming, the development of a computational approach capable to accomplish this task would be of great value. For this purpose, we present here a novel computational approach based on network topology and machine learning capable to predict oncogenic interactions and extract relevant cancer-related signaling subnetworks from an integrated network of human genes interactions (INHGI). This approach, called graph2sig, is twofold: first, it assigns oncogenic scores to all interactions in the INHGI and then these oncogenic scores are used as edge weights to extract oncogenic signaling subnetworks from INHGI. Regarding the prediction of oncogenic interactions, we showed that graph2sig is able to recover 89% of known oncogenic interactions with a precision of 77%. Moreover, the interactions that received high oncogenic scores are enriched in genes for which mutations have been causally implicated in cancer. We also demonstrated that graph2sig is potentially useful in extracting oncogenic signaling subnetworks: more than 80% of constructed subnetworks contain more than 50% of original interactions in their corresponding oncogenic linear pathways present in the KEGG PATHWAY database. In addition, the potential oncogenic signaling subnetworks discovered by graph2sig are supported by experimental evidence. Taken together, these results suggest that graph2sig can be a useful tool for investigators involved in cancer research

  19. Molecular modeling-based analysis of interactions in the RFC-dependent clamp-loading process.

    PubMed

    Venclovas, Ceslovas; Colvin, Michael E; Thelen, Michael P

    2002-10-01

    Replication and related processes in eukaryotic cells require replication factor C (RFC) to load a molecular clamp for DNA polymerase in an ATP-driven process, involving multiple molecular interactions. The detailed understanding of this mechanism is hindered by the lack of data regarding structure, mutual arrangement, and dynamics of the players involved. In this study, we analyzed interactions that take place during loading onto DNA of either the PCNA clamp or the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 checkpoint complex, using computationally derived molecular models. Combining the modeled structures for each RFC subunit with known structural, biochemical, and genetic data, we propose detailed models of how two of the RFC subunits, RFC1 and RFC3, interact with the C-terminal regions of PCNA. RFC1 is predicted to bind PCNA similarly to the p21-PCNA interaction, while the RFC3-PCNA binding is proposed to be similar to the E. coli delta-beta interaction. Additional sequence and structure analysis, supported by experimental data, suggests that RFC5 might be the third clamp loader subunit to bind the equivalent PCNA region. We discuss functional implications stemming from the proposed model of the RFC1-PCNA interaction and compare putative clamp-interacting regions in RFC1 and its paralogs, Rad17 and Ctf18. Based on the individual intermolecular interactions, we propose RFC and PCNA arrangement that places three RFC subunits in association with each of the three C-terminal regions in PCNA. The two other RFC subunits are positioned at the two PCNA interfaces, with the third PCNA interface left unobstructed. In addition, we map interactions at the level of individual subunits between the alternative clamp loader/clamp system, Rad17-RFC(2-5)/Rad9-Rad1-Hus1. The proposed models of interaction between two clamp/clamp loader pairs provide both structural framework for interpretation of existing experimental data and a number of specific findings that can be subjected to direct experimental

  20. A hybrid configuration interaction treatment based on seniority number and excitation schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Alcoba, Diego R.; Capuzzi, Pablo; Torre, Alicia; Lain, Luis; Oña, Ofelia B.; Van Raemdonck, Mario; Bultinck, Patrick; Van Neck, Dimitri

    2014-12-28

    We present a configuration interaction method in which the Hamiltonian of an N-electron system is projected on Slater determinants selected according to the seniority-number criterion along with the traditional excitation-based procedure. This proposed method is especially useful to describe systems which exhibit dynamic (weak) correlation at determined geometric arrangements (where the excitation-based procedure is more suitable) but show static (strong) correlation at other arrangements (where the seniority-number technique is preferred). The hybrid method amends the shortcomings of both individual determinant selection procedures, yielding correct shapes of potential energy curves with results closer to those provided by the full configuration interaction method.

  1. Interactions of Schiff-base ligands with gold nanoparticles: structural, optical and electrocatalytic studies.

    PubMed

    Abad, Jose María; Revenga-Parra, Mónica; García, Tania; Gamero, Miriam; Lorenzo, Encarnación; Pariente, Félix

    2011-04-07

    A study on optical and electrochemical properties resulting upon interaction of Schiff base ligands with gold nanoparticles is presented. The measurements of the optical absorption and fluorescence properties have provided important information about structure-properties dependence. We show that in function of the isomer structure and its attachment orientation with respect to the metal nanoparticle, their optical properties can be modulated. Nanoparticle assemblies mediated by 3,4-DHS were also obtained based on a control of the interparticle interactions and their electrocatalytic activity toward NADH oxidation was investigated.

  2. Efficient fold-change detection based on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Buijsman, W; Sheinman, M

    2014-02-01

    Various biological sensory systems exhibit a response to a relative change of the stimulus, often referred to as fold-change detection. In the past few years, fold-change detecting mechanisms, based on transcriptional networks, have been proposed. Here we present a fold-change detecting mechanism, based on protein-protein interactions, consisting of two interacting proteins. This mechanism does not consume chemical energy and is not subject to transcriptional and translational noise, in contrast to previously proposed mechanisms. We show by analytical and numerical calculations that the mechanism is robust and can have a fast, precise, and efficient response for parameters that are relevant to eukaryotic cells.

  3. Efficient fold-change detection based on protein-protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buijsman, W.; Sheinman, M.

    2014-02-01

    Various biological sensory systems exhibit a response to a relative change of the stimulus, often referred to as fold-change detection. In the past few years, fold-change detecting mechanisms, based on transcriptional networks, have been proposed. Here we present a fold-change detecting mechanism, based on protein-protein interactions, consisting of two interacting proteins. This mechanism does not consume chemical energy and is not subject to transcriptional and translational noise, in contrast to previously proposed mechanisms. We show by analytical and numerical calculations that the mechanism is robust and can have a fast, precise, and efficient response for parameters that are relevant to eukaryotic cells.

  4. Theoretical Studies on the Intermolecular Interactions of Potentially Primordial Base-Pair Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Leszczynski, Jerzy; Sponer, Judit; Sponer, Jiri; Sumpter, Bobby G; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Recent experimental studies on the Watson Crick type base pairing of triazine and aminopyrimidine derivatives suggest that acid/base properties of the constituent bases might be related to the duplex stabilities measured in solution. Herein we use high-level quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate the base pairing and stacking interactions of seven selected base pairs, which are common in that they are stabilized by two NH O hydrogen bonds separated by one NH N hydrogen bond. We show that neither the base pairing nor the base stacking interaction energies correlate with the reported pKa data of the bases and the melting points of the duplexes. This suggests that the experimentally observed correlation between the melting point data of the duplexes and the pKa values of the constituent bases is not rooted in the intrinsic base pairing and stacking properties. The physical chemistry origin of the observed experimental correlation thus remains unexplained and requires further investigations. In addition, since our calculations are carried out with extrapolation to the complete basis set of atomic orbitals and with inclusion of higher electron correlation effects, they provide reference data for stacking and base pairing energies of non-natural bases.

  5. Limitations of a metabolic network-based reverse ecology method for inferring host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kazuhiro; Aie, Kazuki

    2017-05-25

    Host-pathogen interactions are important in a wide range of research fields. Given the importance of metabolic crosstalk between hosts and pathogens, a metabolic network-based reverse ecology method was proposed to infer these interactions. However, the validity of this method remains unclear because of the various explanations presented and the influence of potentially confounding factors that have thus far been neglected. We re-evaluated the importance of the reverse ecology method for evaluating host-pathogen interactions while statistically controlling for confounding effects using oxygen requirement, genome, metabolic network, and phylogeny data. Our data analyses showed that host-pathogen interactions were more strongly influenced by genome size, primary network parameters (e.g., number of edges), oxygen requirement, and phylogeny than the reserve ecology-based measures. These results indicate the limitations of the reverse ecology method; however, they do not discount the importance of adopting reverse ecology approaches altogether. Rather, we highlight the need for developing more suitable methods for inferring host-pathogen interactions and conducting more careful examinations of the relationships between metabolic networks and host-pathogen interactions.

  6. Reputation-Based Conditional Interaction Supports Cooperation in Well-Mixed Prisoner’s Dilemmas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaojie; Schick, Alana; Doebeli, Michael; Blachford, Alistair; Wang, Long

    2012-01-01

    In the well-mixed prisoner’s dilemma game, individuals are typically assumed to have no choice about whether to interact with other individuals in the population. In this paper, we instead consider reputation-based conditional interaction and its consequences for the evolution of cooperation. Each individual has a tolerance range, and only interacts with other individuals whose reputation lies within its tolerance range in a chosen sample of the population. Reputation contains information about the number of interaction partners an individual has just cooperated with. We find that the introduction of conditional interaction promotes cooperation in well-mixed populations, and there exist moderate tolerance ranges for which this effect is maximized. For a given tolerance range, there is a critical cost-to-benefit ratio below which cooperation can be promoted. Interestingly, we find that if cooperation evolves, different cooperators’ interaction clusters are typically maintained in the population, each around a different reputation level. We further investigate some properties of these cooperators’ clusters. Moreover, we examine the effects of the sample number on the evolution of cooperation. Our results highlight the importance of the detailed consideration of modes of interaction for the evolution of cooperation in well-mixed populations. PMID:22615761

  7. Reputation-based conditional interaction supports cooperation in well-mixed prisoner's dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojie; Schick, Alana; Doebeli, Michael; Blachford, Alistair; Wang, Long

    2012-01-01

    In the well-mixed prisoner's dilemma game, individuals are typically assumed to have no choice about whether to interact with other individuals in the population. In this paper, we instead consider reputation-based conditional interaction and its consequences for the evolution of cooperation. Each individual has a tolerance range, and only interacts with other individuals whose reputation lies within its tolerance range in a chosen sample of the population. Reputation contains information about the number of interaction partners an individual has just cooperated with. We find that the introduction of conditional interaction promotes cooperation in well-mixed populations, and there exist moderate tolerance ranges for which this effect is maximized. For a given tolerance range, there is a critical cost-to-benefit ratio below which cooperation can be promoted. Interestingly, we find that if cooperation evolves, different cooperators' interaction clusters are typically maintained in the population, each around a different reputation level. We further investigate some properties of these cooperators' clusters. Moreover, we examine the effects of the sample number on the evolution of cooperation. Our results highlight the importance of the detailed consideration of modes of interaction for the evolution of cooperation in well-mixed populations.

  8. Improving vision-based motor rehabilitation interactive systems for users with disabilities using mirror feedback.

    PubMed

    Jaume-i-Capó, Antoni; Martínez-Bueso, Pau; Moyà-Alcover, Biel; Varona, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Observation is recommended in motor rehabilitation. For this reason, the aim of this study was to experimentally test the feasibility and benefit of including mirror feedback in vision-based rehabilitation systems: we projected the user on the screen. We conducted a user study by using a previously evaluated system that improved the balance and postural control of adults with cerebral palsy. We used a within-subjects design with the two defined feedback conditions (mirror and no-mirror) with two different groups of users (8 with disabilities and 32 without disabilities) using usability measures (time-to-start (T(s)) and time-to-complete (T(c))). A two-tailed paired samples t-test confirmed that in case of disabilities the mirror feedback facilitated the interaction in vision-based systems for rehabilitation. The measured times were significantly worse in the absence of the user's own visual feedback (T(s) = 7.09 (P < 0.001) and T(c) = 4.48 (P < 0.005)). In vision-based interaction systems, the input device is the user's own body; therefore, it makes sense that feedback should be related to the body of the user. In case of disabilities the mirror feedback mechanisms facilitated the interaction in vision-based systems for rehabilitation. Results recommends developers and researchers use this improvement in vision-based motor rehabilitation interactive systems.

  9. Improving Vision-Based Motor Rehabilitation Interactive Systems for Users with Disabilities Using Mirror Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Bueso, Pau; Moyà-Alcover, Biel

    2014-01-01

    Observation is recommended in motor rehabilitation. For this reason, the aim of this study was to experimentally test the feasibility and benefit of including mirror feedback in vision-based rehabilitation systems: we projected the user on the screen. We conducted a user study by using a previously evaluated system that improved the balance and postural control of adults with cerebral palsy. We used a within-subjects design with the two defined feedback conditions (mirror and no-mirror) with two different groups of users (8 with disabilities and 32 without disabilities) using usability measures (time-to-start (Ts) and time-to-complete (Tc)). A two-tailed paired samples t-test confirmed that in case of disabilities the mirror feedback facilitated the interaction in vision-based systems for rehabilitation. The measured times were significantly worse in the absence of the user's own visual feedback (Ts = 7.09 (P < 0.001) and Tc = 4.48 (P < 0.005)). In vision-based interaction systems, the input device is the user's own body; therefore, it makes sense that feedback should be related to the body of the user. In case of disabilities the mirror feedback mechanisms facilitated the interaction in vision-based systems for rehabilitation. Results recommends developers and researchers use this improvement in vision-based motor rehabilitation interactive systems. PMID:25295310

  10. Physics-based scoring of protein-ligand interactions: explicit polarizability, quantum mechanics and free energies.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Richard A

    2011-04-01

    The ability to accurately predict the interaction of a ligand with its receptor is a key limitation in computer-aided drug design approaches such as virtual screening and de novo design. In this article, we examine current strategies for a physics-based approach to scoring of protein-ligand affinity, as well as outlining recent developments in force fields and quantum chemical techniques. We also consider advances in the development and application of simulation-based free energy methods to study protein-ligand interactions. Fuelled by recent advances in computational algorithms and hardware, there is the opportunity for increased integration of physics-based scoring approaches at earlier stages in computationally guided drug discovery. Specifically, we envisage increased use of implicit solvent models and simulation-based scoring methods as tools for computing the affinities of large virtual ligand libraries. Approaches based on end point simulations and reference potentials allow the application of more advanced potential energy functions to prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities. Comprehensive evaluation of polarizable force fields and quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical and QM methods in scoring of protein-ligand interactions is required, particularly in their ability to address challenging targets such as metalloproteins and other proteins that make highly polar interactions. Finally, we anticipate increasingly quantitative free energy perturbation and thermodynamic integration methods that are practical for optimization of hits obtained from screened ligand libraries.

  11. Speech-based interaction in multitask conditions: impact of prompt modality.

    PubMed

    Parush, Avi

    2005-01-01

    Speech-based interaction is often recognized as appropriate for hands-busy, eyes-busy multitask situations. The objective of this study was to explore prompt-guided speech-based interaction and the impact of prompt modality on overall performance in such situations. A dual-task paradigm was employed, with tracking as a primary task and speech-based data input as a secondary task. There were three tracking conditions: no tracking, basic, and difficult tracking. Two prompt modalities were used for the speech interaction: a dialogue with spoken prompts and a dialogue with visual prompts. Data entry duration was longer with the speech prompts than with the visual prompts, regardless of whether or not there was tracking or its level of difficulty. However, when tracking was difficult, data entry duration was similar for both spoken and visual prompts. Tracking performance was also affected by the prompt modality, with poorer performance obtained when the prompts were visual. The findings are discussed in terms of multiple resource theory and the possible implications for speech-based interactions in multitask situations. Actual or potential applications of this research include the design of speech-based dialogues for multitask situations such as driving and other hands-busy, eyes-busy situations.

  12. Influence of the number of predecessors in interaction within acceleration-based flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordeux, Antoine; Chraibi, Mohcine; Schadschneider, Andreas; Seyfried, Armin

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, the stability of the uniform solutions is analysed for microscopic flow models in interaction with K≥slant1 predecessors. We calculate general conditions for the linear stability on the ring geometry and explore the results with particular pedestrian and car-following models based on relaxation processes. The uniform solutions are stable if the relaxation times are sufficiently small. However the stability condition strongly depends on the type of models. The analysis is focused on the relevance of the number of predecessors K in the dynamics. Unexpected non-monotonic relations between K and the stability are presented. Classes of models for which increasing the number of predecessors in interaction does not yield an improvement of the stability, or for which the stability condition converges as K increases (i.e. implicit finite interaction range) are identified. Furthermore, we point out that increasing the interaction range tends to generate characteristic wavelengths in the system when unstable.

  13. Magnetic Yoking and Tunable Interactions in FePt-Based Hard/Soft Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Liao, Jung-Wei; Kirby, Brian J.; Winklhofer, Michael; Lai, Chih-Huang; Liu, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic interactions in magnetic nanostructures are critical to nanomagnetic and spintronic explorations. Here we demonstrate an extremely sensitive magnetic yoking effect and tunable interactions in FePt based hard/soft bilayers mediated by the soft layer. Below the exchange length, a thin soft layer strongly exchange couples to the perpendicular moments of the hard layer; above the exchange length, just a few nanometers thicker, the soft layer moments turn in-plane and act to yoke the dipolar fields from the adjacent hard layer perpendicular domains. The evolution from exchange to dipolar-dominated interactions is experimentally captured by first-order reversal curves, the ΔM method, and polarized neutron reflectometry, and confirmed by micromagnetic simulations. These findings demonstrate an effective yoking approach to design and control magnetic interactions in wide varieties of magnetic nanostructures and devices. PMID:27604428

  14. Apparatus and method for interaction phenomena with world modules in data-flow-based simulation

    DOEpatents

    Xavier, Patrick G.; Gottlieb, Eric J.; McDonald, Michael J.; Oppel, III, Fred J.

    2006-08-01

    A method and apparatus accommodate interaction phenomenon in a data-flow-based simulation of a system of elements, by establishing meta-modules to simulate system elements and by establishing world modules associated with interaction phenomena. World modules are associated with proxy modules from a group of meta-modules associated with one of the interaction phenomenon. The world modules include a communication world, a sensor world, a mobility world, and a contact world. World modules can be further associated with other world modules if necessary. Interaction phenomenon are simulated in corresponding world modules by accessing member functions in the associated group of proxy modules. Proxy modules can be dynamically allocated at a desired point in the simulation to accommodate the addition of elements in the system of elements such as a system of robots, a system of communication terminals, or a system of vehicles, being simulated.

  15. Magnetic Yoking and Tunable Interactions in FePt-Based Hard/Soft Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Dustin A.; Liao, Jung-Wei; Kirby, Brian J.; Winklhofer, Michael; Lai, Chih-Huang; Liu, Kai

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic interactions in magnetic nanostructures are critical to nanomagnetic and spintronic explorations. Here we demonstrate an extremely sensitive magnetic yoking effect and tunable interactions in FePt based hard/soft bilayers mediated by the soft layer. Below the exchange length, a thin soft layer strongly exchange couples to the perpendicular moments of the hard layer; above the exchange length, just a few nanometers thicker, the soft layer moments turn in-plane and act to yoke the dipolar fields from the adjacent hard layer perpendicular domains. The evolution from exchange to dipolar-dominated interactions is experimentally captured by first-order reversal curves, the ΔM method, and polarized neutron reflectometry, and confirmed by micromagnetic simulations. These findings demonstrate an effective yoking approach to design and control magnetic interactions in wide varieties of magnetic nanostructures and devices.

  16. A Look at an Interactive Classroom-Based Drug Abuse Prevention Program: Interactive Contents and Suggestions for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussman, Steve; Rohrbach, Louise A.; Patel, Ravi; Holiday, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Interactivity has been shown to be a critical element of effective drug abuse prevention programs. This study examined the contents of Project Towards No Drug Abuse, a program that has revealed strong effects only when delivered in a highly interactive version. Types of teacher and student interactive messages were identified. It is speculated…

  17. Family-based Gene-by-Environment Interaction Studies: Revelations and Remedies

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Umbach, David M.; Weinberg, Clarice R.

    2011-01-01

    Bias can arise in case-control studies of genotype effects if the underlying population is structured (genetically stratified or admixed). Nuclear-family-based studies enjoy robustness against such bias, provided that inference conditions properly on the parents. Investigators have extended family-based methods to study gene-by-environment interactions, regarding such extensions as retaining robustness. We demonstrate via simulations that, if population structure involves the exposure, nuclear-family-based analyses of gene-by-exposure interaction remain vulnerable to inflated Type I error rates through subtle dependencies that investigators have failed to appreciate. Motivated by the Two Sister Study, an ongoing study of families affected by young-onset breast cancer, we consider a design that supplements the case-parents design with a sibling who is not genotyped but provides exposure data. If, in the population at large, inheritance is Mendelian and genotypes do not influence propensity for exposure, then this four-person (or tetrad) structure permits the study of genetic effects, exposure effects, and genotype-by-exposure interactions. We show for a dichotomous exposure that, when exposure of an unaffected sibling is available, a modification to the analysis of case-sib or tetrad data re-establishes robustness for tests of multiplicative gene-by-environment interaction. We also use simulations to assess the power for detecting interaction across a range of scenarios, designs and analytic methods. PMID:21490534

  18. A CAPS-based binding assay provides semi-quantitative validation of protein-DNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yongyao; Zhang, Yaling; Zhao, Xiucai; Liu, Yao-Guang; Chen, Letian

    2016-02-15

    Investigation of protein-DNA interactions provides crucial information for understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation. Current methods for studying protein-DNA interactions, such as DNaseI footprinting or gel shift assays, involve labeling DNA with radioactive or fluorescent tags, making these methods costly, laborious, and potentially damaging to the environment. Here, we describe a novel cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS)-based binding assay (CBA), which is a label-free method that can simplify the semi-quantitative validation of protein-DNA interactions. The CBA tests the interaction between a protein and its target DNA, based on the CAPS pattern produced due to differences in the accessibility of a restriction endonuclease site (intrinsic or artificial) in amplified DNA in the presence and absence of the protein of interest. Thus, the CBA can produce a semi-quantitative readout of the interaction strength based on the dose of the binding protein. We demonstrate the principle and feasibility of CBA using B3, MADS3 proteins and the corresponding RY or CArG-box containing DNAs.

  19. Family-based gene-by-environment interaction studies: revelations and remedies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Umbach, David M; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2011-05-01

    Bias can arise in case-control studies of genotype effects if the underlying population is structured (genetically stratified or admixed). Nuclear-family-based studies enjoy robustness against such bias, provided that inference conditions properly on the parents. Investigators have extended family-based methods to study gene-by-environment interactions, regarding such extensions as retaining robustness. We demonstrate via simulations that, if population structure involves the exposure, nuclear-family-based analyses of gene-by-exposure interaction remain vulnerable to inflated Type I error rates through subtle dependencies that investigators have failed to appreciate. Motivated by the Two Sister Study, an ongoing study of families affected by young-onset breast cancer, we consider a design that supplements the case-parents design with a sibling who is not genotyped but provides exposure data. If, in the population at large, inheritance is Mendelian and genotypes do not influence propensity for exposure, then this 4-person (or tetrad) structure permits the study of genetic effects, exposure effects, and genotype-by-exposure interactions. We show for a dichotomous exposure that, when exposure of an unaffected sibling is available, a modification to the analysis of case-sib or tetrad data re-establishes robustness for tests of multiplicative gene-by-environment interaction. We also use simulations to assess the power for detecting interaction across a range of scenarios, designs, and analytic methods.

  20. Feasibility of an Exoskeleton-Based Interactive Video Game System for Upper Extremity Burn Contractures.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jeffrey C; Ozsecen, Muzaffer Y; Muraoka, Nicholas K; Mancinelli, Chiara; Della Croce, Ugo; Ryan, Colleen M; Bonato, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Burn contractures are common and difficult to treat. Measuring continuous joint motion would inform the assessment of contracture interventions; however, it is not standard clinical practice. This study examines use of an interactive gaming system to measure continuous joint motion data. To assess the usability of an exoskeleton-based interactive gaming system in the rehabilitation of upper extremity burn contractures. Feasibility study. Eight subjects with a history of burn injury and upper extremity contractures were recruited from the outpatient clinic of a regional inpatient rehabilitation facility. Subjects used an exoskeleton-based interactive gaming system to play 4 different video games. Continuous joint motion data were collected at the shoulder and elbow during game play. Visual analog scale for engagement, difficulty and comfort. Angular range of motion by subject, joint, and game. The study population had an age of 43 ± 16 (mean ± standard deviation) years and total body surface area burned range of 10%-90%. Subjects reported satisfactory levels of enjoyment, comfort, and difficulty. Continuous joint motion data demonstrated variable characteristics by subject, plane of motion, and game. This study demonstrates the feasibility of use of an exoskeleton-based interactive gaming system in the burn population. Future studies are needed that examine the efficacy of tailoring interactive video games to the specific joint impairments of burn survivors. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genome-wide interaction-based association analysis identified multiple new susceptibility Loci for common diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Xu, Haiming; Chen, Suchao; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Zhenguo; Zhu, Zhihong; Qin, Xueying; Hu, Landian; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Kong, Xiangyin

    2011-03-01

    Genome-wide interaction-based association (GWIBA) analysis has the potential to identify novel susceptibility loci. These interaction effects could be missed with the prevailing approaches in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, no convincing loci have been discovered exclusively from GWIBA methods, and the intensive computation involved is a major barrier for application. Here, we developed a fast, multi-thread/parallel program named "pair-wise interaction-based association mapping" (PIAM) for exhaustive two-locus searches. With this program, we performed a complete GWIBA analysis on seven diseases with stringent control for false positives, and we validated the results for three of these diseases. We identified one pair-wise interaction between a previously identified locus, C1orf106, and one new locus, TEC, that was specific for Crohn's disease, with a Bonferroni corrected P < 0.05 (P = 0.039). This interaction was replicated with a pair of proxy linked loci (P = 0.013) on an independent dataset. Five other interactions had corrected P < 0.5. We identified the allelic effect of a locus close to SLC7A13 for coronary artery disease. This was replicated with a linked locus on an independent dataset (P = 1.09 × 10⁻⁷). Through a local validation analysis that evaluated association signals, rather than locus-based associations, we found that several other regions showed association/interaction signals with nominal P < 0.05. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the GWIBA approach was successful for identifying novel loci, and the results provide new insights into the genetic architecture of common diseases. In addition, our PIAM program was capable of handling very large GWAS datasets that are likely to be produced in the future.

  2. MetaMIS: a metagenomic microbial interaction simulator based on microbial community profiles.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Grace Tzun-Wen; Pao, Yueh-Yang; Wang, Daryi

    2016-11-25

    The complexity and dynamics of microbial communities are major factors in the ecology of a system. With the NGS technique, metagenomics data provides a new way to explore microbial interactions. Lotka-Volterra models, which have been widely used to infer animal interactions in dynamic systems, have recently been applied to the analysis of metagenomic data. In this paper, we present the Lotka-Volterra model based tool, the Metagenomic Microbial Interacticon Simulator (MetaMIS), which is designed to analyze the time series data of microbial community profiles. MetaMIS first infers underlying microbial interactions from abundance tables for operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and then interprets interaction networks using the Lotka-Volterra model. We also embed a Bray-Curtis dissimilarity method in MetaMIS in order to evaluate the similarity to biological reality. MetaMIS is designed to tolerate a high level of missing data, and can estimate interaction information without the influence of rare microbes. For each interaction network, MetaMIS systematically examines interaction patterns (such as mutualism or competition) and refines the biotic role within microbes. As a case study, we collect a human male fecal microbiome and show that Micrococcaceae, a relatively low abundance OTU, is highly connected with 13 dominant OTUs and seems to play a critical role. MetaMIS is able to organize multiple interaction networks into a consensus network for comparative studies; thus we as a case study have also identified a consensus interaction network between female and male fecal microbiomes. MetaMIS provides an efficient and user-friendly platform that may reveal new insights into metagenomics data. MetaMIS is freely available at: https://sourceforge.net/projects/metamis/ .

  3. Group interaction in problem-based learning tutorials: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Azer, S A; Azer, D

    2015-11-01

    This review aimed at identifying studies on group interaction in problem-based learning (PBL) and elucidate methods used, factors affecting group interaction and the relationship between interaction and student's learning. PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO and HighWire were searched (January 1999 to June 2013) using a combination of pre-specified search terms. The search words were also used in searching nine journals in dental and medical education. Also edited research books on PBL were searched. Both qualitative and descriptive studies of group interaction were selected and critically appraised. Finally, 42 of 10,606 papers were included (35 journal articles and seven from research books). The materials used in assessing group interaction varied depending on the methodology design. Forty-three percent of the studies used video recording to evaluate group interaction. Other studies used indirect approaches such as focus groups, interviews and questionnaires. Factors affecting group interactions were students' and tutors' perceptions, tutor's subject-matter expertise, training students, tutor's group dynamics. There was no conclusive evidence about the impact of interaction in PBL on learning. Most studies were from medicine (64%), and 35 papers were published in the last 10 years. The majority of studies were conducted in Europe, North America and Asia. Although there is a progressive increase in publications on PBL group interaction during the last 10 years, there are knowledge gaps and deficiencies in this area and most studies are lacking solid theoretical basis and are descriptive. There is a deficiency in the literature in this area from dentistry and other allied health disciplines. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Using a dual safeguard web-based interactive teaching approach in an introductory physics class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lie-Ming; Li, Bin; Luo, Ying

    2015-06-01

    We modified the Just-in-Time Teaching approach and developed a dual safeguard web-based interactive (DGWI) teaching system for an introductory physics course. The system consists of four instructional components that improve student learning by including warm-up assignments and online homework. Student and instructor activities involve activities both in the classroom and on a designated web site. An experimental study with control groups evaluated the effectiveness of the DGWI teaching method. The results indicate that the DGWI method is an effective way to improve students' understanding of physics concepts, develop students' problem-solving abilities through instructor-student interactions, and identify students' misconceptions through a safeguard framework based on questions that satisfy teaching requirements and cover all of the course material. The empirical study and a follow-up survey found that the DGWI method increased student-teacher interaction and improved student learning outcomes.

  5. A centrifugation-based physicochemical characterization method for the interaction between proteins and nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekdemir, Ahmet; Stellacci, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Nanomedicine requires in-depth knowledge of nanoparticle-protein interactions. These interactions are studied with methods limited to large or fluorescently labelled nanoparticles as they rely on scattering or fluorescence-correlation signals. Here, we have developed a method based on analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) as an absorbance-based, label-free tool to determine dissociation constants (KD), stoichiometry (Nmax), and Hill coefficient (n), for the association of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with gold nanoparticles. Absorption at 520 nm in AUC renders the measurements insensitive to unbound and aggregated proteins. Measurements remain accurate and do not become more challenging for small (sub-10 nm) nanoparticles. In AUC, frictional ratio analysis allows for the qualitative assessment of the shape of the analyte. Data suggests that small-nanoparticles/protein complexes significantly deviate from a spherical shape even at maximum coverage. We believe that this method could become one of the established approaches for the characterization of the interaction of (small) nanoparticles with proteins.

  6. Plume Interaction and Base Flow Analysis of a Twin Engine Flight Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Murty, Mamidi Sri Rama; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2016-06-01

    3D RANS simulations are performed to study the multi jet interactions of a twin engine gimbal configuration of an aerospace vehicle at different time instants. Simulations captured all the essential features of the flow field and interaction between the neighboring jets did not occur because of low altitudes and moderate under-expansion of the jets considered in the simulations. For higher gimbal angle, two jets were the closest but still did not interact. Detail exploration of the downstream flow field revealed that the distinct features of the jets are retained at the farthest downstream locations; although the pressure field reached the uniformity. Average base pressure ratios for the three different time instances are 0.91, 0.547 and 0.522 and maximum base temperature is of the order 800 K.

  7. Plume Interaction and Base Flow Analysis of a Twin Engine Flight Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra Murty, Mamidi Sri Rama; Chakraborty, Debasis

    2017-06-01

    3D RANS simulations are performed to study the multi jet interactions of a twin engine gimbal configuration of an aerospace vehicle at different time instants. Simulations captured all the essential features of the flow field and interaction between the neighboring jets did not occur because of low altitudes and moderate under-expansion of the jets considered in the simulations. For higher gimbal angle, two jets were the closest but still did not interact. Detail exploration of the downstream flow field revealed that the distinct features of the jets are retained at the farthest downstream locations; although the pressure field reached the uniformity. Average base pressure ratios for the three different time instances are 0.91, 0.547 and 0.522 and maximum base temperature is of the order 800 K.

  8. Scale-Free Correlations in Flocking Systems with Position-Based Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huepe, Cristián; Ferrante, Eliseo; Wenseleers, Tom; Turgut, Ali Emre

    2015-02-01

    We consider a model of self-propelled agents with spring-like interactions that depend only on relative positions, and not on relative orientations. We observe that groups of these agents self-organize to achieve collective motion (CM) through a mechanism based on the cascading of self-propulsion energy towards lower elastic modes. By computing the correlation functions of the speed and velocity fluctuations for different group sizes, we show that the corresponding correlation lengths are proportional to the linear size of the group and have no intrinsic length scale. We argue that such scale-free correlations are a natural consequence of the position-based interactions and associated CM dynamics. We hypothesize that this effect, acting in the context of more complex realistic interactions, could be at the origin of the scale-free correlations measured experimentally in flocks of starlings, instead of the previously argued proximity to a critical regime.

  9. Predicting disease-related proteins based on clique backbone in protein-protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Zhao, Xudong; Tang, Xianglong

    2014-01-01

    Network biology integrates different kinds of data, including physical or functional networks and disease gene sets, to interpret human disease. A clique (maximal complete subgraph) in a protein-protein interaction network is a topological module and possesses inherently biological significance. A disease-related clique possibly associates with complex diseases. Fully identifying disease components in a clique is conductive to uncovering disease mechanisms. This paper proposes an approach of predicting disease proteins based on cliques in a protein-protein interaction network. To tolerate false positive and negative interactions in protein networks, extending cliques and scoring predicted disease proteins with gene ontology terms are introduced to the clique-based method. Precisions of predicted disease proteins are verified by disease phenotypes and steadily keep to more than 95%. The predicted disease proteins associated with cliques can partly complement mapping between genotype and phenotype, and provide clues for understanding the pathogenesis of serious diseases.

  10. Conservation of Species- and Trait-Based Modeling Network Interactions in Extremely Acidic Microbial Community Assembly.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Jialiang; Cadotte, Marc W; Chen, Yongjian; Shu, Haoyue; Liu, Jun; Chen, Linxing; Hua, Zhengshuang; Shu, Wensheng; Zhou, Jizhong; Huang, Linan

    2017-01-01

    Understanding microbial interactions is essential to decipher the mechanisms of community assembly and their effects on ecosystem functioning, however, the conservation of species- and trait-based network interactions along environmental gradient remains largely unknown. Here, by using the network-based analyses with three paralleled data sets derived from 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, functional microarray, and predicted metagenome, we test our hypothesis that the network interactions of traits are more conserved than those of taxonomic measures, with significantly lower variation of network characteristics along the environmental gradient in acid mine drainage. The results showed that although the overall network characteristics remained similar, the structural variation was significantly lower at trait levels. The higher conserved individual node topological properties at trait level rather than at species level indicated that the responses of diverse traits remained relatively consistent even though different species played key roles under different environmental conditions. Additionally, the randomization tests revealed that it could not reject the null hypothesis that species-based correlations were random, while the tests suggested that correlation patterns of traits were non-random. Furthermore, relationships between trait-based network characteristics and environmental properties implied that trait-based networks might be more useful in reflecting the variation of ecosystem function. Taken together, our results suggest that deterministic trait-based community assembly results in greater conservation of network interaction, which may ensure ecosystem function across environmental regimes, emphasizing the potential importance of measuring the complexity and conservation of network interaction in evaluating the ecosystem stability and functioning.

  11. Conservation of Species- and Trait-Based Modeling Network Interactions in Extremely Acidic Microbial Community Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Jialiang; Cadotte, Marc W.; Chen, Yongjian; Shu, Haoyue; Liu, Jun; Chen, Linxing; Hua, Zhengshuang; Shu, Wensheng; Zhou, Jizhong; Huang, Linan

    2017-01-01

    Understanding microbial interactions is essential to decipher the mechanisms of community assembly and their effects on ecosystem functioning, however, the conservation of species- and trait-based network interactions along environmental gradient remains largely unknown. Here, by using the network-based analyses with three paralleled data sets derived from 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, functional microarray, and predicted metagenome, we test our hypothesis that the network interactions of traits are more conserved than those of taxonomic measures, with significantly lower variation of network characteristics along the environmental gradient in acid mine drainage. The results showed that although the overall network characteristics remained similar, the structural variation was significantly lower at trait levels. The higher conserved individual node topological properties at trait level rather than at species level indicated that the responses of diverse traits remained relatively consistent even though different species played key roles under different environmental conditions. Additionally, the randomization tests revealed that it could not reject the null hypothesis that species-based correlations were random, while the tests suggested that correlation patterns of traits were non-random. Furthermore, relationships between trait-based network characteristics and environmental properties implied that trait-based networks might be more useful in reflecting the variation of ecosystem function. Taken together, our results suggest that deterministic trait-based community assembly results in greater conservation of network interaction, which may ensure ecosystem function across environmental regimes, emphasizing the potential importance of measuring the complexity and conservation of network interaction in evaluating the ecosystem stability and functioning. PMID:28848508

  12. A Nonlinear Model for Gene-Based Gene-Environment Interaction.

    PubMed

    Sa, Jian; Liu, Xu; He, Tao; Liu, Guifen; Cui, Yuehua

    2016-06-04

    A vast amount of literature has confirmed the role of gene-environment (G×E) interaction in the etiology of complex human diseases. Traditional methods are predominantly focused on the analysis of interaction between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and an environmental variable. Given that genes are the functional units, it is crucial to understand how gene effects (rather than single SNP effects) are influenced by an environmental variable to affect disease risk. Motivated by the increasing awareness of the power of gene-based association analysis over single variant based approach, in this work, we proposed a sparse principle component regression (sPCR) model to understand the gene-based G×E interaction effect on complex disease. We first extracted the sparse principal components for SNPs in a gene, then the effect of each principal component was modeled by a varying-coefficient (VC) model. The model can jointly model variants in a gene in which their effects are nonlinearly influenced by an environmental variable. In addition, the varying-coefficient sPCR (VC-sPCR) model has nice interpretation property since the sparsity on the principal component loadings can tell the relative importance of the corresponding SNPs in each component. We applied our method to a human birth weight dataset in Thai population. We analyzed 12,005 genes across 22 chromosomes and found one significant interaction effect using the Bonferroni correction method and one suggestive interaction. The model performance was further evaluated through simulation studies. Our model provides a system approach to evaluate gene-based G×E interaction.

  13. Identification of fever and vaccine-associated gene interaction networks using ontology-based literature mining.

    PubMed

    Hur, Junguk; Ozgür, Arzucan; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2012-12-20

    Fever is one of the most common adverse events of vaccines. The detailed mechanisms of fever and vaccine-associated gene interaction networks are not fully understood. In the present study, we employed a genome-wide, Centrality and Ontology-based Network Discovery using Literature data (CONDL) approach to analyse the genes and gene interaction networks associated with fever or vaccine-related fever responses. Over 170,000 fever-related articles from PubMed abstracts and titles were retrieved and analysed at the sentence level using natural language processing techniques to identify genes and vaccines (including 186 Vaccine Ontology terms) as well as their interactions. This resulted in a generic fever network consisting of 403 genes and 577 gene interactions. A vaccine-specific fever sub-network consisting of 29 genes and 28 gene interactions was extracted from articles that are related to both fever and vaccines. In addition, gene-vaccine interactions were identified. Vaccines (including 4 specific vaccine names) were found to directly interact with 26 genes. Gene set enrichment analysis was performed using the genes in the generated interaction networks. Moreover, the genes in these networks were prioritized using network centrality metrics. Making scientific discoveries and generating new hypotheses were possible by using network centrality and gene set enrichment analyses. For example, our study found that the genes in the generic fever network were more enriched in cell death and responses to wounding, and the vaccine sub-network had more gene enrichment in leukocyte activation and phosphorylation regulation. The most central genes in the vaccine-specific fever network are predicted to be highly relevant to vaccine-induced fever, whereas genes that are central only in the generic fever network are likely to be highly relevant to generic fever responses. Interestingly, no Toll-like receptors (TLRs) were found in the gene-vaccine interaction network. Since

  14. A Framework for Incorporating Orienting Activities in Computer-Based Interactive Video.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannafin, Michael J.; Hughes, Curtis W.

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on presumed functions of orienting activities, such as advance organizers, pre-questions, and statements of performance expectations, as well as the implications of such functions for the design of computer-based interactive video (CBIV). Application of empirically founded principles in design and production of CBIV is described.…

  15. Molecular Interactions between a Novel Soybean Oil-Based Polymer and Doxorubicin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel soybean oil-based polymer, hydrolyzed polymers of epoxidized soybean oil (HPESO), was developed and investigated for drug delivery. This work was aimed at determining the molecular interactions between HPESO and doxorubicin (DOX), an anticancer drug. Powder X-ray diffraction, ATR-FTIR and ...

  16. Shared Hypermedia: Communication and Interaction in Web-Based Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riva, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    Presents a framework for the development of Web-based learning environments that is focused on shared hypermedia, a new form of computer-mediated communication. Highlights include how communication and interaction are changed by computers; changes in training as a result of the Internet; situated action theory; and creating communities of…

  17. The TEACH Method: An Interactive Approach for Teaching the Needs-Based Theories Of Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorer, Cleamon, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive approach for explaining and teaching the Needs-Based Theories of Motivation. The acronym TEACH stands for Theory, Example, Application, Collaboration, and Having Discussion. This method can help business students to better understand and distinguish the implications of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs,…

  18. Perceptions of the Effectiveness of System Dynamics-Based Interactive Learning Environments: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qudrat-Ullah, Hassan

    2010-01-01

    The use of simulations in general and of system dynamics simulation based interactive learning environments (SDILEs) in particular is well recognized as an effective way of improving users' decision making and learning in complex, dynamic tasks. However, the effectiveness of SDILEs in classrooms has rarely been evaluated. This article describes…

  19. Coaching and Inspiring an Interactive Family Literacy Project of Excellence in a School-Based Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, M. Parker; Adelman, David

    2007-01-01

    This article features the Project of Excellence, a program that was designed to engage families in an interactive community-based school literacy program. The authors discuss how they created the Project of Excellence. Although the goal of the Project was to improve the reading skills of young children, the focus of the Project was directed toward…

  20. A Mineral-Exploration Exercise Based on an Interactive Computer-Simulated Drilling Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, W. B.; Allard, G. O.

    1981-01-01

    The effectiveness of an interactive computer-based instruction program designed to give students experience with exploratory drilling is compared to a previously used field-oriented simulated exploration program. The development, operation, and implementation of the computer program are discussed. (DC)

  1. Learning through Interaction in Children with Autism: Preliminary Data from a Social-Communication-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casenhiser, Devin M.; Shanker, Stuart G.; Stieben, Jim

    2013-01-01

    The study evaluates a social-communication-based approach to autism intervention aimed at improving the social interaction skills of children with autism spectrum disorder. We report preliminary results from an ongoing randomized controlled trial of 51 children aged 2 years 0 months to 4 years 11 months. Participants were assigned to either a…

  2. An Investigation of Interactive, Dialogue-Based Instruction for Undergraduate Art History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gioffre, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the feasibility and efficacy of incorporating an interactive, discussion-based instructional approach into an undergraduate art history survey course and investigates effects of the new pedagogic strategy on students' demonstrated comprehension and retention of required content. The action research project follows a systematic…

  3. Personality Types and Learners' Interaction in Web-Based Threaded Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, JeongMin; Lee, Youngmin

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effects of group composition based on the learners' personality types as measured by the Myers-Briggs type indicator as they interacted in threaded discussions. Three groups comprised introverts, extroverts, and mixed introvert-extrovert classifications. Ninety-six participants were divided into 24 groups of 4 participants…

  4. On the Bus and Online: Instantiating an Interactive Learning Environment through Design-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kartoglu, Ümit; Vesper, James L.; Reeves, Thomas C.

    2017-01-01

    The World Health Organization converted an award-winning experiential learning course that takes place on a bus traveling down the "cold chain" for time- and temperature-sensitive pharmaceutical products in Turkey to an online interactive learning environment through design-based research. Similarities and differences in the objectives…

  5. Interactive Computer-Assisted Instruction in Acid-Base Physiology for Mobile Computer Platforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longmuir, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    In this project, the traditional lecture hall presentation of acid-base physiology in the first-year medical school curriculum was replaced by interactive, computer-assisted instruction designed primarily for the iPad and other mobile computer platforms. Three learning modules were developed, each with ~20 screens of information, on the subjects…

  6. Learning Mathematics with Interactive Whiteboards and Computer-Based Graphing Utility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erbas, Ayhan Kursat; Ince, Muge; Kaya, Sukru

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a technology-supported learning environment utilizing an interactive whiteboard (IWB) and NuCalc graphing software compared to a traditional direct instruction-based environment on student achievement in graphs of quadratic functions and attitudes towards mathematics and technology. Sixty-five…

  7. Facilitating Grounded Online Interactions in Video-Case-Based Teacher Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemirovsky, Ricardo; Galvis, Alvaro

    2004-01-01

    The use of interactive video cases for teacher professional development is an emergent medium inspired by case study methods used extensively in law, management, and medicine, and by the advent of multimedia technology available to support online discussions. This paper focuses on Web-based "grounded" discussions--in which the participants base…

  8. Web-Based Interactive System for Analyzing Achievement Gaps in Public Schools System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Kening; Mulvenon, Sean W.; Stegman, Charles; Xia, Yanling

    2010-01-01

    The National Office for Research on Measurement and Evaluation Systems (NORMES) at the University of Arkansas developed a web-based interactive system to provide information on state, district, and school level achievement gaps between white students and black students, socioeconomically disadvantaged students and non-disadvantaged students, male…

  9. Interactive Profiler: An Intuitive, Web-Based Statistical Application in Visualizing Educational and Marketing Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Edward H.; Leung, Phillip; Johnson, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of a web-based statistical program--the Interactive Profiler (IP). The prototypical program, developed in Java, was motivated by the need for the general public to query against data collected from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), a large-scale US survey of the academic state of…

  10. An Interactive Web-Based Program for Stepfamilies: Development and Evaluation of Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelatt, Vicky A.; Adler-Baeder, Francesca; Seeley, John R.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a family life education program for stepfamilies that is self-administered, interactive, and web-based. The program uses behavior-modeling videos to demonstrate effective couple, parenting, and stepparenting practices. A diverse sample of 300 parents/stepparents of a child aged 11-15 years were randomized into…

  11. Interactive Computer Based Assessment Tasks: How Problem-Solving Process Data Can Inform Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoanetti, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents key steps in the design and analysis of a computer based problem-solving assessment featuring interactive tasks. The purpose of the assessment is to support targeted instruction for students by diagnosing strengths and weaknesses at different stages of problem-solving. The first focus of this article is the task piloting…

  12. Understanding Manual-Based Behavior Therapy: Some Theoretical Foundations of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greco, Laurie A.; Sorrell, John T.; McNeil, Cheryl B.

    2001-01-01

    Provides a model of understanding and evaluating manualized treatments by beginning with a review of the theory and data-driven principles upon which one treatment, Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), is based. As a point of illustration, several principles of PCIT, such as reinforcement, punishment, and stimulus control, are highlighted, and…

  13. The TEACH Method: An Interactive Approach for Teaching the Needs-Based Theories Of Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moorer, Cleamon, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive approach for explaining and teaching the Needs-Based Theories of Motivation. The acronym TEACH stands for Theory, Example, Application, Collaboration, and Having Discussion. This method can help business students to better understand and distinguish the implications of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs,…

  14. Web-Based Interactive System for Analyzing Achievement Gaps in Public Schools System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Kening; Mulvenon, Sean W.; Stegman, Charles; Xia, Yanling

    2010-01-01

    The National Office for Research on Measurement and Evaluation Systems (NORMES) at the University of Arkansas developed a web-based interactive system to provide information on state, district, and school level achievement gaps between white students and black students, socioeconomically disadvantaged students and non-disadvantaged students, male…

  15. Levels of Interaction and Proximity: Content Analysis of Video-Based Classroom Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kale, Ugur

    2008-01-01

    This study employed content analysis techniques to examine video-based cases of two websites that exemplify learner-centered pedagogies for pre-service teachers to carry out in their teaching practices. The study focused on interaction types and physical proximity levels between students and teachers observed in the videos. The findings regarding…

  16. Effects of Web-Based Interactive Modules on Engineering Students' Learning Motivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Haiyan; Aman, Amjad; Xu, Yunjun; Orlovskaya, Nina; Zhou, Mingming

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of a newly developed modules, Interactive Web-Based Visualization Tools for Gluing Undergraduate Fuel Cell Systems Courses system (IGLU), on learning motivations of engineering students using two samples (n[subscript 1] = 144 and n[subscript 2] = 135) from senior engineering classes. The…

  17. Learning Mathematics with Interactive Whiteboards and Computer-Based Graphing Utility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erbas, Ayhan Kursat; Ince, Muge; Kaya, Sukru

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a technology-supported learning environment utilizing an interactive whiteboard (IWB) and NuCalc graphing software compared to a traditional direct instruction-based environment on student achievement in graphs of quadratic functions and attitudes towards mathematics and technology. Sixty-five…

  18. Coaching and Inspiring an Interactive Family Literacy Project of Excellence in a School-Based Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, M. Parker; Adelman, David

    2007-01-01

    This article features the Project of Excellence, a program that was designed to engage families in an interactive community-based school literacy program. The authors discuss how they created the Project of Excellence. Although the goal of the Project was to improve the reading skills of young children, the focus of the Project was directed toward…

  19. Relevant Term Suggestion in Interactive Web Search Based on Contextual Information in Query Session Logs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chien-Kang; Chien, Lee-Feng; Oyang, Yen-Jen

    2003-01-01

    Proposes an effective term suggestion approach to interactive Web searches. Explains a log-based approach to relevant term extraction and term suggestion where relevant terms suggested for a user query are those that co-occur in similar query sessions from search engine logs rather than in the retrieved documents. (Author/LRW)

  20. An Interactive Web-Based Method of Outreach to College Students at Risk for Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Ann; Koestner, Bethany; Rosenberg, Jill; Moore, David; Garlow, Steven J.; Sedway, Jan; Nicholas, Linda; Hendin, Herbert; Mann, J. John; Nemeroff, Charles B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: From 2002 to 2005, the authors tested an interactive, Web-based method to encourage college students at risk for suicide to seek treatment. Methods: The authors invited students at 2 universities to complete an online questionnaire that screened for depression and other suicide risk factors. Respondents received a…

  1. Levels of Interaction and Proximity: Content Analysis of Video-Based Classroom Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kale, Ugur

    2008-01-01

    This study employed content analysis techniques to examine video-based cases of two websites that exemplify learner-centered pedagogies for pre-service teachers to carry out in their teaching practices. The study focused on interaction types and physical proximity levels between students and teachers observed in the videos. The findings regarding…

  2. Using a Dual Safeguard Web-Based Interactive Teaching Approach in an Introductory Physics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Lie-Ming; Li, Bin; Luo, Ying

    2015-01-01

    We modified the Just-in-Time Teaching approach and developed a dual safeguard web-based interactive (DGWI) teaching system for an introductory physics course. The system consists of four instructional components that improve student learning by including warm-up assignments and online homework. Student and instructor activities involve activities…

  3. Specifying and Refining a Measurement Model for a Computer-Based Interactive Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Roy; Mislevy, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    The challenges of modeling students' performance in computer-based interactive assessments include accounting for multiple aspects of knowledge and skill that arise in different situations and the conditional dependencies among multiple aspects of performance. This article describes a Bayesian approach to modeling and estimating cognitive models…

  4. Learning through Interaction in Children with Autism: Preliminary Data from a Social-Communication-Based Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casenhiser, Devin M.; Shanker, Stuart G.; Stieben, Jim

    2013-01-01

    The study evaluates a social-communication-based approach to autism intervention aimed at improving the social interaction skills of children with autism spectrum disorder. We report preliminary results from an ongoing randomized controlled trial of 51 children aged 2 years 0 months to 4 years 11 months. Participants were assigned to either a…

  5. Use of Interactive Web-Based Exercises for English as a Foreign Language Learning: Learners' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yen-Hui

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the learner perceptions of a CALL component in a blended language learning context. 52 Taiwanese college students attended instructional classroom sessions and did weekly online assignments in the form of interactive web-based exercises over one semester. Their learning performance was measured by means of two computer-based…

  6. Interactive Television and Problem Based Learning: Viable Delivery "Technologies" for Rural Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Ian W.; Gibson, Kay L.

    1995-01-01

    An Australian preservice teacher education course used interactive television to present real-life, rural teaching situations as examples of best practice. These were integrated with problem-based learning scenarios focusing on dilemmas faced by practicing teachers in multigraded rural classrooms. Evaluation revealed positive feedback from both…

  7. Interactive Multimedia and Problem-Based Learning: Challenges for Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albion, Peter R.; Gibson, Ian W.

    Interactive multimedia (IMM) and problem-based learning (PBL) are both promoted in response to the current need to offer authentic and effective professional education. An emphasis on collaborative work in PBL contexts may have discouraged the application of IMM, more commonly designed for individual use. This paper describes preliminary…

  8. Using a Dual Safeguard Web-Based Interactive Teaching Approach in an Introductory Physics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Lie-Ming; Li, Bin; Luo, Ying

    2015-01-01

    We modified the Just-in-Time Teaching approach and developed a dual safeguard web-based interactive (DGWI) teaching system for an introductory physics course. The system consists of four instructional components that improve student learning by including warm-up assignments and online homework. Student and instructor activities involve activities…

  9. Folding of a supramolecular framework based on a tetrametallic clip driven by π-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Agou, Tomohiro; Sébastian, Manuel; Lescop, Christophe; Réau, Régis

    2011-04-18

    Supramolecular extended frameworks based on a rotational molecular clip and having the same "primary structure" can exhibit either an unfolded or a folded framework. This process is driven by intramolecular π-π interactions, resulting in the formation of an infinite π-stacked column within the folded supramolecular framework.

  10. Rationale, Design and Implementation of a Computer Vision-Based Interactive E-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Richard Y. D.; Jin, Jesse S.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a schematic application of computer vision technologies to e-learning that is synchronous, peer-to-peer-based, and supports an instructor's interaction with non-computer teaching equipments. The article first discusses the importance of these focused e-learning areas, where the properties include accurate bidirectional…

  11. Specifying and Refining a Measurement Model for a Computer-Based Interactive Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Roy; Mislevy, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    The challenges of modeling students' performance in computer-based interactive assessments include accounting for multiple aspects of knowledge and skill that arise in different situations and the conditional dependencies among multiple aspects of performance. This article describes a Bayesian approach to modeling and estimating cognitive models…

  12. Personality Types and Learners' Interaction in Web-Based Threaded Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, JeongMin; Lee, Youngmin

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effects of group composition based on the learners' personality types as measured by the Myers-Briggs type indicator as they interacted in threaded discussions. Three groups comprised introverts, extroverts, and mixed introvert-extrovert classifications. Ninety-six participants were divided into 24 groups of 4 participants…

  13. Human Relations Skills in Individual Interactions for the Occupational Specialist. Competency-Based Modular Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutter, Juanita B.; Boland, Jeanne M.

    This self-instructional module, one volume of a series of competency-based modules in human relations skills for occupational specialists, is designed to help the specialist interact effectively with a variety of students, teachers, co-workers and employees. Other modules in this set of three are Level I Human Relations Skills for the Occupational…

  14. Touch-Based Interaction Approach for Network Science Research and Visualization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory (ARL) Visualization Framework presents a language -agnostic, platform-independent approach to connecting data published by probes to... Visualization by John P Hancock, Mathew Aguirre, and Andrew Toth Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited...Laboratory Touch-Based Interaction Approach for Network Science Research and Visualization by John P Hancock and Mathew Aguirre ArtisTech, Inc

  15. Video-Based Interaction, Negotiation for Comprehensibility, and Second Language Speech Learning: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Kazuya; Akiyama, Yuka

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the impact of video-based conversational interaction on the longitudinal development (one academic semester) of second language production by college-level Japanese English-as-a-foreign-language learners. Students in the experimental group engaged in weekly dyadic conversation exchanges with native speakers in the United States…

  16. The Application Study of MCU in Visual Classroom Interactive Teaching Based on Virtual Experiment Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Diankuan; Li, Lixin

    Because many students are lacking in perceptual knowledge of MCU, they are difficult to engage themselves in classroom activities. The paper therefore offers an interactive teaching mode of proteus-based MCU virtual laboratory. The teaching mode is of help in arousing students' interests, improving their learning efficiency and practical abilities, and promoting the teaching reform of MCU subject.

  17. Interactive Computer-Assisted Instruction in Acid-Base Physiology for Mobile Computer Platforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longmuir, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    In this project, the traditional lecture hall presentation of acid-base physiology in the first-year medical school curriculum was replaced by interactive, computer-assisted instruction designed primarily for the iPad and other mobile computer platforms. Three learning modules were developed, each with ~20 screens of information, on the subjects…

  18. The Generative Effects of Instructional Organizers with Computer-Based Interactive Video.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Richard F.

    This study compared the use of three instructional organizers--the advance organizer (AO), the participatory pictorial graphic organizer (PGO), and the final form pictorial graphic organizer (FGO)--in the design and use of computer-based interactive video (CBIV) programs. That is, it attempted to determine whether a less generative or more…

  19. Ninter-Networked Interaction: Theory-based Cases in Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saarenkunnas, Maarit; Jarvela, Sanna; Hakkinen, Paivi; Kuure, Leena; Taalas, Peppi; Kunelius, Esa

    2000-01-01

    Describes the pedagogical framework of an interdisciplinary, international project entitled NINTER (Networked Interaction: Theory-Based Cases in Teaching and Learning). Discusses a pedagogical model for teacher and staff development programs in a networked environment; distributed cognition; cognitive apprenticeship; challenges for educational…

  20. Inquiry and Groups: Student Interactions in Cooperative Inquiry-Based Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods-McConney, Amanda; Wosnitza, Marold; Sturrock, Keryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Science education research has recommended cooperative inquiry based science in the primary science context for more than two decades but after more than 20 years, student achievement in science has not substantially improved. This study, through direct observation and analysis, investigated content-related student interactions in an authentic…

  1. Inquiry and Groups: Student Interactions in Cooperative Inquiry-Based Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods-McConney, Amanda; Wosnitza, Marold; Sturrock, Keryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Science education research has recommended cooperative inquiry based science in the primary science context for more than two decades but after more than 20 years, student achievement in science has not substantially improved. This study, through direct observation and analysis, investigated content-related student interactions in an authentic…

  2. Video-Based Interaction, Negotiation for Comprehensibility, and Second Language Speech Learning: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Kazuya; Akiyama, Yuka

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the impact of video-based conversational interaction on the longitudinal development (one academic semester) of second language production by college-level Japanese English-as-a-foreign-language learners. Students in the experimental group engaged in weekly dyadic conversation exchanges with native speakers in the United States…

  3. Reconstruction of missing data in social networks based on temporal patterns of interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stomakhin, Alexey; Short, Martin B.; Bertozzi, Andrea L.

    2011-11-01

    We discuss a mathematical framework based on a self-exciting point process aimed at analyzing temporal patterns in the series of interaction events between agents in a social network. We then develop a reconstruction model that allows one to predict the unknown participants in a portion of those events. Finally, we apply our results to the Los Angeles gang network.

  4. Rationale, Design and Implementation of a Computer Vision-Based Interactive E-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Richard Y. D.; Jin, Jesse S.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a schematic application of computer vision technologies to e-learning that is synchronous, peer-to-peer-based, and supports an instructor's interaction with non-computer teaching equipments. The article first discusses the importance of these focused e-learning areas, where the properties include accurate bidirectional…

  5. Project-Based Method as an Effective Means of Interdisciplinary Interaction While Teaching a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bondar, Irina Alekseevna; Kulbakova, Renata Ivanovna; Svintorzhitskaja, Irina Andreevna; Pilat, Larisa Pavlovna; Zavrumov, Zaur Aslanovich

    2016-01-01

    The article explains how to use a project-based method as an effective means of interdisciplinary interaction when teaching a foreign language on the example of The Institute of service, tourism and design (branch) of the North Caucasus Federal University (Pyatigorsk, Stavropol Territory Russia). The article holds the main objectives of the…

  6. Effects of large vessel on temperature distribution based on photothermal coupling interaction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhifang; Zhang, Xiyang; Li, Zuoran; Li, Hui

    2016-10-01

    This paper is based on the finite element analysis method for studying effects of large blood vessel on temperature based on photothermal coupling interaction model, and it couples the physical field of optical transmission with the physical field of heat transfer in biological tissue by using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4 software. The results demonstrate the cooling effect of large blood vessel, which can be potential application for the treatment of liver tumors.

  7. ClicO FS: an interactive web-based service of Circos.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Wei-Hien; Tan, Yung-Chie; Yap, Soon-Joo; Ng, Kee-Peng

    2015-11-15

    : We present ClicO Free Service, an online web-service based on Circos, which provides a user-friendly, interactive web-based interface with configurable features to generate Circos circular plots. Online web-service is freely available at http://clicofs.codoncloud.com : soonjoo.yap@codongenomics.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Stretching single-stranded DNA: interplay of electrostatic, base-pairing, and base-pair stacking interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y; Zhou, H; Ou-Yang, Z C

    2001-01-01

    Recent single-macromolecule observations revealed that the force/extension characteristics of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) are closely related to solution ionic concentration and DNA sequence composition. To understand this, we studied the elastic property of ssDNA through the Monte Carlo implementation of a modified freely jointed chain (FJC), with electrostatic, base-pairing, and base-pair stacking interactions all incorporated. The simulated force-extension profiles for both random and designed sequences have attained quantitative agreements with the experimental data. In low-salt solution, electrostatic interaction dominates, and at low forces, the molecule can be more easily aligned than an unmodified FJC. In high-salt solution, secondary hairpin structure appears in ssDNA by the formation of base pairs between complementary bases, and external stretching causes a hairpin-coil structural transition, which is continuous for ssDNA made of random sequences. In designed sequences such as poly(dA-dT) and poly(dG-dC), the stacking potential between base pairs encourages the aggregation of base pairs into bulk hairpins and makes the hairpin-coil transition a discontinuous (first-order) process. The sensitivity of elongation to the base-pairing rule is also investigated. The comparison of modeling calculations and the experimental data suggests that the base pairing of single-stranded polynucleotide molecules tends to form a nested and independent planar hairpin structure rather than a random intersecting pattern. PMID:11463654

  9. Classification of metal-oxide bonded interactions based on local potential- and kinetic-energy densities

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Cox, David; Crawford, T Daniel; Rosso, Kevin M.; Ross, Nancy; Downs, R. T.

    2006-02-28

    A classification of the HF bonded interactions comprising a large number of molecules has been proposed by Espinosa et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 5529 (2002)] based on the ratio |V(rc)|/G(rc) where |V(rc)| is the magnitude of the local potential energy density and G(rc) is the local kinetic density evaluated at the bond critical points, rc. A calculation of the ratio for the MO bonded interactions comprising a relatively large number of molecules and earth materials, together with the constraints imposed by the values of Ñ2ρ(rc) and the local electronic energy density H(rc) = G(rc) + V(rc) in the HF study, yielded the same classification for the oxides as found for the fluorides. This is true despite the different trends of the bond critical point and local energy properties with the bond length displayed by the HF and MO bonded interactions. LiO, NaO and MgO bonded interactions classify as closed shell ionic bonds, BeO, AlO, SiO, BO and PO bonded interactions classify as bonds of intermediate character and NO bonded interactions classify as shared covalent bonds. CO and SO bonded interactions classify as both intermediate and covalent bonded interactions. The CO triple bonded interaction classifies as a bond of intermediate character and the CO single bonded interaction classifies as a covalent bond whereas their H(rc) value indicates that they are both covalent bonds. The |V(rc)|/G(rc) ratios for the BeO, AlO and SiO bonded interactions indicate that they have a substantial component of ionic character despite their classification as bonds of intermediate character. The trend between |V(rc)|/G(rc) and the character of the bonded interaction is consistent with trends expected from electronegativity considerations. The connection between the net charges and the experimental SiO bond length evaluated for the Si and O atoms comprising two orthosilicates are examined in terms of the |V(rc)|/G(rc) values.

  10. RKKY interaction in P-N junction based on surface states of 3D topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuhui; Yang, Wen; Chang, Kai

    The RKKY interaction mediated by conduction electrons supplies a mechanism to realize the long-range coupling of localized spins which is desired for the spin devices. Here, we examine the controllability of RKKY interaction in P-N junction (PNJ) based on surface states of 3D topological insulator (3DTI). In this study, through quantum way but not usual classical analogy to light propagation, the intuitive picture for electron waves across the interface of PNJ is obtained, e.g., Klein tunneling, negative refraction and focusing. Moreover, we perform the numerical calculations for all kinds of RKKY interaction including the Heisenberg, Ising, and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya terms. We find the focusing of surface states leads to the local augmentation of RKKY interaction. Most importantly, a dimension transition occurs, i.e., the decay rate of RKKY interaction from the deserved 1/R 2 to 1/ R . In addition, the quadratic gate-dependence of RKKY interaction is also beneficial to the application of 3DTI PNJ in the fields of spintronics and quantum computation. This work was supported by the MOST (Grant No. 2015CB921503, and No. 2014CB848700) and NSFC (Grant No. 11434010, No. 11274036, No. 11322542, and No. 11504018).

  11. Learning through interaction in children with autism: preliminary data from asocial-communication-based intervention.

    PubMed

    Casenhiser, Devin M; Shanker, Stuart G; Stieben, Jim

    2013-03-01

    The study evaluates a social-communication-based approach to autism intervention aimed at improving the social interaction skills of children with autism spectrum disorder. We report preliminary results from an ongoing randomized controlled trial of 51 children aged 2 years 0 months to 4 years 11 months. Participants were assigned to either a target treatment or community treatment group. Families in the target treatment group were given 2 hours of therapy and coaching each week in an intervention emphasizing social-interaction and the parent-child relationship. Children in the community treatment group received a variety of services averaging 3.9 hours per week. After 12 months, outcomes were measured to determine changes in the groups in social interaction and communication. In addition, a regression analysis was conducted to determine whether changes in social interaction skills were associated with language development. Results suggest that children in the treatment group made significantly greater gains in social interaction skills in comparison to the community treatment group, but no between-group differences were found for standard language assessments. Initiation of joint attention, involvement, and severity of language delay were found to be significantly associated with improvement of language skills in children with autism. Finally caregiver skills targeted by the intervention were found to be significantly associated with changes in children's interaction skills.

  12. Sequence-based discrimination of protein-RNA interacting residues using a probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Pai, Priyadarshini P; Dash, Tirtharaj; Mondal, Sukanta

    2017-04-07

    Protein interactions with ribonucleic acids (RNA) are well-known to be crucial for a wide range of cellular processes such as transcriptional regulation, protein synthesis or translation, and post-translational modifications. Identification of the RNA-interacting residues can provide insights into these processes and aid in relevant biotechnological manipulations. Owing to their eventual potential in combating diseases and industrial production, several computational attempts have been made over years using sequence- and structure-based information. Recent comparative studies suggest that despite these developments, many problems are faced with respect to the usability, prerequisites, and accessibility of various tools, thereby calling for an alternative approach and perspective supplementation in the prediction scenario. With this motivation, in this paper, we propose the use of a simple-yet-efficient conditional probabilistic approach based on the application of local occurrence of amino acids in the interacting region in a non-numeric sequence feature space, for discriminating between RNA interacting and non-interacting residues. The proposed method has been meticulously tested for robustness using a cross-estimation method showing MCC of 0.341 and F- measure of 66.84%. Upon exploring large scale applications using benchmark datasets available to date, this approach showed an encouraging performance comparable with the state-of-art. The software is available at https://github.com/ABCgrp/DORAEMON. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Protein-protein interaction inference based on semantic similarity of Gene Ontology terms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Bo; Tang, Qiang-Rong

    2016-07-21

    Identifying protein-protein interactions is important in molecular biology. Experimental methods to this issue have their limitations, and computational approaches have attracted more and more attentions from the biological community. The semantic similarity derived from the Gene Ontology (GO) annotation has been regarded as one of the most powerful indicators for protein interaction. However, conventional methods based on GO similarity fail to take advantage of the specificity of GO terms in the ontology graph. We proposed a GO-based method to predict protein-protein interaction by integrating different kinds of similarity measures derived from the intrinsic structure of GO graph. We extended five existing methods to derive the semantic similarity measures from the descending part of two GO terms in the GO graph, then adopted a feature integration strategy to combines both the ascending and the descending similarity scores derived from the three sub-ontologies to construct various kinds of features to characterize each protein pair. Support vector machines (SVM) were employed as discriminate classifiers, and five-fold cross validation experiments were conducted on both human and yeast protein-protein interaction datasets to evaluate the performance of different kinds of integrated features, the experimental results suggest the best performance of the feature that combines information from both the ascending and the descending parts of the three ontologies. Our method is appealing for effective prediction of protein-protein interaction.

  14. A feature-based approach to modeling protein-protein interaction hot spots.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu-il; Kim, Dongsup; Lee, Doheon

    2009-05-01

    Identifying features that effectively represent the energetic contribution of an individual interface residue to the interactions between proteins remains problematic. Here, we present several new features and show that they are more effective than conventional features. By combining the proposed features with conventional features, we develop a predictive model for interaction hot spots. Initially, 54 multifaceted features, composed of different levels of information including structure, sequence and molecular interaction information, are quantified. Then, to identify the best subset of features for predicting hot spots, feature selection is performed using a decision tree. Based on the selected features, a predictive model for hot spots is created using support vector machine (SVM) and tested on an independent test set. Our model shows better overall predictive accuracy than previous methods such as the alanine scanning methods Robetta and FOLDEF, and the knowledge-based method KFC. Subsequent analysis yields several findings about hot spots. As expected, hot spots have a larger relative surface area burial and are more hydrophobic than other residues. Unexpectedly, however, residue conservation displays a rather complicated tendency depending on the types of protein complexes, indicating that this feature is not good for identifying hot spots. Of the selected features, the weighted atomic packing density, relative surface area burial and weighted hydrophobicity are the top 3, with the weighted atomic packing density proving to be the most effective feature for predicting hot spots. Notably, we find that hot spots are closely related to pi-related interactions, especially pi . . . pi interactions.

  15. Probing intramolecular interactions in arylselenides using a property descriptor based approach.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dipankar; Patel, Chandan; Liebman, Joel F; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2008-09-18

    Although a large volume of experimental evidence is available on the existence of intramolecular nonbonding interactions between chalcogen atoms in main group organometallic compounds, the primary focus has been on the contact distances involving the chalcogen atoms. The important class of intramolecular Se...X (where X is O, S, N) nonbonding interaction in a series of organoselenium compounds is quantified using a new scheme based on a molecular property descriptor. In the present study, we have employed the nucleus-independent chemical shift [NICS(0)] values, as a property descriptor to evaluate the strength of exocyclic nonbonding interactions in a series of aryl selenides. The ab initio MP2 as well as density functional theory methods have been used in conjunction with Dunning's cc-pVDZ basis set. The quantified values of Se...X nonbonding interactions are compared with other schemes based on thermochemical equations such as homodesmic and ortho-para methods. The changes in NICS(0) values at the aryl ring center are found to be sensitive to the strength of exocyclic Se...X interaction.

  16. HEMORHEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF PERFLUOROCARBON BASED OXYGEN CARRIER INTERACTION WITH COLLOID PLASMA EXPANDERS AND BLOOD

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Diana M.; Ortiz, Daniel; Alvarez, Oscar A.; Briceño, Juan C.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion based oxygen carriers lack colloid osmotic pressure (COP) and must be administered with colloid-based plasma expanders (PEs). Although PFC emulsions have been widely studied, there is limited information about PFC emulsion interaction with PEs and blood. Their interaction forms aggregates due to electrostatic and rheological phenomena, and change blood rheology and blood flow. This study analyzes the effects of the interaction between PFC emulsions with blood in the presence of clinically-used PEs. The rheological behavior of the mixtures was analyzed in parallel with in vivo analysis of blood flow in microvessels using intravital microscopy when administered in a clinically relevant scenario. The interaction between the PFC emulsion and PE with blood produced PFC droplets and red blood cell (RBCs) aggregation, and increased blood viscosity. The PFC droplets formed aggregates when mixed with PEs containing electrolytes, and the aggregation increased with the electrolyte concentration. Mixtures of PFC with PEs that produced PFC aggregates also induced RCBs aggregation when mixed with blood, increasing blood viscosity at low shear rates. The more viscous suspension at low shear rates produced a blunted blood flow velocity profile in vivo relative to non-aggregating mixtures of PFC and PEs. For the PEs evaluated, albumin produced minimal to undetectable aggregation. PFC and PEs interaction with blood can affect sections of the microcirculation with low shear rate (e.g. arterioles, venules, and pulmonary circulation) because aggregates could cause capillary occlusion, decrease perfusion, pulmonary emboli, or focal ischemia. PMID:23606592

  17. Biotin-Avidin Based Universal Cell-Matrix Interaction for Promoting Three-Dimensional Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiao-Qiu; Zhang, Jia; Feng, Chuanliang

    2015-09-23

    To promote cell adhesion in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial for avoiding cell anoikis, which is one of the most important issues for fundamental cell biology. Herein, a biotin-avidin based universal cell-matrix interaction for different types of cells is developed in order to achieve the promoted adhesion in 3D ECM. For the purpose, biotinylated nanofibrous hydrogels are constructed by coassembling 1,4-benzyldicarboxamide (C2) based non-biotinylated and biotinylated supramolecular gelators. The used cells are modified by avidin (AV-cells) through biotinylating cells and then interacting with avidin. After in situ encapsulating AV-cells in the hydrogels, the adhered amount can be increased by tens of percent even with adding several percentages of the biotinylated C2 gelators in the coassembly due to the specific biotin-avidin interaction. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) confirms that AV-cells can proliferate without varying gene expression and denaturation. Compared with the interaction between RGD and cells, this avidin-biotin interaction should be much more universal and it is feasible to be employed to promote cell adhesion for most types of cells in 3D matrix.

  18. PyPLIF: Python-based Protein-Ligand Interaction Fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Radifar, Muhammad; Yuniarti, Nunung; Istyastono, Enade Perdana

    2013-01-01

    Structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) methods often rely on docking score. The docking score is an over-simplification of the actual ligand-target binding. Its capability to model and predict the actual binding reality is limited. Recently, interaction fingerprinting (IFP) has come and offered us an alternative way to model reality. IFP provides us an alternate way to examine protein-ligand interactions. The docking score indicates the approximate affinity and IFP shows the interaction specificity. IFP is a method to convert three dimensional (3D) protein-ligand interactions into one dimensional (1D) bitstrings. The bitstrings are subsequently employed to compare the protein-ligand interaction predicted by the docking tool against the reference ligand. These comparisons produce scores that can be used to enhance the quality of SBVS campaigns. However, some IFP tools are either proprietary or using a proprietary library, which limits the access to the tools and the development of customized IFP algorithm. Therefore, we have developed PyPLIF, a Python-based open source tool to analyze IFP. In this article, we describe PyPLIF and its application to enhance the quality of SBVS in order to identify antagonists for estrogen α receptor (ERα). PyPLIF is freely available at http://code.google.com/p/pyplif.

  19. Classification of metal-oxide bonded interactions based on local potential- and kinetic-energy densities.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, G V; Cox, D F; Crawford, T D; Rosso, K M; Ross, N L; Downs, R T

    2006-02-28

    A classification of the hydrogen fluoride H-F-bonded interactions comprising a large number of molecules has been proposed by Espinosa et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 5529 (2002)] based on the ratio /Vr(c)/ / Gr(c) where /Vr(c)/ is the magnitude of the local potential-energy density and Gr(c) is the local kinetic-energy density, each evaluated at a bond critical point r(c). A calculation of the ratio for the M-O bonded interactions comprising a relatively large number of oxide molecules and earth materials, together with the constraints imposed by the values of inverted Delta2rho r(c) and the local electronic energy density, Hr(c) = Gr(c) + Vr(c), in the H-F study, yielded practically the same classification for the oxides. This is true despite the different trends that hold between the bond critical point and local energy density properties with the bond lengths displayed by the H-F and M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the ratio, Li-O, Na-O, and Mg-O bonded interactions classify as closed-shell ionic bonds, Be-O, Al-O, Si-O, B-O, and P-O interactions classify as bonds of intermediate character with the covalent character increasing from Be-O to P-O. N-O interactions classify as shared covalent bonds. C-O and S-O bonded interactions classify as both intermediate and covalent bonded interactions. The C-O double- and triple-bonded interactions classify as intermediate-bonded interactions, each with a substantial component of covalent character and the C-O single-bonded interaction classifies as a covalent bond whereas their local electronic energy density values indicate that they are each covalent bonded interactions. The ratios for the Be-O, Al-O, and Si-O bonded interactions indicate that they have a substantial component of ionic character despite their classification as bonds of intermediate character. The trend between the ratio and the character of the bonded interactions is consistent with trends expected from electronegativity considerations. The ratio

  20. A look at an interactive classroom-based drug abuse prevention program: interactive contents and suggestions for research.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Steve; Rohrbach, Louise A; Patel, Ravi; Holiday, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Interactivity has been shown to be a critical element of effective drug abuse prevention programs. This study examined the contents of Project Towards No Drug Abuse, a program that has revealed strong effects only when delivered in a highly interactive version. Types of teacher and student interactive messages were identified. It is speculated that explicit action on the part of the teacher to have students make statements and ask questions of one another may be the essence of effective drug education program delivery. Suggestions for future research on interactivity were made.

  1. Interactive Cosmetic Makeup of a 3D Point-Based Face Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Sik; Choi, Soo-Mi

    We present an interactive system for cosmetic makeup of a point-based face model acquired by 3D scanners. We first enhance the texture of a face model in 3D space using low-pass Gaussian filtering, median filtering, and histogram equalization. The user is provided with a stereoscopic display and haptic feedback, and can perform simulated makeup tasks including the application of foundation, color makeup, and lip gloss. Fast rendering is achieved by processing surfels using the GPU, and we use a BSP tree data structure and a dynamic local refinement of the facial surface to provide interactive haptics. We have implemented a prototype system and evaluated its performance.

  2. Evaluating the Use of Computer-based Interactive Technology for Improving Outpatient Procedure Education

    PubMed Central

    Cowl, Clayton T.; Petersen, Bret T.; Smith, Glenn; Hauser, Stephen C.

    2002-01-01

    We randomly assigned 125 first-time elective colonoscopy or esophagoduodenoscopy patients to receive education about their procedure using the written format used currently or with computer-based interactive technology (CBT) with video animation. Using validated questionnaires, patient anxiety decreased (p<0.001) and satisfaction increased (p<0.05) in the CBT group. CBT patients were more willing to pay out-of-pocket for procedure education (p<0.05). Use of new interactive technologies to educate patients regarding procedures and providing informed consent might be applied successfully to other clinical endeavors.

  3. VIA-RAD: a blackboard-based system for diagnostic radiology. Visual Interaction Assistant for Radiology.

    PubMed

    Rogers, E

    1995-08-01

    The work described in this article presents an approach to the integration of computer-displayed radiological images with cooperative computerized assistance for decision-making. The VIA-RAD system (Visual Interaction Assistant for Radiology) is a blackboard-based architecture, founded on extensive data collection and analysis in the domain of diagnostic radiology, together with cognitive modeling of the interaction between perception and problem-solving. The details of this system are presented in terms of domain knowledge representation and domain knowledge mapping. A small prototype of the system has been implemented and tested with radiology subjects, and the results of this study are also described.

  4. Agent-based paradigm for integration of interactive cable television operations and business support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wattawa, Scott

    1995-11-01

    Offering interactive services and data in a hybrid fiber/coax cable system requires the coordination of a host of operations and business support systems. New service offerings and network growth and evolution create never-ending changes in the network infrastructure. Agent-based enterprise models provide a flexible mechanism for systems integration of service and support systems. Agent models also provide a mechanism to decouple interactive services from network architecture. By using the Java programming language, agents may be made safe, portable, and intelligent. This paper investigates the application of the Object Management Group's Common Object Request Brokering Architecture to the integration of a multiple services metropolitan area network.

  5. The interaction with tubulin of a series of stilbenes based on combretastatin A-4.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, J. A.; Hadfield, J. A.; Pettit, G. R.; Fox, B. W.; McGown, A. T.

    1995-01-01

    A series of stilbenes, based on combretastatin A-4, were synthesised. A structure-activity study was carried out to characterise the interaction of these agents with tubulin. The substitution of small alkyl substituents for the 4'-methoxy group of combretastatin A-4 and the loss of the 3'-hydroxyl group does not have a major effect on the interaction with tubulin. trans-Stilbenes were shown to bind tubulin, but do not inhibit microtubule assembly. This work, together with previous studies, has been used to propose an idealised structure for a tubulin-binding agent of this type. Images Figure 7 PMID:7710932

  6. Nurturing Healthy Relationships through a Community-based Interactive Theater Program

    PubMed Central

    Fredland, Nina M.

    2010-01-01

    Promoting healthy relationships and preventing unhealthy behaviors, such as bullying and teen dating violence, among young adolescents was the goal of this study. This developmentally appropriate project used interactive theater to deliver a healthy message. Students in 7th grade health classes (N = 114) participated in the interactive theater intervention, a program that consisted of three consecutive performances and one follow-up day. This article reports on community-based research related to the development of a theater script in collaboration with a local theater group, the feasibility of using this innovative format as an intervention method, and lessons learned in collaborating with community partners. PMID:20437291

  7. Highly Accurate Structure-Based Prediction of HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage Suggests Intermolecular Interactions Driving Tropism.

    PubMed

    Kieslich, Chris A; Tamamis, Phanourios; Guzman, Yannis A; Onel, Melis; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 entry into host cells is mediated by interactions between the V3-loop of viral glycoprotein gp120 and chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4, collectively known as HIV-1 coreceptors. Accurate genotypic prediction of coreceptor usage is of significant clinical interest and determination of the factors driving tropism has been the focus of extensive study. We have developed a method based on nonlinear support vector machines to elucidate the interacting residue pairs driving coreceptor usage and provide highly accurate coreceptor usage predictions. Our models utilize centroid-centroid interaction energies from computationally derived structures of the V3-loop:coreceptor complexes as primary features, while additional features based on established rules regarding V3-loop sequences are also investigated. We tested our method on 2455 V3-loop sequences of various lengths and subtypes, and produce a median area under the receiver operator curve of 0.977 based on 500 runs of 10-fold cross validation. Our study is the first to elucidate a small set of specific interacting residue pairs between the V3-loop and coreceptors capable of predicting coreceptor usage with high accuracy across major HIV-1 subtypes. The developed method has been implemented as a web tool named CRUSH, CoReceptor USage prediction for HIV-1, which is available at http://ares.tamu.edu/CRUSH/.

  8. Interactive Learning Environment: Web-based Virtual Hydrological Simulation System using Augmented and Immersive Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, I.

    2014-12-01

    Recent developments in internet technologies make it possible to manage and visualize large data on the web. Novel visualization techniques and interactive user interfaces allow users to create realistic environments, and interact with data to gain insight from simulations and environmental observations. The hydrological simulation system is a web-based 3D interactive learning environment for teaching hydrological processes and concepts. The simulation systems provides a visually striking platform with realistic terrain information, and water simulation. Students can create or load predefined scenarios, control environmental parameters, and evaluate environmental mitigation alternatives. The web-based simulation system provides an environment for students to learn about the hydrological processes (e.g. flooding and flood damage), and effects of development and human activity in the floodplain. The system utilizes latest web technologies and graphics processing unit (GPU) for water simulation and object collisions on the terrain. Users can access the system in three visualization modes including virtual reality, augmented reality, and immersive reality using heads-up display. The system provides various scenarios customized to fit the age and education level of various users. This presentation provides an overview of the web-based flood simulation system, and demonstrates the capabilities of the system for various visualization and interaction modes.

  9. Evaluating model based imputation methods for missing covariates in regression models with interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soeun; Sugar, Catherine A.; Belin, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Imputation strategies are widely used in settings that involve inference with incomplete data. However, implementation of a particular approach always rests on assumptions, and subtle distinctions between methods can have an impact on subsequent analyses. In this paper we are concerned with regression models in which the true underlying relationship includes interaction terms. We focus in particular on a linear model with one fully observed continuous predictor, a second partially observed continuous predictor, and their interaction. We derive the conditional distribution of the missing covariate and interaction term given the observed covariate and the outcome variable, and examine the performance of a multiple imputation procedure based on this distribution. We also investigate several alternative procedures that can be implemented by adapting multivariate normal multiple imputation software in ways that might be expected to perform well despite incompatibilities between model assumptions and true underlying relationships among the variables. The methods are compared in terms of bias, coverage and confidence interval width. As expected, the procedure based on the correct conditional distribution (CCD) performs well across all scenarios. Just as importantly for general practitioners, several of the approaches based on multivariate normality perform comparably to the CCD in a number of circumstances, although, interestingly, procedures that seek to preserve the multiplicative relationship between the interaction term and the main-effects are found to be substantially less reliable. For illustration, the various procedures are applied to an analysis of post-traumatic-stress-disorder symptoms in a study of childhood trauma. PMID:25630757

  10. Identification of Essential Proteins Based on a New Combination of Local Interaction Density and Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiawei; Qi, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational approaches aided by computer science have been used to predict essential proteins and are faster than expensive, time-consuming, laborious experimental approaches. However, the performance of such approaches is still poor, making practical applications of computational approaches difficult in some fields. Hence, the development of more suitable and efficient computing methods is necessary for identification of essential proteins. Method In this paper, we propose a new method for predicting essential proteins in a protein interaction network, local interaction density combined with protein complexes (LIDC), based on statistical analyses of essential proteins and protein complexes. First, we introduce a new local topological centrality, local interaction density (LID), of the yeast PPI network; second, we discuss a new integration strategy for multiple bioinformatics. The LIDC method was then developed through a combination of LID and protein complex information based on our new integration strategy. The purpose of LIDC is discovery of important features of essential proteins with their neighbors in real protein complexes, thereby improving the efficiency of identification. Results Experimental results based on three different PPI(protein-protein interaction) networks of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli showed that LIDC outperformed classical topological centrality measures and some recent combinational methods. Moreover, when predicting MIPS datasets, the better improvement of performance obtained by LIDC is over all nine reference methods (i.e., DC, BC, NC, LID, PeC, CoEWC, WDC, ION, and UC). Conclusions LIDC is more effective for the prediction of essential proteins than other recently developed methods. PMID:26125187

  11. InterRNA: a database of base interactions in RNA structures

    PubMed Central

    Appasamy, Sri Devan; Hamdani, Hazrina Yusof; Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2016-01-01

    A major component of RNA structure stabilization are the hydrogen bonded interactions between the base residues. The importance and biological relevance for large clusters of base interactions can be much more easily investigated when their occurrences have been systematically detected, catalogued and compared. In this paper, we describe the database InterRNA (INTERactions in RNA structures database—http://mfrlab.org/interrna/) that contains records of known RNA 3D motifs as well as records for clusters of bases that are interconnected by hydrogen bonds. The contents of the database were compiled from RNA structural annotations carried out by the NASSAM (http://mfrlab.org/grafss/nassam) and COGNAC (http://mfrlab.org/grafss/cognac) computer programs. An analysis of the database content and comparisons with the existing corpus of knowledge regarding RNA 3D motifs clearly show that InterRNA is able to provide an extension of the annotations for known motifs as well as able to provide novel interactions for further investigations. PMID:26553798

  12. Sparse representation of higher-order functional interaction patterns in task-based FMRI data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu; Li, Xiang; Lv, Jinglei; Jiang, Xi; Zhu, Dajiang; Chen, Hanbo; Zhang, Tuo; Guo, Lei; Liu, Tianming

    2013-01-01

    Traditional task-based fMRI activation detection methods, e.g., the widely used general linear model (GLM), assume that the brain's hemodynamic responses follow the block-based or event-related stimulus paradigm. Typically, these activation detections are performed voxel-wise independently, and then are usually followed by statistical corrections. Despite remarkable successes and wide adoption of these methods, it remains largely unknown how functional brain regions interact with each other within specific networks during task performance blocks and in the baseline. In this paper, we present a novel algorithmic pipeline to statistically infer and sparsely represent higher-order functional interaction patterns within the working memory network during task performance and in the baseline. Specifically, a collection of higher-order interactions are inferred via the greedy equivalence search (GES) algorithm for both task and baseline blocks. In the next stage, an effective online dictionary learning algorithm is utilized for sparse representation of the inferred higher-order interaction patterns. Application of this framework on a working memory task-based fMRI data reveals interesting and meaningful distributions of the learned sparse dictionary atoms in task and baseline blocks. In comparison with traditional voxel-wise activation detection and recent pair-wise functional connectivity analysis, our framework offers a new methodology for representation and exploration of higher-order functional activities in the brain.

  13. Interactive case-based learning improves resident knowledge and confidence in reproductive endocrinology and infertility().

    PubMed

    Goldman, Kara N; Tiegs, Ashley W; Uquillas, Kristen; Nachtigall, Margaret; Fino, M Elizabeth; Winkel, Abigail F; Lerner, Veronica

    2017-02-21

    Resident physicians' scores on the REI section of the CREOG exam are traditionally low, and nearly 40% of house staff nation-wide perceive their REI knowledge to be poor. We aimed to assess whether an interactive case-based group-learning curriculum would narrow the REI knowledge gap by improving understanding and retention of core REI concepts under the time constraints affecting residents. A three-hour case-based workshop was developed to address four primary CREOG objectives. A multiple-choice test was administered immediately before and after the intervention and 7 weeks post-workshop, to evaluate both knowledge and confidence. Following the intervention, residents self-reported increased confidence with counseling and treatment of PCOS, ovulation induction cycle monitoring, counseling and treatment of POI, and breaking bad news related to infertility (p < 0.05). The multiple-choice exam was re-administered 7 weeks post-intervention, and scores remained significantly improved compared to pre-workshop scores (p < 0.05). At that time, all residents either strongly agreed (91.7%) or agreed (8.3%) that the case-based interactive format was preferable to traditional lecture-based teaching. In conclusion, a nontraditional curriculum aimed at teaching core REI concepts to residents through interactive case-based learning can be successfully integrated into a residency curriculum, and significantly improves knowledge and confidence of critical concepts in REI.

  14. Design and Implementation of an Interactive Web-Based Near Real-Time Forest Monitoring System.

    PubMed

    Pratihast, Arun Kumar; DeVries, Ben; Avitabile, Valerio; de Bruin, Sytze; Herold, Martin; Bergsma, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive web-based near real-time (NRT) forest monitoring system using four levels of geographic information services: 1) the acquisition of continuous data streams from satellite and community-based monitoring using mobile devices, 2) NRT forest disturbance detection based on satellite time-series, 3) presentation of forest disturbance data through a web-based application and social media and 4) interaction of the satellite based disturbance alerts with the end-user communities to enhance the collection of ground data. The system is developed using open source technologies and has been implemented together with local experts in the UNESCO Kafa Biosphere Reserve, Ethiopia. The results show that the system is able to provide easy access to information on forest change and considerably improves the collection and storage of ground observation by local experts. Social media leads to higher levels of user interaction and noticeably improves communication among stakeholders. Finally, an evaluation of the system confirms the usability of the system in Ethiopia. The implemented system can provide a foundation for an operational forest monitoring system at the national level for REDD+ MRV applications.

  15. Design and Implementation of an Interactive Web-Based Near Real-Time Forest Monitoring System

    PubMed Central

    Pratihast, Arun Kumar; DeVries, Ben; Avitabile, Valerio; de Bruin, Sytze; Herold, Martin; Bergsma, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive web-based near real-time (NRT) forest monitoring system using four levels of geographic information services: 1) the acquisition of continuous data streams from satellite and community-based monitoring using mobile devices, 2) NRT forest disturbance detection based on satellite time-series, 3) presentation of forest disturbance data through a web-based application and social media and 4) interaction of the satellite based disturbance alerts with the end-user communities to enhance the collection of ground data. The system is developed using open source technologies and has been implemented together with local experts in the UNESCO Kafa Biosphere Reserve, Ethiopia. The results show that the system is able to provide easy access to information on forest change and considerably improves the collection and storage of ground observation by local experts. Social media leads to higher levels of user interaction and noticeably improves communication among stakeholders. Finally, an evaluation of the system confirms the usability of the system in Ethiopia. The implemented system can provide a foundation for an operational forest monitoring system at the national level for REDD+ MRV applications. PMID:27031694

  16. Approaches to Interactive Video Anchors in Problem-based Science Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, David Devraj

    2010-02-01

    This paper is an invited adaptation of the IEEE Education Society Distinguished Lecture Approaches to Interactive Video Anchors in Problem-Based Science Learning. Interactive video anchors have a cognitive theory base, and they help to enlarge the context of learning with information-rich real-world situations. Carefully selected movie clips and custom-developed regular videos and virtual simulations have been successfully used as anchors in problem-based science learning. Examples discussed include a range of situations such as Indiana Jones tackling a trap, a teenager misrepresenting lead for gold, an agriculture inspection at the US border, counterintuitive events, analyzing a river ecosystem for pollution, and finding the cause of illness in a nineteenth century river city. Suggestions for teachers are provided.

  17. Application of web-based visualizations to interactive television: a practical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakaveh, Sepideh; Geuer, Olaf; Werning, Stefan; Borggrefe, Sorina; Haeger, Ralf

    2003-06-01

    In the near future interactive television will provide many entertaining and innovative broadcasting formats for TV viewers. Moreover through the recent advancements in web-based visualisation techniques, complex application scenarios can already be realised. With the aid of a demonstrator called "deinewahl02" we proved a challenging concept on how to import web-based applications onto more complex platforms such as MHP set-up boxes. "deinewahl02" which represents a pretend political TV debate of the German general elections 2002, gives one the possibilities to playfully & entertainly be guided into the programme. Using the various functionalities such as "Voting" or "Hotspots" the possibilities of interaction, are well demonstrated within the programme. This provides a two way communication channel which can be established instantly, between the viewer and the broadcaster. "deinewahl02" has successfully demonstrated, ways where web-based applications may quickly and cheaply be implemented onto much more complex platforms.

  18. Regulatory Interactions in ProKaryotes from RegTransBase

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dubchak, Inna; Gelfand, Mikhail

    RegTransBase, a manually curated database of regulatory interactions in prokaryotes, captures the knowledge in published scientific literature using a controlled vocabulary. RegTransBase describes a large number of regulatory interactions reported in many organisms and contains various types of experimental data, in particular: the activation or repression of transcription by an identified direct regulator determining the transcriptional regulatory function of a protein (or RNA) directly binding to DNA or RNA mapping or prediction of binding sites for a regulatory protein characterization of regulatory mutations. RegTransBase also contains manually created position weight matrices (PWM) that can be used to identify candidate regulatory sites in over 60 species. (Specialized Interface)

  19. Testing gene-environment interactions in family-based association studies using trait-based ascertained samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiming; Langefeld, Carl D.; Grunwald, Gary K.; Fingerlin, Tasha E.

    2014-01-01

    The study of gene-environment interactions is an increasingly important aspect of genetic epidemiological investigation. Historically, it has been difficult to study gene-environment interactions using a family-based design for quantitative traits or when parent-offspring trios were incomplete. The QBAT-I[1] provides researchers a tool to estimate and test for a gene-environment interaction in families of arbitrary structure that are sampled without regard to the phenotype of interest, but is vulnerable to inflated type I error if families are ascertained based on the phenotype. In this study, we verified the potential for type I error of the QBAT-I when applied to samples ascertained on a trait of interest. The magnitude of the inflation increases as the main genetic effect increases and as the ascertainment becomes more extreme. We propose an ascertainment-corrected score test that allows use of the QBAT-I to test for gene-environment interactions in ascertained samples. Our results indicate that the score test and an ad-hoc method we propose can often restore the nominal type I error rate, and in cases where complete restoration is not possible, dramatically reduce the inflation of the type I error rate in ascertained samples. PMID:23922213

  20. Interaction of Schiff base ligand with tin dioxide nanoparticles: optical studies.

    PubMed

    Rani, J Suvetha; Ramakrishnan, V

    2013-10-01

    Interaction between 1,4 Bis ((2-Methyl) thio) Phenylamino methyl benzene (BMTPMB) Schiff base with tin dioxide nanoparticles (SnO2 NPs) of various concentrations in methanol have been studied using UV-Visible and Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The low value of Stern-Volmer quenching constant and non-linear plot of Benesi-Hildebrand equation suggests the less affinity of SnO2 NPs towards the adsorption of BMTPMB Schiff base. The Scott equation has been employed to determine molar absorptivity of the Schiff base-NPs system.

  1. Design of a fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based Mammalian protein-protein interaction trap.

    PubMed

    Lievens, Sam; Van der Heyden, José; Vertenten, Els; Plum, Jean; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Tavernier, Jan

    2004-01-01

    The mammalian protein-protein interaction trap (MAPPIT) is a two-hybrid assay based on insights in type I cytokine signal transduction. Bait and prey polypeptides are tethered to mutant cytokine receptor chimeras which are impaired in signaling. On bait-prey interaction and after ligand stimulation, the JAK-STAT signaling cascade is initiated leading to transcription of a reporter or marker gene under the control of the STAT3-responsive rPAP1 promoter. In addition to a physiologically relevant context for mammalian protein-protein interactions this method provides separation of interactor and effector zones, and can be applied for both analytical and screening purposes. In the protocol described here, a cytokine receptor derived surface tag is used as a selectable marker. After an initial presort step using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), "positive" cells are selected by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS).

  2. The influence of arene-ring size on stacking interaction with canonical base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formánek, Martin; Burda, Jaroslav V.

    2014-04-01

    Stacking interactions between aromatic molecules (benzene, p-cymene, biphenyl, and di- and tetra-hydrogen anthracene) and G.C and A.T canonical Watson-Crick (WC) base pairs are explored. Two functionals with dispersion corrections: ω-B97XD and B3LYP-D3 are used. For a comparison also the MP2 and B3LYP-D3/PCM methods were used for the most stable p-cymene…WC geometries. It was found that the stacking interaction increases with the size of π-conjugation system. Its extent is in agreement with experimental finding on anticancer activity of Ru(II) piano-stool complexes where intercalation of these aromatic molecules should play an important role. The explored structures are considered as ternary system so that decomposition of the interaction energy to pairwise and non-additivity contributions is also examined.

  3. Intriguing radical-radical interactions among double-electron oxidized adenine-thymine base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Laibin; Su, Xiyu; Su, Hanlei; Bu, Yuxiang

    2015-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the structural and electronic properties of double-electron oxidized adenine-thymine base pair as well as its deprotonated Watson-Crick derivatives. Double-electron oxidation can destabilize the AT unit, leading to a barrier-hindered metastable A+T+ state with a dissociation channel featuring negative dissociation energy. This unusual energetic phenomenon originates from the competition of electrostatic repulsion and attractively hydrogen-bonding interaction co-existing between Arad + and Trad +. The associated double-proton-transfer process is also explored, suggesting a possible two-step mechanism. Magnetic coupling interactions of various diradical structures are controlled by both intra- and inter-molecular interactions.

  4. Interactive point-based rendering of higher-order tetrahedral data.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Garland, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Computational simulations frequently generate solutions defined over very large tetrahedral volume meshes containing many millions of elements. Furthermore, such solutions may often be expressed using non-linear basis functions. Certain solution techniques, such as discontinuous Galerkin methods, may even produce non-conforming meshes. Such data is difficult to visualize interactively, as it is far too large to fit in memory and many common data reduction techniques, such as mesh simplification, cannot be applied to non-conforming meshes. We introduce a point-based visualization system for interactive rendering of large, potentially non-conforming, tetrahedral meshes. We propose methods for adaptively sampling points from non-linear solution data and for decimating points at run time to fit GPU memory limits. Because these are streaming processes, memory consumption is independent of the input size. We also present an order-independent point rendering method that can efficiently render volumes on the order of 20 million tetrahedra at interactive rates.

  5. Simultaneous occurrence of quadruple Lewis acid-base interactions between selenium atoms in selenocarbonyl dimers.

    PubMed

    Buralli, Gabriel Jesús; Duarte, Darío Jorge Roberto; Peruchena, Nélida María; Alkorta, Ibon

    2017-08-29

    High-level quantum chemical calculations have been performed to investigated the interactions C=Se∙∙∙Se=C. Bounded structures are found with binding energies between -4 and -7 kJ mol-1. The energy decomposition analysis shows that the dispersion is the more attractive term and in all cases save one, the electrostatic interaction is attractive despite every selenium atom has a positive -hole at the extension of the C=Se bond. The topological analysis of the molecular electrostatic potential and L(r)=-2ρ(r) function, and natural bond orbital analysis reveal that these particular Se∙∙∙Se contacts can be considered as quadruple Lewis acid-base interactions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Topology of exchange interactions in copper-nitroxide based molecular magnets studied by EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdyuk, Irina Yu.; Maryunina, Ksenia Yu.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Ovcharenko, Victor I.; Bagryanskaya, Elena G.; Fedin, Matvey V.

    2013-10-01

    Switchable copper-nitroxide based molecular magnets Cu(hfac)2LR ('breathing crystals') have one-dimensional (1D) polymer-chain structure and 1D magnetic motif; however, the directions of polymer and magnetic chains in the crystal do not coincide. In this work we report the detailed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of the topology of intercluster exchange interactions forming the magnetic chains in a series of breathing crystals. The obtained results provide unambiguous manifestation of 1D magnetic behaviour, which degree correlates with the magnitude of intercluster exchange interaction. Analysis of experimental angular-dependent EPR data allowed us to determine relative orientations of magnetic chains with respect to polymer chains. The obtained angle between them is ≈40-46° for three studied compounds. The comparison of EPR and x-ray diffraction data confirms that 1D magnetic chains are formed by interacting adjacent spin triads of neighbouring polymer chains.

  7. Prediction of interface residue based on the features of residue interaction network.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiong; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2017-11-07

    Protein-protein interaction plays a crucial role in the cellular biological processes. Interface prediction can improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the related processes and functions. In this work, we propose a classification method to recognize the interface residue based on the features of a weighted residue interaction network. The random forest algorithm is used for the prediction and 16 network parameters and the B-factor are acting as the element of the input feature vector. Compared with other similar work, the method is feasible and effective. The relative importance of these features also be analyzed to identify the key feature for the prediction. Some biological meaning of the important feature is explained. The results of this work can be used for the related work about the structure-function relationship analysis via a residue interaction network model. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Counter-selectable marker for bacterial-based interaction trap systems.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangdong; Smith, Robin M; Giesecke, Astrid V; Joung, J Keith; Wolfe, Scot A

    2006-02-01

    Counter-selectable markers can be used in two-hybrid systems to search libraries for a protein or compound that interferes with a macromolecular interaction or to identify macromolecules from a population that cannot mediate a particular interaction. In this report, we describe the adaptation of the yeast URA3/5-FOA counter-selection system for use in bacterial interaction trap experiments. Two different URA3 reporter systems were developed that allow robust counter-selection: (i) a single copy F' episome reporter and (ii) a co-cistronic HIS3-URA3 reporter vector. The HIS3-URA3 reporter can be used for either positive or negative selections in appropriate bacterial strains. These reagents extend the utility of the bacterial two-hybrid system as an alternative to its yeast-based counterpart.

  9. Management of hypothermia: impact of lecture-based interactive workshops on training of pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Altun, Insaf; Karakoç, Ali

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to determine the efficacy of interactive workshop on the management of hypothermia and its impact on pediatric nurses' training. This is a pretest-to-posttest quasi-experimental descriptive study. Thirty pediatric nurses attended an interactive lecture-based interactive workshop on the management of hypothermia. Participants had to accept an invitation to the presentation before the training event. They completed the lecture, and a multiple-choice question test before and after the lecture was given. There was a significant improvement in mean test scores after the lecture when compared with those before the lecture (mean [SD], 15.5 [1.3] vs 5.0 [1.7], P < 0.001). The information gained in this study will be valuable as a baseline for further research and help guide improvements in the management of hypothermia with the ultimate goal of enhancing safe and quality patient care.

  10. Active and interactive teaching based on exploring forefront topics in information optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yuhong; Tao, Shiquan; Jiang, Zhuqing; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Yunxin

    2009-06-01

    Information Optics (i.e. Fourier Optics) is a compulsory professional course in the teaching program for juniors in the field of applied physics at Beijing University of Technology. Various methods are applied to information optics teaching in order to obtain satisfying teaching effect. Active and interactive teaching method based on exploring forefront topics was proposed and put into practice, especially for teaching "holography and holographic technology application" section of the course in which the teaching activity was not restricted to classroom any more. A visiting to the exhibit of forefront production of holographic display was introduced as an episode in the teaching. The process of teaching was designed elaborately to an interactive activity between the teacher and students, and to stimulate students to cooperate. The teaching practice proves that the active and interactive teaching method is much favorable by students and successful in information optics teaching.

  11. A walking prescription for statically-stable walkers based on walker/terrain interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Peter V.; Whittaker, William L.; Desa, Subhas

    1992-01-01

    The walker/terrain interaction phenomena for the control of a statically stable walking machine are described. The algorithms, measures, and knowledge of walker/terrain interaction phenomena are then combined to form a prescription for how to walk on general terrain. This prescription consists of two parts: nominal control and reactive control. The function of nominal control is the evaluation and execution of planned motions, based on predicted foot force redistributions, to achieve reliable locomotion. The function of reactive control is the monitoring of walker/terrain interaction in real-time to detect anomalous conditions and then respond with the appropriate reflexive actions. Simulations and experiments have been used to test and verify various aspects of the walking prescription.

  12. A walking prescription for statically-stable walkers based on walker/terrain interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, Peter V.; Whittaker, William L.; Desa, Subhas

    1992-01-01

    The walker/terrain interaction phenomena for the control of a statically stable walking machine are described. The algorithms, measures, and knowledge of walker/terrain interaction phenomena are then combined to form a prescription for how to walk on general terrain. This prescription consists of two parts: nominal control and reactive control. The function of nominal control is the evaluation and execution of planned motions, based on predicted foot force redistributions, to achieve reliable locomotion. The function of reactive control is the monitoring of walker/terrain interaction in real-time to detect anomalous conditions and then respond with the appropriate reflexive actions. Simulations and experiments have been used to test and verify various aspects of the walking prescription.

  13. A walking prescription for statically-stable walkers based on walker/terrain interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Peter V.; Whittaker, William L.; Desa, Subhas

    The walker/terrain interaction phenomena for the control of a statically stable walking machine are described. The algorithms, measures, and knowledge of walker/terrain interaction phenomena are then combined to form a prescription for how to walk on general terrain. This prescription consists of two parts: nominal control and reactive control. The function of nominal control is the evaluation and execution of planned motions, based on predicted foot force redistributions, to achieve reliable locomotion. The function of reactive control is the monitoring of walker/terrain interaction in real-time to detect anomalous conditions and then respond with the appropriate reflexive actions. Simulations and experiments have been used to test and verify various aspects of the walking prescription.

  14. A Quantitative Fluorescence-Based Assay for Assessing LIM Domain-Peptide Interactions.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Neil O; Shah, Manan; Matthews, Jacqueline M

    2016-10-10

    We have developed Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based experiments for measuring the binding affinity, off-rates, and inferred on-rates for interactions between a family of transcriptional regulators and their intrinsically disordered binding partners. It was difficult to evaluate these interactions previously, as the transcriptional regulators are obligate binding proteins that aggregate in the absence of a binding partner. The assays rely on fusion constructs where binding domains are linked by a flexible tether containing a specific protease site, with fluorescent proteins at either end that display FRET when the complex is formed. Loss of FRET is monitored after cutting the tether followed by dilution or competition with a non-fluorescent peptide. These methods allowed a wide range of binding affinities (10(-9) -10(-5)  m) to be determined. Our data indicate that interactions of closely related proteins can have surprisingly different binding properties.

  15. Cool but Counterproductive: Interactive, Web-Based Risk Communications Can Backfire

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Mark; Witteman, Holly O

    2011-01-01

    Background Paper-based patient decision aids generally present risk information using numbers and/or static images. However, limited psychological research has suggested that when people interactively graph risk information, they process the statistics more actively, making the information more available for decision making. Such interactive tools could potentially be incorporated in a new generation of Web-based decision aids. Objective The objective of our study was to investigate whether interactive graphics detailing the risk of side effects of two treatments improve knowledge and decision making over standard risk graphics. Methods A total of 3371 members of a demographically diverse Internet panel viewed a hypothetical scenario about two hypothetical treatments for thyroid cancer. Each treatment had a chance of causing 1 of 2 side effects, but we randomly varied whether one treatment was better on both dimensions (strong dominance condition), slightly better on only one dimension (mild dominance condition), or better on one dimension but worse on the other (trade-off condition) than the other treatment. We also varied whether respondents passively viewed the risk information in static pictograph (icon array) images or actively manipulated the information by using interactive Flash-based animations of “fill-in-the-blank” pictographs. Our primary hypothesis was that active manipulation would increase respondents’ ability to recognize dominance (when available) and choose the better treatment. Results The interactive risk graphic conditions had significantly worse survey completion rates (1110/1695, 65.5% vs 1316/1659, 79.3%, P < .001) than the static image conditions. In addition, respondents using interactive graphs were less likely to recognize and select the dominant treatment option (234/380, 61.6% vs 343/465, 73.8%, P < .001 in the strong dominance condition). Conclusions Interactivity, however visually appealing, can both add to respondent burden

  16. Molecular Interactions of Porphyromonas gingivalis Fimbriae with Host Proteins: Kinetic Analyses Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Atsuo; Nakamura, Takayuki; Kimura, Shigenobu; Morisaki, Ichijiro; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Kawabata, Shigetada; Hamada, Shigeyuki

    1999-01-01

    Fimbriae of Porphyromonas gingivalis are thought to play an important role in the colonization and invasion of periodontal tissues. In this study, we analyzed the interactions of P. gingivalis fimbriae with human hemoglobin, fibrinogen, and salivary components (i.e., proline-rich protein [PRP], proline-rich glycoprotein [PRG], and statherin) based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy with a biomolecular interaction analyzing system (BIAcore). The real-time observation showed that the fimbriae interacted more quickly with hemoglobin and PRG than with other proteins and more intensely with fibrinogen. The significant association constant (ka) values obtained by BIAcore demonstrated that the interactions between fimbriae and these host proteins are specific. These estimated Ka values were not too different; however, the Ka values for hemoglobin (2.43 × 106) and fibrinogen (2.16 × 106) were statistically greater than those for the salivary proteins (1.48 × 106 to 1.63 × 106). The Ka value of anti-fimbriae immunoglobulin G for fimbriae was estimated to be 1.22 × 107, which was 6.55-fold higher than the mean Ka value of the host proteins. Peptide PRP-C, a potent inhibitor of PRP-fimbriae interaction, dramatically inhibited fimbrial association to PRP and PRG and was also inhibitory against other host proteins by BIAcore. The binding of fimbriae to these proteins was also evaluated by other methods with hydroxyapatite beads or polystyrene microtiter plates. The estimated binding abilities differed considerably, depending on the assay method that was used. It was noted that the binding capacity of PRP was strongly diminished by immobilization on a polystyrene surface. Taken together, these findings suggest that P. gingivalis fimbriae possess a strong ability to interact with the host proteins which promote bacterial adherence to the oral cavity and that SPR spectroscopy is a useful method for analyzing specific protein-fimbriae interactions. PMID:10225901

  17. A non-verbal Turing test: differentiating mind from machine in gaze-based social interaction.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Ulrich J; Timmermans, Bert; Bente, Gary; Vogeley, Kai; Schilbach, Leonhard

    2011-01-01

    In social interaction, gaze behavior provides important signals that have a significant impact on our perception of others. Previous investigations, however, have relied on paradigms in which participants are passive observers of other persons' gazes and do not adjust their gaze behavior as is the case in real-life social encounters. We used an interactive eye-tracking paradigm that allows participants to interact with an anthropomorphic virtual character whose gaze behavior is responsive to where the participant looks on the stimulus screen in real time. The character's gaze reactions were systematically varied along a continuum from a maximal probability of gaze aversion to a maximal probability of gaze-following during brief interactions, thereby varying contingency and congruency of the reactions. We investigated how these variations influenced whether participants believed that the character was controlled by another person (i.e., a confederate) or a computer program. In a series of experiments, the human confederate was either introduced as naïve to the task, cooperative, or competitive. Results demonstrate that the ascription of humanness increases with higher congruency of gaze reactions when participants are interacting with a naïve partner. In contrast, humanness ascription is driven by the degree of contingency irrespective of congruency when the confederate was introduced as cooperative. Conversely, during interaction with a competitive confederate, judgments were neither based on congruency nor on contingency. These results offer important insights into what renders the experience of an interaction truly social: Humans appear to have a default expectation of reciprocation that can be influenced drastically by the presumed disposition of the interactor to either cooperate or compete.

  18. A Non-Verbal Turing Test: Differentiating Mind from Machine in Gaze-Based Social Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Ulrich J.; Timmermans, Bert; Bente, Gary; Vogeley, Kai; Schilbach, Leonhard

    2011-01-01

    In social interaction, gaze behavior provides important signals that have a significant impact on our perception of others. Previous investigations, however, have relied on paradigms in which participants are passive observers of other persons’ gazes and do not adjust their gaze behavior as is the case in real-life social encounters. We used an interactive eye-tracking paradigm that allows participants to interact with an anthropomorphic virtual character whose gaze behavior is responsive to where the participant looks on the stimulus screen in real time. The character’s gaze reactions were systematically varied along a continuum from a maximal probability of gaze aversion to a maximal probability of gaze-following during brief interactions, thereby varying contingency and congruency of the reactions. We investigated how these variations influenced whether participants believed that the character was controlled by another person (i.e., a confederate) or a computer program. In a series of experiments, the human confederate was either introduced as naïve to the task, cooperative, or competitive. Results demonstrate that the ascription of humanness increases with higher congruency of gaze reactions when participants are interacting with a naïve partner. In contrast, humanness ascription is driven by the degree of contingency irrespective of congruency when the confederate was introduced as cooperative. Conversely, during interaction with a competitive confederate, judgments were neither based on congruency nor on contingency. These results offer important insights into what renders the experience of an interaction truly social: Humans appear to have a default expectation of reciprocation that can be influenced drastically by the presumed disposition of the interactor to either cooperate or compete. PMID:22096599

  19. Evaluating hydro-mechanical interactions of adjacent clay-based sealing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C.-S.; Dixon, D.

    Canada’s Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is investigating various geological isolation concepts for Canada’s used reactor fuel (NWMO, 2005). These options are all based on the concept of multiple barriers that include Highly Compacted Bentonite (HCB), Dense Backfill (DBF), Light Backfill (LBF), and Gap Fill (GF). The hydraulic, mechanical, and other characteristics of these clay-based sealing materials have been examined previously, but typically in relative isolation (e.g., Dixon, 1999; Blatz, 2000; Siemens, 2006; Stroes-Gascoyne et al., 2006; Baumgartner et al., 2007). Information on how these clay-based sealing materials interact with each other is needed to understand the evolution and performance of the overall sealing system. A total of twenty-three (23) tests that examine the physical interaction of physically dissimilar clay-based sealing materials were installed and monitored at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited’s (AECL) geotechnical laboratory. This paper describes the process of water uptake, interaction between the components installed, and the role of groundwater salinity on water uptake as interpreted from these tests.

  20. Lectin-Glycan Interaction Network-Based Identification of Host Receptors of Microbial Pathogenic Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Ielasi, Francesco S.; Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Donohue, Dagmara; Claes, Sandra; Sahli, Hichem; Schols, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first step in the infection of humans by microbial pathogens is their adherence to host tissue cells, which is frequently based on the binding of carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectin-like adhesins) to human cell receptors that expose glycans. In only a few cases have the human receptors of pathogenic adhesins been described. A novel strategy—based on the construction of a lectin-glycan interaction (LGI) network—to identify the potential human binding receptors for pathogenic adhesins with lectin activity was developed. The new approach is based on linking glycan array screening results of these adhesins to a human glycoprotein database via the construction of an LGI network. This strategy was used to detect human receptors for virulent Escherichia coli (FimH adhesin), and the fungal pathogens Candida albicans (Als1p and Als3p adhesins) and C. glabrata (Epa1, Epa6, and Epa7 adhesins), which cause candidiasis. This LGI network strategy allows the profiling of potential adhesin binding receptors in the host with prioritization, based on experimental binding data, of the most relevant interactions. New potential targets for the selected adhesins were predicted and experimentally confirmed. This methodology was also used to predict lectin interactions with envelope glycoproteins of human-pathogenic viruses. It was shown that this strategy was successful in revealing that the FimH adhesin has anti-HIV activity. PMID:27406561

  1. Ontology-based representation and analysis of host-Brucella interactions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu; Xiang, Zuoshuang; He, Yongqun

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical ontologies are representations of classes of entities in the biomedical domain and how these classes are related in computer- and human-interpretable formats. Ontologies support data standardization and exchange and provide a basis for computer-assisted automated reasoning. IDOBRU is an ontology in the domain of Brucella and brucellosis. Brucella is a Gram-negative intracellular bacterium that causes brucellosis, the most common zoonotic disease in the world. In this study, IDOBRU is used as a platform to model and analyze how the hosts, especially host macrophages, interact with virulent Brucella strains or live attenuated Brucella vaccine strains. Such a study allows us to better integrate and understand intricate Brucella pathogenesis and host immunity mechanisms. Different levels of host-Brucella interactions based on different host cell types and Brucella strains were first defined ontologically. Three important processes of virulent Brucella interacting with host macrophages were represented: Brucella entry into macrophage, intracellular trafficking, and intracellular replication. Two Brucella pathogenesis mechanisms were ontologically represented: Brucella Type IV secretion system that supports intracellular trafficking and replication, and Brucella erythritol metabolism that participates in Brucella intracellular survival and pathogenesis. The host cell death pathway is critical to the outcome of host-Brucella interactions. For better survival and replication, virulent Brucella prevents macrophage cell death. However, live attenuated B. abortus vaccine strain RB51 induces caspase-2-mediated proinflammatory cell death. Brucella-associated cell death processes are represented in IDOBRU. The gene and protein information of 432 manually annotated Brucella virulence factors were represented using the Ontology of Genes and Genomes (OGG) and Protein Ontology (PRO), respectively. Seven inference rules were defined to capture the knowledge of host

  2. Teacher-student interaction: The overlooked dimension of inquiry-based professional development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Alandeom Wanderlei

    This study explores the teacher-student interactional dimension of inquiry-based science instruction. In it, microethnographic and grounded theory analyses are conducted in order to assess the impact of a professional development program designed to enhance in-service elementary teachers' interactional views (i.e., their understandings of inquiry-based social roles and relationships) and discursive practices (i.e., teachers' abilities to interact with student engaged in classroom inquiries) through a combination of expert instruction, immersion in scientific inquiry, and collaborative analysis of video-recorded classroom discourse. A sociolinguistic theoretical perspective on language use is adopted, viewing classroom discourse as comprising multiple linguistic signs (questions, responses, personal pronouns, hedges, backchannels, reactive tokens, directives, figures of speech, parallel repetitions) that convey not only semantic meanings (the literal information being exchanged) but also pragmatic meanings (information about teachers and students' social roles and relationships). A grounded theory analysis of the professional development activities uncovered a gradual shift in teachers' interactional views from a cognitive, monofunctional and decontextualized perspective to a social, multifunctional and contextualized conception of inquiry-based discourse. Furthermore, teachers developed increased levels of pragmatic awareness, being able to recognize the authoritative interactional functions served by discursive moves such as display questions, cued elicitation, convergent questioning, verbal cloze, affirmation, explicit evaluations of students' responses, verbatim repetitions, IRE triplets, IR couplets, second-person pronouns, "I/you" contrastive pairs, and direct or impolite directives. A comparative microethnographic analysis of teachers' classroom practices revealed that after participating in the program teachers demonstrated an improved ability to share

  3. Commercial Motion Sensor Based Low-Cost and Convenient Interactive Treadmill †

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonghyun; Gravunder, Andrew; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Interactive treadmills were developed to improve the simulation of overground walking when compared to conventional treadmills. However, currently available interactive treadmills are expensive and inconvenient, which limits their use. We propose a low-cost and convenient version of the interactive treadmill that does not require expensive equipment and a complicated setup. As a substitute for high-cost sensors, such as motion capture systems, a low-cost motion sensor was used to recognize the subject’s intention for speed changing. Moreover, the sensor enables the subject to make a convenient and safe stop using gesture recognition. For further cost reduction, the novel interactive treadmill was based on an inexpensive treadmill platform and a novel high-level speed control scheme was applied to maximize performance for simulating overground walking. Pilot tests with ten healthy subjects were conducted and results demonstrated that the proposed treadmill achieves similar performance to a typical, costly, interactive treadmill that contains a motion capture system and an instrumented treadmill, while providing a convenient and safe method for stopping. PMID:26393592

  4. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model linking plasma protein binding interactions with drug disposition.

    PubMed

    Buur, J L; Baynes, R E; Smith, G W; Riviere, J E

    2009-04-01

    Combination drug therapy increases the chance for an adverse drug reactions due to drug-drug interactions. Altered disposition for sulfamethazine (SMZ) when concurrently administered with flunixin meglumine (FLU) in swine could lead to increased tissue residues. There is a need for a pharmacokinetic modeling technique that can predict the consequences of possible drug interactions. A physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was developed that links plasma protein binding interactions to drug disposition for SMZ and FLU in swine. The model predicted a sustained decrease in total drug and a temporary increase in free drug concentration. An in vivo study confirmed the presence of a drug interaction. Neither the model nor the in vivo study revealed clinically significant changes that alter tissue disposition. This novel linkage approach has use in the prediction of the clinical impact of plasma protein binding interactions. Ultimately it could be used in the design of dosing regimens and in the protection of the food supply through prediction and minimization of tissue residues.

  5. Do aurophilic interactions compete against hydrogen bonds? Experimental evidence and rationalization based on ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Codina, Antonio; Fernández, Eduardo J; Jones, Peter G; Laguna, Antonio; López-De-Luzuriaga, José M; Monge, Miguel; Olmos, M Elena; Pérez, Javier; Rodríguez, Miguel A

    2002-06-12

    [M(C6F5)(N(H)=CPh2)] (M = Ag (1) and Au (2)) complexes have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis. Complex 1 shows a ladder-type structure in which two [Ag(C6F5)(N(H)=CPh2)] units are linked by a Ag(I)-Ag(I) interaction in an antiparallel disposition. The dimeric units are associated through hydrogen bonds of the type N-H...F(ortho). On the other hand, gold(I) complex 2 displays discrete dimers also in an antiparallel conformation in which both Au(I)-Au(I) interactions and N-H.F(ortho) hydrogen bonds appear within the dimeric units. The features of these coexisting interactions have been theoretically studied by ab initio calculations based on four different model systems in order to analyze them separately. The interactions have been analyzed at HF and MP2 levels of theory showing that, in this case, even at larger distances. The Au(I)-Au(I) interaction is stronger than Ag(I)-Ag(I) and that N-H.F hydrogen bonding and Au(I)-Au(I) contacts have a similar strength in the same molecule, which permits a competition between these two structural motifs giving rise to different structural arrangements.

  6. Metal-support interaction on cobalt based FT catalysts - a DFT study of model inverse catalysts.

    PubMed

    van Heerden, Tracey; van Steen, Eric

    2017-04-28

    It is challenging to isolate the effect of metal-support interactions on catalyst reaction performance. In order to overcome this problem, inverse catalysts can be prepared in the laboratory and characterized and tested at relevant conditions. Inverse catalysts are catalysts where the precursor to the catalytically active phase is bonded to a support-like ligand. We can then view the metal-support interaction as a ligand interaction with the support acting as a supra-molecular ligand. Importantly, laboratory studies have shown that these ligands are still present after reduction of the catalyst. By varying the quantity of these ligands present on the surface, insight into the positive effect SMSI have during a reaction is gained. Here, we present a theoretical study of mono-dentate alumina support based ligands, adsorbed on cobalt surfaces. We find that the presence of the ligand may significantly affect the morphology of a cobalt crystallite. With Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in mind, the CO dissociation is used as a probe reaction, with the ligand assisting the dissociation, making it feasible to dissociate CO on the dense fcc Co(111) surface. The nature of the interaction between the ligand and the probe molecule is characterized, showing that the support-like ligands' metal centre is directly interacting with the probe molecule.

  7. An ELISA Based Binding and Competition Method to Rapidly Determine Ligand-receptor Interactions.

    PubMed

    Syedbasha, Mohameedyaseen; Linnik, Janina; Santer, Deanna; O'Shea, Daire; Barakat, Khaled; Joyce, Michael; Khanna, Nina; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Houghton, Michael; Egli, Adrian

    2016-03-14

    A comprehensive understanding of signaling pathways requires detailed knowledge regarding ligand-receptor interaction. This article describes two fast and reliable point-by-point protocols of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the investigation of ligand-receptor interactions: the direct ligand-receptor interaction assay (LRA) and the competition LRA. As a case study, the ELISA based analysis of the interaction between different lambda interferons (IFNLs) and the alpha subunit of their receptor (IL28RA) is presented: the direct LRA is used for the determination of dissociation constants (KD values) between receptor and IFN ligands, and the competition LRA for the determination of the inhibitory capacity of an oligopeptide, which was designed to compete with the IFNLs at their receptor binding site. Analytical steps to estimate KD and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values are described. Finally, the discussion highlights advantages and disadvantages of the presented method and how the results enable a better molecular understanding of ligand-receptor interactions.

  8. Regulation of catalytic behaviour of hydrolases through interactions with functionalized carbon-based nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlidis, Ioannis V.; Vorhaben, Torge; Gournis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, George K.; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Stamatis, Haralambos

    2012-05-01

    The interaction of enzymes with carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) is crucial for the function of biomolecules and therefore for the design and development of effective nanobiocatalytic systems. In this study, the effect of functionalized CBNs, such as graphene oxide (GO) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs), on the catalytic behaviour of various hydrolases of biotechnological interest was monitored and the interactions between CBNs and proteins were investigated. The enzyme-nanomaterial interactions significantly affect the catalytic behaviour of enzymes, resulting in an increase up to 60 % of the catalytic efficiency of lipases and a decrease up to 30 % of the esterase. Moreover, the use of CNTs and GO derivatives, especially those that are amine-functionalized, led to increased thermal stability of most the hydrolases tested. Fluorescence and circular dichroism studies indicated that the altered catalytic behaviour of enzymes in the presence of CBNs arises from specific enzyme-nanomaterial interactions, which can lead to significant conformational changes. In the case of lipases, the conformational changes led to a more active and rigid structure, while in the case of esterases this led to destabilization and unfolding. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies indicated that the extent of the interactions between CBNs and hydrolases can be mainly controlled by the functionalization of nanomaterials than by their geometry.

  9. Commercial Motion Sensor Based Low-Cost and Convenient Interactive Treadmill.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghyun; Gravunder, Andrew; Park, Hyung-Soon

    2015-09-17

    Interactive treadmills were developed to improve the simulation of overground walking when compared to conventional treadmills. However, currently available interactive treadmills are expensive and inconvenient, which limits their use. We propose a low-cost and convenient version of the interactive treadmill that does not require expensive equipment and a complicated setup. As a substitute for high-cost sensors, such as motion capture systems, a low-cost motion sensor was used to recognize the subject's intention for speed changing. Moreover, the sensor enables the subject to make a convenient and safe stop using gesture recognition. For further cost reduction, the novel interactive treadmill was based on an inexpensive treadmill platform and a novel high-level speed control scheme was applied to maximize performance for simulating overground walking. Pilot tests with ten healthy subjects were conducted and results demonstrated that the proposed treadmill achieves similar performance to a typical, costly, interactive treadmill that contains a motion capture system and an instrumented treadmill, while providing a convenient and safe method for stopping.

  10. A novel microfluidics-based method for probing weak protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Darren Cherng-wen; Wijaya, I Putu Mahendra; Andreasson-Ochsner, Mirjam; Vasina, Elena Nikolaevna; Nallani, Madhavan; Hunziker, Walter; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin

    2012-08-07

    We report the use of a novel microfluidics-based method to detect weak protein-protein interactions between membrane proteins. The tight junction protein, claudin-2, synthesised in vitro using a cell-free expression system in the presence of polymer vesicles as membrane scaffolds, was used as a model membrane protein. Individual claudin-2 molecules interact weakly, although the cumulative effect of these interactions is significant. This effect results in a transient decrease of average vesicle dispersivity and reduction in transport speed of claudin-2-functionalised vesicles. Polymer vesicles functionalised with claudin-2 were perfused through a microfluidic channel and the time taken to traverse a defined distance within the channel was measured. Functionalised vesicles took 1.19 to 1.69 times longer to traverse this distance than unfunctionalised ones. Coating the channel walls with protein A and incubating the vesicles with anti-claudin-2 antibodies prior to perfusion resulted in the functionalised vesicles taking 1.75 to 2.5 times longer to traverse this distance compared to the controls. The data show that our system is able to detect weak as well as strong protein-protein interactions. This system offers researchers a portable, easily operated and customizable platform for the study of weak protein-protein interactions, particularly between membrane proteins.

  11. ESI-MS Characterization of a Novel Pyrrole-Inosine Nucleoside that Interacts with Guanine Bases

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Sarah E.; Sherman, Courtney L.; Jayawickramarajah, Janarthanan; Lawrence, Candace M.; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    Based on binding studies undertaken by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, a synthetic pyrrole-inosine nucleoside, 1, capable of forming an extended three-point Hoogsteen-type hydrogen-bonding interaction with guanine, is shown to form specific complexes with two different quadruplex DNA structures [dTG4T]4 and d(T2G4)4 as well as guanine rich duplex DNA. The binding interactions of two other analogs were evaluated in order to unravel the structural features that contribute to specific DNA recognition. The importance of the Hoogsteen interactions was confirmed through the absence of specific binding when the pyrrole NH hydrogen-bonding site was blocked or removed. While 2, with a large blocking group, was not found to interact with virtually any form of DNA, 3, with the pyrrole functionality missing, was found to interact non-specifically with several types of DNA. The specific binding of 1 to guanine rich DNA emphasizes the necessity of careful ligand design for specific sequence recognition. PMID:18790136

  12. Learning-based interactive segmentation using the maximum mean cycle weight formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilufar, S.; Wang, D. S.; Girgis, J.; Palii, C. G.; Yang, D.; Blais, A.; Brand, M.; Precup, D.; Perkins, T. J.

    2017-02-01

    The maximum mean cycle weight (MMCW) segmentation framework is a graph-based alternative to approaches such as GraphCut or Markov Random Fields. It offers time- and space-efficient computation and guaranteed optimality. However, unlike GraphCut or Markov Random Fields, MMCW does not seek to segment the entire image, but rather to find the single best object within the image, according to an objective function encoded by edge weights. Its focus on a single, best object makes MMCW attractive to interactive segmentation settings, where the user indicates which objects are to be segmented. However, a provably correct way of performing interactive segmentation using the MMCW framework has never been established. Further, the question of how to develop a good objective function based on user-provided information has never been addressed. Here, we propose a three-component objective function specifically designed for use with interactive MMCW segmentation. Two of those components, representing object boundary and object interior information, can be learned from a modest amount of user-labelled data, but in a way unique to the MMCW framework. The third component allows us to extend the MMCW framework to the situation of interactive segmentation. Specifically, we show that an appropriate weighted combination of the three components guarantees that the object produced by MMCW segmentation will enclose user-specified pixels that can be chosen interactively. The component weights can either be computed a priori based on image characteristics, or online via an adaptive reweighting scheme. We demonstrate the success of the approach on several microscope image segmentation problems.

  13. A New Protein-Protein Interaction Sensor Based on Tripartite Split-GFP Association

    PubMed Central

    Cabantous, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Hau B.; Pedelacq, Jean-Denis; Koraïchi, Faten; Chaudhary, Anu; Ganguly, Kumkum; Lockard, Meghan A.; Favre, Gilles; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring protein-protein interactions in living cells is key to unraveling their roles in numerous cellular processes and various diseases. Previously described split-GFP based sensors suffer from poor folding and/or self-assembly background fluorescence. Here, we have engineered a micro-tagging system to monitor protein-protein interactions in vivo and in vitro. The assay is based on tripartite association between two twenty amino-acids long GFP tags, GFP10 and GFP11, fused to interacting protein partners, and the complementary GFP1-9 detector. When proteins interact, GFP10 and GFP11 self-associate with GFP1-9 to reconstitute a functional GFP. Using coiled-coils and FRB/FKBP12 model systems we characterize the sensor in vitro and in Escherichia coli. We extend the studies to mammalian cells and examine the FK-506 inhibition of the rapamycin-induced association of FRB/FKBP12. The small size of these tags and their minimal effect on fusion protein behavior and solubility should enable new experiments for monitoring protein-protein association by fluorescence. PMID:24092409

  14. A new protein-protein interaction sensor based on tripartite split-GFP association.

    PubMed

    Cabantous, Stéphanie; Nguyen, Hau B; Pedelacq, Jean-Denis; Koraïchi, Faten; Chaudhary, Anu; Ganguly, Kumkum; Lockard, Meghan A; Favre, Gilles; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2013-10-04

    Monitoring protein-protein interactions in living cells is key to unraveling their roles in numerous cellular processes and various diseases. Previously described split-GFP based sensors suffer from poor folding and/or self-assembly background fluorescence. Here, we have engineered a micro-tagging system to monitor protein-protein interactions in vivo and in vitro. The assay is based on tripartite association between two twenty amino-acids long GFP tags, GFP10 and GFP11, fused to interacting protein partners, and the complementary GFP1-9 detector. When proteins interact, GFP10 and GFP11 self-associate with GFP1-9 to reconstitute a functional GFP. Using coiled-coils and FRB/FKBP12 model systems we characterize the sensor in vitro and in Escherichia coli. We extend the studies to mammalian cells and examine the FK-506 inhibition of the rapamycin-induced association of FRB/FKBP12. The small size of these tags and their minimal effect on fusion protein behavior and solubility should enable new experiments for monitoring protein-protein association by fluorescence.

  15. Noncovalent interactions from electron density topology and solvent effects on spectral properties of Schiff bases.

    PubMed

    Gandhimathi, S; Balakrishnan, C; Theetharappan, M; Neelakantan, M A; Venkataraman, R

    2017-03-15

    Two Schiff bases were prepared by the condensation of o-allyl substituted 2,4-dihydroxy acetophenone with 1,2-diaminopropane (L1) and ethanediamine (L2) and characterized by elemental analysis, and ESI-MS, IR, UV-Vis, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral techniques. The effect of solvents with respect to different polarities on UV-Vis and emission spectra of L1 and L2 was investigated at room temperature show that the compounds exist in keto and enol forms in solution and may be attributed to the intramolecular proton transfer in the ground state. The solute-solvent interactions, change in dipole moment and solvatochromic properties of the compounds were studied based on the solvent polarity parameters. For L1 and L2, the ground and excited state electronic structure calculations were carried out by DFT and TD-DFT at B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level, respectively. The IR, NMR and electronic absorption spectra computed were compared with the experimental observations. The intramolecular charge transfer within the molecule is evidenced from the HOMO and LUMO energy levels and surface analysis. The noncovalent interactions like hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions were identified from the molecular geometry and electron localization function. These interactions in molecules have been studied by using reduced density gradient and graphed by Multiwfn.

  16. Noncovalent interactions from electron density topology and solvent effects on spectral properties of Schiff bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhimathi, S.; Balakrishnan, C.; Theetharappan, M.; Neelakantan, M. A.; Venkataraman, R.

    2017-03-01

    Two Schiff bases were prepared by the condensation of o-allyl substituted 2,4-dihydroxy acetophenone with 1,2-diaminopropane (L1) and ethanediamine (L2) and characterized by elemental analysis, and ESI-MS, IR, UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectral techniques. The effect of solvents with respect to different polarities on UV-Vis and emission spectra of L1 and L2 was investigated at room temperature show that the compounds exist in keto and enol forms in solution and may be attributed to the intramolecular proton transfer in the ground state. The solute-solvent interactions, change in dipole moment and solvatochromic properties of the compounds were studied based on the solvent polarity parameters. For L1 and L2, the ground and excited state electronic structure calculations were carried out by DFT and TD-DFT at B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level, respectively. The IR, NMR and electronic absorption spectra computed were compared with the experimental observations. The intramolecular charge transfer within the molecule is evidenced from the HOMO and LUMO energy levels and surface analysis. The noncovalent interactions like hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions were identified from the molecular geometry and electron localization function. These interactions in molecules have been studied by using reduced density gradient and graphed by Multiwfn.

  17. Platoon Interactions and Real-World Traffic Simulation and Validation Based on the LWR-IM

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kok Mun; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2016-01-01

    Platoon based traffic flow models form the underlying theoretical framework in traffic simulation tools. They are essentially important in facilitating efficient performance calculation and evaluation in urban traffic networks. For this purpose, a new platoon-based macroscopic model called the LWR-IM has been developed in [1]. Preliminary analytical validation conducted previously has proven the feasibility of the model. In this paper, the LWR-IM is further enhanced with algorithms that describe platoon interactions in urban arterials. The LWR-IM and the proposed platoon interaction algorithms are implemented in the real-world class I and class II urban arterials. Another purpose of the work is to perform quantitative validation to investigate the validity and ability of the LWR-IM and its underlying algorithms to describe platoon interactions and simulate performance indices that closely resemble the real traffic situations. The quantitative validation of the LWR-IM is achieved by performing a two-sampled t-test on queues simulated by the LWR-IM and real queues observed at these real-world locations. The results reveal insignificant differences of simulated queues with real queues where the p-values produced concluded that the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. Thus, the quantitative validation further proved the validity of the LWR-IM and the embedded platoon interactions algorithm for the intended purpose. PMID:26731745

  18. Sensorless Interaction Force Control Based on B-Spline Function for Human-Robot Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsantisuk, Chowarit; Katsura, Seiichiro; Ohishi, Kiyoshi

    In this paper, to provide precise force sensation of human operator, a twin direct-drive motor system with wire rope mechanism has been developed. The human-robot interaction force and the wire rope tension are independently controlled in acceleration dimension by realizing the dual disturbance observer based on modal space design. In the common mode, it is utilized for control of vibration suppression and wire rope tension. In the differential mode, the purity of human external force with compensation of friction force is obtained. This mode is useful for control of the interaction force of human. Furthermore, the human-robot system that has the ability of support of human interaction force is also proposed. The interaction force generation based on B-spline function is applied to automatically adjust the smooth force command corresponding to the adaptive parameters.
    To analyze the human movement stroke, the multi-sensor scheme is applied to fuse both two motor encoders and acceleration sensor signal by using Kalman filter. From the experimental results, the ability to design different level of assistive force makes it well suited to customized training programs due to time and human movement constraints.

  19. Platoon Interactions and Real-World Traffic Simulation and Validation Based on the LWR-IM.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kok Mun; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2016-01-01

    Platoon based traffic flow models form the underlying theoretical framework in traffic simulation tools. They are essentially important in facilitating efficient performance calculation and evaluation in urban traffic networks. For this purpose, a new platoon-based macroscopic model called the LWR-IM has been developed in [1]. Preliminary analytical validation conducted previously has proven the feasibility of the model. In this paper, the LWR-IM is further enhanced with algorithms that describe platoon interactions in urban arterials. The LWR-IM and the proposed platoon interaction algorithms are implemented in the real-world class I and class II urban arterials. Another purpose of the work is to perform quantitative validation to investigate the validity and ability of the LWR-IM and its underlying algorithms to describe platoon interactions and simulate performance indices that closely resemble the real traffic situations. The quantitative validation of the LWR-IM is achieved by performing a two-sampled t-test on queues simulated by the LWR-IM and real queues observed at these real-world locations. The results reveal insignificant differences of simulated queues with real queues where the p-values produced concluded that the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. Thus, the quantitative validation further proved the validity of the LWR-IM and the embedded platoon interactions algorithm for the intended purpose.

  20. A Course-based Cross-Cultural Interaction among Pharmacy Students in Qatar and Canada

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jeff; Khalifa, Sherief I.; Jorgenson, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To develop, implement, and evaluate a course-based, cross-cultural student interaction using real-time videoconferencing between universities in Canada and Qatar. Design. A professional skills simulation practice session on smoking cessation was run for students in Qatar (n=22) and Canada (n=22). Students role played cases in small group situations and then interacted with colleagues from the other country regarding culturally challenging situations and communication strategies. Assessment. Students were assessed on analytical content and communication skills through faculty member and peer evaluation. Cultural competency outcomes were assessed using a postsession survey. Overall, 92.3% of respondents agreed that learning was enhanced through the cross-cultural exchange, and 94.9% agreed that insight was gained into the health-related issues and needs of people from another culture. Conclusion. A course-based, cross-cultural interaction was an effective method to incorporate cultural competency principles into student learning. Future initiatives should increase direct student interaction and focus on culturally sensitive topics. PMID:25861107