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Sample records for murine experimental sparganosis

  1. Human sparganosis, a neglected food borne zoonosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Quan; Li, Ming-Wei; Wang, Ze-Dong; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-10-01

    Human sparganosis is a food borne zoonosis caused by the plerocercoid larvae (spargana) of various diphyllobothroid tapeworms of the genus Spirometra. Human infections are acquired by ingesting the raw or undercooked meat of snakes or frogs, drinking untreated water, or using raw flesh in traditional poultices. More than 1600 cases of sparganosis have been documented worldwide, mostly in east and southeast Asia. Sporadic cases have been reported in South America, Europe, and Africa, and several cases have been described in travellers returning from endemic regions. Epidemiological data suggest that the increased effect of sparganosis on human health is because of greater consumption of raw meat of freshwater frogs and snakes. This Review provides information about the Spirometra parasites and their lifecycles, summarises clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of human sparganosis, and describes geographical distribution and infection characteristics of Spirometra parasites in host animals. PMID:26364132

  2. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  3. Breast Sparganosis Incidentally Detected by FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seunggyun; Oh, So Won; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Yi, Ann; Ahn, Young Joon

    2013-06-01

    Sparganosis is a rare, parasitic infection that is caused by the plercercoid tapeworm larvae of the genus Spirometra. Sparganosis is transmitted by ingestion of larvae-containing water or intermediate hosts, such as raw amphibians, and usually presented with a subcutaneous nodule in the abdominal wall, extremities, and genital organs. Among the various involved organs, the breast is a seldom encountered site for sparganosis. However, breast sparganosis has clinical importance, since it is generally presented with an indolent palpable mass that mimics malignancy, even without evidence of inflammation. Herein, we report a case of breast sparganosis that was detected incidentally by FDG PET/CT during staging work ups in a patient with gall bladder cancer. PMID:24900094

  4. Diagnostic Efficacy of a Recombinant Cysteine Protease of Spirometra erinacei Larvae for Serodiagnosis of Sparganosis

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, S.M. Mazidur; Kim, Jae-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    The mature domain of a cysteine protease of Spirometra erinacei plerocercoid larva (i.e., sparganum) was expressed in Escherichia coli, and its value as an antigen for the serodiagnosis of sparganosis was investigated. The recombinant protein (rSepCp-1) has the molecular weight of 23.4 kDa, and strongly reacted with the sparganum positive human or mice sera but not with negative sera by immunoblotting. ELISA with rSepCp-1 protein or sparganum crude antigen (SeC) was evaluated for the serodiagnosis of sparganosis using patient's sera. The sensitivity and specificity of ELISA using rSepCp-1 protein were 95.0% (19/20) and 99.1% (111/112), respectively. In contrast, the sensitivity and specificity of ELISA with SeC were 100% (20/20) and 96.4% (108/112), respectively. Moreover, in experimentally infected mice, the sensitivity and specificity of both ELISA assays were 100% for the detection of anti-sparganum IgG. It is suggested that the rSepCp-1 protein-based ELISA could provide a highly sensitive and specific assay for the diagnosis of sparganosis. PMID:24623880

  5. A seroepidemiologic survey for human sparganosis in Gangweon-do

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu-Jae; Bae, Yong-Tae; Kim, Dong-Heui; Deung, Young-Kun

    2002-01-01

    Gangweon-do is known to be highly endemic area of sparganosis more than other provinces in Korea. A seroepidmiologic examination for the detection of anti-Spirometra erinacei plerocercoid IgG in serum was carried out in normal inhabitants in Hongcheon-gun, Gangweon-do. Sere were tested by enzyme-linked immunosrobent assay (ELISA) for the anti-sparganum antibodies. Positive rate for anti-sparganum antibody in 719 adults was 3.3%. Data of the questionnaire for 24 ELISA positive inhabitants revealed that 20 had a history of eating raw meat of snakes, 24 had a history of eating frogs, and 24 had a history of drinking stream water. Two positive cases had a past history of sparganosis. Two positive cases showed current symptoms of sparganosis. The data revealed that ELISA would be useful to find infected cases among normal inhabitants at sparganosis-endemic areas. PMID:12509101

  6. Sparganosis of liver: a rare entity and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Sumeeta; Appannanavar, Suma; Bhatti, Harinder Singh; Verma, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Humans are known to serve as the secondary intermediate host for some larval forms of canine or feline tapeworms. Sparganosis is caused by plerocercoid larva of Spirometra of which there are three main species; Spirometra mansoni (or Spirometra erinaceieuropaei), Spirometra mansonoides and Spirometra proliferum. A one-and-half-year-old patient presenting with febrile illness was diagnosed radiologically as a case of liver abscess. The aspirate from the abscess cavity had a thin thread-like worm which was identified as a larval stage of Pseudophyllidea that was further confirmed as belonging to genus Spirometra. Aspiration of the worm and antiparasitic therapy with metronidazole led to complete recovery. Reports of sparganosis from Indian subcontinent are scanty and these cases had involvement of brain, kidney and eye. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case of hepatic sparganosis from India. PMID:23220827

  7. Scrotal Sparganosis Mimicking Scrotal Teratoma in an Infant: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi-Ming; Zhang, Hao-Chuan; Zhang, Hai-Yan

    2014-01-01

    Sparganosis is an infection with a parasitic tapeworm larva that occurs by eating infected foods or drinking contaminated water. The larvae can migrate to a tissue or muscle in the chest, abdominal wall, extremities, eyes, brain, urinary tract, pleura, pericardium, spinal canal, or scrotum. Herein, we report a 5-month old infant with scrotal sparganosis who was initially suspected to have a scrotal inflammatory mass with a history of applying raw frog meat into the umbilicus. Preoperative ultrasound examinations and computed tomography (CT) scanning misdiagnosed the mass as a scrotal teratoma. The scrotal mass was surgically removed, and the histopathology proved it to be scrotal sparganosis. This case displays the youngest patient ever reported with scrotal sparganosis, and the first description of CT characteristics of scrotal sparganosis. A detailed medical history is necessary for patients with scrotal masses suspected of sparganosis. In addition, ultrasound and CT examinations are helpful to rule out other causes of a scrotal mass. PMID:25352706

  8. Cerebral sparganosis in children: epidemiological, clinical and MR imaging characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerebral sparganosis in children is an extremely rare disease of central nervous system, and caused by a tapeworm larva from the genus of Spirometra. In this study, we discussed and summarized epidemiological, clinical and MR imaging characteristics of eighteen children with cerebral sparganosis for a better diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Methods Eighteen children with cerebral sparganosis verified by pathology, serological tests and MR presentations were retrospectively investigated, and the epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of the disease were studied. Results Twenty-seven lesions were found in the eighteen children. Twelve lesions in twelve patients were solitary while the lesions in the rest six patients were multiple and asymmetrical. The positions of the lesions were: seven in frontal, eleven in parietal, four in temporal and two in occipital lobes, one in basal ganglia, one in cerebella hemisphere and one in pons. The lesions were presented as slight hypointensity on T1-weighted images but moderate hyperintensity on T2-weighted images with perilesional brain parenchyma edema. Enhanced MR scans by using Gadopentetic Acid Dimeglumine Salt were performed in the patients, and the images demonstrated abnormal enhancements with the patterns of a peripheral ring, or a tortuous beaded, or a serpiginous tubular shape. Follow-up MR scans were preformed for eight patients, and three out of the eight cases exposed migrations and changes in shapes of the lesion areas. Conclusions The MR presentations in our study in general were similar to those in previous studies. However serpiginous tubular and comma-shaped enhancements of lesions have not been previously reported. The enhanced MR imaging and follow-up MR scans with the positive results from serological tests are the most important methods for the clinical diagnosis of cerebral sparganosis in children. PMID:23006504

  9. Antifungal activity of ajoene on experimental murine paracoccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Maluf, Marcia L F; Takahachi, Gisele; Svidzinski, Terezinha I E; Xander, Patricia; Apitz-Castro, Raphael; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A; Cuman, Roberto K N

    2008-09-30

    The natural compound ajoene (4,5,9- trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene 9-oxide) is capable of controlling infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in experimental models. Swiss mice were inoculated with 5.0 x 10e6 cells of the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Pb18 by intraperitoneal route and treated with ajoene. In weeks 2, 6, 10 and 13 of treatment, levels of anti-Pb antibodies were measured by the ELISA test and the animals were put down and their lungs, livers and spleens removed for histopathological analysis and determination of the number of viable fungus. The results show that experimental murine paracoccidioidomycosis was well established and that ajoene was capable of controlling the evolution of the disease, as it significantly reduced the levels of antibodies from the 10th week of treatment.

  10. Seroprevalence of Sparganosis in Rural Communities of Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kavana, Nicholas; Sonaimuthu, Parthasarathy; Kasanga, Christopher; Kassuku, Ayub; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Fong, Mun Yik; Khan, Mohammad Behram; Mahmud, Rohela; Lau, Yee Ling

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the seroprevalence of sparganosis and its relationship with sociodemographic factors in northern Tanzania have been assessed. A total of 216 serum samples from two rural districts, Monduli and Babati, were tested for sparganosis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The seroprevalence of anti-sparganum IgG antibodies was 62.5% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 56.1–68.9) in all age groups. There were significant associations between district (relative risk [RR] = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.42–2.69), education (RR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.15–1.70), and pet ownership with seropositivity (RR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.02–2.16) based on univariate analysis. However, only the district was significantly associated with seropositivity (odds ratio = 4.20, 95% CI = 1.89–9.32) in binary logistic regression analysis. Providing health education to people residing in sparganosis-endemic areas is likely to improve the efficacy of preventative measures and reduce human disease burden. PMID:27481059

  11. Endoscopic resection of sparganosis presenting as colon submucosal tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joong Keun; Baek, Dong Hoon; Lee, Bong Eun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Song, Geun Am; Park, Do Youn

    2016-01-01

    Human sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by infection with the tapeworm Sparganum, the migrating plerocercoid (second stage) larva of Spirometra species. Sparganosis usually involves subcutaneous tissues and/or muscles of various parts of the body, but involvement of other sites such as the brain, eye, peritoneopleural cavity, urinary track, scrotum, and abdominal viscera has also been documented. Infections caused by sparganum have a worldwide distribution but are most common in Southeast Asia such as China, Japan, and South Korea. Rectal sparganosis is an uncommon disease but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unusual and suspicious rectal submucosal tumors. We report a case of rectal sparganosis presenting as rectal submucosal tumor. We performed endoscopic submucosal dissection of the rectal submucosal tumor. The sparganosis was confirmed based on the presence of calcospherules in the submucosal layer on histological examination. Moreover, the result of the immunoglobulin G antibody test for sparganosis was positive but became negative after endoscopic submucosal dissection. Though rare, rectal sparganosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of rectal submucosal tumor-like lesions. This case suggests that physicians should make effort to exclude sparganosis through careful diagnostic approaches, including detailed history taking and serological tests for parasites. In this report, we aimed to highlight the clinical presentation of Sparganum infection as a rectal submucosal tumor. PMID:27217709

  12. Endoscopic resection of sparganosis presenting as colon submucosal tumor: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joong Keun; Baek, Dong Hoon; Lee, Bong Eun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Song, Geun Am; Park, Do Youn

    2016-05-21

    Human sparganosis is a rare parasitic disease caused by infection with the tapeworm Sparganum, the migrating plerocercoid (second stage) larva of Spirometra species. Sparganosis usually involves subcutaneous tissues and/or muscles of various parts of the body, but involvement of other sites such as the brain, eye, peritoneopleural cavity, urinary track, scrotum, and abdominal viscera has also been documented. Infections caused by sparganum have a worldwide distribution but are most common in Southeast Asia such as China, Japan, and South Korea. Rectal sparganosis is an uncommon disease but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unusual and suspicious rectal submucosal tumors. We report a case of rectal sparganosis presenting as rectal submucosal tumor. We performed endoscopic submucosal dissection of the rectal submucosal tumor. The sparganosis was confirmed based on the presence of calcospherules in the submucosal layer on histological examination. Moreover, the result of the immunoglobulin G antibody test for sparganosis was positive but became negative after endoscopic submucosal dissection. Though rare, rectal sparganosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of rectal submucosal tumor-like lesions. This case suggests that physicians should make effort to exclude sparganosis through careful diagnostic approaches, including detailed history taking and serological tests for parasites. In this report, we aimed to highlight the clinical presentation of Sparganum infection as a rectal submucosal tumor. PMID:27217709

  13. [Diagnosis and Treatment for Four Cases of Sparganosis mansoni].

    PubMed

    Shen, Mei-qing; Liu, Jian; Yang, Li-qun; Zhang, Hong-fang; Qian, Hua

    2015-04-01

    The data of 4 sparganosis mansoni cases were collected from January 2010 to September 2014, and analyzed by descriptive epidemiological methods. Among the cases, 3 cases had a history of eating raw frogs, and 1 case had a history of eating half-cooked frogs and drinking unboiled water. All cased and 3 out of 7 persons eating raw frogs together with case 3 were positive for anti-Sparganum mansoni antibody. 2 patients were cured by operation removal and praziquantel+alhendazole treatment, and the other 2 cases were cured by drugs only. PMID:26245124

  14. Thoracoscopic examination of empyema in a patient with sparganosis mansoni.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Keita; Suzuki, Junko; Nagai, Hideaki; Watanabe, Kaoru; Yokoyama, Akira; Ando, Takahiro; Suzuki, Jun; Ohshima, Nobuharu; Masuda, Kimihiko; Tamura, Atsuhisa; Akagawa, Shinobu; Kitani, Masashi; Hebisawa, Akira; Matsui, Hirotoshi; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Ohta, Ken

    2016-02-01

    A 27-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with right pleural effusion. He had suffered from right chest and back pain and a high fever for one week prior to the admission. He had been treated with clarithromycin without improvement. Since thoracoscopy under local anesthesia revealed purulent effusion, synechiae and fibrous septa in the thoracic cavity, synechiotomy was performed and we started antibiotic treatment with the diagnosis of acute bacterial empyema. At the same time, we also suspected parasitic infection because of massive eosinophilic infiltration in pleural effusion and his dietary history of eating raw frogs. During the course of the disease, he had an infiltration in the right lower lobe and pneumothorax. Finally, we diagnosed him with sparganosis mansoni because his serum as well as pleural effusion was positive for the binding to sparganosis mansoni plerocercoid antigen, without any positive findings in bacteriology. His pleural effusion and lung infiltration were resolved after the administration of a high-dose praziquantel. We report this rare parasitic empyema with findings by thoracoscopic examination. PMID:26603428

  15. Development of a Rapid Diagnostic Kit That Uses an Immunochromatographic Device To Detect Antibodies in Human Sparganosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Takeshi; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Maleewong, Wanchai; Morishima, Yasuyuki; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Takayama, Katsuyoshi; Kobayashi, Yukuharu

    2014-01-01

    A diagnostic kit using an immunochromatographic device was developed to replace the time-consuming immunodiagnostic methods for human sparganosis. The kit was found to be faster and easier to use than an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and showed higher sensitivity and specificity. It will be useful for the laboratory diagnosis of hospitalized cases of sparganosis. PMID:24990912

  16. Correlation between experimental human and murine skin sensitization induction thresholds.

    PubMed

    Api, Anne Marie; Basketter, David; Lalko, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative risk assessment for skin sensitization is directed towards the determination of levels of exposure to known sensitizing substances that will avoid the induction of contact allergy in humans. A key component of this work is the predictive identification of relative skin sensitizing potency, achieved normally by the measurement of the threshold (the "EC3" value) in the local lymph node assay (LLNA). In an extended series of studies, the accuracy of this murine induction threshold as the predictor of the absence of a sensitizing effect has been verified by conduct of a human repeated insult patch test (HRIPT). Murine and human thresholds for a diverse set of 57 fragrance chemicals spanning approximately four orders of magnitude variation in potency have been compared. The results confirm that there is a useful correlation, with the LLNA EC3 value helping particularly to identify stronger sensitizers. Good correlation (with half an order of magnitude) was seen with three-quarters of the dataset. The analysis also helps to identify potential outlier types of (fragrance) chemistry, exemplified by hexyl and benzyl salicylates (an over-prediction) and trans-2-hexenal (an under-prediction).

  17. Molecular Diagnosis of Subcutaneous Spirometra erinaceieuropaei Sparganosis in a Japanese Immigrant

    PubMed Central

    Tappe, Dennis; Berger, Luise; Haeupler, Alexandra; Muntau, Birgit; Racz, Paul; Harder, Yves; Specht, Katja; Prazeres da Costa, Clarissa; Poppert, Sven

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of subcutaneous sparganosis in a 68-year-old female Japanese immigrant in Germany. The patient complained of a painless erythema caudal of the umbilicus with a palpable subcutaneous cherry-sized lump. Polymerase chain reaction on formalin-fixed parasite tissue identified Spirometra erinaceieuropaei as the causative agent; the proliferative form of sparganosis, which is caused by the branching and disseminating Sparganum proliferum, could, thus, be excluded. From the excised sparganum, an immunofluorescence test was established and revealed an antibody response directed against the parasite's tegument. Histological key features of the plerocercoid that facilitate diagnosis with different stains are presented. PMID:23166198

  18. Investigation of the impact of the common animal facility contaminant murine norovirus on experimental murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Doom, Carmen M; Turula, Holly M; Hill, Ann B

    2009-09-30

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered pathogen that has become a common contaminant of specific pathogen-free mouse colonies. MNV-1 induces a robust interferon-beta response and causes histopathology in some mouse strains, suggesting that it may impact other mouse models of infection. Despite many concerns about MNV-1 contamination, there is little information about its impact on immune responses to other infections. This study addresses whether MNV-1 infection has an effect on a model of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Exposure to MNV-1 resulted in a decreased CD8 T cell response to immunodominant MCMV epitopes in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. However, MNV-1 did not impact MCMV titers in either mouse strain, nor did it stimulate reactivation of latent MCMV. These data suggest that while MNV-1 has a mild impact on the immune response to MCMV, it is not likely to affect most experimental outcomes in immunocompetent mice in the MCMV model.

  19. Tumor vascularity and hematogenous metastasis in experimental murine intraocular melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, H E

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that primary tumor vascularity in a murine model of intraocular melanoma positively correlates with the development and hematogenous spread of metastasis. METHODS: Forty 12-week-old C57BL6 mice were inoculated in either the anterior chamber (AC) or posterior compartment (PC) of 1 eye with 5 x 10(5) cells/microL of Queens tissue culture melanoma cells. The inoculated eye was enucleated at 2 weeks; the mice were sacrificed at 4 weeks postinoculation, and necropsies were performed. The enucleated eyes were examined for histologic and ultrastructural features, including relationship of tumor cells to tumor vascular channels, vascular pattern, and mean vascular density. RESULTS: Melanoma grew and was confined to the eye in 12 of 20 AC eyes and 10 of 20 PC eyes. Histologic and electron microscopic examination showed tumor invasion into vascular channels. Five of 12 AC tumors (42%) and 8 of 10 PC tumors (80%) metastasized. All of the AC tumors, but none of the PC tumors, that distantly metastasized also metastasized to ipsilateral cervical lymph nodes (P = .00535). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern between the melanomas that did and did not metastasize to lungs in the PC group (P = .24), although there was a significant difference in the AC group (P = .02). Tumors with high-grade vascular patterns were more likely to metastasize than tumors with low-grade vascular patterns in the AC group. The mean vascular density positively correlated with the presence and number of metastases in both groups (P = .0000 and P < .001, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern and mean vascular density for AC versus PC melanoma (P = .97). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of metastasis in this murine intraocular melanoma model positively correlates with primary tumor vascularity. The melanoma metastasizes via invasion of tumor vascular channels. AC melanoma also

  20. Experimental murine amyloidosis: a model system for studying amyloid formation.

    PubMed Central

    Baumal, R.; Wilson, B.; Pass, E.

    1975-01-01

    Myeloma-associated and casein-induced murine amyloidosis were used as models to study the role of lymphocytes and macrophages in amyloid formation. Amyloidosis occurred rarely and in small amounts in Balb/C mice with immunoglobulin (Ig)-producing myeloma tumours but large amounts could be induced by injections of casein. Fluorescent staining of both forms of amyloid deposits by means of anti-casein- and anti-myeloma-amyloid antibodies indicated that they either crossreacted or coexisted. Nor abnormality of Ig biosynthesis was detected in amyloidosis, suggesting that abnormal degradation was responsible for production of the Ig form of amyloid. Although spleen lymphocytes of casein-injected mice with amyloidosis demonstrated diminished cellular immunologic responses, this did not indicate generalized immunologic incompetence. The non-Ig form of amyloid in casein-injected mice was shown to be produced by macrophages, and a technique was developed for increasing the yield of amyloid-containing cells. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 6 FIG. 7 FIG. 8 PMID:1080430

  1. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Block, Darci R.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Cunningham, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155–330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99–340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225–945 μmol/L and 276–687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  2. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Block, Darci R; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Cunningham, Scott A; Patel, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155-330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99-340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225-945 μmol/L and 276-687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  3. Comparison of serological tests for the detection of antibody to natural and experimental murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Lussier, G; Guénette, D; Descôteaux, J P

    1987-04-01

    Three serological tests, i.e. complement fixation test, indirect immunofluorescent assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were compared for sensitivity in the detection and titration of murine cytomegalovirus antibody. The three tests were compared using sera from experimentally inoculated and naturally infected mice bled at intervals from 3 to 140 days postinfection. In the acute infection, complement fixation and indirect immunofluorescent assay tests were of comparable sensitivity for early detection of antibody, whereas the ELISA was less sensitive. In persistent infection, higher titers were recorded with ELISA. Since murine cytomegalovirus has been shown to exert significant effects on the immune response of infected mice, this antigen should be included routinely in viral antibody screening programs.

  4. Beneficial lactobacilli: effects on the vaginal tract in a murine experimental model.

    PubMed

    De Gregorio, Priscilla Romina; Juárez Tomás, María Silvina; Santos, Viviana; Nader-Macías, María Elena Fatima

    2012-11-01

    Vaginal probiotics containing lactic acid bacteria with activity towards pathogenic microorganisms that cause urogenital tract infections have been proposed as a valid strategy for their prophylaxis and therapy. A murine experimental model was set up to evaluate the colonization capability of beneficial human lactobacilli and their effects on the mouse vaginal mucosa and innate immune cells. Five Lactobacillus strains were intravaginally inoculated into previously estrogenized BALB/c mice. The significance of the effects observed in the vaginal tract was determined by analysis of variance using the general linear model. The numbers of viable vaginal lactobacilli were significantly higher at proestrous-estrous than those at the metaestrous-diestrous phase and decreased markedly on the days after inoculation. Lactobacilli inoculation did not cause cytological or histological modifications of the murine vaginal tract. Moreover, the intravaginal administration of Lactobacillus salivarius CRL (Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos culture collection) 1328 and Lactobacillus gasseri CRL 1263 did not affect the amounts of granulocytes and macrophages present in vaginal washings. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that vaginal lactobacilli did not produce adverse effects on the murine vaginal tract. Therefore, they could be proposed as safe probiotic candidates to promote a balanced microbiota in the urogenital tract.

  5. A murine experimental model for the mechanical behaviour of viable right-ventricular myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Valdez-Jasso, Daniela; Simon, Marc A; Champion, Hunter C; Sacks, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Although right-ventricular function is an important determinant of cardio-pulmonary performance in health and disease, right ventricular myocardium mechanical behaviour has received relatively little attention. We present a novel experimental method for quantifying the mechanical behaviour of transmurally intact, viable right-ventricular myocardium. Seven murine right ventricular free wall (RVFW) specimens were isolated and biaxial mechanical behaviour measured, along with quantification of the local transmural myofibre and collagen fibre architecture. We developed a complementary strain energy function based method to capture the average biomechanical response. Overall, murine RVFW revealed distinct mechanical anisotropy. The preferential alignment of the myofibres and collagen fibres to the apex-to-outflow-tract direction was consistent with this also being the mechanically stiffer axis. We also observed that the myofibre and collagen fibre orientations were remarkably uniform throughout the entire RVFW thickness. Thus, our findings indicate a close correspondence between the tissue microstructure and biomechanical behaviour of the RVFW myocardium, and are a first step towards elucidating the structure–function of non-contracted murine RVFW myocardium in health and disease. PMID:22848044

  6. A comprehensive collection of experimentally validated primers for Polymerase Chain Reaction quantitation of murine transcript abundance

    PubMed Central

    Spandidos, Athanasia; Wang, Xiaowei; Wang, Huajun; Dragnev, Stefan; Thurber, Tara; Seed, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Background Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) is a widely applied analytical method for the accurate determination of transcript abundance. Primers for QPCR have been designed on a genomic scale but non-specific amplification of non-target genes has frequently been a problem. Although several online databases have been created for the storage and retrieval of experimentally validated primers, only a few thousand primer pairs are currently present in existing databases and the primers are not designed for use under a common PCR thermal profile. Results We previously reported the implementation of an algorithm to predict PCR primers for most known human and mouse genes. We now report the use of that resource to identify 17483 pairs of primers that have been experimentally verified to amplify unique sequences corresponding to distinct murine transcripts. The primer pairs have been validated by gel electrophoresis, DNA sequence analysis and thermal denaturation profile. In addition to the validation studies, we have determined the uniformity of amplification using the primers and the technical reproducibility of the QPCR reaction using the popular and inexpensive SYBR Green I detection method. Conclusion We have identified an experimentally validated collection of murine primer pairs for PCR and QPCR which can be used under a common PCR thermal profile, allowing the evaluation of transcript abundance of a large number of genes in parallel. This feature is increasingly attractive for confirming and/or making more precise data trends observed from experiments performed with DNA microarrays. PMID:19108745

  7. Characterization of Spirometra erinaceieuropaei Plerocercoid Cysteine Protease and Potential Application for Serodiagnosis of Sparganosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li Na; Wang, Zhong Quan; Zhang, Xi; Jiang, Peng; Qi, Xin; Liu, Ruo Dan; Zhang, Zi Fang; Cui, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background Sparganosis is a neglected but important food-borne parasitic zoonosis. Clinical diagnosis of sparganosis is difficult because there are no specific manifestations. ELISA using plerocercoid crude or excretory–secretory (ES) antigens has high sensitivity but has cross-reactions with other helminthiases. The aim of this study was to characterize Spirometra erinaceieuropaei cysteine protease (SeCP) and to evaluate its potential application for serodiagnosis of sparganosis. Methodology/Principal Findings The full length SeCP gene was cloned, and recombinant SeCP (rSeCP) was expressed and purified. Western blotting showed that rSeCP was recognized by the serum of sparganum-infected mice, and anti-rSeCP serum recognized the native SeCP protein of plerocercoid crude or ES antigens. Expression of SeCP was observed at plerocercoid stages but not at the adult and egg stages. Immunolocalization identified SeCP in plerocercoid tegument and parenchymal tissue. The rSeCP had CP activity, and the optimum pH and temperature were 5.5 and 37°C, respectively. Enzymatic activity was significantly inhibited by E-64. rSeCP functions to degrade different proteins and the function was inhibited by anti-rSeCP serum and E-64. Immunization of mice with rSeCP induced Th2-predominant immune responses and anti-rSeCP antibodies had the potential capabilities to kill plerocercoids in an ADCC assay. The sensitivity of rSeCP-ELISA and ES antigen ELISA was 100% when performed on sera of patients with sparganosis. The specificity of rSeCP-ELISA and ES antigen ELISA was 98.22% (166/169) and 87.57% (148/169), respectively (P<0.05). Conclusions The rSeCP had the CP enzymatic activity and SeCP seems to be important for the survival of plerocercoids in host. The rSeCP is a potential diagnostic antigen for sparganosis. PMID:26046773

  8. Strain-related effects of fenbendazole treatment on murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ramp, A A; Hall, C; Orian, J M

    2010-07-01

    Parasitic infections are a concern in animal facilities, in view of their influence on physiological processes and the immune status of animals. Pinworms are effectively controlled with the anthelminthic fenbendazole (FBZ, [5-(phenylthio)-1H-benzamidazol-2-yl]carbamic acid methyl ester; C(15)H(13)N(3)O(2)S); however, questions remain as to whether prolonged FBZ exposure alters the disease course in specific experimental models, such as those pertaining to the immune system. We report that a three-month regimen of FBZ-medicated feed severely affected the onset and disease severity of murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease that mimics multiple sclerosis. Differences were recorded between mouse strains used. Our data suggest that where the use of FBZ is mandatory, its full effect should be verified on the particular EAE variant adopted by the laboratory.

  9. Engineered herpes simplex virus expressing IL-12 in the treatment of experimental murine brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jacqueline N.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Love, Cammy E.; Randall, Suzanne; Whitley, Richard J.; Markert, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Genetically engineered, neuroattenuated herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) expressing various cytokines can improve survival when used in the treatment of experimental brain tumors. These attenuated viruses have both copies of γ134.5 deleted. Recently, we demonstrated increased survival of C57BL/6 mice bearing syngeneic GL-261 gliomas when treated with an engineered HSV expressing IL-4, as compared with treatment with the parent construct (γ134.5−) alone or with a virus expressing IL-10. Herein, we report construction of a conditionally replication-competent mutant expressing both subunits of mIL-12 (M002) and its evaluation in a syngeneic neuroblastoma murine model. IL-12 induces a helper T cell subset type 1 response, which may induce more durable antitumor effects. In vitro studies showed that, when infected with M002, both Vero cells and murine Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells produced physiologically relevant levels of IL-12 heterodimers, as determined by ELISA. M002 was cytotoxic for Neuro-2a cells and human glioma cell lines U251MG and D54MG. Neurotoxicity studies, as defined by plaque-forming units/LD50, performed in HSV-1-sensitive A/J strain mice found that M002 was not toxic even at high doses. When evaluated in an intracranial syngeneic neuroblastoma murine model, median survival of M002-treated animals was significantly longer than the median survival of animals treated with R3659, the parent γ134.5− mutant lacking any cytokine gene insert. Immunohistochemical analysis of M002-treated tumors identified a pronounced influx of CD4+ T cells and macrophages as well as CD8+ cells when compared with an analysis of R3659-treated tumors. We conclude that M002 produced a survival benefit via oncolytic effects combined with immunologic effects meditated by helper T cells of subset type 1. PMID:10681459

  10. Oral treatment with Bifidobacterium longum 51A reduced inflammation in a murine experimental model of gout.

    PubMed

    Vieira, A T; Galvão, I; Amaral, F A; Teixeira, M M; Nicoli, J R; Martins, F S

    2015-01-01

    Gout is an acute inflammatory disease characterised by the presence of uric acid crystals in the joint. This event promotes neutrophil infiltration and activation that leads to tissue damage. We investigated here whether the oral administration of the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium longum 5(1A) (BL) could ameliorate monosodium urate crystal (MSU)-induced inflammation in a murine model of gout. Mice received oral administration of BL or saline daily for 7 days and then were injected with MSU in the knee cavity. Treatment with BL significantly alleviated the inflammatory parameters, as seen by reduced hypernociception, reduced neutrophil accumulation in the joint and myeloperoxidase activity in periarticular tissue. There was inhibition of the production of CXCL1 and interleukin(IL)-1β in joints. Levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were significantly higher in the knee tissue of mice treated with than control mice injected with MSU. In conclusion, oral BL treatment reduced the inflammatory response in an experimental murine model of gout, suggesting it may be useful as an adjuvant treatment in patients with gout.

  11. A plasmin-activatable thrombin inhibitor reduces experimental thrombosis and assists experimental thrombolysis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, W P; Eltringham-Smith, L J; Gataiance, S; Bhakta, V

    2015-05-01

    The leech protein hirudin is a potent natural thrombin inhibitor. Its potential as an antithrombotic agent is limited by its promotion of bleeding. We attempted to modify this profile by positioning albumin and a plasmin cleavage site on its N-terminus, in recombinant protein HSACHV3 [comprising hirudin variant 3 (HV3) fused to the C-terminus of human serum albumin (HSA) via a plasmin cleavage site (C)], Previously we showed that HSACHV3 inhibited thrombin in a plasmin-dependent manner, and that, unlike HV3, it did not increase bleeding in vivo when administered to mice. Here we tested HSACHV3 for the ability to reduce thrombosis and assist enzymatic thrombolysis in animal models. Intravenous administration of HSACHV3, but not a control protein lacking the plasmin cleavage site (HSAHV3), reduced thrombus weight by 2.1-fold in the ferric chloride-injured mouse vena cava. Similarly, thrombi formed in a rabbit jugular vein stasis model were 1.7-fold lighter in animals treated with HSACHV3 compared to those receiving HSAHV3. Administration of 60 mg/kg body weight HSACHV3 prolonged the time to occlusion in the ferric chloride-injured mouse carotid artery by threefold compared to vehicle controls, while equimolar HSAHV3 had no effect. HSACHV3 had no ability to restore flow to the murine carotid arteries occluded by ferric chloride treatment, but combining HSACHV3 (60 mg/kg) with recombinant mutant tissue plasminogen activator (TNKase) significantly reduced the time to restore patency to the artery compared to TNKase alone. Unlike unfused HV3, HSACHV3 did not increase bleeding in a mouse liver laceration model. Our results show that HSACHV3 acts as an antithrombotic agent that does not promote bleeding and which speeds the time to flow restoration when used as an adjunct to pharmacological thrombolysis in animal models. PMID:25481811

  12. Alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase enhances Neisseria gonorrhoeae survival during experimental murine genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Jerse, Ann E

    2006-07-01

    The addition of host-derived sialic acid to Neisseria gonorrhoeae lipooligosaccharide is hypothesized to be an important mechanism by which gonococci evade host innate defenses. This hypothesis is based primarily on in vitro assays of complement-mediated and phagocytic killing. Here we report that a nonpolar alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase (lst) mutant of N. gonorrhoeae was significantly attenuated in its capacity to colonize the lower genital tract of 17-beta estradiol-treated female BALB/c mice during competitive infection with the wild-type strain. Genetic complementation of the lst mutation restored recovery of the mutant to wild-type levels. Studies with B10.D2-HC(o)H2(d)H(2)-T18c/OSN (C5-deficient) mice showed that attenuation of the lst mutant was not due to increased sensitivity to complement-mediated bacteriolysis, a result that is consistent with recently reported host restrictions in the complement cascade. However, Lst-deficient gonococci were killed more rapidly than sialylated wild-type gonococci following intraperitoneal injection into normal mice, which is consistent with sialylation conferring protection against killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). As reported for human PMNs, sialylated gonococci were more resistant to killing by murine PMNs, and sialylation led to reduced association with and induction of a weaker respiratory burst in PMNs from estradiol-treated mice. In summary, these studies suggest sialylation confers a survival advantage to N. gonorrhoeae in mice by increasing resistance to PMN killing. This report is the first direct demonstration that alpha-2,3-sialyltransferase contributes to N. gonorrhoeae pathogenesis in an in vivo model. This study also validates the use of experimental murine infection to study certain aspects of gonococcal pathogenesis. PMID:16790783

  13. Treatment with probiotics in experimental oral colonization by Candida albicans in murine model (DBA/2).

    PubMed

    Matsubara, V H; Silva, E G; Paula, C R; Ishikawa, K H; Nakamae, A E M

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the oral colonization by Candida albicans in experimental murine immunosuppressed DBA/2 and treatment with probiotic bacteria. To achieve these objectives, 152 DBA/2-immunosuppressed mice were orally inoculated with a suspension of C. albicans containing 10(8) viable yeast cells, the animals were treated with nystatin or with the probiotics (Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus rhamnosus). Evaluations were performed by Candida count from oral mucosa swabbing. The oral mucosa colonization by C. albicans started at day 1 after inoculation, remained maximal from day 3 until day 7, and then decreased significantly. Probiotics reduced the C. albicans colonization significantly on the oral mucosa in comparison with the untreated animal group. In the group treated with L. rhamnosus, the reduction in yeast colonization was significantly higher compared with that of the group receiving nystatin. Immunosuppressed animal model DBA/2 is a relevant model for experimental Candida oral colonization, and the treatment with probiotics in this model may be an effective alternative to prevent it.

  14. Experimental infection of Phlebotomus perniciosus by bioluminescent Leishmania infantum using murine model and artificial feeder

    PubMed Central

    Cannet, Arnaud; Akhoundi, Mohammad; Michel, Gregory; Marty, Pierre; Delaunay, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease that is transmitted by sandflies and caused by obligate intracellular protozoa of the genus Leishmania. In the present study, we carried out a screening on the experimental infection of Phlebotomus pernioucus by bioluminescent Leishmania infantum using murine model and artificial feeder. We developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based method to determine individually the number of Leishmania promastigotes fed by infected flies. Among 1840 new emerged female sand flies, 428 were fed on the infected mice. After their death, they were analysed individually by RT-PCR. Our results demonstrated just a single Leishmania positive female at sixth day post meal. A total of 1070 female sand flies were exposed in contact with artificial feeder containing the human blood with two different quantities of Leishmania parasites: 2.106/mL and 1.107/mL. A blood meal including 1.107/mL LUC-promastigotes was proposed to 270 females and 75 (28%) flies were engorged. Among them, 44 (59%) were positive by RT-PCR analysis, with a relative average of 50551 Leishmania parasites. In case of blood feeding of females with 2.106/mL promastigotes, 57 out of 800 (7%) females succeed to feed from artificial feeder which 22 (39%) were positive with a relative average of 6487 parasites. PMID:27439032

  15. Vinegar Treatment Prevents the Development of Murine Experimental Colitis via Inhibition of Inflammation and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fengge; Feng, Jiaxuan; Wang, Xinhui; Qi, Zhimin; Shi, Xiaochen; An, Yanan; Zhang, Qiaoli; Wang, Chao; Liu, Mingyuan; Liu, Bo; Yu, Lu

    2016-02-10

    This study investigated the preventive effects of vinegar and acetic acid (the active component of vinegar) on ulcerative colitis (UC) in mice. Vinegar (5% v/v) or acetic acid (0.3% w/v) treatment significantly reduced the disease activity index and histopathological scores, attenuated body weight loss, and shortened the colon length in a murine experimental colitis model induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Further mechanistic analysis showed that vinegar inhibited inflammation through suppressing Th1 and Th17 responses, the NLRP3 inflammasome, and MAPK signaling activation. Vinegar also inhibited endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis in the colitis mouse model. Surprisingly, pretreatment with vinegar for 28 days before DSS induction increased levels of the commensal lactic acid-producing or acetic acid-producing bacteria, including Lactobacillus, Bifidobacteria, and Enterococcus faecalis, whereas decreased Escherichia coli levels were found in the feces of mice. These results suggest that vinegar supplementation might provide a new dietary strategy for the prevention of UC.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody in murine experimental viral myocarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T.; Matsumori, A.; Watanabe, Y.; Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Endo, K.; Konishi, J.; Kawai, C. )

    1990-11-01

    The pharmacokinetics of indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab were investigated with use of murine experimental viral myocarditis as a model. The biodistribution of indium-111-labeled antimyosin antibody Fab on days 3, 5, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after encephalomyocarditis virus inoculation demonstrated that myocardial uptake increased significantly on days 5, 7 and 14 (maximum on day 7) in infected versus uninfected mice (p less than 0.001). In vivo kinetics in infected mice on day 7 demonstrated that the heart to blood ratio reached a maximum 48 h after the intravenous administration of indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab, which was considered to be the optimal time for scintigraphy. The scintigraphic images obtained with indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab demonstrated positive uptake in the cardiac lesion in infected mice. The pathologic study demonstrated that myocardial uptake correlated well with pathologic grades of myocardial necrosis. High performance liquid chromatography revealed the presence of an antigen-antibody complex in the circulation of infected mice after the injection of indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab. This antigen bound to indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab in the circulation might be whole myosin and this complex may decrease myocardial uptake and increase liver uptake. It is concluded that indium-111-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody Fab accumulates selectively in damaged heart tissue in mice with acute myocarditis and that indium-111-labeled antimyosin Fab scintigraphy may be a useful method for the visualization of acute myocarditis.

  17. Fumigaclavine C ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced murine experimental colitis via NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenjie; Hu, Shasha; Elgehama, Ahmed; Shao, Fenli; Ren, Ren; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Wenjing; Wang, Xinlei; Tan, Renxiang; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Jiao, Ruihua

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, the effect of Fumigaclavine C, a fungal metabolite, on murine experimental colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and its possible mechanism were examined in vivo and vitro. Oral administration of Fumigaclavine C dose-dependently attenuated the loss of body weight and shortening of colon length induced by DSS. The disease activity index, histopathologic scores of musco was also significantly reduced by Fumigaclavine C treatment. Protein and mRNA levels of DSS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines in colon, including TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-17A, were markedly suppressed by Fumigaclavine C. At the same time, decreased activation of caspase-1 in peritoneal macrophages was detected in Fumigaclavine C -treated mice which suggested that the NLRP3 inflammasome activation was suppressed. Furthermore, in the LPS plus ATP cell model, we found that Fumigaclavine C dose-dependent inhibited IL-1β release and caspase-1 activation. Taken together, our results demonstrate the ability of Fumigaclavine C to inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation and give some evidence for its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26320672

  18. Sparganosis in wild boar (Sus scrofa) - Implications for veterinarians, hunters, and consumers.

    PubMed

    Kołodziej-Sobocińska, Marta; Miniuk, Mariusz; Ruczyńska, Iwona; Tokarska, Małgorzata

    2016-08-30

    From February to March 2016 we found plerocercoids of Spirometra sp. in four wild boar hunted in Białowieża Primeval Forest, north-eastern Poland. Plerocercoids were located subcutaneously and in muscle tissue. A sequence of a nuclear 18S rRNA gene was used for genetic specification of the samples. The analyzed gene fragment showed 100% identity with the Spirometra erinacei sequence. Thus, the emerge of human sparganosis due to consumption of undercooked or smoked wild boar meat is likely in the areas where wild boar is an approved food source, especially in the absence of routine guidelines for vets. It has become a priority to inform the public about possibilities and consequences of this zoonosis. PMID:27523946

  19. Expression of E-Selectin, P-Selectin, and Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 during Experimental Murine Listeriosis

    PubMed Central

    López, Santiago; Prats, Neus; Marco, Alberto Jesús

    1999-01-01

    The expression of adhesion molecules E-selectin, P-selectin, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was immunohistochemically investigated during the course of experimental murine listeriosis. Infection was monitored by microbiological count of blood, liver, and spleen. After an early generalized expression of P-selectin and ICAM-1, a later regulation occurred specifically to areas of inflammation. Expression of E-selectin was faint and inconstantly detected in all of the studied organs. In the liver, typical lesions of murine listeriosis were related to the expression of ICAM-1 on sinusoidal endothelial cells and the biliary system and to the de novo expression of P-selectin in hepatic portal vessels. Inflammation in the spleen was related to the expression of ICAM-1 on red pulp sinusoidal cells, especially in the marginal sinus. High endothelial venules of inflamed lymph nodes also expressed P-selectin and ICAM-1. Lesions in the central nervous system appeared on day 3 after infection as a pyogranulomatous leptomeningitis associated with an intense expression of P-selectin and ICAM-1 in meningeal vessels, especially those in the hippocampal sulcus, suggesting a way through which inflammation initially reach the central nervous system during experimental murine listeriosis. Leptomeningitis was followed by the presence of ventriculitis, which was related to the up-regulation of ICAM-1 on choroid plexus epithelial cells, periventricular vessels and ependymal cells. Up-regulation of P-selectin and ICAM-1 during experimental murine listeriosis could play an important role in the recruitment of leukocytes, especially to the liver, lymphoid organs, and central nervous system. PMID:10514421

  20. Macrophage activation associated with chronic murine cytomegalovirus infection results in more severe experimental choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Cousins, Scott W; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G; Miller, Daniel M; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Hernandez, Eleut P; Chien, Hsin; Meier-Jewett, Courtney; Dix, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    The neovascular (wet) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV), laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-α, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF), an outcome that requires active virus replication. PMID:22570607

  1. Macrophage Activation Associated with Chronic Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection Results in More Severe Experimental Choroidal Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Scott W.; Espinosa-Heidmann, Diego G.; Miller, Daniel M.; Pereira-Simon, Simone; Hernandez, Eleut P.; Chien, Hsin; Meier-Jewett, Courtney; Dix, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    The neovascular (wet) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to vision loss due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Since macrophages are important in CNV development, and cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific IgG serum titers in patients with wet AMD are elevated, we hypothesized that chronic CMV infection contributes to wet AMD, possibly by pro-angiogenic macrophage activation. This hypothesis was tested using an established mouse model of experimental CNV. At 6 days, 6 weeks, or 12 weeks after infection with murine CMV (MCMV), laser-induced CNV was performed, and CNV severity was determined 4 weeks later by analysis of choroidal flatmounts. Although all MCMV-infected mice exhibited more severe CNV when compared with control mice, the most severe CNV developed in mice with chronic infection, a time when MCMV-specific gene sequences could not be detected within choroidal tissues. Splenic macrophages collected from mice with chronic MCMV infection, however, expressed significantly greater levels of TNF-α, COX-2, MMP-9, and, most significantly, VEGF transcripts by quantitative RT-PCR assay when compared to splenic macrophages from control mice. Direct MCMV infection of monolayers of IC-21 mouse macrophages confirmed significant stimulation of VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein as determined by quantitative RT-PCR assay, ELISA, and immunostaining. Stimulation of VEGF production in vivo and in vitro was sensitive to the antiviral ganciclovir. These studies suggest that chronic CMV infection may serve as a heretofore unrecognized risk factor in the pathogenesis of wet AMD. One mechanism by which chronic CMV infection might promote increased CNV severity is via stimulation of macrophages to make pro-angiogenic factors (VEGF), an outcome that requires active virus replication. PMID:22570607

  2. Cellular basis of the genetic susceptibility of murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, T.A.; Greiner, D.L.; Goldschneider, I.

    1986-03-01

    Murine experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an induced autoimmune disease that resembles human multiple sclerosis. The authors have investigated the cellular basis of the genetic predisposition and resistance of inbred strains of mice to EAE using an adoptive transfer system between two H-2 compatible, Thy 1 antigen disparate strains of mice. Genetically EAE susceptible SJL/J strain mice (H-2/sup s/, Thy 1.2) and resistant B10.S Thy 1.1 (H-2/sub s/, Thy 1.1) strain mice were lethally irradiated (700R) and reconstituted with 5-10 x 10/sup 6/ bone marrow cells from either SJL/J or congenic B10.S (Thy 1.1 or Thy 1.2) donors. After 30-45 days, more than 95% of the thymocytes and 75% of the peripheral T cells in the chimeras were of donor origin. These lymphohemopoietic chimeras were then sensitized in their hind footpads with porcine myelin basic protein in complete Freund's adjuvant containing M. tuberculosis H/sub 37/RA, followed at 24 and 72 hours by i.v. injection of B. pertussis. Clinical signs of EAE developed in unirradiated SJL/J, but not B10.S, controls, and in irradiated B10.S and SJL/J recipients of SJL/J, but not B10.S, bone marrow. These results indicate that bone marrow cells can transfer the predisposition to EAE from genetically susceptible to genetically resistant mouse strains. The cellular component in the bone marrow that is responsible for the transfer of the genetic susceptibility to EAE is under investigation.

  3. Immune response to controlled release of immunomodulating peptides in a murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hong; Kiptoo, Paul; Williams, Todd D.; Siahaan, Teruna J.; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of controlled release on immune response to an immunomodulating peptide were evaluated in a murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of multiple sclerosis (MS). The peptide, Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 (Ac-HSLGKWLGHPDKF-(AcpGAcpGAcp)2-ITDGEATDSG-NH2; Ac = acetyl, Acp = aminocaproic acid) was designed to suppress T-cell activation in response to PLP139–151, an antigenic peptide in MS. Poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) microparticles containing Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 (8±4 μm, 1.4±0.2% (w/w)) were prepared by a powder-in oil-in water emulsion-solvent evaporation method, sterilized and administered subcutaneously (s.c.) to SJL/J (H-2s) mice in which EAE had been induced by immunization with PLP139–151. Treatment groups received Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2: (i) in solution by repeated i.v. or s.c. injection, (ii) in solution co-administered with blank PLGA microparticles, (iii) in solution co-administered with Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 loaded microparticles, and (iv) as Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 loaded microparticles. Administration of Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 as an s.c. solution produced clinical scores and maintenance of body weight comparable to i.v. solution, but with reduced overall survival, presumably due to anaphylaxis. Administration as s.c. microparticles provided a somewhat less effective reduction in symptoms but with no toxicity during treatment. Thus, the results suggest that s.c. administration of Ac-PLP-BPI-NH2-2 microparticles can provide pharmacological efficacy and reduction in dosing frequency without increased toxicity. PMID:19748537

  4. Assessment and in vivo scoring of murine experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Chu, Colin J; Herrmann, Philipp; Carvalho, Livia S; Liyanage, Sidath E; Bainbridge, James W B; Ali, Robin R; Dick, Andrew D; Luhmann, Ulrich F O

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in clinical imaging and grading our understanding of retinal immune responses and their morphological correlates in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU), has been hindered by the requirement for post-mortem histology. To date, monitoring changes occurring during EAU disease progression and evaluating the effect of therapeutic intervention in real time has not been possible. We wanted to establish whether optical coherence tomography (OCT) could detect intraretinal changes during inflammation and to determine its utility as a tool for accurate scoring of EAU. EAU was induced in C57BL/6J mice and animals evaluated after 15, 26, 36 and 60 days. At each time-point, contemporaneous Spectralis-OCT scanning, topical endoscopic fundal imaging (TEFI), fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) and CD45-immunolabelled histology were performed. OCT features were further characterised on retinal flat-mounts using immunohistochemistry and 3D reconstruction. Optic disc swelling and vitreous opacities detected by OCT corresponded to CD45+ cell infiltration on histology. Vasculitis identified by FFA and OCT matched perivascular myeloid and T-cell infiltrates and could be differentiated from unaffected vessels. Evolution of these changes could be followed over time in the same eye. Retinal folds were visible and found to encapsulate mixed populations of activated myeloid cells, T-cells and microglia. Using these features, an OCT-based EAU scoring system was developed, with significant correlation to validated histological (Pearson r(2) = 0.6392, P<0.0001, n = 31 eyes) and TEFI based scoring systems (r(2) = 0.6784, P<0.0001). OCT distinguishes the fundamental features of murine EAU in vivo, permits dynamic assessment of intraretinal changes and can be used to score disease severity. As a result, it allows tissue synchronisation with subsequent cellular and functional assessment and greater efficiency of animal usage. By relating OCT signals with

  5. Cysticercosis vaccine: cross protecting immunity with T. solium antigens against experimental murine T. crassiceps cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Sciutto, E; Fragoso, G; Trueba, L; Lemus, D; Montoya, R M; Diaz, M L; Govezensky, T; Lomeli, C; Tapia, G; Larralde, C

    1990-11-01

    Vaccination of mice with an antigen extract from Taenia solium cysticerci induced protection against challenge with T. crassiceps cysticerci as successfully as did antigen extracts from T. crassiceps. Vaccination was more effective in male than in female mice and in the resistant strain (BALB/B) more so than in the susceptible strain (BALB/c). While only the resistant strain was completely protected by vaccination, the parasite load of the susceptible strain was significantly reduced by vaccination. Cross immunity between the human and murine parasites establishes murine T. crassiceps cysticercosis as a convenient laboratory model in which to test promising T. solium antigens aimed at vaccine development against T. solium cysticercosis. Further, results point to strong interactions of the immune system with sexual and histocompatibility factors in the host's dealing with cysticercosis.

  6. Sparganosis Presenting as Cauda Equina Syndrome with Molecular Identification of the Parasite in Tissue Sections

    PubMed Central

    Boonyasiri, Adhiratha; Cheunsuchon, Pornsuk; Srirabheebhat, Prajak; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old woman presented with lower back pain, progressive symmetrical paraparesis with sensory impairment, and sphincter disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the whole spine revealed multiple intradural extramedullary serpiginous-mass lesions in the subarachnoid space continuously from the prepontine to the anterior part of the medulla oblongata levels, C7, T2-T8, and T12 vertebral levels distally until the end of the theca sac and filling-in the right S1 neural foramen. Sparganosis was diagnosed by demonstration of the sparganum in histopathological sections of surgically resected tissues and also by the presence of serum IgG antibodies by ELISA. DNA was extracted from unstained tissue sections, and a partial fragment of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene was amplified using a primer set specific for Spirometra spp. cox1. After sequencing of the PCR-amplicon and alignment of the nucleotide sequence data, the causative agent was identified as the larva of Spirometra erinaceieuropaei. PMID:24516282

  7. Experimental murine chronic hepatitis: results following intrahepatic inoculation of human uveitis mycoplasma-like organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L. A.; Wirostko, E.; Wirostko, B. M.

    1993-01-01

    Mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO) are non-cultivated intracellular cell-wall deficient pathogenic bacteria with a distinctive ultrastructural appearance. Diagnosis of MLO disease depends on finding the organisms in parasitized cells using a transmission electron microscope. MLO are a well studied cause of transmissible chronic plant disease responsive to antibiotics. MLO have recently been found to cause human chronic uveitis, orbital, and retinal disease with autoimmune features. Ophthalmic leucocytes in these patients display MLO parasitization. Inoculation of human uveitis MLO into mouse eyelids produced chronic uveitis. MLO also disseminated to produce randomly distributed lethal systemic disease including chronic hepatitis. MLO parasitized leucocytes were present in all disease sites. Direct intrahepatic inoculation of human hepatic pathogens is a simple and efficient technique to produce murine hepatitis. This report describes the delayed onset widespread inflammatory liver disease produced by direct intrahepatic inoculation of human chronic uveitis MLO in 12 of 20 mice versus 0 in 40 controls (P < 0.05). The liver disease was accompanied by elevated serum SGOT levels, splenomegaly, and accelerated mortality. All 12 inflamed livers displayed MLO parasitized leucocytes versus 0 of 10 control livers. The resemblance of human chronic active hepatitis, massive hepatic necrosis, and post-necrotic cirrhosis to the MLO induced murine liver disease, the role of molecular biologic techniques in the detection and classification of those bacteria, and in therapy of MLO disease are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8398804

  8. Characterization of murine hepatitis virus (JHM) RNA from rats with experimental encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D P; Percy, D H; Morris, V L

    1984-09-01

    When Wistar Furth rats are inoculated intracerebrally with the murine hepatitis virus JHM they often develop a demyelinating disease with resulting hind leg paralysis. Using an RNA transfer procedure and hybridization kinetic analysis, the virus-specific RNA in these rats was characterized. The pattern of JHM-specific RNA varied with individual infections of Wistar Furth rats. However, two species of JHM-specific RNA, the nucleocapsid and a 2.1-2.4 X 10(6)-Da RNA species were generally present. A general decrease in JHM-specific RNA in brains and spinal cord samples taken later than 20 days postinoculation was observed; however, JHM-specific RNA persisted in the spinal cord longer than in the brain of these rats.

  9. Tumor necrosis factor alpha signaling in the development of experimental murine pre-hepatic portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakis, Nicholas G; Wang, Yining N; Wu, Jianmin; Maluccio, Mary A; Skill, Nicholas J

    2010-01-01

    The cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFa) has previously been identified in the development of portal hypertension (PHT) by facilitating portal venous and systemic hyperemia. TNFa is reported to contribute to hyperemia via endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) induction and nitric oxide (NO) production. This study examines this hypothesis by utilizing TNFa receptor knockout mice and a murine model of pre-hepatic PHT. Plasma TNFa and NOx and tissue TNFa mRNA levels were determined in wild-type mice 0-7d post induction of pre-hepatic PHT by partial portal vein ligation (PVL). TNFa receptor knockout mice also received PVL or sham surgery and splenic pulp pressure, abdominal aortic flow and portal-systemic shunting were recorded 7d following. Portal pressure and systemic hyperemia developed rapidly following PVL. Plasma NOx was increased temporarily 2-3 days following PVL and returned to baseline by day 7. Circulating TNFa was below detectable limits of the ELISA used, as such no increase was observed. Hepatic and vascular TNFa mRNA levels were transiently changed after PVL otherwise there was no significant change. TNFa receptor targeted gene deletion did not ameliorate plasma NOx following PVL and had no effect on the development of PHT. TNFa receptor signaling plays no detectable role in the development of systemic hyperemia in the murine model of pre-hepatic PHT. Consequently, increased TNFa observed in intra-hepatic inflammatory models (CCl4) and in patients is probably related to inflammation associated with intra-hepatic pathology. Alternatively, TNFa may be signaling via a TNFa receptor independent mechanism. PMID:21383890

  10. Sparganosis in the Lumbar Spine : Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Hoon; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Jong Sung

    2011-01-01

    Sparganosis is a rare parasitic infection affecting various organs, including the central nervous system, especially the lumbar epidural space. This report describes the identification of disease and different strategies of treatments with preoperative information. A 42-year-old man presented with a 2-year history of urinary incontinence and impotence. He had a history of ingesting raw frogs 40 years ago. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed an intramedullary nodular mass at conus medullaris and severe inflammation in the cauda equina. A 51-year-old woman was admitted with acute pain in the left inguinal area. We observed a lesion which seemed to be a tumor of the lumbar epidural space on MR imaging. She also had a history of ingesting inadequately cooked snakes 10 years ago. In the first patient, mass removal was attempted through laminectomy and parasite infection was identified during intra-operative frozen biopsy. Total removal could not be performed because of severe arachnoiditis and adhesion. We therefore decided to terminate the operation and final histology confirmed dead sparganum infection. We also concluded further surgical trial for total removal of the dead worm and inflammatory grannulation totally. However, after seeing another physician at different hospital, he was operated again which resulted in worsening of pain and neurological deficit. In the second patient, we totally removed dorsal epidural mass. Final histology and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed living sparganum infection and her pain disappeared. Although the treatment of choice is surgical resection of living sparganum with inflammation, the attempt to remove dead worm and adhesive granulation tissue may cause unwanted complications to the patients. Therefore, the result of preoperative ELISA, as well as the information from image and history, must be considered as important factors to decide whether a surgery is necessary or not. PMID:21607186

  11. Sparganosis in the lumbar spine : report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Hoon; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Jong Sung; Roh, Sung Woo

    2011-04-01

    Sparganosis is a rare parasitic infection affecting various organs, including the central nervous system, especially the lumbar epidural space. This report describes the identification of disease and different strategies of treatments with preoperative information. A 42-year-old man presented with a 2-year history of urinary incontinence and impotence. He had a history of ingesting raw frogs 40 years ago. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed an intramedullary nodular mass at conus medullaris and severe inflammation in the cauda equina. A 51-year-old woman was admitted with acute pain in the left inguinal area. We observed a lesion which seemed to be a tumor of the lumbar epidural space on MR imaging. She also had a history of ingesting inadequately cooked snakes 10 years ago. In the first patient, mass removal was attempted through laminectomy and parasite infection was identified during intra-operative frozen biopsy. Total removal could not be performed because of severe arachnoiditis and adhesion. We therefore decided to terminate the operation and final histology confirmed dead sparganum infection. We also concluded further surgical trial for total removal of the dead worm and inflammatory grannulation totally. However, after seeing another physician at different hospital, he was operated again which resulted in worsening of pain and neurological deficit. In the second patient, we totally removed dorsal epidural mass. Final histology and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) confirmed living sparganum infection and her pain disappeared. Although the treatment of choice is surgical resection of living sparganum with inflammation, the attempt to remove dead worm and adhesive granulation tissue may cause unwanted complications to the patients. Therefore, the result of preoperative ELISA, as well as the information from image and history, must be considered as important factors to decide whether a surgery is necessary or not.

  12. Pathobiology of human RH strain induced experimental toxoplasmosis in murine model.

    PubMed

    Sudan, Vikrant; Tewari, A K; Singh, Harkirat; Singh, R

    2016-09-01

    Of late, toxoplasmosis has gained immense importance as an opportunist parasite in immunocompromised patients. In immunocompromised subjects, the disease is supposed to occur in acute form and causes acute toxoplasmic encephalitis. However, the exact pathogenesis of other vital organs, particularly in acute form of infection, is still a matter of debate. Therefore, an attempt was made to study the pathogenesis of acute form of toxoplasmosis using cryopreserved human RH strain of the parasite in murine models. For this, 100 tachyzoites were given to individual mice and upon the setup of acute form of infection, the mice were euthanized and the organs were processed for histopathology. Histopathology revealed tachyzoites in liver only while severe necrosis due to multiplication of tachyzoites were visible in liver, spleen, lungs and brain. Kidneys and heart appeared more or less normal. Finally, the pathology of disease in these organs is described in detail. The present research has generated some vital information regarding necrotic changes in tissues due to acute toxoplasmosis and will defiantly help the researchers in the better understanding of disease particularly in humans and putting up of suitable treatment regime for human subjects infected with acute toxoplasmosis. PMID:27605794

  13. Cardiac-Specific YAP Activation Improves Cardiac Function and Survival in an Experimental Murine MI Model

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhiqiang; von Gise, Alexander; Zhou, Pingzhu; Gu, Fei; Ma, Qing; Jiang, Jiangming; Yau, Allan L.; Buck, Jessica N.; Gouin, Katryna A.; van Gorp, Pim R. R.; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Jinghai; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Wang, Da-zhi; Pu, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Yes-Associated Protein (YAP), the terminal effector of the Hippo signaling pathway, is crucial for regulating embryonic cardiomyocyte (CM) proliferation. Objective We hypothesized that YAP activation after myocardial infarction would preserve cardiac function and improve survival. Methods and Results We used a cardiac-specific, inducible expression system to activate YAP in adult mouse heart. Activation of YAP in adult heart promoted CM proliferation and did not deleteriously affect heart function. Furthermore, YAP activation after myocardial infarction (MI) preserved heart function and reduced infarct size. Using adeno-associated virus subtype 9 (AAV9) as a delivery vector, we expressed human YAP in the adult murine myocardium immediately after MI. We found that AAV9:hYAP significantly improved cardiac function and mouse survival. AAV9:hYAP did not exert its salutary effects by reducing CM apoptosis. Rather, AAV9:hYAP stimulated adult CM proliferation. Gene expression profiling indicated that AAV9:hYAP stimulated expression of cell cycle genes and promoted a less mature cardiac gene expression signature. Conclusions Cardiac specific YAP activation after MI mitigated myocardial injury, improved cardiac function, and enhanced survival. These findings suggest that therapeutic activation of YAP or its downstream targets, potentially through AAV-mediated gene therapy, may be a strategy to improve outcome after MI. PMID:24833660

  14. Vaccine potential of plasma bead-based dual antigen delivery system against experimental murine candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ejaj; Zia, Qamar; Fatima, Munazza Tamkeen; Owais, Mohammad; Saleemuddin, Mohammed

    2015-11-01

    The development of prophylactic anti-candidal vaccine comprising the Candida albicans cytosolic proteins (Cp) as antigen and plasma beads (PB) prepared from plasma as sustained delivery system, is described. The immune-prophylactic potential of various PBs-based dual antigen delivery systems, co-entrapping Cp pre-entrapped in PLGA microspheres were tested in the murine model. Induction of cell mediated immunity was measured by assaying DTH and NO production as well as in vitro proliferation of lymphocytes derived from the immunized animals. Expression of surface markers on APCs (CD80, CD86) and T-cells (CD4+, CD8+) was also evaluated. Humoral immune response was studied by measuring circulating anti-Cp antibodies and their subclasses. When the prophylactic efficacy of the vaccines was tested in mice challenged with virulent C. albicans, the PB-based formulation (PB-PLGA-Cp vaccine) was found to be most effective in the generation of desirable immune response, in terms of suppression of fungal load and facilitating the survival of the immunized animals.

  15. Monoclonal Immunoglobulin G1 Directed against Aspergillus fumigatus Cell Wall Glycoprotein Protects against Experimental Murine Aspergillosis†

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Kavishwar, A.; Keshava, G. B. Shiva; Shukla, P. K.

    2005-01-01

    Most of the biological functions related to pathogenicity and virulence reside in the fungal cell wall, which, being the outermost part of the cell, mediates the host-fungus interplay. For these reasons much effort has focused on the discovery of useful inhibitors of cell wall glucan, chitin, and mannoprotein biosynthesis. In the absence of a wide-spectrum, safe, and potent antifungal agent, a new strategy for antifungal therapy is directed towards the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). In the present study the MAb A9 (immunoglobulin G1 [IgG1]) was identified from hybridomas raised in BALB/c mice immunized with cell wall antigen of Aspergillus fumigatus. The immunoreactive epitopes for this IgG1 MAb appeared to be associated with a peptide moiety, and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed its binding to the cell wall surface of hyphae as well as with swollen conidia. MAb A9 inhibited hyphal development as observed by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay (25.76%), reduced the duration of spore germination, and exerted an in vitro cidal effect against Aspergillus fumigatus. The in vivo protective efficacy of MAb A9 was also evaluated in a murine model of invasive aspergillosis, where a reduction in CFU (>4 log10 units) was observed in kidney tissue of BALB/c mice challenged with A. fumigatus (2 × 105 CFU/ml) and where enhanced mean survival times (19.5 days) compared to the control (7.1 days) and an irrelevant MAb (6.1 days) were also observed. PMID:16148172

  16. Efficacy of Lysophosphatidylcholine in Combination with Antimicrobial Agents against Acinetobacter baumannii in Experimental Murine Peritoneal Sepsis and Pneumonia Models.

    PubMed

    Parra Millán, R; Jiménez Mejías, M E; Sánchez Encinales, V; Ayerbe Algaba, R; Gutiérrez Valencia, A; Pachón Ibáñez, M E; Díaz, C; Pérez Del Palacio, J; López Cortés, L F; Pachón, J; Smani, Y

    2016-08-01

    Immune response stimulation to prevent infection progression may be an adjuvant to antimicrobial treatment. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is an immunomodulator involved in immune cell recruitment and activation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LPC in combination with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem in experimental murine models of peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia. We used Acinetobacter baumannii strain Ab9, which is susceptible to colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem, and multidrug-resistant strain Ab186, which is susceptible to colistin and resistant to tigecycline and imipenem. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters for colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem and the 100% minimal lethal dose (MLD100) were determined for both strains. The therapeutic efficacies of LPC, colistin (60 mg/kg of body weight/day), tigecycline (10 mg/kg/day), and imipenem (180 mg/kg/day), alone or in combination, were assessed against Ab9 and Ab186 at the MLD100 in murine peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia models. The levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the same experimental models after inoculating mice with the MLD of both strains. LPC in combination with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem markedly enhanced the bacterial clearance of Ab9 and Ab186 from the spleen and lungs and reduced bacteremia and mouse mortality rates (P < 0.05) compared with those for colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem monotherapies. Moreover, at 4 h post-bacterial infection, Ab9 induced higher TNF-α and lower IL-10 levels than those with Ab186 (4 μg/ml versus 3 μg/ml [P < 0.05] and 2 μg/ml versus 3.4 μg/ml [P < 0.05], respectively). LPC treatment combined with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem modestly reduced the severity of infection by A. baumannii strains with different resistance phenotypes compared to LPC monotherapy in both

  17. Development and evaluation of quantitative-competitive PCR for quantitation of coxsackievirus B3 RNA in experimentally infected murine tissues.

    PubMed

    Reetoo, K N; Osman, S A; Illavia, S J; Banatvala, J E; Muir, P

    1999-10-01

    A method is described for quantitation of enterovirus RNA in experimentally infected murine tissues. Viral RNA was extracted from tissue samples and amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR in the presence of an internal standard RNA. The ratio of PCR product derived from viral RNA and internal standard RNA was then determined using specific probes in a post-PCR electrochemiluminescent hybridization assay. This provided an estimate of the viral RNA copy number in the original sample, and detection of PCR product derived from internal standard RNA validated sample processing and amplification procedures. RNA copy number correlated with viral infectivity of cell culture-derived virus, and one tissue culture infective dose was found to contain approximately 10(3) genome equivalents. The ratio of RNA copy number to infectivity in myocardial tissue taken from mice during the acute phase of coxsackievirus B3 myocarditis was more variable ranging from 10(4)-10(7), and was dependent on the stage of infection, reflecting differential rates of clearance for viral RNA and viral infectivity. The assay is rapid, and could facilitate investigations which currently rely upon enterovirus quantitation by titration in cell culture. This would be useful for experimental studies of viral pathogenesis, prophylaxis and antiviral therapy.

  18. Prevention and Mitigation of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis by Murine β-Defensins via Induction of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Bruhs, Anika; Schwarz, Thomas; Schwarz, Agatha

    2016-01-01

    The antimicrobial peptide murine β-defensin-14 (mBD14) was found to exert, in addition to its antimicrobial activity, the capacity to induce regulatory T cells as demonstrated in the model of contact hypersensitivity. Because it is induced by ultraviolet radiation, mBD14 may contribute to the antigen-specific immunosuppression by ultraviolet radiation. To prove whether this applies also for other immunologic models and because ultraviolet radiation appears to have beneficial effects on multiple sclerosis, we utilized the model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Injection of mBD14 into mice before immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein caused amelioration of the disease with less central nervous system inflammation and decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic T cells. The beneficial effect was due to Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells because it was lost on in vivo depletion of regulatory T cells. mBD14, however, also acts in a therapeutic setting, because injection of mBD14 into mice with clinical features of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis reduced the clinical score significantly. Human β-defensin-3, the human orthologue of mBD14, induced in vitro regulatory T cell-specific markers in CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, shifting these nonregulatory cells into a regulatory phenotype with suppressive features. Thus, defensins may represent candidates worth being further pursued for the therapy of multiple sclerosis. PMID:26763437

  19. Dynamic ocular surface and lacrimal gland changes induced in experimental murine dry eye.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bing; Wang, Yu; Reinach, Peter S; Ren, Yueping; Li, Jinyang; Hua, Shanshan; Lu, Huihui; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye disease can be a consequence of lacrimal gland insufficiency in Sjögren's Syndrome or increased tear film evaporation despite normal lacrimal gland function. To determine if there is a correlation between severity effects in these models and underlying pathophysiological responses, we compared the time dependent changes in each of these parameters that occur during a 6 week period. Dry eye was induced in 6-week-old female C57BL/6 mice by exposing them to an Intelligently Controlled Environmental System (ICES). Sixty mice were housed in ICES for 1, 2, 4 and 6 weeks respectively. Twelve were raised in normal environment and received subcutaneous injections of scopolamine hydrobromide (SCOP) 3 times daily for 5 days. Another sixty mice were housed in a normal environment and received no treatment. Corneal fluorescein staining along with corneal MMP-9 and caspase-3 level measurements were performed in parallel with the TUNEL assay. Interleukin-17(IL-17), IL-23, IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α, IFN-γ and TGF-β2 levels were estimated by real-time PCR measurements of conjunctival and lacrimal gland samples (LGs). Immunohistochemistry of excised LGs along with flow cytometry in cervical lymph nodes evaluated immune cell infiltration. Light and transmission electron microscopy studies evaluated LGs cytoarchitectural changes. ICES induced corneal epithelial destruction and apoptosis peaked at 2 weeks and kept stable in the following 4 weeks. In the ICES group, lacrimal gland proinflammatory cytokine level increases were much lower than those in the SCOP group. In accord with the lower proinflammatory cytokine levels, in the ICES group, lacrimal gland cytosolic vesicular density and size exceeded that in the SCOP group. ICES and SCOP induced murine dry eye effects became progressively more severe over a two week period. Subsequently, the disease process stabilized for the next four weeks. ICES induced local effects in the ocular surface, but failed to elicit lacrimal gland

  20. Dynamic Ocular Surface and Lacrimal Gland Changes Induced in Experimental Murine Dry Eye

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bing; Wang, Yu; Reinach, Peter S.; Ren, Yueping; Li, Jinyang; Hua, Shanshan; Lu, Huihui; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Dry eye disease can be a consequence of lacrimal gland insufficiency in Sjögren’s Syndrome or increased tear film evaporation despite normal lacrimal gland function. To determine if there is a correlation between severity effects in these models and underlying pathophysiological responses, we compared the time dependent changes in each of these parameters that occur during a 6 week period. Dry eye was induced in 6-week-old female C57BL/6 mice by exposing them to an Intelligently Controlled Environmental System (ICES). Sixty mice were housed in ICES for 1, 2, 4 and 6 weeks respectively. Twelve were raised in normal environment and received subcutaneous injections of scopolamine hydrobromide (SCOP) 3 times daily for 5 days. Another sixty mice were housed in a normal environment and received no treatment. Corneal fluorescein staining along with corneal MMP-9 and caspase-3 level measurements were performed in parallel with the TUNEL assay. Interleukin-17(IL-17), IL-23, IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α, IFN-γ and TGF-β2 levels were estimated by real-time PCR measurements of conjunctival and lacrimal gland samples (LGs). Immunohistochemistry of excised LGs along with flow cytometry in cervical lymph nodes evaluated immune cell infiltration. Light and transmission electron microscopy studies evaluated LGs cytoarchitectural changes. ICES induced corneal epithelial destruction and apoptosis peaked at 2 weeks and kept stable in the following 4 weeks. In the ICES group, lacrimal gland proinflammatory cytokine level increases were much lower than those in the SCOP group. In accord with the lower proinflammatory cytokine levels, in the ICES group, lacrimal gland cytosolic vesicular density and size exceeded that in the SCOP group. ICES and SCOP induced murine dry eye effects became progressively more severe over a two week period. Subsequently, the disease process stabilized for the next four weeks. ICES induced local effects in the ocular surface, but failed to elicit lacrimal gland

  1. [Human sparganosis. Report of a probable 7th case in South America and review of the subject].

    PubMed

    Rolón, P A

    1976-01-01

    A case of human Sparganosis was found in a resident of Northern Argentina, Pozo del Tigre, Province of Formosa, a zone bordering with the Republic of Paraguay, with a histopathologic diagnosis realized in the Pathologic Anatomy Institute of Asunción. In the Republic of Paraguay Dyphyllobrotium has been observed in cats, which reveals the existence of intermediaries (rats, water snakes, birds, etc.) as sources of human infection. Northern Argentina, where the patient always lived, is a geographic zone similar to the Republic of Paraguay. This case is the first described in the inland zone of the continent (and probably the seventh case in the Southamerican continent). The patient's profession, called "tropero" (cowherd), required that he had close contact with the land or a habitual exposure to nature, which does not exclude the probability of infection related to the patient's professional habitat. PMID:1037439

  2. Utility of the microculture method in non-invasive samples obtained from an experimental murine model with asymptomatic leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Malahat; Cakir-Koc, Rabia; Elcicek, Serhat; Oztel, Olga Nehir; Canim-Ates, Sezen; Abamor, Emrah Sefik; Yesilkir-Baydar, Serap

    2012-07-01

    The sensitivity of diagnostic methods for visceral leishmaniasis (VL) decreases because of the low number of parasites and antibody amounts in asymptomatic healthy donors who are not suitable for invasive sample acquisition procedures. Therefore, new studies are urgently needed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic approaches in non-invasive samples. In this study, the sensitivity of the microculture method (MCM) was compared with polymerase chain reaction (PCR), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) methods in an experimental murine model with asymptomatic leishmaniasis. Results showed that the percent of positive samples in ELISA, IFAT, and peripheral blood (PB) -PCR tests were 17.64%, 8.82%, and 5.88%, respectively, whereas 100% positive results were obtained with MCM and MCM-PCR methods. Thus, this study, for the first time, showed that MCM is more sensitive, specific, and economic than other methods, and the sensitivity of PCR that was performed to samples obtained from MCM was higher than sensitivity of the PCR method sampled by PB. PMID:22764296

  3. IgE expression on the surface of B1 and B2 lymphocytes in experimental murine schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, F L; Aguiar, A M; Borojevic, R; El-Cheikh, M C

    2005-07-01

    In a previous study we monitored the distribution and phenotype expression of B1 cells during the evolution of experimental murine schistosomiasis mansoni and we proposed that the B1 cells were heterogeneous: a fraction which originated in the spleen and followed the migratory pathway to mesenteric ganglia, while the other was the resident peritoneal B1-cell pool. In the present study, we have addressed the question of whether these two B1-lymphocyte populations are involved in the production of the late Ig isotype IgE, which is present in high levels in schistosomal infection. Lymphocyte expression of surface markers and immunoglobulins were monitored by immunofluorescence flow cytometry. Both in the spleen and mesenteric ganglia, the B1 and B2 cells were induced to switch from IgM to IgE in the early Th2-dominated phase of the disease, with an increase of IgE in its later phases. Conversely, peritoneal B1-IgM+ switched to the remaining IgE+ present in high numbers in the peritoneal cavity throughout the disease. We correlated the efficient induction of the expression of late Ig isotypes by B1 cells with high levels of inflammatory cytokines due to the intense host response to the presence of worms and their eggs in the abdominal cavity. In conclusion, B1 cells have a different switch behavior from IgM to IgE indicating that these cell sub-populations depend on the microenvironment.

  4. STAT3 supports experimental K-RasG12D–induced murine myeloproliferative neoplasms dependent on serine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Gough, Daniel J.; Marié, Isabelle J.; Lobry, Camille; Aifantis, Iannis

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and other myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are genetically heterogeneous but frequently display activating mutations in Ras GTPases and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3). Altered STAT3 activity is observed in up to 50% of AML correlating with poor prognosis. Activated STAT proteins, classically associated with tyrosine phosphorylation, support tumor development as transcription factors, but alternative STAT functions independent of tyrosine phosphorylation have been documented, including roles for serine-phosphorylated STAT3 in mitochondria supporting transformation by oncogenic Ras. We examined requirements for STAT3 in experimental murine K-Ras–dependent hematopoietic neoplasia. We show that STAT3 is phosphorylated on S727 but not Y705 in diseased animals. Moreover, a mouse with a point mutation abrogating STAT3 S727 phosphorylation displayed delayed onset and decreased disease severity with significantly extended survival. Activated K-Ras required STAT3 for cytokine-independent growth of myeloid progenitors in vitro, and mitochondrially restricted STAT3 and STAT3-Y705F, both transcriptionally inert mutants, supported factor-independent growth. STAT3 was dispensable for growth of normal or K-Ras–mutant myeloid progenitors in response to cytokines. However, abrogation of STAT3-S727 phosphorylation impaired factor-independent malignant growth. These data document that serine-phosphorylated mitochondrial STAT3 supports neoplastic hematopoietic cell growth induced by K-Ras. PMID:25150294

  5. A method for histopathological study of the multifocal nature of spinal cord lesions in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gibson-Corley, Katherine N; Boyden, Alexander W; Leidinger, Mariah R; Lambertz, Allyn M; Ofori-Amanfo, Georgina; Naumann, Paul W; Goeken, J Adam; Karandikar, Nitin J

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a well-established mouse model for multiple sclerosis and is characterized by infiltration of mononuclear cells and demyelination within the central nervous system along with the clinical symptoms of paralysis. EAE is a multifocal and random disease, which sometimes makes histopathologic analysis of lesions difficult as it may not be possible to predict where lesions will occur, especially when evaluating cross sections of spinal cord. Consequently, lesions may be easily missed due to limited sampling in traditional approaches. To evaluate the entire length of the spinal cord while maintaining anatomic integrity, we have developed a method to section the cord within the decalcified spinal column, which allows for the study of the multifocal nature of this disease and also minimizes handling artifact. HE and Luxol fast blue staining of these spinal cord sections revealed a paucity of lesions in some areas, while others showed marked inflammation and demyelination. The percentage of spinal cord affected by EAE was evaluated at four separate areas of longitudinally sectioned cord and it varied greatly within each animal. Immunohistochemical staining of in situ spinal cords which had undergone decalcification was successful for key immuno-markers used in EAE research including CD3 for T cells, B220 for B cells and F4/80 for murine macrophages. This method will allow investigators to look at the entire spinal cord on a single slide and evaluate the spinal cord with and without classic EAE lesions. PMID:26855861

  6. Ultrastructural Study on Tissue Alterations Caused by Trypanosomatids in Experimental Murine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Finol, Héctor J.; Roschman-González, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The ultrastructural study in different tissues of mice experimentally infected with isolates of Trypanosoma evansi, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania mexicana reveals changes in cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle fibers, and hepatic, adrenal, kidney, and spleen cells. Some of these changes were cytoarchitectural and others consisted of necrosis. Alterations in the microvasculature were also found. The mononuclear cell infiltrate included neutrophils, eosinophils, and macrophages. This work shows that diverse mice tissues are important target for trypanosomatids. PMID:25072046

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, α particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by γH2AX

  8. Effects of ionizing radiation on bone cell differentiation in an experimental murine bone cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Lau, Patrick; Hellweg, Christine; Reitz, Guenther

    During long-term space travel astronauts are exposed to a complex mixture of different radiation types under conditions of dramatically reduced weight-bearing activity. It has been validated that astronauts loose a considerable amount of bone mass at a rate up to one to two percent each month in space. Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation cause bone damage and increase fracture risks after treatment for head-and-neck cancer and in pelvic irradiation. For low radiation doses, the possibility of a disturbed healing potential of bone was described. Radiation induced damage has been discussed to inflict mainly on immature and healing bone. Little is known about radiation effects on bone remodelling and even less on the combined action of microgravity and radiation. Bone remodelling is a life-long process performed by balanced action of cells from the osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. While osteoblasts differentiate either into bone-lining cells or into osteocytes and play a crucial role in bone matrix synthesis, osteoclasts are responsible for bone resorption. We hypothesize that the balance between bone matrix assembly by osteocytes and bone degradation by osteoclasts is modulated by microgravity as well as by ionizing radiation. To address this, a cell model consisting of murine cell lines with the potential to differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts (OCT-1, MC3T3-E1 S24, and MC3T3-E1 S4) was used for studying radiation response after exposure to simulated components of cosmic radiation. Cells were exposed to graded doses of 150 kV X-rays, α particles (0.525 MeV/u, 160 keV/µm; PTB, Braunschweig, Germany) and accelerated heavy ions (75 MeV/u carbon, 29 keV/µm; 95 MeV/u argon, 230 keV/µm; GANIL, Caen, France). Cell survival was measured as colony forming ability; cell cycle progression was analyzed via fluorescence-activated cell scanning (FACS) by measurement of the content of propidium iodide-stained DNA, DNA damage was visualized by γH2AX

  9. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  10. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  11. Role of CD8^+ T Cells in Murine Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Sheng-Le; Pernis, Benvenuto

    1992-05-01

    The course of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis, is affected by immunoregulatory T lymphocytes. When animals are immunized with encephalitogenic peptide of myelin basic protein and recover from the first episode of EAE, they become resistant to a second induction of this disease. Animals depleted of CD8^+ T cells by antibody-mediated clearance were used to examine the role of CD8^+ T cells in EAE. These cells were found to be major participants in the resistance to a second induction of EAE but were not essential for spontaneous recovery from the first episode of the disease.

  12. Comparative study of four antifungal drugs in an experimental model of murine cryptococcosis.

    PubMed

    Bava, A J; Iovannitti, C; Negroni, R

    1989-11-01

    A comparative study among amphotericin B, 5-fluorocytosine, itraconazole and fluconazole in the treatment of experimental cryptococcosis in mice, was carried out. Seventy male Balb C mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(7) cells of Cryptococcus neoformans var. neoformans. They were divided in 7 groups of 10 animals each one: 1) treated with fluconazole by gavage at a daily dose of 16 mg/kg; 2) treated with itraconazole by gavage at a daily dose of 16 mg/kg; 3) treated with 5-fluorocytosine by gavage at a daily dose of 300 mg/kg; 4) treated with amphotericin B intraperitoneally at a dose of 6 mg/kg every other day; 5) control animals receiving polietilenglicol 200 by gavage; 6) control animals receiving distilled water by gavage and 7) control animals receiving sterile distilled water by intraperitoneal route. All the treatments started 5 days after the challenge inoculation and they were given for 2 weeks. The following parameters were taken into account: survival time, macroscopic aspect of the organ after the complete autopsy, microscopic investigation of yeasts in brain, lungs, spleen and liver, histopathology studies of these organs, the colony forming units per gram and massive seeding of brain and lungs. The survival index of the different groups was the most efficient method to measure the antifungal compounds activity. Amphotericin B increased significantly the animals survival and modified the histopathologic response in the studied organs. The colony forming units and the massive seeding in brain and lung showed that this antifungal agent is unable of producing the biological cure of this experimental model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Experimental Demyelination and Remyelination of Murine Spinal Cord by Focal Injection of Lysolecithin

    PubMed Central

    Keough, Michael B.; Jensen, Samuel K.; Yong, V. Wee

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system characterized by plaque formation containing lost oligodendrocytes, myelin, axons, and neurons. Remyelination is an endogenous repair mechanism whereby new myelin is produced subsequent to proliferation, recruitment, and differentiation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells into myelin-forming oligodendrocytes, and is necessary to protect axons from further damage. Currently, all therapeutics for the treatment of multiple sclerosis target the aberrant immune component of the disease, which reduce inflammatory relapses but do not prevent progression to irreversible neurological decline. It is therefore imperative that remyelination-promoting strategies be developed which may delay disease progression and perhaps reverse neurological symptoms. Several animal models of demyelination exist, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and curprizone; however, there are limitations in their use for studying remyelination. A more robust approach is the focal injection of toxins into the central nervous system, including the detergent lysolecithin into the spinal cord white matter of rodents. In this protocol, we demonstrate that the surgical procedure involved in injecting lysolecithin into the ventral white matter of mice is fast, cost-effective, and requires no additional materials than those commercially available. This procedure is important not only for studying the normal events involved in the remyelination process, but also as a pre-clinical tool for screening candidate remyelination-promoting therapeutics. PMID:25867716

  14. Liposome-entrapped ampicillin in the treatment of experimental murine listeriosis and salmonellosis.

    PubMed Central

    Fattal, E; Rojas, J; Youssef, M; Couvreur, P; Andremont, A

    1991-01-01

    The tissue distribution of ampicillin entrapped in liposomes was studied in normal noninfected mice and showed that ampicillin concentrated mostly in the liver and spleen. Liposomate ampicillin was significantly more effective than free ampicillin in reducing splenic and hepatic bacterial counts in C57BL/Ka nude mice chronically infected with Listeria monocytogenes EGD. It was also significantly more effective than free ampicillin in reducing mortality in C57BL/6 mice acutely infected with Salmonella typhimurium C5. Comparison of the results with those previously obtained in the same experimental models with the same amounts of ampicillin bound to polyisohexylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles showed that liposomes were more effective than nanoparticles (M. Youssef, E. Fattal, M. J. Alonso, L. Roblot-Treupel, J. Sauzières, C. Tancrède, A. Omnès, P. Couvreur, and A. Andremont, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 32:1204-1207, 1988) in targeting ampicillin to the spleen but were less effective than nanoparticles in targeting ampicillin to the liver and reducing mortality in acute salmonellosis. PMID:2069386

  15. Murine pattern recognition receptor dectin-1 is essential in the development of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis.

    PubMed

    Stoppelkamp, Sandra; Reid, Delyth M; Yeoh, Joyce; Taylor, Julie; McKenzie, Emma J; Brown, Gordon D; Gordon, Siamon; Forrester, John V; Wong, Simon Y C

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacteria in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) are an essential component of immunization protocols in a number of autoimmune disease animal models including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and uveoretinitis (EAE and EAU, respectively). We determined the role in EAU of two C-type lectin receptors on myeloid cells that recognize and respond to mycobacteria. Using receptor-specific antibodies and knockout mice, we demonstrated for the first time that the macrophage mannose receptor delays disease development but does not affect severity. In contrast, dectin-1 is critically involved in the development of CFA-mediated EAU. Disease severity is reduced in dectin-1 knockout mice and antibody blockade of dectin-1 during the induction, but not the effector phase, prevents EAU development. Significantly, similar blockade of dectin-1 in vivo has no effect in non-CFA-mediated, spontaneously induced or adoptive transfer models of EAU. Thus dectin-1 plays a critical role in the ability of complete Freund's adjuvant to induce EAU in mice.

  16. Heterogeneity of Wild Leishmania major Isolates in Experimental Murine Pathogenicity and Specific Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Kébaïer, C.; Louzir, H.; Chenik, M.; Salah, A. Ben; Dellagi, K.

    2001-01-01

    Virulence variability was investigated by analyzing the experimental pathogenicity of 19 Leishmania major strains in susceptible BALB/c mice. Twelve strains were isolated from Tunisian patients with zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis; seven strains were isolated in Syria (n = 1), Saudi Arabia (n = 2), Jordan (n = 2), or Israel (n = 2). BALB/c mice were injected in the hind footpad with 2 × 106 amastigotes of the various isolates, and lesion progression was recorded weekly for 9 weeks. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production of lymph node mononuclear cells activated in vitro with parasite antigens were evaluated 5 weeks after infection. We show that disease progression induced by different L. major isolates was largely heterogeneous although reproducible results were obtained when using the same isolate. Interestingly, isolates from the Middle East induced a more severe disease than did the majority of Tunisian isolates. Strains with the highest virulence tend to generate more IL-4 and less IFN-γ in vitro at week 5 postinfection as well as higher levels of early IL-4 mRNA in the lymph node draining the inoculation site at 16 h postinfection. These results suggest that L. major isolates from the field may differ in virulence, which influences the course of the disease induced in mice and the type of immune response elicited by the infected host. PMID:11447167

  17. Macrophage Phenotype in the Ocular Surface of Experimental Murine Dry Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    You, In-Cheon; Coursey, Terry G; Bian, Fang; Barbosa, Flavia L; de Paiva, Cintia S; Pflugfelder, Stephen C

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the phenotype of macrophages in the cornea and conjunctiva of C57BL/6 mice with induced experimental dry eye. C57BL/6 mice exposed to desiccating stress (DS) were evaluated at 1, 5, and 10 days and C57BL/6 mice maintained in non-stressed environment were used as controls. Whole eyes and adnexa were excised for histology or used for gene expression analysis. Location and phenotype of macrophages infiltrating the cornea and conjunctiva was evaluated by immunofluorescence analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction evaluated macrophage markers and T cell-related and inflammatory cytokine expression in cornea and conjunctiva. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that macrophages reside in the conjunctiva of control and dry eye mice and their number did not change with DS. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that the level of M1 macrophage marker, iNOS, increased prominently in the conjunctiva at DS 10 days. In contrast, there was a non-significant decrease of the M2 marker Arg1 with DS. The levels of inflammatory cytokine, IL-12a mRNA transcript in the conjunctiva increased significantly at DS1 and decreased at DS5, while levels of IL-18 were significantly increased at DS 10. Macrophages reside in the ocular surface tissues of C57BL/6 mice. Although the number of macrophages in the conjunctiva does not change, evidence of inflammatory M1 activation after desiccating stress was observed. Better understanding of phagocyte diversity and activation in dry eye disease provide a basis for the development of phagocyte-targeted therapeutic strategies.

  18. The Role of Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A₂ in a Murine Model of Experimental Autoimmune Uveoretinitis

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, G. L.; Boldison, J.; Copland, D. A.; Adamson, P.; Gale, D.; Brandt, M.; Nicholson, L. B.; Dick, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage activation is, in part, regulated via hydrolysis of oxidised low density lipoproteins by Lipoprotein-Associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), resulting in increased macrophage migration, pro-inflammatory cytokine release and chemokine expression. In uveitis, tissue damage is mediated as a result of macrophage activation; hence inhibition of Lp-PLA2 may limit macrophage activation and protect the tissue. Utilising Lp-PLA2 gene-deficient (KO) mice and a pharmacological inhibitor of Lp-PLA2 (SB-435495) we aimed to determine the effect of Lp-PLA2 suppression in mediating retinal protection in a model of autoimmune retinal inflammation, experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU). Following immunisation with RBP-3 (IRBP) 1–20 or 161–180 peptides, clinical disease was monitored and severity assessed, infiltrating leukocytes were enumerated by flow cytometry and tissue destruction quantified by histology. Despite ablation of Lp-PLA2 enzyme activity in Lp-PLA2 KO mice or wild-type mice treated with SB-435495, the number of infiltrating CD45+ cells in the retina was equivalent to control EAU animals, and there was no reduction in disease severity. Thus, despite the reported beneficial effects of therapeutic Lp-PLA2 depletion in a variety of vascular inflammatory conditions, we were unable to attenuate disease, show delayed disease onset or prevent progression of EAU in Lp-PLA2 KO mice. Although EAU exhibits inflammatory vasculopathy there is no overt defect in lipid metabolism and given the lack of effect following Lp-PLA2 suppression, these data support the hypothesis that sub-acute autoimmune inflammatory disease progresses independently of Lp-PLA2 activity. PMID:25874928

  19. Efficacy of Lychnopholide Polymeric Nanocapsules after Oral and Intravenous Administration in Murine Experimental Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Carlos Geraldo Campos; Branquinho, Renata Tupinambá; Oliveira, Maykon Tavares; Milagre, Matheus Marques; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; Lana, Marta de

    2016-09-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease remains neglected. The compounds available show several limitations, mainly during the chronic phase. Lychnopholide encapsulated in polymeric nanocapsules (LYC-NC) was efficacious in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated by intravenous administration during the acute phase (AP). As the oral route is preferred for treatment of chronic infections, such as Chagas disease, this study evaluated the use of oral LYC-NC in the AP and also compared it with LYC-NC administered to mice by the oral and intravenous routes during the chronic phase (CP). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by fresh blood examination, hemoculture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cure rates in the AP and CP were 62.5% and 55.6%, respectively, upon oral administration of LYC-poly(d,l-lactide)-polyethylene glycol nanocapsules (LYC-PLA-PEG-NC) and 57.0% and 30.0%, respectively, with LYC-poly-ε-caprolactone nanocapsules (LYC-PCL-NC). These cure rates were significantly higher than that of free LYC, which did not cure any animals. LYC-NC formulations administered orally during the AP showed cure rates similar to that of benznidazole, but only LYC-NC cured mice in the CP. Similar results were achieved with intravenous treatment during the CP. The higher cure rates obtained with LYC loaded in PLA-PEG-NC may be due to the smaller particle size of these NC and the presence of PEG, which influence tissue diffusion and the controlled release of LYC. Furthermore, PLA-PEG-NC may improve the stability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract. This work is the first report of cure of experimental Chagas disease via oral administration during the CP. These findings represent a new and important perspective for oral treatment of Chagas disease. PMID:27324760

  20. Systemic Inflammatory Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury, Femur Fracture, and Shock: An Experimental Murine Polytrauma Model

    PubMed Central

    Probst, C.; Mirzayan, M. J.; Mommsen, P.; Zeckey, C.; Tegeder, T.; Geerken, L.; Maegele, M.; Samii, A.; van Griensven, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Despite broad research in neurotrauma and shock, little is known on systemic inflammatory effects of the clinically most relevant combined polytrauma. Experimental investigation in an animal model may provide relevant insight for therapeutic strategies. We describe the effects of a combined injury with respect to lymphocyte population and cytokine activation. Methods. 45 male C57BL/6J mice (mean weight 27 g) were anesthetized with ketamine/xylazine. Animals were subjected to a weight drop closed traumatic brain injury (WD-TBI), a femoral fracture and hemorrhagic shock (FX-SH). Animals were subdivided into WD-TBI, FX-SH and combined trauma (CO-TX) groups. Subjects were sacrificed at 96 h. Blood was analysed for cytokines and by flow cytometry for lymphocyte populations. Results. Mortality was 8%, 13% and 47% for FX-SH, WD-TBI and CO-TX groups (P < 0.05). TNFα (11/13/139 for FX-SH/WD-TBI/CO-TX; P < 0.05), CCL2 (78/96/227; P < 0.05) and IL-6 (16/48/281; P = 0.05) showed significant increases in the CO-TX group. Lymphocyte populations results for FX-SH, WD-TBI and CO-TX were: CD-4 (31/21/22; P = n.s.), CD-8 (7/28/34, P < 0.05), CD-4-CD-8 (11/12/18; P = n.s.), CD-56 (36/7/8; P < 0.05). Conclusion. This study shows that a combination of closed TBI and femur-fracture/ shock results in an increase of the humoral inflammation. More attention to combined injury models in inflammation research is indicated. PMID:22529516

  1. Leptin augments protective immune responses in murine macrophages and enhances potential of miltefosine against experimental visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Shivahare, Rahul; Ali, Wahid; Vishwakarma, Preeti; Natu, S M; Puri, Sunil K; Gupta, Suman

    2015-10-01

    Adverse side effects and drug resistance issues are the two most important drawbacks which influence the widespread use of existing antileishmanial drugs. Use of immune stimulating agent with standard antileishmanial might be helpful to minimize the toxic effect of drug, shorten the dose regimen and delay the emergence of resistance. In the present study, we explored the in vitro immunomodulatory potential of an immunomodulator, leptin with lower concentration of standard drug, miltefosine. The level of Th1/Th2 cytokines, production of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species and phagocytic activity was assessed by ELISA, Griess reaction and flow cytometric analysis, respectively. Leptin at a concentration of 15μg/mL showed heightened level of Th1 cytokines and nitric oxide generation from murine macrophages (J-774A.1 cells). Leptin (15μg/mL) also reduces the effective concentration of miltefosine by 2-folds from 7.5μM to 3.7μM. When given in conjunction with lower concentration of miltefosine (4μM), leptin (15μg/mL) significantly (***p<0.001) elevated the level of IL-12 (7.7 fold), TNF-α (8.1 fold) and nitric oxide (6.6 fold) along with markedly (***p<0.001) suppressed level of IL-10 and TGF-β when compared with untreated infected macrophages. Leptin plus miltefosine also induces the phagocytic ability (**p<0.01) of macrophages in comparison to leptin alone and miltefosine alone treated groups. These finding illustrate that leptin activates host macrophages to generate protective immune response for the successful elimination of Leishmania parasite at lower concentration of miltefosine and has potential for further exploration in experimental animal model of visceral leishmaniasis (VL).

  2. Protection Provided by an Encapsulated Live Attenuated ΔabcBA Strain of Brucella ovis against Experimental Challenge in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Patrícia C.; Macêdo, Auricélio A.; Silva, Teane M. A.; Ximenes, Luana C. A.; Brandão, Humberto M.; Paixão, Tatiane A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the Brucella ovis ΔabcBA strain as a vaccine candidate in the murine model. BALB/c mice were subcutaneously or intraperitoneally immunized with a single dose or three doses of the B. ovis ΔabcBA strain and then were challenged with wild-type B. ovis. Single or multiple immunizations provided only mild protection, with significantly smaller numbers of wild-type B. ovis CFU in the livers of immunized mice but not in the spleens. Encapsulation of B. ovis ΔabcBA significantly improved protection against experimental challenges in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, immunization with encapsulated B. ovis ΔabcBA markedly prevented lesions in the spleens and livers of experimentally challenged mice. These results demonstrated that the encapsulated B. ovis ΔabcBA strain confers protection to mice; therefore, this strain has potential as a vaccine candidate for rams. PMID:25947146

  3. NLRP3 inflammasome as a target of berberine in experimental murine liver injury: interference with P2X7 signalling.

    PubMed

    Vivoli, Elisa; Cappon, Andrea; Milani, Stefano; Piombanti, Benedetta; Provenzano, Angela; Novo, Erica; Masi, Alessio; Navari, Nadia; Narducci, Roberto; Mannaioni, Guido; Moneti, Gloriano; Oliveira, Claudia P; Parola, Maurizio; Marra, Fabio

    2016-10-01

    Berberine (BRB) is commonly used in herbal medicine, but its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we tested BRB in steatohepatitis induced by a methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet, in acute acetaminophen intoxication and in cultured murine macrophages. BRB markedly improved parameters of liver injury and necroinflammation induced by the MCD diet, although increased mortality was observed by mechanisms independent of bacterial infections or plasma levels of BRB. The MCD diet induced up-regulation of all components of the NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR and PYD domain-containing protein 3) inflammasome, and increased hepatic levels of mature IL-1β (interleukin 1β). All of these parameters were significantly reduced in mice treated with BRB. In mice administered an acetaminophen overdose, a model dependent on inflammasome activation, BRB reduced mortality and ALT (alanine aminotransferase) elevation, and limited the expression of inflammasome components. In vitro, LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in RAW264.7 murine macrophages was markedly decreased by pre-incubation with BRB. BRB significantly limited the activation of the purinergic receptor P2X7, involved in the late phases of inflammasome activation. Upon P2X7 knockdown, the ability of BRB to block LPS-induced secretion of IL-1β was lost. These data indicate that administration of BRB ameliorates inflammation and injury in two unrelated murine models of liver damage. We demonstrate for the first time that BRB interferes with activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in vivo and in vitro, through a mechanism based on interference with activation of P2X7, a purinergic receptor involved in inflammasome activation. PMID:27439970

  4. NLRP3 inflammasome as a target of berberine in experimental murine liver injury: interference with P2X7 signalling.

    PubMed

    Vivoli, Elisa; Cappon, Andrea; Milani, Stefano; Piombanti, Benedetta; Provenzano, Angela; Novo, Erica; Masi, Alessio; Navari, Nadia; Narducci, Roberto; Mannaioni, Guido; Moneti, Gloriano; Oliveira, Claudia P; Parola, Maurizio; Marra, Fabio

    2016-10-01

    Berberine (BRB) is commonly used in herbal medicine, but its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. In the present study, we tested BRB in steatohepatitis induced by a methionine- and choline-deficient (MCD) diet, in acute acetaminophen intoxication and in cultured murine macrophages. BRB markedly improved parameters of liver injury and necroinflammation induced by the MCD diet, although increased mortality was observed by mechanisms independent of bacterial infections or plasma levels of BRB. The MCD diet induced up-regulation of all components of the NLRP3 (NACHT, LRR and PYD domain-containing protein 3) inflammasome, and increased hepatic levels of mature IL-1β (interleukin 1β). All of these parameters were significantly reduced in mice treated with BRB. In mice administered an acetaminophen overdose, a model dependent on inflammasome activation, BRB reduced mortality and ALT (alanine aminotransferase) elevation, and limited the expression of inflammasome components. In vitro, LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in RAW264.7 murine macrophages was markedly decreased by pre-incubation with BRB. BRB significantly limited the activation of the purinergic receptor P2X7, involved in the late phases of inflammasome activation. Upon P2X7 knockdown, the ability of BRB to block LPS-induced secretion of IL-1β was lost. These data indicate that administration of BRB ameliorates inflammation and injury in two unrelated murine models of liver damage. We demonstrate for the first time that BRB interferes with activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome pathway in vivo and in vitro, through a mechanism based on interference with activation of P2X7, a purinergic receptor involved in inflammasome activation.

  5. Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract ameliorates intestinal inflammation through MAPKs/NF-κB signaling in a murine model of acute experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Medicherla, Kanakaraju; Ketkar, Avanee; Sahu, Bidya Dhar; Sudhakar, Godi; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-13

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-colitis effects of Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract (RE) by using both in vitro LPS-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages and in vivo dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental murine colitis and suggested the underlying possible mechanisms. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis was performed to identify the major components present in the RE. The clinical signs, biochemistry, immunoblot, ELISA and histology in colon tissues were assessed in order to elucidate the beneficial effect of RE. RE suppressed the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and the expressions of inflammatory proteins in macrophages. Administration of RE (50 and 100 mg kg(-1)) also significantly reduced the severity of DSS-induced murine colitis, as assessed by the clinical symptoms, colon length and histology. RE administration prevented the DSS-induced activation of p38, ERK and JNK MAPKs, attenuated IκBα phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB (p65). RE also suppressed the COX-2 and iNOS expressions, decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines and the myeloperoxidase activity in the colon tissue. Histological observation revealed that RE administration alleviated mucosal damage and inflammatory cell infiltration induced by DSS in the colon tissue. Hence, RE could be used as a new preventive and therapeutic food ingredient or as a dietary supplement for inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27349640

  6. Severe infection of wild-caught snakes with Spirometra erinaceieuropaei from food markets in Guangzhou, China involves a risk for zoonotic sparganosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fumin; Zhou, Lihua; Gong, Shiping; Deng, Yanzhong; Zou, Jiejian; Wu, Jun; Liu, Wenhua; Hou, Fanghui

    2011-02-01

    Wild-caught snakes are a popular and traditional food in China. However, little known to the public, snakes are also intermediate hosts of Spirometra erinaceieuropaei, a food- and water-borne pathogen of sparganosis. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of S. erinaceieuropaei in 10 popular species of wild-caught snakes in Guangzhou City (Guangdong Province) between July 2009 and July 2010. One hundred and twenty-four specimens of 10 species (including Enhydris plumbea, Zoacys dhumnades, Elaphe radiate, Elaphe taeniura, Elaphe carinata, Ptyas mucosus, Ptyas korros, Naja naja atra, Bungarus fasciatus, and Bungarus multicinctus) were randomly selected from a total of 1,160 wild-caught snakes. They were obtained from food markets in 5 representative districts (Huadou, Panyu, Tianhe, Haizhu, and Conghua). The specimens were killed, necropsied, and examined for parasitic helminths. Of the snakes examined, 29.8% were infected by spargana and the worm burden per infected snake ranged from 1 to 221. Most species were infected except for En. plumbea, B. fasciatus, and B. multicinctus. Prevalence even reached 100% in Zoacys dhumnades. More than half (53.5%) of the spargana were located in muscular tissue, 36.4% in subcutaneous tissue, and 10.1% in the coelomic cavity. The study revealed the potential risk for the zoonotic sparganosis by eating wild-caught snakes and will be helpful in arousing public health concern about the consumption of snake meat.

  7. Efficacy of an experimental azithromycin cream for prophylaxis of tick-transmitted lyme disease spirochete infection in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Piesman, Joseph; Hojgaard, Andrias; Ullmann, Amy J; Dolan, Marc C

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to oral prophylaxis for the prevention of tick transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, we tested antibiotic cream prophylactic formulations in a murine model of spirochete infection. A 4% preparation of doxycycline cream afforded no protection, but a single application of 4% azithromycin cream was 100% protective when applied directly to the tick bite site at the time of tick removal. Indeed, the azithromycin cream was 100% effective when applied at up to 3 days after tick removal and protected 74% of mice exposed to tick bite when applied at up to 2 weeks after tick removal. Azithromycin cream was also protective when applied at a site distal to the tick bite site, suggesting that it was having a systemic effect in addition to a local transdermal effect. Mice that were protected from tick-transmitted infection did not seroconvert and did not infect larval ticks on xenodiagnosis. Azithromycin cream formulations appear to hold promise for Lyme disease prophylaxis. PMID:24165183

  8. Vitamin A Deficiency Promotes Inflammation by Induction of Type 2 Cytokines in Experimental Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Cui, Weiwei; Zhang, Peng; Gu, Jingmin; Tian, Yuan; Gao, Xiuzhu; Liu, Yaqing; Jin, Zheng; Yan, Dongmei; Zhu, Xun; Li, Dong

    2016-10-01

    Vitamin A (VA) deficiency is one of the most common malnutrition conditions. Recent reports showed that VA plays an important role in the immune balance; lack of VA could result in enhanced type 2 immune response characterized by increased type 2 cytokine production and type 2 innate lymphoid cell infiltration and activation. Type 2 immune response plays protective role in anti-infection but plays pathological role in asthmatic disease. In order to investigate the role of VA in the asthmatic disease, we used ovalbumin-induced asthma murine model and observed the pathological changes between mouse-received VA-deficient and VA-sufficient diets. We also measured the type 2 cytokine expressions to reveal the potential mechanism. Our results showed that VA deficiency exacerbates ovalbumin-induced lung inflammation and type 2 cytokine productions. Thus, VA deficiency, or malnutrition in further extent, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of asthma. PMID:27525423

  9. Efficacy of an experimental azithromycin cream for prophylaxis of tick-transmitted lyme disease spirochete infection in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Piesman, Joseph; Hojgaard, Andrias; Ullmann, Amy J; Dolan, Marc C

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to oral prophylaxis for the prevention of tick transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi, we tested antibiotic cream prophylactic formulations in a murine model of spirochete infection. A 4% preparation of doxycycline cream afforded no protection, but a single application of 4% azithromycin cream was 100% protective when applied directly to the tick bite site at the time of tick removal. Indeed, the azithromycin cream was 100% effective when applied at up to 3 days after tick removal and protected 74% of mice exposed to tick bite when applied at up to 2 weeks after tick removal. Azithromycin cream was also protective when applied at a site distal to the tick bite site, suggesting that it was having a systemic effect in addition to a local transdermal effect. Mice that were protected from tick-transmitted infection did not seroconvert and did not infect larval ticks on xenodiagnosis. Azithromycin cream formulations appear to hold promise for Lyme disease prophylaxis.

  10. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Omodeo Salè, Fausta; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  11. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  12. Colonization of the murine hindgut by sacral crest-derived neural precursors: experimental support for an evolutionarily conserved model.

    PubMed

    Kapur, R P

    2000-11-01

    Enteric ganglia in the hindgut are derived from separate vagal and sacral neural crest populations. Two conflicting models, based primarily on avian data, have been proposed to describe the contribution of sacral neural crest cells. One hypothesizes early colonization of the hindgut shortly after neurulation, and the other states that sacral crest cells reside transiently in the extraenteric ganglion of Remak and colonize the hindgut much later, after vagal crest-derived neural precursors arrive. In this study, I show that Wnt1-lacZ-transgene expression, an "early" marker of murine neural crest cells, is inconsistent with the "early-colonization" model. Although Wnt1-lacZ-positive sacral crest cells populate pelvic ganglia in the mesenchyme surrounding the hindgut, they are not found in the gut prior to the arrival of vagal crest cells. Similarly, segments of murine hindgut harvested prior to the arrival of vagal crest cells and grafted under the renal capsule fail to develop enteric neurons, unless adjacent pelvic mesenchyme is included in the graft. When pelvic mesenchyme from DbetaH-nlacZ transgenic embryos is apposed with nontransgenic hindgut, neural precursors from the mesenchyme colonize the hindgut and form intramural ganglion cells that express the transgenic marker. Contribution of sacral crest-derived cells to the enteric nervous system is not affected by cocolonization of grafts by vagal crest-derived neuroglial precursors. The findings complement recent studies of avian chimeras and support an evolutionarily conserved model in which sacral crest cells first colonize the extramural ganglion and secondarily enter the hindgut mesenchyme.

  13. CD8+ Cells Regulate the T helper-17 Response in an Experimental Murine Model of Sjögren Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X.; Schaumburg, C.S.; Coursey, T.G.; Siemasko, K.F.; Volpe, E. A.; Gandhi, N.B.; Li, D.-Q.; Niederkorn, J.Y.; Stern, M.E.; Pflugfelder, S.C.; de Paiva, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the regulatory function of CD8+ cells in T helper (Th) 17 cell-mediated corneal epithelial barrier disruption that develops in a murine desiccating stress (DS) model that resembles Sjögren syndrome. CD8+ cell depletion promoted generation of IL-17A producing CD4+ T cells via activation of dendritic cells in both the ocular surface and draining cervical lymph nodes in C57BL/6 mice subjected to DS. T cell-deficient nude recipient mice receiving adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells from CD8+ cell-depleted donors exposed to DS displayed increased CD4+ T cell infiltration and elevated IL-17A and CCL20 levels in the ocular surface, which was associated with greater corneal barrier disruption. Enhanced DS-specific corneal barrier disruption in CD8-depleted donor mice correlated with a Th17-mediated expression of matrixmetalloproteinases (MMP-3 and MMP-9) in the recipient corneal epithelium. Co-transfer of CD8+ CD103+ Tregs did not affect the ability of DS-specific pathogenic CD4+ T cells to infiltrate and cause ocular surface disease in the nude recipients, showing that CD8+ cells regulate the afferent arm of DS-induced immune response. In summary, CD8+ regulatory cells suppress generation of a pathogenic Th17 response that plays a pivotal role in DS-induced disruption of corneal barrier function. PMID:24022789

  14. Implant-associated localized osteitis in murine femur fracture by biofilm forming Staphylococcus aureus: a novel experimental model.

    PubMed

    Windolf, Ceylan D; Meng, Wei; Lögters, Tim T; MacKenzie, Colin R; Windolf, Joachim; Flohé, Sascha

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is the most common causative agent for implant-associated osteitis. The present study characterizes a novel model of a low grade acute SA osteitis with bone defect in the femur which is stabilized by a titanium locking plate. Wild-type Balb/c mice were osteotomized, fixed by a locking plate and infected with SA. Mice underwent debridement 7 and 14 days later and were sacrificed at Day 28. At Days 7, 14, and 28 after inoculation local and systemic cell populations and IL-6 were analyzed. Fracture healing was quantified by radiography. The control group underwent the same procedure without infection. The bacterial load of implant-associated osteitis with biofilm formation was quantified by counting CFU and real-time PCR. Fracture healing determined by radiography was delayed in infected compared to non-infected mice. Throughout the investigation period CFU and leukocyte counts, as well as IL-6 levels were found to be significantly elevated in infected mice at the infection site but not systemically. Our murine model allows the detailed investigation of implant associated localized osteitis with biofilm producing SA and its influence on fracture healing. The model provides a tool to analyze therapeutic or prophylactic approaches to the problem of biofilm-associated osteitis.

  15. Does Carica papaya leaf-extract increase the platelet count? An experimental study in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarathna, Sinhalagoda Lekamlage Chandi Asoka; Wickramasinghe, Susiji; Waduge, Roshitha Nilmini; Rajapakse, Rajapakse Peramune Veddikkarage Jayanthe; Kularatne, Senanayake Abeysinghe Mudiyanselage

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the potential role of fresh Carica papaya (C. papaya) leaf extract on haematological and biochemical parameters and toxicological changes in a murine model. Methods In total 36 mice were used for the trial. Fresh C. papaya leaf extract [0.2 mL (2 g)/mouse] was given only to the test group (18 mice). General behavior, clinical signs and feeding patterns were recorded. Blood and tissue samples were collected at intervals. Haematological parameters including platelet, red blood cell (RBC), white blood cell (WBC), packed cell volume (PCV), serum biochemistry including serum creatinine, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) were determined. Organs for possible histopathological changes were examined. Results Neither group exhibited alteration of behavior or reduction in food and water intake. Similarly, no significant changes in SGOT, SGPT and serum creatinine levels were detected in the test group. Histopathological organ changes were not observed in either group of mice except in three liver samples of the test group which had a mild focal necrosis. The platelet count (11.33±0.35)×105/µL (P=0.000 04) and the RBC count (7.97±0.61)×106/µL (P=0.000 03) were significantly increased in the test group compared to that of the controls. However, WBC count and PCV (%) values were not changed significantly in the test group. The platelet count in the test group started to increase significantly from Day 3 (3.4±0.18×105/µL), reaching almost a fourfold higher at Day 21 (11.3×105/µL), while it was 3.8×105/µL and 5.5×105/µL at Day 3 and Day 21 respectively in the control. Likewise, the RBC count in the test group increased from 6×106/µL to 9×106/ µL at Day 21 while it remained near constant in the control group (6×106/µL). Conclusions Fresh C. papaya leaf extract significantly increased the platelet and RBC counts in the test group as compared to controls. Therefore, it is very

  16. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  17. Effects of an epidermal growth factor receptor-based cancer vaccine on wound healing and inflammation processes in murine experimental models.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Dasha; Chacón, Lewis; Casacó, Angel; Ledón, Nuris; Fernández, Nidia; Iglesias, Arianna; Hernández, Diana R; Sánchez, Belinda; Pérez, Rolando

    2014-02-01

    Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapies have been proven clinically effective for a variety of epithelial tumours. Vaccination of mice with the extracellular domain (ECD) of autologous EGFR overcomes the tolerance to self-EGFR and has antimetastatic effect on EGFR+ tumour. Because EGF/EGFR-signalling plays an important role in the inflammation stage of wound healing, the main objective of this study was to explore the possible role of murine (m) EGFR-ECD vaccine in the croton-oil-induced ear oedema and wound healing process in mice as autologous experimental models, mimicking the possible post-surgical wound complication in patients treated with human EGFR-ECD/VSSP vaccine. Mice were intramuscularly immunised four times; biweekly with the mEGFR-ECD/VSSP/Mont. Seven days later, an 8 mm diameter, full-thickness skin wound was created on the back of each animal. Immunisation induced a strong specific humoral response against the mEGFR-ECD protein and a DTH dose-response curve but interestingly, animals treated with mEGFR-ECD/VSSP/Mont had similar inflammatory and healing speed responses compared to control ones. These data suggest that application of mEGFR-ECD/VSSP vaccine as a therapeutic approach in cancer patients could not elicit a poor healing process after surgery.

  18. Lack of effect of Candida albicans mannan on development of protective immune responses in experimental murine candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Garner, R E; Domer, J E

    1994-02-01

    Candida albicans mannoprotein (MAN) administered to mice before or during immunization with viable C. albicans downregulates MAN-specific delayed hypersensitivity. In the experiments reported here we determined the effect of MAN downregulation on protective immunity in minimally immunized mice, i.e., mice exposed to C. albicans either intradermally or intragastrically, and in maximally immunized mice, i.e., mice immunized by a combination of intradermal and intragastric exposure, in experimental systemic candidiasis. MAN suppression did not induce statistically significant alterations in the protective responses in experimental candidiasis, although 8 of 12 groups of mice treated with MAN had fewer CFU of C. albicans in their kidneys than their non-MAN-treated counterparts. The results emphasize the lack of correlation of delayed hypersensitivity with protection in candidiasis and suggest that MAN may contain epitopes involved in the protective response.

  19. Reactive changes of retinal microglia during fatal murine cerebral malaria: effects of dexamethasone and experimental permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Medana, I M; Chan-Ling, T; Hunt, N H

    2000-03-01

    Microglial activation and redistribution toward blood vessels are some of the earliest observable events occurring within the central nervous system (CNS) during fatal murine cerebral malaria (FMCM). To investigate stimuli that might modulate microglial reactivity during FMCM we have performed two experimental manipulations and observed microglial responses in retinal whole mounts. First, to determine whether increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in the absence of the malaria parasite initiates the microglial changes, BBB function was compromised experimentally by intracarotid injection of arabinose and retinae were examined 12, 24, or 36 hours later. Second, to determine whether the immune response against the malaria parasite modulates microglial reactivity, infected mice were treated with dexamethasone before day 4 postinoculation. This treatment regime ameliorates cerebral complications without affecting parasite growth. We observed that increased BBB permeability was sufficient to elicit thickening of microglial processes and redistribution of microglia toward the vasculature, characteristic of the early stages of FMCM. However, despite the presence of plasma constituents in the CNS for up to 36 hours, microglia with amoeboid and vacuolated morphology were not observed. Dexamethasone treatment inhibited the up-regulation of alpha-D-galactose expression and reactive morphological changes in microglia during FMCM. These results suggest that disruption of the CNS milieu by entry of plasma constituents, or circulating malaria parasites in the absence of an immune response, by themselves are insufficient to induce the reactive microglial changes that are characteristic of FMCM. In addition, dexamethasone-sensitive event(s), presumably associated with immune system activation, occurring within the first few days of malaria infection are essential for the development of reactive microglia and subsequent fatal neurological complications.

  20. The efficacy of hydro alcoholic extract of Seidlitzia rosmarinus on experimental zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis lesions in murine model

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Fata, Abdolmajid; Khamesipour, Ali; Rakhshandeh, Hasan; Miramin Mohammadi, Akram; Salehi, Ghodratollah; Monavari, Hadi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Leishmaniasis is one of the most important parasitic infectious diseases in the world. Since last century, many efforts have been made to control and treat the disease, but appropriate vaccines, pesticides and medicines are not available or even eligible. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hydro-alcoholic extract of Seidlitzia rosmarinus on the lesions of experimental Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) in Balb/c mice. Materials and Methods: The population study was 60 Ballb/c mice which divided to 6 groups, all infected with Leishmania major [MRHO/75/IR]. Soon after the ulcer started to appear in the early stage, a dose of provided herbal extract with 5, 10 and 15% concentration applied on each lesion. The surface area of the lesions measured during an interval of 10 days. Direct Giemsa stained smears prepared two and four weeks after treatment. Results: Increasing the mean size of the lesions was statistically significant compared to those in control group (p>0.001). Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) developed in all of the mice including the control group that received Eucerine alone. Survival rate in group receiving 15% S. rosmarinus extracts showed significantly higher compared to mice in control group (p<0.001). Conclusion: Hydro-alcoholic extracts of S.rosmarinus with concentrations below15% did not show a therapeutic effect on experimental CL ulcers of Balb/c mice. Further studies with higher concentrations or nano particles are recommended. PMID:25386402

  1. Evaluation of s.c. route of immunization by homologous radio attenuated live vaccine in experimental murine model of visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sanchita; Khanra, Supriya; Chakraborty, Anindita; Roy, Syamal; Manna, Madhumita

    2016-06-01

    Our previous studies in BALB/c mice showed substantial protection against the experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis (MVL) when the animals were immunized with γ-irradiated live Leishmania donovani parasites through intra peritoneal (i.p.) and intra muscular (i.m.) routes respectively. The observations encouraged us to check the prophylactic efficacy of subcutaneous (s.c.) route as it is better alternative for human trial. The mice immunized with two subsequent doses of the radio attenuated homologous vaccine were challenged with virulent L. donovani parasites. Seventy-five days post infection, the animals were sacrificed. The extent of protection against the disease was evaluated by assessing the reduction of parasite burden in spleen and liver, the generation of free radicals (NO & ROS) and release of the cytokines from T-lymphocyte helper 1 (Th 1) and T-lymphocyte helper 2 (Th 2) along with the measurement of the serum immunoglobulins. The reductions in parasitic burden were observed up to 21 and 24 % in spleen and liver of the immunized groups with NO and ROS productions 27 and 34 % respectively. Whereas the increase in IFN gamma releases was between 19 and 34 %, the decrease in IL-10 release was not more than 22 %. This indicates the failure of the establishment of pronounced Th1 ambience which was further corroborated by the observed IgG2a and IgG1 ratio. The present study when compared with our previous observations with i.m. and i.p. routes revealed that s.c. route may not be a good choice for the use of radio attenuated vaccine.

  2. Evaluation of s.c. route of immunization by homologous radio attenuated live vaccine in experimental murine model of visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sanchita; Khanra, Supriya; Chakraborty, Anindita; Roy, Syamal; Manna, Madhumita

    2016-06-01

    Our previous studies in BALB/c mice showed substantial protection against the experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis (MVL) when the animals were immunized with γ-irradiated live Leishmania donovani parasites through intra peritoneal (i.p.) and intra muscular (i.m.) routes respectively. The observations encouraged us to check the prophylactic efficacy of subcutaneous (s.c.) route as it is better alternative for human trial. The mice immunized with two subsequent doses of the radio attenuated homologous vaccine were challenged with virulent L. donovani parasites. Seventy-five days post infection, the animals were sacrificed. The extent of protection against the disease was evaluated by assessing the reduction of parasite burden in spleen and liver, the generation of free radicals (NO & ROS) and release of the cytokines from T-lymphocyte helper 1 (Th 1) and T-lymphocyte helper 2 (Th 2) along with the measurement of the serum immunoglobulins. The reductions in parasitic burden were observed up to 21 and 24 % in spleen and liver of the immunized groups with NO and ROS productions 27 and 34 % respectively. Whereas the increase in IFN gamma releases was between 19 and 34 %, the decrease in IL-10 release was not more than 22 %. This indicates the failure of the establishment of pronounced Th1 ambience which was further corroborated by the observed IgG2a and IgG1 ratio. The present study when compared with our previous observations with i.m. and i.p. routes revealed that s.c. route may not be a good choice for the use of radio attenuated vaccine. PMID:27413317

  3. Therapeutic immunization with radio-attenuated Leishmania parasites through i.m. route revealed protection against the experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sanchita; Manna, Madhumita; Khanra, Supriya; Ghosh, Moumita; Bhar, Radhaballav; Chakraborty, Anindita; Roy, Syamal

    2012-07-01

    After our promising results from prophylactic and therapeutic study (i.p. route) with the radio-attenuated Leishmania donovani parasites against experimental murine visceral leishmaniasis, we prompted to check their therapeutic efficacy through i.m route. BALB/c mice were infected with highly virulent L. donovani parasites. After 75 days, mice were treated with gamma (γ)-irradiated parasites. A second therapeutic immunization was given after 15 days of first immunization. The protection against kala-azar was estimated with the reduction of Leishman-Donovan unit from spleen and liver that scored up to 80% and 93%, respectively, while a twofold increase in nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions has been observed in the immunized groups of animals. These groups of mice also showed disease regression by skewing Th2 cytokines (IL-10) towards Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ) bias along with the increased generation of NO and ROS, while the infected control group of mice without such treatment surrendered to the disease. Establishment of Th1 ambience in the treated groups has also been supported from the measured antileishmanial antibody IgG subsets (IgG2a and IgG1) with higher anti-soluble Leishmania antigen-specific IgG2a titer. As seen in our previous studies, doses of attenuation by γ-radiation should be taken into serious consideration. Attenuation of parasites at 50 Gy of absorbed dose of gamma rays has not worked well. Thus, therapeutic use of L. donovani parasites radio-attenuated at particular doses can be exploited as a promising vaccine agent. Absence of any adjuvant may increase its acceptability as vaccine candidate further.

  4. Local levels of interleukin-1beta, -4, -6 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in an experimental model of murine osteomyelitis due to staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Takashi; Magara, Shinya; Miyai, Daisuke; Nishimura, Hidetaka; Kuroki, Eiji; Furudoi, Shungo; Komori, Takahide; Ohbayashi, Chiho

    2002-07-21

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate local levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), -4 (IL-4), -6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), in a model of murine osteomyelitis due to Staphylococcus aureus. Cytokine levels in supernatants derived from bone homogenates were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, for 28 days following the direct implantation of murine tibiae with S.aureus. Levels of IL-1 beta and IL-6 in infected bone were elevated in the early post-infection period and then decreased. In contrast, TNF-alpha levels remained elevated 3 to 28 days post-infection, while IL-4 levels were elevated late in the course of infection. The histopathology of infected bone showed predominant infiltration of inflammatory cells and bone resorption 3 to 7 days after infection, and bone resorption and adjacent areas of formation 14 to 28 days after infection. These results suggest that the elevated IL-1 beta and IL-6 levels induced by infection may be related to bone damage mainly in the early phase of infection, and that TNF-alpha and IL-4 may at least in part be associated with histopathological changes, including both bone resorption and formation in the later phase of this osteomyelitis model.

  5. Effect of in vivo activation of natural killer (NK) cells by a tilorone analogue on the survival of mice injected intravenously with different experimental murine tumours

    PubMed Central

    ALGARRA, I.; GONZÁLEZ, A.; PÉREZ, M.; GAFORIO, J J; GARRIDO, F.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the effect of a tilorone analogue (RMI 10,874DA) and anti-asialo GM1 serum on the survival of BALB/c and C57B1/6 mice after i.v. injections of different syngeneic murine tumour cells. Tumour lines used were different clones from chemically (GR9 wild type, GR9.B9, B7.1.B4, B7.1.B5, B7.2.38), and ultraviolet light (GRUV3)-induced sarcomas; B16 melanoma and LSTRA and YC8 lymphomas. Pretreatment of mice with tilorone inhibited metastatic colonization and increased survival significantly in all cases. In some tumour systems, the effect was attenuated when high numbers of cells were injected. Abrogation of NK cells with anti-asialo GM1 serum significantly decreased (in all tumours and at different cell doses) survival in comparison with untreated mice injected with tumours, regardless of cell dose used. These results clearly suggest that NK cell activation in vivo by the tilorone analogue we tested prolongs survival and inhibits metastasis formation in mice, even when pretreatment consists of a single dose of the analogue. PMID:8608652

  6. Dimethyl fumarate ameliorates dextran sulfate sodium-induced murine experimental colitis by activating Nrf2 and suppressing NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuting; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Ping; Du, Qianming; Tao, Lei; Ding, Yang; Wang, Yajing; Hu, Rong

    2016-07-15

    In the present study, we examined the effects of dimethyl fumarate (DMF) on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced murine colitis, an animal model which mimics human IBD. Oral administration of DMF dose-dependently attenuated body weight loss, colon length shortening and colonic pathological damage including decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activities in DSS-treated mice. Increased glutathione (GSH) induced by DMF demonstrated its potential antioxidant capacity. In addition, Nrf2 and its downstream genes were markedly activated by DMF. Furthermore, protein and mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 were markedly suppressed by DMF. At the same time, decreased activation of caspase-1 was detected in DMF-treated mice, indicating that the NLRP3 inflammasome activation was suppressed. The in vitro study verified a negative regulation of DMF and its intestinal metabolite on NLRP3 inflammasome. Moreover, the inhibitory effect was found to be mostly dependent on Nrf2 which decreased mitochondrial ROS (mROS) generation and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) release. Taken together, our results demonstrated the ability of DMF to inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome activation and its potential use in the treatment of NLRP3-associated diseases. PMID:27184504

  7. Monoclonal antibody to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus defines a determinant on myelin and oligodendrocytes, and augments demyelination in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Zurbriggen, A; Fujinami, R S

    1990-06-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) causes a chronic demyelinating disease in mice. The mechanisms underlying the demyelination have not been fully elucidated. We have raised a mAb to TMEV (DA strain), H8, that reacts both with TMEV VP-1 and galactocerebroside (GC). In mouse brain cultures, cells positive for the mAb H8 epitope were double labeled with antibody to myelin basic protein, indicating that those cells were oligodendrocytes. Further, mAb H8 could immunostain myelin structures in frozen sections from mouse brains. When injected intravenously into mice with acute allergic encephalomyelitis, mAb H8 increased by 10-fold the size of demyelinated areas within the spinal cords. This is the first report demonstrating that an antibody to virus can enhance demyelination of a central nervous system disease. Ig fractions from the sera of mice with chronic TMEV infection had antibody(s) to GC, as well as to TMEV, as determined by ELISA. Furthermore, a competition ELISA for TMEV or GC antigen revealed that sera from these infected mice contained antibody(s) with the same specificity as mAb H8. Our results indicate that antibodies generated by immune response to TMEV can react with myelin and oligodendrocytes, and contribute to demyelination through an immune process.

  8. Monoclonal antibody to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus defines a determinant on myelin and oligodendrocytes, and augments demyelination in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) causes a chronic demyelinating disease in mice. The mechanisms underlying the demyelination have not been fully elucidated. We have raised a mAb to TMEV (DA strain), H8, that reacts both with TMEV VP-1 and galactocerebroside (GC). In mouse brain cultures, cells positive for the mAb H8 epitope were double labeled with antibody to myelin basic protein, indicating that those cells were oligodendrocytes. Further, mAb H8 could immunostain myelin structures in frozen sections from mouse brains. When injected intravenously into mice with acute allergic encephalomyelitis, mAb H8 increased by 10-fold the size of demyelinated areas within the spinal cords. This is the first report demonstrating that an antibody to virus can enhance demyelination of a central nervous system disease. Ig fractions from the sera of mice with chronic TMEV infection had antibody(s) to GC, as well as to TMEV, as determined by ELISA. Furthermore, a competition ELISA for TMEV or GC antigen revealed that sera from these infected mice contained antibody(s) with the same specificity as mAb H8. Our results indicate that antibodies generated by immune response to TMEV can react with myelin and oligodendrocytes, and contribute to demyelination through an immune process. PMID:1693653

  9. [Protective activity of S-PT84, a heat-killed preparation of Lactobacillus pentosus, against oral and gastric candidiasis in an experimental murine model].

    PubMed

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishijima, Sanae; Ono, Yoshiko; Izumo, Takayuki; Ida, Masayuki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Abe, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    The effect of S-PT84, a heat-killed preparation of Lactobacillus pentosus on growth of Candida albicans was examined in vitro and in vivo. The mycelial growth was effectively inhibited by S-PT84 and seemed to bind to the hyphae. We assessed the potential of S-PT84 for treatment of oral and gastric candidiasis using a murine model. When 2 mg of S-PT84 was administered three times into the oral cavity of orally Candida infected mice, the score of lesions on the tongue was improved on day 2. When 50 μl and 200 μl of S-PT84 (10 mg/ml) were administered three times into the oral cavity (0.5 mg × 3) and the stomach (2 mg × 3) of the same mouse model, the number of viable Candida cells in the stomach was reduced significantly on day 2. These findings suggest the possibility that S-PT84 has potential as a food ingredient supporting anti-Candida treatment, especially for Candida infection in the gastrointestinal tract.

  10. A Detailed Analysis of the Murine TAP Transporter Substrate Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Burgevin, Anne; Saveanu, Loredana; Kim, Yohan; Barilleau, Émilie; Kotturi, Maya; Sette, Alessandro; van Endert, Peter; Peters, Bjoern

    2008-01-01

    Background The transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) supplies cytosolic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum for binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Its specificity therefore influences the repertoire of peptides presented by MHC molecules. Compared to human TAP, murine TAP's binding specificity has not been characterized as well, even though murine systems are widely used for basic studies of antigen processing and presentation. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a detailed experimental analysis of murine TAP binding specificity by measuring the binding affinities of 323 peptides. Based on this experimental data, a computational model of murine TAP specificity was constructed. The model was compared to previously generated data on human and murine TAP specificities. In addition, the murine TAP specificities for known epitopes and random peptides were predicted and compared to assess the impact of murine TAP selectivity on epitope selection. Conclusions/Significance Comparisons to a previously constructed model of human TAP specificity confirms the well-established differences for peptide substrates with positively charged C-termini. In addition these comparisons show that several residues at the N-terminus of peptides which strongly influence binding to human TAP showed little effect on binding to murine TAP, and that the overall influence of the aminoterminal residues on peptide affinity for murine TAP is much lower than for the human transporter. Murine TAP also partly prefers different hydrophobic amino acids than human TAP in the carboxyterminal position. These species-dependent differences in specificity determined in vitro are shown to correlate with the epitope repertoire recognized in vivo. The quantitative model of binding specificity of murine TAP developed herein should be useful for interpreting epitope mapping and immunogenicity data obtained in humanized mouse models. PMID:18545702

  11. In vivo evidence for CD4+ and CD8+ suppressor T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of murine experimental autoimmune thyroiditis

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, J.C.; Kong, Y.C. )

    1991-09-01

    In several experimental autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT), vaccination with attenuated autoantigen-specific T cells has provided protection against subsequent induction of disease. However, the mechanism(s) of vaccination-induced suppression remains to be clarified. Since the authors have previously shown that suppression generated by pretreatment with mouse thyroglobulin (MTg) or thyroid-stimulating hormone in EAT is mediated by CD4+, not CD8+, suppressor T cells, they examined the role of T cell subsets in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT. Mice were vaccinated with irradiated, MTg-primed, and MTg-activated spleen cells and then challenged. Pretreatment with these cells suppressed EAT induced by immunization with MTg and adjuvant, but not by adoptive transfer of thyroiditogenic cells, suggesting a mechanism of afferent suppression. The activation of suppressor mechanisms did not require CD8+ cells, since mice depleted of CD8+ cells before vaccination showed reduced EAT comparable to control vaccinated mice. Furthermore, depletion of either the CD4+ or the CD8+ subset after vaccination did not significantly abrogate suppression. However, suppression was eliminated by the depletion of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells in vaccinated mice. These results provide evidence for the cooperative effects of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vaccination-induced suppression of EAT.

  12. Suppression of NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages is responsible for the amelioration of experimental murine colitis by the natural compound fraxinellone

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Ouyang, Zi-Jun; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Gong; Guo, Wen-Jie; Shen, Yan; Wu, Xu-Dong; Sun, Yang Xu, Qiang

    2014-11-15

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects millions of people worldwide. Although the etiology of this disease is uncertain, accumulating evidence indicates a key role for the activated mucosal immune system. In the present study, we examined the effects of the natural compound fraxinellone on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, an animal model that mimics IBD. Treatment with fraxinellone significantly reduced weight loss and diarrhea in mice and alleviated the macroscopic and microscopic signs of the disease. In addition, the activities of myeloperoxidase and alkaline phosphatase were markedly suppressed, while the levels of glutathione were increased in colitis tissues following fraxinellone treatment. This compound also decreased the colonic levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-18 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects of fraxinellone in mice with experimental colitis were attributed to its inhibition of CD11b{sup +} macrophage infiltration. The mRNA levels of macrophage-related molecules in the colon, including intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), were also markedly inhibited following fraxinellone treatment. The results from in vitro assays showed that fraxinellone significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), IL-1β and IL-18 as well as the activity of iNOS in both THP-1 cells and mouse primary peritoneal macrophages. The mechanisms responsible for these effects were attributed to the inhibitory role of fraxinellone in NF-κB signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Overall, our results support fraxinellone as a novel drug candidate in the treatment of colonic inflammation. - Highlights: • Fraxinellone, a lactone compound, alleviated DSS induced colitis. • The effects of fraxinellone were attributed to its inhibition on

  13. Role of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Production of Prostaglandin E2 and Nitric Oxide during Experimental Murine Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Sargi, S. C.; Dalalio, M. M. O.; Moraes, A. G.; Visentainer, J. E. L.; Morais, D. R.; Visentainer, J. V.

    2013-01-01

    There has recently been increased interest in the potential health effects of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on the immune system. Paracoccidioidomycosis is the most important endemic mycosis in Latin America. Macrophages have a fundamental role and act as first line of organism defense. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of n-3 fatty acids on the production of PGE2 and NO by mice infected with Pb18 and fed a diet enriched with LNA for 8 weeks. To study the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on macrophage activity during experimental paracoccidioidomycosis, mice were infected with Pb18 and fed a diet supplemented with LNA. PGE2 in the serum of animals was analyzed and NO in the supernatants of macrophages cultured and challenged in vitro with Pb18 was measured. Omega-3 fatty acids seemed to decrease the production of PGE2 in vivo in the infected group fed an LNA-supplemented diet during the 4th and 8th weeks of the experiment. At the same time, we observed an increase in synthesis of NO by peritoneal macrophages in this group. Omega-3 fatty acids thus appear to have an immunomodulatory effect in paracoccidioidomycosis. PMID:24455741

  14. Evaluation of three recombinant multi-antigenic vaccines composed of surface and secretory antigens of Toxoplasma gondii in murine models of experimental toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Dziadek, Bozena; Gatkowska, Justyna; Brzostek, Anna; Dziadek, Jaroslaw; Dzitko, Katarzyna; Grzybowski, Marcin; Dlugonska, Henryka

    2011-01-17

    The great clinical and economical impact of Toxoplasma gondii infections makes the development of an effective vaccine for controlling toxoplasmosis an extremely important aim. In the presented study, we evaluate the protective and immunogenic properties of three recombinant subunit vaccines composed of rROP2+rGRA4+rSAG1, rROP2+rROP4+rGRA4 and rROP2+rROP4+rSAG1 proteins of T. gondii in an experimental toxoplasmosis model in the C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6 mouse strains. All three recombinant vaccines induced partial protection as measured by the reduction of brain cyst burden following challenge with five tissue cysts of the low virulence DX T. gondii strain. The level of protection was dependent on the antigen composition of the vaccine and the genetic background of the laboratory animals. The strongest protection against chronic toxoplasmosis was induced in both C3H/HeJ and C57BL/6 mice by the mixture of rhoptry proteins rROP2 and rROP4 combined with tachyzoite major protein rSAG1. The average parasite burden in these groups of mice was reduced by 71% and 90%, respectively, compared to non-vaccinated mice. The observed protective effect was related to the vaccine-induced cellular and humoral immune responses, as measured by the antigen-induced release of the Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-2, the antigen-stimulated proliferation of spleen cells of vaccinated animals in comparison to control animals and the development of systemic antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a (C3H/HeJ) or IgG2c (C57BL/6) antibodies. Our studies show that recombinant rROP2, rROP4, rGRA4 and rSAG1 antigens may be promising candidates for a subunit vaccine against toxoplasmosis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the ideal composition of vaccine antigens can be equally effective in mice with different genetic backgrounds and variable levels of innate resistance to toxoplasmosis, resulting in strong protection against T. gondii invasion.

  15. Adhesion: a confounding bias in murine cervical heterotopic heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinghui; Chen, Qi; Liu, Fang; Fu, Zhiren; Wang, Quanxing

    2015-01-01

    Tissue adhesion is a common postsurgical phenomenon among the human population. This complication also occurs in murine transplant models. In this study, we investigated the impact of adhesion on murine cervical heterotopic heart transplantation by using sodium hyaluronate (SH) as an anti-adhesive agent. Our study revealed that SH administration produced no significant effect on histological change, TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP-1, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 expression, CD4+ T, CD8+ T, or neutrophil and macrophage counts. Our findings suggest that SH was biocompatible and non-immunogenic. Later, we observed that adhesion not only affected the survival of the graft without mediating rejection, but was closely related to the severity of rejection as manifested by larger and more severe adhesion formation in total-allomismatched and MHC class II-allomismatched murine cardiac allografts. Therefore, we inferred that using the murine cervical heterotopic heart transplant model may lead to an exaggerated p-value in statistical significance testing which could mislead experimenters in considering that the results are more significant than the fact. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first demonstration that proves that adhesion was a confounding bias in the murine cervical heterotopic heart transplant model and highlights the possibilities for improvement in future use. PMID:26550450

  16. Murine gamma interferon fails to inhibit Toxoplasma gondii growth in murine fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzman, J D; Gonias, S L; Pfefferkorn, E R

    1990-01-01

    Although treatment of human macrophages or fibroblasts with human gamma interferon results in the inhibition of intracellular Toxoplasma gondii, murine gamma interferon stimulated only murine macrophages, not murine fibroblasts, to inhibit T. gondii. This species difference may be important in understanding the control of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:2106497

  17. Antitumor and antimetastatic activity of interleukin 12 against murine tumors

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that in vivo administration of murine interleukin 12 (IL-12) to mice results in augmentation of cytotoxic natural killer (NK)/lymphocyte-activated killer cell activity, enhancement of cytolytic T cell generation, and induction of interferon gamma secretion. In this study, the in vivo activity of murine IL-12 against a number of murine tumors has been evaluated. Experimental pulmonary metastases or subcutaneous growth of the B16F10 melanoma were markedly reduced in mice treated intraperitoneally with IL-12, resulting in an increase in survival time. The therapeutic effectiveness of IL-12 was dose dependent and treatment of subcutaneous tumors could be initiated up to 14 d after injection of tumor cells. Likewise, established experimental hepatic metastases and established subcutaneous M5076 reticulum cell sarcoma and Renca renal cell adenocarcinoma tumors were effectively treated by IL-12 at doses which resulted in no gross toxicity. Local peritumoral injection of IL-12 into established subcutaneous Renca tumors resulted in regression and complete disappearance of these tumors. IL-12 was as effective in NK cell-deficient beige mice or in mice depleted of NK cell activity by treatment with antiasialo GM1, suggesting that NK cells are not the primary cell type mediating the antitumor effects of this cytokine. However, the efficacy of IL-12 was greatly reduced in nude mice suggesting the involvement of T cells. Furthermore, depletion of CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells significantly reduced the efficacy of IL-12. These results demonstrate that IL-12 has potent in vivo antitumor and antimetastatic effects against murine tumors and demonstrate as well the critical role of CD8+ T cells in mediating the antitumor effects against subcutaneous tumors. PMID:8104230

  18. Murine Typhus, Reunion, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Camuset, Guillaume; Socolovschi, Cristina; Moiton, Marie-Pierre; Kuli, Barbara; Foucher, Aurélie; Poubeau, Patrice; Borgherini, Gianandrea; Wartel, Guillaume; Audin, Héla; Raoult, Didier; Filleul, Laurent; Parola, Philippe; Pagès, Fréderic

    2015-01-01

    Murine typhus case was initially identified in Reunion, France, in 2012 in a tourist. Our investigation confirmed 8 autochthonous cases that occurred during January 2011–January 2013 in Reunion. Murine typhus should be considered in local patients and in travelers returning from Reunion who have fevers of unknown origin. PMID:25625653

  19. Differential effects of processing time and duration of collagenase digestion on human and murine fat grafts

    PubMed Central

    Seaman, SA; Tannan, ST; Cao, Y; Peirce, SM; Lin, KY

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous fat graft retention is unpredictable and mechanisms of optimization are poorly understood. Attempts at improving retention utilize collagenase experimentally and clinically to isolate the stromal vascular fraction to “enhance” fat grafts. However, no standardized duration for collagenase digestion or time following fat graft harvest has been established. This study investigates the effect of 1.) time after fat graft harvest and 2.) collagenase digestion time on interstitial cell and adipocyte viability in murine fat and human lipoaspirate. Methods Murine fat and human lipoaspirate were incubated ex vivo after harvest at room temperature for 120 minutes. Additional groups were incubated with collagenase for increasing five minute intervals from 30-60 minutes. Samples from each group were stained with BODIPY to quantify intact adipocytes and LIVE/DEAD kit to quantify interstitial cell viability. Results With increased time post-harvest, the number of intact adipocytes in murine fat and human lipoaspirate remained unchanged. Human interstitial cells were resistant to the effect of increased time ex vivo, while murine interstitial cells decreased in viability. In both populations, increased collagenase digestion time significantly decreased the number of viable adipocytes (murine: p-value ≤ 0.001, human: p-value ≤ 0.001) and interstitial cells (murine: p-value ≤ 0.001, human: p-value ≤ 0.001). Conclusions Human and murine adipocytes and human interstitial cells appear resistant to deleterious effects of increasing time following harvest. However, murine interstitial cells including are sensitive to increased time and prolonged collagenase digestion. These studies highlight the complex cellular components of fat grafts and how they respond differentially to time and collagenase digestion. PMID:26218393

  20. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus induces tumour necrosis factor-alpha in murine astrocyte cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, A; Rubio, N

    1993-01-01

    Cytokines have been postulated to exert an important modulatory and recruiting role in demyelination induced by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in SJL/J mice. Using a cytolytic bioassay and ELISA, we have detected and quantified a cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), in supernatants from astrocyte cultures infected in vitro with TMEV. TNF was detected only after TMEV-specific infection of astrocyte cultures (approximately 200-400 U/ml). In vitro TNF synthesis appeared in a dose- and time-dependent manner and was produced by both SJL/J (a strain susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelination) and BALB/c (a resistant strain) astrocytes. The precise nature of TNF activity was further assessed by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) and antibody neutralization. These results indicate an active role for astrocytes as accessory immune cells in our experimental model for multiple sclerosis. PMID:8478023

  1. Diagnostic imaging advances in murine models of colitis

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Markus; Lenz, Philipp; Mücke, Marcus M; Gohar, Faekah; Willeke, Peter; Domagk, Dirk; Bettenworth, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic-remittent inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract still evoking challenging clinical diagnostic and therapeutic situations. Murine models of experimental colitis are a vital component of research into human IBD concerning questions of its complex pathogenesis or the evaluation of potential new drugs. To monitor the course of colitis, to the present day, classical parameters like histological tissue alterations or analysis of mucosal cytokine/chemokine expression often require euthanasia of animals. Recent advances mean revolutionary non-invasive imaging techniques for in vivo murine colitis diagnostics are increasingly available. These novel and emerging imaging techniques not only allow direct visualization of intestinal inflammation, but also enable molecular imaging and targeting of specific alterations of the inflamed murine mucosa. For the first time, in vivo imaging techniques allow for longitudinal examinations and evaluation of intra-individual therapeutic response. This review discusses the latest developments in the different fields of ultrasound, molecularly targeted contrast agent ultrasound, fluorescence endoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy as well as tomographic imaging with magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and fluorescence-mediated tomography, discussing their individual limitations and potential future diagnostic applications in the management of human patients with IBD. PMID:26811642

  2. Murine Model of Hindlimb Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Niiyama, Hiroshi; Huang, Ngan F.; Rollins, Mark D.; Cooke, John P.

    2009-01-01

    In the United States, peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects about 10 million individuals, and is also prevalent worldwide. Medical therapies for symptomatic relief are limited. Surgical or endovascular interventions are useful for some individuals, but long-term results are often disappointing. As a result, there is a need for developing new therapies to treat PAD. The murine hindlimb ischemia preparation is a model of PAD, and is useful for testing new therapies. When compared to other models of tissue ischemia such as coronary or cerebral artery ligation, femoral artery ligation provides for a simpler model of ischemic tissue. Other advantages of this model are the ease of access to the femoral artery and low mortality rate. In this video, we demonstrate the methodology for the murine model of unilateral hindimb ischemia. The specific materials and procedures for creating and evaluating the model will be described, including the assessment of limb perfusion by laser Doppler imaging. This protocol can also be utilized for the transplantation and non-invasive tracking of cells, which is demonstrated by Huang et al.1. PMID:19229179

  3. Murine model of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Louise; Prosser, Hamish C G; Tan, Joanne T M; Vanags, Laura Z; Ng, Martin K C; Bursill, Christina A

    2013-05-28

    Wound healing and repair are the most complex biological processes that occur in human life. After injury, multiple biological pathways become activated. Impaired wound healing, which occurs in diabetic patients for example, can lead to severe unfavorable outcomes such as amputation. There is, therefore, an increasing impetus to develop novel agents that promote wound repair. The testing of these has been limited to large animal models such as swine, which are often impractical. Mice represent the ideal preclinical model, as they are economical and amenable to genetic manipulation, which allows for mechanistic investigation. However, wound healing in a mouse is fundamentally different to that of humans as it primarily occurs via contraction. Our murine model overcomes this by incorporating a splint around the wound. By splinting the wound, the repair process is then dependent on epithelialization, cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, which closely mirror the biological processes of human wound healing. Whilst requiring consistency and care, this murine model does not involve complicated surgical techniques and allows for the robust testing of promising agents that may, for example, promote angiogenesis or inhibit inflammation. Furthermore, each mouse acts as its own control as two wounds are prepared, enabling the application of both the test compound and the vehicle control on the same animal. In conclusion, we demonstrate a practical, easy-to-learn, and robust model of wound healing, which is comparable to that of humans.

  4. The B-cell stimulatory cytokines BLyS and APRIL are elevated in human periodontitis and are required for B-cell–dependent bone loss in experimental murine periodontitis1

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Toshiharu; AlSarhan, Mohammed; Benakanakere, Manjunatha R.; Maekawa, Tomoki; Kinane, Denis F.; Cancro, Michael P.; Korostoff, Jonathan M.; Hajishengallis, George

    2015-01-01

    B-lineage cells (B lymphocytes and plasma cells) predominate in the inflammatory infiltrate of human chronic periodontitis. However, their role in disease pathogenesis and the factors responsible for their persistence in chronic lesions are poorly understood. In this regard, two cytokines of the TNF ligand superfamily, namely a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), are important for the survival, proliferation, and maturation of B cells. We thus hypothesized that APRIL and/or BLyS are upregulated in periodontitis and contribute to induction of periodontal bone loss. This hypothesis was addressed in both human and mouse experimental systems. We show that, relative to healthy controls, the expression of APRIL and BLyS mRNA and protein was upregulated in natural and experimental periodontitis in humans and mice, respectively. The elevated expression of these cytokines correlated with increased numbers of B cells/plasma cells in both species. Moreover, APRIL and BLyS partially colocalized with kappa light chain-expressing B lineage cells at the epithelial-connective tissue interface. Ligature-induced periodontitis resulted in significantly less bone loss in B cell-deficient mice compared to wild-type controls. Ab-mediated neutralization of APRIL or BLyS diminished the number of B cells in the gingival tissue and inhibited bone loss in wild-type but not in B cell-deficient mice. In conclusion, B cells and specific cytokines involved in their growth and differentiation contribute to periodontal bone loss. Moreover, APRIL and BLyS have been identified as potential therapeutic targets in periodontitis. PMID:26150532

  5. The B Cell-Stimulatory Cytokines BLyS and APRIL Are Elevated in Human Periodontitis and Are Required for B Cell-Dependent Bone Loss in Experimental Murine Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Abe, Toshiharu; AlSarhan, Mohammed; Benakanakere, Manjunatha R; Maekawa, Tomoki; Kinane, Denis F; Cancro, Michael P; Korostoff, Jonathan M; Hajishengallis, George

    2015-08-15

    B-lineage cells (B lymphocytes and plasma cells) predominate in the inflammatory infiltrate of human chronic periodontitis. However, their role in disease pathogenesis and the factors responsible for their persistence in chronic lesions are poorly understood. In this regard, two cytokines of the TNF ligand superfamily, a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), are important for the survival, proliferation, and maturation of B cells. Thus, we hypothesized that APRIL and/or BLyS are upregulated in periodontitis and contribute to induction of periodontal bone loss. This hypothesis was addressed in both human and mouse experimental systems. We show that, relative to healthy controls, the expression of APRIL and BLyS mRNA and protein was upregulated in natural and experimental periodontitis in humans and mice, respectively. The elevated expression of these cytokines correlated with increased numbers of B cells/plasma cells in both species. Moreover, APRIL and BLyS partially colocalized with κ L chain-expressing B-lineage cells at the epithelial-connective tissue interface. Ligature-induced periodontitis resulted in significantly less bone loss in B cell-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls. Ab-mediated neutralization of APRIL or BLyS diminished the number of B cells in the gingival tissue and inhibited bone loss in wild-type, but not in B cell-deficient, mice. In conclusion, B cells and specific cytokines involved in their growth and differentiation contribute to periodontal bone loss. Moreover, APRIL and BLyS have been identified as potential therapeutic targets in periodontitis.

  6. Osteopontin Is Upregulated in Human and Murine Acute Schistosomiasis Mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Thiago Almeida; Syn, Wing-Kin; Amâncio, Frederico Figueiredo; Cunha, Pedro Henrique Diniz; Caporali, Julia Fonseca Morais; Trindade, Guilherme Vaz de Melo; Santos, Elisângela Trindade; Souza, Márcia Maria; Andrade, Zilton Araújo; Witek, Rafal P; Secor, William Evan; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Background Symptomatic acute schistosomiasis mansoni is a systemic hypersensitivity reaction against the migrating schistosomula and mature eggs after a primary infection. The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of acute schistosomiasis are not fully elucidated. Osteopontin has been implicated in granulomatous reactions and in acute hepatic injury. Our aims were to evaluate if osteopontin plays a role in acute Schistosoma mansoni infection in both human and experimentally infected mice and if circulating OPN levels could be a novel biomarker of this infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Serum/plasma osteopontin levels were measured by ELISA in patients with acute (n = 28), hepatointestinal (n = 26), hepatosplenic (n = 39) schistosomiasis and in uninfected controls (n = 21). Liver osteopontin was assessed by immunohistochemistry in needle biopsies of 5 patients. Sera and hepatic osteopontin were quantified in the murine model of schistosomiasis mansoni during acute (7 and 8 weeks post infection, n = 10) and chronic (30 weeks post infection, n = 8) phase. Circulating osteopontin levels are increased in patients with acute schistosomiasis (p = 0.0001). The highest levels of OPN were observed during the peak of clinical symptoms (7–11 weeks post infection), returning to baseline level once the granulomas were modulated (>12 weeks post infection). The plasma levels in acute schistosomiasis were even higher than in hepatosplenic patients. The murine model mirrored the human disease. Macrophages were the major source of OPN in human and murine acute schistosomiasis, while the ductular reaction maintains OPN production in hepatosplenic disease. Soluble egg antigens from S. mansoni induced OPN expression in primary human kupffer cells. Conclusions/Significance S. mansoni egg antigens induce the production of OPN by macrophages in the necrotic-exudative granulomas characteristic of acute schistosomiasis mansoni. Circulating OPN levels are upregulated in human and

  7. Comprehensive Echocardiographic Assessment of the Right Ventricle in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nishi; Singh, Harpreet

    2016-01-01

    Background Non-invasive high-resolution echocardiography to evaluate cardiovascular function of small animals is increasingly being used due to availability of genetically engineered murine models. Even though guidelines and standard values for humans were revised by the American Society of Echocardiography, evaluations on murine models are not performed according to any standard protocols. These limitations are preventing translation of preclinical evaluations to clinical meaningful conclusions. We have assessed the right heart of two commonly used murine models according to standard clinical guidelines, and provided the practical guide and sample values for cardiac assessments. Methods Right heart echocardiography evaluations of CD1 and C57BL/6 mice were performed under 1–3% isoflurane anesthesia using Vevo® 2100 Imaging System with a high-frequency (18–38 MHz) probe (VisualSonics MS400). We have provided a practical guide on how to image and assess the right heart of a mouse which is frequently used to evaluate development of right heart failure due to pulmonary hypertension. Results Our results show significant differences between CD1 and C57BL/6 mice. Right ventricle structural assessment showed significantly larger (p < 0.05) size, and pulmonary artery diameter in CD1 mice (n = 11) compared to C57BL/6 mice (n = 15). Right heart systolic and diastolic functions were similar for both strains. Conclusion Our practical guide on how to image and assess the right heart of murine models provides the first comprehensive values which can be used for preclinical research studies using echocardiography. Additionally, our results indicate that there is a high variability between mouse species and experimental models should be carefully selected for cardiac evaluations. PMID:27721954

  8. Plaque assay for murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B; Bragazzi Cunha, Juliana; Wobus, Christiane E

    2012-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is the only member of the Norovirus genus that efficiently grows in tissue culture. Cell lysis and cytopathic effect (CPE) are observed during MNV-1 infection of murine dendritic cells or macrophages. This property of MNV-1 can be used to quantify the number of infectious particles in a given sample by performing a plaque assay. The plaque assay relies on the ability of MNV-1 to lyse cells and to form holes in a confluent cell monolayer, which are called plaques. Multiple techniques can be used to detect viral infections in tissue culture, harvested tissue, clinical, and environmental samples, but not all measure the number of infectious particles (e.g. qRT-PCR). One way to quantify infectious viral particles is to perform a plaque assay, which will be described in detail below. A variation on the MNV plaque assay is the fluorescent focus assay, where MNV antigen is immunostained in cell monolayers. This assay can be faster, since viral antigen expression precedes plaque formation. It is also useful for titrating viruses unable to form plaques. However, the fluorescent focus assay requires additional resources beyond those of the plaque assay, such as antibodies and a microscope to count focus-forming units. Infectious MNV can also be quantified by determining the 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose (TCID50). This assay measures the amount of virus required to produce CPE in 50% of inoculated tissue culture cells by endpoint titration. However, its limit of detection is higher compared to a plaque assay. In this article, we describe a plaque assay protocol that can be used to effectively determine the number of infectious MNV particles present in biological or environmental samples. This method is based on the preparation of 10-fold serial dilutions of MNV-containing samples, which are used to inoculate a monolayer of permissive cells (RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells). Virus is allowed to attach to the cell monolayer for a given period of

  9. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcelo, Kathrina L.; Hirschi, Karen K.

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  10. Sexual transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Marcelle; Nitz, Nadjar; Santana, Camilla; Moraes, Aline; Hagström, Luciana; Andrade, Rafael; Rios, Adriano; Sousa, Alessandro; Dallago, Bruno; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Hecht, Mariana

    2016-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is mainly transmitted by blood-sucking triatomines, but other routes also have epidemiological importance, such as blood transfusion and congenital transmission. Although the possibility of sexual transmission of T. cruzi has been suggested since its discovery, few studies have been published on this subject. We investigated acquisition of T. cruzi by sexual intercourse in an experimental murine model. Male and female mice in the chronic phase of Chagas disease were mated with naive partners. Parasitological, serological and molecular tests demonstrated the parasites in tissues and blood of partners. These results confirm the sexual transmission of T. cruzi in mice.

  11. COMPARATIVE TOXICITY OF DIFFERENT EMISSION PARTICLES IN MURINE PULMONARY EPITHELIAL CELLS AND MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative Toxicity of Different Emission Particles in Murine Pulmonary Epithelial Cells and Macrophages. T Stevens1, M Daniels2, P Singh2, M I Gilmour2. 1 UNC, Chapel Hill 27599 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, RTP, NC 27711

    Epidemiological studies have shown ...

  12. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  13. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors.

  14. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  15. Chemoprophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of thymol in murine cystic echinococcosis.

    PubMed

    Maggiore, M; Pensel, P E; Denegri, G; Elissondo, M C

    2015-10-01

    Cystic echinococcosis is a zoonotic disease caused by the larval stage of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. The drugs commonly used against cystic echinococcosis are benzimidazoles. Unfortunately, 20%-40% of cases do not respond favorably to such chemotherapy. Consequently, the search of new therapeutic alternatives such as the use of traditional medicinal plants has been increased. The aim of the current experimental work was to investigate the chemoprophylactic and clinical efficacy of thymol on mice infected with E. granulosus metacestodes. Thymol (40 mg/kg) was administered under two different therapeutic schemes: dosing every 24h over 20 days and treatment every 12h for 10 days. Thymol demonstrated efficacy against experimental murine cystic echinococcosis. The chemoprophylactic and therapeutic effects of thymol were comparable to that of albendazole. Due to the lack of toxicity observed in mice at the tested doses; we consider that thymol is a potential alternative to be applied for the treatment of human hydatid disease. PMID:26096310

  16. Titration of murine leukemia viruses with rat cell line RFL.

    PubMed

    Koga, M

    1977-08-01

    Normal rat embryo cell (RFL) from syncytia after infection with murine leukemia virus. The assay for counting the number of syncytium foci produced in RFL cells is a sensitive method for a direct infectivity assay of murine leukemia virus.

  17. Murine Norovirus: Propagation, Quantification and Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Seungmin; Alhatlani, Bader; Arias, Armando; Caddy, Sarah L; Christodoulou, Constantina; Cunha, Juliana; Emmott, Ed; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta; Kolawole, Abimbola; Lu, Jia; Rippinger, Christine; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Thorne, Lucy; Vashist, Surender; Goodfellow, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a positive-sense, plus-stranded RNA virus in the Caliciviridae family. It is the most common pathogen in biomedical research colonies. MNV is also related to the human noroviruses, which cause the majority of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Like the human noroviruses, MNV is an enteric virus that replicates in the intestine and is transmitted by the fecal-oral route. MNV replicates in murine macrophages and dendritic cells in cells in culture and in the murine host. This virus is often used to study mechanisms in norovirus biology, because the human noroviruses are refractory to growth in cell culture. MNV combines the availability of a cell culture and reverse genetics system with the ability to study infection in the native host. Herein, we describe a panel of techniques that are commonly used to study MNV biology. PMID:24789596

  18. Fluorescence tomography in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Kumar, Anand T. N.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Boas, David A.; Bacskai, Brian J.

    2007-02-01

    Noninvasive molecular imaging of amyloid plaques in murine Alzheimer's disease models would accelerate drug development and basic Alzheimer's research. Amyloid plaques differ from traditional fluorescent targets in size and spatial distribution and therefore present a unique challenge for biomarker development and tomography. To study imaging feasibility and establish biomarker criteria, we developed a digital mouse head model from a 100 μm-resolution, digital, segmented mouse atlas1. The cortical region of the brain was filled with a spatially uniform distribution of plaques that had different fluorescent properties from the surrounding brain tissue, similar to current transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence was simulated with a Monte Carlo algorithm using different plaque densities, detection geometries, and background fluorescence. Our preliminary results demonstrated that shielding effects might require nonlinear reconstruction algorithms and that background fluorescence would seriously hinder quantitative burden estimation. The Monte Carlo based approach presented here offers a powerful way to study the feasibility of non-invasive imaging in murine Alzheimer's models and to optimize experimental conditions.

  19. Murine Models of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Elshafa Hassan; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a B-lymphotropic gamma herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies. Most EBV-related cancers present complex medical management challenges; thus it has been essential to develop preclinical in vivo models allowing for the study of pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of these diseases. Early in vivo models used nonhuman primates; however, such models were limited by the inability of EBV to achieve viral latency, availability, and cost. Immunodeficient mouse strains emerged as efficient models that allow for engraftment of human mononuclear cells and controlled evaluation of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). By using highly immunodeficient strains of mice such as severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) and NOD/LtSz-scid ILrg(-/-)(NOG) mice, investigators have developed efficient platforms for evaluating pathogenesis of benign (HLH) and malignant (EBV-LPD) diseases associated with EBV. Humanized murine chimeric models have been essential tools for evaluating preventive strategies with vaccine and adoptive cellular approaches, as well as development of experimental therapeutic strategies. Manipulation of the human immune cells before engraftment or mutation of viral lytic and latent genes has enhanced our understanding of the oncogenic nature of EBV and the complexity of human immune responses to EBV. In this review, we discuss how the EBV murine models have evolved to become essential tools for studying the virology of EBV as it relates to human EBV-LPD pathogenesis, the immunobiology of innate and adaptive responses, and limitations of these models. PMID:27034395

  20. Immune recognition of AIDS virus antigens by human and murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Langlade-Demoyen, P; Michel, F; Hoffenbach, A; Vilmer, E; Dadaglio, G; Garicia-Pons, F; Mayaud, C; Autran, B; Wain-Hobson, S; Plata, F

    1988-09-15

    The CTL response to HIV was analyzed in humans and in mice. By using a novel and strictly autologous lymphocyte culture system, human CTL lines were established with PBL from seropositive asymptomatic donors and from patients suffering from AIDS or presenting AIDS-related complex. CTL from HLA-A2 donors recognize and kill murine P815 mastocytoma cells doubly transfected with the human HLA-A2 gene and the HIV env gene; they also kill HLA-compatible human macrophages infected with HIV. CTL specific for the HIV env Ag were also generated in BALB/c mice by immunization with syngeneic murine cells transfected with the HIV env gene. Human and murine HIV-immune CTL populations belong to the CD8 subset of T lymphocytes and are restricted by class I HLA or H-2 transplantation Ag, respectively, in the recognition of HIV env Ag. The two different experimental systems presented here can be used to study CD8 lymphocyte immunity against HIV. The murine model of CTL immunity offers the additional advantage of avoiding the manipulation of infectious virus isolates.

  1. Limited Role of Murine ATM in Oncogene-Induced Senescence and p53-Dependent Tumor Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Soria, Rebeca; Collado, Manuel; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Serrano, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:19421407

  2. Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa Extract Attenuates DSS-Induced Murine Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jong-Chan; Lee, Kang Min

    2016-01-01

    We examined the protective effects of Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa (AAK) extract on a murine model of acute experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by 4% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water of male C57BL/6 mice, for 7 consecutive days. Oral administration of AAK extract (500 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated DSS-induced symptoms such as anorexia, weight loss, events of diarrhea or bloody stools, and colon shortening. Histological damage was also ameliorated, as evidenced by the architectural preservation and suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration in colonic samples. Treatment improved the colonic mRNA expression of different inflammatory markers: cytokines, inducible enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases, and tight junction-related proteins. In the isolated serum, IgE levels were downregulated. Collectively, these findings indicate the therapeutic potentials of AAK as an effective complementary or alternative modality for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. PMID:27293323

  3. Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa Extract Attenuates DSS-Induced Murine Colitis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jong-Chan; Lee, Kang Min; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    We examined the protective effects of Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa (AAK) extract on a murine model of acute experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by 4% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water of male C57BL/6 mice, for 7 consecutive days. Oral administration of AAK extract (500 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated DSS-induced symptoms such as anorexia, weight loss, events of diarrhea or bloody stools, and colon shortening. Histological damage was also ameliorated, as evidenced by the architectural preservation and suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration in colonic samples. Treatment improved the colonic mRNA expression of different inflammatory markers: cytokines, inducible enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases, and tight junction-related proteins. In the isolated serum, IgE levels were downregulated. Collectively, these findings indicate the therapeutic potentials of AAK as an effective complementary or alternative modality for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

  4. Murine granulated metrial gland cells are susceptible to Chlamydia psittaci infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J; Buendía, A J; Salinas, J; Bernabé, A; Rodolakis, A; Stewart, I J

    1996-09-01

    Granulated metrial gland (GMG) cells are the most numerous lymphoid cells in the uteroplacental unit in rodent pregnancy. In an experimental murine model of abortion-causing infection, we have studied the responses of GMG cells to Chlamydia psittaci. Chlamydial inclusions have been found within GMG cells, both in apparently healthy cells and in cells with degenerative changes. Establishing the existence of GMG cells infected by C. psittaci opens a new and interesting chapter in the study of these cells.

  5. Murine granulated metrial gland cells are susceptible to Chlamydia psittaci infection in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, J; Buendía, A J; Salinas, J; Bernabé, A; Rodolakis, A; Stewart, I J

    1996-01-01

    Granulated metrial gland (GMG) cells are the most numerous lymphoid cells in the uteroplacental unit in rodent pregnancy. In an experimental murine model of abortion-causing infection, we have studied the responses of GMG cells to Chlamydia psittaci. Chlamydial inclusions have been found within GMG cells, both in apparently healthy cells and in cells with degenerative changes. Establishing the existence of GMG cells infected by C. psittaci opens a new and interesting chapter in the study of these cells. PMID:8751945

  6. Hyperlipidemia affects multiscale structure and strength of murine femur.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Lutz, Andre; Du, Xia; Klimecky, Laureen; Kawas, Neal; Hourany, Talia; Jahng, Joelle; Chin, Jesse; Tintut, Yin; Nackenhors, Udo; Keyak, Joyce

    2014-07-18

    To improve bone strength prediction beyond limitations of assessment founded solely on the bone mineral component, we investigated the effect of hyperlipidemia, present in more than 40% of osteoporotic patients, on multiscale structure of murine bone. Our overarching purpose is to estimate bone strength accurately, to facilitate mitigating fracture morbidity and mortality in patients. Because (i) orientation of collagen type I affects, independently of degree of mineralization, cortical bone׳s micro-structural strength; and, (ii) hyperlipidemia affects collagen orientation and μCT volumetric tissue mineral density (vTMD) in murine cortical bone, we have constructed the first multiscale finite element (mFE), mouse-specific femoral model to study the effect of collagen orientation and vTMD on strength in Ldlr(-/-), a mouse model of hyperlipidemia, and its control wild type, on either high fat diet or normal diet. Each µCT scan-based mFE model included either element-specific elastic orthotropic properties calculated from collagen orientation and vTMD (collagen-density model) by experimentally validated formulation, or usual element-specific elastic isotropic material properties dependent on vTMD-only (density-only model). We found that collagen orientation, assessed by circularly polarized light and confocal microscopies, and vTMD, differed among groups and that microindentation results strongly correlate with elastic modulus of collagen-density models (r(2)=0.85, p=10(-5)). Collagen-density models yielded (1) larger strains, and therefore lower strength, in simulations of 3-point bending and physiological loading; and (2) higher correlation between mFE-predicted strength and 3-point bending experimental strength, than density-only models. This novel method supports ongoing translational research to achieve the as yet elusive goal of accurate bone strength prediction.

  7. In vivo temporal and spatial distribution of depolarization and repolarization and the illusive murine T wave

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Iden, Jason B; Kovithavongs, Kay; Gulamhusein, Rashida; Duff, Henry J; Kavanagh, Katherine M

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed in vivo temporal and spatial electrophysiological properties of murine hearts and the effect of manipulation of transmural action potential durations (APDs) on T wave morphology. Monophasic action potentials (MAPs) were acquired from multiple left ventricular sites. All MAPs exhibited a plateau phase, with a spike and dome appearance being present in epicardial recordings. Activation occurred from endocardial apex to epicardial apex and apex to base while repolarization occurred from base (shortest 90 η0 level of repolarization (MAP90), 95.4 ± 8.9 ms) to apex and epicardium to endocardium (longest MAP90, 110.77 ± 10.6 ms). The peak of phase 0 of the epicardial base MAP correlated with the return to baseline of the initial and usually dominant waveform of the QRS and the onset of the second usually smaller wave, which clearly occurred in early repolarization, thus establishing where depolarization ended and repolarization began on the murine ECG. This second waveform was similar to the J wave seen in larger animals. Despite temporal and spatial electrophysiological similarities, a T wave is frequently not seen on a murine ECG. There are several determinants of T wave morphology, including transmural activation time, slope of phase 3 repolarization and differences in epicardial, endocardial and M cell APDs. Experimental manipulation of murine transmural gradients by shortening epicardial MAP90 to 84% of endocardial MAP90 the epicardial/endocardial ratio in larger mammals when a positive T wave is present, resulted in a positive murine T wave. Thus, manipulation of the transmural gradients such that they are similar to larger mammals can result in T waves with similar morphology. PMID:14634200

  8. Murine models of vaginal trichomonad infections.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Eduardo R; Eckmann, Lars; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2011-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus cause common sexually transmitted infections in humans and cattle, respectively. Mouse models of trichomoniasis are important for pathogenic and therapeutic studies. Here, we compared murine genital infections with T. vaginalis and T. foetus. Persistent vaginal infection with T. foetus was established with 100 parasites but T. vaginalis infection required doses of 10(6), perhaps because of greater susceptibility to killing by mouse vaginal polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Infection with T. vaginalis persisted longest after combined treatment of mice with estrogen and dexamethasone, whereas infection was only short-lived when mice were given estrogen or dexamethasone alone, co-infected with Lactobacillus acidophilus, and/or pretreated with antibiotics. Infection rates were similar with metronidazole-resistant (MR) and metronidazole-sensitive (MS) T. vaginalis. High dose but not low dose metronidazole treatment controlled infection with MS better than MR T. vaginalis. These murine models will be valuable for investigating the pathogenesis and treatment of trichomoniasis. PMID:21976570

  9. Immunodetection of Murine Lymphotoxins in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Boitchenko, Veronika E.; Korobko, Vyacheslav G.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Kravchenko, Vladimir V.; Kuimov, Alexander N.; Turetskaya, Regina L.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2000-10-01

    Lymphotoxins alpha and beta (LTalpha and LTbeta) are members of tumor necrosis factor superfamily. LT heterotrimers exist on the surface of lymphocytes and signal through LTbeta receptor while soluble LTalpha homotrimer can signal through TNF receptors p55 and p75. LT-, as well as TNF-mediated signaling are important for the organogenesis and maintenance of microarchitecture of secondary lymphoid organs in mice and has been implicated in the mechanism of certain inflammatory syndromes in humans. In this study we describe the generation of eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding murine LTalpha and LTbeta genes and a prokaryotic expression construct for murine LTalpha. Using recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors as tools for antisera selection, we produced and characterized several polyclonal antibodies capable of detecting LT proteins in eukaryotic cells.

  10. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  11. Enhanced Cultivation Of Stimulated Murine B Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Method of in vitro cultivation of large numbers of stimulated murine B lymphocytes. Cells electrofused with other cells to produce hybridomas and monoclonal antibodies. Offers several advantages: polyclonally stimulated B-cell blasts cultivated for as long as 14 days, hybridomas created throughout culture period, yield of hybridomas increases during cultivation, and possible to expand polyclonally in vitro number of B cells specific for antigenic determinants first recognized in vivo.

  12. Murine models of human wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jerry S; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-01-01

    In vivo wound healing experiments remain the most predictive models for studying human wound healing, allowing an accurate representation of the complete wound healing environment including various cell types, environmental cues, and paracrine interactions. Small animals are economical, easy to maintain, and allow researchers to take advantage of the numerous transgenic strains that have been developed to investigate the specific mechanisms involved in wound healing and regeneration. Here we describe three reproducible murine wound healing models that recapitulate the human wound healing process.

  13. Review of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models.

    PubMed

    Hicks, John; Bullard, Daniel C

    2006-01-01

    While murine models of autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis have been available for sometime, it is only recently that immune and inflammatory mechanisms and molecular genetics have been extensively investigated. Genes involved in murine and human lupus nephritis have been discovered and provide insight into this disease process and provide avenues for molecular-targeted therapy. Immune modulation of murine nephritis has provided insight into novel therapy that may attenuate this disease or halt disease progression. With the advances in understanding the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis using translational research modalities, including electron microscopy, and molecular genetics, many "designer" therapies have become available for clinical use and for clinical investigational trials. This paper reviews autoimmune (lupus-like) glomerulonephritis in murine models, candidate genes involved in lupus nephritis, adhesion molecules implicated in murine lupus-like nephritis, immune modulation of murine lupus-like nephritis, and novel and potential therapy for immune complex glomerulonephritis.

  14. Force-Induced Craniosynostosis in the Murine Sagittal Suture

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Rhee, Samuel T.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The etiology of non-syndromic craniosynostosis remains elusive. While compressive forces have been implicated in premature suture fusion, conclusive evidence of force-induced craniosynostosis is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine if cyclical loading of the murine calvarium could induce suture fusion. METHODS Calvarial coupons from post-natal day 21, B6CBA wild-type mice (n = 18) were harvested and cultured. A custom appliance capable of delivering controlled, cyclical, compressive loads was applied perpendicular to the sagittal suture within the coupon in vitro. Nine coupons were subjected to 0.3g of force for 30 minutes each day for a total of 14 days. A control group of nine coupons was clamped in the appliance without loading. Analysis of suture phenotype was performed using alkaline phosphatase and H&E staining techniques, as well as in situ hybridization analysis using Bone Sialoprotein (BSP). RESULTS Control group sagittal sutures—which normally remain patent in mice—showed their customary histological appearance. In contradistinction, sagittal sutures subjected to cyclic loading showed histological evidence of premature fusion (craniosynostosis). In addition, alkaline phosphatase activity and BSP expression was observed to be increased in the experimental group when compared to matched controls. CONCLUSIONS An in vitro model of forced-induced craniosynostosis has been devised. Premature fusion of the murine sagittal suture was induced with the application of controlled, cyclical, compressive loads. These results implicate abnormal forces in the development of non-syndromic craniosynostosis, which supports our global hypothesis that epigenetic phenomena have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of craniosynostosis. PMID:19952640

  15. Murine fundus fluorescein angiography: An alternative approach using a handheld camera.

    PubMed

    Ehrenberg, Moshe; Ehrenberg, Scott; Schwob, Ouri; Benny, Ofra

    2016-07-01

    In today's modern pharmacologic approach to treating sight-threatening retinal vascular disorders, there is an increasing demand for a compact, mobile, lightweight and cost-effective fluorescein fundus camera to document the effects of antiangiogenic drugs on laser-induced choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in mice and other experimental animals. We have adapted the use of the Kowa Genesis Df Camera to perform Fundus Fluorescein Angiography (FFA) in mice. The 1 kg, 28 cm high camera has built-in barrier and exciter filters to allow digital FFA recording to a Compact Flash memory card. Furthermore, this handheld unit has a steady Indirect Lens Holder that firmly attaches to the main unit, that securely holds a 90 diopter lens in position, in order to facilitate appropriate focus and stability, for photographing the delicate central murine fundus. This easily portable fundus fluorescein camera can effectively record exceptional central retinal vascular detail in murine laser-induced CNV, while readily allowing the investigator to adjust the camera's position according to the variable head and eye movements that can randomly occur while the mouse is optimally anesthetized. This movable image recording device, with efficiencies of space, time, cost, energy and personnel, has enabled us to accurately document the alterations in the central choroidal and retinal vasculature following induction of CNV, implemented by argon-green laser photocoagulation and disruption of Bruch's Membrane, in the experimental murine model of exudative macular degeneration.

  16. [Local heating of murine skin by millimeter waves based on HBHE].

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuang-Xi; Fan, Chun-Li; Yang, Li; Sun, Feng-Rui

    2012-07-01

    The authors deduced Gaussian function of millimeter wave power distribution, and built up a transient thermal multilayer model for the heating of murine skin by high power millimeter waves with finite volume method (FVM) based on HBHE in the present paper. We analyzed the calculated results and compared them with the results calculated by Pennes' equation and the experimental ones; found that the temperature calculated by HBHE was more reasonable. Especially under high power millimeter wave, the calculated results were basically consistent with the experimental ones, and the superiority of the theoretical model was confirmed.

  17. Histologic Lesions Induced by Murine Norovirus Infection in Laboratory Mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, C C; Piotrowski, S L; Meeker, S M; Smith, K D; Maggio-Price, L; Treuting, P M

    2016-07-01

    Murine noroviruses (MNVs) are highly prevalent in laboratory mice, can cause persistent infections, and have been shown to infect macrophages, dendritic cells, and B cells. To address the potential impact of MNV infection on research outcomes, numerous studies have been conducted with various mouse models of human disease and have generated mixed results, ranging from no impact to significant disease. Many of these studies included histologic evaluations after MNV infection, and these results have similarly been variable in terms of whether MNV induces lesions, despite the fact that localization of MNV by viral culture and molecular techniques have demonstrated systemic distribution regardless of mouse immune status. The aim of this review is to summarize the histologic findings that have been reported with MNV infection in several mouse models. The studies demonstrate that experimental infection of MNV in wild-type mice results in minimal to no histologic changes. In contrast, immunodeficient mice consistently have detectable MNV-induced lesions that are typically inflammatory and, in the most severe cases, accompanied by necrosis. In these, the liver is commonly affected, with more variable lesions reported in the lung, gastrointestinal tract, mesenteric lymph nodes, brain, and spleen. In specific disease models including atherosclerosis, MNV infection had a variable impact that was dependent on the mouse model, viral strain, timing of infection, or other experimental variables. It is important to recognize the reported MNV lesions to help discern the possible influence of MNV infection on data generated in mouse models. PMID:26792844

  18. Murine Cytomegalovirus Exploits Olfaction To Enter New Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Helen E.; Lawler, Clara; Tan, Cindy S. E.; MacDonald, Kate; Bruce, Kimberley; Mach, Michael; Davis-Poynter, Nick

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Viruses transmit via the environmental and social interactions of their hosts. Herpesviruses have colonized mammals since their earliest origins, suggesting that they exploit ancient, common pathways. Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) are assumed to enter new hosts orally, but no site has been identified. We show by live imaging that murine CMV (MCMV) infects nasally rather than orally, both after experimental virus uptake and during natural transmission. Replication-deficient virions revealed the primary target as olfactory neurons. Local, nasal replication by wild-type MCMV was not extensive, but there was rapid systemic spread, associated with macrophage infection. A long-term, transmissible infection was then maintained in the salivary glands. The viral m131/m129 chemokine homolog, which influences tropism, promoted salivary gland colonization after nasal entry but was not required for entry per se. The capacity of MCMV to transmit via olfaction, together with previous demonstrations of experimental olfactory infection by murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), suggest that this is a common, conserved route of mammalian herpesvirus entry. PMID:27118588

  19. Murine Flexor Tendon Injury and Repair Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Jessica E; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2016-01-01

    Tendon connects skeletal muscle and bone, facilitating movement of nearly the entire body. In the hand, flexor tendons (FTs) enable flexion of the fingers and general hand function. Injuries to the FTs are common, and satisfactory healing is often impaired due to excess scar tissue and adhesions between the tendon and surrounding tissue. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular components of FT repair. To that end, a murine model of FT repair that recapitulates many aspects of healing in humans, including impaired range of motion and decreased mechanical properties, has been developed and previously described. Here an in-depth demonstration of this surgical procedure is provided, involving transection and subsequent repair of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon in the murine hind paw. This technique can be used to conduct lineage analysis of different cell types, assess the effects of gene gain or loss-of-function, and to test the efficacy of pharmacological interventions in the healing process. However, there are two primary limitations to this model: i) the FDL tendon in the mid-portion of the murine hind paw, where the transection and repair occur, is not surrounded by a synovial sheath. Therefore this model does not account for the potential contribution of the sheath to the scar formation process. ii) To protect the integrity of the repair site, the FT is released at the myotendinous junction, decreasing the mechanical forces of the tendon, likely contributing to increased scar formation. Isolation of sufficient cells from the granulation tissue of the FT during the healing process for flow cytometric analysis has proved challenging; cytology centrifugation to concentrate these cells is an alternate method used, and allows for generation of cell preparations on which immunofluorescent labeling can be performed. With this method, quantification of cells or proteins of interest during FT healing becomes possible. PMID:27684281

  20. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Vohra, Rahat F.; Bouyer, Donald H.; Walker, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials. PMID:25695758

  1. Methylcellulose media for plaque assay of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Horikawa, Y; Sato, K; Saito, H

    1982-09-01

    When ecotropic murine leukemia virus was assayed by a methylcellulose-XC cell procedure, plaque titers showed less test-to-test variation, more uniform dose-response curves, and larger plaque sizes, as compared with results of the conventional liquid overlay-XC cell test system. This assay therefore seems to be reliable and useful for the titration of ecotropic murine leukemia virus.

  2. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston, Texas, USA, 2013.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Lucas S; Vohra, Rahat F; Bouyer, Donald H; Walker, David H

    2015-03-01

    Twelve patients with murine typhus were identified in Galveston, Texas, USA, in 2013. An isolate from 1 patient was confirmed to be Rickettsia typhi. Reemergence of murine typhus in Galveston emphasizes the importance of vector control and awareness of this disease by physicians and public health officials.

  3. Expression of Fas ligand in murine ovary.

    PubMed

    Guo, M W; Xu, J P; Mori, E; Sato, E; Saito, S; Mori, T

    1997-05-01

    Corresponding to the expression of Fas in the ovarian oocytes as previously reported (Guo et al., Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1994; 203:1438-1446; Mori et al., JSIR 1995; 9:49-50), the expression of Fas ligand (FasL) in the ovarian follicle was found to be restricted in the area of granulosa cells by the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) test. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT/PCR) technique coupled with Southern blot hybridization analysis showed that the highest level of FasL mRNA was demonstrated in murine ovaries and granulosa cells 1 day after the administration of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (PMSG), while the level of FasL mRNA became very weak on the day 5, respectively. The observed gradual decrease in FasL mRNA could not be attributed to a generalized degradation of cellular RNA during atresia, as evidenced by the presence of constitutive expression of elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) mRNA in murine ovaries and granulosa cells treated with PMSG. Furthermore, in situ hybridization analysis with a FasL-specific probe confirmed that FasL was specifically localized in the granulosa cells of most follicles and its expression was regulated by PMSG administration. FasL localized in granulosa cells might possibly play an important role in the formation of the ovarian atretic follicles, most likely depending on PMSG administration. PMID:9196798

  4. Sexual dimorphism of Murine Masticatory Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, David W.; Tian, Zuozhen; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2008-01-01

    (1) Objective To determine if gender distinctions of force generating capacity existed in murine masticatory muscles. (2) Design In order to investigate the effect of sex on force generating capacity in this muscle group, an isolated muscle preparation was developed utilizing the murine anterior deep masseter. Age-matched male and female mice were utilized to assess function, muscle fiber type and size in this muscle. (3) Results Maximum isometric force production was not different between age-matched male and female mice. However, the rate of force generation and relaxation was slower in female masseter muscles. Assessment of fiber type distribution by immunohistochemistry revealed a threefold decrease in the proportion of myosin heavy chain 2b positive fibers in female masseters, which correlated with the differences in contraction kinetics. (4) Conclusions These results provide evidence that masticatory muscle strength in mice is not affected by sex, but there are significant distinctions in kinetics associated with force production between males and females. PMID:18028868

  5. Immunosuppression by Murine Sarcoma Virus (Moloney)

    PubMed Central

    Chan, S. P.; Hook, W. A.; Turner, W.; Chirigos, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    Infection of mice with the murine sarcoma virus (Moloney) markedly suppressed the humoral antibody response to sheep erythrocyte antigen injected 10 days after infection, when tumor size was maximal, and on day 26, when primary tumors had partially regressed. Humoral antibody response was also inhibited when antigen was injected at the time secondary tumors and metastases were evident. No significant suppression of humoral antibody was seen when mice were injected with sheep erythrocyte antigen 5 days after virus infection. Inhibition of the cellular immune response of murine sarcoma virus (Moloney)-infected mice, as measured by the increased survival time of skin grafts, was also determined. Mice that were infected 5 days prior to grafting demonstrated prolonged survival of grafts, suggesting a suppression of cellular immunity. These mice had a graft survival time 14 days greater than noninfected controls. No significant prolongation of graft survival was seen in mice grafted at the times of maximum primary tumor growth, of primary tumor regression, or when secondary tumors had appeared. PMID:16557730

  6. Benzaldehyde suppresses murine allergic asthma and rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Young; Park, Chang-Shin; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Heo, Min-Jeong; Kim, Young Hyo

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the antiallergic effects of oral benzaldehyde in a murine model of allergic asthma and rhinitis, we divided 20 female BALB/c mice aged 8-10 weeks into nonallergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to normal saline), allergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to ovalbumin), and 200- and 400-mg/kg benzaldehyde (allergic but treated) groups. The number of nose-scratching events in 10 min, levels of total and ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum, differential counts of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, titers of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in BAL fluid, histopathologic findings of lung and nasal tissues, and expressions of proteins involved in apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3), inflammation (COX-2), antioxidation (extracellular SOD, HO-1), and hypoxia (HIF-1α, VEGF) in lung tissue were evaluated. The treated mice had significantly fewer nose-scratching events, less inflammatory cell infiltration in lung and nasal tissues, and lower HIF-1α and VEGF expressions in lung tissue than the allergic group. The number of eosinophils and neutrophils and Th2 cytokine titers in BAL fluid significantly decreased after the treatment (P<0.05). These results imply that oral benzaldehyde exerts antiallergic effects in murine allergic asthma and rhinitis, possibly through inhibition of HIF-1α and VEGF.

  7. Neonatal CD71+ erythroid cells do not modify murine sepsis mortality

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, James L.; Scumpia, Philip O.; Stocks, Blair T.; Romano-Keeler, Joann; Alrifai, Mhd Wael; Liu, Jin-Hua; Kim, Annette S.; Alford, Catherine E.; Matta, Pranathi; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Moore, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. A recent report suggested murine neonatal host defense against infection could be compromised by immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid splenocytes. We examined the impact of CD71+ erythroid splenocytes on murine neonatal mortality to endotoxin challenge or polymicrobial sepsis and characterized circulating CD71+ erythroid (CD235a+) cells in human neonates. Adoptive transfer or antibody-mediated reduction of neonatal CD71+ erythroid splenocytes did not alter murine neonatal survival to endotoxin challenge or polymicrobial sepsis challenge. Ex vivo immunosuppression of stimulated adult CD11b+ cells was not limited to neonatal splenocytes as it also occurred with adult and neonatal bone marrow. Animals treated with anti-CD71 antibody showed reduced splenic bacterial load following bacterial challenge compared to isotype-treated mice. However, adoptive transfer of enriched CD71+ erythroid splenocytes to CD71+-reduced animals did not reduce bacterial clearance. Human CD71+CD235a+ cells were common among cord blood mononuclear cells and were shown to be reticulocytes. In summary, a lack of effect on murine survival to polymicrobial sepsis following adoptive transfer or diminution of CD71+ erythroid splenocytes under these experimental conditions suggests the impact of these cells on neonatal infection risk and progression may be limited. An unanticipated immune priming effect of anti-CD71 antibody treatment was likely responsible for the reported enhanced bacterial clearance, rather than a reduction of immunosuppressive CD71+ erythroid splenocytes. In humans, the well-described rapid decrease in circulating reticulocytes after birth suggests they may have a limited role in reducing inflammation secondary to microbial colonization. PMID:26101326

  8. Experimental radioimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, D J; Langmuir, V K; Wessels, B W

    1993-01-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies have been used for radioimmunotherapy studies with human tumor spheroids and murine and human tumor xenografts in experimental animals. This paper reviews the work that has been performed in these models with different types of cancer, and highlights those papers that have presented dosimetry estimates and attempts to correlate the findings. Radioimmunotherapy studies in multicell spheroids, as a model for micrometastases, have been performed in human neuroblastoma, colon cancer, and melanoma cell lines using 131I-, 125I-, 186Re-, and 212Bi-labeled antibodies. The uniform geometry of the spheroid has allowed radiation dose estimates to be made. Up to three logs of cell kill have been achieved with 131I- and 186Re-specific antibody with minimal toxicity from labeled nonspecific antibody, but 212Bi-antibody had little effect because of its short half-life as shown by Langmuir. It appears that the two most important factors for therapeutic efficacy in this model are good penetration of the radiolabeled antibody and an adequate radionuclide half-life to allow penetration of the immunoconjugate prior to significant radionuclide decay. Radioimmunotherapy studies in animals bearing transplants of colon cancer, leukemia, lymphoma, hepatoma, renal cell carcinoma, neuroblastoma, glioma, mammary carcinoma, small cell lung carcinoma, cervical carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma, and bladder cancer have been performed with 131I, 90Y, 186Re, 153Sm, and 177Lu beta emitting, and 212Bi alpha emitting radionuclides conjugated to monoclonal antibodies. A few studies compared different radionuclides in the same model system. The approaches that have been used in these studies to estimate tumor dosimetry include the MIRD approach, thermoluminescent dosimetry, autoradiography, and comparison to external irradiation. The majority of investigators have estimated the dose to tumor and normal organs using MIRD-based calculations (time-activity curve and

  9. Murine erythropoietin gene: cloning, expression, and human gene homology.

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, C B; Mitsock, L D

    1986-01-01

    The gene for murine erythropoietin (EPO) was isolated from a mouse genomic library with a human EPO cDNA probe. Nucleotide sequence analysis permitted the identification of the murine EPO coding sequence and the prediction of the encoded amino acid sequence based on sequence conservation between the mouse and human EPO genes. Both the coding DNA and the amino acid sequences were 80% conserved between the two species. Transformation of COS-1 cells with a mammalian cell expression vector containing the murine EPO coding region resulted in secretion of murine EPO with biological activity on both murine and human erythroid progenitor cells. The transcription start site for the murine EPO gene in kidneys was determined. This permitted tentative identification of the transcription control region. The region included 140 base pairs upstream of the cap site which was over 90% conserved between the murine and human genes. Surprisingly, the first intron and much of the 5'- and 3'-untranslated sequences were also substantially conserved between the genes of the two species. Images PMID:3773894

  10. Murine and epidemic typhus rickettsiae: how close is their relationship?

    PubMed

    Woodward, T E

    1982-01-01

    Typhus fever has occurred globally as epidemic and endemic disorders. In 1910, Brill reported a typhus-like illness which Zinsser and others determined to be recurrent epidemic typhus fever. Maxcy, in 1926, proposed rodents and fleas as reservoir and vector, respectively, of endemic typhus, which Dyer confirmed in 1930. Animals experimentally infected with epidemic typhus (Rickettsia prowazeki) are immune to murine typhus (Rickettsia typhi) and vice versa. Similar solid cross-immunity exists for humans. The two diseases are clinically similar in pathologic and serologic reactions. Human epidemic typhus presumably involved a man-louse-man cycle without an animal reservoir. This concept is now questioned. Antibodies to R. prowazeki have been reported in livestock in Africa, rats in Manila, and from flying squirrels and humans in the United States. R. prowazeki was recovered from blood specimens of goats, sheep, from ixodid ticks, louse, and flea-ectoparasites of flying squirrels, and tissues of flying squirrels. More than 20 cases of squirrel-related acute epidemic typhus have been reported in the United States. R. prowazeki has not been recovered from human cases. Chemical studies of R. prowazeki and R. typhi show genetic similarities but differences in genome size and degree of hybridization suggest that interconversions between the two agents do not occur rapidly in nature. It is proposed that, with time, their relatedness will become even closer. PMID:6817526

  11. Stabilization of the murine gut microbiome following weaning

    PubMed Central

    Schloss, Patrick D.; Schubert, Alyxandria M.; Zackular, Joseph P.; Iverson, Kathryn D.; Young, Vincent B.; Petrosino, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Ecologists hypothesize that community structure and stability affect productivity, sensitivity to invasion and extinction, and resilience and resistance to perturbations. Viewed in the context of the gut microbiome, the stability of the gut community is important for understanding the effects of antibiotics, diet change and other perturbations on host health and colonization resistance. Here we describe the dynamics of a self-contained community, the murine gut microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing of fecal samples collected daily from individual mice, we characterized the community membership and structure to determine whether there were significant changes in the gut community during the first year of life. Based on analysis of molecular variance, we observed two community states. The first was observed in the 10 days following weaning and the second was observed by 15 days following weaning. Interestingly, these two states had the same bacterial populations, but those populations had different relative abundances in the two states. By calculating the root mean squared distances between samples collected in the early and late states for each mouse, we observed that the late state was more stable than the early state. This increase in stability was not correlated with increased taxonomic richness, taxonomic diversity, or phylogenetic diversity. In the absence of an experimentally induced perturbation, the second community state was relatively constant through 364 days post weaning. These results suggest a high degree of stability in the microbiome once the community reached the second state. PMID:22688727

  12. Immunocompetent murine models for the study of glioblastoma immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma remains a lethal diagnosis with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. (NEJM 352:987-96, 2005) Although immunotherapy-based approaches are capable of inducing detectable immune responses against tumor-specific antigens, improvements in clinical outcomes are modest, in no small part due to tumor-induced immunosuppressive mechanisms that promote immune escape and immuno-resistance. Immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at bolstering the immune response while neutralizing immunosuppression will play a critical role in improving treatment outcomes for glioblastoma patients. In vivo murine models of glioma provide an invaluable resource to achieving that end, and their use is an essential part of the preclinical workup for novel therapeutics that need to be tested in animal models prior to testing experimental therapies in patients. In this article, we review five contemporary immunocompetent mouse models, GL261 (C57BL/6), GL26 (C57BL/6) CT-2A (C57BL/6), SMA-560 (VM/Dk), and 4C8 (B6D2F1), each of which offer a suitable platform for testing novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:24779345

  13. Quantitative image analysis of cell colocalization in murine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Zeinab; Mech, Franziska; Zehentmeier, Sandra; Hauser, Anja E; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2015-06-01

    Long-term antibody production is a key property of humoral immunity and is accomplished by long-lived plasma cells. They mainly reside in the bone marrow, whose importance as an organ hosting immunological memory is becoming increasingly evident. Signals provided by stromal cells and eosinophils may play an important role for plasma cell maintenance, constituting a survival microenvironment. In this joint study of experiment and theory, we investigated the spatial colocalization of plasma cells, eosinophils and B cells by applying an image-based systems biology approach. To this end, we generated confocal fluorescence microscopy images of histological sections from murine bone marrow that were subsequently analyzed in an automated fashion. This quantitative analysis was combined with computer simulations of the experimental system for hypothesis testing. In particular, we tested the observed spatial colocalization of cells in the bone marrow against the hypothesis that cells are found within available areas at positions that were drawn from a uniform random number distribution. We find that B cells and plasma cells highly colocalize with stromal cells, to an extent larger than in the simulated random situation. While B cells are preferentially in contact with each other, i.e., form clusters among themselves, plasma cells seem to be solitary or organized in aggregates, i.e., loosely defined groups of cells that are not necessarily in direct contact. Our data suggest that the plasma cell bone marrow survival niche facilitates colocalization of plasma cells with stromal cells and eosinophils, respectively, promoting plasma cell longevity.

  14. Current advances of murine models for food allergy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiange; Navarro, Severine; Lopata, Andreas L

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy affects an increasing population in Western world but also developing countries. Researchers have been taking great efforts in identifying and characterising food allergens using molecular tools. However, there are still many mechanistic hypotheses that need to be tested using an appropriate in vivo experimental platform. To date, a number of mouse models for food allergy have been established and provided valuable insights into food allergenicity, development of therapies and allergic inflammation mechanisms. Nevertheless, a large diversity of protocols have been developed for the establishment of relevant mouse models. As a result, comparisons of outcomes between different models are very difficult to be conducted. The phenotypes of mouse models are greatly influenced by genetic background, gender, route of allergen exposure, the nature and concentration of food allergens, as well as the usage of adjuvants. This review focuses on IgE-mediated food allergy, compares the differential approaches in developing appropriate murine models for food allergy and details specific findings for three major food allergens, peanut, milk and shellfish. PMID:26759987

  15. Role of Cytosolic Calcium Diffusion in Murine Cardiac Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Limbu, Bijay; Shah, Kushal; Weinberg, Seth H.; Deo, Makarand

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Purkinje cells (PCs) are morphologically and electrophysiologically different from ventricular myocytes and, importantly, exhibit distinct calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that PCs are more susceptible to action potential (AP) abnormalities than ventricular myocytes; however, the exact mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we utilized a detailed biophysical mathematical model of a murine PC to systematically examine the role of cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion in shaping the AP in PCs. A biphasic spatiotemporal Ca2+ diffusion process, as recorded experimentally, was implemented in the model. In this study, we investigated the role of cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics on AP and ionic current properties by varying the effective Ca2+ diffusion rate. It was observed that AP morphology, specifically the plateau, was affected due to changes in the intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. Elevated Ca2+ concentration in the sarcolemmal region activated inward sodium–Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) current, resulting in a prolongation of the AP plateau at faster diffusion rates. Artificially clamping the NCX current to control values completely reversed the alterations in the AP plateau, thus confirming the role of NCX in modifying the AP morphology. Our results demonstrate that cytosolic Ca2+ diffusion waves play a significant role in shaping APs of PCs and could provide mechanistic insights in the increased arrhythmogeneity of PCs. PMID:27478391

  16. Current advances of murine models for food allergy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiange; Navarro, Severine; Lopata, Andreas L

    2016-02-01

    Food allergy affects an increasing population in Western world but also developing countries. Researchers have been taking great efforts in identifying and characterising food allergens using molecular tools. However, there are still many mechanistic hypotheses that need to be tested using an appropriate in vivo experimental platform. To date, a number of mouse models for food allergy have been established and provided valuable insights into food allergenicity, development of therapies and allergic inflammation mechanisms. Nevertheless, a large diversity of protocols have been developed for the establishment of relevant mouse models. As a result, comparisons of outcomes between different models are very difficult to be conducted. The phenotypes of mouse models are greatly influenced by genetic background, gender, route of allergen exposure, the nature and concentration of food allergens, as well as the usage of adjuvants. This review focuses on IgE-mediated food allergy, compares the differential approaches in developing appropriate murine models for food allergy and details specific findings for three major food allergens, peanut, milk and shellfish.

  17. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  18. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    PubMed

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  19. The Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) model for multiple sclerosis shows a strong influence of the murine equivalents of HLA-A, B, and C.

    PubMed

    Clatch, R J; Melvold, R W; Dal Canto, M C; Miller, S D; Lipton, H L

    1987-06-01

    Following intracerebral inoculation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), susceptible mouse strains develop a chronic demyelinating disease characterized histologically by mononuclear cell-rich infiltrates in the central nervous system (CNS). An immune-mediated basis for this disease is strongly supported by previous studies demonstrating a correlation between clinical disease susceptibility, the presence of particular H-2 region genotypes, and the development of chronically elevated levels of TMEV-specific, MHC class II-restricted delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). The present study compared disease susceptibility in (B10.S X SJL)F1 and (B10.S(26R) X SJL)F1 mice which differ only at the D region of the H-2 complex. The data conclusively demonstrates a major influence for homozygosity of H-2s alleles at the H-2D region (the murine equivalent of the human class I HLA-A, B, and C genes) in determining disease susceptibility, as measured by either clinical or histopathological endpoints. In addition, disease susceptibility strongly correlated with the development of high levels of TMEV-specific DTH in the susceptible (B10.S X SJL)F1 strain. However, disease susceptibility did not appear to correlate with TMEV titers in the CNS, TMEV-specific humoral (ELISA and neutralizing) immune responses, or virus-specific splenic T cell proliferative responses. These findings lend additional support to our hypothesis that CNS myelin damage is mediated by a TMEV-specific DTH response. The possible role of class I-restricted responses in the demyelinating process is discussed and murine TMEV-induced demyelinating disease is compared with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis as relevant animal models for human multiple sclerosis.

  20. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model.

    PubMed

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R; Hoffman, Michael D; Vella, Joseph B; Benoit, Danielle S W; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-07-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing.

  1. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model.

    PubMed

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R; Hoffman, Michael D; Vella, Joseph B; Benoit, Danielle S W; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-07-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing. PMID:26203392

  2. Non-contact scanning diffuse correlation tomography system for three-dimensional blood flow imaging in a murine bone graft model

    PubMed Central

    Han, Songfeng; Johansson, Johannes; Mireles, Miguel; Proctor, Ashley R.; Hoffman, Michael D.; Vella, Joseph B.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Durduran, Turgut; Choe, Regine

    2015-01-01

    A non-contact galvanometer-based optical scanning system for diffuse correlation tomography was developed for monitoring bone graft healing in a murine femur model. A linear image reconstruction algorithm for diffuse correlation tomography was tested using finite-element method based simulated data and experimental data from a femur or a tube suspended in a homogeneous liquid phantom. Finally, the non-contact system was utilized to monitor in vivo blood flow changes prior to and one week after bone graft transplantation within murine femurs. Localized blood flow changes were observed in three mice, demonstrating a potential for quantification of longitudinal blood flow associated with bone graft healing. PMID:26203392

  3. Novel microbial virulence factor triggers murine lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuli; Qin, Jinhong; Promnares, Kamoltip; Kariu, Toru; Anderson, John F; Pal, Utpal

    2013-03-15

    Borrelia burgdorferi bba57 is a conserved gene encoding a potential lipoprotein of unknown function. Here we show that bba57 is up-regulated in vivo and is required for early murine infection and potential spirochete transmission process. Although BBA57 is dispensable for late murine infection, the mutants were unable to induce disease. We show that BBA57, an outer membrane and surface-exposed antigen, is a major trigger of murine Lyme arthritis; even in cases of larger challenge inocula, which allow their persistence in joints at a level similar to wild-type spirochetes, bba57 mutants are unable to induce joint inflammation. We further showed that BBA57 deficiency reduces the expression of selected "neutrophil-recruiting" chemokines and associated receptors, causing significant impairment of neutrophil chemotaxis. New approaches to combat Lyme disease may include strategies to interfere with BBA57, a novel virulence factor and a trigger of murine Lyme arthritis.

  4. microRNA-222 modulates liver fibrosis in a murine model of biliary atresia

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wen-jun; Dong, Rui; Chen, Gong Zheng, Shan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • The RRV infected group showed cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. • miR-222 was highly expressed, and PPP2R2A was inhibited in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 might represent a potential target for improving biliary atresia prognosis. - Abstract: microRNA-222 (miR-222) has been shown to initiate the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of miR-22 in a mouse model of biliary atresia (BA) induced by Rhesus Rotavirus (RRV) infection. New-born Balb/c mice were randomized into control and RRV infected groups. The extrahepatic bile ducts were evaluated. The experimental group was divided into BA group and negative group based on histology. The expression of miR-222, protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B alpha (PPP2R2A), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phospho-Akt were detected. We found that the experimental group showed signs of cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. No abnormalities were found in the control group. In the BA group, miR-222, PCNA and Akt were highly expressed, and PPP2R2A expression was significantly inhibited. Our findings suggest that miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine BA model, which might represent a potential target for improving BA prognosis.

  5. Molecular isoforms of murine CD44 and evidence that the membrane proximal domain is not critical for hyaluronate recognition

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We previously found that the CD44 glycoprotein on some lymphocytes can mediate adhesion to hyaluronate (HA) bearing cells. However, many questions remain about the molecular heterogeneity of CD44 and mechanisms which control its recognition of this ligand. In vitro mutagenesis and DNA sequencing have now been used to investigate the importance of the membrane proximal region of murine CD44 for recognition of soluble or cell surface HA. CD44 with an 83 amino acid deletion in this region mediated binding to soluble ligand and the apparent avidity increased markedly in the presence of a particular antibody to CD44, IRAWB14. The shortened CD44 was however inefficient in mediating adhesion of transfected cells to HA immobilized on cell surfaces. Four new murine isoforms of CD44 were isolated from a carcinoma line by use of the polymerase chain reaction. Only two of them correspond to ones recently discovered in rat and human cells. The longest variant nearly doubled the length of the extracellular portion of the molecule and introduced an additional 20 potential sites for glycosylation. When expressed on T lymphoma cells, all four of the new murine CD44 isoforms were capable of mediating adhesion to HA bearing cells. This result contrasts with a report that a related human CD44 isoform lacks this ability when expressed on B lineage lymphoma cells. The new murine isoforms also conferred the ability to recognize soluble HA and were very responsive to the IRAWB14 antibody. A brief survey of normal murine cell lines and tissues revealed that the hemopoietic isoform was the most abundant species. These findings indicate that the NH2-terminal portion of CD44 is sufficient for HA recognition and that this function is not necessarily abrogated by variations which occur in the membrane proximal domain. They add to the known molecular diversity of CD44 and provide another experimental model in which isoform specific functions can be investigated. PMID:1469058

  6. Functional organization of the murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase: characterization of a bacterially expressed AKR DNA polymerase deficient in RNase H activity.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, J G; Crouch, R J; Post, K; Hu, S C; McKelvin, D; Zweig, M; Court, D L; Gerwin, B I

    1988-01-01

    The functional organization of the murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase was investigated by expressing a molecular clone containing AKR MuLV reverse transcriptase-coding sequences in Escherichia coli. A purified preparation of the expressed enzyme (pRT250 reverse transcriptase) consisted primarily of a 69-kilodalton protein that has normal levels of murine leukemia virus polymerase activity but 10-fold-reduced levels of RNase H compared with the viral enzyme. The deficit in RNase H activity was correlated with the absence of 60 to 65 amino acids normally present at the carboxyl end of murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase. The results provide additional experimental evidence for the localization of polymerase and RNase H domains to the N- and C-terminal regions of reverse transcriptase, respectively. Images PMID:2459414

  7. Diphtheria toxin-based recombinant murine IL-2 fusion toxin for depleting murine regulatory T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Marino, Jose; Trowell, Aaron; Zhang, Huiping; Stromp Peraino, Jaclyn; Rajasekera, Priyani V; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Benichou, Gilles; Wang, Zhirui

    2014-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells which suppress immune responses of effector cells and are known to play a very important role in protection against autoimmune disease development, induction of transplantation tolerance and suppression of effective immune response against tumor cells. An effective in vivo Treg depletion agent would facilitate Treg-associated studies across many research areas. In this study, we have developed diphtheria toxin-based monovalent and bivalent murine IL-2 fusion toxins for depleting murine IL-2 receptor positive cells including CD25(+) Treg in vivo. Their potencies were assessed by in vitro protein synthesis inhibition and cell proliferation inhibition assays using a murine CD25(+) CTLL-2 cell line. Surprisingly, in contrast to our previously developed recombinant fusion toxins, the monovalent isoform (DT390-mIL-2) was approximately 4-fold more potent than its bivalent counterpart (DT390-bi-mIL-2). Binding analysis by flow cytometry demonstrated that the monovalent isoform bound stronger than the bivalent version. In vivo Treg depletion with the monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin was performed using C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Spleen Treg were significantly depleted with a maximum reduction of ∼70% and detectable as early as 12 h after the last injection. The spleen Treg numbers were reduced until Day 3 and returned to control levels by Day 7. We believe that this monovalent murine IL-2 fusion toxin will be an effective in vivo murine Treg depleter. PMID:25147093

  8. Polyprotein processing of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, R P; Kong, W P; Semler, B L

    1989-01-01

    To investigate polyprotein processing of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis viruses, we analyzed in vitro translation reactions programmed by in vitro-derived transcripts from an infectious full-length cDNA clone of the DA strain of Theiler's virus. To help identify the proteinases that carried out the processing, we modified the DA cDNA clone transcription template by linearization with different restriction endonucleases that generate templates of different lengths or by constructing linker insertion or deletion mutations or both in putative proteinase-coding regions. Protein 3C carried out most of the cleavages of the polyprotein, as is true for the other picornaviruses that have been studied. A second proteinase also appeared active at the LP12A-2B junction. A protein of slightly faster mobility than the leader protein was seen with translation of transcripts derived from DA cDNA but not GDVII cDNA. This protein may be synthesized from an alternative initiation site in the DA leader-coding region out of phase with the polyprotein reading frame. Our findings are relevant to ongoing investigations of the abnormal virus expression seen in DA virus late demyelinating disease, since polyprotein processing is critical in regulating picornaviral gene expression. Images PMID:2555559

  9. MR for the investigation of murine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Flögel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of alterations in vessel morphology of transgenic mouse models generally requires time-consuming and laborious planimetry of histological sections. This postmortem analysis is per se restricted to endpoint studies and, furthermore, may reflect the situation in vivo to a limited degree only. For the repetitive and noninvasive monitoring of dynamic changes in the murine vasculature, several protocols for high-resolution 3D MR angiography (MRA) at a vertical 9.4 T system are described. These protocols are based on flow-compensated 3D gradient echo sequences with application-dependent spatial resolution, resulting in voxel sizes between 1 and 13 nL. To ensure constant physiological conditions, particular attention is paid to minimize the acquisition time. All measurements are carried out without a contrast agent to avoid temporal inconstancy of the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) as well as toxic side effects. Moreover, metabolic alterations as a consequence of disturbed vascularization and blood supply are monitored by (31)P MR spectroscopy. PMID:21874492

  10. Quantitative Trait Loci for Murine Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheverud, J. M.; Routman, E. J.; Duarte, FAM.; van-Swinderen, B.; Cothran, K.; Perel, C.

    1996-01-01

    Body size is an archetypal quantitative trait with variation due to the segregation of many gene loci, each of relatively minor effect, and the environment. We examine the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on age-specific body weights and growth in the F(2) intercross of the LG/J and SM/J strains of inbred mice. Weekly weights (1-10 wk) and 75 microsatellite genotypes were obtained for 535 mice. Interval mapping was used to locate and measure the genotypic effects of QTLs on body weight and growth. QTL effects were detected on 16 of the 19 autosomes with several chromosomes carrying more than one QTL. The number of QTLs for age-specific weights varied from seven at 1 week to 17 at 10 wk. The QTLs were each of relatively minor, subequal effect. QTLs affecting early and late growth were generally distinct, mapping to different chromosomal locations indicating separate genetic and physiological systems for early and later murine growth. PMID:8846907

  11. Implantable Micropump Technologies for Murine Intracochlear Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D. G.; Waldron, M. J.; Frisina, R. D.; Borkholder, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the very small size of the mouse inner ear, 600 nL volume, developing effective, controlled infusion systems is quite challenging. Key technologies have been created to minimize both size and power for an implantable pump for murine intracochlear infusions. A method for coupling fine capillary tubing to microfluidic channels is presented which provides low volume, biocompatible interconnects withstanding pressures as high as 827 kPa (120 psi) and consuming less than 20 nL of volume exiting in-plane with the pump. Surface micromachined resistive bridges integrated into the flow channel for anemometry based flow rate measurement have been optimized for low power operation in the ultra-low flow rate regime. A process for creation of deformable diaphragms over pump chambers with simultaneous coating of the microfluidic channels has been developed allowing integration of a biocompatible fluid flow path. These advances represent enabling capabilities for a drug delivery system suitable for space constrained applications such as subcutaneous implantation in mice. PMID:21096713

  12. Cortactin is implicated in murine zygotic development

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dan; Zhang, Helin; Blanpied, Thomas A.; Smith, Elizabeth; Zhan, Xi

    2009-01-01

    Cortactin is a cortex-enriched protein implicated in Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. However, the physiological role of cortactin remains unknown. We have generated a mouse strain in which the allele of murine cortactin was disrupted by a gene trapping vector. The resulting heterozygous mice developed normally and were fertile, but embryonic fibroblasts derived from heterozygous animals displayed partial impairment in PDGF-induced membrane ruffling. No homozygous offspring or early embryos even at the two-cell stage were detected. Analysis of oocytes revealed a gradual decrease in the detection of homozygous zygotes after fertilization. In normal oocytes arrested at meiotic metaphase II (MII), cortactin immunoreactivity was detected in an apical layer that overlies the maternal chromosome and overlaps with a polarized cortex enriched with actin. The formation of the polarized cortactin layer was diminished upon treatment with latrunculin B, an actin polymerization inhibitor. After resumption of meiosis II, the majority of cortactin protein was accumulated into the second polar body. Microinjection of MII-arrested eggs with either cortactin antibody or RNA encoding a cortactin mutant deficient in Arp2/3 complex binding disrupted the integrity of the actin cap and inhibited emission of the second polar body triggered by parthenogenesis. Our data suggest that cortactin plays an important role in the mechanics of asymmetric division in oocytes. PMID:20004659

  13. Quantitative investigation of murine cytomegalovirus nucleocapsid interaction.

    PubMed

    Buser, Christopher; Fleischer, Frank; Mertens, Thomas; Michel, Detlef; Schmidt, Volker; Walther, Paul

    2007-10-01

    In this study, we quantitatively investigate the role of the M97 protein for viral morphogenesis in murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-infected fibroblast cells. For this purpose, a statistical analysis is performed for the spatial distribution of nuclear B-capsids (devoid of DNA, containing the scaffold) and C-capsids (filled with DNA). Cell nuclei infected with either wild-type or an M97 deletion mutant were compared. Univariate and multivariate point process characteristics (like Ripley's K-function, the L-function and the nearest neighbour distance distribution function) are investigated in order to describe and quantify the effects that the deletion of M97 causes to the process of DNA packaging into nucleocapsids. The estimation of the function L(r) -r reveals that with respect to the wild type there is an increased frequency of point pairs at a very short distance (less than approximately 100 nm) for both the B-capsids as well as for the C-capsids. For the M97 deletion mutant type this is no longer true. Here only the C-capsids show such a clustering behaviour, whereas for B-capsids it is almost nonexistant. Estimations of functionals such as the nearest neighbour distance distribution function confirmed these results. Thereby, a quantification is provided for the effect that the deletion of M97 leads to a loss of typical nucleocapsid clustering in MCMV-infected nuclei. PMID:17910700

  14. The murine excisional wound model: Contraction revisited

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Mirza, Rita; Kwon, Young; DiPietro, Luisa A.; Koh, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Rodent models of healing are considered limited because of the perception that rodent wounds heal by contraction while humans heal by re-epithelialization. The purpose of this report is to present evidence that simple murine excisional wounds provide a valid and reproducible wound model that heals by both contraction and re-epithelialization. Previous studies have shown that, although rodent wounds contract by up to 80%, much of this contraction occurs only after epithelial closure. To confirm these previous findings, we measured re-epithelialization and contraction in three separate mouse strains, (BALB/c, db/+ and db/db); re-epithelialization and contraction each accounted for ~40-60% of the initial closure of full thickness excisional wounds. After closure, the wound continues to contract and this provides the impression of dominant closure by contraction. In conclusion, the simple excisional rodent wound model produces a well-defined and readily identifiable wound bed over which the process of re-epithelialization is clearly measurable. PMID:26136050

  15. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy.

    PubMed

    Münk, C; Löhler, J; Prassolov, V; Just, U; Stockschläder, M; Stocking, C

    1997-05-27

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed.

  16. MR for the investigation of murine vasculature.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Christoph; Flögel, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    The investigation of alterations in vessel morphology of transgenic mouse models generally requires time-consuming and laborious planimetry of histological sections. This postmortem analysis is per se restricted to endpoint studies and, furthermore, may reflect the situation in vivo to a limited degree only. For the repetitive and noninvasive monitoring of dynamic changes in the murine vasculature, several protocols for high-resolution 3D MR angiography (MRA) at a vertical 9.4 T system are described. These protocols are based on flow-compensated 3D gradient echo sequences with application-dependent spatial resolution, resulting in voxel sizes between 1 and 13 nL. To ensure constant physiological conditions, particular attention is paid to minimize the acquisition time. All measurements are carried out without a contrast agent to avoid temporal inconstancy of the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR) as well as toxic side effects. Moreover, metabolic alterations as a consequence of disturbed vascularization and blood supply are monitored by (31)P MR spectroscopy.

  17. Structural and biochemical characterization of the inhibitor complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Matúz, Krisztina; Tözsér, Jozsef; Namwong, Sirilak; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-10-23

    Interactions between the protease (PR) encoded by the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus and a number of potential inhibitors have been investigated by biochemical and structural techniques. It was observed that several inhibitors used clinically against HIV PR exhibit nanomolar or even subnanomolar values of K{sub i}, depending on the exact experimental conditions. Both TL-3, a universal inhibitor of retroviral PRs, and some inhibitors originally shown to inhibit plasmepsins were also quite potent, whereas inhibition by pepstatin A was considerably weaker. Crystal structures of the complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus PR with TL-3, amprenavir and pepstatin A were solved at high resolution and compared with the structures of complexes of these inhibitors with other retropepsins. Whereas TL-3 and amprenavir bound in a predictable manner, spanning the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, two molecules of pepstatin A bound simultaneously in an unprecedented manner, leaving the catalytic water molecule in place.

  18. Murine norovirus infection does not cause major disruptions in the murine intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Murine norovirus (MNV) is the most common gastrointestinal pathogen of research mice and can alter research outcomes in biomedical mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Despite indications that an altered microbiota is a risk factor for IBD, the response of the murine intestinal microbiota to MNV infection has not been examined. Microbiota disruption caused by MNV infection could introduce the confounding effects observed in research experiments. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of MNV infection on the intestinal microbiota of wild-type mice. Results The composition of the intestinal microbiota was assessed over time in both outbred Swiss Webster and inbred C57BL/6 mice following MNV infection. Mice were infected with both persistent and non-persistent MNV strains and tissue-associated or fecal-associated microbiota was analyzed by 16S rRNA-encoding gene pyrosequencing. Analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in infected mice at the phylum and family level showed no major differences to uninfected controls, both in tissue-associated samples and feces, and also over time following infection, demonstrating that the intestinal microbiota of wild-type mice is highly resistant to disruption following MNV infection. Conclusions This is the first study to describe the intestinal microbiota following MNV infection and demonstrates that acute or persistent MNV infection is not associated with major disruptions of microbial communities in Swiss Webster and C57BL/6 mice. PMID:24451302

  19. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  20. Apoptosis and the thymic microenvironment in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Takeoka, Y; Taguchi, N; Shultz, L; Boyd, R L; Naiki, M; Ansari, A A; Gershwin, M E

    1999-11-01

    The thymus of New Zealand black (NZB) mice undergoes premature involution. In addition, cultured thymic epithelial cells from NZB mice undergo accelerated preprogrammed degeneration. NZB mice also have distinctive and well-defined abnormalities of thymic architecture involving stromal cells, defined by staining with monoclonal antibodies specific for the thymic microenvironment. We took advantage of these findings, as well as our large panel of monoclonal antibodies which recognize thymic stroma, to study the induction of apoptosis in the thymus of murine lupus and including changes of epithelial architecture. We studied NZB, MRL/lpr, BXSB/Yaa, C3H/gld mice and BALB/c and C57BL/6 as control mice. Apoptosis was studied both at basal levels and following induction with either dexamethasone or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The apoptotic cells were primarily found in the thymic cortex, and the frequency of apoptosis in murine lupus was less than 20% of controls. Moreover, all strains of murine lupus had severe abnormalities of the cortical network. These changes were not accentuated by dexamethasone treatment in cultured thymocytes. However, the thymus in murine lupus was less susceptible to LPS-induced apoptosis than control mice. Finally we note that the number of thymic nurse cells (TNC) was lowest in NZB mice. Our findings demonstrate significant abnormalities in the induction of apoptosis and the formation of TNC-like epithelial cells in SLE mice, and suggest that the abnormalities of the thymic microenvironment have an important role in the pathogenesis of murine lupus.

  1. Development of a non-invasive murine infection model for acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Stol, K; van Selm, S; van den Berg, S; Bootsma, H J; Blokx, W A M; Graamans, K; Tonnaer, E L G M; Hermans, P W M

    2009-12-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most frequent diseases in childhood, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is among the main causative bacterial agents. Since current experimental models used to study the bacterial pathogenesis of OM have several limitations, such as the invasiveness of the experimental procedures, we developed a non-invasive murine OM model. In our model, adapted from a previously developed rat OM model, a pressure cabin is used in which a 40 kPa pressure increase is applied to translocate pneumococci from the nasopharyngeal cavity into both mouse middle ears. Wild-type pneumococci were found to persist in the middle ear cavity for 144 h after infection, with a maximum bacterial load at 96 h. Inflammation was confirmed at 96 and 144 h post-infection by IL-1beta and TNF-alpha cytokine analysis and histopathology. Subsequently, we investigated the contribution of two surface-associated pneumococcal proteins, the streptococcal lipoprotein rotamase A (SlrA) and the putative proteinase maturation protein A (PpmA), to experimental OM in our model. Pneumococci lacking the slrA gene, but not those lacking the ppmA gene, were significantly reduced in virulence in the OM model. Importantly, pneumococci lacking both genes were significantly more attenuated than the DeltaslrA single mutant. This additive effect suggests that SlrA and PpmA exert complementary functions during experimental OM. In conclusion, we have developed a highly reproducible and non-invasive murine infection model for pneumococcal OM using a pressure cabin, which is very suitable to study pneumococcal pathogenesis and virulence in vivo.

  2. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ysasi, Alexandra B.; Wagner, Willi L.; Bennett, Robert D.; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D.; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A.

    2015-01-01

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends (“E”). Septal retraction, observed in 20–30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P < 0.01) and returned to baseline levels within 3 wk. Consistent with septal retraction, the postpneumonectomy alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P < 0.001). To identify clumped capillaries predicted by septal retraction, vascular casting, analyzed by both scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron imaging, demonstrated matted capillaries that were most prominent 3 days after pneumonectomy. Numerical simulations suggested that septal retraction could reflect increased surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  3. Telomere sister chromatid exchange in telomerase deficient murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yisong; Giannone, Richard J; Liu, Yie

    2005-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that several types of genomic rearrangements (i.e., telomere sister chromatid exchange (T-SCE), genomic-SCE, or end-to-end fusions) were more often detected in long-term cultured murine telomerase deficient embryonic stem (ES) cells than in freshly prepared murine splenocytes, even through they possessed similar frequencies of critically short telomeres. The high rate of genomic rearrangements in telomerase deficient ES cells, when compared to murine splenocytes, may reflect the cultured cells' gained ability to protect chromosome ends with eroded telomeres allowing them to escape 'end crisis'. However, the possibility that ES cells were more permissive to genomic rearrangements than other cell types or that differences in the microenvironment or genetic background of the animals might consequentially determine the rate of T-SCEs or other genomic rearrangements at critically short telomeres could not be ruled out.

  4. The purification and properties of cancer procoagulant from murine tumors.

    PubMed

    Moore, W R

    1992-04-30

    The protease, cancer procoagulant, was isolated from three murine metastatic tumors and was purified to apparent homogeneity (SDS-PAGE) from Lewis lung cells by the sequence of (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DE-53 anion-exchange chromatography, and Sephacryl 200 chromatography. The murine tumor enzyme has a molecular weight of 68,000 and Ca2+ is required for procoagulant and proteolytic activity; thus, the murine enzyme is very similar to that isolated from rabbit tumors. Two peptidyl chromogenic substrates of cancer procoagulant were discovered, facilitating kinetic and inhibition studies with the enzyme. The peptide substrate structures and the results of inhibition studies suggest that cancer procoagulant is thrombin-like in specificity but is a thiol protease.

  5. Characterization of eosinophilic esophagitis murine models using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Noti, Mario; Wojno, Elia D. Tait; Artis, David; Zhou, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies using murine models are critical for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying immune-mediated disorders such as Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). In this study, an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system capable of providing three-dimensional images with axial and transverse resolutions of 5 µm and 10 µm, respectively, was utilized to obtain esophageal images from a murine model of EoE-like disease ex vivo. Structural changes in the esophagus of wild-type (Tslpr+/+) and mutant (Tslpr−/−) mice with EoE-like disease were quantitatively evaluated and food impaction sites in the esophagus of diseased mice were monitored using OCT. Here, the capability of OCT as a label-free imaging tool devoid of tissue-processing artifacts to effectively characterize murine EoE-like disease models has been demonstrated. PMID:24575353

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the murine cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Akki, Ashwin; Gupta, Ashish; Weiss, Robert G

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful and reliable tool to noninvasively study the cardiovascular system in clinical practice. Because transgenic mouse models have assumed a critical role in cardiovascular research, technological advances in MRI have been extended to mice over the last decade. These have provided critical insights into cardiac and vascular morphology, function, and physiology/pathophysiology in many murine models of heart disease. Furthermore, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has allowed the nondestructive study of myocardial metabolism in both isolated hearts and in intact mice. This article reviews the current techniques and important pathophysiological insights from the application of MRI/MRS technology to murine models of cardiovascular disease.

  7. Anatomy of the Murine Hepatobiliary System: A Whole-Organ-Level Analysis Using a Transparency Method.

    PubMed

    Higashiyama, Hiroki; Sumitomo, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Aisa; Igarashi, Hitomi; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Kurohmaru, Masamichi; Kanai, Yoshiakira

    2016-02-01

    The biliary tract is a well-branched ductal structure that exhibits great variation in morphology among vertebrates. Its function is maintained by complex constructions of blood vessels, nerves, and smooth muscles, the so-called hepatobiliary system. Although the mouse (Mus musculus) has been used as a model organism for humans, the morphology of its hepatobiliary system has not been well documented at the topographical level, mostly because of its small size and complexity. To reconcile this, we conducted whole-mount anatomical descriptions of the murine extrahepatic biliary tracts with related blood vessels, nerves, and smooth muscles using a recently developed transparentizing method, CUBIC. Several major differences from humans were found in mice: (1) among the biliary arteries, the arteria gastrica sinistra accessoria was commonly found, which rarely appears in humans; (2) the sphincter muscle in the choledochoduodenal junction is unseparated from the duodenal muscle; (3) the pancreatic duct opens to the bile duct without any sphincter muscles because of its distance from the duodenum. This state is identical to a human congenital malformation, an anomalous arrangement of pancreaticobiliary ducts. However, other parts of the murine hepatobiliary system (such as the branching patterns of the biliary tract, blood vessels, and nerves) presented the same patterns as humans and other mammals topologically. Thus, the mouse is useful as an experimental model for studying the human hepatobiliary system.

  8. R-phycoerythrin-conjugated antibodies are inappropriate for intracellular staining of murine plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myun Soo; Kim, Tae Sung

    2013-05-01

    Phycoerythrin (PE) is a type of phycobiliproteins found in cyanobacteria and red algae. PE-conjugated antibodies are broadly used for flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Because nonspecific binding of antibodies results in decreased analytic accuracy, numerous efforts have been made to unveil cases and mechanisms of nonspecific bindings. However, nonspecific binding of specific cell types by a fluorescent dye-conjugated form of antibody has been rarely reported. In the present study, we discovered that PE-conjugated antibodies, but not FITC- or APC-antibodies, selectively stained lamina propria plasma cells (LP-PCs) from the murine small intestine after membrane permeabilization. We demonstrated that LP-PC-selective staining with PE-antibodies was not due to interactions of antibody-epitope or antibody-Fc receptor. This unexpected staining by PE-antibody was not dependent on the mouse strain of LP-PCs, experimental methods, or origin species of the antibody, but dependent on PE itself. This phenomenon was also observed in plasma cells isolated from bone marrow, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, in vitro activated B cells and in vivo generated LP-PCs were also selectively stained by PE-conjugated antibodies. Taken together, these results show that PE-conjugated antibodies are inappropriate for intracellular staining of murine plasma cells.

  9. Intrahepatic DNA vaccination: unexpected increased resistance against murine cysticercosis induced by non-specific enhanced immunity.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Revilla, C; Sonabend, A M; Rosas, G; Toledo, A; Meneses, G; Lopez-Casillas, F; Hernández, B; Fragoso, G; Sciutto, E

    2006-06-01

    Experimental murine cysticercosis caused by Taenia crassiceps has proved to be a useful model with which to test the efficacy of new vaccine candidates and delivery systems against pig cysticercosis. A high level of protection against murine cysticercosis was previously observed by intramuscular or intradermal DNA immunization with the use of the sequence of the recombinant KETc7 antigen cloned in pcDNA3 (pTc-sp7). To determine the effect of KETc7 differential expression in DNA vaccination, KETc7 was cloned in pGEM 11Zf(+) under the control of the tissue-specific regulatory promoter phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (pPc-sp7). A high level of protection was induced by intrahepatic immunization with pPc-sp7, pTc-sp7 and the empty vector in the absence of any specific immunity. The empty vector pGEM 11Zf(+), the plasmid with the highest content of CpG sequences, provided to the most efficient protection. This protection was related to an increased number of splenocytes, enhanced nonspecific splenocyte proliferation, and intensified intrahepatic INF-gamma production. Overall, intrahepatic plasmid CpG-DNA immunization provokes an exacerbated nonspecific immune response that can effectively control Taenia crassiceps cysticercosis.

  10. Several murine metastasizing tumors possess a cysteine proteinase with cancer procoagulant characteristics.

    PubMed

    Falanga, A; Bolognese Dalessandro, A P; Casali, B; Roncaglioni, M C; Donati, M B

    1987-06-15

    Cancer Procoagulant (CP), a cysteine proteinase which triggers blood coagulation by directly activating Factor X (FX) in the absence of Factor VII (F VII), has recently been isolated from rabbit V2 carcinoma and biochemically characterized. We have studied the procoagulant activity of tissue extracts from 4 murine experimental tumors in order to define whether or not a F VII-independent activity with cysteine proteinase characteristics was present. The tumors studied were: Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL), B16 melanoma (B16), JW sarcoma (JWS) and the M4 variant of the mFS6 fibrosarcoma (M4). Extracts from 3LL, B16 and JWS tumor initiated coagulation in both the presence and absence of F VII, their procoagulant activity was sensitive to iodoacetamide (1 mM) and mercury chloride (0.1 mM). The procoagulant of M4 extract was dependent on the presence of F VII and was not significantly affected by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors. An Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion study showed immunological cross-reactivity of all but M4 extracts to a polyclonal antibody to purified CP. The present study suggests that the procoagulant(s) present in the murine tumors 3LL, B16 and JWS are enzymatically and immunologically indistinguishable from cancer procoagulant of the rabbit V2 carcinoma.

  11. Activity of an Intralipid formulation of nystatin in murine systemic candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Semis, R; Mendlovic, S; Polacheck, I; Segal, E

    2011-10-01

    Since nystatin (NYT) is used only topically owing to its toxicity upon systemic administration, a study was initiated aiming to develop a formulation of NYT that could be used systemically against invasive mycoses. The present research is a continuation of previous in vitro investigation of the antifungal effect of nystatin-Intralipid (NYT-IL) against Candida, exploring its in vivo activity. NYT-IL was tested in murine systemic candidiasis induced in naïve as well as cyclophosphamide-immunosuppressed female ICR mice. The infection was assessed by survival rate (SR), mean survival time (MST) and qualitative and quantitative fungal organ colonisation. Mice were treated by intravenous administration of various doses of NYT-IL for 5 consecutive days starting either 24h or 48 h after the initiation of infection. The experiments showed that NYT-IL is therapeutically effective in the murine candidiasis model. NYT-IL was found to be less toxic in vivo than NYT and therefore higher doses of NYT-IL could be used. The efficacy of NYT-IL was expressed in treated naïve and immunosuppressed mice by increased SR, prolonged MST and reduced fungal organ colonisation. Early initiation of treatment increased efficacy. In summary, the Intralipid formulation of NYT can be administered parenterally and is effective against systemic experimental Candida infection.

  12. Femur Window Chamber Model for In Vivo Cell Tracking in the Murine Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonghong; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; DaCosta, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow is a complex organ that contains various hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. These cells are involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, immune regulation and tumor regulation. Commonly used methods for understanding cellular actions in the bone marrow, such as histology and blood counts, provide static information rather than capturing the dynamic action of multiple cellular components in vivo. To complement the standard methods, a window chamber (WC)-based model was developed to enable serial in vivo imaging of cells and structures in the murine bone marrow. This protocol describes a surgical procedure for installing the WC in the femur, in order to facilitate long-term optical access to the femoral bone marrow. In particular, to demonstrate its experimental utility, this WC approach was used to image and track neutrophils within the vascular network of the femur, thereby providing a novel method to visualize and quantify immune cell trafficking and regulation in the bone marrow. This method can be applied to study various biological processes in the murine bone marrow, such as hematopoiesis, stem cell transplantation, and immune responses in pathological conditions, including cancer. PMID:27500928

  13. Membrane configuration optimization for a murine in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Wuest, Diane M; Wing, Allison M; Lee, Kelvin H

    2013-01-30

    A powerful experimental tool used to study the dynamic functions of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is an in vitro cellular based system utilizing cell culture inserts in multi-well plates. Currently, usage of divergent model configurations without explanation of selected variable set points renders data comparisons difficult and limits widespread understanding. This work presents for the first time in literature a comprehensive screening study to optimize membrane configuration, with aims to unveil influential membrane effects on the ability of cerebral endothelial cells to form a tight monolayer. First, primary murine brain endothelial cells and astrocytes were co-cultured in contact and non-contact orientations on membranes of pore diameter sizes ranging from 0.4 μm to 8.0 μm, and the non-contact orientation and smallest pore diameter size were shown to support a significantly tighter monolayer formation. Then, membranes made from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) purchased from three different commercial sources were compared, and PET membranes purchased from two manufacturers facilitated a significantly tighter monolayer formation. Models were characterized by transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER), sodium fluorescein permeability, and immunocytochemical labeling of tight junction proteins. Finally, a murine brain endothelial cell line, bEnd.3, was grown on the different membranes, and similar results were obtained with respect to optimal membrane configuration selection. The results and methodology presented here on high throughput 24-well plate inserts can be translated to other BBB systems to advance model understanding.

  14. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela; Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H.; Tang, Jean Y.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  15. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K. H.; O’Neill, Helen C.

    2016-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed “L-DC” in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6CloLy6G− cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6Clo and Ly6Chi monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11bhiCD11cloMHCII−Ly6C−Ly6G− cells, which are CD43+, Siglec-F− and CD115−. Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types. PMID:26793192

  16. Association of murine lupus and thymic full-length endogenous retroviral expression maps to a bone marrow stem cell

    SciTech Connect

    Krieg, A.M.; Gourley, M.F.; Steinberg, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Recent studies of thymic gene expression in murine lupus have demonstrated 8.4-kb (full-length size) modified polytropic (Mpmv) endogenous retroviral RNA. In contrast, normal control mouse strains do not produce detectable amounts of such RNA in their thymuses. Prior studies have attributed a defect in experimental tolerance in murine lupus to a bone marrow stem cell rather than to the thymic epithelium; in contrast, infectious retroviral expression has been associated with the thymic epithelium, rather than with the bone marrow stem cell. The present study was designed to determine whether the abnormal Mpmv expression associated with murine lupus mapped to thymic epithelium or to a marrow precursor. Lethally irradiated control and lupus-prone mice were reconstituted with T cell depleted bone marrow; one month later their thymuses were studied for endogenous retroviral RNA and protein expression. Recipients of bone marrow from nonautoimmune donors expressed neither 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA nor surface MCF gp70 in their thymuses. In contrast, recipients of bone marrow from autoimmune NZB or BXSB donors expressed thymic 8.4-kb Mpmv RNA and mink cell focus-forming gp70. These studies demonstrate that lupus-associated 8.4-kb Mpmv endogenous retroviral expression is determined by bone marrow stem cells.

  17. In vivo murine and in vitro M-like cell models of gastrointestinal anthrax.

    PubMed

    Tonry, Jessica H; Popov, Serguei G; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kashanchi, Fatah; Hakami, Ramin M; Carpenter, Calvin; Bailey, Charles; Chung, Myung-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax and is acquired by three routes of infection: inhalational, gastrointestinal and cutaneous. Gastrointestinal (GI) anthrax is rare, but can rapidly result in severe, systemic disease that is fatal in 25%-60% of cases. Disease mechanisms of GI anthrax remain unclear due to limited numbers of clinical cases and the lack of experimental animal models. Here, we developed an in vivo murine model of GI anthrax where spore survival was maximized through the neutralization of stomach acid followed by an intragastric administration of a thiabendazole paste spore formulation. Infected mice showed a dose-dependent mortality rate and pathological features closely mimicking human GI anthrax. Since Peyer's patches in the murine intestine are the primary sites of B. anthracis growth, we developed a human M (microfold)-like-cell model using a Caco-2/Raji B-cell co-culturing system to study invasive mechanisms of GI anthrax across the intestinal epithelium. Translocation of B. anthracis spores was higher in M-like cells than Caco-2 monolayers, suggesting that M-like cells may serve as an initial entry site for spores. Here, we developed an in vivo murine model of GI anthrax and an in vitro M-like cell model that could be used to further our knowledge of GI anthrax pathogenesis.

  18. The cannabinoid TRPA1 agonist cannabichromene inhibits nitric oxide production in macrophages and ameliorates murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Romano, B; Borrelli, F; Fasolino, I; Capasso, R; Piscitelli, F; Cascio, MG; Pertwee, RG; Coppola, D; Vassallo, L; Orlando, P; Di Marzo, V; Izzo, AA

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The non-psychotropic cannabinoid cannabichromene is known to activate the transient receptor potential ankyrin-type1 (TRPA1) and to inhibit endocannabinoid inactivation, both of which are involved in inflammatory processes. We examined here the effects of this phytocannabinoid on peritoneal macrophages and its efficacy in an experimental model of colitis. Experimental Approach Murine peritoneal macrophages were activated in vitro by LPS. Nitrite levels were measured using a fluorescent assay; inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) receptors were analysed by RT-PCR (and/or Western blot analysis); colitis was induced by dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS). Endocannabinoid (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol), palmitoylethanolamide and oleoylethanolamide levels were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Colonic inflammation was assessed by evaluating the myeloperoxidase activity as well as by histology and immunohistochemistry. Key Results LPS caused a significant production of nitrites, associated to up-regulation of anandamide, iNOS, COX-2, CB1 receptors and down-regulation of CB2 receptors mRNA expression. Cannabichromene significantly reduced LPS-stimulated nitrite levels, and its effect was mimicked by cannabinoid receptor and TRPA1 agonists (carvacrol and cinnamaldehyde) and enhanced by CB1 receptor antagonists. LPS-induced anandamide, iNOS, COX-2 and cannabinoid receptor changes were not significantly modified by cannabichromene, which, however, increased oleoylethanolamide levels. In vivo, cannabichromene ameliorated DNBS-induced colonic inflammation, as revealed by histology, immunohistochemistry and myeloperoxidase activity. Conclusion and Implications Cannabichromene exerts anti-inflammatory actions in activated macrophages – with tonic CB1 cannabinoid signalling being negatively coupled to this effect – and ameliorates experimental murine colitis. PMID:23373571

  19. Murine myocardium OCT imaging with a blood substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeehyun; Villard, Joseph W.; Lee, Ho; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2002-06-01

    Imaging of the in vivo murine myocardium using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. Application of conventional techniques (e.g. MRI, Ultrasound imaging) for imaging the murine myocardium is problematic because the wall thickness is less than 1.5mm (20g mouse), and the heart rate can be as high as six-hundred beats per minute. To acquire a real-time image of the murine myocardium, OCT can provide sufficient spatial resolution (10 micrometers ) and imaging speed (1000 A-Scans/s). Strong light scattering by blood in the heart causes significant light attenuation making delineation of the endocardium-chamber boundary problematic. By replacing whole blood in the mouse with an artificial blood substitute we demonstrate significant reduction of light scattering in the murine myocardium. The results indicate a significant reduction in light scattering as whole blood hematocrit is diminished below 5%. To measure thickness change of the myocardium during one cycle, a myocardium edge detection algorithm is developed and demonstrated.

  20. Solution structure of murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2.

    PubMed

    Shao, W; Jerva, L F; West, J; Lolis, E; Schweitzer, B I

    1998-06-01

    The solution structure of murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), a heparin-binding chemokine that is secreted in response to inflammatory stimuli, has been determined using two-dimensional homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Structure calculations were carried out by means of torsion-angle molecular dynamics using the program X-PLOR. The structure is based on a total of 2390 experimental restraints, comprising 2246 NOE-derived distance restraints, 44 distance restraints for 22 hydrogen bonds, and 100 torsion angle restraints. The structure is well-defined, with the backbone (N, Calpha, C) and heavy atom atomic rms distribution about the mean coordinates for residues 9-69 of the dimer being 0.57 +/- 0.16 A and 0.96 +/- 0.12 A, respectively. The N- and C-terminal residues (1-8 and 70-73, respectively) are disordered. The overall structure of the MIP-2 dimer is similar to that reported previously for the NMR structures of MGSA and IL-8 and consists of a six-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet (residue 25-29, 39-44, and 48-52) packed against two C-terminal antiparallel alpha-helices. A best fit superposition of the NMR structure of MIP-2 on the structures of MGSA, NAP-2, and the NMR and X-ray structures of IL-8 are 1.11, 1.02, 1.27, and 1.19 A, respectively, for the monomers, and 1.28, 1.10, 1.55, and 1.36 A, respectively, for the dimers (IL-8 residues 7-14 and 16-67, NAP-2 residues 25-84). At the tertiary level, the main differences between the MIP-2 solution structure and the IL-8, MGSA, and NAP-2 structures involve the N-terminal loop between residues 9-23 and the loops formed by residues 30-38 and residues 53-58. At the quaternary level, the difference between MIP-2 and IL-8, MGSA, or NAP-2 results from differing interhelical angles and separations.

  1. Solution structure of murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2.

    PubMed

    Shao, W; Jerva, L F; West, J; Lolis, E; Schweitzer, B I

    1998-06-01

    The solution structure of murine macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2), a heparin-binding chemokine that is secreted in response to inflammatory stimuli, has been determined using two-dimensional homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Structure calculations were carried out by means of torsion-angle molecular dynamics using the program X-PLOR. The structure is based on a total of 2390 experimental restraints, comprising 2246 NOE-derived distance restraints, 44 distance restraints for 22 hydrogen bonds, and 100 torsion angle restraints. The structure is well-defined, with the backbone (N, Calpha, C) and heavy atom atomic rms distribution about the mean coordinates for residues 9-69 of the dimer being 0.57 +/- 0.16 A and 0.96 +/- 0.12 A, respectively. The N- and C-terminal residues (1-8 and 70-73, respectively) are disordered. The overall structure of the MIP-2 dimer is similar to that reported previously for the NMR structures of MGSA and IL-8 and consists of a six-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet (residue 25-29, 39-44, and 48-52) packed against two C-terminal antiparallel alpha-helices. A best fit superposition of the NMR structure of MIP-2 on the structures of MGSA, NAP-2, and the NMR and X-ray structures of IL-8 are 1.11, 1.02, 1.27, and 1.19 A, respectively, for the monomers, and 1.28, 1.10, 1.55, and 1.36 A, respectively, for the dimers (IL-8 residues 7-14 and 16-67, NAP-2 residues 25-84). At the tertiary level, the main differences between the MIP-2 solution structure and the IL-8, MGSA, and NAP-2 structures involve the N-terminal loop between residues 9-23 and the loops formed by residues 30-38 and residues 53-58. At the quaternary level, the difference between MIP-2 and IL-8, MGSA, or NAP-2 results from differing interhelical angles and separations. PMID:9622482

  2. [Anti-Candida activity of aroma candy and its protective activity against murine oral candidiasis].

    PubMed

    Hayama, Kazumi; Takahashi, Miki; Suzuki, Motofumi; Ezawa, Kunio; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Matsukawa, Taiji; Kishi, Akinobu; Sato, Nobuya; Abe, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    A daily eatable candy that has possible protective activity against oral candidiasis was experimentally produced. The candy was made from reduced-maltose as main constituent and from several natural products, such as oligonol (depolymerized polyphenols derived from lychee), cinnamon (cassia), citral, and capric acid, which are known to have anti-Candida activity in vitro and in vivo. The candy effectively inhibited the mycelial growth of C. albicans, even when it was diluted 1,000 times with culture media. We assessed the protective activity of the candy against murine candidiasis. When 50μl of candy dissolved and diluted 4 times with water was administered 3 times into the oral cavity of Candida infected mice, the score of lesions on the Candida-infected tongues improved on day 2. These findings suggest that this candy has potential as food that provides protective activity against oral candidiasis. PMID:25855024

  3. Characterization of the murine model of schistosomal hepatic periportal fibrosis ('pipestem' fibrosis).

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Z. A.; Cheever, A. W.

    1993-01-01

    During mild (one to two pairs of worms) and prolonged (23 weeks or more) mouse infections with Schistosoma mansoni, but not with S. japonicum, periovular granulomas and fibrosis were seen to be preferentially located along periportal tissues. This caused fibrotic expansion of the portal spaces on a background of normal-looking hepatic parenchyma, a picture mimicking 'clay pipestem fibrosis' seen in human patients with advanced schistosomiasis. The model was reproduced in outbred and in several strains of inbred mice, and their main characteristics were studied and compared to the human counterpart. A balanced consideration of the similarities and differences between the murine model and human pipestem fibrosis is needed for the adequate utilization of this simple, reproducible and inexpensive experimental model. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8499320

  4. The role of L1cam in murine corticogenesis, and the pathogenesis of hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kyoko; Fushiki, Shinji

    2015-02-01

    L1cam (L1), one of the cell adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily, plays critical roles in neuronal migration, axon growth, guidance, fasciculation, and synaptic plasticity in the central as well as the peripheral nervous system. A number of X-linked forms of mental retardation have been associated with mutations in the L1 gene, including X-linked hydrocephalus in humans. Although model mice with different sites of L1 mutation have been studied, the pathogenetic mechanisms of hydrocephalus and mental retardation still remain unsolved. We herein present an overview of the function of L1 in the central nervous system and describe a human case of L1 mutation and knock-in mice that showed deleted sixth immunoglobulin of L1. Finally, we present experimental evidence showing that L1 is involved in murine neocortical histogenesis and propose a hypothetical mechanism of L1-linked hydrocephalus, with reference to corticogenesis. PMID:25641508

  5. [Anti-Candida activity of aroma candy and its protective activity against murine oral candidiasis].

    PubMed

    Hayama, Kazumi; Takahashi, Miki; Suzuki, Motofumi; Ezawa, Kunio; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Matsukawa, Taiji; Kishi, Akinobu; Sato, Nobuya; Abe, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    A daily eatable candy that has possible protective activity against oral candidiasis was experimentally produced. The candy was made from reduced-maltose as main constituent and from several natural products, such as oligonol (depolymerized polyphenols derived from lychee), cinnamon (cassia), citral, and capric acid, which are known to have anti-Candida activity in vitro and in vivo. The candy effectively inhibited the mycelial growth of C. albicans, even when it was diluted 1,000 times with culture media. We assessed the protective activity of the candy against murine candidiasis. When 50μl of candy dissolved and diluted 4 times with water was administered 3 times into the oral cavity of Candida infected mice, the score of lesions on the Candida-infected tongues improved on day 2. These findings suggest that this candy has potential as food that provides protective activity against oral candidiasis.

  6. Evaluation of the protective potential of a Taenia solium cysticercus mimotope on murine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Capelli-Peixoto, Janaína; Chávez-Olórtegui, Carlos; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Minozzo, João Carlos; Gabardo, Juarez; Teixeira, Kádima Nayara; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Alvarenga, Larissa Magalhães; de Moura, Juliana

    2011-11-28

    An NC-1 mimotope from Taenia solium cysticerci can help identify patients with neurocysticercosis through immunoassay. After chemical synthesis, an NC-1 peptide was coupled to bovine serum albumin (NC-1/BSA) for used as an immunogen in murine Taenia crassiceps cysticercosis, which is an experimental model of cysticercosis caused by T. solium. NC-1/BSA immunisation decreased parasitaemia by inducing 74% protection compared to the 77% protection obtained with T. crassiceps crude antigen. The influence of immunisation was also observed on the size and stage of development of the parasite. Antibodies from NC-1/BSA-immunised mice recognised proteins from the tegument and from the buddings, and intense immunostaining was observed in the final stage of the metacestode. The capacity of NC-1/BSA to induce protective antibodies which are reactive to proteins from the tegument of the metacestode suggests that this mimotope is a potential candidate for a vaccine against human and animal cysticercosis.

  7. Nerve growth factor translates stress response and subsequent murine abortion via adhesion molecule-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Tometten, Mareike; Blois, Sandra; Kuhlmei, Arne; Stretz, Anna; Klapp, Burghard F; Arck, Petra C

    2006-04-01

    Spontaneous abortion is a frequent threat affecting 10%-25% of human pregnancies. Psychosocial stress has been suggested to be attributable for pregnancy losses by challenging the equilibrium of systems mandatory for pregnancy maintenance, including the nervous, endocrine, and immune system. Strong evidence indicates that stress-triggered abortion is mediated by adhesion molecules, i.e., intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) and leukocyte function associated molecule 1, now being referred to as integrin alpha L (ITGAL), which facilitate recruitment of inflammatory cells to the feto-maternal interface. The neurotrophin beta-nerve growth factor (NGFB), which has been shown to be upregulated in response to stress in multiple experimental settings including in the uterine lining (decidua) during pregnancy, increases ICAM1 expression on endothelial cells. Here, we investigated whether and how NGFB neutralization has a preventive effect on stress-triggered abortion in the murine CBA/J x DBA/2J model. We provide experimental evidence that stress exposure upregulates the frequency of abortion and the expression of uterine NGFB. Further, adhesion molecules ICAM1 and selectin platelet (SELP, formerly P-Selectin) and their ligands ITGAL and SELP ligand (SELPL, formerly P selectin glycoprotein ligand 1) respectively increase in murine deciduas in response to stress. Subsequently, decidual cytokines are biased toward a proinflammatory and abortogenic cytokine profile. Additionally, a decrease of pregnancy protective CD8alpha(+) decidual cells is present. Strikingly, all such uterine stress responses are abrogated by NGFB neutralization. Hence, NGFB acts as a proximal mediator in the hierarchical network of immune rejection by mediating an abortogenic environment comprised of classical signs of neurogenic inflammation. PMID:16371592

  8. Mechanism of tumor remission by cytomegalovirus in a murine lymphoma model: evidence for involvement of virally induced cellular interleukin-15.

    PubMed

    Erlach, Katja C; Reddehase, Matthias J; Podlech, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    A murine model of B and T cell lymphomas in recipients after hematoablative conditioning for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has previously revealed a tumor-repressive, metastasis-inhibiting function of murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV). More recently, this prediction from the experimental model was put on trial in several clinical studies that indeed gave evidence for a lower incidence of tumor relapse associated with early reactivation of latent human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) after allogeneic HCT in patients treated against different types of hematopoietic malignancies, including lymphoma and acute as well as chronic leukemias. Due to the limitations inherent to clinical studies, the tumor-repressive role of hCMV remained observational with no approach to clarify mechanisms. Although the tumor-repressive mechanisms of mCMV and hCMV may differ and depend on the type of tumor, experimental approaches in the murine model might give valuable hints for concepts to follow in clinical research. We have previously shown for the liver-adapted A20-derived B cell lymphoma E12E that mCMV does not infect the lymphoma cells for causing cell death by viral cytopathogenicity but triggers tumor-selective apoptosis at a tissue site of tumor metastasis distant from a local site of infection. This finding suggested involvement of a cytokine that triggers apoptosis, directly or indirectly. Here we used a series of differential high-density microarray analyses to identify cellular genes whose expression is specifically upregulated at the site of virus entry only by viruses capable of triggering lymphoma cell apoptosis. This strategy identified interleukin-15 (IL-15) as most promising candidate, eventually confirmed by lymphoma repression with recombinant IL-15. PMID:25805565

  9. A mixture of amino acids and other small molecules present in the serum suppresses the growth of murine and human tumors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kulcsár, Gyula; Gaál, Dezső; Kulcsár, Péter I; Schulcz, Ákos; Czömpöly, Tamás

    2013-03-01

    Previously we have hypothesized that the small molecules which are selectively accumulated in cancer cells might participate in a non-immunological antitumor surveillance mechanism. We demonstrated earlier that a mixture of experimentally selected substances ("active mixture", AM: L-arginine, L-histidine, L-methionine, L-phenylalanine, L-tyrosine, L-tryptophan, L-ascorbate, D-biotin, pyridoxine, riboflavin, adenine, L(-)malate) possesses a selective toxic effect in vitro on a variety of tumor cell lines, and we have shown that the AM selectively induces apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro. To explore the in vivo significance of our earlier findings we examined the antitumor effect of AM in Colon 26 murine colorectal adenocarcinoma, B16 murine melanoma, MXT murine mammary carcinoma, S180 murine sarcoma, P388 murine lymphoid leukemia, HL-60 human promyeloid leukemia, PC-3 human prostate carcinoma, and HT-29 human colon carcinoma tumor models. Treatment of tumor bearing mice with AM inhibited the growth of the tumors investigated, with an inhibitory effect ranging from 40 to 69%. The AM had a comparable antitumor effect with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin in the Colon-26 tumor model, and combined treatment with AM and 5-fluorouracil or cisplatin resulted in an enhanced tumor growth inhibitory effect. The AM induced apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway and induced G1 arrest in PC-3 cells and increased the number of apoptotic cells in PC-3 xenografts. These findings suggest that the AM might offer an interesting perspective in the treatment of cancer and in combination with other treatments may offer hope for a more effective cancer therapy.

  10. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  11. Broadband acoustic properties of a murine skull.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Turner, Jake; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    It has been well recognized that the presence of a skull imposes harsh restrictions on the use of ultrasound and optoacoustic techniques in the study, treatment and modulation of the brain function. We propose a rigorous modeling and experimental methodology for estimating the insertion loss and the elastic constants of the skull over a wide range of frequencies and incidence angles. A point-source-like excitation of ultrawideband acoustic radiation was induced via the absorption of nanosecond duration laser pulses by a 20 μm diameter microsphere. The acoustic waves transmitted through the skull are recorded by a broadband, spherically focused ultrasound transducer. A coregistered pulse-echo ultrasound scan is subsequently performed to provide accurate skull geometry to be fed into an acoustic transmission model represented in an angular spectrum domain. The modeling predictions were validated by measurements taken from a glass cover-slip and ex vivo adult mouse skulls. The flexible semi-analytical formulation of the model allows for seamless extension to other transducer geometries and diverse experimental scenarios involving broadband acoustic transmission through locally flat solid structures. It is anticipated that accurate quantification and modeling of the skull transmission effects would ultimately allow for skull aberration correction in a broad variety of applications employing transcranial detection or transmission of high frequency ultrasound.

  12. Effects of the murine skull in optoacoustic brain microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great promise behind the recent introduction of optoacoustic technology into the arsenal of small-animal neuroimaging methods, a variety of acoustic and light-related effects introduced by adult murine skull severely compromise the performance of optoacoustics in transcranial imaging. As a result, high-resolution noninvasive optoacoustic microscopy studies are still limited to a thin layer of pial microvasculature, which can be effectively resolved by tight focusing of the excitation light. We examined a range of distortions introduced by an adult murine skull in transcranial optoacoustic imaging under both acoustically- and optically-determined resolution scenarios. It is shown that strong low-pass filtering characteristics of the skull may significantly deteriorate the achievable spatial resolution in deep brain imaging where no light focusing is possible. While only brain vasculature with a diameter larger than 60 µm was effectively resolved via transcranial measurements with acoustic resolution, significant improvements are seen through cranial windows and thinned skull experiments.

  13. Genomic organization of the murine CTL lipase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, M.H.; Boyer, S.N.; Grusby, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    Murine cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) lipase was originally identified as an IL-4-inducible gene in CD8-positive T cells. To further our understanding of both the function and the regulation of CTL lipase in T cells, we have cloned and characterized the murine gene. Two overlapping phage clones spanning 29 kb contain the entire CTL lipase gene. The exon structure in similar to those characterized for the human and canine pancreatic lipase-related protein 1 genes, with notable differences in the 5{prime} end. Transcripts initiate from a site that matches a consensus for an initiator sequence. Potential cis-regulatory elements in the CTL lipase 5{prime} regulatory region that would confer dual tissue specificity in exocrine pancreas and cytotoxic T lymphocytes are identified. The implications of this promoter organization are discussed. 27 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy of the murine cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Akki, Ashwin; Gupta, Ashish

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful and reliable tool to noninvasively study the cardiovascular system in clinical practice. Because transgenic mouse models have assumed a critical role in cardiovascular research, technological advances in MRI have been extended to mice over the last decade. These have provided critical insights into cardiac and vascular morphology, function, and physiology/pathophysiology in many murine models of heart disease. Furthermore, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has allowed the nondestructive study of myocardial metabolism in both isolated hearts and in intact mice. This article reviews the current techniques and important pathophysiological insights from the application of MRI/MRS technology to murine models of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23292717

  15. Practical Murine Hematopathology: A Comparative Review and Implications for Research

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Karyn E; Mikkola, Amy M; Stepanek, Aaron M; Vernet, Andyna; Hall, Christopher D; Sun, Chia C; Yildirim, Eda; Staropoli, John F; Lee, Jeannie T; Brown, Diane E

    2015-01-01

    Hematologic parameters are important markers of disease in human and veterinary medicine. Biomedical research has benefited from mouse models that recapitulate such disease, thus expanding knowledge of pathogenetic mechanisms and investigative therapies that translate across species. Mice in health have many notable hematologic differences from humans and other veterinary species, including smaller erythrocytes, higher percentage of circulating reticulocytes or polychromasia, lower peripheral blood neutrophil and higher peripheral blood and bone marrow lymphocyte percentages, variable leukocyte morphologies, physiologic splenic hematopoiesis and iron storage, and more numerous and shorter-lived erythrocytes and platelets. For accurate and complete hematologic analyses of disease and response to investigative therapeutic interventions, these differences and the unique features of murine hematopathology must be understood. Here we review murine hematology and hematopathology for practical application to translational investigation. PMID:25926395

  16. Flow Cytometric Analysis of Immune Cells Within Murine Aorta.

    PubMed

    Gjurich, Breanne N; Taghavie-Moghadam, Parésa L; Galkina, Elena V

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a critical role in the modulation of atherogenesis at all stages of the disease. However, there are many technical difficulties when studying the immune system within murine aortas. Common techniques such as PCR and immunohistochemistry have answered many questions about the presence of immune cells and mediators of inflammation within the aorta yet many questions remain unanswered due to the limitations of these techniques. On the other hand, cumulatively the flow cytometry approach has propelled the immunology field forward but it has been challenging to apply this technique to aortic tissues. Here, we describe the methodology to isolate and characterize the immune cells within the murine aorta and provide examples of functional assays for aortic leukocytes using flow cytometry. The method involves the harvesting and enzymatic digestion of the aorta, extracellular and intracellular protein staining, and a subsequent flow cytometric analysis. PMID:26445788

  17. Increased photosensitivity to near-ultraviolet light in murine SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Golan, D.T.; Borel, Y.

    1984-02-01

    The authors investigated whether there is increased susceptibility to near-UVL in murine SLE. Cultured spleen cells from either strain of mice with lupus disease or conventional strains of mice were exposed to different UVL fractions in vitro. The effect of DNA synthesis, release, and repair was examined. DNA synthesis and release was measured as percent of (/sup 3/H)thymidine (dT) uptake into either total acid-precipitable radioactive material of cell sediment plus supernatant, or that of the medium alone, whereas hydroxyurea-resistant dT incorporation represented DNA repair. The data indicate that all SLE strains, in contrast to all non-SLE strains, show increased DNA synthesis and release after UV-A exposure. In addition, all murine SLE strains demonstrate increased susceptibility to induction of DNA damage by UV-A. The significance of these observations in relation to the clinical activity of SLE after sunlight exposure is discussed.

  18. A generalized transducing phage for the murine pathogen Citrobacter rodentium

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Nicola K.; Toribio, Ana L.; Goulding, David; Foulds, Ian; Thomson, Nicholas; Dougan, Gordon; Salmond, George P. C.

    2008-01-01

    A virulent phage (φCR1) capable of generalized transduction in Citrobacter rodentium was isolated from the environment and characterized. C. rodentium is a natural pathogen of mice, causing transmissible murine colonic hyperplasia. Sequencing of its genome has recently been completed and will soon be fully annotated and published. C. rodentium is an important model organism for infections caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC). φCR1 uses a lipopolysaccharide receptor, has a genome size of approximately 300 kb, and is able to transduce a variety of markers. φCR1 is the first reported transducing phage for C. rodentium and will be a useful tool for functional genomic analysis of this important natural murine pathogen. PMID:17768241

  19. Morphology and growth of murine cell lines on model biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Godek, Marisha L; Duchsherer, Nichole L; McElwee, Quinn; Grainger, David W

    2004-01-01

    All biomaterial implants are assaulted by the host "foreign body" immune response. Understanding the complex, dynamic relationship between cells, biomaterials and milieu is an important first step towards controlling this reaction. Material surface chemistry dictates protein adsorption, and thus subsequent cell interactions. The cell-implant is a microenvironment involving 1) proteins that coat the surface and 2) cells that interact with these proteins. Macrophages and fibroblasts are two cell types that interact with proteins on biomaterials surfaces and play different related, but equally important, roles in biomaterials rejection and implant failure. Growth characteristics of four murine cell lines on model biomaterials surfaces were examined. Murine monocyte-macrophages (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1), murine macrophage (IC-21) and murine fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines were tested to determine whether differences exist in adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, spreading, and fusion (macrophage lineages only) on these surfaces. Differences were observed in the ability of cells to adhere to and subsequently proliferate on polymer surfaces. (Monocyte-) macrophages grew well on all surfaces tested and growth rates were measured on three representative polymer biomaterials surfaces: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), polystyrene, and Teflon-AF. J774A.1 cultures grown on TCPS and treated with exogenous cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF were observed to contain multinucleate cells with unusual morphologies. Thus, (monocyte-) macrophage cell lines were found to effectively attach to and interrogate each surface presented, with evidence of extensive spreading on Teflon-AF surfaces, particularly in the IC-21 cultures. The J774A.1 line was able to proliferate and/or differentiate to more specialized cell types (multinucleate/dendritic-like cells) in the presence of soluble chemokine cues. PMID:15133927

  20. Murine immunization by cesium-137 irradiation attenuated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Stek, M. Jr.; Minard, P.; Cruess, D.F.

    1984-06-01

    Cesium-137, becoming a more readily available ionizing gamma radiation source for laboratory use, was shown to effectively attenuate Schistosoma mansoni cercariae for vaccine production. In parallel comparison studies with the murine model, cesium-137 attenuated cercariae consistently afforded better protection than did the cobalt-60 prepared vaccine. Dose-response data indicated that the optimal total irradiation with cesium-137 was between 45 and 50 Krad.

  1. Inflammatory and remodeling events in asthma with chronic exposure to house dust mites: a murine model.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joong Hyun; Kim, Chi Hong; Kim, Yong Hyun; Kim, Seung Joon; Lee, Sook Young; Kim, Young Kyoon; Kim, Kwan Hyoung; Moon, Hwa Sik; Song, Jeong Sup; Park, Sung Hak; Kwon, Soon Seog

    2007-12-01

    Although animal models with ovalbumin have been used to study chronic asthma, there are difficulties in inducing recurrence as well as in maintaining chronic inflammation in this system. Using a murine model of house dust mite (HDM)-induced bronchial asthma, we examined the airway remodeling process in response to the chronic exposure to HDM. During the seventh and twelfth weeks of study, HDM were inhaled through the nose for three consecutive days and airway responsiveness was measured. Twenty-four hours later, bronchoalveolar lavage and histological examination were performed. The degree of overproduction of mucus, subepithelial fibrosis, and the thickness of the peribronchial smooth muscle in the experimental group was clearly increased compared to the control group. In addition, HDM-exposed mice demonstrated severe airway hyperreactivity to methacholine. In the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the number of total cells and eosinophils was increased; during the twelfth week, the number of neutrophils increased in the experimental group. With regard to changes in cytokines, the concentrations of IL-4, IL- 13, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) were increased in the experimental group. The data suggest that eosinophils, IL-4, IL-13, and TGF-beta might play an important role in the airway remodeling process and that neutrophils may be involved with increased exposure time.

  2. Pheromone-induced cell proliferation in the murine subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sachiko; Soini, Helena A; Foley, John; Novotny, Milos V; Lai, Cary

    2014-08-01

    Enhancement of adult neurogenesis in female mice was previously demonstrated through exposure to soiled bedding from males, although the identity of relevant chemosignals has remained unknown. The farnesenes and SBT (2-sec-butyl-4,5-dihydrothiazole) are male murine pheromones that dominant males secrete at higher levels. Previous studies have shown that they induce oestrus in female mice. We have recently shown that these pheromones strongly increase cell proliferation in the SVZ (subventricular zone) of adult female mice. In addition, we found that a female murine pheromone, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, facilitates similar changes in males. 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is a female pheromone that is secreted when females are housed in large groups and it was originally found to suppress oestrus in females. We found that it does not have suppressive effect on the cell proliferation in the SVZ of females. Similarly, male murine pheromones, SBT and the farnesenes, do not show a suppressive effect on the cell proliferation in the SVZ of males. Our results demonstrated that pheromonal communication between males and females has strong stimulatory effect on both the reproductive physiology and brain cell proliferation, but intrasex pheromonal exchanges do not reduce progenitor proliferation in these brain regions.

  3. Structure and regulation of the murine gamma-casein gene.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Andreas F

    2002-12-12

    The murine casein locus consists of five genes, which are coordinately regulated during mammary development. The levels of casein-specific mRNAs in mammary epithelial cells increase during the second half of pregnancy and remain high during lactation. The murine gamma-casein gene, which corresponds to the alphaS2-casein gene in ruminants, was isolated from a mouse bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library (strain 129SV). The gene contains 14 exons, which are distributed over 14 kb of DNA sequence. The expression pattern of the murine gamma-casein gene mimics that of the neighbouring beta-casein gene in terms of developmental induction in vivo. In cell culture, both the beta- and gamma-casein promoter are synergistically induced by prolactin and glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoid induction is critically dependent on prolactin-mediated activation of STAT5 in both promoters. Several consensus STAT5 binding sites were identified in the gamma-casein promoter, some of which may have an additive effect on prolactin induction. mRNA levels of gamma- and beta-casein are similar in lactating mammary tissue. However, promoter segments derived from the gamma-casein gene are significantly less active in cell culture than comparable fragments of the beta-casein promoter. Promoter hybrids between the gamma- and beta-casein promoters revealed that the critical sequences which are responsible for the different in vitro activity are located in a short promoter proximal region.

  4. Activation of murine macrophages and lymphocytes by Ureaplasma diversum.

    PubMed Central

    Chelmonska-Soyta, A; Miller, R B; Ruhnke, L; Rosendal, S

    1994-01-01

    Ureaplasma diversum is a pathogen in the bovine reproductive tract. The objective of the research was to study interactions with macrophages and lymphocytes which might elucidate aspects of pathogenetic mechanisms of this organism. We studied the activation of murine macrophages of C3H/HeN (LPS-responder) and C3H/HeJ (LPS-low-responder) genotype for TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1 and nitric oxide production and blastogenic response of C3H/HeJ splenocytes after Ureaplasma diversum stimulation. Live and heat-killed U. diversum induced TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 in peritoneal macrophage cultures of both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice in a dose dependent manner. Interferon-gamma modulated the cytokine production, by increasing the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and nitric oxide, but IL-1 secretion was only enhanced in C3H/HeJ macrophages stimulated by live ureaplasmas. Supernatant of U. diversum sonicate was mitogenic for murine spleen lymphocytes. The blastogenic response was dose dependent, and stimulation with both U. diversum and Concanavalin A seemed to have an additive effect. These results suggest that U. diversum, similar to other mycoplasmas, activates murine macrophages and lymphoid cells. The studies should be repeated with bovine cells in order to elucidate pathogenetic aspects of inflammation in cattle caused by U. diversum. PMID:7889459

  5. Cloning and characterization of a murine SIL gene

    SciTech Connect

    Collazo-Garcia, N.; Scherer, P.; Aplan, P.D.

    1995-12-10

    The human SIL gene is disrupted by a site-specific interstitial deletion in 25% of children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since transcriptionally active genes are prone to recombination events, the recurrent nature of this lesion suggests that the SIL gene product is transcriptionally active in the cell type that undergoes this interstitial deletion and that the SIL gene product may play a role in normal lymphoid development. To facilitate studies of SIL gene function, we have cloned and characterized a murine SIL gene. The predicted murine SIL protein is 75% identical to the human gene, with good homology throughout the open reading frame. An in vitro translated SIL cDNA generated a protein slightly larger than the predicted 139-kDa protein. Although a prior report detected SIL mRNA expression exclusively in hematopoietic tissues, a sensitive RT-PCR assay demonstrated SIL expression to be ubiquitous, detectable in all tissues examined. Since the RT-PCR assay suggested that SIL mRNA expression was higher in rapidly proliferating tissues, we assayed SIL mRNA expression using a murine erythroleukemia model of terminal differentiation and found it to be dramatically decreased in conjunction with terminal differentiation. These studies demonstrate that the human SIL gene product is quite well conserved in rodents and suggest that the SIL gene product may play a role in cell proliferation. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for visualization of tissue morphology and cellular dynamics in murine and human airways

    PubMed Central

    Kretschmer, Sarah; Pieper, Mario; Hüttmann, Gereon; Bölke, Torsten; Wollenberg, Barbara; Marsh, Leigh M; Garn, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The basic understanding of inflammatory airway diseases greatly benefits from imaging the cellular dynamics of immune cells. Current imaging approaches focus on labeling specific cells to follow their dynamics but fail to visualize the surrounding tissue. To overcome this problem, we evaluated autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for following the motion and interaction of cells in the airways in the context of tissue morphology. Freshly isolated murine tracheae from healthy mice and mice with experimental allergic airway inflammation were examined by autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy. In addition, fluorescently labeled ovalbumin and fluorophore-labeled antibodies were applied to visualize antigen uptake and to identify specific cell populations, respectively. The trachea in living mice was imaged to verify that the ex vivo preparation reflects the in vivo situation. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy was also tested to examine human tissue from patients in short-term tissue culture. Using autofluorescence, the epithelium, underlying cells, and fibers of the connective tissue, as well as blood vessels, were identified in isolated tracheae. Similar structures were visualized in living mice and in the human airway tissue. In explanted murine airways, mobile cells were localized within the tissue and we could follow their migration, interactions between individual cells, and their phagocytic activity. During allergic airway inflammation, increased number of eosinophil and neutrophil granulocytes were detected that moved within the connective tissue and immediately below the epithelium without damaging the epithelial cells or connective tissues. Contacts between granulocytes were transient lasting 3 min on average. Unexpectedly, prolonged interactions between granulocytes and antigen-uptaking cells were observed lasting for an average of 13 min. Our results indicate that autofluorescence-based imaging can detect previously unknown immune cell

  7. The development of an improved murine iontophoresis reactivation model for the study of HSV-1 latency.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Y J; Araullo-Cruz, T P; Romanowski, E; Ruziczka, L; Balouris, C; Oren, J; Cheng, K P; Kim, S

    1986-08-01

    The present study reviews the development of an effective murine iontophoresis reactivation model for the study of HSV-1 latency. In a series of experiments, Balb C mice latently infected with HSV-1 McKrae strain were iontophoresed with epinephrine X 3 days (EPI X 3/ION) or 6-hydroxydopamine X 1 day followed by topical epinephrine (6-HD ION/EPI). Reactivation and recovery of latent HSV-1 was determined by daily ocular swabs, titration, and neutralization. Additional studies determined the effect of topical ocular steroids on viral recovery rate. The results demonstrated no recovery of McKrae strain in Balb C (0%) with EPI X 3/ION, and no enhancement with topical steroids. 6-HD ION/EPI demonstrated a low recovery rate in mice (8%). However, the recovery rate was significantly increased to 50% by the addition of topical steroids to form the 6-HD ION/EPI/STEROID model, a useful experimental tool. The substitution of a clinical isolate, W strain, for McKrae strain further improved the model. The results demonstrated that, following the acute infection in mice, W strain was associated with a significantly higher (P = .001) survival rate than McKrae strain (81% vs. 52%). There was no statistically significant difference between the two strains, W vs McKrae, in Balb C mice comparing keratitis, establishment of latency (by co-cultivation), spontaneous shedding rate, or induced ocular shedding following iontophoresis. The development of an effective murine iontophoresis model offers an economical method which is uniquely suited for immunological and genetic studies of HSV-1 latency.

  8. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for visualization of tissue morphology and cellular dynamics in murine and human airways.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Sarah; Pieper, Mario; Hüttmann, Gereon; Bölke, Torsten; Wollenberg, Barbara; Marsh, Leigh M; Garn, Holger; König, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The basic understanding of inflammatory airway diseases greatly benefits from imaging the cellular dynamics of immune cells. Current imaging approaches focus on labeling specific cells to follow their dynamics but fail to visualize the surrounding tissue. To overcome this problem, we evaluated autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy for following the motion and interaction of cells in the airways in the context of tissue morphology. Freshly isolated murine tracheae from healthy mice and mice with experimental allergic airway inflammation were examined by autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy. In addition, fluorescently labeled ovalbumin and fluorophore-labeled antibodies were applied to visualize antigen uptake and to identify specific cell populations, respectively. The trachea in living mice was imaged to verify that the ex vivo preparation reflects the in vivo situation. Autofluorescence multiphoton microscopy was also tested to examine human tissue from patients in short-term tissue culture. Using autofluorescence, the epithelium, underlying cells, and fibers of the connective tissue, as well as blood vessels, were identified in isolated tracheae. Similar structures were visualized in living mice and in the human airway tissue. In explanted murine airways, mobile cells were localized within the tissue and we could follow their migration, interactions between individual cells, and their phagocytic activity. During allergic airway inflammation, increased number of eosinophil and neutrophil granulocytes were detected that moved within the connective tissue and immediately below the epithelium without damaging the epithelial cells or connective tissues. Contacts between granulocytes were transient lasting 3 min on average. Unexpectedly, prolonged interactions between granulocytes and antigen-uptaking cells were observed lasting for an average of 13 min. Our results indicate that autofluorescence-based imaging can detect previously unknown immune cell

  9. High Resolution Imaging of Murine Myocardial Infarction With Delayed Enhancement and Cine Micro-CT

    PubMed Central

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Badea, Cristian; Hedlund, Laurence W; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Sosnovik, David E.; Johnson, G Allan; Weissleder, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility of delayed enhancement µCT imaging to quantify myocardial infarct size in experimental mouse models. Methods and Results A total of 20 mice were imaged 5 or 35 days after surgical ligation of the left coronary artery, or sham surgery (n=6–7 per group). We utilized a prototype εCT which covers a 3D volume with an isotropic spatial resolution of 100 µm. A series of image acquisitions were started after a 200 µL bolus of a high molecular weight blood pool CT agent to outline the ventricles. CT imaging was continuously performed over 60 minutes, while an intravenous constant infusion with iopamidol 370 was started at a dosage of 1 mL/h. Thirty minutes after the initiation of this infusion, signal intensity in Hounsfild Units was significantly higher in the infarct than in the remote, uninjured myocardium. Cardiac morphology and motion was visualized with excellent contrast and in fine detail. In vivo CT determination of infarct extension and transmurality was in good agreement with ex vivo staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride (5 days post MI: r2= 0.86, p < 0.01; 35 days post MI r2=0.92, p < 0.01). In addition, we detected significant left ventricular remodeling consisting of left ventricular dilation and decreased ejection fraction. Conclusion 3D cine µCT reliably and rapidly quantifies infarct size and assesses murine anatomy and physiology after coronary ligation, despite the small size and the fast movement of the mouse heart. This efficient imaging tool is a valuable addition to the current phenotyping armamentarium and will allow rapid testing of novel drugs and cell based interventions in murine models. PMID:17322414

  10. CTGF/CCN2 Postconditioning Increases Tolerance of Murine Hearts towards Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kaasbøll, Ole Jørgen; Moe, Ingvild Tronstad; Ahmed, Mohammad Shakil; Stang, Espen; Hagelin, Else Marie Valbjørn; Attramadal, Håvard

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Previous studies of ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) in hearts from mice with cardiac-restricted overexpression of CCN2 have shown that CCN2 increases tolerance towards IRI. The objectives of this study were to investigate to what extent post-ischemic administration of recombinant human CCN2 (rhCCN2) would limit infarct size and improve functional recovery and what signaling pathways are involved. Experimental Approach Isolated mice hearts were perfused ad modum Langendorff, subjected to no-flow, global ischemia, and subsequently, exposed to mammalian cell derived, full-length (38-40kDa) rhCCN2 (250 nM) or vehicle during the first 15 min of a 60 min reperfusion period. Key Results Post-ischemic administration of rhCCN2 resulted in attenuation of infarct size from 58 ± 4% to 34 ± 2% (p < 0.001) which was abrogated by concomitant administration of the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 (45 ± 3% vs. 50 ± 3%, ns). In congruence with reduction of infarct size rhCCN2 also improved recovery of left ventricular developed pressure (p < 0.05). Western blot analyses of extracts of ex vivo-perfused murine hearts also revealed that rhCCN2 evoked concentration-dependent increase of cardiac phospho-GSK3β (serine-9) contents. Conclusions and Implications We demonstrate that post-ischemic administration of rhCCN2 increases the tolerance of ex vivo-perfused murine hearts to IRI. Mechanistically, this postconditioning effect of rhCCN2 appeared to be mediated by activation of the reperfusion injury salvage kinase pathway as demonstrated by sensitivity to PI3 kinase inhibition and increased CCN2-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β (Ser-9). Thus, the rationale for testing rhCCN2-mediated post-ischemic conditioning of the heart in more complex models is established. PMID:26872261

  11. Correlation of repolarization of ventricular monophasic action potential with ECG in the murine heart.

    PubMed

    Danik, Stephan; Cabo, Candido; Chiello, Christine; Kang, Sacha; Wit, Andrew L; Coromilas, James

    2002-07-01

    Transgenic mice have become important experimental models in the investigation of mechanisms causing cardiac arrhythmias because of the ability to create strains with alterations in repolarizing membrane currents. It is important to relate alterations in membrane currents in cells to their phenotypic expression on the electrocardiogram (ECG). The murine ECG, however, has unusual characteristics that make interpretation of the phenotypic expression of changes in ventricular repolarization uncertain. The major deflection representing the QRS (referred to as "a") is often followed by a secondary slower deflection ("b") and sometimes a subtle third deflection ("c"). To determine whether the second or third deflections or both represent ventricular repolarization, we recorded the ventricular monophasic action potential (MAP) in open-chest mice and correlated repolarization with the ECG. There was no significant correlation by linear regression, between action potential duration to 50% or 90% repolarization (APD(50) or APD(90)), respectively, of the MAP and either the interval from onset of Q to onset of b (Qb interval) or onset of c (Qc interval). Administration of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) significantly prolonged APD(50) and APD(90) and the Qb interval, indicating that this deflection on the ECG represents part of ventricular repolarization. After 4-AP, the c wave disappeared, also suggesting that it represents a component of ventricular repolarization. Although it appears that both the b and c waves that follow the Q wave on the ECG represent ventricular repolarization, neither correlates exactly with APD(90) of the MAP. Therefore, an accurate measurement of complete repolarization of the murine ventricle cannot be obtained from the surface ECG. PMID:12063311

  12. Expression and modulation of IL-1 alpha in murine keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ansel, J.C.; Luger, T.A.; Lowry, D.; Perry, P.; Roop, D.R.; Mountz, J.D.

    1988-04-01

    Murine and human keratinocytes produce an IL-1-like factor that appears to be similar if not identical to monocyte-derived IL-1. IL-1 may be an important mediator in cutaneous inflammatory responses, however, little is currently known concerning factors that may modulate IL-1 expression in keratinocytes. To address this issue we examined the effect of LPS, UV, and the cell differentiation state on murine keratinocyte IL-1 mRNA expression. Our results indicated that as with the murine P388D1 monocyte cell line, PAM 212 keratinocytes constitutively express abundant amounts of IL-1 alpha mRNA. On exposure to LPS (100 micrograms/ml) for 8 h there was more than 10 times the increase in PAM 212 IL-1 alpha mRNA which was accompanied by a sixfold increase in supernatant IL-1 activity. Similarly UV irradiation had a significant effect on keratinocyte IL-1 alpha expression. High dose UV (300 mJ/cm2) inhibited PAM 212 IL-1 alpha expression at 4, 8, 24, 48 h post-UV whereas a lower dose of UV (100 mJ/cm2) inhibited UV at 4 and 8 h post-UV, but induced IL-1 expression at 24 and 48 h post-UV. The expression of IL-1 alpha varied with the differentiation state of the keratinocytes. Freshly removed newborn murine keratinocytes were found to constitutively express IL-1 alpha mRNA. Keratinocytes grown in low (Ca2+) tissue culture media (0.05 mM) for 6 days, functionally and phenotypically become undifferentiated and express increased quantities of IL-1 alpha mRNA, whereas cells grown in high (Ca2+) media (1.2 mM) for 6 days become terminally differentiated and IL-1 expression ceased. Keratinocytes cultured for 3 days in low (Ca2+) conditions expressed an intermediate level of IL-1 alpha. In contrast, little or no IL-1 beta mRNA was detected in either the PAM 212 cells or newborn murine keratinocytes.

  13. Murine Norovirus Transcytosis across an In Vitro Polarized Murine Intestinal Epithelial Monolayer Is Mediated by M-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Mariam B.; Liu, Thomas; Blanco, Luz P.; Auble, Heather; Payne, Hilary C.

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the causative agent of the vast majority of nonbacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Due to the inability to culture human NoVs and the inability to orally infect a small animal model, little is known about the initial steps of viral entry. One particular step that is not understood is how NoVs breach the intestinal epithelial barrier. Murine NoV (MNV) is the only NoV that can be propagated in vitro by infecting murine macrophages and dendritic cells, making this virus an attractive model for studies of different aspects of NoV biology. Polarized murine intestinal epithelial mICcl2 cells were used to investigate how MNV interacts with and crosses the intestinal epithelium. In this in vitro model of the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE), MNV is transported across the polarized cell monolayer in the absence of viral replication or disruption of tight junctions by a distinct epithelial cell with microfold (M) cell properties. In addition to transporting MNV, these M-like cells also transcytose microbeads and express an IgA receptor. Interestingly, B myeloma cells cultured in the basolateral compartment underlying the epithelial monolayer did not alter the number of M-like cells but increased their transcytotic activity. Our data demonstrate that MNV can cross an intact intestinal epithelial monolayer in vitro by hijacking the M-like cells' intrinsic transcytotic pathway and suggest a potential mechanism for MNV entry into the host. PMID:24049163

  14. Ferric Chloride-induced Murine Thrombosis Models.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Nieman, Marvin; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Arterial thrombosis (blood clot) is a common complication of many systemic diseases associated with chronic inflammation, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, obesity, cancer and chronic autoimmune rheumatologic disorders. Thrombi are the cause of most heart attacks, strokes and extremity loss, making thrombosis an extremely important public health problem. Since these thrombi stem from inappropriate platelet activation and subsequent coagulation, targeting these systems therapeutically has important clinical significance for developing safer treatments. Due to the complexities of the hemostatic system, in vitro experiments cannot replicate the blood-to-vessel wall interactions; therefore, in vivo studies are critical to understand pathological mechanisms of thrombus formation. To this end, various thrombosis models have been developed in mice. Among them, ferric chloride (FeCl3) induced vascular injury is a widely used model of occlusive thrombosis that reports platelet activation and aggregation in the context of an aseptic closed vascular system. This model is based on redox-induced endothelial cell injury, which is simple and sensitive to both anticoagulant and anti-platelets drugs. The time required for the development of a thrombus that occludes blood flow gives a quantitative measure of vascular injury, platelet activation and aggregation that is relevant to thrombotic diseases. We have significantly refined this FeCl3-induced vascular thrombosis model, which makes the data highly reproducible with minimal variation. Here we describe the model and present representative data from several experimental set-ups that demonstrate the utility of this model in thrombosis research. PMID:27684194

  15. Microbiome and Asthma: What Have Experimental Models Already Taught Us?

    PubMed Central

    Bonamichi-Santos, R.; Aun, M. V.; Agondi, R. C.; Kalil, J.; Giavina-Bianchi, P.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease that imposes a substantial burden on patients, their families, and the community. Although many aspects of the pathogenesis of classical allergic asthma are well known by the scientific community, other points are not yet understood. Experimental asthma models, particularly murine models, have been used for over 100 years in order to better understand the immunopathology of asthma. It has been shown that human microbiome is an important component in the development of the immune system. Furthermore, the occurrence of many inflammatory diseases is influenced by the presence of microbes. Again, experimental models of asthma have helped researchers to understand the relationship between the microbiome and respiratory inflammation. In this review, we discuss the evolution of murine models of asthma and approach the major studies involving the microbiome and asthma. PMID:26266269

  16. Therapeutic effect of hydroxychloroquine on colorectal carcinogenesis in experimental murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Junlin; Xie, Jiansheng; Xie, Binbin; Li, Yiran; Jiang, Liming; Sui, Xinbing; Zhou, Xiaoyun; Pan, Hongming; Han, Weidong

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammation in the intestine is a strong risk factor for colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is widely used as an anti-inflammatory drug in the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory disorders and various tumors. However, little is known regarding the effects of HCQ on colitis-associated tumorigenesis. In this study, mice treated with HCQ showed a significant reduction in early-stage colitis following azoxymethane (AOM)/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) administration, as well as a remarkable inhibition of colonic tumorigenesis and tumor growth at late stages of CAC. Mechanistically, the therapeutic effects of HCQ were attributed to inhibition of inflammatory responses and production of mutagenic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in immune cells and subsequent promotion of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, we found that HCQ inhibited the production of inflammatory cytokines and ROS in response to toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation in macrophages. Our data presented herein may help guide the clinical use of HCQ as a prevention and treatment strategy for CAC. PMID:27288548

  17. The Roles of Streptozotocin Neurotoxicity and Neutral Endopeptidase in Murine Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Eric; Coppey, Lawrence; Lu, Bao; Arballo, Victor; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Gerard, Craig; Yorek, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrated that inhibition of neutral endopeptidase (NEP), a protease that degrades vaso- and neuroactive peptides, improves vascular and neural function in diabetic animal models. In this study we explored the role of NEP in neuropathy related to either insulin-deficient diabetes or diet-induced obesity using NEP deficient (−/−) mice. Initial studies showed that streptozotocin, in the absence of subsequent hyperglycemia, did not induce nerve conduction slowing or paw thermal hypoalgesia. Glucose disposal was impaired in both C57Bl/6 and NEP −/− mice fed a high fat diet. Thermal hypoalgesia and nerve conduction slowing were present in both streptozotocin-diabetic and high fat fed C57Bl/6 mice but not in NEP −/− mice exposed to either streptozotocin-induced diabetes or a high fat diet. These studies suggest that streptozotocin does not induce neurotoxicity in mice and that NEP plays a role in regulating nerve function in insulin-deficient diabetes and diet-induced obesity. PMID:20148083

  18. Treatment of experimental intracranial murine melanoma with a neuroattenuated herpes simplex virus 1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, B P; Kesari, S; Gesser, R M; Alsop, D; Ford, J C; Brown, S M; Maclean, A; Fraser, N W

    1995-08-01

    Brain metastases occur commonly in the setting of a variety of human cancers. At present, such cases are invariably fatal and highlight a need for research on new therapies. We have developed a mouse brain tumor model utilizing the Harding-Passey melanoma cell line injected intracranially into C57Bl/6 mice. Tumors develop in 100% of the mice and can be detected by magnetic resonance imaging as early as 5 days post cell injection. Death from tumor progression occurs between 12 and 16 days post cell injection. Stereotactic injection of the neuroattenuated HSV-1 strain 1716 into brain tumors 5 or 10 days postinjection of the melanoma cells results in a statistically significant increase in the time to development of neurological symptoms and in complete tumor regression and the long-term survival of some treated animals. Moreover, viral titration studies and immunohistochemistry suggest that replication of this virus is restricted to tumor cells and does not occur in the surrounding brain tissue. These results suggest that HSV-1 mutant 1716 shows particular promise for use as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of brain tumors.

  19. ORI2 inhibits coxsackievirus replication and myocardial inflammation in experimental murine myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung-Kwan; Kim, Jin Hee

    2014-01-01

    We purified ORI2 [3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)acrylic acid 1-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-methoxycarbonylethyl ester] from an extract of the plant Isodon excisus. We tested the antiviral effect of ORI2 in a coxsackievirus-induced myocarditis model. Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common cause of myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt signaling in virus-infected cells is essential for CVB3 replication. Antiviral compounds were screened by HeLa cell survival assay. Several purified natural compounds were added to HeLa cells cultured in 96-well plates for 30 min after 1 multiplicity of infection (m.o.i) CVB3 infection. ORI2 significantly improved HeLa cell survival in a dose-dependent manner. For in vivo studies, BALB/c mice (n=20) were infected with CVB3, then 10 of the mice were treated by daily intraperitoneal injections of ORI2 (100 mM) for 3 consecutive days. ORI2 treatment significantly improved early survival in the treated mice compared to untreated mice (85% vs. 50%, respectively). Organ virus titers and myocardial damage were significantly lower in the ORI2-treated mice than in untreated mice. These results demonstrate that ORI2, delivered by intraperitoneal injection after CVB3 infection, has a significant antiviral effect by markedly inhibiting virus replication, resulting in a decrease in organ virus titer and myocardial damage. ORI2 may be developed as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of CVB3 infections. PMID:25273388

  20. Immunity in Experimental Murine Filariasis: Roles of T and B Cells Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Subash; Shultz, Leonard D.; Klei, Thomas R.; Rajan, T. V.

    1999-01-01

    We have reevaluated the contributions of T and B cells in Brugia malayi infection by utilizing knockout mice on a uniform background (C57BL/6J). We find that B-cell-deficient mice are more permissive to infection than T-cell-deficient mice. PMID:10338538

  1. Glibenclamide, a Blocker of K+ATP Channels, Shows Antileishmanial Activity in Experimental Murine Cutaneous Leishmaniasis▿

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Martín, Xenón; Payares, Gilberto; Mendoza-León, Alexis

    2006-01-01

    Glibenclamide reduced the rate of lesion growth in BALB/c mice infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana, the effect was dose dependent, and the highest dose proved more effective than glucantime. Cross-resistance to glucantime was found in animals infected with a glibenclamide-resistant line, but combined therapy reduced lesion progression even in the glibenclamide-resistant strain. PMID:17015627

  2. Independent and inter-dependent immunoregulatory effects of IL-27, IFN-β and IL-10 in the suppression of human Th17 cells and murine EAE

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Denise C.; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoe; Cullimore, Melissa L.; Safabakhsh, Pegah; Saris, Christiaan J. M.; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2013-01-01

    IFN-β, IL-27 and IL-10 have been shown to exert a range of similar immunoregulatory effects in murine and human experimental systems, particularly in Th1 and Th17 mediated models of autoimmune inflammatory disease. In this study we sought to translate some of our previous findings in murine systems to human in vitro models and delineate the inter-dependence of these different cytokines in their immunoregulatory effects. We demonstrate that human IL-27 upregulates IL-10 in T cell-activated PBMC cultures and that IFN-β drives IL-27 production in activated monocytes. IFN-β-driven IL-27 is responsible for the upregulation of IL-10, but not IL-17 suppression, by IFN-β in human PBMCs. Surprisingly, IL-10 is not required for the suppression of IL-17 by either IL-27 or IFN-β in this model or in de novo differentiating Th17 cells. Neither is IL-27 signaling required for the suppression of EAE by IFN-β in vivo. Further, and even more surprisingly, IL-10 is not required for the suppression of Th17-biased EAE by IL-27, in sharp contrast to Th1-biased EAE. In conclusion, IFN-β and IL-27 both induce human IL-10, both suppress human Th17 responses and both suppress murine EAE. However, IL-27 signaling is not required for the therapeutic effect of IFN-β in EAE. Suppression of Th17-biased EAE by IL-27 is IL-10-independent, in contrast to its mechanism of action in Th1-biased EAE. Together, these findings delineate a complex set of inter-dependent and independent immunoregulatory mechanisms of IFN-β, IL-27 and IL-10 in human experimental models and in murine Th1 and Th17-driven autoimmunity. PMID:23455508

  3. Anti-Lipid IgG Antibodies Are Produced via Germinal Centers in a Murine Model Resembling Human Lupus

    PubMed Central

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Reséndiz-Mora, Albany; Donis-Maturano, Luis; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Zárate-Neira, Luz; Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Calderón-Amador, Juana; Medina, Yolanda; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are produced in some mycobacterial infections and in certain autoimmune diseases [such as anti-phospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)]. However, few studies have addressed the B cell responses underlying the production of these immunoglobulins. Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are consistently found in a murine model resembling human lupus induced by chlorpromazine-stabilized non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements (NPA). NPA are transitory lipid associations found in the membranes of most cells; when NPA are stabilized they can become immunogenic and induce specific IgG antibodies, which appear to be involved in the development of the mouse model of lupus. Of note, anti-NPA antibodies are also detected in patients with SLE and leprosy. We used this model of lupus to investigate in vivo the cellular mechanisms that lead to the production of anti-lipid, class-switched IgG antibodies. In this murine lupus model, we found plasma cells (Gr1−, CD19−, CD138+) producing NPA-specific IgGs in the draining lymph nodes, the spleen, and the bone marrow. We also found a significant number of germinal center B cells (IgD−, CD19+, PNA+) specific for NPA in the draining lymph nodes and the spleen, and we identified in situ the presence of NPA in these germinal centers. By contrast, very few NPA-specific, extrafollicular reaction B cells (B220+, Blimp1+) were found. Moreover, when assessing the anti-NPA IgG antibodies produced during the experimental protocol, we found that the affinity of these antibodies progressively increased over time. Altogether, our data indicate that, in this murine model resembling human lupus, B cells produce anti-NPA IgG antibodies mainly via germinal centers. PMID:27746783

  4. A Murine Model of Candida glabrata Vaginitis Shows No Evidence of an Inflammatory Immunopathogenic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Evelyn E.; Peters, Brian M.; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Noverr, Mairi C.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Candida glabrata is the second most common organism isolated from women with vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), particularly in women with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. However, mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of C. glabrata-associated VVC are unknown and have not been studied at any depth in animal models. The objective of this study was to evaluate host responses to infection following efforts to optimize a murine model of C. glabrata VVC. For this, various designs were evaluated for consistent experimental vaginal colonization (i.e., type 1 and type 2 diabetic mice, exogenous estrogen, varying inocula, and co-infection with C. albicans). Upon model optimization, vaginal fungal burden and polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) recruitment were assessed longitudinally over 21 days post-inoculation, together with vaginal concentrations of IL-1β, S100A8 alarmin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and in vivo biofilm formation. Consistent and sustained vaginal colonization with C. glabrata was achieved in estrogenized streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. Vaginal PMN infiltration was consistently low, with IL-1β, S100A8, and LDH concentrations similar to uninoculated mice. Biofilm formation was not detected in vivo, and co-infection with C. albicans did not induce synergistic immunopathogenic effects. This data suggests that experimental vaginal colonization of C. glabrata is not associated with an inflammatory immunopathogenic response or biofilm formation. PMID:26807975

  5. Control of murine macrophage H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ metabolism by amphotericin B

    SciTech Connect

    Stein, S.H.; Wolf, J.E.; Little, J.R.

    1986-03-05

    The authors investigated the ability of amphotericin B (AmB) to modulate H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ metabolism in murine macrophages (M theta). Following a single 0.5 mg intraperitoneal dose of AmB, AKR peritoneal M theta showed greater chemiluminescence (CL) after triggering with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) than C57BL/6 M theta. The capacity for enhanced M theta CL was sustained for at least 2 weeks after AmB injection in AKR mice but less in C57BL/6 M theta. In other experiments, intracellular H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ metabolism was evaluated by a fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) assay described by Bass et al. A comparison of FACS histograms of peritoneal M theta from AmB treated and control AKR mice revealed 25-28% stimulation in the experimental group; M theta from AmB treated C57BL/6 mice showed a significant reduction of the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ metabolism compared with resident M theta. These results are in accord with the effects of AmB on survival from experimental infection with Listeria monocytogenes. AmB enhanced survival in AKR mice while it reduced the survival of C57BL/6 mice infected with this facultative intracellular bacterium. Thus, AmB-induced resistance to infection correlates with stimulation of the M theta respiratory burst.

  6. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Shannan L; Tesh, Robert B; Azar, Sasha R; Muruato, Antonio E; Hanley, Kathryn A; Auguste, Albert J; Langsjoen, Rose M; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-06-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼10(7) plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines.

  7. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Tesh, Robert B.; Azar, Sasha R.; Muruato, Antonio E.; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Auguste, Albert J.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain–Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼107 plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  8. Methylated MicroRNA Genes of the Developing Murine Palate

    PubMed Central

    Seelan, Ratnam S.; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Warner, Dennis R.; Appana, Savitri N.; Brock, Guy N.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the etiology of cleft palate (CP). Environmental factors can also affect gene expression via alterations in DNA methylation suggesting a possible mechanism for the induction of CP. Identification of genes methylated during development of the secondary palate provides the basis for examination of the means by which environmental factors may adversely influence palatal ontogeny. We previously characterized the methylome of the developing murine secondary palate focusing primarily on protein-encoding genes. We now extend this study to include methylated microRNA (miRNA) genes. A total of 42 miRNA genes were found to be stably methylated in developing murine palatal tissue. Twenty eight of these were localized within host genes. Gene methylation was confirmed by pyrosequencing of selected miRNA genes. Integration of methylated miRNA gene and expression datasets identified 62 miRNAs, 69% of which were non-expressed. For a majority of genes (83%), upstream CpG islands (CGIs) were highly methylated suggesting down-regulation of CGI-associated promoters. DAVID and IPA analyses indicated that both expressed and non-expressed miRNAs target identical signaling pathways and biological processes associated with palatogenesis. Furthermore, these analyses also identified novel signaling pathways whose roles in palatogenesis remain to be elucidated. In summary, we identify methylated miRNA genes in the developing murine secondary palate, correlate miRNA gene methylation with expression of their cognate miRNA transcripts, and identify pathways and biological processes potentially mediated by these miRNAs. PMID:25642850

  9. Production of antibodies which recognize opiate receptors on murine leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.J.J.; Bost, K.L.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    An antibody has been developed which recognizes opiate receptors on cells of the immune system. This antibody blocks specific binding of the radiolabeled opiate receptor ligand, /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine, to receptors on murine splenocytes. Additionally, the anti-receptor antibody competes with ..beta..-endorphin, meta-enkephalin, and naloxone for the same binding site on the leukocytes. Moreover, the anti-receptor antibody possesses agonist activity similar to ..beta..-endorphin in suppressing cAMP production by lymphocytes. These results suggest the development of an antibody which recognizes classical opiate receptors on cells of the immune system.

  10. Gene Regulation and Quality Control in Murine Polyomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Gordon G.

    2016-01-01

    Murine polyomavirus (MPyV) infects mouse cells and is highly oncogenic in immunocompromised hosts and in other rodents. Its genome is a small, circular DNA molecule of just over 5000 base pairs and it encodes only seven polypeptides. While seemingly simply organized, this virus has adopted an unusual genome structure and some unusual uses of cellular quality control pathways that, together, allow an amazingly complex and varied pattern of gene regulation. In this review we discuss how MPyV leverages these various pathways to control its life cycle. PMID:27763514

  11. Analysis of murine cellular receptors for tumor-killing factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, F.; Natori, S.

    1987-01-01

    Receptors for tumor-killing factor (TKF) on the surface of murine cells were analyzed using radioiodinated TKF. Not only sensitive cells but also insensitive cells were found to have specific receptors. Among the sensitive cells, no clear relation was observed between the number of receptors on the cell surface and sensitivity to TKF. Compounds affecting microfilaments (cytochalasin B and D) and microtubules (colchicine and Colcemid) significantly inhibited cytolysis of sensitive cells induced by receptor-bound TKF. It is concluded that internalization of receptor-bound TKF is a prerequisite for triggering cytolysis.

  12. Calcium-activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 promote murine uterine smooth muscle contractility

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Kyra; Vink, Joy Y; Fu, Xiao Wen; Wakita, Hiromi; Danielsson, Jennifer; Wapner, Ronald; Gallos, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the presence of calcium activated chloride channels anoctamin 1 and 2 in human and murine uterine smooth muscle and evaluate the physiologic role for these ion channels in murine myometrial contractility. Study Design We performed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine if anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine uterine tissue to validate the study of this protein in mouse models. Immunohistochemical staining of anoctamin 1 and 2 was then performed to determine protein expression in murine myometrial tissue. The function of anoctamin 1 and 2 in murine uterine tissue was evaluated using electrophysiological studies, organ bath, and calcium flux experiments. Results Anoctamin 1 and 2 are expressed in human and murine USM cells. Functional studies show that selective antagonism of these channels promotes relaxation of spontaneous murine uterine smooth muscle contractions. Blockade of anoctamin 1 and 2 inhibits both agonist-induced and spontaneous transient inward currents and abolishes G-protein coupled receptor (oxytocin) mediated elevations in intracellular calcium. Conclusion The calcium activated chloride channels ANO 1 and 2 are present in human and murine myometrial tissue and may provide novel potential therapeutic targets to achieve effective tocolysis. PMID:24928056

  13. Experimental Pi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corris, G.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the calculation of pi by means of experimental methods. Polygon circle ratios, Archimedes' method, Buffon's needles, a Monte Carlo method, and prime number approaches are used. Presents three BASIC programs for the calculations. (YP)

  14. Overexpression of the influenza virus polymerase can titrate out inhibition by the murine Mx1 protein.

    PubMed

    Huang, T; Pavlovic, J; Staeheli, P; Krystal, M

    1992-07-01

    The murine Mx1 protein is an interferon-inducible protein which confers selective resistance to influenza virus infection both in vitro and in vivo. The precise mechanism by which the murine Mx1 specifically inhibits replication of influenza virus is not known. Previously, sensitive replication systems for influenza virus ribonucleoprotein, in which a synthetic influenza virus-like ribonucleoprotein is replicated and transcribed by influenza virus proteins provided in trans, have been developed. With these systems, the antiviral activity of the murine Mx1 protein was examined. It was found that continued expression of influenza polymerase polypeptides via vaccinia virus vectors can titrate out the inhibitory action of the murine Mx1 protein. This titration of inhibitory activity also occurs when the viral PB2 protein alone is overexpressed, suggesting that an antiviral target for the murine Mx1 polypeptide is the viral PB2 protein.

  15. Assessment of murine lung mechanics outcome measures: alignment with those made in asthmatics

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Julia K. L.; Kraft, Monica; Fisher, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Although asthma is characterized as an inflammatory disease, recent reports highlight the importance of pulmonary physiology outcome measures to the clinical assessment of asthma control and risk of asthma exacerbation. Murine models of allergic inflammatory airway disease have been widely used to gain mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of asthma; however, several aspects of murine models could benefit from improvement. This review focuses on aligning lung mechanics measures made in mice with those made in humans, with an eye toward improving the translational utility of these measures. A brief description of techniques available to measure murine lung mechanics is provided along with a methodological consideration of their utilization. How murine lung mechanics outcome measures relate to pulmonary physiology measures conducted in humans is discussed and we recommend that, like human studies, outcome measures be standardized for murine models of asthma. PMID:23408785

  16. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes: biodegradation by gastric agents in vitro and effect on murine intestinal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masyutin, A.; Erokhina, M.; Sychevskaya, K.; Gusev, A.; Vasyukova, I.; Smirnova, E.; Onishchenko, G.

    2015-11-01

    One of the main questions limiting application of fibrous carbon nanomaterials (CNM) in medicine and food industry concerns presumptive degradation of CNM in living organisms. In this study, we have investigated biodegradation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by gastric agents in vitro and influence of ingested MWCNTs on murine intestine. Using scanning, conventional transmission and analytical electron microscopy, we demonstrated that industrial MWCNTs treated in vitro by 0.1 M hydrochloric acid (pH=1) and gastric juice (pH=2-3) isolated from murine stomach, are subjected to incomplete degradation. After 30 days of oral administration to experimental mice, we did find MWCNTs in the cells of small intestine, and it may indicate that agglomerates of MWCNTs do not penetrate into colon epithelia and do not accumulate in enterocytes. However, we observed local areas of necrotic damages of intestinal villi. It seems likely, therefore, that MWCNTs end up leaving gastrointestinal tract by excretion with the feces. Our results suggest that MWCNTs do not undergo complete degradation in gastrointestinal tract of mice, and passing through non-degraded particles may negatively affect intestinal system.

  17. Regulation of endothelial VCAM-1 expression in murine cardiac grafts. Roles for TNF and IL4.

    PubMed Central

    Bergese, S.; Pelletier, R.; Vallera, D.; Widmer, M.; Orosz, C.

    1995-01-01

    The in vivo mechanisms of vascular endothelial activation and VCAM-1 expression were studied in murine heterotopic cardiac grafts. Preliminary studies demonstrated that cardiac allograft endothelia develop reactivity with MECA-32 monoclonal antibody (MAb) and M/K-2 (anti-VCAM-1) MAb within 3 days of transplantation, whereas cardiac isografts develop MECA-32 reactivity but no M/K-2 reactivity. Additional studies demonstrated that a single treatment of cardiac isograft recipients with the anti-CD3 MAb 145-2C11 induces VCAM-1 expression on isograft microvascular endothelia within 24 hours. We have used this experimental system to identify the cytokines responsible for expression of VCAM-1 and MECA-32 MAb reactivity on graft vascular endothelia. We report that the expression of VCAM-1 on isograft endothelia that was induced with anti-CD3 MAb was blocked by simultaneous treatment with either pentoxifylline, soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor (TNFR-Fc), anti-IL4 MAb, or soluble IL4R, but not by anti-IFN-gamma MAb. Alternatively, a similar pattern of isograft endothelial VCAM-1 expression was stimulated in the absence of anti-CD3 MAbs with a single injection of human recombinant TNF-alpha, or with recombinant murine IL4 provided as IL4/anti-IL4 MAb complexes. In addition, the IL4-induced VCAM-1 expression was completely blocked by a single intravenous treatment of the isograft recipients with TNFR:Fc. This suggests that high concentrations of TNF-alpha can stimulate endothelial VCAM-1 expression, but these concentrations are apparently not achieved in cardiac isografts. In the absence of an inducing agent such as anti-CD3 MAb, the stimulation of VCAM-1 expression with exogenous IL4 may reflect functional interaction between endogenous TNF and exogenous IL4, as suggested by the blocking experiments with TNFR:Fc. Although cardiac isograft endothelia normally develop reactivity with MECA-32 MAb within 3 days of transplantation, treatment of cardiac isograft

  18. Measles virus persistence in an immortalized murine macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M B; Buckthal, D J; Picciotto, S; O'Bryan, T A; Goldman, J N

    1995-02-20

    Persistent infection with the Edmonston strain of measles virus (MV) has been established in IC-21 cells, an immortalized murine macrophage cell line. Persistence was established immediately without syncytia formation or cytopathic effects. MV was expressed in the majority of the cells as evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, infectious centers assays, and limiting dilution analysis. Hemagglutinin (H) and phosphoprotein expressed in persistently infected IC-21 cells had retarded migration in SDS-PAGE gels when compared to these proteins expressed in Vero cells. H protein differences were also found between freshly infected IC-21 cells and persistently infected IC-21 cells passaged for over 2 years. Six sublines of IC-21 cells, infected at different times, have maintained these characteristics for 2 years of passage. During this time period the intensity of immunofluorescence and the number of infectious virus particles recoverable fluctuated in five of the six cell lines. In one cell line virus expression remained at a consistent high level. The ability to establish a persistent MV infection in murine macrophages allows studies using a cell important in disseminating the infection. It facilitates experiments on immunological aspects of viral immunity by enabling cell mixing experiments with histocompatible cell populations and by making available the wide array of cellular and humoral reagents in the mouse. PMID:7871720

  19. Surgical Modification of the Murine Calvaria Osteolysis Model.

    PubMed

    Al-Quhali, Ali Mohammed; Sun, Yu; Bai, Xizhuang; Jin, Zhe; Yu, Guibo

    2015-01-01

    The murine calvaria model has been adopted for evaluation of osteolysis and inflammation induced by polyethylene (PE) or metal wear debris. However, this model suffers from several complications. The purpose of our study is to introduce a surgical modification with lower complication rates, thus providing more accurate results. Forty C57/BL6 mice were divided into two groups, both receiving polyethylene particles. Surgical modifications were performed in group 1, and group 2 underwent traditional surgeries. The incidence of fluid leakage was recorded on the operative day. Curst formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were recorded on day 7. Histological osteolysis was demonstrated by HE staining of tissue slices. Micro-CT was used for quantifying evaluation of osteolysis in two groups. Intraoperative fluid leakage was significantly reduced in group 1. Postoperative crust formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were also significantly decreased in group 1. HE staining results revealed obvious osteolysis in group 1 and more obvious osteolysis in group 2. Bone volume fraction (BVF) was (0.32 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (0.24 ± 0.05). Bone mineral density (BMD) was (1.11 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (1.01 ± 0.02). Surgical modifications provide a reliable way for establishment of the murine calvaria osteolysis model. PMID:26769571

  20. Expression and regulation of CCN genes in murine osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Muriel S; Gazzerro, Elizabetta; Rydziel, Sheila; Canalis, Ernesto

    2006-05-01

    Members of the CCN family of genes include cysteine-rich 61 (CYR61), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV), and Wnt-induced secreted proteins (WISP) 1, 2 and 3. CCN proteins play a role in cell differentiation and function, but their expression and function in skeletal tissue is partially understood. We examined the expression and regulation of CCN genes in primary cultures of murine osteoblasts treated with transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, or cortisol. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of CYR61, CTGF, NOV, and WISP 1 and 2 transcripts in murine osteoblasts, but not WISP 3 transcripts. Northern and Western blot analyses revealed that TGF beta, BMP-2, and cortisol increased CYR61 and CTGF mRNA and protein levels. TGF beta decreased NOV and increased WISP 2 mRNA and protein levels, and TGF beta and BMP-2 increased, whereas cortisol decreased WISP 1 mRNA and protein levels. Nuclear run-on assays revealed that TGF beta, BMP-2 and cortisol enhanced CYR61 and CTGF transcription, TGF beta and BMP-2 induced and cortisol suppressed WISP 1, and TGF beta induced WISP 2 transcription. Suppression of NOV transcription could not be detected due to low control levels. In conclusion, five of the six known CCN genes are expressed by osteoblasts and their transcription is regulated by TGF beta, BMP-2 and cortisol.

  1. Toxocara canis: anthelmintic activity of quinone derivatives in murine toxocarosis.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, T; Mata-Santos, H A; Carneiro, P F; De Moura, K C G; Fenalti, J M; Klafke, G B; Cruz, L A X; Martins, L H R; Pinto, N F; Pinto, M C F R; Berne, M E A; Da Silva, P E A; Scaini, C J

    2016-04-01

    Human toxocarosis is a chronic tissue parasitosis most often caused by Toxocara canis. The seroprevalence can reach up to 50%, especially among children and adolescents. The anthelmintics used in the treatment have moderate efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of quinones and their derivatives against T. canis larvae and the cytotoxicity of the larvicidal compounds. The compounds were evaluated at 1 mg mL(-1) concentration in microculture plates containing third stage larvae in an Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 environment, incubated at 37 °C in 5% CO2 tension for 48 h. Five naphthoxiranes were selected for the cytotoxicity analysis. The cell viability evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays using murine peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice revealed that the naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) were less cytotoxic at a concentration of 0.05 mg mL(-1). The efficacy of naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) was examined in murine toxocarosis also. The anthelmintic activity was examined by evaluating the number of larvae in the brain, carcass, liver, lungs, heart, kidneys and eyes. Compound (3) demonstrated anthelmintic activity similar to that of albendazole by decreasing the number of larvae in the organs of mice and thus could form the basis of the development of a new anthelmintic drug. PMID:26887285

  2. Viruses in Rodent Colonies: Lessons Learned from Murine Noroviruses.

    PubMed

    Karst, Stephanie M; Wobus, Christiane E

    2015-11-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are highly prevalent, positive-sense RNA viruses that infect a range of mammals, including humans and mice. Murine noroviruses (MuNoVs) are the most prevalent pathogens in biomedical research colonies, and they have been used extensively as a model system for human noroviruses (HuNoVs). Despite recent successes in culturing HuNoVs in the laboratory and a small animal host, studies of human viruses have inherent limitations. Thus, owing to its versatility, the MuNoV system-with its native host, reverse genetics, and cell culture systems-will continue to provide important insights into NoV and enteric virus biology. In the current review, we summarize recent findings from MuNoVs that increase our understanding of enteric virus pathogenesis and highlight similarities between human and murine NoVs that underscore the value of MuNoVs to inform studies of HuNoV biology. We also discuss the potential of endemic MuNoV infections to impact other disease models. PMID:26958927

  3. Toxocara canis: anthelmintic activity of quinone derivatives in murine toxocarosis.

    PubMed

    Mata-Santos, T; Mata-Santos, H A; Carneiro, P F; De Moura, K C G; Fenalti, J M; Klafke, G B; Cruz, L A X; Martins, L H R; Pinto, N F; Pinto, M C F R; Berne, M E A; Da Silva, P E A; Scaini, C J

    2016-04-01

    Human toxocarosis is a chronic tissue parasitosis most often caused by Toxocara canis. The seroprevalence can reach up to 50%, especially among children and adolescents. The anthelmintics used in the treatment have moderate efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of quinones and their derivatives against T. canis larvae and the cytotoxicity of the larvicidal compounds. The compounds were evaluated at 1 mg mL(-1) concentration in microculture plates containing third stage larvae in an Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 environment, incubated at 37 °C in 5% CO2 tension for 48 h. Five naphthoxiranes were selected for the cytotoxicity analysis. The cell viability evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays using murine peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice revealed that the naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) were less cytotoxic at a concentration of 0.05 mg mL(-1). The efficacy of naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) was examined in murine toxocarosis also. The anthelmintic activity was examined by evaluating the number of larvae in the brain, carcass, liver, lungs, heart, kidneys and eyes. Compound (3) demonstrated anthelmintic activity similar to that of albendazole by decreasing the number of larvae in the organs of mice and thus could form the basis of the development of a new anthelmintic drug.

  4. Global Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Taher, Leila; Collette, Nicole M.; Murugesh, Deepa; Maxwell, Evan; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed information about stage-specific changes in gene expression is crucial for understanding the gene regulatory networks underlying development and the various signal transduction pathways contributing to morphogenesis. Here we describe the global gene expression dynamics during early murine limb development, when cartilage, tendons, muscle, joints, vasculature and nerves are specified and the musculoskeletal system of limbs is established. We used whole-genome microarrays to identify genes with differential expression at 5 stages of limb development (E9.5 to 13.5), during fore- and hind-limb patterning. We found that the onset of limb formation is characterized by an up-regulation of transcription factors, which is followed by a massive activation of genes during E10.5 and E11.5 which levels off at later time points. Among the 3520 genes identified as significantly up-regulated in the limb, we find ∼30% to be novel, dramatically expanding the repertoire of candidate genes likely to function in the limb. Hierarchical and stage-specific clustering identified expression profiles that are likely to correlate with functional programs during limb development and further characterization of these transcripts will provide new insights into specific tissue patterning processes. Here, we provide for the first time a comprehensive analysis of developmentally regulated genes during murine limb development, and provide some novel insights into the expression dynamics governing limb morphogenesis. PMID:22174793

  5. Global gene expression analysis of murine limb development.

    PubMed

    Taher, Leila; Collette, Nicole M; Murugesh, Deepa; Maxwell, Evan; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Loots, Gabriela G

    2011-01-01

    Detailed information about stage-specific changes in gene expression is crucial for understanding the gene regulatory networks underlying development and the various signal transduction pathways contributing to morphogenesis. Here we describe the global gene expression dynamics during early murine limb development, when cartilage, tendons, muscle, joints, vasculature and nerves are specified and the musculoskeletal system of limbs is established. We used whole-genome microarrays to identify genes with differential expression at 5 stages of limb development (E9.5 to 13.5), during fore- and hind-limb patterning. We found that the onset of limb formation is characterized by an up-regulation of transcription factors, which is followed by a massive activation of genes during E10.5 and E11.5 which levels off at later time points. Among the 3520 genes identified as significantly up-regulated in the limb, we find ~30% to be novel, dramatically expanding the repertoire of candidate genes likely to function in the limb. Hierarchical and stage-specific clustering identified expression profiles that are likely to correlate with functional programs during limb development and further characterization of these transcripts will provide new insights into specific tissue patterning processes. Here, we provide for the first time a comprehensive analysis of developmentally regulated genes during murine limb development, and provide some novel insights into the expression dynamics governing limb morphogenesis.

  6. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Tabata, Hidenori; Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-09-01

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle.

  7. Adaptive Immunity Restricts Replication of Novel Murine Astroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Christine C.; Loh, Joy; Zhao, Guoyan; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.; Wang, David; Huang, Henry V.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms of astrovirus pathogenesis are largely unknown, in part due to a lack of a small-animal model of disease. Using shotgun sequencing and a custom analysis pipeline, we identified two novel astroviruses capable of infecting research mice, murine astrovirus (MuAstV) STL1 and STL2. Subsequent analysis revealed the presence of at least two additional viruses (MuAstV STL3 and STL4), suggestive of a diverse population of murine astroviruses in research mice. Complete genomic characterization and subsequent phylogenetic analysis showed that MuAstV STL1 to STL4 are members of the mamastrovirus genus and are likely members of a new mamastrovirus genogroup. Using Rag1−/− mice deficient in B and T cells, we demonstrate that adaptive immunity is required to control MuAstV infection. Furthermore, using Stat1−/− mice deficient in innate signaling, we demonstrate a role for the innate immune response in the control of MuAstV replication. Our results demonstrate that MuAstV STL permits the study of the mechanisms of astrovirus infection and host-pathogen interactions in a genetically manipulable small-animal model. Finally, we detected MuAstV in commercially available mice, suggesting that these viruses may be present in academic and commercial research mouse facilities, with possible implications for interpretation of data generated in current mouse models of disease. PMID:22951832

  8. Tensile Properties of the Murine Ventral Vertical Midline Incision

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Mark A.; Chakkalakal, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Background In clinical surgery, the vertical midline abdominal incision is popular but associated with healing failures. A murine model of the ventral vertical midline incision was developed in order to study the healing of this incision type. Methodology/Principal Findings The strength of the wild type murine ventral abdominal wall in the midline was contained within the dermis; the linea alba made a negligible contribution. Unwounded abdominal wall had a downward trend (nonsignificant) in maximal tension between 12 and 29 weeks of age. The incision attained 50% of its final strength by postoperative day 40. The maximal tension of the ventral vertical midline incision was nearly that of unwounded abdominal wall by postwounding day 60; there was no difference in unwounded vs. wounded maximal tension at postwounding day 120. Conclusions/Significance After 120 days of healing, the ventral vertical midline incision in the wild type mouse was not significantly different from age-matched nonwounded controls. About half of the final incisional strength was attained after 6 weeks of healing. The significance of this work was to establish the kinetics of wild type incisional healing in a model for which numerous genotypes and genetic tools would be available for subsequent study. PMID:21915298

  9. Surgical Modification of the Murine Calvaria Osteolysis Model

    PubMed Central

    Al-quhali, Ali Mohammed; Sun, Yu; Bai, Xizhuang; Jin, Zhe; Yu, Guibo

    2015-01-01

    The murine calvaria model has been adopted for evaluation of osteolysis and inflammation induced by polyethylene (PE) or metal wear debris. However, this model suffers from several complications. The purpose of our study is to introduce a surgical modification with lower complication rates, thus providing more accurate results. Forty C57/BL6 mice were divided into two groups, both receiving polyethylene particles. Surgical modifications were performed in group 1, and group 2 underwent traditional surgeries. The incidence of fluid leakage was recorded on the operative day. Curst formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were recorded on day 7. Histological osteolysis was demonstrated by HE staining of tissue slices. Micro-CT was used for quantifying evaluation of osteolysis in two groups. Intraoperative fluid leakage was significantly reduced in group 1. Postoperative crust formation, wound dehiscence, and bone exposure were also significantly decreased in group 1. HE staining results revealed obvious osteolysis in group 1 and more obvious osteolysis in group 2. Bone volume fraction (BVF) was (0.32 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (0.24 ± 0.05). Bone mineral density (BMD) was (1.11 ± 0.03) in group 1 compared to group 2 (1.01 ± 0.02). Surgical modifications provide a reliable way for establishment of the murine calvaria osteolysis model. PMID:26769571

  10. Surface Contaminants Inhibit Osseointegration in a Novel Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignore, Lindsay A.; Colbrunn, Robb W.; Tatro, Joscelyn M.; Messerschmitt, Patrick J.; Hernandez, Christopher J.; Goldberg, Victor M.; Stewart, Matthew C.; Greenfield, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Surface contaminants, such as bacterial debris and manufacturing residues, may remain on orthopaedic implants after sterilization procedures and affect osseointegration. The goals of this study were to develop a murine model of osseointegration in order to determine whether removing surface contaminants enhances osseointegration. To develop the murine model, titanium alloy implants were implanted into a unicortical pilot hole in the mid-diaphysis of the femur and osseointegration was measured over a five week time course. Histology, backscatter scanning electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy showed areas of bone in intimate physical contact with the implant, confirming osseointegration. Histomorphometric quantification of bone-to-implant contact and peri-implant bone and biomechanical pullout quantification of ultimate force, stiffness and work to failure increased significantly over time, also demonstrating successful osseointegration. We also found that a rigorous cleaning procedure significantly enhances bone-to-implant contact and biomechanical pullout measures by two-fold compared with implants that were autoclaved, as recommended by the manufacturer. The most likely interpretation of these results is that surface contaminants inhibit osseointegration. The results of this study justify the need for the development of better detection and removal techniques for contaminants on orthopaedic implants and other medical devices. PMID:21801863

  11. Convenience experimentation.

    PubMed

    Krohs, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Systems biology aims at explaining life processes by means of detailed models of molecular networks, mainly on the whole-cell scale. The whole cell perspective distinguishes the new field of systems biology from earlier approaches within molecular cell biology. The shift was made possible by the high throughput methods that were developed for gathering 'omic' (genomic, proteomic, etc.) data. These new techniques are made commercially available as semi-automatic analytic equipment, ready-made analytic kits and probe arrays. There is a whole industry of supplies for what may be called convenience experimentation. My paper inquires some epistemic consequences of strong reliance on convenience experimentation in systems biology. In times when experimentation was automated to a lesser degree, modeling and in part even experimentation could be understood fairly well as either being driven by hypotheses, and thus proceed by the testing of hypothesis, or as being performed in an exploratory mode, intended to sharpen concepts or initially vague phenomena. In systems biology, the situation is dramatically different. Data collection became so easy (though not cheap) that experimentation is, to a high degree, driven by convenience equipment, and model building is driven by the vast amount of data that is produced by convenience experimentation. This results in a shift in the mode of science. The paper shows that convenience driven science is not primarily hypothesis-testing, nor is it in an exploratory mode. It rather proceeds in a gathering mode. This shift demands another shift in the mode of evaluation, which now becomes an exploratory endeavor, in response to the superabundance of gathered data.

  12. The murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 from persistently infected murine cells exhibits an extended host range.

    PubMed Central

    Schickli, J H; Zelus, B D; Wentworth, D E; Sawicki, S G; Holmes, K V

    1997-01-01

    In murine 17 Cl 1 cells persistently infected with murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus strain A59 (MHV-A59), expression of the virus receptor glycoprotein MHVR was markedly reduced (S. G. Sawicki, J. H. Lu, and K. V. Holmes, J. Virol. 69:5535-5543, 1995). Virus isolated from passage 600 of the persistently infected cells made smaller plaques on 17 Cl 1 cells than did MHV-A59. Unlike the parental MHV-A59, this variant virus also infected the BHK-21 (BHK) line of hamster cells. Virus plaque purified on BHK cells (MHV/BHK) grew more slowly in murine cells than did MHV-A59, and the rate of viral RNA synthesis was lower and the development of the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein was slower than those of MHV-A59. MHV/BHK was 100-fold more resistant to neutralization with the purified soluble recombinant MHV receptor glycoprotein (sMHVR) than was MHV-A59. Pretreatment of 17 Cl 1 cells with anti-MHVR monoclonal antibody CC1 protected the cells from infection with MHV-A59 but only partially protected them from infection with MHV/BHK. Thus, although MHV/BHK could still utilize MHVR as a receptor, its interactions with the receptor were significantly different from those of MHV-A59. To determine whether a hemagglutinin esterase (HE) glycoprotein that could bind the virions to 9-O-acetylated neuraminic acid moieties on the cell surface was expressed by MHV/BHK, an in situ esterase assay was used. No expression of HE activity was detected in 17 Cl 1 cells infected with MHV/BHK, suggesting that this virus, like MHV-A59, bound to cell membranes via its S glycoprotein. MHV/BHK was able to infect cell lines from many mammalian species, including murine (17 Cl 1), hamster (BHK), feline (Fcwf), bovine (MDBK), rat (RIE), monkey (Vero), and human (L132 and HeLa) cell lines. MHV/BHK could not infect dog kidney (MDCK I) or swine testis (ST) cell lines. Thus, in persistently infected murine cell lines that express very low levels of virus receptor MHVR and which also have and may

  13. Experimental errors?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downie, Neil; Turner, Jez

    2014-07-01

    In reply to Matin Durrani's article “Experimental mistake” (May p15, see also http://ow.ly/vDYlM) criticizing plans to base A-level science exams in England entirely on written tests, with practical skills noted as a separate grade.

  14. A pain-mediated neural signal induces relapse in murine autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a multiple sclerosis model

    PubMed Central

    Arima, Yasunobu; Kamimura, Daisuke; Atsumi, Toru; Harada, Masaya; Kawamoto, Tadafumi; Nishikawa, Naoki; Stofkova, Andrea; Ohki, Takuto; Higuchi, Kotaro; Morimoto, Yuji; Wieghofer, Peter; Okada, Yuka; Mori, Yuki; Sakoda, Saburo; Saika, Shizuya; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Komuro, Issei; Yamashita, Toshihide; Hirano, Toshio; Prinz, Marco; Murakami, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Although pain is a common symptom of various diseases and disorders, its contribution to disease pathogenesis is not well understood. Here we show using murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for multiple sclerosis (MS), that pain induces EAE relapse. Mechanistic analysis showed that pain induction activates a sensory-sympathetic signal followed by a chemokine-mediated accumulation of MHC class II+CD11b+ cells that showed antigen-presentation activity at specific ventral vessels in the fifth lumbar cord of EAE-recovered mice. Following this accumulation, various immune cells including pathogenic CD4+ T cells recruited in the spinal cord in a manner dependent on a local chemokine inducer in endothelial cells, resulting in EAE relapse. Our results demonstrate that a pain-mediated neural signal can be transformed into an inflammation reaction at specific vessels to induce disease relapse, thus making this signal a potential therapeutic target. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08733.001 PMID:26193120

  15. ICAM-1–expressing neutrophils exhibit enhanced effector functions in murine models of endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Woodfin, Abigail; Beyrau, Martina; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Ma, Bin; Whiteford, James R.; Hordijk, Peter L.; Hogg, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface of numerous cell types such as endothelial and epithelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and certain leukocyte subsets. With respect to the latter, ICAM-1 has been detected on neutrophils in several clinical and experimental settings, but little is known about the regulation of expression or function of neutrophil ICAM-1. In this study, we report on the de novo induction of ICAM-1 on the cell surface of murine neutrophils by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor, and zymosan particles in vitro. The induction of neutrophil ICAM-1 was associated with enhanced phagocytosis of zymosan particles and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Conversely, neutrophils from ICAM-1–deficient mice were defective in these effector functions. Mechanistically, ICAM-1–mediated intracellular signaling appeared to support neutrophil ROS generation and phagocytosis. In vivo, LPS-induced inflammation in the mouse cremaster muscle and peritoneal cavity led to ICAM-1 expression on intravascular and locally transmigrated neutrophils. The use of chimeric mice deficient in ICAM-1 on myeloid cells demonstrated that neutrophil ICAM-1 was not required for local neutrophil transmigration, but supported optimal intravascular and extravascular phagocytosis of zymosan particles. Collectively, the present results shed light on regulation of expression and function of ICAM-1 on neutrophils and identify it as an additional regulator of neutrophil effector responses in host defense. PMID:26647392

  16. Assessing the accuracy and reproducibility of modality independent elastography in a murine model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Jared A.; Flint, Katelyn M.; Sanchez, Violeta; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Cancer progression has been linked to mechanics. Therefore, there has been recent interest in developing noninvasive imaging tools for cancer assessment that are sensitive to changes in tissue mechanical properties. We have developed one such method, modality independent elastography (MIE), that estimates the relative elastic properties of tissue by fitting anatomical image volumes acquired before and after the application of compression to biomechanical models. The aim of this study was to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of the method using phantoms and a murine breast cancer model. Magnetic resonance imaging data were acquired, and the MIE method was used to estimate relative volumetric stiffness. Accuracy was assessed using phantom data by comparing to gold-standard mechanical testing of elasticity ratios. Validation error was <12%. Reproducibility analysis was performed on animal data, and within-subject coefficients of variation ranged from 2 to 13% at the bulk level and 32% at the voxel level. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the reproducibility of an elasticity imaging metric in a preclinical cancer model. Our results suggest that the MIE method can reproducibly generate accurate estimates of the relative mechanical stiffness and provide guidance on the degree of change needed in order to declare biological changes rather than experimental error in future therapeutic studies. PMID:26158120

  17. Differential Distribution of Blood and Lymphatic Vessels in the Murine Cornea

    PubMed Central

    Ecoiffier, Tatiana; Yuen, Don

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Because of its unique characteristics, the cornea has been widely used for blood and lymphatic vessel research. However, whether limbal or corneal vessels are evenly distributed under normal or inflamed conditions has never been studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate this question and to examine whether and how the distribution patterns change during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis (LG) and hemangiogenesis (HG). Methods. Corneal inflammatory LG and HG were induced in two most commonly used mouse strains, BALB/c and C57BL/6 (6–8 weeks of age), by a standardized two-suture placement model. Oriented flat-mount corneas together with the limbal tissues were used for immunofluorescence microscope studies. Blood and lymphatic vessels under normal and inflamed conditions were analyzed and quantified to compare their distributions. Results. The data demonstrate, for the first time, greater distribution of both blood and lymphatic vessels in the nasal side in normal murine limbal areas. This nasal-dominant pattern was maintained during corneal inflammatory LG, whereas it was lost for HG. Conclusions. Blood and lymphatic vessels are not evenly distributed in normal limbal areas. Furthermore, corneal LG and HG respond differently to inflammatory stimuli. These new findings will shed some light on corneal physiology and pathogenesis and on the development of experimental models and therapeutic strategies for corneal diseases. PMID:20019372

  18. Omics Studies of the Murine Intestinal Ecosystem Exposed to Subchronic and Mild Social Defeat Stress.

    PubMed

    Aoki-Yoshida, Ayako; Aoki, Reiji; Moriya, Naoko; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Kubota, Yoshifumi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Takayama, Yoshiharu; Suzuki, Chise

    2016-09-01

    The microbiota-gut-brain axis plays an important role in the development of stress-induced mental disorders. We previously established the subchronic and mild social defeat stress (sCSDS) model, a murine experimental model of depression, and investigated the metabolomic profiles of plasma and liver. Here we used omics approaches to identify stress-induced changes in the gastrointestinal tract. Mice exposed to sCSDS for 10 days showed the following changes: (1) elevation of cholic acid and reduction of 5-aminovaleric acid among cecal metabolites; (2) downregulation of genes involved in the immune response in the terminal ileum; (3) a shift in the diversity of the microbiota in cecal contents and feces; and (4) fluctuations in the concentrations of cecal metabolites produced by gut microbiota reflected in plasma and hepatic metabolites. Operational taxonomic units within the family Lachnospiraceae showed an inverse correlation with certain metabolites. The social interaction score correlated with cecal metabolites, IgA, and cecal and fecal microbiota, suggesting that sCSDS suppressed the ileal immune response, altering the balance of microbiota, which together with host cells and host enzymes resulted in a pattern of accumulated metabolites in the intestinal ecosystem distinct from that of control mice. PMID:27482843

  19. Treatment with tetrahydrobiopterin overcomes brain death-associated injury in a murine model of pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oberhuber, R; Ritschl, P; Fabritius, C; Nguyen, A-V; Hermann, M; Obrist, P; Werner, E R; Maglione, M; Flörchinger, B; Ebner, S; Resch, T; Pratschke, J; Kotsch, K

    2015-11-01

    Brain death (BD) has been associated with an immunological priming of donor organs and is thought to exacerbate ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Recently, we showed that the essential nitric oxide synthase co-factor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) abrogates IRI following experimental pancreas transplantation. We therefore studied the effects of BD in a murine model of syngeneic pancreas transplantation and tested the therapeutic potential of BH4 treatment. Compared with sham-operated controls, donor BD resulted in intragraft inflammation reflected by induced IL-1ß, IL-6, VCAM-1, and P-selectin mRNA expression levels and impaired microcirculation after reperfusion (p < 0.05), whereas pretreatment of the BD donor with BH4 significantly improved microcirculation after reperfusion (p < 0.05). Moreover, BD had a devastating impact on cell viability, whereas BH4-treated grafts showed a significantly higher percentage of viable cells (p < 0.001). Early parenchymal damage in pancreatic grafts was significantly more pronounced in organs from BD donors than from sham or non-BD donors (p < 0.05), but BH4 pretreatment significantly ameliorated necrotic lesions in BD organs (p < 0.05). Pretreatment of the BD donor with BH4 resulted in significant recipient survival (p < 0.05). Our data provide novel insights into the impact of BD on pancreatic isografts, further demonstrating the potential of donor pretreatment strategies including BH4 for preventing BD-associated injury after transplantation.

  20. A statistical analysis of murine incisional and excisional acute wound models

    PubMed Central

    Ansell, David M; Campbell, Laura; Thomason, Helen A; Brass, Andrew; Hardman, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Mice represent the most commonly used species for preclinical in vivo research. While incisional and excisional acute murine wound models are both frequently employed, there is little agreement on which model is optimum. Moreover, current lack of standardization of wounding procedure, analysis time point(s), method of assessment, and the use of individual wounds vs. individual animals as replicates makes it difficult to compare across studies. Here we have profiled secondary intention healing of incisional and excisional wounds within the same animal, assessing multiple parameters to determine the optimal methodology for future studies. We report that histology provides the least variable assessment of healing. Furthermore, histology alone (not planimetry) is able to detect accelerated healing in a castrated mouse model. Perhaps most importantly, we find virtually no correlation between wounds within the same animal, suggesting that use of wound (not animal) biological replicates is perfectly acceptable. Overall, these findings should guide and refine future studies, increasing the likelihood of detecting novel phenotypes while reducing the numbers of animals required for experimentation. PMID:24635179

  1. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sebeson, Amy; Xi, Liqun; Zhang, Quanwei; Sigmund, Audrey; Wang, Ji-Ping; Widom, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  2. The Murine Lung Microbiome Changes During Lung Inflammation and Intranasal Vancomycin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Barfod, Kenneth Klingenberg; Vrankx, Katleen; Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Hansen, Jitka Stilund; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Larsen, Søren Thor; Ouwenhand, Arthur C; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    Most microbiome research related to airway diseases has focused on the gut microbiome. This is despite advances in culture independent microbial identification techniques revealing that even healthy lungs possess a unique dynamic microbiome. This conceptual change raises the question; if lung diseases could be causally linked to local dysbiosis of the local lung microbiota. Here, we manipulate the murine lung and gut microbiome, in order to show that the lung microbiota can be changed experimentally. We have used four different approaches: lung inflammation by exposure to carbon nano-tube particles, oral probiotics and oral or intranasal exposure to the antibiotic vancomycin. Bacterial DNA was extracted from broncho-alveolar and nasal lavage fluids, caecum samples and compared by DGGE. Our results show that: the lung microbiota is sex dependent and not just a reflection of the gut microbiota, and that induced inflammation can change lung microbiota. This change is not transferred to offspring. Oral probiotics in adult mice do not change lung microbiome detectible by DGGE. Nasal vancomycin can change the lung microbiome preferentially, while oral exposure does not. These observations should be considered in future studies of the causal relationship between lung microbiota and lung diseases. PMID:26668669

  3. Effect of Cold Plasma on Cell Viability and Collagen Synthesis in Cultured Murine Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xingmin; Cai, Jingfen; Xu, Guimin; Ren, Hongbin; Chen, Sile; Chang, Zhengshi; Liu, Jinren; Huang, Chongya; Zhang, Guanjun; Wu, Xili

    2016-04-01

    An argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet was employed to treat L929 murine fibroblasts cultured in vitro. Experimental results showed that, compared with the control cells, the treatment of fibroblasts with 15 s of plasma led to a significant increase of cell viability and collagen synthesis, while the treatment of 25 s plasma resulted in a remarkable decrease. Exploration of related mechanisms suggested that cold plasma could up-regulate CyclinD1 gene expression and down-regulate p27 gene expression at a low dose, while it could down-regulate CyclinD1 expression and up-regulate p27 expression at a higher dose, thus altering the cell cycle progression, and then affecting cell viability and collagen synthesis of fibroblasts. supported partly by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 81372076, 51307133 and 51221005), China National Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists (No. 51125029), the Sci-Tech Project of Shaanxi Province of China (No. 2010K16-04), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. xkjc2013004)

  4. The Murine Lung Microbiome Changes During Lung Inflammation and Intranasal Vancomycin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Barfod, Kenneth Klingenberg; Vrankx, Katleen; Mirsepasi-Lauridsen, Hengameh Chloé; Hansen, Jitka Stilund; Hougaard, Karin Sørig; Larsen, Søren Thor; Ouwenhand, Arthur C.; Krogfelt, Karen Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    Most microbiome research related to airway diseases has focused on the gut microbiome. This is despite advances in culture independent microbial identification techniques revealing that even healthy lungs possess a unique dynamic microbiome. This conceptual change raises the question; if lung diseases could be causally linked to local dysbiosis of the local lung microbiota. Here, we manipulate the murine lung and gut microbiome, in order to show that the lung microbiota can be changed experimentally. We have used four different approaches: lung inflammation by exposure to carbon nano-tube particles, oral probiotics and oral or intranasal exposure to the antibiotic vancomycin. Bacterial DNA was extracted from broncho-alveolar and nasal lavage fluids, caecum samples and compared by DGGE. Our results show that: the lung microbiota is sex dependent and not just a reflection of the gut microbiota, and that induced inflammation can change lung microbiota. This change is not transferred to offspring. Oral probiotics in adult mice do not change lung microbiome detectible by DGGE. Nasal vancomycin can change the lung microbiome preferentially, while oral exposure does not. These observations should be considered in future studies of the causal relationship between lung microbiota and lung diseases. PMID:26668669

  5. Transcutaneous photodynamic therapy delays the onset of paralysis in a murine multiple sclerosis model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, David W. C.; Leong, Simon; Levy, Julia G.; Chan, Agnes H.

    1995-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using benzoporphyrin derivative (BPD, Verteporfin) and whole body irradiation, can affect the course of adoptively transferred experimental allergic (autoimmune) encephalomyelitis (EAE) in PL mice. Murine EAE is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease which serves as a model for human multiple sclerosis. Using a novel disease induction protocol, we found that mice characteristically developed EAE within 3 weeks of receipt of myelin basic protein (MBP)-sensitized, in vitro-cultured spleen or lymph node cells. However, if animals were treated with PDT (1 mg BPD/kg bodyweight and exposed to whole body 15 Joules cm2 of LED light) 24 hours after receiving these cells, disease onset time was significantly delayed. PDT-treated mice developed disease symptoms 45 +/- 3 days following cell administration whereas untreated controls were affected within 23 +/- 2 days. In contrast, application of PDT 48 or 120 hours following injection of the pathogenic cells had no significant effect upon the development of EAE. Experiments are in progress to account for the protective effect of PDT in this animal model. These studies should provide evidence on the feasibility of PDT as a treatment for human autoimmune disease.

  6. ICAM-1-expressing neutrophils exhibit enhanced effector functions in murine models of endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Woodfin, Abigail; Beyrau, Martina; Voisin, Mathieu-Benoit; Ma, Bin; Whiteford, James R; Hordijk, Peter L; Hogg, Nancy; Nourshargh, Sussan

    2016-02-18

    Intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on the cell surface of numerous cell types such as endothelial and epithelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and certain leukocyte subsets. With respect to the latter, ICAM-1 has been detected on neutrophils in several clinical and experimental settings, but little is known about the regulation of expression or function of neutrophil ICAM-1. In this study, we report on the de novo induction of ICAM-1 on the cell surface of murine neutrophils by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tumor necrosis factor, and zymosan particles in vitro. The induction of neutrophil ICAM-1 was associated with enhanced phagocytosis of zymosan particles and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Conversely, neutrophils from ICAM-1-deficient mice were defective in these effector functions. Mechanistically, ICAM-1-mediated intracellular signaling appeared to support neutrophil ROS generation and phagocytosis. In vivo, LPS-induced inflammation in the mouse cremaster muscle and peritoneal cavity led to ICAM-1 expression on intravascular and locally transmigrated neutrophils. The use of chimeric mice deficient in ICAM-1 on myeloid cells demonstrated that neutrophil ICAM-1 was not required for local neutrophil transmigration, but supported optimal intravascular and extravascular phagocytosis of zymosan particles. Collectively, the present results shed light on regulation of expression and function of ICAM-1 on neutrophils and identify it as an additional regulator of neutrophil effector responses in host defense. PMID:26647392

  7. Therapeutic effect of Broussonetia papyrifera and Lonicera japonica in ovalbumin-induced murine asthma model.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Kwon, Jung-Taek; Shin, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Eun; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Lee, Somin; Park, Sung-Jin; Chang, Seung-Hee; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Vibin, M; Han, Kiwon; Son, Kun-Ho; Kwak, Wie-Jong; Chae, Chanhee; Bang, Sung-Hye; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2013-11-01

    Broussonetia papyrifera (L.) Vent. and Lonicera japonica Thunb. have been used in recent medicinal research for their antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the therapeutic efficacy of B. papyrifera and L. japonica ethanolic extracts in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced asthma, in which intra-peritoneal (IP) injections and aerosol ovalbumin delivery were used to induce allergic asthma. Bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), serum samples, lungs and livers were collected from the experimental groups. In the groups treated with B. papyrifera and L. japonica extracts, CD3, CD4, serum IgE and IL-4 levels; activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9; and eotaxin levels in the BALF significantly decreased to near normal levels. Results of a histopathological analysis showed that the level of inflammation and mucous secretions reduced in the treated groups compared to the corresponding levels in the other groups. Moreover, results of a serum enzymatic analysis showed the non-toxic nature of the extracts in the B. papyrifera and L. japonica treated groups. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that the B. papyrifera and L. japonica extracts may be very effective against asthma and inflammation related diseases. PMID:24427953

  8. Neutropenia exacerbates infection by Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates in a murine wound model

    PubMed Central

    Grguric-Smith, Laryssa M.; Lee, Hiu H.; Gandhi, Jay A.; Brennan, Melissa B.; DeLeon-Rodriguez, Carlos M.; Coelho, Carolina; Han, George; Martinez, Luis R.

    2015-01-01

    The Gram negative coccobacillus Acinetobacter baumannii has become an increasingly prevalent cause of hospital-acquired infections in recent years. The majority of clinical A. baumannii isolates display high-level resistance to antimicrobials, which severely compromises our capacity to care for patients with A. baumannii disease. Neutrophils are of major importance in the host defense against microbial infections. However, the contribution of these cells of innate immunity in host resistance to cutaneous A. baumannii infection has not been directly investigated. Hence, we hypothesized that depletion of neutrophils increases severity of bacterial disease in an experimental A. baumannii murine wound model. In this study, the Ly-6G-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb), 1A8, was used to generate neutropenic mice and the pathogenesis of several A. baumannii clinical isolates on wounded cutaneous tissue was investigated. We demonstrated that neutrophil depletion enhances bacterial burden using colony forming unit determinations. Also, mAb 1A8 reduces global measurements of wound healing in A. baumannii-infected animals. Interestingly, histological analysis of cutaneous tissue excised from A. baumannii-infected animals treated with mAb 1A8 displays enhanced collagen deposition. Furthermore, neutropenia and A. baumannii infection alter pro-inflammatory cytokine release leading to severe microbial disease. Our findings provide a better understanding of the impact of these innate immune cells in controlling A. baumannii skin infections. PMID:26528277

  9. Trace element profiles in murine Lewis lung carcinoma by radioisotope-induced X-ray fluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, A. S.; Schauble, M. K.; Preiss, I. L.

    1986-01-01

    Trace element profiles of various body tissues and tumor were established during growth of the Lewis lung tumor (LLT) with the use of radioisotope-induced X-ray fluorescence (RIXRF) analysis. The LLT, a highly malignant experimental murine tumor, resembles its human counterpart, has a well-defined life cycle, and kills its host in 30 days. When compared with normal controls, Zn, Br, and Rb levels in lung, liver, and skeletal muscle and Zn and Sr levels in bone from tumor-bearing mice exhibited large fluctuations at critical points in the tumor life cycle. In addition, the 24-day primary tumor trace element profile resembled that of its tissue of origin, normal lung, and was quite different from other normal tissues studied. These findings indicate that trace element profiles may help in the diagnosis, staging, and monitoring of disease. RIXRF is an excellent technique for this purpose because it is sensitive and relatively nondestructive of samples and has multielement capabilities. Images Figure 1 p423-a PMID:3953767

  10. PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO SMOKE ALTERS GENE EXPRESSION IN THE DEVELOPING MURINE HIPPOCAMPUS

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Horn, Kristin H.; Greene, Robert M.; Pisano, M. Michele

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of passive smoke exposures on the developing brain. Objective The purpose of the current study was to identify changes in gene expression in the murine hippocampus as a consequence of in utero exposure to sidestream cigarette smoke (an experimental equivalent of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS)) at exposure levels that do not result in fetal growth inhibition. Methods A whole body smoke inhalation exposure system was utilized to deliver ETS to pregnant C57BL/6J mice for six hours/day from gestational days 6–17 (gd 6–17) [for microarray] or gd 6–18.5 [for fetal phenotyping]. Results There were no significant effects of ETS exposure on fetal phenotype. However, 61 “expressed” genes in the gd 18.5 fetal hippocampus were differentially regulated (up- or down-regulated by 1.5 fold or greater) by maternal exposure to ETS. Of these 61 genes, 25 genes were upregulated while 36 genes were downregulated. A systems biology approach, including computational methodologies, identified cellular response pathways, and biological themes, underlying altered fetal programming of the embryonic hippocampus by in utero cigarette smoke exposure. Conclusions Results from the present study suggest that even in the absence of effects on fetal growth, prenatal smoke exposure can alter gene expression during the “early” period of hippocampal growth and may result in abnormal hippocampal morphology, connectivity, and function. PMID:19969065

  11. Toll-Like Receptor-4 Dependent Small Intestinal Immune Responses Following Murine Arcobacter Butzleri Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heimesaat, Markus M.; Karadas, Gül; Fischer, André; Göbel, Ulf B.; Alter, Thomas; Bereswill, Stefan; Gölz, Greta

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic cases of gastroenteritis have been attributed to Arcobacter butzleri infection, but information about the underlying immunopathological mechanisms is scarce. We have recently shown that experimental A. butzleri infection induces intestinal, extraintestinal and systemic immune responses in gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the immunopathological role of Toll-like Receptor-4, the receptor for lipopolysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide of Gram-negative bacteria, during murine A. butzleri infection. To address this, gnotobiotic IL-10–/– mice lacking TLR-4 were generated by broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment and perorally infected with two different A. butzleri strains isolated from a patient (CCUG 30485) or fresh chicken meat (C1), respectively. Bacteria of either strain stably colonized the ilea of mice irrespective of their genotype at days 6 and 16 postinfection. As compared to IL-10–/– control animals, TLR-4–/– IL-10–/– mice were protected from A. butzleri-induced ileal apoptosis, from ileal influx of adaptive immune cells including T lymphocytes, regulatory T-cells and B lymphocytes, and from increased ileal IFN-γ secretion. Given that TLR-4-signaling is essential for A. butzleri-induced intestinal inflammation, we conclude that bacterial lipooligosaccharide or lipopolysaccharide compounds aggravate intestinal inflammation and may thus represent major virulence factors of Arcobacter. Future studies need to further unravel the molecular mechanisms of TLR-4-mediated A. butzleri-host interactions. PMID:26716022

  12. Murine whole-organ immune cell populations revealed by multi-epitope-ligand cartography.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, Jenny; Ostalecki, Christian; Kuczera, Katarzyna; Schuler, Gerold; Pommer, Ansgar J; Lechmann, Matthias

    2013-02-01

    Multi-epitope-ligand cartography (MELC) is an innovative high-throughput fluorescence microscopy-based method. A tissue section is analyzed through a repeated cycling of (1) incubation with a fluorophore-labeled antibody, (2) fluorescence imaging, and (3) soft bleaching. This method allows staining of the same tissue section with up to 100 fluorescent markers and to analyze their toponomic expression using further image processing and pixel-precise overlay of the corresponding images. In this study, we adapted this method to identify a large panel of murine leukocyte subpopulations in a whole frozen section of a peripheral lymph node. Using the resulting antibody library, we examined non-inflamed versus inflamed tissues of brain and spinal cord in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. The presence and activity of specific leukocyte subpopulations (different T cell subpopulations, dendritic cells, macrophages, etc.) could be assessed and the cellular localizations and the corresponding activation status in situ were investigated. The results were then correlated with quantitative RT-PCR.

  13. Murine Whole-Organ Immune Cell Populations Revealed by Multi-epitope-Ligand Cartography

    PubMed Central

    Eckhardt, Jenny; Ostalecki, Christian; Kuczera, Katarzyna; Schuler, Gerold; Lechmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Multi-epitope-ligand cartography (MELC) is an innovative high-throughput fluorescence microscopy–based method. A tissue section is analyzed through a repeated cycling of (1) incubation with a fluorophore-labeled antibody, (2) fluorescence imaging, and (3) soft bleaching. This method allows staining of the same tissue section with up to 100 fluorescent markers and to analyze their toponomic expression using further image processing and pixel-precise overlay of the corresponding images. In this study, we adapted this method to identify a large panel of murine leukocyte subpopulations in a whole frozen section of a peripheral lymph node. Using the resulting antibody library, we examined non-inflamed versus inflamed tissues of brain and spinal cord in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. The presence and activity of specific leukocyte subpopulations (different T cell subpopulations, dendritic cells, macrophages, etc.) could be assessed and the cellular localizations and the corresponding activation status in situ were investigated. The results were then correlated with quantitative RT-PCR. PMID:23160665

  14. Efficacy of quercetin against chemically induced murine oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    DROGUETT, DANIEL; CASTILLO, CHRISTIAN; LEIVA, ELBA; THEODULOZ, CRISTINA; SCHMEDA-HIRSCHMANN, GUILLERMO; KEMMERLING, ULRIKE

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common form of head and neck cancer, and oxidative damage is associated with the development of OSCCs. Antioxidants have therefore been proposed for use as chemoprotective agents against different types of cancer. In the present study, the effect of the antioxidant quercetin, administered at doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg/day, was investigated in an experimental murine model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced carcinogenesis. The survival of the treated animals, the plasmatic levels of reduced glutathione and the type and severity of lesions (according the International Histological Classification of Tumors and Bryne's Multifactorial Grading System for the Invasive Tumor Front) were assessed. Additionally, the organization of the extracellular matrix was analyzed by carbohydrate and collagen histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of the tumor markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen and mutated p53. The results indicate that, despite the promising effect of quercetin in other studies, this drug is ineffective as a chemoprotective agent against 4-NQO-induced OSCC in mice at the assayed doses. PMID:26622865

  15. Thrombin detection in murine plasma using engineered fluorescence resonance energy transfer aptadimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trapaidze, Ana; Brut, Marie; Mazères, Serge; Estève, Daniel; Gué, Anne-Marie; Bancaud, Aurélien

    2015-12-01

    Biodetection strategies, in which two sides of one target protein are targeted simultaneously, have been shown to increase specificity, selectivity, and affinity, and it has been suggested that they constitute excellent candidates for protein sensing in complex media. In this study we propose a method to engineer the sequence of a DNA construct dedicated to reversible thrombin detection. This construct, called Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) aptadimer, is assembled with two aptamers, which target different epitopes of thrombin, interconnected with a DNA linker that contains a FRET couple and a reversible double helix stem. In the absence of target, the stem is stable maintaining a FRET couple in close proximity, and fluorescence is unquenched upon thrombin addition due to the dehybridization of the stem. We define design rules for the conception of FRET aptadimers, and develop a software to optimize their functionality. One engineered FRET aptadimer sequence is subsequently characterized experimentally by temperature scanning fluorimetry, demonstrating the relevance of our technology for thrombin sensing in bulk and diluted murine plasma.

  16. Genotypic adaptations associated with prolonged persistence of Lactobacillus plantarum in the murine digestive tract.

    PubMed

    van Bokhorst-van de Veen, Hermien; Smelt, Maaike J; Wels, Michiel; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; de Vos, Paul; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Bron, Peter A

    2013-08-01

    Probiotic bacteria harbor effector molecules that confer health benefits, but also adaptation factors that enable them to persist in the gastrointestinal tract of the consumer. To study these adaptation factors, an antibiotic-resistant derivative of the probiotic model organism Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 was repeatedly exposed to the mouse digestive tract by three consecutive rounds of (re)feeding of the longest persisting colonies. This exposure to the murine intestine allowed the isolation of intestine-adapted derivatives of the original strain that displayed prolonged digestive tract residence time. Re-sequencing of the genomes of these adapted derivatives revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as a single nucleotide insertion in comparison with the genome of the original WCFS1 strain. Detailed in silico analysis of the identified genomic modifications pinpointed that alterations in the coding regions of genes encoding cell envelope associated functions and energy metabolism appeared to be beneficial for the gastrointestinal tract survival of L. plantarum WCFS1. This work demonstrates the feasibility of experimental evolution for the enhancement of the gastrointestinal residence time of probiotic strains, while full-genome resequencing of the adapted isolates provided clues towards the bacterial functions involved. Enhanced gastrointestinal residence is industrially relevant because it enhances the efficacy of the delivery of viable probiotics in situ.

  17. Surface properties and early murine pre-osteoblastic cell responses of phosphoric acid modified titanium surface

    PubMed Central

    Osathanon, Thanaphum; Sawangmake, Chenphop; Ruangchainicom, Nanticha; Wutikornwipak, Pavitra; Kantukiti, Panisa; Nowwarote, Nunthawan; Pavasant, Prasit

    2015-01-01

    Aims The present study investigated the surface properties and murine pre-osteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) responses of phosphoric acid (H3PO4) treated commercially pure titanium. Methods Titanium discs were treated with various concentration of H3PO4 (5%, 10%, and 20%; v/v) at 90 °C for 30 min. Surface properties were evaluated by profilometer, contact angle meter, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-rays. MC3T3-E1 attachment and spreading were evaluated by SEM and phalloidin immunohistochemistry staining. Results Surface roughness and wettability were not statistically difference among all experimental and control groups. Phosphate and oxygen were detected on H3PO4 treated surfaces. At 20 min, cell attachment was significantly higher in 10% and 20% H3PO4 treated groups compared to the control. Cells exhibited orientated-cytoskeleton fibers on 20% H3PO4 modified titanium surface. Though, there was no difference in cell spreading stage among all treatment groups. Conclusion H3PO4 treatment on titanium may influence early cell response, particularly on attachment and spreading. PMID:26937362

  18. Exploiting changes in the tumour microenvironment with sequential cytokine and matrix metalloprotease inhibitor treatment in a murine breast cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Scott, K A; Holdsworth, H; Balkwill, F R; Dias, S

    2000-01-01

    The study of treatment-induced changes in the tumour microenvironment might lead to effective combinations of biological therapy. IL-12 induced tumour regression and cure of an experimental murine breast cancer, HTH-K, but only after long-term treatment that was associated with chronic toxicity. During IL-12 therapy, tumour levels of the matrix metalloprotease MMP-9 declined and its inhibitor TIMP-1 was strongly induced. We therefore administered alternate cycles of IL-12 and the MMP inhibitor Batimastat (BB94) to mice. Therapeutic efficacy was increased compared with short-term IL-12 therapy but without the chronic toxicity associated with long-term IL-12 treatment. Image analysis of treated tumours revealed that BB94 prevented regeneration of tumour and stromal compartments that normally occurred after short-term IL-12 therapy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11076665

  19. Derivation and validation of murine histologic alterations resembling asthma, with two proposed histologic grade parameters

    PubMed Central

    Wachtel, Mitchell S; Shome, Goutam; Sutherland, Mhairi; McGlone, John J

    2009-01-01

    Background The objective was to define murine histologic alterations resembling asthma in a BALB/c OVA model and to suggest grading criteria. Identified were six salient histologic findings in lungs with putative allergic inflammation: 1) bronchoarterial space inflammation; 2) peri-venular inflammation; 3) inflammation about amuscular blood vessels; 4) inter-alveolar space inflammation, not about capillaries; 5) pleural inflammation; and 6) eosinophils within the inflammatory aggregates. An initial study comprised six groups of twelve mice each: 1) stressed, control; 2) stressed, sensitized; 3) stressed, challenged; 4) not physically stressed, control; 5) not physically stressed, sensitized; 6) not physically stressed, challenged. A second study comprised four experimental groups of twenty mice each: 1) stressed, control; 2) stressed, challenged; 3) not physically stressed, control; 4) not physically stressed, challenged. A third study evaluated two grading criteria, 1) the proportion of non-tracheal respiratory passages with inflammatory aggregates and 2) mitoses in the largest two non-tracheal respiratory passages, in five groups of five mice each, evaluated at different times after the last exposure. Results The first study suggested the six histological findings might reliably indicate the presence of alterations resembling asthma: whereas 82.4% of mice with a complete response had detectable interleukin (IL)-5, only 3.8% of mice without one did; whereas 77.8% of mice with a complete response were challenged mice, only 6.7% of mice without complete responses were. The second study revealed that the six histological findings provided a definition that was 97.4% sensitive and 100% specific. The third study found that the odds of a bronchial passage's having inflammation declined 1) when mitoses were present (OR = 0.73, 0.60 - 0.90), and 2) with one day increased time (OR = 0.75, 0.65 - 0.86). Conclusion A definition of murine histologic alterations resembling

  20. Sequential univariate gating approach to study the effects of erythropoietin in murine bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Achuthanandam, Ram; Quinn, John; Capocasale, Renold J; Bugelski, Peter J; Hrebien, Leonid; Kam, Moshe

    2008-08-01

    using SUG in less subjective, time efficient, biologically interpretable manner that corroborates with the expert analysis. The results suggest that basophilic erythroblasts cells or their immediate precursors are an important target for the effects of rHuEPO in murine bone marrow. The MATLAB implementation of the method described in the article, both experimental data and other supplemental materials are freely available at http://web.mac.com/acidrap18.

  1. Ependymal damage in a Plasmodium yoelii yoelii lethal murine malaria model.

    PubMed

    Rivera Fernández, Norma; Colín Barenque, Laura; Romero Silva, Samanta E; Salas Garrido, Gerardo; Jiménez Rosey, Samantha G; Zepeda Rodríguez, Armando; Romero Romero, Laura P; Menchaca Gómez, Ángeles; Malagón Gutiérrez, Filiberto

    2015-02-01

    Malaria continues to be a major global health problem, and over 40% of the world's population is at risk. Severe or complicated malaria is defined by clinical or laboratory evidence of vital organ dysfunction, including dysfunction of the central nervous system (CNS). The pathogenesis of complicated malaria has not been completely elucidated; however, the development of the multiorgan affection seems to play an important role in the disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB) that protects the CNS against chemical insults. Historically, the BBB has received more attention in the pathogenesis of malaria than have the cerebrospinal fluid-brain barrier (CSFBB) and ependymal cells. This perspective may be misguided because, in the context of disease or toxicity, the CSFBB is more vulnerable to many foreign invaders than are the capillaries. Given the lack on studies of the damage to the CSFBB and ependymal epithelium in experimental murine malaria, the present study evaluated morphological changes in the ependymal cells of CD-1 male mice infected with lethal Plasmodium yoelii yoelii (Pyy) via histopathology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Samples were taken two, four and six days post-infection (PI). No lesions were observed upon the initial infection. By the fourth day PI, fourth ventricle ependymal samples exhibited disruptions and roughened epithelia. More severe injuries were observed at six days PI and included thickened cilia and deep separations between the ependymal intercellular spaces. In some of the analyzed areas, the absence of microvilli and cell layer detachment were observed, and some areas exhibited blebbing surfaces. The ependymal cell lesions observed in the CD1 male mice infected with lethal Pyy seemed to facilitate the paracellular permeability of the CSFBB and consequently promote the access of inflammatory mediators and toxic molecules through the barrier, which resulted in damage to the brain tissue. Understanding the mechanism of

  2. Heterogeneity across the murine small and large intestine.

    PubMed

    Bowcutt, Rowann; Forman, Ruth; Glymenaki, Maria; Carding, Simon Richard; Else, Kathryn Jane; Cruickshank, Sheena Margaret

    2014-11-01

    The small and large intestine of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) have evolved to have discrete functions with distinct anatomies and immune cell composition. The importance of these differences is underlined when considering that different pathogens have uniquely adapted to live in each region of the gut. Furthermore, different regions of the GIT are also associated with differences in susceptibility to diseases such as cancer and chronic inflammation. The large and small intestine, given their anatomical and functional differences, should be seen as two separate immunological sites. However, this distinction is often ignored with findings from one area of the GIT being inappropriately extrapolated to the other. Focussing largely on the murine small and large intestine, this review addresses the literature relating to the immunology and biology of the two sites, drawing comparisons between them and clarifying similarities and differences. We also highlight the gaps in our understanding and where further research is needed.

  3. Zika Virus Infection and Development of a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankit; Kumar, Anil

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV), there is an urgent need to investigate the pathogenesis of the symptoms associated with ZIKV infection. Since the first identification of the virus in 1947, the pathologies associated with ZIKV infection were thought to be limited with mild illness that presented fever, rashes, muscle aches, and weakness. However, ZIKV infection has been shown to cause Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and numerous cases of congenital microcephaly in children have been reported when pregnant females were exposed to the virus. The severity and the rate of spread of ZIKV in the last year has drawn alarming interest among researchers to investigate murine models to study viral pathogenesis and develop candidate vaccines. A recent study by Lazear and colleagues, in the May 2016 issue of cell host and microbe, is an effort to study the pathogenesis of contemporary and historical virus strains in various mouse models. PMID:27260223

  4. Monitoring Murine Skeletal Muscle Function for Muscle Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, Chady H.; Li, Dejia; Duan, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    The primary function of skeletal muscle is to generate force. Muscle force production is compromised in various forms of acquired and/or inherited muscle diseases. An important goal of muscle gene therapy is to recover muscle strength. Genetically engineered mice and spontaneous mouse mutants are readily available for preclinical muscle gene therapy studies. In this chapter, we outlined the methods commonly used for measuring murine skeletal muscle function. These include ex vivo and in situ analysis of the contractile profile of a single intact limb muscle (the extensor digitorium longus for ex vivo assay and the tibialis anterior muscle for in situ assay), grip force analysis, and downhill treadmill exercise. Force measurement in a single muscle is extremely useful for pilot testing of new gene therapy protocols by local gene transfer. Grip force and treadmill assessments offer body-wide evaluation following systemic muscle gene therapy. PMID:21194022

  5. Dye-mediated photosensitization of murine neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sieber, F.; Sieber-Blum, M.

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if photosensitization mediated by the fluorescent dye, merocyanine 540, could be used to preferentially kill murine neuroblastoma cells in simulated autologous remission marrow grafts. Simultaneous exposure of Neuro 2a or NB41A3 neuroblastoma cells to merocyanine 540 and white light reduced the concentration of in vitro-clonogenic tumor cells 50,000-fold. By contrast, the same treatment had little effect on the graft's ability to rescue lethally irradiated syngeneic hosts. Lethally irradiated C57BL/6J X A/J F1 mice transplanted with photosensitized mixtures of neuroblastoma cells and normal marrow cells (1:100 or 1:10) survived without developing neuroblastomas. It is conceivable that merocyanine 540-mediated photosensitization will prove useful for the extracorporeal purging of residual neuroblastoma cells from human autologous remission marrow grafts.

  6. Effects of trichostatins on differentiation of murine erythroleukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, M.; Nomura, S.; Beppu, T.

    1987-07-15

    The fungistatic antibiotics trichostatins (TS) A and C were isolated from culture broth of Streptomyces platensis No. 145 and were found to be potent inducers of differentiation in murine erythroleukemia (Friend and RV133) cells at concentrations of 1.5 X 10(-8) M for TSA and 5 X 10(-7) M for TSC. Differentiation induced by TS was cooperatively enhanced by UV irradiation but not by treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide. This enhanced activity was completely inhibited by adding cycloheximide to the culture medium 2 h after exposure to TS, suggesting that TS are dimethyl sulfoxide-type inducers of erythroid differentiation. No inhibitory effect of TS was observed on macromolecular synthesis in cultured cells.

  7. Murine Tumor Models for Oncolytic Rhabdo-Virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Falls, Theresa; Roy, Dominic Guy; Bell, John Cameron; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude

    2016-01-01

    The preclinical optimization and validation of novel treatments for cancer therapy requires the use of laboratory animals. Although in vitro experiments using tumor cell lines and ex vivo treatment of patient tumor samples provide a remarkable first-line tool for the initial study of tumoricidal potential, tumor-bearing animals remain the primary option to study delivery, efficacy, and safety of therapies in the context of a complete tumor microenvironment and functional immune system. In this review, we will describe the use of murine tumor models for oncolytic virotherapy using vesicular stomatitis virus. We will discuss studies using immunocompetent and immunodeficient models with respect to toxicity and therapeutic treatments, as well as the various techniques and tools available to study cancer therapy with Rhabdoviruses. PMID:27034397

  8. Modulation of cell-surface antigens of a murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Akeson, R; Herschman, H R

    1974-01-01

    Antisera were produced in rabbits to morphologically differentiated cells from the C1300 murine neuroblastoma (i.e., cells in which process formation was induced by maintenance on serum-free medium for 5 days). These antisera reacted more strongly in the complement fixation reaction with such "differentiated" cells than with "undifferentiated" (nonprocess-bearing) neuroblastoma cells. Adsorption of the antisera with undifferentiated cells removed the reactivity to cells without processes, while the reactivity with serum-free cells which possess processes was retained. Indirect immunofluorescence studies confirmed the results obtained by complement fixation and demonstrated that antibodies to the surface antigens of process-bearing cells could be adsorbed by particulate preparations from brain but not liver, spleen, or kidney. This is the first description of neural-associated cell-surface changes that correlate with the morphological differentiation in culture of neuroblastoma cells.

  9. Efficacy of echinocandins against murine infections by Diutina (Candida) rugosa.

    PubMed

    Sanchis, Marta; Sutton, Deanna A; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Guarro, Josep; Capilla, Javier

    2016-09-01

    Echinocandins are recommended as a first-line therapy for invasive candidiasis. Candida rugosa was recently transferred to the new genus Diutina. We have determined the in vitro killing kinetics of two echinocandins, anidulafungin, and caspofungin and their in vivo efficacy, administering doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg, and 1 or 5 mg/kg, respectively against 2 clinical strains of D. rugosa. Both drugs showed a fungicidal concentration-dependent activity and, in a neutropenic murine model of disseminated infection, were able to reduce tissue burden and to prolong survival of mice. These results suggest that both echinocandins could be useful to treat infections by this fungus when isolates show minimal inhibitory concentrations within the range of susceptibility for both drugs. PMID:27342787

  10. Visualisation of nitric oxide generated by activated murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Leone, A M; Furst, V W; Foxwell, N A; Cellek, S; Moncada, S

    1996-04-01

    We have visualised the release and approximate diffusion profile of nitric oxide (NO) from activated murine macrophages using a high transmission microscope coupled to a high sensitivity photon counting camera. The images generated by NO were cell-associated and spread over an area of approximately 175 micrometers from the activated macrophage. The signals obtained were dependent on the presence of exogenous L-arginine in the medium and followed a time course similar to that previously described for the generation of NO by the inducible form of NO synthase. The light signal was attenuated by the inhibitor of NO synthase, N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Studies using superoxide-deficient macrophages further confirmed that the signals detected were generated by NO rather than reactive oxygen intermediates. PMID:8660339

  11. Effects of fludarabine treatment on murine lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Jones, O Y; Alexander, P J; Lacson, A; Gok, F; Feliz, A; Marikar, Y; Madivi, C; Jones, J M; Good, R A

    2004-01-01

    BXSB mice, a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), were treated with two different doses of fludarabine for a four-week period and examined two weeks after the final dose. Control mice were treated with saline or cyclophosphamide. Mice treated with fludarabine had a significant reduction in renal pathology compared to control mice. Fludarabine-treated mice also had an almost 10-fold increase in percentile of CD8+CD25+ T cells in the spleen and a smaller but significant increase in CD4+CD25+ cells. Mice treated with cyclophosphamide had a greater leucopenia compared to the other groups and a significant reduction in percentile of B220+ cells in peripheral blood and spleen. Serum autoantibody levels to dsDNA did not differ significantly among the groups, but were higher in 4/10 mice treated with fludarabine. Although few trials of fludarabine for human SLE have been conducted, additional studies may be warranted.

  12. Expression of Wnts in the developing murine secondary palate

    PubMed Central

    WARNER, DENNIS R.; SMITH, HENRY S.; WEBB, CYNTHIA L.; GREENE, ROBERT M.; PISANO, M. MICHELE

    2009-01-01

    Morphogenesis of the mammalian secondary palate requires coordination of cell migration, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and synthesis of extracellular matrix molecules by numerous signal transduction pathways. Recent evidence suggests a role for members of the Wnt family of secreted cytokines in orofacial development. However, no study has systematically or comprehensively examined the expression of Wnts in embryonic orofacial tissue. We thus conducted a survey of the expression of all known Wnt genes in the developing murine secondary palate. Using an RT-PCR strategy to assay gene expression, 12 of the 19 known members of the Wnt family were found to be expressed in embryonic palatal tissue during key phases of its development. The expression of 5 Wnt family members was found to be temporally regulated. Moreover, these Wnts had unique spatio-temporal patterns of expression which suggested possible roles in palatal ontogeny. PMID:19598129

  13. Histopathology of spontaneous regression in virus-induced murine leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Russo, I.; Russo, J.; Baldwin, J.; Rich, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The histopathology of the spontaneous regression of murine leukemia induced by a particular strain of Friend leukemia virus was studied in Swiss ICR/Ha mice. Animals inoculated with the regressing strain of Friend virus exhibited an initial pathologic response identical to that induced by conventional strains of Friend virus. Unlike the fatal leukemia produced by conventional Friend virus, the pathology of the disease induced by the regressing strain of Friend virus appeared to be self-limiting. The histopathology of the two diseases is compared in this report. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:970443

  14. Inactivation of feline calicivirus and murine norovirus during Dongchimi fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Hwa; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Ha, Sang-Do; Choi, Changsun

    2012-09-01

    Among the traditional fermented vegetables in Korea, Dongchimi is a type of kimchi with a large water base. We aimed to investigate the survival of norovirus surrogates during Dongchimi fermentation. Dongchimi spiked with feline calicivirus (FCV) or murine norovirus (MNV) was prepared following a traditional recipe. Dongchimi was initially fermented at room temperature overnight and then kept at 4 °C. The number of lactic acid bacteria, pH, acidity, and virus titer were measured 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20 days after fermentation. During the fermentation process, lactic acid bacteria and acidity increased. At the end of the fermentation, population of FCV and MNV decreased about 4.12 and 1.47 log units, respectively. Based on the significant reduction of norovirus surrogate during Dongchimi fermentation, we conclude that the risk of norovirus in Dongchimi may be low.

  15. Zika Virus Infection and Development of a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ankit; Kumar, Anil

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV), there is an urgent need to investigate the pathogenesis of the symptoms associated with ZIKV infection. Since the first identification of the virus in 1947, the pathologies associated with ZIKV infection were thought to be limited with mild illness that presented fever, rashes, muscle aches, and weakness. However, ZIKV infection has been shown to cause Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and numerous cases of congenital microcephaly in children have been reported when pregnant females were exposed to the virus. The severity and the rate of spread of ZIKV in the last year has drawn alarming interest among researchers to investigate murine models to study viral pathogenesis and develop candidate vaccines. A recent study by Lazear and colleagues, in the May 2016 issue of cell host and microbe, is an effort to study the pathogenesis of contemporary and historical virus strains in various mouse models.

  16. Flow cytometric quantification of radiation responses of murine peritoneal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tokita, N.; Raju, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods have been developed to distinguish subpopulations of murine peritoneal cells, and these were applied to the measurement of early changes in peritoneal cells after irradiation. The ratio of the two major subpopulations in the peritoneal fluid, lymphocytes and macrophages, was measured rapidly by means of cell volume distribution analysis as well as by hypotonic propidium iodide (PI) staining. After irradiation, dose and time dependent changes were noted in the cell volume distributions: a rapid loss of peritoneal lymphocytes, and an increase in the mean cell volume of macrophages. The hypotonic PI staining characteristics of the peritoneal cells showed two or three distinctive G/sub 1/ peaks. The ratio of the areas of these peaks was also found to be dependent of the radiation dose and the time after irradiation. These results demonstrate that these two parameters may be used to monitor changes induced by irradiation (biological dosimetry), and to sort different peritoneal subpopulations.

  17. Metronidazole-induced alterations in murine spermatozoa morphology.

    PubMed

    Mudry, Marta D; Palermo, Ana M; Merani, María S; Carballo, Marta A

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of metronidazole (MTZ) on the stages of the seminiferous epithelial cycle and spermatozoa morphology when the drug is administered in human therapeutic doses to 60-day-old CFW male mice. The frequency of the stages was established by counting spermatocytes in pachytene and spermatids. Abnormalities in the flagellum or the head, lack of maturity and multiple malformations, were considered in the morphological analysis. Murine control strain was compared with MTZ treated group (v.ip 130 mg/kg/bw) both kept in standard captivity conditions. Cellular composition or number of stages in the seminiferous tubules were not altered in MTZ exposed animals, though the number of cells in stages I, V and XII was increased. The sperm cell morphology was severely affected by the treatment with potentially serious consequences on the normal fertilization process. Thus, the MTZ has to be considered as a conceivable thread regarding male fertility. PMID:17184970

  18. Functional expression of murine multidrug resistance in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, G.; Vera, J.C.; Rosen, O.M. ); Yang, Chiaping Huang; Horwitz, S.B. )

    1990-06-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is associated with the overproduction of a plasma membrane glycoprotein, P glycoprotein. Here the authors report the functional expression of a member of the murine MDR family of proteins and show that Xenopus oocytes injected with RNA encoding the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein develop a MDR-like phenotype. Immunological analysis indicated that oocytes injected with the mdr1b RNA synthesized a protein with the size and immunological characteristics of the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein. These oocytes exhibited a decreased accumulation of ({sup 3}H)vinblastine and showed an increased capacity to extrude the drug compared to control oocytes not expressing the P glycoprotein. In addition, competition experiments indicated that verapamil, vincristine, daunomycin, and quinidine, but not colchicine, can overcome the rapid drug efflux conferred by the expression of the mouse P glycoprotein.

  19. Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase1 Is an Organ-Specific Mediator of End Organ Damage in a Murine Model of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sydow, Karsten; Schmitz, Christine; von Leitner, Eike-Christin; von Leitner, Robin; Klinke, Anna; Atzler, Dorothee; Krebs, Christian; Wieboldt, Hartwig; Ehmke, Heimo; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Meinertz, Thomas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Böger, Rainer H.; Magnus, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Background The endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular and overall mortality. Moreover, elevated ADMA plasma concentrations are associated with the extent of hypertension. However, data from small-sized clinical trials and experimental approaches using murine transgenic models have revealed conflicting results regarding the impact of ADMA and its metabolizing enzyme dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Methodology/Principal Findings Therefore, we investigated the role of ADMA and DDAH1 in hypertension-induced end organ damage using the uninephrectomized, deoxycorticosterone actetate salt, and angiotensin II-induced hypertension model in human DDAH1 (hDDAH1) overexpressing and wild-type (WT) mice. ADMA plasma concentrations differed significantly between hDDAH1 and WT mice at baseline, but did not significantly change during the induction of hypertension. hDDAH1 overexpression did not protect against hypertension-induced cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy. In addition, the hypertension-induced impairment of the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of aortic segments ex vivo was not significantly attenuated by hDDAH1 overexpression. However, hDDAH1 mice displayed an attenuated hypertensive inflammatory response in renal tissue, resulting in less hypertensive renal injury. Conclusion/Significance Our data reveal that hDDAH1 organ-specifically modulates the inflammatory response in this murine model of hypertension. The lack of protection in cardiac and aortic tissues may be due to DDAH1 tissue selectivity and/or the extent of hypertension by the used combined model. However, our study underlines the potency of hDDAH1 overexpression in modulating inflammatory processes as a crucial step in the pathogenesis of hypertension, which needs further experimental and clinical investigation. PMID:23110194

  20. Treatment with gentamicin on a murine model of protothecal mastitis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ruilong; Yang, Qiaoling; Liu, Gang; Liu, Yongxia; Zheng, Bowen; Su, Jingliang; Han, Bo

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a murine protothecal mastitis model and to evaluate the treatment efficiency of gentamicin. Challenge routes were determined with a pathogenic Prototheca zopfii genotype 2 (P. zopfii) strain. 25 BALB/c mice were inoculated in mammary glands with graded dosages (10(3), 10(4), 10(5), 10(6), 10(7) CFU of P. zopfii) and killed on the 7th day. Another 25 animals were also killed at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 days after inoculation of 1 × 10(6) CFU of P. zopfii, the milk somatic cell counts, pathological section of mammary glands, and P. zopfii burden were observed. The antimicrobial activity was tested using disc diffusion test and minimum inhibitory concentrations. Gentamicin was given intramuscularly to analyze the therapeutic effect. The results showed that the best infection route was intra-mammary gland, and the mastitis model was established with 1 × 10(6) CFU of P. zopfii. After infection, the somatic cell counts increased significantly. The pathological reaction mainly consisted of infiltration of inflammatory cells, destruction of acini, accumulation of lymphocyte cells and the severity of the changes was dosage and time-dependent. The P. zopfii burden revealed that P. zopfii continuously replicated. In vitro susceptibility tests indicated that the Prototheca strains were antimicrobial susceptible to gentamicin at concentrations between 0.03 and 4 μg/ml. In vivo therapeutic assay demonstrated that high concentrations of gentamicin (≥20 mg/kg) could inhibit the growth of P. zopfii. We conclude that the murine model of protothecal mastitis was established successfully and gentamicin may be an effective choice for treatment of P. zopfii. PMID:23463523

  1. Expression of fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) in murine tooth development.

    PubMed

    Porntaveetus, Thantrira; Otsuka-Tanaka, Yoko; Basson, M Albert; Moon, Anne M; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2011-05-01

    Fgf signalling is known to play critical roles in tooth development. Twenty-two Fgf ligands have been identified in mammals, but expression of only 10 in molars and three in the incisor loop stem cell region have been documented in murine tooth development. Our understanding of Fgf signalling in tooth development thus remains incomplete and we therefore carried out comparative in situ hybridisation analysis of unexamined Fgf ligands (eight in molars and 15 in cervical loops of incisors; Fgf11-Fgf14 were excluded from this analysis because they are not secreted and do not activate Fgf receptors) during tooth development. To identify where Fgf signalling is activated, we also examined the expression of Etv4 and Etv5, considered to be transcriptional targets of the Fgf signalling pathway. In molar tooth development, the expression of Fgf15 and Fgf20 was restricted to the primary enamel knots, whereas Etv4 and Etv5 were expressed in cells surrounding the primary enamel knots. Fgf20 expression was observed in the secondary enamel knots, whereas Fgf15 showed localised expression in the adjacent mesenchyme. Fgf16, Etv4 and Etv5 were strongly expressed in the ameloblasts of molars. In the incisor cervical loop stem cell region, Fgf17, Fgf18, Etv4 and Etv5 showed a restricted expression pattern. These molecules thus show dynamic temporo-spatial expression in murine tooth development. We also analysed teeth in Fgf15(-/-) and Fgf15(-/-) ;Fgf8(+/-) mutant mice. Neither mutant showed significant abnormalities in tooth development, indicating likely functional redundancy.

  2. Deep Sequencing of the Murine Olfactory Receptor Neuron Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Kanageswaran, Ninthujah; Demond, Marilen; Nagel, Maximilian; Schreiner, Benjamin S. P.; Baumgart, Sabrina; Scholz, Paul; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Doerner, Julia F.; Conrad, Heike; Oberland, Sonja; Wetzel, Christian H.; Neuhaus, Eva M.; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2015-01-01

    The ability of animals to sense and differentiate among thousands of odorants relies on a large set of olfactory receptors (OR) and a multitude of accessory proteins within the olfactory epithelium (OE). ORs and related signaling mechanisms have been the subject of intensive studies over the past years, but our knowledge regarding olfactory processing remains limited. The recent development of next generation sequencing (NGS) techniques encouraged us to assess the transcriptome of the murine OE. We analyzed RNA from OEs of female and male adult mice and from fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-sorted olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) obtained from transgenic OMP-GFP mice. The Illumina RNA-Seq protocol was utilized to generate up to 86 million reads per transcriptome. In OE samples, nearly all OR and trace amine-associated receptor (TAAR) genes involved in the perception of volatile amines were detectably expressed. Other genes known to participate in olfactory signaling pathways were among the 200 genes with the highest expression levels in the OE. To identify OE-specific genes, we compared olfactory neuron expression profiles with RNA-Seq transcriptome data from different murine tissues. By analyzing different transcript classes, we detected the expression of non-olfactory GPCRs in ORNs and established an expression ranking for GPCRs detected in the OE. We also identified other previously undescribed membrane proteins as potential new players in olfaction. The quantitative and comprehensive transcriptome data provide a virtually complete catalogue of genes expressed in the OE and present a useful tool to uncover candidate genes involved in, for example, olfactory signaling, OR trafficking and recycling, and proliferation. PMID:25590618

  3. Experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, B; Pfeiffer, C J

    1976-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are complex, problematic diseases of unknown etiology in man, and appropriate experimental models would be useful in elucidating their pathogenesis and treatment. Although there have been numerous attempts to produce inflammatory ulcerative colonic disease in laboratory animals resembling those human disease forms, none has been entirely successful. Investigators have conducted experiments involving almost every etiological factor suggested for initiation of these diseases. The methods reviewed in this paper include production of experimental colitis by vascular impairment, and immunological methods such as bacterial infection, allergic reactions, direct and indirect hypersensitivity reactions, as well as autoimmune mechanisms. The results of carrageenan-induced colitis, irradiation, dietary, and drug-induced techniques are also discussed and the frequency and nature of spontaneous colonic lesions in animals is summarized.

  4. Animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Roman

    2006-01-01

    Millions of animals are used every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Legislation of animal experimentation in modern societies is based on the supposition that this is ethically acceptable when certain more or less defined formal (e.g. logistical, technical) demands and ethical principles are met. The main parameters in this context correspond to the "3Rs" concept as defined by Russel and Burch in 1959, i.e. that all efforts to replace, reduce and refine experiments must be undertaken. The licensing of animal experiments normally requires an ethical evaluation process, often times undertaken by ethics committees. The serious problems in putting this idea into practice include inter alia unclear conditions and standards for ethical decisions, insufficient management of experiments undertaken for specific (e.g. regulatory) purposes, and conflicts of interest of ethics committees' members. There is an ongoing societal debate about ethical issues of animal use in science. Existing EU legislation on animal experimentation for cosmetics testing is an example of both the public will for setting clear limits to animal experiments and the need to further critically examine other fields and aspects of animal experimentation.

  5. Protein-RNA linkage and posttranslational modifications of feline calicivirus and murine norovirus VPg proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olspert, Allan; Hosmillo, Myra; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Peil, Lauri; Truve, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Caliciviridae family of positive sense RNA viruses cause a wide range of diseases in both humans and animals. The detailed characterization of the calicivirus life cycle had been hampered due to the lack of robust cell culture systems and experimental tools for many of the members of the family. However, a number of caliciviruses replicate efficiently in cell culture and have robust reverse genetics systems available, most notably feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV). These are therefore widely used as representative members with which to examine the mechanistic details of calicivirus genome translation and replication. The replication of the calicivirus RNA genome occurs via a double-stranded RNA intermediate that is then used as a template for the production of new positive sense viral RNA, which is covalently linked to the virus-encoded protein VPg. The covalent linkage to VPg occurs during genome replication via the nucleotidylylation activity of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Using FCV and MNV, we used mass spectrometry-based approach to identify the specific amino acid linked to the 5′ end of the viral nucleic acid. We observed that both VPg proteins are covalently linked to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) moieties via tyrosine positions 24 and 26 for FCV and MNV respectively. These data fit with previous observations indicating that mutations introduced into these specific amino acids are deleterious for viral replication and fail to produce infectious virus. In addition, we also detected serine phosphorylation sites within the FCV VPg protein with positions 80 and 107 found consistently phosphorylated on VPg-linked viral RNA isolated from infected cells. This work provides the first direct experimental characterization of the linkage of infectious calicivirus viral RNA to the VPg protein and highlights that post-translational modifications of VPg may also occur during the viral life cycle. PMID:27375966

  6. Protein-RNA linkage and posttranslational modifications of feline calicivirus and murine norovirus VPg proteins.

    PubMed

    Olspert, Allan; Hosmillo, Myra; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Peil, Lauri; Truve, Erkki; Goodfellow, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Caliciviridae family of positive sense RNA viruses cause a wide range of diseases in both humans and animals. The detailed characterization of the calicivirus life cycle had been hampered due to the lack of robust cell culture systems and experimental tools for many of the members of the family. However, a number of caliciviruses replicate efficiently in cell culture and have robust reverse genetics systems available, most notably feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV). These are therefore widely used as representative members with which to examine the mechanistic details of calicivirus genome translation and replication. The replication of the calicivirus RNA genome occurs via a double-stranded RNA intermediate that is then used as a template for the production of new positive sense viral RNA, which is covalently linked to the virus-encoded protein VPg. The covalent linkage to VPg occurs during genome replication via the nucleotidylylation activity of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Using FCV and MNV, we used mass spectrometry-based approach to identify the specific amino acid linked to the 5' end of the viral nucleic acid. We observed that both VPg proteins are covalently linked to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) moieties via tyrosine positions 24 and 26 for FCV and MNV respectively. These data fit with previous observations indicating that mutations introduced into these specific amino acids are deleterious for viral replication and fail to produce infectious virus. In addition, we also detected serine phosphorylation sites within the FCV VPg protein with positions 80 and 107 found consistently phosphorylated on VPg-linked viral RNA isolated from infected cells. This work provides the first direct experimental characterization of the linkage of infectious calicivirus viral RNA to the VPg protein and highlights that post-translational modifications of VPg may also occur during the viral life cycle. PMID:27375966

  7. Amifostine Reduces Radiation-Induced Complications in a Murine Model of Expander-Based Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Felice, Peter A.; Nelson, Noah S.; Page, Erin E.; Deshpande, Sagar S.; Donneys, Alexis; Rodriguez, José; Buchman, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Immediate expander-based breast reconstruction after mastectomy is a prevalent option for many women with breast cancer. When coupled with adjuvant radiation, however, radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury diminish the success of this reconstructive technique. We hypothesize that prophylactic administration of the cytoprotectant Amifostine will reduce soft tissue complications from irradiation, aiding expander-based reconstruction for women battling this disease. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were divided into two experimental groups, Operative Expander Placement (Expander) and Operative Sham (Sham). Expander specimens received a sub-latissimus tissue expander with a 15cc fill volume; Shams underwent identical procedures without expander placement. Experimental groups were further divided into Control specimens receiving no further intervention, XRT specimens receiving human-equivalent radiation, and AMF-XRT specimens receiving both Amifostine and human-equivalent radiation. Animals underwent a 45-day recovery period and were evaluated grossly and via ImageJ analysis for skin and soft tissue complications. Results None of the Control, XRT, or AMF-XRT Sham specimens showed skin and soft tissue complications. For Expander animals, significantly fewer AMF-XRT specimens (4 of 13, 30%) demonstrated skin and soft tissue complications compared to XRT specimens (9 of 13, 69%; p = 0.041). ImageJ evaluation of Expander specimens demonstrated a significant increase in skin and soft tissue necrosis for XRT specimens (12.94%), compared with AMF-XRT animals (6.96%, p = 0.019). Conclusions Amifostine pre-treatment significantly reduced skin and soft-tissue complications in both gross inspection and ImageJ analysis. These findings demonstrate that Amifostine prophylaxis provides protection against radiation-induced skin and soft tissue injury in a murine model of expander-based breast reconstruction. Level of Evidence Animal study, not gradable for level of

  8. Co-culture: A quick approach for isolation of street rabies virus in murine neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sasikalaveni, A.; Tirumurugaan, K. G.; Manoharan, S.; Raj, G. Dhinakar; Kumanan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Laboratory detection of rabies in most cases is based on detection of the antigen by fluorescent antibody test, however, in weak positive cases confirmative laboratory diagnosis depends on widely accepted mouse inoculation test. Cell lines like neuroblastoma have been used to isolate the virus with greater success not only to target for diagnosis, but also for molecular studies that determine the epidemiology of the circulating street rabies strains and in studies that look at the efficiency of the developed monoclonal antibodies to neutralize the different rabies strains. Due to the recent issues in obtaining ethical permission for mouse experimentation, and also the passages required in the cell lines to isolate the virus, we report herewith a co-culture protocol using the murine neuroblastoma (MNA) cells, which enable quicker isolation of street rabies virus with minimum passages. Objective: This study is not to have an alternative diagnostic assay, but an approach to produce sufficient amount of rabies virus in minimum passages by a co-culture approach in MNA cells. Materials and Methods: The MNA cells are co-cultured by topping the normal cells with infected cells every 48 h and the infectivity was followed up by performing direct fluorescent-antibody test. Results: The co-culture approach results in 100% infectivity and hence the use of live mouse for experimentation could be avoided. Conclusion: Co-culture method provides an alternative for the situations with limited sample volume and for the quicker isolation of virus which warrants the wild type strains without much modification. PMID:27047148

  9. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S; Basco, Maria D S; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L; Hart, Mark E; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together.

  10. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S.; Basco, Maria D. S.; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L.; Hart, Mark E.; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P.

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together. PMID:26658916

  11. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S; Basco, Maria D S; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L; Hart, Mark E; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together. PMID:26658916

  12. A murine-ES like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Buecker, Christa; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Polo, Jose; Daheron, Laurence; Bu, Lei; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Okwieka, Patricia; Porter, Andrew; Gribnau, Joost; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Geijsen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem cells have been shown to exist in two functionally distinct pluripotent states, embryonic stem cells (ES cell)- and epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), which are defined by the culture growth factor conditions. Human ES cells appear to exist in an epiblast-like state, which in comparison to their murine counterparts, is relatively difficult to propagate and manipulate. As a result, gene targeting is difficult and to-date only a handful of human knock-in or knock-out cell lines exist. We explored whether an alternative stem cell state exists for human stem cells as well, and demonstrate that manipulation of the growth factor milieu allows the derivation of a novel human stem cell type that displays morphological, molecular and functional properties of murine ES cells and facilitates gene targeting. As such, the murine ES-like state provides a powerful tool for the generation of recombinant human pluripotent stem cell lines. PMID:20569691

  13. Experimental macroevolution†

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The convergence of several disparate research programmes raises the possibility that the long-term evolutionary processes of innovation and radiation may become amenable to laboratory experimentation. Ancestors might be resurrected directly from naturally stored propagules or tissues, or indirectly from the expression of ancestral genes in contemporary genomes. New kinds of organisms might be evolved through artificial selection of major developmental genes. Adaptive radiation can be studied by mimicking major ecological transitions in the laboratory. All of these possibilities are subject to severe quantitative and qualitative limitations. In some cases, however, laboratory experiments may be capable of illuminating the processes responsible for the evolution of new kinds of organisms. PMID:26763705

  14. Experimental macroevolution.

    PubMed

    Bell, Graham

    2016-01-13

    The convergence of several disparate research programmes raises the possibility that the long-term evolutionary processes of innovation and radiation may become amenable to laboratory experimentation. Ancestors might be resurrected directly from naturally stored propagules or tissues, or indirectly from the expression of ancestral genes in contemporary genomes. New kinds of organisms might be evolved through artificial selection of major developmental genes. Adaptive radiation can be studied by mimicking major ecological transitions in the laboratory. All of these possibilities are subject to severe quantitative and qualitative limitations. In some cases, however, laboratory experiments may be capable of illuminating the processes responsible for the evolution of new kinds of organisms. PMID:26763705

  15. Dependence on exogenous methionine of rat sarcoma and murine leukemia cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Koziorowska, J; Pieńkowska, K; Tautt, J

    1980-01-01

    A comparative study was performed on methionine auxotrophy of rat sarcoma and murine leukemia cells taken directly from the organism and grown in culture in media lacking methionine or in which methionine was substituted by homocysteine. Methionine auxotrophy was observed in both kinds of cells. At low levels of methionine in the media containing homocysteine rat sarcoma cells showed an increase in growth. Addition of homocysteine to the media with low levels of methionine did not influence the survival of murine leukemia cells.

  16. HAC stability in murine cells is influenced by nuclear localization and chromatin organization

    PubMed Central

    Moralli, Daniela; Chan, David YL; Jefferson, Andrew; Volpi, Emanuela V; Monaco, Zoia L

    2009-01-01

    Background Human artificial chromosomes (HAC) are small functional extrachromosomal elements, which segregate correctly during each cell division. In human cells, they are mitotically stable, however when the HAC are transferred to murine cells they show an increased and variable rate of loss. In some cell lines the HAC are lost over a short period of time, while in others the HAC become stable without acquiring murine DNA. Results In this study, we linked the loss rate to the position of the HAC in the murine cell nucleus with respect to the chromocenters. HAC that associated preferentially with the chromocenter displayed a lower loss rate compared to the HAC that are less frequently associated. The chromocenter acts as a hub for the deposition of heterochromatic markers, controlling centromeric and pericentromeric DNA replication timing and chromosome segregation. The HAC which localized more frequently outside the chromocenters bound variable amounts of histone H3 tri-methylated at lysine 9, and the high level of intraclonal variability was associated with an increase in HAC segregation errors and delayed DNA replication timing. Conclusion This is a novel result indicating that HAC segregation is closely linked to the position in the murine nucleus and gives important insight for HAC gene expression studies in murine cells and establishing murine models of human genetic disease. PMID:19267891

  17. Specific lysis of murine cells expressing HLA molecules by allospecific human and murine H-2-restricted anti-HLA T killer lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Achour, A; Begue, B; Gomard, E; Paul, P; Sayagh, B; Van Pel, A; Levy, J P

    1986-06-01

    The lysis by human and murine anti-HLA cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) of murine cells expressing class I HLA molecule after gene transfection has been studied using two different murine cells: LMTK- and P815-HTR-TK-. Weak but significant HLA-A11-specific lysis was found occasionally with human CTL on the HLA-A11+ L cells. On the contrary, P815-A11 or P815-A2 cells were lysed strongly and specifically by HLA-A11 or HLA-A2-specific human CTL. The T8+T4- phenotype of the effector cells was confirmed and the reaction was inhibited by anti-HLA class I monoclonal antibodies. Despite their higher sensitivity to human CTL, the P815-HLA+ cells did not express higher levels of HLA antigens than L cells, and the presence or the absence of human beta 2 microglobulin was irrelevant. Anti-human LFA-1 antibodies abrogated the lysis of P815-A11+ cells showing that the LFA-1 receptor which is apparently lacking on the L cell surface was on the contrary expressed on P815 cells. On the other hand, murine anti-HLA CTL have been prepared by immunizing mice against syngeneic HLA-A11+ L cells. They lysed very efficiently and specifically these cells, but appeared completely devoid of activity against human HLA-A11 target cells. This barrier was apparently due to the H-2 restriction of these H-2k anti-HLA murine CTL, as shown by their inability to lyse allogeneic H-2d cells expressing HLA-A11, and by the blocking of their activity by anti H-2k antibodies. By contrast, xenogeneic anti-HLA CTL obtained by immunizing murine lymphocytes against human cells lysed both human and murine HLA+ cells but they reacted with a monomorphic epitope of the HLA molecule in a nonrestricted way. These results show that human cells lyse very efficiently P815 murine cells expressing HLA class I antigens; the higher sensitivity of P815 cells compared to L cells is probably due to the presence of a LFA-1 receptor on these cells; a class I molecule of human origin can be seen as an H-2-restricted minor

  18. A role for smoothened during murine lens and cornea development.

    PubMed

    Choi, Janet J Y; Ting, Chao-Tung; Trogrlic, Lidia; Milevski, Stefan V; Familari, Mary; Martinez, Gemma; de Iongh, Robb U

    2014-01-01

    Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh) signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316-30) showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3) were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre) did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre) resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5-E12.5) in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs secondary to defects

  19. Bone marrow mononuclears from murine tibia after spaceflight on biosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Elena; Roe, Maria; Buravkova, Ludmila; Andrianova, Irina; Goncharova, Elena; Gornostaeva, Alexandra

    Elucidation of the space flight effects on the adult stem and progenitor cells is an important goal in space biology and medicine. A unique opportunity for this is provided by project "BION -M1". The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 30-day flight on biosatellite "BION - M1" and the subsequent 7-day recovery on the quantity, viability, immunophenotype of mononuclears from murine tibia bone marrow. Also the in vitro characterization of functional capacity of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) was scheduled. Under the project, the S57black/6 mice were divided into groups: spaceflight/vivarium control, recovery after spaceflight/ vivarium control to recovery. Bone marrow mononuclears were isolated from the tibia and immunophenotyped using antibodies against CD45, CD34, CD90 on a flow cytometer Epics XL (Beckman Coulter). A part of the each pool was frozen for subsequent estimation of hematopoietic colony-forming units (CFU), the rest was used for the evaluation of fibroblast CFU (CFUf) number, MSC proliferative activity and osteogenic potency. The cell number in the flight group was significantly lower than in the vivarium control group. There were no differences in this parameter between flight and control groups after 7 days of recovery. The mononuclears viability was more than 95 percent in all examined groups. Flow cytometric analysis showed no differences in the bone marrow cell immunophenotype (CD45, CD34, CD90.1 (Thy1)), but the flight animals had more large-sized CD45+mononuclears, than the control groups of mice. There was no difference in the CFUf number between groups. After 7 days in vitro the MSC number in flight group was twice higher than in vivarium group, after 10 days - 4 times higher. These data may indicate a higher proliferative activity of MSCs after spaceflight. MSCs showed the same and high alkaline phosphatase activity, both in flight and in the control groups, suggesting no effect of spaceflight factors on early

  20. [Kinetic study of splenocytes after allogeneic murine bone marrow transplantation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Hua; Zhou, Fan; Dou, Li-Ping; Wang, Li-Li; Wang, Xin-Rong; Li, Li; Yu, Li

    2010-08-01

    The study was purposed to understand immunological reconstitution of peripheral immune organs after transplantation, through establishing allogeneic murine bone marrow transplantation model and detecting the kinetic change of splenocytes after transplantation. C57BL/6 mice were donors, BALB/c mice were recipients. Recipient mice were divided into irradiation group (R), irradiation plus inoculating bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNC) group (B), and irradiation plus inoculating bone marrow mononuclear cells and spleno-MNC group (S). After transplantation, the mice were examined daily for the symptoms such as weight, hunched posture, activity, ruffled fur, diarrhea, and survival. Blood routine test was done once a week, splenocyte was counted and CD3, CD4, CD8, B220, CD11c positive cell relative count was detected by FACS on day 2, 7, 14, 27, 60 after transplantation, Liver, skin and intestine were biopsied for histopathological examination before dying. The results indicated that 89% mice in S group died of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) during day 6 to 78. The spleno-mononuclear cell count quickly decreased and reached to lowest level on day 2, then gradually recovered to level of pretransplantation on day 14; CD8 and B220 positive cells decreased to lowest level on day 12, in which CD8(+) cells quickly recovered and reached to level of pretransplantation, but the B220(+) recovered most slowly and sustained to be with low level, then gradually recovered to level of pretransplantation on day 60; CD3 and CD4 positive cells decreased relatively slowly, and reached to lowest level on day 14, then both gradually recovered to level of pretransplantation on day 60; CD11c positive cell count changed unstrikingly except day 14. It is concluded that when C57BL/6 mice are donors, and BALB/c mice are recipients treated with irradiation of 7.5 Gy and inoculated with 1 x 10⁷ bone marrow MNC and 1 x 10⁷ spleno-MNC, allogeneic murine bone marrow transplantation model

  1. A Role for Smoothened during Murine Lens and Cornea Development

    PubMed Central

    Trogrlic, Lidia; Milevski, Stefan V.; Familari, Mary; Martinez, Gemma; de Iongh, Robb U

    2014-01-01

    Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh) signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316–30) showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3) were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre) did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre) resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5–E12.5) in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs secondary to

  2. Assessment of carbon nanoparticle exposure on murine macrophage function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suro-Maldonado, Raquel M.

    There is growing concern about the potential cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. Exposure to respirable ultrafine particles (2.5uM) can adversely affect human health and have been implicated with episodes of increased respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. Nanoparticles are of particular interest because of their ability to penetrate into the lung and potentially elicit health effects triggering immune responses. Nanoparticles are structures and devises with length scales in the 1 to 100-nanometer range. Black carbon (BC) nanoparticles have been observed to be products of combustion, especially flame combustion and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to be found in both indoor and outdoor air. Furthermore, asbestos, which have been known to cause mesothelioma as well as lung cancer, have been shown to be structurally identical to MWCNTs. The aims of these studies were to examine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on murine macrophage function and clearance mechanisms. Macrophages are immune cells that function as the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are likely to be amongst the first cells affected by nanoparticles. Our research focused on two manufactured nanoparticles, MWCNT and BC. The two were tested against murine-derived macrophages in a chronic contact model. We hypothesized that long-term chronic exposure to carbon nanoparticles would decrease macrophages ability to effectively respond to immunological challenge. Production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), cell surface macrophage; activation markers, reactive oxygen species formation (ROS), and antigen processing and presentation were examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following a 144hr exposure to the particulates. Data demonstrated an increase in TNF-alpha, and NO production; a decrease in phagocytosis and antigen processing and presentation; and a decrease in the expression levels of cell surface macrophage

  3. [Determination of the specificity of seric IgA produced in response to antigens of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana in murine leishmaniasis].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguilar, Mary Carmen; Hernández, Oskarina; Maizo de Segnini, Zulay; Rojas, Carmen Haydee; Díaz, Silverio; Alarcón, Maritza; Goncalves, Loredana

    2011-09-01

    In experimental leishmaniasis, the role of antibodies is not entirely clear, as some authors consider that these proteins are not involved in protection against infection. However, histopathological studies in human and experimental leishmaniasis lesions, show plasma cell infiltrates positive for IgA and secretion of IgM, IgG and IgA could mediate the formation of immune complexes with parasite antigens or self components, favoring necrosis leading to the elimination of the parasite. In this study, we determined if the serum IgA in the murine model has specific reactivity against antigens of Leishmania (Leishmania) mexicana of diagnostic utility. To do this, we used mice either susceptible or resistant to cutaneous leishmaniasis, and demonstrated by indirect ELISA that serum IgA is elevated in susceptible mice compared with that produced by resistant mice. Although other studies in murine models show that the serum IgG from mice infected with L. (L) mexicana present cross reactivity with unrelated parasite antigens derived from Trypanosoma cruzi, the analysis of the specificity of IgA by antigens of L. (L) mexicana and T. cruzi, by Western Blot, showed that the IgA serum of mice infected with T. cruzi reacts too with antigens of L. (L) mexicana. These findings suggest that IgA may be useful for the clinical management and prognosis of the disease.

  4. Two epitopes shared by Taenia crassiceps and Taenia solium confer protection against murine T. crassiceps cysticercosis along with a prominent T1 response.

    PubMed

    Toledo, A; Fragoso, G; Rosas, G; Hernández, M; Gevorkian, G; López-Casillas, F; Hernández, B; Acero, G; Huerta, M; Larralde, C; Sciutto, E

    2001-03-01

    Taenia crassiceps recombinant antigens KETc1 and KETc12 have been shown to induce high level of protection against experimental murine T. crassiceps cysticercosis, an experimental model successfully used to test candidate antigens for use in vaccination against porcine Taenia solium cysticercosis. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, KETc1 and KETc12 were chemically synthesized in linear form. Immunization with KETc1 induced 66.7 to 100% protection against murine cysticercosis, and immunization with KETc12 induced 52.7 to 88.1% protection. The elicited immune response indicated that both peptides contain at least one B-cell epitope (as demonstrated by their ability to induce specific antibodies) and one T-cell epitope that strongly stimulated the proliferation of T cells primed with either the free peptide or total cysticercal T. crassiceps antigens. The high percentage of spleen cells expressing inflammatory cytokines points to the likelihood of a T1 response being involved in protection. The protective capacity of the peptides and their presence in all developmental stages of T. solium point to these two epitopes as strong candidates for inclusion in a polyepitopic synthetic vaccine against T. solium pig cysticercosis.

  5. Two Epitopes Shared by Taenia crassiceps and Taenia solium Confer Protection against Murine T. crassiceps Cysticercosis along with a Prominent T1 Response

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Andrea; Fragoso, Gladis; Rosas, Gabriela; Hernández, Marisela; Gevorkian, Goar; López-Casillas, Fernando; Hernández, Beatriz; Acero, Gonzalo; Huerta, Mirna; Larralde, Carlos; Sciutto, Edda

    2001-01-01

    Taenia crassiceps recombinant antigens KETc1 and KETc12 have been shown to induce high level of protection against experimental murine T. crassiceps cysticercosis, an experimental model successfully used to test candidate antigens for use in vaccination against porcine Taenia solium cysticercosis. Based on the deduced amino acid sequence, KETc1 and KETc12 were chemically synthesized in linear form. Immunization with KETc1 induced 66.7 to 100% protection against murine cysticercosis, and immunization with KETc12 induced 52.7 to 88.1% protection. The elicited immune response indicated that both peptides contain at least one B-cell epitope (as demonstrated by their ability to induce specific antibodies) and one T-cell epitope that strongly stimulated the proliferation of T cells primed with either the free peptide or total cysticercal T. crassiceps antigens. The high percentage of spleen cells expressing inflammatory cytokines points to the likelihood of a T1 response being involved in protection. The protective capacity of the peptides and their presence in all developmental stages of T. solium point to these two epitopes as strong candidates for inclusion in a polyepitopic synthetic vaccine against T. solium pig cysticercosis. PMID:11179354

  6. The dynamics of murine mammary stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    DONG, Qiaoxiang; SUN, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The stem/progenitor cells in the murine mammary gland are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for ductal elongation in puberty, homeostasis maintenance in adult, and lobulo-alveolar genesis during pregnancy. In recent years understanding the epithelial cell hierarchy within the mammary gland is becoming particularly important as these different stem/progenitor cells were perceived to be the cells of origin for various subtypes of breast cancer. Although significant advances have been made in enrichment and isolation of stem/progenitor cells by combinations of antibodies against cell surface proteins together with flow cytometry, and in identification of stem/progenitor cells with multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal using mammary fat pad reconstitution assay and in vivo genetic labeling technique, a clear understanding of how these different stem/progenitors are orchestrated in the mammary gland is still lacking. Here we discuss the different in vivo and in vitro methods currently available for stem/progenitor identification, their associated caveats, and a possible new hierarchy model to reconcile various putative stem/progenitor cell populations identified by different research groups. PMID:25580105

  7. Lack of XBP-1 Impedes Murine Cytomegalovirus Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Drori, Adi; Messerle, Martin; Brune, Wolfram; Tirosh, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-nucleus signaling cascade induced in response to ER stress. The UPR aims at restoring homeostasis, but can also induce apoptosis if stress persists. Infection by human and murine cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) provokes ER stress and induces the UPR. However, both CMVs manipulate the UPR to promote its prosurvival activity and delay apoptosis. The underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Recently, we demonstrated that MCMV and HCMV encode a late protein to target IRE1 for degradation. However, the importance of its downstream effector, X Box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), has not been directly studied. Here we show that deletion of XBP-1 prior to or early after infection confers a transient delay in viral propagation in fibroblasts that can be overcome by increasing the viral dose. A similar phenotype was demonstrated in peritoneal macrophages. In vivo, acute infection by MCMV is reduced in the absence of XBP-1. Our data indicate that removal of XBP-1 confers a kinetic delay in early stages of MCMV infection and suggest that the late targeting of IRE1 is aimed at inhibiting activities other than the splicing of XBP-1 mRNA. PMID:25333725

  8. TRPC6 regulates CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis of murine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Otto; Umlauf, Daniel; Frank, Svetlana; Schimmelpfennig, Sandra; Bertrand, Jessica; Pap, Thomas; Hanley, Peter J; Fabian, Anke; Dietrich, Alexander; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-06-01

    Unraveling the mechanisms involved in chemotactic navigation of immune cells is of particular interest for the development of new immunoregulatory therapies. It is generally agreed upon that members of the classical transient receptor potential channel family (TRPC) are involved in chemotaxis. However, the regulatory role of TRPC channels in chemoattractant receptor-mediated signaling has not yet been clarified in detail. In this study, we demonstrate that the TRPC6 channels play a pronounced role in CXCR2-mediated intermediary chemotaxis, whereas N-formyl-methionine-leucine-phenylalanine receptor-mediated end-target chemotaxis is TRPC6 independent. The knockout of TRPC6 channels in murine neutrophils led to a strongly impaired intermediary chemotaxis after CXCR2 activation which is not further reinforced by CXCR2, PI3K, or p38 MAPK inhibition. Furthermore, CXCR2-mediated Ca(2+) influx but not Ca(2+) store release was attenuated in TRPC6(-/-) neutrophils. We demonstrate that the TRPC6 deficiency affected phosphorylation of AKT and MAPK downstream of CXCR2 receptor activation and led to altered remodeling of actin. The relevance of this TRPC6-depending defect in neutrophil chemotaxis is underscored by our in vivo findings. A nonseptic peritoneal inflammation revealed an attenuated recruitment of neutrophils in the peritoneal cavity of TRPC6(-/-) mice. In summary, this paper defines a specific role of TRPC6 channels in CXCR2-induced intermediary chemotaxis. In particular, TRPC6-mediated supply of calcium appears to be critical for activation of downstream signaling components.

  9. Inactivation of murine norovirus and feline calicivirus during oyster fermentation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dong Joo; Lee, Min Hwa; Seo, Jina; Ha, Sang-Do; Choi, Changsun

    2014-12-01

    Fermented seafood is popular in Asian countries. This study examined the survival of feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV) during oyster fermentation. Oysters spiked with FCV and MNV were fermented with 5% or 10% salt at 18 °C for 15 days, and MNV and FCV titers, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) populations, pH, and enzymatic activity were measured at 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 15 days post-fermentation (DPF). Reductions in MNV and FCV were greater in 5% NaCl-supplemented oysters than in 10% NaCl-supplemented oysters. In 5% NaCl oysters, MNV and FCV titers significantly decreased by 1.60 log and 3.01 log, respectively, at 15 DPF. Populations of LAB increased from 3.62 log10 colony-forming units/g at 0 DPF to 8.77 log10 colony-forming units/g at 15 DPF during oyster fermentation supplemented with 5% NaCl supplementation, and the pH decreased gradually from 5.38 at 0 DPF to 4.17 at 15 DPF. During oyster fermentation, α-amylase, proteinase, and lipase were produced at higher levels in 5% salted oysters than in 10% salted oysters (P < 0.01). We concluded that many of the antimicrobial factors produced in fermented oysters could contribute to a reduction in foodborne viruses.

  10. Curcumin modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion in murine sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Vachharajani, Vidula; Wang, Si-Wei; Mishra, Nilamadhab; El-Gazzar, Mohammad; Yoza, Barbara; McCall, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective Circulating cell-endothelial cell interaction in sepsis is a rate-determining factor in organ dysfunction, and interventions targeting this process have a potential therapeutic value. In this project, we examined whether curcumin, an active ingredient of turmeric and an anti-inflammatory agent, could disrupt interactions between circulating blood cells and endothelium and improve survival in a murine model of sepsis. Methods Mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce sepsis vs. sham surgery. We studied leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation using intravital fluorescent video microscopy technique, blood brain barrier dysfunction using Evans Blue leakage method, P-selectin expression using dual radiolabeling technique and survival in mice subjected to Sham, CLP and CLP with curcumin pre-treatment (CLP+Curcumin). Results Curcumin significantly attenuated leukocyte and platelet adhesion in cerebral microcirculation, Evans Blue leakage in the brain tissue and improved survival in mice with CLP. P-selectin expression in mice with CLP+Curcumin was significantly attenuated compared to CLP in various microcirculatory beds including brain. Reduction in platelet adhesion was predominantly via modulation of endothelium by curcumin. Conclusion Curcumin pre-treatment modulates leukocyte and platelet adhesion and blood brain barrier dysfunction in mice with CLP via P-selectin expression and improves survival in mice with CLP. PMID:20690979

  11. Neuronal and glial properties of a murine transgenic retinoblastoma model.

    PubMed Central

    Kivelä, T.; Virtanen, I.; Marcus, D. M.; O'Brien, J. M.; Carpenter, J. L.; Brauner, E.; Tarkkanen, A.; Albert, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Antigenic properties of a murine transgenic model for hereditary retinoblastoma, induced by a chimeric gene coding for Simian virus 40 large T antigen, an oncogene that inactivates the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product, were studied by immunohistochemistry. All transgenic mice develop bilateral intraocular retinal tumors in the inner nuclear layer with Homer Wright-like rosettes, and one quarter develop midbrain tumors resembling trilateral retinoblastoma. Cell lines TE-1 and TM-1 were established from intraocular and metastatic tumors, respectively. Intraocular tumors reacted with antibodies to neuron-specific enolase and synaptophysin, while vimentin, glial fibrillary acidic, and S-100 proteins were detected only in reactive glia derived from adjacent retina. The midbrain tumors showed weak reactivity to synaptophysin, and they blended with reactive astrocytes positive for glial markers. The tumors were negative for cytokeratins. Finally both derived cell lines expressed synaptophysin and individual neurofilament triplet proteins in immunofluorescence and Western blotting, supporting their essentially neuronal nature. The antigenic profile resembles human retinoblastoma, but differences in morphology and antigen distribution suggest a more close relationship to neurons of the inner nuclear layer than to photoreceptor cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1708946

  12. Can microbiota transplantation abrogate murine colonization resistance against Campylobacter jejuni?

    PubMed Central

    Plickert, R.; Fischer, A.; Göbel, U. B.; Bereswill, S.

    2013-01-01

    Enterocolitis caused by Campylobacter jejuni represents an important socioeconomic burden worldwide. The host-specific intestinal microbiota is essential for maintaining colonization resistance (CR) against C. jejuni in conventional mice. Notably, CR is abrogated by shifts of the intestinal microbiota towards overgrowth with commensal E. coli during acute ileitis. Thus, we investigated whether oral transplantation (TX) of ileal microbiota derived from C. jejuni susceptible mice with acute ileitis overcomes CR of healthy conventional animals. Four days following ileitis microbiota TX or ileitis induction and right before C. jejuni infection, mice displayed comparable loads of main intestinal bacterial groups as shown by culture. Eight days following ileitis induction, but not ileal microbiota TX, however, C. jejuni could readily colonize the gastrointestinal tract of conventional mice and also translocate to extra-intestinal tissue sites such as mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and blood within 4 days following oral infection. Of note, C. jejuni did not further deteriorate histopathology following ileitis induction. Lack of C. jejuni colonization in TX mice was accompanied by a decrease of commensal E. coli loads in the feces 4 days following C. jejuni infection. In summary, oral ileal microbiota TX from susceptible donors is not sufficient to abrogate murine CR against C. jejuni. PMID:24265916

  13. Cinnarizine and flunarizine as radiation sensitisers in two murine tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, P. J.; Hirst, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the calcium antagonists, cinnarizine and flunarizine on the radiation sensitivity of two murine tumours, RIF-1 and SCCVII/St was investigated. Initial experiments giving the compounds at 50 mg kg-1 i.p. indicated that cinnarizine had no effect on cell survival after 20 Gy of X-rays in the RIF-1 sarcoma and only a small effect in the SCCVII/St carcinoma. However, flunarizine produced a small radiosensitisation in the RIF-1 tumour and a substantial sensitisation in the SCCVII/St tumour. Subsequent experiments in the SCCVII/St tumour indicated that the optimal radiosensitising dose of flunarizine was approximately 5 mg kg-1, although some sensitisation was apparent throughout the range of 0.05-500 mg kg-1. Flunarizine produced a parallel shift in the X-ray dose response curve, equivalent to a 5-fold reduction in hypoxic fraction. In a normal tissue study, 5 mg kg-1 flunarizine did not enhance the reduction in white cell counts produced by X-ray doses of 2-8 Gy. These data suggest that flunarizine may have some potential use as a radiosensitiser. PMID:3224079

  14. Dynamic imaging of preimplantation embryos in the murine oviduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Jason C.; Wang, Shang; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-03-01

    Studying the dynamic events involved in early preimplantation embryo development during their transport from the ovary to the uterus is of great significance to improve the understanding of infertility, and eventually to help reduce the infertility rate. The mouse is a widely used mammalian model in reproductive biology, however, dynamic imaging studies of mouse preimplantation embryos have been very limited due to the lack of proper imaging tools for such analysis. Here, we introduce an innovative approach, which can potentially be used for three-dimensional imaging and tracking of murine oocytes with optical coherence tomography (OCT) as they exit the ovary and migrate through the oviduct to the uterus. The imaging is performed with spectral-domain OCT system operating at 70 kHz A-scan rate. The preimplantation embryos and surrounding cumulus cells can be clearly visualized. Results from our experiments indicate that OCT has great potential for dynamic imaging of the oviduct and oocyte tracking, which provides the foundation for future investigations aimed at understanding dynamic events during preimplantation stages in normal development as well as in mouse models of infertility.

  15. Organization, structure and expression of murine interferon alpha genes.

    PubMed

    Zwarthoff, E C; Mooren, A T; Trapman, J

    1985-02-11

    Using a human interferon-alpha probe we have isolated recombinant phages containing murine interferon-alpha (Mu IFN-alpha) genes from a genomic library. One of these phages contained two complete Mu IFN-alpha genes and part of a third gene. The insert of a second phage held two IFN genes. This indicates that the Mu IFN-alpha genes are clustered in the genome as is the case for the analogous human genes. The nucleotide sequences of these 5 genes were determined. They show that the genes are all different, albeit highly homologous. The deduced amino acid sequences show that four of the five genes contain a putative glycosylation site. Three genes were transiently expressed in COS cells and they gave rise to protein products showing antiviral properties. The expression of the five Mu IFN-alpha genes and the Mu IFN-beta gene was studied in virus-induced mouse L cells. The individual mRNAs were visualized in a nuclease S1 experiment, using a specific probe for each gene. In RNA preparations from induced cells mRNAs for each of the five alpha genes and the beta gene were present. However, substantial differences in the amounts of the individual mRNAs were observed.

  16. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease.

  17. Gene expression of lactobacilli in murine forestomach biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Clarissa; Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacilli populate the gastro-intestinal tract of vertebrates, and are used in food fermentations and as probiotics. Lactobacilli are also major constituents of stable biofilms in the forestomach of rodents. In order to investigate the lifestyle of these biofilm lactobacilli in C57BL/6 mice, we applied metatranscriptomics to analyse gene expression (assessed by mRNA) and community composition (assessed by rRNA). Lactobacillales were the major biofilm inhabitants (62–82% of rRNA reads), followed by Clostridiales (8–31% of rRNA reads). To identify mRNA transcripts specific for the forestomach, we compared forestomach and hindgut metatranscriptomes. Gene expression of the biofilm microbiota was characterized by high abundance of transcripts related to glucose and maltose utilization, peptide degradation, and amino acid transport, indicating their major catabolic and anabolic pathways. The microbiota transcribed genes encoding pathways enhancing oxidative stress (glutathione synthesis) and acid tolerance. Various pathways, including metabolite formation (urea degradation, arginine pathway, γ-aminobutyrate) and cell wall modification (DltA, cyclopropane-fatty-acyl-phospholipid synthase), contributed to acid tolerance, as judged from the transcript profile. In addition, the biofilm microbiota expressed numerous genes encoding extracellular proteins involved in adhesion and/or biofilm formation (e.g. MucBP, glycosyl hydrolase families 68 and 70). This study shed light on the lifestyle and specific adaptations of lactobacilli in the murine forestomach that might also be relevant for lactobacilli biofilms in other vertebrates, including humans. PMID:24702817

  18. Infectious Agents Are Not Necessary for Murine Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Samuel D.; Burton, Charlotte; Hernandez, Melba; Hassing, Heide; Montenegro, Judy; Mundt, Steve; Patel, Sushma; Card, Deborah J.; Hermanowski-Vosatka, Anne; Bergstrom, James D.; Sparrow, Carl P.; Detmers, Patricia A.; Chao, Yu-Sheng

    2000-01-01

    Recent work has revealed correlations between bacterial or viral infections and atherosclerotic disease. One particular bacterium, Chlamydia pneumoniae, has been observed at high frequency in human atherosclerotic lesions, prompting the hypothesis that infectious agents may be necessary for the initiation or progression of atherosclerosis. To determine if responses to gram-negative bacteria are necessary for atherogenesis, we first bred atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein (apo) E−/− (deficient) mice with animals incapable of responding to bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Atherogenesis was unaffected in doubly deficient animals. We further tested the role of infectious agents by creating a colony of germ-free apo E−/− mice. These animals are free of all microbial agents (bacterial, viral, and fungal). Atherosclerosis in germ-free animals was not measurably different from that in animals raised with ambient levels of microbial challenge. These studies show that infection is not necessary for murine atherosclerosis and that, unlike peptic ulcer, Koch's postulates cannot be fulfilled for any infectious agent in atherosclerosis. PMID:10770809

  19. Infectious agents are not necessary for murine atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wright, S D; Burton, C; Hernandez, M; Hassing, H; Montenegro, J; Mundt, S; Patel, S; Card, D J; Hermanowski-Vosatka, A; Bergstrom, J D; Sparrow, C P; Detmers, P A; Chao, Y S

    2000-04-17

    Recent work has revealed correlations between bacterial or viral infections and atherosclerotic disease. One particular bacterium, Chlamydia pneumoniae, has been observed at high frequency in human atherosclerotic lesions, prompting the hypothesis that infectious agents may be necessary for the initiation or progression of atherosclerosis. To determine if responses to gram-negative bacteria are necessary for atherogenesis, we first bred atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein (apo) E(-/)- (deficient) mice with animals incapable of responding to bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Atherogenesis was unaffected in doubly deficient animals. We further tested the role of infectious agents by creating a colony of germ-free apo E(-/)- mice. These animals are free of all microbial agents (bacterial, viral, and fungal). Atherosclerosis in germ-free animals was not measurably different from that in animals raised with ambient levels of microbial challenge. These studies show that infection is not necessary for murine atherosclerosis and that, unlike peptic ulcer, Koch's postulates cannot be fulfilled for any infectious agent in atherosclerosis. PMID:10770809

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin Topographical Variations in Parasites Infecting Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    González, Andrea; Valck, Carolina; Sánchez, Gittith; Härtel, Steffen; Mansilla, Jorge; Ramírez, Galia; Fernández, María Soledad; Arias, José Luis; Galanti, Norbel; Ferreira, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT), a 47-kDa chaperone, translocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the area of flagellum emergence. There, it binds to complement components C1 and mannan-binding lectin (MBL), thus acting as a main virulence factor, and inhibits the classical and lectin pathways. The localization and functions of TcCRT, once the parasite is inside the host cell, are unknown. In parasites infecting murine macrophages, polyclonal anti-TcCRT antibodies detected TcCRT mainly in the parasite nucleus and kinetoplast. However, with a monoclonal antibody (E2G7), the resolution and specificity of the label markedly improved, and TcCRT was detected mainly in the parasite kinetoplast. Gold particles, bound to the respective antibodies, were used as probes in electron microscopy. This organelle may represent a stopover and accumulation site for TcCRT, previous its translocation to the area of flagellum emergence. Finally, early during T. cruzi infection and by unknown mechanisms, an important decrease in the number of MHC-I positive host cells was observed. PMID:25758653

  1. Saliva suppresses osteoclastogenesis in murine bone marrow cultures.

    PubMed

    Caballé-Serrano, J; Cvikl, B; Bosshardt, D D; Buser, D; Lussi, A; Gruber, R

    2015-01-01

    Saliva can reach mineralized surfaces in the oral cavity; however, the relationship between saliva and bone resorption is unclear. Herein, we examined whether saliva affects the process of osteoclastogenesis in vitro. We used murine bone marrow cultures to study osteoclast formation. The addition of fresh sterile saliva eliminated the formation of multinucleated cells that stained positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). In line with the histochemical staining, saliva substantially reduced gene expression of cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and TRAP. Addition of saliva led to considerably decreased gene expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) and, to a lesser extent, that of c-fms. The respective master regulators of osteoclastogenesis (c-fos and NFATc1) and the downstream cell fusion genes (DC-STAMP and Atp6v0d2) showed decreased expression after the addition of saliva. Among the costimulatory molecules for osteoclastogenesis, only OSCAR showed decreased expression. In contrast, CD40, CD80, and CD86-all costimulatory molecules of phagocytic cells-were increasingly expressed with saliva. The phagocytic capacity of the cells was confirmed by latex bead ingestion. Based on these in vitro results, it can be concluded that saliva suppresses osteoclastogenesis and leads to the development of a phagocytic cell phenotype.

  2. Hypoxia inhibits Moloney murine leukemia virus expression in activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Puppo, Maura; Bosco, Maria Carla; Federico, Maurizio; Pastorino, Sandra; Varesio, Luigi

    2007-02-01

    Hypoxia, a local decrease in oxygen tension, occurring in many pathological processes, modifies macrophage (Mphi) gene expression and function. Here, we provide the first evidence that hypoxia inhibits transgene expression driven by the Moloney murine leukemia virus-long terminal repeats (MoMLV-LTR) in IFN-gamma-activated Mphi. Hypoxia silenced the expression of several MoMLV-LTR-driven genes, including v-myc, enhanced green fluorescence protein, and env, and was effective in different mouse Mphi cell lines and on distinct MoMLV backbone-based viruses. Down-regulation of MoMLV mRNA occurred at the transcriptional level and was associated with decreased retrovirus production, as determined by titration experiments, suggesting that hypoxia may control MoMLV retroviral spread through the suppression of LTR activity. In contrast, genes driven by the CMV or the SV40 promoter were up-regulated or unchanged by hypoxia, indicating a selective inhibitory activity on the MoMLV promoter. It is interesting that hypoxia was ineffective in suppressing MoMLV-LTR-controlled gene expression in T or fibroblast cell lines, suggesting a Mphi lineage-selective action. Finally, we found that MoMLV-mediated gene expression in Mphi was also inhibited by picolinic acid, a tryptophan catabolite with hypoxia-like activity and Mphi-activating properties, suggesting a pathophysiological role of this molecule in viral resistance and its possible use as an antiviral agent.

  3. Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV Is a Human and Murine Neutrophil Chemorepellent

    PubMed Central

    Herlihy, Sarah E.; Pilling, Darrell; Maharjan, Anu S.; Gomer, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, AprA is a secreted protein that inhibits proliferation and causes chemorepulsion of Dictyostelium cells, yet AprA has little sequence similarity to any human proteins. We found that a predicted structure of AprA has similarity to human dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV). DPPIV is a serine protease present in extracellular fluids that cleaves peptides with a proline or alanine in the second position. In Insall chambers, DPPIV gradients below, similar to, and above the human serum DPPIV concentration cause movement of human neutrophils away from the higher concentration of DPPIV. A 1% DPPIV concentration difference between the front and back of the cell is sufficient to cause chemorepulsion. Neutrophil speed and viability are unaffected by DPPIV. DPPIV inhibitors block DPPIV-mediated chemorepulsion. In a murine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome, aspirated bleomycin induces a significant increase in the number of neutrophils in the lungs after 3 d. Oropharyngeal aspiration of DPPIV inhibits the bleomycin-induced accumulation of mouse neutrophils. These results indicate that DPPIV functions as a chemorepellent of human and mouse neutrophils, and they suggest new mechanisms to inhibit neutrophil accumulation in acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:23677473

  4. Analysis of the complete DNA sequence of murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Rawlinson, W D; Farrell, H E; Barrell, B G

    1996-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the Smith strain of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) was determined from virion DNA by using a whole-genome shotgun approach. The genome has an overall G+C content of 58.7%, consists of 230,278 bp, and is arranged as a single unique sequence with short (31-bp) terminal direct repeats and several short internal repeats. Significant similarity to the genome of the sequenced human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strain AD169 is evident, particularly for 78 open reading frames encoded by the central part of the genome. There is a very similar distribution of G+C content across the two genomes. Sequences toward the ends of the MCMV genome encode tandem arrays of homologous glycoproteins (gps) arranged as two gene families. The left end encodes 15 gps that represent one family, and the right end encodes a different family of 11 gps. A homolog (m144) of cellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes is located at the end of the genome opposite the HCMV MHC class I homolog (UL18). G protein-coupled receptor (GCR) homologs (M33 and M78) occur in positions congruent with two (UL33 and UL78) of the four putative HCMV GCR homologs. Counterparts of all of the known enzyme homologs in HCMV are present in the MCMV genome, including the phosphotransferase gene (M97), whose product phosphorylates ganciclovir in HCMV-infected cells, and the assembly protein (M80). PMID:8971012

  5. Index sorting resolves heterogeneous murine hematopoietic stem cell populations.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Reiner; Wilson, Nicola K; Prick, Janine C M; Cossetti, Chiara; Maj, Michal K; Gottgens, Berthold; Kent, David G

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in the cellular and molecular biology of single stem cells have uncovered significant heterogeneity in the functional properties of stem cell populations. This has prompted the development of approaches to study single cells in isolation, often performed using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, many stem cell populations are too rare to test all possible cell surface marker combinations, and virtually nothing is known about functional differences associated with varying intensities of such markers. Here we describe the use of index sorting for further resolution of the flow cytometric isolation of single murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Specifically, we associate single-cell functional assay outcomes with distinct cell surface marker expression intensities. High levels of both CD150 and EPCR associate with delayed kinetics of cell division and low levels of differentiation. Moreover, cells that do not form single HSC-derived clones appear in the 7AAD(dim) fraction, suggesting that even low levels of 7AAD staining are indicative of less healthy cell populations. These data indicate that when used in combination with single-cell functional assays, index sorting is a powerful tool for refining cell isolation strategies. This approach can be broadly applied to other single-cell systems, both to improve isolation and to acquire additional cell surface marker information.

  6. Depletion of B cells in murine lupus: efficacy and resistance.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Anupama; Shupe, Jonathan; Dunn, Robert; Kashgarian, Michael; Kehry, Marilyn R; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2007-09-01

    In mice, genetic deletion of B cells strongly suppresses systemic autoimmunity, providing a rationale for depleting B cells to treat autoimmunity. In fact, B cell depletion with rituximab is approved for rheumatoid arthritis patients, and clinical trials are underway for systemic lupus erythematosus. Yet, basic questions concerning mechanism, pathologic effect, and extent of B cell depletion cannot be easily studied in humans. To better understand how B cell depletion affects autoimmunity, we have generated a transgenic mouse expressing human CD20 on B cells in an autoimmune-prone MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr) (MRL/lpr) background. Using high doses of a murine anti-human CD20 mAb, we were able to achieve significant depletion of B cells, which in turn markedly ameliorated clinical and histologic disease as well as antinuclear Ab and serum autoantibody levels. However, we also found that B cells were quite refractory to depletion in autoimmune-prone strains compared with non-autoimmune-prone strains. This was true with multiple anti-CD20 Abs, including a new anti-mouse CD20 Ab, and in several different autoimmune-prone strains. Thus, whereas successful B cell depletion is a promising therapy for lupus, at least some patients might be resistant to the therapy as a byproduct of the autoimmune condition itself.

  7. Specific binding sites for muramyl peptides on murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.H.S.; Krueger, J.M.; Karnovsky, M.L.

    1986-03-15

    Two radiolabeled (/sup 125/I) muramyl peptide derivatives of high specific activity were prepared: a tripeptide with an iodinated C-terminal tyrosine methyl ester (Ligand I), and a muramyl tripeptide with a C-terminal lysine derivatized with Bolton-Hunter reagent (Ligand II). These were used to characterize binding of muramyl peptides to monolayers of murine macrophages. Saturable high-affinity binding to resident, caseinate-elicited, and Listeria-activated peritoneal cells was observed with both radioligands. Binding affinities varied with the state of activation of the macrophages, and K/sub D/ values ranged from 48 +/- 33 pM (for resident macrophages, Ligand I) to 1020 +/- 90 pM (for activated macrophages, Ligand II). Specific binding sites were also found on a macrophage-derived cell line. The ability of several unlabeled muramyl peptides to compete with Ligands I and II for their binding sites was tested. Competition was stereospecific and correlated with known biological activities of these compounds (i.e., immunoadjuvanticity, pyrogenicity, and somnogenicity). The sites identified here for Ligands I and II may mediate some of the effects that muramyl peptides have previously been demonstrated to have on macrophages.

  8. Virulence characteristics of oral treponemes in a murine model.

    PubMed Central

    Kesavalu, L; Walker, S G; Holt, S C; Crawley, R R; Ebersole, J L

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the virulence characteristics of Treponema denticola, T. socranskii, T. pectinovorum, and T. vincentii following challenge infection of mice. These microorganisms induced well-demarcated, dose-dependent, raised subcutaneous (s.c.) abscesses which were similar in time of onset, lesion progression, and duration of healing. Only viable cells were capable of inducing these characteristic s.c. abscesses. Histological examination of the skin lesion 3 and 5 days postinfection revealed abscess formation in the s.c. tissues, and abundant spiral organisms were demonstrated to be present in the abscess. Host resistance modulation by dexamethasone (neutrophil alteration) and cyclophosphamide (neutrophil depletion) pretreatment had a minimal effect on the virulence expression by any of these treponemes. The T. denticola isolates demonstrated significant trypsin-like protease (TLPase) activity, while both T. socranskii and T. vincentii were devoid of this activity. Interestingly, T. pectinovorum strains were heterogeneous with respect to TLPase as high producers, low producers, and nonproducers. However, no differences in lesion formation were noted regardless of whether the species expressed this proteolytic activity or whether treatment with N alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK) and dithiothreitol was performed. These results showed that (i) a murine model may be used to evaluate virulence expression by oral treponemes; (ii) while TLPase activity varies among the oral treponemes, this protease does not appear to participate in abscess induction in the mouse model; and (iii) T. pectinovorum strains show variation in TLPase activity. PMID:9393801

  9. Interleukin 6 promotes vasculogenesis of murine brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fee, D; Grzybicki, D; Dobbs, M; Ihyer, S; Clotfelter, J; Macvilay, S; Hart, M N; Sandor, M; Fabry, Z

    2000-06-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a cytokine that acts on a wide range of tissues influencing cell growth and differentiation. Here we show that IL-6 plays a role in the early vascular development (vasculogenesis) in the central nervous system (CNS). We report that IL-6 induces the proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro. Furthermore, IL-6 significantly accelerates the formation of tube-like structures by these cells in Matrigel basement matrix. Moreover, IL-6 mRNA is expressed in vivo in two physiological conditions in which vascularization in the CNS is important: (1) during normal brain development, (2) during the healing process of a traumatic brain injury. Expression of IL-6 mRNA coincides with the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA in the developing brain with decreasing expression following birth. However, IL-6 mRNA can be detected in the healing adult murine brain tissue by in situ hybridization coinciding with the period of intense tissue reorganization. The transient upregulation of IL-6 mRNA during normal brain development and at brain injury site and the effect of IL-6 on in vitro vasculogenesis suggest that IL-6 may play a role in normal physiology of vascularization in the CNS.

  10. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  11. Surface Markers for the Murine Oval Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Dorrell, Craig; Erker, Laura; Lanxon-Cookson, Kelsea M.; Abraham, Stephanie L.; Victoroff, Tristan; Ro, Simon; Canaday, Pamela S.; Streeter, Philip R.; Grompe, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The biology of progenitor activation in the liver is of considerable medical and scientific interest. The powerful genetic tools available for the mouse make it an ideal model system to study this complex process involving many different cell types. However, reagents for the isolation and study of distinct hepatic subpopulations have been quite limited compared to those available for hematopoietic cells. To produce cell surface reactive reagents more specific for the oval cell response, we generated a new collection of monoclonal antibodies by immunization of Fischer rats with enzymatically dispersed nonparenchymal cells from the livers of adult mice treated with 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine. Each of the resulting antibodies recognized a surface antigen present on a liver cell subset and permitted the viable isolation of the associated subpopulation by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Differential activity was observed on normal liver cells and at different stages of oval cell activation, indicating potential utility for progenitor cell identification. The subdivision of liver cells using these tools should facilitate the study of the biology of ductal and periductal hepatic cell types, including progenitors. Conclusion A new panel of surface reactive monoclonal antibodies to support investigation of the murine oval cell response has been developed. PMID:18726953

  12. Murine macrophage-lymphocyte interactions: scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, R M; Hinsdill, R D; Sandok, P L; Horowitz, S D

    1978-01-01

    Light and scanning electron microscopic observations revealed murine macrophage-lymphocyte interactions involving the initial contact of peritoneal, spleen, or thymus lymphocytes with peritoneal macrophage processes or microprocesses followed by clustering of lymphocytes over the central nuclear area of the macrophages. Lymphocyte-lymphocyte clustering was not observed in the absence of macrophages. Attachment and subsequent clustering appeared not to require the presence of serum or antigen; the attachment of allogeneic or xenogeneic lymphocytes was comparable to that seen in the syngeneic system, but central clustering of these lymphocytes failed to occur. No attachment or clustering was observed when thymic lymphocytes were cultured with thymus derived fibroblasts rather than with peritoneal macrophages. Lymphocyte attachment to immune, antigen-activated, syngeneic macrophages occurred more rapidly than that to normal unstimulated syngeneic macrophages; however, lymphocytes attached to the "activated" macrophages appeared to be killed by a nonphagocytic mechanism. A similar increase in the rate of lymphocyte attachment to macrophages occurred in the presence of migration inhibitory factor. Subsequent lymphocyte clustering on macrophages was observed in the migration inhibitory factor-stimulated cultures. In addition, lymphocyte-macrophage interactions similar to those in vitro were observed to occur in vivo on intraperitoneally implanted cover slips. Images PMID:101458

  13. Transcriptional interference among the murine β-like globin genes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Eszterhas, Susan; Pallazzi, Nicolas; Bouhassira, Eric E.; Fields, Jennifer; Tanabe, Osamu; Gerber, Scott A.; Bulger, Michael; Engel, James Douglas; Groudine, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Mammalian β-globin loci contain multiple genes that are activated at different developmental stages. Studies have suggested that the transcription of one gene in a locus can influence the expression of the other locus genes. The prevalent model to explain this transcriptional interference is that all potentially active genes compete for locus control region (LCR) activity. To investigate the influence of transcription by the murine embryonic genes on transcription of the other β-like genes, we generated mice with deletions of the promoter regions of Ey and βh1 and measured transcription of the remaining genes. Deletion of the Ey and βh1 promoters increased transcription of βmajor and βminor 2-fold to 3-fold during primitive erythropoiesis. Deletion of Ey did not affect βh1 nor did deletion of βh1 affect Ey, but Ey deletion uniquely activated transcription from βh0, a β-like globin gene immediately downstream of Ey. Protein analysis showed that βh0 encodes a translatable β-like globin protein that can pair with alpha globin. The lack of transcriptional interference between Ey and βh1 and the gene-specific repression of βh0 did not support LCR competition among the embryonic genes and suggested that direct transcriptional interference from Ey suppressed βh0. PMID:17077320

  14. High-dimensional analysis of the murine myeloid cell system.

    PubMed

    Becher, Burkhard; Schlitzer, Andreas; Chen, Jinmiao; Mair, Florian; Sumatoh, Hermi R; Teng, Karen Wei Weng; Low, Donovan; Ruedl, Christiane; Riccardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Poidinger, Michael; Greter, Melanie; Ginhoux, Florent; Newell, Evan W

    2014-12-01

    Advances in cell-fate mapping have revealed the complexity in phenotype, ontogeny and tissue distribution of the mammalian myeloid system. To capture this phenotypic diversity, we developed a 38-antibody panel for mass cytometry and used dimensionality reduction with machine learning-aided cluster analysis to build a composite of murine (mouse) myeloid cells in the steady state across lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues. In addition to identifying all previously described myeloid populations, higher-order analysis allowed objective delineation of otherwise ambiguous subsets, including monocyte-macrophage intermediates and an array of granulocyte variants. Using mice that cannot sense granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor GM-CSF (Csf2rb(-/-)), which have discrete alterations in myeloid development, we confirmed differences in barrier tissue dendritic cells, lung macrophages and eosinophils. The methodology further identified variations in the monocyte and innate lymphoid cell compartment that were unexpected, which confirmed that this approach is a powerful tool for unambiguous and unbiased characterization of the myeloid system. PMID:25306126

  15. Murine Brca1: sequence and significance for human missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Sharan, S K; Wims, M; Bradley, A

    1995-12-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a mouse homologue of the human breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1. The predicted mouse Brca1 protein is composed of 1812 amino acids. The murine protein is 60% identical and 72% similar to the human BRCA1 protein. Two regions of high homology have been identified between the two proteins. First is the Cys3-His-Cys4 type zinc-finger domain that is identical between the two proteins. The second region is defined by 115 amino acids near the carboxyl end of the Brca1 protein that is 83% identical to human BRCA1 sequence. Seven of eight amino acids involved in human missense mutations that are associated with the disease were found to be conserved between the two species. In contrast, most of the amino acids that are involved in polymorphic variations were not conserved. We therefore propose that the interspecies conservation of predicted amino acid sequences can be used as an additional criterion to determine the significance of human missense mutations.

  16. Human APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Melanie; Schnierle, Barbara S. . E-mail: schba@pei.de

    2005-06-20

    The human APOBEC3G protein exhibits broad antiretroviral activity against a variety of retroviruses. It is packaged into viral particles and executes its antiviral function in the target cell. The packaging of APOBEC3G into different viral particles requires a mechanism that confers this promiscuity. Here, APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus (MLV) was studied using retroviral vectors. APOBEC3G uptake did not require either its cytidine deaminase activity or the presence of a retroviral vector genome. Results from immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies of APOBEC3G with a MLV Gag-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) fusion protein imply an interaction between both proteins. RNase A treatment did not inhibit the co-precipitation of Gag-CFP and APOBEC3G, suggesting that the interaction is RNA independent. Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag, the MLV Gag precursor protein appears to interact with APOBEC3G, indicating that Gag contains conserved structures which are used to encapsidate APOBEC3G into different retroviral particles.

  17. TALEN mediated somatic mutagenesis in murine models of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyuan; Li, Lin; Kendrick, Sara L.; Gerard, Robert D.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Cancer genome sequencing has identified numerous somatic mutations whose biological relevance is uncertain. In this study, we used genome-editing tools to create and analyze targeted somatic mutations in murine models of liver cancer. TALEN were designed against β-catenin (Ctnnb1) and Apc, two commonly mutated genes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), to generate isogenic HCC cell lines. Both mutant cell lines exhibited evidence of Wnt pathway dysregulation. We asked if these TALENs could create targeted somatic mutations after hydrodynamic transfection (HDT) into mouse liver. TALENs targeting β-catenin promoted endogenous HCC carrying the intended gain-of-function mutations. However, TALENs targeting Apc were not as efficient in inducing in vivo homozygous loss-of-function mutations. We hypothesized that hepatocyte polyploidy might be protective against TALEN-induced loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and indeed Apc gene editing was less efficient in tetraploid than in diploid hepatocytes. To increase efficiency, we administered adenoviral Apc TALENs and found that we could achieve a higher mutagenesis rate in vivo. Our results demonstrate that genome-editing tools can enable the in vivo study of cancer genes and faithfully recapitulate the mosaic nature of mutagenesis in mouse cancer models. PMID:25070752

  18. Analysis of the complete DNA sequence of murine cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Rawlinson, W D; Farrell, H E; Barrell, B G

    1996-12-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the Smith strain of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) was determined from virion DNA by using a whole-genome shotgun approach. The genome has an overall G+C content of 58.7%, consists of 230,278 bp, and is arranged as a single unique sequence with short (31-bp) terminal direct repeats and several short internal repeats. Significant similarity to the genome of the sequenced human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) strain AD169 is evident, particularly for 78 open reading frames encoded by the central part of the genome. There is a very similar distribution of G+C content across the two genomes. Sequences toward the ends of the MCMV genome encode tandem arrays of homologous glycoproteins (gps) arranged as two gene families. The left end encodes 15 gps that represent one family, and the right end encodes a different family of 11 gps. A homolog (m144) of cellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes is located at the end of the genome opposite the HCMV MHC class I homolog (UL18). G protein-coupled receptor (GCR) homologs (M33 and M78) occur in positions congruent with two (UL33 and UL78) of the four putative HCMV GCR homologs. Counterparts of all of the known enzyme homologs in HCMV are present in the MCMV genome, including the phosphotransferase gene (M97), whose product phosphorylates ganciclovir in HCMV-infected cells, and the assembly protein (M80). PMID:8971012

  19. Murine Cervical Heart Transplantation Model Using a Modified Cuff Technique

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Markus; Ritschl, Paul; Oellinger, Robert; Aigner, Felix; Sucher, Robert; Schneeberger, Stefan; Pratschke, Johann; Brandacher, Gerald; Maglione, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models are of special interest in research since a wide variety of monoclonal antibodies and commercially defined inbred and knockout strains are available to perform mechanistic in vivo studies. While heart transplantation models using a suture technique were first successfully developed in rats, the translation into an equally widespread used murine equivalent was never achieved due the technical complexity of the microsurgical procedure. In contrast, non-suture cuff techniques, also developed initially in rats, were successfully adapted for use in mice1-3. This technique for revascularization involves two major steps I) everting the recipient vessel over a polyethylene cuff; II) pulling the donor vessel over the formerly everted recipient vessel and holding it in place with a circumferential tie. This ensures a continuity of the endothelial layer, short operating time and very high patency rates4. Using this technique for vascular anastomosis we performed more than 1,000 cervical heart transplants with an overall success rate of 95%. For arterial inflow the common carotid artery and the proximal aortic arch were anastomosed resulting in a retrograde perfusion of the transplanted heart. For venous drainage the pulmonary artery of the graft was anastomosed with the external jugular vein of the recipient5. Herein, we provide additional details of this technique to supplement the video. PMID:25350682

  20. Ocular tolerance of preservatives on the murine cornea.

    PubMed

    Furrer, P; Mayer, J M; Plazonnet, B; Gurny, R

    1999-03-01

    We investigated the effects of instilling 13 commonly used preservatives on the murine cornea in vivo. Due to the instillation of preservatives, micro-lesions are formed on the cornea and can be selectively marked by fluorescein. The sum of the resulting fluorescent areas was measured using an episcopic microscope coupled to an image processing system. All the tested preservatives proved to be well-tolerated by the eye at commonly used concentrations. However, in some cases, increased concentrations of preservatives or combinations resulted in significant increase of the amount of corneal damage. With increasing the concentration, corneal lesion increased the most in the case of cetylpyridinium. While a combination of chlorobutanol 0.5% and phenylethylalcohol 0.5% did not result in an increase in corneal damage (when compared to the use of each separately), the associations of thiomersal 0.02% and phenylethylalcohol 0.4% on one hand and of edetate disodium (EDTA) 0.1% and benzalkonium 0.01% on the other, resulted in significant increases in the amount of corneal damage. However, in none of the tested combinations, the increase in the observed damage exceed the limit of ocular intolerance we had defined beforehand: thus, they were all deemed relatively well-tolerated. In the last part of the study, we investigated the effects of combining several preservatives, at usual concentrations, with an anesthetic solution of oxybuprocaine and found no notable increase in ocular damage.

  1. Peptidylarginine deiminase inhibition is immunomodulatory and vasculoprotective in murine lupus.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jason S; Zhao, Wenpu; Luo, Wei; Subramanian, Venkataraman; O'Dell, Alexander A; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Hodgin, Jeffrey B; Eitzman, Daniel T; Thompson, Paul R; Kaplan, Mariana J

    2013-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that enhanced neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation activates plasmacytoid dendritic cells and serves as a source of autoantigens in SLE. We propose that aberrant NET formation is also linked to organ damage and to the premature vascular disease characteristic of human SLE. Here, we demonstrate enhanced NET formation in the New Zealand mixed 2328 (NZM) model of murine lupus. NZM mice also developed autoantibodies to NETs as well as the ortholog of human cathelicidin/LL37 (CRAMP), a molecule externalized in the NETs. NZM mice were treated with Cl-amidine, an inhibitor of peptidylarginine deiminases (PAD), to block NET formation and were evaluated for lupus-like disease activity, endothelial function, and prothrombotic phenotype. Cl-amidine treatment inhibited NZM NET formation in vivo and significantly altered circulating autoantibody profiles and complement levels while reducing glomerular IgG deposition. Further, Cl-amidine increased the differentiation capacity of bone marrow endothelial progenitor cells, improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and markedly delayed time to arterial thrombosis induced by photochemical injury. Overall, these findings suggest that PAD inhibition can modulate phenotypes crucial for lupus pathogenesis and disease activity and may represent an important strategy for mitigating cardiovascular risk in lupus patients.

  2. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Münk, Carsten; Löhler, Jürgen; Prassolov, Vladimir; Just, Ursula; Stockschläder, Marcus; Stocking, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed. PMID:9159161

  3. Effects of sodium fluoride on immune response in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Beatriz; Vázquez, Marta; Rocha, René Antonio; Devesa, Vicenta; Vélez, Dinoraz

    2016-08-01

    Excessive fluoride intake may be harmful for health, producing dental and skeletal fluorosis, and effects upon neurobehavioral development. Studies in animals have revealed effects upon the gastrointestinal, renal and reproductive systems. Some of the disorders may be a consequence of immune system alterations. In this study, an in vitro evaluation is made of fluoride immunotoxicity using the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage line over a broad range of concentrations (2.5-75mg/L). The results show that the highest fluoride concentrations used (50-75mg/L) reduce the macrophage population in part as a consequence of the generation of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species and consequent redox imbalance, which in turn is accompanied by lipid peroxidation. A decrease in the expression of the antiinflammatory cytokine Il10 is observed from the lowest concentrations (5mg/L). High concentrations (50mg/L) in turn produce a significant increase in the proinflammatory cytokines Il6 and Mip2 from 4h of exposure. In addition, cell phagocytic capacity is seen to decrease at concentrations of ≥20mg/L. These data indicate that fluoride, at high concentrations, may affect macrophages and thus immune system function - particularly with regard to the inflammation autoregulatory processes, in which macrophages play a key role. PMID:26965474

  4. Bmp4 from the optic vesicle specifies murine retina formation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jie; Liu, Ying; Oltean, Alina; Beebe, David C

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies of mouse embryos concluded that after the optic vesicle evaginates from the ventral forebrain and contacts the surface ectoderm, signals from the ectoderm specify the distal region of the optic vesicle to become retina and signals from the optic vesicle induce the lens. Germline deletion of Bmp4 resulted in failure of lens formation. We performed conditional deletion of Bmp4 from the optic vesicle to test the function of Bmp4 in murine eye development. The optic vesicle evaginated normally and contacted the surface ectoderm. Lens induction did not occur. The optic cup failed to form and the expression of retina-specific genes decreased markedly in the distal optic vesicle. Instead, cells in the prospective retina expressed genes characteristic of the retinal pigmented epithelium. We conclude that Bmp4 is required for retina specification in mice. In the absence of Bmp4, formation of the retinal pigmented epithelium is the default differentiation pathway of the optic vesicle. Differences in the signaling pathways required for specification of the retina and retinal pigmented epithelium in chicken and mouse embryos suggest major changes in signaling during the evolution of the vertebrate eye.

  5. Hamster and murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T; Du Chateau, Brian K; Callister, Steven M; Schell, Ronald F

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology.

  6. Interleukin-12-induced adhesion molecule expression in murine liver.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, K. J.; Eppihimer, M. J.; Hall, L.; Wolitzky, B.

    1998-01-01

    Systemically administered interleukin (IL)-12 causes liver inflammation in mice characterized by Kupffer cell proliferation and hypertrophy, hepatocyte necrosis, and multifocal accumulations of leukocytes in the hepatic parenchyma and around portal tracts and central veins. We have used both immunohistochemical staining and radiolabeled antibody quantitation to examine adhesion molecule expression in the livers of mice dosed daily with murine IL-12. Cells infiltrating livers of IL-12-treated mice were primarily mononuclear leukocytes expressing LFA-1, VLA-4, MAC-1, and CD18 adhesion molecules but little L-selectin. Kupffer cells constitutively expressed LFA-1 and smaller amounts of MAC-1, and high levels of ICAM-1 were constitutively expressed by liver sinusoidal lining cells, portal tract, and central vein endothelia. With IL-12 treatment, existing ICAM-1 expression was up-regulated and de novo expression occurred along bile duct epithelia. VCAM-1 levels were dramatically increased, with induced expression occurring along portal tract and central vein endothelia and scattered bile duct epithelial cells and in aggregations of cells in perivascular areas and the liver parenchyma. Although constitutive expression of E- and P-selectin was negligible, Il-12 induced a moderate rise in E-selectin levels. These increases in adhesion molecule expression may have implications for the therapeutic use of IL-12, especially in patients with liver disease or autoimmune conditions where augmented adhesion molecule expression may be critical to disease pathogenesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9466572

  7. Positional cloning of the murine flavivirus resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Perelygin, Andrey A; Scherbik, Svetlana V; Zhulin, Igor B; Stockman, Bronislava M; Li, Yan; Brinton, Margo A

    2002-07-01

    Inbred mouse strains exhibit significant differences in their susceptibility to viruses in the genus Flavivirus, which includes human pathogens such as yellow fever, Dengue, and West Nile virus. A single gene, designated Flv, confers this differential susceptibility and was mapped previously to a region of mouse chromosome 5. A positional cloning strategy was used to identify 22 genes from the Flv gene interval including 10 members of the 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase gene family. One 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase gene, Oas1b, was identified as Flv by correlation between genotype and phenotype in nine mouse strains. Susceptible mouse strains produce a protein lacking 30% of the C-terminal sequence as compared with the resistant counterpart because of the presence of a premature stop codon. The Oas1b gene differs from all the other murine Oas genes by a unique four-amino acid deletion in the P-loop located within the conserved RNA binding domain. Expression of the resistant allele of Oas1b in susceptible embryo fibroblasts resulted in partial inhibition of the replication of a flavivirus but not of an alpha togavirus.

  8. Gene expression of lactobacilli in murine forestomach biofilms.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Clarissa; Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim

    2014-07-01

    Lactobacilli populate the gastro-intestinal tract of vertebrates, and are used in food fermentations and as probiotics. Lactobacilli are also major constituents of stable biofilms in the forestomach of rodents. In order to investigate the lifestyle of these biofilm lactobacilli in C57BL/6 mice, we applied metatranscriptomics to analyse gene expression (assessed by mRNA) and community composition (assessed by rRNA). Lactobacillales were the major biofilm inhabitants (62-82% of rRNA reads), followed by Clostridiales (8-31% of rRNA reads). To identify mRNA transcripts specific for the forestomach, we compared forestomach and hindgut metatranscriptomes. Gene expression of the biofilm microbiota was characterized by high abundance of transcripts related to glucose and maltose utilization, peptide degradation, and amino acid transport, indicating their major catabolic and anabolic pathways. The microbiota transcribed genes encoding pathways enhancing oxidative stress (glutathione synthesis) and acid tolerance. Various pathways, including metabolite formation (urea degradation, arginine pathway, γ-aminobutyrate) and cell wall modification (DltA, cyclopropane-fatty-acyl-phospholipid synthase), contributed to acid tolerance, as judged from the transcript profile. In addition, the biofilm microbiota expressed numerous genes encoding extracellular proteins involved in adhesion and/or biofilm formation (e.g. MucBP, glycosyl hydrolase families 68 and 70). This study shed light on the lifestyle and specific adaptations of lactobacilli in the murine forestomach that might also be relevant for lactobacilli biofilms in other vertebrates, including humans.

  9. Murine mammary stem/progenitor cell isolation: Different method matters?

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Dong, Qiaoxiang; Chen, Yuanhong; Zhang, Fuchuang; Wu, Anqi; Shi, Yuanshuo; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Daniel, Benjamin J; Huang, Changjiang; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Murine mammary stem/progenitor cell isolation has been routinely used in many laboratories, yet direct comparison among different methods is lacking. In this study, we compared two frequently used digestion methods and three sets of frequently used surface markers for their efficiency in enriching mammary stem and progenitor cells in two commonly used mouse strains, C57BL/6J and FVB. Our findings revealed that the slow overnight digestion method using gentle collagenase/hyaluronidase could be easily adopted and yielded reliable and consistent results in different batches of animals. In contrast, the different fast digestion protocols, as described in published studies, yielded high percent of non-epithelial cells with very few basal epithelial cells liberated in our hands. The three sets of markers tested in our hands reveal rather equally efficiency in separating luminal and basal cells if same fluorochrome conjugations were used. However, the tendency of non-epithelial cell inclusion in the basal cell gate was highest in samples profiled by CD24/CD29 and lowest in samples profiled by CD49f/EpCAM, this is especially true in mammary cells isolated from C57BL/6J mice. This finding will have significant implication when sorted basal cells are used for subsequent gene expression analysis. PMID:26933638

  10. Immunotherapy of murine bladder cancer by irradiated tumor vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, D.L.; Riggs, D.R.; DeHaven, J.I.; Bryner, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation explored the efficacy of irradiated autologous mouse bladder tumor (Ir-MBT2) as an active specific immunotherapeutic agent and as adjuvant therapy with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) against a subcutaneously transplanted murine bladder tumor. Tumor incidence was significantly reduced in groups receiving BCG (27%, p less than 0.005) or Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.025), compared to control (93%). Survival was significantly improved in groups treated with BCG (100%, p less than 0.005), 10(5) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (53%, p less than 0.01), or 10(7) Ir-MBT2 with BCG (47%, p less than 0.025) compared with control (13%). Surprisingly, Ir-MBT2 consistently reduced the efficacy of BCG alone. Ir-MBT2 alone (10(7)) appeared to enhance tumor growth. Autologous irradiated bladder tumor vaccine, alone or in combination with BCG, displayed no immunotherapeutic advantage. The use of irradiated tumor cell vaccine for bladder cancer therapy may reduce the results achievable with BCG alone.

  11. Toxicity of Calcium Hydroxide Nanoparticles on Murine Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Omid; Azadnia, Sina; Mozayeni, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: One of the major contributing factors, which may cause failure of endodontic treatment, is the presence of residual microorganisms in the root canal system. For years, most dentists have been using calcium hydroxide (CH) as the intracanal medicament between treatment sessions to eliminate remnant microorganisms. Reducing the size of CH particles into nanoparticles enhances the penetration of this medicament into dentinal tubules and increases their antimicrobial efficacy. This in vitro study aimed to compare the cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles and conventional CH on fibroblast cell line using the Mosmann’s Tetrazolium Toxicity (MTT) assay. Methods and Materials: This study was conducted on L929 murine fibroblast cell line by cell culture and evaluation of the direct effect of materials on the cultured cells. Materials were evaluated in two groups of 10 samples each at 24, 48 and 72 h. At each time point, 10 samples along with 5 positive and 5 negative controls were evaluated. The samples were transferred into tubes and exposed to fibroblast cells. The viability of cells was then evaluated. The Two-way ANOVA was used for statistical analysis and the level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Cytotoxicity of both materials decreased over time and for conventional CH was lower than that of nanoparticles. However, this difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The cytotoxicity of CH nanoparticles was similar to that of conventional CH. PMID:25598810

  12. Klebsiella pneumoniae FimK Promotes Virulence in Murine Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Rosen, David A; Hilliard, Julia K; Tiemann, Kristin M; Todd, Elizabeth M; Morley, S Celeste; Hunstad, David A

    2016-02-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a chief cause of nosocomial pneumonia, is a versatile and commonly multidrug-resistant human pathogen for which further insight into pathogenesis is needed. We show that the pilus regulatory gene fimK promotes the virulence of K. pneumoniae strain TOP52 in murine pneumonia. This contrasts with the attenuating effect of fimK on urinary tract virulence, illustrating that a single factor may exert opposing effects on pathogenesis in distinct host niches. Loss of fimK in TOP52 pneumonia was associated with diminished lung bacterial burden, limited innate responses within the lung, and improved host survival. FimK expression was shown to promote serum resistance, capsule production, and protection from phagocytosis by host immune cells. Finally, while the widely used K. pneumoniae model strain 43816 produces rapid dissemination and death in mice, TOP52 caused largely localized pneumonia with limited lethality, thereby providing an alternative tool for studying K. pneumoniae pathogenesis and control within the lung.

  13. T cell-activating protein on murine lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E T; Reiser, H; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-12-01

    A functional T cell surface molecule, T cell-activating protein (TAP), has been identified on murine lymphocytes. TAP is a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 10-12 kilodaltons (kDa) nonreduced, 16-17 kDa reduced. Cross-linking of TAP can result in profound activation of T lymphocytes to produce lymphokines and to enter the cell cycle. Furthermore, antibody binding to TAP can modulate antigen-driven T cell stimulation. Current data suggest that TAP is physically distinct from the T cell receptor complex. On unstimulated lymphocytes, TAP is expressed on T cells and defines heterogeneity within the major T cell subsets. Its profile of expression is rapidly altered on cell activation. Ontologically, it is first detected in the thymus, where it is found on both the most immature and the most mature cell subsets, and it is functional on both. Together, these TAP+ cells constitute a small fraction of thymocytes. TAP expression, however, defines the immunocompetent compartment of the thymus, and thus could be involved in functional maturation. Finally, the gene controlling TAP expression has been mapped, and is tightly linked to a locus of hematopoietic antigens (Ly-6). TAP is molecularly distinct from these antigens. Furthermore, all of these proteins show a markedly distinct developmental regulation in their cell surface expression.

  14. Murine models of atrophy, cachexia, and sarcopenia in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Romanick, Mark; Brown-Borg, Holly M.

    2013-01-01

    With the extension of life span over the past several decades, the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength that characterizes sarcopenia is becoming more evident and thus, has a more significant impact on society. To determine ways to intervene and delay, or even arrest the physical frailty and dependence that accompany sarcopenia, it is necessary to identify those biochemical pathways that define this process. Animal models that mimic one or more of the physiological pathways involved with this phenomenon are very beneficial in providing an understanding of the cellular processes at work in sarcopenia. The ability to influence pathways through genetic manipulation gives insight into cellular responses and their impact on the physical expression of sarcopenia. This review evaluates several murine models that have the potential to elucidate biochemical processes integral to sarcopenia. Identifying animal models that reflect sarcopenia or its component pathways will enable researchers to better understand those pathways that contribute to age-related skeletal muscle mass loss, and in turn, develop interventions that will prevent, retard, arrest, or reverse this phenomenon. PMID:23523469

  15. Biological effectiveness of fast neutrons on a murine osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Ando, K.; Koike, S.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of fast neutrons and gamma rays on a murine osteosarcoma was studied. The NROS tumor, a radiation-induced osteosarcoma in a C3H mouse, was transplanted into the right hind legs of syngeneic female mice and locally irradiated with single or four daily doses of either fast neutrons or gamma rays. The NROS contained 13-30% hypoxic cells. It took approximately 7 days for the NROS tumor to show apparent reoxygenation following gamma ray irradiations. Two assays were used to determine the neutrons' relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to gamma rays: tumor growth delay time and tumor control dose. The largest RBE of 4.5 was obtained at the smallest dose of neutrons examined, followed by a gradual decrease down to 2.3. The tumor growth delay assay indicated that the RBE values of 2.6-3.1 after single doses of fast neutrons increased to 3.1-4.5 after four daily fractions. The 50% tumor control doses were 78.5 Gy and 33.0 Gy after single doses of gamma rays and fast neutrons, resulting in an RBE of 2.3. Fractionated doses increased the RBE to 2.6. Mitotic cells disappeared shortly after irradiation but reappeared 7 days after irradiation.

  16. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    PubMed Central

    Muindi, Fanuel; Zeitzer, Jamie M.; Heller, Horace Craig

    2014-01-01

    The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages. PMID:25140132

  17. Isolation and characterization of recombinant murine Wnt3a.

    PubMed

    Witkowski, Andrzej; Krishnamoorthy, Aparna; Su, Betty; Beckstead, Jennifer A; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-02-01

    Wnt proteins are a family of morphogens that possess potent biological activity. Structure-function studies have been impeded by poor yield of biologically active recombinant Wnt as well as a propensity of isolated Wnt to self-associate in the absence of detergent. Using stably transfected Drosophila S2 cells, studies have been conducted to improve recovery of recombinant murine Wnt3a, establish conditions for a detergent-free Wnt preparation and examine the effects of limited proteolysis. S2 cell culture conditioned media was subjected to a 3-step protocol including dye-ligand chromatography, immobilized metal affinity chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. Through selective pooling of column fractions, homogeneous and purified Wnt3a preparations were obtained. Limited proteolysis of Wnt3a with thrombin resulted in site-specific cleavage within the N-terminal saposin-like motif. To generate detergent-free protein, Wnt3a was immobilized on Cu(2+)-charged, iminodiacetic acid-derivatized Sepharose beads, detergent-free buffer was applied and Wnt3a eluted from the beads with buffer containing imidazole plus 30mM methyl-ß-cyclodextrin (MßCD). Wnt3a recovered in MßCD-containing buffer was soluble and biologically active. Insofar as MßCD is a member of a family of non-toxic, low molecular weight compounds capable of binding and solubilizing small hydrophobic ligands, Wnt-cyclodextrin complexes may facilitate structure-activity studies in the absence of adverse detergent effects.

  18. Comparison of the gating behaviour of human and murine cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl− channels expressed in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Lansdell, K A; Delaney, S J; Lunn, D P; Thomson, S A; Sheppard, D N; Wainwright, B J

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the function of the murine cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a full-length cDNA encoding wild-type murine CFTR was assembled and stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Like human CFTR, murine CFTR formed Cl− channels that were regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation and intracellular ATP. However, murine CFTR Cl− channels had a reduced single-channel conductance and decreased open probability (Po) compared with those of human CFTR. Analysis of the dwell time distributions of single channels suggested that the reduced Po of murine CFTR was caused by both decreased residence in the open state and transitions to a new closed state, described by an intermediate closed time constant. For both human and murine CFTR, ATP and ADP regulated the rate of exit from the long-lived closed state. 5′-Adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) and pyrophosphate, two compounds that disrupt cycles of ATP hydrolysis, stabilized the open state of human CFTR. However, neither agent locked murine CFTR Cl− channels open, although AMP-PNP increased the Po of murine CFTR. The data indicate that although human and murine CFTR have many properties in common, some important differences in function are observed. These differences could be exploited in future studies to provide new understanding about CFTR. PMID:9508803

  19. A drug carrier targeting murine uPAR for photodynamic therapy and tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolei; Zheng, Ke; Li, Rui; Chen, Zhuo; Yuan, Cai; Hu, Ping; Chen, Jincan; Xue, Jinping; Huang, Mingdong

    2015-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an effective therapeutical modality for tumors. In PDT, a photosensitizer was used to capture the light of specific wavelength, leading to the generation of reactive oxygen species and cytotoxicity surrounding the photosensitizer. Modifications of photosensitizers to enhance tumor specificity are common approaches to increase the efficacy and reduce the side effects of PDT. Previously, we developed a human serum albumin (HSA)-based drug carrier fused with the human amino-terminal fragment (hATF), which binds to a tumor surface marker (urokinase receptor, uPAR). However, hATF-HSA binds to murine uPAR much weaker (79-fold) than to human uPAR, and is not optimal for applications on murine tumor models. In this study, we developed a murine version of the drug carrier (mATF-HSA). A photosensitizer (mono-substituted β-carboxy phthalocyanine zinc, CPZ) was loaded into this carrier, giving a rather stable macromolecule (mATF-HSA:CPZ) that was shown to bind to murine uPAR in vitro. In addition, we evaluated both the photodynamic therapy efficacy and tumor retention capability of the macromolecule (at a dose of 0.05mg CPZ/kg mouse body weight) on murine hepatoma-22 (H22) tumor bearing mouse model. mATF-HSA:CPZ showed more accumulation in tumors compared to its human counterpart (hATF-HSA:CPZ) measured by quantitative fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). Besides, mATF-HSA:CPZ exhibited a higher tumor killing efficacy than hATF-HSA:CPZ. Together, the macromolecule mATF-HSA is a promising tumor-specific drug carrier on murine tumor models and is an useful tool to study tumor biology on murine tumor models. PMID:26004218

  20. Rabies virus replication in primary murine bone marrow macrophages and in human and murine macrophage-like cell lines: implications for viral persistence.

    PubMed

    Ray, N B; Ewalt, L C; Lodmell, D L

    1995-02-01

    To determine whether rabies viruses replicate in macrophage or macrophage-like cells, several human and murine macrophage-like cell lines, as well as primary cultures of murine bone marrow macrophages, were incubated with the Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) virus and several different street rabies viruses (SRV). ERA rabies virus replicated well in human monocytic U937 and THP-1 cells and murine macrophage IC-21 cells, as well as primary cultures of murine macrophages. Minimal replication was detected in murine monocytic WEHI-3BD- and PU5-1R cells, and ERA virus did not replicate in murine monocytic P388D1 or J774A.1 cells. A tissue culture-adapted SRV of bat origin also replicated in IC-21 and U937 cells. Non-tissue culture-adapted SRV isolated from different animal species, particularly bats, replicated minimally in U937, THP-1, IC-21 cells and primary murine bone marrow macrophages. To determine whether rabies virus replication is dependent upon the state of differentiation of the macrophage-like cell, human promyelocytic HL-60 cells were differentiated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). ERA rabies virus replicated in the differentiated HL-60 cells but not in undifferentiated HL-60 cells. Persistent infections were established in macrophage-like U937 cells with ERA rabies virus and SRV, and infectious SRV was isolated from adherent bone marrow cells of mice that had been infected 96 days previously. Virus harvested from persistently infected U937 cells and the adherent bone marrow cells had specifically adapted to each cell. This specificity was shown by the inability of the viruses to infect macrophages other than U937 cells and primary bone marrow macrophages, respectively. Virus titers of the persistently infected U937 cells fluctuated with extended cell passage. After 30 passages, virus released from the cells had lost virulence as shown by its inability to kill intracranially inoculated mice. However, the avirulent virus released from the

  1. A comparison of two distinct murine macrophage gene expression profiles in response to Leishmania amazonensis infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The experimental murine model of leishmaniasis has been widely used to characterize the immune response against Leishmania. CBA mice develop severe lesions, while C57BL/6 present small chronic lesions under L. amazonensis infection. Employing a transcriptomic approach combined with biological network analysis, the gene expression profiles of C57BL/6 and CBA macrophages, before and after L. amazonensis infection in vitro, were compared. These strains were selected due to their different degrees of susceptibility to this parasite. Results The genes expressed by C57BL/6 and CBA macrophages, before and after infection, differ greatly, both with respect to absolute number as well as cell function. Uninfected C57BL/6 macrophages express genes involved in the deactivation pathway of macrophages at lower levels, while genes related to the activation of the host immune inflammatory response, including apoptosis and phagocytosis, have elevated expression levels. Several genes that participate in the apoptosis process were also observed to be up-regulated in C57BL/6 macrophages infected with L. amazonensis, which is very likely related to the capacity of these cells to control parasite infection. By contrast, genes involved in lipid metabolism were found to be up-regulated in CBA macrophages in response to infection, which supports the notion that L. amazonensis probably modulates parasitophorous vacuoles in order to survive and multiply in host cells. Conclusion The transcriptomic profiles of C57BL/6 macrophages, before and after infection, were shown to be involved in the macrophage pathway of activation, which may aid in the control of L. amazonensis infection, in contrast to the profiles of CBA cells. PMID:22321871

  2. Prevention and Immunotherapy of Secondary Murine Alveolar Echinococcosis Employing Recombinant EmP29 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Boubaker, Ghalia; Hemphill, Andrew; Huber, Cristina Olivia; Spiliotis, Markus; Babba, Hamouda; Gottstein, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is caused by infection with the larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. An increasing understanding of immunological events that account for the metacestode survival in human and murine AE infection prompted us to undertake explorative experiments tackling the potential of novel preventive and/or immunotherapeutic measures. In this study, the immunoprotective and immunotherapeutic ability of recombinant EmP29 antigen (rEmP29) was assessed in mice that were intraperitoneally infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes. For vaccination, three intraperitoneal injections with 20μg rEmP29 emulsified in saponin adjuvants were applied over 6 weeks. 2 weeks after the last boost, mice were infected, and at 90 days post-infection, rEmP29-vaccinated mice exhibited a median parasite weight that was reduced by 75% and 59% when compared to NaCl- or saponin–treated control mice, respectively. For immunotherapeutical application, the rEmP29 (20μg) vaccine was administered to experimentally infected mice, starting at 1 month post-infection, three times with 2 weeks intervals. Mice undergoing rEmP29 immunotherapy exhibited a median parasite load that was reduced by 53% and 49% when compared to NaCl- and saponin–treated control mice, respectively. Upon analysis of spleen cells, both, vaccination and treatment with rEmP29, resulted in low ratios of Th2/Th1 (IL-4/IFN-γ) cytokine mRNA and low levels of mRNA coding for IL-10 and IL-2. These results suggest that reduction of the immunosuppressive environment takes place in vaccinated as well as immunotreated mice, and a shift towards a Th1 type of immune response may be responsible for the observed increased restriction of parasite growth. The present study provides the first evidence that active immunotherapy may present a sustainable route for the control of AE. PMID:26053794

  3. β-carotene Regulates the Murine Liver Microenvironment of a Metastatic Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Ye; Kim, Yoo-Sun; Kim, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Background: The anticarcinogenic effects of β-carotene (BC) have been well-characterized. However, the effect of BC on the microenvironment of a tumor remains to be investigated, especially since normal tissue proximal to a tumor has been shown to play a critical role in cancer progression and metastasis. For young children, neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid cancer diagnosed. Therefore, in the present study, effect of BC on the murine liver microenvironment of a metastatic NB was evaluated. Methods: Using a mouse model, three experimental groups were established: control mice, mice receiving an injection of SK-N-BE(2)C cells (TC), and mice receiving an injection of SK-N-BE(2)C cells plus 2 mg/kg BC twice a week (BC). Eight weeks after the injection of tumor, liver tissues were collected from all three groups, with the TC and BC tissues collected proximal to the metastatic NBs. Results: Compared to control tissues, BC tissues exhibited lower levels of proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis. Assays for these processes included the detection of lower levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Bax, MMP2, and MMP9. In addition, higher levels of Bcl-2 were detected. Fewer cells undergoing an epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) were also observed in the BC group. Furthermore, BC tissues were associated with reduced expression of cancer stem cell marker, delta-like 1 homologue (DLK1), lower levels of VEGF mRNA and fewer CD31-positive cells. Finally, The antioxidant capability of the tumor microenvironment for the BC group was enhanced with higher expression levels of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalase, and manganese superoxide (MnSOD) detected. Conclusion: These data suggest that BC affects the microenvironment of a tumor, and this enhances the anti-cancer effects of BC. PMID:25337563

  4. Cholera toxin B induced activation of murine macrophages exposed to a fixed bacterial immunogen

    PubMed Central

    Wiedinger, Kari; Romlein, Heather; Bitsaktsis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Previous studies have demonstrated that intranasal administration of inactivated (fixed) Francisella tularensis (iFt) live vaccine strain (LVS) in conjunction with the mucosal adjuvant, cholera toxin B (CTB), provides full protection against subsequent lethal challenge with Ft LVS and partial protection against the more virulent Ft SchuS4 strain. Understanding the mechanisms of CTB-induced immune stimulation that confer protection against Ft will be valuable to the development of an effective vaccine against this highly virulent fatal pathogen. In this study, an in vitro system was utilized to further elucidate the immunologic adjuvant effect of CTB when administered with the fixed bacterial immunogen iFt. Methods: The murine macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) was treated with combinations of iFt and CTB. The treated RAW264.7 cells and their supernatants were collected and assessed for cell surface marker expression and cytokine secretion. In addition, the ability of RAW264.7 cells to present bacterial antigens (iFt or LVS) to an Ft-specific T-cell hybridoma cell line, following exposure to CTB, was analyzed. Results: We found that RAW264.7 cells responded to treatment with iFt + CTB by an increased secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α and upregulation of the surface expression of toll-like receptor 4 and the costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. Furthermore, the experimental vaccine treatment iFt + CTB enhanced the ability of macrophages to present iFt antigens to an FT-specific T-cell hybridoma cell line, although they failed to do so with LVS. Conclusion: The adjuvant CTB administered in conjunction with iFt showed evidence of enhancing an antigen-specific proinflammatory response in vitro. These observations allow us to define, in part, the mechanisms of immune activation conferred by mucosal administration of iFt + CTB against lethal F. tularensis challenge. PMID:26668753

  5. Effects of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on a murine allergic airway inflammation model

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Ken-ichiro Koike, Eiko; Yanagisawa, Rie; Hirano, Seishiro; Nishikawa, Masataka; Takano, Hirohisa

    2009-06-15

    The development of nanotechnology has increased the risk of exposure to types of particles other than combustion-derived particles in the environment, namely, industrial nanomaterials. On the other hand, patients with bronchial asthma are sensitive to inhaled substances including particulate matters. This study examined the effects of pulmonary exposure to a type of nano-sized carbon nanotube (multi-walled nanotubes: MWCNT) on allergic airway inflammation in vivo and their cellular mechanisms in vitro. In vivo, ICR mice were divided into 4 experimental groups. Vehicle, MWCNT (50 {mu}g/animal), ovalbumin (OVA), and OVA + MWCNT were repeatedly administered intratracheally. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cellularity, lung histology, levels of cytokines related to allergic inflammation in lung homogenates/BAL fluids (BALFs), and serum immunoglobulin levels were studied. Also, we evaluated the impact of MWCNT (0.1-1 {mu}g/ml) on the phenotype and function of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) in vitro. MWCNT aggravated allergen-induced airway inflammation characterized by the infiltration of eosinophils, neutrophils, and mononuclear cells in the lung, and an increase in the number of goblet cells in the bronchial epithelium. MWCNT with allergen amplified lung protein levels of Th cytokines and chemokines compared with allergen alone. MWCNT exhibited adjuvant activity for allergen-specific IgG{sub 1} and IgE. MWCNT significantly increased allergen (OVA)-specific syngeneic T-cell proliferation, particularly at a lower concentration in vitro. Taken together, MWCNT can exacerbate murine allergic airway inflammation, at least partly, via the promotion of a Th-dominant milieu. In addition, the exacerbation may be partly through the inappropriate activation of antigen-presenting cells including DC.

  6. Cryoprotectant Delivery and Removal from Murine Insulinomas at Vitrification-Relevant Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Indra Neil; Song, Ying C.; Sambanis, Athanassios

    2009-01-01

    Development of optimal cryopreservation protocols requires delivery and removal of cryoprotective agents (CPAs) in such a way that negative osmotic and cytotoxic effects on cells are minimized. This is especially true for vitrification, where high CPA concentrations are employed. In this study, we report on the determination of cell membrane permeability parameters for water (Lp) and solute (Ps), and on the design and experimental verification of CPA addition and removal protocols at vitrification-relevant concentrations for a murine insulinoma cell line, βTC-tet cells. Using membrane permeability values and osmotic tolerance limits, mathematical modeling and computer simulations were used to design CPA addition and removal protocols at high concentrations. The cytotoxic effects of CPAs were also evaluated. Cells were able to tolerate the addition and removal of 2.5 M dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and 2.5 M 1,2 propanediol (PD) in single steps, but required multi-step addition and removal with 3.0 M DMSO, 3.0 M PD, and a vitrification-relevant concentration of 3.0 M DMSO+3.0M PD. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that βTC-tet cells were able to tolerate the presence of single component 6.0 M DMSO and 6.0 M PD and to a lesser extent 3.0 M DMSO+3.0 M PD. These results determine the time and concentration domain of CPA exposure that cells can tolerate and are essential for designing cryopreservation protocols for free cells as well as cells in engineered tissues. PMID:17533114

  7. Pulsed Electric Fields for Burn Wound Disinfection in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Vecchio, Daniela; Khan, Saiqa; Hamblin, Michael R.; Austen, William G.; Sheridan, Robert L.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging bacterial resistance renders many antibiotics ineffective, making alternative strategies of wound disinfection important. Here the authors report on a new, physical burn wound disinfection method: pulsed electric fields (PEFs). High voltage, short PEFs create nonthermal, permanent damage to cell membranes, possibly by irreversible electroporation. In medicine, PEF technology has recently been used for nonthermal ablation of solid tumors. The authors have expanded the spectrum of PEF applications in medicine to burn wound disinfection. A third-degree burn was induced on the dorsal skin of C57BL/6 mice. Immediately after the injury, the burn wound was infected with Acinetobacter baumannii expressing the luxCDABE operon. Thirty minutes after infection, the infected areas were treated with 80 pulses delivered at 500 V/mm, 70 μs, 1 Hz. The authors used bioluminescence to quantify bacteria on skin. Three animals were used for each experimental condition. PEFs were effective in the disinfection of infected burned murine skin. The bacterial load reduction correlated with the number of delivered pulses. Forty pulses of 500 V/mm led to a 2.04 ± 0.29 Log10 reduction in bacterial load; 80 pulses led to the immediate 5.53 ± 0.30 Log10 reduction. Three hours after PEF, the bacterial reduction of the skin treated with 500 V/mm, 80 pulses was 4.91 ± 0.71 Log10. The authors introduce a new method of wound disinfection using high voltage, short PEFs. They believe that PEF technology may represent an important alternative to antibiotics in addressing bacterial contamination of wounds, particularly those contaminated with multidrug-resistant bacteria. PMID:25167374

  8. Cannabidiol increases survival and promotes rescue of cognitive function in a murine model of cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Campos, A C; Brant, F; Miranda, A S; Machado, F S; Teixeira, A L

    2015-03-19

    Cerebral malaria (CM) is a severe complication resulting from Plasmodium falciparum infection that might cause permanent neurological deficits. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a nonpsychotomimetic compound of Cannabis sativa with neuroprotective properties. In the present work, we evaluated the effects of CBD in a murine model of CM. Female mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) and treated with CBD (30mg/kg/day - 3 or 7days i.p.) or vehicle. On 5th day-post-infection (dpi), at the peak of the disease), animals were treated with single or repeated doses of Artesunate, an antimalarial drug. All groups were tested for memory impairment (Novel Object Recognition or Morris Water Maze) and anxiety-like behaviors (Open field or elevated plus maze test) in different stages of the disease (at the peak or after the complete clearance of the disease). Th1/Th2 cytokines and neurotrophins (brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF)) were measured in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of experimental groups. PbA-infected mice displayed memory deficits and exhibited increase in anxiety-like behaviors on the 5dpi or after the clearance of the parasitemia, effects prevented by CBD treatment. On 5dpi, TNF-α and IL-6 increased in the hippocampus, while only IL-6 increased in the prefrontal cortex. CBD treatment resulted in an increase in BDNF expression in the hippocampus and decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus (TNF-α) and prefrontal cortex (IL-6). Our results indicate that CBD exhibits neuroprotective effects in CM model and might be useful as an adjunctive therapy to prevent neurological symptoms following this disease.

  9. Abnormal morphology of myelin and axon pathology in murine models of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bando, Yoshio; Nomura, Taichi; Bochimoto, Hiroki; Murakami, Koichi; Tanaka, Tatsuhide; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Shigetaka

    2015-02-01

    Demyelination and axonal damage are responsible for neurological deficits in multiple sclerosis (MS), an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. However, the pathology of axonal damage in MS is not fully understood. In this study, histological analysis of morphological changes of axonal organelles during demyelination in murine models was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using an osmium-maceration method. In cuprizone-induced demyelination, SEM showed typical morphology of demyelination in the corpus callosum of mouse brain. In contrast, SEM displayed variations in ultrastructural abnormalities of myelin structures and axonal organelles in spinal cord white matter of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice, an animal model of MS. Myelin detachment and excessive myelin formation were observed as typical morphological myelin abnormalities in EAE. In addition, well-developed axoplasmic reticulum-like structures and accumulated mitochondria were observed in tortuous degenerating/degenerated axons and the length of mitochondria in axons of EAE spinal cord was shorter compared with naïve spinal cord. Immunohistochemistry also revealed dysfunction of mitochondrial fusion/fission machinery in EAE spinal cord axons. Moreover, the number of Y-shaped mitochondria was significantly increased in axons of the EAE spinal cord. Axonal morphologies in myelin basic protein-deficient shiverer mice were similar to those in EAE. However, shiverer mice had "tortuous" (S-curve shaped mitochondria) and larger mitochondria compared with wild-type and EAE mice. Lastly, analysis of human MS patient autopsied brains also demonstrated abnormal myelin structures in demyelinating lesions. These results indicate that morphological abnormalities of myelin and axonal organelles play important role on the pathogenesis of axonal injury in demyelinating diseases.

  10. Effects of protein-energy malnutrition on NF-kappaB signalling in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fock, Ricardo Ambrósio; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Vinolo, Marco Aurélio Ramirez; Curi, Rui; Borges, Maria Carolina; Borelli, Primavera

    2010-04-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is an important public health problem affecting millions of people worldwide. PEM decreases resistance to infection, impairing a number of physiological processes. In unstimulated cells, NF-kappaB is kept from binding to its consensus sequence by the inhibitor I kappaB alpha, which retains NF-kappaB in the cytoplasm. Upon various signals, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), I kappaB alpha is rapidly degraded and NF-kappaB is induced to translocate into the nucleus, where it activates expression of various genes that participate in the inflammatory response, including those involved in the synthesis of TNF-alpha. TRAF-6 is a cytoplasmic adapter protein that links the stimulatory signal from Toll like receptor-4 to NF-kappaB. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of malnutrition on induction of TNF-alpha by LPS in murine peritoneal macrophages. We evaluated peritoneal cellularity, the expression of MyD88, TRAF-6, IKK, I kappaB alpha and NF-kappaB, NF-kappaB activation and TNF-alpha mRNA and protein synthesis in macrophages. Two-month-old male BALB/C mice were submitted to PEM with a low-protein diet that contained 2% protein, compared to 12% protein in the control diet. When the experimental group had lost about 20% of the original body weight, it was used in the subsequent experiments. Malnourished animals presented anemia, leucopenia and severe reduction in peritoneal cavity cellularity. TNF-alpha mRNA and protein levels of macrophages stimulated with LPS were significantly lower in malnourished animals. PEM also decreased TRAF-6 expression and NF-kappaB activation after LPS stimulation. These results led us to conclude that PEM changes NF-kB signalling pathway in macrophages to LPS stimulus.

  11. C/EBPβ is a transcriptional key regulator of IL-36α in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nerlich, Andreas; Ruangkiattikul, Nanthapon; Laarmann, Kristin; Janze, Nina; Dittrich-Breiholz, Oliver; Kracht, Michael; Goethe, Ralph

    2015-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-36α - one of the novel members of the IL-1 family of cytokines - is a potent regulator of dendritic and T cells and plays an important role in inflammatory processes like experimental skin inflammation in mice and in mouse models for human psoriasis. Here, we demonstrate that C/EBPβ, a transcription factor required for the selective expression of inflammatory genes, is a key activator of the Il36A gene in murine macrophages. RNAi-mediated suppression of C/EBPβ expression in macrophages (C/EBPβ(low) cells) significantly impaired Il36A gene induction following challenge with LPS. Despite the presence of five predicted C/EBP binding sites, luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that C/EBPβ confers responsiveness to LPS primarily through a half-CRE•C/EBP element in the proximal Il36A promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that C/EBPβ but not CREB proteins interact with this critical half-CRE•C/EBP element. In addition, overexpression of C/EBPβ in C/EBPβ(low) cells enhanced the expression of Il36A whereas CREB-1 had no effect. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that C/EBPβ but neither CREB-1, ATF-2 nor ATF4 is directly recruited to the proximal promoter region of the Il36A gene. Together, these findings demonstrate an essential role of C/EBPβ in the regulation of the Il36A gene via the proximal half-CRE•C/EBP element in response to inflammatory stimuli.

  12. Detection of Neospora caninum in tissue sections using a murine monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Cole, R A; Lindsay, D S; Dubey, J P; Blagburn, B L

    1993-10-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (MAb 6G7), isotype IgG2a, produced against tachyzoites of Neospora caninum (isolate NC-1) reacted specifically with tachyzoites of N. caninum in an indirect immunofluorescent antibody test. MAb 6G7 did not react with tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, sporozoites of Isospora suis, Eimeria bovis, or E. tenella, or merozoites of E. bovis in the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test. MAb 6G7 reacted positively with both tachyzoites and bradyzoites of N. caninum in an avidin-biotin peroxidase complex immunohistochemical test on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. No reaction was observed with the following: tachyzoites and bradyzoites of T. gondii, T. gondii-like parasites, or Hammondia hammondi; bradyzoites of Frenkelia microti; schizonts and merozoites of Sarcocystis-like organisms; schizonts, sarcocysts, and oocysts/sporocysts of S. cruzi; schizonts and merozoites of S. canis; schizonts of S. hirsuta, S. tenella, and S. capracanis; merozoites of S. neurona and S. neurona-like organisms, E. bovis, or Haemoproteus sp.; bradyzoites and merozoites of S. montanaensis; bradyzoites of S. odocoileocanis, S. cruzi, and S. tenella; meronts, sexual stages, and caryocysts of Caryospora sp. and C. bigenetica; micromerozoites, macromerozoites, and schizonts of Hepatozoon canis; sporozoites, sexual stages, and oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum and C. baileyi; trophozoites of Monocystis lumbrici, Tritrichomonas foetus, and Balantidium coli; tissue cysts and bradyzoites of Besnoitia sp. and B. jellisoni; amastigotes of Leishmania sp.; and trophic theronts of Ichthyopthirius multifilis. MAb 6G7 reacted with tachyzoites and bradyzoites of N. caninum in natural and experimental infections in dogs, cattle, mice, rats, sheep, and goats, indicating that host origin of the tissues did not affect the performance of the test. PMID:8286458

  13. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone ameliorates disease activity in an induced murine lupus-like model.

    PubMed

    Botte, D A C; Noronha, I L; Malheiros, D M A C; Peixoto, T V; de Mello, S B V

    2014-08-01

    Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is a neuropeptide exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity in experimental models of autoimmune diseases. However, no studies thus far have examined the effects of α-MSH on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study aimed to determine the effects of an α-MSH agonist in induced murine lupus. Here we employed female Balb/cAn mice in which lupus was induced by pristane. Groups of lupus animals were treated daily with the α-MSH analogue [Nle4, DPhe7]-α-MSH (NDP-MSH) (1·25 mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally or saline for 180 days. Normal animals comprised the control group. Arthritis incidence, plasma immunoglobulin (Ig)G isotypes, anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) and plasma cytokines were evaluated. Renal function was assessed by proteinuria and histopathological lesion. Glomerular levels of IgG, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), C3, CD3, melanocortin receptors (MCR)1, corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and α-MSH was estimated by immunohistochemistry. When compared with normal controls, lupus animals exhibited increased arthritis, IgG levels, ANA, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, proteinuria and mesangial cell proliferation together with glomerular expression of α-SMA and iNOS. Glomerular expression of MCR1 was reduced in lupus animals. NDP-MSH treatment reduced arthritis scores by 70% and also diminished IgG1 and IgG2a levels and ANA incidence. In the glomerulus, NDP-MSH treatment reduced cellularity by 50% together with reducing IgG deposits, and expression levels of α-SMA, iNOS and CRF were also all decreased. Taken together, our results suggest for the first time that α-MSH treatment improves several parameters of SLE disease activity in mice, and indicate that this hormone is an interesting potential future treatment option.

  14. Novel Methodology for Characterizing Regional Variations in the Material Properties of Murine Aortas.

    PubMed

    Bersi, Matthew R; Bellini, Chiara; Di Achille, Paolo; Humphrey, Jay D; Genovese, Katia; Avril, Stéphane

    2016-07-01

    Many vascular disorders, including aortic aneurysms and dissections, are characterized by localized changes in wall composition and structure. Notwithstanding the importance of histopathologic changes that occur at the microstructural level, macroscopic manifestations ultimately dictate the mechanical functionality and structural integrity of the aortic wall. Understanding structure-function relationships locally is thus critical for gaining increased insight into conditions that render a vessel susceptible to disease or failure. Given the scarcity of human data, mouse models are increasingly useful in this regard. In this paper, we present a novel inverse characterization of regional, nonlinear, anisotropic properties of the murine aorta. Full-field biaxial data are collected using a panoramic-digital image correlation (p-DIC) system. An inverse method, based on the principle of virtual power (PVP), is used to estimate values of material parameters regionally for a microstructurally motivated constitutive relation. We validate our experimental-computational approach by comparing results to those from standard biaxial testing. The results for the nondiseased suprarenal abdominal aorta from apolipoprotein-E null mice reveal material heterogeneities, with significant differences between dorsal and ventral as well as between proximal and distal locations, which may arise in part due to differential perivascular support and localized branches. Overall results were validated for both a membrane and a thick-wall model that delineated medial and adventitial properties. Whereas full-field characterization can be useful in the study of normal arteries, we submit that it will be particularly useful for studying complex lesions such as aneurysms, which can now be pursued with confidence given the present validation. PMID:27210500

  15. The Effect of Mir-451 Upregulation on Erythroid Lineage Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Obeidi, Narges; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Soleimani, Masoud; Nikougoftar Zarif, Mahin; Kouhkan, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous non-coding regulatory RNAs that control mRNAs post-transcriptionally. Several mouse stem cells miRNAs are cloned differentially regulated in different hematopoietic lineages, suggesting their possible role in hematopoietic lineage differentiation. Recent studies have shown that specific miRNAs such as Mir-451 have key roles in erythropoiesis. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) were infected with lentiviruses containing pCDH-Mir-451. Erythroid differentiation was assessed based on the expression level of transcriptional factors (Gata-1, Klf-1, Epor) and hemoglobin chains (α, β, γ , ε and ζ) genes using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and presence of erythroid surface antigens (TER-119 and CD235a) using flow cytometery. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assay was also on days 14thand 21thafter transduction. Results Mature Mir-451 expression level increased by 3.434-fold relative to the untreated mESCs on day 4 after transduction (P<0.001). Mir-451 up-regulation correlated with the induction of transcriptional factor (Gata-1, Klf-1, Epor) and hemoglobin chain (α, β, γ, ε and ζ) genes in mESCs (P<0.001) and also showed a strong correlation with presence of CD235a and Ter- 119 markers in these cells (13.084and 13.327-fold increse, respectively) (P<0.05). Moreover, mESCs treated with pCDH-Mir-451 showed a significant raise in CFU-erythroid (CFU-E) colonies (5.2-fold) compared with untreated control group (P<0.05). Conclusion Our results showed that Mir-451 up-regulation strongly induces erythroid differentiation and maturation of mESCs. Overexpression of Mir-451 may have the potential to produce artificial red blood cells (RBCs) without the presence of any stimulatory cytokines. PMID:27540521

  16. EXPERIMENTAL THYROIDISM

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, R. H.

    1898-01-01

    From the results of the various experiments already detailed I feel justified in drawing the following conclusions: (1) Absolutely fresh thyroid gland is not poisonous, in the usual sense of the term, when absorbed through the alimentary canal. (2) The symptoms of induced thyroidism are manifestations of an intoxication resulting from the ingestion of decomposed thyroid material, a conclusion that agrees in part with the previously related observations of Lanz. (3) The so-called experimental thyroidism is not specific for the thyroid only, for the ingestion of many substances derived from animal tissues other than the thyroid gland may produce an intoxication strikingly similar in every respect to that of experimental thyroidism. (4) Most, if not all, animal tissues yield substances which, if injected in large quantities directly into the circulation or beneath the skin, will produce an intoxication often very similar to that produced by injections of various substances derived from the fresh thyroid tissue. (5) The effects resulting from the intravascular or subcutaneous injections of aqueous extracts, decoctions and the concentrated extractives of the thyroid tissue, of the thymus, of muscle, etc., are by no means necessarily indicative of the function and the action of the hypothetical internal secretions of the same tissues during life. (6) The utilization of the fact that ingestion of decomposed thyroid material produces on certain occasions an intoxication with certain symptoms similar to some of those of G-raves' disease is not justifiable for the furtherance of the theory that the symptoms of exophthalmic goitre result from an over-production of the thyroid secretion. (7) Our results lead us to conclude with Drechsel that the fresh thyroid tissue yields at least probably two substances that are capable of palliating the symptoms of the acute cachexia in totally thyroidless dogs. (8) The thymus tissue also yields one and probably two substances that are as

  17. Membrane-dependent Activities of Human 15-LOX-2 and Its Murine Counterpart: IMPLICATIONS FOR MURINE MODELS OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS.

    PubMed

    Bender, Gunes; Schexnaydre, Erin E; Murphy, Robert C; Uhlson, Charis; Newcomer, Marcia E

    2016-09-01

    The enzyme encoded by the ALOX15B gene has been linked to the development of atherosclerotic plaques in humans and in a mouse model of hypercholesterolemia. In vitro, these enzymes, which share 78% sequence identity, generate distinct products from their substrate arachidonic acid: the human enzyme, a 15-S-hydroperoxy product; and the murine enzyme, an 8-S-product. We probed the activities of these enzymes with nanodiscs as membrane mimics to determine whether they can access substrate esterified in a bilayer and characterized their activities at the membrane interface. We observed that both enzymes transform phospholipid-esterified arachidonic acid to a 15-S-product. Moreover, when expressed in transfected HEK cells, both enzymes result in significant increases in the amounts of 15-hydroxyderivatives of eicosanoids detected. In addition, we show that 15-LOX-2 is distributed at the plasma membrane when the HEK293 cells are stimulated by the addition Ca(2+) ionophore and that cellular localization is dependent upon the presence of a putative membrane insertion loop. We also report that sequence differences between the human and mouse enzymes in this loop appear to confer distinct mechanisms of enzyme-membrane interaction for the homologues.

  18. Effects of Standardized Eriobotrya japonica Extract in LP-BM5 Murine Leukemia Viruses-Induced Murine Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok-Kyung; Nam, Da-Eun; Jun, Woojin; Lee, Jeongmin

    2016-01-01

    Folk medicine has long employed leaves from Eriobotrya japonica Lindl. (Rosaceae) (LEJ) as relieving many diseases including chronic bronchitis and high fever. In this study, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of leaves from LEJ water extracts (LEJE) in LP-BM5 murine leukemia viruses (MuLV)-induced immune-deficient animal model. Dietary supplementation of LEJE (100, 300, 500 mg/kg) began on the day of LP-BM5 MuLV infection and continued for 12 weeks. Dietary supplementation of LEJE inhibited LP-BM5 MuLV-induced splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Moreover, LEJE attenuated reductions of T- and B-cell proliferation and Th1/Th2 cytokine imbalance in LP-BM5. We found that dietary supplements of LEJE suppressed the hypergammaglobulinemia by ameliorating LP-BM5 MuLV infection-induced B-cell dysfunction and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We suggest that Eriobotrya japonica may have beneficial immunomodulatory effects, improving the balance of Th1/Th2 cytokines and anti-inflammatory effects.

  19. The Multicomponent Medication Lymphomyosot Improves the Outcome of Experimental Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Keim, Alex P.; Slis, Justin R.; Mendez, Uziel; Stroup, Emily M.; Burmeister, Yvonne; Tsolaki, Natalie; Gailing, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Secondary lymphedema is a life-long disease of painful tissue swelling that often follows axillary lymph node dissection to treat breast cancer. It is hypothesized that poor lymphatic regeneration across the obstructive scar tissue during the wound healing process may predispose the tissue to swell at a later date. Treatment for lymphedema remains suboptimal and is in most cases palliative. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of Lymphomyosot to treat tissue swelling and promote lymphangiogenesis in experimental models of murine lymphedema. Methods Experimental models of mouse lymphedema were injected with varied amounts of Lymphomyosot and saline as control. Measurements of tail swelling and wound closure were taken and compared amongst the groups. Three separate groups of mice were analyzed for lymphatic capillary migration, lymphatic vessel regeneration, and macrophage recruitment. Results Lymphomyosot significantly reduced swelling and increased the rate of surgical wound closure. Lymphomyosot did not increase the migration of lymph capillaries in a mouse tail skin regeneration model or regeneration of lymph vessels following murine axillary lymph node dissection. Conclusions Lymphomyosot may act through inflammatory and wound repair pathways to reduce experimental lymphedema. Its ability to regulate inflammation as well as assist in tissue repair and extracellular formation may allow for the production of a scar-free matrix bridge through which migrating cells and accumulated interstitial fluid can freely spread. PMID:23725444

  20. Enhanced detection and study of murine norovirus-1 using a more efficient microglial cell line

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Courtney; Cao, Shengbo; Lu, Yuanan

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Noroviruses are the predominant cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. To facilitate prevention and control, a norovirus isolated from mice can provide a model to understand human noroviruses. To establish optimal viral infectivity conditions for murine noroviruses, several cell lines of hematopoietic lineage, including murine BV-2, RAW 264.7, and TIB, as well as human CHME-5, were tested comparatively for their sensitivity to murine norovirus-1. Results Except for CHME-5, all three murine-derived cell lines were susceptible to MNV infection. Viral infection of these cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. Using both viral plaque and replication assays, BV-2 and RAW 264.7 cells were determined to have comparable sensitivities to MNV-1 infection. Comparisons of cell growth characteristics, general laboratory handling and potential in-field applications suggest the use of BV-2 to be more advantageous. Conclusion Results obtained from these studies demonstrate that an immortalized microglial cell line can support MNV-1 replication and provides a more efficient method to detect and study murine noroviruses, facilitating future investigations using MNV-1 as a model to study, detect, and control Human Norovirus. PMID:19903359

  1. Genomic structure and chromosomal mapping of the murine CD40 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, J.C.; Chang, R.; Howard, M.; Cockayne, D.A. ); Torres, R.; Clark, E.A. ); Kozak, C.A. )

    1992-12-15

    The B cell-associated surface molecule, CD40, is likely to play a central role in the expansion of Ag-stimulated B cells, and their interaction with activated Th cells. In this study the authors have isolated genomic clones of murine CD40 from a mouse liver genomic DNA library. Comparison with the murine CD40 cDNA sequence revealed the presence of nine exons that together contain the entire murine CD40 coding region, and span approximately 16.3 kb of genomic DNA. The intron/exon structure of the CD40 gene resembles that of the low affinity nerve growth factor receptor gene, a close homolog of both human and murine CD40. In both cases the functional domains of the receptor molecules are separated onto different exons throughout the genes. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that murine CD40 is a single copy gene that maps in the distal region of mouse chromosome 2. 58 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Capto MMC mixed-mode chromatography of murine and rabbit antibodies.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Storms, Michael; Maruyama, Toshiaki; Okumura, C J; Kita, Yoshiko

    2016-11-01

    Murine antibodies have weak affinity for Protein-A. Here, we have tested binding of murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) to Protein-A or Protein-A/Protein-G mixture under salting-out conditions. The addition of ammonium sulfate to HEK conditioned medium (CM) expressing murine mAb resulted in complete binding, leading to its elution by low pH or neutral arginine solution. Alternatively, a mixed-mode chromatography using Capto MMC resin was developed as a capture step. Binding of murine mAb occurred at neutral pH. The bound mAb was eluted with a gradient from 0.3 M NaCl to 0.3 M arginine/0.3 M NaCl at pH 7.0. The Capto MMC-purified murine mAb was further purified by hydroxyl apatite chromatography. Similarly, rabbit mAb was processed with some modifications. Binding of rabbit mAb to Capto MMC required a lower pH. Elution of the bound rabbit mAb was achieved by a gradient to 0.3 M NaCl, pH 7.0. PMID:27444249

  3. Expression cloning of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Munro, S; Maniatis, T

    1989-01-01

    A cDNA encoding a receptor for murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) was isolated from an expression library made from murine thymocytes. The clone was identified by transfecting the library into monkey COS cells and probing the transfected monolayer with radiolabeled murine IFN-gamma. Cells expressing the receptor were identified by autoradiography and plasmids encoding the receptor were directly rescued from those cells producing a positive signal. A partial cDNA so obtained was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from mouse L929 cells by conventional means. When this cDNA was expressed in COS cells it produced a specific binding site for murine IFN-gamma with an affinity constant similar to that of the receptor found on L929 cells. The predicted amino acid sequence of the murine IFN-gamma receptor shows homology to that previously reported for the human IFN-gamma receptor. However, although the two proteins are clearly related, they show less than 60% identity in both the putative extracellular domain and the intracellular domain. Images PMID:2531896

  4. Unstable resistance of G mouse fibroblasts to ecotropic murine leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikura, H; Naito, Y; Moriwaki, K

    1979-01-01

    G mouse cells were resistant to N- and NB-tropic Friend leukemia viruses and to B-tropic WN 1802B. Though the cells were resistant to focus formation by the Moloney isolate of murine sarcoma virus, they were relatively sensitive to helper component murine leukemia virus. To amphotropic murine leukemia virus and to focus formation by amphotropic murine sarcoma virus, G mouse cells were fully permissive. When the cell lines were established starting from the individual embryos, most cell lines were not resistant to the murine leukemia viruses. Only one resistant line was established. Cloning of this cell line indicated that the resistant cells constantly segregated sensitive cells during the culture; i.e., the G mouse cell cultures were probably always mixtures of sensitive and resistant cells. Among the sensitive cell clones, some were devoid of Fv-1 restriction. Such dually permissive cells, and also feral mouse-derived SC-1 cells, retained glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-1 and apparently normal number 4 chromosomes. The loss of Fv-1 restriction in these mouse cells was not brought about by any gross structural changes in the vicinity of Fv-1 on number 4 chromosomes. Images PMID:221667

  5. Identification and characterization of the inducible murine mast cell gene, imc-415.

    PubMed

    Cho, S H; Cho, J J; Kim, I S; Vliagoftis, H; Metcalfe, D D; Oh, C K

    1998-11-01

    Activation of mast cells results in the generation and release of bioactive mediators which in turn initiate allergic inflammation. Mast cell function is enhanced following stimulation in part because of the induction of specific genes and their products. To identify additional genes induced in mast cells that support this process, we thus constructed an activation-specific mast cell subtraction library. To date, we have isolated 26 novel inducible murine mast cell (imc) cDNA clones. Among them, a full-coding region of the murine gene imc-415 was found to have a greater than 90% nucleotide sequence homology and a 97.5% amino acid sequence homology to both a human beta4 integrin-binding protein (p27(BBP)) and a human translation initiation factor 6 (eIF6), which in turn are identical. In vitro translation of the imc-415 gene yielded a band of an approximately 26 kDa. This is the same as the calculated molecular weight of murine IMC-415 protein based on the predicted amino acid sequence and is the molecular weight of p27(BBP)/eIF6. Murine imc-415 message was also induced in inflamed lung tissues in a mouse model of asthma. These results suggest a role for murine imc-415 in allergic inflammation where it may enhance protein synthesis. Human eIF6/p27(BBP) may also play a role in allergic diseases based on the similarities in sequence and in gene expression patterns.

  6. Differential IL-1 synthesis by astrocytes from Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-susceptible and -resistant strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Rubio, N; Capa, L

    1993-07-01

    Increasing evidence shows that interleukin-1 (IL-1) contributes to inflammatory processes, such as experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) and virus-induced demyelination, inside the central nervous system (CNS). Using primary cultures of mouse astrocytes, we show that these glial cells can be induced to produce IL-1 alpha when infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). This was true for astrocytes from SJL/J mice, a strain susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelination. Conversely, BALB/c astrocytes, derived from animals genetically resistant to demyelination, did not produce IL-1 alpha in detectable amounts. Therefore, a differential IL-1 gene expression, which is strain specific, is demonstrated after TMEV infection in astrocytes. The release of IL-1 alpha by SJL astrocytes was studied from kinetic, infectivity, and immunochemical points of view. Since IL-1 plays a critical role in the immune response, its production by astrocytes in some strains of mice may contribute to virus-induced susceptibility and to inflammation associated with this experimental model of multiple sclerosis.

  7. Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) and Its Murine Functional Homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fabrício C.; Mendes-Junior, Celso T.; Silva, Maria C.; Tristão, Fabrine S. M.; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Soares, Edson G.; Menezes, Jean G.; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Roberto O.; Marin-Neto, José A.; Silva, João S.; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding) and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus) in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3′UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate). HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2) genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection. PMID:25688175

  8. Human leucocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and its murine functional homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    Dias, Fabrício C; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Silva, Maria C; Tristão, Fabrine S M; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Moreau, Philippe; Soares, Edson G; Menezes, Jean G; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Roberto O; Marin-Neto, José A; Silva, João S; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding) and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus) in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3'UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate). HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2) genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection.

  9. Metabolism under hypoxia in Tm1 murine melanoma cells is affected by the presence of galectin-3, a metabolomics approach.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Pedro Starzynski; Bloise, Antonio Carlos; Bustos, Silvina Odete; Zimmermann, Lara; Chammas, Roger; Rabbani, Said Rahnamaye

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics has proven an useful tool for systems biology. Here we have used a metabolomics approach to identify conditions in which de novo expression of an established tumor marker, galectin-3, would confer a potential selective advantage for melanoma growth and survival. A murine melanoma cell line (Tm1) that lacks galectin-3 was modified to express it or not (Tm1.G2 and Tm1.N3, respectively). These variant cell line were then exposed to conditions of controlled oxygen tensions and glucose levels. Metabolic profiling of intracellular metabolites of cells exposed to these conditions was obtained in steady state using high resolution (1)H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) and multivariate statistical analysis. The Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectra contained a large number of absorption lines from which we were able to distinguish 20 metabolites, 3 fatty acids and some absorption lines and clusters were not identified. Principal Components Analysis (PCA) allowed for the discrimination of 2 experimental conditions in which expression of the tumor marker galectin-3 may play a significant role, namely exposure of cells to hypoxia under high glucose. Interestingly, under all other experimental conditions tested, the cellular system was quite robust. Our results suggest that the Metabolomics approach can be used to access information about changes in many metabolic pathways induced in tumorigenic cells and to allow the evaluation of their behavior in controlled environmental conditions or selective pressures.

  10. Murine atherosclerotic plaque imaging with the USPIO Ferumoxtran-10.

    PubMed

    Klug, Gert; Kampf, Thomas; Ziener, Christan; Parczyk, Marco; Bauer, Elizabeth; Herold, Volker; Rommel, Eberhard; Jakob, Peter Michael; Bauer, Wolfgang Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    In this study we intended to image plaque inflammation in a murine model of atherosclerosis with MRI and Ferumoxtran-10 (Sinerem, Guerbet, France). 8 apoE-/- mice were injected 500 micromol Fe/kg or 1000 micromol Fe/kg Ferumoxtran-10. 2 apoE-/- mice were injected NaCl. After a post-contrast time of 24 to 336 hours the mice were scarificed and the aortas were imaged ex vivo. All measurements were performed on a 17.6 Tesla Bruker AVANCE 750WB MR scanner (Bruker, Germany). Spin-echo sequences and gradient-echo sequences with variable TE were performed and T2* maps were generated. Prussian-blue and hematoxilin-eosin histology were obtained afterwards and iron-uptake was quantified by counting iron positive areas. 2 apoE-/- mice were imaged in vivo before and 48 hours after 1000 micromol Fe/kg. Atheroma iron uptake was not elevated after 24 hours compared to controls. 48 hours after 1000 micromol Fe/kg but not 500 micromol Fe/kg histology revealed a 1.3- fold increase in plaque iron content compared to NaCl injected mice. Normalized T2*-times decreased from 0.86+/-0.02 in controls to 0.66+/-0.15 after a dose of 500 micromol Fe/ml and 0.59+/-0.14 in mice injected with 1000 micromol Fe/Kg (p=0.038). These results translated into a mean of 122% increase in CNR, as measured by in vivo MRI. We have demonstrated that Ferumoxtran-10 is taken up by atherosclerotic plaques in untreated apoE-/- mice and this alters plaque signal properties.

  11. Simvastatin induces osteogenic differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pagkalos, Joseph; Cha, Jae Min; Kang, Yunyi; Heliotis, Manolis; Tsiridis, Eleftherios; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2010-11-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis. Several statins are available with different molecular and pharmacokinetic properties. Simvastatin is more lipophilic than pravastatin and has a higher affinity to phospholipid membranes than atorvastatin, allowing its passive diffusion through the cell membrane. In vitro studies on bone marrow stromal cells, osteoblast-like cells, and embryonic stem cells have shown statins to have cholesterol-independent anabolic effects on bone metabolism; alas, statins were supplemented in osteogenic medium, which does not facilitate elucidation of their potential osteoinductive properties. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), derived from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst, are unique in that they enjoy perpetual self-proliferation, are pluripotent, and are able to differentiate toward all the cellular lineages composing the body, including the osteogenic lineage. Consequently, ESCs represent a potentially potent cell source for future clinical cellular therapies of various bone diseases, even though there are several hurdles that still need to be overcome. Herein we demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, that simvastatin induces murine ESC (mESC) differentiation toward the osteogenic lineage in the absence of osteoinductive supplements. Specifically, we found that a simvastatin concentration in the micromolar range and higher was toxic to the cells and that an effective concentration for osteoinduction is 0.1 nM, as shown by increased alizarin red staining as well as increased osteocalcin and osetrix gene expression. These results suggest that in the future, lipophilic simvastatin may provide a novel pharmacologic agent for bone tissue engineering applications. PMID:20564244

  12. Combined MEK and JAK inhibition abrogates murine myeloproliferative neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Guangyao; Wunderlich, Mark; Yang, David; Ranheim, Erik A.; Young, Ken H.; Wang, Jinyong; Chang, Yuan-I; Du, Juan; Liu, Yangang; Tey, Sin Ruow; Zhang, Xinmin; Juckett, Mark; Mattison, Ryan; Damnernsawad, Alisa; Zhang, Jingfang; Mulloy, James C.; Zhang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Overactive RAS signaling is prevalent in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) and the myeloproliferative variant of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (MP-CMML) in humans, and both are refractory to conventional chemotherapy. Conditional activation of a constitutively active oncogenic Nras (NrasG12D/G12D) in murine hematopoietic cells promotes an acute myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) that recapitulates many features of JMML and MP-CMML. We found that NrasG12D/G12D-expressing HSCs, which serve as JMML/MP-CMML–initiating cells, show strong hyperactivation of ERK1/2, promoting hyperproliferation and depletion of HSCs and expansion of downstream progenitors. Inhibition of the MEK pathway alone prolonged the presence of NrasG12D/G12D-expressing HSCs but failed to restore their proper function. Consequently, approximately 60% of NrasG12D/G12D mice treated with MEK inhibitor alone died within 20 weeks, and the remaining animals continued to display JMML/MP-CMML–like phenotypes. In contrast, combined inhibition of MEK and JAK/STAT signaling, which is commonly hyperactivated in human and mouse CMML, potently inhibited human and mouse CMML cell growth in vitro, rescued mutant NrasG12D/G12D-expressing HSC function in vivo, and promoted long-term survival without evident disease manifestation in NrasG12D/G12D animals. These results provide a strong rationale for further exploration of combined targeting of MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT in treating patients with JMML and MP-CMML. PMID:24812670

  13. Inhibition of murine cardiomyocyte respiration by amine local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Aburawi, Elhadi H; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2014-12-01

    The hydrophobic amino acyl amide-linked local anesthetics (e.g., lidocaine and bupivacaine) impose potent cardiac toxicity and direct mitochondrial dysfunction. To investigate these adverse events, an in vitro system was employed to measure their effects on O2 consumption (cellular respiration) by murine myocardium. Specimens were collected from the ventricular myocardium and immediately immersed in ice-cold Krebs-Henseleit buffer saturated with 95 % O2:5 % CO2. O2 concentration was determined as a function of time from the phosphorescence decay rates of Pd(II)-meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-tetrabenzoporphyrin. Myocardial O2 consumption was linear with time (zero-order kinetics); its rate (k, in μM O2 min(-1)), thus, was the negative of the slope of [O2] vs. time. Cyanide inhibited O2 consumption, confirming the oxidation occurred in the respiratory chain. Lidocaine and bupivacaine produced immediate and sustained inhibition of cellular respiration at plasma concentrations of the drugs (low micromolar range). Bupivacaine was twice as potent as lidocaine. The inhibition was dose-dependent, saturating at concentrations ≥30 μM. At saturating doses, lidocaine produced ~20 % inhibition and bupivacaine ~40 % inhibition. Cellular ATP was also decreased in the presence of 30 μM lidocaine or bupivacaine. The studied amines inhibited myocardial cellular respiration. This effect is consistent with their known adverse events on mitochondrial function. The described approach allows accurate assessments and comparisons of the toxic effects of local anesthetics on heart tissue bioenergetics. PMID:24254523

  14. Characterization of a Novel Murine Retrovirus Mixture That Facilitates Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Hook, Lauren M.; Jude, Brooke A.; Ter-Grigorov, Victor S.; Hartley, Janet W.; Morse III, Herbert C.; Trainin, Zeev; Toder, Vladimir; Chervonsky, Alexander V.; Golovkina, Tatyana V.

    2002-01-01

    A new virus previously arose in BALB/c females mated repeatedly to C57BL/6 (B6) males and then injected with fixed, activated B6 male spleen cells (V. S. Ter-Grigorov, O. Krifuks, E. Liubashevsky, A. Nyska, Z. Trainin, and V. Toder, Nat. Med. 3:37-41, 1997). In the present study, BALB/cJ mice inoculated with virus-containing plasma from affected mice developed splenomegaly, which was caused by increased numbers of Sca-1+ Lin− hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their differentiated progeny. Biological and molecular analyses of a new virus revealed a mixture of murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs). These MuLVs comprised ecotropic and mink lung cell focus-forming (MCF) virus classes and are termed Rauscher-like MuLVs because they bear numerous similarities to the ecotropic and MCF viruses of the Rauscher MuLV complex but do not include a spleen focus-forming virus. The ecotropic virus component alone transferred some disease characteristics, while MCF virus alone did not. Thus, we have described a novel virus mixture, termed Rauscher-like MuLV, that causes an increase in hematopoiesis due to activation of pluripotent HSC. Experiments using mice and a protocol that replicated the pregnancy and immunization strategy of the original experiment demonstrated that endogenous BALB/c mouse ecotropic and xenotropic MuLVs are activated by these treatments. Emv1 was expressed in the spleens of multiparous mice but not in those of virgin mice, and Bxv1Emv1-pseudotyped MuLVs were recovered following injection of fixed, activated B6 cells. Thus, multiple pregnancies and allostimuli appear to have provided the signals required for activation of and recombination among endogenous viruses and could have resulted in generation of the Rauscher-like MuLV mixture. PMID:12414952

  15. Effect of Murine Norovirus Infection on Mouse Parvovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Paturzo, Frank X; Macy, James D

    2010-01-01

    Enzootic infection with mouse parvovirus (MPV) remains a common problem in laboratory colonies, and diagnosis of MPV infection is complicated by viral and host factors. The effect of an underlying viral infection on MPV infection has not previously been investigated. We assessed the effect of murine norovirus (MNV) infection, the most prevalent infectious agent in laboratory mice, on MPV shedding, tissue distribution and transmission. Fecal MPV shedding persisted longer in BALB/c mice infected with MNV 1 wk prior to MPV infection than in mice infected with MPV only, but transmission of MPV to soiled-bedding sentinels was not prolonged in coinfected mice. MPV DNA levels in coinfected BALB/c mice were higher in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleens at 1 and 2 wk after inoculation and in small intestines at 1 wk after inoculation compared with levels in mice infected with MPV only. In C57BL/6 mice, fecal shedding was prolonged, but no difference in soiled bedding transmission or MPV DNA levels in tissues was detected between singly and coinfected mice. MPV DNA levels in singly and coinfected SW mice were similar. MPV DNA levels were highest in SW, intermediate in BALB/c and lowest in C57BL/6 mice. MPV DNA levels in mesenteric lymph nodes of BALB/c and SW mice exceeded those in small intestines and feces, whereas the inverse occurred in C57BL/6 mice. In conclusion, MNV infection increased the duration of MPV shedding and increased MPV DNA levels in tissues of BALB/c mice. PMID:20122310

  16. The Complete Genome Sequence of the Murine Pathobiont Helicobacter typhlonius

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Jeroen; Dingemanse, Celia; Schmitz, Arnoud M.; Vossen, Rolf H. A. M.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Robanus-Maandag, Els C.; Anvar, Seyed Yahya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Immuno-compromised mice infected with Helicobacter typhlonius are used to model microbially inducted inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The specific mechanism through which H. typhlonius induces and promotes IBD is not fully understood. Access to the genome sequence is essential to examine emergent properties of this organism, such as its pathogenicity. To this end, we present the complete genome sequence of H. typhlonius MIT 97-6810, obtained through single-molecule real-time sequencing. Results: The genome was assembled into a single circularized contig measuring 1.92 Mbp with an average GC content of 38.8%. In total 2,117 protein-encoding genes and 43 RNA genes were identified. Numerous pathogenic features were found, including a putative pathogenicity island (PAIs) containing components of type IV secretion system, virulence-associated proteins and cag PAI protein. We compared the genome of H. typhlonius to those of the murine pathobiont H. hepaticus and human pathobiont H. pylori. H. typhlonius resembles H. hepaticus most with 1,594 (75.3%) of its genes being orthologous to genes in H. hepaticus. Determination of the global methylation state revealed eight distinct recognition motifs for adenine and cytosine methylation. H. typhlonius shares four of its recognition motifs with H. pylori. Conclusion: The complete genome sequence of H. typhlonius MIT 97-6810 enabled us to identify many pathogenic features suggesting that H. typhlonius can act as a pathogen. Follow-up studies are necessary to evaluate the true nature of its pathogenic capabilities. We found many methylated sites and a plethora of restriction-modification systems. The genome, together with the methylome, will provide an essential resource for future studies investigating gene regulation, host interaction and pathogenicity of H. typhlonius. In turn, this work can contribute to unraveling the role of Helicobacter in enteric disease. PMID:26779178

  17. Mechanisms of antiviral action of plant antimicrobials against murine norovirus.

    PubMed

    Gilling, Damian H; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R; Bright, Kelly R

    2014-08-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤ 35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses.

  18. Combined preoperative and postoperative immunotherapy for murine C1300 neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Fowler, C L; Brooks, S P; Rossman, J E; Cooney, D R

    1993-03-01

    Preoperative treatment of murine C1300-neuroblastoma (C1300) with triple immunotherapy using low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY), retinyl palmitate (RP), and interleukin-2 (IL2), followed by tumor resection leads to significant initial tumor control and prolonged survival. However, because long-term tumor recurrence is 67%, the efficacy of continued postoperative immunotherapy is now evaluated. Thirty-two A/J mice with 1 cm subcutaneous C1300 tumors were treated for 13 days with CY-100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (IP), on day 2 of treatment then 25 mg/kg on day 9, RP-2500 IU IP 2 x/week, and IL2 1.6 x 10(5) U IP BID on days 4 to 9 and 11 to 13. On day 14, mice were divided into five treatment groups: (1) OP (operated-tumor resection, n = 6); (2) OP+CY (resection and postoperative CY, n = 7); (3) OP+CY+RP (resection and postoperative CY+RP, n = 7); (4) OP+CY+RP+IL2 (resection and postoperative CY+RP+IL2, n = 7); and (5) CY+RP+IL2 (continued CY+RP+IL2 with no resection, n = 5). Survival and postoperative tumor recurrence were followed for 60 days. The cure rates were group 1 33% (2/6), group 2 43% (3/7), group 3 29% (2/7), group 4 71% (5/7), and group 5 20% (1/5). After surgery, tumors that recurred did so in 8 to 22 days, with no statistical difference noted between groups. MHC class I antigenic expression of tumors resected on day 14 and recurrent tumors was determined with monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry. In tumors resected on day 14, class I expression measured by mean fluorescence, was 374.8 +/- 27.40.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. A Murine Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Model: The DBA/2J Strain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenyuan; Zhao, Tieqiang; Chen, Yuanjian; Zhao, Fengbo; Gu, Qingqing; Williams, Robert W; Bhattacharya, Syamal K; Lu, Lu; Sun, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is attributed to mutations in genes that encode for the sarcomere proteins, especially Mybpc3 and Myh7. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies show significant variability in HCM phenotypes among affected individuals with identical causal mutations. Morphological changes and clinical expression of HCM are the result of interactions with modifier genes. With the exceptions of angiotensin converting enzyme, these modifiers have not been identified. Although mouse models have been used to investigate the genetics of many complex diseases, natural murine models for HCM are still lacking. In this study we show that the DBA/2J (D2) strain of mouse has sequence variants in Mybpc3 and Myh7, relative to widely used C57BL/6J (B6) reference strain and the key features of human HCM. Four-month-old of male D2 mice exhibit hallmarks of HCM including increased heart weight and cardiomyocyte size relative to B6 mice, as well as elevated markers for cardiac hypertrophy including β-myosin heavy chain (MHC), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and skeletal muscle alpha actin (α1-actin). Furthermore, cardiac interstitial fibrosis, another feature of HCM, is also evident in the D2 strain, and is accompanied by up-regulation of type I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-markers of fibrosis. Of great interest, blood pressure and cardiac function are within the normal range in the D2 strain, demonstrating that cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis are not secondary to hypertension, myocardial infarction, or heart failure. Because D2 and B6 strains have been used to generate a large family of recombinant inbred strains, the BXD cohort, the D2 model can be effectively exploited for in-depth genetic analysis of HCM susceptibility and modifier screens.

  20. Osteoporosis in murine systemic lupus erythematosus--a laboratory model.

    PubMed

    Schapira, D; Kabala, A; Raz, B; Israeli, E

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the skeletal metabolism in a murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). MRL/n and MRL/l mice (respectively representing a benign and a malignant form of the disease) were observed from 1.5 to 6.5 months of life. The monthly follow-up included: biochemical and histomorphometrical studies of the femoral bone, serum biochemistry, immunoglobulins and osteocalcin, and histological evaluation of the kidney tissue. The results showed a higher femoral weight (+11.5%), calcium (+4.4%) and protein bone content (+11.4%) and a significantly higher (+77%) phosphorus bone content in the MRL/n group; significantly lower (-48.9%) bone alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity, lower bone alkaline/acid phosphatase enzymatic activities ratio (-40.8%) and lower (-38.4%) serum osteocalcin values in the MRL/l group (which might suggest reduced bone formation in these animals); markedly smaller trabecular bone volume (BV/TV) in the femoral head (-36.2%) and femoral neck (-39.8%), and smaller cortical and femoral areas in the mid-femoral shaft (-38.8% and -38.1% respectively) in the MRL/l group; higher serum immunoglobulins, increased serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine and a higher index of activity in the kidney histology in the MRL/l group, indicating increased activity of the disease in this substrain. The MRL mice, through their two substrains, may serve as a valuable laboratory animal model for study of the skeletal changes in SLE and of the influence of the disease activity on the skeletal metabolism.

  1. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial uncoupling in a murine cancer cachexia model.

    PubMed

    Tzika, A Aria; Fontes-Oliveira, Cibely Cristine; Shestov, Alexander A; Constantinou, Caterina; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Righi, Valeria; Mintzopoulos, Dionyssios; Busquets, Silvia; Lopez-Soriano, Francisco J; Milot, Sylvain; Lepine, Francois; Mindrinos, Michael N; Rahme, Laurence G; Argiles, Josep M

    2013-09-01

    Approximately half of all cancer patients present with cachexia, a condition in which disease-associated metabolic changes lead to a severe loss of skeletal muscle mass. Working toward an integrated and mechanistic view of cancer cachexia, we investigated the hypothesis that cancer promotes mitochondrial uncoupling in skeletal muscle. We subjected mice to in vivo phosphorous-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy and subjected murine skeletal muscle samples to gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The mice used in both experiments were Lewis lung carcinoma models of cancer cachexia. A novel 'fragmented mass isotopomer' approach was used in our dynamic analysis of 13C mass isotopomer data. Our 31P NMR and GC/MS results indicated that the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis rate and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux were reduced by 49% and 22%, respectively, in the cancer-bearing mice (p<0.008; t-test vs. controls). The ratio of ATP synthesis rate to the TCA cycle flux (an index of mitochondrial coupling) was reduced by 32% in the cancer-bearing mice (p=0.036; t-test vs. controls). Genomic analysis revealed aberrant expression levels for key regulatory genes and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed ultrastructural abnormalities in the muscle fiber, consistent with the presence of abnormal, giant mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggest that mitochondrial uncoupling occurs in cancer cachexia and thus point to the mitochondria as a potential pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cachexia. These findings may prove relevant to elucidating the mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle wasting observed in other chronic diseases, as well as in aging.

  2. B CELL DEPLETION THERAPY EXACERBATES MURINE PRIMARY BILIARY CIRRHOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Dhirapong, Amy; Lleo, Ana; Yang, Guo-Xiang; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Dunn, Robert; Kehry, Marilyn; Packard, Thomas A.; Cambier, John C.; Liu, Fu-Tong; Lindor, Keith; Coppel, Ross L.; Ansari, Aftab A.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2010-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is considered a model autoimmune disease due to the clinical homogeneity of patients and the classic hallmark of anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMAS). Indeed, the presence of AMAS is the most highly directed and specific autoantibody in autoimmune diseases. However, the contribution of B cells to the pathogenesis of PBC is unclear. Thus, although AMAs appear to interact with the biliary cell apotope and contribute to biliary pathology, there is no correlation of disease severity and titer of AMA. The recent development of well characterized mAbs specific for the B cell populations, anti-CD20 and anti-CD79, and the development of a well defined xenobiotic induced model of autoimmune cholangitis, prompted us to utilize these reagents and the model to address the contribution of B cells in the pathogenesis of murine PBC. Prior to the induction of autoimmune cholangitis, mice were treated with either anti-CD20, anti-CD79, or isotype matched control mAb and followed for B cell development, the appearance of AMAs, liver pathology and cytokine production. Results of the studies reported herein show that the in vivo depletion of B cells using either anti-CD20 or anti-CD79 led to the development of a more severe form of cholangitis than control mice which is in contrast with results from a number of other autoimmune models which have documented an important therapeutic role of B cell specific depletion. The anti-CD20/CD79 treated mice have increased liver T cell infiltrates and higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, our results reflect a novel disease protective role of B cells in PBC and suggest that B cell depletion therapy in humans with PBC should be approached with caution. PMID:21274873

  3. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  4. Murine macrophage heparanase: inhibition and comparison with metastatic tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savion, N.; Disatnik, M.H.; Nevo, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Circulating macrophages and metastatic tumor cells can penetrate the vascular endothelium and migrate from the circulatory system to extravascular compartments. Both activated murine macrophages and different metastatic tumor cells attach, invade, and penetrate confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro, by degrading heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the subendothelial extracellular matrix. The sensitivity of the enzymes from the various sources degrading the heparan sulfate proteoglycan was challenged and compared by a series of inhibitors. Activated macrophages demonstrate a heparanase with an endoglycosidase activity that cleaves from the (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix 10 kDa glycosaminoglycan fragments. The degradation of (/sup 35/S)O/sub 4//sup -/-labeled extracellular matrix proteoglycans by the macrophages' heparanase is significantly inhibited in the presence of heparan sulfate (10..mu..g/ml), arteparon (10..mu..g/ml), and heparin at a concentration of 3 ..mu..g/ml. Degradation of this heparan sulfate proteoglycan is a two-step sequential process involving protease activity followed by heparanase activity. B16-BL6 metastatic melanoma cell heparanase, which is also a cell-associated enzyme, was inhibited by heparin to the same extent as the macrophage haparanase. On the other hand, heparanase of the highly metastatic variant (ESb) of a methylcholanthrene-induced T lymphoma, which is an extracellular enzyme released by the cells to the incubation medium, was more sensitive to heparin and arteparon than the macrophages' heparanase. These results may indicate the potential use of heparin or other glycosaminoglycans as specific and differential inhibitors for the formation in certain cases of blood-borne tumor metastasis.

  5. Environmental Modulation of Oral Treponeme Virulence in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Holt, Stanley C.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of environmental alteration on the virulence of the oral treponemes Treponema denticola and Treponema pectinovorum. The environmental effects were assessed by using a model of localized inflammatory abscesses in mice. In vitro growth of T. denticola and T. pectinovorum as a function of modification of the cysteine concentration significantly enhanced abscess formation and size. In contrast, growth of T. denticola or T. pectinovorum under iron-limiting conditions (e.g., dipyridyl chelation) had no effect on abscess induction in comparison to that when the strains were grown under normal iron conditions. In vivo modulation of the microenvironment at the focus of infection with Cytodex beads demonstrated that increasing the local inflammation had no effect on lesion induction or size. In vivo studies involved the determination of the effects of increased systemic iron availability (e.g., iron dextran or phenylhydrazine) on the induction, kinetics, and size of lesions. T. denticola induced significantly larger lesions in mice with iron pretreatment and demonstrated systemic manifestations of the infectious challenge and an accompanying spreading lesion with phenylhydrazine pretreatment (e.g., increases in circulating free hemoglobin). In contrast, T. pectinovorum virulence was minimally affected by this in vivo treatment to increase iron availability. T. denticola virulence, as evaluated by lesion size, was increased additively by in vivo iron availability, and cysteine modified growth of the microorganism. Additionally, galactosamine sensitized mice to a lethal outcome following infection with both T. denticola and T. pectinovorum, suggesting an endotoxin-like activity in these treponemes. These findings demonstrated the ability to modify the virulence capacity of T. denticola and T. pectinovorum by environmental conditions which can be evaluated by using in vivo murine models. PMID:10338481

  6. Induction and treatment of anergy in murine leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Juarez-Ortega, Mario; Hernandez, Víctor G; Arce-Paredes, Patricia; Villanueva, Enrique B; Aguilar-Santelises, Miguel; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease consisting of a spectrum of clinical, bacteriological, histopathological and immunological manifestations. Tuberculoid leprosy is frequently recognized as the benign polar form of the disease, while lepromatous leprosy is regarded as the malignant form. The different forms of leprosy depend on the genetic and immunological characteristics of the patient and on the characteristics of the leprosy bacillus. The malignant manifestations of lepromatous leprosy result from the mycobacterial-specific anergy that develops in this form of the disease. Using murine leprosy as a model of anergy in this study, we first induced the development of anergy to Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) in mice and then attempted to reverse it by the administration of dialysable leucocyte extracts (DLE) prepared from healthy (HLT), BCG-inoculated and MLM-inoculated mice. Mice inoculated with either MLM or BCG developed a robust cell-mediated immune response (CMI) that was temporary in the MLM-inoculated group and long-lasting in the BCG-inoculated group. DLE were prepared from the spleens of MLM- and BCG-inoculated mice at the peak of CMI. Independent MLM intradermally-inoculated groups were treated every other day with HLT-DLE, BCG-DLE or MLM-DLE, and the effect was documented for 98 days. DLE administered at a dose of 1.0 U (1 × 106 splenocytes) did not affect the evolution of leprosy, while DLE given at a dose of 0.1 U showed beneficial effects regardless of the DLE source. The dose but not the specificity of DLE was the determining factor for reversing anergy. PMID:25529580

  7. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Pietrofesa, Ralph A.; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S.; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K.; Solomides, Charalambos C.; Ullrich, Robert L.; Petrache, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to 137Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u 56Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u 28Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy 56Fe or 28Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  8. Complementation analysis of the murine scid cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zdzienicka, M.Z. |; Priestly, A.; Jeggo, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    It has been shown that several X-ray-sensitive Chinese hamster cell mutants defective in repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are also impaired in the process of V(D)J recombination. The hamster mutants with this phenotype represent three distinct complementation groups, represented by the xrs series, XR-1 and V-3. The murine scid cell line also shows the same phenotype, and therefore we examined whether the scid mutant represents a new complementation group or belongs to one of the existing groups. Scid cells were fused with hamster cell mutants representing the three complementation groups. Hybrids between V-3 and scid cells were only partially complemented for X-ray sensitivity, whereas hybrids derived from fusions with the other mutants were resistant to X rays. These results suggest that V-3 and scid cells are defective in the same gene. To confirm this finding, a single human chromosome 8, which is known to carry the scid gene, was introduced into V-3 cells by microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Nine hybrid clones derived from V-3 and carrying human chromosome 8 were obtained, and seven were found to be partially complemented for X-ray sensitivity. When human chromosome 8 was introduced into scid cells, seven of eight hybrid clones became resistant to X rays. The results indicate that the defective genes in V-3 and scid are both localized on human chromosome 8. This supports the results from the fusion analysis that V-3 and scid cells are defective in the same gene. 53 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Melatonin modulates adiponectin expression on murine colitis with sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kyun; Park, Young Sook; Baik, Haing-Woon; Jun, Jin Hyun; Kim, Eun Kyung; Sull, Jae Woong; Sung, Ho Joong; Choi, Jin Woo; Chung, Sook Hee; Gye, Myung Chan; Lim, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jun Bong; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine adiponectin expression in colonic tissue of murine colitis and systemic cytokine expression after melatonin treatments and sleep deprivation. METHODS The following five groups of C57BL/6 mice were used in this study: (1) group I, control; (2) group II, 2% DSS induced colitis for 7 d; (3) group III, 2% DSS induced colitis and melatonin treatment; (4) group IV, 2% DSS induced colitis with sleep deprivation (SD) using specially designed and modified multiple platform water baths; and (5) group V, 2% DSS induced colitis with SD and melatonin treatment. Melatonin (10 mg/kg) or saline was intraperitoneally injected daily to mice for 4 d. The body weight was monitored daily. The degree of colitis was evaluated histologically after sacrificing the mice. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis was performed using anti-adiponectin antibody. After sampling by intracardiac punctures, levels of serum cytokines were measured by ELISA. RESULTS Sleep deprivation in water bath exacerbated DSS induced colitis and worsened weight loss. Melatonin injection not only alleviated the severity of mucosal injury, but also helped survival during stressful condition. The expression level of adiponectin in mucosa was decreased in colitis, with the lowest level observed in colitis combined with sleep deprivation. Melatonin injection significantly (P < 0.05) recovered the expression of adiponectin. The expression levels of IL-6 and IL-17 were increased in the serum of mice with DSS colitis but decreased after melatonin injection. CONCLUSION This study suggested that melatonin modulated adiponectin expression in colonic tissue and melatonin and adiponectin synergistically potentiated anti-inflammatory effects on colitis with sleep deprivation.

  10. Melatonin modulates adiponectin expression on murine colitis with sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Kyun; Park, Young Sook; Baik, Haing-Woon; Jun, Jin Hyun; Kim, Eun Kyung; Sull, Jae Woong; Sung, Ho Joong; Choi, Jin Woo; Chung, Sook Hee; Gye, Myung Chan; Lim, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jun Bong; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine adiponectin expression in colonic tissue of murine colitis and systemic cytokine expression after melatonin treatments and sleep deprivation. METHODS The following five groups of C57BL/6 mice were used in this study: (1) group I, control; (2) group II, 2% DSS induced colitis for 7 d; (3) group III, 2% DSS induced colitis and melatonin treatment; (4) group IV, 2% DSS induced colitis with sleep deprivation (SD) using specially designed and modified multiple platform water baths; and (5) group V, 2% DSS induced colitis with SD and melatonin treatment. Melatonin (10 mg/kg) or saline was intraperitoneally injected daily to mice for 4 d. The body weight was monitored daily. The degree of colitis was evaluated histologically after sacrificing the mice. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis was performed using anti-adiponectin antibody. After sampling by intracardiac punctures, levels of serum cytokines were measured by ELISA. RESULTS Sleep deprivation in water bath exacerbated DSS induced colitis and worsened weight loss. Melatonin injection not only alleviated the severity of mucosal injury, but also helped survival during stressful condition. The expression level of adiponectin in mucosa was decreased in colitis, with the lowest level observed in colitis combined with sleep deprivation. Melatonin injection significantly (P < 0.05) recovered the expression of adiponectin. The expression levels of IL-6 and IL-17 were increased in the serum of mice with DSS colitis but decreased after melatonin injection. CONCLUSION This study suggested that melatonin modulated adiponectin expression in colonic tissue and melatonin and adiponectin synergistically potentiated anti-inflammatory effects on colitis with sleep deprivation. PMID:27672276

  11. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for <1% of all patients with Alzheimer's disease. The inherited form is even regarded a 'rare' disease according to the regulations for funding of the European Union (www.erare.eu). Here, we show that mice that are double-deficient for neprilysin (encoded by Mme), one major amyloid-β-degrading enzyme, and the ABC transporter ABCC1, a major contributor to amyloid-β clearance from the brain, develop various aspects of sporadic Alzheimer's disease mimicking the clinical stage of mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows

  12. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions.

  13. Induction and regulation of murine emphysema by elastin peptides.

    PubMed

    Sellami, Mehdi; Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Terryn, Christine; Fichel, Caroline; Bouland, Nicole; Diebold, Marie-Daniele; Guenounou, Moncef; Héry-Huynh, Stéphanie; Le Naour, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Emphysema is the major component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). During emphysema, elastin breakdown in the lung tissue originates from the release of large amounts of elastase by inflammatory cells. Elevated levels of elastin-derived peptides (EP) reflect massive pulmonary elastin breakdown in COPD patients. Only the EP containing the GXXPG conformational motif with a type VIII β-turn are elastin receptor ligands inducing biological activities. In addition, the COOH-terminal glycine residue of the GXXPG motif seems a prerequisite to the biological activity. In this study, we endotracheally instilled C57BL/6J mice with GXXPG EP and/or COOH-terminal glycine deleted-EP whose sequences were designed by molecular dynamics and docking simulations. We investigated their effect on all criteria associated with the progression of murine emphysema. Bronchoalveolar lavages were recovered to analyze cell profiles by flow cytometry and lungs were prepared to allow morphological and histological analysis by immunostaining and confocal microscopy. We observed that exposure of mice to EP elicited hallmark features of emphysema with inflammatory cell accumulation associated with increased matrix metalloproteinases and desmosine expression and of remodeling of parenchymal tissue. We also identified an inactive COOH-terminal glycine deleted-EP that retains its binding-activity to EBP and that is able to inhibit the in vitro and in vivo activities of emphysema-inducing EP. This study demonstrates that EP are key actors in the development of emphysema and that they represent pharmacological targets for an alternative treatment of emphysema based on the identification of EP analogous antagonists by molecular modeling studies.

  14. Activity of levofloxacin in a murine model of tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Klemens, S P; Sharpe, C A; Rogge, M C; Cynamon, M H

    1994-01-01

    The activity of levofloxacin (LEV) was evaluated in a murine model of tuberculosis. Approximately 10(7) viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis ATCC 35801 were given intravenously to 4-week-old female outbred mice. In a dose-response study, treatment with LEV at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg of body weight was started 1 day after infection and was given daily for 28 days. Viable cell counts were determined from homogenates of spleens and lungs. A dose-related reduction in organism cell counts in organs was noted for LEV. The activities of LEV at 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg were compared with those of first-line antituberculosis agents. Both isoniazid and rifampin were more active than LEV. There was no difference in activity between LEV and either ethambutol or pyrazinamide against splenic organisms. The activities of ethambutol and LEV at the two higher doses were comparable against lung organisms. LEV at 300 mg/kg was more active than pyrazinamide against lung organisms. The activity of LEV was compared with those of two other quinolones, ofloxacin and sparfloxacin. LEV at 200 mg/kg had more than twofold greater activity than ofloxacin at the same dose. Sparfloxacin at 100 mg/kg was more active than LEV at 200 mg/kg; however, the activities of sparfloxacin at 50 mg/kg and LEV at 200 mg/kg were comparable. The promising activity of LEV in M. tuberculosis-infected mice suggests that it is a good candidate for clinical development as a new antituberculosis agent. PMID:7979275

  15. Murine fertilized ovum, blastomere and morula cells lacking SP phenotype.

    PubMed

    Xu, YiXin; He, ZhiYing; Zhu, HaiYing; Chen, XueSong; Li, JianXiu; Zhang, HongXia; Pan, XingHua; Hu, YiPing

    2007-12-01

    In the field of stem cell research, SP (side population) phenotype is used to define the property that cells maintain a high efflux capability for some fluorescent dye, such as Hoechst 33342. Recently, many researches proposed that SP phenotype is a phenotype shared by some stem cells and some progenitor cells, and that SP phenotype is regarded as a candidate purification marker for stem cells. In this research, murine fertilized ova (including conjugate and single nucleus fertilized ova), 2-cell stage and 8-cell stage blastomeres, morulas and blastocysts were isolated and directly stained by Hoechst 33342 dye. The results show that fertilized ovum, blastomere and morula cells do not demonstrate any ability to efflux the dye. However, the inner cell mass (ICM) cells of blastocyst exhibit SP phenotype, which is consistent with the result of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro. These results indicate that the SP phenotype of ICM-derived ESCs is an intrinsic property and independent of the culture condition in vitro, and that SP phenotype is one of the characteristics of at least some pluripotent stem cells, but is not shared by totipotent stem cells. In addition, the result that the SP phenotype of ICM cells disappeared when the inhibitor verapamil was added into medium implies that the SP phenotype is directly associated with ABCG2. These results suggest that not all the stem cells demonstrate SP phenotype, and that SP phenotype might act as a purification marker for partial stem cells such as some pluripotent embryonic stem cells and multipotent adult stem cells, but not for all stem cells exampled by the totipotent stem cells in the very early stage of mouse embryos.

  16. Expression of heteromeric amino acid transporters along the murine intestine.

    PubMed

    Dave, Mital H; Schulz, Nicole; Zecevic, Marija; Wagner, Carsten A; Verrey, Francois

    2004-07-15

    Members of the new heterodimeric amino acid transporter family are composed of two subunits, a catalytic multitransmembrane spanning protein (light chain) and a type II glycoprotein (heavy chain). These transporters function as exchangers and thereby extend the transmembrane amino acid transport selectivity to specific amino acids. The heavy chain rBAT associates with the light chain b degrees (,+)AT to form a cystine and cationic amino acid transporter. The other heavy chain, 4F2hc, can interact with seven different light chains to form various transporters corresponding to systems L, y(+)L, asc or x(-)(c). The importance of some of these transporters in intestinal and renal (re)absorption of amino acids is highlighted by the fact that mutations in either the rBAT or b degrees (,+)AT subunit result in cystinuria whereas a defect in the y(+)-LAT1 light chain causes lysinuric protein intolerance. Here we investigated the localization of these transporters in intestine since both diseases are also characterized by altered intestinal amino acid absorption. Real time PCR showed organ-specific expression patterns for all transporter subunit mRNAs along the intestine and Western blotting confirmed these findings on the protein level. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated basolateral coexpression of 4F2hc, LAT2 and y(+)-LAT1 in stomach and small intestine, whereas rBAT and b degrees (,+)AT were found colocalizing on the apical side of small intestine epithelium. In stomach, 4F2hc and LAT2 were localized in H(+)/K(+)-ATPase-expressing parietal cells. The abundant expression of several members of the heterodimeric transporter family along the murine small intestine suggests their involvement in amino acids absorption. Furthermore, strong expression of rBAT, b degrees (,+)AT and y(+)-LAT1 in the small intestine explains the reduced intestinal absorption of some amino acid in patients with cystinuria or lysinuric protein intolerance.

  17. Mechanisms of Antiviral Action of Plant Antimicrobials against Murine Norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Gilling, Damian H.; Kitajima, Masaaki; Torrey, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous plant compounds have antibacterial or antiviral properties; however, limited research has been conducted with nonenveloped viruses. The efficacies of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral were evaluated against the nonenveloped murine norovirus (MNV), a human norovirus surrogate. The antiviral mechanisms of action were also examined using an RNase I protection assay, a host cell binding assay, and transmission electron microscopy. All three antimicrobials produced significant reductions (P ≤ 0.05) in viral infectivity within 6 h of exposure (0.90 log10 to 1.88 log10). After 24 h, the reductions were 2.74, 3.00, and 3.41 log10 for lemongrass oil, citral, and allspice oil, respectively. The antiviral effect of allspice oil was both time and concentration dependent; the effects of lemongrass oil and citral were time dependent. Based on the RNase I assay, allspice oil appeared to act directly upon the viral capsid and RNA. The capsids enlarged from ≤35 nm to up to 75 nm following treatment. MNV adsorption to host cells was not significantly affected. Alternatively, the capsid remained intact following exposure to lemongrass oil and citral, which appeared to coat the capsid, causing nonspecific and nonproductive binding to host cells that did not lead to successful infection. Such contrasting effects between allspice oil and both lemongrass oil and citral suggest that though different plant compounds may yield similar reductions in virus infectivity, the mechanisms of inactivation may be highly varied and specific to the antimicrobial. This study demonstrates the antiviral properties of allspice oil, lemongrass oil, and citral against MNV and thus indicates their potential as natural food and surface sanitizers to control noroviruses. PMID:24907316

  18. T cells in murine lupus: propagation and regulation of disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, S L; Craft, J

    1996-01-01

    MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice develop a spontaneous lupus syndrome, including hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibodies, glomerulonephritis, and lymphadenopathy. To investigate the role of lymphocytes subsets in the pathogenesis of disease, lupus-prone MRL mice deficient in alpha beta T cells, gamma delta T cells, or both were generated. Mice deficient in alpha beta T cells developed a partially penetrant lupus syndrome, characterized by lymphadenopathy, elevated levels of class-switched immunoglobulins, an increased incidence of antinuclear antibodies, and immune deposits in kidneys which progressed to renal insufficiency over time. In comparison to wild type animals, gamma delta T cell-deficient animals developed an accelerated and exacerbated disease phenotype, characterized by accelerated hypergammaglobulinemia and enhanced autoantibody production and mortality. Repertoire analysis of these latter animals identified polyclonal expansion (V beta) of alpha beta CD4+ B220-cells. Mice lacking both alpha beta and gamma delta T cells failed to generate class-switched autoantibodies and immune complex renal disease. First, these findings demonstrate that murine lupus in the setting of Fas-deficiency does not absolutely require the presence of alpha beta T cells, and they also suggest that a significant basis for MRL/lpr disease, including renal disease, involves alpha beta T cell-independent, gamma delta T cell dependent, polyreactive B cell autoimmunity, upon which alpha beta T cell-dependent mechanisms aggravate specific autoimmune responses. Second, these data indicate that gamma delta T cells partake in the regulation of systemic autoimmunity, presumably via their effects on alpha beta CD4+ B220-T cells that provide B cell help. Finally, these results demonstrate that MRL/lpr B cells, despite their intrinsic abnormalities, cannot per se cause tissue injury without T cell help.

  19. Schistosoma japonicum cystatin attenuates murine collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Cheng, Weisheng; Pappoe, Faustina; Hu, Xiaodong; Wen, Huiqin; Luo, Qingli; Wang, Shushu; Deng, Fang; Xie, Yuanyuan; Xu, Yuanhong; Shen, Jilong

    2016-10-01

    Recombinant SjCystatin (rSjCystatin), a recombinant protein of Schistosoma japonicum cystatin, has been reported to have an effect on immunoregulation mediated by IL-10 induction. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune inflammatory arthropathy, and recombinant immune-modulating drugs for RA treatment are under development. We aimed to study the putative immune regulation of rSjCystatin and its prophylactic/therapeutic effects on murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). CIA was induced in DBA/1 mice by inoculation with bovine collagen II (CII). rSjCystatin was administered prior or post development of CIA. The severity of CIA was assessed using established clinical and histopathological scoring systems. The incidence was also determined. The CII-specific antibodies in sera and cytokines in splenocyte culture supernatants were measured by ELISA. Th1/Th2/Th17 cells and Tregs development in splenocytes were monitored by flow cytometry. The inflammatory mediators in the diseased joint were semiquantitated by qPCR. Prophylactic injection of rSjCystatin attenuated paw clinical scores, incidence, and histopathology scores of joints in CIA mice. The arthritis-alleviative effects were closely associated with the augmentation of IL-4, IL-10, and collagen-specific IgG1, and with the distinct reduction of IFN-γ, collagen-specific IgG2a, and the marked decrease of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-17, and TNF-α and RANKL. The data indicate that rSjCystatin may prevent cartilage destruction and inflammation of joints in CIA mice. The effects are related to the inhibitory modulation of Th1 and Th17 and upregulation of Tregs and Th2 via a shift of cytokines profiling from Th1 to Th2 response. PMID:27393379

  20. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J.; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA ‘off-target’ effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host–pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host–virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host–virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  1. Interferon-alpha inhibits murine macrophage transforming growth factor-beta mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Dhanani, S; Huang, M; Wang, J; Dubinett, S M

    1994-06-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), a multifunctional polypeptide is produced by a wide variety of cells and regulates a broad array of physiological and pathological functions. TGF-beta appears to play a central role in pulmonary fibrosis and may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. Alveolar macrophages are a rich source of TGF-beta and are intimately involved in lung inflammation. We therefore chose to study TGF-beta regulation in murine alveolar macrophages as well as an immortalized peritoneal macrophage cell line (IC-21). Murine macrophages were incubated with cytokines to evaluate their role in regulating TGF-beta mRNA expression. We conclude that IFN-alpha downregulates TGF-beta mRNA expression in murine macrophages. PMID:8088926

  2. Shared idiotypes and restricted immunoglobulin variable region heavy chain genes characterize murine autoantibodies of various specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Monestier, M; Manheimer-Lory, A; Bellon, B; Painter, C; Dang, H; Talal, N; Zanetti, M; Schwartz, R; Pisetsky, D; Kuppers, R

    1986-01-01

    The study of the Ig variable region heavy chain (VH) genes used to encode antibodies specific for self-epitopes from murine hybridomas showed that three VH families are primarily utilized: VH J558, the largest family, and VH QPC52 and VH 7183, the families most proximal to the Ig joining region heavy chain genes. These monoclonal autoantibodies express cross-reactive idiotopes shared by rheumatoid factors and antibodies specific for Sm. The expression of these idiotypes is independent of major histocompatibility complex and Ig constant region heavy chain haplotypes, self-antigen specificity, and even the VH gene family utilized. Though the experiments described here are limited to murine autoantibodies, similarities exist between murine and human autoimmune diseases. Studies that aim to investigate the relationship between VH gene expression and the presence of cross-reactive idiotypes among human autoantibodies should enable us to better understand the mechanisms of autoimmunity and self-tolerance. Images PMID:2427543

  3. Murine Typhus in Returned Travelers: A Report of Thirty-Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Gaëlle; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth; Socolovschi, Cristina; Raoult, Didier; Parola, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Murine typhus, caused by Rickettsia typhi a