Science.gov

Sample records for murine el4 thymoma

  1. Opioid binding site in EL-4 thymoma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorica, E.; Spector, S.

    1988-01-01

    Using EL-4 thymoma cell-line we found a binding site similar to the k opioid receptor of the nervous system. The Scatchard analysis of the binding of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine indicated a single site with a K/sub D/ = 60 +/- 17 nM and Bmax = 2.7 +/- 0.8 pmols/10/sup 6/ cells. To characterize this binding site, competition studies were performed using selective compounds for the various opioid receptors. The k agonist U-50,488H was the most potent displacer of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine with an IC/sub 50/ value = 0.57..mu..M. The two steroisomers levorphanol and dextrorphan showed the same affinity for this site. While morphine, (D-Pen/sup 2/, D-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin and ..beta..-endorphin failed to displace, except at very high concentrations, codeine demonstrated a IC/sub 50/ = 60..mu..M, that was similar to naloxone. 32 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Differential downstream functions of protein kinase Ceta and -theta in EL4 mouse thymoma cells.

    PubMed

    Resnick, M S; Kang, B S; Luu, D; Wickham, J T; Sando, J J; Hahn, C S

    1998-10-16

    Sensitive EL4 mouse thymoma cells (s-EL4) respond to phorbol esters with growth inhibition, adherence to substrate, and production of cytokines including interleukin 2. Since these cells express several of the phorbol ester-sensitive protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes, the function of each isozyme remains unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that s-EL4 cells expressed substantially more PKCeta and PKCtheta than did EL4 cells resistant to phorbol esters (r-EL4). To examine potential roles for PKCeta and PKCtheta in EL4 cells, wild type and constitutively active versions of the isozymes were transiently expressed using a Sindbis virus system. Expression of constitutively active PKCeta, but not PKCtheta, in s- and r-EL4 cells altered cell morphology and cytoskeletal structure in a manner similar to that of phorbol ester treatment, suggesting a role for PKCeta in cytoskeletal organization. Prolonged treatment of s-EL4 cells with phorbol esters results in inhibition of cell cycling along with a decreased expression of most of the PKC isozymes, including PKCtheta. Introduction of virally expressed PKCtheta, but not PKCeta, overcame the inhibitory effects of the prolonged phorbol ester treatment on cell cycle progression, suggesting a possible involvement of PKCtheta in cell cycle regulation. These results support differential functions for PKCeta and PKCtheta in T cell activation.

  3. Staurosporine, but not Ro 31-8220, induces interleukin 2 production and synergizes with interleukin 1alpha in EL4 thymoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, T M; Matthews, J S; O'Neill, L A

    1997-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) has been implicated in interleukin 1 (IL1) signal transduction in a number of cellular systems, either as a key event in IL1 action or as a negative regulator. Here we have examined the effects of two PKC inhibitors, staurosporine and the more selective agent Ro 31-8220, on IL1 responses in the murine thymoma line EL4.NOB-1. A 1 h pulse of staurosporine was found to strongly potentiate the induction of IL2 by IL1alpha in these cells. In contrast, neither a pulse nor prolonged incubation with Ro 31-8220 affected the response to IL1alpha. Both agents blocked the response to PMA, however. A 1 h pulse of staurosporine was also found to induce IL2 production on its own, activate the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) and increase the expression of a NFkappaB-linked reporter gene. It synergized with IL1alpha in all of these responses. Ro 31-8220 was again without effect, although both staurosporine and Ro 31-8220 blocked the activation of NFkappaB by PMA. Finally, staurosporine caused the translocation of PKC-alpha and -epsilon, and to a lesser extent PKC-beta, but not PKC-θ or -zeta, from the cytosol to the membrane, although a similar effect was observed with Ro 31-8220. The results suggest that PKC is not involved in IL1alpha signalling in EL4 cells. Furthermore, the potentiating effect of staurosporine on IL1alpha action does not involve PKC inhibition, and is likely to be at the level of NFkappaB activation. PMID:9224627

  4. Lysosomal processing of sialoglycoconjugates in a wheat germ agglutinin resistant variant of EL4 murine leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Devino, N.L.

    1989-01-01

    Metabolic studies were undertaken in EL4 murine leukemia in WB6, a wheat germ agglutinin-resistant variant of EL4, in order to identify any differences in lysosomal processing of sialoglyco-conjugates. Five lysosomal acid hydrolases, acetylesterase, acid phosphatase, {beta}-galactosidase, {alpha}-mannosidase, and neuraminidase, were studied using fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl substrates. No significant differences were found in the total activity of any of these enzymes in EL4 and WB6. Cells were incubated in the presence of N-acetylmannosamine, the metabolic precursor of sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid). Free sialic acid accumulated in the lysosomes of WB6 but not of EL4. The accumulation of lysosomal free sialic acid in WB6 showed a dependence on the concentration of N-acetylmannosamine in the growth medium. Metabolic labelling with (6-{sup 3}H)-N-acetylmannosamine showed that WB6 accumulated lysosomal free sialic acid even at very low concentrations of N-acetylmannosamine. The two cell lines differed in their distribution of radiolabelled neutral sugars, free sialic acid, and sialoglycoproteins. The velocity of {sup 3}H-sialic acid release was 3.7-fold lower in WB6 than in EL4, suggesting that WB6 has a defect in lysosomal sialic acid transport. The metabolic consequences of this defect are examined, in light of other biochemical and immunological data on these cells.

  5. Canine thymoma.

    PubMed

    Aronsohn, M

    1985-07-01

    Thymoma is an uncommon canine neoplasm of thymic epithelial cells. It is seen in various breeds but may occur more frequently in German Shepherd Dogs. Middle-aged or older dogs can be affected and no sex predilection exists. A paraneoplastic syndrome of myasthenia gravis, nonthymic malignant tumors, and/or polymyositis occurs in a significant number of dogs with thymoma. Clinical signs are variable and are related to a space-occupying cranial mediastinal mass and/or manifestations of the paraneo-plastic syndrome. Dyspnea is the most common presenting clinical sign. Thoracic radiographs usually show a cranial mediastinal mass. Lymphoma is the main differential diagnosis. A definitive diagnosis may be made by closed biopsy but is more likely to be confirmed by thoracotomy. Thymomas may be completely contained within the thymic capsule or may spread by local invasion or metastasis. A staging system allows for an accurate prognosis and a therapeutic plan. Surgical removal of encapsulated thymomas may result in long-term survival or cure. Invasive or metastatic thymomas carry a guarded prognosis. Manifestations of the paraneoplastic syndrome complicate treatment. Adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy may be of value for advanced cases; however, adequate clinical trials have not been done in the dog.

  6. V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Valls Serón, Mercedes; Ferwerda, Bart; Engelen-Lee, JooYeon; Geldhoff, Madelijn; Jaspers, Valery; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Tanck, Michael W; Baas, Frank; van der Ende, Arie; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-05-18

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Here, we have performed a prospective nationwide genetic association study using the Human Exome BeadChip and identified gene variants in encoding dynactin 4 (DCTN4), retinoic acid early transcript 1E (RAET1E), and V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) to be associated with unfavourable outcome in patients with pneumococcal meningitis. No clinical replication cohort is available, so we validated the role of one of these targets, AKT3, in a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model. Akt3 deficient mice had worse survival and increased histopathology scores for parenchymal damage (infiltration) and vascular infiltration (large meningeal artery inflammation) but similar bacterial loads, cytokine responses, compared to wild-type mice. We found no differences in cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels between patients with risk or non-risk alleles. Patients with the risk genotype (rs10157763, AA) presented with low scores on the Glasgow Coma Scale and high rate of epileptic seizures. Thus, our results show that AKT3 influences outcome of pneumococcal meningitis.

  7. Differential immunotoxic effects of ethanol on murine EL-4 lymphoma and normal lymphocytes is mediated through increased ROS production and activation of p38MAPK.

    PubMed

    Premachandran, Sudha; Khan, Nazir M; Thakur, Vikas S; Shukla, Jyoti; Poduval, T B

    2012-08-01

    Ethanol has been used to achieve thymic depletion in myasthenia gravis patients. Ethanol (95%) has also been used widely in the therapy of many tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma. In light of these findings, we delineated the differential immunotoxic behavior and mechanism of lower concentration of ethanol towards murine EL-4 lymphoma and its normal counterpart lymphocytes. EL-4 lymphoma and normal lymphocytes were cultured with ethanol (0%-5%) for 6 h and cytotoxicity was measured by various methods. EL-4 cells treated with ethanol showed concentration-dependent loss of viability at 2%-5% ethanol concentration and exhibit proliferative arrest at preG1 stage. Acridine-orange and ethidium-bromide staining indicated that ethanol induced death in EL-4 cells, by induction of both apoptosis and necrosis which was further supported by findings of DNA-fragmentation and trypan blue dye exclusion test. However, treatment of lymphocytes with similar concentration of ethanol did not show any death-associated parameters. Furthermore, ethanol induced significantly higher ROS generation in EL-4 cells as compared to lymphocytes and caused PARP cleavage and activation of apoptotic proteins like p53 and Bax, in EL-4 cells and not in normal lymphocytes. In addition, ethanol exposure to EL-4 cells led to phosphorylation of p38MAPK, and upregulation of death receptor Fas (CD95). Taken together, these results suggest that ethanol upto a concentration of 5% caused no significant immunotoxicity towards normal lymphocytes and induced cell death in EL-4 cells via phosphorylation of p38MAPK and regulation of p53 leading to further activation of both extrinsic (Fas) and intrinsic (Bax) apoptotic markers.

  8. Activation of the prolactin receptor gene by promoter insertion in a Moloney murine leukemia virus-induced rat thymoma.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, C S; Bear, S E; Keler, T; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Yeung, R S; Tsichlis, P N

    1992-01-01

    The prolactin receptor (Prlr) and growth hormone receptor (Ghr) genes and the Moloney murine leukemia virus integration-2 (Mlvi-2) locus were mapped to mouse chromosome 15 and human chromosome 5 bands p12-p14. To examine the potential relationship between Mlvi-2 and the genes encoding the growth hormone receptor and the prolactin receptor, we determined the chromosomal location of all three loci in the rat, using a panel of rat-mouse somatic cell hybrids, and in the mouse, using a panel of (C57BL/6J x Mus spretus)F1 x C57BL/6J interspecific backcross mice. These analyses revealed that Ghr, Prlr, and Mlvi-2 map to chromosome 2 in the rat and to chromosome 15 in the mouse, in close proximity with each other. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of rat genomic DNA showed no overlaps between the gene encoding the prolactin receptor and the remaining loci. Moreover, expression of the prolactin receptor was not affected by provirus insertion in Mlvi-2. During these studies, however, we detected one T-cell lymphoma line (2779) in which the prolactin receptor gene was activated by provirus integration. Sequence analysis of polymerase chain reaction-derived cDNA clones showed that the prolactin receptor RNA message initiates at the 5' long terminal repeat and utilizes the splice donor site 5' of the gag gene to splice the viral sequences onto exon 1 of the prolactin receptor. This message is predicted to encode the intact prolactin receptor protein product. Exposure of the T-cell lymphoma line 2779 to prolactin promoted cellular proliferation. Images PMID:1404614

  9. Antitumor protection from the murine T-cell leukemia/lymphoma EL4 by the continuous subcutaneous coadministration of recombinant macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Vallera, D A; Taylor, P A; Aukerman, S L; Blazar, B R

    1993-09-15

    Combined continuous s.c. coadministration of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) plus interleukin-2 (IL-2) by osmotic pump protected mice given i.v. injections of a lethal dose of EL4 T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Antitumor protection was significantly greater than that afforded by treatment with either cytokine alone. Since neither IL-2 receptors nor M-CSF receptors were expressed on EL4, the antitumor effect was likely attributed to murine effector cells. To determine how M-CSF+IL-2 provided this effect, we performed immunophenotypic and functional analyses as well as in vivo depletion studies of putative antitumor effector cells. Splenic phenotyping experiments revealed that the highest levels of macrophages and natural killer cells were observed in mice given the cytokine combination rather than either M-CSF or IL-2 alone. In vivo depletion of natural killer cells ablated the antitumor protective effect of M-CSF and IL-2. T-cells were also important for M-CSF+IL-2 efficacy, since adult thymectomy/T-cell depletion significantly inhibited the ability of cytokine coadministration to protect against EL4. Coadministration of the 2 cytokines significantly elevated in vivo levels of CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD3+NK1.1+ T-cells, and CD3+CD25+ (activated) T-cells, and elevated anti-EL4 cytotoxic T-cell activity measured in vitro. Although WBC counts and fluorescence-activated cell sorter studies showed that M-CSF+IL-2 treatment significantly elevated neutrophils, s.c. delivery of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor at doses sufficient to induce neutrophilia was unable to confer anti-EL4 protection. These studies indicate that macrophages, T-cells, and natural killer cells are all important in the M-CSF+IL-2 anti-EL4 response. The superior antitumor effect of this cytokine combination along with the ability of M-CSF to diminish the toxicity of IL-2 in this model suggests that further investigations into the clinical potential of this combination treatment are warranted.

  10. Proteomic Signatures of Thymomas

    PubMed Central

    Shilo, Konstantin; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Freitas, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Based on the histological features and outcome, the current WHO classification separates thymomas into A, AB, B1, B2 and B3 subtypes. It is hypothesized that the type A thymomas are derived from the thymic medulla while the type B thymomas are derived from the cortex. Due to occasional histological overlap between the tumor subtypes creating difficulties in their separation, the aim of this study was to provide their proteomic characterization and identify potential immunohistochemical markers aiding in tissue diagnosis. Pair-wise comparison of neoplastic and normal thymus by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) of formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue revealed 61 proteins differentially expressed in thymomas compared to normal tissue. Hierarchical clustering showed distinct segregation of subtypes AB, B1 and B2 from that of A and B3. Most notably, desmoyokin, a protein that is encoded by the AHNAK gene, was associated with type A thymomas and medulla of normal thymus, by LC-MS/MS and immunohistochemistry. In this global proteomic characterization of the thymoma, several proteins unique to different thymic compartments and thymoma subtypes were identified. Among differentially expressed proteins, desmoyokin is a marker specific for thymic medulla and is potentially promising immunohistochemical marker in separation of type A and B3 thymomas. PMID:27832160

  11. Thymoma related myasthenia gravis in humans and potential animal models.

    PubMed

    Marx, Alexander; Porubsky, Stefan; Belharazem, Djeda; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Schalke, Berthold; Ströbel, Philipp; Weis, Cleo-Aron

    2015-08-01

    Thymoma-associated Myasthenia gravis (TAMG) is one of the anti-acetylcholine receptor MG (AChR-MG) subtypes. The clinico-pathological features of TAMG and its pathogenesis are described here in comparison with pathogenetic models suggested for the more common non-thymoma AChR-MG subtypes, early onset MG and late onset MG. Emphasis is put on the role of abnormal intratumorous T cell selection and activation, lack of intratumorous myoid cells and regulatory T cells as well as deficient expression of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) by neoplastic thymic epithelial cells. We review spontaneous and genetically engineered thymoma models in a spectrum of animals and the extensive clinical and immunological overlap between canine, feline and human TAMG. Finally, limitations and perspectives of the transplantation of human and murine thymoma tissue into nude mice, as potential models for TAMG, are addressed.

  12. [Thymoma and autoimmune diseases].

    PubMed

    Jamilloux, Y; Frih, H; Bernard, C; Broussolle, C; Petiot, P; Girard, N; Sève, P

    2017-03-29

    The association between thymoma and autoimmunity is well known. Besides myasthenia gravis, which is found in 15 to 20% of patients with thymoma, other autoimmune diseases have been reported: erythroblastopenia, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory myopathies, thyroid disorders, Isaac's syndrome or Good's syndrome. More anecdotally, Morvan's syndrome, limbic encephalitis, other autoimmune cytopenias, autoimmune hepatitis, and bullous skin diseases (pemphigus, lichen) have been reported. Autoimmune diseases occur most often before thymectomy, but they can be discovered at the time of surgery or later. Two situations require the systematic investigation of a thymoma: the occurrence of myasthenia gravis or autoimmune erythroblastopenia. Nevertheless, the late onset of systemic lupus erythematosus or the association of several autoimmune manifestations should lead to look for a thymoma. Neither the characteristics of the patients nor the pathological data can predict the occurrence of an autoimmune disease after thymectomy. Thus, thymectomy usefulness in the course of the autoimmune disease, except myasthenia gravis, has not been demonstrated. This seems to indicate the preponderant role of self-reactive T lymphocytes distributed in the peripheral immune system prior to surgery. Given the high infectious morbidity in patients with thymoma, immunoglobulin replacement therapy should be considered in patients with hypogammaglobulinemia who receive immunosuppressive therapy, even in the absence of prior infection.

  13. Treatment Options for Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thymoma & Thymic Carcinoma Treatment Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Thymoma and ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  14. Multiple Thymoma with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong Hyun; Cho, Sukki

    2017-01-01

    The actual incidence of multiple thymoma is unknown and rarely reported because it remains controversial whether the cases represent a disease of multicentric origin or a disease resulting from intrathymic metastasis. In this case, a patient underwent total thymectomy for multiple thymoma with myasthenia gravis via bilateral video-assisted thoracic surgery. A well-encapsulated multinodular cystic mass, measuring 57 mm×50 mm×22 mm in the right lobe of the thymus, and a well-encapsulated mass, measuring 32 mm×15 mm×14 mm in the left lobe, were found. Both tumors were type B2 thymoma. Few cases of multiple thymoma with myasthenia gravis have ever been reported in the literature. We report a case of synchronous multiple thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis. PMID:28180109

  15. General Information about Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of thymoma and thymic carcinoma include a cough and chest pain. Thymoma and thymic carcinoma may ... if you have any of the following: A cough that doesn't go away. Chest pain. Trouble ...

  16. Thymomas: Review of Current Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszek, Sandra; Wigle, Dennis A.; Keshavjee, Shaf; Fischer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Thymomas are the most common tumors of the mediastinum. The introduction of multimodality treatment strategies, as well as novel approaches to the diagnosis of these tumors, has led to changes in the clinical management of thymomas. Here we review the literature for current clinical practice in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of thymomas. PMID:19463649

  17. Case Report of Thymoma Tumor Reduction Following Plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Yu, Qitao

    2015-11-01

    For thymoma, multidisciplinary antitumor strategy is composed of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Meanwhile, ~20% to 25% of patients with thymoma have myasthenia gravis and plasmapheresis is recommended for thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis.We report a case that a 40-year-old woman with thymoma experiencing tumor relapse after surgery showed significant response to plasmapheresis.This is the first case of thymoma responded to plasmapheresis, which may guide the study of the etiology and pathogenesis of thymoma.

  18. Thymoma Metastasis to the Semimembranosus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Kenta; Susa, Michiro; Ogata, Sho; Ozeki, Yuichi; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Thymoma is the most common thymic epithelial tumor whose classification was first introduced in 1999. Type B2 thymoma is considered a moderate/high-risk tumor; however, extrathoracic metastases are extremely rare with limited reports to date. In this report, we present a rare thymoma metastasis to the semimembranosus muscle, which was resected with a wide margin after confirmation by open biopsy. At the final follow-up after 1 year, no local recurrence has been observed. PMID:28203162

  19. Thymoma masquerading as transfusion dependent anemia

    PubMed Central

    Muzamil, Javvid; Shiekh, Aejaz Aziz; Bhat, Gull Mohammad; Lone, Abdul Rashid; Bhat, Shuaeb; Nabi, Firdousa

    2016-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a known entity in clinical medicine. Patients are often transfusion dependent for their whole life. Ascertaining its etiology is always a herculean task. We received a similar transfusion-dependent patient, who on evaluation was found to have thymoma as an etiological factor. Thymoma presenting as PRCA is seen in 2%–5% patients and evaluating PRCA for thymoma is seen in 5%–13% patient. As per the WHO histopathological classification, thymoma has six types and Type A is associated with PRCA and Type B is associated with myasthenia gravis. This correlation was not seen in our patient, who had Type B thymoma. Surgical resection of thymus improves 30% of PRCA and rest needs immunosuppression. Our patient was not the surgical candidate, and hence he was put on chemotherapy. PMID:28144099

  20. Disseminated Salmonella Infection Coexisting with Thymoma.

    PubMed

    Saheer, S; Immanuel, Subash; Balamugesh, T; Christopher, D J

    2015-01-01

    A 21-year-old boy presented with high grade fever, diffuse chest pain and exertional breathlessness of one month duration. Radiologically he had a large lobulated anterior mediastinal mass with necrotic thick enhancing septaes. Histopathology of the mass was suggestive of thymoma and culture from the necrotic aspirate yielded Salmonella typhi. The same pathogen was isolated in subsequent blood and sputum cultures. This current report describes the rare association of salmonella infection with thymoma.

  1. Thymus, thymoma and myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2013-05-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease. An autoantibody directed toward acetylcholine receptor (AChR) causes the destruction of the postsynaptic membrane and a reduction of the number of AChRs at neuromuscular junctions. A very puzzling, but interesting characteristic of myasthenia gravis is that many of the patients have an abnormality in their thymus. Many have a hyperplastic thymus with germinal centers, while others have a thymic tumor. How is the abnormality of the thymus related to myasthenia gravis? This review will summarize the existing evidence and try to find the missing link between the thymus and myasthenia gravis. The review will also comment on two distinct populations of myasthenia gravis patients without thymoma. The autoimmunity found in elderly patients is nonspecific and initiated via a different mechanism from the initiation of myasthenia gravis in younger patients.

  2. Thymoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content ASCO Conquer Cancer Foundation Journal of Clinical Oncology Journal of Oncology Practice ASCO University Donate eNEWS SIGNUP f Cancer. ... of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. ...

  3. First description of cervical intradural thymoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Nicola; Mancarella, Cristina; Colistra, Davide; Landi, Alessandro; Dugoni, Demo Eugenio; Delfini, Roberto

    2015-11-16

    Thymoma and thymic carcinoma are rare epithelial tumors, which originate from the thymus gland. According to the World Health Organization there are "organotypic" (types A, AB, B1, B2, and B3) and "non-organotypic" (thymic carcinomas) thymomas. Type B3 thymomas are aggressive tumors, which can metastasize. Due to the rarity of these lesions, only 7 cases of extradural metastasis are described in the literature. We report the first and unique case of a man with cervical intradural B3 thymoma metastasis. A 46-year-old man underwent thymoma surgical removal. The year after the procedure he was treated for a parietal pleura metastasis. In 2006 he underwent cervical-dorsal extradural metastasis removal and C5-Th1 stabilization. Seven years after he came to our observation complaining left cervicobrachialgia and a reduction of strength of the left arm. He underwent a cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging, which showed a new lesion at the C5-C7 level. The patient underwent a surgery for the intradural B3 thymoma metastasis. Neurological symptoms improved although the removal was subtotal. He went through postoperative radiation therapy with further mass reduction. Spinal metastases are extremely rare. To date, only 7 cases of spinal extradural metastasis have been described in the literature. This is the first case of spinal intradural metastasis. Early individuation of these tumors and surgical treatment improve neurological outcome in patients with spinal cord compression. A multimodal treatment including neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery and postoperative radiation therapy seems to improve survival in patients with metastatic thymoma.

  4. First description of cervical intradural thymoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Marotta, Nicola; Mancarella, Cristina; Colistra, Davide; Landi, Alessandro; Dugoni, Demo Eugenio; Delfini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Thymoma and thymic carcinoma are rare epithelial tumors, which originate from the thymus gland. According to the World Health Organization there are “organotypic” (types A, AB, B1, B2, and B3) and “non-organotypic” (thymic carcinomas) thymomas. Type B3 thymomas are aggressive tumors, which can metastasize. Due to the rarity of these lesions, only 7 cases of extradural metastasis are described in the literature. We report the first and unique case of a man with cervical intradural B3 thymoma metastasis. A 46-year-old man underwent thymoma surgical removal. The year after the procedure he was treated for a parietal pleura metastasis. In 2006 he underwent cervical-dorsal extradural metastasis removal and C5-Th1 stabilization. Seven years after he came to our observation complaining left cervicobrachialgia and a reduction of strength of the left arm. He underwent a cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging, which showed a new lesion at the C5-C7 level. The patient underwent a surgery for the intradural B3 thymoma metastasis. Neurological symptoms improved although the removal was subtotal. He went through postoperative radiation therapy with further mass reduction. Spinal metastases are extremely rare. To date, only 7 cases of spinal extradural metastasis have been described in the literature. This is the first case of spinal intradural metastasis. Early individuation of these tumors and surgical treatment improve neurological outcome in patients with spinal cord compression. A multimodal treatment including neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery and postoperative radiation therapy seems to improve survival in patients with metastatic thymoma. PMID:26601098

  5. Thymoma associated with exfoliative dermatitis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Jacqueline Vallim Jacobina; Moura, Mariana Pereira; Monteiro, Fabio Oliveira

    2014-12-01

    A 7-year-old, castrated male, domestic shorthair cat presented with generalized exfoliative dermatitis, lethargy, anorexia and weight loss. Multiple skin scrapings taken at the time did not reveal any abnormalities. Skin histopathological examination was consistent with sebaceous adenitis or exfoliative dermatitis caused by an underlying thymoma (thymoma-associated feline exfoliative dermatitis). Thoracic radiographs revealed a cranial mediastinal mass, which was removed surgically. Histopathological examinations indicated that it was a thymoma. Within 90 days of surgery, the cutaneous signs had resolved, suggesting a causal relationship between the thymoma and the skin disease. Recurrence of thymoma was detected 24 months after surgery.

  6. [Malignant thymoma associated with severe aplastic anaemia].

    PubMed

    Escobosa Sánchez, O M; Herrero Hernández, A; Acha García, T

    2009-01-01

    Malignant thymoma is a very rare neoplasm in paediatric patients; it is usually associated with para-neoplastic syndromes, the most frequent is myasthenia gravis; some haematological abnormalities may also be present, such as pure red cell aplasia or aplastic anaemia. We report a 12-year-old boy suffering from a very large thymoma, treated with multiple chemotherapy, and who developed a severe aplastic anaemia after surgery. He had a poor response to immunosuppressive treatment and later developed massive pulmonary bleeding as a complication.

  7. The clinical features, diagnosis and management of recurrent thymoma.

    PubMed

    Luo, Taobo; Zhao, Hongguang; Zhou, Xinming

    2016-08-31

    Thymoma is a disease with malignant potential, which has a recurrence rate after complete resection ranging from 5 to 50 %. Multiple studies on the risk factors, treatment or prognosis have been reported. Many of them are controversial, however. In this review, we summarized some accepted risk factors, means of diagnosis and different treatments of recurrent thymoma. The risk factors of recurrent thymoma haven't been well-studied, and its management remains controversial. We reviewed the literatures and found some key points which should be noticed during the surgery of initial thymoma. Although reoperation should be taken into account preferentially, multimodal treatments are also available. The prognosis are also been discussed.

  8. Clinical and pathologic features of thymoma in 15 dogs.

    PubMed

    Aronsohn, M G; Schunk, K L; Carpenter, J L; King, N W

    1984-06-01

    Thymoma was diagnosed in 15 dogs at Angell Memorial Animal Hospital between 1972 and 1983. All thymomas developed in the cranial portion of the mediastinum. An autoimmune paraneoplastic syndrome was observed in 10 (67%) of the dogs and included myasthenia gravis, nonthymic neoplasms, and polymyositis. Clinical signs were variable and inconsistent, depending on whether they were attributable to the cranial mediastinal mass or to the paraneoplastic syndrome. Eleven dogs were necropsied. Two thymomas had gross characteristics of malignancy. In 3 cases, a cell consistent with a subclass of mast cell was found and in 1 thymoma, melanocytes were observed.

  9. Amyloid deposition in 2 feline thymomas.

    PubMed

    Burrough, E R; Myers, R K; Hostetter, S J; Fox, L E; Bayer, B J; Felz, C L; Waller, K R; Whitley, E M

    2012-07-01

    Two cases of feline thymoma with amyloid deposition were encountered between 1982 and 2010. Neoplastic cells were separated by abundant, pale eosinophilic, homogeneous material that was congophilic and birefringent. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells were connected by desmosomes, and the extracellular deposits were composed of nonbranching, hollow-cored fibrils, 8-10 nm in diameter. In the case with sufficient archived tissue for additional sections, the amyloid remained congophilic following potassium permanganate incubation, and the neoplastic cells were immunoreactive for pancytokeratin. The histologic, histochemical, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical features of both neoplasms are consistent with epithelial-predominant thymoma with the unusual feature of intratumoral amyloid deposition. The affinity of the amyloid for Congo red following potassium permanganate incubation is consistent with non-AA amyloid. The ultrastructural findings were consistent with amyloid production by the neoplastic epithelial cells.

  10. Thymoma-associated exfoliative dermatitis in cats.

    PubMed

    Rottenberg, S; von Tscharner, C; Roosje, P J

    2004-07-01

    Five cases of exfoliative dermatitis in cats were presented from 1996 to 2002 in which a feline thymoma was found by postmortem or postsurgical examination. Besides abundant exfoliation of keratin squames and layers, the histologic picture of the skin revealed a similar pattern of interface dermatitis with predominantly CD3+ lymphocytes and fewer mast cells and plasma cells. In the epidermal basal layer a hydropic degeneration of keratinocytes was present. In all cases an infundibular lymphocytic mural folliculitis and absence of or drastic decrease in the number of sebaceous glands occurred. In addition to the so far described cell-poor type, we also found examples of a cell-rich skin lesion. Together with the clinical observation of generalized exfoliative dermatitis, the histologic pattern of this dermatitis was suggestive of an underlying thymoma. The pathogenesis of this skin disease in association with thymic neoplasia remains obscure, and our results contradict the hypothesis of production of autoantibodies that cross-react with epithelial antigens. The morphology of the thymomas and CD3 expression of the thymocytes varied and did not seem to have an impact on the dermal lesions.

  11. Entire hemithorax irradiation for Masaoka stage IVa thymomas.

    PubMed

    Soares, André; Louro, Luís Vasco; Almeida, Marta; Sousa, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Thymomas are rare neoplasms that have an indolent growth with a preferentially intra-thoracic dissemination pattern. Surgery is currently the standard treatment of thymomas; however radiotherapy is often used in an adjuvant setting due to a high sensitivity of these tumors to such treatment. Postoperative entire hemithoracic irradiation has been used in selected Masaoka stage IVa cases after complete surgical excision of metastatic lesions. In the present article, the authors report three cases of Masaoka stage IVa thymoma that underwent entire hemithorax irradiation after surgical excision of metastatic lesions. The first two patients presented as stage IVa thymomas. The third case consisted of a pleural recurrence of a thymoma. Hemithoracic irradiation with low doses has been used by different authors; the available data shows that it is a well-tolerated treatment that could potentially lead to better loco-regional control and increased overall survival.

  12. Transcervical excision of thymoma and video-assisted thoracoscopic extended thymectomy (VATET) for ectopic cervical thymoma with myasthenia gravis: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Kumazawa, Sachiko; Ishibashi, Hironori; Takahashi, Ken; Okubo, Kenichi

    2016-12-01

    Myasthenia gravis is the most common disease associated with thymoma, but it is rarely accompanied by ectopic thymoma. We describe a 47-year-old woman who presented with an ectopic cervical thymoma with myasthenia gravis. She was admitted to our neurology department with ptosis, diplopia, and mandibular muscle fatigue, and was diagnosed with myasthenia gravis. The mass was located posterior to the right lobe of thyroid gland on computed tomography and was diagnosed as ectopic thymoma on fine-needle aspiration biopsy examination. Transcervical excision of thymoma and VATET were performed. The patient has been free of neurological symptoms and has displayed no evidence of recurrent thymoma for 2 years.

  13. Thallium-201 uptake in a benign thymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Campeau, R.J.; Ey, E.H.; Varma, D.G.

    1986-07-01

    A 68-year-old woman was admitted with atypical angina. A chest radiograph showed an anterior mediastinal mass that was confirmed on CT. The mass was relatively avascular and separate from the heart and great vessels. She underwent stress thallium testing that demonstrated no exercise-induced ischemia; however, an abnormal focus of thallium activity was present in the anterior mediastinum on stress and redistribution images. Cardiac catheterization demonstrated a normal left ventriculogram, coronary arteries and thoracic aorta. Subsequent surgery and pathologic examination revealed the mass to be a benign thymoma arising in the right lobe of the thymus gland.

  14. Nephrotic syndrome associated with metastatic thymoma treated with chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Shin Hye; Kim, Hyean-Ji; Kim, Jeong-Han; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Lee, Jeong Hee; Kim, Se Hyun; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Jin Won; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Jee Hyun; Bang, Soo-Mee; Lee, Jong Seok

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Nephropathy with concurrent invasive thymoma is a type of paraneoplastic syndrome. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: We report a 32-year-old female with nephrotic syndrome that was first diagnosed along with invasive thymoma and treated by means of cisplatin-based chemotherapy for the thymoma. The patient initially presented with dyspnea and generalized edema. Chest radiography and computed tomography scans revealed right pleural effusion and a mass in the right middle lung field, which were confirmed by a percutaneous lung biopsy as metastatic invasive thymoma. Severe hypoalbuminemia, heavy proteinuria, hyponatremia, and hypercholesterolemia were features of the nephrotic syndrome. A kidney needle biopsy suggested focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Interventions and Outcomes: All of the symptoms of nephrotic syndrome were resolved simultaneously during the first 2 cycles of chemotherapy. The patient was on regular follow-up with no specific treatment for nephrotic syndrome and underwent successful resection of the left pleura and anterior thymoma. The patient has shown no evidence of recurrence for 2 years. Lessons: We conclude that chemotherapy for invasive thymoma is an effective treatment for nephrotic syndrome accompanying the thymoma. PMID:28072685

  15. Myasthenia gravis and thymoma coexisting with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Ekmekci, Ozgul; Karasoy, Hatice; Bademkiran, Fikret; Akkus, Dilek Evyapan; Yuceyar, Nur

    2014-01-01

    We describe a 34-year old man presenting with subacute generalized myasthenic symptoms. His clinical features and laboratory investigations demonstrated both myasthenia gravis and myotonic dystrophy type 1. The computerized tomography of chest revealed anterior mediastinal mass. The lymphocyte-rich thymoma was removed surgically and he received radiotherapy. Recent observations suggested that the patients with myotonic dystrophy may have an increased risk of benign and malignant tumours but its coexistence with thymoma is very rare. The risk of thymoma associated with myotonic dystrophy is unknown.

  16. Metastatic thymoma and acquired generalized myasthenia gravis in a beagle.

    PubMed

    Moffet, Adrienne C

    2007-01-01

    A 16-year-old, spayed female beagle was diagnosed with metastatic thymoma causing a probable paraneoplastic syndrome of generalized acquired myasthenia gravis. Anticholinesterase treatment was initiated; however, 5 days later the dog died.

  17. Primary Intrapulmonary Thymoma Presenting as a Solitary Pulmonary Nodule

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Woohyun; Kang, Chang Hyun; Kim, Young Tae; Park, In Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Primary intrapulmonary thymoma (PIT) is a very rare lesion of uncertain pathogenesis. PIT should be considered when the histopathological appearance of a lung tumor shows features that are uncommon but similar to those of a thymoma. In this case report, we discuss the case of a 59-year-old female with a solitary pulmonary nodule that was confirmed to be PIT on the basis of pathological tests. Treatment with complete resection showed good results. PMID:28180106

  18. A rare thymoma case with seven paraneoplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Li; Zhang, Pei; Liu, Xue-Yuan; Fang, Min

    2015-01-01

    Thymoma is a kind of epithelial tumor of the thymus which about 30-50% patients accompanied by paraneoplastic disorders. However, the coexistence of seven symptoms in an individual is rare. This report represented a patient, diagnosed of thymoma, with myasthenia gravis, erythema multiforme, plasma cell cheilitis, recurrent oral ulcer, vitiligo, Raynaud’s phenomenon and fissured tongue. Detailed clinical manifestations, serum immune biomarkers, imaging study, electrophysiology examination and pathology results are described in this case. PMID:26770603

  19. Thymoma versus thymic carcinoma: differences in biology impacting treatment.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Ronan J

    2013-05-01

    A better understanding of the biology of both thymomas and thymic carcinomas has occurred in recent years thanks to advanced technologies such as comparative genomic hybridization, expression array analysis, and next-generation sequencing. Gene expression profiling and genomic clustering studies have shown that thymic tumors as classified by the 2004 WHO system do have different molecular features. Because of the rarity of these tumors, there is a paucity of high-quality clinical research data, and treatment decisions are often guided by the small amount of prospective trial data, retrospective series, and individual case reports. The literature does report on several advanced thymic tumors that have responded to new targeted agents, indicating that across the spectrum of thymic malignancies there may be clinically relevant molecular subsets. Genomic profiling distinguishes type B3 thymoma and thymic carcinoma from type A and B2 thymomas. Furthermore, type B2 thymomas can be separated from other subgroups in that it has a more distinctly lymphocytic component than the other groups in which epithelial cells predominate. The presence of KIT mutations in thymic carcinomas rather than in thymomas further adds to a growing body of evidence showing that underlying tumor biology may in the future lead to molecular classifications, which may enhance therapies for these rare tumors.

  20. Hepatic metastasis of thymoma: case report and immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Speisky, Daniela; de Davila, María Teresa García; Vigovich, Felix; Mendez, Julian; Maurette, Rafael; Ejarque, Marcos García; Spina, Juan Carlos; Iotti, Alejandro; Dezanzo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Thymomas are rare tumours characterised by their slow growth and capacity to invade directly by contiguity. While distant dissemination is infrequent, all sub-types of thymoma have the capacity to metastasise to extrathoracic organs. We present here the case of a female patient with a liver mass discovered 13 years after the removal of a mediastinal thymoma and after ten years from thyroidectomy for papillary carcinoma. The histopathological study showed that the lesion contained an epithelial component, which was immunohistochemically positive for pankeratin. It was accompanied by numerous small lymphocytes testing positive for TdT, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8, CD99, and CD43. The result was consistent with hepatic metastatic thymoma sub-type B1, according to the World Health Organisation classification (WHO). Our case highlights the importance of morphological and immunohistological examinations in the differential diagnosis of visceral masses in patients with a history of thymoma. Given the infrequency of its metastasis and the increased risk of developing other primary tumours that these patients have, these studies play a significant role. PMID:28101136

  1. Thymoma-associated exfoliative dermatitis in a rabbit.

    PubMed

    Florizoone, Koenraad

    2005-08-01

    A 5-year-old rabbit with generalized scaling is presented. Multiple skin scrapings and acetate tape impressions were negative for mites and Malassezia. Culture for dermatophytes was also negative. Skin biopsies showed similarities with sebaceous adenitis described in rabbits (absence of sebaceous glands, perifollicular lymphocytic infiltrate at the level of the absent sebaceous glands, lymphocytic mural folliculitis, interface dermatitis). The owners refused any treatment and 2 months later the rabbit was euthanized due to anorexia. At necropsy a mass was found in the anterior mediastinum. Histopathology confirmed a diagnosis of thymoma. A possible paraneoplastic skin disease was suspected, based on similarities with thymoma-associated exfoliative dermatitis in cats.

  2. [Two Cases of Invasive Thymoma with Taste Disorder].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Tatsuya; Hirai, Shinji

    2017-02-01

    Two 50s female patients with the taste disorder of sweet taste loss and stage IV a type B2 invasive thymoma underwent surgery at our hospital. One patient with myasthenia gravis (MG) developed postoperative myasthenic crisis and recovered by the treatment with plasma apheresis and steroid pulse therapy. Her taste disorder fully recovered together with her MG symptom. The taste disorder of the other patient without MG had persisted for 3 years after the surgery. The taste disorder of sweet taste loss was reported as one of non-motor symptoms caused by MG-related autoimmune mechanisms associated with thymoma, improving with the therapy for MG. Anti-Kv 1.4 antibody was reported to be positive in nearly half patients with the taste disorder and MG and is speculated to affect selectively the sweet taste receptor.

  3. Shock induced by spontaneous rupture of a giant thymoma.

    PubMed

    Santoprete, Stefano; Ragusa, Mark; Urbani, Moira; Puma, Francesco

    2007-04-01

    Spontaneous bleeding of thymoma is a very rare event. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman who was referred to our hospital for acute onset of chest pain followed by shock. Chest computed tomographic scanning showed a huge mediastinal tumor with abundant left pleural effusion and contralateral shift of the mediastinum. Emergency surgical treatment was carried out through a clamshell incision. At the opening of the left pleura 1,600 mL of fresh blood was found, originating from a rupture of the tumor's capsular veins. The lesion was completely resected, en-bloc with a wide pericardial excision. The postoperative course was uneventful. The pathology report classified the lesion as thymoma AB.

  4. Ruptured thymoma causing a hemothorax: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HOKKA, DAISUKE; OGAWA, HIROYUKI; TANE, SHINYA; TANAKA, YUGO; TAUCHI, SHUNSUKE; MANIWA, YOSHIMASA

    2015-01-01

    A thymoma is a neoplasm that arises from the epithelial cells of the thymus, and may cause various signs and symptoms dependent upon its local extent. A non-traumatic hemothorax is extremely rare. The present study reports the case of a 77-year-old female who presented with an acute onset of chest pain. Imaging procedures revealed a mass occupying the anterior mediastinum and left hemithorax, and a left pleural effusion. Progressive anemia was noted following admission. Left hemothorax due to rupture of the anterior mediastinal mass was suspected, and emergency surgery was performed. Hemorrhage was observed on the cut surface of the tumor. An analysis of frozen sections indicated a thymoma, and a thymo-partial thymectomy was subsequently performed to remove as much of the hematoma as possible. The patient was discharged on post-operative day 13 following an uneventful recovery. The present case suggests that in previously healthy individuals, sudden-onset dyspnea and chest pain co-occurring with an acute widening of the mediastinum observed on roentgenograph may be indicative of a ruptured thymoma. PMID:26622755

  5. Invasive Thymoma with Pure Red Cell Aplasia and Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Kiyoki, Yusuke; Ueda, Sho; Yamaoka, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Seiich; Inagaki, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We here describe a case involving a 67-yearold female patient who was referred to our hospital due to severe anemia (hemoglobin, 5.0 g/dL), thrombocytopenia (platelet count, 0.6 × 104/μL), and a mediastinal shadow with calcification noted on X-ray. On admission, an anterior mediastinal tumor was detected, and bone marrow biopsy revealed few megakaryocytes and severely reduced numbers of erythroid cells. The diagnosis was thymoma with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (AAMT). On Day 8 of admission, the patient received immunosuppressive therapy together with cyclosporine for the 2 severe hematologic diseases, which were stabilized within 2 months. Subsequently, total thymectomy was performed. The diagnosis of the tumor invading the left lung was invasive thymoma, Masaokakoga stage III. The histological diagnosis was World Health Organization type AB. Thymoma accompanied with PRCA and AAMT is very rare, and, based on our case, immunotherapeutic therapy for the hematologic disorders should precede surgical intervention. PMID:28053696

  6. Thymoma associated with hypogammaglobulinaemia and pure red cell aplasia

    PubMed Central

    Briones, Juan; Iruretagoyena, Mirentxu; Galindo, Héctor; Ortega, Claudia; Zoroquiain, Pablo; Valbuena, José; Acevedo, Francisco; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Sánchez, Cesar

    2013-01-01

    Thymomas are neoplasias that begin in the thymus and develop in the anterior mediastinum. They are commonly associated with a variety of systemic and autoimmune disorders, such as pure red cell aplasia, hypogammaglobulinaemia, pancytopaenia, collagen diseases, and, most commonly, myasthenia gravis. The presence of inter-current infections, especially diarrhoea and pneumonia, in the presence of lymphocyte B depletion and hypogammaglobulinaemia is known as Good’s syndrome and may affect up to 5% of patients with thymoma. While anaemia is present in 50%–86% of patients with Good’s syndrome, only 41.9% of cases present pure red cell aplasia. Concomitance of these two conditions has only been rarely studied. We report on the case of a 55-year-old man diagnosed with advanced thymoma, who, during the progression of his disease, developed signs and symptoms suggesting Good’s syndrome and pure red cell aplasia. We also performed a brief review of the literature concerning this association, its clinical characteristics, and treatment. PMID:24171048

  7. Multimodal treatment for stage IVA thymoma: a proposable strategy.

    PubMed

    Rena, Ottavio; Mineo, Tommaso Claudio; Casadio, Caterina

    2012-04-01

    A retrospective review of a series of consecutive patients was carried out to evaluate the feasibility and the efficacy of a multimodal treatment in the management of stage IVA thymoma at first diagnosis. From 1998 to 2008, 18 patients affected by stage IVA thymoma underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy, surgery and subsequent mediastinal radiation therapy. There were 10 males and 8 females, mean age 54.5 years (range 29-68). Not specific symptoms were present in 12 cases and thymus-related syndromes were reported in 4. Histological subtypes were 1 AB, 2 B1, 4 B2, 7 B3, 1 mixed B1-B2, 1 mixed B1-B3 and 2 mixed B2-B3 thymomas. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (4 courses of cisplatin-based chemotherapy) was well tolerated in all cases. Those patients demonstrating clinical response at restaging (16/18) received surgical resection: "en-bloc" thymoma, residual thymic tissue and tumour involved organs resection was carried out together with the pleural implants removal. Complete macroscopic resection was achieved 10/16 patients (64%). Postoperative mortality and morbidity were null and 24%, respectively. Adjuvant radiation therapy consisted of 45-54 Gy administered by a 6 MV linear accelerator to the whole mediastinum and previous tumour bed. Mean follow-up was 82±33 months (range 31-143); overall survival was 85% and 53% at 5- and 10-years. Disease-related survival of the entire cohort was 100% and 58% at 5- and 10-years, whereas freedom from relapse survival for patients submitted to complete resection was 58% and 42% at 5- and 10-years. Disease-related survival when complete and not complete resection were considered were 100% and 52% and 72% and 0% at 5- and 10-years respectively (p=0.048). Multimodal management based on induction chemotherapy, subsequent surgery and postoperative mediastinal radiation allows a good complete resection rate and it is demonstrated to be a safe and effective treatment to warrant a good long-term survival in stage IVA thymoma patients.

  8. Thymoma-associated exfoliative dermatitis with post-thymectomy myasthenia gravis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ameet; Boston, Sarah E; Poma, Roberto

    2010-07-01

    Thymoma-associated exfoliative dermatitis was suspected in a cat with a cranial mediastinal mass. The dermatopathy resolved with surgical removal of a thymoma. The cat manifested neurologic signs consistent with myasthenia gravis 7 wk after surgery. Exfoliative dermatitis and post-thymectomy myasthenia gravis in the same cat has not been reported previously.

  9. Murine interleukin 1 receptor. Direct identification by ligand blotting and purification to homogeneity of an interleukin 1-binding glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, T.A.; Gearing, A.J.; Saklatvala, J.

    1988-08-25

    Functional receptors (IL1-R) for the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1 (IL1) were solubilized from plasma membranes of the NOB-1 subclone of murine EL4 6.1 thymoma cells using the zwitterionic detergent 3((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). Membrane extracts were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and ligand blotted with /sup 125/I-labeled recombinant human IL1 alpha in order to reveal proteins capable of specifically binding IL1. A single polydisperse polypeptide of Mr approximately equal to 80,000 was identified in this way, which bound IL1 alpha and IL1 beta with the same affinity as the IL1-R on intact NOB-1 cells (approximately equal to 10(-10) M). The IL1-binding polypeptide was only seen in membranes from IL1-R-bearing cells and did not react with interleukin 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or interferon. IL1-R was purified to apparent homogeneity from solubilized NOB-1 membranes by affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose and IL1 alpha-Sepharose. Gel electrophoresis and silver staining of purified preparations revealed a single protein of Mr approximately equal to 80,000 which reacted positively in the ligand-blotting procedure and which we identify as the ligand-binding moiety of the murine IL1-R. Purified IL1-R exhibited the same affinity and specificity as the receptor on intact cells. The relationship of this protein to proteins identified by covalent cross-linking studies is discussed.

  10. The effect of myasthenia gravis as a prognostic factor in thymoma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aydemir, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Thymoma is a standard epithelial tumor. Though it is rare, it constitutes 50% of anterior mediastinal masses. Variety of immunological diseases may accompany thymoma; however, myasthenia gravis (MG) is the most frequently associated paraneoplastic syndrome. Most effective treatment for thymoma is complete surgical resection. In this study, impact of MG on prognosis of thymoma cases was examined. METHODS: Records of 61 patients who underwent surgery with diagnosis of thymoma between January 2003 and September 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. All cases were analyzed for data related to age, gender, complaint, localization of lesion, surgical procedure, histopathological diagnosis, stage, MG, and long-term follow-up results. RESULTS: Total of 58 cases were included in the study. Of those, 37 patients were male and 21 were female. Mean age was 48 years. While 24 cases of thymoma were accompanied by MG, 34 cases were not. Duration of follow-up ranged from 1 month to 155 months. CONCLUSION: It was found that in group with MG, 5-year survival rate was 87.5% while it was 82.4% in group without MG. Despite longer duration of survival in group of thymoma associated with MG, there was no significant statistical difference between groups (p=0.311). PMID:28275751

  11. Preoperative misdiagnosis analysis and accurate distinguish intrathymic cyst from small thymoma on computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Han, Xingpeng; Sun, Wei; Wang, Meng; Jing, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) in preoperative diagnosis of intrathymic cyst and small thymoma, and determine the best CT threshold for distinguish intrathymic cyst from small thymoma. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 30 patients (17 intrathymic cyst and 13 small thymoma) who had undergone mediastinal masses resection (with diameter less than 3 cm) under thoracoscope between January 2014 and July 2015 at our hospital. Clinical and CT features were compared and receiver-operating characteristics curve (ROC) analysis was performed. Results The CT value of small thymoma [39.5 HU (IQR, 33.7–42.2 HU)] was significantly higher than intrathymic cyst [25.8 HU (IQR, 22.3–29.3 HU), P=0.004]. When CT value was 31.2 HU, it could act as a threshold for identification of small thymoma and intrathymic cyst (the sensitivity and specificity was 92.3% and 82.4%, respectively). The ΔCT value of enhanced CT value with the non-enhanced CT value was significantly different between small thymoma [18.7 HU (IQR, 10.9–19.0 HU)] and intrathymic cyst [4.3 HU (IQR, 3.0–11.7 HU), P=0.04]. The density was more homogenous in intrathymic cyst than small thymoma, and the contour of the intrathymic cyst was more smoothly than small thymoma. Conclusions Preoperative CT scans could help clinicians to identify intrathymic cyst and small thymoma, and we recommend 31.2 HU as the best thresholds. Contrast-enhanced CT scans is useful for further identification of the two diseases. PMID:27621863

  12. Metastatic Thymoma-Associated Myasthenia Gravis: Favorable Response to Steroid Pulse Therapy Plus Immunosuppressive Agent

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Guoyan; Liu, Peng; Dong, Huimin; Gu, Shanshan; Yang, Hongxia; Xue, Yinping

    2017-01-01

    Background Our study retrospectively reviewed the therapeutic effect of steroid pulse therapy in combination with an immunosuppressive agent in myasthenia gravis (MG) patients with metastatic thymoma. Material/Methods MG patients with metastatic thymoma that underwent methylprednisolone pulse therapy plus cyclophosphamide were retrospectively analyzed. Patients initially received methylprednisolone pulse therapy followed by oral methylprednisolone. Cyclophosphamide was prescribed simultaneously at the beginning of treatment. Clinical outcomes, including therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects of MG and thymoma, were assessed. Results Twelve patients were recruited. According to histological classification, 4 cases were type B2 thymoma, 3 were type B3, 2 were type B1, and 1 was type AB. After combined treatment for 15 days, both the thymoma and MG responded dramatically to high-dose methylprednisolone plus cyclophosphamide. The symptoms of MG were improved in all patients, with marked improvement in 6 patients and basic remission in 4. Interestingly, complete remission of thymoma was achieved in 5 patients and partial remission in 7 patients. Myasthenic crisis was observed in 1 patient and was relieved after intubation and ventilation. Adverse reactions were observed in 7 patients (58.3%), most commonly infections, and all were resolved without discontinuation of therapy. During the follow-up, all patients were stabilized except for 1 with pleural metastasis who received further treatment and another 1 who died from myasthenic crisis. Conclusions The present study in a series of MG patients with metastatic thymoma indicated that steroid pulse therapy in combination with immunosuppressive agents was an effective and well-tolerated for treatment of both metastatic thymoma and MG. Glucocorticoid pulse therapy plus immunosuppressive agents should therefore be considered in MG patients with metastatic thymoma. PMID:28278141

  13. Myasthenia gravis in patients with thymoma affects survival rate following extended thymectomy

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZHEFENG; CUI, YOUBIN; JIA, RUI; XUE, LEI; LIANG, HUAGANG

    2016-01-01

    Thymomas are the most common adult tumors in the anterior mediastinal compartment, and a significant amount of thymomas are complicated by myasthenia gravis (MG). Extended thymectomy (ET) is the primary treatment method for thymomas and is used to completely resect possible ectopic thymus to avoid recurrence. Studies on the effect of MG in thymoma patients following ET are limited. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the presence of MG affects the prognosis of patients with thymoma. The present study consisted of 104 patients with thymoma that underwent ET; 61 men (58.7%) and 43 women (41.3%) (mean age, 54.6 years). In total, 38 patients had MG (36.5%). MG was most frequently observed in World Health Organization (WHO) classification type B2 thymoma compared with other types of thymoma. During the 5-year follow-up period, 11 patients succumbed to a recurrence of thymoma or respiratory failure due to MG. The overall 5-year survival rate in patients without MG or with MG was 89.1 and 76.0%, respectively. The overall survival (OS) rate in patients with Masaoka stages I + II and III + IV was 90.0 and 68.0%, respectively. The OS rate in patients with WHO type A + AB + B1 and type B2 + B3 was 96.9 and 76.8%, respectively. The patients with MG (P=0.026), Masaoka stages III + IV (P=0.008) and WHO type B2 + B3 (P=0.032) had a poorer prognosis compared with patients without these characteristics. Furthermore, multivariate analysis by Cox regression revealed that age [P=0.032; relative risk (RR)=1.097; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.097–1.192] and MG (P=0.042; RR=0.167; 95% CI=0.037–0.940) significantly affected OS rate. In summary, ET is a reliable method for the treatment of thymoma. Long-term survival is expected for patients at early Masaoka stages, and for patients without MG. The prognosis of patients with thymomas with MG is poorer compared with patients without MG. The present findings provide useful information for the future management of

  14. Focal myasthenia gravis as a paraneoplastic syndrome of canine thymoma: improvement following thymectomy.

    PubMed

    Lainesse, M F; Taylor, S M; Myers, S L; Haines, D; Fowler, J D

    1996-01-01

    A 10-year-old, neutered male cocker spaniel-cross experienced regurgitation, dry retching, and weight loss. A large, mediastinal mass and dilatation of the esophagus were seen on thoracic radiographs. Cytological, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and serological findings were consistent with a lymphoepithelial thymoma and focal, esophageal myasthenia gravis. Surgical removal of the mass resulted in rapid resolution of the megaesophagus and a decrease in serum acetylcholine-receptor antibody concentration. The dog was clinically normal until the thymoma recurred six months postoperatively. Clinical signs, diagnostic evaluation, management, and treatment of a dog with thymoma and megaesophagus are described.

  15. Paraneoplastic T cell lymphocytosis associated with a thymoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Batlivala, T P; Bacon, N J; Avery, A C; Barabas, K; Gunn-Christie, R G; Conway, J; Avery, P R

    2010-09-01

    A four-year-old male neutered Australian shepherd dog was diagnosed with a thymoma and concurrent mature T cell lymphocytosis. The lymphocytosis consisted of a mixed population of T cells expressing either CD4 or CD8 or neither marker, and the result of polymerase chain reaction for antigen receptor rearrangement was negative. The peripheral lymphocytosis resolved within 24 hours following thoracotomy and thymectomy. Similar cases have been reported in man, but the aetiology of the increased circulating lymphocytes remains unclear. Although peripheral lymphocytosis is an uncommon paraneoplastic syndrome associated with thymomas, thymoma should be considered as a differential when the increased lymphocytes consist of a mixed population of T cells.

  16. Postoperative Recurrence of Invasive Thymoma with Cold Agglutinin Disease and Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Taro; Koba, Hayato; Tanimura, Kota; Ogawa, Naohiko; Watanabe, Satoshi; Hara, Johsuke; Abo, Miki; Sone, Takashi; Kimura, Hideharu; Kasahara, Kazuo

    A 50-year-old man presented to our hospital in 1995. Invasive thymoma was diagnosed and extended thymectomy and left upper lobe partial resection were performed. In 2013, he complained of dyspnea. Chest computed tomography showed postoperative recurrence of invasive thymoma. Several chemotherapies were administered. Severe anemia and an increase in the total bilirubin level were observed with chemotherapies. In additional, an examination showed that the direct Coombs test was positive. Cold agglutinin was also high. We herein experienced a rare case of postoperative recurrence of invasive thymoma with cold agglutinin disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

  17. The Triad of Lichen Planus, Thymoma and Liver Cirrhosis-Hepatoma. First Reported Case

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, J. A.; Saadiah, S; Roslina, A M; Atan, M; Masir, Noraidah; Hussein, S; Ganesapillai, T

    2000-01-01

    We describe a patient with liver cirrhosis who presented with erosive oral and cutaneous lichen planus (LP) and incidentally was found simultaneously to have thymoma and hepatoma. We support the notion forwarded earlier that LP and chronic liver disease is more than a mere coincidence and that there is a non-coincidental association between LP and thymoma. We believe this is also the first reported case in the English Literature of coexistence of the three condition LP, thymoma and hepatoma complicating liver disease. PMID:22977389

  18. Two Cases of Ectopic Hamartomatous Thymoma Masquerading as Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yukiko; Tanaka, Hiroko; Sasaki, Toru; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi; Mitani, Hiroki; Yonekawa, Hiroyuki; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Shimbashi, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic hamartomatous thymoma (EHT) is an extremely rare benign tumor. EHTs are difficult to differentiate from sarcomas, especially synovial sarcomas. We encountered two cases of EHT that were referred from other hospitals because sarcoma was suspected. In these cases, fusion gene detection via polymerase chain reaction or fluorescence in situ hybridization was useful for differentiating EHT from synovial sarcoma. EHT requires accurate diagnosis before surgery to avoid excessive treatment. Both tumor location and the presence of fat inside the tumor are important imaging findings for EHT, and confirmation of spindle cells, epithelial cells, and mature adipose cells in the tumor is an important pathological finding. It is important to exclude synovial sarcoma from the differential diagnosis via fusion gene analysis. PMID:28168073

  19. Two Cases of Ectopic Hamartomatous Thymoma Masquerading as Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takahito; Sato, Yukiko; Tanaka, Hiroko; Sasaki, Toru; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi; Mitani, Hiroki; Yonekawa, Hiroyuki; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Shimbashi, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic hamartomatous thymoma (EHT) is an extremely rare benign tumor. EHTs are difficult to differentiate from sarcomas, especially synovial sarcomas. We encountered two cases of EHT that were referred from other hospitals because sarcoma was suspected. In these cases, fusion gene detection via polymerase chain reaction or fluorescence in situ hybridization was useful for differentiating EHT from synovial sarcoma. EHT requires accurate diagnosis before surgery to avoid excessive treatment. Both tumor location and the presence of fat inside the tumor are important imaging findings for EHT, and confirmation of spindle cells, epithelial cells, and mature adipose cells in the tumor is an important pathological finding. It is important to exclude synovial sarcoma from the differential diagnosis via fusion gene analysis.

  20. An ectopic hamartomatous thymoma compressing left jugular vein.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Zhao, L; Chai, Y

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic hamartomatous thymoma (EHT) is an extremely rare benign neoplasm. It is usually found at the root of the neck (frequently on the left) and does not usually impact adjacent tissues in clinically significant ways. While EHT manifests distinct pathological features, the lesion is either asymptomatic or may show nonspecific clinical features. We report one case of EHT which was assumed to be of low malignant potential since it severely compressed the inlet of left internal jugular vein as seen by computed tomography scan. To the best of our knowledge, this clinical finding of EHT is very rare. After the diagnosis and treatment of this patient, we believe that EHT or suspected EHT should be treated less invasively.

  1. Metaplastic thymoma with myasthenia gravis presumably caused by an accumulation of intratumoral immature T cells: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Shogo; Yanagiya, Masahiro; Sato, Masaaki; Nakajima, Jun; Fukayama, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Among human neoplasms, thymomas are well known for their association with paraneoplastic autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis. However, regarding rare metaplastic thymoma, only one case of an association with myasthenia gravis has been reported. Here, we present the second case of a 44-year-old woman with metaplastic thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis. In metaplastic thymoma, intratumoral terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-positive T-cells (immature T-cells) are generally scarce, while they were abundant in the present case. We believe that these immature T-cells could be related to the occurrence of myasthenia gravis.

  2. Tetradecanol reduces EL-4 T cell growth by the down regulation of NF-κB mediated IL-2 secretion.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Up; Kang, Bok Yun; Lee, Hwa-Jeong; Kim, Sunoh; Bae, Donghyuck; Park, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Young Ran

    2017-03-15

    Tetradecanol is a straight-chain saturated fatty alcohol purified from Dendropanax morbifera leaves. We found that tetradecanol (30μM) reduced specifically the growth of T cells such as EL-4 T cell and isolated murine CD4(+) T cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of tetradecanol on the regulation of interlukin-2 (IL-2), a potent T cell growth factor. Tetradecanol significantly inhibited IL-2 secretion in EL-4 T cells activated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) plus ionomycin (Io) and also in isolated murine CD4(+) T cells activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. Next, we examined the effect of tetradecanol on the transcriptional activity related to IL-2 production in T cells. Tetradecanol decreased PMA/Io-induced promoter activity of NF-κB in EL-4 T cells, but did not show any significant effects on the promoters of activator protein 1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT). Tetradecanol inhibited IκBα degradation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunit, p65 in PMA/Io-activated EL-4 T cells. These results suggest that tetradecanol might have immunosuppressive effects on T cell mediated disorders. Using a chronic allergic contact dermatitis model induced by repeated application of oxazolone, we showed that tetradecanol reduced ear thickness induced by oxazolone.

  3. Role of Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Stage II Thymoma After Complete Tumor Resection

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yidong

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To determine whether patients with Masaoka stage II thymoma benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy after complete tumor resection. Methods and Materials: A total of 107 patients with stage II thymoma who underwent complete resection of their tumors between September 1964 and October 2006 were retrospectively analyzed. Sixty-six patients were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, and 41 patients received surgery alone. Results: Eight patients (7.5%) had a relapse of their disease, including two patients (4.5%) who had surgery alone, and 6 patients (9.5%) who had adjuvant radiation therapy. Disease-free survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 92.3% and 82.6%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group, and 97.6% and 93.1%, respectively, for the group that underwent surgery alone (p = 0.265). Disease-specific survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 96.4% and 89.3%, respectively, for the surgery-plus-radiation group and 97.5% and 97.5% for the surgery group (p = 0.973). On univariate analysis, patients with type B3 thymomas had the lowest disease-free survival rates among all subtypes (p = 0.001), and patients with large thymomas (>7 cm) had lower disease-specific survival rates than those with small tumors (<7 cm) (p = 0.017). On multivariate analysis, histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy after complete tumor resection for patients with stage II thymoma did not significantly reduce recurrence rates or improve survival rates. Histological type (type B3) thymoma was a significant independent prognostic factor. Further investigation should be carried out using a multicenter randomized or controlled study.

  4. Pleural Photodynamic Therapy and Surgery in Lung Cancer and Thymoma Patients with Pleural Spread.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Cheng; Hsieh, Yi-Shan; Tseng, Ying-Fan; Shieh, Ming-Jium; Chen, Jin-Shing; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Lee, Jang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Pleural spread is difficult to treat in malignancies, especially in lung cancer and thymoma. Monotherapy with surgery fails to have a better survival benefit than palliative chemotherapy, the currently accepted treatment. Photodynamic therapy utilizes a photosensitizer to target the tumor site, and the tumor is exposed to light after performing a pleurectomy and tumor resection. However, the benefits of this procedure to lung cancer or thymoma patients are unknown. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with lung cancer or thymoma with pleural seeding who underwent pleural photodynamic therapy and surgery between 2005 and 2013. Eighteen patients enrolled in this study. The mean patient age was 52.9 ± 12.2 years. Lung cancer was the inciting cancer of pleural dissemination in 10 patients (55.6%), and thymoma in 8 (44.4%). There was no procedure-related mortality. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the 3-year survival rate and the 5-year survival rate were 68.9% and 57.4%, respectively. We compared the PDT lung cancer patients with those receiving chemotherapy or target therapy (n = 51) and found that the PDT group had better survival than non-PDT patients (mean survival time: 39.0 versus 17.6 months; P = .047). With proper patient selection, radical surgical resection combined with intrapleural photodynamic therapy for pleural spread in patients with non-small cell lung cancer or thymoma is feasible and may provide a survival benefit.

  5. Acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit and myogenin mRNAs in thymus and thymomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kornstein, M. J.; Asher, O.; Fuchs, S.

    1995-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder characterized in most cases by serological antibody against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Evidence for intrathymic localization of AChR suggests that the thymus has an important role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Using reverse transcription followed by the polymerase chain reaction, we have demonstrated AChR alpha-subunit mRNA in thymuses and thymomas from patients with and without myasthenia gravis. We have also studied the expression of myogenin which is known to be involved in the regulation of AChR expression. By using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we found myogenin mRNAs in all of the thymuses and thymomas. Thus, both AChR alpha-subunit and myogenin mRNA are present in all of these specimens. By immunohistochemistry myoid cells (desmin and myoglobin positive) were present in all (four of four) thymuses studied and in two of five thymomas. Thus, in thymomas, nonmyoid cells might express both AChR and myogenin. These results indicate that cells within the thymus and thymoma express AChR and its regulatory protein myogenin and that such cells, under certain conditions, might play a role in the triggering of myasthenia gravis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7778671

  6. The prognostic value of architectural patterns in a study of 37 type AB thymomas.

    PubMed

    Vladislav, I Tudor; Gökmen-Polar, Yesim; Kesler, Kenneth A; Loehrer, Patrick J; Badve, Sunil

    2014-06-01

    Spindle cell thymomas with prominent amount of lymphocytes are classified as WHO type AB tumors. However, there are architectural pattern differences in these tumors. We investigated the importance of architectural pattern in type AB thymomas in relation to prognostic value. Archival hematoxylin-eosin stained slides of 37 AB type thymomas were reviewed for the presence (type 1) or absence (type 2) of reticular growth pattern. Reticular growth pattern is defined as the presence of a network of elongated bland spindle cells separating nests of tumor cells admixed with lymphoid cells. The architectural patterns were correlated with tumor stage at diagnosis and presence or absence of recurrent disease. The analysis identified 18 cases of type 1 AB thymoma and 19 cases of type 2. Type 2 cases also had greater cytologic atypia within the spindle cells. Patients with type 1 tumors were more likely to have early stage disease. In contrast, type 2 pattern was associated with higher stage at diagnosis (P<0.001) and greater likelihood for recurrence (P<0.05) and metastases. Architectural features are prognostically relevant in classification of WHO AB type thymomas and may constitute a form of personalized medicine. Independent confirmation of the findings is necessary to confirm the association of architectural pattern with outcomes.

  7. Recurrent thymoma with stiff-person syndrome and pure red blood cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Rei; Kaji, Masahiro; Horiuchi, Sho; Miyahara, Naofumi; Hino, Yumi; Suemasu, Keiichi

    2014-05-01

    Stiff-person syndrome (formerly known as stiff-man syndrome) is a very rare autoimmune and neurogenic disorder, thought to present as a paraneoplastic variant in association with thymoma. Pure red blood cell aplasia is also a paraneoplastic disorder associated with thymoma. Although separate cases of stiff-person syndrome and pure red blood cell aplasia have been reported, we describe here what is to our knowledge the first case of recurrent thymoma with both stiff-person syndrome and pure red blood cell aplasia. We describe the successful treatment of the neurogenic symptoms of stiff-person syndrome and the progressive anemia associated with pure red blood cell aplasia by tumor excision.

  8. Chemotherapy improves thymoma-associated graft-versus-host-disease-like erythroderma.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Tatsuya; Kotani, Yoshikazu; Kobayashi, Kazuyuki; Tomita, Nanako; Nakata, Kyosuke; Sakashita, Akihiro; Funada, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Hiroshi; Itoh, Tomoo; Nishimura, Yoshihiro

    2011-05-10

    Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) with erythroderma can rarely occur in the context of thymoma and is associated with a poor prognosis due to an increased risk of infection-related death. The present study describes a case of a 50-year-old man with malignant thymoma who developed sepsis in addition to skin manifestations similar to that seen in GVHD. This patient experienced marked improvement in skin lesions in response to steroids and combination chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel, with subsequent resolution of infection. The present study describes the clinical course of this patient, followed by a review of pertinent reports of thymoma associated with GVHD with particular focus on the efficacy of treatment strategies.

  9. Recurrence of thymoma after 11 years presenting as diffuse pleural thickening.

    PubMed

    Köksal, Deniz; Bayiz, Hülya; Gülgösteren, Mahmut; Başay, Nihal; Mutluay, Neslihan; Boyacı, Ebru; Berktaş, Bahadır; Çakır, Ebru; Berkoğlu, Mine

    2012-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented with a 1-month history of dyspnea, weight loss, and pleuritic chest pain. He had environmental asbest exposure from birth to 12 years-old. Past medical history revealed maximal thymectomy operation and adjuvant radiotherapy with the diagnosis of minimally invasive lymphocytic thymoma 11 years ago. Thorax computerized tomography demonstrated a circumferential pleural thickening encasing the entire left lung and pleural effusion. VATS-pleural biopsy revealed the diagnosis invasive tymoma, Type B1, stage IVA. In conclusion, the diagnosis of invasive thymoma must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of diffuse pleural lesions. The recurrence of thymomas may be as long as 10 years after complete resection.

  10. Massive thymoma of the mid-posterior mediastinum: an unprecedented case in a young adult*

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Karen Fernandes; Rodrigues, Marcio Maciel; Lopes, Gesner Pereira; de Almeida, Renan Sandoval; Lusvarghi, Juliana Lopes; dos Santos, João Paulo Vieira

    2016-01-01

    We report an unprecedented case of ectopic thymoma in a young adult. A 33-year-old male presented with a 10-day history of non-productive cough and fever. Investigation revealed mediastinal widening without pulmonary involvement. Computed tomography showed a large mass-14.8 × 10.8 × 8.4 cm-in the mid-posterior mediastinum, and a biopsy obtained by video-assisted thoracoscopy indicated that the mass was a tumor. Immunohistochemistry showed combined thymoma type AB1. Because of the considerable proportions of the tumor and its close proximity to major structures, the patient was treated with chemotherapy. PMID:28057967

  11. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia associated with a thymoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    De Keyzer, K; Peeters, P; Verhelst, C; Dendooven, A; Vonck, A; Vanholder, R

    2009-01-01

    A 67-year-old female presents with a small mass in the anterior mediastinum on chest computed tomography. A biopsy proves the mass to be a spindle-cell-type or type A thymoma. Subsequently the patient develops fever and severe Coombs-positive haemolytic anaemia. She is initially treated with oral corticosteroids. Because of persistence of the haemolysis subsequent thymectomy is performed. Haemolysis disappears almost instantly and does not return after discontinuation of the oral corticosteroids. Review of the literature reveals only 17 other cases of thymoma-associated autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

  12. Massive thymoma of the mid-posterior mediastinum: an unprecedented case in a young adult.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Karen Fernandes; Rodrigues, Marcio Maciel; Lopes, Gesner Pereira; de Almeida, Renan Sandoval; Lusvarghi, Juliana Lopes; Dos Santos, João Paulo Vieira

    2016-01-01

    We report an unprecedented case of ectopic thymoma in a young adult. A 33-year-old male presented with a 10-day history of non-productive cough and fever. Investigation revealed mediastinal widening without pulmonary involvement. Computed tomography showed a large mass-14.8 × 10.8 × 8.4 cm-in the mid-posterior mediastinum, and a biopsy obtained by video-assisted thoracoscopy indicated that the mass was a tumor. Immunohistochemistry showed combined thymoma type AB1. Because of the considerable proportions of the tumor and its close proximity to major structures, the patient was treated with chemotherapy.

  13. Surgical Treatment of an Invasive Thymoma with Intracaval and Intracardiac Extension

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kun-Eng; Shen, Ta-Chung

    2017-01-01

    A 53-year-old male with an invasive thymoma extending to the superior vena and right atrium, presenting as superior vena cava syndrome is herein reported. However invasive thymoma with this growth pattern is extremely rare. In this case, the tumor was successfully resected via median sternotomy with cardiopulmonary bypass. After 17 months of follow-up, the patient was still free from any signs and symptoms indicative of superior vena cava syndrome, but recurrent tumor in the right pleura was observed on the follow-up chest computed tomography. PMID:28344425

  14. Detection of Thymoma on 99mTc MIBI Scintigraphy: Revisiting the Past

    PubMed Central

    Parida, Girish Kumar; Roy, Shambo Guha; Sharma, Anshul; Patel, Chetan D.

    2017-01-01

    Although thymoma is a rare tumor, it is the most common anterior mediastinal tumor, usually affecting the adults in their fifth and sixth decade. We present a case of 68-year-old man with history of myocardial infarction, who presented to the cardiology OPD with recent onset of exertional dyspnea. On 99mTc MIBI myocardial perfusion SPECT, there was an extra cardiac accumulation of radiotracer in the anterior mediastinum just above the heart, which later was diagnosed as thymoma on histopathology. PMID:28242989

  15. Spontaneous rupture of hepatic metastasis from a thymoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ho Jae; Park, Yong Eun; Ki, Min Seo; Lee, Se Ju; Beom, Seung Hun; Han, Dai Hoon; Park, Young Nyun; Park, Jun Yong

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding resulting from spontaneous rupture of the liver is an infrequent but potentially life threatening complication that may be associated with an underlying liver disease. A hepatocellular carcinoma or hepatic adenoma is frequently reported is such cases. However, hemoperitoneum resulting from a hepatic metastatic thymoma is extremely rare. Here, we present a case of a 62-year-old man with hypovolemic shock induced by ruptured hepatic metastasis from a thymoma. At the first hospital admission, the patient had a 45-mm anterior mediastinal mass that was eventually diagnosed as a type A thymoma. The mass was excised, and the patient was disease-free for 6 years. He experienced sudden-onset right upper quadrant pain and was again admitted to our hospital. We noted large hemoperitoneum with a 10-cm encapsulated mass in S5/8 and a 2.3-cm nodular lesion in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. He was diagnosed with hepatic metastasis from the thymoma, and he underwent chemotherapy and surgical excision. PMID:27956811

  16. Feline cystic thymoma: a clinicopathologic, immunohistologic, and electron microscopic study of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, A K; Lieberman, P H; Erlandson, R A; Antonescu, C

    2003-02-01

    Cystic thymoma was diagnosed in 14 cats in a period of 6 years. The most common clinical sign was laboured breathing. The tumours were characterized by various-sized cystic spaces with central vessels. The epithelial cells varied from oval to spindle to polygonal cells enclosing cystic spaces or in pure epithelial cell components. The nuclei of the neoplastic cells had scattered chromatin and small nucleoli. The cytoplasm was pale eosinophilic. The concentration of mature lymphocytes varied from area to area with rare germinal centres. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial cells stained only with AE(1)/AE(3). The central vessels were positive for vimentin, smooth muscle actin, and factor VIII antigen. Electron microscopy revealed that the cyst walls were lined by epithelial cells that were joined by desmosomes, and the walls were well separated from the cystic spaces by a well-defined basement membrane. The neoplastic epithelial cells contained scattered tonofilaments. Three of the cats had metastasis to the lymph nodes and lungs. Two novel cases of ectopic cystic thymoma have also been described. Results of this study reveal that cystic thymoma is uncommon in cats, and that the histomorphologic, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic features are similar to those of cystic thymoma in humans.

  17. /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate uptake in a thymoma: case report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.L.; Cowan, R.J.

    1982-04-01

    A case is reported to /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate accumulation within an anterior mediastinal thymoma during a search for substernal goiter. This reemphasizes the non-specificity of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate uptake and the need for caution in using this agent to detect ectopic thyroid tissue.

  18. Cardiac Metastasis from Invasive Thymoma Via the Superior Vena Cava: Cardiac MRI Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Dursun, Memduh Sarvar, Sadik; Cekrezi, Bledi; Kaba, Erkan; Bakir, Baris; Toker, Alper

    2008-07-15

    Cardiac tumors are rare, and metastatic deposits are more common than primary cardiac tumors. We present cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 50-year-old woman with invasive thymoma. Cardiac MRI revealed a heterogeneous, lobulated anterior mediastinal mass invading the superior vena cava and extending to the right atrium. In cine images there was no invasion to the right atrial wall.

  19. Paraneoplastic Morvan's syndrome following surgical treatment of recurrent thymoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Galié, Edvina; Renna, Rosaria; Plantone, Domenico; Pace, Andrea; Marino, Mirella; Jandolo, Bruno; Koudriavtseva, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Morvan's syndrome (MoS) is a rare, complex neurological disorder characterized by neuromyotonia, neuropsychiatric features, dysautonomia and neuropathic pain. The majority of MoS cases have a paraneoplastic aetiology, usually occurring prior to the diagnosis of the underlying tumour and showing improvement following its treatment. The present study reports the case of a 35-year-old Caucasian male patient who was diagnosed with stage IVA thymoma. Thymectomy, lung resection, diaphragmatic pleurectomy and pericardio-phrenectomy were performed 6 months after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The pathological evaluation revealed a type B2-B3 thymoma with focal squamous differentiation. Two years later, the patient underwent new surgical treatment for a local recurrence of the same histological type, and 4 weeks later, the patient presented with complex neurological symptoms compatible with MoS, including neuromyotonia, neuropsychiatric features, dysautonomia and neuropathic pain. Electromyography was compatible with a diagnosis of neuromyotonia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging scan and tests for serum anti-acetylcholine receptor, anti-striated muscle antibodies and anti-30-kDa titin fragment antibodies were all negative, whereas tests for anti-voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex antibodies (333.3 pmol/l), anti-leucine-rich glioma inactivated protein 1 and anti-contactin-associated protein-like 2 antibodies were positive. The patient underwent 3 cycles of intravenous administration of immunoglobulins (0.4 g/kg/day for 5 days every 4 weeks) with little clinical and electrophysiological improvement. We speculated that the late onset of the symptoms in the present patient may have been triggered by an increase in the serum level of anti-VGKC antibody, which was caused by the surgery performed for the treatment of recurrent thymoma. To the best of our knowledge, the present report is the first case of MoS associated with this histological type of thymoma uncommonly

  20. Proteins with epitopes of the acetylcholine receptor in epithelial cell cultures of thymomas in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed Central

    Marx, A.; Kirchner, T.; Hoppe, F.; O'Connor, R.; Schalke, B.; Tzartos, S.; Müller-Hermelink, H. K.

    1989-01-01

    Thymomas from 12 patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) were investigated for the presence of epitopes of the alpha-subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AchR) using monoclonal antibodies (MAb) reacting against the AchR. In all but two of the tumors epitopes corresponding to antigenic determinants located on the cytoplasmic side of the AchR were identified. From eight thymomas cell lines were established that have been kept in culture for up to 6 months. The cultured cells expressed the same AchR-epitopes as did the primary tumors. During early passages the percentage of epithelial cells positive for the AchR epitopes approximately mirrored the percentage of positive cells in the original tumors. With passaging the relative number of positive cells usually declined but in some cultures an increase was observed. Three cell lines that showed extensive staining with an MAb against the AchR were radiolabeled to characterize the antigen. From protein extracts of these three cell lines proteins of 45 kd and 156 kd molecular weight (MW) were precipitated. These proteins are different from other proteins described in the context of both thymomas and MG. The negative reactivity with MAb against other epitopes of the alpha-subunit, especially against the main immunogenic region (MIR), speaks in favor of membrane-associated proteins of only limited crossreactivity to the AchR. A previous study found an almost exclusive occurrence of these AchR-epitopes in thymomas associated with MG, but not in other thymomas of similar histologic type. The expression of the proteins described here could therefore play a role in the triggering of the autoimmune process against the AchR of the motor, endplate in MG patients. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2468286

  1. An Unusual Case of Superior Vena Cava Syndrome Caused by the Intravascular Invasion of an Invasive Thymoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Joon; Cho, Sun Young; Cho, Woo Hee; Lee, Do Hyun; Lim, Do Hyoung; Seo, Pil Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Wonae; Lee, Jai Hyuen

    2013-01-01

    Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is usually caused by extrinsic compression or invasion of the superior vena cava (SVC) by malignant tumors involving mediastinal structures. Although thymomas are well-known causes of SVCS, cases of SVCS caused by malignant thymomas protruding into adjacent vessels draining the SVC with thrombosis have been very rarely reported worldwide. We experienced a 39-year-old female patient with SVCS that developed after the direct invasion of the left brachiocephalic vein (LBCV) and SVC by an anterior mediastinal mass with a high maximum standardized uptake value on the chest computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography-CT. Based on these results, she underwent en bloc resection of the tumor, including removal of the involved vessels, and was eventually diagnosed as having a type B2 thymoma permeating into the LBCV and SVC. We present this case as a very rare form of SVCS caused by an invasive thymoma. PMID:24348669

  2. Thymopoiesis, regulatory T cells, and TCRVbeta expression in thymoma with and without myasthenia gravis, and modulatory effects of steroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Fattorossi, Andrea; Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Minicuci, Giacomo; Riso, Raffaella; Peri, Laura; Scambia, Giovanni; Evoli, Amelia

    2008-03-01

    We analyzed thymocyte and thymic regulatory T cell (CD4SPCD25+Foxp3+cells, Treg) development in thymoma with and without myasthenia gravis (MG, MG-thymoma, non-MG-thymoma) and in MG-associated non-neoplastic thymus (MG-NNT). An increased number of immature CD4+CD8(-)CD3(-) thymocytes through the CD4+CD8+ to CD4+CD8(-) transition and an abnormal T cell receptor Vbeta (TCRVbeta) development through the CD4+CD8+ to CD4(-)CD8+ transition were seen both in MG-and non-MG-thymomas. Terminal thymopoiesis, i.e., CD45RA+ cells within the CD4+CD8(-)CD3+ and CD8+CD4(-)CD3+ subsets, was skewed towards the CD4+ compartment in MG-thymoma and CD8+ compartment in non-MG-thymoma, but thymic export was increased only in the latter in keeping with the hypothesis that CD8+ lymphocytes may play a role in the initial stages of autosensitization and in disagreement with the relevance of an increased output of CD4+ T lymphocytes in paraneoplastic MG. Treg level in normal thymus and MG-NNT and both MG- and non-MG-thymoma was similar, and TCRVbeta development in Treg cells was slightly altered in thymoma but irrespective of MG presence. Thus, the relevance of a defective Treg development in MG context remains to be established. Most alterations in thymopoiesis were corrected by therapeutic corticosteroid administration, and the effects of steroid administration may be mediated by thymic microenvironment.

  3. A comparative study of the spatial distribution of mast cells and microvessels in the foetal, adult human thymus and thymoma.

    PubMed

    Raica, Marius; Cimpean, Anca Maria; Nico, Beatrice; Guidolin, Diego; Ribatti, Domenico

    2010-02-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are widely distributed in human and animal tissues and have been shown to play an important role in angiogenesis in normal and pathological conditions. Few data are available about the relationship between MCs and blood vessels in the normal human thymus, and there are virtually no data about their distribution and significance in thymoma. The aim of this study was to analyse the spatial distribution of MCs and microvessels in the normal foetal and adult thymus and thymoma. Twenty biopsy specimens of human thymus, including foetal and adult normal thymus and thymoma were analysed. Double staining with CD34 and mast cell tryptase was used to count both mast cells and microvessels in the same fields. Computer-assisted image analysis was performed to characterize the spatial distribution of MCs and blood vessels in selected specimens. Results demonstrated that MCs were localized exclusively to the medulla. Their number was significantly higher in thymoma specimens as compared with adult and foetal normal specimens respectively. In contrast the microvessel area was unchanged. The analysis of the spatial distribution and relationship between MCs and microvessels revealed that only in the thymoma specimens was there a significant spatial association between MCs and microvessels. Overall, these data suggest that MCs do not contribute significantly to the development of the vascular network in foetal and adult thymus, whereas in thymoma they show a close relationship to blood vessels. This could be an expression of their involvement not only in endothelial cells but also in tumour cell proliferation.

  4. Differential Expression of Ccn4 and Other Genes Between Metastatic and Non-metastatic EL4 Mouse Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    S. CHAHAL, MANPREET; TERESA KU, H.; ZHANG, ZHIHONG; M. LEGASPI, CHRISTIAN; LUO, ANGELA; M. HOPKINS, MANDI; E. MEIER, KATHRYN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous work characterized variants of the EL4 murine lymphoma cell line. Some are non-metastatic, and others metastatic, in syngenic mice. In addition, metastatic EL4 cells were stably transfected with phospholipase D2 (PLD2), which further enhanced metastasis. Materials and Methods: Microarray analyses of mRNA expression was performed for non-metastatic, metastatic, and PLD2-expressing metastatic EL4 cells. Results: Many differences were observed between non-metastatic and metastatic cell lines. One of the most striking new findings was up-regulation of mRNA for the matricellular protein WNT1-inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (CCN4) in metastatic cells; increased protein expression was verified by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Other differentially expressed genes included those for reproductive homeobox 5 (Rhox5; increased in metastatic) and cystatin 7 (Cst7; decreased in metastatic). Differences between PLD2-expressing and parental cell lines were limited but included the signaling proteins Ras guanyl releasing protein 1 (RGS18; increased with PLD2) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2; decreased with PLD2). Conclusion: The results provide insights into signaling pathways potentially involved in conferring metastatic ability on lymphoma cells. PMID:27807066

  5. Thymic TFH cells involved in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis with thymoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Zhou, Yongan; Guo, Jun; Li, Hongzeng; Tian, Feng; Gong, Li; Wang, Xianni; Lan, Miao; Li, Zhuyi; Zhang, Wei

    2014-04-01

    Follicular helper CD4+ T (TFH) cells are the specialized providers of B cell help in germinal centers (GCs). Formation of GCs in thymi is the primary thymi characteristic in MG patients. TFH cells are involved in the pathogenic process of many autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and autoimmune thyroid disease. The role thymic TFH cells played in MG with thymoma has not been elucidated. Here, we analyzed surface markers CXCR5, Bcl-6, ICOS and IL-21 on TFH cells in thymus derived from thymoma patients with ocular MG (OMG), generalized MG (GMG) or without MG using immunohistochemical staining, immunofluorescence, western blotting, and real-time PCR analysis. We show that clinical severity of MG is correlated with higher mRNA expression of the four markers. Indeed, results show higher expression of all four markers in thymoma with GMG patients compared with both OMG and non-MG patients. We found no significant difference in the expression of CXCR5, Bcl-6 and ICOS in OMG compared with non-MG patients. Regression analysis shows a positive correlation between thymic CXCR5, BCL-6, ICOS and IL-21 levels and quantitative MG score (QMGS) in GMG patients. In addition, we found no significant correlation between TFH cell expression and QMGS in OMG patients. Our findings show that higher expression of TFH cells in the thymoma is related to the clinical severity of MG and suggests a role in the pathogenesis of MG. However, the real source of these TFH cells is still uncertain and needs further study.

  6. The Effect of Immunonutrition on the Postoperative Complications in Thymoma with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Yanzhong; Cai, Hongfei; Wu, Lihui

    2016-01-01

    Object. To test whether preoperative immunonutrition is efficacious in reducing postoperative complications in patients of thymoma with myasthenia gravis (MG). Material and Methods. A total of 244 patients operated on for thymoma with myasthenia gravis were prospectively assigned to two groups, each receiving seven-day preoperative and seven-day postoperative nutrition. The patients in immunonutrition group were given oral immunonutrition (IN). The patients in control group received oral standard nutrition. Immunonutritional and inflammatory biomarkers (IgA, IgG, IgM, CD3t, CD4t, CD8t, CD4t/CD8t ratio, NK-cell, prealbumin, albumin, white blood cells counts, and C-reactive protein) and clinical variables (age, gender, BMI, performance status, type of thymoma, type of MG, operative time, pathology, operative approach, postoperative complications, quantity of drainage, hospital stays) were examined. Results. A significant reduction in the length of hospital stay, quantity of drainage, and postoperative complications was observed in the IN group (p < 0.05). An increase in the level of IgA, IgG, IgM, CD3+T, CD4+T, CD4+T/CD8+T, WBC, CRP, and NK-cell in the IN group was observed after thymectomy, while a decrease was seen with regard to prealbumin and albumin (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Preoperative immunonutrition support is effective in reducing postoperative complications in patients of thymoma with MG. It helps to lower the risk of postoperative infectious complications and hospital stays. PMID:27956763

  7. Coincidence of thymoma and breast cancer and in a 56-year-old female patient

    PubMed Central

    Athanasiou, Evangelia; Michalopoulou-Manoloutsiou, Electra; Bobos, Mattheos; Hatzibougias, Dimitris I.; Katsikogiannis, Nikolos; Sarika, Eirini; Karapantzos, Ilias; Barbetakis, Nikolaos; Paliouras, Dimitrios; Chatzinikolaou, Fotis; Charalampidis, Charalampos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Kolettas, Alexandros; Bakas, Andreas; Tzelepi, Keraso; Kalaitzis, Efstratios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 56-year-old female, with a familial history of breast, lung and brain cancer, which revealed a breast tumor, located in the upper outer quadrant of the left breast. During the routinely staging examinations, a 15 cm intrathoracic tumor was found in the upper left mediastinum, penetrating the pericardium and a smaller tumor, in the left side of parietal pleura. Core biopsies from both lesions, revealed a lobular carcinoma of the breast classic type, grade II (e-cadherin-, ER+, PR+, Her-2−, Ki-67 10%) and a B3 thymoma (CK19+, CD5+) penetrating the pericardium and the left lung. A synchronous removal of both tumors was scheduled, including median sternotomy and left intrapericardial pneumonectomy, followed by a modified radical left mastectomy and a sentinel lymph node biopsy. The postoperative course was uneventful. This case advocates that thymoma patients appear to have a predisposition towards developing additional neoplasms, as breast carcinoma. Clinicians should be aware of the increased incidence of extrathymic cancers, occurring in thymoma patients. PMID:27999780

  8. A novel thymoma-associated autoimmune disease: Anti-PIT-1 antibody syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bando, Hironori; Iguchi, Genzo; Okimura, Yasuhiko; Odake, Yukiko; Yoshida, Kenichi; Matsumoto, Ryusaku; Suda, Kentaro; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Mokubo, Atsuko; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Maniwa, Yoshimasa; Ogawa, Wataru; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Anti-PIT-1 antibody syndrome has recently been reported and characterized by acquired growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) deficiencies associated with autoimmunity to a pituitary specific transcription factor PIT-1, which plays an essential role in GH-, PRL-, and TSH-producing cells. Although circulating anti-PIT-1 antibody and PIT-1-reactive cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) were detected in the patients, the pathophysiology and precise mechanisms for the autoimmunity remain unclarified. During the follow up, thymoma was diagnosed in all 3 cases with anti-PIT-1 antibody syndrome. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PIT-1 was strongly expressed in neoplastic cortical thymic epithelial cells. Importantly, after thymectomy, the titer of anti-PIT-1 antibody decreased and reactivity of CTLs toward PIT-1 diminished. These data strongly suggest that the aberrant expression of PIT-1 in the thymoma plays a causal role in the development of this syndrome. Thus, we define that this syndrome is a novel thymoma-associated autoimmune disease. PMID:28216655

  9. Gene-Specific Methylation Analysis in Thymomas of Patients with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Lopomo, Angela; Ricciardi, Roberta; Maestri, Michelangelo; De Rosa, Anna; Melfi, Franca; Lucchi, Marco; Mussi, Alfredo; Coppedè, Fabio; Migliore, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Thymomas are uncommon neoplasms that arise from epithelial cells of the thymus and are often associated with myasthenia gravis (MG), an autoimmune disease characterized by autoantibodies directed to different targets at the neuromuscular junction. Little is known, however, concerning epigenetic changes occurring in thymomas from MG individuals. To further address this issue, we analyzed DNA methylation levels of genes involved in one-carbon metabolism (MTHFR) and DNA methylation (DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B) in blood, tumor tissue, and healthy thymic epithelial cells from MG patients that underwent a surgical resection of a thymic neoplasm. For the analyses we applied the methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting technique. Both MTHFR and DNMT3A promoters showed significantly higher methylation in tumor tissue with respect to blood, and MTHFR also showed significantly higher methylation levels in tumor tissue respect to healthy adjacent thymic epithelial cells. Both DNMT1 and DNMT3B promoter regions were mostly hypomethylated in all the investigated tissues. The present study suggests that MTHFR methylation is increased in thymomas obtained from MG patients; furthermore, some degrees of methylation of the DNMT3A gene were observed in thymic tissue with respect to blood. PMID:27999265

  10. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  11. T-lymphocyte-rich Thymoma and Myasthenia Gravis in a Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica)☆

    PubMed Central

    Allan, K.; Masters, N.; Rivers, S.; Berry, K.; Routh, A.; Lamm, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 10-year-old captive male Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) presented with acute onset collapse, vomiting and dyspnoea, preceded by a 6-month period of progressive muscle wasting. Following humane destruction, post-mortem examination revealed a large multilobulated mass in the cranial mediastinum, which was diagnosed as a T-lymphocyte-rich thymoma with the aid of immunohistochemistry. Retrospective serology for acetylcholine receptor antibodies (titre 3.90 nmol/l) confirmed a diagnosis of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. Thymomas are reported rarely in wild carnivores, but when detected they appear to be similar in morphology to those seen in domestic carnivores and may also be accompanied by paraneoplastic syndromes. The clinical signs of myasthenia gravis in the tiger were consistent with those reported in cats and dogs and the condition is proposed as an important differential diagnosis for generalized weakness in captive Felidae. PMID:24444818

  12. Postoperative survival for patients with thymoma complicating myasthenia gravis—preliminary retrospective results of the ChART database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangrui; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Li, Yin; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan; Gu, Zhitao

    2016-01-01

    Background It is so far not clear that how myasthenia gravis (MG) affected the prognosis of thymoma patients. The aim of this assay is to compare the postoperative survival between patients with thymoma only and those with both thymoma and MG. Methods The Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) registry recruited patients with thymoma from 18 centers over the country on an intention to treat basis from 1992 to 2012. Two groups were formed according to whether the patient complicated MG. Demographic and clinical data were reviewed, patients were followed and their survival status were analyzed. Results There were 1,850 patients included in this study, including 421 with and 1,429 without MG. Complete thymectomy were done in 91.2% patients in MG group and 71.0% in non-MG group (P<0.05). There were more percentage of patients with the histology of thymoma AB, B1, or B2 (P<0.05) in MG group, and more percentage of patients with MG were in Masaoka stage I and II. The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were both higher in MG group (93% vs. 88%; 83% vs. 81%, P=0.034) respectively. The survival rate was significantly higher in patients with MG when the Masaoka staging was 3/4 (P=0.003). Among patients with advanced stage thymoma (stage 3, 4a, 4b), the constituent ratios of 3, 4a, 4b were similar between MG and non-MG group. Histologically, however, there were significantly more proportion of AB/B1/B2/B3 in the MG group while there were more C in the non-MG group (P=0.000). Univariate analyses for all patients showed that MG, WHO classification, Masaoka stage, surgical approach, chemotherapy and radiotherapy and resectability were significant factors, and multivariate analysis showed WHO classification, Masaoka stage, and resectability were strong independent prognostic indicators. Conclusions Although MG is not an independent prognostic factor, the survival of patients with thymoma was superior when MG was present, especially in late Masaoka stage

  13. [Multidisciplinary treatment for a patient with recurrent thymoma associated with myasthenia gravis (MG), pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), and hypogammaglobulinemia].

    PubMed

    Kawamura, M; Sawafuji, M; Hangai, N; Yamamoto, T; Kakizaki, T; Kobayashi, T; Kato, R; Kikuchi, K; Kobayashi, K

    1993-12-01

    The patient is 62-year-old female. When she was 43 years old, MG occurred. At age of 49 years thymoma was found and complete thymectomy (stage III) and postsurgical irradiation were performed. At age of 57 years pleural dissemination of the thymoma was found. Chemotherapy was effective but did not obtain total tumor cell kill. Though chemotherapy has been repeated for each tumor regrowth, the regimen used at first recurrence became ineffective and the interval between tumor regrowth became shorter. This year, when she is 62 years old, PRCA and hypogammaglobulinemia were accompanied with the forth tumor regrowth.

  14. IL‐6‐specific autoantibodies among APECED and thymoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Pihlap, Maire; Ranki, Annamari; Krohn, Kai; Trebusak Podkrajsek, Katarina; Bratanic, Nina; Battelino, Tadej; Willcox, Nick; Peterson, Pärt; Kisand, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Both autoimmune polyendocrinopathy‐candidiasis‐ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) and the rare thymoma patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) have neutralizing autoantibodies to Th17 cytokines and significant defects in production of IL‐22 and IL‐17F by their T cells. The cause of these defects is unknown. We hypothesized that they might result from autoimmunity against upstream cytokines normally responsible for generating and maintaining Th17 cells. Methods Luciferase immunoprecipitation (LIPS) was used to screen for autoantibodies to IL‐6, IL‐1β, TGF‐β3, IL‐21, and IL‐23 in patients with APECED or thymoma. We used Western blotting to assess the conformation‐dependence of the IL‐6 autoantibodies and flow cytometric analysis of intracellular phospho‐STAT3 induction to assess IL‐6‐neutralizing capacity in IgGs isolated from patient and control sera. We also used Luminex xMAP to measure serum cytokine levels. Results We found autoantibodies binding to conformational epitopes of IL‐6 in 19.5% of 41 patients with APECED and 12.5% of 104 with thymoma—especially in those with long disease durations. The autoantibodies were predominantly of IgG1 subclass and failed to neutralize IL‐6 activity. Notably, serum levels of the IL‐6 and IL‐17A cytokines were higher in anti‐IL‐6 seropositive than—negative APECED patients or healthy controls. We also detected autoantibody binding to IL‐23 in 27.9% of thymoma patients, resulting from cross‐recognition through the p40 subunit it shares with IL‐12. Conclusions IL‐6 and IL‐17A elevation in these seropositive patients suggests that antibody‐binding may protect IL‐6 from degradation and prolong its half‐life in vivo. PMID:27957331

  15. Thymomas with prominent glandular differentiation: a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Weissferdt, Annikka; Moran, Cesar A

    2013-08-01

    Twelve cases of thymomas with prominent glandular differentiation are presented. The patients were 7 men and 5 women aged between 45 and 68 years (average, 56.5 years). Clinically, the patients presented with nonspecific symptoms of chest pain, cough, and fatigue. None of the patients had a history of myasthenia gravis or other autoimmune syndrome. Thymectomy was performed in all patients. The tumor size ranged from 4 to 7 cm in greatest diameter. Macroscopically, the tumors were described as firm and light tan without areas of necrosis, hemorrhage, or cystic change. Histologically, 7 tumors were classified as spindle cell (World Health Organization type A), 2 as mixed spindle cell and conventional (A+B1), 2 as conventional (B1), and 1 as atypical thymoma (B3). In 4 cases, the tumors showed invasion into periadipose thymic tissue. All cases showed the typical growth patterns of their particular subtypes. In addition, a distinct glandular component was present in all cases showing mucinous differentiation in 4 of them. Immunohistochemical studies showed tumor cells positive for CAM5.2, cytokeratin 5/6, and Pax8 and negative for carcinoembryonic antigen, thyroid transcription factor 1, and epithelial membrane antigen. Calretinin showed focal weak staining in the nonmucinous glandular components in 3 cases. Follow-up information obtained in 8 patients showed that all were alive and well in a period ranging from 2 to 5 years. The possibility of a glandular component in thymomas should be kept in mind in the assessment of mediastinoscopic biopsies to avoid misdiagnosis for other neoplasms that may require different treatment modalities.

  16. Graft-versus-host disease-like erythroderma: a manifestation of thymoma-associated multiorgan autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Shay; Nehal, Kishwer; Querfeld, Christiane; Wong, Richard; Huang, James; Pulitzer, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Thymoma associated multiorgan autoimmunity is a rare paraneoplastic disorder, clinicopathologically similar to graft versus host disease, which is thought to be mediated by dysfunctional negative thymocyte selection and abnormally low levels of Tregs. We report a 50 year old Chinese women with a history of malignant thymoma and myasthenia gravis who developed graft versus host disease- like erythroderma after instituting chemotherapy and undergoing myasthenia crisis. Clinically her rash presented as erythematous scaly papules, which evolved to psoriasiform patches and plaques with foci of vitiligo. Histopathologically the biopsy showed a predominantly interface dermatitis with necrotic keratinocytes extending to the upper levels of the epidermis, and florid basket weave orthokeratosis. Clinical and laboratory work-up ruled out common inflammatory or infectious causes, eventually favoring the diagnosis of TAMA with GVHD-like erythroderma. Unfortunately, the patient underwent multi-organ compromise and death due to respiratory failure from myasthenia crisis. Patients with TAMA have a poor clinical outlook; rare successful treatments include high dose oral steroids and additional modalities including bone marrow transplant and chemotherapeutic or biologic agents. As the predominant findings are in the skin, dermatologists and dermatopathologists are in a unique position to enable the early diagnosis and treatment of this unusual disease. PMID:26509934

  17. Ultrasound guided electrochemotherapy for the treatment of a clear cell thymoma in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Menicagli, Francesco; Pettorali, Michela; Baldi, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    A twelve-year-old male castrated domestic shorthair cat was presented for rapidly progressing respiratory distress. The cat was depressed, tachypneic and moderately responsive. Ultrasonography showed a mediastinal mass associated with a significant pleural effusion that needed tapping every five to seven days. Ultrasound guided biopsy yielded a diagnosis of clear cell thymoma upon histopathology. After complete staging procedures, the owner elected to treat the cat with electrochemotherapy (ECT) using systemic bleomycin. Two sessions of ultrasound guided ECT were performed at two week intervals with trains of biphasic electric pulses applied using needle electrodes until complete coverage of the area was achieved. The treatment was well tolerated and resulted in partial remission (PR). Additional sessions were performed on a monthly basis. The cat is still in PR after fourteen months. ECT resulted in improved local control and should be considered among the available adjuvant treatments in pets carrying visceral tumors. PMID:28331834

  18. miR-20b Inhibits T Cell Proliferation and Activation via NFAT Signaling Pathway in Thymoma-Associated Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Yanzhong; Cai, Hongfei; Lu, Tianyu; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. We examined the role of miR-20b in development of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis, especially in T cell proliferation and activation. Materials and Methods. Using qRT-PCR, we assessed expression levels of miR-20b and its target genes in cultured cells and patient samples and examined the proliferation of cultured cells, using MTT cell proliferation assays and flow cytometry based cell cycle analysis. Activation of T cells was determined by both flow cytometry and qRT-PCR of activation-specific marker genes. Results. Expression of miR-20b was downregulated in samples of thymoma tissues and serum from patients with thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. In addition, T cell proliferation and activation were inhibited by ectopic overexpression of miR-20b, which led to increased T cell proliferation and activation. NFAT5 and CAMTA1 were identified as targets of miR-20b. Expression levels of NFAT5 and CAMTA1 were inhibited by miR-20b expression in cultured cells, and the expression levels of miR-20b and NFAT5/CAMTA1 were inversely correlated in patients with thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. Conclusion. miR-20b acts as a tumor suppressor in the development of thymoma and thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis. The tumor suppressive function of miR-20b in thymoma could be due to its inhibition of NFAT signaling by repression of NFAT5 and CAMTA1 expression. PMID:27833920

  19. Severe diarrhea due to Isospora belli in a patient with thymoma.

    PubMed

    Meamar, Ahmad Reza; Rezaian, Mostafa; Mirzaei, Ali Zare; Zahabiun, Farzaneh; Faghihi, Amir Hossein; Oormazdi, Hormazd; Kia, Eshrat Beigom

    2009-12-01

    Opportunistic isosporidial infection of the gastrointestinal tract is frequently encountered in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is considered to be an AIDS-defining illness. Chronic severe watery diarrhea due to Isospora belli has also been reported in other immunodeficiency states. This report describes severe chronic debilitating diarrhea due to isosporiasis in a patient with mediastinal thymoma, a common tumor of the anterior mediastinum, originating from the epithelial cells of the thymus. Numerous oocysts of I. belli were detected in direct smear preparation of the diarrheic stool sample of the patient, who had an 8-month history of recurrent diarrhea. Duodenal and colonic mucosal biopsies revealed slight degrees of atrophic changes associated with infiltration of the lamina propria by an appreciable number of eosinophiles and the presence of unizoit tissue cysts of I. belli in the surface epithelium of the duodenal mucosa. The patient was first treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and subsequently underwent complete thymectomy. Later, due to recurrence of the diarrhea, he was treated with ciprofloxacin.

  20. Aberrant decrease of microRNA19b regulates TSLP expression and contributes to Th17 cells development in myasthenia gravis related thymomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongkui; Chen, Yuping; Xu, Shengjie; Yang, Yanhua; Wei, Dongning; Wang, Wei; Huang, Xusheng

    2015-11-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an organ-specific autoimmune disease. The imbalance of T helper type 17 cells (Th17) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of thymomatous MG. But the regulatory mechanism for Th17 cell development in MG-related thymoma remains undefined. Here we demonstrated that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is significantly decreased in thymomas. We also proved that TSLP was post-trancriptionally regulated by microRNA-19b. The expression of microRNA-19b was negatively correlated with the expression of TSLP mRNA and protein in thymomas. This study indicated that the elevation of microRNA-19b suppressed TSLP expression and then influenced T cell development in thymomatous MG.

  1. Thymoma and Synchronous Primary Mediastinal Seminomas with Florid Follicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia in the Anterior Mediastinum: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyang-im; Jang, In-seok; Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Ko, Gyung Hyuck; Lee, Jong Sil; Kim, Dong Chul; Song, Dae Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Thymoma is the most common neoplasm of the anterior mediastinum and has malignant potential. Germ cell tumors (GCTs) found in the anterior mediastinum are usually benign, and malignant GCTs, such as seminomas, are rare. Histologically, mediastinal seminoma is indistinguishable from testicular seminoma except for site-associated morphological features such as lymphoid follicular hyperplasia. Therefore, excluding metastasis is very important. Recently, we treated a young adult patient with multiple thymic masses that occurred simultaneously. The patient underwent a thymectomy for the removal of the mediastinal masses, one of which was diagnosed as type B2 invasive thymoma, and two of which were diagnosed as primary mediastinal seminomas with massive follicular hyperplasia. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy after surgical resection. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a thymoma and a mediastinal seminoma occurring simultaneously in the thymus. We present this case along with a literature review. PMID:28147469

  2. Ectopic micronodular thymoma with lymphoid stroma in the cervical region: a rare case associated with Langerhans cells proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min; Meng, Yuan; Xu, Bin; Zhao, Lin; Zhang, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    Micronodular thymoma (MNT) with lymphoid stroma is a rare thymic epithelial neoplasm with the characteristics of multiple nodules separated by abundant lymphoid stroma. MNTs mainly arise in the anterior mediastinum and thymus, while ectopic MNTs are extremely rarely seen. Here, we report an ectopic MNT that occurred in the neck of a 62-year-old woman. There were also scattered eosinophilic granulocytes and S100+/CD1a+ Langerhans cells within the tumor. This case provides a better understanding of such rare, poorly understood cases. PMID:27486334

  3. Postoperative Radiotherapy After Surgical Resection of Thymoma: Differing Roles in Localized and Regional Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Forquer, Jeffrey A.; Rong Nan; Fakiris, Achilles J.; Loehrer, Patrick J.; Johnstone, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry data to determine the impact of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for thymoma and thymic carcinoma (T/TC). Methods and Materials: Patients with surgically resected localized (LOC) or regional (REG) malignant T/TC with or without PORT were analyzed for overall survival (OS) and cause-specific survival (CSS) by querying the SEER database from 1973-2005. Patients dying within the first 3 months after surgery were excluded. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate analyses with Cox proportional hazards were performed. Results: A total of 901 T/TC patients were identified (275 with LOC disease and 626 with REG disease). For all patients with LOC disease, PORT had no benefit and may adversely impact the 5-year CSS rate (91% vs. 98%, p = 0.03). For patients with REG disease, the 5-year OS rate was significantly improved by adding PORT (76% vs. 66% for surgery alone, p = 0.01), but the 5-year CSS rate was no better (91% vs. 86%, p = 0.12). No benefit was noted for PORT in REG disease after extirpative surgery (defined as radical or total thymectomy). On multivariate OS and CSS analysis, stage and age were independently correlated with survival. For multivariate CSS analysis, the outcome of PORT is significantly better for REG disease than for LOC disease (hazard ratio, 0.167; p = 0.001). Conclusions: Our results from SEER show that PORT for T/TC had no advantage in patients with LOC disease (Masaoka Stage I), but a possible OS benefit of PORT in patients with REG disease (Masaoka Stage II-III) was found, especially after non-extirpative surgery. The role of PORT in T/TC needs further evaluation.

  4. Altered expression of miR-125a-5p in thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis and its down-regulation of foxp3 expression in Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinpin; Qiu, Di; Chen, Zezhi; Du, Weiwei; Liu, Jingli; Mo, Xuean

    2016-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoantibody-mediated and T cell-dependent autoimmune disease of neuromuscular junctions. Thymomas may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis (TAMG), but the thymic pathogenesis of TAMG is unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNA molecules 21-24 nt in length that regulate the expression of their target genes in a post-transcriptional manner. In this study, we used a miRNA microarray chip to identify, for the first time, 137 miRNAs in normal tissue adjacent to the thymoma from TAMG patients that were significantly dysregulated compared with normal thymus controls. We confirmed the differential expression of miR-125a-5p in larger samples using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Using bioinformatics analysis, we identified the foxp3 3' untranslated region (UTR) as a target of miR-125a-5p. Importantly, miR-125a-5p expression exhibited a negative correlation with foxp3 expression in normal tissue adjacent to the thymoma from TAMG patients. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the expression of the foxp3 gene was modulated by miR-125a-5p in Jurkat cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the abnormal expression of miR-125a-5p and its effect on foxp3 expression are likely involved in the pathogenesis of TAMG.

  5. Thymoma-associated multi-organ autoimmunity: A case of graft-versus-host disease-like erythroderma complicated by Good syndrome successfully treated by thymectomy.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Ayano; Ichimura, Yoshiko; Obata, Shoko; Kinoshita-Ise, Misaki; Fujio, Yumi; Takeno, Mitsuhiro; Konohana, Izumi

    2017-03-03

    Thymoma-associated multi-organ autoimmunity disease (TAMA) is a rare paraneoplastic disorder, clinicopathologically similar to graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Many reported cases follow a difficult course; half of them die from serious infectious diseases subsequent to immunosuppression induced by chemotherapy for unresectable thymoma, or intensive therapies including systemic steroids for complicating autoimmune diseases and GVHD-like symptoms. We report a patient whose skin symptoms were improved subsequently to total thymectomy. The patient also presented with hypogammaglobulinemia, which led to the diagnosis of complicated Good syndrome. Taking account of her immunodeficient condition, antibiotics and i.v. immunoglobulin were administrated promptly on onset of bacterial pneumonia, which was successfully treated. According to a review of the published work, treatments with systemic steroids for skin symptoms have limited effects and may contribute to serious infection. Our case indicates that successful treatment of thymoma itself may lead to the amelioration of the disease. The management priority should be given to the treatment of thymoma and the control of subsequent immune abnormality other than GVHD-like erythroderma.

  6. Conventional murine gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Albert G; Sun, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Murine gene knockout models engineered over the last two decades have continued to demonstrate their potential as invaluable tools in understanding the role of gene function in the context of normal human development and disease. The more recent elucidation of the human and mouse genomes through sequencing has opened up the capability to elucidate the function of every human gene. State-of-the-art mouse model generation allows, through a multitude of experimental steps requiring careful standardization, gene function to be reliably and predictably ablated in a live model system. The application of these standardized methodologies to directly target gene function through murine gene knockout has to date provided comprehensive and verifiable genetic models that have contributed tremendously to our understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying normal and disease states in humans. The ensuing chapter provides an overview of the latest steps and procedures required to ablate gene function in a murine model.

  7. Paraneoplastic Pemphigus Associated with a Malignant Thymoma: A Case of Persistent and Refractory Oral Ulcerations Following Thymectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung Min; Lee, Sang Eun; Seo, Jimyung; Kim, Do Young; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Paraneoplastic pemphigus is a rare, life-threatening autoimmune mucocutaneous blistering disease associated with underlying neoplasia, commonly lymphoproliferative tumors. Herein we report a case of paraneoplastic pemphigus with a unique autoantibody profile associated with a malignant thymoma. A 56-year-old female patient presented with relapsing oral ulcerations accompanied by erythematous papules and patches on her extremities for 2 months. Skin and mucosal biopsies identified interface dermatitis with lichenoid lymphocytic infiltration in the upper dermis. Immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays revealed that the patient had multiple autoantibodies against desmoglein 1, desmocollin 1, 2, 3, laminin gamma-1, envoplakin, and periplakin. The skin lesions completely healed following thymectomy and systemic corticosteroid therapy, but the oral ulcerations persisted through a follow-up period of over 2 years. PMID:28392652

  8. Treatment Modalities and Outcomes in Patients with Advanced Invasive Thymoma or Thymic Carcinoma: A Retrospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Modh, Ankit; Rimner, Andreas; Allen, Pamela K.; Greenfield, Brad; Marom, Edith M.; Rice, David; Huang, James; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We investigated relationships between treatment characteristics and long-term outcomes in patients with locally advanced thymoma or thymic carcinoma. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 146 patients treated in 1980–2011 at two tertiary cancer care centers, 110 with Masaoka-Koga stage III–IVa invasive thymoma and 36 with stage I–IVa thymic carcinoma. Survival probabilities were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Risk factors related to survival were identified by univariate and multivariate competing risk analysis, with overall survival (OS) as the competing risk. Cox regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for OS. Results Median follow-up time for all patients was 64 months. At 5/10 years, rates of OS and freedom from recurrence (FFR) were 81/58% and 81/65%, respectively. Of patients who underwent surgery, trimodality treatment produced better survival compared to less aggressive treatment among patients with stage III disease (p=0.03). Among patients who underwent trimodality treatment, patients with stage III disease had better OS (p=0.03) and FFR (p<0.001) than those with stage IVA disease. On Cox regression analysis, decreased OS was associated with thymic carcinoma (hazard ratio [HR]=7.36, 95% CI=2.38–22.77, p=0.001), R2/unresectable disease (HR=8.45, 95% CI=1.44–49.42, p=0.02) and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score of 1 (HR=8.14, 95% CI=1.55–42.75, p=0.01) or 2–3 (HR=29.60, 95% CI=4.0–218.98, p=0.001) versus 0. Conclusion Aggressive treatment with chemotherapy, surgical resection, and postoperative radiation therapy can produce long-term survival for patients with invasive thymic malignanices. PMID:24390276

  9. Pure red cell aplasia as a presenting feature in systemic lupus erythematosus and association with thymoma, hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Sasan; Akbarian, Mahmoud; Dabiri, Shahriar

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a 54-year-old female with lupus whom severe anaemia due to pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) was the first manifestation. There was seven years interval between PRCA onset and diagnosis of lupus. Thymectomy due to thymoma had been carried out six years before but anaemia sustained. Hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism were other associated diseases. Severe anaemia and the need for monthly blood infusions were resolved following treatment with Prednisolone, Hydroxychloroquine and Levothyroxine.

  10. Mining the human autoantibody repertoire: isolation of potent IL17A-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies from a patient with thymoma.

    PubMed

    Beerli, Roger R; Bauer, Monika; Fritzer, Andrea; Rosen, Lindsey B; Buser, Regula B; Hanner, Markus; Maudrich, Melanie; Nebenfuehr, Mario; Toepfer, Jorge Alejandro Sepulveda; Mangold, Susanne; Bauer, Anton; Holland, Steven M; Browne, Sarah K; Meinke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Anti-cytokine autoantibodies have been widely reported to be present in human plasma, both in healthy subjects and in patients with underlying autoimmune conditions, such as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) or thymic epithelial neoplasms. While often asymptomatic, they can cause or facilitate a wide range of diseases including opportunistic infections. The potential therapeutic value of specific neutralizing anti-cytokine autoantibodies has not been thoroughly investigated. Here we used mammalian cell display to isolate IL17A-specific antibodies from a thymoma patient with proven high-titer autoantibodies against the same. We identified 3 distinct clonotypes that efficiently neutralized IL17A in a cell-based in vitro assay. Their potencies were comparable to those of known neutralizing antibodies, including 2, AIN457 (secukinumab) and ixekizumab that are currently in clinical development for the treatment of various inflammatory disorders. These data clearly demonstrate that the human autoantibody repertoire can be mined for antibodies with high therapeutic potential for clinical development.

  11. Mining the human autoantibody repertoire: Isolation of potent IL17A-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies from a patient with thymoma

    PubMed Central

    Beerli, Roger R; Bauer, Monika; Fritzer, Andrea; Rosen, Lindsey B; Buser, Regula B; Hanner, Markus; Maudrich, Melanie; Nebenfuehr, Mario; Toepfer, Jorge Alejandro Sepulveda; Mangold, Susanne; Bauer, Anton; Holland, Steven M; Browne, Sarah K; Meinke, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Anti-cytokine autoantibodies have been widely reported to be present in human plasma, both in healthy subjects and in patients with underlying autoimmune conditions, such as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) or thymic epithelial neoplasms. While often asymptomatic, they can cause or facilitate a wide range of diseases including opportunistic infections. The potential therapeutic value of specific neutralizing anti-cytokine autoantibodies has not been thoroughly investigated. Here we used mammalian cell display to isolate IL17A-specific antibodies from a thymoma patient with proven high-titer autoantibodies against the same. We identified 3 distinct clonotypes that efficiently neutralized IL17A in a cell-based in vitro assay. Their potencies were comparable to those of known neutralizing antibodies, including 2, AIN457 (secukinumab) and ixekizumab that are currently in clinical development for the treatment of various inflammatory disorders. These data clearly demonstrate that the human autoantibody repertoire can be mined for antibodies with high therapeutic potential for clinical development. PMID:25484038

  12. Survival after subsequent non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and non-small cell lung cancer in patients with malignant thymoma

    PubMed Central

    Parzen, Jacob S.; Bates, James E.; Milano, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Survivors of malignant thymoma (MT) are at an increased risk of developing subsequent neoplasms. We compare overall survival (OS) between MT survivors who developed non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) or non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and patients with first primary NHL (NHL-1) or NSCLC (NSCLC-1), respectively. Methods Using the population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database for 1973 through 2013, 273,313 patients who had NHL-1, 21 patients with MT-NHL, 566,819 patients with NSCLC-1, and 38 patients with MT-NSCLC were identified. Univariate and multivariate models were used to assess the impact of various factors on OS. Results The observed-to-expected ratio among MT patients was 2.63 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.40−4.49; P<0.05] for NHL and 1.90 (95% CI, 1.33–3.63; P<0.05) for lung cancer. On univariate analysis, MT history did not worsen OS for NHL [hazard ratio (HR), 1.46; 95% CI, 0.87–2.47; P=0.16] or NSCLC (HR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.61–1.29; P=0.53). On multivariate analysis, MT history was found to be an adverse prognostic indicator on OS for NHL (HR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.20–3.42; P=0.008), but not NSCLC (HR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.60–1.25; P=0.45). Conclusions Patients who develop NHL after MT have inferior survival than those with first primary NHL. A history of MT does not have an adverse prognostic impact on subsequent NSCLC. Clinicians must be aware of the intrinsic risk for subsequent malignancies after MT and the potential adverse impact of MT history on NHL prognosis but not NSCLC. PMID:28149555

  13. Platelet-derived growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α expression in the normal human thymus and thymoma.

    PubMed

    Cimpean, Anca Maria; Ceauşu, Raluca; Encică, Svetlana; Gaje, Pusa Nela; Ribatti, Domenico; Raica, Marius

    2011-10-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptors (PDGFRs) are strongly involved in the normal development of several organs, tumour angiogenesis and malignant progression and metastasis. Few studies concerning their expression, distribution and role in normal and pathological human thymus are available in the literature. The aim of this study has been to analyse the immunohistochemical expression of PDGF and PDGFR-α in prenatal and postnatal normal human thymus and thymomal biopsy specimens. The results demonstrated immunoreactivity to both PDGF and PDGFR-α in all specimens, but the intensity, distribution and number of positive cells were different in normal thymus and thymomas, and also among different tumour types. PDGF and PDGFR-α were weakly expressed in foetal and postnatal humans with a different distribution between cortex and medulla in both blood vessels and epithelial cells, whereas they were overexpressed in thymoma, especially in type B2 and B3, in the tumour epithelial cells. Overall, these data suggest that PDGF and PDGFR-α may be involved in the pathophysiology of the human thymus.

  14. Impact of Surgical Evaluation of Additional Cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Advanced Thymoma with Infiltration of Adjacent Structures: The Thoracic Surgeon's View.

    PubMed

    Ried, Michael; Hnevkovsky, Stefanie; Neu, Reiner; von Süßkind-Schwendi, Marietta; Götz, Andrea; Hamer, Okka W; Schalke, Berthold; Hofmann, Hans-Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Background Preoperative radiological assessment is important for clarification of surgical operability for advanced thymic tumors. Objective was to determine the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with cine sequences for evaluation of cardiovascular tumor invasion. Patients and Methods This prospective study included patients with advanced thymoma, who underwent surgical resection. All patients received preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan and cine MRI. Results Tumor infiltration was surgically confirmed in the pericardium (n = 12), myocardium (n = 1), superior caval vein (SCV; n = 3), and aorta (n = 2). A macroscopic complete resection was possible in 10 patients, whereas 2 patients with aortic or myocardial tumor invasion had R2 resection. The positive predictive value (PPV) was 50% for cine MRI compared with 0% for CT scan regarding myocardial tumor infiltration. The PPV for tumor infiltration of the aorta was 50%, with a higher sensitivity for the CT scan (100 vs. 50%). Infiltration of the SCV could be detected slightly better with cine MRI (PPV 75 vs. 66.7%). Conclusion Cine MRI seems to improve the accuracy of preoperative staging of advanced thymoma regarding infiltration of cardiovascular structures and supports the surgical approach.

  15. Murine typhus in travelers returning from Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Parola, P.; Vogelaers, D.; Roure, C.; Janbon, F.; Raoult, D.

    1998-01-01

    We report the first three documented cases of murine typhus imported into Europe from Indonesia, discuss clues for the diagnosis of the disease, and urge that murine fever be considered in the diagnosis of febrile disease in travelers. PMID:9866749

  16. Murine typhus in travelers returning from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Parola, P; Vogelaers, D; Roure, C; Janbon, F; Raoult, D

    1998-01-01

    We report the first three documented cases of murine typhus imported into Europe from Indonesia, discuss clues for the diagnosis of the disease, and urge that murine fever be considered in the diagnosis of febrile disease in travelers.

  17. Antimicrobial proteins of murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, P S; Eisenhauer, P B; Harwig, S S; van den Barselaar, M T; van Furth, R; Lehrer, R I

    1993-01-01

    Three murine microbicidal proteins (MUMPs) were purified from cells of the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 that had been activated by gamma interferon. Similar proteins were also present in nonactivated RAW264.7 cells, in cells of the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1, and in resident and activated murine peritoneal macrophages. MUMP-1, MUMP-2, and MUMP-3 killed Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro. MUMP-1 resembled an H1 histone but was unusual because its N-terminal residue (serine) was not N acetylated. Although MUMP-2 was N terminally blocked, its high lysine/arginine ratio and its reactivity with an antibody to H1 histones suggested that it also belonged to the H1 histone family. MUMP-3 was identical to histone H2B in 30 of 30 amino-terminal residues. Although the antimicrobial properties of histones have been recognized for decades, this is the first evidence that such proteins may endow the lysosomal apparatus of macrophages with nonoxidative antimicrobial potential. Other MUMPs, including some with a more restricted antimicrobial spectrum and one that appeared to be induced in RAW264.7 cells after gamma interferon stimulation, were noted but remain to be characterized. Images PMID:8514411

  18. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-05-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN/sup -/) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10/sup -6/ M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied.

  19. Secretion of an articular cartilage proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity by murine T lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Kammer, G M; Sapolsky, A I; Malemud, C J

    1985-01-01

    Destruction of articular cartilage is the hallmark of inflammatory arthritides. Enzymes elaborated by mononuclear cells infiltrating the synovium mediate, in part, the degradation of the cartilage extracellular matrix. Since mononuclear cells are the dominant cell type found in chronic inflammatory synovitis, we investigated whether interaction of immune mononuclear cells with antigen initiated the synthesis and secretion of a proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity. Proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity was monitored by the capacity of murine spleen cell conditioned medium to release [3H]serine/35SO4 incorporated into rabbit cartilage proteoglycan monomer fraction (A1D1), and by the relative change in specific viscosity of bovine nasal cartilage proteoglycan monomer. The results demonstrated that both virgin and immune mononuclear cells spontaneously generated proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity and that cellular activation and proliferation induced by the antigen keyhole limpet hemocyanin or the mitogen phytohemagglutinin was not required. Kinetic studies demonstrated stable release of the enzyme activity over 72 h. Cell separation studies showed that T lymphocytes, a thymoma line, and macrophages separately produced proteoglycan-degrading enzyme activity. The enzyme activity has been partially characterized and appears to belong to a class of neutral pH metal-dependent proteinases. These observations, the first to demonstrate that T lymphocytes secrete an enzyme capable of degrading cartilage proteoglycan, raise the possibility that this enzyme activity contributes to cartilage extracellular matrix destruction in vivo. Moreover, these data support the conclusion that production of this enzyme by T lymphocytes is independent of an antigen-specific stimulus. PMID:3897284

  20. Surgical approaches for stage I and II thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis: feasibility of complete video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) thymectomy in comparison with trans-sternal resection

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhicheng; Zhu, Quan; Wen, Wei; Chen, Liang; Xu, Hai; Li, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Complete resection could be achieved in virtually all myasthenic patients with Masaoka stage I and II thymoma using the trans-sternal technique. Whether this is appropriate for minimally invasive approach is not yet clear. We evaluated the feasibility of complete video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) thymectomy for the treatment of Masaoka stage I and II thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis, compared to conventional trans-sternal thymectomy. We summarized 33 patients with Masaoka stage I and II thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis between April 2006 and September 2011. Of these, 15 patients underwent right-sided complete VATS (the VATS group) by using adjuvant pneuomomediastinum, comparing with 18 patients using the trans-sternal approach (the T3b group). No intraoperative death was found and no VATS case required conversion to median sternotomy. Significant differences between the two groups regarding duration of surgery and volume of intraoperative blood loss (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively) were observed. Postoperative morbidities were 26.7% and 33.3% for the VATS and T3b groups, respectively. All 33 patients were followed up for 12 to 61 months in the study. The cumulative probabilities of reaching complete stable remission and effective rate were 26.7% (4/15) and 93.3% (14/15) in the VATS group, which had a significantly higher complete stable remission and effective rate than those in the T3b group (P = 0.026 and P = 0.000, respectively). We conclude that VATS thymectomy utilizing adjuvant pneuomomediastinum for the treatment of stage I and II thymoma-associated myasthenia gravis is technically feasible but deserves further investigation in a large series with long-term follow-up. PMID:23554796

  1. Murine Typhus, Reunion, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Camuset, Guillaume; Socolovschi, Cristina; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Kuli, Barbara; Foucher, Aurélie; Poubeau, Patrice; Borgherini, Gianandrea; Wartel, Guillaume; Audin, Héla; Raoult, Didier; Filleul, Laurent; Parola, Philippe; Pagès, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus case was initially identified in Reunion, France, in 2012 in a tourist. Our investigation confirmed 8 autochthonous cases that occurred during January 2011–January 2013 in Reunion. Murine typhus should be considered in local patients and in travelers returning from Reunion who have fevers of unknown origin. PMID:25625653

  2. IL-10 regulates murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhinan; Bahtiyar, Gul; Zhang, Na; Liu, Lanzhen; Zhu, Ping; Robert, Marie E; McNiff, Jennifer; Madaio, Michael P; Craft, Joe

    2002-08-15

    MRL/MpJ-Tnfrsf6(lpr) (MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr); MRL-Fas(lpr)) mice develop a spontaneous lupus syndrome closely resembling human systemic lupus erythematosus. To define the role of IL-10 in the regulation of murine lupus, IL-10 gene-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) MRL-Fas(lpr) (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-)) mice were generated and their disease phenotype was compared with littermates with one or two copies of an intact IL-10 locus (MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/-) and MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(+/+) mice, respectively). MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice developed severe lupus, with earlier appearance of skin lesions, increased lymphadenopathy, more severe glomerulonephritis, and higher mortality than their IL-10-intact littermate controls. The increased severity of lupus in MRL-Fas(lpr) IL-10(-/-) mice was closely associated with enhanced IFN-gamma production by both CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells and increased serum concentration of IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibodies. The protective effect of IL-10 in this lupus model was further supported by the observation that administration of rIL-10 reduced IgG2a anti-dsDNA autoantibody production in wild-type MRL-Fas(lpr) animals. In summary, our results provide evidence that IL-10 can down-modulate murine lupus through inhibition of pathogenic Th1 cytokine responses. Modulation of the level of IL-10 may be of potential therapeutic benefit for human lupus.

  3. Association of blebbing with assembly of cytoskeletal proteins in ATP-depleted EL-4 ascites tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Gabai, V L; Kabakov, A E; Mosin, A F

    1992-01-01

    ATP depletion in EL-4 ascites tumour cells rapidly induced the changes in cell morphology (blebbing), cytoskeletal protein assembly and finally resulted in cell death. After 1 hr of incubation with 2 microM rotenone (inhibitor of respiration) in glucose-free medium, when ATP level was 4% of the initial level, there were increases in triton-insoluble actin and vinculin levels (2.5-fold and 2.8-fold, respectively) and 44% of cells showed blebs; such treatment damaged cells irreversibly. Ca2+ removal did not diminish the effect of ATP depletion on cytoskeleton, blebbing and cell death, although the elevation of free intracellular Ca2+ in rotenone-treated cells was prevented. The role of ATP in maintaining cytoskeleton and cell shape is discussed.

  4. EL4 cell-based colorimetric toxin neutralization activity assays for determination of neutralizing anti-ricin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Changhong Y; Brown, J Edward; Torabazar, Nahid R; Smith, Leonard A

    2013-01-01

    A recombinant ricin toxin A-chain 1-33/44-198 vaccine (RVEc), developed at the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases as a vaccine candidate, is under investigation in a phase 1 clinical study. To effectively evaluate the immunogenicity of this ricin vaccine and to eliminate the use of radioactive material, an EL4 cell-based colorimetric toxin neutralization activity (TNA) assay using a CellTiter 96 AQueous One Solution Cell Proliferation Assay Reagent has been developed, optimized, and applied in the vaccine efficacy studies. The TNA assay measures the protective neutralizing anti-ricin antibodies in animal sera by determining the cell viability after ricin exposure in the assay system and comparing it to a purified mouse polyclonal antiricin IgG standard curve. The standard curve of the anti-ricin TNA assay closely fits a four-parameter logistic regression model. The unknown test sample concentration was expressed as microg/mL, but not the 50% effective concentration (EC50), which was determined by most TNA assays. The neutralizing endpoint titers, not the 50% effective dilution (ED50), of human specimens were measured with the TNA assay in support of the clinical study of the RVEc vaccine. The optimal amount of ricin toxin, EL4 cells, and concentration of standards used in the assay system was established to minimize false-negative and false-positive results of serum specimens from the nonclinical and clinical studies of RVEc. The testing conditions were adjusted to optimize assay performance. The colorimetric TNA assay replaced a radioactive TNA assay previously used in the ricin vaccine studies.

  5. The expression of TIPE1 in murine tissues and human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Zhang, Guizhong; Hao, Chunyan; Wang, Yan; Lou, Yunwei; Zhang, Wenqian; Wang, Juan; Liu, Suxia

    2011-07-01

    Members of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein-8 (TNFAIP8 or TIPE) family play important roles in immune homeostasis and cancer. TIPE1 (TNFAIP8-like 1) is a new member of the TIPE family that may regulate cell death. However, due to the lack of a suitable antibody, the nature of cells and tissues that express TIPE1 protein has not been determined. In this study, we generated a highly specific antibody to TIPE1 and examined TIPE1 expression in various murine tissues and human cell lines by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription real-time PCR, and Western blot. We found that TIPE1 protein was detected in a wide variety of tissues in C57BL/6 mice, such as neurons in brain, hepatocytes, germ cells of female and male reproductive organs, muscular tissues, and a variety of cells of the epithelial origin, particularly those with secretory functions. TIPE1 protein was not expressed in mature T or B lymphocytes, but detectable in human B lymphoblast cell line HMy2.CIR and murine T cell line EL4. Furthermore, high levels of TIPE1 mRNA were detected in most human carcinoma cell lines, especially in cells transformed with viral genomes. These results indicate that TIPE1 may perform functions in cell secretion and carcinogenesis, but not in immunity.

  6. Identification of cysteine-644 as the covalent site of attachment of dexamethasone 21-mesylate to murine glucocorticoid receptors in WEHI-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.I.; Bodwell, J.E.; Mendel, D.B.; Ciardelli, T.; North, W.G.; Munck, A.

    1988-05-17

    Dexamethasone 21-mesylate is a highly specific synthetic glucocorticoid derivative that binds covalently to glucocorticoid receptors via sulfhydryl groups. The authors have identified the amino acid that reacts with the dexamethasone 21-mesylate by using enzymatic digestion and microsequencing for radiolabel. Nonactivated glucocorticoid receptors obtained from labeling intact WEHI-7 mouse thymoma cells with (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone 21-mesylate were immunopurified and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Trypsin digestion followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (reversed-phase HPLC) produced a single (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone 21-mesylate labeled peptide. Automated Edman degradation of this peptide revealed that the (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone 21-mesylate was located at position 5 from the amino terminus. Dual-isotope labeling studies with (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone 21-mesylate and (/sup 35/S)methionine demonstrated that this peptide contained methionine. Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion of (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone 21-mesylate labeled steroid-binding subunits generated a different radiolabeled peptide containing label at position 7 from the amino terminus. On the basis of the published amino acid sequence of the murine glucocorticoid receptor, their data clearly identify cysteine-644 as the single residue in the steroid-binding domain that covalently binds dexamethasone 21-mesylate. They have confirmed this finding by demonstrating that a synthetic peptide representing the amino acid sequence 640-650 of the murine glucocorticoid receptor behaves in an identical manner on reversed-phase HPLC as the trypsin-generated peptide from intact cells.

  7. Modulation of radiation-induced apoptosis and G{sub 2}/M block in murine T-lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Palayoor, S.T.; Macklis, R.M.; Bump, E.A.; Coleman, C.N.

    1995-03-01

    Radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphocyte-derived cell lines is characterized by endonucleolytic cleavage of cellular DNA within hours after radiation exposure. We have studied this phenomenon qualitatively (DNA gel electrophoresis) and quantitatively (diphenylamine reagent assay) in murine EL4 T-lymphoma cells exposed to {sup 137}Cs {gamma} irradiation. Fragmentation was discernible within 18-24 h after exposure. It increased with time and dose and reached a plateau after 8 Gy of {gamma} radiation. We studied the effect of several pharmacological agents on the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block and DNA fragmentation. The agents which reduced the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (caffeine, theobromine, theophylline and 2-aminopurine) enhanced the degree of DNA fragmentation at 24 h. In contrast, the agents which sustained the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M-phase arrest (TPA, DBcAMP, IBMX and 3-aminobenzamide) inhibited the DNA fragmentation at 24 h. These studies on EL4 lymphoma cells are consistent with the hypothesis that cells with radiation-induced genetic damage are eliminated by apoptosis subsequent to a G{sub 2}/M block. Furthermore, it may be possible to modulate the process of radiation-induced apoptosis in lymphoma cells with pharmacological agents that modify the radiation-induced G{sub 2}/M block, and to use this effect in the treatment of patients with malignant disease. 59 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Commonly dysregulated genes in murine APL cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wenlin; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Holt, Matthew S.; Link, Daniel C.; Watson, Mark A.; DiPersio, John F.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    To identify genes that are commonly dysregulated in a murine model of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), we first defined gene expression patterns during normal murine myeloid development; serial gene expression profiling studies were performed with primary murine hematopoietic progenitors that were induced to undergo myeloid maturation in vitro with G-CSF. Many genes were reproducibly expressed in restricted developmental “windows,” suggesting a structured hierarchy of expression that is relevant for the induction of developmental fates and/or differentiated cell functions. We compared the normal myeloid developmental transcriptome with that of APL cells derived from mice expressing PML-RARα under control of the murine cathepsin G locus. While many promyelocyte-specific genes were highly expressed in all APL samples, 116 genes were reproducibly dysregulated in many independent APL samples, including Fos, Jun, Egr1, Tnf, and Vcam1. However, this set of commonly dysregulated genes was expressed normally in preleukemic, early myeloid cells from the same mouse model, suggesting that dysregulation occurs as a “downstream” event during disease progression. These studies suggest that the genetic events that lead to APL progression may converge on common pathways that are important for leukemia pathogenesis. PMID:17008535

  9. Synergistic effect of EMF-BEMER-type pulsed weak electromagnetic field and HPMA-bound doxorubicin on mouse EL4 T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Říhová, Blanka; Etrych, Tomáš; Šírová, Milada; Tomala, Jakub; Ulbrich, Karel; Kovář, Marek

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated the effects of low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (LF-EMF) produced by BEMER device on experimental mouse T-cell lymphoma EL4 growing on conventional and/or athymic (nude) mice. Exposure to EMF-BEMER slowed down the growth of tumor mass and prolonged the survival of experimental animals. The effect was more pronounced in immuno-compromised nude mice compared to conventional ones. Acceleration of tumor growth was never observed. No measurable levels of Hsp 70 or increased levels of specific anti-EL4 antibodies were detected in the serum taken from experimental mice before and at different intervals during the experiment, i.e. before solid tumor appeared, at the time of its aggressive growth, and at the terminal stage of the disease. A significant synergizing antitumor effect was seen when EL4 tumor-bearing mice were simultaneously exposed to EMF-BEMER and treated with suboptimal dose of synthetic HPMA copolymer-based doxorubicin, DOX(HYD)-HPMA. Such a combination may be especially useful for heavily treated patients suffering from advanced tumor and requiring additional aggressive chemotherapy which, however, at that time could represent almost life-threatening way of medication.

  10. Murine typhus: an unrecognized suburban vectorborne disease.

    PubMed

    Civen, Rachel; Ngo, Van

    2008-03-15

    Murine typhus, an acute febrile illness caused by Rickettsia typhi, is distributed worldwide. Mainly transmitted by the fleas of rodents, it is associated with cities and ports where urban rats (Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus) are abundant. In the United States, cases are concentrated in suburban areas of Texas and California. Contrary to the classic rat-flea-rat cycle, the most important reservoirs of infection in these areas are opossums and cats. The cat flea, Ctenocephalides felis, has been identified as the principal vector. In Texas, murine typhus cases occur in spring and summer, whereas, in California, cases have been documented in summer and fall. Most patients present with fever, and many have rash and headache. Serologic testing with the indirect immunofluorescence assay is the preferred diagnostic method. Doxycycline is the antibiotic of choice and has been shown to shorten the course of illness.

  11. Enhanced Cultivation Of Stimulated Murine B Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Method of in vitro cultivation of large numbers of stimulated murine B lymphocytes. Cells electrofused with other cells to produce hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies. Offers several advantages: polyclonally stimulated B-cell blasts cultivated for as long as 14 days, hybridomas created throughout culture period, yield of hybridomas increases during cultivation, and possible to expand polyclonally in vitro number of B cells specific for antigenic determinants first recognized in vivo.

  12. Efficacy of posaconazole in murine experimental sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio; Guarro, Josep

    2012-05-01

    We developed a murine model of systemic sporotrichosis by using three strains of each of the two commonest species causing sporotrichosis, i.e., Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis, in order to evaluate the efficacy of posaconazole (PSC). The drug was administered at a dose of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a day by gavage, and one group was treated with amphotericin B (AMB) as a control treatment. Posaconazole, especially at 5 mg/kg, showed good efficacy against all the strains tested, regardless of their MICs, as measured by prolonged survival, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology.

  13. Efficacy of Posaconazole in Murine Experimental Sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    We developed a murine model of systemic sporotrichosis by using three strains of each of the two commonest species causing sporotrichosis, i.e., Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis, in order to evaluate the efficacy of posaconazole (PSC). The drug was administered at a dose of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a day by gavage, and one group was treated with amphotericin B (AMB) as a control treatment. Posaconazole, especially at 5 mg/kg, showed good efficacy against all the strains tested, regardless of their MICs, as measured by prolonged survival, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology. PMID:22330929

  14. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  15. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Zebadúa, P.; Lárraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; García-Garduño, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramírez, V.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Paz, C.; Celis, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  16. Characterization of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Glycoprotein B

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Filipa B.; Colaco, Susanna; May, Janet S.; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2004-01-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) glycoprotein B (gB) was identified in purified virions by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunoelectron microscopy. It was synthesized as a 120-kDa precursor in infected cells and cleaved into 65-kDa and 55-kDa disulfide-linked subunits close to the time of virion release. The N-linked glycans on the cleaved, virion gB remained partially endoglycosidase H sensitive. The processing of MHV-68 gB therefore appears similar to that of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus gB and human cytomegalovirus gB. PMID:15542690

  17. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lucas S; Vohra, Rahat F; Bouyer, Donald H; Walker, David H

    2015-03-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials.

  18. An Unusual Cutaneous Manifestation in a Patient with Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Blanton, Lucas S.; Lea, Alfred S.; Kelly, Brent C.; Walker, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus is a flea-borne febrile illness caused by Rickettsia typhi. Although often accompanied by rash, an inoculation lesion has not been observed as it is with many tick- and mite-transmitted rickettsioses. We describe a patient with murine typhus and an unusual cutaneous manifestation at the site of rickettsial inoculation. PMID:26416115

  19. The future of murine sepsis and trauma research models

    PubMed Central

    Efron, Philip A.; Mohr, Alicia M.; Moore, Frederick A.; Moldawer, Lyle L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent comparisons of the murine and human transcriptome in health and disease have called into question the appropriateness of the use of murine models for human sepsis and trauma research. More specifically, researchers have debated the suitability of mouse models of severe inflammation that is intended for eventual translation to human patients. This mini-review outlines this recent research, as well as specifically defines the arguments for and against murine models of sepsis and trauma research based on these transcriptional studies. In addition, we review newer advancements in murine models of infection and injury and define what we envision as an evolving but viable future for murine studies of sepsis and trauma. PMID:26034205

  20. Pathogenesis and immunity in murine salmonellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, H S

    1989-01-01

    Salmonella is traditionally described as a facultative intracellular parasite, and host macrophages are regarded as the primary effector cells in both native and acquired immunity in mouse typhoid. This concept has not been unanimously accepted in the literature. Based on cell culture experiments and electron microscopic examinations of infected tissues, we observed that virulent Salmonella typhimurium is killed within polymorphs and macrophages of guinea pigs and mice. In a systemic disease, the organism propagates primarily in the extracellular locations of sinusoids and tissue lesions and within hepatocytes. Hence, it is more likely to be an extracellular pathogen and its virulence is directly related to its antiphagocytic property. The conspicuous absence of macrophages in the primary lesions of murine salmonellosis disputes the likelihood of their significant role in native resistance to the disease. Acquired cellular immunity is expressed as an enhanced antibacterial activity of macrophages facilitated by cytophilic antibodies rather than as an altered antibacterial action of immune macrophages. It is proposed that acquired immunity in murine salmonellosis is a synergistic manifestation of the innate capacity of polymorphs and macrophages to destroy ingested salmonellae, the activated antibacterial functions of macrophages mediated by cytophilic antibodies, the opsonic and agglutinating actions of antiserum, and the accelerated inflammation associated with delayed hypersensitivity to bacterial antigens. Unlike live attenuated vaccines, nonviable vaccines offer a significant, though not a solid, protection against subsequent challenges. Images PMID:2687679

  1. Effect of zidovudine on preimplantation murine embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Toltzis, P; Mourton, T; Magnuson, T

    1993-01-01

    It previously has been demonstrated that zidovudine (AZT) is lethal to early murine embryos. The effect of the drug on pre- and postimplantation embryos was examined to delineate the timing of this toxicity and to investigate its possible mechanisms. Embryos exposed in the whole mouse during preblastocyst development were unable to proceed beyond the blastocyst stage. Similarly, when two-cell embryos harvested from unexposed females were exposed to low-concentration (1 microM) AZT in vitro over 24 h, development beyond the blastocyst stage was inhibited. In contrast, drug exposure during in vitro blastocyst and postblastocyst development resulted in little or no morphologic toxicity. Further investigation revealed that preblastocyst AZT exposure resulted in the development of blastocysts with significantly lower cell numbers than control embryos. While embryonic exposure to AZT at the blastocyst and postblastocyst stages also resulted in retarded cell division, the effects were milder than those recorded after preblastocyst exposure. These data demonstrate that the critical period of AZT toxicity toward murine embryos is between ovulation and implantation and indicate that AZT directly suppresses cell division in the preimplantation embryo. PMID:8215271

  2. Dimerumic Acid and Deferricoprogen Activate Ak Mouse Strain Thymoma/Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathways and Prevent Apoptotic Cell Death in 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced SH-SY5Y Cells.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Ya-Wen; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2016-08-03

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder, which can be modeled using the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to generate oxidative stress. Here, we studied the effects of the antioxidants deferricoprogen (DFC) and dimerumic acid (DMA), produced by rice fermented with Monascus purpureus NTU 568, on 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells and their potential protective mechanisms. DMA and DFC inhibited 6-OHDA-induced apoptosis and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Molecular analysis demonstrated associated upregulation of the Ak mouse strain thymoma (Akt), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways along with inhibited phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 pathways and altered homodimeric glycoprotein, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and immunoglobulin Fc receptor gene expression. These results suggested that the neuroprotection elicited by DMA and DFC against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity was associated with the Akt, MAPK, and HO-1 pathways via regulating the gene expression of NMDA receptor, homodimeric glycoprotein, and immunoglobulin Fc receptor.

  3. Glucosylceramides stimulate mitogenesis in aged murine epidermis.

    PubMed

    Marchell, N L; Uchida, Y; Brown, B E; Elias, P M; Holleran, W M

    1998-04-01

    Glucosylceramides (GlcCer) and ceramides (Cer) appear to have opposite effects on epidermal growth and differentiation. Whereas Cer inhibit mitosis and induce terminal differentiation and apoptosis in cultured keratinocytes, GlcCer is mitogenic in young murine epidermis. Using a recently described murine model of chronologic senescence we explored whether GlcCer is mitogenic in aged epidermis. Epidermal GlcCer content increases following topical applications of either conduritol-B epoxide (CBE), an inhibitor of GlcCer hydrolysis, or exogenous GlcCer in a penetration-enhancing vehicle. During chronologic aging in the hairless mouse, baseline epidermal DNA synthesis rates remain normal until 18 mo, but decline significantly at 24 mo. Topical CBE stimulates a 1.5- to 1.9-fold increase in epidermal DNA synthesis in all age groups (i.e., 1-2, 18, and 24 mo). Although the CBE induced increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation in 24 mo old animals is significant (p < 0.01), it is not sufficient to reach the absolute levels reached in similarly treated, younger mouse epidermis. Moreover, topical GlcCer induced mitogenesis is both dose dependent and hexose specific in young (1-2 mo old) animals, and remains effective in aged (< or = 24 mo old) animals. Furthermore, the CBE induced increase in DNA synthesis in aged epidermis is sufficient to produce epidermal hyperplasia. Finally, although an increased GlcCer:Cer ratio can alter stratum corneum barrier function and membrane structure, neither stratum corneum function nor extracellular membrane structure change under these experimental conditions, and therefore the mitogenic effects of increased epidermal GlcCer cannot be attributed to effects on the stratum corneum. These results show that: (i) elevations in endogenous GlcCer are mitogenic for aged as well as young murine epidermis; (ii) topical GlcCer is also mitogenic when delivered in an enhancing vehicle; and (iii) despite the putative importance of epidermal DNA synthesis

  4. Glucocorticoid receptors in murine erythroleukaemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, K.D.; Torrance, J.M.; DiDomenico, M.

    1987-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors in murine erythroleukaemic cells were studied in relation to hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) induced differentiation. Specific binding of dexamethasone was measured. A single class of saturable, high affinity binding sites was demonstrated in intact cells; with cell homogenates or fractions binding was low and could not be reliably quantified. Receptor binding in whole cell suspensions was lower in cells which had been treated with HMBA (36.5 +/- 8.2 pmol/g protein) than in untreated controls (87.9 +/- 23.6 pmol/g protein); dissociation constants were similar in treated (2.7 nM) and untreated cells (2.5 nM). Dexamethasone, hydrocortisone, corticosterone and progesterone competed with tritium-labelled dexamethasone for receptor binding sites; cortisone, deoxycorticosterone and oestradiol had little effect.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with murine teratocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, P N; Levinson, J R; Williams, V E; McDevitt, H O

    1979-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were produced in vitro by fusing mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from a rat immunized with the C3H mouse teratocarcinoma C86-S1. After the fusion two clones were chosen for further analysis. The first clone, 3C4-10, produced an antibody recognizing an antigen with a distribution restricted to teratocarcinoma cell lines, an endoderm cell line, and a neuroblastoma. The second clone, 4A1-9, produced an antibody that reacted with all cultured murine cells tested and adult brain. Neither antibody reacted with preimplantation embryos. The 3C4-10 antibody recognized an antigen associated with proteins. The apparent molecular weight of the 3C4-10 antigen was greater than 100,000. PMID:284353

  6. Cultivation and characterization of three strains of murine rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, H B; Vo, P T; Jones, R

    1986-01-01

    Three distinct strains of murine rotavirus were adapted to growth in cell culture. These strains are genetically related but not identical; they are serotypically heterogeneous. The cultivatable strains were substantially more infectious (approximately 10(6)-fold) for suckling mice than heterologous simian rotaviruses were. Homologous murine rotavirus strains spread from inoculated to uninoculated litter mates and caused diarrhea, while heterologous rotaviruses did not spread and cause illness. Images PMID:3003390

  7. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK-3β) Inhibition Enhances Dendritic Cell-based Cancer Vaccine Potency via Suppression of Interferon-γ-induced Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Expression.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kyung Tae; Son, Kwang Hee; Jung, In Duk; Kang, Tae Heung; Choi, Chang Hun; Park, Yeong-Min

    2015-05-08

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) functions as a crucial mediator of tumor-mediated immune tolerance by causing T-cell suppression via tryptophan starvation in a tumor environment. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is also involved in immune and anti-tumor responses. However, the relativity of these proteins has not been as well defined. Here, we found that GSK-3β-dependent IDO expression in the dendritic cell (DC) plays a role in anti-tumor activity via the regulation of CD8(+) T-cell polarization and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity. By the inhibition of GSK-3β, attenuated IDO expression and impaired JAK1/2-Stat signaling crucial for IDO expression were observed. Protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) activity and the interaction between JAK1/2 and Stat3, which are important for IDO expression, were also reduced by GSK-3β inhibition. CD8(+) T-cell proliferation mediated by OVA-pulsed DC was blocked by interferon (IFN)-γ-induced IDO expression via GSK-3β activity. Specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity mediated by OVA-pulsed DC against OVA-expressing EG7 thymoma cells but not OVA-nonexpressing EL4 thymoma cells was also attenuated by the expressed IDO via IFN-γ-induced activation of GSK-3β. Furthermore, tumor growth that was suppressed with OVA-pulsed DC vaccination was restored by IDO-expressing DC via IFN-γ-induced activation of GSK-3β in an OVA-expressing murine EG7 thymoma model. Taken together, DC-based immune response mediated by interferon-γ-induced IDO expression via GSK-3β activity not only regulates CD8(+) T-cell proliferation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity but also modulates OVA-pulsed DC vaccination against EG7 thymoma.

  8. Implantable micropump technologies for murine intracochlear infusions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D G; Waldron, M J; Frisina, R D; Borkholder, D A

    2010-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice.

  9. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  10. Murine Ileocolic Bowel Resection with Primary Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Troy; Borowiec, Anna; Dicken, Bryan; Fedorak, Richard; Madsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal resections are frequently required for treatment of diseases involving the gastrointestinal tract, with Crohn’s disease and colon cancer being two common examples. Despite the frequency of these procedures, a significant knowledge gap remains in describing the inherent effects of intestinal resection on host physiology and disease pathophysiology. This article provides detailed instructions for an ileocolic resection with primary end-to-end anastomosis in mice, as well as essential aspects of peri-operative care to maximize post-operative success. When followed closely, this procedure yields a 95% long-term survival rate, no failure to thrive, and minimizes post-operative complications of bowel obstruction and anastomotic leak. The technical challenges of performing the procedure in mice are a barrier to its wide spread use in research. The skills described in this article can be acquired without previous surgical experience. Once mastered, the murine ileocolic resection procedure will provide a reproducible tool for studying the effects of intestinal resection in models of human disease. PMID:25406841

  11. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release.

    PubMed

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-04-18

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements.

  12. Nuclear Nonhistone Proteins in Murine Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wikswo, Muriel A.; Mcguire, Joseph S.; Shansky, Janet E.; Boshes, Roger A.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear nonhistone proteins (NHP's) have been implicated as regulatory agents involved in controlling genetic expression. Utilizing murine melanoma cells, we describe a method for isolating and fractionating NHP's which greatly increases the yield of these proteins as well as the level of resolution required for detecting small differences in particular NHP's. Mouse melanoma cells were grown in medium labeled with [3H]leucine. Following 48 hr of incubation, the cells were harvested and nuclei isolated. The NHP's were extracted from the nuclei in a series of steps which yielded four major fractions: NHP1, NHP2, NHP3, NHP4. This method solubilized 80-90% of the protein from the nuclear homogenate. The NHP fractions were then separated on DEAE-cellulose columns in a series of salt steps increasing in concentration from 0.05 to 0.50 M NaCl, followed by steps of 2 M NaCl and 4 and 7 M guanidine-hydrochloride. The 40 NHP fractions eluted from these columns were further separated on polyacrylamide-SDS gels and ranged in molecular weight from 9000 to 110,000 daltons. Differences were observed in the electrophoretic pattern of each of these 40 fractions. The high resolution of these fractionation procedures greatly enhances the possibility of observing small changes in proteins which may play a role in gene regulation. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 5 PMID:997593

  13. Regulation of Murine Natural Killer Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Wilford; Huntington, Nicholas D.

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are effector lymphocytes of the innate immune system that are known for their ability to kill transformed and virus-infected cells. NK cells originate from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, and studies on mouse models have revealed that NK cell development is a complex, yet tightly regulated process, which is dependent on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The development of NK cells can be broadly categorized into two phases: lineage commitment and maturation. Efforts to better define the developmental framework of NK cells have led to the identification of several murine NK progenitor populations and mature NK cell subsets, each defined by a varied set of cell surface markers. Nevertheless, the relationship between some of these NK cell subsets remains to be determined. The classical approach to studying both NK cell development and function is to identify the transcription factors involved and elucidate the mechanistic action of each transcription factor. In this regard, recent studies have provided further insight into the mechanisms by which transcription factors, such as ID2, FOXO1, Kruppel-like factor 2, and GATA-binding protein 3 regulate various aspects of NK cell biology. It is also becoming evident that the biology of NK cells is not only transcriptionally regulated but also determined by epigenetic alterations and posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression by microRNAs. This review summarizes recent progress made in NK development, focusing primarily on transcriptional regulators and their mechanistic actions. PMID:28261203

  14. Murine cytomegalovirus infection of cultured mouse embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Y.; Naruse, I.

    1987-01-01

    Isolated mouse whole embryos of 7.5 days' gestation were infected with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and cultured in pure rat serum. Although the MCMV infection had little effect on the survival and development of the embryos during 3 days of cultivation, immunohistochemical analysis of their serial sections using monoclonal antibody showed MCMV-infected cells in various portions of the embryos. This monoclonal antibody, when tested with the use of infected cultured mouse fibroblasts, reacted with nuclear antigen within 2 hours after infection and also reacted with nuclear inclusions in the late phase of infection. The viral antigen-positive cells detected by the monoclonal antibody were present in almost all of the ectoplacental cone and the yolk sac and in about 82% of the embryos. In the embryos, antigen-positive cells were frequently observed in the epithelium of the digestive tracts, endothelial cells of the blood vessels, and the mesodermal cells. In some of the embryos, viral antigen-positive cells were clearly observed in a small percentage of the blood cells. These findings indicate that blood cells, in addition to cell migration during embryogenesis, may play an important role in transmission of infectious virus into the embryos. Mouse whole embryo culture infected with MCMV can provide a model for the study of cellular tropism related to congenital infection by cytomegalovirus. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:3034066

  15. Characterization of ozone disinfection of murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mi Young; Kim, Ju-Mi; Lee, Jung Eun; Ko, GwangPyo

    2010-02-01

    Despite the importance of human noroviruses (NoVs) in public health, little information concerning the effectiveness of ozone against NoVs is available. We determined the efficacy of ozone disinfection using murine norovirus (MNV) as a surrogate of human NoV. MNV in ozone demand-free buffer was exposed to a predetermined dose of ozone at two different pHs and temperatures. The virus remaining in the solution was analyzed by plaque assay, real-time TaqMan reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) (short template), and long-template conventional RT-PCR. Under all conditions, more than 99% of the MNV was inactivated by ozone at 1 mg/liter within 2 min. Both RT-PCR assays significantly underestimated the inactivation of MNV, compared with that measured by plaque assay. Our results indicate that NoV may be more resistant to ozone than has been previously reported. Nevertheless, proper ozone disinfection practices can be used to easily control its transmission in water.

  16. Quantitative Trait Loci for Murine Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J. M.; Routman, E. J.; Duarte, FAM.; van-Swinderen, B.; Cothran, K.; Perel, C.

    1996-01-01

    Body size is an archetypal quantitative trait with variation due to the segregation of many gene loci, each of relatively minor effect, and the environment. We examine the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on age-specific body weights and growth in the F(2) intercross of the LG/J and SM/J strains of inbred mice. Weekly weights (1-10 wk) and 75 microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 535 mice. Interval mapping was used to locate and measure the genotypic effects of QTLs on body weight and growth. QTL effects were detected on 16 of the 19 autosomes with several chromosomes carrying more than one QTL. The number of QTLs for age-specific weights varied from seven at 1 week to 17 at 10 wk. The QTLs were each of relatively minor, subequal effect. QTLs affecting early and late growth were generally distinct, mapping to different chromosomal locations indicating separate genetic and physiological systems for early and later murine growth. PMID:8846907

  17. The murine Sry gene encodes a nuclear transcriptional activator

    SciTech Connect

    Dubin, R.A.; Ostrer, H.

    1994-09-01

    The Sry gene functions as a genetic switch in gonadal ridge initiating testis determination. The murine Sry and human SRY open reading frames (ORF) share a conserved 79 amino acid motif, the HMG-box, that binds DNA. Outside this region the two genes share no additional homology. These studies were undertaken to determine whether the Sry/SRY genes encode nuclear transcriptional regulators. As judged by the accumulation of lacZ-SRY hybrid proteins in the nucleus, both the human and murine SRY ORFs contain a nuclear localization signal. The murine Sry HMG-box selectively binds the sequence NACAAT in vitro when presented with a random pool of oligonucleotides and binds AACAAT with the highest affinity. The murine Sry ORF, when expressed in HeLa cells, activates transcription of a reporter gene containing multiple copies of the AACAAT binding site. Activation was observed for a GAL4-responsive gene when the murine Sry ORF was linked to the DNA-binding domain of GAL4. Using this system, the activation function was mapped to a C-terminal glutamine/histidine-rich domain. In addition, LexA-Sry fusion genes activated a LexA-responsive gene in yeast. In contrast, a GAL4-human SRY fusion gene did not cause transcriptional activation. These studies suggest that both the human and mouse SRY ORFs encode nuclear, DNA-binding proteins, and that the mouse Sry ORF can function as a transcriptional activator with separable DNA-binding and activator domains.

  18. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  19. Murine bladder wall biomechanics following partial bladder obstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph; Drzewiecki, Beth A; Merryman, W David; Pope, John C

    2013-10-18

    Evaluation of bladder wall mechanical behavior is important in understanding the functional changes that occur in response to pathologic processes such as partial bladder outlet obstruction (pBOO). In the murine model, the traditional approach of cystometry to describe bladder compliance can prove difficult secondary to small bladder capacity and surgical exposure of the bladder. Here, we explore an alternative technique to characterize murine mechanical properties by applying biaxial mechanical stretch to murine bladders that had undergone pBOO. 5-6 week old female C57/Bl6 mice were ovariectomized and subjected to pBOO via an open surgical urethral ligation and sacrificed after 4 weeks (n=12). Age matched controls (n=6) were also analyzed. Bladders were separated based on phenotype of fibrotic (n=6) or distended (n=6) at the time of harvest. Biaxial testing was performed in modified Kreb's solution at 37°C. Tissue was preconditioned to 10 cycles and mechanical response was evaluated by comparing axial strain at 50kPa. The normal murine bladders exhibited anisotropy and were stiffer in the longitudinal direction. All mice showed a loss of anisotropy after 4 weeks of pBOO. The two phenotypes observed after pBOO, fibrotic and distended, exhibited less and more extensibility, respectively. These proof-of-principle data demonstrate that pBOO creates quantifiable changes in the mechanics of the murine bladder that can be effectively quantified with biaxial testing.

  20. Optimized flow cytometry isolation of murine spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gaysinskaya, Valeriya; Soh, Ina Y.; van der Heijden, Godfried W.; Bortvin, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Meiotic prophase I (MPI), is an initial stage of meiosis characterized by intricate homologous chromosome interactions, synapsis and DNA recombination. These processes depend on the complex, but poorly understood early MPI events of homologous chromosome search, alignment and pairing. Detailed molecular investigation of these early events requires isolation of individual MPI substages. Enrichment for Pachytene (P) and Diplotene (D) substages of late MPI was previously accomplished using flow cytometry. However, separation of early MPI spermatocytes, specifically, of Leptotene (L) and Zygotene (Z) substages, has been a challenge due to these cells’ similar characteristics. In this report, we describe an optimized Hoechst-33342 (Hoechst)-based flow cytometry approach for isolating individual MPI populations from adult murine testis. We get significant enrichment for individual L and Z spermatocytes, previously inseparable from each other, and optimize the isolation of other MPI substages. Our flow cytometry approach is a combination of three optimized strategies. The first is optimization of testis dissociation protocol that yields more consistent and reproducible testicular single cell suspension. The second involves optimization of flow cytometric gating protocol where a critical addition to the standard protocol for cell discrimination based on Hoechst fluorescence, involves a back-gating technique based on light scattering parameters. This step specifies selection of individual MPI substages. The third, is an addition of DNA content restriction to the gating protocol to minimize contamination from non-meiotic cells. Finally, we confirm significant enrichment of high-purity Preleptotene (PreL), L, Z, P and D MPI spermatocytes using stage-specific marker distribution. The technique will facilitate understanding of the molecular events underlying meiotic prophase I. PMID:24664803

  1. Neuropharmacological properties of farnesol in Murine model

    PubMed Central

    Shahnouri, M.; Abouhosseini Tabari, M.; Araghi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Research on new compounds of therapeutic value for behavioral disorders has progressed recently. Several studies have reported neuropharmacological activities of plant derived terpenes. Farnesol is a sesquiterpene whose most popular source is fruits but the anxiolytic activity for farnesol is still unknown. The present study was conducted on 32 male Swiss Albino mice (8 in each group) to evaluate the neuropharmacological properties of farnesol and its effects on plasma cortisol levels. Farnesol was administered intraperitoneally at single doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg, while diazepam 2 mg/kg was used as standard anxiolytic. Thirty minutes after injections, open field test (OFT), elevated plus maze (EPM), a forced swimming test (FST), and a hot plate test (HPT) were performed for evaluation of anxiety-like behavior, depression and nociception. In OFT, farnesol at the dose of 100 mg/kg led to significant decrease in locomotor activity (P<0.01). In EPM, only farnesol 100 mg/kg led to significant increase in the number of entries to the open arms and the time spent in open arms (P<0.01). Increase in immobility time in FST was seen in farnesol 50 and 100 mg/kg (P<0.001). Farnesol 100 mg/kg exerts significant prolongation in the latency of responses to noxious heat stimuli in HPT. Like diazepam, farnesol decreased plasma levels of cortisol. Results revealed that farnesol had anxiolytic, anti-nociceptive and depressant effects in murine models. The present study provides pharmacological evidence supporting the use of farnesol as a sedative for anxiety disorders. PMID:28224010

  2. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Wagner, Willi L.; Bennett, Robert D.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D.; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends (“E”). Septal retraction, observed in 20–30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  3. Docosahexaenoic acid modifies the clustering and size of lipid rafts and the lateral organization and surface expression of MHC class I of EL4 cells.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Salameh, Muhammad; Carraway, Kristen

    2009-09-01

    An emerging molecular mechanism by which docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) exerts its effects is modification of lipid raft organization. The biophysical model, based on studies with liposomes, shows that DHA avoids lipid rafts because of steric incompatibility between DHA and cholesterol. The model predicts that DHA does not directly modify rafts; rather, it incorporates into nonrafts to modify the lateral organization and/or conformation of membrane proteins, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. Here, we tested predictions of the model at a cellular level by incorporating oleic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and DHA, compared with a bovine serum albumin (BSA) control, into the membranes of EL4 cells. Quantitative microscopy showed that DHA, but not EPA, treatment, relative to the BSA control diminished lipid raft clustering and increased their size. Approximately 30% of DHA was incorporated directly into rafts without changing the distribution of cholesterol between rafts and nonrafts. Quantification of fluorescence colocalization images showed that DHA selectively altered MHC class I lateral organization by increasing the fraction of the nonraft protein into rafts compared with BSA. Both DHA and EPA treatments increased antibody binding to MHC class I compared with BSA. Antibody titration showed that DHA and EPA did not change MHC I conformation but increased total surface levels relative to BSA. Taken together, our findings are not in agreement with the biophysical model. Therefore, we propose a model that reconciles contradictory viewpoints from biophysical and cellular studies to explain how DHA modifies lipid rafts on several length scales. Our study supports the notion that rafts are an important target of DHA's mode of action.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the murine cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Akki, Ashwin; Gupta, Ashish; Weiss, Robert G

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful and reliable tool to noninvasively study the cardiovascular system in clinical practice. Because transgenic mouse models have assumed a critical role in cardiovascular research, technological advances in MRI have been extended to mice over the last decade. These have provided critical insights into cardiac and vascular morphology, function, and physiology/pathophysiology in many murine models of heart disease. Furthermore, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has allowed the nondestructive study of myocardial metabolism in both isolated hearts and in intact mice. This article reviews the current techniques and important pathophysiological insights from the application of MRI/MRS technology to murine models of cardiovascular disease.

  5. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen.

    PubMed

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K H; O'Neill, Helen C

    2015-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed "L-DC" in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)MHCII(-)Ly6C(-)Ly6G(-) subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)MHCII(-)Ly6C(lo)Ly6G(-) cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6C(lo) and Ly6C(hi) monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)MHCII(-)Ly6C(-)Ly6G(-) cells, which are CD43(+), Siglec-F(-) and CD115(-). Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types.

  6. Organization of the murine Cd22 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Che-Leung; Torres, R.M.; Sundeberg, H.A.; Clark, E.A ); Parkhouse, R.M.E. ); Brannan, C.I.; Copeland, N.G.; Jenkins, N.A. )

    1993-07-01

    Murine CD22 (mCD22) is a B cell-associated adhesion protein with seven extracellular Ig-like domains that has 62% amino acid identify to its human homologue. Southern analysis on genomic DNA isolated from tissues and cell lines from several mouse strains using mCD22 cDNA demonstrated that the Cd22 locus encoding mCD22 is a single copy gene of [le]30 kb. Digestion of genomic DNA preparations with four restriction endonucleases revealed the presence of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in BALB/c, C57BL/6, and C3H strains vs DBA/2j, NZB, and NZC strains, suggesting the presence of two or more Cd22 alleles. Using a mCD22 cDNA clone derived from the BALB/c strain, the authors isolated genomic clones from a DBA/2 genomic library that contained all the exons necessary to encode the full length mCD22 cDNA. Fifteen exons, including exon 3 that encodes the translation start codon, were identified. Each extracellular Ig-like domain of mCD22 is encoded by a single exon. A comparison between the nucleotide sequences of the BALB/c CD22 cDNA and the exons of the DBA/2j CD22 genomic clones revealed an 18-nucleotide deletion in exon 4 (encoding the most distal Ig-like domain 1 of mCD22) of the DBA/2j genomic sequence in addition to a number of substitutions, insertions, and deletions in other exons. These nucleotide differences were also present in a cDNA clone isolated from total RNA of LPS-activated DBA/2j splenocytes mosome 7, a region sytenic to human chromosome 19q, close to the previously reported loci, Lyb-8 and Mag (a homologue of Cd22). An antibody (CY34) against the Lyb-8.2 B cell marker reacted with a BHK transfectant expressing the full length mCd22 cDNA, thus demonstrating that Lyb-8 and Cd22 loci are identical. Furthermore, a rat anti-mCD22 mAb, NIM-R6, bound to slgM[sup +] DBA/2j B cells, confirming the expression of a CD22 protein by the Cd22[sup a]/lyb-8[sup a] allele. 63 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  8. Murine Sirt3 protein isoforms have variable half-lives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sirt3 is a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase mainly localized in mitochondria. Recent studies indicate that the murine Sirt3 gene expresses different transcript variants resulting in three possible Sirt3 protein isoforms with variable lengths at the N-terminus: M1 (aa 1-334), M2 (aa 15-334), and M3...

  9. Expression of biologically active murine interleukin-18 in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Feizollahzadeh, Sadegh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Rahimmanesh, Ilnaz; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, Mazdak; Andalib, Alireza; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas

    2016-11-01

    The food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis is increasingly used for heterologous protein expression in therapeutic and industrial applications. The ability of L. lactis to secrete biologically active cytokines may be used for the generation of therapeutic cytokines. Interleukin (IL)-18 enhances the immune response, especially on mucosal surfaces, emphasizing its therapeutic potential. However, it is produced as an inactive precursor and has to be enzymatically cleaved for maturation. We genetically manipulated L. lactis to secrete murine IL-18. The mature murine IL-18 gene was inserted downstream of a nisin promoter in pNZ8149 plasmid and the construct was used to transform L. lactis NZ3900. The transformants were selected on Elliker agar and confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The expression and secretion of IL-18 protein was verified by SDS-PAGE, western blotting and ELISA. The biological activity of recombinant IL-18 was determined by its ability to induce interferon (IFN)-γ production in L. lactis co-cultured with murine splenic T cells. The amounts of IL-18 in bacterial lysates and supernatants were 3-4 μg mL(-1) and 0.6-0.7 ng mL(-1), respectively. The successfully generated L. lactis strain that expressed biologically active murine IL-18 can be used to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of IL-18 on mucosal surfaces.

  10. Biochemical characterization of murine glycosylation-inhibiting factor

    SciTech Connect

    Tagaya, Yutaka; Mori, Akio; Ishizaka, Kimishige )

    1991-10-15

    The glycosylation-inhibiting factor (GIF) was isolated from serum-free culture supernatants of the murine T-cell hybridoma, 231F1 cells, by using an immunosorbent coupled with the monoclonal anti-lipomodulin antibody. The isolated lymphokine is a 14-kDa protein with a pI of 5.5, as determined by SDS/PAGE and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Fractionation of a mixture of radiolabeled GIF with culture supernatant of the 231F1 cells on ion-exchange and revere-phase columns and by gel filtration demonstrated homogeneity of the 14-kDa GIF and confirmed that the bioactivity of GIF and the antigenic determinant recognized by the monoclonal anti-GIF antibody are associated with the 14-kDa protein. The {sup 125}II-labeled 14-kDa protein binds to the murine T-cell hybridoma 12H5 cells, which have been used for bioassay of GIF, and the murine B-cell line A20.3 cells, but the binding of the protein to resting murine splenic lymphocytes was barely detectable. Under the same experimental conditions, binding of the {sup 125}I-labeled recombinant human lipocortin I to the 12H5 cells was not detectable. In contrast, the {sup 125}I labeled lipocortin, but not the 14-kDa GIF, bound to phosphatidylserine vesicles. The results indicate that GIF does not belong to the anexin family.

  11. Current Translational Research and Murine Models For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Mutations in the DMD gene result in the absence of dystrophin, a protein required for muscle strength and stability. Currently, there is no cure for DMD. Since murine models are relatively easy to genetically manipulate, cost effective, and easily reproducible due to their short generation time, they have helped to elucidate the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency and to assess therapies for treating DMD. Recently, several murine models have been developed by our group and others to be more representative of the human DMD mutation types and phenotypes. For instance, mdx mice on a DBA/2 genetic background, developed by Fukada et al., have lower regenerative capacity and exhibit very severe phenotype. Cmah-deficient mdx mice display an accelerated disease onset and severe cardiac phenotype due to differences in glycosylation between humans and mice. Other novel murine models include mdx52, which harbors a deletion mutation in exon 52, a hot spot region in humans, and dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), which displays a severe dystrophic phenotype due the absence of utrophin, a dystrophin homolog. This paper reviews the pathological manifestations and recent therapeutic developments in murine models of DMD such as standard mdx (C57BL/10), mdx on C57BL/6 background (C57BL/6-mdx), mdx52, dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), mdxβgeo, Dmd-null, humanized DMD (hDMD), mdx on DBA/2 background (DBA/2-mdx), Cmah-mdx, and mdx/mTRKO murine models. PMID:27854202

  12. Deferasirox shows in vitro and in vivo antileukemic effects on murine leukemic cell lines regardless of iron status.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Hyoung; Jang, Pil Sang; Chung, Nack Gyun; Cho, Bin; Jeong, Dae Chul; Kim, Hack Ki

    2013-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown the antiproliferative effect of iron chelating agents (ICAs), which have been used traditionally in patients with secondary iron overload (SIO). Because the in vivo model for these studies has been animals with normal iron status, the antileukemic effect of ICAs in the SIO condition has not been determined clearly. We investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of ICAs in murine leukemic cell lines regarding the iron status. The viability of both EL4 cells and L1210 cells incubated with either deferoxamine (DFO) or deferasirox (DFX) decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. This effect was most prominent in L1210 cells treated with DFX. The viability of L1210 cells incubated with both ICAs did not change regardless of the presence of ferric chloride. The percentage of apoptosis in L1210 cells treated with DFO or DFX increased in a concentration-dependent manner; however, the expression of Fas showed no significant change. The non-SIO mice and SIO mice bearing L1210 cells showed longer survival than other groups when treated with DFX, whereas the SIO mice treated with DFO showed shorter survival than the control group. The tumor was significantly smaller in the SIO mice treated with DFX or DFO compared with the control group. The iron content of the liver or the tumor in SIO mice decreased after ICA treatment. This study indicates an antileukemic effect of DFX regardless of iron status and suggests that the use of DFX has a survival benefit for SIO leukemia murine model in terms of iron chelation and antileukemic therapy.

  13. Characterization of the murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator system.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, H R; Van Hoef, B; Collen, D

    1996-11-01

    The murine plasminogen/urokinase-type plasminogen-activator (u-PA) system was studied using purified proteins, plasma and endothelioma cells. Recombinant murine u-PA was obtained as a single-chain molecule of 45 kDa which was converted to two-chain u-PA with plasmin by cleavage of the Lys159-Ile160 peptide bond. Murine plasminogen, purified from plasma as a single-chain protein of 95 kDa, was resistant to quantitative activation with murine recombinant two-chain u-PA: only 15% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C was obtained in mixtures of 1 microM plasminogen and 5 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas quantitative activation was observed in the autologous human system. Addition of 6-aminohexanoic acid to native murine plasminogen resulted in quantitative activation within 1 h. In murine plasma in vitro, plasminogen was also resistant to quantitative activation with u-PA (50% activation within 1 h at 37 degrees C with 50 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA, whereas in the human system nearly quantitative activation was obtained). Murine plasma clots submerged in murine plasma were resistant to lysis with u-PA; < or = 2% clot lysis in 2 h was obtained with 80 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous murine system whereas 50% clot lysis in 2 h required only 15 nM recombinant two-chain u-PA in the autologous human system. Saturable binding of murine recombinant two-chain u-PA was observed to murine endothelioma cells that are genetically deficient in u-PA (u-PA-/- End cells). Binding was characterized by a Kd of 5.5 nM and 800000 binding sites/cell. However, u-PA-/- End cells did not significantly stimulate the activation rate of murine plasminogen by murine recombinant two-chain u-PA and did not enhance the plasmin-mediated conversion rate of murine recombinant single-chain u-PA to its two-chain derivative. Murine recombinant two-chain u-PA bound to murine endothelioma cells was quantitatively inhibited by murine plasminogen-activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Thus

  14. [Comparison of the Masaoka-Koga and The IASLC/ITMIG Proposal for The TNM 
Staging Systems Based on the Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART)
Retrospective Database].

    PubMed

    Liang, Guanghui; Gu, Zhitao; Li, Yin; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Chen, Ke-Neng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Pang, Liewen; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan; Fang, Wentao

    2016-07-20

    背景与目的 使用中国胸腺协作组(Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas, ChART)回顾性数据,比较Masaoka-Koga分期系统和国际肺癌协会(International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, IASLC)/国际胸腺肿瘤协作组(International Thymic Malignancies Interest Group, ITMIG)推荐的新TNM分期对胸腺肿瘤预后的预测作用。方法 我们回顾分析了1992年-2012年ChART数据库共2,370例患者。其中1,198例信息完整的患者被纳入研究,按照TNM及Masaoka-Koga分期系统进行分期,并进行生存分析。评估指标为R0患者的累积复发率(cumulative incidence of recurrence, CIR)以及患者总生存率(overall survival, OS)。对比分析Masaoka-Koga分期系统和新的TNM分期系统。结果 根据Masaoka-Koga分期系统,不同分期CIR差异具有统计学意义,其中I期和II期或者II期和III期之间累积复发率无差异,IV期的患者具有更高的复发率,预后最差。根据新的TNM分期系统,T1a患者的累积复发率低于其他患者(P<0.05),T1a患者总生存高于T1b患者(P=0.004),T4患者总生存率差于其它患者。N(+)患者累及复发率及总生存率差于N0患者。在M0患者与M1b患者之间总体累积复发率和总体生存率差异具有统计学意义,但在M0和M1b患者之间二者无差异。I期-IIIa期与IIIb 期-IVb期患者之间总生存率具有差异,然而IIIb期与IVb期患者之间总生存率无差异。结论 与Masaoka-Koga分期相比,IASLC/ITMIG TNM分期系统不仅描述了肿瘤侵犯的范围,也提供了有关淋巴结转移和肿瘤播散的情况。使用新的TNM分期系统进行前瞻性研究有助于更好的对胸腺肿瘤分组,预测预后,并指导治疗。.

  15. Transcriptional targets of Foxd3 in murine ES cells.

    PubMed

    Plank, Jennifer L; Suflita, Michael T; Galindo, Cristi L; Labosky, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding gene regulatory networks controlling properties of pluripotent stem cells will facilitate development of stem cell-based therapies. The transcription factor Foxd3 is critical for maintenance of self-renewal, survival, and pluripotency in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Using a conditional deletion of Foxd3 followed by gene expression analyses, we demonstrate that genes required for several developmental processes including embryonic organ development, epithelium development, and epithelial differentiation were misregulated in the absence of Foxd3. Additionally, we identified 6 novel targets of Foxd3 (Sox4, Safb, Sox15, Fosb, Pmaip1 and Smarcd3). Finally, we present data suggesting that Foxd3 functions upstream of genes required for skeletal muscle development. Together, this work provides further evidence that Foxd3 is a critical regulator of murine development through the regulation of lineage specific differentiation.

  16. Effects of the murine skull in optoacoustic brain microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great promise behind the recent introduction of optoacoustic technology into the arsenal of small-animal neuroimaging methods, a variety of acoustic and light-related effects introduced by adult murine skull severely compromise the performance of optoacoustics in transcranial imaging. As a result, high-resolution noninvasive optoacoustic microscopy studies are still limited to a thin layer of pial microvasculature, which can be effectively resolved by tight focusing of the excitation light. We examined a range of distortions introduced by an adult murine skull in transcranial optoacoustic imaging under both acoustically- and optically-determined resolution scenarios. It is shown that strong low-pass filtering characteristics of the skull may significantly deteriorate the achievable spatial resolution in deep brain imaging where no light focusing is possible. While only brain vasculature with a diameter larger than 60 µm was effectively resolved via transcranial measurements with acoustic resolution, significant improvements are seen through cranial windows and thinned skull experiments.

  17. Practical Murine Hematopathology: A Comparative Review and Implications for Research

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Karyn E; Mikkola, Amy M; Stepanek, Aaron M; Vernet, Andyna; Hall, Christopher D; Sun, Chia C; Yildirim, Eda; Staropoli, John F; Lee, Jeannie T; Brown, Diane E

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic parameters are important markers of disease in human and veterinary medicine. Biomedical research has benefited from mouse models that recapitulate such disease, thus expanding knowledge of pathogenetic mechanisms and investigative therapies that translate across species. Mice in health have many notable hematologic differences from humans and other veterinary species, including smaller erythrocytes, higher percentage of circulating reticulocytes or polychromasia, lower peripheral blood neutrophil and higher peripheral blood and bone marrow lymphocyte percentages, variable leukocyte morphologies, physiologic splenic hematopoiesis and iron storage, and more numerous and shorter-lived erythrocytes and platelets. For accurate and complete hematologic analyses of disease and response to investigative therapeutic interventions, these differences and the unique features of murine hematopathology must be understood. Here we review murine hematology and hematopathology for practical application to translational investigation. PMID:25926395

  18. Increased photosensitivity to near-ultraviolet light in murine SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, D.T.; Borel, Y.

    1984-02-01

    The authors investigated whether there is increased susceptibility to near-UVL in murine SLE. Cultured spleen cells from either strain of mice with lupus disease or conventional strains of mice were exposed to different UVL fractions in vitro. The effect of DNA synthesis, release, and repair was examined. DNA synthesis and release was measured as percent of (/sup 3/H)thymidine (dT) uptake into either total acid-precipitable radioactive material of cell sediment plus supernatant, or that of the medium alone, whereas hydroxyurea-resistant dT incorporation represented DNA repair. The data indicate that all SLE strains, in contrast to all non-SLE strains, show increased DNA synthesis and release after UV-A exposure. In addition, all murine SLE strains demonstrate increased susceptibility to induction of DNA damage by UV-A. The significance of these observations in relation to the clinical activity of SLE after sunlight exposure is discussed.

  19. Murine immunization by cesium-137 irradiation attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Cruess, D.F.

    1984-06-01

    Cesium-137, becoming a more readily available ionizing gamma radiation source for laboratory use, was shown to effectively attenuate Schistosoma mansoni cercariae for vaccine production. In parallel comparison studies with the murine model, cesium-137 attenuated cercariae consistently afforded better protection than did the cobalt-60 prepared vaccine. Dose-response data indicated that the optimal total irradiation with cesium-137 was between 45 and 50 Krad.

  20. Osteopontin Is Upregulated in Human and Murine Acute Schistosomiasis Mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Thiago Almeida; Syn, Wing-Kin; Amâncio, Frederico Figueiredo; Cunha, Pedro Henrique Diniz; Caporali, Julia Fonseca Morais; Trindade, Guilherme Vaz de Melo; Santos, Elisângela Trindade; Souza, Márcia Maria; Andrade, Zilton Araújo; Witek, Rafal P; Secor, William Evan; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Background Symptomatic acute schistosomiasis mansoni is a systemic hypersensitivity reaction against the migrating schistosomula and mature eggs after a primary infection. The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of acute schistosomiasis are not fully elucidated. Osteopontin has been implicated in granulomatous reactions and in acute hepatic injury. Our aims were to evaluate if osteopontin plays a role in acute Schistosoma mansoni infection in both human and experimentally infected mice and if circulating OPN levels could be a novel biomarker of this infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Serum/plasma osteopontin levels were measured by ELISA in patients with acute (n = 28), hepatointestinal (n = 26), hepatosplenic (n = 39) schistosomiasis and in uninfected controls (n = 21). Liver osteopontin was assessed by immunohistochemistry in needle biopsies of 5 patients. Sera and hepatic osteopontin were quantified in the murine model of schistosomiasis mansoni during acute (7 and 8 weeks post infection, n = 10) and chronic (30 weeks post infection, n = 8) phase. Circulating osteopontin levels are increased in patients with acute schistosomiasis (p = 0.0001). The highest levels of OPN were observed during the peak of clinical symptoms (7–11 weeks post infection), returning to baseline level once the granulomas were modulated (>12 weeks post infection). The plasma levels in acute schistosomiasis were even higher than in hepatosplenic patients. The murine model mirrored the human disease. Macrophages were the major source of OPN in human and murine acute schistosomiasis, while the ductular reaction maintains OPN production in hepatosplenic disease. Soluble egg antigens from S. mansoni induced OPN expression in primary human kupffer cells. Conclusions/Significance S. mansoni egg antigens induce the production of OPN by macrophages in the necrotic-exudative granulomas characteristic of acute schistosomiasis mansoni. Circulating OPN levels are upregulated in human and

  1. A Case of Laboratory-Acquired Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jun Hee; Cho, Joo Young; Kim, Young Sun; Choi, Doo Hong; Lee, Nam Min; Choe, Kang Won; Chang, Woo Hyun

    1990-01-01

    We encountered a 32-year-old Korean woman who developed murine typhus in a laboratory. She worked as a technician in a laboratory for rickettsial disease. Immunofluorescence test with rickettsial antigen (R. typhi) was positive at 1 : 320 on admission and 1 : 1280 after 4 weeks. A dose of 200 mg of doxycycline for 7 days proved to be effective for her condition. PMID:2098096

  2. Miniature Microwave Applicator for Murine Bladder Hyperthermia Studies

    PubMed Central

    Salahi, Sara; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Rodrigues, Dario B.; Etienne, Wiguins; Landon, Chelsea D.; Inman, Brant A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Novel combinations of heat with chemotherapeutic agents are often studied in murine tumor models. Currently, no device exists to selectively heat small tumors at depth in mice. In this project, we modelled, built and tested a miniature microwave heat applicator, the physical dimensions of which can be scaled to adjust the volume and depth of heating to focus on the tumor volume. Of particular interest is a device that can selectively heat murine bladder. Materials and Methods Using Avizo® segmentation software, we created a numerical mouse model based on micro-MRI scan data. The model was imported into HFSS™ simulation software and parametric studies were performed to optimize the dimensions of a water-loaded circular waveguide for selective power deposition inside a 0.15ml bladder. A working prototype was constructed operating at 2.45GHz. Heating performance was characterized by mapping fiber-optic temperature sensors along catheters inserted at depths of 0-1mm (subcutaneous), 2-3mm (vaginal), and 4-5mm (rectal) below the abdominal wall, with the mid-depth catheter adjacent to the bladder. Core temperature was monitored orally. Results Thermal measurements confirm the simulations which demonstrate that this applicator can provide local heating at depth in small animals. Measured temperatures in murine pelvis show well-localized bladder heating to 42-43°C while maintaining normothermic skin and core temperatures. Conclusions Simulation techniques facilitate the design optimization of microwave antennas for use in pre-clinical applications such as localized tumor heating in small animals. Laboratory measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of a new miniature water-coupled microwave applicator for localized heating of murine bladder. PMID:22690856

  3. Stages of Thymoma and Thymic Carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary ...

  4. First steps to define murine amniotic fluid stem cell microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, E.; Piccoli, M.; Franzin, C.; Spiro, G.; Donà, S.; Dedja, A.; Schiavi, F.; Taschin, E.; Bonaldo, P.; Braghetta, P.; De Coppi, P.; Pozzobon, M.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell niche refers to the microenvironment where stem cells reside in living organisms. Several elements define the niche and regulate stem cell characteristics, such as stromal support cells, gap junctions, soluble factors, extracellular matrix proteins, blood vessels and neural inputs. In the last years, different studies demonstrated the presence of cKit+ cells in human and murine amniotic fluid, which have been defined as amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells. Firstly, we characterized the murine cKit+ cells present both in the amniotic fluid and in the amnion. Secondly, to analyze the AFS cell microenvironment, we injected murine YFP+ embryonic stem cells (ESC) into the amniotic fluid of E13.5 wild type embryos. Four days after transplantation we found that YFP+ sorted cells maintained the expression of pluripotency markers and that ESC adherent to the amnion were more similar to original ESC in respect to those isolated from the amniotic fluid. Moreover, cytokines evaluation and oxygen concentration analysis revealed in this microenvironment the presence of factors that are considered key regulators in stem cell niches. This is the first indication that AFS cells reside in a microenvironment that possess specific characteristics able to maintain stemness of resident and exogenous stem cells. PMID:27845396

  5. Moloney murine leukemia virus activates NF-kappa B.

    PubMed Central

    Pak, J; Faller, D V

    1996-01-01

    Nonacutely transforming retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV), differ from transforming viruses in their mechanisms of tumor induction. While the transforming viruses cause tumors by transduction of oncogenes, the leukemia retroviruses, lacking oncogenes, employ other mechanisms, including promoter insertion and enhancer activation. Although these two mechanisms occur in many tumors induced by leukemia viruses, a substantial proportion of such tumors do not show site-specific proviral insertions. Thus, other, unidentified virus-driven mechanisms may participate in tumorigenesis. In these studies, we show that infection of cells by M-MuLV activates expression of Rel family transcription factors. In murine cells chronically infected with M-MuLV, gel shift analyses with kappaB DNA-binding motifs from the murine immunoglobulin kappa light chain enhancer demonstrated induction of at least two distinct kappaB enhancer-binding complexes. Supershifting and immunoblotting analyses defined p50, p52, RelB, and c-Rel subunits as constituents of these virus-induced protein complexes. Transient transfections performed with kappaB-dependent reporter plasmids showed transcriptional activation in M-MuLV-infected cells relative to uninfected cells. Induction of Rel/NF-kappaB transcription factor activity by M-MuLV infection may prove relevant to the mechanism of M-MuLV-induced leukemia. PMID:8648762

  6. Evaluation of a Murine Single-Blood-Injection SAH Model

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Clemens; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Schneider, Toni; Hänggi, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) are poorly understood and continue to be a matter of debate. A valid murine SAH injection model is not yet available but would be the prerequisite for further transgenic studies assessing the mechanisms following SAH. Using the murine single injection model, we examined the effects of SAH on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the somatosensory (S1) and cerebellar cortex, neuro-behavioural and morphological integrity and changes in quantitative electrocorticographic and electrocardiographic parameters. Micro CT imaging verified successful blood delivery into the cisterna magna. An acute impairment of rCBF was observed immediately after injection in the SAH and after 6, 12 and 24 hours in the S1 and 6 and 12 hours after SAH in the cerebellum. Injection of blood into the foramen magnum reduced telemetric recorded total ECoG power by an average of 65%. Spectral analysis of ECoGs revealed significantly increased absolute delta power, i.e., slowing, cortical depolarisations and changes in ripples and fast ripple oscillations 12 hours and 24 hours after SAH. Therefore, murine single-blood-injection SAH model is suitable for pathophysiological and further molecular analysis following SAH. PMID:25545775

  7. Cloning and characterization of a murine SIL gene

    SciTech Connect

    Collazo-Garcia, N.; Scherer, P.; Aplan, P.D.

    1995-12-10

    The human SIL gene is disrupted by a site-specific interstitial deletion in 25% of children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since transcriptionally active genes are prone to recombination events, the recurrent nature of this lesion suggests that the SIL gene product is transcriptionally active in the cell type that undergoes this interstitial deletion and that the SIL gene product may play a role in normal lymphoid development. To facilitate studies of SIL gene function, we have cloned and characterized a murine SIL gene. The predicted murine SIL protein is 75% identical to the human gene, with good homology throughout the open reading frame. An in vitro translated SIL cDNA generated a protein slightly larger than the predicted 139-kDa protein. Although a prior report detected SIL mRNA expression exclusively in hematopoietic tissues, a sensitive RT-PCR assay demonstrated SIL expression to be ubiquitous, detectable in all tissues examined. Since the RT-PCR assay suggested that SIL mRNA expression was higher in rapidly proliferating tissues, we assayed SIL mRNA expression using a murine erythroleukemia model of terminal differentiation and found it to be dramatically decreased in conjunction with terminal differentiation. These studies demonstrate that the human SIL gene product is quite well conserved in rodents and suggest that the SIL gene product may play a role in cell proliferation. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD.

  9. Molecular analysis of fiber type-specific expression of murine myostatin promoter.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Mônica Senna; Thomas, Mark; Forbes, Davanea; Watson, Trevor; Kambadur, Ravi; Sharma, Mridula

    2004-10-01

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of muscle growth, and absence of the functional myostatin protein leads to the heavy muscle phenotype in both mouse and cattle. Although the role of myostatin in controlling muscle mass is established, little is known of the mechanisms regulating the expression of the myostatin gene. In this study, we have characterized the murine myostatin promoter in vivo. Various constructs of the murine myostatin promoter were injected into the quadriceps muscle of mice, and the reporter luciferase activity was analyzed. The results indicate that of the seven E-boxes present in the 2.5-kb fragment of the murine myostatin promoter, the E5 E-box plays an important role in the regulation of promoter activity in vivo. Furthermore, the in vitro studies demonstrated that MyoD preferentially binds and upregulates the murine myostatin promoter activity. We also analyzed the activity of the bovine and murine promoters in murine skeletal muscle and showed that, despite displaying comparable levels of activity in murine myoblast cultures, bovine myostatin promoter activity is much weaker than murine myostatin promoter in mice. Finally, we demonstrate that in vivo, the 2.5-kb region of the murine myostatin promoter is sufficient to drive the activity of the reporter gene in a fiber type-specific manner.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of murine p75-Fc fusion protein and MP6-XT22 anti-murine TNF-alpha mAb in mice.

    PubMed

    Filler, Scott G; Solis, Norma V; Guo, Jane; Doellgast, George; Ruiz-Garcia, Ana; Pan, Wei-Jian

    2007-05-01

    Immunologic limitations make it difficult to study the pharmacokinetic effects of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers in murine models. To counter this, we have studied the pharmacokinetics in mice of two murine analogs of human TNF blockers, a murine p75-FC fusion protein (analogous to etanercept), and the rat MP6-XT22 anti-murine TNF mAb (analogous to infliximab). We analyzed the pharmacokinetics of the murine p75-Fc protein and MP6-XT22 antibody in mice that were uninfected and in mice with disseminated candidiasis in order to confirm dosing strategies and interpret future studies evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of these agents in mice. We propose that, while conducting safety or efficacy studies in murine disease models, it is reasonable to administer the murine p75-Fc protein to mice at <10 mg/kg every 4-5 days, and the MP6-XT22 antibody at 10-20 mg/kg every 4-5 days.

  11. Cloning and expression analysis of the murine lymphotoxin beta gene.

    PubMed Central

    Pokholok, D K; Maroulakou, I G; Kuprash, D V; Alimzhanov, M B; Kozlov, S V; Novobrantseva, T I; Turetskaya, R L; Green, J E; Nedospasov, S A

    1995-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and soluble lymphotoxin (LT) (also called LT-alpha or TNF-beta) are cytokines with similar biological activities that are encoded by related and closely linked genes. TNF-alpha, a mediator of the inflammatory response, exists in soluble and transmembrane forms. LT-alpha can be secreted or retained at the cell surface by binding to a 33-kDa transmembrane subunit, LT-beta. The recently cloned human LT-beta gene encodes another TNF family member and is linked to the TNF/LT locus within the major histocompatibility complex locus. The cell surface LT is a heterotrimer consisting of LT-alpha and LT-beta, whose physiological function is not yet clearly defined. We now report the sequence analysis of the genomic region and cDNA of murine LT-beta gene, which is closely associated with the TNF-alpha and LT-alpha genes within the murine major histocompatibility complex locus. Unlike the TNF-alpha, LT-alpha, and human LT-beta genes, which contain four exons, the murine LT-beta contains three exons and encodes a 244-amino acid polypeptide with a 66-amino acid insert that is absent from the human homologue. In situ hybridization demonstrates constitutive expression of LT-beta in lymphoid and hematopoietic tissues. LT-beta transcription is maximal in the thymic medulla and in splenic white pulp. LT-beta mRNA is also detected in the skin and in specific regions of the brain. The LT-beta promoter region contains putative Ets-binding sites, suggesting that the expression of LT-beta may be regulated in part by Ets transcription factors whose pattern of lymphoid expression overlaps that of LT-beta. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7846035

  12. Methylated MicroRNA Genes of the Developing Murine Palate

    PubMed Central

    Seelan, Ratnam S.; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Warner, Dennis R.; Appana, Savitri N.; Brock, Guy N.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the etiology of cleft palate (CP). Environmental factors can also affect gene expression via alterations in DNA methylation suggesting a possible mechanism for the induction of CP. Identification of genes methylated during development of the secondary palate provides the basis for examination of the means by which environmental factors may adversely influence palatal ontogeny. We previously characterized the methylome of the developing murine secondary palate focusing primarily on protein-encoding genes. We now extend this study to include methylated microRNA (miRNA) genes. A total of 42 miRNA genes were found to be stably methylated in developing murine palatal tissue. Twenty eight of these were localized within host genes. Gene methylation was confirmed by pyrosequencing of selected miRNA genes. Integration of methylated miRNA gene and expression datasets identified 62 miRNAs, 69% of which were non-expressed. For a majority of genes (83%), upstream CpG islands (CGIs) were highly methylated suggesting down-regulation of CGI-associated promoters. DAVID and IPA analyses indicated that both expressed and non-expressed miRNAs target identical signaling pathways and biological processes associated with palatogenesis. Furthermore, these analyses also identified novel signaling pathways whose roles in palatogenesis remain to be elucidated. In summary, we identify methylated miRNA genes in the developing murine secondary palate, correlate miRNA gene methylation with expression of their cognate miRNA transcripts, and identify pathways and biological processes potentially mediated by these miRNAs. PMID:25642850

  13. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Tesh, Robert B.; Azar, Sasha R.; Muruato, Antonio E.; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Auguste, Albert J.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain–Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼107 plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  14. Vitamin D Deficiency in Human and Murine Sepsis*

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Dhruv; Patel, Jaimin M.; Scott, Aaron; Lax, Sian; Dancer, Rachel C. A.; D’Souza, Vijay; Greenwood, Hannah; Fraser, William D.; Gao, Fang; Sapey, Elizabeth; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Vitamin D deficiency has been implicated as a pathogenic factor in sepsis and ICU mortality but causality of these associations has not been demonstrated. To determine whether sepsis and severe sepsis are associated with vitamin D deficiency and to determine whether vitamin D deficiency influences the severity of sepsis. Design, Setting, and Patients: Sixty-one patients with sepsis and severe sepsis from two large U.K. hospitals and 20 healthy controls were recruited. Murine models of cecal ligation and puncture and intratracheal lipopolysaccharide were undertaken in normal and vitamin D deficient mice to address the issue of causality. Measurements and Main Results: Patients with severe sepsis had significantly lower concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 than patients with either mild sepsis or age-matched healthy controls (15.7 vs 49.5 vs 66.5 nmol/L; p = 0.0001). 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations were significantly lower in patients who had positive microbiologic culture than those who were culture negative (p = 0.0023) as well as those who died within 30 days of hospital admission (p = 0.025). Vitamin D deficiency in murine sepsis was associated with increased peritoneal (p = 0.037), systemic (p = 0.019), and bronchoalveolar lavage (p = 0.011) quantitative bacterial culture. This was associated with reduced local expression of the cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide as well as evidence of defective macrophage phagocytosis (p = 0.029). In the intratracheal lipopolysaccharide model, 1,500 IU of intraperitoneal cholecalciferol treatment 6 hours postinjury reduced alveolar inflammation, cellular damage, and hypoxia. Conclusions: Vitamin D deficiency is common in severe sepsis. This appears to contribute to the development of the condition in clinically relevant murine models and approaches to correct vitamin D deficiency in patients with sepsis should be developed. PMID:27632669

  15. Effect of N-methylformamide on radiocurability of murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Iwakawa, M.; Milas, L.

    1988-01-01

    N-Methylformamide (NMF) is a polar solvent with maturational activity, i.e., it induces malignant cells to form more differentiated phenotypes. In addition, it renders tumor cells more sensitive to chemotherapeutic drugs and ionizing radiation. In the present study, NMF failed to augment radiocurability, as measured by the single-dose TCD50 assay, of two murine tumors: an 8-mm fibrosarcoma (FSA) and a 6-mm mammary carcinoma (MCA-K). NMF, at a dose of 300 mg/kg, was given ip daily for several days before and/or after local tumor irradiation.

  16. Gene Regulation and Quality Control in Murine Polyomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Gordon G.

    2016-01-01

    Murine polyomavirus (MPyV) infects mouse cells and is highly oncogenic in immunocompromised hosts and in other rodents. Its genome is a small, circular DNA molecule of just over 5000 base pairs and it encodes only seven polypeptides. While seemingly simply organized, this virus has adopted an unusual genome structure and some unusual uses of cellular quality control pathways that, together, allow an amazingly complex and varied pattern of gene regulation. In this review we discuss how MPyV leverages these various pathways to control its life cycle. PMID:27763514

  17. Temporal profiling of the coding and noncoding murine cytomegalovirus transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Lacaze, Paul; Forster, Thorsten; Ross, Alan; Kerr, Lorraine E; Salvo-Chirnside, Eliane; Lisnic, Vanda Juranic; López-Campos, Guillermo H; García-Ramírez, José J; Messerle, Martin; Trgovcich, Joanne; Angulo, Ana; Ghazal, Peter

    2011-06-01

    The global transcriptional program of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV), involving coding, noncoding, and antisense transcription, remains unknown. Here we report an oligonucleotide custom microarray platform capable of measuring both coding and noncoding transcription on a genome-wide scale. By profiling MCMV wild-type and immediate-early mutant strains in fibroblasts, we found rapid activation of the transcriptome by 6.5 h postinfection, with absolute dependency on ie3, but not ie1 or ie2, for genomic programming of viral gene expression. Evidence is also presented to show, for the first time, genome-wide noncoding and bidirectional transcription at late stages of MCMV infection.

  18. 77 FR 52333 - International Workshop on Alternatives to the Murine Histamine Sensitization Test (HIST) for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES International Workshop on Alternatives to the Murine Histamine Sensitization Test (HIST... an ``International Workshop on Alternatives to the Murine Histamine Sensitization Test (HIST) for... histamine sensitization test (HIST) is a key safety test used to monitor residual levels of pertussis...

  19. Calcium-activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 promote murine uterine smooth muscle contractility

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kyra; Vink, Joy Y; Fu, Xiao Wen; Wakita, Hiromi; Danielsson, Jennifer; Wapner, Ronald; Gallos, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the presence of calcium activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 in human and murine uterine smooth muscle and evaluate the physiologic role for these ion channels in murine myometrial contractility. Study Design We performed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine if anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine uterine tissue to validate the study of this protein in mouse models. Immunohistochemical staining of anoctamin 1 and 2 was then performed to determine protein expression in murine myometrial tissue. The function of anoctamin 1 and 2 in murine uterine tissue was evaluated using electrophysiological studies, organ bath, and calcium flux experiments. Results Anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine USM cells. Functional studies show that selective antagonism of these channels promotes relaxation of spontaneous murine uterine smooth muscle contractions. Blockade of anoctamin 1 and 2 inhibits both agonist-induced and spontaneous transient inward currents and abolishes G-protein coupled receptor (oxytocin) mediated elevations in intracellular calcium. Conclusion The calcium activated chloride channels ANO 1 and 2 are present in human and murine myometrial tissue and may provide novel potential therapeutic targets to achieve effective tocolysis. PMID:24928056

  20. Endogenous murine Aβ increases amyloid deposition in APP23 but not in APPPS1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Jasmin; Morales-Corraliza, Jose; Stolz, Julia; Skodras, Angelos; Radde, Rebecca; Duma, Carmen C; Eisele, Yvonne S; Mazzella, Matthew J; Wong, Harrison; Klunk, William E; Nilsson, K Peter R; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Mathews, Paul M; Jucker, Mathias; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M

    2015-07-01

    Endogenous murine amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) is expressed in most Aβ precursor protein (APP) transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease but its contribution to β-amyloidosis remains unclear. We demonstrate ∼ 35% increased cerebral Aβ load in APP23 transgenic mice compared with age-matched APP23 mice on an App-null background. No such difference was found for the much faster Aβ-depositing APPPS1 transgenic mouse model between animals with or without the murine App gene. Nevertheless, both APP23 and APPPS1 mice codeposited murine Aβ, and immunoelectron microscopy revealed a tight association of murine Aβ with human Aβ fibrils. Deposition of murine Aβ was considerably less efficient compared with the deposition of human Aβ indicating a lower amyloidogenic potential of murine Aβ in vivo. The amyloid dyes Pittsburgh Compound-B and pentamer formyl thiophene acetic acid did not differentiate between amyloid deposits consisting of human Aβ and deposits of mixed human-murine Aβ. Our data demonstrate a differential effect of murine Aβ on human Aβ deposition in different APP transgenic mice. The mechanistically complex interaction of human and mouse Aβ may affect pathogenesis of the models and should be considered when models are used for translational preclinical studies.

  1. Murine embryonic stem cells secrete cytokines/growth modulators that enhance cell survival/anti-apoptosis and stimulate colony formation of murine hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Graham-Evans, Barbara; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2006-04-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1/CXCL12, released by murine embryonic stem (ES) cells, enhances survival, chemotaxis, and hematopoietic differentiation of murine ES cells. Conditioned medium (CM) from murine ES cells growing in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) was generated while the ES cells were in an undifferentiated Oct-4 expressing state. ES cell-CM enhanced survival of normal murine bone marrow myeloid progenitors (CFU-GM) subjected to delayed growth factor addition in vitro and decreased apoptosis of murine bone marrow c-kit(+)lin- cells. ES CM contained interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-10, IL-11, macrophage-colony stimulating factor (CSF), oncostatin M, stem cell factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, as well as a number of chemokines and other proteins, some of which are known to enhance survival/anti-apoptosis of progenitors. Irradiation of ES cells enhanced release of some proteins and decreased release of others. IL-6, FGF-9, and TNF-alpha, not detected prior to irradiation was found after ES cells were irradiated. ES cell CM also stimulated CFU-GM colony formation. Thus, undifferentiated murine ES cells growing in the presence of LIF produce/release a number of biologically active interleukins, CSFs, chemokines, and other growth modulatory proteins, results which may be of physiological and/or practical significance.

  2. Epigenetic alterations in a murine model for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Shih; Sherman, Maura H; Hertlein, Erin; Johnson, Amy J; Teitell, Michael A.; Byrd, John C.; Plass, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Early stages in the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have not been explored mainly due to the inability to study normal B-cells in route to transformation. In order to determine such early events of leukemogenesis, we have used a well established mouse model for CLL. Over-expression of human TCL1, a known CLL oncogene, in murine B-cells leads to the development of mature CD19+/CD5+/IgM+ clonal leukemia with a similar disease phenotype seen in human CLL. Herein, we review our recent study using this TCL1 murine model for CLL and corresponding human CLL samples in a cross-species epigenomics approach to address the timing and relevance of epigenetic events occurring during leukemogenesis. We were able to demonstrate that the mouse model recapitulates epigenetic events very similar to what has been reported for human CLL and thus provides an exciting new tool to study early epigenetic events. Epigenetic alterations are seen at a time of three month after birth, much earlier than the phenotypically visible disease which occurs around 11 month of age. An early event in gene silencing is the inactivation of transcription factor Foxd3 expression through an NF-κB mediated process in animals with one month of age. PMID:19901553

  3. Murine Models of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Elshafa Hassan; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a B-lymphotropic gamma herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies. Most EBV-related cancers present complex medical management challenges; thus it has been essential to develop preclinical in vivo models allowing for the study of pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of these diseases. Early in vivo models used nonhuman primates; however, such models were limited by the inability of EBV to achieve viral latency, availability, and cost. Immunodeficient mouse strains emerged as efficient models that allow for engraftment of human mononuclear cells and controlled evaluation of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). By using highly immunodeficient strains of mice such as severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) and NOD/LtSz-scid ILrg(-/-)(NOG) mice, investigators have developed efficient platforms for evaluating pathogenesis of benign (HLH) and malignant (EBV-LPD) diseases associated with EBV. Humanized murine chimeric models have been essential tools for evaluating preventive strategies with vaccine and adoptive cellular approaches, as well as development of experimental therapeutic strategies. Manipulation of the human immune cells before engraftment or mutation of viral lytic and latent genes has enhanced our understanding of the oncogenic nature of EBV and the complexity of human immune responses to EBV. In this review, we discuss how the EBV murine models have evolved to become essential tools for studying the virology of EBV as it relates to human EBV-LPD pathogenesis, the immunobiology of innate and adaptive responses, and limitations of these models.

  4. Molecular determinants of disease in Coxsackievirus B1 murine infection

    PubMed Central

    Cifuente, Javier O.; Ferrer, María F.; de Giusti, Carolina Jaquenod; Song, Wen-Chao; Romanowski, Víctor; Hafenstein, Susan L.; Gómez, Ricardo M.

    2013-01-01

    To understand better how different genomic regions may confer pathogenicity for the coxsackievirus B (CVB), two intratypic CVB1 variants and a number of recombinant viruses were studied. Sequencing analysis showed 23 nucleotide changes between the parental non-pathogenic CVB1N and the pathogenic CVB1Nm. Mutations present in CVB1Nm were more conserved than those in CVB1N when compared to other CVB sequences. Inoculation in C3H/HeJ mice showed that the P1 region is critical for pathogenicity in murine pancreas and heart. The molecular determinants of disease for these organs partially overlap. Several P1 region amino acid differences appear to be located in the decay accelerating factor (DAF) footprint CVBs. CVB1N and CVB1Nm interacted with human CAR, but only CVB1N seemed to interact with human DAF, as determined using soluble receptors in a plaque reduction assay. However, the murine homologue Daf-1 did not interact with any virus assessed by haemagglutination. The results of this study suggest that an unknown receptor interaction with the virus play an important role in the pathogenicity of CVB1Nm. Further in vivo studies may clarify this issue. PMID:21739448

  5. Molecular determinants of disease in coxsackievirus B1 murine infection.

    PubMed

    Cifuente, Javier O; Ferrer, María F; Jaquenod de Giusti, Carolina; Song, Wen-Chao; Romanowski, Víctor; Hafenstein, Susan L; Gómez, Ricardo M

    2011-09-01

    To understand better how different genomic regions may confer pathogenicity for the coxsackievirus B (CVB), two intratypic CVB1 variants, and a number of recombinant viruses were studied. Sequencing analysis showed 23 nucleotide changes between the parental non-pathogenic CVB1N and the pathogenic CVB1Nm. Mutations present in CVB1Nm were more conserved than those in CVB1N when compared to other CVB sequences. Inoculation in C3H/HeJ mice showed that the P1 region is critical for pathogenicity in murine pancreas and heart. The molecular determinants of disease for these organs partially overlap. Several P1 region amino acid differences appear to be located in the decay-accelerating factor (DAF) footprint CVBs. CVB1N and CVB1Nm interacted with human CAR, but only CVB1N seemed to interact with human DAF, as determined using soluble receptors in a plaque-reduction assay. However, the murine homolog Daf-1 did not interact with any virus assessed by hemagglutination. The results of this study suggest that an unknown receptor interaction with the virus play an important role in the pathogenicity of CVB1Nm. Further in vivo studies may clarify this issue.

  6. Rapamycin improves lymphoproliferative disease in murine autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Obzut, Dana A; Axsom, Kelly; Choi, John K; Goldsmith, Kelly C; Hall, Junior; Hulitt, Jessica; Manno, Catherine S; Maris, John M; Rhodin, Nicholas; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Brown, Valerie I; Grupp, Stephan A

    2006-09-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte survival caused by defective Fas-mediated apoptosis, leading to lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and an increased number of double-negative T cells (DNTs). Treatment options for patients with ALPS are limited. Rapamycin has been shown to induce apoptosis in normal and malignant lymphocytes. Since ALPS is caused by defective lymphocyte apoptosis, we hypothesized that rapamycin would be effective in treating ALPS. We tested this hypothesis using rapamycin in murine models of ALPS. We followed treatment response with serial assessment of DNTs by flow cytometry in blood and lymphoid tissue, by serial monitoring of lymph node and spleen size with ultrasonography, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibodies. Three-dimensional ultrasound measurements in the mice correlated to actual tissue measurements at death (r = .9648). We found a dramatic and statistically significant decrease in DNTs, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and autoantibodies after only 4 weeks when comparing rapamycin-treated mice with controls. Rapamycin induced apoptosis through the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. We compared rapamycin to mycophenolate mofetil, a second-line agent used to treat ALPS, and found rapamycin's control of lymphoproliferation was superior. We conclude that rapamycin is an effective treatment for murine ALPS and should be explored as treatment for affected humans.

  7. A novel immunocompetent murine model for replicating oncolytic adenoviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Hedjran, F; Larson, C; Perez, G L; Reid, T

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses are under investigation as a promising novel strategy for cancer immunotherapeutics. Unfortunately, there is no immunocompetent mouse cancer model to test oncolytic adenovirus because murine cancer cells are generally unable to produce infectious viral progeny from human adenoviruses. We find that the murine K-ras-induced lung adenocarcinoma cell line ADS-12 supports adenoviral infection and generates infectious viral progeny. ADS-12 cells express the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor and infected ADS-12 cells express the viral protein E1A. We find that our previously described oncolytic virus, adenovirus TAV-255 (AdTAV-255), kills ADS-12 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We investigated ADS-12 cells as an in-vivo model system for replicating oncolytic adenoviruses. Subcutaneous injection of ADS-12 cells into immunocompetent 129 mice led to tumor formation in all injected mice. Intratumoral injection of AdTAV-255 in established tumors causes a significant reduction in tumor growth. This model system represents the first fully immunocompetent mouse model for cancer treatment with replicating oncolytic adenoviruses, and therefore will be useful to study the therapeutic effect of oncolytic adenoviruses in general and particularly immunostimulatory viruses designed to evoke an antitumor immune response. PMID:25525035

  8. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle.

  9. Murine models of Aspergillosis: Role of collectins in host defense.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mamta; Mahajan, Lakshna; Chaudhary, Neelkamal; Kaur, Savneet; Madan, Taruna; Sarma, P Usha

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a ubiquitous fungus, causes a wide spectrum of clinical conditions ranging from allergic to invasive aspergillosis depending upon the hosts' immune status. Several animal models have been generated to mimic the human clinical conditions in allergic and invasive aspergillosis. The onset, duration and severity of the disease developed in models varied depending on the animal strain/fungal isolate, quantity and mode of administration of fungal antigens/spores, duration of the treatment, and type of immunosuppressive agent used. These models provide insight into host and pathogen factors and prove to be useful for evaluation of diagnostic markers and effective therapies. A series of studies established the protective role of collectins in murine models of Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis and Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis. Collectins, namely surfactant protein A (SP-A), surfactant protein D (SP-D) and mannan binding lectin (MBL), are pattern recognition molecules regulating both innate and adaptive immune response against pathogens. In the present review, we discussed various murine models of allergic and invasive aspergillosis and the role of collectins in host defense against aspergillosis.

  10. Toxocara canis: anthelmintic activity of quinone derivatives in murine toxocarosis.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, T; Mata-Santos, H A; Carneiro, P F; De Moura, K C G; Fenalti, J M; Klafke, G B; Cruz, L A X; Martins, L H R; Pinto, N F; Pinto, M C F R; Berne, M E A; Da Silva, P E A; Scaini, C J

    2016-04-01

    Human toxocarosis is a chronic tissue parasitosis most often caused by Toxocara canis. The seroprevalence can reach up to 50%, especially among children and adolescents. The anthelmintics used in the treatment have moderate efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of quinones and their derivatives against T. canis larvae and the cytotoxicity of the larvicidal compounds. The compounds were evaluated at 1 mg mL(-1) concentration in microculture plates containing third stage larvae in an Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 environment, incubated at 37 °C in 5% CO2 tension for 48 h. Five naphthoxiranes were selected for the cytotoxicity analysis. The cell viability evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays using murine peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice revealed that the naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) were less cytotoxic at a concentration of 0.05 mg mL(-1). The efficacy of naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) was examined in murine toxocarosis also. The anthelmintic activity was examined by evaluating the number of larvae in the brain, carcass, liver, lungs, heart, kidneys and eyes. Compound (3) demonstrated anthelmintic activity similar to that of albendazole by decreasing the number of larvae in the organs of mice and thus could form the basis of the development of a new anthelmintic drug.

  11. Coxsackievirus-induced chronic myocarditis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Gauntt, C J; Tracy, S M; Chapman, N; Wood, H J; Kolbeck, P C; Karaganis, A G; Winfrey, C L; Cunningham, M W

    1995-12-01

    Challenge of several murine strains with two highly myocarditic variants of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) induced acute and chronic myocarditis, detectable at 21 and 45 days post-inoculation (p.i.). In-situ hybridization of coronal heart sections showing chronic inflammation with a radiolabelled CVB3 probe detected viral genomic RNA at day 7 p.i. but rarely at 21 or 45 days p.i., suggesting few murine heart cells actively replicate virus during chronic myocardial inflammation. Data will be presented that favour an alternative hypothesis, i.e. autoimmune responses to shared epitopes among CVB3 proteins, cardiac myosin and myocardial cell surface proteins (molecular mimicry) can affect the severity of chronic inflammation. Mice inoculated with human cardiac myosin (HM) prior to a CVB3m challenge develop less myocarditis than mice inoculated with virus only, suggesting that antibodies stimulated by HM bind virus, reduce the virus burden and provide protection. Mice inoculated with HM only develop non-neutralizing antibodies against purified CVB3m particles. Several strains of mice inoculated with specific synthetic peptides of HM produce antibodies against CVB3m and/or develop cardiomyopathy. Thus antigen-challenged mice can produce antibodies which cross-react among CVB3m HM or cardiac cells to protect or exacerbate heart disease.

  12. Immunological impact of magnetic nanoparticles (Ferucarbotran) on murine peritoneal macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chen-Hao; Hsiao, Jong-Kai; Wang, Jaw-Lin; Sheu, Fuu

    2010-01-01

    Ferucarbotran, a clinically used superparamagnetic iron oxide, is widely developed as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent and has the potential to improve the monitoring of macrophage recirculation in vivo. However, the biological effect of Ferucarbotran or magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) on macrophage is not clearly understood yet. This study is aimed to examine the immunological impact of Ferucarbotran toward murine peritoneal macrophages. Cells treated with Ferucarbotran demonstrated a dose-responsive increase of granularity in the cytoplasm. After 24 h of incubation, viability and cytotoxicity in macrophages treated with 200 μg Fe/mL of Ferucarbotran were not affected. Macrophages loaded with Ferucarbotran above 100 μg Fe/mL showed a significant ( p < 0.01) increase in cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) secretion and mRNA expression, followed by nitric oxide (NO) secretion and iNOS mRNA expression. Chemotactic responses of Ferucarbotran-preloaded macrophages toward CX3CL1 were significantly ( p < 0.05) lower than those of untreated macrophages. Taking together, Ferucarbotran at high dose (100 μg Fe/mL) could induce murine peritoneal macrophages activation in pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and NO production.

  13. Notch Signaling Pathway Regulates Progesterone Secretion in Murine Luteal Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Shuangmei; Peng, Lichao; Dong, Qiming; Bao, Riqiang; Lv, Qiulan; Tang, Min; Hu, Chuan; Li, Gang; Liang, Shangdong; Zhang, Chunping

    2015-10-01

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway, which involves in various cell life activities. Other studies and our report showed that the Notch signaling plays very important role in follicle development in mammalian ovaries. In luteal cells, Notch ligand, delta-like ligand 4, is involved in normal luteal vasculature. In this study, murine luteal cells were cultured in vitro and treated with Notch signaling inhibitors, L-658,458 and N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl)-l-alanyl]-S-phenylglycinet-butyl ester (DAPT). We found that L-658,458 and DAPT treatment decrease basal and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated progesterone secretion. On the contrary, overexpression of intracellular domain of Notch3 increased basal and hCG-stimulated progesterone secretion. Further studies demonstrated that Notch signaling regulated the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and CYP11A, 2 key enzymes for progesterone synthesis. In conclusion, Notch signaling plays important role in regulating progesterone secretion in murine luteal cells.

  14. Hyperglycemia-Induced Vasculopathy in the Murine Vitelline Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, Emese; Mahooti, Sepi; Wang, Yi; Imhof, Beat A.; Madri, Joseph A.

    1999-01-01

    Maternal diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased incidence of congenital abnormalities as well as embryonic and perinatal lethality. In particular, a wide range of cardiovascular abnormalities have been noted in children of diabetic mothers and in the offspring of diabetic animals. The vascular system is the first organ system to develop in the embryo and is critical for normal organogenesis. The organization of mesodermal cells into endothelial and hematopoietic cells and into a complex vascular system is, in part, mediated by a series of specific cell-cell, cell-extracellular matrix, and cell-factor interactions. PECAM-1 expression has been observed during the earliest stages of vasculogenesis, and changes in PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation have been associated with endothelial cell migration, vasculogenesis, and angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. In this report we demonstrate that exposure to hyperglycemia during gastrulation causes yolk sac and embryonic vasculopathy in cultured murine conceptuses and in the conceptuses of streptozotocin-induced diabetic pregnant mice. In addition, we correlate the presence of yolk sac and embryonic vasculopathy with the failure of PECAM-1 tyrosine dephosphorylation during the formation of blood islands/vessels from clusters of extra-embryonic and embryonic angioblasts in the murine conceptus using both in vitro and in vivo models. The importance of these findings in the development of vasculopathy in the offspring of diabetic mothers and the potential effects and benefits of glucose regulation during the periods of vasculogenesis/angiogenesis in embryonic development are discussed. PMID:10329590

  15. In vitro stimulation of murine lymphoid cell cultures by levamisole.

    PubMed Central

    Merluzzi, V J; Badger, A M; Kaiser, C W; Cooperband, S R

    1975-01-01

    Levamisole has been reported to act as an immunological adjuvant. Experiments reported here on the effect of this agent on a variety of murine lymphoid culture systems were designed to gain an insight into its mechanism of action. We have found levamisole to be a weak mitogen for mouse spleen cells producing a dose related response which peaks at 48 hr in culture. The drug acted to augment the response of spleen cells to sub-optimal concentrations of concanavalin A, but had no unusual effect on the lipopolysaccharide stimulation of B-cell DNA synthesis in vitro. Levamisole was directly stimulatory on enriched T-cell populations and was found to have two actions: (1) to stimulate a subpopulation of T cells and (2) to augment the response of suboptimal mitogen concentrations of concanavalin A. In addition, we have found that murine thymocytes stimulated by concanavalin A were greatly potentiated in the presence of levamisole, but this population of cells could not be stimulated directly by the drug. PMID:1083786

  16. Correlation between experimental human and murine skin sensitization induction thresholds.

    PubMed

    Api, Anne Marie; Basketter, David; Lalko, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative risk assessment for skin sensitization is directed towards the determination of levels of exposure to known sensitizing substances that will avoid the induction of contact allergy in humans. A key component of this work is the predictive identification of relative skin sensitizing potency, achieved normally by the measurement of the threshold (the "EC3" value) in the local lymph node assay (LLNA). In an extended series of studies, the accuracy of this murine induction threshold as the predictor of the absence of a sensitizing effect has been verified by conduct of a human repeated insult patch test (HRIPT). Murine and human thresholds for a diverse set of 57 fragrance chemicals spanning approximately four orders of magnitude variation in potency have been compared. The results confirm that there is a useful correlation, with the LLNA EC3 value helping particularly to identify stronger sensitizers. Good correlation (with half an order of magnitude) was seen with three-quarters of the dataset. The analysis also helps to identify potential outlier types of (fragrance) chemistry, exemplified by hexyl and benzyl salicylates (an over-prediction) and trans-2-hexenal (an under-prediction).

  17. Expression of murine interleukin 7 in a murine glioma cell line results in reduced tumorigenicity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, T; Tashiro, K; Miyatake, S; Kinashi, T; Nakano, T; Oda, Y; Kikuchi, H; Honjo, T

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the immunoregulatory effect of local and continuous secretion of interleukin 7 (IL-7) from murine glioma cells (203-glioma) engineered by murine IL-7 gene transfection. Secretion of IL-7 from glioma cells did not result in morphology or growth rate changes but did reduce tumorigenicity in vivo in proportion to the amount of IL-7 produced. This reduction in tumorigenicity could be reversed in a dose-dependent fashion by injection of anti-IL-7 neutralizing monoclonal antibody at the tumor site. Mice immunized with IL-7-producing glioma cells showed a specific immune response to 203-glioma but not to two other syngeneic cell lines (B-16, a melanoma, and YM-12, a fibrosarcoma). IL-7-producing glioma cells were not rejected in mice depleted of CD8+ cells but were rejected in mice depleted of CD4+ or NK1.1+ cells. These results suggest that CD8+ T cells may play an important role in tumor rejection. Images PMID:1570303

  18. Nanoliposomal artemisinin for the treatment of murine visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Want, Muzamil Y; Islammudin, Mohammad; Chouhan, Garima; Ozbak, Hani A; Hemeg, Hassan A; Chattopadhyay, Asoke P; Afrin, Farhat

    2017-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a fatal, vector-borne disease caused by the intracellular protozoa of the genus Leishmania. Most of the therapeutics for VL are toxic, expensive, or ineffective. Sesquiterpenes are a new class of drugs with proven antimicrobial and antiviral activities. Artemisinin is a sesquiterpene lactone with potent antileishmanial activity, but with limited access to infected cells, being a highly lipophilic molecule. Association of artemisinin with liposome is a desirable strategy to circumvent the problem of poor accessibility, thereby improving its efficacy, as demonstrated in a murine model of experimental VL. Nanoliposomal artemisinin (NLA) was prepared by thin-film hydration method and optimized using Box–Behnken design with a mean particle diameter of 83±16 nm, polydispersity index of 0.2±0.03, zeta potential of −27.4±5.7 mV, and drug loading of 33.2%±2.1%. Morphological study of these nanoliposomes by microscopy showed a smooth and spherical surface. The mechanism of release of artemisinin from the liposomes followed the Higuchi model in vitro. NLA was free from concomitant signs of toxicity, both ex vivo in murine macrophages and in vivo in healthy BALB/c mice. NLA significantly denigrated the intracellular infection of Leishmania donovani amastigotes and the number of infected macrophages ex vivo with an IC50 of 6.0±1.4 µg/mL and 5.1±0.9 µg/mL, respectively. Following treatment in a murine model of VL, NLA demonstrated superior efficacy compared to artemisinin with a percentage inhibition of 82.4%±3.8% in the liver and 77.6%±5.5% in spleen at the highest dose of 20 mg/kg body weight with modulation of cell-mediated immunity towards protective Th1 type. This study is the first report on the use of a liposomal drug delivery system for artemisinin as a promising alternative intervention against VL. PMID:28356736

  19. Murine Mycobacterium marinum Infection as a Model for Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lienard, Julia; Carlsson, Fredric

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacteria are a major human health problem globally. Regarding tuberculosis the situation is worsened by the poor efficacy of current vaccine regimens and by emergence of drug-resistant strains (Manjelievskaia J et al, Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 110: 110, 2016; Pereira et al., Lancet Infect Dis 12:300-306, 2012; http://www.who.int/tb/publications/global_report/en/) undermining both disease-prevention and available treatments. Thus, increased basic understanding of mycobacterial-and particularly Mycobacterium tuberculosis-virulence strategies and pathogenesis is of great importance. To this end several in vivo infection models are available (Guirado and Schlesinger, Front Immunol 4:98, 2013; Leung et al., Eur J Immunol 43:2246-2254, 2013; Patel et al., J Lab Physicians 3:75-79, 2011; van Leeuwen et al., Cold Spring Harb Perspect Med 5:a018580, 2015). While these models all have their merits they also exhibit limitations, and none perfectly mimics all aspects of human tuberculosis. Thus, there is a need for multiple models that may complement each other, ultimately allowing us to gain true insight into the pathogenesis of mycobacterial infections.Here, we describe a recently developed mouse model of Mycobacterium marinum infection that allows kinetic and quantitative studies of disease progression in live animals [8]. Notably, this model exhibits features of human tuberculosis not replicated in M. tuberculosis infected mice, and may provide an important complement to the field. For example, granulomas in the M. marinum model develop central caseating necrosis (Carlsson et al., PLoS Pathog 6:e1000895, 2010), a hallmark of granulomas in human tuberculosis normally not replicated in murine M. tuberculosis infection. Moreover, while tuberculosis is heterogeneous and presents with a continuum of active and latent disease, M. tuberculosis infected mice essentially lack this dynamic range and do not replicate latency (Guirado and Schlesinger, Front Immunol 4:98, 2013

  20. Growth and metabolism of murine and bovine embryos in bovine uterine flushing-supplemented culture media.

    PubMed Central

    Rondeau, M; Guay, P; Goff, A K; Cooke, G M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the development and metabolic activity of cultured murine and bovine embryos in 2 standard media (HAM F-10 and RPMI) in the presence or absence of bovine uterine flushings. Murine morulae (n = 653) and day 7 bovine embryos (n = 273) were cultured for 18 h or 36 h in either HAM F-10 or RPMI in the presence or absence of bovine uterine flushings. After culture, the development, quality, and metabolic activity (glucose utilization or methionine uptake and incorporation) of embryos was assessed. It was found that HAM F-10 (without uterine flushings) was a more suitable medium than RPMI for optimal development and metabolism of murine and bovine embryos. Poor quality and development, as well as decreased metabolism, were evident after culture of murine embryos in RPMI; in contrast, this medium had no adverse effects on bovine embryos in culture. Supplementation of HAM F-10 with bovine uterine flushings improved the growth of murine embryos and the protein synthesis (as measured by an increased methionine incorporation) for both murine and bovine embryos. However, supplementation with bovine uterine flushings could not overcome deficiencies of an inappropriate medium (RPMI) for murine embryos. Supplementation of a well-defined culture medium with uterine flushings increased metabolism of embryos in culture, and thus might help to increase pregnancy rates after transfer of such embryos to recipient cows. PMID:8825988

  1. Validation of the murine aortic arch as a model to study human vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Casteleyn, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Van Loo, Denis; Devos, Daniel G H; Van den Broeck, Wim; Simoens, Paul; Cornillie, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Although the murine thoracic aorta and its main branches are widely studied to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of human vascular diseases, detailed anatomical data on the murine aorta are sparse. Moreover, comparative studies between mice and men focusing on the topography and geometry of the heart and aorta are lacking. As this hampers the validation of murine vascular models, the branching pattern of the murine thoracic aorta was examined in 30 vascular corrosion casts. On six casts the intrathoracic position of the heart was compared with that of six younger and six older men of whom contrast-enhanced computer tomography images of the thorax were three-dimensionally reconstructed. In addition, the geometry of the human thoracic aorta was compared with that of the mouse by reconstructing micro-computer tomography images of six murine casts. It was found that the right brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery branched subsequently from the aortic arch in both mice and men. The geometry of the branches of the murine aortic arch was quite similar to that of men. In both species the initial segment of the aorta, comprising the ascending aorta, aortic arch and cranial/superior part of the descending aorta, was sigmoidally curved on a cranial/superior view. Although some analogy between the intrathoracic position of the murine and human heart was observed, the murine heart manifestly deviated more ventrally. The major conclusion of this study is that, in both mice and men, the ascending and descending aorta do not lie in a single vertical plane (non-planar aortic geometry). This contrasts clearly with most domestic mammals in which a planar aortic pattern is present. As the vascular branching pattern of the aortic arch is also similar in mice and men, the murine model seems valuable to study human vascular diseases. PMID:20345858

  2. Validation of the murine aortic arch as a model to study human vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Casteleyn, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Van Loo, Denis; Devos, Daniel G H; Van den Broeck, Wim; Simoens, Paul; Cornillie, Pieter

    2010-05-01

    Although the murine thoracic aorta and its main branches are widely studied to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of human vascular diseases, detailed anatomical data on the murine aorta are sparse. Moreover, comparative studies between mice and men focusing on the topography and geometry of the heart and aorta are lacking. As this hampers the validation of murine vascular models, the branching pattern of the murine thoracic aorta was examined in 30 vascular corrosion casts. On six casts the intrathoracic position of the heart was compared with that of six younger and six older men of whom contrast-enhanced computer tomography images of the thorax were three-dimensionally reconstructed. In addition, the geometry of the human thoracic aorta was compared with that of the mouse by reconstructing micro-computer tomography images of six murine casts. It was found that the right brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery branched subsequently from the aortic arch in both mice and men. The geometry of the branches of the murine aortic arch was quite similar to that of men. In both species the initial segment of the aorta, comprising the ascending aorta, aortic arch and cranial/superior part of the descending aorta, was sigmoidally curved on a cranial/superior view. Although some analogy between the intrathoracic position of the murine and human heart was observed, the murine heart manifestly deviated more ventrally. The major conclusion of this study is that, in both mice and men, the ascending and descending aorta do not lie in a single vertical plane (non-planar aortic geometry). This contrasts clearly with most domestic mammals in which a planar aortic pattern is present. As the vascular branching pattern of the aortic arch is also similar in mice and men, the murine model seems valuable to study human vascular diseases.

  3. Key Role of MicroRNA in the Regulation of Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor Expression in Murine Alveolar Epithelial Cells during Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Sturrock, Anne; Mir-Kasimov, Mustafa; Baker, Jessica; Rowley, Jesse; Paine, Robert

    2014-01-01

    GM-CSF is an endogenous pulmonary cytokine produced by normal alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) that is a key defender of the alveolar space. AEC GM-CSF expression is suppressed by oxidative stress through alternations in mRNA turnover, an effect that is reversed by treatment with recombinant GM-CSF. We hypothesized that specific microRNA (miRNA) would play a key role in AEC GM-CSF regulation. A genome-wide miRNA microarray identified 19 candidate miRNA altered in primary AEC during oxidative stress with reversal by treatment with GM-CSF. Three of these miRNA (miR 133a, miR 133a*, and miR 133b) are also predicted to bind the GM-CSF 3′-untranslated region (UTR). PCR for the mature miRNA confirmed induction during oxidative stress that was reversed by treatment with GM-CSF. Experiments using a GM-CSF 3′-UTR reporter construct demonstrated that miR133a and miR133b effects on GM-CSF expression are through interactions with the GM-CSF 3′-UTR. Using lentiviral transduction of specific mimics and inhibitors in primary murine AEC, we determined that miR133a and miR133b suppress GM-CSF expression and that their inhibition both reverses oxidant-induced suppression of GM-CSF expression and increases basal expression of GM-CSF in cells in normoxia. In contrast, these miRNAs are not active in regulation of GM-CSF expression in murine EL4 T cells. Thus, members of the miR133 family play key roles in regulation of GM-CSF expression through effects on mRNA turnover in AEC during oxidative stress. Increased understanding of GM-CSF gene regulation may provide novel miRNA-based interventions to augment pulmonary innate immune defense in lung injury. PMID:24371146

  4. The murine Cd48 gene: allelic polymorphism in the IgV-like region.

    PubMed

    Cabrero, J G; Freeman, G J; Reiser, H

    1998-12-01

    The murine CD48 molecule is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily which regulates the activation of T lymphocytes. prior cloning experiments using mRNA from two different mouse strains had yielded discrepant sequences within the IgV-like domain of murine CD48. To resolve this issue, we have directly sequenced genomic DNA of 10 laboratory strains and two inbred strains of wild origin. The results of our analysis reveal an allelic polymorphism within the IgV-like domain of murine CD48.

  5. Computational Analysis of Lung Deformation after Murine neumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic, Nenad; Gibney, Barry C.; Nikolic, Dalibor; Konerding, Moritz A.; Mentzer, Steven J.; Tsuda, Akira

    2012-01-01

    In many mammalian species, the removal of one lung (pneumonectomy) is associated with the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. To investigate the hypothesis that parenchymal deformation may trigger lung regeneration, we used microCT scanning to create 3-dimensional finite element geometric models of the murine lung pre- and post-pneumonectomy (24 hours). The structural correspondence between models was established using anatomic landmarks and an iterative computational algorithm. When compared with the pre-pneumonectomy lung, the post-pneumonectomy models demonstrated significant translation and rotation of the cardiac lobe into the post-pneumonectomy pleural space. 2-dimensional maps of lung deformation demonstrated significant heterogeneity ; the areas of greatest deformation were present in the subpleural regions of the lobe. Consistent with previously identified growth patterns, subpleural regions of enhanced deformation are compatible with a mechanical signal—likely involving parenchymal stretch—triggering lung growth. PMID:22978574

  6. Dye-mediated photosensitization of murine neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sieber, F.; Sieber-Blum, M.

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if photosensitization mediated by the fluorescent dye, merocyanine 540, could be used to preferentially kill murine neuroblastoma cells in simulated autologous remission marrow grafts. Simultaneous exposure of Neuro 2a or NB41A3 neuroblastoma cells to merocyanine 540 and white light reduced the concentration of in vitro-clonogenic tumor cells 50,000-fold. By contrast, the same treatment had little effect on the graft's ability to rescue lethally irradiated syngeneic hosts. Lethally irradiated C57BL/6J X A/J F1 mice transplanted with photosensitized mixtures of neuroblastoma cells and normal marrow cells (1:100 or 1:10) survived without developing neuroblastomas. It is conceivable that merocyanine 540-mediated photosensitization will prove useful for the extracorporeal purging of residual neuroblastoma cells from human autologous remission marrow grafts.

  7. Methylation of Inorganic Arsenic by Murine Fetal Tissue Explants

    PubMed Central

    Broka, Derrick; Ditzel, Eric; Quach, Stephanie; Camenisch, Todd D.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is generally believed that the developing fetus is principally exposed to inorganic arsenic and the methylated metabolites from the maternal metabolism of arsenic, little is known about whether the developing embryo can autonomously metabolize arsenic. This study investigates inorganic arsenic methylation by murine embryonic organ cultures of the heart, lung, and liver. mRNA for AS3mt, the gene responsible for methylation of arsenic, was detected in all of embryonic tissue types studied. In addition, methylated arsenic metabolites were generated by all three tissue types. The fetal liver explants yielded the most methylated arsenic metabolites (~7% of total arsenic/ 48 hr incubation) while the heart, and lung preparations produced slightly greater than 2% methylated metabolites. With all tissues the methylation proceeded mostly to the dimethylated arsenic species. This has profound implications for understanding arsenic-induced fetal toxicity, particularly if the methylated metabolites are produced autonomously by embryonic tissues. PMID:26446802

  8. Large-scale characterization of the murine cardiac proteome.

    PubMed

    Cosme, Jake; Emili, Andrew; Gramolini, Anthony O

    2013-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of the heart that result in impaired cardiac muscle function. This dysfunction can progress to an inability to supply blood to the body. Cardiovascular diseases play a large role in overall global morbidity. Investigating the protein changes in the heart during disease can uncover pathophysiological mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. Establishing a global protein expression "footprint" can facilitate more targeted studies of diseases of the heart.In the technical review presented here, we present methods to elucidate the heart's proteome through subfractionation of the cellular compartments to reduce sample complexity and improve detection of lower abundant proteins during multidimensional protein identification technology analysis. Analysis of the cytosolic, microsomal, and mitochondrial subproteomes separately in order to characterize the murine cardiac proteome is advantageous by simplifying complex cardiac protein mixtures. In combination with bioinformatic analysis and genome correlation, large-scale protein changes can be identified at the cellular compartment level in this animal model.

  9. Experimental infection of murine and human macrophages with Cystoisospora belli.

    PubMed

    Resende, Deisy V; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Assis, Dnieber C; Prata, Aluízio; Oliveira-Silva, Márcia B

    2009-08-01

    Extraintestinal cystoisosporosis by Cystoisospora belli has already been reported in HIV/AIDS patients, generally involving preferential invasion of mesenteric and trachaeobronchial lymph nodes, liver and spleen by unizoic cysts of this parasite, which may infect macrophages. To test this hypothesis, murine and human macrophages were exposed to sporozoites of C. belli and cultures were observed daily after contact with these cells. The parasites penetrated and multiplied by endodyogeny in both cell types and inserted themselves inside perinuclear vacuoles. After 48 h, extracellular parasites were removed from macrophage cultures and incubated in Monkey Kidney Rhesus cells (MK2) where there was intense multiplication. This is the first report of infection of macrophages by this parasite, which supports the hypothesis that these could act as C. belli host cells in extraintestinal sites.

  10. Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa Extract Attenuates DSS-Induced Murine Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jong-Chan; Lee, Kang Min

    2016-01-01

    We examined the protective effects of Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa (AAK) extract on a murine model of acute experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by 4% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water of male C57BL/6 mice, for 7 consecutive days. Oral administration of AAK extract (500 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated DSS-induced symptoms such as anorexia, weight loss, events of diarrhea or bloody stools, and colon shortening. Histological damage was also ameliorated, as evidenced by the architectural preservation and suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration in colonic samples. Treatment improved the colonic mRNA expression of different inflammatory markers: cytokines, inducible enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases, and tight junction-related proteins. In the isolated serum, IgE levels were downregulated. Collectively, these findings indicate the therapeutic potentials of AAK as an effective complementary or alternative modality for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. PMID:27293323

  11. Effect of gold sodium thiomalate on murine lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, J J; Macrae, S; Gorczynski, R M

    1979-01-01

    The in vitro effects of gold sodium thiomalate (GTM) on various murine splenic lymphocytic functions were tested. The presence of GTM in cultures of splenic cells suppressed anti-hapten responses to both thymus-independent and thymus-dependent antigens. GTM also suppressed the in vitro generation of cytotoxic effector cells as well as the mitogenic response to both T cell and B cell mitogens. This suppression could not be reversed by the addition of irradiated spleen cells. Spleen cells exposed to GTM for 4 hr prior to culture also exhibited similarly suppressed functions, although their functional capacity could be fully restored by the addition of irradiated spleen cells. These results show that GTM inhibits both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms and appears to act primarily at the accessory (macrophage) cell level, with perhaps a secondary effect on T lymphocytes. PMID:113153

  12. A novel inexpensive murine model of oral chronic digitalization.

    PubMed

    Helber, Izo; Kanashiro, Rosemeire M; Alarcon, Ernesto A; Antonio, Ednei L; Tucci, Paulo J F

    2004-01-01

    A novel inexpensive murine model of oral administration of digitoxin (100 micro g/kg per day) added to routine chow is described. Serum digitoxin levels achieved after oral (n = 5; 116 +/- 14 ng/mL) and subcutaneous (n = 5; 124 +/- 11 ng/mL) administration were similar. A significant increase in the maximal left ventricular pressure rise of treated (n = 9) compared with control (n = 6) rats (dP/dt: 8956 +/- 233 vs 7980 +/- 234 mmHg/s, respectively; P = 0.01) characterized the positive inotropic action of digitoxin. In addition, no differences were observed in treated compared with control rats with regard to the electrocardiogram and systolic and diastolic left ventricular pressures.

  13. Murine model of concurrent oral and vaginal Candida albicans colonisation.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Durdana; Mistry, Mukesh; Thavaraj, Selvam; Naglik, Julian R; Challacombe, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Investigations into the complex interaction between the fungal pathogen Candida albicans and its human host require the use of animals as in vivo models. A major advance is the creation of a low-oestrogen murine model of concurrent oral and vaginal C. albicans colonisation that resembles human candidal carriage at both mucosal sites. Weekly intramuscular (5 μg) and subcutaneous (5 μg) oestrogen administration was determined as optimal, enhancing oral colonisation but essential for vaginal colonisation. Using a clinical C. albicans oral isolate, persistent colonisation for up to 6 weeks can be achieved at both sites in two strains of mice (BALB/c and C57BL/6). This concurrent model of mucosal colonisation reduces the numbers of experimental mice by half, and opens up new avenues of research in assessing potential mucosal vaccine candidates and in studying delicate host-pathogen interactions during the most natural state of C. albicans epithelial colonisation.

  14. Heterogeneity across the murine small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Bowcutt, Rowann; Forman, Ruth; Glymenaki, Maria; Carding, Simon Richard; Else, Kathryn Jane; Cruickshank, Sheena Margaret

    2014-11-07

    The small and large intestine of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) have evolved to have discrete functions with distinct anatomies and immune cell composition. The importance of these differences is underlined when considering that different pathogens have uniquely adapted to live in each region of the gut. Furthermore, different regions of the GIT are also associated with differences in susceptibility to diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammation. The large and small intestine, given their anatomical and functional differences, should be seen as two separate immunological sites. However, this distinction is often ignored with findings from one area of the GIT being inappropriately extrapolated to the other. Focussing largely on the murine small and large intestine, this review addresses the literature relating to the immunology and biology of the two sites, drawing comparisons between them and clarifying similarities and differences. We also highlight the gaps in our understanding and where further research is needed.

  15. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in murine hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Belmont, J W; MacGregor, G R; Wager-Smith, K; Fletcher, F A; Moore, K A; Hawkins, D; Villalon, D; Chang, S M; Caskey, C T

    1988-01-01

    Multiple replication-defective retrovirus vectors were tested for their ability to transfer and express human adenosine deaminase in vitro and in vivo in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model. High-titer virus production was obtained from vectors by using both a retrovirus long terminal repeat promoter and internal transcriptional units with human c-fos and herpes virus thymidine kinase promoters. After infection of primary murine bone marrow with one of these vectors, human adenosine deaminase was detected in 60 to 85% of spleen colony-forming units and in the blood of 14 of 14 syngeneic marrow transplant recipients. This system offers the opportunity to assess methods for increasing efficiency of gene transfer, for regulation of expression of foreign genes in hematopoietic progenitors, and for long-term measurement of the stability of expression in these cells. Images PMID:3072474

  16. Isolation of primary murine brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ruck, Tobias; Bittner, Stefan; Epping, Lisa; Herrmann, Alexander M; Meuth, Sven G

    2014-11-14

    The blood-brain-barrier is ultrastructurally assembled by a monolayer of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) interconnected by a junctional complex of tight and adherens junctions. Together with other cell-types such as astrocytes or pericytes, they form the neurovascular unit (NVU), which specifically regulates the interchange of fluids, molecules and cells between the peripheral blood and the CNS. Through this complex and dynamic system BMECs are involved in various processes maintaining the homeostasis of the CNS. A dysfunction of the BBB is observed as an essential step in the pathogenesis of many severe CNS diseases. However, specific and targeted therapies are very limited, as the underlying mechanisms are still far from being understood. Animal and in vitro models have been extensively used to gain in-depth understanding of complex physiological and pathophysiological processes. By reduction and simplification it is possible to focus the investigation on the subject of interest and to exclude a variety of confounding factors. However, comparability and transferability are also reduced in model systems, which have to be taken into account for evaluation. The most common animal models are based on mice, among other reasons, mainly due to the constantly increasing possibilities of methodology. In vitro studies of isolated murine BMECs might enable an in-depth analysis of their properties and of the blood-brain-barrier under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Further insights into the complex mechanisms at the BBB potentially provide the basis for new therapeutic strategies. This protocol describes a method to isolate primary murine microvascular endothelial cells by a sequence of physical and chemical purification steps. Special considerations for purity and cultivation of MBMECs as well as quality control, potential applications and limitations are discussed.

  17. Deep Sequencing of the Murine Olfactory Receptor Neuron Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kanageswaran, Ninthujah; Demond, Marilen; Nagel, Maximilian; Schreiner, Benjamin S. P.; Baumgart, Sabrina; Scholz, Paul; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Doerner, Julia F.; Conrad, Heike; Oberland, Sonja; Wetzel, Christian H.; Neuhaus, Eva M.; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The ability of animals to sense and differentiate among thousands of odorants relies on a large set of olfactory receptors (OR) and a multitude of accessory proteins within the olfactory epithelium (OE). ORs and related signaling mechanisms have been the subject of intensive studies over the past years, but our knowledge regarding olfactory processing remains limited. The recent development of next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques encouraged us to assess the transcriptome of the murine OE. We analyzed RNA from OEs of female and male adult mice and from fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-sorted olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) obtained from transgenic OMP-GFP mice. The Illumina RNA-Seq protocol was utilized to generate up to 86 million reads per transcriptome. In OE samples, nearly all OR and trace amine-associated receptor (TAAR) genes involved in the perception of volatile amines were detectably expressed. Other genes known to participate in olfactory signaling pathways were among the 200 genes with the highest expression levels in the OE. To identify OE-specific genes, we compared olfactory neuron expression profiles with RNA-Seq transcriptome data from different murine tissues. By analyzing different transcript classes, we detected the expression of non-olfactory GPCRs in ORNs and established an expression ranking for GPCRs detected in the OE. We also identified other previously undescribed membrane proteins as potential new players in olfaction. The quantitative and comprehensive transcriptome data provide a virtually complete catalogue of genes expressed in the OE and present a useful tool to uncover candidate genes involved in, for example, olfactory signaling, OR trafficking and recycling, and proliferation. PMID:25590618

  18. Functional characterization of muscarinic receptors in murine airways.

    PubMed Central

    Garssen, J.; Van Loveren, H.; Gierveld, C. M.; Van der Vliet, H.; Nijkamp, F. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists considered to be selective for M1 receptors (pirenzepine; PZ), M2 receptors (AFDX-116), and for M3 receptors (4-diphenyl acetoxy N-methyl-piperidine (4-DAMP)) were used to investigate the existence of muscarinic receptors subtypes in murine airways. Atropine was used as a nonselective antagonist. The effects of these antagonists were studied upon tracheal contractions induced either by EFS (electric field stimulation) or by application of an exogenous cholinoceptor agonist (arecoline). 2. The muscarinic receptor antagonists tested inhibited arecoline-induced tracheal contractions with the following rank order of potency: 4-DAMP = atropine > pirenzepine = AFDX-116. The rank order of potency of the muscarinic antagonists used in inhibiting EFS-induced tracheal contractions was: 4-DAMP = atropine > PZ > AFDX-116. The pA2 values for these antagonists were similar when compared to the pA2 values determined in guinea-pig and bovine airway smooth muscle. 3. In addition to in vitro studies, the effects of inhalation of the different muscarinic antagonists on lung function parameters in vivo were investigated. Inhalation of 4-DAMP induced a decrease in airway resistance and an increase in lung compliance. In contrast, inhalation of AFDX-116 induced an increase in airway resistance and almost no change in lung compliance. Apart from some minor effects of atropine on airway resistance, atropine, PZ, and pilocarpine failed to induce changes in lung mechanics as determined by in vivo lung function measurements. 4. The results provide evidence for the existence of M3 receptors on murine tracheae that are involved in the contraction of tracheal smooth muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8495246

  19. Optimizing dosage of ketamine and xylazine in murine echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Ming, Ziqiu; Dart, Anthony M; Du, Xiao-Jun

    2007-01-01

    1. Ketamine and xylazine (KX) mixture is the most commonly used anaesthetic drug during echocardiography in mice to induce sedation and immobility. Nevertheless, the doses of KX reported in the literature vary substantially with associated significant difference in cardiac function. To explore the optimal KX dosage and observation time for murine echocardiography, we compared the effects of various KX combinations on echocardiographic measurement. 2. Mice were anaesthetized with ketamine (50 or 100 mg/kg) and xylazine (0-10 mg/kg). Echocardiography was performed 5, 10, 20 and 40 min after induction of anaesthesia. Also, cardiac function was assessed in mice with and without pressure-overload induced left ventricle (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction, either under anaesthesia with KX or whilst conscious. 3. Ketamine at 100 mg/kg alone or together with xylazine at 0.1 mg/kg was associated with a high and stable heart rate (HR), a high fractional shortening (FS) and produced the least effect on LV inner dimension at end of diastole (LVIDd). Ketamine and xylazine at 100 and 10 mg/kg, respectively, produced a lower and stable FS, but with a low and unstable HR. All other combinations resulted in depressed and unstable cardiac function during this period. 4. The dose-dependent suppression of FS by xylazine was counteracted partly by ketamine. 5. Although in the chronic pressure-overload model LV hypertrophy can be detected accurately in both the anaesthetized or conscious state, systolic dysfunction was masked partially by higher doses of xylazine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg) combined with ketamine at 100 mg/kg. 6. With KX anaesthesia, both the dose of xylazine and the anaesthetic duration are critical in achieving an ideal condition for murine echocardiography. Ketamine at 100 mg/kg alone produces acceptable anaesthesia, stable cardiac function with a minimal depressant effect and is therefore recommended if single-dose anaesthetic is to be used.

  20. Force-Induced Craniosynostosis in the Murine Sagittal Suture

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Rhee, Samuel T.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The etiology of non-syndromic craniosynostosis remains elusive. While compressive forces have been implicated in premature suture fusion, conclusive evidence of force-induced craniosynostosis is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine if cyclical loading of the murine calvarium could induce suture fusion. METHODS Calvarial coupons from post-natal day 21, B6CBA wild-type mice (n = 18) were harvested and cultured. A custom appliance capable of delivering controlled, cyclical, compressive loads was applied perpendicular to the sagittal suture within the coupon in vitro. Nine coupons were subjected to 0.3g of force for 30 minutes each day for a total of 14 days. A control group of nine coupons was clamped in the appliance without loading. Analysis of suture phenotype was performed using alkaline phosphatase and H&E staining techniques, as well as in situ hybridization analysis using Bone Sialoprotein (BSP). RESULTS Control group sagittal sutures—which normally remain patent in mice—showed their customary histological appearance. In contradistinction, sagittal sutures subjected to cyclic loading showed histological evidence of premature fusion (craniosynostosis). In addition, alkaline phosphatase activity and BSP expression was observed to be increased in the experimental group when compared to matched controls. CONCLUSIONS An in vitro model of forced-induced craniosynostosis has been devised. Premature fusion of the murine sagittal suture was induced with the application of controlled, cyclical, compressive loads. These results implicate abnormal forces in the development of non-syndromic craniosynostosis, which supports our global hypothesis that epigenetic phenomena have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis. PMID:19952640

  1. Dynein Regulators Are Important for Ecotropic Murine Leukemia Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Valle-Tenney, Roger; Opazo, Tatiana; Cancino, Jorge; Goff, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the early steps of infection, retroviruses must direct the movement of the viral genome into the nucleus to complete their replication cycle. This process is mediated by cellular proteins that interact first with the reverse transcription complex and later with the preintegration complex (PIC), allowing it to reach and enter the nucleus. For simple retroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), the identities of the cellular proteins involved in trafficking of the PIC in infection are unknown. To identify cellular proteins that interact with the MLV PIC, we developed a replication-competent MLV in which the integrase protein was tagged with a FLAG epitope. Using a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we established that the microtubule motor dynein regulator DCTN2/p50/dynamitin interacts with the MLV preintegration complex early in infection, suggesting a direct interaction between the incoming viral particles and the dynein complex regulators. Further experiments showed that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of either DCTN2/p50/dynamitin or another dynein regulator, NudEL, profoundly reduced the efficiency of infection by ecotropic, but not amphotropic, MLV reporters. We propose that the cytoplasmic dynein regulators are a critical component of the host machinery needed for infection by the retroviruses entering the cell via the ecotropic envelope pathway. IMPORTANCE Retroviruses must access the chromatin of host cells to integrate the viral DNA, but before this crucial event, they must reach the nucleus. The movement through the cytoplasm—a crowded environment where diffusion is slow—is thought to utilize retrograde transport along the microtubule network by the dynein complex. Different viruses use different components of this multisubunit complex. We found that the preintegration complex of murine leukemia virus (MLV) interacts with the dynein complex and that regulators of this complex are essential for

  2. Differential display analysis of murine collagen-induced arthritis: cloning of the cDNA-encoding murine ATPase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, E; Ishiguro, N; Miyaishi, O; Takeuchi, A; Nakashima, I; Iwata, H; Isobe, K

    1997-01-01

    We used the differential display technique in order to detect a new gene involved in murine type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). In this study, we have identified a novel gene, IF1, whose expression level is increased during the natural course of CIA. Northern blot analyses suggest that IF1 is involved in the natural course of CIA but is not involved as a trigger of CIA. IF1 is considered to be the murine ATPase inhibitor gene for several reasons. First, IF1 shows an extremely high homology to the rat ATPase inhibitor; the highly conserved region between rat and bovine amino acid residues 22-45, which is the minimum sequence showing ATPase inhibitory activities, is also highly conserved in IF1. Second, IF1 possesses a histidine-rich region in the same area, which is thought to be important for regulation of mammalian inhibitors. Third, the tissue distribution of IF1 is very suggestive. The expression of IF1 was very strong in energetic organs such as the heart, brain and kidney, and the development of arthritis requires great amounts of ATP. As arthritis develops rapidly, the cellular ATP pool may be decreased. Before the ATP pool is exhausted, the ATPase inhibitor may serve as a brake for ATP hydrolysis. If the supply of free energy can be reduced, the inflammation of arthritis may in turn be restored. Our hypothesis is that the ATPase inhibitor is involved in regulating the inflammatory responses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9497501

  3. Human anti-murine antibody responses in ovarian cancer patients undergoing radioimmunotherapy with the murine monoclonal antibody OC-125

    SciTech Connect

    Muto, M.G.; Finkler, N.J.; Kassis, A.I.; Lepisto, E.M.; Knapp, R.C. )

    1990-08-01

    Human anti-murine antibody (HAMA) responses were monitored in 23 patients with recurrent or persistent epithelial ovarian carcinoma undergoing single-dose intraperitoneal radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with the murine monoclonal antibody OC-125. Sera of patients receiving escalating doses of OC-125 F(ab')2 (10-70 mg) radiolabeled with 18 to 141 mCi of iodine-131 were assayed for HAMA by a protein A-based radioimmunoassay. Overall, 70% of patients (16/23) developed HAMA within 10 to 46 days (median = 29) postinfusion, with peak values (23 +/- 6 to 325 +/- 10 micrograms/ml) at 32 to 102 days (median = 38). HAMA was undetectable prior to infusion in all cases and persisted up to 76 weeks. Of patients receiving a dose of 123 mCi or less, 80% (16/20) developed HAMA, whereas in the 140-mCi group, none of the three patients had detectable levels. Two patients in the 140-mCi group demonstrated dose-limiting bone marrow toxicity (severe thrombocytopenia and neutropenia). It is concluded that a single intraperitoneal dose of monoclonal antibody leads to a high incidence of HAMA production. The results also suggest that the likelihood of HAMA formation in patients who either had undergone recent chemotherapy or had received the highest dose of the radioimmunoconjugate is reduced. These observations may be of significance in designing multiple-dose therapy trials as HAMA has been demonstrated to decrease antibody-to-tumor binding and may potentially increase renal, hepatic, and hematologic toxicity associated with radioimmunotherapy.

  4. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S; Basco, Maria D S; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L; Hart, Mark E; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together.

  5. A murine-ES like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Buecker, Christa; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Polo, Jose; Daheron, Laurence; Bu, Lei; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Okwieka, Patricia; Porter, Andrew; Gribnau, Joost; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Geijsen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem cells have been shown to exist in two functionally distinct pluripotent states, embryonic stem cells (ES cell)- and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), which are defined by the culture growth factor conditions. Human ES cells appear to exist in an epiblast-like state, which in comparison to their murine counterparts, is relatively difficult to propagate and manipulate. As a result, gene targeting is difficult and to-date only a handful of human knock-in or knock-out cell lines exist. We explored whether an alternative stem cell state exists for human stem cells as well, and demonstrate that manipulation of the growth factor milieu allows the derivation of a novel human stem cell type that displays morphological, molecular and functional properties of murine ES cells and facilitates gene targeting. As such, the murine ES-like state provides a powerful tool for the generation of recombinant human pluripotent stem cell lines. PMID:20569691

  6. Effect of cell cycle synchronization on the accuracy of murine and bovine embryo sex determination.

    PubMed

    Hossepian de Lima, V F; De Bem, A R; Jorge, W; Moreira-Filho, C A

    1994-02-01

    Different cell cycle synchronization methods were used to increase the mitotic index and accuracy of sex determination in murine and bovine embryos. For sexing purposes, colchicine treatment for 2, 4, 6 and 8 h and the FdU-thymidine-colchicine combination were tested in murine embryos. The best results were obtained with colchicine treatment for 8 h (96.88% accuracy) and with FdU-thymidine-colchicine (97.22% accuracy). Mitotic indexes differed significantly between the 2 treatments (21.71% for colchicine and 32.95% for FdU-thymidine-colchicine). For sex identification of murine and bovine demi-embryos, both treatments were demonstrated to be equally effective (nearly 90%). The mitotic index for the FdU-treated murine demi-embryos (19.04%) was higher than the one obtained for the 8-h colchicine treatment (15.62%).

  7. Studies on the murine Ss protein. I. Purification, molecular weight, and subunit structure

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The murine Ss protein has been isolated and purified. Using specific antisera, the radiolabeled protein has a mol wt of 120,000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. It is composed of two basic subunits of 23,000 and 14,000 daltons. The smaller molecular weight subunit contains a single disulfide bridge, is devoid of carbohydrate, and may represent the murine equivalent of beta2-microglobulin. PMID:809530

  8. Detection of Murine Typhus Infection in Fleas by Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    spotted fever ( Rickettsia group-specific primers and probes for the diagnosis of rick- rickettsii ), epidemic typhus ( Rickettsia prowazekii), murine...Polymerase chain reaction, Xenops.yl~j.Lopsis;" Rickettsia typhi,- Enz me-linked immunosorbent assay ’ A amplificatin6 fProu)t 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on...olymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of CDNA was used to detect the etiologic agent of murine typhus, Rickettsia typhi, in experimentally infected

  9. Handling stress may confound murine gut microbiota studies

    PubMed Central

    Allen-Blevins, Cary R.; You, Xiaomeng; Hinde, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence indicates interactions between human milk composition, particularly sugars (human milk oligosaccharides or HMO), the gut microbiota of human infants, and behavioral effects. Some HMO secreted in human milk are unable to be endogenously digested by the human infant but are able to be metabolized by certain species of gut microbiota, including Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis), a species sensitive to host stress (Bailey & Coe, 2004). Exposure to gut bacteria like B. infantisduring critical neurodevelopment windows in early life appears to have behavioral consequences; however, environmental, physical, and social stress during this period can also have behavioral and microbial consequences. While rodent models are a useful method for determining causal relationships between HMO, gut microbiota, and behavior, murine studies of gut microbiota usually employ oral gavage, a technique stressful to the mouse. Our aim was to develop a less-invasive technique for HMO administration to remove the potential confound of gavage stress. Under the hypothesis that stress affects gut microbiota, particularly B. infantis, we predicted the pups receiving a prebiotic solution in a less-invasive manner would have the highest amount of Bifidobacteria in their gut. Methods This study was designed to test two methods, active and passive, of solution administration to mice and the effects on their gut microbiome. Neonatal C57BL/6J mice housed in a specific-pathogen free facility received increasing doses of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) solution or deionized, distilled water. Gastrointestinal (GI) tracts were collected from five dams, six sires, and 41 pups over four time points. Seven fecal pellets from unhandled pups and two pellets from unhandled dams were also collected. Qualitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to quantify and compare the amount of Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes

  10. Development of a mechanical testing assay for fibrotic murine liver

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Stephanie L.; Lyshchik, Andrej; Washington, Mary K.; Gore, John C.; Miga, Michael I.

    2007-11-15

    In this article, a novel protocol for mechanical testing, combined with finite element modeling, is presented that allows the determination of the elastic modulus of normal and fibrotic murine livers and is compared to an independent mechanical testing method. The novel protocol employs suspending a portion of murine liver tissue in a cylindrical polyacrylamide gel, imaging with a microCT, conducting mechanical testing, and concluding with a mechanical property determination via a finite element method analysis. More specifically, the finite element model is built from the computerized tomography (CT) images, and boundary conditions are imposed in order to simulate the mechanical testing conditions. The resulting model surface stress is compared to that obtained during mechanical testing, which subsequently allows for direct evaluation of the liver modulus. The second comparison method involves a mechanical indentation test performed on a remaining liver lobe for comparison. In addition, this lobe is used for histological analysis to determine relationships between elasticity measurements and tissue health. This complete system was used to study 14 fibrotic livers displaying advanced fibrosis (injections with irritant), three control livers (injections without irritant), and three normal livers (no injections). The moduli evaluations for nondiseased livers were estimated as 0.62{+-}0.09 kPa and 0.59{+-}0.1 kPa for indenter and model-gel-tissue (MGT) assay tests, respectively. Moduli estimates for diseased liver ranged from 0.6-1.64 kPa and 0.96-1.88 kPa for indenter and MGT assay tests, respectively. The MGT modulus, though not equivalent to the modulus determined by indentation, demonstrates a high correlation, thus indicating a relationship between the two testing methods. The results also showed a clear difference between nondiseased and diseased livers. The developed MGT assay system is quite compact and could easily be utilized for controlled evaluation of

  11. Low concentrations of human neutrophil peptide ameliorate experimental murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Takuro; Sakiyama, Toshio; Kanmura, Shuji; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Ibusuki, Kazunari; Tanoue, Shiroh; Komaki, Yuga; Arima, Shiho; Nasu, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Fumisato; Taguchi, Hiroki; Numata, Masatsugu; Uto, Hirofumi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Ido, Akio

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) not only have antimicrobial properties, but also exert multiple immunomodulatory effects depending on the concentration used. We have previously demonstrated that the intraperitoneal administration of high-dose HNP-1 (100 µg/day) aggravates murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, suggesting a potential pro-inflammatory role for HNPs at high concentrations. However, the role of low physiological concentrations of HNPs in the intestinal tract remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of low concentrations of HNPs on intestinal inflammation. We first examined the effects of the mild transgenic overexpression of HNP-1 in DSS-induced colitis. HNP-1 transgenic mice have plasma HNP-1 levels similar to the physiological concentrations in human plasma. Compared to wild-type mice treated with DSS, HNP-1 transgenic mice treated with DSS had significantly lower clinical and histological scores, and lower colonic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We then injected low-dose HNP-1 (5 µg/day) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally into C57BL/6N and BALB/c mice administered DSS. The HNP-1-treated mice exhibited significantly milder colitis with reduced expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with the PBS-treated mice. Finally, we examined the in vitro effects of HNP-1 on the expression of cytokines associated with macrophage activation. Low physiological concentrations of HNP-1 did not significantly affect the expression levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 or IL-10 in colonic lamina propria mononuclear cells activated with heat-killed Escherichia coli, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of HNP-1 on murine colitis may not be exerted by direct action on intestinal macrophages. Collectively, our data demonstrated a biphasic dose-dependent effect of HNP-1 on DSS-induced colitis: an amelioration at

  12. Verapamil ameliorates the clinical and pathological course of murine myocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Dong, R; Liu, P; Wee, L; Butany, J; Sole, M J

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the calcium channel blocking agent, verapamil, were studied in a murine model of viral myocarditis. Three groups of 8-wk-old DBA/2 mice (n = 25 each) were inoculated with 10 plaque-forming units of encephalomyocarditis virus and randomized to three treatment regimens. Group 1 mice received verapamil intraperitoneally (5 mg/kg per d) for 7 d before infection, followed by verapamil orally (mean dose of 3.5 mg/mouse per d) in drinking water during infection. Group 2 mice received only verapamil orally starting on day 4 after infection, coincident with peak viremia. Group 3 (infected control) received no verapamil in regular drinking water after viral inoculation. Additional control animals were studied in group 4 (n = 21), consisting of uninfected control animals receiving intraperitoneal and oral verapamil at doses identical to group 1, and in group 5 (n = 21), consisting of uninfected and untreated controls. Animals were randomly killed from each group (n = 7) at 7, 14, and 28 d after infection. Routine histology was performed blindly on an apical slice of each heart and semi-quantitatively graded for inflammation, necrosis, calcification, and fibrosis on a scale of 0-4. Digital planimetry was performed to measure the absolute and relative areas of inflammation and necrosis. The pretreated animals in group 1 showed marked reduction in inflammation and necrosis (score of 3.7 +/- 1.4 vs. 8.7 +/- 2.0 in group 3 on day 14, P < 0.05) and were indistinguishable from the posttreated group 2 mice (score of 4.0 +/- 1.5 vs. 8.7 +/- 2.0 in group 3 on day 14, P < 0.05). All the uninfected control animals (groups 4 and 5) showed no myocardial lesions whether treated with verapamil or not. Quantitative planimetry confirmed decreased inflammation and necrosis (2.0 +/- 3.3% in group 1 and 3.5 +/- 3.1% in group 2 vs. 21.9 +/- 22.6% in group 3 on day 14). Untreated infected hearts injected with liquid silicone rubber exhibited extensive areas of focal microvascular

  13. Bone marrow mononuclears from murine tibia after spaceflight on biosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Elena; Roe, Maria; Buravkova, Ludmila; Andrianova, Irina; Goncharova, Elena; Gornostaeva, Alexandra

    Elucidation of the space flight effects on the adult stem and progenitor cells is an important goal in space biology and medicine. A unique opportunity for this is provided by project "BION -M1". The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 30-day flight on biosatellite "BION - M1" and the subsequent 7-day recovery on the quantity, viability, immunophenotype of mononuclears from murine tibia bone marrow. Also the in vitro characterization of functional capacity of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) was scheduled. Under the project, the S57black/6 mice were divided into groups: spaceflight/vivarium control, recovery after spaceflight/ vivarium control to recovery. Bone marrow mononuclears were isolated from the tibia and immunophenotyped using antibodies against CD45, CD34, CD90 on a flow cytometer Epics XL (Beckman Coulter). A part of the each pool was frozen for subsequent estimation of hematopoietic colony-forming units (CFU), the rest was used for the evaluation of fibroblast CFU (CFUf) number, MSC proliferative activity and osteogenic potency. The cell number in the flight group was significantly lower than in the vivarium control group. There were no differences in this parameter between flight and control groups after 7 days of recovery. The mononuclears viability was more than 95 percent in all examined groups. Flow cytometric analysis showed no differences in the bone marrow cell immunophenotype (CD45, CD34, CD90.1 (Thy1)), but the flight animals had more large-sized CD45+mononuclears, than the control groups of mice. There was no difference in the CFUf number between groups. After 7 days in vitro the MSC number in flight group was twice higher than in vivarium group, after 10 days - 4 times higher. These data may indicate a higher proliferative activity of MSCs after spaceflight. MSCs showed the same and high alkaline phosphatase activity, both in flight and in the control groups, suggesting no effect of spaceflight factors on early

  14. Assessment of carbon nanoparticle exposure on murine macrophage function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suro-Maldonado, Raquel M.

    There is growing concern about the potential cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. Exposure to respirable ultrafine particles (2.5uM) can adversely affect human health and have been implicated with episodes of increased respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. Nanoparticles are of particular interest because of their ability to penetrate into the lung and potentially elicit health effects triggering immune responses. Nanoparticles are structures and devises with length scales in the 1 to 100-nanometer range. Black carbon (BC) nanoparticles have been observed to be products of combustion, especially flame combustion and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to be found in both indoor and outdoor air. Furthermore, asbestos, which have been known to cause mesothelioma as well as lung cancer, have been shown to be structurally identical to MWCNTs. The aims of these studies were to examine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on murine macrophage function and clearance mechanisms. Macrophages are immune cells that function as the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are likely to be amongst the first cells affected by nanoparticles. Our research focused on two manufactured nanoparticles, MWCNT and BC. The two were tested against murine-derived macrophages in a chronic contact model. We hypothesized that long-term chronic exposure to carbon nanoparticles would decrease macrophages ability to effectively respond to immunological challenge. Production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), cell surface macrophage; activation markers, reactive oxygen species formation (ROS), and antigen processing and presentation were examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following a 144hr exposure to the particulates. Data demonstrated an increase in TNF-alpha, and NO production; a decrease in phagocytosis and antigen processing and presentation; and a decrease in the expression levels of cell surface macrophage

  15. Low concentrations of human neutrophil peptide ameliorate experimental murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takuro; Sakiyama, Toshio; Kanmura, Shuji; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Ibusuki, Kazunari; Tanoue, Shiroh; Komaki, Yuga; Arima, Shiho; Nasu, Yuichiro; Sasaki, Fumisato; Taguchi, Hiroki; Numata, Masatsugu; Uto, Hirofumi; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Ido, Akio

    2016-12-01

    Human neutrophil peptides (HNPs) not only have antimicrobial properties, but also exert multiple immunomodulatory effects depending on the concentration used. We have previously demonstrated that the intraperitoneal administration of high-dose HNP-1 (100 µg/day) aggravates murine dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, suggesting a potential pro-inflammatory role for HNPs at high concentrations. However, the role of low physiological concentrations of HNPs in the intestinal tract remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of low concentrations of HNPs on intestinal inflammation. We first examined the effects of the mild transgenic overexpression of HNP-1 in DSS-induced colitis. HNP-1 transgenic mice have plasma HNP-1 levels similar to the physiological concentrations in human plasma. Compared to wild-type mice treated with DSS, HNP-1 transgenic mice treated with DSS had significantly lower clinical and histological scores, and lower colonic mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. We then injected low-dose HNP-1 (5 µg/day) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) intraperitoneally into C57BL/6N and BALB/c mice administered DSS. The HNP-1-treated mice exhibited significantly milder colitis with reduced expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with the PBS-treated mice. Finally, we examined the in vitro effects of HNP-1 on the expression of cytokines associated with macrophage activation. Low physiological concentrations of HNP-1 did not significantly affect the expression levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 or IL-10 in colonic lamina propria mononuclear cells activated with heat-killed Escherichia coli, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects of HNP-1 on murine colitis may not be exerted by direct action on intestinal macrophages. Collectively, our data demonstrated a biphasic dose-dependent effect of HNP-1 on DSS-induced colitis: an

  16. Considerations concerning the murine hepatocarcinogenicity of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Maronpot, R R; Anna, C H; Devereux, T R; Lucier, G W; Butterworth, B E; Anderson, M W

    1995-01-01

    Of the chlorinated hydrocarbons discussed above, all six are associated with induction of hepatocellular neoplasia in mice. None of the six is considered to be potent mutagen and most are without any significant genotoxic activity as assessed by conventional in vitro testing schemes. Although some of the agents have biological effects in common (see Figure 4), there is no single biological response (mode of action) that they all share to provide a mechanistic basis for the observed murine hepatocarcinogenicity. Based upon the information currently available for each of the chlorinated hydrocarbons discussed above, it is probable that some modes of action may be more contributory to the rodent carcinogenic response than others; however, no mode of action, pathway, or mechanism should be considered to be mutually exclusive. The murine hepatocarcinogenic effect of TriCE is most probably contingent upon its species-specific metabolism to trichloroacetic acid and DCA. There is fairly consistent evidence that cytotoxicity and reparative hyperplasia are associated with doses of TriCE that cause induction of liver neoplasms. The possibility that peroxisome proliferation is playing a role in the induction of mouse hepatocellular neoplasia remains a tempting explanation, since higher intracellular steady states of H2O2 production would be consistent with observed enhanced cellular proliferation as well as the possibility of in vivo DNA damage. The mouse hepatocarcinogenicity associated with TetCE most probably is associated with species-specific metabolic production of trichloroacetic acid. As with TriCE, cytotoxicity and reparative hyperplasia may represent a potential mode of action for the observed hepatocarcinogenicity. Once again, the potential for enhanced peroxisome proliferation is consistent with enhanced cell proliferation and oxygen radical damage would help explain the random point mutations in ras proto-oncogenes documented in DNA from TetCE-induced mouse liver

  17. Nitric oxide-mediated immunosuppression following murine Echinococcus multilocularis infection

    PubMed Central

    DAI, W J; GOTTSTEIN, B

    1999-01-01

    In some parasitic infections immunosuppression is a prominent characteristic of the host–parasite interplay. We have used a murine alveolar echinococcosis (AE) model in susceptible C57BL/6 mice to document a suppressed splenocyte proliferative response to concanavalin A (Con A) at the early (1-month) stage and to Echinococcus multilocularis-crude antigen (Emc-antigen) at the late (4–6-month) stage of chronic infection. Despite proliferative suppression, splenic cytokine production [interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)] in response to Con A or Emc-antigen stimulation was not suppressed at 1 month postinfection (p.i.). Infection resulted in a strong Mac-1+ cell infiltration of the peritoneal cavity and spleen. Peritoneal cells (PEC) from mice infected at the 1-month stage were rich in macrophages and expressed significantly higher levels of transcripts for the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and for tumour necrosis factor-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), when compared with PEC from non-infected control mice. Conversely, the IL-10 transcript level remained low and did not change during infection. Spleen cells supplemented with PEC from infected mice induced a marked increase in the levels of nitrite in response to Con A and Emc-antigen stimulation, and also a complete suppression of splenic proliferation. The spleen cells from late-stage infected mice expressed only background levels of IL-10 but greatly increased levels of iNOS, when compared with normal spleen cells. This observation correlated with the immunosuppression demonstrated at the late stage of murine AE. Furthermore, the suppressed splenic proliferative responses observed at the early and late stage were reversed to a large extent by the addition of NG-monomethyl-l-arginine and partially by anti-IFN-γ. Thus, our results demonstrated that the immunosuppression observed in chronic AE was not primarily dependent on IL-10 but rather on nitric oxide production by macrophages

  18. Murine Cervical Heart Transplantation Model Using a Modified Cuff Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Markus; Ritschl, Paul; Oellinger, Robert; Aigner, Felix; Sucher, Robert; Schneeberger, Stefan; Pratschke, Johann; Brandacher, Gerald; Maglione, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models are of special interest in research since a wide variety of monoclonal antibodies and commercially defined inbred and knockout strains are available to perform mechanistic in vivo studies. While heart transplantation models using a suture technique were first successfully developed in rats, the translation into an equally widespread used murine equivalent was never achieved due the technical complexity of the microsurgical procedure. In contrast, non-suture cuff techniques, also developed initially in rats, were successfully adapted for use in mice1-3. This technique for revascularization involves two major steps I) everting the recipient vessel over a polyethylene cuff; II) pulling the donor vessel over the formerly everted recipient vessel and holding it in place with a circumferential tie. This ensures a continuity of the endothelial layer, short operating time and very high patency rates4. Using this technique for vascular anastomosis we performed more than 1,000 cervical heart transplants with an overall success rate of 95%. For arterial inflow the common carotid artery and the proximal aortic arch were anastomosed resulting in a retrograde perfusion of the transplanted heart. For venous drainage the pulmonary artery of the graft was anastomosed with the external jugular vein of the recipient5. Herein, we provide additional details of this technique to supplement the video. PMID:25350682

  19. Inactivation of murine norovirus and feline calicivirus during oyster fermentation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Joo; Lee, Min Hwa; Seo, Jina; Ha, Sang-Do; Choi, Changsun

    2014-12-01

    Fermented seafood is popular in Asian countries. This study examined the survival of feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV) during oyster fermentation. Oysters spiked with FCV and MNV were fermented with 5% or 10% salt at 18 °C for 15 days, and MNV and FCV titers, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) populations, pH, and enzymatic activity were measured at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 15 days post-fermentation (DPF). Reductions in MNV and FCV were greater in 5% NaCl-supplemented oysters than in 10% NaCl-supplemented oysters. In 5% NaCl oysters, MNV and FCV titers significantly decreased by 1.60 log and 3.01 log, respectively, at 15 DPF. Populations of LAB increased from 3.62 log10 colony-forming units/g at 0 DPF to 8.77 log10 colony-forming units/g at 15 DPF during oyster fermentation supplemented with 5% NaCl supplementation, and the pH decreased gradually from 5.38 at 0 DPF to 4.17 at 15 DPF. During oyster fermentation, α-amylase, proteinase, and lipase were produced at higher levels in 5% salted oysters than in 10% salted oysters (P < 0.01). We concluded that many of the antimicrobial factors produced in fermented oysters could contribute to a reduction in foodborne viruses.

  20. Bmp4 from the optic vesicle specifies murine retina formation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Liu, Ying; Oltean, Alina; Beebe, David C

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies of mouse embryos concluded that after the optic vesicle evaginates from the ventral forebrain and contacts the surface ectoderm, signals from the ectoderm specify the distal region of the optic vesicle to become retina and signals from the optic vesicle induce the lens. Germline deletion of Bmp4 resulted in failure of lens formation. We performed conditional deletion of Bmp4 from the optic vesicle to test the function of Bmp4 in murine eye development. The optic vesicle evaginated normally and contacted the surface ectoderm. Lens induction did not occur. The optic cup failed to form and the expression of retina-specific genes decreased markedly in the distal optic vesicle. Instead, cells in the prospective retina expressed genes characteristic of the retinal pigmented epithelium. We conclude that Bmp4 is required for retina specification in mice. In the absence of Bmp4, formation of the retinal pigmented epithelium is the default differentiation pathway of the optic vesicle. Differences in the signaling pathways required for specification of the retina and retinal pigmented epithelium in chicken and mouse embryos suggest major changes in signaling during the evolution of the vertebrate eye.

  1. Analysis of the complete DNA sequence of murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlinson, W D; Farrell, H E; Barrell, B G

    1996-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the Smith strain of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) was determined from virion DNA by using a whole-genome shotgun approach. The genome has an overall G+C content of 58.7%, consists of 230,278 bp, and is arranged as a single unique sequence with short (31-bp) terminal direct repeats and several short internal repeats. Significant similarity to the genome of the sequenced human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strain AD169 is evident, particularly for 78 open reading frames encoded by the central part of the genome. There is a very similar distribution of G+C content across the two genomes. Sequences toward the ends of the MCMV genome encode tandem arrays of homologous glycoproteins (gps) arranged as two gene families. The left end encodes 15 gps that represent one family, and the right end encodes a different family of 11 gps. A homolog (m144) of cellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes is located at the end of the genome opposite the HCMV MHC class I homolog (UL18). G protein-coupled receptor (GCR) homologs (M33 and M78) occur in positions congruent with two (UL33 and UL78) of the four putative HCMV GCR homologs. Counterparts of all of the known enzyme homologs in HCMV are present in the MCMV genome, including the phosphotransferase gene (M97), whose product phosphorylates ganciclovir in HCMV-infected cells, and the assembly protein (M80). PMID:8971012

  2. Klebsiella pneumoniae FimK Promotes Virulence in Murine Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rosen, David A; Hilliard, Julia K; Tiemann, Kristin M; Todd, Elizabeth M; Morley, S Celeste; Hunstad, David A

    2016-02-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a chief cause of nosocomial pneumonia, is a versatile and commonly multidrug-resistant human pathogen for which further insight into pathogenesis is needed. We show that the pilus regulatory gene fimK promotes the virulence of K. pneumoniae strain TOP52 in murine pneumonia. This contrasts with the attenuating effect of fimK on urinary tract virulence, illustrating that a single factor may exert opposing effects on pathogenesis in distinct host niches. Loss of fimK in TOP52 pneumonia was associated with diminished lung bacterial burden, limited innate responses within the lung, and improved host survival. FimK expression was shown to promote serum resistance, capsule production, and protection from phagocytosis by host immune cells. Finally, while the widely used K. pneumoniae model strain 43816 produces rapid dissemination and death in mice, TOP52 caused largely localized pneumonia with limited lethality, thereby providing an alternative tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis and control within the lung.

  3. Epigenetic alterations in a murine model for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Shih; Sherman, Mara H; Hertlein, Erin; Johnson, Amy J; Teitell, Michael A; Byrd, John C; Plass, Christoph

    2009-11-15

    Early stages in the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have not been explored mainly due to the inability to study normal B-cells en route to transformation. In order to determine such early events of leukemogenesis, we have used a well established mouse model for CLL. Over-expression of human TCL1, a known CLL oncogene in murine B-cells leads to the development of mature CD19+/CD5+/IgM+ clonal leukemia with a disease phenotype similar to that seen in human CLL. Herein, we review our recent study using this TCL1-driven mouse model for CLL and corresponding human CLL samples in a cross-species epigenomics approach to address the timing and relevance of epigenetic events occurring during leukemogenesis. We demonstrated that the mouse model recapitulates the epigenetic events that have been reported for human CLL, affirming the power and validity of this mouse model to study early epigenetic events in cancer progression. Epigenetic alterations are detected as early as three months after birth, far before disease manifests at about 11 months of age. These mice undergo NFkappaB repressor complex mediated inactivation of the transcription factor Foxd3, whose targets become aberrantly methylated and silenced in mouse and human CLL. Overall, our data suggest the accumulated epigenetic alterations during CLL pathogenesis as a consequence of gene silencing through TCL1 and NFkappaB repressor complex, suggesting the relevance for NFkappaB as a therapeutic target in CLL.

  4. Dynamics of notch expression during murine prostate development and tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Shou, J; Ross, S; Koeppen, H; de Sauvage, F J; Gao, W Q

    2001-10-01

    Notch signaling has been widely demonstrated to be responsible for cell fate determination during normal development and implicated in human T-cell leukemia and mouse mammary carcinomas. Here we show that Notch signaling may be involved in prostatic development and cancer cell growth. In situ hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that Notch1 was expressed in prostate epithelial cells during normal development and in prostate cancer cells. Characterization of Notch1-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice, in which the expression of reporter green fluorescent protein is under the control of the Notch1 promoter, indicated that Notch1-expressing cells were associated with the basal epithelial cell population in the prostate. Examination of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate showed that expression of Notch1 was elevated in malignant prostatic epithelial cells of primary and metastatic tumors. Expression of Notch ligands, however, was low or undetectable in cultured prostate cancer cells or in malignant prostatic epithelial cells in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate. Furthermore, overexpression of a constitutively active form of Notch1 inhibited the proliferation of various prostate cancer cells, including DU145, LNCaP, and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data indicate for the first time that Notch signaling may play a role in murine prostatic development and tumorigenesis.

  5. Manipulation of pulmonary prostacyclin synthase expression prevents murine lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Keith, Robert L; Miller, York E; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Moore, Mark D; Gesell, Tracy L; Gao, Bifeng; Malkinson, Alvin M; Golpon, Heiko A; Nemenoff, Raphael A; Geraci, Mark W

    2002-02-01

    Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity decreases eicosanoid production and prevents lung cancer in animal models. Prostaglandin (PG) I(2) (PGI(2), prostacyclin) is a PGH(2) metabolite with anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and antimetastatic properties. The instability of PGI(2) has limited its evaluation in animal models of cancer. We hypothesized that pulmonary overexpression of prostacyclin synthase may prevent the development of murine lung tumors. Transgenic mice with selective pulmonary prostacyclin synthase overexpression were exposed to two distinct carcinogenesis protocols: an initiation/promotion model and a simple carcinogen model. The transgenic mice exhibited significantly reduced lung tumor multiplicity (tumor number) in proportion to transgene expression, a dose-response effect. Moreover, the highest expressing mice demonstrated reduced tumor incidence. To investigate the mechanism for protection, we evaluated PG levels and inflammatory responses. At the time of sacrifice following one carcinogenesis model, the transgenics exhibited only an increase in 6-keto-PGF(1alpha), not a decrease in PGE(2). Thus, elevated PGI(2) levels and not decreased PGE(2) levels appear to be necessary for the chemopreventive effects. When exposed to a single dose of butylated hydroxytoluene, transgenic mice exhibited a survival advantage; however, reduction in alveolar inflammatory response was not observed. These studies demonstrate that manipulation of PG metabolism downstream from COX produces even more profound lung cancer reduction than COX inhibition alone and could be the basis for new approaches to understanding the pathogenesis and prevention of lung cancer.

  6. TRPC6 regulates CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis of murine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Otto; Umlauf, Daniel; Frank, Svetlana; Schimmelpfennig, Sandra; Bertrand, Jessica; Pap, Thomas; Hanley, Peter J; Fabian, Anke; Dietrich, Alexander; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-06-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms involved in chemotactic navigation of immune cells is of particular interest for the development of new immunoregulatory therapies. It is generally agreed upon that members of the classical transient receptor potential channel family (TRPC) are involved in chemotaxis. However, the regulatory role of TRPC channels in chemoattractant receptor-mediated signaling has not yet been clarified in detail. In this study, we demonstrate that the TRPC6 channels play a pronounced role in CXCR2-mediated intermediary chemotaxis, whereas N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine receptor-mediated end-target chemotaxis is TRPC6 independent. The knockout of TRPC6 channels in murine neutrophils led to a strongly impaired intermediary chemotaxis after CXCR2 activation which is not further reinforced by CXCR2, PI3K, or p38 MAPK inhibition. Furthermore, CXCR2-mediated Ca(2+) influx but not Ca(2+) store release was attenuated in TRPC6(-/-) neutrophils. We demonstrate that the TRPC6 deficiency affected phosphorylation of AKT and MAPK downstream of CXCR2 receptor activation and led to altered remodeling of actin. The relevance of this TRPC6-depending defect in neutrophil chemotaxis is underscored by our in vivo findings. A nonseptic peritoneal inflammation revealed an attenuated recruitment of neutrophils in the peritoneal cavity of TRPC6(-/-) mice. In summary, this paper defines a specific role of TRPC6 channels in CXCR2-induced intermediary chemotaxis. In particular, TRPC6-mediated supply of calcium appears to be critical for activation of downstream signaling components.

  7. Inhibition of a Plasmodium vinckei cysteine proteinase cures murine malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, P J; Lee, G K; Smith, R E

    1993-01-01

    Intraerythrocytic malaria parasites degrade hemoglobin as a principal source of amino acids for parasite protein synthesis. We have previously identified a Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite cysteine proteinase as a putative hemoglobinase and shown that specific inhibitors of this proteinase block the hydrolysis of globin and the development of cultured parasites. We now show that the murine malaria parasite Plasmodium vinckei has an analogous cysteine proteinase with similar biochemical properties to the P. falciparum proteinase, including an acid pH optimum, a preference for the peptide proteolytic substrate benzyloxycarbonyl (Z)-Phe-Arg-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, and nonomolar inhibition by seven peptide fluoromethyl ketone proteinase inhibitors. Thus, P. vinckei offers a model system for the in vivo testing of the antimalarial properties of cysteine proteinase inhibitors. One of the proteinase inhibitors studied, morpholine urea (Mu)-Phe-Homophenylalanine (HPhe)-CH2F strongly inhibited the P. vinckei cysteine proteinase in vitro and rapidly blocked parasite cysteine proteinase activity in vivo. When administered four times a day for 4 d to P. vinckei-infected mice, Mu-Phe-HPhe-CH2F elicited long-term cures in 80% of the treated animals. These results show that peptide proteinase inhibitors can be effective antimalarial compounds in vivo and suggest that the P. falciparum cysteine proteinase is a promising target for chemotherapy. Images PMID:8450035

  8. Disinfection kinetics of murine norovirus using chlorine and chlorine dioxide.

    PubMed

    Lim, Mi Young; Kim, Ju-Mi; Ko, Gwangpyo

    2010-05-01

    We determined the disinfection efficiency of chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) using murine norovirus (MNV) and coliphage MS2 as surrogates for human norovirus. Experiments were performed in oxidant demand-free buffer (pH 7.2) at 5 degrees C and 20 degrees C. The extent of virus inactivation by a disinfectant was quantified using three different analytical methods: plaque, short template real-time TaqMan reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and long template RT-PCR assays. Rapid inactivation of MNV by both chlorine and chlorine dioxide was observed by the plaque assay. According to the efficiency factor Hom model, Ct values of 0.314mg/Lmin and 0.247mg/Lmin were required for a 4-log reduction of MNV at 5 degrees C by chlorine and chlorine dioxide, respectively. Lower Ct values were required at 20 degrees C. Both long template and short template RT-PCR assays significantly underestimated the virus inactivation compared to the plaque assay. Our study demonstrates that adequate treatment of water with either chlorine or ClO(2) is likely to effectively control the waterborne transmission of human norovirus.

  9. TALEN mediated somatic mutagenesis in murine models of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyuan; Li, Lin; Kendrick, Sara L.; Gerard, Robert D.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has identified numerous somatic mutations whose biological relevance is uncertain. In this study, we used genome-editing tools to create and analyze targeted somatic mutations in murine models of liver cancer. TALEN were designed against β-catenin (Ctnnb1) and Apc, two commonly mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), to generate isogenic HCC cell lines. Both mutant cell lines exhibited evidence of Wnt pathway dysregulation. We asked if these TALENs could create targeted somatic mutations after hydrodynamic transfection (HDT) into mouse liver. TALENs targeting β-catenin promoted endogenous HCC carrying the intended gain-of-function mutations. However, TALENs targeting Apc were not as efficient in inducing in vivo homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesized that hepatocyte polyploidy might be protective against TALEN-induced loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and indeed Apc gene editing was less efficient in tetraploid than in diploid hepatocytes. To increase efficiency, we administered adenoviral Apc TALENs and found that we could achieve a higher mutagenesis rate in vivo. Our results demonstrate that genome-editing tools can enable the in vivo study of cancer genes and faithfully recapitulate the mosaic nature of mutagenesis in mouse cancer models. PMID:25070752

  10. Tofacitinib ameliorates murine lupus and its associated vascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Furumoto, Yasuko; Smith, Carolyne K.; Blanco, Luz; Zhao, Wenpu; Brooks, Stephen R.; Thacker, Seth G; Abdalrahman, Zarzour; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Tsai, Wanxia L.; Trier, Anna M.; Nunez, Leti; Mast, Laurel; Hoffmann, Victoria; Remaley, Alan T.; O'Shea, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Dysregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses contributes to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its associated premature vascular damage. To date, no drug targets both systemic inflammatory disease and the cardiovascular complications of SLE. Tofacitinib is a Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor that blocks signaling downstream of multiple cytokines implicated in lupus pathogenesis. While clinical trials have shown that tofacitinib exhibits significant clinical efficacy in various autoimmune diseases, its role in SLE and on its associated vascular pathology remains to be characterized. Methods MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice received tofacitinib or vehicle by gavage for 6 weeks (therapeutic arm) or 8 weeks (preventive arm). Nephritis, skin inflammation, serum autoantibody levels and cytokines, mononuclear cell phenotype and gene expression, neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) release, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and endothelial differentiation were compared in treated and untreated mice. Results Treatment with tofacitinib led to significant improvement in measures of disease activity including nephritis, skin inflammation, and autoantibody production. In addition, tofacitinib treatment reduced serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and interferon responses in splenocytes and kidney tissue. Tofacitinib also modulated NET formation and significantly increased endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and endothelial differentiation. The drug was effective as both preventive and therapeutic strategies. Conclusions Tofacitinib modulates the innate and adaptive immune responses, ameliorates murine lupus and improves vascular function. These results indicate that JAK inhibitors have the potential to be beneficial in SLE and its associated vascular damage. PMID:27429362

  11. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J.; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B.; Deng, Alicia C.; Spin, Joshua M.; Stevenson, David K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  12. Non-apoptotic toxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa toward murine cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sanhita; Bonfield, Tracey; Tartakoff, Alan M

    2013-01-01

    Although P. aeruginosa is especially dangerous in cystic fibrosis (CF), there is no consensus as to how it kills representative cell types that are of key importance in the lung. This study concerns the acute toxicity of the sequenced strain, PAO1, toward a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7). Toxicity requires brief contact with the target cell, but is then delayed for more than 12 h. None of the classical toxic effectors of this organism is required and cell death occurs without phagocytosis or acute perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton. Apoptosis is not required for toxicity toward either RAW 264.7 cells or for alveolar macrophages. Transcriptional profiling shows that encounter between PAO1 and RAW 264.7 cells elicits an early inflammatory response, followed by growth arrest. As an independent strategy to understand the mechanism of toxicity, we selected variant RAW 264.7 cells that resist PAO1. Upon exposure to P. aeruginosa, they are hyper-responsive with regard to classical inflammatory cytokine production and show transient downregulation of transcripts that are required for cell growth. They do not show obvious morphologic changes. Although they do not increase interferon transcripts, when exposed to PAO1 they dramatically upregulate a subset of the responses that are characteristic of exposure to g-interferon, including several guanylate-binding proteins. The present observations provide a novel foundation for learning how to equip cells with resistance to a complex challenge.

  13. Toxicity of Calcium Hydroxide Nanoparticles on Murine Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Omid; Azadnia, Sina; Mozayeni, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: One of the major contributing factors, which may cause failure of endodontic treatment, is the presence of residual microorganisms in the root canal system. For years, most dentists have been using calcium hydroxide (CH) as the intracanal medicament between treatment sessions to eliminate remnant microorganisms. Reducing the size of CH particles into nanoparticles enhances the penetration of this medicament into dentinal tubules and increases their antimicrobial efficacy. This in vitro study aimed to compare the cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles and conventional CH on fibroblast cell line using the Mosmann’s Tetrazolium Toxicity (MTT) assay. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted on L929 murine fibroblast cell line by cell culture and evaluation of the direct effect of materials on the cultured cells. Materials were evaluated in two groups of 10 samples each at 24, 48 and 72 h. At each time point, 10 samples along with 5 positive and 5 negative controls were evaluated. The samples were transferred into tubes and exposed to fibroblast cells. The viability of cells was then evaluated. The Two-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis and the level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Cytotoxicity of both materials decreased over time and for conventional CH was lower than that of nanoparticles. However, this difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles was similar to that of conventional CH. PMID:25598810

  14. Tert-butylhydroquinone Compromises Survival in Murine Experimental Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiahong; Hu, Heng; Ren, Xuefang; Simpkins, James W.

    2016-01-01

    tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), an Nrf2 signaling pathway inducer that is widely used as a food additive in the U.S., prevents oxidative stress-induced cytotoxicity in neurons. This study assesses the effects of tBHQ on ischemic stroke outcomes in mice. We measured infarct size, neurological deficits, and brain volume after tBHQ treatments in murine permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) model in vivo. Further, we evaluated the regulation of tBHQ on mitochondrial function in cerebrovascular endothelial cells in vitro, which is critical to the blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability. Our results demonstrated that tBHQ increased post-stroke mortality and worsened stroke outcomes. Mitochondrial function was suppressed by tBHQ treatment of cerebrovascular endothelial cells, and this suppression was potentiated by co-treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the bacterial mimic. These data indicate that tBHQ-exacerbated stroke damage might due to the compromised BBB permeability in permanent stroke. PMID:26827673

  15. An in vitro model of murine middle ear epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Apoorva; Akram, Khondoker M.; Williams, Debbie; Armes, Hannah; Russell, Catherine; Hood, Derek; Armstrong, Stuart; Stewart, James P.; Brown, Steve D. M.; Bingle, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Otitis media (OM), or middle ear inflammation, is the most common paediatric disease and leads to significant morbidity. Although understanding of underlying disease mechanisms is hampered by complex pathophysiology it is clear that epithelial abnormalities underpin the disease. There is currently a lack of a well-characterised in vitro model of the middle ear (ME) epithelium that replicates the complex cellular composition of the middle ear. Here, we report the development of a novel in vitro model of mouse middle ear epithelial cells (mMECs) at an air–liquid interface (ALI) that recapitulates the characteristics of the native murine ME epithelium. We demonstrate that mMECs undergo differentiation into the varied cell populations seen within the native middle ear. Proteomic analysis confirmed that the cultures secrete a multitude of innate defence proteins from their apical surface. We showed that the mMECs supported the growth of the otopathogen, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), suggesting that the model can be successfully utilised to study host–pathogen interactions in the middle ear. Overall, our mMEC culture system can help to better understand the cell biology of the middle ear and improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of OM. The model also has the potential to serve as a platform for validation of treatments designed to reverse aspects of epithelial remodelling that underpin OM development. PMID:27660200

  16. Abelson murine leukemia virus: structural requirements for transforming gene function.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, A; Dunn, C Y; Yuasa, Y; Devare, S G; Reddy, E P; Aaronson, S A

    1982-01-01

    The integrated Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) genome cloned in bacteriophage lambda gtWES.lambda B was used to localize viral genetic sequences required for transformation. Comparison of the biological activity of cloned A-MuLV genomic and subgenomic fragments showed that subgenomic clones that lacked the 5' long terminal repeat and adjoining sequences (300 base pairs downstream of the repeat) were not biologically active. In contrast, subgenomic clones that lacked the 3' long terminal repeat and as much as 1.3 kilobase pairs of the A-MuLV cell-derived abl gene were as efficient as wild-type viral DNA in transformation. The A-MuLV-encoded polyprotein P120 and its associated protein kinase activity were detected in transformants obtained by transfection with Cla I, BamHI, and HindIII subgenomic clones. In contrast, individual transformants obtained with subgenomic Sal I clones expressed A-MuLV proteins ranging in size from 82,000 to 95,000 daltons. Each demonstrated an associated protein kinase activity. These results provide direct genetic evidence that only the proximal 40% of abl with its associated 5' helper viral sequences is required for fibroblast transformation. Images PMID:6291048

  17. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  18. Nardilysin regulates inflammation, metaplasia, and tumors in murine stomach

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuto; Ikuta, Kozo; Kimura, Takeshi; Chiba, Tsutomu; Oshima, Hiroko; Oshima, Masanobu; Nishi, Eiichiro; Seno, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to a wide variety of human disorders. In the stomach, longstanding gastritis often results in structural alterations in the gastric mucosa, including metaplastic changes and gastric cancers. Therefore, it is important to elucidate factors that are involved in gastric inflammation. Nardilysin (N-arginine dibasic convertase; Nrdc) is a metalloendopeptidase of the M16 family that promotes ectodomain shedding of the precursor forms of various growth factors and cytokines by enhancing the protease activities of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) proteins. Here, we have demonstrated that Nrdc crucially regulates gastric inflammation caused by Helicobacter felis infection or forced expression of prostaglandin E2 in K19-C2mE mice. Metaplastic changes following gastric inflammation were suppressed by the deletion of Nrdc. Furthremore, the deletion of Nrdc significantly suppressed N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced gastric tumorigenesis in the murine stomach. These data may lead to a global therapeutic approach against various gastric disorders by targeting Nrdc. PMID:28230087

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed.

  20. Analytical workflow profiling gene expression in murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Scott E.; González-Peña, Dianelys; Lawson, Marcus A.; McCusker, Robert H.; Hernandez, Alvaro G.; O’Connor, Jason C.; Dantzer, Robert; Kelley, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive and simultaneous analysis of all genes in a biological sample is a capability of RNA-Seq technology. Analysis of the entire transcriptome benefits from summarization of genes at the functional level. As a cellular response of interest not previously explored with RNA-Seq, peritoneal macrophages from mice under two conditions (control and immunologically challenged) were analyzed for gene expression differences. Quantification of individual transcripts modeled RNA-Seq read distribution and uncertainty (using a Beta Negative Binomial distribution), then tested for differential transcript expression (False Discovery Rate-adjusted p-value < 0.05). Enrichment of functional categories utilized the list of differentially expressed genes. A total of 2079 differentially expressed transcripts representing 1884 genes were detected. Enrichment of 92 categories from Gene Ontology Biological Processes and Molecular Functions, and KEGG pathways were grouped into 6 clusters. Clusters included defense and inflammatory response (Enrichment Score = 11.24) and ribosomal activity (Enrichment Score = 17.89). Our work provides a context to the fine detail of individual gene expression differences in murine peritoneal macrophages during immunological challenge with high throughput RNA-Seq. PMID:25708305

  1. Immunomodulation by Blastomyces dermatitidis: functional activity of murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, L S; Cozad, G C

    1983-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays the dominant role in the immune response of mice to Blastomyces dermatitidis infections. Since macrophages play an important role in cell-mediated immunity, the interactions between sensitized murine peritoneal macrophages and the yeast phase of B. dermatitidis were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the sensitized macrophages readily phagocytized B. dermatitidis yeast cells. In addition, there appeared to be activation of metabolic pathways within the sensitized macrophages, as indicated by increased chemiluminescence activity during phagocytosis. Sensitized macrophages were significantly better at controlling intracellular proliferation of the yeast cells when compared to nonsensitized cells. This was determined by disruption of macrophages and plating for viable yeasts. Scanning electron microscope observations offered further substantiation. Experiments with Candida albicans indicated that B. dermatitidis non-specifically activated macrophages. At 2 h postphagocytosis, 30% fewer C. albicans in B. dermatitidis-activated macrophages were able to form germ tubes. These studies demonstrated the multiple potential of activated macrophages with regard to their functional activity. Images PMID:6840859

  2. Specific binding sites for muramyl peptides on murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.H.S.; Krueger, J.M.; Karnovsky, M.L.

    1986-03-15

    Two radiolabeled (/sup 125/I) muramyl peptide derivatives of high specific activity were prepared: a tripeptide with an iodinated C-terminal tyrosine methyl ester (Ligand I), and a muramyl tripeptide with a C-terminal lysine derivatized with Bolton-Hunter reagent (Ligand II). These were used to characterize binding of muramyl peptides to monolayers of murine macrophages. Saturable high-affinity binding to resident, caseinate-elicited, and Listeria-activated peritoneal cells was observed with both radioligands. Binding affinities varied with the state of activation of the macrophages, and K/sub D/ values ranged from 48 +/- 33 pM (for resident macrophages, Ligand I) to 1020 +/- 90 pM (for activated macrophages, Ligand II). Specific binding sites were also found on a macrophage-derived cell line. The ability of several unlabeled muramyl peptides to compete with Ligands I and II for their binding sites was tested. Competition was stereospecific and correlated with known biological activities of these compounds (i.e., immunoadjuvanticity, pyrogenicity, and somnogenicity). The sites identified here for Ligands I and II may mediate some of the effects that muramyl peptides have previously been demonstrated to have on macrophages.

  3. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836

  4. Inhibition of murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation by 3-deazaadenosine.

    PubMed

    Sherman, M L; Shafman, T D; Spriggs, D R; Kufe, D W

    1985-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that 5'-methylthioadenosine, an inhibitor of S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy) hydrolase, blocks induction of murine erythroleukemia cell (MEL) differentiation. The nucleoside analogue 3-deazaadenosine (c3Ado) is both an efficient substrate and a potent inhibitor of AdoHcy hydrolase. The present study was undertaken to determine whether c3Ado would similarly inhibit MEL differentiation. The results demonstrate that c3Ado inhibits induction of MEL differentiation by dimethyl sulfoxide, hexamethylene bisacetamide, butyric acid, and diazapam. c3Ado blocks the appearance of the differentiated MEL phenotype by inhibiting both MEL heme synthesis and transcription of alpha- and beta-globin RNA. The inhibitory effect of c3Ado on MEL differentiation is concentration dependent, reversible, and potentiated by L-homocysteine thiolactone. Furthermore the AdoHcy/AdoMet ratio increases nearly 3.5-fold after 24 h of treatment with 50 microM c3Ado. In contrast, this c3Ado effect is not associated with polyamine depletion or cytostasis. These findings indicate that c3Ado blocks the induction of MEL differentiation at a transcriptional level and that this effect may be related to inhibition of AdoHcy hydrolase.

  5. Chinese medicinal herbs inhibit growth of murine renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lau, B H; Ruckle, H C; Botolazzo, T; Lui, P D

    1994-01-01

    Tumors are known to produce factors suppressing immune functions. We previously showed that a murine renal cell carcinoma (Renca) suppressed macrophage function in vitro and that this suppression was abolished by co-incubation with extracts of two Chinese medicinal herbs. We now report that these phytochemicals are capable of inhibiting growth of Renca in vivo. BALB/c mice were transplanted intraperitoneally (IP) with 1-2 x 10(5) Renca cells. One day after tumor transplant, mice were randomized into two groups. One group was treated IP, daily for 10 days, with 100 microliters of phytochemicals containing 500 micrograms each of Astragalus membranaceus and Ligustrum lucidum, while the other group received saline as controls. A cure rate of 57% was obtained with these phytochemicals when the initial tumor load was 2 x 10(5), and 100% when the initial tumor load was 1 x 10(5). Additional experiments were performed to investigate the mechanisms involved in this protection. Splenic macrophages from tumor-bearing mice were shown to have depressed chemiluminescent oxidative burst activity, and this depression was restored with phytochemical treatment. Splenocytes from mice transplanted with Renca responded less favorably to interleukin-2 (IL-2) in generating lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells; again this depression was restored with phytochemical treatment. Our data suggest that these phytochemicals may have exerted their antitumor effects via augmentation of phagocyte and LAK cell activities.

  6. Oxygen-regulated gene expression in murine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Kind, Karen L; Tam, Kimberley K Y; Banwell, Kelly M; Gauld, Ashley D; Russell, Darryl L; Macpherson, Anne M; Brown, Hannah M; Frank, Laura A; Peet, Daniel J; Thompson, Jeremy G

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an important component of the environment of the cumulus-oocyte complex (COC), both in vivo within the ovarian follicle and during in vitro oocyte maturation (IVM). Cumulus cells have a key role in supporting oocyte development, and cumulus cell function and gene expression are known to be altered when the environment of the COC is perturbed. Oxygen-regulated gene expression is mediated through the actions of the transcription factors, the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). In the present study, the effect of oxygen on cumulus cell gene expression was examined following in vitro maturation of the murine COC at 2%, 5% or 20% oxygen. Increased expression of HIF-responsive genes, including glucose transporter-1, lactate dehydrogenase A and BCL2/adenovirus E1B interacting protein 3, was observed in cumulus cells matured at 2% or 5%, compared with 20% oxygen. Stabilisation of HIF1α protein in cumulus cells exposed to low oxygen was confirmed by western blot and HIF-mediated transcriptional activity was demonstrated using a transgenic mouse expressing green fluorescent protein under the control of a promoter containing hypoxia response elements. These results indicate that oxygen concentration influences cumulus cell gene expression and support a role for HIF1α in mediating the cumulus cell response to varying oxygen.

  7. Quantitative Monitoring of Murine Lung Tumors by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Krupnick, Alexander Sasha; Tidwell, Vanessa K.; Engelbach, John A.; Alli, Vamsi V.; Nehorai, Arye; You, Ming; Vikis, Haris G.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Kreisel, Daniel; Garbow, Joel R.

    2013-01-01

    Primary lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the western world and the lung is a common site for recurrence of extra-thoracic malignancies. Small-animal (rodent) models of cancer can play a very valuable role in the development of improved therapeutic strategies. However, detection of murine pulmonary tumors and their subsequent response to therapy, in situ, is challenging. We have recently described magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a reliable, reproducible, and non-destructive modality for the detection and serial monitoring of pulmonary tumors. Combining respiratory-gated data acquisition methods with manual and automated segmentation algorithms described by our laboratory, pulmonary tumor burden can be quantitatively measured in approximately one hour (data acquisition plus analysis) per mouse. Quantitative, analytic methods are described for measuring tumor burden in both primary (discrete tumors) and metastatic (diffuse tumors) disease. Thus, small-animal MRI represents a novel and unique research tool for preclinical investigation of therapeutic strategies for treatment of pulmonary malignancies and may be valuable in evaluating new compounds targeting lung cancer in vivo. PMID:22222788

  8. Radiosensitization of two murine fibrosarcomas with 6-thioguanine.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Alfieri, A A; Kim, S H; Hong, S S

    1990-03-01

    In Vivo murine tumor experiments were carried out to determine whether 6-thioguanine (6-TG) could enhance the cytotoxic effects of radiation on tumors. The combined effects of single and fractionated x-irradiation were evaluated on the transplanted methylcholanthrene induced fibrosarcoma (Meth-A) in BALB/c mice, a moderately radioresponsive tumor and on the radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) in C3H/He mice, a highly radioresistant tumor. The combined treatment of single administration of 6-TG (25 mg/kg) and of x-irradiation (20 Gy) on Meth-A tumors produced more than 90% tumor control, whereas the radiation alone resulted in less than 5% tumor control. The radiosensitizing effect by 6-TG was higher when the drug was administered either 1 to 8 hr prior to or 24 hr after x-irradiation. The dose modification factor of single dose 6-TG (10 mg/kg) is estimated to be 1.47 for Meth-A tumor and 1.25 for RIF tumor. The tumor control rates of fractionated irradiation alone and with concomitant 6-TG in Meth-A tumors were 14% and 59%, respectively. Based on the studies reported here and well documented pharmacokinetics in humans, it is suggested that combined radiation therapy and 6-TG may provide an enhanced therapeutic effect even in tumor varieties where the drug has no apparent anti-tumor activity on non-irradiated cells.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653

  10. Murine cytomegalovirus regulation of NKG2D ligands.

    PubMed

    Lenac, Tihana; Arapović, Jurica; Traven, Luka; Krmpotić, Astrid; Jonjić, Stipan

    2008-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that causes morbidity risk in immunologically suppressed and immunodeficient patients including congenital infections. Approaches to curb the consequences of HCMV infections are restricted by a lack of complete understanding of viral pathogenesis. The infection of mice with murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) as a model of HCMV infection has been particularly useful in elucidating the role of innate and adaptive immune response mechanisms. A large number of cytomegalovirus genes modulate the innate and the adaptive host immune response. The products of several MCMV genes are involved in subverting the natural killer (NK) cell response by down-modulating cellular ligands for the NKG2D receptor expressed on NK cells and CD8(+) T cells. Mutant viruses lacking these immunoevasion genes are attenuated with respect to virus growth in vivo. Given the importance of the NKG2D receptor in controlling both NK- and T cell-mediated immunity, it is of tremendous importance to understand the molecular mechanisms and consequences of viral regulation of the NKG2D ligands.

  11. Growth of Murine Cytomegalovirus in Various Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Soo; Carp, Richard I.

    1971-01-01

    Murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) was capable of infecting and replicating in both primary and continuous cell lines obtained from various species. In African green monkey kidney (BSC-1) cells, primary rabbit kidney cells, and baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells, there were cytopathic effects (CPE) and virus replication upon initial exposure of cells to virus. In primary fetal sheep brain (FSB) cells, L cells, and rabbit kidney (RK-13) cells, it was necessary to subculture the infected cells one or more times before appearance of CPE and replication of virus. In the case of the infected FSB cultures, it was found that the virus effect could be induced if subculturing were accomplished by trypsinization but did not occur if cells were subcultured by scraping. FSB-grown virus replicated better in FSB than in mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells. The CPE produced in all of the above cell lines was similar to that observed in MEF infected with MCMV. The virus grown in different cell lines was completely neutralized when mixed with several reference sera prepared in rabbits or mice. The populations of virions released from infected MEF and FSB cells were compared by isopycnic centrifugation in potassium tartrate, and no differences were revealed in the buoyant densities of the populations. Human embryonic brain cells, human embryonic kidney cells, a human lung fibroblast cell strain (WI-38), HeLa, and Hep-2 were not susceptible to MCMV. PMID:4327583

  12. Novel transient outward K+ current of mature murine hippocampal neurones.

    PubMed

    Li, X Y; McArdle, J J

    1997-06-01

    Hippocampal neurones were freshly isolated from the brain of adult mice and voltage-dependent K+ currents were recorded with whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Three components of transient K+ current (IA) were isolated when analyzing data with exponential functions or treating neurones with a variety of voltage protocols and pharmacologic agents. Subtraction of the delayed rectifier current (IK) from the K+ currents elicited after prepulses to -120 mV of varying duration revealed fast (IAf) and slow (IAs) components with decay time constants of 45 +/- 8 and 612 +/- 140 ms, respectively; the corresponding time constants for the removal of inactivation were 12.3 and 189.6 ms. both tetraethylammonium and dendrotoxin selectively inhibited IAs. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) specifically blocked IAf and 40% of IAs with different affinities. Therefore, the properties of a 4-AP-resistant (IAsR) and 4-AP-sensitive (IAsS) component of IAs were compared. These data suggest that three distinct subtypes of K+ currents contribute to the IA of mature murine hippocampal neurones.

  13. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease.

  14. Insertional mutagenesis of preneoplastic astrocytes by Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Afanasieva, T A; Pekarik, V; Grazia D'Angelo, M; Klein, M A; Voigtländer, T; Stocking, C; Aguzzi, A

    2001-04-01

    Retroviral infection can induce transcriptional activation of genes flanking the sites of proviral integration in target cells. Because integration is essentially random, this phenomenon can be exploited for random mutagenesis of the genome, and analysis of integration sites in tumors may identify potential oncogenes. Here we have investigated this strategy in the context of astrocytoma progression. Neuroectodermal explants from astrocytoma-prone GFAP-v-src transgenic mice were infected with the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV). In situ hybridization and FACS analysis indicated that astrocytes from E12.5-13.5 embryos were highly susceptible to retroviral infection and expressed viral RNA and proteins both in vitro and in vivo. In average 80% of neuroectodermal cells were infected in vitro with 9-14 proviral integrations per cell. Virus mobility assays confirmed that Mo-MuLV remained transcriptionally active and replicating in neuroectodermal primary cultures even after 45 days of cultivation. Proviral insertion sites were investigated by inverse long-range PCR. Analysis of a limited number of provirus flanking sequences in clones originated from in vitro infected GFAP-v-src neuroectodermal cells identified loci of possible relevance to tumorigenesis. Therefore, the approach described here might be suitable for acceleration of tumorigenesis in preneoplastic astrocytes. We expect this method to be useful for identifying genes involved in astrocytoma development/progression in animal models.

  15. Exopolysaccharide from Trichoderma pseudokoningii promotes maturation of murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanghui; Li, Jing; Ju, Jing; Shen, Bingxiang; Chen, Guochuang; Qian, Wen; Zhu, Lei; Lu, Jingbo; Liu, Chunyan; Qin, Guozheng; Wang, Guodong; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the key regulators of immune responses. In this study, the effect of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) from the culture broth of Trichoderma pseudokoningii on the phenotypic and functional maturation of murine DCs and its underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated. It showed that EPS induced the morphological changes of DCs and the enhanced expression of DCs featured surface molecules CD11c, CD86, CD80 and major histocompatibility complex II (MHC-II). Flow cytometry analysis showed that the treatment with EPS could reduce FITC-dextran uptake by DCs. Sequentially, the results of ELISA indicated that EPS could increase the production of interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70) in culture supernatant of DCs. Immunofluorescence staining and western blot analysis further revealed that EPS significantly prompted nuclear factor (NF)-κB subunit p65 translocation, IκB-α protein degradation, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. And the production of IL-12p70 was significantly decreased in condition of the inhibition of p38 or NF-κB signaling pathway. These findings suggested that EPS could induce DCs maturation through both p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways.

  16. BCMA deficiency exacerbates lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity in murine lupus1

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chao; Loo, William M.; Greenley, Erin J.; Tung, Kenneth S.; Erickson, Loren D.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its preclinical lupus-prone mouse models are autoimmune disorders involving the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Genetic predisposition to SLE results in B cell hyperactivity, survival of self-reactive B cells, and differentiation to autoantibody-secreting plasma cells (PC). These corrupt B cell responses are, in part, controlled by excess levels of the cytokine B cell activation factor from the TNF family (BAFF) that normally maintains B cell homeostasis and self-tolerance through limited production. B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is a receptor for BAFF that, under nonautoimmune conditions, is important for sustaining enduring antibody protection by mediating survival of long-lived PCs, but is not required for B cell maturation and homeostasis. Through analysis of two different lupus-prone mouse models deficient in BCMA, we identify BCMA as an important factor in regulating peripheral B cell expansion, differentiation, and survival. We demonstrate that a BCMA deficiency combined with the lpr mutation or the murine lupus susceptibility locus Nba2 cause dramatic B cell and PC lymphoproliferation, accelerated autoantibody production, and early lethality. This study unexpectedly reveals that BCMA works to control B cell homeostasis and self-tolerance in systemic autoimmunity. PMID:21536804

  17. NAP reduces murine microvascular endothelial cells proliferation induced by hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Agata Grazia; Scuderi, Soraya; Maugeri, Grazia; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; Drago, Filippo; D'Agata, Velia

    2014-11-01

    Hyperglycemia has been identified as a risk factor responsible for micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetes. NAP (Davunetide) is a peptide whose neuroprotective actions are widely demonstrated, although its biological role on endothelial dysfunctions induced by hyperglycemia remains uninvestigated. In the present study we hypothesized that NAP could play a protective role on hyperglycemia-induced endothelial cell proliferation. To this end we investigated the effects of NAP on an in vitro model of murine microvascular endothelial cells grown in high glucose for 7 days. The MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and cyclin D1 protein expression analysis revealed that NAP treatment significantly reduces viability and proliferation of the cells. Hyperglycemia induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and/or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt pathways in a time-dependent manner. NAP treatment reduced the phosphorylation levels of ERK and AKT in cells grown in high glucose. These evidences suggest that NAP might be effective in the regulation of endothelial dysfunction induced by hyperglycemia.

  18. Effect of premedications in a murine model of asparaginase hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Christian A; Smith, Colton; Karol, Seth E; Ramsey, Laura B; Liu, Chengcheng; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima; Evans, William E; Finkelman, Fred D; Relling, Mary V

    2015-03-01

    A murine model was developed that recapitulates key features of clinical hypersensitivity to Escherichia coli asparaginase. Sensitized mice developed high levels of anti-asparaginase IgG antibodies and had immediate hypersensitivity reactions to asparaginase upon challenge. Sensitized mice had complete inhibition of plasma asparaginase activity (P = 4.2 × 10(-13)) and elevated levels of mouse mast cell protease 1 (P = 6.1 × 10(-3)) compared with nonsensitized mice. We investigated the influence of pretreatment with triprolidine, cimetidine, the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist CV-6209 [2-(2-acetyl-6-methoxy-3,9-dioxo-4,8-dioxa-2,10-diazaoctacos-1-yl)-1-ethyl-pyridinium chloride], or dexamethasone on the severity of asparaginase-induced allergies. Combining triprolidine and CV-6209 was best for mitigating asparaginase-induced hypersensitivity compared with nonpretreated, sensitized mice (P = 1.2 × 10(-5)). However, pretreatment with oral dexamethasone was the only agent capable of mitigating the severity of the hypersensitivity (P = 0.03) and partially restoring asparaginase activity (P = 8.3 × 10(-4)). To rescue asparaginase activity in sensitized mice without requiring dexamethasone, a 5-fold greater dose of asparaginase was needed to restore enzyme activity to a similar concentration as in nonsensitized mice. Our results suggest a role of histamine and PAF in asparaginase-induced allergies and indicate that mast cell-derived proteases released during asparaginase allergy may be a useful marker of clinical hypersensitivity.

  19. RNA activation of haploinsufficient Foxg1 gene in murine neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Fimiani, Cristina; Goina, Elisa; Su, Qin; Gao, Guangping; Mallamaci, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    More than one hundred distinct gene hemizygosities are specifically linked to epilepsy, mental retardation, autism, schizophrenia and neuro-degeneration. Radical repair of these gene deficits via genome engineering is hardly feasible. The same applies to therapeutic stimulation of the spared allele by artificial transactivators. Small activating RNAs (saRNAs) offer an alternative, appealing approach. As a proof-of-principle, here we tested this approach on the Rett syndrome-linked, haploinsufficient, Foxg1 brain patterning gene. We selected a set of artificial small activating RNAs (saRNAs) upregulating it in neocortical precursors and their derivatives. Expression of these effectors achieved a robust biological outcome. saRNA-driven activation (RNAa) was limited to neural cells which normally express Foxg1 and did not hide endogenous gene tuning. saRNAs recognized target chromatin through a ncRNA stemming from it. Gene upregulation required Ago1 and was associated to RNApolII enrichment throughout the Foxg1 locus. Finally, saRNA delivery to murine neonatal brain replicated Foxg1-RNAa in vivo. PMID:27995975

  20. An Immunocompromised Murine Model of Chronic Bartonella Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chiaraviglio, Lucius; Duong, Scott; Brown, Daniel A.; Birtles, Richard J.; Kirby, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Bartonella are ubiquitous Gram-negative pathogens that cause chronic blood stream infections in mammals. Two species most often responsible for human infection, B. henselae and B. quintana, cause prolonged febrile illness in immunocompetent hosts, known as cat scratch disease and trench fever, respectively. Fascinatingly, in immunocompromised hosts, these organisms also induce new blood vessel formation leading to the formation of angioproliferative tumors, a disease process named bacillary angiomatosis. In addition, they cause an endothelial-lined cystic disease in the liver known as bacillary peliosis. Unfortunately, there are as yet no completely satisfying small animal models for exploring these unique human pathologies, as neither species appears able to sustain infection in small animal models. Therefore, we investigated the potential use of other Bartonella species for their ability to recapitulate human pathologies in an immunodeficient murine host. Here, we demonstrate the ability of Bartonella taylorii to cause chronic infection in SCID/BEIGE mice. In this model, Bartonella grows in extracellular aggregates, embedded within collagen matrix, similar to previous observations in cat scratch disease, bacillary peliosis, and bacillary angiomatosis. Interestingly, despite overwhelming infection later in disease, evidence for significant intracellular replication in endothelial or other cell types was not evident. We believe that this new model will provide an important new tool for investigation of Bartonella–host interaction. PMID:20395436

  1. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Fanuel; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Heller, Horace Craig

    2014-01-01

    The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages. PMID:25140132

  2. Mitochondrial DNA replication during differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Facucho-Oliveira, Joao M; Alderson, Jon; Spikings, Emma C; Egginton, Stuart; St John, Justin C

    2007-11-15

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), the intracellular process that generates the majority of the ATP of a cell through the electron-transfer chain, is highly dependent on proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). MtDNA replication is regulated by the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and the mitochondrial-specific DNA polymerase gamma, which consists of a catalytic (POLG) and an accessory (POLG2) subunit. Differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into specific cell types requires expansion of discrete populations of mitochondria and mtDNA replication to meet the specific metabolic requirements of the cell. We determined by real-time PCR that expression of pluripotent markers is reduced before the upregulation of Polg, Polg2 and Tfam in spontaneously differentiating R1 murine (m)ESCs, along with transient increases in mtDNA copy number. In D3 mESCs, the initial transient increase did not take place. However, precursors of neuronal and cardiomyocyte differentiation were positive for both POLG and TFAM. Similar-stage ESCs also showed active mtDNA replication, identified by 5-bromo-2'-deoxy-uridine labelling, as mtDNA copy number increased. Retinoic-acid-induced differentiation resulted in more consistent patterns of replication and upregulation of Polg, Polg2 and Tfam, whereas siRNA knockdown demonstrated that steady-state expression of POLG is essential for maintaining pluripotency.

  3. Human APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Melanie; Schnierle, Barbara S. . E-mail: schba@pei.de

    2005-06-20

    The human APOBEC3G protein exhibits broad antiretroviral activity against a variety of retroviruses. It is packaged into viral particles and executes its antiviral function in the target cell. The packaging of APOBEC3G into different viral particles requires a mechanism that confers this promiscuity. Here, APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus (MLV) was studied using retroviral vectors. APOBEC3G uptake did not require either its cytidine deaminase activity or the presence of a retroviral vector genome. Results from immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies of APOBEC3G with a MLV Gag-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) fusion protein imply an interaction between both proteins. RNase A treatment did not inhibit the co-precipitation of Gag-CFP and APOBEC3G, suggesting that the interaction is RNA independent. Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag, the MLV Gag precursor protein appears to interact with APOBEC3G, indicating that Gag contains conserved structures which are used to encapsidate APOBEC3G into different retroviral particles.

  4. Murine Cytomegalovirus Exploits Olfaction To Enter New Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Lawler, Clara; Tan, Cindy S. E.; MacDonald, Kate; Bruce, Kimberley; Mach, Michael; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Viruses transmit via the environmental and social interactions of their hosts. Herpesviruses have colonized mammals since their earliest origins, suggesting that they exploit ancient, common pathways. Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) are assumed to enter new hosts orally, but no site has been identified. We show by live imaging that murine CMV (MCMV) infects nasally rather than orally, both after experimental virus uptake and during natural transmission. Replication-deficient virions revealed the primary target as olfactory neurons. Local, nasal replication by wild-type MCMV was not extensive, but there was rapid systemic spread, associated with macrophage infection. A long-term, transmissible infection was then maintained in the salivary glands. The viral m131/m129 chemokine homolog, which influences tropism, promoted salivary gland colonization after nasal entry but was not required for entry per se. The capacity of MCMV to transmit via olfaction, together with previous demonstrations of experimental olfactory infection by murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), suggest that this is a common, conserved route of mammalian herpesvirus entry. PMID:27118588

  5. Dynamic imaging of preimplantation embryos in the murine oviduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Jason C.; Wang, Shang; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    Studying the dynamic events involved in early preimplantation embryo development during their transport from the ovary to the uterus is of great significance to improve the understanding of infertility, and eventually to help reduce the infertility rate. The mouse is a widely used mammalian model in reproductive biology, however, dynamic imaging studies of mouse preimplantation embryos have been very limited due to the lack of proper imaging tools for such analysis. Here, we introduce an innovative approach, which can potentially be used for three-dimensional imaging and tracking of murine oocytes with optical coherence tomography (OCT) as they exit the ovary and migrate through the oviduct to the uterus. The imaging is performed with spectral-domain OCT system operating at 70 kHz A-scan rate. The preimplantation embryos and surrounding cumulus cells can be clearly visualized. Results from our experiments indicate that OCT has great potential for dynamic imaging of the oviduct and oocyte tracking, which provides the foundation for future investigations aimed at understanding dynamic events during preimplantation stages in normal development as well as in mouse models of infertility.

  6. Overexpression of catalase targeted to mitochondria attenuates murine cardiac aging

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Santana, Luis F.; Vermulst, Marc; Tomazela, Daniela M.; Emond, M.J.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Gollahon, Katherine; Martin, George M.; Loeb, Lawrence A.; Ladiges, Warren C.; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Age is a major risk for cardiovascular diseases. Although mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proposed as one of the causes of aging, their role in cardiac aging remains unclear. We have previously shown that overexpression of catalase targeted to mitochondria (mCAT) prolongs murine median lifespan by 17-21%. Methods and Results: We used echocardiography to study cardiac function in aging cohorts of wild type (WT) and mCAT mice. Changes found in WT mice recapitulate human aging: age-dependent increases in left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and left atrial dimension, worsening of the myocardial performance index (MPI), and a decline in diastolic function. Cardiac aging in mice is accompanied by accumulation of mitochondrial protein oxidation, increased mitochondrial DNA mutations and deletions and mitochondrial biogenesis, increased ventricular fibrosis, enlarged myocardial fiber size, decreased cardiac SERCA2 protein and activation of the calcineurin-NFAT pathway. All of these age-related changes were significantly attenuated in mCAT mice. Analysis of survival of 130 mice demonstrated that echocardiographic cardiac aging risk scores were significant predictors of mortality. The estimated attributable risk to mortality for these two parameters was 55%. Conclusion: This study shows that cardiac aging in the mouse closely recapitulates human aging and demonstrates the critical role of mitochondrial ROS in cardiac aging and the impact of cardiac aging on survival. These findings also support the potential application of mitochondrial antioxidants in ROS-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19451351

  7. Identification of a RNA Polymerase II Initiation Site in the Long Terminal Repeat of Moloney Murine Leukemia Viral DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrman, Shella A.; van Beveren, Charles; Verma, Inder M.

    1981-09-01

    We have used a soluble in vitro RNA polymerase II transcription system to define the site of initiation of Moloney murine leukemia viral RNA synthesis. Molecularly cloned integrated and unintegrated Moloney murine leukemia virus DNAs were used as templates. The 5' ends of in vitro transcripts and virion RNA of Moloney murine leukemia virus were compared by nuclease S1 protection experiments. Our results indicate that viral sequences upstream of the in vivo cap site are implicated in the transcription of viral RNA and that the 5' end of an in vitro transcript derived from an integrated Moloney murine leukemia virus clone corresponds to the 5' end of viral genomic RNA.

  8. Overview of the Use of Murine Models in Leukemia and Lymphoma Research

    PubMed Central

    Kohnken, Rebecca; Porcu, Pierluigi; Mishra, Anjali

    2017-01-01

    Murine models have been adopted as a significant and powerful tool in the study of cancer. The applications of murine models of cancer are numerous: mechanism discovery, oncogenesis, molecular genetics, microenvironment, metastasis, and therapeutic efficacy. Leukemias and lymphomas are a group of highly heterogeneous hematologic malignancies that affect people of all ages and ethnicities. Leukemia and lymphoma arise from hematopoietic and immune cells and usually spread widely throughout the body. The liquid nature of many of these malignancies, as well as the complex microenvironment from which they arise and their multifaceted genetic basis, has added to the difficulty in generating appropriate and translational models to study them. Murine models of leukemia and lymphoma have made substantial contributions to our understanding of the pathobiology of these disorders in humans. However, while there are many advantages to these models, limitations remain. In this review, we discuss the mouse as a model to study leukemia and lymphoma, and the importance of choosing the correct methodology. Specific examples of murine models of leukemias and lymphomas are provided, with particular attention to those that are highly translational to their human counterpart. Finally, future applications of murine models and potential for better models are discussed. PMID:28265553

  9. Expression cloning of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Munro, S; Maniatis, T

    1989-12-01

    A cDNA encoding a receptor for murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) was isolated from an expression library made from murine thymocytes. The clone was identified by transfecting the library into monkey COS cells and probing the transfected monolayer with radiolabeled murine IFN-gamma. Cells expressing the receptor were identified by autoradiography and plasmids encoding the receptor were directly rescued from those cells producing a positive signal. A partial cDNA so obtained was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from mouse L929 cells by conventional means. When this cDNA was expressed in COS cells it produced a specific binding site for murine IFN-gamma with an affinity constant similar to that of the receptor found on L929 cells. The predicted amino acid sequence of the murine IFN-gamma receptor shows homology to that previously reported for the human IFN-gamma receptor. However, although the two proteins are clearly related, they show less than 60% identity in both the putative extracellular domain and the intracellular domain.

  10. Intrapulmonary Versus Nasal Transduction of Murine Airways With GP64-pseudotyped Viral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Oakland, Mayumi; Maury, Wendy; McCray, Paul B; Sinn, Patrick L

    2013-01-01

    Persistent viral vector-mediated transgene expression in the airways requires delivery to cells with progenitor capacity and avoidance of immune responses. Previously, we observed that GP64-pseudotyped feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-mediated gene transfer was more efficient in the nasal airways than the large airways of the murine lung. We hypothesized that in vivo gene transfer was limited by immunological and physiological barriers in the murine intrapulmonary airways. Here, we systematically investigate multiple potential barriers to lentiviral gene transfer in the airways of mice. We show that GP64-FIV vector transduced primary cultures of well-differentiated murine nasal epithelia with greater efficiency than primary cultures of murine tracheal epithelia. We further demonstrate that neutrophils, type I interferon (IFN) responses, as well as T and B lymphocytes are not the major factors limiting the transduction of murine conducting airways. In addition, we observed better transduction of GP64-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in the nasal epithelia compared with the intrapulmonary airways in mice. VSVG glycoprotein pseudotyped VSV transduced intrapulmonary epithelia with similar efficiency as nasal epithelia. Our results suggest that the differential transduction efficiency of nasal versus intrapulmonary airways by FIV vector is not a result of immunological barriers or surface area, but rather differential expression of cellular factors specific for FIV vector transduction. PMID:23360952

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cell derived extracellular vesicles rescue radiation damage to murine marrow hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Sicheng; Dooner, Mark; Cheng, Yan; Papa, Elaine; Del Tatto, Michael; Pereira, Mandy; Deng, Yanhui; Goldberg, Laura; Aliotta, Jason; Chatterjee, Devasis; Stewart, Connor; Carpanetto, Andrea; Collino, Federica; Bruno, Stefania; Camussi, Giovanni; Quesenberry, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to reverse radiation damage to marrow stem cells. We have evaluated the capacity of MSC-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) to mitigate radiation injury to marrow stem cells at 4 hours to 7 days after irradiation. Significant restoration of marrow stem cell engraftment at 4, 24 and 168 hours post-irradiation by exposure to MSC-EVs was observed at 3 weeks to 9 months after transplant and further confirmed by secondary engraftment. Intravenous injection of MSC-EVs to 500cGy exposed mice led to partial recovery of peripheral blood counts and restoration of the engraftment of marrow. The murine hematopoietic cell line, FDC-P1 exposed to 500 cGy, showed reversal of growth inhibition, DNA damage and apoptosis on exposure to murine or human MSC-EVs. Both murine and human MSC-EVs reverse radiation damage to murine marrow cells and stimulate normal murine marrow stem cell/progenitors to proliferate. A preparation with both exosomes and microvesicles was found to be superior to either microvesicles or exosomes alone. Biologic activity was seen in freshly isolated vesicles and in vesicles stored for up to 6 months in 10% DMSO at −80°C. These studies indicate that MSC-EVs can reverse radiation damage to bone marrow stem cells. PMID:27150009

  12. Radiobiologic effect of intermittent radiation exposure in murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sugie, Chikao . E-mail: chikao@bg8.so-net.ne.jp; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ito, Masato; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Akihiko; Fukaya, Nobuyuki; Niimi, Hiroshige; Hashizume, Takuya

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: In stereotactic irradiation using a linear accelerator, the effect of radiation may be reduced during intermittent exposures owing to recovery from sublethal damage in tumor cells. After our previous in vitro study suggesting this phenomenon, we investigated the issue in murine tumors. Methods and Materials: We used EMT6 and SCCVII tumors approximately 1 cm in diameter growing in the hind legs of syngeneic mice. Three schedules of intermittent radiation were investigated. First, 2 fractions of 10 Gy were given at an interval of 15-360 min to investigate the pattern of recovery from sublethal damage. Second, 5 fractions of 4 Gy were given with interfraction intervals of 2.5-15 min each. Third, 10 fractions of 2 Gy were given with interfraction intervals of 1-7 min each. Doses of 15-20 Gy were also given without interruption to estimate the dose-modifying factors. Tumors were excised 20 h later, and tumor cell survival was determined by an in vivo-in vitro assay. Results: In the 2-fraction experiment, the increase in cell survival with elongation of the interval was much less than that observed in our previous in vitro study. In the 5- and 10-fraction experiments, no significant increase in cell survival was observed after the intermittent exposures. Moreover, cell survival decreased at most points of the 5-fraction experiments by interruption of radiation in both EMT6 and SCCVII tumors. In the 10-fraction experiment, cell survival also decreased when the interruption was 3 or 7 min in EMT6 tumors. Conclusion: The results of the present in vivo studies were different from those of our in vitro studies in which cell survival increased significantly when a few minutes or longer intervals were posed between fractions. This suggests that recovery from sublethal damage in vivo may be counterbalanced by other phenomena such as reoxygenation that sensitizes tumor cells to subsequent irradiation.

  13. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S.; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Ullrich, Robert L.; Petrache, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to 137Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u 56Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u 28Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy 56Fe or 28Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  14. Glycomics of Proteoglycan Biosynthesis in Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Nairn, Alison V.; Kinoshita-Toyoda, Akiko; Toyoda, Hidenao; Xie, Jin; Harris, Kyle; Dalton, Stephen; Kulik, Michael; Pierce, J. Michael; Toida, Toshihiko; Moremen, Kelley W.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) play a critical role in binding and activation of growth factors involved in cell signaling critical for developmental biology. The biosynthetic pathways for GAGs have been elucidated over the past decade and now analytical methodology makes it possible to determine GAG composition in as few as 10 million cells. A glycomics approach was used to examine GAG content, composition, and the level of transcripts encoding for GAG biosynthetic enzymes as murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) differentiate to embryoid bodies (EBs) and to extraembryonic endodermal cells (ExE) to better understand the role of GAGs in stem cell differentiation. Hyaluronan synthesis was enhanced by 13- and 24-fold, most likely due to increased expression of hyaluronan synthase-2. Chondroitin sulfate (CS)/dermatan sulfate (DS) synthesis was enhanced by 4- and 6-fold, and heparan sulfate (HS) synthesis was enhanced by 5- and 8-fold following the transition from mESC to EB and ExE. Transcripts associated with the synthesis of the early precursors were largely unaltered, suggesting other factors account for enhanced GAG synthesis. The composition of both CS/DS and HS also changed upon differentiation. Interestingly, CS type E and highly sulfated HS both increase as mESCs differentiate to EBs and ExE. Differentiation was also accompanied by enhanced 2-sulfation in both CS/DS and HS families. Transcript levels for core proteins generally showed increases or remained constant upon mESC differentiation. Finally, transcripts encoding selected enzymes and isoforms, including GlcNAc-4,6-O-sulfotransferase, C5-epimerases, and 3-O-sulfotransferases involved in late GAG biosynthesis, were also enriched. These biosynthetic enzymes are particularly important in introducing GAG fine structure, essential for intercellular communication, cell adhesion, and outside-in signaling. Knowing the changes in GAG fine structure should improve our understanding the biological properties of

  15. Bovine cementum extract influences murine dental follicle cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Arzate, H; Aguilar-Mendoza, M E; Esponda Aguilar, C; Portilla Robertson, J

    1997-01-01

    This study evaluated the attachment, chemoattractive, proliferative and mineralization inductive potential of a bovine cementum extract (CPE) on newborn murine dental follicle cells (MDFC) in vitro. Cementum extract was partially purified by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. A band representing an M(r) of 55,000 was excised from the gel and the protein(s) were electroeluted. Attachment assays revealed that CPE (1.0 microgram/ml) promoted MDFC attachment by 96% in comparison with collagen type I (5 micrograms/ml), and was five-fold greater compared with serum-free media (SFM), (P < 0.05). Between 1 and 5 days CPE at 1.0 microgram/ml and collagen type I at 5 micrograms/ml sustained more than 75% attachment and spreading of MDFC when compared to SFM (P < 0.05). Contrary to other reports, fibronectin (0.5 microgram/ml) was more potent than CPE in promoting MDFC chemoattraction (P < 0.05). MDFC proliferation was stimulated by CPE (0.125 microgram/ml), but this response was elicited only when CPE was used together with 10% FBS (37.3%) or 0.2% FBS (76%) (P < 0.05). Alkaline phosphatase expression by MDFC was increased by CPE (1.0 microgram/ml), in comparison to the control. Calcium deposits were detected by von Kossa staining in 14-day MDFC cultures treated with CPE. Nodule formation and its mineralization in long-term MDFC cultures were induced by CPE (1.0 microgram/ml). Molecule(s) contained in CPE appear to regulate various biological activities in MDFC, indicating that CPE could play a key role in selecting progenitor cells required for the process of cementogenesis during development.

  16. Melatonin modulates adiponectin expression on murine colitis with sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kyun; Park, Young Sook; Baik, Haing-Woon; Jun, Jin Hyun; Kim, Eun Kyung; Sull, Jae Woong; Sung, Ho Joong; Choi, Jin Woo; Chung, Sook Hee; Gye, Myung Chan; Lim, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jun Bong; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine adiponectin expression in colonic tissue of murine colitis and systemic cytokine expression after melatonin treatments and sleep deprivation. METHODS The following five groups of C57BL/6 mice were used in this study: (1) group I, control; (2) group II, 2% DSS induced colitis for 7 d; (3) group III, 2% DSS induced colitis and melatonin treatment; (4) group IV, 2% DSS induced colitis with sleep deprivation (SD) using specially designed and modified multiple platform water baths; and (5) group V, 2% DSS induced colitis with SD and melatonin treatment. Melatonin (10 mg/kg) or saline was intraperitoneally injected daily to mice for 4 d. The body weight was monitored daily. The degree of colitis was evaluated histologically after sacrificing the mice. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis was performed using anti-adiponectin antibody. After sampling by intracardiac punctures, levels of serum cytokines were measured by ELISA. RESULTS Sleep deprivation in water bath exacerbated DSS induced colitis and worsened weight loss. Melatonin injection not only alleviated the severity of mucosal injury, but also helped survival during stressful condition. The expression level of adiponectin in mucosa was decreased in colitis, with the lowest level observed in colitis combined with sleep deprivation. Melatonin injection significantly (P < 0.05) recovered the expression of adiponectin. The expression levels of IL-6 and IL-17 were increased in the serum of mice with DSS colitis but decreased after melatonin injection. CONCLUSION This study suggested that melatonin modulated adiponectin expression in colonic tissue and melatonin and adiponectin synergistically potentiated anti-inflammatory effects on colitis with sleep deprivation. PMID:27672276

  17. A TRPM4-dependent current in murine renal primary cilia

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Richard J.; Kleene, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in primary cilia lead to a variety of human diseases. One of these, polycystic kidney disease, can be caused by defects in a Ca2+-gated ion channel (TRPP2) found on the cilium. Other ciliary functions also contribute to cystogenesis, and defects in apical Ca2+ homeostasis have been implicated. By recording directly from the native cilia of mIMCD-3 cells, a murine cell line of renal epithelial origin, we have identified a second Ca2+-gated channel in the ciliary membrane: the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 4 (TRPM4). In excised primary cilia, TRPM4 was found to have a low sensitivity to Ca2+, with an EC50 of 646 μM at +100 mV. It was inhibited by MgATP and by 9-phenanthrol. The channel was not permeable to Ca2+ or Cl− and had a permeability ratio PK/PNa of 1.42. Reducing the expression of Trpm4 mRNA with short hairpin (sh) RNA reduced the TRPM4 current by 87% and shortened primary cilia by 43%. When phospholipase C was inhibited, the sensitivity to cytoplasmic Ca2+ greatly increased (EC50 = 26 μM at +100 mV), which is consistent with previous reports that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) modulates the channel. MgATP did not restore the channel to a preinactivation state, suggesting that the enzyme or substrate necessary for making PIP2 is not abundant in primary cilia of mIMCD-3 cells. The function of TRPM4 in renal primary cilia is not yet known, but it is likely to influence the apical Ca2+ dynamics of the cell, perhaps in tandem with TRPP2. PMID:26290373

  18. Thymopoietic and Bone Marrow Response to Murine Pneumocystis Pneumonia▿

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xin; Zhang, Ping; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a key role in host defense against Pneumocystis infection. To define the role of naïve CD4+ T cell production through the thymopoietic response in host defense against Pneumocystis infection, Pneumocystis murina infection in the lung was induced in adult male C57BL/6 mice with and without prior thymectomy. Pneumocystis infection caused a significant increase in the number of CCR9+ multipotent progenitor (MPP) cells in the bone marrow and peripheral circulation, an increase in populations of earliest thymic progenitors (ETPs) and double negative (DN) thymocytes in the thymus, and recruitment of naïve and total CD4+ T cells into the alveolar space. The level of murine signal joint T cell receptor excision circles (msjTRECs) in spleen CD4+ cells was increased at 5 weeks post-Pneumocystis infection. In thymectomized mice, the numbers of naïve, central memory, and total CD4+ T cells in all tissues examined were markedly reduced following Pneumocystis infection. This deficiency of naïve and central memory CD4+ T cells was associated with delayed pulmonary clearance of Pneumocystis. Extracts of Pneumocystis resulted in an increase in the number of CCR9+ MPPs in the cultured bone marrow cells. Stimulation of cultured bone marrow cells with ligands to Toll-like receptor 2 ([TLR-2] zymosan) and TLR-9 (ODN M362) each caused a similar increase in CCR9+ MPP cells via activation of the Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) pathway. These results demonstrate that enhanced production of naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes through the thymopoietic response and enhanced delivery of lymphopoietic precursors from the bone marrow play an important role in host defense against Pneumocystis infection. PMID:21343353

  19. Immunomodulatory effects of curcumin treatment on murine schistosomiasis mansoni.

    PubMed

    Allam, Gamal

    2009-01-01

    Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from the dietary spice turmeric. It has been shown to regulate numerous transcription factors, cytokines, adhesion molecules, and enzymes that have been linked to inflammation. In addition to inhibiting the growth of a variety of pathogens, curcumin has been shown to have nematocidal activity. The present study was designed to evaluate the schistosomicidal activity of curcumin in vivo as well as immunomodulation of granulomatous inflammation and liver pathology in acute schistosomiasis mansoni. Mice were infected each with 80 Schistosoma (S.) mansoni cercariae and injected intraperitoneally with curcumin at a total dose of 400mg/kg body weight. Curcumin was effective in reducing worm and tissue-egg burdens, hepatic granuloma volume and liver collagen content by 44.4%, 30.9%, 79%, and 38.6%, respectively. Curcumin treatment restored hepatic enzymes activities to the normal levels and enhanced catalase activity in the liver tissue of infected mice. Moreover, hepato-spleenomegaly and eosinophilia induced by S. mansoni infection were largely improved with curcumin treatment. Infected mice treated with curcumin showed low serum level of both interleukin (IL)-12 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), but IL-10 level was not significantly altered. Specific IgG and IgG1 responses against both soluble worm antigen (SWAP) and soluble egg antigen (SEA) were augmented with curcumin treatment, but IgM and IgG2a responses were not significantly changed. In conclusion, curcumin treatment modulates cellular and humoral immune responses of infected mice and lead to a significant reduction of parasite burden and liver pathology in acute murine schistosomiasis mansoni.

  20. BMP and BMP receptor expression during murine organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Danesh, Shahab M.; Villasenor, Alethia; Chong, Diana; Soukup, Carrie; Cleaver, Ondine

    2009-01-01

    Cell-cell communication is critical for regulating embryonic organ growth and differentiation. The Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) family of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) molecules represents one class of such cell-cell signaling molecules that regulate the morphogenesis of several organs. Due to high redundancy between the myriad BMP ligands and receptors in certain tissues, it has been challenging to address the role of BMP signaling using targeting of single Bmp genes in mouse models. Here, we present a detailed study of the developmental expression profiles of three BMP ligands (Bmp2, Bmp4, Bmp7) and three BMP receptors (Bmpr1a, Bmpr1b, and BmprII), as well as their molecular antagonist (noggin), in the early embryo during the initial steps of murine organogenesis. In particular, we focus on the expression of Bmp family members in the first organs and tissues that take shape during embryogenesis, such as the heart, vascular system, lungs, liver, stomach, nervous system, somites and limbs. Using in situ hybridization, we identify domains where ligand(s) and receptor(s) are either singly or co-expressed in specific tissues. In addition, we identify a previously unnoticed asymmetric expression of Bmp4 in the gut mesogastrium, which initiates just prior to gut turning and the establishment of organ asymmetry in the gastrointestinal tract. Our studies will aid in the future design and/or interpretation of targeted deletion of individual Bmp or Bmpr genes, since this study identifies organs and tissues where redundant BMP signaling pathways are likely to occur. PMID:19393343

  1. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for <1% of all patients with Alzheimer's disease. The inherited form is even regarded a 'rare' disease according to the regulations for funding of the European Union (www.erare.eu). Here, we show that mice that are double-deficient for neprilysin (encoded by Mme), one major amyloid-β-degrading enzyme, and the ABC transporter ABCC1, a major contributor to amyloid-β clearance from the brain, develop various aspects of sporadic Alzheimer's disease mimicking the clinical stage of mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows

  2. Mechanisms of antiviral action of plant antimicrobials against murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gilling, Damian H; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R; Bright, Kelly R

    2014-08-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤ 35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses.

  3. Follistatin attenuates radiation-induced fibrosis in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, Helen B.; de Kretser, David M.; Leong, Trevor; Hagekyriakou, Jim; Sprung, Carl N.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Fibrosis can be a disabling, severe side effect of radiotherapy that can occur in patients, and for which there is currently no effective treatment. The activins, proteins which are members of the TGFβ superfamily, have a major role in stimulating the inflammatory response and subsequent fibrosis. Follistatin is an endogenous protein that binds the activins virtually irreversibly and inhibits their actions. These studies test if follistatin can attenuate the fibrotic response using a murine model of radiation-induced fibrosis. Experimental design C57BL/6 mice were subcutaneously injected with follistatin 24 hours prior to irradiation. Mice were irradiated in a 10 x 10 mm square area of the right hind leg with 35 Gy and were given follistatin 24 hours before radiation and three times a week for six months following. Leg extension was measured, and tissue was collected for histological and molecular analysis to evaluate the progression of the radiation-induced fibrosis. Results Leg extension was improved in follistatin treated mice compared to vehicle treated mice at six months after irradiation. Also, epidermal thickness and cell nucleus area of keratinocytes were decreased by the follistatin treatment compared to the cells in irradiated skin of control mice. Finally, the gene expression of transforming growth factor β1 (Tgfb1), and smooth muscle actin (Acta2) were decreased in the irradiated skin and Acta2 and inhibin βA subunit (Inhba) were decreased in the irradiated muscle of the follistatin treated mice. Conclusions Follistatin attenuated the radiation-induced fibrotic response in irradiated mice. These studies provide the data to support further investigation of the use of follistatin to reduce radiation-induced fibrosis in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer. PMID:28301516

  4. BMP and BMP receptor expression during murine organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Danesh, Shahab M; Villasenor, Alethia; Chong, Diana; Soukup, Carrie; Cleaver, Ondine

    2009-06-01

    Cell-cell communication is critical for regulating embryonic organ growth and differentiation. The Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) family of transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) molecules represents one class of such cell-cell signaling molecules that regulate the morphogenesis of several organs. Due to high redundancy between the myriad BMP ligands and receptors in certain tissues, it has been challenging to address the role of BMP signaling using targeting of single Bmp genes in mouse models. Here, we present a detailed study of the developmental expression profiles of three BMP ligands (Bmp2, Bmp4, Bmp7) and three BMP receptors (Bmpr1a, Bmpr1b, and BmprII), as well as their molecular antagonist (noggin), in the early embryo during the initial steps of murine organogenesis. In particular, we focus on the expression of Bmp family members in the first organs and tissues that take shape during embryogenesis, such as the heart, vascular system, lungs, liver, stomach, nervous system, somites and limbs. Using in situ hybridization, we identify domains where ligand(s) and receptor(s) are either singly or co-expressed in specific tissues. In addition, we identify a previously unnoticed asymmetric expression of Bmp4 in the gut mesogastrium, which initiates just prior to gut turning and the establishment of organ asymmetry in the gastrointestinal tract. Our studies will aid in the future design and/or interpretation of targeted deletion of individual Bmp or Bmpr genes, since this study identifies organs and tissues where redundant BMP signaling pathways are likely to occur.

  5. Murine intestinal antibody response to heterologous rotavirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, A A; Groene, W S; Cheng, E H; Shaw, R D

    1991-01-01

    Rotavirus is the most important worldwide cause of severe gastroenteritis. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the design of a vaccine that will prevent disease, but development of a more effective vaccine strategy may require progress in the understanding of the mucosal immune response to replicating viral antigens. In this article, we report the characterization of the intestinal antibody response of a murine model to heterologous infection with the rhesus rotavirus vaccine strain. We have adapted the enzyme-linked immunospot assay to measure this response without the difficulties associated with measurement of antibodies in intestinal contents or the artifacts associated with culturing of lymphocytes. The predominant response in terms of antibody-secreting cells (ASC) is seen in the small intestine lamina propria, which can be measured within 4 days of infection, peaks 3 weeks after infection, and remains near that level for longer than 8 weeks. The magnitude of the immunoglobulin A (IgA) cell response is approximately 10 times greater than the intestinal IgG cell response, and IgM cells are rare. Virus-specific ASC constitute approximately 50% of all ASC in the gut at the peak of the virus-specific response. This response is considerably greater than responses to nonreplicating mucosal antigens measured by similar techniques. Enteral infection engenders minimal virus-specific ASC response in the spleen. Rhesus rotavirus-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and neutralization assays of serum and intestinal contents did not correlate with virus-specific ASC response. Images PMID:1761691

  6. Effects of murine natural killer cells on Cryptococcus neoformans

    SciTech Connect

    Nabavi Nouri, N.

    1985-01-01

    Previous data generated by Murphy and McDaniel indicate that normal murine nylon wool nonadherent splenic cells, with the characteristics of natural killer (NK) cells, effectively inhibit the in vitro growth of Cryptococcus neoformans, a yeast-like pathogen. Nylon wood nonadherent cells from spleens of 7-8 week old mice were further fractionated on discontinuous Percoll gradients. The enrichment of NK cells in Percoll fractions 1 and 2 was confirmed by morphological examination, immunofluorescent staining, and by assessing the cytolytic activity of each Percoll cell fraction against YAC-1 targets in the 4 h /sup 51/Cr release assay. Cells isolated from each Percoll fraction were tested for growth inhibitory activity against C neoformans, using an in vitro 18 h growth inhibition assay. The results showed that NK cell enrichment was concomitant with the enrichment of anti-cryptococcal activity the Percoll fractions 1 and 2. An immunolabeling method combined with scanning electron microscopy was used to demonstrate that the effector cells attached to C. neoformans were asialo GM/sub 1/ positive and, therefore, had NK cell characteristics. NK cells have Fc receptors on their surfaces , and are capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against IgG-coated target cells. The author examined the effects of the IgG fraction of rabbit anti-cryptococcal antibody on the NK cell-mediated growth inhibition of C. neoformans. The data indicated that the effector cells involved in antibody-dependent growth inhibition of cryptococci are either NK cells or copurify and coexist in the same population with NK cells.

  7. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial uncoupling in a murine cancer cachexia model.

    PubMed

    Tzika, A Aria; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely Cristine; Shestov, Alexander A; Constantinou, Caterina; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Righi, Valeria; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Busquets, Silvia; Lopez-Soriano, Francisco J; Milot, Sylvain; Lepine, Francois; Mindrinos, Michael N; Rahme, Laurence G; Argiles, Josep M

    2013-09-01

    Approximately half of all cancer patients present with cachexia, a condition in which disease-associated metabolic changes lead to a severe loss of skeletal muscle mass. Working toward an integrated and mechanistic view of cancer cachexia, we investigated the hypothesis that cancer promotes mitochondrial uncoupling in skeletal muscle. We subjected mice to in vivo phosphorous-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy and subjected murine skeletal muscle samples to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The mice used in both experiments were Lewis lung carcinoma models of cancer cachexia. A novel 'fragmented mass isotopomer' approach was used in our dynamic analysis of 13C mass isotopomer data. Our 31P NMR and GC/MS results indicated that the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis rate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux were reduced by 49% and 22%, respectively, in the cancer-bearing mice (p<0.008; t-test vs. controls). The ratio of ATP synthesis rate to the TCA cycle flux (an index of mitochondrial coupling) was reduced by 32% in the cancer-bearing mice (p=0.036; t-test vs. controls). Genomic analysis revealed aberrant expression levels for key regulatory genes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the muscle fiber, consistent with the presence of abnormal, giant mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggest that mitochondrial uncoupling occurs in cancer cachexia and thus point to the mitochondria as a potential pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cachexia. These findings may prove relevant to elucidating the mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle wasting observed in other chronic diseases, as well as in aging.

  8. Characterization of Ferroptosis in Murine Models of Hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; An, Peng; Xie, Enjun; Wu, Qian; Fang, Xuexian; Gao, Hong; Zhang, Zhuzhen; Li, Yuzhu; Wang, Xudong; Zhang, Jiaying; Li, Guoli; Yang, Lei; Liu, Wei; Min, Junxia; Wang, Fudi

    2017-02-13

    Ferroptosis is a recently identified iron-dependent form of non-apoptotic cell death implicated in brain, kidney, and heart pathology. However, the biological roles of iron and iron metabolism in ferroptosis remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the functional role of iron and iron metabolism in the pathogenesis of ferroptosis. We found that ferric citrate potently induces ferroptosis in murine primary hepatocytes and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). Next, we screened for ferroptosis in mice fed a high-iron diet and in mouse models of hereditary hemochromatosis with iron overload. We found that ferroptosis occurred in mice fed a high-iron diet and in two knockout mouse lines that develop severe iron overload (Hjv(-/-) and Smad4(Alb/Alb) mice), but not in a third line that develops only mild iron overload (Hfe(-/-) mice). Moreover, we found that iron overload-induced liver damage was rescued by the ferroptosis inhibitor ferrostatin-1. To identify the genes involved in iron-induced ferroptosis, we performed microarray analyses of iron-treated BMDMs. Interestingly, Slc7a11, a known ferroptosis-related gene, was significantly upregulated in iron-treated cells compared with untreated cells. However, genetically deleting Slc7a11 expression was not sufficient to induce ferroptosis in mice. Next, we studied iron-treated hepatocytes and BMDMs isolated from Slc7a11(-/-) mice fed a high-iron diet. We found that iron treatment induced ferroptosis in Slc7a11(-/-) cells, indicating that deleting Slc7a11 facilitates the onset of ferroptosis specifically under high-iron conditions. These results provide compelling evidence that iron plays a key role in triggering Slc7a11-mediated ferroptosis. These results also suggest that ferroptosis may be a promising target for treating hemochromatosis-related tissue damage. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Factors affecting responses to murine oncogenic viral infections.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, J. J.; Rager-Zisman, B.; Wheelock, E. F.; Nevin, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    Silica specifically kills macrophages in vitro, and in vivo has been used as a method of determining the possible immunological or other roles of macrophages in a number of viral infections. In experiments reported here, injection of 30 or 50 mg silica i.p. increased the severity of the oncogenic effects of the murine sarcoma virus (MSV) and Friend virus (FV) in BALB/c mice. Unlike Herpes simplex and Coxsackie B-3 infections, however, passive transfer of adult macrophages to suckling mice did not protect the latter against MSV. In mice injected with silica, histological evidence of the compensatory proliferation of macrophages suggests that precursors of these cells may act as target cells for the virus and that this may override any immunosuppressive response effected by the silica. In addition, there was a considerable enhancing effect on the erythroproliferative response to both MSV and FV by injection of saline 5 h before the virus, and indeed to FV after only a simple abdominal needle puncture. We attributed this to the lymphopenic immunodepressive effects of stress, and our data may explain previously published findings of augmented oncogenic responses in mice after "normal" serum injections. Newborn BALB/c (FV-1b) mice were susceptible to N-tropic FV, but developed resistance by 29 days of age. Antithymocyte serum (ATS) but not silica injections or adult thymectomy ablated this resistance. C57BL (FV-2r) mice were completely resistant to FV; however, those receiving FV and ATS developed late-onset leukaemia histologically characteristic of that produced by the helper component of the FV complex. Images Fig. PMID:6248095

  10. Mechanisms of Antiviral Action of Plant Antimicrobials against Murine Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gilling, Damian H.; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses. PMID:24907316

  11. Murine and human CFTR exhibit different sensitivities to CFTR potentiators

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guiying

    2015-01-01

    Development of therapeutic molecules with clinical efficacy as modulators of defective CFTR includes efforts to identify potentiators that can overcome or repair the gating defect in mutant CFTR channels. This has taken a great leap forward with the identification of the potentiator VX-770, now available to patients as “Kalydeco.” Other small molecules with different chemical structure also are capable of potentiating the activity of either wild-type or mutant CFTR, suggesting that there are features of the protein that may be targeted to achieve stimulation of channel activity by structurally diverse compounds. However, neither the mechanisms by which these compounds potentiate mutant CFTR nor the site(s) where these compounds bind have been identified. This knowledge gap partly reflects the lack of appropriate experimental models to provide clues toward the identification of binding sites. Here, we have compared the channel behavior and response to novel and known potentiators of human CFTR (hCFTR) and murine (mCFTR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Both hCFTR and mCFTR were blocked by GlyH-101 from the extracellular side, but mCFTR activity was increased with GlyH-101 applied directly to the cytoplasmic side. Similarly, glibenclamide only exhibited a blocking effect on hCFTR but both blocked and potentiated mCFTR in excised membrane patches and in intact oocytes. The clinically used CFTR potentiator VX-770 transiently increased hCFTR by ∼13% but potentiated mCFTR significantly more strongly. Our results suggest that mCFTR pharmacological sensitivities differ from hCFTR, which will provide a useful tool for identifying the binding sites and mechanism for these potentiators. PMID:26209275

  12. Induction and treatment of anergy in murine leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Juarez-Ortega, Mario; Hernandez, Víctor G; Arce-Paredes, Patricia; Villanueva, Enrique B; Aguilar-Santelises, Miguel; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease consisting of a spectrum of clinical, bacteriological, histopathological and immunological manifestations. Tuberculoid leprosy is frequently recognized as the benign polar form of the disease, while lepromatous leprosy is regarded as the malignant form. The different forms of leprosy depend on the genetic and immunological characteristics of the patient and on the characteristics of the leprosy bacillus. The malignant manifestations of lepromatous leprosy result from the mycobacterial-specific anergy that develops in this form of the disease. Using murine leprosy as a model of anergy in this study, we first induced the development of anergy to Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) in mice and then attempted to reverse it by the administration of dialysable leucocyte extracts (DLE) prepared from healthy (HLT), BCG-inoculated and MLM-inoculated mice. Mice inoculated with either MLM or BCG developed a robust cell-mediated immune response (CMI) that was temporary in the MLM-inoculated group and long-lasting in the BCG-inoculated group. DLE were prepared from the spleens of MLM- and BCG-inoculated mice at the peak of CMI. Independent MLM intradermally-inoculated groups were treated every other day with HLT-DLE, BCG-DLE or MLM-DLE, and the effect was documented for 98 days. DLE administered at a dose of 1.0 U (1 × 106 splenocytes) did not affect the evolution of leprosy, while DLE given at a dose of 0.1 U showed beneficial effects regardless of the DLE source. The dose but not the specificity of DLE was the determining factor for reversing anergy. PMID:25529580

  13. A Murine Model of Muscle Training by Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Fitzgerald, G. Kelley; Ferrari, Ricardo; Distefano, Giovanna; Carvell, George

    2012-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a common clinical modality that is widely used to restore1, maintain2 or enhance3-5 muscle functional capacity. Transcutaneous surface stimulation of skeletal muscle involves a current flow between a cathode and an anode, thereby inducing excitement of the motor unit and the surrounding muscle fibers. NMES is an attractive modality to evaluate skeletal muscle adaptive responses for several reasons. First, it provides a reproducible experimental model in which physiological adaptations, such as myofiber hypertophy and muscle strengthening6, angiogenesis7-9, growth factor secretion9-11, and muscle precursor cell activation12 are well documented. Such physiological responses may be carefully titrated using different parameters of stimulation (for Cochrane review, see 13). In addition, NMES recruits motor units non-selectively, and in a spatially fixed and temporally synchronous manner14, offering the advantage of exerting a treatment effect on all fibers, regardless of fiber type. Although there are specified contraindications to NMES in clinical populations, including peripheral venous disorders or malignancy, for example, NMES is safe and feasible, even for those who are ill and/or bedridden and for populations in which rigorous exercise may be challenging. Here, we demonstrate the protocol for adapting commercially available electrodes and performing a NMES protocol using a murine model. This animal model has the advantage of utilizing a clinically available device and providing instant feedback regarding positioning of the electrode to elicit the desired muscle contractile effect. For the purpose of this manuscript, we will describe the protocol for muscle stimulation of the anterior compartment muscles of a mouse hindlimb. PMID:22617846

  14. A murine model of muscle training by neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Fitzgerald, G Kelley; Ferrari, Ricardo; Distefano, Giovanna; Carvell, George

    2012-05-09

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is a common clinical modality that is widely used to restore (1), maintain (2) or enhance (3-5) muscle functional capacity. Transcutaneous surface stimulation of skeletal muscle involves a current flow between a cathode and an anode, thereby inducing excitement of the motor unit and the surrounding muscle fibers. NMES is an attractive modality to evaluate skeletal muscle adaptive responses for several reasons. First, it provides a reproducible experimental model in which physiological adaptations, such as myofiber hypertophy and muscle strengthening (6), angiogenesis (7-9), growth factor secretion (9-11), and muscle precursor cell activation (12) are well documented. Such physiological responses may be carefully titrated using different parameters of stimulation (for Cochrane review, see (13)). In addition, NMES recruits motor units non-selectively, and in a spatially fixed and temporally synchronous manner (14), offering the advantage of exerting a treatment effect on all fibers, regardless of fiber type. Although there are specified contraindications to NMES in clinical populations, including peripheral venous disorders or malignancy, for example, NMES is safe and feasible, even for those who are ill and/or bedridden and for populations in which rigorous exercise may be challenging. Here, we demonstrate the protocol for adapting commercially available electrodes and performing a NMES protocol using a murine model. This animal model has the advantage of utilizing a clinically available device and providing instant feedback regarding positioning of the electrode to elicit the desired muscle contractile effect. For the purpose of this manuscript, we will describe the protocol for muscle stimulation of the anterior compartment muscles of a mouse hindlimb.

  15. Murine and human CFTR exhibit different sensitivities to CFTR potentiators.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guiying; McCarty, Nael A

    2015-10-01

    Development of therapeutic molecules with clinical efficacy as modulators of defective CFTR includes efforts to identify potentiators that can overcome or repair the gating defect in mutant CFTR channels. This has taken a great leap forward with the identification of the potentiator VX-770, now available to patients as "Kalydeco." Other small molecules with different chemical structure also are capable of potentiating the activity of either wild-type or mutant CFTR, suggesting that there are features of the protein that may be targeted to achieve stimulation of channel activity by structurally diverse compounds. However, neither the mechanisms by which these compounds potentiate mutant CFTR nor the site(s) where these compounds bind have been identified. This knowledge gap partly reflects the lack of appropriate experimental models to provide clues toward the identification of binding sites. Here, we have compared the channel behavior and response to novel and known potentiators of human CFTR (hCFTR) and murine (mCFTR) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Both hCFTR and mCFTR were blocked by GlyH-101 from the extracellular side, but mCFTR activity was increased with GlyH-101 applied directly to the cytoplasmic side. Similarly, glibenclamide only exhibited a blocking effect on hCFTR but both blocked and potentiated mCFTR in excised membrane patches and in intact oocytes. The clinically used CFTR potentiator VX-770 transiently increased hCFTR by ∼13% but potentiated mCFTR significantly more strongly. Our results suggest that mCFTR pharmacological sensitivities differ from hCFTR, which will provide a useful tool for identifying the binding sites and mechanism for these potentiators.

  16. Transcriptomic Analysis of Murine Embryos Lacking Endogenous Retinoic Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paschaki, Marie; Schneider, Carole; Rhinn, Muriel; Thibault-Carpentier, Christelle; Dembélé, Doulaye; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active derivative of the liposoluble vitamin A (retinol), acts as an important signaling molecule during embryonic development, regulating phenomenons as diverse as anterior-posterior axial patterning, forebrain and optic vesicle development, specification of hindbrain rhombomeres, pharyngeal arches and second heart field, somitogenesis, and differentiation of spinal cord neurons. This small molecule directly triggers gene activation by binding to nuclear receptors (RARs), switching them from potential repressors to transcriptional activators. The repertoire of RA-regulated genes in embryonic tissues is poorly characterized. We performed a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of murine wild-type and Retinaldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 null-mutant (Raldh2−/−) embryos — unable to synthesize RA from maternally-derived retinol — using Affymetrix DNA microarrays. Transcriptomic changes were analyzed in two embryonic regions: anterior tissues including forebrain and optic vesicle, and posterior (trunk) tissues, at early stages preceding the appearance of overt phenotypic abnormalities. Several genes expected to be downregulated under RA deficiency appeared in the transcriptome data (e.g. Emx2, Foxg1 anteriorly, Cdx1, Hoxa1, Rarb posteriorly), whereas reverse-transcriptase-PCR and in situ hybridization performed for additional selected genes validated the changes identified through microarray analysis. Altogether, the affected genes belonged to numerous molecular pathways and cellular/organismal functions, demonstrating the pleiotropic nature of RA-dependent events. In both tissue samples, genes upregulated were more numerous than those downregulated, probably due to feedback regulatory loops. Bioinformatic analyses highlighted groups (clusters) of genes displaying similar behaviors in mutant tissues, and biological functions most significantly affected (e.g. mTOR, VEGF, ILK signaling in forebrain tissues; pyrimidine and purine metabolism

  17. Inactivation of murine norovirus by chemical biocides on stainless steel

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Human norovirus (NoV) causes more than 80% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Europe and the United States. NoV transmission via contaminated surfaces may be significant for the spread of viruses. Therefore, measures for prevention and control, such as surface disinfection, are necessary to interrupt the dissemination of human NoV. Murine norovirus (MNV) as a surrogate for human NoV was used to study the efficacy of active ingredients of chemical disinfectants for virus inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides were tested in a quantitative carrier test with stainless steel discs without mechanical action. Vacuum-dried MNV was exposed to different concentrations of alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA) or glutaraldehyde (GDA) for 5 minutes exposure time. Detection of residual virus was determined by endpoint-titration on RAW 264.7 cells. Results PAA [1000 ppm], GDA [2500 ppm], ethanol [50% (v/v)] and 1-propanol [30% (v/v)] were able to inactivate MNV under clean conditions (0.03% BSA) on the carriers by ≥ 4 log10 within 5 minutes exposure time, whereas 2-propanol showed a reduced effectiveness even at 60% (v/v). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in virus reduction whatever interfering substances were used. When testing with ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol, results under clean conditions were nearly the same as in the presence of dirty conditions (0.3% BSA plus 0.3% erythrocytes). Conclusion Products based upon PAA, GDA, ethanol and 1-propanol should be used for NoV inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Our data provide valuable information for the development of strategies to control NoV transmission via surfaces. PMID:19583832

  18. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions.

  19. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes.

  20. PECAM-Independent Thioglycollate Peritonitis Is Associated With a Locus on Murine Chromosome 2

    PubMed Central

    Seidman, Michael A.; Chew, Tina W.; Schenkel, Alan R.; Muller, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have demonstrated that knockout or inhibition of Platelet/Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (PECAM, CD31) in a number of murine strains results in impaired inflammatory responses, but that no such phenotype is seen in the C57BL/6 (B6) murine background. Methodology/Principal Findings We have undertaken a quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping effort between FVB/n (FVB) and B6 mice deficient for PECAM to identify the gene or genes responsible for this unique feature of B6 mice. We have identified a locus on murine chromosome 2 at approximately 35.8 Mb that is strongly associated (LOD score = 9.0) with inflammatory responses in the absence of PECAM. Conclusions/Significance These data potentiate further study of the diapedesis machinery, as well as potential identification of new components of this machinery. As such, this study is an important step to better understanding the processes of inflammation. PMID:19180231

  1. Cloning of the murine counterpart of the tumor-associated antigen H-L6: Epitope mapping of the human and murine L6 antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, C.P.; Farr, A.G.; Marken, J.S. |

    1995-10-03

    The murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) L6 was raised against human lung carcinoma cells and found to recognize an antigen which is highly expressed on lung, breast, colon, and ovarian carcinomas. Promising results in phase 1 clinical studies with this antibody or its chimerized counterpart suggest the antigen recognized by mAb L6 (H-L6) is an attractive target for monoclonal antibody-based cancer therapy. Further development of L6 as an anti-tumor-targeting agent would benefit from the development of a murine model. However, initial attempts to develop such a model were hampered by our inability to generate antibodies against the murine homologue of the L6 antigen, M-L6. Here we describe the preparation of the mAb 12A8, which was raised against murine thymic epithelial cells, the tissue distribution of the murine antigen recognized by 12A8, the cloning of a cDNA encoding the 12A8 target antigen, and the demonstration that this antigen is M-L6. Using H-L6/M-L6 chimeric proteins, we show that the region of the M-L6 protein recognized by mAb 12A8 corresponds to the region of H-L6 recognized by mAb L6. There are five amino acid differences in the regions of the H-L6 and M-L6 proteins recognized by L6 and 12A8, respectively. We further mapped the protein epitope recognized by L6 by individually exchanging each of these residues in H-L6 with the corresponding residue found in M-L6. Substitution of the single H-L6 residue Leu122 with Ser resulted in the H-L6 mutant HL6-L122S which failed to bind L6. The HL6-L122S mutant also failed to bind 12A8. Substituting residue Ser122 in M-L6 with Leu did not prevent 12A8 binding and did not result in L6 binding. The availability of mAb 12A8 and the finding that it recognizes the same region of M-L6 that is recognized by L6 on H-L6 might allow the development of a murine tumor model in which the L6 antigen can be further evaluated as a therapeutic target. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Kinetics of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Gene Expression following Infection of Murine Cells in Culture and in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rochford, Rosemary; Lutzke, Mary L.; Alfinito, Rosiane S.; Clavo, Anaira; Cardin, Rhonda D.

    2001-01-01

    A model system to study the pathogenesis of gammaherpesvirus infections is the infection of mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68). To define the kinetics of infection, we developed an RNase protection assay to quantitate gene expression from lytic (K3, Rta, M8, DNA polymerase [DNA pol], and gB) and candidate latency (M2, M3, M9, M11, ORF73, and ORF74) genes. All candidate latency genes were expressed during lytic infection of 3T3 cells. Four kinetic classes of transcripts were observed following infection of 3T3 cells: immediate-early (K3, Rta, M8, and ORF73), early (DNA pol), early-late (M3, M11, and ORF74), and late (M2, M9, and gB). To assess the kinetics of viral gene expression in vivo, lungs, spleens, and mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) were harvested from MHV-68-infected mice. All transcripts were expressed between 3 and 6 days postinfection (dpi) in the lungs. In the spleen, K3, M3, M8, and M9 transcripts were expressed between 10 and 16 dpi when latency is established. The K3, M3, M8, M9, and M11 transcripts were detected in the MLN from 2 through 16 dpi. This is the first demonstration of MHV-68 gene expression in the MLN. Importantly, our data showed that MHV-68 has different kinetics of gene expression at different sites of infection. Furthermore, we demonstrated that K3, a gene recently shown to encode a protein that downregulates major histocompatibility complex class I on the surface of cells, is expressed during latency, which argues for a role of K3 in immune evasion during latent infection. PMID:11333874

  3. Kinetics of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 gene expression following infection of murine cells in culture and in mice.

    PubMed

    Rochford, R; Lutzke, M L; Alfinito, R S; Clavo, A; Cardin, R D

    2001-06-01

    A model system to study the pathogenesis of gammaherpesvirus infections is the infection of mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68). To define the kinetics of infection, we developed an RNase protection assay to quantitate gene expression from lytic (K3, Rta, M8, DNA polymerase [DNA pol], and gB) and candidate latency (M2, M3, M9, M11, ORF73, and ORF74) genes. All candidate latency genes were expressed during lytic infection of 3T3 cells. Four kinetic classes of transcripts were observed following infection of 3T3 cells: immediate-early (K3, Rta, M8, and ORF73), early (DNA pol), early-late (M3, M11, and ORF74), and late (M2, M9, and gB). To assess the kinetics of viral gene expression in vivo, lungs, spleens, and mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) were harvested from MHV-68-infected mice. All transcripts were expressed between 3 and 6 days postinfection (dpi) in the lungs. In the spleen, K3, M3, M8, and M9 transcripts were expressed between 10 and 16 dpi when latency is established. The K3, M3, M8, M9, and M11 transcripts were detected in the MLN from 2 through 16 dpi. This is the first demonstration of MHV-68 gene expression in the MLN. Importantly, our data showed that MHV-68 has different kinetics of gene expression at different sites of infection. Furthermore, we demonstrated that K3, a gene recently shown to encode a protein that downregulates major histocompatibility complex class I on the surface of cells, is expressed during latency, which argues for a role of K3 in immune evasion during latent infection.

  4. Significance of major international seaports in the distribution of murine typhus in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wardrop, Nicola; Chang, Chung-Te; Wang, Hsi-Chieh; Atkinson, Peter M.

    2017-01-01

    Background International seaports are hotspots for disease invasion and pathogens can persist in seaports even after ports are abandoned. Transmitted by fleas infected by Rickettsia typhi, murine typhus, a largely neglected and easily misdiagnosed disease, is known to occur primarily in large seaports. However, the significance of seaports in the occurrence of murine typhus has never been validated quantitatively. Methodology/Principal findings We studied the spatial distribution of murine typhus, a notifiable disease, in Taiwan. We investigated whether risk of infection was correlated with distance to international seaports and a collection of environmental and socioeconomic factors, using a Bayesian negative binomial conditionally autoregressive model, followed with geographically weighted regression. Seaports that are currently in use and those that operated in the 19th century for trade with China, but were later abandoned due to siltation were analyzed. A total of 476 human cases of murine typhus were reported during 2000–2014 in the main island of Taiwan, with spatial clustering in districts in southwest and central-west Taiwan. A higher incidence rate (case/population) was associated with a smaller distance to currently in-use international seaports and lower rainfall and temperature, but was uncorrelated with distance to abandoned ports. Geographically weighted regression revealed a geographic heterogeneity in the importance of distance to in-use seaports near the four international seaports of Taiwan. Conclusions/Significance Our study suggests that murine typhus is associated with international seaports, especially for those with large trading volume. Thus, one of the costs of global trade in Taiwan might be elevated risks of murine typhus. Globalization has accelerated the spread of infectious diseases, but the burden of disease varies geographically, with regions surrounding major international seaports warranting particular surveillance. PMID

  5. Structure, distribution, and expression of an ancient murine endogenous retroviruslike DNA family.

    PubMed Central

    Obata, M M; Khan, A S

    1988-01-01

    An endogenous retroviruslike DNA, B-26, was cloned from a BALB/c mouse embryo gene library by using a generalized murine leukemia virus DNA probe. Southern blot hybridization and nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that B-26 DNA might be a novel member of the GLN DNA family (A. Itin and E. Keshet, J. Virol. 59:301-307, 1986) which contains murine leukemia virus-related pol and env sequences. Northern analysis indicated that B-26-related RNAs of 8.4 and 3.0 kilobases were transcribed in thymus, spleen, brain, and liver tissues of 6-week-old BALB/c mice. Images PMID:3172346

  6. Effects of Prenatal Irradiation on Fetal, Neonate, and Young Adult Murine Hemopoiesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    mEffects of prenatal irradiation ,9t on fetal , neonate, and young < adult murine hemopoiesis S. R. Weinberg ,C:),x’--, ::- CTE L,: -’ A U U 6 19 8 4...4L/ 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED EFFECTS OF PRENATAL IRRADIATION ON FETAL , NEONATE, AND YOUNG ADULT MURINE HEMOPOIESIS 7...studied at four seleeted age pr)Ciods: (a) day 14.5 of gestation, (b) tieonate, (c) juvenile, and (d) 13 week-old adult. Fetal liver eellularity

  7. Multispectral Imaging of T and B Cells in Murine Spleen and Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zipei; Jensen, Shawn M.; Messenheimer, David J.; Farhad, Mohammed; Neuberger, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in multiplex immunohistochemistry techniques allow for quantitative, spatial identification of multiple immune parameters for enhanced diagnostic and prognostic insight. However, applying such techniques to murine fixed tissues, particularly sensitive epitopes, such as CD4, CD8α, and CD19, has been difficult. We compared different fixation protocols and Ag-retrieval techniques and validated the use of multiplex immunohistochemistry for detection of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ T cell subsets in murine spleen and tumor. This allows for enumeration of these T cell subsets within immune environments, as well as the study of their spatial distribution. PMID:26994219

  8. The Murine Femoral Allograft Model and a Semi-automated Histomorphometric Analysis Tool

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Robinder S.; Zhang, Longze; Schwarz, Edward M.; Boyce, Brendan F.; Xie, Chao

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Preclinical studies on bone repair remain a high priority due to the unresolved clinical problems associated with treating critical segmental defects and complications of fracture healing. Over the last decade the murine femoral allograft model has gained popularity due to its standardized surgery and potential for examining a vast array of radiographic, biomechanical and histological outcome measures. Here, we describe these methods and a novel semi-automated histomorphometric approach to quantify the amount of bone, cartilage and undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue in demineralized paraffin sections of allografted murine femurs using the VisioPharm Image Analysis Software System. PMID:24482164

  9. Genesis of Kirsten murine sarcoma virus: sequence analysis reveals recombination points and potential leukaemogenic determinant on parental leukaemia virus genome.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, J D; Connor, J; Avery, R J

    1984-01-01

    The genome of Kirsten murine sarcoma virus was formed by recombination between Kirsten murine leukaemia virus sequences, and rat sequences derived from a retrovirus-like '30S' (VL30) genetic element encompassing the Kras oncogene. Using cloned DNAs we have determined the nucleotide sequences of the long terminal repeats and adjacent regions, extending across the points of recombination on the sarcoma and leukaemia virus genomes. Our results suggest that discrete regions of homology and other cryptic sequence features, may have constituted recombinational hot-spots involved in the genesis of the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus genome. We have also compared the sequence of the Kirsten murine leukaemia virus p15 env and adjacent long terminal repeat with the corresponding regions of the AKV and Gross A murine leukaemia virus genomes. This comparison has identified a leukaemogenic determinant in the U3 domain of the long terminal repeat, possibly within a enhancer-like sequence element. PMID:6091040

  10. Temperature is a powerful promoter of interleukin 2 transcription.

    PubMed

    Gern, J E; Jayman, J R; Goldberg, L I; Murphy, P A; Lederman, H M

    1991-09-01

    Elevated temperature has profound effects on the immune system, particularly by increasing T-cell proliferation rates, interleukin 1 (IL-1)-driven secretion of IL-2, and primary antibody responses to T-dependent antigens. Therefore, this study shows, in detail, the effects of incubation temperature (29 degrees C to 41 degrees C) on proliferation, IL-2 secretion, and IL-2 mRNA expression in both a murine thymoma cell line (EL4-6.1) and in nontransformed murine splenocytes. Temperature was found to be a positive regulator of IL-2 secretion whether or not IL-1 was part of the activation signal. Parallel effects were observed at the level of IL-2 gene expression. Messenger RNA was quantitated with a novel system, using solution hybridization followed by detection of RNA-DNA complexes by enzyme immunoassay. The time to onset of IL-2 mRNA expression was inversely related to temperature, and mRNA levels increased 20- to 50-fold with increases in average incubation temperature from 29 degrees C to 39 degrees C. This effect was observed whether cells were incubated at constant temperature or exposed intermittently to elevated temperature. Over the same intervals of time and temperature, mRNA levels for tau-actin and beta-tubulin remained relatively constant. Taken together, these findings suggest that temperature-mediated augmentation of IL-2 secretion does not require the presence of IL-1, and that the effect occurs at a pretranslational level.

  11. Role of nitric oxide in murine conventional outflow physiology

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jason Y. H.; Stamer, W. Daniel; Bertrand, Jacques; Read, A. Thomas; Marando, Catherine M.; Ethier, C. Ross

    2015-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is the main risk factor for glaucoma. Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) decreases IOP by increasing outflow facility, but whether endogenous NO production contributes to the physiological regulation of outflow facility is unclear. Outflow facility was measured by pressure-controlled perfusion in ex vivo eyes from C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or transgenic mice expressing human endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) superimposed on the endogenously expressed murine eNOS (eNOS-GFPtg). In WT mice, exogenous NO delivered by 100 μM S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) increased outflow facility by 62 ± 28% (SD) relative to control eyes perfused with the inactive SNAP analog N-acetyl-d-penicillamine (NAP; n = 5, P = 0.016). In contrast, in eyes from eNOS-GFPtg mice, SNAP had no effect on outflow facility relative to NAP (−9 ± 4%, P = 0.40). In WT mice, the nonselective NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10 μM) decreased outflow facility by 36 ± 13% (n = 5 each, P = 0.012), but 100 μM l-NAME had no detectable effect on outflow facility (−16 ± 5%, P = 0.22). An eNOS-selective inhibitor (cavtratin, 50 μM) decreased outflow facility by 19 ± 12% in WT (P = 0.011) and 39 ± 25% in eNOS-GFPtg (P = 0.014) mice. In the conventional outflow pathway of eNOS-GFPtg mice, eNOS-GFP expression was localized to endothelial cells lining Schlemm's canal and the downstream vessels, with no apparent expression in the trabecular meshwork. These results suggest that endogenous NO production by eNOS within endothelial cells of Schlemm's canal or downstream vessels contributes to the physiological regulation of aqueous humor outflow facility in mice, representing a viable strategy to more successfully lower IOP in glaucoma. PMID:26040898

  12. Expression of phospholipase C isozymes by murine B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hempel, W M; DeFranco, A L

    1991-06-01

    Cross-linking of membrane (m) Ig, the B cell receptor for Ag, activates protein tyrosine phosphorylation and hydrolysis of phosphotidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. The latter signal transduction pathway is an important mediator of antigen receptor engagement. The initial event in this pathway is the activation of phospholipase C (PLC). The identity of the isozyme of PLC used in B cells and the mechanism by which it becomes activated are currently unknown. The cDNA encoding five different isozymes have been cloned. As a first step in identifying the isozyme of PLC that is coupled to mIgM, murine cDNA fragments for the five cloned PLC isozymes were generated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cloned, and used to screen a panel of B cell lines representing different stages of development for PLC mRNA expression. All the B cell lines tested expressed high levels of PLC alpha and PLC gamma 2 mRNA, whereas PLC beta and PLC delta mRNA expression were undetectable by both Northern blot and PCR analysis. PLC gamma 1 had a more complicated pattern of mRNA expression. PLC gamma 1 mRNA expression was lower than that observed for PLC alpha or PLC gamma 2 mRNA and varied widely among different cell lines. The pattern of PLC gamma 1 mRNA expression did not correlate with the developmental stage of the cell lines. The pattern of PLC gamma 1 protein expression in the panel of B cell lines correlated with the pattern of PLC gamma 1 mRNA expression. PLC gamma 1 expression was very low in several B cell lines, despite the fact that these cell lines show mIgM-stimulatable PLC activity. The variable and in some cases very low expression of PLC gamma 1 suggests that it may not be the form of PLC that is activated by mIgM. In contrast, PLC alpha and PLC gamma 2 were abundantly expressed in all B cell lines tested. This observation is consistent with the possibility that PLC alpha or PLC gamma 2 is activated by mIgM.

  13. Characterization of iron uptake from transferrin by murine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, R; Savigni, D L; Morgan, E H; Baker, E

    2000-01-01

    Iron is required by the brain for normal function, however, the mechanisms by which it crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are poorly understood. The uptake and efflux of transferrin (Tf) and Fe by murine brain-derived (bEND3) and lymph node-derived (m1END1) endothelial cell lines was compared. The effects of iron chelators, metabolic inhibitors and the cellular activators, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), on Tf and Fe uptake were investigated. Cells were incubated with 59Fe-125I-Tf; Fe uptake was shown to increase linearly over time for both cell lines, while Tf uptake reached a plateau within 2 h. Both Tf and Fe uptake were saturable. bEND3 cells were shown to have half as many Tf receptors as m1END1 cells, but the mean cycling times of a Tf molecule were the same. Tf and Fe efflux from the cells were measured over time, revealing that after 2 h only 25% of the Tf but 80% of the Fe remained associated with the cells. Of 7 iron chelators, only deferriprone (L1) markedly decreased Tf uptake. However, Fe uptake was reduced by more than 50% by L1, pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone (PIH) and desferrithiocin (DFT). The cellular activators TNF-alpha or LPS had little effect on Tf turnover, but they accelerated Fe uptake in both endothelial cell types. Phenylarsenoxide (PhAsO) and N-ethyl maleimide (NEM), inhibitors of Tf endocytosis, reduced both Tf and Fe uptake in both cell lines, while bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of endosomal acidification, reduced Fe uptake but did not affect Tf uptake. The results suggest that Tf and Fe uptake by both bEND3 and m1END1 is via receptor-mediated endocytosis with release of Fe from Tf within the cell and recycling of apo-Tf. On the basis of Tf- and Fe-metabolism both cell lines are similar and therefore well suited for use in in vitro models for Fe transport across the BBB.

  14. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Oleszak, E L; Katsetos, C D; Kuzmak, J; Varadhachary, A

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection of susceptible (SJL) and resistant (C57BL/6 [B6]) strains of mice. TMEV is an excellent model of virus-induced demyelinating disease, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Previous studies of others have suggested that NO may play a role in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. The presence and level of iNOS were determined in the brains and spinal cords of SJL and B6 TMEV-infected mice by the following methods: (i) PCR amplification of iNOS transcripts, followed by Southern blotting with an iNOS-specific probe, and (ii) immunohistochemical staining with an anti-iNOS-specific affinity-purified rabbit antibody. iNOS-specific transcripts were determined in the brains and spinal cord of both SJL and B6 TMEV-infected mice on days 0 (control), days 3, 6, and 10 (encephalitic stage of disease), and days 39 to 42, 66, and 180 (demyelinating phase) postinfection (p.i.). iNOS-specific transcripts were found in the brains and spinal cords of both SJL and B6 TMEV-infected mice at 6, 10, and 39 (SJL) days p.i., but they were absent in mock-infected mice and in TMEV-infected SJL and B6 mice at 0, 3, 66, and 180 days p.i. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of iNOS protein in both TMEV-infected SJL and B6 mice at days 6 and 10 p.i., but not at days 0, 3, 66, and 180 days p.i. Weak iNOS staining was also observed in TMEV-infected SJL mice at 42 days p.i. iNOS-positive staining was found in reactive astrocytes surrounding areas of necrotizing inflammation, particularly in the midbrain. Weak iNOS staining was also observed in cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage in areas of parenchymal inflammation and necrosis (mesencephalon) and in leptomeningeal and white matter perivascular infiltrates of the spinal cord. Rod-shaped microglia-like cells and foamy macrophages (myelin-laden) were iNOS negative. These results suggest that NO does not

  15. Sleep and fatigue in mice infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68.

    PubMed

    Olivadoti, Melissa D; Weinberg, Jason B; Toth, Linda A; Opp, Mark R

    2011-05-01

    Fatigue, a common symptom of many acute and chronic medical conditions, reduces both quality of life and workplace productivity and can be disabling. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that underlie fatigue can be difficult to study in human populations due to the patient heterogeneity, the variety of underlying causes and potential triggering events, and an inability to collect samples that may be essential to elucidation of mechanisms (e.g., brain). Although the etiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) remains elusive, some studies have implicated viral infections, including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a human gammaherpesvirus, as a potential factor in the pathogenesis of CFS. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (γHV68) is a mouse pathogen that shares many similarities with human γHVs, including EBV. In this study, we use γHV68-infected C57BL/6J mice as a model system for studying the impact of chronic viral infection on sleep-wake behavior, activity patterns, and body temperature profiles. Our data show that γHV68 alters sleep, activity, and temperature in a manner suggestive of fatigue. In mice infected with the highest dose used in this study (40,000plaque forming units), food intake, body weight, wheel running, body temperature, and sleep were normal until approximately 7days after infection. These parameters were significantly altered during days 7 through 11, returned to baseline levels at day 12 after infection, and remained within the normal range for the remainder of the 30-day period after inoculation. At that time, both infected and uninfected mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and their responses monitored. Uninfected mice given LPS developed a modest and transient febrile response during the initial light phase (hours 12 through 24) after injection. In contrast, infected mice developed changes in core body temperatures that persisted for at least 5days. Infected mice showed an initial hypothermia that lasted for approximately 12h

  16. A Multicenter Blinded Analysis Indicates No Association between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and either Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus or Polytropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Harvey J.; Mikovits, Judy A.; Switzer, William M.; Ruscetti, Francis W.; Lo, Shyh-Ching; Klimas, Nancy; Komaroff, Anthony L.; Montoya, Jose G.; Bateman, Lucinda; Levine, Susan; Peterson, Daniel; Levin, Bruce; Hanson, Maureen R.; Genfi, Afia; Bhat, Meera; Zheng, HaoQiang; Wang, Richard; Li, Bingjie; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Lee, Li Ling; Sameroff, Stephen; Heneine, Walid; Coffin, John; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disabling disorder known as chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) has been linked in two independent studies to infection with xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and polytropic murine leukemia virus (pMLV). Although the associations were not confirmed in subsequent studies by other investigators, patients continue to question the consensus of the scientific community in rejecting the validity of the association. Here we report blinded analysis of peripheral blood from a rigorously characterized, geographically diverse population of 147 patients with CFS/ME and 146 healthy subjects by the investigators describing the original association. This analysis reveals no evidence of either XMRV or pMLV infection. PMID:22991430

  17. Murine B7 antigen provides an efficient costimulatory signal for activation of murine T lymphocytes via the T-cell receptor/CD3 complex.

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, H; Freeman, G J; Razi-Wolf, Z; Gimmi, C D; Benacerraf, B; Nadler, L M

    1992-01-01

    We demonstrate that the murine B7 (mB7) protein is a potent costimulatory molecule for the activation of resting murine CD4+ T cells through the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 complex. Stable mB7-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, but not vector-transfected controls, synergize with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody and Con A-induced T-cell activation, resulting ultimately in proliferation. mB7 exerted its effect by inducing production of interleukin 2 and expression of the interleukin 2 receptor. Thus, mB7 costimulates T-cell activation through the TCR/CD3 complex by positively modulating the normal pathway of T-cell expansion. In contrast to the pronounced effect of mB7 on the activation of T cells through the TCR/CD3 complex, the mB7-transfected CHO cell line costimulated T-cell activation via the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins Thy-1 and Ly-6A.2 only inefficiently. Finally, the combination of a calcium ionophore and mB7 is not sufficient to cause T-cell proliferation, while the combination of a calcium ionophore and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulates T cells efficiently. The signals that mB7 and PMA provide for murine T lymphocyte activation are therefore not interchangeable, although both costimulate activation through the TCR/CD3 complex. Images PMID:1370349

  18. Cutting edge: murine UL16-binding protein-like transcript 1: a newly described transcript encoding a high-affinity ligand for murine NKG2D.

    PubMed

    Carayannopoulos, Leonidas N; Naidenko, Olga V; Fremont, Daved H; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2002-10-15

    Murine NKG2D is known to recognize H60 and five RAE1 variants. The human homologue recognizes both inducible MHC class I chain-related gene and constitutive (UL16-binding protein (ULBP)) ligands. Widely expressed, the latter are thought to mark transformed or infected cells for destruction by NK cells in the context of down-regulated cell surface class I (i.e., the "missing self"-response). Unlike MIC and ULBP however, mRNA for the murine ligands appears only in very limited contexts in the mature animal. In this study, we describe a NKG2D ligand termed "murine ULBP-like transcript 1 (MULT1) whose mRNA appears to be widely expressed in adult parenchyma. This molecule possesses MHC class I-like alpha1 and alpha2 domains as well as a large cytoplasmic domain. Recombinant MULT1 binds NKG2D with relatively high affinity (K(D) approximately 6 nM) and low k(off) (approximately 0.006s(-1)). Expression of MULT1 by normally resistant RMA cells results in their susceptibility to lysis by C57BL/6 splenocytes.

  19. Evaluation of hypothalamic murine and human melanocortin 3 receptor transcript structure.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Douglas, Dezmond C; Basu, Arunabha; Gardner, Ryan M; Aspelund, Sender; Wen, Xin; Yanovski, Jack A

    2014-11-07

    The melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3R) is involved in regulation of energy homeostasis. However, its transcript structure is not well understood. We therefore studied initiation and termination sites for hypothalamic murine Mc3r and human MC3R transcripts. Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) was performed for the 5' and 3' ends of murine and human hypothalamic RNA. 5' RACE experiments using hypothalamic murine RNA indicated mouse hypothalamus expresses two major Mc3r transcription start sites: one with a 5' UTR approximately 368 bases in length and another previously unknown transcript with a 5' UTR approximately 440 bases in length. 5' RACE experiments using human hypothalamic RNA identified a 5' UTR beginning 533 bases upstream of the start codon with a 248 base splice. 3' RACE experiments using hypothalamic murine RNA indicated the 3' UTR terminates approximately 1286 bases after the translational stop codon, with a previously unknown 787 base splice between consensus splice donor and acceptor sites. 3' RACE experiments using human MC3R transcript indicated the 3' UTR terminates approximately 115-160 bases after the translational stop codon. These data provide insight into melanocortin 3 receptor transcript structure.

  20. Development of an ex vivo BrdU labeling procedure for the murine LLNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) is widely used to identify chemicals that may cause allergic contact dermatitis. Exposure to a dermal sensitizer results in proliferation of local lymph node T cells, which has traditionally been measured by in vivo incorporation of [3H]m...

  1. Monitoring the accumulation of lipofuscin in aging murine eyes by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integrated fluorescence of murine eyes is collected as a function of age. This fluorescence is attributed to pigments generally referred to as lipofuscin and is observed to increase with age. No difference in fluorescence intensity is observed between the eyes of males or females. This work p...

  2. Murine typhus and leptospirosis as causes of acute undifferentiated fever, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Gasem, M Hussein; Wagenaar, Jiri F P; Goris, Marga G A; Adi, Mateus S; Isbandrio, Bambang B; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; Rolain, Jean Marc; Raoult, Didier; van Gorp, Eric C M

    2009-06-01

    To investigate rickettsioses and leptospirosis among urban residents of Semarang, Indonesia, we tested the blood of 137 patients with fever. Evidence of Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was found in 9 patients. Another 9 patients showed inconclusive serologic results. Thirteen patients received a diagnosis of leptospirosis. No dual infections were detected.

  3. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, epidemiology, and outcomes of murine typhus: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tsioutis, Constantinos; Zafeiri, Maria; Avramopoulos, Asimakis; Prousali, Efthymia; Miligkos, Michael; Karageorgos, Spyridon A

    2017-02-01

    Murine or endemic typhus, a febrile disease caused by Rickettsia typhi, is often misdiagnosed due to its non-specific presentation. We sought to evaluate all available evidence in the literature regarding the clinical and laboratory manifestations, epidemiological characteristics, and outcomes of murine typhus. Pubmed was searched for all articles providing available data. In an effort to incorporate contemporary data, only studies from 1980 were included. Thirty-three case series including 2074 patients were included in final analysis. Available evidence suggests that the classic triad of fever, headache and rash is encountered in only one-third of patients. Other frequent symptoms were chills, malaise, myalgia, and anorexia. A tetrad of reported laboratory abnormalities consisting of elevated liver enzymes, lactate dehydrogenase, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and hypoalbuminemia was detected. Complications were observed in one-fourth of patients, reported mortality was extremely low, but untreated patients had notably longer duration of fever. Among epidemiological characteristics, a seasonal distribution with most cases reported during warmer months, was the most prominent finding. Murine typhus in children exhibits several different characteristics, with abdominal pain, diarrhea, and sore throat reported more commonly, higher frequency of anemia, lower frequency of hypoalbuminemia, hematuria and proteinuria and a much lower rate of complications. This systematic review of published evidence provides a thorough description of the clinical and laboratory features of murine typhus and highlights important differences in children.

  4. Characterization of murine SIRT3 transcript variants and corresponding protein products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SIRT3 is one of the seven mammalian sirtuin homologs of the yeast SIR2 gene. SIRT3 possesses NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase activity. Recent studies indicate that the murine SIRT3 gene expresses different transcript variants, resulting in three possible SIRT3 protein isoforms with various leng...

  5. Genome Sequences of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Detected in Wild House Mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Nicole; Moens, Ugo; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2016-01-21

    Using generic PCR, we identified a variant of murine pneumotropic virus (MptV) (family Polyomaviridae) in 3 wild house mice (Mus musculus). The fully amplified and sequenced genomes display considerable differences from the MptV genomes published previously and enlighten us on the natural diversity of rodent polyomaviruses.

  6. Opossums and Cat Fleas: New Insights in the Ecology of Murine Typhus in Galveston, Texas.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lucas S; Idowu, Boluwatife M; Tatsch, Tyler N; Henderson, Joshua M; Bouyer, Donald H; Walker, David H

    2016-08-03

    Murine typhus is an acute undifferentiated febrile illness caused by Rickettsia typhi The classic reservoir (Rattus spp.) and flea vector (Xenopsylla cheopis) were once culprits of murine typhus in the United States. Vector and rodent control efforts have drastically decreased the prevalence of disease, except in a few endemic foci where opossums and cat fleas play a role in transmission. Since 2012, there has been a reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston, TX. We hypothesize that opossums and cat fleas are involved in the transmission of R. typhi in Galveston. To explore this, we sought to find the seroprevalence of typhus group antibodies from opossums. We also sought to find the prevalence of R. typhi in fleas parasitizing these animals. We collected blood from 12 opossums and found that eight (66.7%) had the presence of anti-R. typhi antibodies. All opossums were infested with fleas; a total of 250 Ctenocephalides felis fleas were collected from these animals. Seven opossums (53.8%) were infested with fleas that had molecular evidence of R. typhi infection, while six (46.2%) were infested with fleas that contained Candidatus Rickettsia senegalensis, an organism closely related to R. felis The minimum flea infection rate for R. typhi was 7.0%. The minimum infection rate for Candidatus R. senegalensis was 6.1%. Our study demonstrates that fleas infected with R. typhi parasitize opossums in Galveston. It is therefore likely that opossums and their fleas play a role in the city's recent reemergence of murine typhus.

  7. Murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68) is not horizontally transmitted amongst laboratory mice by cage contact.

    PubMed

    Aligo, Jason; Brosnan, Kerry; Walker, Mindi; Emmell, Eva; Mikkelsen, S Rochelle; Burleson, Gary R; Burleson, Florence G; Volk, Amy; Weinstock, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68), a natural pathogen of mice, is being evaluated as a model of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) infection for use in investigation of the effects of immunomodulatory therapy on herpesvirus pathogenesis in humans. Immunosuppressive agents are used for treatment of a variety of autoimmune diseases as well as for prevention of tissue rejection after organ transplantation and can result in recrudescence of latent herpesvirus infections. Prior to examination of MHV-68 as a suitable model for EBV, better characterization of the MHV-68 model was desirable. Characterization of the MHV-68 model involved development of assays for detecting virus and for demonstration of safety when present in murine colonies. Limited information is available in the literature regarding MHV-68 transmission, although recent reports indicate the virus is not horizontally spread in research facilities. To further determine transmission potential, immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice were infected with MHV-68 and co-habitated with naïve animals. Molecular pathology assays were developed to characterize the MHV-68 model and to determine viral transmission. Horizontal transmission of virus was not observed from infected animals to naïve cagemates after fluorescence microscopy assays and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Serologic analysis complemented these studies and was used as a method of monitoring infection amongst murine colonies. Overall, these findings demonstrate that MHV-68 infection can be controlled and monitored in murine research facilities, and the potential for unintentional infection is low.

  8. Long terminal repeat of murine retroviral DNAs: sequence analysis, host-proviral junctions, and preintegration site.

    PubMed Central

    Van Beveren, C; Rands, E; Chattopadhyay, S K; Lowy, D R; Verma, I M

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of three murine retroviral DNAs has been determined. The data indicate that the U5 region (sequences originating from the 5' end of the genome) of various LTRs is more conserved than the U3 region (sequences from the 3' end of the genome). The location and sequence of the control elements such as the 5' cap, "TATA-like" sequences, "CCAAT-box," and presumptive polyadenylic acid addition signal AATAAA in the various LTRs are nearly identical. Some murine retroviral DNAs contain a duplication of sequences within the LTR ranging in size from 58 to 100 base pairs. A variant of molecularly cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus DNA in which one of the two LTRs integrated into the viral DNA was also analyzed. A 4-base-pair duplication was generated at the site of integration of LTR in the viral DNA. The host-viral junction of two molecularly cloned AKR-murine leukemia virus DNAs (clones 623 and 614) was determined. In the case of AKR-623 DNA, a 3- or 4-base-pair direct repeat of cellular sequences flanking the viral DNA was observed. However, AKR-614 DNA contained a 5-base-pair repeat of cellular sequences. The nucleotide sequence of the preintegration site of AKR-623 DNA revealed that the cellular sequences duplicated during integration are present only once. Finally, a striking homology between the sequences flanking the preintegration site and viral LTRs was observed. Images PMID:6281466

  9. Therapeutic effects of garenoxacin in murine experimental secondary pneumonia by Streptococcus pneumoniae after influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yoshiko; Furuya, Yuri; Nozaki, Yusuke; Takahata, Masahiro; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Mitsuyama, Junichi

    2014-02-01

    In a pneumococcal pneumonia murine model following influenza virus infection, garenoxacin was more effective than other fluoroquinolones and demonstrated high levels of bacterial eradication in the lung, low mortality, and potent histopathological improvements. Garenoxacin could potentially be used for the treatment of secondary pneumococcal pneumonia following influenza.

  10. Fetal wound healing using a genetically modified murine model: the contribution of P-selectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During early gestation, fetal wounds heal with paucity of inflammation and absent scar formation. P-selectin is an adhesion molecule that is important for leukocyte recruitment to injury sites. We used a murine fetal wound healing model to study the specific contribution of P-selectin to scarless wo...

  11. Limited Role of Murine ATM in Oncogene-Induced Senescence and p53-Dependent Tumor Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Soria, Rebeca; Collado, Manuel; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Serrano, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:19421407

  12. A human/murine chimeric fab antibody neutralizes anthrax lethal toxin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guipeng; Chen, Ximin; Zhu, Jin; Duesbery, Nicholas S; Cheng, Xunjia; Cao, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Human anthrax infection caused by exposure to Bacillus anthracis cannot always be treated by antibiotics. This is mostly because of the effect of the remaining anthrax toxin in the body. Lethal factor (LF) is a component of lethal toxin (LeTx), which is the major virulence of anthrax toxin. A murine IgG monoclonal antibody (mAb) against LF with blocking activity (coded LF8) was produced in a previous study. In this report, a human/murine chimeric Fab mAb (coded LF8-Fab) was developed from LF8 by inserting murine variable regions into human constant regions using antibody engineering to reduce the incompatibility of the murine antibody for human use. The LF8-Fab expressed in Escherichia coli could specifically identify LF with an affinity of 3.46 × 10(7) L/mol and could neutralize LeTx with an EC50 of 85  μ g/mL. Even after LeTx challenge at various time points, the LF8-Fab demonstrated protection of J774A.1 cells in vitro. The results suggest that the LF8-Fab might be further characterized and potentially be used for clinical applications against anthrax infection.

  13. Murine macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and immune activation in response to Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the most common cause of bacterial seafood-related illness in the United States. Currently, there is a dearth of literature regarding immunity to infection with this pathogen. Here we studied V. parahaemolyticus-infected RAW 264.7 murine macrophage detecting both pro- and...

  14. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF DIFFERENT EMISSION PARTICLES IN MURINE PULMONARY EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative Toxicity of Different Emission Particles in Murine Pulmonary Epithelial Cells and Macrophages. T Stevens1, M Daniels2, P Singh2, M I Gilmour2. 1 UNC, Chapel Hill 27599 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    Epidemiological studies have shown ...

  15. Suppression of retroviral propagation and disease by suramin in murine systems.

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, R M; Rossoni, L D; Haseltine, W A; Broder, S

    1985-01-01

    Retroviral propagation crucially depends on reverse transcriptase (RT). We have developed murine models to test the biological effectiveness of the RT inhibitor suramin. The drug was active in our assay system, which includes (i) inhibition of RT activity in the murine T-cell tropic virus SL3-3 and Rauscher murine leukemia virus (MuLV), (ii) inhibition of plaque formation in the XC plaque assay, (iii) inhibition of viral infection of cultured murine T cells, and (iv) inhibition of splenomegaly induced by Rauscher MuLV in BALB/c mice. Suramin decreases viral titers significantly, even if started 36 hr after infection. Viral titers and number of infected cells increased to control levels after removal of the drug. BALB/c mice treated i.v. with 40 mg of suramin per kg twice per week following infection with Rauscher MuLV showed a 35% decrease in splenomegaly. Suramin is an active antiretroviral agent whose effect on retroviral propagation is reversible. We conclude that it acts as a virustatic drug and that long-term administration of suramin will be necessary if it is used for experimental treatment of human retroviral illnesses such as the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. PMID:2415971

  16. Altered Innate and Lymphocytic Immunity in Murine Splenocytes Following Short-Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Hwang, Shen-An; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Quiriarte, Heather; Sams, Clarence F.

    2011-01-01

    Immune dysregulation has been demonstrated following spaceflight of varying durations and limited in-flight studies indicate this phenomenon may persist during spaceflight. Causes may include microgravity, physiological stress, isolation, confinement and disrupted circadian rhythms. To further investigate the mechanisms associated with flight-associated immune changes, murine splenocytes immune parameters were assessed following 14 day space flight on Space Shuttle mission STS-135.

  17. TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE-INDUCED EOSINOPHILIA IN A MURINE MODEL OF OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA

    EPA Science Inventory

    TRIMELLITIC ANHYDRIDE-INDUCED EOSINOPHILIA IN A MURINE MODEL OF OCCUPATIONAL ASTHMA. J F Regal, ME Mohrman, E Boykin and D Sailstad. Dept. of Pharmacology, University of Minnesota, Duluth, MN, USA and NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RTP, NC, USA.
    Trimellitic anhydride (TMA) is a small m...

  18. Use of Murine Norovirus as a Surrogate To Evaluate Resistance of Human Norovirus to Disinfectants▿

    PubMed Central

    Belliot, Gaël; Lavaux, Amandine; Souihel, Donya; Agnello, Davide; Pothier, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) was used as a surrogate to study resistance of human norovirus to disinfectants used in hospitals. MNV was sensitive to alcohol, alcohol hand rubs, bleach, and povidone iodine-based disinfectant. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR results indicated that the presence of viral RNA did not correlate with the presence of infectious virus. PMID:18378650

  19. ROLE OF COPPER,ZINC-SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE IN CATALYZING NITROTYROSINE FORMATION IN MURINE LIVER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The solely known function of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is to catalyze the dismutation of superoxide anion into hydrogen peroxide. Our objective was to determine if SOD1 catalyzed murine liver protein nitration induced by acetaminophen (APAP) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Liver and plasma ...

  20. STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    STRAIN-DEPENDENT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO TRANSPLACENTALLY-INDUCED MURINE LUNG TUMORS
    M S Miller, J E Moore, M Xu, G B Nelson, S T Dance, N D Kock, J A Ross Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC and USEPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Previously, our laboratory demonstrated...

  1. Heterologous murine and bovine IVF using bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Calabuig, M J; de la Fuente, J; Laguna-Barraza, R; Beltrán-Breña, P; Martínez-Nevado, E; Johnston, S D; Rizos, D; Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Pérez-Gutiérrez, J F

    2015-10-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies are of great importance for increasing the genetic diversity in captive animals. The use of bovine or murine oocytes in heterologous IVF provides advantages compared to homologous IVF in nondomestic animals, such as the accessibility to oocytes and the availability of well-developed in vitro maturation systems. The aim of this study was to determine the heterologous IVF parameters using cryopreserved dolphin spermatozoa and zona-intact bovine or murine oocytes and to examine the nuclear chromatin status of the dolphin spermatozoa. All the processes involved in the fertilization including embryo cleavage were observed by confocal microscopy and hybrid embryo formation was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Heterologous bovine IVF showed no polyspermy, lower percentages of pronuclear formation, and a lower cleavage rate compared to homologous IVF group (34.8% vs. 89.3%). Heterologous murine IVF showed a lower cleavage rate than homologous IVF (9.6% vs. 77.1%). With respect to dolphin sperm chromatin, it was more stable, i.e. more resistant to EDTA-SDS decondensation than the bovine sperm chromatin. This study revealed the stability of the dolphin sperm chromatin and the ability of the dolphin spermatozoa to penetrate zona-intact bovine and murine oocytes, leading to hybrid embryo formation.

  2. Serosurvey of wild rodents for Rickettsioses (spotted fever, murine typhus and Q fever) in Java Island, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, I N; Okabayashi, T; Ristiyanto; Lestari, E W; Yanase, T; Muramatsu, Y; Ueno, H; Morita, C

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of antibodies against spotted fever group rickettsia (SFGR), murine typhus and Q fever were investigated in wild rats captured in Indonesia. Sera of 327 rats were collected from Jakarta and Boyolali on Java Island. The prevalences of antibodies against SFGR and murine typhus were 128 (39.1%) and 48 (14.7%), respectively. Antibodies against Q fever were not detected in these serum samples. Antibodies against SFGR were found in all species of rats (20.8-51.9%). The antibody positive rate against murine typhus in Rattus norvegicus (38.0%) was significantly higher than that in other rat species (0-4.8%, p<0.01). The antibody positive rates against SFGR and murine typhus in rats captured in Jakarta were significantly higher than those in rats captured in Boyolali (p<0.01). In this survey, all species of rats had antibodies against SFGR, indicating that the 4 species of tested rats (R. norvegicus, R. rattus, R. exulans, R. tiomanicus) were infected with SFGR and that SFGR may infest the whole of Java Island. Most of the rats that were antibody-positive against murine typhus were captured in Jakarta. Therefore, R. norvegicus and R. rattus are likely to be important hosts of murine typhus in Jakarta. The antibody-positive rates against SFGR and murine typhus in rats captured in the dry season were significantly higher than those in rats captured in the rainy season. This may coincide with the active periods of ticks and fleas in Indonesia.

  3. Comparison of the Drosophila melanogaster, human and murine Sm B cDNAs: evolutionary conservation.

    PubMed

    Brunet, C; Quan, T; Craft, J

    1993-02-28

    To analyze the evolutionary stability of the Sm B polypeptides, the cDNA nucleotide (nt) sequence was derived for the Drosophila melanogaster Sm B polypeptide and compared to the cDNAs encoding human and murine Sm B. The three cDNAs were transcribed and translated in reticulocyte lysates followed by analysis of the synthesized proteins by SDS-PAGE. D. melanogaster B migrated at approximately 25 kDa, in comparison to 28 kDa for the murine and human B proteins, although all three proteins were immunoprecipitated by human anti-Sm autoantibodies and by the Y12 anti-Sm murine monoclonal antibody (Y12 mAb). Immunoblots and immunoprecipitations of [35S]methionine-labeled D. melanogaster S2/M3 cells confirmed the smaller size of the D. melanogaster protein, and revealed that B' was absent in this cell line, as in murine cells. In comparison to the 231 amino acids (aa) of human and murine B, the deduced sequence for the D. melanogaster clone was 199 aa (predicted M(r) of 24,598) with two 5-aa deletions and a 19-aa truncation at the 3' end, compared to the other two clones. D. melanogaster protein B shared 65% aa sequence identity with the human and mouse clones, and 80% similarity when conservative aa substitutions were noted. The C-terminal portion of the D. melanogaster protein was the most evolutionarily variable in comparison to the deduced aa sequences for the other two proteins; however, autoantigenic epitopes bound by human anti-Sm antibodies and the Y12 mAb in this region of the protein were conserved across species lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Abscisic acid does not evoke calcium influx in murine primary microglia and immortalised murine microglial BV-2 and N9 cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Susan X; Benson, Chantel L; Zaharia, L Irina; Abrams, Suzanne R; Hou, Sheng T

    2010-10-22

    Brain microglia are resident macrophage-like cells representing the first and main form of active immune response during brain injury. Microglia-mediated inflammatory events in the brain are known to be associated with chronic degenerative diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson's, or Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, identification of mechanisms activating microglia is not only important in the understanding of microglia-mediated brain pathologies, but may also lead to the development of new anti-inflammatory drugs for the treatment of chronic neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, abscisic acid (ABA), a phytohormone regulating important physiological functions in higher plants, has been proposed to activate murine microglial cell line N9 through increased intracellular calcium. In the present study, we determined the response to ABA and its analogues from murine primary microglia and immortalized murine microglial cell line BV-2 and N9 cells. A Fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester (Fura-2AM)-based ratiometric calcium imaging and measurement technique was used to determine the intracellular calcium changes in these cells when treated with (-)-ABA, (+)-ABA, (-)-trans-ABA and (+)-trans-ABA. Both primary microglia and microglial cell lines (BV-2 and N9 cells) showed significant increase in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) in response to treatment with ATP and ionomycine. However, ABAs failed to evoke dose- and time-dependent [Ca(2+)]i changes in mouse primary microglia, BV-2 and N9 cells. Together, these surprising findings demonstrate that, contrary to that reported in N9 cells [3], ABAs do not evoke intracellular calcium changes in primary microglia and microglial cell lines. The broad conclusion that ABA evokes [Ca(2+)]i in microglia requires more evidence and further careful examination.

  5. Murine interleukin 7 (IL-7) receptor. Characterization on an IL-7- dependent cell line

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    A murine cell line (IxN/2b) absolutely dependent upon exogenous IL-7 for continued growth has been obtained that expresses lymphoid precursor and class I MHC antigens and also contains a rearranged mu heavy chain. This cell line has been used to define the binding and structural characteristics of the murine IL-7 receptor using 125I- labeled recombinant murine IL-7. 125I-IL-7 binding to IxN/2b cell was rapid and saturable at both 4 degrees and 37 degrees C. Equilibrium binding studies produced curvilinear Scatchard plots at both temperatures with high and low affinity Ka values of approximately 1 x 10(10) M-1 and 4 x 10(8) M-1, respectively, and a total of 2,000-2,500 IL-7 binding sites expressed per cell. Experiments measuring inhibition of binding of 125I-IL-7 by unlabeled IL-7 also produced data consistent with the existence of two classes of IL-7 receptors. Evidence concerning the possible molecular nature of two classes of IL-7 receptors was provided by dissociation kinetics and affinity crosslinking experiments. The dissociation rate of 125I-IL-7 was markedly increased when measured in the presence of unlabeled IL-7 at both 37 degrees and 4 degrees C, which is diagnostic of a receptor population displaying negative cooperativity. Crosslinking studies showed that under both reducing and nonreducing conditions, the major crosslinked species observed corresponded to a receptor size of 75-79 kD while a less intense higher molecular mass crosslinked species was also seen which corresponded to a receptor size approximately twice as large (159-162 kD). Both types of experiments suggest that the IL-7 receptor may form noncovalently associated dimers in the membrane. The IL-7 receptor was expressed on pre-B cells, but not detected on several murine B cell lines or primary mature B cells. It was also expressed on murine thymocytes, some T lineage cell lines, and on bone marrow- derived macrophage. All cells binding 125I-IL-7 exhibited curvilinear Scatchard plots. No

  6. Multi-frequency, multi-technique pulsed EPR investigation of the copper binding site of murine amyloid β peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghun; Bang, Jeong Kyu; Kim, Sun Hee

    2015-01-26

    Copper-amyloid peptides are proposed to be the cause of Alzheimer's disease, presumably by oxidative stress. However, mice do not produce amyloid plaques and thus do not suffer from Alzheimer's disease. Although much effort has been focused on the structural characterization of the copper- human amyloid peptides, little is known regarding the copper-binding mode in murine amyloid peptides. Thus, we investigated the structure of copper-murine amyloid peptides through multi-frequency, multi-technique pulsed EPR spectroscopy in conjunction with specific isotope labeling. Based on our pulsed EPR results, we found that Ala2, Glu3, His6, and His14 are directly coordinated with the copper ion in murine amyloid β peptides at pH 8.5. This is the first detailed structural characterization of the copper-binding mode in murine amyloid β peptides. This work may advance the knowledge required for developing inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Detection of adulterated murine components in meat products by TaqMan© real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xin; Zhang, Chi

    2016-02-01

    Using murine meat to substitute mutton has been identified as a new type of meat fraud in China, yet no detection method for murine species has been reported. Here, three kinds of rodent were used as target species to establish a murine-specific real-time PCR method of detection. The mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (cytb) of each target was sequenced and a TaqMan probe was designed based on the cytb. Simultaneously, an internal positive control (IPC) plasmid along with its respective probe were designed to monitor the PCR reaction. As a result, the duplex real-time PCR system was verified to be specific. The limit of detection (LOD) was lower than 1 pg of DNA per reaction and 0.1% murine contamination in meat mixtures. Standard curves were generated for a quantitative analysis. Thus, this study provided a new tool to control the quality of meat products for official and third-party laboratories.

  8. 1.8 Astroms Structure of Murine GITR Ligand Dimer Expressed in Drosophila Melanogaster S2 Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, K.; Ramagopal, U; Nathenson, S; Almo, S

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced TNF receptor ligand (GITRL), a prominent member of the TNF superfamily, activates its receptor on both effector and regulatory T cells to generate critical costimulatory signals that have been implicated in a wide range of T-cell immune functions. The crystal structures of murine and human orthologs of GITRL recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli have previously been determined. In contrast to all classical TNF structures, including the human GITRL structure, murine GITRL demonstrated a unique 'strand-exchanged' dimeric organization. Such a novel assembly behavior indicated a dramatic impact on receptor activation as well as on the signaling mechanism associated with the murine GITRL costimulatory system. In this present work, the 1.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of murine GITRL expressed in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells is reported. The eukaryotic protein-expression system allows transport of the recombinant protein into the extracellular culture medium, thus maximizing the possibility of obtaining correctly folded material devoid of any folding/assembly artifacts that are often suspected with E. coli-expressed proteins. The S2 cell-expressed murine GITRL adopts an identical 'strand-exchanged' dimeric structure to that observed for the E. coli-expressed protein, thus conclusively demonstrating the novel quaternary structure assembly behavior of murine GITRL.

  9. Molecular cloning of mXCR1, the murine SCM-1/lymphotactin receptor.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, T; Izawa, D; Nakayama, T; Nakahara, K; Kakizaki, M; Imai, T; Suzuki, R; Miyasaka, M; Yoshie, O

    1999-09-10

    Single C motif-1 (SCM-1)/lymphotactin is a C-type member of the chemokine superfamily. Previously, we identified its specific receptor XCR1. Here we isolated the murine homologue of XCR1 (mXCR1). To demonstrate its biological activity, we produced recombinant mouse SCM-1 by the baculovirus expression system. B300-19 murine pre-B cells expressing mXCR1 responded to mSCM-1 in chemotactic and calcium-mobilization assays. mXCR1 mRNA was weakly expressed in spleen and lung of normal C57BL/6 mice. In spleen, CD8+ cells and NK1.1+ cells were found to express mXCR1. Identification of mXCR1 will now allow us to study the role of this unique cytokine system in the mouse models of inflammation and immunity.

  10. Tumors in murine brains studied by grating-based phase contrast microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Georg; Dominietto, Marco; Kovacs, Zsofia; Schmitz, Rüdiger; Hieber, Simone E.; Thalmann, Peter; Beckmann, Felix; Müller, Bert

    2014-09-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of vessels, is one of the key processes during tumor development. The newly formed vessels transport oxygen and nutrients from the healthy tissue to the tumor and gives tumor cells the possibility to replicate. The principle of anti-angiogenic therapy is to block angiogenic process in order to stop tumor growth. The aim of the present study is the investigation of murine glioma vascular architecture at early (7 days), intermediate (10 and 15 days) and late (23 days) stage of growth by means of grating-based phase contrast microtomography. We demonstrate that this technique yields premium contrast between healthy and cancerous parts of murine brain tissues.

  11. A novel murine homeobox gene isolated by a tissue specific PCR cloning strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Kern, M J; Witte, D P; Valerius, M T; Aronow, B J; Potter, S S

    1992-01-01

    We have identified a novel homeobox gene, designated K-2, using a reverse transcription PCR cloning strategy. Sequence analysis reveals that the homeobox of K-2 is 77.6% homologous at the nucleotide level and 97% identical at the amino acid sequence level to another murine gene, S8. Homeodomain sequence comparisons indicate that K-2 and S8 represent a distinct subclass of paired type homeobox genes. Northern blot analysis of RNA from murine embryos and adult tissues identified multiple transcripts that are expressed in a developmentally specific and tissue restricted manner. Alternate splicing of K-2 at the 3-coding region leads to the inclusion of a chain terminating sequence. In addition, the developmental expression pattern of this gene at day 12 of gestation was determined by in situ hybridization. Expression was observed in diverse mesenchymal cells in craniofacial, pericardial, primitive dermal, prevertebral, and genital structures. Images PMID:1383943

  12. Hepatic differentiation of embryonic stem cells by murine fetal liver mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takamichi; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Ikai, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocytes derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are a potential cell source for regenerative medicine. However, it has been technically difficult to differentiate ESCs into mature hepatocytes because the definitive growth factors and molecular mechanisms governing hepatocyte differentiation have not yet been well defined. The CD45(-)CD49f(+/-)Thy1(+)gp38(+) mesenchymal cells that reside in murine fetal livers induce hepatic progenitor cells to differentiate into mature hepatocytes by direct cell-cell contact. Utilizing these cells, we employ a two-step procedure for hepatic maturation of ESCs: first, ESCs are differentiated into endodermal cells or hepatic progenitor cells, and second, ESC-derived endodermal cells are matured into functional hepatocytes by coculture with murine fetal liver mesenchymal cells. The ESC-derived hepatocyte-like cells possess hepatic functions, including ammonia removal activity, albumin secretion ability, glycogen synthesis and storage, and cytochrome P450 enzymatic activity.

  13. Human malignant mesothelioma is recapitulated in immunocompetent BALB/c mice injected with murine AB cells

    PubMed Central

    Mezzapelle, Rosanna; Rrapaj, Eltjona; Gatti, Elena; Ceriotti, Chiara; Marchis, Francesco De; Preti, Alessandro; Spinelli, Antonello E.; Perani, Laura; Venturini, Massimo; Valtorta, Silvia; Moresco, Rosa Maria; Pecciarini, Lorenza; Doglioni, Claudio; Frenquelli, Michela; Crippa, Luca; Recordati, Camilla; Scanziani, Eugenio; de Vries, Hilda; Berns, Anton; Frapolli, Roberta; Boldorini, Renzo; D’Incalci, Maurizio; Bianchi, Marco E.; Crippa, Massimo P.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Mesothelioma is a highly aggressive cancer, which is difficult to diagnose and treat. Here we describe the molecular, cellular and morphological characterization of a syngeneic system consisting of murine AB1, AB12 and AB22 mesothelioma cells injected in immunocompetent BALB/c mice, which allows the study of the interplay of tumor cells with the immune system. Murine mesothelioma cells, like human ones, respond to exogenous High Mobility Group Box 1 protein, a Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern that acts as a chemoattractant for leukocytes and as a proinflammatory mediator. The tumors derived from AB cells are morphologically and histologically similar to human MM tumors, and respond to treatments used for MM patients. Our system largely recapitulates human mesothelioma, and we advocate its use for the study of MM development and treatment. PMID:26961782

  14. Usefulness of the murine model to study the immune response against Histoplasma capsulatum infection.

    PubMed

    Sahaza, Jorge H; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Zenteno, Edgar; Taylor, Maria Lucia

    2014-05-01

    The present paper is an overview of the primary events that are associated with the histoplasmosis immune response in the murine model. Valuable data that have been recorded in the scientific literature have contributed to an improved understanding of the clinical course of this systemic mycosis, which is caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. Data must be analyzed carefully, given that misinterpretation could be generated because most of the available information is based on experimental host-parasite interactions that used inappropriate proceedings, i.e., the non-natural route of infection with the parasitic and virulent fungal yeast-phase, which is not the usual infective phase of the etiological agent of this mycosis. Thus, due to their versatility, complexity, and similarities with humans, several murine models have played a fundamental role in exploring the host-parasite interaction during H. capsulatum infection.

  15. Murine Mueller cells are progenitor cells for neuronal cells and fibrous tissue cells

    SciTech Connect

    Florian, Christian; Langmann, Thomas; Weber, Bernhard H.F.; Morsczeck, Christian

    2008-09-19

    Mammalian Mueller cells have been reported to possess retinal progenitor cell properties and generate new neurons after injury. This study investigates murine Mueller cells under in vitro conditions for their capability of dedifferentiation into retinal progenitor cells. Mueller cells were isolated from mouse retina, and proliferating cells were expanded in serum-containing medium. For dedifferentiation, the cultured cells were transferred to serum-replacement medium (SRM) at different points in time after their isolation. Interestingly, early cell passages produced fibrous tissue in which extracellular matrix proteins and connective tissue markers were differentially expressed. In contrast, aged Mueller cell cultures formed neurospheres in SRM that are characteristic for neuronal progenitor cells. These neurospheres differentiated into neuron-like cells after cultivation on laminin/ornithine cell culture substrate. Here, we report for the first time that murine Mueller cells can be progenitors for both, fibrous tissue cells and neuronal cells, depending on the age of the cell culture.

  16. Hepatic Differentiation from Murine and Human iPS Cells Using Nanofiber Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Taiji; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kume, Shoen

    2016-01-01

    The induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells of murine and human are capable to differentiate into any cell type of the body through recapitulating normal development, similarly as the embryonic stem (ES) cells. Lines of evidence support that both ES cells and iPS cells are induced to differentiate in vitro by sequential treatment of humoral cues such as growth factors and chemicals, combined with the use of certain microenvironments including extracellular matrices and scaffolds.Here, we describe the procedure to potentiate hepatic lineage cells differentiation from murine and human iPS cells, using growth factor cocktails and nanofiber scaffolds. Nanofiber scaffolds have a three-dimensional surface mimicking the fine structures of the basement membrane in vivo, allow the iPS cells to differentiate into the definitive endoderm and mature hepatocyte-like cells more efficiently than the two-dimensional conventional culture plates.

  17. Generation of murine sympathoadrenergic progenitor-like cells from embryonic stem cells and postnatal adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Shobhit; Wahl, Joachim; Huber-Lang, Markus S; Stadel, Dominic; Braubach, Peter; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Beltinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Sympathoadrenergic progenitor cells (SAPs) of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are important for normal development of the sympathetic PNS and for the genesis of neuroblastoma, the most common and often lethal extracranial solid tumor in childhood. However, it remains difficult to isolate sufficient numbers of SAPs for investigations. We therefore set out to improve generation of SAPs by using two complementary approaches, differentiation from murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolation from postnatal murine adrenal glands. We provide evidence that selecting for GD2 expression enriches for ESC-derived SAP-like cells and that proliferating SAP-like cells can be isolated from postnatal adrenal glands of mice. These advances may facilitate investigations about the development and malignant transformation of the sympathetic PNS.

  18. Altered transcription of genes coding for class I histocompatibility antigens in murine tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Three murine tumors induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MLV) which exhibited loss of some or all H-2 class I antigens at the cell surface were analyzed at the DNA and RNA level with molecular probes specific of H-2 heavy chains and beta 2-microglobulin sequences. No observable difference could be detected at the DNA level between the tumors and the parent animals. However, a decrease in H-2 mRNA was observed, especially in phenotypically H-2 negative tumor, BM5R, where H-2 transcripts were at least 30-fold less abundant. These results show that an H-2-negative character may result from a general alteration in the transcription of H-2 genes, which could reflect some kind of regulatory process. PMID:6311935

  19. Large-scale purification of gp70 from Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Pyle, S W; Chabot, D J; Miller, T L; Serabyn, S A; Bess, J W; Arthur, L O

    1991-05-01

    The external envelope glycoprotein, gp70, of the Moloney murine leukemia virus was extracted from NIH 3T3 cells utilizing the detergent n-octyl-beta-D-glycopyranoside. The extracted gp70 was sequentially purified utilizing lectin-affinity, anion-exchange, and molecular-exclusion chromatography techniques. Approximately 10 mg of gp70 was purified by this method and shown to be 95% homogeneous, as assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The presence of purified gp70 from Moloney murine leukemia virus was confirmed by amino acid analysis, amino-terminal sequencing, and immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody raised against gp70. The procedure is rapid, utilizes commercially available media, and can be used to purify large amounts of retroviral envelope glycoprotein from virus.

  20. Generation of Murine Sympathoadrenergic Progenitor-Like Cells from Embryonic Stem Cells and Postnatal Adrenal Glands

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Shobhit; Wahl, Joachim; Huber-Lang, Markus S.; Stadel, Dominic; Braubach, Peter; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Beltinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Sympathoadrenergic progenitor cells (SAPs) of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are important for normal development of the sympathetic PNS and for the genesis of neuroblastoma, the most common and often lethal extracranial solid tumor in childhood. However, it remains difficult to isolate sufficient numbers of SAPs for investigations. We therefore set out to improve generation of SAPs by using two complementary approaches, differentiation from murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolation from postnatal murine adrenal glands. We provide evidence that selecting for GD2 expression enriches for ESC-derived SAP-like cells and that proliferating SAP-like cells can be isolated from postnatal adrenal glands of mice. These advances may facilitate investigations about the development and malignant transformation of the sympathetic PNS. PMID:23675538

  1. Expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in murine small intestine during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Ryo; Yajima, Takaji; Tsukahara, Takamitsu

    2017-02-01

    The important role played by the gut microbiota in host immunity is mediated, in part, through toll-like receptors (TLRs). We evaluated the postnatal changes in expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the murine small intestine and assessed how expression is influenced by gut microbiota. The expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the murine small intestine was highly dynamic during development. The changes were especially profound during the suckling period, with the maximal mRNA levels detected in the mid-suckling period. Immunohistochemical and flow-cytometric analyses indicated that the changes in TLR2 and TLR4 expression involve primarily epithelial cells. The germ-free mice showed minor changes in TLR2/TLR4 mRNA and TLR2 protein during the suckling period. This study demonstrated that the postnatal expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in small intestinal epithelial cells is dynamic and depends on the presence of commensal intestinal microbiota.

  2. The HIR protein family: isolation and characterization of a complete murine cDNA.

    PubMed

    Scamps, C; Lorain, S; Lamour, V; Lipinski, M

    1996-04-10

    A full-length cDNA has been isolated for the murine homolog of the human HIRA protein, a member of the HIR family of nuclear proteins that is encoded from the chromosome 22 region critical for the DiGeorge syndrome. This family also contains Hir1p and Hir2p, two proteins identified as regulators of histone gene transcription in yeast. The murine and human amino acid sequences are 95.3% identical, with a striking 99.2% identity in the N-terminal WD repeat domain that is characteristic of the family. The two cDNAs are highly conserved within the coding regions, but also in the entire 5' untranslated region and in a strikingly long stretch of nucleotides in the 3' untranslated region.

  3. Enzymatic inactivation of N-nitroso compounds in murine blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Brundrett, R B; Aukerman, S L

    1985-03-01

    Murine blood plasma rapidly inactivates nitrosamides and nitrosocarbamates but not nitrosoureas. The mechanism of this inactivation in murine blood plasma has been investigated. The vast majority of activity (greater than 97%) was inhibited by serine hydroxylase inhibitors. Also, 92% of the activity was inhibited by bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate, a selective inhibitor of carboxylesterases. Decomposition products formed after blood plasma action on N-ethyl-N-nitrosoacetamide or N-methyl-N-nitrosoethylcarbamate were separated and identified by gas chromatography. The products formed were consistent with a hydrolytic cleavage of the amidic bond. These observations are consistent with the idea that the major active factor(s) in plasma is a carboxylesterase(s).

  4. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vellenga, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date. PMID:27642303

  5. Eukaryotic expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of murine Manic Fringe

    SciTech Connect

    Jinek, Martin; Conti, Elena

    2006-08-01

    The catalytic domain of the murine glycosyltransferase Manic Fringe was expressed in insect cells. Removal by site-directed mutagenesis of two N-glycosylation sites present in the protein was essential to obtain crystals that diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. Fringe proteins are Golgi-resident β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that regulate development in metazoa through glycosylation of the Notch receptor and its ligands. The catalytic domain of murine Manic Fringe was expressed in the baculovirus/insect-cell system as a secreted protein. Mass-spectrometric analysis of the purified protein indicated the presence of two N-linked glycans. Abolishing the glycosylation sites by site-directed mutagenesis was necessary in order to obtain orthorhombic crystals that diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. For phasing, a highly redundant data set was collected using a crystal soaked with halide salts.

  6. [Effect of verapamil on cyclosporine-induced vasoconstriction in human or murine isolated glomerules].

    PubMed

    L'Azou, B; Lakhdar, B; Potaux, L; Aparicio, M; Cambar, J

    1991-11-27

    Cyclosporin is a very potent immunosuppressant, but it often produces renal disturbances which limit its clinical use. Using an image analyzer which determines the areas of isolated glomerules, we were able to demonstrate that cyclosporin in various concentrations exerts a direct vasoconstrictive effect on human and murine glomerules. We also showed that verapamil has an almost total inhibitory effect on cyclosporin-induced vasoconstriction. These findings seem to be of interest in clinical practice to reduce the nephrotoxicity of cyclosporin.

  7. Neonatal CD71+ erythroid cells do not modify murine sepsis mortality

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.; Scumpia, Philip O.; Stocks, Blair T.; Romano-Keeler, Joann; Alrifai, Mhd Wael; Liu, Jin-Hua; Kim, Annette S.; Alford, Catherine E.; Matta, Pranathi; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Moore, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. A recent report suggested murine neonatal host defense against infection could be compromised by immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid splenocytes. We examined the impact of CD71+ erythroid splenocytes on murine neonatal mortality to endotoxin challenge or polymicrobial sepsis and characterized circulating CD71+ erythroid (CD235a+) cells in human neonates. Adoptive transfer or antibody-mediated reduction of neonatal CD71+ erythroid splenocytes did not alter murine neonatal survival to endotoxin challenge or polymicrobial sepsis challenge. Ex vivo immunosuppression of stimulated adult CD11b+ cells was not limited to neonatal splenocytes as it also occurred with adult and neonatal bone marrow. Animals treated with anti-CD71 antibody showed reduced splenic bacterial load following bacterial challenge compared to isotype-treated mice. However, adoptive transfer of enriched CD71+ erythroid splenocytes to CD71+-reduced animals did not reduce bacterial clearance. Human CD71+CD235a+ cells were common among cord blood mononuclear cells and were shown to be reticulocytes. In summary, a lack of effect on murine survival to polymicrobial sepsis following adoptive transfer or diminution of CD71+ erythroid splenocytes under these experimental conditions suggests the impact of these cells on neonatal infection risk and progression may be limited. An unanticipated immune priming effect of anti-CD71 antibody treatment was likely responsible for the reported enhanced bacterial clearance, rather than a reduction of immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid splenocytes. In humans, the well-described rapid decrease in circulating reticulocytes after birth suggests they may have a limited role in reducing inflammation secondary to microbial colonization. PMID:26101326

  8. Allelic Variation on Murine Chromosome 11 Modifies Host Inflammatory Responses and Resistance to Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Allelic Variation on Murine Chromosome 11 Modifies Host Inflammatory Responses and Resistance to Bacillus anthracis Jill K. Terra1, Bryan France1...of America Abstract Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by...Inflammatory Responses and Resistance to Bacillus anthracis. PLoS Pathog 7(12): e1002469. doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002469 Editor: Theresa M. Koehler, The

  9. CD44 Antibodies and Immune Thrombocytopenia in the Amelioration of Murine Inflammatory Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Patrick J.; Lazarus, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies to CD44 have been used to successfully ameliorate murine models of autoimmune disease. The most often studied disease model has been murine inflammatory arthritis, where a clear mechanism for the efficacy of CD44 antibodies has not been established. We have recently shown in a murine passive-model of the autoimmune disease immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) that some CD44 antibodies themselves can induce thrombocytopenia in mice, and the CD44 antibody causing the most severe thrombocytopenia (IM7), also is known to be highly effective in ameliorating murine models of arthritis. Recent work in the K/BxN serum-induced model of arthritis demonstrated that antibody-induced thrombocytopenia reduced arthritis, causing us to question whether CD44 antibodies might primarily ameliorate arthritis through their thrombocytopenic effect. We evaluated IM7, IRAWB14.4, 5035-41.1D, KM201, KM114, and KM81, and found that while all could induce thrombocytopenia, the degree of protection against serum-induced arthritis was not closely related to the length or severity of the thrombocytopenia. CD44 antibody treatment was also able to reverse established inflammation, while thrombocytopenia induced by an anti-platelet antibody targeting the GPIIbIIIa platelet antigen, could not mediate this effect. While CD44 antibody-induced thrombocytopenia may contribute to some of its therapeutic effect against the initiation of arthritis, for established disease there are likely other mechanisms contributing to its efficacy. Humans are not known to express CD44 on platelets, and are therefore unlikely to develop thrombocytopenia after CD44 antibody treatment. An understanding of the relationship between arthritis, thrombocytopenia, and CD44 antibody treatment remains critical for continued development of CD44 antibody therapeutics. PMID:23785450

  10. Expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in a murine model of Aspergillus fumigatus keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Gui-Qiu; Lin, Jing; Hu, Li-Ting; Che, Cheng-Ye; Li, Cui; Wang, Qian; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Peng, Xu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    AIM To observe the presence and expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) during the corneal immunity to Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) in the murine models. METHODS The murine model of fungal keratitis was established by smearing with colonies of A. fumigatus after scraping central epithelium of cornea and covering with contact lenses in C57BL/6 mice. The mice were randomly divided into control group, sham group and A. fumigatus keratitis group. The cornea was monitored daily using a slit lamp and recorded disease score after infection. Corneal lesion was detected by immunofluorescence staining. IDO mRNA and protein were also detected by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot. RESULTS The disease score and slit lamp photography indicated that disease severity was consistent with corneal inflammation in the murine models, and the disease scores in A. fumigatus keratitis group were obviously higher than those in the sham group. By immunofluorescence staining, IDO was mainly localized in corneal epithelium and stroma in the murine corneal tissues with A. fumigatus keratitis. Compared with the sham group, IDO mRNA expression was significantly enhanced in corneal epithelium infected by A. fumigatus. Furthermore, IDO protein expression detected by Western blot was in accord with transcript levels of IDO mRNA measured by qRT-PCR. IDO protein expression was enhanced after A. fumigatus infection compared with the sham group. CONCLUSION IDO is detected in corneal epithelium and stroma locally, which indicates IDO takes part in the pathogenesis of A. fumigatus keratitis and plays a key role in immune regulation at the early stage. PMID:27162718

  11. Combination therapy of murine mucormycosis or aspergillosis with iron chelation, polyenes, and echinocandins.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Luo, Guanpingsheng; Fu, Yue; French, Samuel W; Edwards, John E; Spellberg, Brad

    2011-04-01

    Liposomal amphotericin B (LAmB) combined wither either micafungin or deferasirox was synergistic in previous murine studies with mucormycosis or aspergillosis. We hypothesized that triple therapy using LAmB, micafungin, and deferasirox could further improve outcomes of mucormycosis or aspergillosis. Triple therapy improved survival and reduced tissue fungal burden of mice with mucormycosis and to a lesser extent with aspergillosis. Continued investigation into the use of triple therapy against mucormycosis and aspergillosis is warranted.

  12. Homocysteine enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via ERK and Akt signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Yi Sle; Seo, Kyo Won; Bae, Jin Ung; Kim, Gyu Hee; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2012-04-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) at elevated levels is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hcy on the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in murine macrophages. Among the MMP known to regulate the activities of collagenase and gelatinase, Hcy exclusively increased the gelatinolytic activity of MMP-9 in J774A.1 cells as well as in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, this activity was found to be correlated with Western blot findings in J774A.1 cells, which showed that MMP-9 expression was concentration- and time-dependently increased by Hcy. Inhibition of the ERK and Akt pathways led to a significant decrease in Hcy-induced MMP-9 expression, and combined treatment with inhibitors of the ERK and Akt pathways showed an additive effects. Activity assays for ERK and Akt showed that Hcy increased the phosphorylation of both, but these phosphorylation were not affected by inhibitors of the Akt and ERK pathways. In line with these findings, the molecular inhibition of ERK and Akt using siRNA did not affect the Hcy-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, respectively. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages by separately activating the ERK and Akt signaling pathways. -- Highlights: ► Homocysteine (Hcy) induced MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. ► Hcy induced MMP-9 production through ERK and Akt signaling pathways. ► ERK and Akt signaling pathways were activated by Hcy in murine macrophages. ► ERK and Akt pathways were additively act on Hcy-induced MMP-9 production. ► Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in macrophages via activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways in an independent manner.

  13. Ventricular aneurysms complicating coxsackievirus group B, types 1 and 4 murine myocarditis.

    PubMed

    El-Khatib, M R; Chason, J L; Lerner, A M

    1979-02-01

    Suckling Swiss Webster mice were inoculated with 10(4)TCD50 of coxsackieviruses, group B types 1 or 4. Virulent necrotizing myocarditis resulted in 185 infected mice. Of the latter group, three (14.3%) nurslings on the 17th and 23rd day after inoculations had left ventricular aneurysms postmortem. None of 61 concurrently matched control mice developed aneurysms. Ventricular aneurysm is a suggested but previously undocumented complication of murine, and possibly human necrotizing transmural coxsackievirus myocarditis.

  14. Biomechanical properties of murine meniscus surface via AFM-based nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Doyran, Basak; Gamer, Laura W; Lu, X Lucas; Qin, Ling; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Rosen, Vicki; Han, Lin

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to quantify the biomechanical properties of murine meniscus surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation was performed on the central region, proximal side of menisci from 6- to 24-week old male C57BL/6 mice using microspherical tips (Rtip≈5µm) in PBS. A unique, linear correlation between indentation depth, D, and response force, F, was found on menisci from all age groups. This non-Hertzian behavior is likely due to the dominance of tensile resistance by the collagen fibril bundles on meniscus surface that are mostly aligned along the circumferential direction. The indentation resistance was calculated as both the effective modulus, Eind, via the isotropic Hertz model, and the effective stiffness, Sind = dF/dD. Values of Sind and Eind were found to depend on indentation rate, suggesting the existence of poro-viscoelasticity. These values do not significantly vary with anatomical sites, lateral versus medial compartments, or mouse age. In addition, Eind of meniscus surface (e.g., 6.1±0.8MPa for 12 weeks of age, mean±SEM, n=13) was found to be significantly higher than those of meniscus surfaces in other species, and of murine articular cartilage surface (1.4±0.1MPa, n=6). In summary, these results provided the first direct mechanical knowledge of murine knee meniscus tissues. We expect this understanding to serve as a mechanics-based benchmark for further probing the developmental biology and osteoarthritis symptoms of meniscus in various murine models.

  15. Isolation and characterisation of Ebolavirus-specific recombinant antibody fragments from murine and shark immune libraries.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, Sarah A; Dooley, Helen; Schoepp, Randal J; Flajnik, Martin; Lonsdale, Stephen G

    2011-09-01

    Members of the genus Ebolavirus cause fulminating outbreaks of disease in human and non-human primate populations with a mortality rate up to 90%. To facilitate rapid detection of these pathogens in clinical and environmental samples, robust reagents capable of providing sensitive and specific detection are required. In this work recombinant antibody libraries were generated from murine (single chain variable domain fragment; scFv) and nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum (IgNAR V) hosts immunised with Zaire ebolavirus. This provides the first recorded IgNAR V response against a particulate antigen in the nurse shark. Both murine scFv and shark IgNAR V libraries were panned by phage display technology to identify useful antibodies for the generation of immunological detection reagents. Two murine scFv were shown to have specificity to the Zaire ebolavirus viral matrix protein VP40. Two isolated IgNAR V were shown to bind to the viral nucleoprotein (NP) and to capture viable Zaire ebolavirus with a high degree of sensitivity. Assays developed with IgNAR V cross-reacted to Reston ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus and Bundibugyo ebolavirus. Despite this broad reactivity, neither of IgNAR V showed reactivity to Côte d'Ivoire ebolavirus. IgNAR V was substantially more resistant to irreversible thermal denaturation than murine scFv and monoclonal IgG in a comparative test. The demonstrable robustness of the IgNAR V domains may offer enhanced utility as immunological detection reagents in fieldable biosensor applications for use in tropical or subtropical countries where outbreaks of Ebolavirus haemorrhagic fever occur.

  16. Serological Differentiation of Murine Typhus and Epidemic Typhus Using Cross-Adsorption and Western Blotting

    PubMed Central

    La Scola, Bernard; Rydkina, Lena; Ndihokubwayo, Jean-Bosco; Vene, Sirkka; Raoult, Didier

    2000-01-01

    Differentiation of murine typhus due to Rickettsia typhi and epidemic typhus due to Rickettsia prowazekii is critical epidemiologically but difficult serologically. Using serological, epidemiological, and clinical criteria, we selected sera from 264 patients with epidemic typhus and from 44 patients with murine typhus among the 29,188 tested sera in our bank. These sera cross-reacted extensively in indirect fluorescent antibody assays (IFAs) against R. typhi and R. prowazekii, as 42% of the sera from patients with epidemic typhus and 34% of the sera from patients with murine typhus exhibited immunoglobulin M (IgM) and/or IgG titers against the homologous antigen (R. prowazekii and R. typhi, respectively) that were more than one dilution higher than those against the heterologous antigen. Serum cross-adsorption studies and Western blotting were performed on sera from 12 selected patients, 5 with murine typhus, 5 with epidemic typhus, and 2 suffering from typhus of undetermined etiology. Differences in IFA titers against R. typhi and R. prowazekii allowed the identification of the etiological agent in 8 of 12 patients. Western blot studies enabled the identification of the etiological agent in six patients. When the results of IFA and Western blot studies were considered in combination, identification of the etiological agent was possible for 10 of 12 patients. Serum cross-adsorption studies enabled the differentiation of the etiological agent in all patients. Our study indicates that when used together, Western blotting and IFA are useful serological tools to differentiate between R. prowazekii and R. typhi exposures. While a cross-adsorption study is the definitive technique to differentiate between infections with these agents, it was necessary in only 2 of 12 cases (16.7%), and the high costs of such a study limit its use. PMID:10882661

  17. Efficacy of orally delivered cochleates containing amphotericin B in a murine model of aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Delmas, G; Park, S; Chen, Z W; Tan, F; Kashiwazaki, R; Zarif, L; Perlin, D S

    2002-08-01

    Cochleates containing amphotericin B (CAMB) were administered orally at doses ranging from 0 to 40 mg/kg of body weight/day for 14 days in a murine model of systemic aspergillosis. The administration of oral doses of CAMB (20 and 40 mg/kg/day) resulted in a survival rate of 70% and a reduction in colony counts of more than 2 logs in lungs, livers, and kidneys. Orally administered CAMB shows promise for the treatment of aspergillosis.

  18. Efficacy of Orally Delivered Cochleates Containing Amphotericin B in a Murine Model of Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, G.; Park, S.; Chen, Z. W.; Tan, F.; Kashiwazaki, R.; Zarif, L.; Perlin, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Cochleates containing amphotericin B (CAMB) were administered orally at doses ranging from 0 to 40 mg/kg of body weight/day for 14 days in a murine model of systemic aspergillosis. The administration of oral doses of CAMB (20 and 40 mg/kg/day) resulted in a survival rate of 70% and a reduction in colony counts of more than 2 logs in lungs, livers, and kidneys. Orally administered CAMB shows promise for the treatment of aspergillosis. PMID:12121962

  19. ABC- and SLC-Transporters in Murine and Bovine Mammary Epithelium - Effects of Prochloraz

    PubMed Central

    Yagdiran, Yagmur; Oskarsson, Agneta; Knight, Christopher H.; Tallkvist, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Some chemicals are ligands to efflux transporters which may result in high concentrations in milk. Limited knowledge is available on the influence of maternal exposure to chemicals on the expression and function of transporters in the lactating mammary gland. We determined gene expression of ABC and SLC transporters in murine mammary tissue of different gestation and lactation stages, in murine mammary cells (HC11) featuring resting and secreting phenotypes and in bovine mammary tissue and cells (BME-UV). Effects on transporter expression and function of the imidazole fungicide prochloraz, previously reported to influence BCRP in mammary cells, was investigated on transporter expression and function in the two cell lines. Transporters studied were BCRP, MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5/OATP1A2, OCTN1 and OCT1. Gene expressions of BCRP and OCT1 in murine mammary glands were increased during gestation and lactation, whereas MDR1, MRP1, OATP1A5 and OCTN1 were decreased, compared to expressions in virgins. All transporters measured in mammary glands of mice were detected in bovine mammary tissue and in HC11 cells, while only MDR1 and MRP1 were detected in BME-UV cells. Prochloraz treatment induced MDR1 gene and protein expression in both differentiated HC11 and BME-UV cells and increased protein function in HC11 cells, resulting in decreased accumulation of the MDR1 substrate digoxin. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that murine (HC11) and bovine (BME-UV) mammary epithelial cells can be applied to characterize expression and function of transporters as well as effects of contaminants on the mammary transporters. An altered expression, induced by a drug or toxic chemical, on any of the transporters expressed in the mammary epithelial cells during lactation may modulate the well-balanced composition of nutrients and/or secretion of contaminants in milk with potential adverse effects on breast-fed infants and dairy consumers. PMID:27028005

  20. Growth Self-Incitement in Murine Melanoma B16: A Phenomenological Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajzer, Zeljko; Pavelic, Kresimir; Vuk-Pavlovic, Stanimir

    1984-08-01

    The growing murine melanoma B16 secretes increasing quantities of a substance or substances immunologically cross-reactive with insulin. The elevated concentrations of these substances in blood are accompanied by a decrease in blood glucose concentration and release of growth hormone, which is followed by increased tumor growth. By use of a phenomenological model based on these data, we show that B16 incites its own growth by positive feedback.

  1. Adapting Human Videofluoroscopic Swallow Study Methods to Detect and Characterize Dysphagia in Murine Disease Models

    PubMed Central

    Lever, Teresa E.; Braun, Sabrina M.; Brooks, Ryan T.; Harris, Rebecca A.; Littrell, Loren L.; Neff, Ryan M.; Hinkel, Cameron J.; Allen, Mitchell J.; Ulsas, Mollie A.

    2015-01-01

    This study adapted human videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) methods for use with murine disease models for the purpose of facilitating translational dysphagia research. Successful outcomes are dependent upon three critical components: test chambers that permit self-feeding while standing unrestrained in a confined space, recipes that mask the aversive taste/odor of commercially-available oral contrast agents, and a step-by-step test protocol that permits quantification of swallow physiology. Elimination of one or more of these components will have a detrimental impact on the study results. Moreover, the energy level capability of the fluoroscopy system will determine which swallow parameters can be investigated. Most research centers have high energy fluoroscopes designed for use with people and larger animals, which results in exceptionally poor image quality when testing mice and other small rodents. Despite this limitation, we have identified seven VFSS parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice when using a high energy fluoroscope in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol. We recently obtained a low energy fluoroscopy system with exceptionally high imaging resolution and magnification capabilities that was designed for use with mice and other small rodents. Preliminary work using this new system, in combination with the new murine VFSS protocol, has identified 13 swallow parameters that are consistently quantifiable in mice, which is nearly double the number obtained using conventional (i.e., high energy) fluoroscopes. Identification of additional swallow parameters is expected as we optimize the capabilities of this new system. Results thus far demonstrate the utility of using a low energy fluoroscopy system to detect and quantify subtle changes in swallow physiology that may otherwise be overlooked when using high energy fluoroscopes to investigate murine disease models. PMID:25866882

  2. The Pharmacokinetics and Metabolism of Lumiracoxib in Chimeric Humanized and Murinized FRG Mice.

    PubMed

    Dickie, A P; Wilson, C E; Schreiter, K; Wehr, R; Wilson, E M; Bial, J; Scheer, N; Wilson, I D; Riley, R J

    2017-03-25

    The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of lumiracoxib were studied, after administration of single 10 mg/kg oral doses to chimeric liver-humanized and murinized FRG mice. In the chimeric humanized mice, lumiracoxib reached peak observed concentrations in the blood of 1.10 ± 0.08 μg/mL at 0.25-0.5 h post-dose with an AUCinf of 1.74 ± 0.52 μg h/mL and an effective half-life for the drug of 1.42 ± 0.72 h (n=3). In the case of the murinized animals peak observed concentrations in the blood were determined as 1.15 ± 0.08 μg/mL at 0.25 h post-dose with an AUCinf of 1.94 ± 0.22 μg h/mL and an effective half-life of 1.28 ± 0.02 h (n=3). Analysis of blood indicated only the presence of unchanged lumiracoxib. Metabolic profiling of urine, bile and faecal extracts revealed a complex pattern of metabolites for both humanized and murinized animals with, in addition to unchanged parent drug, a variety of hydroxylated and conjugated metabolites detected. The profiles obtained in humanized mice were different compared to murinized animals with e.g., a higher proportion of the dose detected in the form of acyl glucuronide metabolites and much reduced amounts of taurine conjugates. Comparison of the metabolic profiles obtained from the present study with previously published data from C57bl/6J mice and humans, revealed a greater though not complete match between chimeric humanized mice and humans, such that the liver-humanized FRG model may represent a useful approach to assessing the biotransformation of such compounds in humans.

  3. Killing of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis by reactive nitrogen intermediates produced by activated murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of the major infectious causes of morbidity and mortality in the world, yet the mechanisms by which macrophages defend against Mycobacterium tuberculosis have remained obscure. Results from this study show that murine macrophages, activated by interferon gamma, and lipopolysaccharide or tumor necrosis factor alpha, both growth inhibit and kill M. tuberculosis. This antimycobacterial effect, demonstrable both in murine macrophage cell lines and in peritoneal macrophages of BALB/c mice, is independent of the macrophage capacity to generate reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). Both the ROI-deficient murine macrophage cell line D9, and its ROI-generating, parental line J774.16, expressed comparable antimycobacterial activity upon activation. In addition, the oxygen radical scavengers superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, mannitol, and diazabicyclooctane had no effect on the antimycobacterial activity of macrophages. These findings, together with the results showing the relative resistance of M. tuberculosis to enzymatically generated H2O2, suggest that ROI are unlikely to be significantly involved in killing M. tuberculosis. In contrast, the antimycobacterial activity of these macrophages strongly correlates with the induction of the L-arginine- dependent generation of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI). The effector molecule(s) that could participate in mediating this antimycobacterial function are toxic RNI, including NO, NO2, and HNO2, as demonstrated by the mycobacteriocidal effect of acidified NO2. The oxygen radical scavenger SOD adventitiously perturbs RNI production, and cannot be used to discriminate between cytocidal mechanisms involving ROI and RNI. Overall, our results provide support for the view that the L-arginine-dependent production of RNI is the principal effector mechanism in activated murine macrophages responsible for killing and growth inhibiting virulent M. tuberculosis. PMID:1552282

  4. Murine Models of Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma: A Role for Cav1?

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Chelsey L.; Cutucache, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Dozens of murine models of indolent and aggressive B-cell lymphomas have been generated to date. These include those manifesting chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), as well as xenografts of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). These models have led to an improved understanding of disease etiology, B-cell biology, immunomodulation, and the importance of the tumor microenvironment. Despite these efforts in CLL, DLBCL, and MCL, considerably little progress toward a model of splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) has been accomplished. Herein, we describe the similarities and differences between CLL, MCL, and SMZL and highlight effective murine models that mimic disease in the two former, in hopes of informing a potential model of the latter. At the time of writing this review, the precise molecular events of SMZL remain to be determined and a treatment regimen remains to be identified. Therefore, based on the efforts put forth in the B-cell lymphoma field throughout the past three decades, the established role of caveolin-1 in B- and T-cell biology as an oncogene or tumor suppressor, and the recurrent deletion or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 7q in many cancers, we make recommendations for a murine model of SMZL. PMID:28018857

  5. Murine Models of Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma: A Role for Cav1?

    PubMed

    Patten, Chelsey L; Cutucache, Christine E

    2016-01-01

    Dozens of murine models of indolent and aggressive B-cell lymphomas have been generated to date. These include those manifesting chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), as well as xenografts of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). These models have led to an improved understanding of disease etiology, B-cell biology, immunomodulation, and the importance of the tumor microenvironment. Despite these efforts in CLL, DLBCL, and MCL, considerably little progress toward a model of splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) has been accomplished. Herein, we describe the similarities and differences between CLL, MCL, and SMZL and highlight effective murine models that mimic disease in the two former, in hopes of informing a potential model of the latter. At the time of writing this review, the precise molecular events of SMZL remain to be determined and a treatment regimen remains to be identified. Therefore, based on the efforts put forth in the B-cell lymphoma field throughout the past three decades, the established role of caveolin-1 in B- and T-cell biology as an oncogene or tumor suppressor, and the recurrent deletion or loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of 7q in many cancers, we make recommendations for a murine model of SMZL.

  6. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects. PMID:26629697

  7. Notch pathway inhibition controls myeloma bone disease in the murine MOPC315.BM model

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzer, R; Nickel, N; Godau, J; Willie, B M; Duda, G N; Schwarzer, R; Cirovic, B; Leutz, A; Manz, R; Bogen, B; Dörken, B; Jundt, F

    2014-01-01

    Despite evidence that deregulated Notch signalling is a master regulator of multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis, its contribution to myeloma bone disease remains to be resolved. Notch promotes survival of human MM cells and triggers human osteoclast activity in vitro. Here, we show that inhibition of Notch through the γ-secretase inhibitor XII (GSI XII) induces apoptosis of murine MOPC315.BM myeloma cells with high Notch activity. GSI XII impairs murine osteoclast differentiation of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells in vitro. In the murine MOPC315.BM myeloma model GSI XII has potent anti-MM activity and reduces osteolytic lesions as evidenced by diminished myeloma-specific monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig)-A serum levels and quantitative assessment of bone structure changes via high-resolution microcomputed tomography scans. Thus, we suggest that Notch inhibition through GSI XII controls myeloma bone disease mainly by targeting Notch in MM cells and possibly in osteoclasts in their microenvironment. We conclude that Notch inhibition is a valid therapeutic strategy in MM. PMID:24927406

  8. Notch pathway inhibition controls myeloma bone disease in the murine MOPC315.BM model.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, R; Nickel, N; Godau, J; Willie, B M; Duda, G N; Schwarzer, R; Cirovic, B; Leutz, A; Manz, R; Bogen, B; Dörken, B; Jundt, F

    2014-06-13

    Despite evidence that deregulated Notch signalling is a master regulator of multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis, its contribution to myeloma bone disease remains to be resolved. Notch promotes survival of human MM cells and triggers human osteoclast activity in vitro. Here, we show that inhibition of Notch through the γ-secretase inhibitor XII (GSI XII) induces apoptosis of murine MOPC315.BM myeloma cells with high Notch activity. GSI XII impairs murine osteoclast differentiation of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells in vitro. In the murine MOPC315.BM myeloma model GSI XII has potent anti-MM activity and reduces osteolytic lesions as evidenced by diminished myeloma-specific monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig)-A serum levels and quantitative assessment of bone structure changes via high-resolution microcomputed tomography scans. Thus, we suggest that Notch inhibition through GSI XII controls myeloma bone disease mainly by targeting Notch in MM cells and possibly in osteoclasts in their microenvironment. We conclude that Notch inhibition is a valid therapeutic strategy in MM.

  9. Role of the POZ zinc finger transcription factor FBI-1 in human and murine adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Laudes, Matthias; Christodoulides, Constantinos; Sewter, Ciaran; Rochford, Justin J; Considine, Robert V; Sethi, Jaswinder K; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2004-03-19

    Poxvirus zinc finger (POZ) zinc finger domain transcription factors have been shown to play a role in the control of growth arrest and differentiation in several types of mesenchymal cells but not, as yet, adipocytes. We found that a POZ domain protein, factor that binds to inducer of short transcripts-1 (FBI-1), was induced during both murine and human preadipocyte differentiation with maximal expression levels seen at days 2-4. FBI-1 mRNA was expressed in human adipose tissue with the highest levels found in samples from morbidly obese subjects. Murine cell lines constitutively expressing FBI-1 showed evidence for accelerated adipogenesis with earlier induction of markers of differentiation and enhanced lipid accumulation, suggesting that FBI-1 may be an active participant in the differentiation process. Consistent with the properties of this family of proteins in other cell systems, 3T3L1 cells stably overexpressing FBI-1 showed reduced DNA synthesis and reduced expression of cyclin A, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, and p107, proteins known to be involved in the regulation of mitotic clonal expansion. In addition, FBI-1 reduced the transcriptional activity of the cyclin A promoter. Thus, FBI-1, a POZ zinc finger transcription factor, is induced during the early phases of human and murine preadipocyte differentiation where it may contribute to adipogenesis through influencing the switch from cellular proliferation to terminal differentiation.

  10. Molecular phylogenetic characterization of common murine rodents from Manipur, Northeast India.

    PubMed

    Chingangbam, Dhananjoy S; Laishram, Joykumar M; Suzuki, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia are hotspots of murine biodiversity, but no species from the Arakan Mountain system that demarcates the border between the two areas has been subjected to molecular phylogenetic analyses. We examined the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequences in six murine species (the Rattus rattus species complex, R. norvegicus, R. nitidus, Berylmys manipulus, Niviventer sp. and Mus musculus) from Manipur, which is located at the western foot of the mountain range. The sequences of B. manipulus and Niviventer sp. examined here were distinct from available congeneric sequences in the databases, with sequence divergences of 10-15%. Substantial degrees of intrapopulation divergence were detected in R. nitidus and the R. rattus species complex from Manipur, implying ancient habitation of the species in this region, while the recent introduction by modern and prehistoric human activities was suggested for R. norvegicus and M. musculus, respectively. In the nuclear gene Mc1r, also analyzed here, the R. rattus species complex from Manipur was shown to possess allelic sequences related to those from the Indian subcontinent in addition to those from East Asia. These results not only fill gaps in the phylogenetic knowledge of each taxon examined but also provide valuable insight to better understand the biogeographic importance of the Arakan Mountain system in generating the species and genetic diversity of murine rodents.

  11. Exon-intron organization and sequence comparison of human and murine T11 (CD2) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, D.J.; Clayton, L.K.; Sayre, P.H.; Reinherz, E.L.

    1988-03-01

    Genomic DNA clones containing the human and murine genes coding for the 50-kDa T11 (CD2) T-cell surface glycoprotein were characterized. The human T11 gene is approx. = 12 kilobases long and comprised of five exons. A leader exon (L) contains the 5'-untranslated region and most of the nucleotides defining the signal peptide (amino acids (aa) -24 to -5). Two exons encode the extracellular segment; exon Ex1 is 321 base pairs (bp) long and codes for four residues of the leader peptide and aa 1-103 of the mature protein, and exon Ex2 is 231 bp long and encodes aa 104-180. Exon TM is 123 bp long and codes for the single transmembrane region of the molecule (aa 181-221). Exon C is a large 765-bp exon encoding virtually the entire cytoplasmic domain (aa 222-327) and the 3'-untranslated region. The murine region T11 gene has a similar organization with exon-intron boundaries essentially identical to the human gene. Substantial conservation of nucleotide sequences between species in both 5'- and 3'-gene flanking regions equivalent to that among homologous exons suggests that murine and human genes may be regulated in a similar fashion. The probable relationship of the individual T11 exons to functional and structural protein domains is discussed.

  12. Potent Inhibition of Junín Virus Infection by Interferon in Murine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Walker, Aida G.; Grant, Ashley M.; Kolokoltsova, Olga A.; Yun, Nadezhda E.; Seregin, Alexey V.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    The new world arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV) is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, a lethal human infectious disease. Adult laboratory mice are generally resistant to peripheral infection by JUNV. The mechanism underlying the mouse resistance to JUNV infection is largely unknown. We have reported that interferon receptor knockout mice succumb to JUNV infection, indicating the critical role of interferon in restricting JUNV infection in mice. Here we report that the pathogenic and vaccine strains of JUNV were highly sensitive to interferon in murine primary cells. Treatment with low concentrations of interferon abrogated viral NP protein expression in murine cells. The replication of both JUNVs was enhanced in IRF3/IRF7 deficient cells. In addition, the vaccine strain of JUNV displayed impaired growth in primary murine cells. Our data suggested a direct and potent role of host interferon response in restricting JUNV replication in mice. The defect in viral growth for vaccine JUNV might also partially explain its attenuation in mice. PMID:24901990

  13. Isolation of Murine Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells using Twist2 Cre Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaling; Wang, Liping; Fatahi, Reza; Kronenberg, Mark; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rowe, David; Li, Yingcui; Maye, Peter

    2010-01-01

    While human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are of great interest for their potential therapeutic value, its murine equivalent remains an important basic research model that can provide critical insights into the biology of this progenitor cell population. Here we present a novel transgenic strategy that allowed for the selective identification and isolation of murine BMSCs at the early stages of stromal cell culture. This strategy involved crossing Twist2 –Cre mice with Cre reporter mice such as Z/EG or Ai9, which express EGFP or Tomato fluorescent protein, respectively, upon Cre mediated excision of a stop sequence. Using this approach, we identified an adherent fluorescent protein+ cell population (T2C+) that is present during the earliest stages of colony formation and by day 5 of culture represents ~20% of the total cell population. Cell surface profiling by flow cytometry showed that T2C+ cells are highly positive for SCA1 and CD29 and negative for CD45, CD117, TIE2, and TER119. Isolation of T2C+ cells by FACS selected for a cell population with skeletal potential that can be directed to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, or chondrocytes. We also demonstrated in a calvarial bone defect model that T2C+ cells retain a strong efficacy for osteogenic repair and can support a hematopoietic environment. Collectively, these studies provide evidence that the Twist2-Cre x Cre reporter breeding strategy can be used to positively identify and isolate multipotent murine BMSCs. PMID:20673822

  14. Geographic Association of Rickettsia felis-Infected Opossums with Human Murine Typhus, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Boostrom, Ardys; Beier, Magda S.; Macaluso, Jackie A.; Macaluso, Kevin R.; Sprenger, Daniel; Hayes, Jack; Radulovic, Suzan

    2002-01-01

    Application of molecular diagnostic technology in the past 10 years has resulted in the discovery of several new species of pathogenic rickettsiae, including Rickettsia felis. As more sequence information for rickettsial genes has become available, the data have been used to reclassify rickettsial species and to develop new diagnostic tools for analysis of mixed rickettsial pathogens. R. felis has been associated with opossums and their fleas in Texas and California. Because R. felis can cause human illness, we investigated the distribution dynamics in the murine typhus–endemic areas of these two states. The geographic distribution of R. felis-infected opossum populations in two well-established endemic foci overlaps with that of the reported human cases of murine typhus. Descriptive epidemiologic analysis of 1998 human cases in Corpus Christi, Texas, identified disease patterns consistent with studies done in the 1980s. A close geographic association of seropositive opossums (22% R. felis; 8% R. typhi) with human murine typhus cases was also observed. PMID:12023908

  15. Therapeutic effect of the YH6 phage in a murine hemorrhagic pneumonia model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Du, Chongtao; Gong, Pengjuan; Xia, Feifei; Sun, Changjiang; Feng, Xin; Lei, Liancheng; Song, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Bin; Xiao, Feng; Yan, Xinwu; Cui, Ziyin; Li, Xinwei; Gu, Jingmin; Han, Wenyu

    2015-10-01

    The treatment, in farmed mink, of hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains has become increasingly difficult. This study investigated the potential use of phages as a therapy against hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by P. aeruginosa in a murine hemorrhagic pneumonia model. An N4-like phage designated YH6 was isolated using P. aeruginosa strain D9. YH6 is a virulent phage with efficient and broad host lytic activity against P. aeruginosa. No bacterial virulence- or lysogenesis-related ORF is present in the YH6 genome, making it eligible for use in phage therapy. In our murine experiments, a single intranasal administration of YH6 (2 × 10(7) PFU) 2 h after D9 intranasal injections at double minimum lethal dose was sufficient to protect mice against hemorrhagic pneumonia. The bacterial load in the lungs of YH6-protected mice was less than 10(3) CFU/g within 24 h after challenge and ultimately became undetectable, whereas the amount of bacteria in the lung tissue derived from unprotected mice was more than 10(8) CFU/g within 24 h after challenge. In view of its protective efficacy in this murine hemorrhagic pneumonia model, YH6 may serve as an alternative treatment strategy for infections caused by multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa.

  16. Geographic association of Rickettsia felis-infected opossums with human murine typhus, Texas.

    PubMed

    Boostrom, Ardys; Beier, Magda S; Macaluso, Jacqueline A; Macaluso, Kevin R; Sprenger, Daniel; Hayes, Jack; Radulovic, Suzana; Azad, Abdu F

    2002-06-01

    Application of molecular diagnostic technology in the past 10 years has resulted in the discovery of several new species of pathogenic rickettsiae, including Rickettsia felis. As more sequence information for rickettsial genes has become available, the data have been used to reclassify rickettsial species and to develop new diagnostic tools for analysis of mixed rickettsial pathogens. R. felis has been associated with opossums and their fleas in Texas and California. Because R. felis can cause human illness, we investigated the distribution dynamics in the murine typhus-endemic areas of these two states. The geographic distribution of R. felis-infected opossum populations in two well-established endemic foci overlaps with that of the reported human cases of murine typhus. Descriptive epidemiologic analysis of 1998 human cases in Corpus Christi, Texas, identified disease patterns consistent with studies done in the 1980s. A close geographic association of seropositive opossums (22% R. felis; 8% R. typhi) with human murine typhus cases was also observed.

  17. Administration route-dependent vaccine efficiency of murine dendritic cells pulsed with antigens

    PubMed Central

    Okada, N; Tsujino, M; Hagiwara, Y; Tada, A; Tamura, Y; Mori, K; Saito, T; Nakagawa, S; Mayumi, T; Fujita, T; Yamamoto, A

    2001-01-01

     Dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with tumour antigens have been successfully used to induce protective tumour immunity in murine models and human trials. However, it is still unclear which DC administration route elicits a superior therapeutic effect. Herein, we investigated the vaccine efficiency of DC2.4 cells, a murine dendritic cell line, pulsed with ovalbumin (OVA) in the murine E.G7-OVA tumour model after immunization via various routes. After a single vaccination using 1 × 106OVA-pulsed DC2.4 cells, tumour was completely rejected in the intradermally (i.d.; three of four mice), subcutaneously (s.c.; three of four mice), and intraperitoneally (i.p.; one of four mice) immunized groups. Double vaccinations enhanced the anti-tumour effect in all groups except the intravenous (i.v.) group, which failed to achieve complete rejection. The anti-tumour efficacy of each immunization route was correlated with the OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity evaluated on day 7 post-vaccination. Furthermore, the accumulation of DC2.4 cells in the regional lymph nodes was detected only in the i.d.-and s.c.-injected groups. These results demonstrate that the administration route of antigen-loaded DCs affects the migration of DCs to lymphoid tissues and the magnitude of antigen-specific CTL response. Furthermore, the immunization route affects vaccine efficiency. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11384109

  18. Bidirectional Estrogen-Like Effects of Genistein on Murine Experimental Autoimmune Ovarian Disease.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiao; Wang, Yuxiao; Li, Na; Zhu, Kexue; Hu, Jielun; Wang, Sunan; Zhu, Fan; Nie, Shaoping

    2016-11-08

    This study was to investigate the bidirectional estrogen-like effects of genistein on murine experimental autoimmune ovarian disease (AOD). Female BALB/c mice were induced by immunization with a peptide from murine zona pellucida. The changes of estrous cycle, ovarian histomorphology were measured, and the levels of serum sex hormone were analyzed using radioimmunoassay. Proliferative responses of the ovary were also determined by immunohistochemistry. Administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein enhanced ovary development with changes in serum sex hormone levels and proliferative responses. Meanwhile, the proportions of growing and mature follicles increased and the incidence of autoimmune oophoritis decreased, which exhibited normal ovarian morphology in administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein, while a lower dose (5 mg/kg body weight genistein) produced the opposite effect. These findings suggest that genistein exerts bidirectional estrogen-like effects on murine experimental AOD, while a high dose (45 mg/kg body weight) of genistein may suppress AOD.

  19. Differential Toll-Like Receptor-Signalling of Burkholderia pseudomallei Lipopolysaccharide in Murine and Human Models.

    PubMed

    Weehuizen, Tassili A F; Prior, Joann L; van der Vaart, Thomas W; Ngugi, Sarah A; Nepogodiev, Sergey A; Field, Robert A; Kager, Liesbeth M; van 't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; Wiersinga, W Joost

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis and is a CDC category B bioterrorism agent. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 impairs host defense during pulmonary B.pseudomallei infection while TLR4 only has limited impact. We investigated the role of TLRs in B.pseudomallei-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation. Purified B.pseudomallei-LPS activated only TLR2-transfected-HEK-cells during short stimulation but both HEK-TLR2 and HEK-TLR4-cells after 24 h. In human blood, an additive effect of TLR2 on TLR4-mediated signalling induced by B.pseudomallei-LPS was observed. In contrast, murine peritoneal macrophages recognized B.pseudomallei-LPS solely through TLR4. Intranasal inoculation of B.pseudomallei-LPS showed that both TLR4-knockout(-/-) and TLR2x4-/-, but not TLR2-/- mice, displayed diminished cytokine responses and neutrophil influx compared to wild-type controls. These data suggest that B.pseudomallei-LPS signalling occurs solely through murine TLR4, while in human models TLR2 plays an additional role, highlighting important differences between specificity of human and murine models that may have important consequences for B.pseudomallei-LPS sensing by TLRs and subsequent susceptibility to melioidosis.

  20. Antioxidative effects in vivo and colonization of Lactobacillus plantarum MA2 in the murine intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Xing, Zhuqing; Hu, Wei; Li, Chao; Wang, Jinju; Wang, Yanping

    2016-08-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum MA2 was isolated from traditional Chinese Tibet kefir grains, which possess several excellent properties and functions. We previously demonstrated the antioxidant activities of this bacterium in vitro. However, the maintenance and survival of L. plantarum MA2 inside the murine intestinal tract, where it exerts its probiotic properties, and whether its effects are elicited directly on the host remain unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the mechanisms of L. plantarum MA2 in aging mice following D-galactose administration. The levels of malondialdehyde decreased significantly in the L. plantarum MA2 groups after oral ingestion compared to the D-galactose model group, and total antioxidant capacity and glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities increased significantly in the serum and liver. We combined fluorescein isothiocyanate labeling and green fluorescent protein expression to dynamically monitor the colonization and distribution of L. plantarum MA2 in the murine intestinal tract. The results indicated that L. plantarum MA2 was detected in the ileum, colon, and feces after single and continuous oral administration at day 21 and was maintained at 10(4)-10(5) CFU/g. These results suggest that L. plantarum MA2 colonizes and survives in the murine intestinal tract to exert its antioxidative effects.

  1. Secretion of N- and O-linked Glycoproteins from 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Wai-Mei; Tan, Aik-Aun; Gopinath, Subash C.B.; Hashim, Onn H.; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chen, Yeng

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers that affect women globally and accounts for ~23% of all cancers diagnosed in women. Breast cancer is also one of the leading causes of death primarily due to late stage diagnoses and a lack of effective treatments. Therefore, discovering protein expression biomarkers is mandatory for early detection and thus, critical for successful therapy. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-E) coupled with lectin-based analysis followed by mass spectrometry were applied to identify potential biomarkers in the secretions of a murine mammary carcinoma cell line. Comparisons of the protein profiles of the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma cell line and a normal murine MM3MG mammary cell line indicated that cadherin-1 (CDH), collagenase 3 (MMP-13), Viral envelope protein G7e (VEP), Gag protein (GAG) and Hypothetical protein LOC433182 (LOC) were uniquely expressed by the 4T1 cells, and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) was exclusively secreted by the MM3MG cells. Further analysis by a lectin-based study revealed that aberrant O-glycosylated CDH, N-glycosylated MMP-13 and LOC were present in the 4T1 medium. These differentially expressed N- and O-linked glycoprotein candidates, which were identified by combining lectin-based analysis with 2D-E, could serve as potential diagnostic and prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:27226773

  2. Radiation survival of murine and human melanoma cells utilizing two assay systems: monolayer and soft agar.

    PubMed Central

    Yohem, K. H.; Slymen, D. J.; Bregman, M. D.; Meyskens, F. L.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation response of murine and human melanoma cells assayed in bilayer soft agar and monolayer was examined. Cells from the murine melanoma Cloudman S91 CCL 53.1 cell line and three human melanoma cell strains (C8146C, C8161, and R83-4) developed in our laboratory were irradiated by single dose X-rays and plated either in agar or on plastic. D0 values were the same within 95% confidence intervals for cells from the human melanoma cell strains C8146C, C8161, and R83-4 but were dissimilar for the murine cell line CCL 53.1 Dq values were different for all cells studied. The shape of the survival curve for all four melanomas was not identical for cells assayed in soft agar versus cells grown on plastic. This would indicate that apparent radiosensitivity was influenced by the method of assay although there were no apparent consistent differences between the curves generated by monolayer or bilayer soft agar assays. PMID:3348949

  3. Stable long-term blood formation by stem cells in murine steady-state hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Zavidij, Oksana; Ball, Claudia R; Herbst, Friederike; Oppel, Felix; Fessler, Sylvia; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Glimm, Hanno

    2012-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate all mature blood cells during the whole lifespan of an individual. However, the clonal contribution of individual HSC and progenitor cells in steady-state hematopoiesis is poorly understood. To investigate the activity of HSCs under steady-state conditions, murine HSC and progenitor cells were genetically marked in vivo by integrating lentiviral vectors (LVs) encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP). Hematopoietic contribution of individual marked clones was monitored by determination of lentiviral integration sites using highly sensitive linear amplification-mediated-polymerase chain reaction. A remarkably stable small proportion of hematopoietic cells expressed GFP in LV-injected animals for up to 24 months, indicating stable marking of murine steady-state hematopoiesis. Analysis of the lentiviral integration sites revealed that multiple hematopoietic clones with both myeloid and lymphoid differentiation potential contributed to long-term hematopoiesis. In contrast to intrafemoral vector injection, intravenous administration of LV preferentially targeted short-lived progenitor cells. Myelosuppressive treatment of mice prior to LV-injection did not affect the marking efficiency. Our study represents the first continuous analysis of clonal behavior of genetically marked hematopoietic cells in an unmanipulated system, providing evidence that multiple clones are simultaneously active in murine steady-state hematopoiesis.

  4. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  5. Correction of murine mucopolysaccharidosis VII by a human. beta. -glucuronidase transgene

    SciTech Connect

    Kyle, J.W.; Vogler, C.; Hoffmann, J.W.; Sly, W.S. ); Birkenmeier, E.H.; Gwynn, B. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors recently described a murine model for mucopolysaccharidosis VII in mice that have an inherited deficiency of {beta}-glucuronidase. Affected mice, of genotype gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps}, present clinical manifestations similar to those of humans with mucopolysaccharidosis VII (Sly syndrome) and are shown here to have secondary elevations of other lysosomal enzymes. The mucopolysaccharidosis VII phenotype in both species includes dwarfism, skeletal deformities, and premature death. Lysosome storage is visualized within enlarged vesicles and correlates biochemically with accumulation of undegraded and partially degraded glycosaminoglycans. In this report they describe the consequences of introducing the human {beta}-glucuronidase gene, GUSB, into gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps} mice that produce virtually no murine {beta}-glucuronidase. Transgenic mice homozygous for the mucopolysaccharidosis VII mutation expressed high levels of human {beta}-glucuronidase activity in all tissues examined and were phenotypically normal. Biochemically, both the intralysosomal storage of glycosaminoglycans and the secondary elevation of other acid hydrolases were corrected. These findings demonstrate that the GUSB transgene is expressed in gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps} mice and that human {beta}-glucuronidase corrects the murine mucopolysaccharidosis storage disease.

  6. Three-dimensional optical coherence tomography of the embryonic murine cardiovascular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Marks, Daniel L.; Ralston, Tyler S.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2006-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging high-resolution real-time biomedical imaging technology that has potential as a novel investigational tool in developmental biology and functional genomics. In this study, murine embryos and embryonic hearts are visualized with an OCT system capable of 2-µm axial and 15-µm lateral resolution and with real-time acquisition rates. We present, to our knowledge, the first sets of high-resolution 2- and 3-D OCT images that reveal the internal structures of the mammalian (murine) embryo (E10.5) and embryonic (E14.5 and E17.5) cardiovascular system. Strong correlations are observed between OCT images and corresponding hematoxylin- and eosin-stained histological sections. Real-time in vivo embryonic (E10.5) heart activity is captured by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, processed, and displayed at a continuous rate of five frames per second. With the ability to obtain not only high-resolution anatomical data but also functional information during cardiovascular development, the OCT technology has the potential to visualize and quantify changes in murine development and in congenital and induced heart disease, as well as enable a wide range of basic in vitro and in vivo research studies in functional genomics.

  7. ENHANCED ABSORPTION OF MILLIMETER WAVE ENERGY IN MURINE SUBCUTANEOUS BLOOD VESSELS

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Stanislav I.; Ziskin, Marvin C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine millimeter wave (MMW) absorption by blood vessels traversing the subcutaneous fat layer of murine skin. Most calculations were performed using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. We used two types of models: (1) a rectangular block of multilayer tissue with blood vessels traversing the fat layer and (2) cylindrical models with circular and elliptical cross sections simulating the real geometry of murine limbs. We found that the specific absorption rate (SAR) in blood vessels normally traversing the fat layer achieved its maximal value at the parallel orientation of the E-field to the vessel axis. At 42 GHz exposure, the maximal SAR in small blood vessels could be more than 30 times greater than that in the skin. The SAR increased with decreasing the blood vessel diameter and increasing the fat thickness. The SAR decreased with increasing the exposure frequency. When the cylindrical or elliptical models of murine limbs were exposed to plane MMW, the greatest absorption of MMW energy occurred in blood vessels located on the lateral areas of the limb model. At these areas the maximal SAR values were comparable with or were greater than the maximal SAR on the front surface of the skin. Enhanced absorption of MMW energy by blood vessels traversing the fat layer may play a primary role in initiating MMW effects on blood cells and vasodilatation of cutaneous blood vessels. PMID:21344460

  8. Inactivation and reactivation of sex-linked steroid sulfatase gene in murine cell culture.

    PubMed

    Schorderet, D F; Keitges, E A; Dubois, P M; Gartler, S M

    1988-03-01

    The murine X-linked steroid sulfatase gene (Sts) normally escapes X inactivation. However, we have observed that most long-term murine cell cultures are deficient in STS activity even though only the L cells are known to be derived from an STS- mouse strain. To investigate this phenomenon, we developed a selective system whereby STS+ cells could be selected from STS- populations. The system is based on making cells dependent on cholesterol-sulfate as the sole source of cholesterol, allowing only STS+ cells to grow. Two STS- cell lines, after treatment with either 5-azacytidine (5AC) or ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS), yielded STS+ revertants, suggesting that their STS- phenotype was due to hypermethylation. To study the evolution of STS- cell lines, we established XO and XX primary lines from STS+ strains; the XX cell line remained STS+ after more than 200 cell doublings whereas the XO became STS- after about 100 doublings. Treatment of this STS- XO cell line with 5AC produced clones with restored STS activity. All the revertants showed a growth disadvantage compared to their STS- counterparts. It would appear that aberrant methylation is the basis for much of the STS deficiency observed in established murine lines and that its propagation is due to the growth advantage of STS- over STS+ cells.

  9. Psoriasiform architecture of murine epidermis overlying human psoriatic dermis transplanted onto SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Boehncke, W H; Sterry, W; Hainzl, A; Scheffold, W; Kaufmann, R

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary observations in a xenogeneic SCID mouse transplantation model indicated that murine epidermis overgrows human dermis from psoriatic skin but not that form normal skin. To investigate the effect of peripheral blood mononuclear cells on the differentiation of murine keratinocytes, we transplanted involved and uninvolved full-thickness skin from patients with psoriasis onto SCID mice and followed this with repeated subcutaneous injections of cells suspended in patient serum. After 6 weeks grafts were analysed morphologically and immunohistochemically. The epidermis in grafts from clinically uninvolved skin appeared normal. The persistence of a psoriasiform epidermis was noted in all grafts from affected sites despite a lack of lymphocytic infiltration. Staining for human and mouse MHC class I antigens revealed the murine origin of keratinocytes forming the psoriasiform epidermis, while the human dermis was retained. Our observations indicate that the defect underlying the pathogenesis of psoriasis is most likely located in the dermal rather than the epidermal compartment. This xenogeneic transplantation model may be useful for future studies of the pathogenesis and treatment of psoriasis.

  10. Unveiling the anti-inflammatory activity of Sutherlandia frutescens using murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wei; Browning, Jimmy D.; Eichen, Peggy A.; Brownstein, Korey J.; Folk, William R.; Sun, Grace Y.; Lubahn, Dennis B.; Rottinghaus, George E.; Fritsche, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Sutherlandia frutescens is a botanical widely used in southern Africa for treatment of inflammatory and other conditions. Previously, an ethanolic extract of S. frutescens (SFE) has been shown to inhibit the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) by murine neurons and a microglia cell line (BV-2 cells). In this study we sought to confirm the anti-inflammatory activities of SFE on a widely used murine macrophage cell line (i.e., RAW 264.7 cells) and primary mouse macrophages. Furthermore, experiments were conducted to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of the flavonol and cycloartanol glycosides found in high quantities in S. frutescens. While the SFE exhibited anti-inflammatory activities upon murine macrophages similar to that reported with the microglia cell line, this effect does not appear to be mediated by sutherlandiosides or sutherlandins. In contrast, chlorophyll in our extracts appeared to be partly responsible for some of the activity observed in our macrophage-dependent screening assay. PMID:26585972

  11. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Laura B.; Janke, Laura J.; Payton, Monique A.; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W.; Karol, Seth E.; Kamdem, Landry Kamdem; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26252865

  12. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis (strain CIDCA 133) stimulates murine macrophages infected with Citrobacter rodentium.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Ayelén A; Rolny, Ivanna S; Romanin, David; Pérez, Pablo F

    2017-03-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a specific murine enteropathogen which causes diarrheal disease characterized by colonic hyperplasia and intestinal inflammation. Recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages constitute a key step to control the infection. Since modulation of the activity of professional phagocytic cells could contribute to improve host´s defences against C. rodentium, we investigated the effect of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis (strain CIDCA 133) on the interaction between murine macrophages (RAW 264.7) and C. rodentium. Phagocytosis, surface molecules and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOs) expression were determined by flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. The presence of lactobacilli increased phagocytosis of C. rodentium whereas C. rodentium had no effect on lactobacilli internalization. Survival of internalized C. rodentium diminished when strain CIDCA 133 was present. CD-86, MHCII, iNOs expression and nitrite production were increased when C. rodentium and lactobacilli were present even though strain CIDCA 133 alone had no effect. Strain CIDCA 133 led to a strong induction of ROS activity which was not modified by C. rodentium. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis (strain CIDCA 133) is able to increase the activation of murine macrophages infected with C. rodentium. The sole presence of lactobacilli is enough to modify some stimulation markers (e.g. ROS induction) whereas other markers require the presence of both bacteria; thus, indicating a synergistic effect.

  13. Bidirectional Estrogen-Like Effects of Genistein on Murine Experimental Autoimmune Ovarian Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Qiao; Wang, Yuxiao; Li, Na; Zhu, Kexue; Hu, Jielun; Wang, Sunan; Zhu, Fan; Nie, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    This study was to investigate the bidirectional estrogen-like effects of genistein on murine experimental autoimmune ovarian disease (AOD). Female BALB/c mice were induced by immunization with a peptide from murine zona pellucida. The changes of estrous cycle, ovarian histomorphology were measured, and the levels of serum sex hormone were analyzed using radioimmunoassay. Proliferative responses of the ovary were also determined by immunohistochemistry. Administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein enhanced ovary development with changes in serum sex hormone levels and proliferative responses. Meanwhile, the proportions of growing and mature follicles increased and the incidence of autoimmune oophoritis decreased, which exhibited normal ovarian morphology in administration of 25 or 45 mg/kg body weight genistein, while a lower dose (5 mg/kg body weight genistein) produced the opposite effect. These findings suggest that genistein exerts bidirectional estrogen-like effects on murine experimental AOD, while a high dose (45 mg/kg body weight) of genistein may suppress AOD. PMID:27834809

  14. Tissue-specific in vivo transcription start sites of the human and murine cystic fibrosis genes.

    PubMed

    White, N L; Higgins, C F; Trezise, A E

    1998-03-01

    The in vivo transcription start sites of the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene ( CFTR ) and its murine homologue ( Cftr ) have been mapped in a range of tissues using the technique of 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5' RACE). These are the first in vivo transcription start sites for CFTR or Cftr to be reported. Distinct, tissue-specific patterns of CFTR start site usage were identified in both mouse and human. In particular, striking variation in the position of the murine Cftr transcription start site was seen along the length of the intestinal tract; different start sites being utilized in ileum and in duodenum. In humans, distinct transcription start sites are utilized in adult and foetal lungs. In addition, a novel 5'-untranslated exon of murine Cftr , denoted exon -1, was identified and shown to be expressed exclusively in mouse testis. Expression of exon -1-containing Cftr transcripts was shown by mRNA in situ hybridization to be confined to the germ cells and to be regulated during spermatogenesis.

  15. Comparison of optical projection tomography and optical coherence tomography for assessment of murine embryonic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manmohan; Nair, Achuth; Vadakkan, Tegy; Piazza, Victor; Udan, Ryan; Frazier, Michael V.; Janecek, Trevor; Dickinson, Mary E.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    The murine model is a common model for studying developmental diseases. In this study, we compare the performance of the relatively new method of Optical Projection Tomography (OPT) to the well-established technique of Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) to assess murine embryonic development at three stages, 9.5, 11.5, and 13.5 days post conception. While both methods can provide spatial resolution at the micrometer scale, OPT can provide superior imaging depth compared to OCT. However, OPT requires samples to be fixed, placed in an immobilization media such as agar, and cleared before imaging. Because OCT does not require fixing, it can be used to image embryos in vivo and in utero. In this study, we compare the efficacy of OPT and OCT for imaging murine embryonic development. The data demonstrate the superior capability of OPT for imaging fine structures with high resolution in optically-cleared embryos while only OCT can provide structural and functional imaging of live embryos ex vivo and in utero with micrometer scale resolution.

  16. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects.

  17. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Laura B; Janke, Laura J; Payton, Monique A; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W; Karol, Seth E; Kamdem Kamdem, Landry; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  18. Effects of fish oil on cytokines and immune functions of mice with murine AIDS.

    PubMed

    Xi, S; Cohen, D; Chen, L H

    1998-08-01

    The effects of fish oil, which is rich in n-3 fatty acids, on cytokine levels in a murine model of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied. Thirty-two C57BL/6 female mice were divided into two dietary groups and fed either a corn oil diet or a fish oil diet. After 4 weeks, each diet group was further divided into two subgroups, and mice in one subgroup were injected i.p. with LP-BM5 murine retrovirus (MAIDS) stock. After 4 weeks, all mice were killed, blood samples were collected, and the spleens and the livers were excised. Splenocytes were isolated immediately and cultured in RPMI-1640 medium and stimulated by either lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or Concanavalin A (ConA) for 24 h. The supernatant was collected for cytokine assays. The results showed that MAIDS infection increased the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1-beta (IL-1beta), while fish oil partially prevented this elevation. MAIDS infection depressed interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFNgamma), while fish oil partially prevented the depression of IL-2. In addition, MAIDS infection depressed LPS- and ConA-stimulated cell proliferation, while fish oil partially prevented the depression. The results suggest that fish oil may slow down the progression of murine AIDS by modulating levels of cytokines including TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-2.

  19. Differential Secreted Proteome Approach in Murine Model for Candidate Biomarker Discovery in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rangiah, Kannan; Tippornwong, Montri; Sangar, Vineet; Austin, David; Tétreault, Marie-Pier; Rustgi, Anil K.; Blair, Ian A.; Yu, Kenneth H.

    2009-01-01

    The complexity and heterogeneity of the plasma proteome have presented significant challenges in the identification of protein changes associated with tumor development. We used cell culture as a model system and identified differentially expressed, secreted proteins which may constitute serological biomarkers. A stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) approach was used to label the entire secreted proteomes of the CT26 murine colon cancer cell line and normal young adult mouse colon (YAMC) cell line, thereby creating a stable isotope labeled proteome (SILAP) standard. This SILAP standard was added to unlabeled murine CT26 colon cancer cell or normal murine YAMC colon epithelial cell secreted proteome samples. A multidimensional approach combining isoelectric focusing (IEF), strong cation exchange (SCX) followed by reversed phase liquid chromatography was used for extensive protein and peptide separation. A total of 614 and 929 proteins were identified from the YAMC and CT26 cell lines, with 418 proteins common to both cell lines. Twenty highly abundant differentially expressed proteins from these groups were selected for liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring/mass spectrometry (LC-MRM/MS) analysis in sera. Differential secretion into the serum was observed for several proteins when Apcmin mice were compared with control mice. These findings were then confirmed by Western blot analysis. PMID:19769411

  20. Interplay of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 with NF-kappaB Signaling of the Host

    PubMed Central

    Cieniewicz, Brandon; Santana, Alexis L.; Minkah, Nana; Krug, Laurie T.

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses establish a chronic infection in the host characterized by intervals of lytic replication, quiescent latency, and reactivation from latency. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) naturally infects small rodents and has genetic and biologic parallels with the human gammaherpesviruses (gHVs), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein–Barr virus. The murine gammaherpesvirus model pathogen system provides a platform to apply cutting-edge approaches to dissect the interplay of gammaherpesvirus and host determinants that enable colonization of the host, and that shape the latent or lytic fate of an infected cell. This knowledge is critical for the development of novel therapeutic interventions against the oncogenic gHVs. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway is well-known for its role in the promotion of inflammation and many aspects of B cell biology. Here, we review key aspects of the virus lifecycle in the host, with an emphasis on the route that the virus takes to gain access to the B cell latency reservoir. We highlight how the murine gammaherpesvirus requires components of the NF-κB signaling pathway to promote replication, latency establishment, and maintenance of latency. These studies emphasize the complexity of gammaherpesvirus interactions with NF-κB signaling components that direct innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Importantly, multiple facets of NF-κB signaling have been identified that might be targeted to reduce the burden of gammaherpesvirus-associated diseases. PMID:27582728

  1. Murine fundus fluorescein angiography: An alternative approach using a handheld camera.

    PubMed

    Ehrenberg, Moshe; Ehrenberg, Scott; Schwob, Ouri; Benny, Ofra

    2016-07-01

    In today's modern pharmacologic approach to treating sight-threatening retinal vascular disorders, there is an increasing demand for a compact, mobile, lightweight and cost-effective fluorescein fundus camera to document the effects of antiangiogenic drugs on laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in mice and other experimental animals. We have adapted the use of the Kowa Genesis Df Camera to perform Fundus Fluorescein Angiography (FFA) in mice. The 1 kg, 28 cm high camera has built-in barrier and exciter filters to allow digital FFA recording to a Compact Flash memory card. Furthermore, this handheld unit has a steady Indirect Lens Holder that firmly attaches to the main unit, that securely holds a 90 diopter lens in position, in order to facilitate appropriate focus and stability, for photographing the delicate central murine fundus. This easily portable fundus fluorescein camera can effectively record exceptional central retinal vascular detail in murine laser-induced CNV, while readily allowing the investigator to adjust the camera's position according to the variable head and eye movements that can randomly occur while the mouse is optimally anesthetized. This movable image recording device, with efficiencies of space, time, cost, energy and personnel, has enabled us to accurately document the alterations in the central choroidal and retinal vasculature following induction of CNV, implemented by argon-green laser photocoagulation and disruption of Bruch's Membrane, in the experimental murine model of exudative macular degeneration.

  2. A system for repertoire cloning and phage display of murine and leporid antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Schüller, Carolin; Wiebe, Julia C; Pegel, Antje; Kramer, Karl; Skerra, Arne; Hock, Bertold

    2010-01-01

    Even though rabbit antibodies (Abs) are known to exceed murine Abs with respect to specificity, affinity, and stability, cloned leporid immune repertoires have been rarely considered in recombinant Ab preparation for environmental analysis. We have developed a set of four tet(p/o)-based phasmid vectors that allow the efficient cloning of both murine and leporid Ab repertoires. These vectors differ in the design of the cloning sites, choice of signal peptides, and antibiotic selection markers. A set of 39 primer oligodeoxynucleotides has been developed for the PCR amplification of rabbit Ab genes, representing the most exhaustive coverage of the leporid immune repertoire described so far. The atrazine-specific murine Fab fragment K411B and a cloned V-gene repertoire from sulfonamide-immunized rabbits were used to compare these phasmids with respect to expression of Fab fragments, phagemid titers, and number of Fab displaying phagemid particles. Our results show that the ratio of recombinant phagemids could be increased up to 65% of total phage titer by utilizing the appropriate phasmid. Based on this system, the selection of two sulfonamide-specific rabbit Abs, SA2 23 and SA2 90, was accomplished after a single phagemid panning round.

  3. In vitro proteolytic cleavage of Gazdar murine sarcoma virus p65gag.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, S; Arlinghaus, R B

    1981-09-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus, disrupted in concentrations of 0.1 to 0.5% Nonidet P-40, catalyzed the cleavage of p65, the gag gene polyprotein of the Gazdar strain of murine sarcoma virus, into polypeptides with sizes and antigenic determinants of murine leukemia virus-specified p30, p15, pp12, and p10. Cleavage performed in the presence of 0.15% Nonidet P-40 in water yielded polypeptides of approximately 40,000 (P40) and 25,000 (P25) Mr. In vitro cleavage performed in a buffered solution containing dithiothreitol in addition to 0.1% Nonidet P-40 allowed the efficient processing of P40 to p30 and a band migrating with p10. Immunoprecipitation with monospecific sera indicated that P40 contained p30 and p10, whereas P25 contained p15 and pp12 determinants. P40 and P25 are similar in size and antigenic properties to Pr40gag and Pr25gag observed in infected cells (Naso et al, J. Virol. 32:187-198, 1979).

  4. Characterization of the molecularly cloned murine alpha-globin transcription factor CP2.

    PubMed

    Lim, L C; Fang, L; Swendeman, S L; Sheffery, M

    1993-08-25

    We recently cloned human and murine cDNAs that encode CP2, a transcription factor that interacts with the murine alpha-globin promoter. In this report, we exploited our ability to express CP2 in bacteria and eukaryotic cells to further investigate factor activities in vitro and in vivo. CP2 expressed in bacteria was significantly enriched and used in a series of DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic gel shift assays. The results suggest that CP2 binds a hyphenated recognition sequence motif that spans one DNA helix turn. In addition, the enriched bacterial protein activated transcription of alpha-globin promoter templates approximately 3- to 4-fold in vitro. We then tested the effect of elevating CP2 levels 2.5- to 5.5-fold in vivo using both transient and stable transformation assays. When a reporter construct comprised of the intact murine alpha-globin promoter driving the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was introduced into these overexpressing cells, we observed a 3- to 6-fold increase in CAT activity when compared to cells expressing normal levels of CP2. These results define the CP2 factor binding site in more detail and help characterize the activities of the factor in vivo.

  5. Enhanced absorption of millimeter wave energy in murine subcutaneous blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, Stanislav I; Ziskin, Marvin C

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine millimeter wave (MMW) absorption by blood vessels traversing the subcutaneous fat layer of murine skin. Most calculations were performed using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. We used two types of models: (1) a rectangular block of multilayer tissue with blood vessels traversing the fat layer and (2) cylindrical models with circular and elliptical cross-sections simulating the real geometry of murine limbs. We found that the specific absorption rate (SAR) in blood vessels normally traversing the fat layer achieved its maximal value at the parallel orientation of the E-field to the vessel axis. At 42 GHz exposure, the maximal SAR in small blood vessels could be more than 30 times greater than that in the skin. The SAR increased with decreasing the blood vessel diameter and increasing the fat thickness. The SAR decreased with increasing the exposure frequency. When the cylindrical or elliptical models of murine limbs were exposed to plane MMW, the greatest absorption of MMW energy occurred in blood vessels located on the lateral areas of the limb model. At these areas the maximal SAR values were comparable with or were greater than the maximal SAR on the front surface of the skin. Enhanced absorption of MMW energy by blood vessels traversing the fat layer may play a primary role in initiating MMW effects on blood cells and vasodilatation of cutaneous blood vessels.

  6. Contrasting Spatial Distribution and Risk Factors for Past Infection with Scrub Typhus and Murine Typhus in Vientiane City, Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Julie; Thaojaikong, Thaksinaporn; Moore, Catrin E.; Phetsouvanh, Rattanaphone; Richards, Allen L.; Souris, Marc; Fournet, Florence; Salem, Gérard; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul J.; Newton, Paul N.

    2010-01-01

    Background The aetiological diagnostic of fevers in Laos remains difficult due to limited laboratory diagnostic facilities. However, it has recently become apparent that both scrub and murine typhus are common causes of previous undiagnosed fever. Epidemiological data suggests that scrub typhus would be more common in rural areas and murine typhus in urban areas, but there is very little recent information on factors involved in scrub and murine typhus transmission, especially where they are sympatric - as is the case in Vientiane, the capital of the Lao PDR. Methodology and Principal Findings We therefore determined the frequency of IgG seropositivity against scrub typhus (Orientia tsutsugamushi) and murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi), as indices of prior exposure to these pathogens, in randomly selected adults in urban and peri-urban Vientiane City (n = 2,002, ≥35 years). Anti-scrub and murine typhus IgG were detected by ELISA assays using filter paper elutes. We validated the accuracy of ELISA of these elutes against ELISA using serum samples. The overall prevalence of scrub and murine typhus IgG antibodies was 20.3% and 20.6%, respectively. Scrub typhus seropositivity was significantly higher among adults living in the periphery (28.4%) than in the central zone (13.1%) of Vientiane. In contrast, seroprevalence of murine typhus IgG antibodies was significantly higher in the central zone (30.8%) as compared to the periphery (14.4%). In multivariate analysis, adults with a longer residence in Vientiane were at significant greater risk of past infection with murine typhus and at lower risk for scrub typhus. Those with no education, living on low incomes, living on plots of land with poor sanitary conditions, living in large households, and farmers were at higher risk of scrub typhus and those living in neighborhoods with high building density and close to markets were at greater risk for murine typhus and at lower risk of scrub typhus past infection

  7. Dynamic changes in high and low mammographic density human breast tissues maintained in murine tissue engineering chambers during various murine peripartum states and over time.

    PubMed

    Chew, G L; Huang, D; Huo, C W; Blick, T; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Frazer, H; Southey, M D; Hopper, J L; Henderson, M A; Haviv, I; Thompson, E W

    2013-07-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is a strong heritable risk factor for breast cancer, and may decrease with increasing parity. However, the biomolecular basis for MD-associated breast cancer remains unclear, and systemic hormonal effects on MD-associated risk is poorly understood. This study assessed the effect of murine peripartum states on high and low MD tissue maintained in a xenograft model of human MD. Method High and low MD human breast tissues were precisely sampled under radiographic guidance from prophylactic mastectomy specimens of women. The high and low MD tissues were maintained in separate vascularised biochambers in nulliparous or pregnant SCID mice for 4 weeks, or mice undergoing postpartum involution or lactation for three additional weeks. High and low MD biochamber material was harvested for histologic and radiographic comparisons during various murine peripartum states. High and low MD biochamber tissues in nulliparous mice were harvested at different timepoints for histologic and radiographic comparisons. Results High MD biochamber tissues had decreased stromal (p = 0.0027), increased adipose (p = 0.0003) and a trend to increased glandular tissue areas (p = 0.076) after murine postpartum involution. Stromal areas decreased (p = 0.042), while glandular (p = 0.001) and adipose areas (p = 0.009) increased in high MD biochamber tissues during lactation. A difference in radiographic density was observed in high (p = 0.0021) or low MD biochamber tissues (p = 0.004) between nulliparous, pregnant and involution groups. No differences in tissue composition were observed in high or low MD biochamber tissues maintained for different durations, although radiographic density increased over time. Conclusion High MD biochamber tissues had measurable histologic changes after postpartum involution or lactation. Alterations in radiographic density occurred in biochamber tissues between different peripartum states and over time. These findings

  8. Influence of murine mesenchymal stem cells on proliferation, phenotype, vitality, and cytotoxicity of murine cytokine-induced killer cells in coculture.

    PubMed

    Bach, Martin; Schimmelpfennig, Christoph; Stolzing, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Stimulating lymphocytes with Ifn-γ, anti-CD3, and interleukin-2 promotes the proliferation of a cell population coexpressing T-lymphocyte surface antigens such as CD3, CD8a, and CD25 as well as natural killer cell markers such as NK1.1, CD49, and CD69. These cells, referred to as cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs), display cytotoxic activity against tumour cells, even without prior antigen presentation, and offer a new cell-based approach to the treatment of malignant diseases. Because CIKs are limited in vivo, strategies to optimize in vitro culture yield are required. In the last 10 years, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have gathered considerable attention. Aside from their uses in tissue engineering and as support in haematopoietic stem cell transplantations, MSCs show notable immunomodulatory characteristics, providing further possibilities for therapeutic applications. In this study, we investigated the influence of murine MSCs on proliferation, phenotype, vitality, and cytotoxicity of murine CIKs in a coculture system. We found that CIKs in coculture proliferated within 7 days, with an average growth factor of 18.84, whereas controls grew with an average factor of 3.7 in the same period. Furthermore, higher vitality was noted in cocultured CIKs than in controls. Cell phenotype was unaffected by coculture with MSCs and, notably, coculture did not impact cytotoxicity against the tumour cells analysed. The findings suggest that cell-cell contact is primarily responsible for these effects. Humoral interactions play only a minor role. Furthermore, no phenotypical MSCs were detected after coculture for 4 h, suggesting the occurrence of immune reactions between CIKs and MSCs. Further investigations with DiD-labelled MSCs revealed that the observed disappearance of MSCs appears not to be due to differentiation processes.

  9. Influence of Murine Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Proliferation, Phenotype, Vitality, and Cytotoxicity of Murine Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells in Coculture

    PubMed Central

    Stolzing, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Stimulating lymphocytes with Ifn-γ, anti-CD3, and interleukin-2 promotes the proliferation of a cell population coexpressing T-lymphocyte surface antigens such as CD3, CD8a, and CD25 as well as natural killer cell markers such as NK1.1, CD49, and CD69. These cells, referred to as cytokine-induced killer cells (CIKs), display cytotoxic activity against tumour cells, even without prior antigen presentation, and offer a new cell-based approach to the treatment of malignant diseases. Because CIKs are limited in vivo, strategies to optimize in vitro culture yield are required. In the last 10 years, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have gathered considerable attention. Aside from their uses in tissue engineering and as support in haematopoietic stem cell transplantations, MSCs show notable immunomodulatory characteristics, providing further possibilities for therapeutic applications. In this study, we investigated the influence of murine MSCs on proliferation, phenotype, vitality, and cytotoxicity of murine CIKs in a coculture system. We found that CIKs in coculture proliferated within 7 days, with an average growth factor of 18.84, whereas controls grew with an average factor of 3.7 in the same period. Furthermore, higher vitality was noted in cocultured CIKs than in controls. Cell phenotype was unaffected by coculture with MSCs and, notably, coculture did not impact cytotoxicity against the tumour cells analysed. The findings suggest that cell–cell contact is primarily responsible for these effects. Humoral interactions play only a minor role. Furthermore, no phenotypical MSCs were detected after coculture for 4 h, suggesting the occurrence of immune reactions between CIKs and MSCs. Further investigations with DiD-labelled MSCs revealed that the observed disappearance of MSCs appears not to be due to differentiation processes. PMID:24516591

  10. Expression and function of the murine B7 antigen, the major costimulatory molecule expressed by peritoneal exudate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Razi-Wolf, Z; Freeman, G J; Galvin, F; Benacerraf, B; Nadler, L; Reiser, H

    1992-01-01

    The murine B7 (mB7) protein is a potent costimulatory molecule for the T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated activation of murine CD4+ T cells. We have previously shown that stable mB7-transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells but not vector-transfected controls synergize with either anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody-induced or concanavalin A-induced T-cell activation, resulting ultimately in lymphokine production and proliferation. We now have generated a hamster anti-mB7 monoclonal antibody. This reagent recognizes a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 50-60 kDa. The mB7 antigen is expressed on activated B cells and on peritoneal exudate cells (PECs). Antibody blocking experiments demonstrate that mB7 is the major costimulatory molecule expressed by PECs for the activation of murine CD4+ T cells. This suggests an important role for mB7 during immune-cell interactions. We have also surveyed a panel of murine cell lines capable of providing costimulatory activity. Our results indicate that mB7 is the major costimulatory molecule on some but not all cell lines and that there may be additional molecules besides mB7 that can costimulate the activation of murine CD4+ T cells. Images PMID:1373896

  11. Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics of Scrub Typhus and Murine Typhus among Hospitalized Patients with Acute Undifferentiated Fever in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Sugihiro; Cuong, Ngo Chi; Tra, Doan Thu; Doan, Yen Hai; Shimizu, Kenta; Tuan, Nguyen Quang; Yoshida, Lay-Myint; Mai, Le Quynh; Duc-Anh, Dang; Ando, Shuji; Arikawa, Jiro; Parry, Christopher M; Ariyoshi, Koya; Thuy, Pham Thanh

    2015-05-01

    A descriptive study on rickettsiosis was conducted at the largest referral hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam, to identify epidemiological and clinical characteristics of specific rickettsiosis. Between March 2001 and February 2003, we enrolled 579 patients with acute undifferentiated fever (AUF), excluding patients with malaria, dengue fever, and typhoid fever, and serologically tested for Orientia tsutsugamushi and Rickettsia typhi. Of the patients, 237 (40.9%) and 193 (33.3%) had scrub and murine typhus, respectively, and 149 (25.7%) had neither of them (non-scrub and murine typhus [non-ST/MT]). The proportion of murine typhus was highest among patients living in Hanoi whereas that of scrub typhus was highest in national or regional border areas. The presence of an eschar, dyspnea, hypotension, and lymphadenopathy was significantly associated with a diagnosis of scrub typhus (OR = 46.56, 10.90, 9.01, and 7.92, respectively). Patients with murine typhus were less likely to have these findings but more likely to have myalgia, rash, and relative bradycardia (OR = 1.60, 1.56, and 1.45, respectively). Scrub typhus and murine typhus were shown to be common causes of AUF in northern Vietnam although the occurrence of spotted fever group rickettsiae was not determined. Clinical and epidemiological information may help local clinicians make clinical diagnosis of specific rickettsioses in a resource-limited setting.

  12. The first structure from the SOUL/HBP family of heme-binding proteins, murine P22HBP.

    PubMed

    Dias, Jorge S; Macedo, Anjos L; Ferreira, Gloria C; Peterson, Francis C; Volkman, Brian F; Goodfellow, Brian J

    2006-10-20

    Murine p22HBP, a 22-kDa monomer originally identified as a cytosolic heme-binding protein ubiquitously expressed in various tissues, has 27% sequence identity to murine SOUL, a heme-binding hexamer specifically expressed in the retina. In contrast to murine SOUL, which binds one heme per subunit via coordination of the Fe(III)-heme to a histidine, murine p22HBP binds one heme molecule per subunit with no specific axial ligand coordination of the Fe(III)-heme. Using intrinsic protein fluorescence quenching, the values for the dissociation constants of p22HBP for hemin and protoporphyrin-IX were determined to be in the low nanomolar range. The three-dimensional structure of murine p22HBP, the first for a protein from the SOUL/HBP family, was determined by NMR methods to consist of a 9-stranded distorted beta-barrel flanked by two long alpha-helices. Although homologous domains have been found in three bacterial proteins, two of which are transcription factors, the fold determined for p22HBP corresponds to a novel alpha plus beta fold in a eukaryotic protein. Chemical shift mapping localized the tetrapyrrole binding site to a hydrophobic cleft formed by residues from helix alphaA and an extended loop. In an attempt to assess the structural basis for tetrapyrrole binding in the SOUL/HBP family, models for the p22HBP-protoporphyrin-IX complex and the SOUL protein were generated by manual docking and automated methods.

  13. Characterization of the Arterial Anatomy of the Murine Hindlimb: Functional Role in the Design and Understanding of Ischemia Models

    PubMed Central

    Kochi, Takashi; Imai, Yoshimichi; Takeda, Atsushi; Watanabe, Yukiko; Mori, Shiro; Tachi, Masahiro; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Appropriate ischemia models are required for successful studies of therapeutic angiogenesis. While collateral routes are known to be present within the innate vasculature, there are no reports describing the detailed vascular anatomy of the murine hindlimb. In addition, differences in the descriptions of anatomical names and locations in the literature impede understanding of the circulation and the design of hindlimb ischemia models. To understand better the collateral circulation in the whole hindlimb, clarification of all the feeding arteries of the hindlimb is required. Objective The aim of this study is to reveal the detailed arterial anatomy and collateral routes in murine hindlimb to enable the appropriate design of therapeutic angiogenesis studies and to facilitate understanding of the circulation in ischemia models. Methods and Results Arterial anatomy in the murine hindlimb was investigated by contrast-enhanced X-ray imaging and surgical dissection. The observed anatomy is shown in photographic images and in a schema. Previously unnoticed but relatively large arteries were observed in deep, cranial and lateral parts of the thigh. The data indicates that there are three collateral routes through the medial thigh, quadriceps femoris, and the biceps femoris muscles. Furthermore, anatomical variations were found at the origins of the three feeding arteries. Conclusions The detailed arterial anatomy of murine hindlimb and collateral routes deduced from the anatomy are described. Limitations on designs of ischemia models in view of anatomical variations are proposed. These observations will contribute to the development of animal studies of therapeutic angiogenesis using murine hindlimb ischemia models. PMID:24386328

  14. Murine erythroleukemia cell line GM979 contains factors that can activate silent chromosomal human. gamma. -globin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Zitnik, G.; Hines, P.; Stamatoyannopoulos, G.; Papayannopoulou, T. )

    1991-03-15

    The authors introduced a normal chromosome 11 into GM979 murine erythroleukemia cells by fusing them with Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphocytes from a normal individual. In contrast to precious data obtained with other murine erythroleukemia cells, they detected activation of human chromosomal {gamma}-globin genes in GM979 cells. GM979, unlike previously used murine erythroleukemia cell lines, expresses murine embryonic globin in addition to adult globin. While all the hybrids expressed {gamma}- and {beta}-globin, they displayed a wide range of {gamma}-globin expression in relation to that of {beta}-globin. No correlation, however, was found in quantitative expression between murine embryonic globin and human {gamma}-globin in these hybrids, suggesting that the two globins are regulated independently, at least in this cell line. These data indicate that {gamma}-globin genes from normal, nonerythroid chromosomes are not irreversibly silenced, and they can be activated by a positive trans factor(s) present in GM979 cells.

  15. PU.1 downregulation in murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML): from molecular mechanism to human AML

    PubMed Central

    Verbiest, Tom; Bouffler, Simon; Nutt, Stephen L.; Badie, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1, encoded by the murine Sfpi1 gene (SPI1 in humans), is a member of the Ets transcription factor family and plays a vital role in commitment and maturation of the myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Murine studies directly link primary acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and decreased PU.1 expression in specifically modified strains. Similarly, a radiation-induced chromosome 2 deletion and subsequent Sfpi1 point mutation in the remaining allele lead to murine radiation-induced AML. Consistent with murine data, heterozygous deletion of the SPI1 locus and mutation of the −14kb SPI1 upstream regulatory element were described previously in human primary AML, although they are rare events. Other mechanisms linked to PU.1 downregulation in human AML include TP53 deletion, FLT3-ITD mutation and the recurrent AML1-ETO [t(8;21)] and PML-RARA [t(15;17)] translocations. This review provides an up-to-date overview on our current understanding of the involvement of PU.1 in the initiation and development of radiation-induced AML, together with recommendations for future murine and human studies. PMID:25750172

  16. Nucleotide sequence of murine PCNA: interspecies comparison of the cDNA and the 5' flanking region of the gene.

    PubMed

    Shipman-Appasamy, P M; Cohen, K S; Prystowsky, M B

    1991-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) RNA levels are regulated by transcription as well as changes in stability, in growing cells. We have cloned the murine PCNA cDNA and a fragment of the murine PCNA gene flanking the transcription initiation site. Comparison of the murine deduced amino acid sequence with the PCNA sequence from rat, human, Drosophila, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and higher plants, reveals extensive homology between species. The homology is likely to be related to the fundamental role of PCNA as an auxiliary protein for DNA replication. Consensus sequences for transcriptional regulatory factors identified within 520 bp 5' of the cap site of the murine PCNA gene include: an inverted CCAAT site, an enhancer core element (EBP-1), three cAMP-response elements (CRE-BP), one AP-2 site, three Sp1 sites, and two octamer sequences. The first 20 bp of the transcriptional unit are homologous to an initiator element, which may direct transcription from RNA polymerase II in the absence of a TATAA box. The consensus elements in the murine PCNA gene are similar in sequence and/or location to elements identified in the genes for human, Drosophilia, and yeast PCNA.

  17. Sodium Thiosulfate Prevents Chondrocyte Mineralization and Reduces the Severity of Murine Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nasi, Sonia; Ea, Hang-Korng; Lioté, Frédéric; So, Alexander; Busso, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Calcium-containing crystals participate in the pathogenesis of OA. Sodium thiosulfate (STS) has been shown to be an effective treatment in calcification disorders such as calciphylaxis and vascular calcification. This study investigated the effects and mechanisms of action of STS in a murine model of OA and in chondrocyte calcification. Methods Hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals-stimulated murine chondrocytes and macrophages were treated with STS. Mineralization and cellular production of IL-6, MCP-1 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assayed. STS's effects on genes involved in calcification, inflammation and cartilage matrix degradation were studied by RT-PCR. STS was administered in the menisectomy model of murine OA, and the effect on periarticular calcific deposits and cartilage degeneration was investigated by micro-CT-scan and histology. Results In vitro, STS prevented in a dose-dependent manner calcium crystal deposition in chondrocytes and inhibited Annexin V gene expression. In addition, there was a reduction in crystal-induced IL-6 and MCP-1 production. STS also had an antioxidant effect, diminished HA-induced ROS generation and abrogated HA-induced catabolic responses in chondrocytes. In vivo, administration of STS reduced the histological severity of OA, by limiting the size of new periarticular calcific deposits and reducing the severity of cartilage damage. Conclusions STS reduces the severity of periarticular calcification and cartilage damage in an animal model of OA via its effects on chondrocyte mineralization and its attenuation of crystal-induced inflammation as well as catabolic enzymes and ROS generation. Our study suggests that STS may be a disease-modifying drug in crystal-associated OA. PMID:27391970

  18. Effects of lymphokines and immune complexes on murine placental cell growth in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.T.; Chaouat, G. )

    1989-03-01

    Isolated murine placental cells obtained at Day 16 of allogeneic gestation (C3H x DBA/2J) were cultured for 3 days alone or in coculture with irradiated mouse splenocytes at the end of which 3H-thymidine was added for an additional 18-h culture to assess cell proliferation. Placental cell proliferation was significantly enhanced at spleen cell:placental cell ratios of 10:1 and 25:1 above that observed in the absence of added spleen cells. The stimulatory effect of irradiated allogeneic (C3H plus Balb/cJ) spleen cell cultures was significantly greater (approximately 2-fold) than that of isogeneic spleen cells (C3H alone). Conditioned medium from murine spleen cells cultured with concanavalin A (ConA) to induce lymphokine production had dose-dependent inhibitory effects on proliferation when added to placental cell cultures over a range of concentrations from 10 to 40% (vol:vol). Addition of pseudo immune complexes in the form of heat-aggregated human gamma globulin (AHGG) to culture medium failed to alter placental cell proliferation over a range of concentrations from 2 to 200 micrograms/ml either in the absence or presence of ConA-conditioned medium. In contrast to late-gestational stage placental cells, cell suspensions obtained from Days 8-9 murine ectoplacental cone (EPC) outgrowths, or from earlier stage placentas (Days 12-14) responded to low concentrations of conditioned medium from ConA-stimulated splenocytes with increased proliferation. The effect was less impressive on placental cells at gestational ages later than 12 days than on earlier stage preparations. On all placental cell suspensions tested, as well as EPC cells, a clear-cut inhibition of growth was observed at high doses of conditioned medium.

  19. Cytokine combinations on the potential for ex vivo expansion of murine hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lui, Wing Chi; Chan, Yuen Fan; Chan, Li Chong; Ng, Ray Kit

    2014-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is a rare cell population, which is capable of self-renewal and differentiation to all blood lineages. The clinical potential of HSCs for treating hematological disorders has led to the use of cytokine stimulation for ex vivo expansion. However, little is known about the molecular features of the HSC populations expanded under different cytokine combinations. We studied the expansion of murine HSCs cultured with six different cytokine combinations under serum-containing or serum-free conditions for 14days. We found that all the cytokine combinations promoted expansion of murine HSCs. Although SCF/IL-3/IL-6 induced the highest expansion of the immunophenotypic Lineage(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) (LSK) cells at day 14, over 90% of them were FcεRIα(+) mast cells. In contrast, the serum-free medium with SCF/Flt3-L/IL-11 effectively promoted the expansion of LSK/FcεRIα(-) HSCs by over 50-fold. HSCs expanded by SCF/Flt3-L/IL-11 combination formed compact hematopoietic colonies and demonstrated a higher degree of multipotency compared to the HSCs cultured with other cytokine combinations. Surprisingly, despite the same LSK/FcεRIα(-) immunophenotype, HSCs cultured with different cytokine combinations demonstrated differential patterns of hematopoietic gene expression. HSCs cultured with SCF/Flt3-L/IL-11 maintained a transcription profile resembling that of freshly isolated HSCs. We propose that serum-free medium supplemented with SCF/Flt3-L/IL-11 is the optimal culture condition to maintain the stemness of ex vivo expanded HSCs. This study used molecular characterization of cytokine-expanded murine HSCs to facilitate the selection of cytokine combinations that could induce fully competent HSC for clinical applications.

  20. Modulatory Effects and Action Mechanisms of Tryptanthrin on Murine Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hoi-Ling; Yip, Hon-Yan; Mak, Nai-Ki; Leung, Kwok-Nam

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia is the disorder of hematopoietic cell development and is characterized by an uncoupling of cell proliferation and differentiation. There is a pressing need for the development of novel tactics for leukemia therapy as conventional treatments often have severe adverse side effects. Tryptanthrin (6,12-dihydro-6,12-dioxoindolo-(2,1-b)-quinazoline) is a naturally-occurring, weakly basic alkaloid isolated from the dried roots of medicinal indigo plants (Ban-Lan-Gen). It has been reported to have various biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. However, its modulatory effects and action mechanisms on myeloid cells remain poorly understood. In this study, tryptanthrin was shown to suppress the proliferation of the murine myeloid leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also significantly reduced the growth of WEHI-3B JCS cells in vivo in syngeneic BALB/c mice. However, it exhibited no significant direct cytotoxicity on normal murine peritoneal macrophages. Flow cytometric analysis showed an obvious cell cycle arrest of the tryptanthrin-treated WEHI-3B JCS cells at the G0/G1 phase. The expression of cyclin D2, D3, Cdk 2, 4 and 6 genes in WEHI-3B JCS cells was found to be down-regulated at 24 h as measured by RT-PCR. Morphological and functional studies revealed that tryptanthrin could induce differentiation in WEHI-3B JCS cells, as shown by the increases in vacuolation, cellular granularity and NBT-reducing activity in tryptanthrin-treated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that tryptanthrin might exert its anti-tumor effect on the murine myelomonocytic leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells by causing cell cycle arrest and by triggering cell differentiation. PMID:19887046

  1. Modulation of inflammatory response via α2-adrenoceptor blockade in acute murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, A; Lu, N; Guo, Y; Chen, J; Liu, Z

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by heavy production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β. Interactions of the autonomic nervous system with local immune cells play an important role in the development of IBD, and the balance of autonomic nerve function is broken in IBD patients with sympathetic overactivity. However, the function of catecholamines in the progress of colitis is unclear. In this study, we examined the role of catecholamines via α2-adrenoreceptor in acute murine colitis. The expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine b-hydroxylase (DBH), two rate-limiting enzymes in catecholamine synthesis, was detected by immunohistochemistry in murine colitis. Murine colitis was induced by dextran sodium sulphate or trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS), and the mice were administered RX821002 or UK14304, α2-adrenoceptor antagonists or agonists. Colitis was evaluated by clinical symptoms, myeloperoxidase assay, TNF-α and IL-1β production and histology. Lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) from mice with TNBS colitis were cultured in the absence or presence of RX821002 or UK14304, and stimulated further by lipopolysaccharide. TH and DBH are induced in LPMCs of inflamed colon, the evidence of catecholamine synthesis during the process of colitis. RX821002 down-regulates the production of proinflammatory cytokines from LPMCs, while UK14304 leads to exacerbation of colitis. Together, our data show a critical role of catecholamines via α2-adrenoreceptors in the progress of acute colitis, and suggest that use of the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist represents a novel therapeutic approach for the management of colitis. PMID:19250273

  2. Characterization of murine lung dendritic cells: similarities to Langerhans cells and thymic dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent accessory cells (AC) for the initiation of primary immune responses. Although murine lymphoid DC and Langerhans cells have been extensively characterized, DC from murine lung have been incompletely described. We isolated cells from enzyme-digested murine lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages that were potent stimulators of a primary mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). The AC had a low buoyant density, were loosely adherent and nonphagocytic. AC function was unaffected by depletion of cells expressing the splenic DC marker, 33D1. In addition, antibody and complement depletion of cells bearing the macrophage marker F4/80, or removal of phagocytic cells with silica also failed to decrease AC activity. In contrast, AC function was decreased by depletion of cells expressing the markers J11d and the low affinity interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R), both present on thymic and skin DC. AC function was approximately equal in FcR+ and FcR- subpopulations, indicating there was heterogeneity within the AC population. Consistent with the functional data, a combined two-color immunofluorescence and latex bead uptake technique revealed that lung cells high in AC activity were enriched in brightly Ia+ dendritic- shaped cells that (a) were nonphagocytic, (b) lacked specific T and B lymphocyte markers and the macrophage marker F4/80, but (c) frequently expressed C3biR, low affinity IL-2R, FcRII, and the markers NLDC-145 and J11d. Taken together, the functional and phenotypic data suggest the lung cells that stimulate resting T cells in an MLR and that might be important in local pulmonary immune responses are DC that bear functional and phenotypic similarity to other tissues DC, such as Langerhans cells and thymic DC. PMID:2162904

  3. Correction of murine hemoglobinopathies by prenatal tolerance induction and postnatal nonmyeloablative allogeneic BM transplants.

    PubMed

    Peranteau, William H; Hayashi, Satoshi; Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Chen, Qiukan; Merchant, Aziz; Asakura, Toshio; Flake, Alan W

    2015-09-03

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) and thalassemias (Thal) are common congenital disorders, which can be diagnosed early in gestation and result in significant morbidity and mortality. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the only curative therapy for SCD and Thal, is limited by the absence of matched donors and treatment-related toxicities. In utero hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (IUHCT) is a novel nonmyeloablative transplant approach that takes advantage of the immunologic immaturity and normal developmental properties of the fetus to achieve mixed allogeneic chimerism and donor-specific tolerance (DST). We hypothesized that a combined strategy of IUHCT to induce DST, followed by postnatal nonmyeloablative same donor "booster" bone marrow (BM) transplants in murine models of SCD and Thal would result in high levels of allogeneic engraftment and donor hemoglobin (Hb) expression with subsequent phenotypic correction of SCD and Thal. Our results show that: (1) IUHCT is associated with DST and low levels of allogeneic engraftment in the murine SCD and Thal models; (2) low-level chimerism following IUHCT can be enhanced to high-level chimerism and near complete Hb replacement with normal donor Hb with this postnatal "boosting" strategy; and (3) high-level chimerism following IUHCT and postnatal "boosting" results in phenotypic correction in the murine Thal and SCD models. This study supports the potential of IUHCT, combined with a postnatal nonmyelablative "boosting" strategy, to cure Thal and SCD without the toxic conditioning currently required for postnatal transplant regimens while expanding the eligible transplant patient population due to the lack of a restricted donor pool.

  4. Oatp-associated uptake and toxicity of microcystins in primary murine whole brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Feurstein, D.; Holst, K.; Fischer, A.; Dietrich, D.R.

    2009-01-15

    Microcystins (MCs) are naturally occurring cyclic heptapeptides that exhibit hepato-, nephro- and possibly neurotoxic effects in mammals. Organic anion transporting polypeptides (rodent Oatp/human OATP) appear to be specifically required for active uptake of MCs into hepatocytes and kidney epithelial cells. Based on symptoms of neurotoxicity in MC-intoxicated patients and the presence of Oatp/OATP at the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal-fluid-barrier (BCFB) it is hypothesized that MCs can be transported across the BBB/BCFB in an Oatp/OATP-dependent manner and can induce toxicity in brain cells via inhibition of protein phosphatase (PP). To test these hypotheses, the presence of murine Oatp (mOatp) in primary murine whole brain cells (mWBC) was investigated at the mRNA and protein level. MC transport was tested by exposing mWBCs to three different MC-congeners (MC-LR, -LW, -LF) with/without co-incubation with the OATP/Oatp-substrates taurocholate (TC) and bromosulfophthalein (BSP). Uptake of MCs and cytotoxicity was demonstrated via MC-Western blot analysis, immunocytochemistry, cell viability and PP inhibition assays. All MC congeners bound covalently and inhibited mWBC PP. MC-LF was the most cytotoxic congener followed by -LW and -LR. The lowest toxin concentration significantly reducing mWBC viability after 48 h exposure was 400 nM (MC-LF). Uptake of MCs into mWBCs was inhibited via co-incubation with excess TC (50 and 500 {mu}M) and BSP (50 {mu}M). MC-Western blot analysis demonstrated a concentration-dependent accumulation of MCs. In conclusion, the in vitro data support the assumed MC-congener-dependent uptake in a mOatp-associated manner and cytotoxicity of MCs in primary murine whole brain cells.

  5. Deltamethrin-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial caspase-dependent signaling pathways in murine splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anoop; Sasmal, D; Bhaskar, Amand; Mukhopadhyay, Kunal; Thakur, Aman; Sharma, Neelima

    2016-07-01

    Deltamethrin (DLM) is a well-known pyrethroid insecticide used extensively in pest control. Exposure to DLM has been demonstrated to cause apoptosis in various cells. However, the immunotoxic effects of DLM on mammalian system and its mechanism is still an open question to be explored. To explore these effects, this study has been designed to first observe the interactions of DLM to immune cell receptors and its effects on the immune system. The docking score revealed that DLM has strong binding affinity toward the CD45 and CD28 receptors. In vitro study revealed that DLM induces apoptosis in murine splenocytes in a concentration-dependent manner. The earliest markers of apoptosis such as enhanced reactive oxygen species and caspase 3 activation are evident as early as 1 h by 25 and 50 µM DLM. Western blot analysis demonstrated that p38 MAP kinase and Bax expression is increased in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas Bcl 2 expression is significantly reduced after 3 h of DLM treatment. Glutathione depletion has been also observed at 3 and 6 h by 25 and 50 µM concentration of DLM. Flow cytometry results imply that the fraction of hypodiploid cells has gradually increased with all the concentrations of DLM at 18 h. N-acetyl cysteine effectively reduces the percentage of apoptotic cells, which is increased by DLM. In contrast, buthionine sulfoxamine causes an elevation in the percentage of apoptotic cells. Phenotyping data imply the effect of DLM toxicity in murine splenocytes. In brief, the study demonstrates that DLM causes apoptosis through its interaction with CD45 and CD28 receptors, leading to oxidative stress and activation of the mitochondrial caspase-dependent pathways which ultimately affects the immune functions. This study provides mechanistic information by which DLM causes toxicity in murine splenocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 808-819, 2016.

  6. Characterization of msim, a murine homologue of the Drosophila sim transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Moffett, P.; Reece, M.; Pelletier, J.

    1996-07-01

    Mutations in the Drosophila single-minded (sim) gene result in loss of precursor cells that give rise to midline cells of the embryonic central nervous system. During the course of an exon-trapping strategy aimed at identifying transcripts that contribute to the etiology and pathophysiology of Down syndrome, we identified a human exon from the Down syndrome, we identified a human exon from the Down syndrome critical region showing significantly homology to the Drosophila sim gene. Using a cross-hybridization approach, we have isolated a murine homolog of Drosophila sim gene, which we designated msim. Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence analyses of msim cDNA clones indicate the this gene encodes a member of the basic-helix-loop-helix class of transcription factors. The murine and Drosophila proteins share 88% residues within the basic-helix-loop helix domain, with an overall homology of 92%. In addition, the N-terminal domain of MSIM contains two PAS dimerization motifs also featured in the Drosophila sim gene product, as well as a small number of other transcription factors. Northern blot analysis of adult murine tissues revealed that the msim gene produces a single mRNA species of {approximately}4 kb expressed in a small number of tissues, with the highest levels in the kidneys and lower levels present in skeletal muscle, lung, testis, brain, and heart. In situ hybridization experiments demonstrate that msim is also expressed in early fetal development in the central nervous system and in cartilage primordia. The characteristics of the msim gene are consistent with its putative function as a transcriptional regulator. 51 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Ammonia elicits a different myogenic response in avian and murine myotubes.

    PubMed

    Stern, Rachel A; Dasarathy, Srinivasan; Mozdziak, Paul E

    2017-02-01

    Increased myostatin expression, resulting in muscle loss, has been associated with hyperammonemia in mammalian models of cirrhosis. However, there is evidence that hyperammonemia in avian embryos results in a reduction of myostatin expression, suggesting a proliferative myogenic environment. The present in vitro study examines species differences in myotube and liver cell response to ammonia using avian and murine-derived cells. Primary myoblasts and liver cells were isolated from embryonic day 15 and 17 chick embryos to be compared with mouse myoblasts (C2C12) and liver (AML12) cells. Cells were exposed to varying concentrations of ammonium acetate (AA; 2.5, 5, or 10 mM) to determine the effects of ammonia on the cells. Relative expression of myostatin mRNA, determined by quantitative real-time PCR, was significantly increased in AA (10 mM) treated C2C12 myotubes compared to both ages of chick embryonic myotube cultures after 48 h (P < 0.02). Western blot analysis of myostatin protein confirmed an increase in myostatin expression in AA-treated C2C12 myotubes compared to the sodium acetate (SA) controls, while myostatin expression was decreased in the chick embryonic myotube cultures when treated with AA. Myotube diameter was significantly decreased in AA-treated C2C12 myotubes compared to controls, while avian myotube diameter increased with AA treatment (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences between avian and murine liver cell viability, assessed using 2', 7'- bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6-)-carboxyfluorescein, acetoxymethyl ester, when treated with AA. However, after 24 h, AA-treated avian myotubes showed a significant increase in cell viability compared to the C2C12 myotubes (P < 0.05). Overall, it appears that there is a positive myogenic response to hyperammonemia in avian myotubes compared to murine myotubes, which supports a proliferative myogenic environment.

  8. CMV Infection Attenuates the Disease Course in a Murine Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pirko, Istvan; Cardin, Rhonda; Chen, Yi; Lohrey, Anne K.; Lindquist, Diana M.; Dunn, R. Scott; Zivadinov, Robert; Johnson, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence in multiple sclerosis (MS) suggests that active CMV infection may result in more benign clinical disease. The goal of this pilot study was to determine whether underlying murine CMV (MCMV) infection affects the course of the Theiler's murine encephalitis virus (TMEV) induced murine model of MS. A group of eight TMEV-infected mice were co-infected with MCMV at 2 weeks prior to TMEV infection while a second group of TMEV-infected mice received MCMV two weeks post TMEV. We also used 2 control groups, where at the above time points MCMV was replaced with PBS. Outcome measures included (1) monthly monitoring of disability via rotarod for 8 months; (2) in vivo MRI for brain atrophy studies and (3) FACS analysis of brain infiltrating lymphocytes at 8 months post TMEV infection. Co-infection with MCMV influenced the disease course in mice infected prior to TMEV infection. In this group, rotarod detectable motor performance was significantly improved starting 3 months post-infection and beyond (p≤0.024). In addition, their brain atrophy was close to 30% reduced at 8 months, but this was only present as a trend due to low power (p = 0.19). A significant reduction in the proportion of brain infiltrating CD3+ cells was detected in this group (p = 0.026), while the proportion of CD45+ Mac1+ cells significantly increased (p = 0.003). There was also a strong trend for a reduced proportion of CD4+ cells (p = 0.17) while CD8 and B220+ cell proportion did not change. These findings support an immunomodulatory effect of MCMV infection in this MS model. Future studies in this co-infection model will provide insight into mechanisms which modulate the development of demyelination and may be utilized for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:22393447

  9. Circadian Mechanisms in Murine and Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Following Dexamethasone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiying; Yu, Gang; Parks, Helen; Hebert, Teddi; Goh, Brian C.; Dietrich, Marilyn A.; Pelled, Gadi; Izadpanah, Reza; Gazit, Dan; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.

    2008-01-01

    A core group of transcriptional regulatory factors regulate circadian rhythms in mammalian cells. While the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the brain serves as the central core circadian oscillator, circadian clocks also exist within peripheral tissues and cells. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated that >20% of expressed mRNAs in bone and adipose tissues oscillate in a circadian manner. The current manuscript reports evidence of the core circadian transcriptional apparatus within primary cultures of murine and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Exposure of confluent, quiescent BMSCs to dexamethasone synchronized the oscillating expression of the mRNAs encoding the albumin D binding protein (dbp), brain-muscle arnt-like 1 (bmal1), period 3 (per3), rev-erb α, and rev-erb β. The genes displayed a mean oscillatory period of 22.2 to 24.3 hours. The acrophase or peak expression of mRNAs encoding “positive” (bmal1) and “negative” (per3) transcriptional regulatory factors were out of phase with each other by ∼8-12 hours, consistent with in vivo observations. In vivo, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) mediated phosphorylation regulates the turnover of per3 and core circadian transcriptional apparatus. In vitro addition of lithium chloride, a GSK3β inhibitor, significantly shifted the acrophase of all genes by 4.2-4.7 hours oscillation in BMSCs; however, only the male murine BMSCs displayed a significant increase in the length of the period of oscillation. We conclude that human and murine BMSCs represent a valid in vitro model for the analysis of circadian mechanisms in bone metabolism and stem cell biology. PMID:18302991

  10. microRNA-222 modulates liver fibrosis in a murine model of biliary atresia

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wen-jun; Dong, Rui; Chen, Gong Zheng, Shan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • The RRV infected group showed cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. • miR-222 was highly expressed, and PPP2R2A was inhibited in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 might represent a potential target for improving biliary atresia prognosis. - Abstract: microRNA-222 (miR-222) has been shown to initiate the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of miR-22 in a mouse model of biliary atresia (BA) induced by Rhesus Rotavirus (RRV) infection. New-born Balb/c mice were randomized into control and RRV infected groups. The extrahepatic bile ducts were evaluated. The experimental group was divided into BA group and negative group based on histology. The expression of miR-222, protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B alpha (PPP2R2A), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phospho-Akt were detected. We found that the experimental group showed signs of cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. No abnormalities were found in the control group. In the BA group, miR-222, PCNA and Akt were highly expressed, and PPP2R2A expression was significantly inhibited. Our findings suggest that miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine BA model, which might represent a potential target for improving BA prognosis.

  11. Integrating Murine Gene Expression Studies to Understand Obstructive Lung Disease Due to Chronic Inhaled Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peggy S.; Hofmann, Oliver; Baron, Rebecca M.; Cernadas, Manuela; Meng, Quanxin Ryan; Bresler, Herbert S.; Brass, David M.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.; Christiani, David C.; Hide, Winston

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Endotoxin is a near ubiquitous environmental exposure that that has been associated with both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These obstructive lung diseases have a complex pathophysiology, making them difficult to study comprehensively in the context of endotoxin. Genome-wide gene expression studies have been used to identify a molecular snapshot of the response to environmental exposures. Identification of differentially expressed genes shared across all published murine models of chronic inhaled endotoxin will provide insight into the biology underlying endotoxin-associated lung disease. Methods We identified three published murine models with gene expression profiling after repeated low-dose inhaled endotoxin. All array data from these experiments were re-analyzed, annotated consistently, and tested for shared genes found to be differentially expressed. Additional functional comparison was conducted by testing for significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes in known pathways. The importance of this gene signature in smoking-related lung disease was assessed using hierarchical clustering in an independent experiment where mice were exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and endotoxin plus smoke. Results A 101-gene signature was detected in three murine models, more than expected by chance. The three model systems exhibit additional similarity beyond shared genes when compared at the pathway level, with increasing enrichment of inflammatory pathways associated with longer duration of endotoxin exposure. Genes and pathways important in both asthma and COPD were shared across all endotoxin models. Mice exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and smoke plus endotoxin were accurately classified with the endotoxin gene signature. Conclusions Despite the differences in laboratory, duration of exposure, and strain of mouse used in three experimental models of chronic inhaled endotoxin, surprising similarities in gene expression were observed

  12. High and low mammographic density human breast tissues maintain histological differential in murine tissue engineering chambers.

    PubMed

    Chew, G L; Huang, D; Lin, S J; Huo, C; Blick, T; Henderson, M A; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Morrison, W A; Campbell, I G; Hopper, J L; Southey, M C; Haviv, I; Thompson, E W

    2012-08-01

    Mammographic density (MD) is the area of breast tissue that appears radiologically white on mammography. Although high MD is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, independent of BRCA1/2 mutation status, the molecular basis of high MD and its associated breast cancer risk is poorly understood. MD studies will benefit from an animal model, where hormonal, gene and drug perturbations on MD can be measured in a preclinical context. High and low MD tissues were selectively sampled by stereotactic biopsy from operative specimens of high-risk women undergoing prophylactic mastectomy. The high and low MD tissues were transferred into separate vascularised biochambers in the groins of SCID mice. Chamber material was harvested after 6 weeks for histological analyses and immunohistochemistry for cytokeratins, vimentin and a human-specific mitochondrial antigen. Within-individual analysis was performed in replicate mice, eliminating confounding by age, body mass index and process-related factors, and comparisons were made to the parental human tissue. Maintenance of differential MD post-propagation was assessed radiographically. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the preservation of human glandular and stromal components in the murine biochambers, with maintenance of radiographic MD differential. Propagated high MD regions had higher stromal (p = 0.0002) and lower adipose (p = 0.0006) composition, reflecting the findings in the original human breast tissue, although glands appeared small and non-complex in both high and low MD groups. No significant differences were observed in glandular area (p = 0.4) or count (p = 0.4) between high and low MD biochamber tissues. Human mammary glandular and stromal tissues were viably maintained in murine biochambers, with preservation of differential radiographic density and histological features. Our study provides a murine model for future studies into the biomolecular basis of MD as a risk factor for breast cancer.

  13. Immunotherapeutic targeting of shared melanoma-associated antigens in a murine glioma model.

    PubMed

    Prins, Robert M; Odesa, Sylvia K; Liau, Linda M

    2003-12-01

    Immune-based treatments for central nervous system gliomas have traditionally lagged behind those of more immunogenic tumors such as melanoma. The relative paucity of defined glioma-associated antigens that can be targeted by the immune system may partially account for this situation. Antigens present on melanomas have been extensively characterized, both in humans and in murine preclinical models. Melanocytes and astrocytes are both derived embryologically from the neural ectoderm. Their neoplastic counterparts, malignant melanomas and gliomas, have been shown in humans to share common antigens at the RNA level. However, little is known concerning whether gliomas can be targeted by immune-based strategies that prime T cells to epitopes from melanoma-associated antigens (MAAs). In this study, we provide evidence that two common murine glioma cell lines (GL26 and GL261) express the melanoma antigens gp100 and tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2). To understand the immunogenicity of murine gliomas to CD8(+) T cells, we examined the ability of a MAA-specific CTL cell line to lyse the glioma cells, as well as the in vivo expansion of MAA-specific CD8(+) T cells in animals harboring gliomas. Both glioma cell lines were lysed by a human gp100-specific CTL cell line in vitro. Mice harboring s.c. GL26 gliomas possessed TRP-2-specific CD8(+) T cells, providing further evidence that these gliomas express the protein products in the context of MHC class I. Furthermore, MAA peptide-pulsed dendritic cells could prime T cells that specifically recognize GL26 glioma cells in vitro. Lastly, mice that were prevaccinated with human gp100 and TRP-2 peptide-pulsed dendritic cells had significantly extended survival when challenged with tumor cells in the brain, resulting in >50% long-term survival. These results suggest that shared MAAs on gliomas can be targeted immunotherapeutically, pointing the way to a new potential treatment option for patients with malignant gliomas.

  14. Scaling of rotational inertia in murine rodents and two species of lizard.

    PubMed

    Walter, Rebecca M; Carrier, David R

    2002-07-01

    Because the force required to rotate a body about an axis is directly proportional to its rotational inertia about the axis, it is likely that animals with high rotational inertia would be constrained in their turning abilities. Given that rotational inertia scales with mass(1.67) in geometrically similar animals, whereas the ability to apply torque scales with mass(1.00), larger animals would be expected to have more difficulty turning than smaller animals of similar shape. To determine how rotational inertia scales with body mass, we used the fact that the period of a physical pendulum is proportional to its rotational inertia(0.50), and measured rotational inertia in two groups of vertebrates with greatly different body shapes: murine rodents (Mus domesticus and Rattus norvegicus) and lizards (Iguana iguana and Varanus exanthematicus). Rotational inertia did not deviate significantly from isometric scaling in the murine rodents as a group or in the varanid lizards, scaling with mass(1.63) and mass(1.59), respectively. Although rotational inertia did scale with negative allometry in iguanas and rats alone, with mass(1.56) and mass(1.42), respectively, it still increased much more quickly with increasing mass than the predicted ability to apply torque. This suggests either that these animals are not constrained by rotational inertia because of their relatively small size or that larger rodents and lizards are poorer turners than smaller ones. The murine rodents had a 3.0- to 4.9-fold lower rotational inertia than similarly sized lizards of either species. Given that the basal synapsids had body proportions and limb configurations similar to those of modern lizards, we suggest that the loss of the large muscular tail and elongated body form during the evolution of cynodonts and mammals reduced rotational inertia and probably improved turning ability.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide activates innate immune responses in murine intestinal myofibroblasts through multiple signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Kristen L. W.; Holt, Lisa; Sartor, R. Balfour

    2009-01-01

    Myofibroblasts (MF) play an important role in intestinal wound healing. A compromised epithelial barrier exposes intestinal subepithelial MF to luminal bacterial products. However, responses of murine intestinal MF to bacterial adjuvants and potential roles of intestinal MF in innate immune responses are not well defined. Our aims in this study were to determine innate immune responses and intracellular signaling pathways of intestinal MF exposed to LPS, a prototypic Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand. Expression of TLR4 in primary murine intestinal MF cultures was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. LPS-induced secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin (IL)-6, and keratinocyte-derived chemokines (KC) was measured by ELISA. Intracellular responses to LPS were assessed by Western blotting for NF-κB p65, Iκ-Bα, Akt, p38 MAP kinase, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). LPS induced rapid phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, Akt, and p38 MAPK and degradation of Iκ-Bα. LPS induced expression of COX-2 and secretion of PGE2 (2.0 ± 0.8-fold induction vs. unstimulated cells), IL-6 (6.6 ± 0.4-fold induction), and KC (12.5 ± 0.4-fold induction). Inhibition of phosphoinositide-3 (PI3)-kinase, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB pathways reduced LPS-induced PGE2, IL-6, and KC secretion. These studies show that primary murine intestinal MF respond to LPS, evidenced by activation of NF-κB, PI3-kinase, and MAPK signaling pathways and secretion of proinflammatory molecules. Inhibition of these pathways attenuated LPS-dependent PGE2, IL-6, and KC production, indicating that LPS activates MF by multiple signaling pathways. These data support the hypothesis that MF are a component of the innate immune system and may exert paracrine effects on adjacent epithelial and immune cells by responding to luminal bacterial adjuvants. PMID:19136385

  16. Increased Echogenicity and Radiodense Foci on Echocardiogram and MicroCT in Murine Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Nancy D.; Gu, Yusu; Chao, Chieh-Ju; Peterson, Kirk L.; Knowlton, Kirk U.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To address the question as to whether echocardiographic and/or microcomputed tomography (microCT) analysis can be utilized to assess the extent of Coxsackie B virus (CVB) induced myocarditis in the absence of left ventricular dysfunction in the mouse. Background Viral myocarditis is a significant clinical problem with associated inflammation of the myocardium and myocardial injury. Murine models of myocarditis are commonly used to study the pathophysiology of the disease, but methods for imaging the mouse myocardium have been limited to echocardiographic assessment of ventricular dysfunction and, to a lesser extent, MRI imaging. Methods Using a murine model of myocarditis, we used both echocardiography and microCT to assess the extent of myocardial involvement in murine myocarditis using both wild-type mice and CVB cleavage-resistant dystrophin knock-in mice. Results Areas of increased echogenicity were only observed in the myocardium of Coxsackie B virus infected mice. These echocardiographic abnormalities correlated with the extent of von Kossa staining (a marker of membrane permeability), inflammation, and fibrosis. Given that calcium phosphate uptake as imaged by von Kossa staining might also be visualized using microCT, we utilized microCT imaging which allowed for high-resolution, 3-dimensional images of radiodensities that likely represent calcium phosphate uptake. As with echocardiography, only mice infected with Coxsackie B virus displayed abnormal accumulation of calcium within individual myocytes indicating increased membrane permeability only upon exposure to virus. Conclusions These studies demonstrate new, quantitative, and semi-quantitative imaging approaches for the assessment of myocardial involvement in the setting of viral myocarditis in the commonly utilized mouse model of viral myocarditis. PMID:27486657

  17. Optimization of Gene Transfection in Murine Myeloma Cell Lines using Different Transfection Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Shabani, Mahdi; Hemmati, Sheyda; Hadavi, Reza; Amirghofran, Zahra; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Shokri, Fazel

    2010-01-01

    Purification and isolation of cellular target proteins for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production is a difficult and time-consuming process. Immunization of mice with murine cell lines stably transfected with genes coding for xenogenic target molecules is an alternative method for mouse immunization and MAb production. Here we present data on transfection efficiency of some commercial reagents used for transfection of murine myeloma cell lines. Little is known about transfectability of murine myeloma cell lines by different transfection reagents. Mouse myeloma cell lines (SP2/0, NS0, NS1, Ag8, and P3U1) were transfected with pEGFP-N1 vector using Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec commercial transfection reagents in different combinations. The transfection permissible HEK293-FT cell line was used as a control in transfection procedure. Transfected cells, expressing the Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP), were analyzed by flow cytometry 48 hrs post transfection. Our results showed transfection efficiency of 71%, 57% and 22% for HEK293-FT, 5.5%, 3.4% and 1% for SP2/0, 55.7%, 21.1% and 9.3% for NS0, 8.2%, 6% and 5.5% for NS1, 22%, 49.2% and 5.5% for Ag8 and 6.3%, 21.5% and 4.6% for P3U1 cell lines after transfection with Lipofectamine 2000, jetPEI and LyoVec reagents, respectively. Our data indicate that NS0 and Ag8 are efficiently transfected by Lipofectamine 2000 and jetPEI reagents. Finally, we propose Ag8 and NS0 cell lines as suitable host cells for efficient expression of target genes which can be used for mouse immunization and MAb production. PMID:23408356

  18. Environmentally determined differences in the murine lung microbiota and their relation to alveolar architecture.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yeojun; Srinivas, Girish; Kuenzel, Sven; Linnenbrink, Miriam; Alnahas, Safa; Bruce, Kenneth D; Steinhoff, Ulrich; Baines, John F; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2014-01-01

    Commensal bacteria control the micro-ecology of metazoan epithelial surfaces with pivotal effect on tissue homeostasis and host defense. In contrast to the upper respiratory tract, the lower respiratory tract of healthy individuals has largely been considered free of microorganisms. To understand airway micro-ecology we studied microbiota of sterilely excised lungs from mice of different origin including outbred wild mice caught in the natural environment or kept under non-specific-pathogen-free (SPF) conditions as well as inbred mice maintained in non-SPF, SPF or germ-free (GF) facilities. High-throughput pyrosequencing of reverse transcribed 16S rRNA revealed metabolically active murine lung microbiota in all but GF mice. The overall composition across samples was similar at the phylum and family level. However, species richness was significantly different between lung microbiota from SPF and non-SPF mice. Non-cultivatable Betaproteobacteria such as Ralstonia spp. made up the major constituents and were also confirmed by 16S rRNA gene cloning analysis. Additionally, Pasteurellaceae, Enterobacteria and Firmicutes were isolated from lungs of non-SPF mice. Bacterial communities were detectable by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) at alveolar epithelia in the absence of inflammation. Notably, higher bacterial abundance in non-SPF mice correlated with more and smaller size alveolae, which was corroborated by transplanting Lactobacillus spp. lung isolates into GF mice. Our data indicate a common microbial composition of murine lungs, which is diversified through different environmental conditions and affects lung architecture. Identification of the microbiota of murine lungs will pave the path to study their influence on pulmonary immunity to infection and allergens using mouse models.

  19. Development and characterization of Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine T-cell lines and clones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepe, George S., Jr.; Smith, James G.; Denman, David; Bullock, Ward E.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1986-01-01

    Several Histoplasma capsulatum-reactive murine cloned T-cell lines (TCLs) were isolated from spleens of C57BL/6 mice immunized with viable H. capsulatum yeast cells, using the methodology of Kimoto and Fathman (1980). These T-cells were characterized phenotypically as Thy-1.2(+) Lyt-1(+) L3T4(+) Lyt-2(-), that is, as the helper/inducer phenotype. The cloned T cells proliferate in response to histoplasmin and, in some cases, to heterologous fungal anigens. Upon injection of mice with the antigen, the T-cells mediate local delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and, after stimulation, release regulatory lymphokines.

  20. Nucleotide sequence of the transforming gene of m1 murine sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Brow, M A; Sen, A; Sutcliffe, J G

    1984-01-01

    The v-mosm1 nucleotide sequence codes for a protein that is 376 amino acids long. Although the N-terminus is homologous with that of the v-mos124 protein, the C-terminus is substantially different from the C-termini of all other examined mos proteins, suggesting that this region is nonessential and perhaps cleaved. Overall, v-mosm1 has greater homology with c-mos than does v-mos124, but mutually exclusive differences between c-mos and each of the v-mos genes preclude linear descent and suggest a common ancestral murine sarcoma virus. PMID:6319757