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Sample records for murine leukemia efficacy

  1. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Laura B.; Janke, Laura J.; Payton, Monique A.; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W.; Karol, Seth E.; Kamdem, Landry Kamdem; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26252865

  2. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Laura B; Janke, Laura J; Payton, Monique A; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W; Karol, Seth E; Kamdem Kamdem, Landry; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  3. Immunotherapy of murine leukemia. Efficacy of passive serum therapy of Friend leukemia virus-induced disease in immunocompromised mice

    SciTech Connect

    Genovesi, E.V.; Livnat, D.; Collins, J.J.

    1983-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the passive therapy of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced disease with chimpanzee anti-F-MuLV serum is accompanied by the development of host antiviral humoral and cellular immunity, the latter measurable in adoptive transfer protocols and by the ability of serum-protected mice to resist virus rechallenge. The present study was designed to further examine the contribution of various compartments of the host immune system to serum therapy itself, as well as to the acquired antiviral immunity that develops in serum-protected mice, through the use of naturally immunocompromised animals (e.g., nude athymic mice and natural killer (NK)-deficient beige mutant mice) or mice treated with immunoabrogating agents such as sublethal irradiation, cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan (Cy)), cortisone, and /sup 89/Sr. The studies in nude mice indicate that while mature T-cells are not needed for effective serum therapy, they do appear to be necessary for the long-term resistance of serum-protected mice to virus rechallenge and for the generation of the cell population(s) responsible for adoptive transfer of antiviral immunity. Furthermore, this acquired resistance is not due to virus neutralization by serum antibodies since antibody-negative, Cy-treated, serum-protected mice still reject the secondary virus infection. Lastly, while the immunocompromise systems examined did effect various host antiviral immune responses, none of them, including the NK-deficient beige mutation, significantly diminished the efficacy of the passive serum therapy of F-MuLV-induced disease.

  4. Pronounced Hypoxia in Models of Murine and Human Leukemia: High Efficacy of Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug PR-104

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Juliana; Shi, Yuexi; Szymanska, Barbara; Carol, Hernan; Boehm, Ingrid; Lu, Hongbo; Konoplev, Sergej; Fang, Wendy; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick A.; Campana, Dario; Borthakur, Gautam; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Shpall, Elizabeth; Thomas, Deborah A.; Jordan, Craig T.; Kantarjian, Hagop; Wilson, William R.; Lock, Richard; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that interactions between leukemia cells and the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment promote leukemia cell survival and confer resistance to anti-leukemic drugs. There is evidence that BM microenvironment contains hypoxic areas that confer survival advantage to hematopoietic cells. In the present study we investigated whether hypoxia in leukemic BM contributes to the protective role of the BM microenvironment. We observed a marked expansion of hypoxic BM areas in immunodeficient mice engrafted with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Consistent with this finding, we found that hypoxia promotes chemoresistance in various ALL derived cell lines. These findings suggest to employ hypoxia-activated prodrugs to eliminate leukemia cells within hypoxic niches. Using several xenograft models, we demonstrated that administration of the hypoxia-activated dinitrobenzamide mustard, PR-104 prolonged survival and decreased leukemia burden of immune-deficient mice injected with primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Together, these findings strongly suggest that targeting hypoxia in leukemic BM is feasible and may significantly improve leukemia therapy. PMID:21853076

  5. Overview of the Use of Murine Models in Leukemia and Lymphoma Research

    PubMed Central

    Kohnken, Rebecca; Porcu, Pierluigi; Mishra, Anjali

    2017-01-01

    Murine models have been adopted as a significant and powerful tool in the study of cancer. The applications of murine models of cancer are numerous: mechanism discovery, oncogenesis, molecular genetics, microenvironment, metastasis, and therapeutic efficacy. Leukemias and lymphomas are a group of highly heterogeneous hematologic malignancies that affect people of all ages and ethnicities. Leukemia and lymphoma arise from hematopoietic and immune cells and usually spread widely throughout the body. The liquid nature of many of these malignancies, as well as the complex microenvironment from which they arise and their multifaceted genetic basis, has added to the difficulty in generating appropriate and translational models to study them. Murine models of leukemia and lymphoma have made substantial contributions to our understanding of the pathobiology of these disorders in humans. However, while there are many advantages to these models, limitations remain. In this review, we discuss the mouse as a model to study leukemia and lymphoma, and the importance of choosing the correct methodology. Specific examples of murine models of leukemias and lymphomas are provided, with particular attention to those that are highly translational to their human counterpart. Finally, future applications of murine models and potential for better models are discussed. PMID:28265553

  6. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release.

    PubMed

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-04-18

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements.

  7. Moloney murine leukemia virus activates NF-kappa B.

    PubMed Central

    Pak, J; Faller, D V

    1996-01-01

    Nonacutely transforming retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV), differ from transforming viruses in their mechanisms of tumor induction. While the transforming viruses cause tumors by transduction of oncogenes, the leukemia retroviruses, lacking oncogenes, employ other mechanisms, including promoter insertion and enhancer activation. Although these two mechanisms occur in many tumors induced by leukemia viruses, a substantial proportion of such tumors do not show site-specific proviral insertions. Thus, other, unidentified virus-driven mechanisms may participate in tumorigenesis. In these studies, we show that infection of cells by M-MuLV activates expression of Rel family transcription factors. In murine cells chronically infected with M-MuLV, gel shift analyses with kappaB DNA-binding motifs from the murine immunoglobulin kappa light chain enhancer demonstrated induction of at least two distinct kappaB enhancer-binding complexes. Supershifting and immunoblotting analyses defined p50, p52, RelB, and c-Rel subunits as constituents of these virus-induced protein complexes. Transient transfections performed with kappaB-dependent reporter plasmids showed transcriptional activation in M-MuLV-infected cells relative to uninfected cells. Induction of Rel/NF-kappaB transcription factor activity by M-MuLV infection may prove relevant to the mechanism of M-MuLV-induced leukemia. PMID:8648762

  8. Efficacy of posaconazole in murine experimental sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio; Guarro, Josep

    2012-05-01

    We developed a murine model of systemic sporotrichosis by using three strains of each of the two commonest species causing sporotrichosis, i.e., Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis, in order to evaluate the efficacy of posaconazole (PSC). The drug was administered at a dose of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a day by gavage, and one group was treated with amphotericin B (AMB) as a control treatment. Posaconazole, especially at 5 mg/kg, showed good efficacy against all the strains tested, regardless of their MICs, as measured by prolonged survival, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology.

  9. Efficacy of Posaconazole in Murine Experimental Sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    We developed a murine model of systemic sporotrichosis by using three strains of each of the two commonest species causing sporotrichosis, i.e., Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis, in order to evaluate the efficacy of posaconazole (PSC). The drug was administered at a dose of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a day by gavage, and one group was treated with amphotericin B (AMB) as a control treatment. Posaconazole, especially at 5 mg/kg, showed good efficacy against all the strains tested, regardless of their MICs, as measured by prolonged survival, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology. PMID:22330929

  10. An HSEF for murine myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.; Cronkite, E.P.; Bullis, J.E.; Wuu, C.S.; Marino, S.A.; Zaider, M.

    1996-10-01

    In the past decade, a large amount of effort has gone into the development of hit size effectiveness functions (HSEFs), with the ultimate aim of replacing the present absorbed dose-RBE-Q system. However, the absorbed dose determined at the tissue level is incapable of providing information on single hits on (doses to) the single cell. As a result, it is necessary to resort to microdosimetry, which is capable of providing not only the number of hits on cells, but the distribution of hit sizes as well. From this information, an HSEF can be derived. However, to date there have been no sets of data available on animals exposed to radiations of several qualities, and for which microdosimetric data were available. The objective of the present set of experiments was to remedy this situation. Large numbers of mice were exposed to radiations of several different qualities, and were observed throughout their entire lifespan for the appearance of myeloid leukemia. The HSEF developed for this neoplasm is presented and discussed.

  11. Epigenetic alterations in a murine model for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Shih; Sherman, Maura H; Hertlein, Erin; Johnson, Amy J; Teitell, Michael A.; Byrd, John C.; Plass, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Early stages in the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have not been explored mainly due to the inability to study normal B-cells in route to transformation. In order to determine such early events of leukemogenesis, we have used a well established mouse model for CLL. Over-expression of human TCL1, a known CLL oncogene, in murine B-cells leads to the development of mature CD19+/CD5+/IgM+ clonal leukemia with a similar disease phenotype seen in human CLL. Herein, we review our recent study using this TCL1 murine model for CLL and corresponding human CLL samples in a cross-species epigenomics approach to address the timing and relevance of epigenetic events occurring during leukemogenesis. We were able to demonstrate that the mouse model recapitulates epigenetic events very similar to what has been reported for human CLL and thus provides an exciting new tool to study early epigenetic events. Epigenetic alterations are seen at a time of three month after birth, much earlier than the phenotypically visible disease which occurs around 11 month of age. An early event in gene silencing is the inactivation of transcription factor Foxd3 expression through an NF-κB mediated process in animals with one month of age. PMID:19901553

  12. Dynein Regulators Are Important for Ecotropic Murine Leukemia Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Valle-Tenney, Roger; Opazo, Tatiana; Cancino, Jorge; Goff, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the early steps of infection, retroviruses must direct the movement of the viral genome into the nucleus to complete their replication cycle. This process is mediated by cellular proteins that interact first with the reverse transcription complex and later with the preintegration complex (PIC), allowing it to reach and enter the nucleus. For simple retroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), the identities of the cellular proteins involved in trafficking of the PIC in infection are unknown. To identify cellular proteins that interact with the MLV PIC, we developed a replication-competent MLV in which the integrase protein was tagged with a FLAG epitope. Using a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we established that the microtubule motor dynein regulator DCTN2/p50/dynamitin interacts with the MLV preintegration complex early in infection, suggesting a direct interaction between the incoming viral particles and the dynein complex regulators. Further experiments showed that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of either DCTN2/p50/dynamitin or another dynein regulator, NudEL, profoundly reduced the efficiency of infection by ecotropic, but not amphotropic, MLV reporters. We propose that the cytoplasmic dynein regulators are a critical component of the host machinery needed for infection by the retroviruses entering the cell via the ecotropic envelope pathway. IMPORTANCE Retroviruses must access the chromatin of host cells to integrate the viral DNA, but before this crucial event, they must reach the nucleus. The movement through the cytoplasm—a crowded environment where diffusion is slow—is thought to utilize retrograde transport along the microtubule network by the dynein complex. Different viruses use different components of this multisubunit complex. We found that the preintegration complex of murine leukemia virus (MLV) interacts with the dynein complex and that regulators of this complex are essential for

  13. Epigenetic alterations in a murine model for chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Shih; Sherman, Mara H; Hertlein, Erin; Johnson, Amy J; Teitell, Michael A; Byrd, John C; Plass, Christoph

    2009-11-15

    Early stages in the development of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have not been explored mainly due to the inability to study normal B-cells en route to transformation. In order to determine such early events of leukemogenesis, we have used a well established mouse model for CLL. Over-expression of human TCL1, a known CLL oncogene in murine B-cells leads to the development of mature CD19+/CD5+/IgM+ clonal leukemia with a disease phenotype similar to that seen in human CLL. Herein, we review our recent study using this TCL1-driven mouse model for CLL and corresponding human CLL samples in a cross-species epigenomics approach to address the timing and relevance of epigenetic events occurring during leukemogenesis. We demonstrated that the mouse model recapitulates the epigenetic events that have been reported for human CLL, affirming the power and validity of this mouse model to study early epigenetic events in cancer progression. Epigenetic alterations are detected as early as three months after birth, far before disease manifests at about 11 months of age. These mice undergo NFkappaB repressor complex mediated inactivation of the transcription factor Foxd3, whose targets become aberrantly methylated and silenced in mouse and human CLL. Overall, our data suggest the accumulated epigenetic alterations during CLL pathogenesis as a consequence of gene silencing through TCL1 and NFkappaB repressor complex, suggesting the relevance for NFkappaB as a therapeutic target in CLL.

  14. Exogenous IL-33 overcomes T cell tolerance in murine acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Lei; Dominguez, Donye; Chen, Siqi; Fan, Jie; Long, Alan; Zhang, Minghui; Fang, Deyu; Zhang, Yi; Kuzel, Timothy M.; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Emerging studies suggest that dominant peripheral tolerance is a major mechanism of immune escape in disseminated leukemia. Using an established murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model, we here show that systemic administration of recombinant IL-33 dramatically inhibits the leukemia growth and prolongs the survival of leukemia-bearing mice in a CD8+ T cell dependent manner. Exogenous IL-33 treatment enhanced anti-leukemia activity by increasing the expansion and IFN-γ production of leukemia-reactive CD8+ T cells. Moreover, IL-33 promoted dendritic cell (DC) maturation and activation in favor of its cross presentation ability to evoke a vigorous anti-leukemia immune response. Finally, we found that the combination of PD-1 blockade with IL-33 further prolonged the survival, with half of the mice achieving complete regression. Our data establish a role of exogenous IL-33 in reversing T cell tolerance, and suggest its potential clinical implication into leukemia immunotherapy. PMID:27517629

  15. Identification of a RNA Polymerase II Initiation Site in the Long Terminal Repeat of Moloney Murine Leukemia Viral DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrman, Shella A.; van Beveren, Charles; Verma, Inder M.

    1981-09-01

    We have used a soluble in vitro RNA polymerase II transcription system to define the site of initiation of Moloney murine leukemia viral RNA synthesis. Molecularly cloned integrated and unintegrated Moloney murine leukemia virus DNAs were used as templates. The 5' ends of in vitro transcripts and virion RNA of Moloney murine leukemia virus were compared by nuclease S1 protection experiments. Our results indicate that viral sequences upstream of the in vivo cap site are implicated in the transcription of viral RNA and that the 5' end of an in vitro transcript derived from an integrated Moloney murine leukemia virus clone corresponds to the 5' end of viral genomic RNA.

  16. Abelson murine leukemia virus: structural requirements for transforming gene function.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, A; Dunn, C Y; Yuasa, Y; Devare, S G; Reddy, E P; Aaronson, S A

    1982-01-01

    The integrated Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) genome cloned in bacteriophage lambda gtWES.lambda B was used to localize viral genetic sequences required for transformation. Comparison of the biological activity of cloned A-MuLV genomic and subgenomic fragments showed that subgenomic clones that lacked the 5' long terminal repeat and adjoining sequences (300 base pairs downstream of the repeat) were not biologically active. In contrast, subgenomic clones that lacked the 3' long terminal repeat and as much as 1.3 kilobase pairs of the A-MuLV cell-derived abl gene were as efficient as wild-type viral DNA in transformation. The A-MuLV-encoded polyprotein P120 and its associated protein kinase activity were detected in transformants obtained by transfection with Cla I, BamHI, and HindIII subgenomic clones. In contrast, individual transformants obtained with subgenomic Sal I clones expressed A-MuLV proteins ranging in size from 82,000 to 95,000 daltons. Each demonstrated an associated protein kinase activity. These results provide direct genetic evidence that only the proximal 40% of abl with its associated 5' helper viral sequences is required for fibroblast transformation. Images PMID:6291048

  17. Insertional mutagenesis of preneoplastic astrocytes by Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Afanasieva, T A; Pekarik, V; Grazia D'Angelo, M; Klein, M A; Voigtländer, T; Stocking, C; Aguzzi, A

    2001-04-01

    Retroviral infection can induce transcriptional activation of genes flanking the sites of proviral integration in target cells. Because integration is essentially random, this phenomenon can be exploited for random mutagenesis of the genome, and analysis of integration sites in tumors may identify potential oncogenes. Here we have investigated this strategy in the context of astrocytoma progression. Neuroectodermal explants from astrocytoma-prone GFAP-v-src transgenic mice were infected with the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV). In situ hybridization and FACS analysis indicated that astrocytes from E12.5-13.5 embryos were highly susceptible to retroviral infection and expressed viral RNA and proteins both in vitro and in vivo. In average 80% of neuroectodermal cells were infected in vitro with 9-14 proviral integrations per cell. Virus mobility assays confirmed that Mo-MuLV remained transcriptionally active and replicating in neuroectodermal primary cultures even after 45 days of cultivation. Proviral insertion sites were investigated by inverse long-range PCR. Analysis of a limited number of provirus flanking sequences in clones originated from in vitro infected GFAP-v-src neuroectodermal cells identified loci of possible relevance to tumorigenesis. Therefore, the approach described here might be suitable for acceleration of tumorigenesis in preneoplastic astrocytes. We expect this method to be useful for identifying genes involved in astrocytoma development/progression in animal models.

  18. Human APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Melanie; Schnierle, Barbara S. . E-mail: schba@pei.de

    2005-06-20

    The human APOBEC3G protein exhibits broad antiretroviral activity against a variety of retroviruses. It is packaged into viral particles and executes its antiviral function in the target cell. The packaging of APOBEC3G into different viral particles requires a mechanism that confers this promiscuity. Here, APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus (MLV) was studied using retroviral vectors. APOBEC3G uptake did not require either its cytidine deaminase activity or the presence of a retroviral vector genome. Results from immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies of APOBEC3G with a MLV Gag-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) fusion protein imply an interaction between both proteins. RNase A treatment did not inhibit the co-precipitation of Gag-CFP and APOBEC3G, suggesting that the interaction is RNA independent. Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag, the MLV Gag precursor protein appears to interact with APOBEC3G, indicating that Gag contains conserved structures which are used to encapsidate APOBEC3G into different retroviral particles.

  19. Radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in murine models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy is a cornerstone of modern cancer treatment. The number of patients that undergo radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is only increasing every year, but this does not come without cost. As this number increases, so too does the incidence of secondary, radiation-induced neoplasias, creating a need for therapeutic agents targeted specifically towards incidence reduction and treatment of these cancers. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro testing but also a set of reliable animal models to accurately recreate the complex situations of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. As radiation-induced leukemic progression often involves genomic changes such as rearrangements, deletions, and changes in methylation, the laboratory mouse Mus musculus, with its fully sequenced genome, is a powerful tool in cancer research. This fact, combined with the molecular and physiological similarities it shares with man and its small size and high rate of breeding in captivity, makes it the most relevant model to use in radiation-induced leukemia research. In this work, we review relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models, as well as methods of induction of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia. Associated molecular pathologies are also included. PMID:25062865

  20. A Multicenter Blinded Analysis Indicates No Association between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and either Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus or Polytropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Harvey J.; Mikovits, Judy A.; Switzer, William M.; Ruscetti, Francis W.; Lo, Shyh-Ching; Klimas, Nancy; Komaroff, Anthony L.; Montoya, Jose G.; Bateman, Lucinda; Levine, Susan; Peterson, Daniel; Levin, Bruce; Hanson, Maureen R.; Genfi, Afia; Bhat, Meera; Zheng, HaoQiang; Wang, Richard; Li, Bingjie; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Lee, Li Ling; Sameroff, Stephen; Heneine, Walid; Coffin, John; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disabling disorder known as chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) has been linked in two independent studies to infection with xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and polytropic murine leukemia virus (pMLV). Although the associations were not confirmed in subsequent studies by other investigators, patients continue to question the consensus of the scientific community in rejecting the validity of the association. Here we report blinded analysis of peripheral blood from a rigorously characterized, geographically diverse population of 147 patients with CFS/ME and 146 healthy subjects by the investigators describing the original association. This analysis reveals no evidence of either XMRV or pMLV infection. PMID:22991430

  1. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

    SciTech Connect

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Back, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani; Hylarides, Mark; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-05-15

    Anti-CD45 Radioimmunotherapy using an Alpha-Emitting Radionuclide 211At Combined with Bone Marrow Transplantation Prolongs Survival in a Disseminated Murine Leukemia Model ABSTRACT Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using antibodies (Ab) labeled primarily with beta-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse.

  2. Large-scale purification of gp70 from Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Pyle, S W; Chabot, D J; Miller, T L; Serabyn, S A; Bess, J W; Arthur, L O

    1991-05-01

    The external envelope glycoprotein, gp70, of the Moloney murine leukemia virus was extracted from NIH 3T3 cells utilizing the detergent n-octyl-beta-D-glycopyranoside. The extracted gp70 was sequentially purified utilizing lectin-affinity, anion-exchange, and molecular-exclusion chromatography techniques. Approximately 10 mg of gp70 was purified by this method and shown to be 95% homogeneous, as assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The presence of purified gp70 from Moloney murine leukemia virus was confirmed by amino acid analysis, amino-terminal sequencing, and immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody raised against gp70. The procedure is rapid, utilizes commercially available media, and can be used to purify large amounts of retroviral envelope glycoprotein from virus.

  3. Solanum lyratum Extracts Induce Extrinsic and Intrinsic Pathways of Apoptosis in WEHI-3 Murine Leukemia Cells and Inhibit Allograft Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jai-Sing; Wu, Chia-Chun; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Yeh, Chin-Chung; Yu, Chien-Chih; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Wood, W. Gibson; Tsuzuki, Minoru; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms of cell cycle arrest and apoptotic death induced by Solanum lyratum extracts (SLE) or diosgenin in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro and antitumor activity in vivo. Diosgenin is one of the components of SLE. Our study showed that SLE and diosgenin decreased the viable WEHI-3 cells and induced G0/G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in concentration- or time-dependent manners. Both reagents increased the levels of ROS production and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). SLE- and diosgenin-triggered apoptosis is mediated through modulating the extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways. Intriguingly, the p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), anti-Fas ligand (FasL) mAb, and specific inhibitors of caspase-8 (z-IETD-fmk), caspase-9 (z-LEHD-fmk), and caspase-3 (z-DEVD-fmk) blocked SLE- and diosgenin-reduced cell viability of WEHI-3 cells. The in vivo study demonstrated that SLE has marked antitumor efficacy against tumors in the WEHI-3 cell allograft model. In conclusion, SLE- and diosgenin-induced G0/G1 phase arrest and triggered extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways via p53 activation in WEHI-3 cells. SLE also exhibited antitumor activity in vivo. Our findings showed that SLE may be potentially efficacious in the treatment of leukemia in the future. PMID:22611426

  4. Triptolide induced cell death through apoptosis and autophagy in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vitro and promoting immune responses in WEHI-3 generated leukemia mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chan, Shih-Feng; Chen, Ya-Yin; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Liao, Ching-Lung; Ko, Yang-Ching; Tang, Nou-Ying; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Liu, Kuo-Ching; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-02-01

    Triptolide, a traditional Chinese medicine, obtained from Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, has anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and proapoptotic properties. We investigated the potential efficacy of triptolide on murine leukemia by measuring the triptolide-induced cytotoxicity in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vitro. Results indicated that triptolide induced cell morphological changes and induced cytotoxic effects through G0/G1 phase arrest, induction of apoptosis. Flow cytometric assays showed that triptolide increased the production of reactive oxygen species, Ca(2+) release and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm ), and activations of caspase-8, -9, and -3. Triptolide increased protein levels of Fas, Fas-L, Bax, cytochrome c, caspase-9, Endo G, Apaf-1, PARP, caspase-3 but reduced levels of AIF, ATF6α, ATF6β, and GRP78 in WEHI-3 cells. Triptolide stimulated autophagy based on an increase in acidic vacuoles, monodansylcadaverine staining for LC-3 expression and increased protein levels of ATG 5, ATG 7, and ATG 12. The in vitro data suggest that the cytotoxic effects of triptolide may involve cross-talk between cross-interaction of apoptosis and autophagy. Normal BALB/c mice were i.p. injected with WEHI-3 cells to generate leukemia and were oral treatment with triptolide at 0, 0.02, and 0.2 mg/kg for 3 weeks then animals were weighted and blood, liver, spleen samples were collected. Results indicated that triptolide did not significantly affect the weights of animal body, spleen and liver of leukemia mice, however, triptolide significant increased the cell populations of T cells (CD3), B cells (CD19), monocytes (CD11b), and macrophage (Mac-3). Furthermore, triptolide increased the phagocytosis of macrophage from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) but not effects from peritoneum. Triptolide promoted T and B cell proliferation at 0.02 and 0.2 mg/kg treatment when cells were pretreated with Con A and LPS stimulation, respectively; however, triptolide

  5. Antagonism of SET using OP449 enhances the efficacy of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and overcome drug resistance in myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anupriya; MacKenzie, Ryan J.; Pippa, Raffaella; Eide, Christopher A.; Oddo, Jessica; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Sears, Rosalie; Vitek, Michael P.; Odero, María D.; Christensen, Dale; Druker, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The SET oncoprotein, a potent inhibitor of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), is overexpressed in leukemia. We evaluated the efficacy of SET antagonism in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, a murine leukemia model, and primary patient samples using OP449, a specific, cell-penetrating peptide that antagonizes SET's inhibition of PP2A. Experimental Design In vitro cytotoxicity and specificity of OP449 in CML and AML cell lines and primary samples were measured using proliferation, apoptosis and colonogenic assays. Efficacy of target inhibition by OP449 is evaluated by immunoblotting and PP2A assay. In vivo antitumor efficacy of OP449 was measured in human HL-60 xenografted murine model. Results We observed that OP449 inhibited growth of CML cells including those from patients with blastic phase disease and patients harboring highly drug-resistant BCR-ABL1 mutations. Combined treatment with OP449 and ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors was significantly more cytotoxic to K562 cells and primary CD34+ CML cells. SET protein levels remained unchanged with OP449 treatment, but BCR-ABL1-mediated downstream signaling was significantly inhibited with the degradation of key signaling molecules such as BCR-ABL1, STAT5, and AKT. Similarly, AML cell lines and primary patient samples with various genetic lesions showed inhibition of cell growth after treatment with OP449 alone or in combination with respective kinase inhibitors. Finally, OP449 reduced the tumor burden of mice xenografted with human leukemia cells. Conclusions We demonstrate a novel therapeutic paradigm of SET antagonism using OP449 in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of CML and AML. PMID:24436473

  6. Biochemical analysis of murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced leukemias of strain BALB/c

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.W.; Hopkins, N.; Fleissner, E.

    1980-02-01

    Murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced BALB/c leukemias were characterized with respect to viral proteins and RNA. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral structural proteins revealed that for p12, p15, p30, and gp70, three to four electrophoretic variants of each could be detected. There was no correlation found between any of these mobilities and N- or B-tropism of the viruses. Proteins of all xenotropic viral isolates were identical in their gel electrophoretic profiles. The similar phenotypes of multiple viral clones from individual leukemias and of isolates grown in different cells suggest that the polymorphism of ecotropic viruses was generated in vivo rather than during in vitro virus growth. By two-dimensional fingerprinting of RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides from 70S viral RNA, the previously reported association of N- and B-tropism with two distinct oligonucleotides was confirmed. The presence of two other oligonucleotides was correlated with positive and negative phenotypes of the virus-coded G/sub IX/ cell surface antigen. The RNAs of two B-tropic isolates with distinctive p15 and p12 phenotypes differed from the RNA of a prototype N-tropic virus by the absence of three oligonucleotides mapping in the 5' portion (gag region) of the prototype RNA. In addition, one small-plaque B-tropic virus displayed extensive changes in the RNA sequences associated with the env region of the prototype.

  7. Modulatory Effects and Action Mechanisms of Tryptanthrin on Murine Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hoi-Ling; Yip, Hon-Yan; Mak, Nai-Ki; Leung, Kwok-Nam

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia is the disorder of hematopoietic cell development and is characterized by an uncoupling of cell proliferation and differentiation. There is a pressing need for the development of novel tactics for leukemia therapy as conventional treatments often have severe adverse side effects. Tryptanthrin (6,12-dihydro-6,12-dioxoindolo-(2,1-b)-quinazoline) is a naturally-occurring, weakly basic alkaloid isolated from the dried roots of medicinal indigo plants (Ban-Lan-Gen). It has been reported to have various biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. However, its modulatory effects and action mechanisms on myeloid cells remain poorly understood. In this study, tryptanthrin was shown to suppress the proliferation of the murine myeloid leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also significantly reduced the growth of WEHI-3B JCS cells in vivo in syngeneic BALB/c mice. However, it exhibited no significant direct cytotoxicity on normal murine peritoneal macrophages. Flow cytometric analysis showed an obvious cell cycle arrest of the tryptanthrin-treated WEHI-3B JCS cells at the G0/G1 phase. The expression of cyclin D2, D3, Cdk 2, 4 and 6 genes in WEHI-3B JCS cells was found to be down-regulated at 24 h as measured by RT-PCR. Morphological and functional studies revealed that tryptanthrin could induce differentiation in WEHI-3B JCS cells, as shown by the increases in vacuolation, cellular granularity and NBT-reducing activity in tryptanthrin-treated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that tryptanthrin might exert its anti-tumor effect on the murine myelomonocytic leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells by causing cell cycle arrest and by triggering cell differentiation. PMID:19887046

  8. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using (211)At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Johnnie J; Bäck, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee; Balkin, Ethan R; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D Scott; Fisher, Darrell R; Frayo, Shani L; Hylarides, Mark D; Green, Damian J; Gopal, Ajay K; Press, Oliver W; Pagel, John M

    2013-05-02

    Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using monoclonal antibodies labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse. β emitters are limited by lower energies and nonspecific cytotoxicity from longer path lengths compared with α emitters such as (211)At, which has a higher energy profile and shorter path length. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT using (211)At in a disseminated murine AML model. Biodistribution studies in leukemic SJL/J mice showed excellent localization of (211)At-anti-murine CD45 mAb (30F11) to marrow and spleen within 24 hours (18% and 79% injected dose per gram of tissue [ID/g], respectively), with lower kidney and lung uptake (8.4% and 14% ID/g, respectively). In syngeneic HSCT studies, (211)At-B10-30F11 RIT improved the median survival of leukemic mice in a dose-dependent fashion (123, 101, 61, and 37 days given 24, 20, 12, and 0 µCi, respectively). This approach had minimal toxicity with nadir white blood cell counts >2.7 K/µL 2 weeks after HSCT and recovery by 4 weeks. These data suggest that (211)At-anti-CD45 RIT in conjunction with HSCT may be a promising therapeutic option for AML.

  9. Anti-CD45 radioimmunotherapy using 211At with bone marrow transplantation prolongs survival in a disseminated murine leukemia model

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Bäck, Tom; Kenoyer, Aimee; Balkin, Ethan R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Frayo, Shani L.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Press, Oliver W.

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive chemotherapy combined with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using monoclonal antibodies labeled with β-emitting radionuclides has been explored to reduce relapse. β emitters are limited by lower energies and nonspecific cytotoxicity from longer path lengths compared with α emitters such as 211At, which has a higher energy profile and shorter path length. We evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of anti-CD45 RIT using 211At in a disseminated murine AML model. Biodistribution studies in leukemic SJL/J mice showed excellent localization of 211At-anti-murine CD45 mAb (30F11) to marrow and spleen within 24 hours (18% and 79% injected dose per gram of tissue [ID/g], respectively), with lower kidney and lung uptake (8.4% and 14% ID/g, respectively). In syngeneic HSCT studies, 211At-B10-30F11 RIT improved the median survival of leukemic mice in a dose-dependent fashion (123, 101, 61, and 37 days given 24, 20, 12, and 0 µCi, respectively). This approach had minimal toxicity with nadir white blood cell counts >2.7 K/µL 2 weeks after HSCT and recovery by 4 weeks. These data suggest that 211At-anti-CD45 RIT in conjunction with HSCT may be a promising therapeutic option for AML. PMID:23471305

  10. Interactions of Host Proteins with the Murine Leukemia Virus Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Studamire, Barbara; Goff, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Retroviral infections cause a variety of cancers in animals and a number of diverse diseases in humans such as leukemia and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Productive and efficient proviral integration is critical for retroviral function and is the key step in establishing a stable and productive infection, as well as the mechanism by which host genes are activated in leukemogenesis. Host factors are widely anticipated to be involved in all stages of the retroviral life cycle, and the identification of integrase interacting factors has the potential to increase our understanding of mechanisms by which the incoming virus might appropriate cellular proteins to target and capture host DNA sequences. Identification of MoMLV integrase interacting host factors may be key to designing efficient and benign retroviral-based gene therapy vectors; key to understanding the basic mechanism of integration; and key in designing efficient integrase inhibitors. In this review, we discuss current progress in the field of MoMLV integrase interacting proteins and possible roles for these proteins in integration. PMID:21637732

  11. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Vellenga, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone marrow retroviral transduction models followed by transplantation. With the advancement of immunodeficient xenograft models, it has become possible to use human stem/progenitor cells for in vivo studies as well as cells directly derived from CML patients. These models not only mimic CML but also have been instrumental in uncovering various fundamental mechanisms of CML disease progression and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance. With the availability of iPSC technology, it has become feasible to derive, maintain, and expand CML subclones that are at least genetically identical to those in patients. The following review provides an overview of all murine as well as human xenograft models for CML established till date. PMID:27642303

  12. Comparative Analysis of HIV-1 and Murine Leukemia Virus Three-Dimensional Nuclear Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Quercioli, Valentina; Di Primio, Cristina; Casini, Antonio; Mulder, Lubbertus C. F.; Vranckx, Lenard S.; Borrenberghs, Doortje; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy allow three-dimensional analysis of HIV-1 preintegration complexes in the nuclei of infected cells. To extend this investigation to gammaretroviruses, we engineered a fluorescent Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) system consisting of MLV-integrase fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (MLV-IN-EGFP). A comparative analysis of lentiviral (HIV-1) and gammaretroviral (MLV) fluorescent complexes in the nuclei of infected cells revealed their different spatial distributions. This research tool has the potential to achieve new insight into the nuclear biology of these retroviruses. PMID:26962222

  13. Effect of polymerase mutations on packaging of primer tRNAPro during murine leukemia virus assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, J G; Seidman, J G

    1981-01-01

    The role of reverse transcriptase in selective encapsidation of the murine leukemia virus (MuLV) tRNA primer, tRNAPro, was investigated by examining the tRNA composition of several nonconditional pol mutants. One mutant, clone 23, which contains an altered polymerase about 40% smaller than the wild-type enzyme (B. I. Gerwin et al., J. Virol. 31:741-751, 1979) had a typical viral tRNA pattern, including normal levels of tRNAPro in free and 70S-associated 4S RNA. Another class of mutants, produced by Moloney murine leukemia virus-infected cell clone M13 and subclone M13/1, does not contain any detectable polymerase protein (A. Shields et al., Cell 14:601-609, 1978) and was found to have reduced amounts of tRNAPro in free 4S RNA. However, the level of tRNAPro associated with the genome was normal in the mutant virions. These results suggest that the reverse transcriptase protein is involved in the initial selection of tRNA primer during virus assembly, but not in the subsequent association of this tRNA with genomic RNA. Images PMID:6165833

  14. Viral genome RNA serves as messenger early in the infectious cycle of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Shurtz, R; Dolev, S; Aboud, M; Salzberg, S

    1979-01-01

    When NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts were infected with the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus, part of the viral genome RNA molecules were detected in polyribosomes of the infected cells early in the infectious cycle. The binding appears to be specific, since we could demonstrate the release of viral RNA from polyribosomes with EDTA. Moreover, when infection occurred in the presence of cycloheximide, most viral RNA molecules were detected in the free cytoplasm. Size analysis on polyribosomal viral RNA molecules indicated that two size class molecules, 38S and 23S, are present in polyribosomes at 3 h after infection. Analysis of the polyriboadenylate [poly(rA)] content of viral RNA extracted from infected polyribosomes demonstrated that such molecules bind with greatest abundance at 3 h after infection, as has been detected with total viral RNA. No molecules lacking poly(rA) stretches could be detected in polyribosomes. Furthermore, when a similar analysis was performed on unbound molecules present in the free cytoplasm, identical results were obtained. We conclude that no selection towards poly(rA)-containing viral molecules is evident on binding to polyribosomes. These findings suggest that the incoming viral genome of the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus may serve as a messenger for the synthesis of one or more virus-specific proteins early after infection of mouse fibroblasts. PMID:117118

  15. Murine leukemia virus infects early bone marrow progenitors in immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Tumas-Brundage, K M; Garret, W; Blank, K; Prystowsky, M B

    1996-10-15

    Chronic murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) are retroviruses which induce leukemias/lymphomas after long latency periods. The induction of leukemia by MuLVs is complex, requiring multiple steps beginning with infection of an appropriate target cell. A number of investigators have proposed a bone marrow-thymus axis in the development of retrovirus induced T-cell lymphoma in which cells are initially infected in the bone marrow. These bone marrow cells or their progeny migrate to the thymus during the disease process. In our system using adult, immunocompetent BALB.K mice infected with E-55(+) MuLV, a similar pattern is seen; integrated virus is initially detectable in the bone marrow and spleen and only later in the thymus. In order to better understand the leukemic process, we analyzed the bone marrow from adult, immunocompetent BALB.K mice infected with the E-55(+) MuLV in bone marrow colony assays. The results from these assays demonstrate that either a pluripotent progenitor cell or an early progenitor cell is a target in the bone marrow for the virus.

  16. Sequences responsible for erythroid and lymphoid leukemia in the long terminal repeats of Friend-mink cell focus-forming and Moloney murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, A; Takimoto, M; Adachi, A; Kakuyama, M; Kato, S; Kakimi, K; Fukuoka, K; Ogiu, T; Matsuyama, M

    1987-01-01

    Despite the high degree of homology (91%) between the nucleotide sequences of the Friend-mink cell focus-forming (MCF) and the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) genomic long terminal repeats (LTRs), the pathogenicities determined by the LTR sequences of the two viruses are quite different. Friend-MCF MuLV is an erythroid leukemia virus, and Moloney MuLV is a lymphoid leukemia virus. To map the LTR sequences responsible for the different disease specificities, we constructed nine viruses with LTRs recombinant between the Friend-MCF and Moloney MuLVs. Analysis of the leukemia induced with the recombinant viruses showed that a 195-base-pair nucleotide sequence, including a 75-base-pair nucleotide Moloney enhancer, is responsible for the tissue-specific leukemogenicity of Moloney MuLV. However, not only the enhancer but also its downstream sequences appear to be necessary. The Moloney virus enhancer and its downstream sequence exerted a dominant effect over that of the Friend-MCF virus, but the enhancer sequence alone did not. The results that three of the nine recombinant viruses induced both erythroid and lymphoid leukemias supported the hypothesis that multiple viral genetic determinants control both the ability to cause leukemia and the type of leukemia induced. PMID:3033317

  17. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Leukemia What Is Leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells. ... diagnosed with leukemia are over 50 years old. Leukemia Starts in Bone Marrow Click for more information ...

  18. Removal of xenotropic murine leukemia virus by nanocellulose based filter paper.

    PubMed

    Asper, M; Hanrieder, T; Quellmalz, A; Mihranyan, A

    2015-11-01

    The removal of xenotrpic murine leukemia virus (xMuLV) by size-exclusion filter paper composed of 100% naturally derived cellulose was validated. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. algae. The filter paper was characterized using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, helium pycnometry, and model tracer (100 nm latex beads and 50 nm gold nanoparticles) retention tests. Following the filtration of xMuLV spiked solutions, LRV ≥5.25 log10 TCID50 was observed, as limited by the virus titre in the feed solution and sensitivity of the tissue infectivity test. The results of the validation study suggest that the nanocellulose filter paper is useful for removal of endogenous rodent retroviruses and retrovirus-like particles during the production of recombinant proteins.

  19. Conditions for Copackaging Rous Sarcoma Virus and Murine Leukemia Virus Gag Proteins during Retroviral Budding

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Robert P.; Wills, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and murine leukemia virus (MLV) are examples of distantly related retroviruses that normally do not encounter one another in nature. Their Gag proteins direct particle assembly at the plasma membrane but possess very little sequence similarity. As expected, coexpression of these two Gag proteins did not result in particles that contain both. However, when the N-terminal membrane-binding domain of each molecule was replaced with that of the Src oncoprotein, which is also targeted to the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane, efficient copackaging was observed in genetic complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays. We hypothesize that the RSV and MLV Gag proteins normally use distinct locations on the plasma membrane for particle assembly but otherwise have assembly domains that are sufficiently similar in function (but not sequence) to allow heterologous interactions when these proteins are redirected to a common membrane location. PMID:9971785

  20. Tissue selectivity of murine leukemia virus infection is determined by long terminal repeat sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, C A; Haseltine, W A; Lenz, J; Ruprecht, R; Cloyd, M W

    1985-01-01

    Here we show that the tissue specificity of murine retrovirus infections is determined by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of an otherwise isogenic set of viruses. The isogenic viruses used for this study contain the coding gag, pol, and env genes of the avirulent Akv virus. Recombinant viruses that contain the LTR of a virus that induces T-cell leukemia lymphoma preferentially infect T lymphocytes. Viruses that carry the LTR of a virus that induces erythroleukemia preferentially infect non-T lymphoblastoid cell lines in the marrow and spleen. The Akv virus itself displays no tissue preference for hematopoietic cells. These experiments suggest that retroviruses that carry appropriate enhancer-promoters can be used to infect selectively specific target cells in animals. PMID:2991605

  1. A flavone derivative from Sesbania sesban leaves and its cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dianhar, Hanhan Syah, Yana Maolana Mujahidin, Didin Hakim, Euis Holisotan Juliawaty, Lia Dewi

    2014-03-24

    Sesbania sesban, locally named as Jayanti, is one of Indonesia plants belonging to Fabaceae family. This species is traditionally used by Indonesian people to cure digestive disorders, fever, or headache. Jayanti can grow well in tropical to subtropical region, such as in Asia and Africa. Based on literature, qualitative analysis of the methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban showed that it contained flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and glycosides. In addition, the activity assay of extracts of different tissues of this species showed antitumor, antimalarial, and antidiabetic activityies (leaves and seed extracts), antioxidants (flower extract), and analgesic (wood extract). Though the extracts of S. sesban parts showed interesting activities, chemical study of those extracts have not been widely reported. Therefore, the objective of this research was to isolate the secondary metabolites from methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban and to determine their cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells. One compound has been obtained and identified as 3-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavone (1), a new isolated compound from nature. This compound was obtained through separation of methanol extract using various chromatographic techniques, such as vacuum liquid chromatography and radial chromatography. The structure elucidation of isolated compound was based on 1D NMR ({sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR) and 2D NMR (HMBC). The cytotoxicity of methanol extract and compound 1 against murine leukemia P-388 cells examined through MTT assay showed IC{sub 50} value of 60.04 μg/mL and 5.40 μg/mL, respectively.

  2. A flavone derivative from Sesbania sesban leaves and its cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianhar, Hanhan; Syah, Yana Maolana; Mujahidin, Didin; Hakim, Euis Holisotan; Juliawaty, Lia Dewi

    2014-03-01

    Sesbania sesban, locally named as Jayanti, is one of Indonesia plants belonging to Fabaceae family. This species is traditionally used by Indonesian people to cure digestive disorders, fever, or headache. Jayanti can grow well in tropical to subtropical region, such as in Asia and Africa. Based on literature, qualitative analysis of the methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban showed that it contained flavonoids, alkaloids, saponins and glycosides. In addition, the activity assay of extracts of different tissues of this species showed antitumor, antimalarial, and antidiabetic activityies (leaves and seed extracts), antioxidants (flower extract), and analgesic (wood extract). Though the extracts of S. sesban parts showed interesting activities, chemical study of those extracts have not been widely reported. Therefore, the objective of this research was to isolate the secondary metabolites from methanol extract of leaves of S. sesban and to determine their cytotoxicity against murine leukemia P-388 cells. One compound has been obtained and identified as 3-hydroxy-4',7-dimethoxyflavone (1), a new isolated compound from nature. This compound was obtained through separation of methanol extract using various chromatographic techniques, such as vacuum liquid chromatography and radial chromatography. The structure elucidation of isolated compound was based on 1D NMR (1H-NMR and 13C-NMR) and 2D NMR (HMBC). The cytotoxicity of methanol extract and compound 1 against murine leukemia P-388 cells examined through MTT assay showed IC50 value of 60.04 μg/mL and 5.40 μg/mL, respectively.

  3. Murine leukemias with retroviral insertions at Lmo2 are predictive of the leukemias induced in SCID-X1 patients following retroviral gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Davé, Utpal P; Akagi, Keiko; Tripathi, Rati; Cleveland, Susan M; Thompson, Mary A; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert; Downing, James R; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G

    2009-05-01

    Five X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency patients (SCID-X1) successfully treated with autologous bone marrow stem cells infected ex vivo with an IL2RG-containing retrovirus subsequently developed T-cell leukemia and four contained insertional mutations at LMO2. Genetic evidence also suggests a role for IL2RG in tumor formation, although this remains controversial. Here, we show that the genes and signaling pathways deregulated in murine leukemias with retroviral insertions at Lmo2 are similar to those deregulated in human leukemias with high LMO2 expression and are highly predictive of the leukemias induced in SCID-X1 patients. We also provide additional evidence supporting the notion that IL2RG and LMO2 cooperate in leukemia induction but are not sufficient and require additional cooperating mutations. The highly concordant nature of the genetic events giving rise to mouse and human leukemias with mutations at Lmo2 are an encouraging sign to those wanting to use mice to model human cancer and may help in designing safer methods for retroviral gene therapy.

  4. Differential Susceptibility of Spleen Focus-Forming Virus and Murine Leukemia Viruses to Ansamycin Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Horoszewicz, Julius S.; Leong, Susan S.; Carter, William A.

    1977-01-01

    The streptovaricin complex (SvCx) and rifamycin SV derivatives display potent antiviral activity against the polycythemic strain of Friend leukemia virus (FV-P), as measured by a reduction in the number of spleen foci produced in mice. Such reductions may be explained by inactivation of functions of (i) the spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV), (ii) its “helper” murine leukemia virus (MuLV), or (iii) both viruses normally present in FV-P. We noted that preincubation of FV-P with fractionation products of SvCx, or derivatives of rifamycin SV, at low concentrations (3 to 5 μg/ml) reduces the number of spleen foci 80 to 97%, whereas titers of MuLV (from the same inoculum) remain unaffected (MuLV titers were measured by XC, S+L−, and “helper activity” assays). Our findings indicate a remarkable biological selectivity of ansamycins, as well as nonansamycin components of SvCx, against the transforming and defective spleen focus-forming virus as compared to MuLV. Thus, the drugs might be useful in distinguishing other types of oncornaviruses. PMID:18986

  5. Transcriptional Silencing of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus in Human Embryonic Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gary Z; Goff, Stephen P

    2017-01-01

    Embryonic carcinoma (EC) cells are malignant counterparts of embryonic stem (ES) cells and serve as useful models for investigating cellular differentiation and human embryogenesis. Though the susceptibility of murine EC cells to retroviral infection has been extensively analyzed, few studies of retrovirus infection of human EC cells have been performed. We tested the susceptibility of human EC cells to transduction by retroviral vectors derived from three different retroviral genera. We show that human EC cells efficiently express reporter genes delivered by vectors based on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) but not Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV). In human EC cells, MLV integration occurs normally, but no viral gene expression is observed. The block to MLV expression of MLV genomes is relieved upon cellular differentiation. The lack of gene expression is correlated with transcriptional silencing of the MLV promoter through the deposition of repressive histone marks as well as DNA methylation. Moreover, depletion of SETDB1, a histone methyltransferase, resulted in a loss of transcriptional silencing and upregulation of MLV gene expression. Finally, we provide evidence showing that the lack of MLV gene expression may be attributed in part to the lack of MLV enhancer function in human EC cells.

  6. Effects of murine leukemia virus env gene proteins on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Takemoto, L. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    F5b Tumor cells were incubated with concentrated culture supernatants taken from cells resistant (F5m) or sensitive (F5b) to contact-dependent macrophage cytotoxicity. Macrophage cell line B6MP102 and murine peritoneal macrophages killed targets incubated with supernatants taken from sensitive cells but poorly killed cells incubated in supernatants isolated from resistant cells. Membranes from cells resistant to macrophage killing, F5m, were fused into F5b cells. The fused F5b cells were killed significantly less than F5b cells fused with F5b cell membranes or untreated F5b cells. The decreased killing of F5b cells corresponded to increased concentrations of gp70(a) molecules on F5b cells. Affinity purified gp70(a) was added to cytotoxicity assays but failed to inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. P15E molecules were detectable on both F5b and F5m cells. In addition, a synthetic peptide found to exhibit the inhibitory properties of p15E was added to cytotoxicity assays. P15E synthetic peptide also did not inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. Therefore, env gene proteins of murine leukemia virus do not appear responsible for inducing tumor cell resistance to activated macrophage contact-dependent cytotoxicity.

  7. Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy Using Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibodies to Deliver Radiation to Murine Hematolymphoid Tissues and Human Myeloid Leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M.; Matthews, Dana C.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Lin, Yukang; Saganic, Laura; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for treatment of patients with hematological malignancies frequently fails because of disease recurrence. We therefore conducted pretargeted RIT studies to augment the efficacy in mice of therapy using a pretargeted anti-human (h)CD45 antibody (Ab)-streptavidin (SA) conjugate followed by delivery of a biotinylated clearing agent and radiolabeled-DOTA-biotin. Tumor-to-blood ratios at 24 hours were 20:1 using pretargeted anti-hCD45 RIT and <1:1 with conventional RIT. In vivo imaging studies confirmed that the pretargeted RIT approach provided high-contrast tumor images with minimal blood-pool activity, whereas directly-labeled anti-hCD45 Ab produced distinct tumor images but the blood pool retained a large amount of labeled antibody for a prolonged time. Therapy experiments demonstrated that 90Y-DOTA-biotin significantly prolonged survival of mice treated pretargeted with anti-hCD45 Ab-SA compared to mice treated with conventional RIT using 90Y-labeled anti-hCD45 Ab at the maximally tolerated dose (400 µCi). Since human CD45 antigens are confined to xenograft tumor cells in this model, and all murine tissues are devoid of hCD45 and will not bind anti-hCD45 Ab, we also compared one-step and pretargeted RIT using an anti-murine (m)CD45 Ab (A20 ) in a model where the target antigen is present on normal hematopoietic tissues. After 24 hours, 27.3 ± 2.8% of the injected dose of radionuclide was delivered per gram (% ID/g) of lymph node using 131I-A20-Ab compared with 40.0 ± 5.4% ID/g for pretargeted 111In-DOTA-biotin (p value). These data suggest that multi-step pretargeted methods for delivering RIT are superior to conventional RIT when targeting CD45 for the treatment of leukemia and may allow for the intensification of therapy, while minimizing toxicities.

  8. Molecular cloning of osteoma-inducing replication-competent murine leukemia viruses from the RFB osteoma virus stock.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, L; Behnisch, W; Schmidt, J; Luz, A; Pedersen, F S; Erfle, V; Strauss, P G

    1992-01-01

    We report the molecular cloning of two replication-competent osteoma-inducing murine leukemia viruses from the RFB osteoma virus stock (M. P. Finkel, C. A. Reilly, Jr., B. O. Biskis, and I. L. Greco, p. 353-366, in C. H. G. Price and F. G. M. Ross, ed., Bone--Certain Aspects of Neoplasia, 1973). Like the original RFB osteoma virus stock, viruses derived from the molecular RFB clones induced multiple osteomas in mice of the CBA/Ca strain. The cloned RFB viruses were indistinguishable by restriction enzyme analysis and by nucleotide sequence analysis of their long-terminal-repeat regions and showed close relatedness to the Akv murine leukemia virus. Images PMID:1326664

  9. Organization, distribution, and stability of endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia virus DNA sequences in chromosomes of Mus musculus.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G; Taylor, B A; Lee, B K

    1982-01-01

    The endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia virus DNA content and integration sites were characterized for 54 inbred strains and substrains of mice by restriction enzyme digestion, Southern blotting, and hybridization with an ecotropic murine leukemia virus DNA-specific probe. More than 75% of these strains carried endogenous ecotropic proviruses which were located in at least 29 distinct integration sites in chromosomes of Mus musculus. Fourteen of these proviruses have been assigned specific locus designations. Most, but not all, of the endogenous ecotropic proviruses were structurally indistinguishable by this analysis from the prototype AKR ecotropic virus, and the distribution of these proviruses followed known relationships among the inbred strains and substrains of mice. These results suggest that, in general, viral DNA integration preceded the establishment of inbred mouse strains and that these integrations are relatively stable. Images PMID:6287001

  10. Structural and biochemical characterization of the inhibitor complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Matúz, Krisztina; Tözsér, Jozsef; Namwong, Sirilak; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-10-23

    Interactions between the protease (PR) encoded by the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus and a number of potential inhibitors have been investigated by biochemical and structural techniques. It was observed that several inhibitors used clinically against HIV PR exhibit nanomolar or even subnanomolar values of K{sub i}, depending on the exact experimental conditions. Both TL-3, a universal inhibitor of retroviral PRs, and some inhibitors originally shown to inhibit plasmepsins were also quite potent, whereas inhibition by pepstatin A was considerably weaker. Crystal structures of the complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus PR with TL-3, amprenavir and pepstatin A were solved at high resolution and compared with the structures of complexes of these inhibitors with other retropepsins. Whereas TL-3 and amprenavir bound in a predictable manner, spanning the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, two molecules of pepstatin A bound simultaneously in an unprecedented manner, leaving the catalytic water molecule in place.

  11. Cellular RNA homologous to the Abelson murine leukemia virus transforming gene: expression and relationship to the viral sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J Y; Baltimore, D

    1983-01-01

    To examine the expression of the cellular homolog of the Abelson murine leukemia virus transforming gene (the v-abl sequence), a DNA probe representing the v-abl sequence was prepared. The probe detected two cytoplasmic polyadenylic acid-containing c-abl RNAs of about 6.5 and 5.5 kilobases in a variety of rodent cells, and slightly larger RNAs were detected in human cells. These two RNA species were found in all normal tissues or cell lines examined, but at differing concentrations: liver cells had the least, fibroblastic cell lines had the most. By using a probe able to detect the cellular but not the viral gene, the two RNAs were shown to be present in Abelson murine leukemia virus-transformed cells at levels found either in their untransformed counterparts or in similar cell types transformed by other means. The target cells of the virus have a somewhat elevated level of the two RNAs although expression of the c-abl gene is not restricted to these cells. The v-abl sequence lacks 0.35 and 0.85 kilobases of the c-abl RNA on the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. Thus, the Abelson murine leukemia virus transforming gene is an internal fragment of the transcript of a normal cellular gene. Images PMID:6306446

  12. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Ayako; Okamura, Hideyasu; Morishita, Ryo; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protease (PR) of XMR virus (XMRV) was successfully synthesized with cell-free system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interface of XMRV PR with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), was identified with NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is induced for two PR protomers in the APV:PR = 1:2 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is transmitted even to distant regions from the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-range transmission of structural change may be utilized for drug discovery. -- Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially {sup 15}N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting's method, with which the amino acid types of the [{sup 1}H, {sup 15}N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) . A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR = 1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR has

  13. Characterization of producer cell-dependent restriction of murine leukemia virus replication.

    PubMed

    Serhan, Fatima; Jourdan, Nathalie; Saleun, Sylvie; Moullier, Philippe; Duisit, Ghislaine

    2002-07-01

    We previously reported that the human bronchocarcinoma cell line A549 produces poorly infectious gibbon ape leukemia virus-pseudotyped Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV). In contrast, similar amounts of virions recovered from human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells result in 10-fold-higher transduction rates (G. Duisit, A. Salvetti, P. Moullier, and F. Cosset, Hum. Gene Ther. 10:189-200, 1999). We have now extended this initial observation to other type-C envelope (Env) pseudotypes and analyzed the mechanism involved. Structural and morphological analysis showed that viral particles recovered from A549 (A549-MLV) and HT1080 (HT1080-MLV) cells were normal and indistinguishable from each other. They expressed equivalent levels of mature Env proteins and bound similarly to the target cells. Furthermore, incoming particles reached the cytosol and directed the synthesis of linear viral DNA equally efficiently. However, almost no detectable circular DNAs could be detected in A549-MLV-infected cells, indicating that the block of infection resulted from defective nuclear translocation of the preintegration complex. Interestingly, pseudotyping of A549-MLV with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G restored the amount of circular DNA forms as well as the transduction rates to HT1080-MLV levels, suggesting that the postentry blockage could be overcome by endocytic delivery of the core particles downstream of the restriction point. Thus, in contrast to the previously described target cell-dependent Fv-1 (or Fv1-like) restriction in mammalian cells (P. Pryciak and H. E. Varmus, J. Virol. 66:5959-5966, 1992; G. Towers, M. Bock, S. Martin, Y. Takeuchi, J. P. Stoye, and O. Danos, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97:12295-12299, 2000), we report here a new restriction of MLV replication that relies only on the producer cell type.

  14. Effect of Doxorubicin/Pluronic SP1049C on Tumorigenicity, Aggressiveness, DNA Methylation and Stem Cell Markers in Murine Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pluronic block copolymers are potent sensitizers of multidrug resistant cancers. SP1049C, a Pluronic-based micellar formulation of doxorubicin (Dox) has completed Phase II clinical trial and demonstrated safety and efficacy in patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. This study elucidates the ability of SP1049C to deplete cancer stem cells (CSC) and decrease tumorigenicity of cancer cells in vivo. Experimental Design P388 murine leukemia ascitic tumor was grown in BDF1 mice. The animals were treated with: (a) saline, (b) Pluronics alone, (c) Dox or (d) SP1049C. The ascitic cancer cells were isolated at different passages and examined for 1) in vitro colony formation potential, 2) in vivo tumorigenicity and aggressiveness, 3) development of drug resistance and Wnt signaling activation 4) global DNA methylation profiles, and 5) expression of CSC markers. Results SP1049C treatment reduced tumor aggressiveness, in vivo tumor formation frequency and in vitro clonogenic potential of the ascitic cells compared to drug, saline and polymer controls. SP1049C also prevented overexpression of BCRP and activation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling observed with Dox alone. Moreover, SP1049C significantly altered the DNA methylation profiles of the cells. Finally, SP1049C decreased CD133+ P388 cells populations, which displayed CSC-like properties and were more tumorigenic compared to CD133− cells. Conclusions SP1049C therapy effectively suppresses the tumorigenicity and aggressiveness of P388 cells in a mouse model. This may be due to enhanced activity of SP1049C against CSC and/or altered epigenetic regulation restricting appearance of malignant cancer cell phenotype. PMID:23977261

  15. Epigenetic changes during disease progression in a murine model of human chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Shih; Raval, Aparna; Johnson, Amy J.; Hertlein, Erin; Liu, Te-Hui; Jin, Victor X.; Sherman, Mara H.; Liu, Shu-Jun; Dawson, David W.; Williams, Katie E.; Lanasa, Mark; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Lin, Thomas S.; Marcucci, Guido; Pekarsky, Yuri; Davuluri, Ramana; Croce, Carlo M.; Guttridge, Denis C.; Teitell, Michael A.; Byrd, John C.; Plass, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations, including gain or loss of DNA methylation, are a hallmark of nearly every malignancy. Changes in DNA methylation can impact expression of cancer-related genes including apoptosis regulators and tumor suppressors. Because such epigenetic changes are reversible, they are being aggressively investigated as potential therapeutic targets. Here we use the Eμ-TCL1 transgenic mouse model of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) to determine the timing and patterns of aberrant DNA methylation, and to investigate the mechanisms that lead to aberrant DNA methylation. We show that CLL cells from Eμ-TCL1 mice at various stages recapitulate epigenetic alterations seen in human CLL. Aberrant methylation of promoter sequences is observed as early as 3 months of age in these animals, well before disease onset. Abnormally methylated promoter regions include binding sites for the transcription factor FOXD3. We show that loss of Foxd3 expression due to an NF-κB p50/p50:HDAC1 repressor complex occurs in TCL1-positive B cells before methylation. Therefore, specific transcriptional repression is an early event leading to epigenetic silencing of target genes in murine and human CLL. These results provide strong rationale for the development of strategies to target NF-κB components in CLL and potentially other B-cell malignancies. PMID:19666576

  16. Epigenetic changes during disease progression in a murine model of human chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Shih; Raval, Aparna; Johnson, Amy J; Hertlein, Erin; Liu, Te-Hui; Jin, Victor X; Sherman, Mara H; Liu, Shu-Jun; Dawson, David W; Williams, Katie E; Lanasa, Mark; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Lin, Thomas S; Marcucci, Guido; Pekarsky, Yuri; Davuluri, Ramana; Croce, Carlo M; Guttridge, Denis C; Teitell, Michael A; Byrd, John C; Plass, Christoph

    2009-08-11

    Epigenetic alterations, including gain or loss of DNA methylation, are a hallmark of nearly every malignancy. Changes in DNA methylation can impact expression of cancer-related genes including apoptosis regulators and tumor suppressors. Because such epigenetic changes are reversible, they are being aggressively investigated as potential therapeutic targets. Here we use the Emu-TCL1 transgenic mouse model of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) to determine the timing and patterns of aberrant DNA methylation, and to investigate the mechanisms that lead to aberrant DNA methylation. We show that CLL cells from Emu-TCL1 mice at various stages recapitulate epigenetic alterations seen in human CLL. Aberrant methylation of promoter sequences is observed as early as 3 months of age in these animals, well before disease onset. Abnormally methylated promoter regions include binding sites for the transcription factor FOXD3. We show that loss of Foxd3 expression due to an NF-kappaB p50/p50:HDAC1 repressor complex occurs in TCL1-positive B cells before methylation. Therefore, specific transcriptional repression is an early event leading to epigenetic silencing of target genes in murine and human CLL. These results provide strong rationale for the development of strategies to target NF-kappaB components in CLL and potentially other B-cell malignancies.

  17. Insights into the nuclear export of murine leukemia virus intron-containing RNA.

    PubMed

    Pessel-Vivares, Lucie; Houzet, Laurent; Lainé, Sébastien; Mougel, Marylène

    2015-01-01

    The retroviral genome consists of an intron-containing transcript that has essential cytoplasmic functions in the infected cell. This viral transcript can escape splicing, circumvent the nuclear checkpoint mechanisms and be transported to the cytoplasm by hijacking the host machinery. Once in the cytoplasm, viral unspliced RNA acts as mRNA to be translated and as genomic RNA to be packaged into nascent viruses. The murine leukemia virus (MLV) is among the first retroviruses discovered and is classified as simple Retroviridae due to its minimal encoding capacity. The oncogenic and transduction abilities of MLV are extensively studied, whereas surprisingly the crucial step of its nuclear export has remained unsolved until 2014. Recent work has revealed the recruitment by MLV of the cellular NXF1/Tap-dependent pathway for export. Unconventionally, MLV uses of Tap to export both spliced and unspliced viral RNAs. Unlike other retroviruses, MLV does not harbor a unique RNA signal for export. Indeed, multiple sequences throughout the MLV genome appear to promote export of the unspliced MLV RNA. We review here the current understanding of the export mechanism and highlight the determinants that influence MLV export. As the molecular mechanism of MLV export is elucidated, we will gain insight into the contribution of the export pathway to the cytoplasmic fate of the viral RNA.

  18. Murine leukemia virus uses TREX components for efficient nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Toshie; Tonne, Jason M; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-10

    Previously we reported that nuclear export of both unspliced and spliced murine leukemia virus (MLV) transcripts depends on the nuclear export factor (NXF1) pathway. Although the mRNA export complex TREX, which contains Aly/REF, UAP56, and the THO complex, is involved in the NXF1-mediated nuclear export of cellular mRNAs, its contribution to the export of MLV mRNA transcripts remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the involvement of TREX components in the export of MLV transcripts. Depletion of UAP56, but not Aly/REF, reduced the level of both unspliced and spliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, depletion of THO components, including THOC5 and THOC7, affected only unspliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed that only the unspliced viral transcript interacted with THOC5. These results imply that MLV requires UAP56, THOC5 and THOC7, in addition to NXF1, for nuclear export of viral transcripts. Given that naturally intronless mRNAs, but not bulk mRNAs, require THOC5 for nuclear export, it is plausible that THOC5 plays a key role in the export of unspliced MLV transcripts.

  19. Small synthetic ligands for the enrichment of viral particles pseudotyped with amphotropic murine leukemia virus envelope.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Castro, Rute; Coroadinha, Ana Sofia; Roque, A Cecília A

    2016-03-18

    Retroviral vectors gained popularity toward other viral vectors as they integrate their genome into hosts' genome, a characteristic required for the modification of stem cells. However, the production of viable particles for gene therapy is hampered by the low ratio of infectious to non-infectious viral particles after purification, low titers and limited number of competent viral receptors. We have developed de novo two fully synthetic triazine-based ligands that can selectively bind retroviral particles pseudotyped with amphotropic murine leukemia virus envelope (AMPHO4070A). A 78-membered library of triazine-based ligands was designed in silico and was virtually screened against the modeled structure of the AMPHO4070A protein. Ligands displaying the highest energy of binding were synthesized on cross-linked agarose and experimentally tested. Adsorbents containing ligands A5A10 and A10A11 showed selectivity toward viral particles containing the target protein (VLP-AMPHO), binding 19 ± 5 μg/g support and 47 ± 13 μg/g support, respectively. The elution conditions for both ligands were mild and with high recovery yields (80-100%), in comparison with common purification practices. These results were based on a lab-scale experimental setting with VLP integrity being confirmed through TEM. In particular, the elution buffer containing 12 mM imidazole allowed the recovery of intact amphotropic viral particles.

  20. Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV)-based Coronavirus Spike-pseudotyped Particle Production and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Jean Kaoru; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2016-01-01

    Viral pseudotyped particles (pp) are enveloped virus particles, typically derived from retroviruses or rhabdoviruses, that harbor heterologous envelope glycoproteins on their surface and a genome lacking essential genes. These synthetic viral particles are safer surrogates of native viruses and acquire the tropism and host entry pathway characteristics governed by the heterologous envelope glycoprotein used. They have proven to be very useful tools used in research with many applications, such as enabling the study of entry pathways of enveloped viruses and to generate effective gene-delivery vectors. The basis for their generation lies in the capacity of some viruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), to incorporate envelope glycoproteins of other viruses into a pseudotyped virus particle. These can be engineered to contain reporter genes such as luciferase, enabling quantification of virus entry events upon pseudotyped particle infection with susceptible cells. Here, we detail a protocol enabling generation of MLV-based pseudotyped particles, using the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) spike (S) as an example of a heterologous envelope glycoprotein to be incorporated. We also describe how these particles are used to infect susceptible cells and to perform a quantitative infectivity readout by a luciferase assay. PMID:28018942

  1. Solution Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Gag Protein: Differences from HIV-1 Gag

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Zuo, Xiaobing; Clark, Patrick K.; Campbell, Stephen J.; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan

    2012-05-09

    Immature retrovirus particles are assembled from the multidomain Gag protein. In these particles, the Gag proteins are arranged radially as elongated rods. We have previously characterized the properties of HIV-1 Gag in solution. In the absence of nucleic acid, HIV-1 Gag displays moderately weak interprotein interactions, existing in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Neutron scattering and hydrodynamic studies suggest that the protein is compact, and biochemical studies indicate that the two ends can approach close in three-dimensional space, implying the need for a significant conformational change during assembly. We now describe the properties of the Gag protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), a gammaretrovirus. We found that this protein is very different from HIV-1 Gag: it has much weaker protein-protein interaction and is predominantly monomeric in solution. This has allowed us to study the protein by small-angle X-ray scattering and to build a low-resolution molecular envelope for the protein. We found that MLV Gag is extended in solution, with an axial ratio of {approx}7, comparable to its dimensions in immature particles. Mutational analysis suggests that runs of prolines in its matrix and p12 domains and the highly charged stretch at the C terminus of its capsid domain all contribute to this extended conformation. These differences between MLV Gag and HIV-1 Gag and their implications for retroviral assembly are discussed.

  2. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-06-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins.

  3. Efficient N-tailing of blunt DNA ends by Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase (MMLV-RT) is a widely used enzyme for cDNA synthesis. Here we show that MMLV-RT has a strong template-independent polymerase activity using blunt DNA ends as substrate that generates 3′ overhangs of A, C, G, or T. Nucleotides were appended efficiently in the order A > G > T > C, and tail lengths varied from 4 to 5, 2 to 7, 2 to 4, and 2 to 3 for A, C, G, and T, respectively. The activity was so strong that nearly all our test DNA ends were appended with at least one A, C, G, or T. The N-tailing activity of MMLV-RT was enhanced in the presence of Mn2+, and the G-, C-, and T-tailing activities were further enhanced by dCMP, dGMP, and dAMP, respectively. This is the first report of an enzymatic activity that almost thoroughly appends two or more As, or one or more Cs, Gs, or Ts to the 3′ end of double-stranded DNA, which would enable exhaustive analysis of DNA samples. The N-tailing activity of MMLV-RT is potentially useful in many biotechnological applications. PMID:28150748

  4. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, Keith R.; Diem, Kurt; Huang, Meei-Li; Selke, Stacy; Corey, Lawrence; Buchwald, Dedra

    2011-01-01

    A recent report suggested an association between xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). If confirmed, this would suggest that antiretroviral therapy might benefit patients suffering from CFS. We validated a set of assays for XMRV, and evaluated the prevalence of XMRV in a cohort of monozygotic twins discordant for CFS. Stored PBMC were tested with 3 separate PCR assays (one of which was nested) for XMRV DNA, and serum/plasma was tested for XMRV RNA by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. None of the PBMC samples from the twins with CFS or their unaffected co-twins were positive for XMRV, by any of the assays. One plasma sample, from an unaffected co-twin, was reproducibly positive by RT-PCR. However, serum from the same day was negative, as was a followup plasma sample obtained 2 days after the positive specimen. These data do not support an association of XMRV with CFS. PMID:21795004

  5. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag–Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins. PMID:27329342

  6. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a γ retrovirus that has been associated with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and prostate cancer. The search for viral causes of these syndromes was reignited by the finding that RNase L activity was low in hereditary prostate cancer and some CFS patients. The six strains of XMRV that have been sequenced have greater than 99% identity, indicating a new human infection rather than laboratory contamination. DNA, RNA, and proteins from XMRV have been detected in 50% to 67% of CFS patients and in about 3.7% of healthy controls. XMRV infections could be transmitted to permissive cell lines from CFS plasma, suggesting the potential for communicable and blood-borne spread of the virus and potentially CFS. This troubling concept is currently under intense evaluation. The most important steps now are to independently confirm the initial findings; develop reliable assays of biomarkers; and to move on to investigations of XMRV pathophysiology and treatment in CFS, prostate cancer, and potentially other virus-related syndromes, if they exist. PMID:20425007

  7. Efficient N-tailing of blunt DNA ends by Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka

    2017-02-02

    Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase (MMLV-RT) is a widely used enzyme for cDNA synthesis. Here we show that MMLV-RT has a strong template-independent polymerase activity using blunt DNA ends as substrate that generates 3' overhangs of A, C, G, or T. Nucleotides were appended efficiently in the order A > G > T > C, and tail lengths varied from 4 to 5, 2 to 7, 2 to 4, and 2 to 3 for A, C, G, and T, respectively. The activity was so strong that nearly all our test DNA ends were appended with at least one A, C, G, or T. The N-tailing activity of MMLV-RT was enhanced in the presence of Mn(2+), and the G-, C-, and T-tailing activities were further enhanced by dCMP, dGMP, and dAMP, respectively. This is the first report of an enzymatic activity that almost thoroughly appends two or more As, or one or more Cs, Gs, or Ts to the 3' end of double-stranded DNA, which would enable exhaustive analysis of DNA samples. The N-tailing activity of MMLV-RT is potentially useful in many biotechnological applications.

  8. Biochemical, inhibition and inhibitor resistance studies of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Ndongwe, Tanyaradzwa P.; Adedeji, Adeyemi O.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Ryan, Emily M.; Rai, Devendra K.; Kirby, Karen A.; Whatley, Angela S.; Burke, Donald H.; Johnson, Marc; Ding, Shilei; Zheng, Yi-Min; Liu, Shan-Lu; Kodama, Ei-Ichi; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A.; Pathak, Vinay K.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Parniak, Michael A.; Singh, Kamalendra; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    We report key mechanistic differences between the reverse transcriptases (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), a gammaretrovirus that can infect human cells. Steady and pre-steady state kinetics demonstrated that XMRV RT is significantly less efficient in DNA synthesis and in unblocking chain-terminated primers. Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the gammaretroviral enzyme has a remarkably higher dissociation rate (koff) from DNA, which also results in lower processivity than HIV-1 RT. Transient kinetics of mismatch incorporation revealed that XMRV RT has higher fidelity than HIV-1 RT. We identified RNA aptamers that potently inhibit XMRV, but not HIV-1 RT. XMRV RT is highly susceptible to some nucleoside RT inhibitors, including Translocation Deficient RT inhibitors, but not to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors. We demonstrated that XMRV RT mutants K103R and Q190M, which are equivalent to HIV-1 mutants that are resistant to tenofovir (K65R) and AZT (Q151M), are also resistant to the respective drugs, suggesting that XMRV can acquire resistance to these compounds through the decreased incorporation mechanism reported in HIV-1. PMID:21908397

  9. Phenotypes of murine leukemia virus-induced tumors: influence of 3' viral coding sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, D E; Keller, J; Sill, K; Rein, A

    1992-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) induce leukemias and lymphomas in mice. We have used fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis to determine the hematopoietic phenotypes of tumor cells induced by a number of MuLVs. Tumor cells induced by ecotropic Moloney, amphotropic 4070A, and 10A1 MuLVs and by two chimeric MuLVs, Mo(4070A) and Mo(10A1), were examined with antibodies to 13 lineage-specific cell surface markers found on myeloid cell, T-cell, and B-cell lineages. The chimeric Mo(4070A) and Mo(10A1) MuLVs, consisting of Moloney MuLV with the carboxy half of the Pol region and nearly all of the Env region of 4070A and 10A1, respectively, were constructed to examine the possible influence of these sequences on Moloney MuLV-induced tumor cell phenotypes. In some instances, these phenotypic analyses were supplemented by Southern blot analysis for lymphoid cell-specific genomic DNA rearrangements at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain, the T-cell receptor gamma, and the T-cell receptor beta loci. The results of our analysis showed that Moloney MuLV, 4070A, Mo(4070A), and Mo(10A1) induced mostly T-cell tumors. Moloney MuLV and Mo(4070A) induced a wide variety of T-cell phenotypes, ranging from immature to mature phenotypes, while 4070A induced mostly prothymocyte and double-negative (CD4- CD8-) T-cell tumors. The tumor phenotypes obtained with 10A1 and Mo(10A1) were each less variable than those obtained with the other MuLVs tested. 10A1 uniformly induced a tumor consisting of lineage marker-negative cells that lack lymphoid cell-specific DNA rearrangements and histologically appear to be early undifferentiated erythroid cell-like precursors. The Mo(10A1) chimera consistently induced an intermediate T-cell tumor. The chimeric constructions demonstrated that while 4070A 3' pol and env sequences apparently did not influence the observed tumor cell phenotypes, the 10A1 half of pol and env had a strong effect on the phenotypes induced by Mo(10A1) that resulted in a phenotypic

  10. Murine tumor necrosis-inducing factor: purification and effects on myelomonocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Green, S; Dobrjansky, A; Chiasson, M A

    1982-06-01

    The tumor necrosis-inducing factor (TNF) found in sera of Corynebacterium parvum-treated, endotoxin-stressed BALB/C and outbred albino CD-1 mice has been purified to a single band of protein by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after identification and removal of contaminating albumin and transferrin. This purified TNF has a molecular weight of 140,000, is glycoprotein in nature, and migrates on free electrophoresis as an alpha 2-globulin. TNF activity was continuously monitored during purification by bioassay in vitro (tumor cell lysis) and was confirmed by demonstration of induction of tumor necrosis in vivo. A single target tumor cell line, murine myelomonocytic leukemia (WEHI/3), was used in both assays. In the in vivo assay, controls were heat-inactivated samples of TNF. As additional controls, a line of TNF-resistant WEHI/3 cells was used in the in vitro assay. Results from in vivo radiolabeling of TNF-sensitive and TNF-resistant cells indicated a difference between their cytoplasmic peptide profiles. Optimal TNF production was not altered in C. parvum-endotoxin-treated mice by treatment with silica, a substance that is specifically toxic for macrophages. Exposure of mice to 650 rad whole-body radiation, which is not markedly damaging to macrophage elements in the reticuloendothelial system, completely abrogated the ability of the mice to produce TNF after C. parvum-endotoxin treatment. These findings suggest that in the sera of C. parvum-endotoxin-treated mice the protein that induces necrosis in tumors may not be of macrophage origin.

  11. Splicing of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus env-mRNA Enhances Its Ability to Form Polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Machinaga, Akihito; Ishihara, Syuhei; Shirai, Akiko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) belongs to the gamma retroviruses of the Retroviridae family. The positive-sense RNA of its genome contains a 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR), 5′ leader sequence, gag, pol, env, and 3′ LTR. Transcription from proviral DNA begins from the R region of the 5′ LTR and ends at the polyadenylation signal located at the R region of the other end of the 3′ LTR. There is a 5′ splice site in the 5′ leader sequence and a 3′ splice site at the 3′ end of the pol region. Both full-length unspliced mRNAs and a singly spliced mRNA (env-mRNA) are produced in MLV-infected cells. The MLV Env protein plays important roles both in viral adsorption to host cells and in neuropathogenic disease in MLV-infected mice and rats. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling Env expression is important for determining the functions of the Env protein. We have previously shown that splicing increases env-mRNA stability and translation efficiency. Generally, mRNA polysome formation correlates with translation efficiency. Therefore, here we investigated the effects of env-mRNA splicing on polysome formation to identify mechanisms for Env up-regulation due to splicing. We performed polysome profile analyses using Env-expression plasmids producing spliced or unspliced env-mRNA and showed that the former formed polysomes more efficiently than the latter. Thus, splicing of env-mRNA facilitated polysome formation, suggesting that this contributes to up-regulation of Env expression. We replaced the env region of the expression plasmids with a luciferase (luc) gene, and found that in this case both unspliced and spliced luc-mRNA formed polysomes to a similar extent. Thus, we conclude that whether mRNA polysome formation is affected by splicing depends on the structure of gene in question. PMID:26909075

  12. Identification of a subdomain in the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope protein involved in receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    MacKrell, A J; Soong, N W; Curtis, C M; Anderson, W F

    1996-01-01

    We have mutated amino acids within the receptor-binding domain of Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope in order to identify residues involved in receptor binding. Analysis of mutations in the region of amino acids 81 to 88 indicates that this region is important for specific envelope-receptor interactions. None of the aspartate 84 (D-84) mutants studied bind measurably, although they are efficiently incorporated into particles. D-84 mutants have titers that correspond to the severity of the substitution. This observation suggests that D-84 may provide a direct receptor contact. Mutations in the other charged amino acids in this domain (R-83, E-86, and E-87) yield titers similar to those of wild-type envelope, but the affinity of the mutant envelope in the binding assay is decreased by nonconservative substitutions in parallel to the severity of the change. These other amino acids may either provide secondary receptor contacts or assist in maintaining a structure in the domain that favors efficient binding. We also studied other regions of high hydrophilicity. Our initial characterization indicates that amino acids 106 to 111 and 170 to 188 do not play a major role in receptor binding. Measurements of relative binding affinity and titer indicate that most mutations in the region of amino acids 120 to 131 did not significantly affect receptor binding. However, SU encoded by mutants H123V, R124L, and C131A as well as C81A could not be detected in particles and therefore did not bind measurably. Therefore, the region encompassed by amino acids 81 to 88 appears to be directly involved in receptor binding. PMID:8627699

  13. Genetic rearrangements occurring during a single cycle of murine leukemia virus vector replication: characterization and implications.

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathi, S; Varela-Echavarría, A; Ron, Y; Preston, B D; Dougherty, J P

    1995-01-01

    Retroviruses evolve at rapid rates, which is presumably advantageous for responding to selective pressures. Understanding the basic mutational processes involved during retroviral replication is important for comprehending the ability of retroviruses to escape immunosurveillance and antiviral drug treatment. Moreover, since retroviral vectors are important vehicles for somatic cell gene therapy, knowledge of the mechanism of retroviral variation is critical for anticipating untoward mutational events occurring during retrovirus-medicated gene transfer. The focus of this report is to examine the spectrum of genomic rearrangements arising during a single cycle of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) vector virus replication. An MoMLV vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (tk) gene was constructed. MoMLV vector virus was produced in packaging lines, and target cells were infected. From a total of 224 mutant proviruses analyzed, 114 had gross rearrangements readily detectable by Southern blotting. The remaining proviruses were of parental size. PCR and DNA sequence analysis of 73 of the grossly rearranged mutant proviruses indicated they resulted from deletions, combined with insertions, duplications, and complex mutations that were a result of multiple genomic alterations in the same provirus. Complex hypermutations distinct from those previously described for spleen necrosis virus and human immunodeficiency virus were detected. There was a correlation between the mutation breakpoints and single-stranded regions in the predicted viral RNA secondary structure. The results also confirmed that the tk gene is inactivated at an average rate of about 8.8% per cycle of retroviral replication, which corresponds to a rate of mutation of 3%/kbp. PMID:7494312

  14. Abelson murine leukemia virus transformation-defective mutants with impaired P120-associated protein kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, F H; Van de Ven, W J; Stephenson, J R

    1980-01-01

    Several transformation-defective (td) mutants of Abelson murine leukemia virus (AbLV) are described. Cells nonproductively infected with such mutants exhibited a high degree of growth contact inhibition, failed to form colonies in soft agar, lacked rescuable transforming virus, and were as susceptible as uninfected control cells to transformation by wild-type (wt) AbLV pseudotype virus. In addition, each of several td AbLV nonproductively infected cell clones analyzed was found to be nontumorigenic in vivo. Biochemical analysis of td mutant AbLV-infected clones revealed levels of expression of the major AbLV translational product, P120, and a highly related 80,000-Mr AbLV-encoded protein, P80, at concentrations analogous to those in wt AbLV-transformed cells. Although the AbLV-specific 120,000-Mr polyproteins expressed in td mutant AbLV-infected clones were indistinguishable from those in wt AbLV-transformed lines with respect to molecular weight and [35S]methionine tryptic peptide composition, they each differed from wt AbLV P120 in their patterns of post-translational phosphorylation. A previously described AbLV-associated protein kinase activity is shown to recognize as substrate a major tyrosine-specific acceptor site(s) contained within a single well-resolved tryptic peptide common to both AbLV P120 and P80. In vitro [gamma-32P]ATP-mediated labeling of this phosphorylation site was reduced to below detectable levels in td mutant nonproductively infected cell clones. These findings establish that the AbLV-encoded polyprotein P120 and its associated protein kinase activity are involved in AbLV tumorigenesis. Images PMID:6253663

  15. Six distinct nuclear factors interact with the 75-base-pair repeat of the Moloney murine leukemia virus enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Speck, N A; Baltimore, D

    1987-01-01

    Binding sites for six distinct nuclear factors on the 75-base-pair repeat of the Moloney murine leukemia virus enhancer have been identified by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay combined with methylation interference. Three of these factors, found in WEHI 231 nuclear extracts, which we have named LVa, LVb, and LVc (for leukemia virus factors a, b, and c) have not been previously identified. Nuclear factors that bind to the conserved simian virus 40 corelike motif, the NF-1 motif, and the glucocorticoid response element were also detected. Testing of multiple cell lines showed that most factors appeared ubiquitous, except that the NF-1 binding factor was found neither in nuclear extracts from MEL cells nor in the embryonal carcinoma cell lines PCC4 and F9, and core-binding factor was relatively depleted from MEL and F9 nuclear extracts. Images PMID:3561410

  16. Origin of pathogenic determinants of recombinant murine leukemia viruses: analysis of Bxv-1-related xenotropic viruses from CWD mice.

    PubMed Central

    Massey, A C; Coppola, M A; Thomas, C Y

    1990-01-01

    The acquisition of U3 region sequences derived from the endogenous xenotropic provirus Bxv-1 appears to be an important step in the generation of leukemogenic recombinant viruses in AKR, HRS, C58, and some CWD mice. We report here that each of three CWD lymphomas produced infectious xenotropic murine leukemia virus related to Bxv-1. In Southern blot experiments, these proviruses hybridized to probes that were specific for the xenotropic envelope and Bxv-1 U3 region sequences. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a cloned CWD xenotropic provirus, CWM-S-5X, revealed that the envelope gene was closely related to but distinct from those of other known xenotropic viruses. In addition, the U3 region of CWM-S-5X contained a viral enhancer sequence that was identical to that found in MCF 247, a recombinant AKR virus that is thought to contain the Bxv-1 enhancer. Finally, restriction enzyme sites in the CWM-S-5X provirus were analogous to those reported within Bxv-1. These results establish that the virus progeny of Bxv-1 have the potential to donate pathogenic enhancer sequences to recombinant polytropic murine leukemia viruses. Interestingly, the three CWD polytropic viruses that were isolated from the same tumor cells that produced the Bxv-1-like viruses had not incorporated Bxv-1 sequences into the U3 region. Images PMID:2170683

  17. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kakoki, Katsura; Kamiyama, Haruka; Izumida, Mai; Yashima, Yuka; Hayashi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Naoki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV.

  18. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... exist, including hairy cell leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative disorders. Factors that may increase your risk of developing some types of leukemia include: Previous cancer treatment. People who've had certain types of ...

  19. Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  20. Localization of actin in Moloney murine leukemia virus by immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nermut, M V; Wallengren, K; Pager, J

    1999-07-20

    Immunoelectron microscopy was used to detect actin in wild-type (wt) Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) and in virus-like particles (VLP) produced by recombinant Semliki Forest virus expressing only the MoMuLV gag polyprotein. Gold immunolabeling revealed the presence of actin on the surface of delipidized VLP and delipidized wt virus particles. Statistical evaluation of the number of colloidal gold particles per VLP revealed a large range of values and a prevalence of VLP with small numbers of gold particles. Labeling for actin was lost after prolonged treatment of VLP with 1% Nonidet-P40, high-pH buffer, or gelsolin. Gold immunolabeling with antibodies to gag proteins p15 (MA) and p12 and p30 (CA) was abundant and was not affected by treatment of VLP or wt virus with 1% Nonidet or gelsolin. VLP treated with a mixture of detergent and aldehyde fixatives showed more uniform and consistent labeling for actin than without fixatives. Negative staining or heavy metal shadowing revealed a globular surface of delipidized VLP. Stereomicrographs of gold-immunolabeled VLP showed that p15gag and p12gag were associated with the globular projections. Delipidized VLP were also well labeled with antibody to p30gag, which indicated that the gag shell permitted access of antibodies to p30gag and was therefore not a closely packed structure. Labeling for actin-binding proteins moesin and ezrin was negative in both the wt virus and the VLP. The absence of Gaussian distribution of actin in the sample of VLP suggests that actin is not a structural protein and its presence in MuLV virus particles may be fortuitous. This, however, does not rule out any possible role of actin in transport, assembly, budding, or release of virus particles, events which take place in the cytoplasm or at the plasma membrane. The site of actin in VLP is discussed in relation to the present knowledge of the molecular organization of the MuLV gag shell.

  1. MN1–Fli1 oncofusion transforms murine hematopoietic progenitor cells into acute megakaryoblastic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Wenge, D V; Felipe-Fumero, E; Angenendt, L; Schliemann, C; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, L H; Thiede, C; Ehninger, G; Berdel, W E; Arteaga, M-F; Mikesch, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Long-term outcome of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) patients without Down's syndrome remains poor. Founding mutations and chimeric oncogenes characterize various AMKL subtypes. However, for around one third of all cases the underlying mechanisms of AMKL leukemogenesis are still largely unknown. Recently, an in-frame fusion of meningeoma 1–friend leukemia virus integration 1 (MN1–Fli1) gene was detected in a child with AMKL. We intended to investigate the potential role of this oncofusion in leukemogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. Strikingly, expression of MN1–Fli1 in murine hematopoietic progenitor cells was sufficient to induce leukemic transformation generating immature myeloid cells with cytomorphology and expression of surface markers typical for AMKL. Systematic structure function analyses revealed FLS and 3′ETS domains of Fli1 as decisive domains for the AMKL phenotype. Our data highlight an important role of MN1–Fli1 in AMKL leukemogenesis and provide a basis for research assessing the value of this oncofusion as a future diagnostic marker and/or therapeutic target in AMKL patients. PMID:26690545

  2. Biochemical effects and therapeutic potential of tunicamycin in murine L1210 leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, M.J.; Bernacki, R.J.

    1983-04-01

    Tunicamycin, an antibiotic which specifically inhibits the dolichol-mediated synthesis of glycoproteins, significantly decreased the incorporation of tritiated D-mannose and D-glucosamine into L1210 ascites leukemia cell glycoproteins at concentrations which affected the biosynthesis of proteins minimally. Mice receiving inoculations of L1210 cells pretreated with 10 microM tunicamycin in vitro survived nearly twice as long as did mice receiving implants of untreated tumor cells. A nonlethal dose of X-irradiation (350 rads) to mice 24 hr prior to receiving their inoculation of tunicamycin-treated L1210 cells prevented this increase in life span. Thirty-eight % of the long-term surviving mice which received 1 X 10(5) L1210 cells pretreated with 10 microM tunicamycin in vitro were then resistant to a subsequent challenge with 10(6) untreated L1210 ascites cells. Direct i.p. administration of tunicamycin to mice resulted in potent liver toxicity (50% lethal dose, 2.0 mg/kg) which obviated any therapeutic efficacy when administered to L1210 ascites tumor-bearing mice. The administration of nontoxic levels of D-mannose prior to the administration of tunicamycin decreased the toxicity of the antibiotic in vivo and, when combined with D-mannose in vitro, exhibited cytotoxic additivity in terms of the inhibition of L1210 leukemic cell growth. A therapeutic regimen incorporating a 24-hr infusion of the sugar prior to multiple administrations of tunicamycin gave evidence of a small therapeutic response in terms of the survival of tumor-bearing mice. These results suggest that tunicamycin, an inhibitor of glycoprotein biosynthesis, might be able to alter tumor cell growth and immunogenicity provided that host liver toxicity is diminished.

  3. Purification of core-binding factor, a protein that binds the conserved core site in murine leukemia virus enhancers.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S W; Speck, N A

    1992-01-01

    The Moloney murine leukemia virus causes thymic leukemias when injected into newborn mice. A major genetic determinant of the thymic disease specificity of the Moloney virus genetically maps to two protein binding sites in the Moloney virus enhancer, the leukemia virus factor b site and the adjacent core site. Point mutations introduced into either of these sites significantly shifts the disease specificity of the Moloney virus from thymic leukemia to erythroleukemia (N. A. Speck, B. Renjifo, E. Golemis, T. Frederickson, J. Hartley, and N. Hopkins, Genes Dev. 4:233-242, 1990). We have purified several polypeptides that bind to the core site in the Moloney virus enhancer. These proteins were purified from calf thymus nuclear extracts by selective pH denaturation, followed by chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, nonspecific double-stranded DNA-cellulose, and core oligonucleotide-coupled affinity columns. We have achieved greater than 13,000-fold purification of the core-binding factors (CBFs), with an overall yield of approximately 19%. Analysis of purified protein fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis reveals more than 10 polypeptides. Each of the polypeptides was recovered from an SDS-polyacrylamide gel, and those in the molecular size range of 19 to 35 kDa were demonstrated to have core-binding activity. The purified CBFs were shown by DNase I footprint analyses to bind the core site in the Moloney virus enhancer specifically, and also to core motifs in the enhancers from a simian immunodeficiency virus, the immunoglobulin mu chain, and T-cell receptor gamma-chain genes. Images PMID:1309596

  4. Targeting JAK1/2 and mTOR in murine xenograft models of Ph-like acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Tasian, Sarah K.; Vincent, Tiffaney; Hall, Junior W.; Sheen, Cecilia; Roberts, Kathryn G.; Seif, Alix E.; Barrett, David M.; Chen, I-Ming; Collins, J. Racquel; Mullighan, Charles G.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Harvey, Richard C.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Fridman, Jordan S.; Loh, Mignon L.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2012-01-01

    CRLF2 rearrangements, JAK1/2 point mutations, and JAK2 fusion genes have been identified in Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–like acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a recently described subtype of pediatric high-risk B-precursor ALL (B-ALL) which exhibits a gene expression profile similar to Ph-positive ALL and has a poor prognosis. Hyperactive JAK/STAT and PI3K/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is common in this high-risk subset. We, therefore, investigated the efficacy of the JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin in xenograft models of 8 pediatric B-ALL cases with and without CRLF2 and JAK genomic lesions. Ruxolitinib treatment yielded significantly lower peripheral blast counts compared with vehicle (P < .05) in 6 of 8 human leukemia xenografts and lower splenic blast counts (P < .05) in 8 of 8 samples. Enhanced responses to ruxolitinib were observed in samples harboring JAK-activating lesions and higher levels of STAT5 phosphorylation. Rapamycin controlled leukemia burden in all 8 B-ALL samples. Survival analysis of 2 representative B-ALL xenografts demonstrated prolonged survival with rapamycin treatment compared with vehicle (P < .01). These data demonstrate preclinical in vivo efficacy of ruxolitinib and rapamycin in this high-risk B-ALL subtype, for which novel treatments are urgently needed, and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeted kinase inhibition in Ph-like ALL. PMID:22955920

  5. Nuclease S1-sensitive sites on superhelical DNA molecules carrying the LTR region of Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Takeya, T

    1987-04-29

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) from proviral DNA of Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) was cloned on a derivative of pBR322, and after introducing superhelical torsions into the resulting recombinant, the sites of conformational transition were investigated by the nuclease S1-digestion method. With an increase in the negative linking differences, fourteen dominant cutting sites were identified, of which two were mapped inside the LTR and one at the 3' end of the LTR. By searching the sequence data, all these sites were localized in the regions having either palindromic sequences or AT-rich sequences. Free energy calculation for the local secondary structure on one strand indicated that nuclease S1 attacked the palindromic sequence regions which could form relatively stable hairpin structures. Under the conditions used, no correlation was found between the S1-sensitive sites and the potential Z-DNA-forming regions, including those within the enhancer sequence.

  6. Contrasting roles of leukemia inhibitory factor in murine bone development and remodeling involve region-specific changes in vascularization.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Ingrid J; McGregor, Narelle E; Pompolo, Sueli; Walker, Emma C; Sims, Natalie A

    2012-03-01

    We describe here distinct functions of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) in bone development/growth and adult skeletal homeostasis. In the growth plate and developing neonate bones, LIF deficiency enhanced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels, enlarged blood vessel formation, and increased the formation of "giant" osteoclasts/chondroclasts that rapidly destroyed the mineralized regions of the growth plate and developing neonatal bone. Below this region, osteoblasts formed large quantities of woven bone. In contrast, in adult bone undergoing remodeling osteoclast formation was unaffected by LIF deficiency, whereas osteoblast formation and function were both significantly impaired, resulting in osteopenia. Consistent with LIF promoting osteoblast commitment, enhanced marrow adipocyte formation was also observed in adult LIF null mice, and adipocytic differentiation of murine stromal cells was delayed by LIF treatment. LIF, therefore, controls vascular size and osteoclast differentiation during the transition of cartilage to bone, whereas an anatomically separate LIF-dependent pathway regulates osteoblast and adipocyte commitment in bone remodeling.

  7. Expression of IMP1 enhances production of murine leukemia virus vector by facilitating viral genomic RNA packaging.

    PubMed

    Mai, Yun; Gao, Guangxia

    2010-12-29

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based retroviral vector is widely used for gene transfer. Efficient packaging of the genomic RNA is critical for production of high-titer virus. Here, we report that expression of the insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 1 (IMP1) enhanced the production of infectious MLV vector. Overexpression of IMP1 increased the stability of viral genomic RNA in virus producer cells and packaging of the RNA into progeny virus in a dose-dependent manner. Downregulation of IMP1 in virus producer cells resulted in reduced production of the retroviral vector. These results indicate that IMP1 plays a role in regulating the packaging of MLV genomic RNA and can be used for improving production of retroviral vectors.

  8. A locus that enhances the induction of endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia viruses is distinct from genome-length ecotropic proviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, J M; Risser, R

    1982-01-01

    The segregation of genes that enhance the induction of ecotropic murine leukemia viruses (In loci) has been compared with the segregation of ecotropic-specific nucleotide sequences in 12 low-leukemic mouse strains and 18 recombinant inbred strains. Endogenous ecotropic viruses of these strains are of genome length and structurally similar to AKR ecotropic proviruses. Low-leukemic strains of related pedigree contain ecotropic proviruses at common integration sites. Loci previously identified which enhance induction of ecotropic viruses (In genes) were correlated with the inheritance of ecotropic viral sequences in inbred low-leukemic mouse strains and in CXB recombinant inbred mouse strains. However, four BXH recombinant inbred strains were observed to possess an In gene(s) yet lack the probed envelope gene region for the corresponding endogenous ecotropic virus. These observations indicate that at least one gene that enhances ecotropic virus expression in vitro is encoded by DNA sequences outside ecotropic proviruses or by subgenomic viral sequences. Images PMID:6294342

  9. Domain structure of the Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase: mutational analysis and separate expression of the DNA polymerase and RNase H activities.

    PubMed Central

    Tanese, N; Goff, S P

    1988-01-01

    The reverse transcriptase of Moloney murine leukemia virus, like that of all retroviruses, exhibits a DNA polymerase activity capable of synthesis on RNA or DNA templates and an RNase H activity with specificity for RNA in the form of an RNA.DNA hybrid. We have generated a library of linker insertion mutants of the Moloney murine leukemia virus enzyme expressed in bacteria and assayed these mutants for both enzymatic activities. Those mutations affecting the DNA polymerase activity were clustered in the 5'-proximal two-thirds of the gene, and those affecting RNase H were in the remaining 3' one-third. Based on these maps, plasmids were made that expressed each one of the domains separately; assays of the proteins encoded by these plasmids showed that each domain exhibited only the expected activity. Images PMID:2450347

  10. Efficacy of Ceftobiprole Medocaril against Enterococcus faecalis in a Murine Urinary Tract Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Barbara E.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated ceftobiprole against the well-characterized Enterococcus faecalis strain OG1RF (with and without the β-lactamase [Bla] plasmid pBEM10) in a murine urinary tract infection (UTI) model. Ceftobiprole was equally effective for Bla+ and Bla− OG1 strains, while ampicillin was moderately to markedly (depending on the inoculum) less effective against Bla+ than Bla− OG1 strains. These data illustrate an in vivo effect on ampicillin of Bla production by E. faecalis and the stability and efficacy of ceftobiprole in experimental UTI. PMID:22450988

  11. Prevalence of Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog-breakpoint cluster region fusions and correlation with peripheral blood parameters in chronic myelogenous leukemia patients in Lorestan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Ali Asghar; Shahsavar, Farhad; Gorji, Mojtaba; Ahmadi, Kolsoum; Nazarabad, Vahideh Heydari; Bahmani, Banafsheh

    2016-01-01

    Context: Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a chronic malignancy of myeloid linage associated with a significant increase in granulocytes in bone marrow and peripheral blood. CML diagnosis is based on detection of Philadelphia chromosome and “Abelson murine leukemia viral oncogene homolog” (ABL)-“breakpoint cluster region protein” fusions (ABL-BCR fusions). Aims: In this study, patients with CML morphology were studied according to ABL-BCR fusions and the relationship between the fusions and peripheral blood cell changes was examined. Materials and Methods: All patients suspected to chronic myeloproliferative disorders in Lorestan Province visiting subspecialist hematology clinics who were confirmed by oncologist were studied over a period of 5 years. After completing basic data questionnaire, blood samples were obtained with informed consent from the patients. Blood cell count and morphology were investigated and RNA was extracted from blood samples. cDNA was synthesized from RNA and ABL-BCR fusions including b3a2 and b2a2 (protein 210 kd or p210), e1a2 (protein 190 kdor p190), and e19a2 (protein 230 kdor p230) were studied by multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method. Coexistence of e1a2 and b2a2 (p210/p190) fusions was also studied. The prevalence of mutations and their correlation with the blood parameters were statistically analyzed. Results: Of 58 patients positive for ABL-BCR fusion, 18 (30.5%) had b2a2 fusion, 37 (62.71%) had b3a2 fusion and three (3.08%) had e1a2 fusion. Coexistence of e1a2 and b2a2 (p210/p190) was not observed. There was no significant correlation between ABL-BCR fusions and white blood cell count, platelet count, and hemoglobin concentration. Conclusions: The ABL-BCR fusions in Lorestan Province were similar to other studies in Iran, and b3a2 fusion had the highest prevalence in the studied patients studied. PMID:27857896

  12. Efficacy of Posaconazole in a Murine Model of Systemic Infection by Saprochaete capitata

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Pamela; Guarro, Josep; Mayayo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Saprochaete capitata causes opportunistic human infections, mainly in immunocompromised patients with hematological malignancies. The best therapy for this severe infection is still unknown. We evaluated the in vitro killing activity and the in vivo efficacy of posaconazole at 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg twice a day (BID) in a murine neutropenic model of systemic infection with S. capitata by testing a set of six clinical isolates. Posaconazole showed fungistatic activity against all of the isolates tested. The different doses of the drug, especially the highest one, showed good efficacy, measured by prolonged survival, reduction of (1-3)-β-d-glucan levels in serum, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology. PMID:26392490

  13. Induction of donor-type chimerism in murine recipients of bone marrow allografts by different radiation regimens currently used in treatment of leukemia patients

    SciTech Connect

    Salomon, O.; Lapidot, T.; Terenzi, A.; Lubin, I.; Rabi, I.; Reisner, Y. )

    1990-11-01

    Three radiation protocols currently used in treatment of leukemia patients before bone marrow transplantation (BMT) were investigated in a murine model (C57BL/6----C3H/HeJ) for BM allograft rejection. These include (a) a single dose of total body irradiation (8.5 Gy TBI delivered at a dose rate of 0.2 Gy/min), (b) fractionated TBI 12 Gy administered in six fractions, 2 Gy twice a day in 3 days, delivered at a dose rate of 0.1 Gy/min, and (c) hyperfractionated TBI (14.4 Gy administered in 12 fractions, 1.2 Gy three times a day in 3 days, delivered at a dose rate of 0.1 Gy/min). Donor-type chimerism 6 to 8 weeks after BMT and hematologic reconstitution on day 12 after BMT found in these groups were compared with results obtained in mice conditioned with 8 Gy TBI delivered at a dose rate of 0.67 Gy/min, routinely used in this murine model. The results in both parameters showed a marked advantage for the single dose 8.5 Gy TBI over all the other treatments. This advantage was found to be equivalent to three- to fourfold increment in the BM inoculum when compared with hyperfractionated radiation, which afforded the least favorable conditions for development of donor-type chimerism. The fractionated radiation protocol was equivalent in its efficacy to results obtained in mice irradiated by single-dose 8 Gy TBI, both of which afforded a smaller but not significant advantage over the hyperfractionated protocol. This model was also used to test the effect of radiation dose rate on the development of donor-type chimerism. A significant enhancement was found after an increase in dose rate from 0.1 to 0.7 Gy/min. Further enhancement could be achieved when the dose rate was increased to 1.3 Gy/min, but survival at this high dose rate was reduced.

  14. Substitution of Feline Leukemia Virus Long Terminal Repeat Sequences into Murine Leukemia Virus Alters the Pattern of Insertional Activation and Identifies New Common Insertion Sites

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Chassidy; Lobelle-Rich, Patricia A.; Puetter, Adriane; Levy, Laura S.

    2005-01-01

    The recombinant retrovirus, MoFe2-MuLV (MoFe2), was constructed by replacing the U3 region of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) with homologous sequences from the FeLV-945 LTR. NIH/Swiss mice neonatally inoculated with MoFe2 developed T-cell lymphomas of immature thymocyte surface phenotype. MoFe2 integrated infrequently (0 to 9%) near common insertion sites (CISs) previously identified for either parent virus. Using three different strategies, CISs in MoFe2-induced tumors were identified at six loci, none of which had been previously reported as CISs in tumors induced by either parent virus in wild-type animals. Two of the newly identified CISs had not previously been implicated in lymphoma in any retrovirus model. One of these, designated 3-19, encodes the p101 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase-gamma. The other, designated Rw1, is predicted to encode a protein that functions in the immune response to virus infection. Thus, substitution of FeLV-945 U3 sequences into the M-MuLV long terminal repeat (LTR) did not alter the target tissue for M-MuLV transformation but significantly altered the pattern of CIS utilization in the induction of T-cell lymphoma. These observations support a growing body of evidence that the distinctive sequence and/or structure of the retroviral LTR determines its pattern of insertional activation. The findings also demonstrate the oligoclonal nature of retrovirus-induced lymphomas by demonstrating proviral insertions at CISs in subdominant populations in the tumor mass. Finally, the findings demonstrate the utility of novel recombinant retroviruses such as MoFe2 to contribute new genes potentially relevant to the induction of lymphoid malignancy. PMID:15596801

  15. Chromatin states shape insertion profiles of the piggyBac, Tol2 and Sleeping Beauty transposons and murine leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Junko; Akagi, Keiko; Misawa, Ryo; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Horie, Kyoji

    2017-01-01

    DNA transposons and retroviruses are versatile tools in functional genomics and gene therapy. To facilitate their application, we conducted a genome-wide insertion site profiling of the piggyBac (PB), Tol2 and Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposons and the murine leukemia virus (MLV) in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). PB and MLV preferred highly expressed genes, whereas Tol2 and SB preferred weakly expressed genes. However, correlations with DNase I hypersensitive sites were different for all vectors, indicating that chromatin accessibility is not the sole determinant. Therefore, we analysed various chromatin states. PB and MLV highly correlated with Cohesin, Mediator and ESC-specific transcription factors. Notably, CTCF sites were correlated with PB but not with MLV, suggesting MLV prefers smaller promoter–enhancer loops, whereas PB insertion encompasses larger chromatin loops termed topologically associating domains. Tol2 also correlated with Cohesin and CTCF. However, correlations with ESC-specific transcription factors were weaker, suggesting that Tol2 prefers transcriptionally weak chromatin loops. Consistently, Tol2 insertions were associated with bivalent histone modifications characteristic of silent and inducible loci. SB showed minimum preference to all chromatin states, suggesting the least adverse effect on adjacent genes. These results will be useful for vector selection for various applications. PMID:28252665

  16. CD45 phosphatase is crucial for human and murine acute myeloid leukemia maintenance through its localization in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Buffière, Anne; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Hammann, Arlette; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Johnson, Pauline; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent; Quéré, Ronan

    2016-10-04

    CD45 is a pan-leukocyte protein with tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the regulation of signal transduction in hematopoiesis. Exploiting CD45 KO mice and lentiviral shRNA, we prove the crucial role that CD45 plays in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and maintenance. We discovered that CD45 does not colocalize with lipid rafts on murine and human non-transformed hematopoietic cells. Using a mouse model, we proved that CD45 positioning within lipid rafts is modified during their oncogenic transformation to AML. CD45 colocalized with lipid rafts on AML cells, which contributes to elevated GM-CSF signal intensity involved in proliferation of leukemic cells. We furthermore proved that the GM-CSF/Lyn/Stat3 pathway that contributes to growth of leukemic cells could be profoundly affected, by using a new plasma membrane disrupting agent, which rapidly delocalized CD45 away from lipid rafts. We provide evidence that this mechanism is also effective on human primary AML samples and xenograft transplantation. In conclusion, this study highlights the emerging evidence of the involvement of lipid rafts in oncogenic development of AML and the targeting of CD45 positioning among lipid rafts as a new strategy in the treatment of AML.

  17. Second site mutation in the virus envelope expands the host range of a cytopathic variant of Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Ferrarone, John; Knoper, Ryan C; Li, Randolph; Kozak, Christine A

    2012-11-10

    Spl574 MLV (murine leukemia virus) is a variant of Moloney ecotropic MLV (MoMLV) that is cytopathic in Mus dunni cells and restricted by other mouse cells. Its host range and cytopathicity are due to a mutation, S82F, at a site critical for binding to the CAT-1 receptor. To identify residues that affect affinity for receptor variants, virus with S82F was passed in restrictive cells. The env genes of the adapted viruses contained 18 novel mutations, including one, E114G, present in 6 of 30 sequenced envs. MoMLV-E114G efficiently infected all mouse cells as well as ecotropic MLV resistant Chinese hamster cells. Virus with E114G and S82F induced large multinucleated syncytia in NIH 3T3 and SC-1 cells as well as M. dunni cells. Inoculation of Mo-S82F,E114G into mice produced lymphomas typical of MoMLV. Residues at env position 114 are thus important determinants of host range, and E114G suppresses host range restriction due to S82F, but does not affect S82F-governed cytopathicity.

  18. Lysosomal processing of sialoglycoconjugates in a wheat germ agglutinin resistant variant of EL4 murine leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Devino, N.L.

    1989-01-01

    Metabolic studies were undertaken in EL4 murine leukemia in WB6, a wheat germ agglutinin-resistant variant of EL4, in order to identify any differences in lysosomal processing of sialoglyco-conjugates. Five lysosomal acid hydrolases, acetylesterase, acid phosphatase, {beta}-galactosidase, {alpha}-mannosidase, and neuraminidase, were studied using fluorescent 4-methylumbelliferyl substrates. No significant differences were found in the total activity of any of these enzymes in EL4 and WB6. Cells were incubated in the presence of N-acetylmannosamine, the metabolic precursor of sialic acid (N-acetylneuraminic acid). Free sialic acid accumulated in the lysosomes of WB6 but not of EL4. The accumulation of lysosomal free sialic acid in WB6 showed a dependence on the concentration of N-acetylmannosamine in the growth medium. Metabolic labelling with (6-{sup 3}H)-N-acetylmannosamine showed that WB6 accumulated lysosomal free sialic acid even at very low concentrations of N-acetylmannosamine. The two cell lines differed in their distribution of radiolabelled neutral sugars, free sialic acid, and sialoglycoproteins. The velocity of {sup 3}H-sialic acid release was 3.7-fold lower in WB6 than in EL4, suggesting that WB6 has a defect in lysosomal sialic acid transport. The metabolic consequences of this defect are examined, in light of other biochemical and immunological data on these cells.

  19. Specific sequence deletions in two classes of murine leukemia virus-related proviruses in the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Ch'ang, L Y; Yang, W K; Myer, F E; Koh, C K; Boone, L R

    1989-02-01

    Characteristic long terminal repeats (LTR) of approximately 700 and 750 bp were found, respectively, in the two classes (polytropic and modified polytropic) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related nonecotropic nonxenotropic proviral sequences in eight individual molecular clones of RFM/Un mouse chromosomal DNA fragments. Three proviral clones, two polytropic and one modified polytropic, contained sequence deletions in the viral structural genes. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that 7-bp direct repeats occur at both ends of deleted sequences in intact structures and one of the repeats remains in genomes with the deletion. Specifically, the deleted sequences were a 1487-bp gag-pol sequence with ACTGCCC repeat, a 113-bp mid-pol sequence with CAGGCAA repeat, and a 1811-bp env sequence with GGTCCAG repeat. The same specific sequence deletions were found in both classes of MuLV-related proviral structures. Examination of chromosomal DNA from eight inbred laboratory mouse strains and six wild mouse species showed that a minor population of proviruses with these specific deletions were present in Mus musculus and Mus spretus, all of which contain prominent 700-bp LTR polytropic proviral structures. The 750-bp LTR modified polytropic proviral structures were phylogenetically more restricted, being equally predominant in Mus musculus domesticus mice, but minor to undetectable in Mus spretus subspecies, and absent in other wild mouse populations.

  20. Four Moloney murine leukemia virus-infected rat cell clones producing replication-defective particles: protein and nucleic acid analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, F K; Yamamura, J M

    1981-01-01

    Four cloned rat cell lines (NX-1 to -4) infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus and defective in virus replication were found to be all different by viral protein and nucleic acid analyses. All four clones produced noninfectious particles and, except for NX-2, at about the same level as wild type. Compared with wild-type virions these defective particles contained larger amounts of gag precursor proteins and very little or no p30 or p15. Analysis of intracellular precursor proteins revealed that NX-2 to -4 synthesized normal Pr65gag, whereas NX-1 produced a slightly smaller precursor. Both NX-1 and NX-4 synthesized an intracellular polyprotein with a size similar to that of wild-type Pr180 gag-pol. Restriction endonuclease analysis of NX-1 to -4 cellular DNA showed that each clone contained a single integrated provirus which possessed large terminal repeat sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. The proviruses of NX-1 to -3 appeared normal by restriction endonuclease analysis, but NX-4 provirus had a deletion of 1,700 base pairs comprising part of the polymerase region. The noninfectious particles produced by all four clones packaged Moloney viral RNAs and rat RNAs of two different sizes. Images PMID:6165841

  1. Alpha-phellandrene-induced DNA damage and affect DNA repair protein expression in WEHI-3 murine leukemia cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Weng, Shu-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Huang, Yi-Ping; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Although there are few reports regarding α-phellandrene (α-PA), a natural compound from Schinus molle L. essential oil, there is no report to show that α-PA induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression. Herein, we investigated the effects of α-PA on DNA damage and repair associated protein expression in murine leukemia cells. Flow cytometric assay was used to measure the effects of α-PA on total cell viability and the results indicated that α-PA induced cell death. Comet assay and 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride staining were used for measuring DNA damage and condensation, respectively, and the results indicated that α-PA induced DNA damage and condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. DNA gel electrophoresis was used to examine the DNA damage and the results showed that α-PA induced DNA damage in WEHI-3 cells. Western blotting assay was used to measure the changes of DNA damage and repair associated protein expression and the results indicated that α-PA increased p-p53, p-H2A.X, 14-3-3-σ, and MDC1 protein expression but inhibited the protein of p53, MGMT, DNA-PK, and BRCA-1.

  2. Functional and Structural Characterization of Novel Type of Linker Connecting Capsid and Nucleocapsid Protein Domains in Murine Leukemia Virus.

    PubMed

    Doležal, Michal; Hadravová, Romana; Kožíšek, Milan; Bednárová, Lucie; Langerová, Hana; Ruml, Tomáš; Rumlová, Michaela

    2016-09-23

    The assembly of immature retroviral particles is initiated in the cytoplasm by the binding of the structural polyprotein precursor Gag with viral genomic RNA. The protein interactions necessary for assembly are mediated predominantly by the capsid (CA) and nucleocapsid (NC) domains, which have conserved structures. In contrast, the structural arrangement of the CA-NC connecting region differs between retroviral species. In HIV-1 and Rous sarcoma virus, this region forms a rod-like structure that separates the CA and NC domains, whereas in Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, this region is densely packed, thus holding the CA and NC domains in close proximity. Interestingly, the sequence connecting the CA and NC domains in gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), is unique. The sequence is called a charged assembly helix (CAH) due to a high number of positively and negatively charged residues. Although both computational and deletion analyses suggested that the MLV CAH forms a helical conformation, no structural or biochemical data supporting this hypothesis have been published. Using an in vitro assembly assay, alanine scanning mutagenesis, and biophysical techniques (circular dichroism, NMR, microcalorimetry, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay), we have characterized the structure and function of the MLV CAH. We provide experimental evidence that the MLV CAH belongs to a group of charged, E(R/K)-rich, single α-helices. This is the first single α-helix motif identified in viral proteins.

  3. Human and murine pituitary expression of leukemia inhibitory factor. Novel intrapituitary regulation of adrenocorticotropin hormone synthesis and secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Akita, S; Webster, J; Ren, S G; Takino, H; Said, J; Zand, O; Melmed, S

    1995-01-01

    Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) gene expression was detected in human fetal pituitary tissue by expression of LIF mRNA transcripts, protein immunocytochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Fetal LIF immunoreactivity colocalized with 30% of ACTH-expressing cells, approximately 20% of somatotrophs, and approximately 15% of non-hormone-expressing cells. LIF was also strongly expressed in normal adult pituitary and in four growth hormone-producing and two ACTH-producing adenomas, but not in eight nonfunctioning pituitary tumors. Culture of fetal cells expressing surface LIF-binding sites demonstrated predominance of in vitro ACTH secretion as compared with other pituitary hormones. In AtT-20 murine cells, LIF (ED50 10 pM) stimulated basal proopiomelanocortin mRNA levels by 40% and corticotropin-releasing hormone-induced ACTH secretion (two- to threefold), as did oncostatin M (ED50 30 pM), a related peptide. ACTH responses were not further enhanced by both cytokines together, which is consistent with their shared receptor. Anti-LIF antiserum neutralized basal and LIF-induced ACTH secretion, suggesting autocrine regulation of ACTH by LIF. The results show that human pituitary cells express the LIF gene and LIF-binding sites, predominantly in corticotrophs. Pituitary LIF expression and LIF regulation of proopiomelanocortin and ACTH reflect an intrapituitary role for LIF in modulating early embryonic determination of specific human pituitary cells and as a paracrine or autocrine regulator of mature ACTH. Images PMID:7883977

  4. Crystal structures of the reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia-virus related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dongwen; Chung, Suhman; Miller, Maria; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-06-19

    The ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain of retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a critical role in the life cycle by degrading the RNA strands of DNA/RNA hybrids. In addition, RNase H activity is required to precisely remove the RNA primers from nascent (-) and (+) strand DNA. We report here three crystal structures of the RNase H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) RT, namely (i) the previously identified construct from which helix C was deleted, (ii) the intact domain, and (iii) the intact domain complexed with an active site {alpha}-hydroxytropolone inhibitor. Enzymatic assays showed that the intact RNase H domain retained catalytic activity, whereas the variant lacking helix C was only marginally active, corroborating the importance of this helix for enzymatic activity. Modeling of the enzyme-substrate complex elucidated the essential role of helix C in binding a DNA/RNA hybrid and its likely mode of recognition. The crystal structure of the RNase H domain complexed with {beta}-thujaplicinol clearly showed that coordination by two divalent cations mediates recognition of the inhibitor.

  5. Supramolecular organization of immature and mature murine leukemia virus revealed by electron cryo-microscopy: Implications for retroviral assembly mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Mark; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.; Weiner, Scott G.; Brown, Patrick O.; Rein, Alan

    1998-01-01

    We have used electron cryo-microscopy and image analysis to examine the native structure of immature, protease-deficient (PR−) and mature, wild-type (WT) Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV). Maturational cleavage of the Gag polyprotein by the viral protease is associated with striking morphological changes. The PR− MuLV particles exhibit a rounded central core, which has a characteristic track-like shell on its surface, whereas the WT MuLV cores display a polygonal surface with loss of the track-like feature. The pleomorphic shape and inability to refine unique orientation angles suggest that neither the PR− nor the WT MuLV adheres to strict icosahedral symmetry. Nevertheless, the PR− MuLV particles do exhibit paracrystalline order with a spacing between Gag molecules of ≈45 Å and a length of ≈200 Å. Because of the pleomorphic shape and paracrystalline packing of the Gag–RNA complexes, we raise the possibility that assembly of MuLV is driven by protein–RNA, as well as protein–protein, interactions. The maturation process involves a dramatic reorganization of the packing arrangements within the ribonucleoprotein core with disordering and loosening of the individual protein components. PMID:9636143

  6. Immunoprophylactic potential of wheat grass extract on benzene-induced leukemia: An in vivo study on murine model

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Neelofar; Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Dubey, Nazneen; Bansal, Divya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Wheat grass (Triticum aestivum) is a gift of nature given to mankind. A number of scientific research on wheatgrass establishes its anticancer and antioxidant potential. Current work was focused to determine antileukemic effect of wheat grass. Materials and Methods: The commercial wheatgrass powder was extracted with 95% of methanol. Methanol extract of wheat grass was studied for acute oral toxicity as per revised Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Guidelines number 423. Leukemia was successfully induced in Wister rats by intravenous injection of benzene. The blood was collected and analyzed for hematological parameters. Phagocytotic activity of the extract was determined. Results: Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of flavonoids, phenolics, carbohydrates, and amino acids. From acute toxicity studies, it was found that the methanol extract of wheatgrass was safe up to a dose level of 2000 mg/kg of body weight. Outcomes of hematological parameters in various experimental groups of murine model demonstrated antileukemic effect of extract. Methanol extract of wheatgrass aroused the process of phagocytosis of killed Candida albicans and also demonstrated a significant chemotactic activity at all tested concentrations. Conclusion: In the current work, methanol extract of wheat grass demonstrated antileukemic potential that might be due to the presence of flavonoids and polyphenolics in it. Further isolation, structural characterization of active constituents is necessary to extrapolate the mechanism of action. PMID:26288471

  7. Chromatin states shape insertion profiles of the piggyBac, Tol2 and Sleeping Beauty transposons and murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Junko; Akagi, Keiko; Misawa, Ryo; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Horie, Kyoji

    2017-03-02

    DNA transposons and retroviruses are versatile tools in functional genomics and gene therapy. To facilitate their application, we conducted a genome-wide insertion site profiling of the piggyBac (PB), Tol2 and Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposons and the murine leukemia virus (MLV) in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). PB and MLV preferred highly expressed genes, whereas Tol2 and SB preferred weakly expressed genes. However, correlations with DNase I hypersensitive sites were different for all vectors, indicating that chromatin accessibility is not the sole determinant. Therefore, we analysed various chromatin states. PB and MLV highly correlated with Cohesin, Mediator and ESC-specific transcription factors. Notably, CTCF sites were correlated with PB but not with MLV, suggesting MLV prefers smaller promoter-enhancer loops, whereas PB insertion encompasses larger chromatin loops termed topologically associating domains. Tol2 also correlated with Cohesin and CTCF. However, correlations with ESC-specific transcription factors were weaker, suggesting that Tol2 prefers transcriptionally weak chromatin loops. Consistently, Tol2 insertions were associated with bivalent histone modifications characteristic of silent and inducible loci. SB showed minimum preference to all chromatin states, suggesting the least adverse effect on adjacent genes. These results will be useful for vector selection for various applications.

  8. CD45 phosphatase is crucial for human and murine acute myeloid leukemia maintenance through its localization in lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Buffière, Anne; de Barros, Jean-Paul Pais; Hammann, Arlette; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Johnson, Pauline; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent; Quéré, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    CD45 is a pan-leukocyte protein with tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the regulation of signal transduction in hematopoiesis. Exploiting CD45 KO mice and lentiviral shRNA, we prove the crucial role that CD45 plays in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and maintenance. We discovered that CD45 does not colocalize with lipid rafts on murine and human non-transformed hematopoietic cells. Using a mouse model, we proved that CD45 positioning within lipid rafts is modified during their oncogenic transformation to AML. CD45 colocalized with lipid rafts on AML cells, which contributes to elevated GM-CSF signal intensity involved in proliferation of leukemic cells. We furthermore proved that the GM-CSF/Lyn/Stat3 pathway that contributes to growth of leukemic cells could be profoundly affected, by using a new plasma membrane disrupting agent, which rapidly delocalized CD45 away from lipid rafts. We provide evidence that this mechanism is also effective on human primary AML samples and xenograft transplantation. In conclusion, this study highlights the emerging evidence of the involvement of lipid rafts in oncogenic development of AML and the targeting of CD45 positioning among lipid rafts as a new strategy in the treatment of AML. PMID:27579617

  9. Ludwik Gross, Sarah Stewart, and the 1950s discoveries of Gross murine leukemia virus and polyoma virus.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gregory J

    2014-12-01

    The Polish-American scientist Ludwik Gross made two important discoveries in the early 1950s. He showed that two viruses - murine leukemia virus and parotid tumor virus - could cause cancer when they were injected into susceptible animals. At first, Gross's discoveries were greeted with skepticism: it seemed implausible that viruses could cause a disease as complex as cancer. Inspired by Gross's initial experiments, similar results were obtained by Sarah Stewart and Bernice Eddy who later renamed the parotid tumor virus SE polyoma virus after finding it could cause many different types of tumors in mice, hamsters, and rats. Eventually the "SE" was dropped and virologists adopted the name "polyoma virus." After Gross's work was published, additional viruses capable of causing solid tumors or blood-borne tumors in mice were described by Arnold Graffi, Charlotte Friend, John Moloney and others. By 1961, sufficient data had been accumulated for Gross to confidently publish an extensive monograph--Oncogenic Viruses--the first history of tumor virology, which became a standard reference work and marked the emergence of tumor virology as a distinct, legitimate field of study.

  10. Characterization of AKR murine leukemia virus sequences in AKR mouse substrains and structure of integrated recombinant genomes in tumor tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Quint, W; Quax, W; van der Putten, H; Berns, A

    1981-01-01

    A specific cDNA probe of AKR murine leukemia virus (AKR-MLV) was prepared to detect AKR-MLV sequences in normal and tumor tissues in a variety of AKR mouse substrains. AKR strains contained up to six endogenous AKR-MLV genomes. All substrains tested had one AKR-MLV locus in common, and closely related substrains had several proviruses integrated in an identical site. Virus-induced tumors in the AKR/FuRdA and AKR/JS strains showed a reintegration pattern of AKR-MLV sequences unique for the individual animal, suggesting a monoclonal origin for the outgrown tumors. An analysis of tumor DNAs from the AKR/FuRdA and AKR/JS substrains with restriction enzymes cleaving within the proviral genome revealed a new EcoRI restriction site and BamHI restriction site not present in normal tissues. The positions of these sites corresponded both with cleavage sites of EcoRI and BamHI in integrated Moloney recombinants and with the structure of isolated AKR mink cell focus-forming viruses. All tumors analyzed to data contain nearly identical integrated recombinant genomes, suggesting a causal relationship between the formation of recombinants and the leukemogenic process. Images PMID:6268802

  11. Accelerated appearance of multiple B cell lymphoma types in NFS/N mice congenic for ecotropic murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed

    Hartley, J W; Chattopadhyay, S K; Lander, M R; Taddesse-Heath, L; Naghashfar, Z; Morse, H C; Fredrickson, T N

    2000-02-01

    Spontaneous lymphomas occur at high frequency in NFS x V+ mice, strains congenic for ecotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV) proviral genes and expressing virus at high titer. In the present study, a total of 703 NFS x V+ lymphomas were studied by histopathology, immunophenotypic analysis, immunoglobulin heavy chain or T cell receptor beta chain rearrangements, and somatic ecotropic MuLV integrations; 90% of the lymphomas tested were of B cell lineage. Low-grade tumors included small lymphocytic, follicular, and splenic marginal zone lymphomas, while high-grade tumors comprised diffuse large-cell (centroblastic and immunoblastic types), splenic marginal zone, and lymphoblastic lymphomas. Comparison of mice of similar genetic background except for presence (NFS x V+) or absence (NFS x V-) of functional ecotropic MuLV genomes showed that NFS x V-clonal lymphomas developed at about one-half the rate of those occurring in NFS x V+ mice, and most were low-grade B cell lymphomas with extended latent periods. In NFS x V+ mice, clonal outgrowth, defined by Ig gene rearrangements, was associated with acquisition of somatic ecotropic proviral integrations, suggesting that, although generation of B cell clones can be virus independent, ecotropic virus may act to increase the rate of generation of clones and speed their evolution to lymphoma. The mechanism remains undefined, because only rare rearrangements were detected in several cellular loci previously associated with MuLV insertional mutagenesis.

  12. Tyrosine phosphorylation of HSC70 and its interaction with RFC mediates methotrexate resistance in murine L1210 leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tuoen; Singh, Ratan; Rios, Zechary; Bhushan, Alok; Li, Mengxiong; Sheridan, Peter P; Bearden, Shawn E; Lai, James C K; Agbenowu, Senyo; Cao, Shousong; Daniels, Christopher K

    2015-02-01

    We previously identified and characterized a 66-68 kDa membrane-associated, tyrosine phosphorylated protein in murine leukemia L1210 cells as HSC70 which is a methotrexate (MTX)-binding protein. In order to further characterize the functional role of HSC70 in regulating MTX resistance in L1210 cells, we first showed that HSC70 colocalizes and interacts with reduced folate carrier (RFC) in L1210 cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy and Duolink in situ proximity ligation assay. The tyrosine phosphorylation status of HSC70 found in the membrane fraction was different from the parental L1210/0 and cisplatin (CDDP)-MTX cross resistant L1210/DDP cells. In MTX-binding assays, HSC70 from L1210/DDP cells showed less affinity for MTX-agarose beads than that of L1210/0 cells. In addition, genistein (a tyrosine phosphorylation inhibitor) significantly enhanced the resistance of L1210/0 cells to MTX. Moreover, site-directed mutation studies indicated the importance of tyrosine phosphorylation of HSC70 in regulating its binding to MTX. These findings suggest that tyrosine phosphorylation of HSC70 regulates the transportation of MTX into the cells via the HSC70-RFC system and contributes to MTX resistance in L1210 cells.

  13. A murine model of acute myeloid leukemia with Evi1 overexpression and autocrine stimulation by an intracellular form of GM-CSF in DA-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Maria E; Simonson, Oscar E; Oprea, Iulian I; Moreno, Pedro M D; Silva-Lara, Maria F; Mohamed, Abdalla J; Christensson, Birger; Gahrton, Gösta; Dilber, M Sirac; Smith, C I Edvard; Arteaga, H Jose

    2016-01-01

    The poor treatment response of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) overexpressing high-risk oncogenes such as EVI1, demands specific animal models for new treatment evaluations. Evi1 is a common site of activating integrations in murine leukemia virus (MLV)-induced AML and in retroviral and lentiviral gene-modified HCS. Still, a model of overt AML induced by Evi1 has not been generated. Cell lines from MLV-induced AML are growth factor-dependent and non-transplantable. Hence, for the leukemia maintenance in the infected animals, a growth factor source such as chronic immune response has been suggested. We have investigated whether these leukemias are transplantable if provided with growth factors. We show that the Evi1(+)DA-3 cells modified to express an intracellular form of GM-CSF, acquired growth factor independence and transplantability and caused an overt leukemia in syngeneic hosts, without increasing serum GM-CSF levels. We propose this as a general approach for modeling different forms of high-risk human AML using similar cell lines.

  14. Efficacy of ponatinib against ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okabe, Seiichi Tauchi, Tetsuzo; Tanaka, Yuko; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Efficacy of ponatinib against ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant leukemia cells okabe et al. •Imatinib or nilotinib resistance was involved Src family kinase. •The BCR-ABL point mutation (E334V) was highly resistant to imatinib or nilotinib. •Ponatinib was a powerful strategy against imatinib or nilotinib resistant Ph-positive cells. -- Abstract: Because a substantial number of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia acquire resistance to ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), their management remains a challenge. Ponatinib, also known as AP24534, is an oral multi-targeted TKI. Ponatinib is currently being investigated in a pivotal phase 2 clinical trial. In the present study, we analyzed the molecular and functional consequences of ponatinib against imatinib- or nilotinib-resistant (R) K562 and Ba/F3 cells. The proliferation of imatinib- or nilotinib-resistant K562 cells did not decrease after treatment with imatinib or nilotinib. Src family kinase Lyn was activated. Point mutation Ba/F3 cells (E334 V) were also highly resistant to imatinib and nilotinib. Treatment with ponatinib for 72 h inhibited the growth of imatinib- and nilotinib-resistant cells. The phosphorylation of BCR-ABL, Lyn, and Crk-L was reduced. This study demonstrates that ponatinib has an anti-leukemia effect by reducing ABL and Lyn kinase activity and this information may be of therapeutic relevance.

  15. Transferrin-conjugated polymeric nanomedicine to enhance the anticancer efficacy of edelfosine in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Sun, Zhong-Liang

    2016-10-01

    In this study, transferrin (Tf)-conjugated polyethylene glycol (PEG)-poly-l-lysine (PLL)-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) (PEG-PLL-PLGA)-based micellar formulations were successfully prepared for the delivery of edelfosine (EDS) in leukemia treatment. The micelles were nanosized and presented spherical shaped particles. Our in vitro data suggest that the nanoformulations maintain the biological activity of drugs for longer periods and lead to a continuous release of active drug. The enhanced cellular uptake of EDS-TM resulted in significantly higher cytotoxic effect in K562 leukemia cells. Cell cycle analysis further demonstrated the significantly higher G2/M phase arrest of cancer cells. Immunoblot analysis clearly revealed the potential of EDS-TM in inducing apoptosis of cancer cells which could improve the anticancer efficacy in leukemia. Importantly, EDS-M and EDS-TM significantly prolonged the circulation profile of EDS throughout until 24h, indicating the potential of targeted nanoparticulate delivery system. The prolonged blood circulation potential of micellar formulations might improve the therapeutic potential of drug by increasing its bioavailability in the serum. It would be worthwhile evaluating the effects of the EDS-loaded micelles on cancer cells in vivo for clinical application.

  16. Murine Model Imitating Chronic Wound Infections for Evaluation of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Fila, Grzegorz; Kasimova, Kamola; Arenas, Yaxal; Nakonieczna, Joanna; Grinholc, Mariusz; Bielawski, Krzysztof P.; Lilge, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    It is generally acknowledged that the age of antibiotics could come to an end, due to their widespread, and inappropriate use. Particularly for chronic wounds alternatives are being thought. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy (APDT) is a potential candidate, and while approved for some indications, such as periodontitis, chronic sinusitis and other niche indications, its use in chronic wounds is not established. To further facilitate the development of APDT in chronic wounds we present an easy to use animal model exhibiting the key hallmarks of chronic wounds, based on full-thickness skin wounds paired with an optically transparent cover. The moisture-retaining wound exhibited rapid expansion of pathogen colonies up to 8 days while not jeopardizing the host survival. Use of two bioluminescent pathogens; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa permits real time monitoring of the pathogens. The murine model was employed to evaluate the performance of four different photosensitizers as mediators in Photodynamic Therapy. While all four photosensitizers, Rose Bengal, porphyrin TMPyP, New Methylene Blue, and TLD1411 demonstrated good to excellent antimicrobial efficacy in planktonic solutions at 1 to 50 μM concentrations, whereas in in vivo the growth delay was limited with 24–48 h delay in pathogen expansion for MRSA, and we noticed longer growth suppression of P. aeruginosa with TLD1411 mediated Photodynamic Therapy. The murine model will enable developing new strategies for enhancement of APDT for chronic wound infections. PMID:27555843

  17. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    de Munck, Estefanía; Palomo, Valle; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Perez, Daniel I.; Gómez-Miguel, Begoña; Solas, M. Teresa; Gil, Carmen; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS. PMID:27631495

  18. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Palomo, Valle; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Perez, Daniel I; Gómez-Miguel, Begoña; Solas, M Teresa; Gil, Carmen; Martínez, Ana; Arahuetes, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA), a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS.

  19. DNA methyltransferase inhibition increases efficacy of adoptive cellular immunotherapy of murine breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Terracina, Krista P; Graham, Laura J; Payne, Kyle K; Manjili, Masoud H; Baek, Annabel; Damle, Sheela R; Bear, Harry D

    2016-09-01

    Adoptive T cell immunotherapy is a promising approach to cancer treatment that currently has limited clinical applications. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNAMTi) have known potential to affect the immune system through multiple mechanisms that could enhance the cytotoxic T cell responses, including: upregulation of tumor antigen expression, increased MHC class I expression, and blunting of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) expansion. In this study, we have investigated the effect of combining the DNAMTi, decitabine, with adoptive T cell immunotherapy in the murine 4T1 mammary carcinoma model. We found that expression of neu, MHC class I molecules, and several murine cancer testis antigens (CTA) was increased by decitabine treatment of 4T1 cells in vitro. Decitabine also increased expression of multiple CTA in two human breast cancer cell lines. Decitabine-treated 4T1 cells stimulated greater IFN-gamma release from tumor-sensitized lymphocytes, implying increased immunogenicity. Expansion of CD11b + Gr1 + MDSC in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice was significantly diminished by decitabine treatment. Decitabine treatment improved the efficacy of adoptive T cell immunotherapy in mice with established 4T1 tumors, with greater inhibition of tumor growth and an increased cure rate. Decitabine may have a role in combination with existing and emerging immunotherapies for breast cancer.

  20. Stromal cell-dependent growth of leukemic cells from murine erythroblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Itoh, K; Sasaki, R; Ono, K; Tezuka, H; Sakoda, H; Sawada, H; Hitomi, K; Nakane, H; Uchiyama, T; Uchino, H

    1988-08-01

    Transplantable erythroblastic leukemia was induced by 300-rad irradiation of C3H mice. Conditions for in vitro growth of the leukemic cells were studied. None of interleukin-3, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor and erythropoietin could support the growth of the cells in vitro. In contrast, the leukemic cells grew into a stroma-dependent cell line, ELM-D, in close contact with the stromal cell layer of 900-rad-irradiated long-term bone marrow culture. A stroma-independent cell line, termed ELM-I-1, was further established from the non-adherent population in the co-culture of the leukemic cells, ELM-D, with stromal cells. Reverse transcriptase activity was not detectable in ELM-D or ELM-I-1 cells. Studies on binding and cross-linking of 125I-erythropoietin showed that ELM-I-1 cells had erythropoietin receptors, and two major radiolabeled protein products with molecular weights of 120 kDa and 140 kDa were detected on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions.

  1. Activation of the prolactin receptor gene by promoter insertion in a Moloney murine leukemia virus-induced rat thymoma.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, C S; Bear, S E; Keler, T; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Yeung, R S; Tsichlis, P N

    1992-01-01

    The prolactin receptor (Prlr) and growth hormone receptor (Ghr) genes and the Moloney murine leukemia virus integration-2 (Mlvi-2) locus were mapped to mouse chromosome 15 and human chromosome 5 bands p12-p14. To examine the potential relationship between Mlvi-2 and the genes encoding the growth hormone receptor and the prolactin receptor, we determined the chromosomal location of all three loci in the rat, using a panel of rat-mouse somatic cell hybrids, and in the mouse, using a panel of (C57BL/6J x Mus spretus)F1 x C57BL/6J interspecific backcross mice. These analyses revealed that Ghr, Prlr, and Mlvi-2 map to chromosome 2 in the rat and to chromosome 15 in the mouse, in close proximity with each other. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of rat genomic DNA showed no overlaps between the gene encoding the prolactin receptor and the remaining loci. Moreover, expression of the prolactin receptor was not affected by provirus insertion in Mlvi-2. During these studies, however, we detected one T-cell lymphoma line (2779) in which the prolactin receptor gene was activated by provirus integration. Sequence analysis of polymerase chain reaction-derived cDNA clones showed that the prolactin receptor RNA message initiates at the 5' long terminal repeat and utilizes the splice donor site 5' of the gag gene to splice the viral sequences onto exon 1 of the prolactin receptor. This message is predicted to encode the intact prolactin receptor protein product. Exposure of the T-cell lymphoma line 2779 to prolactin promoted cellular proliferation. Images PMID:1404614

  2. Role of Murine Leukemia Virus Reverse Transcriptase Deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphate-Binding Site in Retroviral Replication and In Vivo Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Halvas, Elias K.; Svarovskaia, Evguenia S.; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2000-01-01

    Retroviral populations exhibit a high evolutionary potential, giving rise to extensive genetic variation. Error-prone DNA synthesis catalyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT) generates variation in retroviral populations. Structural features within RTs are likely to contribute to the high rate of errors that occur during reverse transcription. We sought to determine whether amino acids within murine leukemia virus (MLV) RT that contact the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate are important for in vivo fidelity of reverse transcription. We utilized the previously described ANGIE P encapsidating cell line, which expresses the amphotropic MLV envelope and a retroviral vector (pGA-1). pGA-1 expresses the bacterial β-galactosidase gene (lacZ), which serves as a reporter of mutations. Extensive mutagenesis was performed on residues likely to interact with the dNTP substrate, and the effects of these mutations on the fidelity of reverse transcription were determined. As expected, most substitution mutations of amino acids that directly interact with the dNTP substrate significantly reduced viral titers (>10,000-fold), indicating that these residues played a critical role in catalysis and viral replication. However, the D153A and A154S substitutions, which are predicted to affect the interactions with the triphosphate, resulted in statistically significant increases in the mutation rate. In addition, the conservative substitution F155W, which may affect interactions with the base and the ribose, increased the mutation rate 2.8-fold. Substitutions of residues in the vicinity of the dNTP-binding site also resulted in statistically significant decreases in fidelity (1.3- to 2.4-fold). These results suggest that mutations of residues that contact the substrate dNTP can affect viral replication as well as alter the fidelity of reverse transcription. PMID:11044079

  3. Characterization of a progressive neurodegenerative disease induced by a temperature-sensitive Moloney murine leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bilello, J A; Pitts, O M; Hoffman, P M

    1986-01-01

    A progressive neurodegenerative disease occurred following infection of mice with a temperature-sensitive (ts) isolate of Moloney (Mo) murine leukemia virus (MuLV), ts Mo BA-1 MuLV. This NB-tropic ecotropic MuLV, which was ts for a late function, induced a syndrome of tremor, weakness of the hind limbs, and spasticity following infection of several strains of laboratory neonatal mice, including NFS, C3H/He, CBA, SJL, and BALB/c. The latent period of 8 to 16 weeks was considerably longer than that observed for the acute paralytic diseases observed following neonatal infection with other ts Mo-MuLV, rat-passaged Friend MuLV, and some wild mouse ecotropic MuLVs. Spongiform pathology without inflammation and degeneration of neurons devoid of budding virions occurred in the cerebellar grey matter, brain stem, and upper spinal cord; but lower spinal cord anterior horn cells were less obviously affected than in other MuLV-associated neuroparalytic syndromes. ts Mo BA-1 MuLV differed from other ts Mo-MuLV mutants that are capable of inducing a neuroparalytic syndrome in that while infected nervous system tissue contained high levels of MuLV p30 and gp70, no evidence of precursor accumulation or abnormal processing of MuLV p30 or gp70 could be demonstrated. The localization of virus within the nervous system suggests that direct neuronal infection may not be the etiologic mechanism in this MuLV-induced neurodegenerative disease. Images PMID:3735486

  4. Comparative study of the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activities of black tea theaflavins and green tea catechin on murine myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Lung, Hong-Lok; Ip, Wai-Ki; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Mak, Nai-Ki; Leung, Kwok-Nam

    2004-03-01

    Among the black tea polyphenols, theaflavins are generally considered to be the more effective components for the inhibition of carcinogenesis. In this study, we attempted to compare the growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing activities of the four black tea theaflavins (TF-1, TF-2A, TF-2B and TF-3) with the major green tea catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the murine myeloid leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells. All the four black tea theaflavins were shown to exert potent anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects on the leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells in a dose-dependent manner. The observed anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects were in the following order of potency: EGCG > TF-2B > TF-3 > TF-2A > TF-1. In addition, all theaflavins were capable of inducing apoptosis in the leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells. Among the four theaflavins tested, TF-2B and TF-3 were found to be slightly more potent in inducing apoptosis of the WEHI-3B JCS cells than that of TF-2A and TF-1 but were comparable to the major green tea epicatechin EGCG. More interestingly, both TF-2B and TF-3 were found to be much more effective than TF-1 and TF-2B in reducing both the in vitro clonogenicity and in vivo tumorigenicity of the WEHI-3B JCS cells, suggesting that these two black tea theaflavins might represent potential candidates for the treatment of some forms of leukemia.

  5. Oxygen radical detoxification enzymes in doxorubicin-sensitive and -resistant P388 murine leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramu, A.; Cohen, L.; Glaubiger, D.

    1984-05-01

    One of the proposed mechanisms for the cytotoxic effects of anthracycline compounds suggests that the effect is mediated through the formation of intracellular superoxide radicals. It is therefore possible that doxorubicin resistance is associated with increased intracellular enzyme capacity to convert these superoxide radicals to inactive metabolites. We have measured the relative activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in P388 mouse leukemia cells and in a doxorubicin-resistant subline. Since oxygen-reactive metabolites also play a role in mediating the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation, the radiosensitivity of both cell lines was also studied. No significant differences in superoxide dismutase activity between these cell lines was observed, indicating that they have a similar capacity to convert superoxide anion radicals to hydrogen peroxide. P388 cells that are resistant to doxorubicin have 1.5 times the glutathione content and 1.5 times the activity of glutathione peroxidase measured in drug-sensitive P388 cells. However, incubation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, which covalently binds glutathione, had no effect on the sensitivity of either cell line to doxorubicin. Measured catalase activity in drug-resistant P388 cells was one-third of the activity measured in doxorubicin-sensitive P388 cells. The activity of this enzyme was much higher than that of glutathione peroxidase in terms of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ deactivation in both cell lines. It is therefore unlikely that doxorubicin-resistant P388 cells have an increased ability to detoxify reactive oxygen metabolites when compared to drug-sensitive cells. Doxorubicin-resistant P388 cells were significantly more sensitive to X-irradiation than were drug-sensitive P388 cells. These observations suggest that the difference in catalase activity in these cell lines may be associated with the observed differences in radiosensitivity.

  6. β2 Agonists Enhance the Efficacy of Simultaneous Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Koeberl, Dwight D.; Li, Songtao; Dai, Jian; Thurberg, Beth L.; Bali, Deeksha; Kishnani, Priya S.

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) has improved clinical outcomes in patients with Pompe disease; however, the response of skeletal muscle and the central nervous system to ERT has been attenuated. The poor response of skeletal muscle to ERT has been attributed to the low abundance of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR), which mediates receptor-mediated uptake of rhGAA. Hence the ability of adjunctive therapy with β2-agonists to increase CI-MPR expression in skeletal muscle was evaluated during ERT in murine Pompe disease with regard to reversal of neuromuscular involvement. Mice with Pompe disease were treated with weekly rhGAA injections (20 mg/kg) and a selective β2-agonist, either albuterol (30 mg/l in drinking water) or low-dose clenbuterol (6 mg/l in drinking water). Biochemical correction was enhanced by β2-agonist treatment in both muscle and the cerebellum, indicating that adjunctive therapy could enhance efficacy from ERT in Pompe disease with regard to neuromuscular involvement. Intriguingly, clenbuterol slightly reduced muscle glycogen content independent of CI-MPR expression, as demonstrated in CI-MPR knockout/GAA knockout mice that were otherwise resistant to ERT. Thus, adjunctive therapy with β2 agonists might improve the efficacy of ERT in Pompe disease and possibly other lysosomal storage disorders through enhancing receptor-mediated uptake of recombinant lysosomal enzymes. PMID:22154081

  7. β2 Agonists enhance the efficacy of simultaneous enzyme replacement therapy in murine Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Li, Songtao; Dai, Jian; Thurberg, Beth L; Bali, Deeksha; Kishnani, Priya S

    2012-02-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) has improved clinical outcomes in patients with Pompe disease; however, the response of skeletal muscle and the central nervous system to ERT has been attenuated. The poor response of skeletal muscle to ERT has been attributed to the low abundance of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR), which mediates receptor-mediated uptake of rhGAA. Hence the ability of adjunctive therapy with β2-agonists to increase CI-MPR expression in skeletal muscle was evaluated during ERT in murine Pompe disease with regard to reversal of neuromuscular involvement. Mice with Pompe disease were treated with weekly rhGAA injections (20 mg/kg) and a selective β2-agonist, either albuterol (30 mg/l in drinking water) or low-dose clenbuterol (6 mg/l in drinking water). Biochemical correction was enhanced by β2-agonist treatment in both muscle and the cerebellum, indicating that adjunctive therapy could enhance efficacy from ERT in Pompe disease with regard to neuromuscular involvement. Intriguingly, clenbuterol slightly reduced muscle glycogen content independent of CI-MPR expression, as demonstrated in CI-MPR knockout/GAA knockout mice that were otherwise resistant to ERT. Thus, adjunctive therapy with β2 agonists might improve the efficacy of ERT in Pompe disease and possibly other lysosomal storage disorders through enhancing receptor-mediated uptake of recombinant lysosomal enzymes.

  8. Efficacy and Toxicity of Induction Therapy with Cladribine, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine (IAC) for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Woelich, Susan K; Braun, James T; Schoen, Martin W; Ramlal, Reshma; Freter, Carl E; Petruska, Paul J; Lionberger, Jack M

    2017-02-01

    We report our single-center experience with cytarabine and idarubicin for induction therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an additional 5 days of cladribine (IAC therapy). From July 2012 to September 2014, 38 patients completed a full course of IAC induction. Median patient age was 61 years, 61% of patients were ≥60 years old, and 71% were male. The complete remission (CR) rate was 63% following a single induction course, three patients (8%) required a second induction course to achieve CR, for an overall response rate of 71%. The median duration of severe neutropenia was 30.5 days. Thirty-two percent of patients developed mucositis, 76% experienced diarrhea, and 61% developed a rash. Incidence of CR following IAC induction therapy for AML was comparable to historical data, but with frequent diarrhea, rash, and fungal infections. This study found IAC efficacy and toxicity was similar irrespective of age.

  9. Antitumor protection from the murine T-cell leukemia/lymphoma EL4 by the continuous subcutaneous coadministration of recombinant macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Vallera, D A; Taylor, P A; Aukerman, S L; Blazar, B R

    1993-09-15

    Combined continuous s.c. coadministration of macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) plus interleukin-2 (IL-2) by osmotic pump protected mice given i.v. injections of a lethal dose of EL4 T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Antitumor protection was significantly greater than that afforded by treatment with either cytokine alone. Since neither IL-2 receptors nor M-CSF receptors were expressed on EL4, the antitumor effect was likely attributed to murine effector cells. To determine how M-CSF+IL-2 provided this effect, we performed immunophenotypic and functional analyses as well as in vivo depletion studies of putative antitumor effector cells. Splenic phenotyping experiments revealed that the highest levels of macrophages and natural killer cells were observed in mice given the cytokine combination rather than either M-CSF or IL-2 alone. In vivo depletion of natural killer cells ablated the antitumor protective effect of M-CSF and IL-2. T-cells were also important for M-CSF+IL-2 efficacy, since adult thymectomy/T-cell depletion significantly inhibited the ability of cytokine coadministration to protect against EL4. Coadministration of the 2 cytokines significantly elevated in vivo levels of CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, CD3+NK1.1+ T-cells, and CD3+CD25+ (activated) T-cells, and elevated anti-EL4 cytotoxic T-cell activity measured in vitro. Although WBC counts and fluorescence-activated cell sorter studies showed that M-CSF+IL-2 treatment significantly elevated neutrophils, s.c. delivery of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor at doses sufficient to induce neutrophilia was unable to confer anti-EL4 protection. These studies indicate that macrophages, T-cells, and natural killer cells are all important in the M-CSF+IL-2 anti-EL4 response. The superior antitumor effect of this cytokine combination along with the ability of M-CSF to diminish the toxicity of IL-2 in this model suggests that further investigations into the clinical potential of this combination treatment are warranted.

  10. Efficacy of aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B against murine invasive pulmonary mucormycosis.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Tomo; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Izumikawa, Koichi; Obata, Yoko; Nishino, Tomoya; Takazono, Takahiro; Kosai, Kosuke; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Kurihara, Shintaro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Tsukamoto, Misuzu; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Tashiro, Takayoshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Invasive pulmonary mucormycosis is a life-threatening fungal infection encountered in immunocompromised patients. An intravenous high-dose lipid formulation of amphotericin B, such as liposomal amphotericin B (L-AMB), is the recommended treatment. The efficacy of inhaled L-AMB against mucormycosis has not been evaluated. We evaluated the efficacy of inhaled aerosolized L-AMB in murine invasive pulmonary mucormycosis. ICR female mice were immunosuppressed with cortisone acetate and cyclophosphamide and challenged on day 0 with 1 × 10⁶ conidia of Rhizopus oryzae (TIMM 1327) intratracheally. Infected mice were assigned to one of the following 3 treatment groups: (i) control, (ii) treatment only (aerosolized L-AMB from day 1-5 after challenge), and (iii) prophylaxis followed by treatment (aerosolized L-AMB from day -2 to 5 before and after challenge). Survival was monitored until 12 days after challenge. For fungal-burden and histopathological examination, mice were sacrificed 4 h after treatment on day 3. Numbers of colony-forming units per lung were calculated. To study the distribution of AMB after inhalation of L-AMB, immunohistochemical studies using AMB antibody were performed. Aerosolized L-AMB significantly improved survival rate and decreased fungal burden compared with control group, and histopathology findings were superior to those of control group. However, no significant differences were detected between the treatment-only and prophylaxis followed by treatment groups. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that L-AMB was promptly distributed in lung tissue after inhalation therapy. Aerosolized L-AMB showed modest efficacy against R. oryzae infection in mice treated after fungal challenge. Prophylaxis with aerosolized L-AMB was not effective in this animal model.

  11. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus establishes an efficient spreading infection and exhibits enhanced transcriptional activity in prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jason J; Goff, Stephen P

    2010-03-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel human gammaretrovirus discovered in association with human prostate tumors. XMRV was first identified in prostate stromal cells surrounding the tumors of patients carrying a mutation in the HPC1 gene locus. To determine the tropism of XMRV in cell culture, we tested the ability of XMRV to spread and replicate in various prostate and nonprostate cell lines. We found that although the expression of XMRV viral proteins and the spread of infectious virus were minimal in a variety of cell lines, XMRV displayed robust expression and infection in LNCaP prostate tumor cells. The transcriptional activity of the XMRV long terminal repeat (LTR) was found to be higher than the Moloney murine leukemia virus LTRs in both LNCaP and WPMY-1 (simian virus 40-transformed prostate stromal cells). The U3 promoter of XMRV and a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) within the U3 were required for the transcriptional activity in LNCaP cells. Coexpression of the androgen receptor and stimulation with dihydrotestosterone stimulated XMRV-LTR-dependent transcription in 293T cells, and the GRE was required for this activity. These data suggest that XMRV may replicate more efficiently in LNCaP cells in part due to the transcriptional environment in LNCaP cells.

  12. The Icsbp locus is a common proviral insertion site in mature B-cell lymphomas/plasmacytomas induced by exogenous murine leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Shiliang; Sorensen, Annette Balle; Kunder, Sandra; Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Morris, David W.; Schmidt, Joerg; Pedersen, Finn Skou . E-mail: fsp@mb.au.dk

    2006-09-01

    ICSBP (interferon consensus sequence binding protein)/IRF8 (interferon regulatory factor 8) is an interferon gamma-inducible transcription factor expressed predominantly in hematopoietic cells, and down-regulation of this factor has been observed in chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia in man. By screening about 1200 murine leukemia virus (MLV)-induced lymphomas, we found proviral insertions at the Icsbp locus in 14 tumors, 13 of which were mature B-cell lymphomas or plasmacytomas. Only one was a T-cell lymphoma, although such tumors constituted about half of the samples screened. This indicates that the Icsbp locus can play a specific role in the development of mature B-lineage malignancies. Two proviral insertions in the last Icsbp exon were found to act by a poly(A)-insertion mechanism. The remaining insertions were found within or outside Icsbp. Since our results showed expression of Icsbp RNA and protein in all end-stage tumor samples, a simple tumor suppressor function of ICSBP is not likely. Interestingly, proviral insertions at Icsbp have not been reported from previous extensive screenings of mature B-cell lymphomas induced by endogenous MLVs. We propose that ICSBP might be involved in an early modulation of an immune response to exogenous MLVs that might also play a role in proliferation of the mature B-cell lymphomas.

  13. Point mutations in the Moloney murine leukemia virus enhancer identify a lymphoid-specific viral core motif and 1,3-phorbol myristate acetate-inducible element.

    PubMed Central

    Speck, N A; Renjifo, B; Hopkins, N

    1990-01-01

    The transcriptional enhancer of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is organized as a 75-base-pair repeat, and in each copy of the repeat there are multiple binding sites for nuclear factors. We have introduced point mutations into each of the known nuclear factor-binding sites in the MoMLV enhancer, in both copies of the direct repeat, and have analyzed the transcriptional activity conferred by the mutated enhancers by transient-expression assays in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell lines. Mutation of individual binding sites in the MoMLV enhancer has moderate effects (less than 2-fold to 20-fold) on transcription in six independent cell lines. Several mutations decreased transcription from the MoMLV enhancer ubiquitously (the leukemia virus factor b site and the glucocorticoid response element), whereas others affected transcription specifically in lymphoid cell lines (core motif) or, more significantly, in fibroblasts (nuclear factor 1 site). The transcriptional activity of the MoMLV enhancer can be induced 8- to 10-fold by 1,3-phorbol myristate acetate in Jurkat T cells. Mutations in any of three adjacent binding sites (leukemia virus factor b and c sites and the core motif) within a 28-base-pair region in the center of the direct repeat sequence of the MoMLV enhancer completely attenuate the response to 1,3-phorbol myristate acetate. Images PMID:2104942

  14. Efficacy of combination antifungal therapy with intraperitoneally administered micafungin and aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B against murine invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Takazono, Takahiro; Izumikawa, Koichi; Mihara, Tomo; Kosai, Kosuke; Saijo, Tomomi; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Seki, Masafumi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru

    2009-08-01

    Targeted intrapulmonary delivery of drugs may reduce systemic toxicity and improve treatment efficacy. In the current study, we evaluated the effects of a combination treatment consisting of inhalation of aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B (L-AMB) with intraperitoneal administration of micafungin (MCFG) against murine invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. The combination of aerosolized L-AMB with intraperitoneal MCFG significantly improved the survival rate, and the fungal burdens and histopathology findings after this treatment were superior to those of the control and both monotherapy groups.

  15. Comparative efficacy of seven hand sanitizers against murine norovirus, feline calicivirus, and GII.4 norovirus.

    PubMed

    Park, Geun Woo; Barclay, Leslie; Macinga, David; Charbonneau, Duane; Pettigrew, Charles A; Vinjé, Jan

    2010-12-01

    Contaminated hands or inanimate surfaces can act as a source of infection during outbreaks of human norovirus infection. We evaluated the virucidal efficacy of seven hand sanitizers containing various active ingredients, such as ethanol, triclosan, and chlorhexidine, and compared their effectiveness against feline calicivirus (FCV), murine norovirus (MNV), and a GII.4 norovirus fecal extract. We also tested the efficacy of 50, 70, and 90% of ethanol and isopropanol. Reduction of viral infectivity was measured by plaque assay, and the number of genomic copies was determined with a TaqMan real-time reverse transcription PCR assay. Based on the results of a quantitative suspension test, only one ethanol-based product (72% ethanol, pH 2.9) and one triclosan-based product (0.1% triclosan, pH 3.0) reduced the infectivity of both MNV and FCV (by >2.6 and ≥3.4 log units, respectively). Four of the seven products were effective against either MNV or FCV, whereas chlorhexidine was ineffective against both viruses. For these hand sanitizers, no correlation was found between reduced infectivity and decline of viral RNA. Ethanol and isopropanol concentrations ≥70% reduced the infectivity of MNV by ≥2.6 log units, whereas 50 and 70% ethanol reduced the infectivity of FCV by ≥2.2 log units after exposure for 5 min. The susceptibility of FCV to low pH and the relative high susceptibility of MNV to alcohols suggest that both surrogate viruses should be considered for in vitro testing of hand sanitizers.

  16. Virucidal efficacy of treatment with photodynamically activated curcumin on murine norovirus bio-accumulated in oysters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Hou, Wei; Cao, Binbin; Zuo, Tao; Xue, Changhu; Leung, Albert Wingnang; Xu, Chuanshan; Tang, Qing-Juan

    2015-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is one of the most important seafood- and water-borne viruses, and is a major cause of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks. In the present study we investigated the effect of curcumin as a sensitizer to photodynamic treatment both in buffer and in oysters against murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate of NoV. MNV-1 cultured in buffer and MNV-1 bio-accumulated in oysters were irradiated with a novel LED light source with a wavelength of 470nm and an energy of 3.6J/cm(2). Inactivation of MNV-1 was investigated by plaque assays. After virus was extracted from the gut of oysters treated over a range of curcumin concentrations, the ultrastructural morphology of the virus was observed using electron microscopy, and the integrity of viral nucleic acids and stability of viral capsid proteins were also determined. Results showed that the infectivity of MNV-1 was significantly inhibited by 1-3logPFU/ml, with significant damage to viral nucleic acids in a curcumin dose-dependent manner after photodynamic activation. Virus morphology was altered after the photodynamic treatment with curcumin, presumably due to the change of the viral capsid protein structures. The data suggest that treatment of oysters with photodynamic activation of curcumin is a potentially efficacious and cost-effective method to inactivate food-borne NoV. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the toxicology of this approach in detail and perform sensory evaluation of the treated product.

  17. Efficacy of single large doses of caspofungin in a neutropenic murine model against the "psilosis" group.

    PubMed

    Berényi, Réka; Kovács, Renátó; Domán, Marianna; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Kardos, Gábor; Juhász, Béla; Perlin, David; Majoros, László

    2014-07-01

    We compared the in vivo efficacy of single large dose of caspofungin to that of daily smaller caspofungin doses (with same cumulative doses) against C. albicans (echinocandin susceptible and resistant isolates) and the “psilosis� group in a neutropenic murine model. Seven treatment groups were formed for C. orthopsilosis, C. metapsilosis and C. albicans (no treatment, 1, 2 and 3 mg/kg caspofungin daily for five days; single 5, 10 and 15 mg/kg caspofungin doses). For C. parapsilosis there were five treatment groups (no treatment, 3 and 4 mg/kg caspofungin daily for five days; single 15 and 20 mg/kg caspofungin). Tissue burdens of C. orthopsilosis and C. parapsilosis were significantly decreased by daily 3 mg/kg and 10 or 15 mg/kg single caspofungin doses (P<0.05-0.01) and daily 4 mg/kg and by single 15 and 20 mg/kg caspofungin doses (P<0.05-0.01), respectively. Against C. metapsilosis all treatment arms except the daily 1 mg/kg were effective (P<0.05-<0.001). Against C. albicans all treatment doses were effective. Neither daily 16 mg/kg nor single 80 mg/kg were effective against the resistant C. albicans strain. Higher doses and less frequent administration of caspofungin were comparable or sometimes superior to the lower, daily-dose regimen against the “psilosis� group supporting further studies with this therapeutic strategy.

  18. Ruthenium-Clotrimazole complex has significant efficacy in the murine model of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Iniguez, Eva; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Martínez, Alberto; Torres, Caresse L; Sánchez-Delgado, Roberto A; Maldonado, Rosa A

    2016-12-01

    In previous studies we reported a novel series of organometallic compounds, Ru(II) complexed with clotrimazole, displaying potent trypanosomatid activity with unnoticeable toxicity toward normal mammalian cells. In view of the promising activity of Ru-clotrimazole complexes against Leishmania major (L. major), the present work sought to investigate the anti-leishmanial activity of the AM162 complex in the murine model of cutaneous leishmaniasis. In addition, to facilitate the design of new therapeutic strategies against this disease, we investigated the mode of action of two Ru-clotrimazole complexes in L. major promastigotes. Overall, we demonstrate that AM162 significantly reduced the lesion size in mice exposed to L. major infection. In addition, Ru-clotrimazole compounds are able to induce a mitochondrial dependent apoptotic-like death in the extracellular form of the parasite based on labeling of DNA fragments, mitochondrial depolarization, cell cycle alteration profile and plasma membrane phospholipid externalization. Our findings reveal a promising efficacy of the Ru-clotrimazole AM162 complex for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis, as well as pro-apoptotic activity and thus guarantees further evaluation in pre-clinical studies.

  19. Ibrutinib enhances chimeric antigen receptor T-cell engraftment and efficacy in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Beckwith, Kyle A.; Patel, Prachi R.; Ruella, Marco; Zheng, Zhaohui; Barrett, David M.; Lacey, Simon F.; Melenhorst, Jan Joseph; McGettigan, Shannon E.; Cook, Danielle R.; Zhang, Changfeng; Xu, Jun; Do, Priscilla; Hulitt, Jessica; Kudchodkar, Sagar B.; Cogdill, Alexandria P.; Gill, Saar; Porter, David L.; Woyach, Jennifer A.; Long, Meixiao; Johnson, Amy J.; Maddocks, Kami; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Byrd, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is highly promising but requires robust T-cell expansion and engraftment. A T-cell defect in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) due to disease and/or therapy impairs ex vivo expansion and response to CAR T cells. To evaluate the effect of ibrutinib treatment on the T-cell compartment in CLL as it relates to CAR T-cell generation, we examined the phenotype and function of T cells in a cohort of CLL patients during their course of treatment with ibrutinib. We found that ≥5 cycles of ibrutinib therapy improved the expansion of CD19-directed CAR T cells (CTL019), in association with decreased expression of the immunosuppressive molecule programmed cell death 1 on T cells and of CD200 on B-CLL cells. In support of these findings, we observed that 3 CLL patients who had been treated with ibrutinib for ≥1 year at the time of T-cell collection had improved ex vivo and in vivo CTL019 expansion, which correlated positively together and with clinical response. Lastly, we show that ibrutinib exposure does not impair CAR T-cell function in vitro but does improve CAR T-cell engraftment, tumor clearance, and survival in human xenograft models of resistant acute lymphocytic leukemia and CLL when administered concurrently. Our collective findings indicate that ibrutinib enhances CAR T-cell function and suggest that clinical trials with combination therapy are warranted. Our studies demonstrate that improved T-cell function may also contribute to the efficacy of ibrutinib in CLL. These trials were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01747486, #NCT01105247, and #NCT01217749. PMID:26813675

  20. Effects of diallyl trisulfide on induction of apoptotic death in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vitro and alterations of the immune responses in normal and leukemic mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hung, Fang-Ming; Shang, Hung-Sheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lu, Kung-Wen; Lin, Jing-Pin; Ko, Yang-Ching; Yu, Chien-Chih; Wang, Hai-Lung; Liao, Jung-Chi; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Diallyl trisulfide (DATS), a chemopreventive dietary constituent and extracted from garlic, has been shown to against cultured many types of human cancer cell liens but the fate of apoptosis in murine leukemia cells in vitro and immune responses in leukemic mice remain elusive. Herein, we clarified the actions of DATS on growth inhibition of murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vitro and used WEHI-3 cells to generate leukemic mice in vivo, following to investigate the effects of DATS in animal model. In in vitro study, DATS induced apoptosis of WEHI-3 cells through the G0/G1 phase arrest and induction of caspase-3 activation. In in vivo study DATS decreased the weight of spleen of leukemia mice but did not affect the spleen weight of normal mice. DATS promoted the immune responses such as promotions of the macrophage phagocytosis and NK cell activities in WEHI-3 leukemic and normal mice. However, DATS only promotes NK cell activities in normal mice. DATS increases the surface markers of CD11b and Mac-3 in leukemia mice but only promoted CD3 in normal mice. In conclusion, the present study indicates that DATS induces cell death through induction of apoptosis in mice leukemia WHEI-3 cells. DATS also promotes immune responses in leukemia and normal mice in vivo.

  1. Limits in virus filtration capability? Impact of virus quality and spike level on virus removal with xenotropic murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Roush, David J; Myrold, Adam; Burnham, Michael S; And, Joseph V; Hughes, Joseph V

    2015-01-01

    Virus filtration (VF) is a key step in an overall viral clearance process since it has been demonstrated to effectively clear a wide range of mammalian viruses with a log reduction value (LRV) > 4. The potential to achieve higher LRV from virus retentive filters has historically been examined using bacteriophage surrogates, which commonly demonstrated a potential of > 9 LRV when using high titer spikes (e.g. 10(10) PFU/mL). However, as the filter loading increases, one typically experiences significant decreases in performance and LRV. The 9 LRV value is markedly higher than the current expected range of 4-5 LRV when utilizing mammalian retroviruses on virus removal filters (Miesegaes et al., Dev Biol (Basel) 2010;133:3-101). Recent values have been reported in the literature (Stuckey et al., Biotech Progr 2014;30:79-85) of LRV in excess of 6 for PPV and XMuLV although this result appears to be atypical. LRV for VF with therapeutic proteins could be limited by several factors including process limits (flux decay, load matrix), virus spike level and the analytical methods used for virus detection (i.e. the Limits of Quantitation), as well as the virus spike quality. Research was conducted using the Xenotropic-Murine Leukemia Virus (XMuLV) for its direct relevance to the most commonly cited document, the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) Q5A (International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use, Geneva, Switzerland, 1999) for viral safety evaluations. A unique aspect of this work is the independent evaluation of the impact of retrovirus quality and virus spike level on VF performance and LRV. The VF studies used XMuLV preparations purified by either ultracentrifugation (Ultra 1) or by chromatographic processes that yielded a more highly purified virus stock (Ultra 2). Two monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) with markedly different filtration characteristics and with similar levels of

  2. Efficacy and Mechanisms of Murine Norovirus Inhibition by Pulsed-Light Technology

    PubMed Central

    Vimont, Allison; Fliss, Ismaïl

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed light is a nonthermal processing technology recognized by the FDA for killing microorganisms on food surfaces, with cumulative fluences up to 12 J cm−2. In this study, we investigated its efficacy for inactivating murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) as a human norovirus surrogate in phosphate-buffered saline, hard water, mineral water, turbid water, and sewage treatment effluent and on food contact surfaces, including high-density polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and stainless steel, free or in an alginate matrix. The pulsed-light device emitted a broadband spectrum (200 to 1,000 nm) at a fluence of 0.67 J cm−2 per pulse, with 2% UV at 8 cm beneath the lamp. Reductions in viral infectivity exceeded 3 log10 in less than 3 s (5 pulses; 3.45 J cm−2) in clear suspensions and on clean surfaces, even in the presence of alginate, and in 6 s (11 pulses; 7.60 J cm−2) on fouled surfaces except for stainless steel (2.6 log10). The presence of protein or bentonite interfered with viral inactivation. Analysis of the morphology, the viral proteins, and the RNA integrity of treated MNV-1 allowed us to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the antiviral activity of pulsed light. Pulsed light appeared to disrupt MNV-1 structure and degrade viral protein and RNA. The results suggest that pulsed-light technology could provide an effective alternative means of inactivating noroviruses in wastewaters, in clear beverages, in drinking water, or on food-handling surfaces in the presence or absence of biofilms. PMID:25681193

  3. Murine leukemia provirus-mediated activation of the Notch1 gene leads to induction of HES-1 in a mouse T lymphoma cell line, DL-3.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Ishimoto, A; Honjo, T; Yanagawa, S

    1999-07-23

    Constitutive activation of Notch signaling is known to be associated with tumorigenesis. In a mouse T lymphoma cell line, DL-3, we found that a murine leukemia provirus was inserted in the Notch1 locus, which led to marked expression of a virus-Notch1 fusion mRNA encoding an intracellular portion of the Notch1 protein. Furthermore, expression and nuclear localization of this constitutively active form of Notch1 protein were confirmed. Corresponding to this finding, the transcription of the hairy/enhancer of split (HES-1) gene, a known target of Notch1 signaling, was elevated in this cell line. A potential role for overexpressed HES-1 in the development of the lymphoma was discussed.

  4. Functional Interactions of the HHCC Domain of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Integrase Revealed by Nonoverlapping Complementation and Zinc-Dependent Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Leon, Oscar; Greenfield, Norma J.; Roth, Monica J.

    1999-01-01

    The retroviral integrase (IN) is required for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome. The N terminus of IN contains an HHCC zinc finger-like motif, which is conserved among all retroviruses. To study the function of the HHCC domain of Moloney murine leukemia virus IN, the first N-terminal 105 residues were expressed independently. This HHCC domain protein is found to complement a completely nonoverlapping construct lacking the HHCC domain for strand transfer, 3′ processing and coordinated disintegration reactions, revealing trans interactions among IN domains. The HHCC domain protein binds zinc at a 1:1 ratio and changes its conformation upon binding to zinc. The presence of zinc within the HHCC domain stimulates selective integration processes. Zinc promotes the dimerization of the HHCC domain and protects it from N-ethylmaleimide modification. These studies dissect and define the requirement for the HHCC domain, the exact function of which remains unknown. PMID:9971758

  5. Efficacy of Exercise Interventions in Patients with Acute Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinjie; Gu, Zejuan; Yin, Xiangguang

    2016-01-01

    Background Decreased physical performance and impaired physiological and psychological fitness have been reported in patients with acute leukemia (AL). We performed a meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of exercise in patients with AL. Methods In this meta-analysis, the electronic databases MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL and PEDro were searched through November 2015. Three authors participated in the study selection, data extraction and quality assessment. The instrument used for quality assessment was derived from the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. Analyses were performed according to the recommendations of The Cochrane Collaboration using Review Manager 5.3. Results Nine trials (8 randomized controlled trials and 1 quasi-experimental design trial) with 314 AL participants were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled standardized mean differences between the exercise and control groups were 0.45 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.09 to 0.80, P value = 0.01, P for heterogeneity = 0.23, I2 = 28%) for cardiorespiratory fitness and 0.67 (95% CI: 0.28 to 1.06, P value = 0.0007, P for heterogeneity = 0.14, I2 = 43%) for muscle strength. Based on the data for fatigue, anxiety, and depression, there were no significant differences in these parameters between the exercise and control groups. Conclusions Exercise has beneficial effects on cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength and functional mobility; however, no significant improvements in fatigue, anxiety, depression or quality of life were observed. Further large-scale randomized trials are needed to assess the safety, feasibility and efficacy of exercise programs for AL patients. PMID:27463234

  6. Cellular and species resistance to murine amphotropic, gibbon ape, and feline subgroup C leukemia viruses is strongly influenced by receptor expression levels and by receptor masking mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tailor, C S; Nouri, A; Kabat, D

    2000-10-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are resistant to infections by gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV) unless they are pretreated with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation. These viruses use the related sodium-phosphate symporters Pit1 and Pit2, respectively, as receptors in nonhamster cells, and evidence has suggested that the corresponding transporters of CHO cells may be masked by tunicamycin-sensitive secreted inhibitors. Although the E36 line of Chinese hamster cells was reported to secrete the putative Pit2 inhibitor and to be sensitive to the inhibitory CHO factors, E36 cells are highly susceptible to both GALV and A-MLV in the absence of tunicamycin. Moreover, expression of E36 Pit2 in CHO cells conferred tunicamycin-independent susceptibilities to both viruses. Based on the latter results, it was suggested that E36 Pit2 must functionally differ from the endogenous Pit2 of CHO cells. To test these ideas, we analyzed the receptor properties of CHO Pit1 and Pit2 in CHO cells. Surprisingly, and counterintuitively, transfection of a CHO Pit2 expression vector into CHO cells conferred strong susceptibility to both GALV and A-MLV, and similar overexpression of CHO Pit1 conferred susceptibility to GALV. Thus, CHO Pit2 is a promiscuous functional receptor for both viruses, and CHO Pit1 is a functional receptor for GALV. Similarly, we found that the natural resistance of Mus dunni tail fibroblasts to subgroup C feline leukemia viruses (FeLV-C) was eliminated simply by overexpression of the endogenous FeLV-C receptor homologue. These results demonstrate a novel and simple method to unmask latent retroviral receptor activities that occur in some cells. Specifically, resistances to retroviruses that are caused by subthreshold levels of receptor expression or by stoichiometrically limited masking or interference mechanisms can be efficiently overcome simply by overexpressing the endogenous receptors in the same

  7. Phylogeny-Directed Search for Murine Leukemia Virus-Like Retroviruses in Vertebrate Genomes and in Patients Suffering from Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, Jonas; Sheikholvaezin, Ali; Elfaitouri, Amal; Blomberg, Fredrik; Sjösten, Anna; Mattson Ulfstedt, Johan; Pipkorn, Rüdiger; Källander, Clas; Öhrmalm, Christina; Sperber, Göran

    2011-01-01

    Gammaretrovirus-like sequences occur in most vertebrate genomes. Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) like retroviruses (MLLVs) are a subset, which may be pathogenic and spread cross-species. Retroviruses highly similar to MLLVs (xenotropic murine retrovirus related virus (XMRV) and Human Mouse retrovirus-like RetroViruses (HMRVs)) reported from patients suffering from prostate cancer (PC) and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) raise the possibility that also humans have been infected. Structurally intact, potentially infectious MLLVs occur in the genomes of some mammals, especially mouse. Mouse MLLVs contain three major groups. One, MERV G3, contained MLVs and XMRV/HMRV. Its presence in mouse DNA, and the abundance of xenotropic MLVs in biologicals, is a source of false positivity. Theoretically, XMRV/HMRV could be one of several MLLV transspecies infections. MLLV pathobiology and diversity indicate optimal strategies for investigating XMRV/HMRV in humans and raise ethical concerns. The alternatives that XMRV/HMRV may give a hard-to-detect “stealth” infection, or that XMRV/HMRV never reached humans, have to be considered. PMID:22315600

  8. Systematic chemical and molecular profiling of MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals efficacy of romidepsin

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshank, M N; Ford, J; Cheung, L C; Heng, J; Singh, S; Wells, J; Failes, T W; Arndt, G M; Smithers, N; Prinjha, R K; Anderson, D; Carter, K W; Gout, A M; Lassmann, T; O'Reilly, J; Cole, C H; Kotecha, R S; Kees, U R

    2017-01-01

    To address the poor prognosis of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (iALL), we generated a panel of cell lines from primary patient samples and investigated cytotoxic responses to contemporary and novel Food and Drug Administration-approved chemotherapeutics. To characterize representation of primary disease within cell lines, molecular features were compared using RNA-sequencing and cytogenetics. High-throughput screening revealed variable efficacy of currently used drugs, however identified consistent efficacy of three novel drug classes: proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Gene expression of drug targets was highly reproducible comparing iALL cell lines to matched primary specimens. Histone deacetylase inhibitors, including romidepsin (ROM), enhanced the activity of a key component of iALL therapy, cytarabine (ARAC) in vitro and combined administration of ROM and ARAC to xenografted mice further reduced leukemia burden. Molecular studies showed that ROM reduces expression of cytidine deaminase, an enzyme involved in ARAC deactivation, and enhances the DNA damage–response to ARAC. In conclusion, we present a valuable resource for drug discovery, including the first systematic analysis of transcriptome reproducibility in vitro, and have identified ROM as a promising therapeutic for MLL-rearranged iALL. PMID:27443263

  9. Systematic chemical and molecular profiling of MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals efficacy of romidepsin.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, M N; Ford, J; Cheung, L C; Heng, J; Singh, S; Wells, J; Failes, T W; Arndt, G M; Smithers, N; Prinjha, R K; Anderson, D; Carter, K W; Gout, A M; Lassmann, T; O'Reilly, J; Cole, C H; Kotecha, R S; Kees, U R

    2017-01-01

    To address the poor prognosis of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (iALL), we generated a panel of cell lines from primary patient samples and investigated cytotoxic responses to contemporary and novel Food and Drug Administration-approved chemotherapeutics. To characterize representation of primary disease within cell lines, molecular features were compared using RNA-sequencing and cytogenetics. High-throughput screening revealed variable efficacy of currently used drugs, however identified consistent efficacy of three novel drug classes: proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Gene expression of drug targets was highly reproducible comparing iALL cell lines to matched primary specimens. Histone deacetylase inhibitors, including romidepsin (ROM), enhanced the activity of a key component of iALL therapy, cytarabine (ARAC) in vitro and combined administration of ROM and ARAC to xenografted mice further reduced leukemia burden. Molecular studies showed that ROM reduces expression of cytidine deaminase, an enzyme involved in ARAC deactivation, and enhances the DNA damage-response to ARAC. In conclusion, we present a valuable resource for drug discovery, including the first systematic analysis of transcriptome reproducibility in vitro, and have identified ROM as a promising therapeutic for MLL-rearranged iALL.

  10. Characterization of structural and immunological properties of specific domains of Friend ecotropic and dual-tropic murine leukemia virus gp70s.

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, A; Honnen, W J

    1984-01-01

    A detailed comparison of the gp70 proteins of cloned ecotropic Friend murine leukemia virus (FLV) and dual-tropic Friend mink focus-forming virus (FrMCF) was performed by analyzing the structural and immunological properties of amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of these molecules generated upon controlled trypsinization. The two gp70s gave characteristic fragmentation patterns; the amino-terminal fragments of FrMCF gp70 were smaller than the corresponding fragments of FLV and contained a trypsin site which resulted in a 19,000-dalton amino-terminal fragment not observed for FLV, whereas both molecules yielded an identically sized carboxy-terminal fragment. All amino-terminal fragments of both gp70 molecules contained an endo H-sensitive oligosaccharide chain; for FrMCF, a second endo H-sensitive carbohydrate was present as well at a carboxy-terminal site for approximately 50% of the molecules. Several aspects of the disulfide interactions of the two gp70s were conserved; in both cases the carboxy-terminal fragments were disulfide bonded to p15(E), there were no disulfide bonds between amino- and carboxy-terminal fragments, and the amino-terminal fragments exhibited a significant increase in mobility upon analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nonreducing conditions. Analysis of the immunoreactivity of the different domains of the proteins by immunoprecipitation of the fragments with antisera prepared against xenotropic murine leukemia virus and feline leukemia virus gp70s indicated major differences in antigenicity for the amino-terminal domains of FLV and FrMCF gp70, whereas the carboxy-terminal domains were immunologically conserved. Similar analyses with antibodies specific for p15(E) and Pr15(E) demonstrate that these components are conserved as well. These data provide direct evidence that p15(E) and the C-terminal gp70 domain of FrMCF gp70 are related to the corresponding regions of the ecotropic FLV parent and indicate

  11. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors for elderly chronic myeloid leukemia patients: a systematic review of efficacy and safety data.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Tiribelli, Mario; Alimena, Giuliana

    2012-10-01

    The impact of age as a poor prognostic factor in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has been well described. In the interferon era, elderly patients diagnosed as having chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) had shorter survival compared to younger patients. With the advent of target therapy with imatinib, several reports described improved responses in elderly late CP-CML patients treated with imatinib after IFN failure, with similar overall survival compared to younger population. Imatinib in newly diagnosed older patients showed similar rate of cytogenetic and molecular responses compared to younger patients. Few data are available relating elderly CML patients subset treated with second-generation TKIs after resistance/intolerance to imatinib: both nilotinib and dasatinib have demonstrated efficacy and limited toxicity profile as in younger patients. The aim of this review is, through the revision of published data, to highlight the fact that elderly CML patients can benefit from target therapy with limited adverse events.

  12. A Detailed Protocol for Characterizing the Murine C1498 Cell Line and its Associated Leukemia Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mopin, Alexia; Driss, Virginie; Brinster, Carine

    2016-01-01

    The intravenous injection of C1498 cells into syngeneic or congenic mice has been performed since 1941. These injections result in the development of acute leukemia. However, the nature of this disease has not been well documented in the literature. Here, we provide a technical protocol for characterizing C1498 cells in vitro and for determining the nature of the induced leukemia in vivo. The first part of this procedure is focused on determining the hematopoietic lineage and the stage of differentiation of cultured C1498 cells. To achieve this, multi-parametric flow cytometric staining is used to detect hematopoietic cell markers. Immunofluorescence microscopy, cytochemistry and a May-Grünwald Giemsa staining are then performed to assess the expression of myeloperoxidase, the activity of esterases and cellular morphology, respectively. The second part of this protocol is dedicated to describing the leukemia disease that is induced in vivo. The latter can be achieved by determining the frequencies of leukemic and inherent cells in the blood, hematopoietic organs (e.g., bone marrow and spleen) and non-lymphoid tissues (e.g., the liver and lungs) using specific staining and flow cytometry analyses. The nature of the leukemia is then confirmed using May-Grünwald Giemsa staining and staining for specific esterases in the bone marrow. Here, we present the results that were obtained using this protocol in age-matched C1498- and PBS-injected mice. PMID:27768040

  13. [Efficacy of siRNA on feline leukemia virus replication in vitro].

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Melanie; Weber, Karin; Rauch, Gisep; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Hosie, Margaret J; Meli, Marina L; Hartmann, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) can lead to severe clinical signs in cats. Until now, there is no effective therapy for FeLV-infected cats. RNA interference-based antiviral therapy is a new concept. Specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) are designed complementary to the mRNA of a target region, and thus inhibit replication. Several studies have proven efficacy of siRNAs in inhibiting virus replication. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory potential of siRNAs against FeLV replication in vitro. siRNAs against the FeLV env gene and the host cell surface receptor (feTHTR1) which is used by FeLV-A for entry as well as siRNA that were not complementary to the FeLV or cat genome, were tested. Crandell feline kidney cells (CrFK cells) were transfected with FeLV-A/Glasgow-1. On day 13, infected cells were transfected with siRNAs. As control, cells were mock-transfected or treated with azidothymidine (AZT) (5 μg/ml). Culture supernatants were analyzed for FeLV RNA using quantitative real-time RT-PCR and for FeLV p27 by ELISA every 24 hours for five days. All siRNAs significantly reduced viral RNA and p27 production, starting after 48 hours. The fact that non-complementary siRNAs also inhibited virus replication may lead to the conclusion that unspecific mechanisms rather than specific binding lead to inhibition.

  14. Highly efficient tumor transduction and antitumor efficacy in experimental human malignant mesothelioma using replicating gibbon ape leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Kubo, S; Takagi-Kimura, M; Logg, C R; Kasahara, N

    2013-12-01

    Retroviral replicating vectors (RRVs) have been shown to achieve efficient tumor transduction and enhanced therapeutic benefit in a wide variety of cancer models. Here we evaluated two different RRVs derived from amphotropic murine leukemia virus (AMLV) and gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV), in human malignant mesothelioma cells. In vitro, both RRVs expressing the green fluorescent protein gene efficiently replicated in most mesothelioma cell lines tested, but not in normal mesothelial cells. Notably, in ACC-MESO-1 mesothelioma cells that were not permissive for AMLV-RRV, the GALV-RRV could spread efficiently in culture and in mice with subcutaneous xenografts by in vivo fluorescence imaging. Next, GALV-RRV expressing the cytosine deaminase prodrug activator gene showed efficient killing of ACC-MESO-1 cells in a prodrug 5-fluorocytosine dose-dependent manner, compared with AMLV-RRV. GALV-RRV-mediated prodrug activator gene therapy achieved significant inhibition of subcutaneous ACC-MESO-1 tumor growth in nude mice. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR demonstrated that ACC-MESO-1 cells express higher PiT-1 (GALV receptor) and lower PiT-2 (AMLV receptor) compared with normal mesothelial cells and other mesothelioma cells, presumably accounting for the distinctive finding that GALV-RRV replicates much more robustly than AMLV-RRV in these cells. These data indicate the potential utility of GALV-RRV-mediated prodrug activator gene therapy in the treatment of mesothelioma.

  15. Unraveling graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-leukemia responses using TCR Vβ spectratype analysis in a murine bone marrow transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Stacey L; Zilberberg, Jenny; Stein, Johann; Vazzana, Kristin; Berger, Stephanie A; Korngold, Robert; Friedman, Thea M

    2013-01-01

    The optimum use of allogeneic blood and marrow transplantation (BMT) as a curative therapy for hematological malignancies lies in the successful separation of mature donor T cells that are host reactive and induce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) from those that are tumor reactive and mediate graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects. To study whether this separation was possible in an MHC-matched murine BMT model (B10.BR→CBA) with a CBA-derived myeloid leukemia line, MMC6, we used TCR Vβ CDR3-size spectratype analysis to first show that the Vβ13 family was highly skewed in the B10.BR anti-MMC6 CD8(+) T cell response but not in the alloresponse against recipient cells alone. Transplantation of CD8(+)Vβ13(+) T cells at the dose equivalent of their constituency in 1 × 10(7) CD8(+) T cells, a dose that had been shown to mediate lethal GVHD in recipient mice, induced a slight GVL response with no concomitant GVHD. Increasing doses of CD8(+)Vβ13(+) T cells led to more significant GVL responses but also increased GVHD symptoms and associated mortality. Subsequent spectratype analysis of GVHD target tissues revealed involvement of gut-infiltrating CD8(+)Vβ13(+) T cells accounting for the observed in vivo effects. When BMT recipients were given MMC6-presensitized CD8(+)Vβ13(+) T cells, they displayed a significant GVL response with minimal GVHD. Spectratype analysis of tumor-presensitized, gut-infiltrating CD8(+)Vβ13(+) T cells showed preferential usage of tumor-reactive CDR3-size lengths, and these cells expressed increased effector memory phenotype (CD44(+)CD62L(-/lo)). Thus, Vβ spectratyping can identify T cells involved in antihost and antitumor reactivity and tumor presensitization can aid in the separation of GVHD and GVL responses.

  16. Influence of WR 2721 on the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy of murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, J.J.; Johnson, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    The effect of WR2721 on the response of tumors to radiation, antineoplastic alkylating drugs, and DNA binding agents was evaluated and compared to the degree of normal tissue protection provided by WR 2721 against these agents. WR 2721 administered to mice bearing P388 leukemia or Lewis lung carcinoma was found to reduce the radiosensitivity of the leukemia and lung tumor by dose modifying factors of 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. WR 2721 protected bone marow, intestine, and skin from radiation by factors of 1.9. 1.4 and 1.8. WR 2721 protected mice from the lethality of cyclophosphamide by a factor of only 1.2 whereas protection from melphalan toxicity was more dramatic with a dose modifying factor of 1.6. In chemotherapy studies of established M5076 ovarian tumor, the combination of WR 2721 plus cyclophosphamide was equivalent in activity to cyclophosphamide alone. WR 2721 did not modify the antitumor activity of melphalan in early Lewis lung carcinoma did not decrease the antileukemic effects of this agent by a factor of 2.6 indicating tumor protection greater than host protection in the leukemia. The antitumor activity of the DNA binding agents etoposide (VP16-213) and mitoxantrone against systemic P388 leukemia was not diminished by WR 2721, while a substantial increase in host toxicity was noted for the combinations. The protective effects of WR 2721 against radiation and drug damage were, therefore, not entirely selective for normal tissues. In some cases the degree of tumor protection can be similar to, or greater than, normal tissue protection.

  17. Nucleotide Sequence of the Envelope Gene of Gardner-Arnstein Feline Leukemia Virus B Reveals Unique Sequence Homologies with a Murine Mink Cell Focus-Forming Virus †

    PubMed Central

    Elder, John H.; Mullins, James I.

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the envelope gene and the adjacent 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR) of Gardner-Arnstein feline leukemia virus of subgroup B (GA-FeLV-B) has been determined. Comparison of the derived amino acid sequence of the gp70-p15E polyprotein to those of several previously reported murine retroviruses revealed striking homologies between GA-FeLV-B gp70 and the gp70 of a Moloney virus-derived mink cell focus-forming virus. These homologies were located within the substituted (presumably xenotropic) portion of the mink cell focus-forming virus envelope gene and comprised amino acid sequences not present in three ecotropic virus gp70s. In addition, areas of insertions and deletions, in general, were the same between GA-FeLV-B and Moloney mink cell focus-forming virus, although the sizes of the insertions and deletions differed. Homologies between GA-FeLV-B and mink cell focus-forming virus gp70s is functionally significant in that they both possess expanded host ranges, a property dictated by gp70. The amino acid sequence of FeLV-B contains 12 Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences, indicating 12 possible sites of N-linked glycosylation as compared with 7 or 8 for its murine counterparts. Comparison of the 3′ LTR of GA-FeLV-B to AKR and Moloney virus LTRs revealed extensive conservation in several regions including the “CCAAT” and Goldberg-Hogness (TATA) boxes thought to be involved in promotion of transcription and in the repeat region of the LTR. The inverted repeats that flanked the LTR of GA-FeLV-B were identical to the murine inverted repeats, but were one base longer than the latter. The region of U3 corresponding to the approximately 75-nucleotide “enhancer sequence” is present in GA-FeLV-B, but contains deletions relative to AKR and Moloney virus and is not repeated. An interesting pallindrome in the repeat region immediately 3′ to the U3 region was noted in all the LTRs, but was particularly pronounced in GA-FeLV-B. Possible roles for this

  18. Efficacy of orally delivered cochleates containing amphotericin B in a murine model of aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Delmas, G; Park, S; Chen, Z W; Tan, F; Kashiwazaki, R; Zarif, L; Perlin, D S

    2002-08-01

    Cochleates containing amphotericin B (CAMB) were administered orally at doses ranging from 0 to 40 mg/kg of body weight/day for 14 days in a murine model of systemic aspergillosis. The administration of oral doses of CAMB (20 and 40 mg/kg/day) resulted in a survival rate of 70% and a reduction in colony counts of more than 2 logs in lungs, livers, and kidneys. Orally administered CAMB shows promise for the treatment of aspergillosis.

  19. Efficacy of Orally Delivered Cochleates Containing Amphotericin B in a Murine Model of Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, G.; Park, S.; Chen, Z. W.; Tan, F.; Kashiwazaki, R.; Zarif, L.; Perlin, D. S.

    2002-01-01

    Cochleates containing amphotericin B (CAMB) were administered orally at doses ranging from 0 to 40 mg/kg of body weight/day for 14 days in a murine model of systemic aspergillosis. The administration of oral doses of CAMB (20 and 40 mg/kg/day) resulted in a survival rate of 70% and a reduction in colony counts of more than 2 logs in lungs, livers, and kidneys. Orally administered CAMB shows promise for the treatment of aspergillosis. PMID:12121962

  20. Improvement of retroviral retargeting by using amino acid spacers between an additional binding domain and the N terminus of Moloney murine leukemia virus SU.

    PubMed Central

    Valsesia-Wittmann, S; Morling, F J; Nilson, B H; Takeuchi, Y; Russell, S J; Cosset, F L

    1996-01-01

    We previously reported a strategy to redirect the retroviral host range by expressing single-chain antibodies (S. J. Russell, R. E. Hawkins, and G. Winter, Nucleic Acids Res. 21:1081-1085, 1993) or ligands (F.-L. Cosset, F. J Morling, Y. Takeuchi, R. A. Weiss, M. K. L. Collins, and S. J. Russell, J. Virol. 69:6314-6322, 1995) at the N terminus of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) surface proteins (SU). Although such chimeric envelopes were able to bind the new receptors, the transduction efficiency of retargeted viruses was generally low. We hypothesized that conformational rearrangements of envelope glycoproteins were not optimally triggered following binding, and to overcome these postbinding blocks, we have generated here a set of chimeric MoMLV-derived envelopes targeted to the Ram-1 phosphate transporter in which we have varied the spacing between the Ram-1-binding domain and the MoMLV SU. All of the recombinant envelopes were correctly expressed on virions, and all bound efficiently to Ram-1. However, the interdomain spacing greatly affected the efficiency of gene transfer by retroviral vectors that had bound to Ram-1 via their chimeric envelopes. Optimal interdomain spacing allowed a 100-fold-increased viral transduction via Ram-1 compared to our previous results. PMID:8627737

  1. Abnormalities induced by the mutant gene, lpr. Patterns of disease and expression of murine leukemia viruses in SJL/J mice homozygous and heterozygous for lpr.

    PubMed

    Morse, H C; Roths, J B; Davidson, W F; Langdon, W Y; Fredrickson, T N; Hartley, J W

    1985-03-01

    SJL/J mice heterozygous or homozygous for the lpr mutation were compared with SJL/J-+/+ mice for longevity, histopathology, antigenic characteristics of lymphocytes and expression of murine leukemia viruses (MuLV). In comparison to +/+ mice, lpr homozygotes had a markedly shortened life span, died with infiltrative pulmonary disease, but little or no renal disease, and expressed high levels of infectious ecotropic MuLV in lymphoid tissues. SJL-lpr/+ mice had a life span intermediate between SJL-+/+ and -lpr/lpr mice, died with lymphomas that histologically resembled the neoplasms of +/+ mice, and sometimes expressed high levels of ecotropic MuLV. The lymphomas of lpr/+ could be transplanted to +/+ recipients in 78% of cases, and continuous in vitro lines were established from some of them. Similar effects on virus expression or lymphoma development were not observed in other strains homozygous or heterozygous for the lpr mutation. These results indicate that the diseases expressed by mice homozygous for the lpr mutation are highly strain-dependent, and that this gene can have an effect in the heterozygous state in SJL mice.

  2. Distinct roles of enhancer nuclear factor 1 (NF1) sites in plasmacytoma and osteopetrosis induction by Akv1-99 murine leukemia virus

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Sorensen, Annette Balle; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Kunder, Sandra; Schmidt, Joerg; Pedersen, Finn Skou . E-mail: fsp@mb.au.dk

    2005-04-10

    Murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) can be lymphomagenic and bone pathogenic. In this work, the possible roles of two distinct proviral enhancer nuclear factor 1 (NF1) binding sites in osteopetrosis and tumor induction by B-lymphomagenic Akv1-99 MLV were investigated. Akv1-99 and mutants either with NF1 site 1, NF1 site 2 or both sites disrupted induced tumors (plasma cell proliferations by histopathology) with remarkably similar incidence and mean latency in inbred NMRI mice. Clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement detection, by Southern analysis, confirmed approximately half of the tumors induced by each virus to be plasmacytomas while the remaining lacked detectable clonally rearranged Ig genes and were considered polyclonal; a demonstration that enhancer NF1 sites are dispensable for plasmacytoma induction by Akv1-99. In contrast, X-ray analysis revealed significant differences in osteopetrosis induction by the four viruses strongly indicating that NF1 site 2 is critical for viral bone pathogenicity, whereas NF1 site 1 is neutral or moderately inhibitory. In conclusion, enhancer NF1 sites are major determinants of osteopetrosis induction by Akv1-99 without significant influence on viral oncogenicity.

  3. Complementation of a primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector by a genetically engineered tRNA-like primer.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, A H; Duch, M; Lovmand, J; Jørgensen, P; Pedersen, F S

    1997-01-01

    Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes is primed by a tRNA annealed to an 18-nucleotide primer binding site. Here, we present a primer complementation system to study molecular interaction of the replication machinery with the primer and primer binding site in vivo. Introduction of eight base substitutions into the primer binding site of a murine leukemia virus-based vector allowed efficient RNA encapsidation but resulted in severely reduced vector replication capacity. Replication was restored upon complementation with a synthetic gene designed to encode a complementary tRNA-like primer, but not with a noncomplementary tRNA-like molecule. The engineered primer was shown to be involved in both the initiation of first-strand synthesis and second-strand transfer. These results provide an in vivo demonstration that the retroviral replication machinery may recognize sequence complementarity rather than actual primer binding site and 3' primer sequences. Use of mutated primer binding site vectors replicating via engineered primers may add additional control features to retroviral gene transfer technology. PMID:8995641

  4. Characterization of pal-1, a common proviral insertion site in murine leukemia virus-induced lymphomas of c-myc and Pim-1 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Scheijen, B; Jonkers, J; Acton, D; Berns, A

    1997-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) in c-myc and Pim-1 transgenic mice permits the identification of oncogenes that collaborate with the transgenes in lymphomagenesis. The recently identified common insertion site pal-1, in MoMLV-induced lymphomas, is located in a region in which several independent integration clusters are found: eis-1, gfi-1, and evi-5. Proviral insertions of MoMLV in the different integration clusters upregulate the transcriptional activity of the Gfi-1 gene, which is located within the pal-1 locus. The eis-1/pal-1/gfi-1/evi-5 locus serves as a target for MoMLV proviral insertions in pre-B-cell lymphomas of Emu-myc transgenic mice (20%) and in T-cell lymphomas of H-2K-myc (75%) and Emu-pim-1 (93%) transgenic mice. Many tumors overexpress both Gfi-1 as well as Myc and Pim gene family members, indicating that Gfi-1 collaborates with Myc and Pim in lymphomagenesis. Proviral integrations in the previously identified insertion site bmi-1 are, however, mutually exclusive with integrations in the eis-1/pal-1/gfi-1/evi-5 locus. This finding suggests that Bmi-1 and Gfi-1 belong to the same complementation group in lymphoid transformation. PMID:8985317

  5. Identification of amino acids inserted during suppression of UAA and UGA termination codons at the gag-pol junction of Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Y X; Copeland, T D; Oroszlan, S; Rein, A; Levin, J G

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the murine leukemia virus pol gene occurs by translational readthrough of an in-frame UAG codon between the gag and pol coding regions. In a previous study, we mutated the UAG codon to UAA or UGA and demonstrated that both of these termination codons could be suppressed in reticulocyte lysates and in infected cells with the same efficiency as UAG. We now report the identity of the amino acids inserted in vitro in response to UAA and UGA in fusion products containing the gag-pol junction region. The results show that UAA, like UAG, directs the incorporation of glutamine, whereas UGA directs the incorporation of three amino acids, arginine, cysteine, and tryptophan. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating misreading of UAA as glutamine and UGA as arginine and cysteine in higher eukaryotes. Interestingly, although our protein synthesis system presumably contains other known UAG and UGA suppressors, these tRNAs did not suppress the termination codons in our experiments. Thus, it seems possible that the sequence surrounding the gag-pol junction not only promotes suppression but also helps determine which tRNAs function in suppression. Images PMID:2247457

  6. The conserved His8 of the Moloney murine leukemia virus Env SU subunit directs the activity of the SU-TM disulphide bond isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Li Kejun; Zhang, Shujing; Kronqvist, Malin; Ekstroem, Maria; Wallin, Michael; Garoff, Henrik . E-mail: henrik.garoff@cbt.ki.se

    2007-04-25

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV) fusion is controlled by isomerization of the disulphide bond between the receptor-binding surface (SU) and fusion-active transmembrane subunits of the Env-complex. The bond is in SU linked to a CXXC motif. This carries a free thiol that upon receptor binding can be activated (ionized) to attack the disulphide and rearrange it into a disulphide isomer within the motif. To find out whether His8 in the conserved SPHQ sequence of Env directs thiol activation, we analyzed its ionization in MLV vectors with wtEnv and Env with His8 deleted or substituted for Tyr or Arg, which partially or completely arrests fusion. The ionization was monitored by following the pH effect on isomerization in vitro by Ca{sup 2+} depletion or in vivo by receptor binding. We found that wtEnv isomerized optimally at slightly basic pH whereas the partially active mutant required higher and the inactive mutants still higher pH. This suggests that His8 directs the ionization of the CXXC thiol.

  7. Restoration of adenylate cyclase responsiveness in murine myeloid leukemia permits inhibition of proliferation by hormone. Butyrate augments catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Inhorn, L; Fleming, J W; Klingberg, D; Gabig, T G; Boswell, H S

    1988-04-01

    Mechanisms of leukemic cell clonal dominance may include aberrations of transmembrane signaling. In particular, neoplastic transformation has been associated with reduced capacity for hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. In the present study, prostaglandin E, a hormonal activator of adenylate cyclase that has antiproliferative activity in myeloid cells, and cholera toxin, an adenylate cyclase agonist that functions at a postreceptor site by activating the adenylate cyclase stimulatory GTP-binding protein (Gs), were studied for antiproliferative activity in two murine myeloid cell lines. FDC-P1, an interleukin 3 (IL 3)-dependent myeloid cell line and a tumorigenic IL 3-independent subline, FI, were resistant to these antiproliferative agents. The in vitro ability of the "differentiation" agent, sodium butyrate, to reverse their resistance to adenylate cyclase agonists was studied. The antiproliferative action of butyrate involved augmentation of transmembrane adenylate cyclase activity. Increased adenylate cyclase catalyst activity was the primary alteration of this transmembrane signaling group leading to the functional inhibitory effects on leukemia cells, although alterations in regulatory G-proteins appear to play a secondary role.

  8. Targeting of Murine Leukemia Virus Gag to the Plasma Membrane Is Mediated by PI(4,5)P2/PS and a Polybasic Region in the Matrix ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hamard-Peron, E.; Juillard, F.; Saad, J. S.; Roy, C.; Roingeard, P.; Summers, M. F.; Darlix, J.-L.; Picart, C.; Muriaux, D.

    2010-01-01

    Membrane targeting of the human immunodeficiency virus Gag proteins is dependent on phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] located in the plasma membrane. In order to determine if evolutionarily distant retroviral Gag proteins are targeted by a similar mechanism, we generated mutants of the matrix (MA) domain of murine leukemia virus (MuLV) Gag, examined their binding to membrane models in vitro, and analyzed their phenotypes in cell culture. In vitro, we showed that MA bound all the phosphatidylinositol phosphates with significant affinity but displayed a strong specificity for PI(4,5)P2 only if enhanced by phosphatidylserine. Mutations in the polybasic region in MA dramatically reduced this affinity. In cells, virus production was strongly impaired by PI(4,5)P2 depletion under conditions of 5ptaseIV overexpression, and mutations in the MA polybasic region altered Gag localization, membrane binding, and virion production. Our results suggest that the N-terminal polybasic cluster of MA is essential for Gag targeting to the plasma membrane. The binding of the MA domain to PI(4,5)P2 appears to be a conserved feature among retroviruses despite the fact that the MuLV-MA domain is structurally different from that of human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 and lacks a readily identifiable PI(4,5)P2 binding cleft. PMID:19828619

  9. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Sorensen, Jonna; Schmidt, Joerg; Pedersen, Finn Skou . E-mail: fsp@mb.au.dk

    2007-05-25

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid receptor, Ets, Runx, or basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in the proviral U3 region, however, shifted disease induction to almost exclusively PCPs, but had no major influence on tumor latency periods. Southern analysis of immunoglobulin rearrangements and ecotropic provirus integration patterns showed that many of the tumors/cell proliferations induced by each virus were polyclonal. Our results indicate that enhancer mutations weaken the ability of Akv to induce mature B-cell lymphomas prior to the plasma cell stage, whereas development of plasma cell proliferations is less dependent of viral enhancer strength.

  10. The efficacy of X-ray does on murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) in pure culture, half-shell oyster, salmon sushi, and tuna salad

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this investigation, we determined the efficacy of X-ray doses on reducing a human norovirus (HuNoV) surrogate [murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1)] in pure culture, half-shell oyster, salmon sushi and tuna salad. The pure culture (phosphate-buffer saline, pH 7.4), half-shell oyster, salmon sushi and tuna ...

  11. Gallium nitrate is efficacious in murine models of tuberculosis and inhibits key bacterial Fe-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Olakanmi, Oyebode; Kesavalu, Banurekha; Pasula, Rajamouli; Abdalla, Maher Y; Schlesinger, Larry S; Britigan, Bradley E

    2013-12-01

    Acquiring iron (Fe) is critical to the metabolism and growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Disruption of Fe metabolism is a potential approach for novel antituberculous therapy. Gallium (Ga) has many similarities to Fe. Biological systems are often unable to distinguish Ga(3+) from Fe(3+). Unlike Fe(3+), Ga(3+) cannot be physiologically reduced to Ga(2+). Thus, substituting Ga for Fe in the active site of enzymes may render them nonfunctional. We previously showed that Ga inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis in broth and within cultured human macrophages. We now report that Ga(NO3)3 shows efficacy in murine tuberculosis models. BALB/c SCID mice were infected intratracheally with M. tuberculosis, following which they received daily intraperitoneal saline, Ga(NO3)3, or NaNO3. All mice receiving saline or NaNO3 died. All Ga(NO3)3-treated mice survived. M. tuberculosis CFU in the lungs, liver, and spleen of the NaNO3-treated or saline-treated mice were significantly higher than those in Ga-treated mice. When BALB/c mice were substituted for BALB/c SCID mice as a chronic (nonlethal) infection model, Ga(NO3)3 treatment significantly decreased lung CFU. To assess the mechanism(s) whereby Ga inhibits bacterial growth, the effect of Ga on M. tuberculosis ribonucleotide reductase (RR) (a key enzyme in DNA replication) and aconitase activities was assessed. Ga decreased M. tuberculosis RR activity by 50 to 60%, but no additional decrease in RR activity was seen at Ga concentrations that completely inhibited mycobacterial growth. Ga decreased aconitase activity by 90%. Ga(NO3)3 shows efficacy in murine M. tuberculosis infection and leads to a decrease in activity of Fe-dependent enzymes. Additional work is warranted to further define Ga's mechanism of action and to optimize delivery forms for possible therapeutic uses in humans.

  12. Stage-specific expression of intracisternal A-particle sequences in murine myelomonocytic leukemia cell lines and normal myelomonocytic differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Y; O'Mara, M A; Spilsbury, K; Thwaite, R; Rowe, P B; Symonds, G

    1991-01-01

    The levels of intracisternal A-particle (IAP) mRNA were analyzed in a variety of myelomonocytic leukemia cell lines, peritoneally derived macrophages, and normal hemopoietic progenitors induced to differentiate. In both normal and leukemic cells, the highest level of IAP message was found in cells at an intermediate stage of myelomonocytic differentiation, namely, the promyelomonocyte. These results indicate that IAP sequence transcription is regulated differentially during myelomonocytic cell development and that in general, the expression pattern is preserved in leukemic cell lines in vitro. In addition, Northern (RNA) analysis detected only type I IAP transcripts as the major IAP message and the expressed IAP subtypes varied in certain cell lines. This is the first comprehensive study of IAP expression in the myelomonocytic lineage and provides a useful system to study the biology of IAPs. Images PMID:1848323

  13. Chrysin, a natural and biologically active flavonoid, influences a murine leukemia model in vivo through enhancing populations of T-and B-cells, and promoting macrophage phagocytosis and NK cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Chung; Yu, Chun-Shu; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lin, Jing-Pin; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-01-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural and biologically active flavonoid found in plants, possesses many biological activities and anticancer effects. However, there is no available evidence regarding the antileukemia responses to chrysin in a mouse model. We hypothesized that chrysin affects murine WEHI-3 leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. The present study showed that chrysin at concentrations of 5-50 μM reduced the cell viability in concentration- and time-dependent manners. In an in vivo study, WEHI-3 leukemic BALB/c mice were established in order to determine antileukemia activity of chrysin. Our results revealed that chrysin increased the percentage of CD3 (T-cell maker), CD19 (B-cell maker) and Mac-3 (macrophages) cell surface markers in treated mice as compared with the untreated leukemia group. However, chrysin did not significantly influence the level of CD11b (a monocyte maker) in treated mice. Moreover, there was a significant increase in phagocytosis by macrophages from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, but no effect in those from the peritoneal cavity in leukemic mice after chrysin treatment. Isolated splenocytes from chrysin-treated leukemic mice demonstrated an increase of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity. Based on these observations, chrysin might exhibit antileukemia effects on a murine WEHI-3 cell line-induced leukemia in vivo.

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Megakaryocytes Induced from Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Murine and Nonhuman Primate Models.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xin; Qin, Meng; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yanan; Shen, Bin; Ren, Zhihua; Ding, Xinxin; Dai, Wei; Jiang, Yongping

    2017-03-01

    Because of a lack of platelet supply and a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved platelet growth factor, megakaryocytes have emerged as an effective substitute for alleviating thrombocytopenia. Here, we report the development of an efficient two-stage culture system that is free of stroma, animal components, and genetic manipulations for the production of functional megakaryocytes from hematopoietic stem cells. Safety and functional studies were performed in murine and nonhuman primate models. One human cryopreserved cord blood CD34(+) cell could be induced ex vivo to produce up to 1.0 × 10(4) megakaryocytes that included CD41a(+) and CD42b(+) cells at 82.4% ± 6.1% and 73.3% ± 8.5% (mean ± SD), respectively, yielding approximately 650-fold higher cell numbers than reported previously. Induced human megakaryocytic cells were capable of engrafting and producing functional platelets in the murine xenotransplantation model. In the nonhuman primate model, transplantation of primate megakaryocytic progenitors increased platelet count nadir and enhanced hemostatic function with no adverse effects. In addition, primate platelets were released in vivo as early as 3 hours after transplantation with autologous or allogeneic mature megakaryocytes and lasted for more than 48 hours. These results strongly suggest that large-scale induction of functional megakaryocytic cells is applicable for treating thrombocytopenic blood diseases in the clinic. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:897-909.

  15. Evaluation of the safety and efficacy of recombinant soluble thrombomodulin for patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with acute leukemia: multicenter prospective study by the Tohoku Hematology Forum.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hisayuki; Takahashi, Naoto; Katsuoka, Yuna; Inomata, Mitsue; Ito, Toshihiro; Meguro, Kuniaki; Kameoka, Yoshihiro; Tsumanuma, Riko; Murai, Kazunori; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Ito, Shigeki; Onishi, Yasushi; Harigae, Hideo

    2017-02-07

    It has been suggested that use of recombinant soluble thrombomodulin (rTM) is superior to conventional drugs in treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) complicating acute leukemia. However, its safety and efficacy have not been fully examined in prospective studies. Here, we performed a multicenter prospective study to examine outcomes of rTM treatment for DIC in patients with acute leukemia. Of 33 patients registered in this study, 13 had acute myeloid leukemia (AML), three had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 17 had acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The cumulative rates of DIC resolution at day 7 and day 35 were 56 and 81% in AML/ALL and 53 and 77% in APL, respectively. The median time from the initiation of rTM to DIC resolution was 4 days in AML/ALL and 6 days in APL patients. Adverse events related to hemorrhage occurred in two AML/ALL patients (13%) and three APL patients (18%). Of these, one AML/ALL patient died with intracranial hemorrhage, and two APL patients died with intracranial hemorrhage and pulmonary hemorrhage. These results suggest that rTM may improve the survival of acute leukemia patients with DIC by inhibiting early death related to hemorrhagic events, as reported previously.

  16. Testing the Efficacy of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Detecting Transplant Rejection Using a Murine Model of Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, K; Ohori, S; Meral, F C; Uehara, M; Giannini, S; Ichimura, T; Smith, R N; Jolesz, F A; Guleria, I; Zhang, Y; White, P J; McDannold, N J; Hoffmeister, K; Givertz, M M; Abdi, R

    2016-12-23

    One of the key unmet needs to improve long-term outcomes of heart transplantation is to develop accurate, noninvasive, and practical diagnostic tools to detect transplant rejection. Early intragraft inflammation and endothelial cell injuries occur prior to advanced transplant rejection. We developed a novel diagnostic imaging platform to detect early declines in microvascular perfusion (MP) of cardiac transplants using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). The efficacy of CEUS in detecting transplant rejection was tested in a murine model of heart transplants, a standard preclinical model of solid organ transplant. As compared to the syngeneic groups, a progressive decline in MP was demonstrated in the allografts undergoing acute transplant rejection (40%, 64%, and 92% on days 4, 6, and 8 posttransplantation, respectively) and chronic rejection (33%, 33%, and 92% on days 5, 14, and 30 posttransplantation, respectively). Our perfusion studies showed restoration of MP following antirejection therapy, highlighting its potential to help monitor efficacy of antirejection therapy. Our data suggest that early endothelial cell injury and platelet aggregation contributed to the early MP decline observed in the allografts. High-resolution MP mapping may allow for noninvasive detection of heart transplant rejection. The data presented have the potential to help in the development of next-generation imaging approaches to diagnose transplant rejection.

  17. Fatty acid metabolism in L1210 murine leukemia cells: differences in modification of fatty acids incorporated into various lipids.

    PubMed

    Burns, C P; Wei, S P; Spector, A A

    1978-10-01

    L1210 leukemia cells can utilize all of the main fatty acids that normally are present in the ascites fluid in which they grow. This finding is consistent with the view that L1210 cells derive most of their fatty acids from the ascites fluid. From 80--90% of each fatty acid was incorporated into cell lipids without structural modification, suggesting that the lipid composition of these cells can be altered by changing the type of fatty acids to which they are exposed. Most importantly, the palmitate that was subsequently incorporated into total cell phospholipids was elongated and desaturated somewhat more than that incorporated into triglycerides. This difference was due primarily to more extensive modification of the palmitate incorporated into the ethanolamine phosphoglycerides fraction. Although there was no difference between total phospholipids and triglycerides with linoleate, more of the linoleate incorporated into ethanolamine phosphoglycerides was elongated and further desaturated than that incorporated into choline phosphoglycerides and triglycerides. These findings indicate fatty acids incorporated into various cell lipid fractions are not structurally modified to the same extent. There appears to be greater modification of fatty acid used for ethanolamine phosphoglyceride synthesis as compared with triglyceride and choline phosphoglyceride synthesis.

  18. Negative regulatory element associated with potentially functional promoter and enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats of endogenous murine leukemia virus-related proviral sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ang, L.Y.; Yang, W.K.; Myer, F.E.; Yang, D.M.

    1989-06-01

    Three series of recombinant DNA clones were constructed, with the bacterial chloramphenical acetyltransferase (CAT) gene as a quantitative indicator, to examine the activities of promoter and enhancer sequence elements in the 5' long terminal repeat (LTR) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related proviral sequences isolated from the mouse genome. Transient CAT expression was determined in mouse NIH 3T3, human HT1080, and mink CCL64 cultured cells transfected with the LTR-CAT constructs. The 700-base pair (bp) LTRs of three polytropic MuLV-related proviral clones and the 750-bp LTRs of four modified polytropic proviral clones, in complete structures either with or without the adjacent downstream sequences, all showed very little or negligible activities for CAT expression, while ecotropic MuLV LTRs were highly active. The MuLV-related LTRs were divided into three portions and examined separately. The 3' portion of the MuLV-related LTRs that contains the CCAAC and TATAA boxes was found to be a functional promoter, being about one-half to one-third as active as the corresponding portion of the ecotropic MuLV LTRs. A MboI-Bg/II fragment, representing the distinct 190- to 200-pb inserted segment in the middle, was found to be a potential enhancer, especially when examined in combination with the simian virus 40 promoter in CCL64 cells. A PstI-MboI fragment of the 5' portion, which contains the protein-binding motifs on the enhancer segment as well as the upstream LTF sequences, showed moderate enhancer activities in CCL6 cells but was virtually inactive in NIH 3T3 cells and HT1080 cells; addition of this fragment to the ecotropic LTR-CAT constructs depressed CAT expression.

  19. Contributions to transcriptional activity and to viral leukemogenicity made by sequences within and downstream of the MCF13 murine leukemia virus enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Tupper, J C; Chen, H; Hays, E F; Bristol, G C; Yoshimura, F K

    1992-01-01

    We have identified nucleotide sequences that regulate transcription in both a cell-type-specific and general manner in the long terminal repeat of the MCF13 murine leukemia virus. Besides the enhancer element, we have observed that the region between the enhancer and promoter (DEN) has a profound effect on transcription in different cell types. This effect, however, was dependent on the copy number of enhancer repeats and was detectable in the presence of a single repeat. When two enhancer repeats were present, the effect of DEN on transcription was abrogated except in T cells. DEN also makes a significant contribution to the leukemogenic property of the MCF13 retrovirus. Its deletion from the MCF13 virus dramatically reduced the incidence of thymic lymphoma and increased the latency of disease in comparison with the wild-type virus. This effect was most marked when one rather than two enhancer repeats was present in the mutant viruses. We also observed that the removal of one repeat alone remarkably reduced leukemogenicity by the MCF13 virus. A newly identified protein-binding site (MLPal) located within DEN affects transcription only in T cells, and its deletion attenuates the ability of an MCF13 virus with a single enhancer repeat to induce thymic lymphoma. This observation suggests that the MLPal protein-binding site contributes to the effect of the DEN region on T-cell-specific transcription and viral leukemogenicity. This study identifies the importance of nonenhancer sequences in the long terminal repeat for the oncogenesis of the MCF13 retrovirus. PMID:1331510

  20. Immunopathology of B-cell lymphomas induced in C57BL/6 mice by dualtropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV).

    PubMed Central

    Pattengale, P. K.; Taylor, C. R.; Twomey, P.; Hill, S.; Jonasson, J.; Beardsley, T.; Haas, M.

    1982-01-01

    Combined clinicopathologic and immunomorphologic evidence is presented that would indicate that a murine leukemia virus (MuLV) with the dualtropic host range is capable of producing a clinically malignant lesion composed of immunoblasts and associated plasma cells in C57BL/6 mice. This process, morphologically diagnosed as an immunoblastic lymphoma of B cells using standard histopathologic criteria, was found to be distinctly polyclonal with regard to immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype when analyzed for both surface and cytoplasmic Ig. Further studies demonstrated that this clinicopathologically malignant, dualtropic MuLV-induced, polyclonal immunoblastic lymphoma of B cells in C57BL/6 mice was normal diploid and unable to be successfully transplanted to nonimmunosuppressed syngeneic recipients. Although all serum heavy and light chain components were found to be progressively elevated as the tumor load increased, the polyclonal increase in serum immunoglobulins was most pronounced for mu heavy and kappa light chains (ie, mu greater than gamma 2A greater than alpha greater than gamma 2B greater than gamma 1; kappa greater than lamba). The dissociation of clinicopathologic and biologic criteria for malignancy in the presently described dualtropic (RadLV) MuLV-induced B-cell lesion is sharply contrasted with the thymotropic (RadLV), MuLV-induced T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma in C57BL/6 mice. This process is also a clinicopathologically malignant lesion but, when one uses biologic criteria, is found to be distinctly monoclonal, aneuploid, and easily transplanted to nonimmunosuppressed syngeneic recipients. The close clinicopathologic and biologic similarities of the dualtropic MuLV-induced animal model to corresponding human B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases are stressed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:6282131

  1. X-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal region of Moloney murine leukemia virus integrase and its implications for viral DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Guan, Rongjin; Aiyer, Sriram; Cote, Marie L; Xiao, Rong; Jiang, Mei; Acton, Thomas B; Roth, Monica J; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2017-04-01

    The retroviral integrase (IN) carries out the integration of a dsDNA copy of the viral genome into the host DNA, an essential step for viral replication. All IN proteins have three general domains, the N-terminal domain (NTD), the catalytic core domain, and the C-terminal domain. The NTD includes an HHCC zinc finger-like motif, which is conserved in all retroviral IN proteins. Two crystal structures of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) IN N-terminal region (NTR) constructs that both include an N-terminal extension domain (NED, residues 1-44) and an HHCC zinc-finger NTD (residues 45-105), in two crystal forms are reported. The structures of IN NTR constructs encoding residues 1-105 (NTR1-105 ) and 8-105 (NTR8-105 ) were determined at 2.7 and 2.15 Å resolution, respectively and belong to different space groups. While both crystal forms have similar protomer structures, NTR1-105 packs as a dimer and NTR8-105 packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of the NED consists of three anti-parallel β-strands and an α-helix, similar to the NED of prototype foamy virus (PFV) IN. These three β-strands form an extended β-sheet with another β-strand in the HHCC Zn(2+) binding domain, which is a unique structural feature for the M-MuLV IN. The HHCC Zn(2+) binding domain structure is similar to that in HIV and PFV INs, with variations within the loop regions. Differences between the PFV and MLV IN NEDs localize at regions identified to interact with the PFV LTR and are compared with established biochemical and virological data for M-MuLV. Proteins 2017; 85:647-656. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mouse Siglec-1 Mediates trans-Infection of Surface-bound Murine Leukemia Virus in a Sialic Acid N-Acyl Side Chain-dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Erikson, Elina; Wratil, Paul R; Frank, Martin; Ambiel, Ina; Pahnke, Katharina; Pino, Maria; Azadi, Parastoo; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Meier, Chris; Schnaar, Ronald L; Crocker, Paul R; Reutter, Werner; Keppler, Oliver T

    2015-11-06

    Siglec-1 (sialoadhesin, CD169) is a surface receptor on human cells that mediates trans-enhancement of HIV-1 infection through recognition of sialic acid moieties in virus membrane gangliosides. Here, we demonstrate that mouse Siglec-1, expressed on the surface of primary macrophages in an interferon-α-responsive manner, captures murine leukemia virus (MLV) particles and mediates their transfer to proliferating lymphocytes. The MLV infection of primary B-cells was markedly more efficient than that of primary T-cells. The major structural protein of MLV particles, Gag, frequently co-localized with Siglec-1, and trans-infection, primarily of surface-bound MLV particles, efficiently occurred. To explore the role of sialic acid for MLV trans-infection at a submolecular level, we analyzed the potential of six sialic acid precursor analogs to modulate the sialylated ganglioside-dependent interaction of MLV particles with Siglec-1. Biosynthetically engineered sialic acids were detected in both the glycolipid and glycoprotein fractions of MLV producer cells. MLV released from cells carrying N-acyl-modified sialic acids displayed strikingly different capacities for Siglec-1-mediated capture and trans-infection; N-butanoyl, N-isobutanoyl, N-glycolyl, or N-pentanoyl side chain modifications resulted in up to 92 and 80% reduction of virus particle capture and trans-infection, respectively, whereas N-propanoyl or N-cyclopropylcarbamyl side chains had no effect. In agreement with these functional analyses, molecular modeling indicated reduced binding affinities for non-functional N-acyl modifications. Thus, Siglec-1 is a key receptor for macrophage/lymphocyte trans-infection of surface-bound virions, and the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid is a critical determinant for the Siglec-1/MLV interaction.

  3. Endogenous CD317/Tetherin limits replication of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus in rodent cells and is resistant to antagonists from primate viruses.

    PubMed

    Goffinet, Christine; Schmidt, Sarah; Kern, Christian; Oberbremer, Lena; Keppler, Oliver T

    2010-11-01

    Human CD317 (BST-2/tetherin) is an intrinsic immunity factor that blocks the release of retroviruses, filoviruses, herpesviruses, and arenaviruses. It is unclear whether CD317 expressed endogenously in rodent cells has the capacity to interfere with the replication of the retroviral rodent pathogen murine leukemia virus (MLV) or, in the context of small-animal model development, contributes to the well-established late-phase restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we show that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CD317 relieved a virion release restriction and markedly enhanced the egress of HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in rat cells, including primary macrophages. Moreover, rodent CD317 potently inhibited MLV release, and siRNA-mediated depletion of CD317 in a mouse T-cell line resulted in the accelerated spread of MLV. Several virus-encoded antagonists have recently been reported to overcome the restriction imposed by human or monkey CD317, including HIV-1 Vpu, envelope glycoproteins of HIV-2 and Ebola virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K5, and SIV Nef. In contrast, both rat and mouse CD317 showed a high degree of resistance to these viral antagonists. These data suggest that CD317 is a broadly acting and conserved mediator of innate control of retroviral infection and pathogenesis that restricts the release of retroviruses and lentiviruses in rodents. The high degree of resistance of the rodent CD317 restriction factors to antagonists from primate viruses has implications for HIV-1 small-animal model development and may guide the design of novel antiviral interventions.

  4. Evaluation of cellular determinants required for in vitro xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus entry into human prostate cancer and noncancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Bhosle, Sushma; Suppiah, Suganthi; Molinaro, Ross; Liang, Yuying; Arnold, Rebecca; Diehl, William; Makarova, Natalia; Blackwell, Jerry; Petros, John; Liotta, Dennis; Hunter, Eric; Ly, Hinh

    2010-07-01

    The newly identified retrovirus-the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV)-has recently been shown to be strongly associated with familial prostate cancer in humans (A. Urisman et al., PLoS Pathog. 2:e25, 2006). While that study showed evidence of XMRV infection exclusively in the prostatic stromal fibroblasts, a recent study found XMRV protein antigens mainly in malignant prostate epithelial cells (R. Schlaberg et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 106:16351-16356, 2009). To help elucidate the mechanisms behind XMRV infection, we show that prostatic fibroblast cells express Xpr1, a known receptor of XMRV, but its expression is absent in other cell lines of the prostate (i.e., epithelial and stromal smooth muscle cells). We also show that certain amino acid residues located within the predicted extracellular loop (ECL3 and ECL4) sequences of Xpr1 are required for efficient XMRV entry. Although we found strong evidence to support XMRV infection of prostatic fibroblast cell lines via Xpr1, we learned that XMRV was indeed capable of infecting cells that did not necessarily express Xpr1, such as those of the prostatic epithelial and smooth muscle origins. Further studies suggest that the expression of Xpr1 and certain genotypes of the RNASEL gene, which could restrict XMRV infection, may play important roles in defining XMRV tropisms in certain cell types. Collectively, our data reveal important cellular determinants required for XMRV entry into different human prostate cells in vitro, which may provide important insights into the possible role of XMRV as an etiologic agent in human prostate cancer.

  5. Functional Interplay Between Murine Leukemia Virus Glycogag, Serinc5, and Surface Glycoprotein Governs Virus Entry, with Opposite Effects on Gammaretroviral and Ebolavirus Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Zhang, Shu; Thappeta, Yashna; Denman, Audrey; Feizpour, Amin; Reinhard, Bjoern; Muriaux, Delphine; Fivash, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia viruses (MLVs), encode, in addition to the canonical Gag, Pol, and Env proteins that will form progeny virus particles, a protein called “glycogag” (glycosylated Gag). MLV glycogag contains the entire Gag sequence plus an 88-residue N-terminal extension. It has recently been reported that glycogag, like the Nef protein of HIV-1, counteracts the antiviral effects of the cellular protein Serinc5. We have found, in agreement with prior work, that glycogag strongly enhances the infectivity of MLVs with some Env proteins but not those with others. In contrast, however, glycogag was detrimental to MLVs carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. Glycogag could be replaced, with respect to viral infectivity, by the unrelated S2 protein of equine infectious anemia virus. We devised an assay for viral entry in which virus particles deliver the Cre recombinase into cells, leading to the expression of a reporter. Data from this assay showed that both the positive and the negative effects of glycogag and S2 upon MLV infectivity are exerted at the level of virus entry. Moreover, transfection of the virus-producing cells with a Serinc5 expression plasmid reduced the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying xenotropic MLV Env, particularly in the absence of glycogag. Conversely, Serinc5 expression abrogated the negative effects of glycogag upon the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. As Serinc5 may influence cellular phospholipid metabolism, it seems possible that all of these effects on virus entry derive from changes in the lipid composition of viral membranes. PMID:27879338

  6. Mouse Siglec-1 Mediates trans-Infection of Surface-bound Murine Leukemia Virus in a Sialic Acid N-Acyl Side Chain-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Erikson, Elina; Wratil, Paul R.; Frank, Martin; Ambiel, Ina; Pahnke, Katharina; Pino, Maria; Azadi, Parastoo; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Meier, Chris; Schnaar, Ronald L.; Crocker, Paul R.; Reutter, Werner; Keppler, Oliver T.

    2015-01-01

    Siglec-1 (sialoadhesin, CD169) is a surface receptor on human cells that mediates trans-enhancement of HIV-1 infection through recognition of sialic acid moieties in virus membrane gangliosides. Here, we demonstrate that mouse Siglec-1, expressed on the surface of primary macrophages in an interferon-α-responsive manner, captures murine leukemia virus (MLV) particles and mediates their transfer to proliferating lymphocytes. The MLV infection of primary B-cells was markedly more efficient than that of primary T-cells. The major structural protein of MLV particles, Gag, frequently co-localized with Siglec-1, and trans-infection, primarily of surface-bound MLV particles, efficiently occurred. To explore the role of sialic acid for MLV trans-infection at a submolecular level, we analyzed the potential of six sialic acid precursor analogs to modulate the sialylated ganglioside-dependent interaction of MLV particles with Siglec-1. Biosynthetically engineered sialic acids were detected in both the glycolipid and glycoprotein fractions of MLV producer cells. MLV released from cells carrying N-acyl-modified sialic acids displayed strikingly different capacities for Siglec-1-mediated capture and trans-infection; N-butanoyl, N-isobutanoyl, N-glycolyl, or N-pentanoyl side chain modifications resulted in up to 92 and 80% reduction of virus particle capture and trans-infection, respectively, whereas N-propanoyl or N-cyclopropylcarbamyl side chains had no effect. In agreement with these functional analyses, molecular modeling indicated reduced binding affinities for non-functional N-acyl modifications. Thus, Siglec-1 is a key receptor for macrophage/lymphocyte trans-infection of surface-bound virions, and the N-acyl side chain of sialic acid is a critical determinant for the Siglec-1/MLV interaction. PMID:26370074

  7. Expression and survival significance of B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Mingkui; Song, Yang; Zhang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    One of the main challenges in lung cancer research is identifying patients at high risk of progression and metastasis following surgical resection. In the present study, the prognostic significance of B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site 1 (BMI1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was evaluated. BMI1 and MMP9 expression in tumors from 132 surgical NSCLC patients [squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), n=79; and adenocarcinoma (AD), n=53] was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The clinical significance was determined using multivariate Cox regression analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test. High BMI1 expression was more frequent in SCC compared with that in AD (P=0.015). Comparisons between the expression of BMI1 and that of other known biological markers revealed that the expression of BMI1 was correlated with that of MMP9 (χ2=4.241, P=0.039) in SCC. Although an association was not identified between high BMI1 expression and overall survival (OS) in NSCLC or AD, high BMI1 expression was an unfavorable predictor of survival in SCC according to the survival curves (P=0.038). In addition, combined high BMI1 and MMP9 expression levels were significantly correlated with SCC nodal/distant metastasis (χ2=6.392, P=0.014). Multivariate Cox proportional model analysis demonstrated that this combined marker was an independent prognostic indicator of OS in SCC (P=0.025; hazard ratio = 12.963; 95% confidence interval: 1.142–7.637). Therefore, this study demonstrated that combined BMI1 and MMP9 expression may be used as a marker for the progression and metastasis of SCC. These results may aid in the elucidation of the potential mechanism underlying the involvement of BMI1 and MMP9 in tissue-specific SCC progression. PMID:27900059

  8. Functional Interplay Between Murine Leukemia Virus Glycogag, Serinc5, and Surface Glycoprotein Governs Virus Entry, with Opposite Effects on Gammaretroviral and Ebolavirus Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ahi, Yadvinder S; Zhang, Shu; Thappeta, Yashna; Denman, Audrey; Feizpour, Amin; Gummuluru, Suryaram; Reinhard, Bjoern; Muriaux, Delphine; Fivash, Matthew J; Rein, Alan

    2016-11-22

    Gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia viruses (MLVs), encode, in addition to the canonical Gag, Pol, and Env proteins that will form progeny virus particles, a protein called "glycogag" (glycosylated Gag). MLV glycogag contains the entire Gag sequence plus an 88-residue N-terminal extension. It has recently been reported that glycogag, like the Nef protein of HIV-1, counteracts the antiviral effects of the cellular protein Serinc5. We have found, in agreement with prior work, that glycogag strongly enhances the infectivity of MLVs with some Env proteins but not those with others. In contrast, however, glycogag was detrimental to MLVs carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. Glycogag could be replaced, with respect to viral infectivity, by the unrelated S2 protein of equine infectious anemia virus. We devised an assay for viral entry in which virus particles deliver the Cre recombinase into cells, leading to the expression of a reporter. Data from this assay showed that both the positive and the negative effects of glycogag and S2 upon MLV infectivity are exerted at the level of virus entry. Moreover, transfection of the virus-producing cells with a Serinc5 expression plasmid reduced the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying xenotropic MLV Env, particularly in the absence of glycogag. Conversely, Serinc5 expression abrogated the negative effects of glycogag upon the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. As Serinc5 may influence cellular phospholipid metabolism, it seems possible that all of these effects on virus entry derive from changes in the lipid composition of viral membranes.

  9. Killing Rates of Caspofungin in 50 Percent Serum Correlate with Caspofungin Efficacy Against Candida albicans in a Neutropenic Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Domán, Marianna; Kovács, Renátó; Kardos, Gábor; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Juhász, Béla; Bozó, Aliz; Kardos, Tamás; Saleh, Qasem; Majoros, László

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that caspofungin dose escalation against Candida species is more beneficial than currently used lower daily doses. Thus, we determined in vitro and in vivo activity of caspofungin against six wild-type C. albicans clinical isolates, the ATCC 10231 strain and an echinocandin resistant strain. MIC ranges of clinical isolates in RPMI-1640 with and without 50% serum were 0.125-0.25 and 0.015-0.06 mg/L, respectively. Two and three isolates showed paradoxical growth in MIC and time-kill tests, respectively, in RPMI-1640 but not in 50% serum. Caspofungin killing rate (k) in RPMI-1640 at 1 mg/L was higher than at 16 and 32 mg/L for all isolates (p<0.001). Killing rates for five of six isolates were concentration independent between 1-32 mg/L in 50% serum (p>0.05 for all comparisons), but for one isolate k value at 32 mg/L was significantly lower than at 1-16 mg/L. Although k values at 1-32 mg/L showed a great variability in 50% serum (the lowest and highest k value ranges were 0.085-0.109 and 0.882-0.985 1/h, respectively), daily 3, 5 and 15 mg/kg caspofungin was effective in a neutropenic murine model against all isolates, without significant differences between the effective doses. This study confirms that paradoxical growth does not affect the in vivo efficacy of caspofungin. We demonstrated that dose escalation did not increase the efficacy of caspofungin against C. albicans either in vitro or in vivo. These results are in concordance with the clinical experience that efficacy of echinocandins does not increase at larger doses.

  10. Efficacy of Lysophosphatidylcholine in Combination with Antimicrobial Agents against Acinetobacter baumannii in Experimental Murine Peritoneal Sepsis and Pneumonia Models

    PubMed Central

    Parra Millán, R.; Jiménez Mejías, M. E.; Sánchez Encinales, V.; Ayerbe Algaba, R.; Gutiérrez Valencia, A.; Pachón Ibáñez, M. E.; Díaz, C.; Pérez del Palacio, J.; López Cortés, L. F.; Smani, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Immune response stimulation to prevent infection progression may be an adjuvant to antimicrobial treatment. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is an immunomodulator involved in immune cell recruitment and activation. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LPC in combination with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem in experimental murine models of peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia. We used Acinetobacter baumannii strain Ab9, which is susceptible to colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem, and multidrug-resistant strain Ab186, which is susceptible to colistin and resistant to tigecycline and imipenem. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters for colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem and the 100% minimal lethal dose (MLD100) were determined for both strains. The therapeutic efficacies of LPC, colistin (60 mg/kg of body weight/day), tigecycline (10 mg/kg/day), and imipenem (180 mg/kg/day), alone or in combination, were assessed against Ab9 and Ab186 at the MLD100 in murine peritoneal sepsis and pneumonia models. The levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, i.e., tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the same experimental models after inoculating mice with the MLD of both strains. LPC in combination with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem markedly enhanced the bacterial clearance of Ab9 and Ab186 from the spleen and lungs and reduced bacteremia and mouse mortality rates (P < 0.05) compared with those for colistin, tigecycline, and imipenem monotherapies. Moreover, at 4 h post-bacterial infection, Ab9 induced higher TNF-α and lower IL-10 levels than those with Ab186 (4 μg/ml versus 3 μg/ml [P < 0.05] and 2 μg/ml versus 3.4 μg/ml [P < 0.05], respectively). LPC treatment combined with colistin, tigecycline, or imipenem modestly reduced the severity of infection by A. baumannii strains with different resistance phenotypes compared to LPC monotherapy in both

  11. Proteinase activity in human and murine saliva as a biomarker for proteinase inhibitor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Fingleton, Barbara; Menon, Ramkumar; Carter, Kathy J; Overstreet, P Dawn; Hachey, David L; Matrisian, Lynn M; McIntyre, J Oliver

    2004-12-01

    As molecularly targeted agents reach the clinic, there is a need for assays to detect their presence and effectiveness against target molecules in vivo. Proteinase inhibitors are one example of a class of therapeutic agent for which satisfactory methods of identifying successful target modulation in vivo are lacking. This is of particular importance while these drugs are in clinical trials because standard maximum-tolerated dose-finding studies often are not suitable due to lack of toxicity. Saliva represents a readily accessible bodily fluid that can be repeatedly sampled and used for assaying in vivo effects of systemic drugs. Here we show the development of a simple assay that can be used to measure proteinase activity in saliva and proteinase inhibition after systemic treatment with three different proteinase inhibitors. A variety of gelatinolytic activities present in human and murine saliva have been assayed with a fluorescent dye-labeled substrate and assigned to different proteinase categories by inclusion of specific classes of inhibitors. Treatment of mice with either matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or a urokinase inhibitor for a period as short as 48 hours results in levels of the drugs that can be detected in saliva by mass spectrometry and concomitant decreases in salivary proteinase activity, thus demonstrating that these inhibitors successfully modulate their targets in vivo.

  12. Efficacy of quercetin against chemically induced murine oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    DROGUETT, DANIEL; CASTILLO, CHRISTIAN; LEIVA, ELBA; THEODULOZ, CRISTINA; SCHMEDA-HIRSCHMANN, GUILLERMO; KEMMERLING, ULRIKE

    2015-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common form of head and neck cancer, and oxidative damage is associated with the development of OSCCs. Antioxidants have therefore been proposed for use as chemoprotective agents against different types of cancer. In the present study, the effect of the antioxidant quercetin, administered at doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg/day, was investigated in an experimental murine model of 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO)-induced carcinogenesis. The survival of the treated animals, the plasmatic levels of reduced glutathione and the type and severity of lesions (according the International Histological Classification of Tumors and Bryne's Multifactorial Grading System for the Invasive Tumor Front) were assessed. Additionally, the organization of the extracellular matrix was analyzed by carbohydrate and collagen histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of the tumor markers proliferating cell nuclear antigen and mutated p53. The results indicate that, despite the promising effect of quercetin in other studies, this drug is ineffective as a chemoprotective agent against 4-NQO-induced OSCC in mice at the assayed doses. PMID:26622865

  13. Efficacy of Antifungal Therapy in a Nonneutropenic Murine Model of Zygomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Dannaoui, Eric; Mouton, Johan W.; Meis, Jacques F. G. M.; Verweij, Paul E.

    2002-01-01

    Three isolates of zygomycetes belonging to three different genera (Rhizopus microsporus, Absidia corymbifera, and Apophysomyces elegans) were used to produce a disseminated infection in nonimmunocompromised mice. The therapeutic efficacy of amphotericin B, given intraperitoneally at doses ranging from 0.5 to 4.5 mg/kg of body weight/day, oral itraconazole at 100 mg/kg/day, and oral terbinafine at 150 mg/kg/day was evaluated in this model. The markers of antifungal efficacy were the median survival time, the mortality rate, and the percentage of infected organs. Organ culture was performed along with microscopic direct examinations of tissues to assess the presence of an active infection. An acute and lethal infection was obtained in untreated mice challenged with each of the three strains. The data obtained for direct examinations and qualitative cultures indicate that, due to the nonseptate nature of the hyphae, each technique gives different information and should be used together with the others. Against all three strains, amphotericin B yielded a 90 to 100% survival rate. Itraconazole was inactive against R. microsporus but significantly reduced mortality in mice infected with A. corymbifera or A. elegans. Terbinafine had no beneficial effects against R. microsporus and A. corymbifera despite documented absorption of the drug. Overall, only limited correlations were observed between MICs determined in vitro and in vivo efficacy of the drugs. The efficacy of itraconazole in these models of zygomycosis suggests that this drug, as well as the new azole compounds presently under development, warrants close evaluation. PMID:12019114

  14. Diet-Induced Obesity Does Not Alter Tigecycline Treatment Efficacy in Murine Lyme Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pětrošová, Helena; Eshghi, Azad; Anjum, Zoha; Zlotnikov, Nataliya; Cameron, Caroline E.; Moriarty, Tara J.

    2017-01-01

    Obese individuals more frequently suffer from infections, as a result of increased susceptibility to a number of bacterial pathogens. Furthermore, obesity can alter antibiotic treatment efficacy due to changes in drug pharmacokinetics which can result in under-dosing. However, studies on the treatment of bacterial infections in the context of obesity are scarce. To address this research gap, we assessed efficacy of antibiotic treatment in diet-induced obese mice infected with the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi. Diet-induced obese C3H/HeN mice and normal-weight controls were infected with B. burgdorferi, and treated during the acute phase of infection with two doses of tigecycline, adjusted to the weights of diet-induced obese and normal-weight mice. Antibiotic treatment efficacy was assessed 1 month after the treatment by cultivating bacteria from tissues, measuring severity of Lyme carditis, and quantifying bacterial DNA clearance in ten tissues. In addition, B. burgdorferi-specific IgG production was monitored throughout the experiment. Tigecycline treatment was ineffective in reducing B. burgdorferi DNA copies in brain. However, diet-induced obesity did not affect antibiotic-dependent bacterial DNA clearance in any tissues, regardless of the tigecycline dose used for treatment. Production of B. burgdorferi-specific IgGs was delayed and attenuated in mock-treated diet-induced obese mice compared to mock-treated normal-weight animals, but did not differ among experimental groups following antibiotic treatment. No carditis or cultivatable B. burgdorferi were detected in any antibiotic-treated group. In conclusion, obesity was associated with attenuated and delayed humoral immune responses to B. burgdorferi, but did not affect efficacy of antibiotic treatment. PMID:28286500

  15. Efficacy of a Novel Tricyclic Topoisomerase Inhibitor in a Murine Model of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Infection

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Victoria J.; Charrier, Cédric; Salisbury, Anne-Marie; Box, Helen; Chaffer-Malam, Nathan; Huxley, Anthony; Kirk, Ralph; Noonan, Gary M.; Mohmed, Sarfraz; Craighead, Mark W.; Ratcliffe, Andrew J.; Best, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new antibiotics to treat multidrug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae. In this report, the microbiology, in vivo pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of REDX05931, a representative novel tricyclic topoisomerase inhibitor, were evaluated. REDX05931 demonstrated high oral bioavailability in mice and reduced N. gonorrhoeae infection after a single dose in a mouse model of gonorrhea. These data support the potential of this series of small molecules as a new treatment for drug-resistant gonorrheal infections. PMID:27324777

  16. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  17. Abrogating Cbl-b in effector CD8(+) T cells improves the efficacy of adoptive therapy of leukemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; Blattman, Joseph N; Tan, Xiaoxia; Jeevanjee, Sara; Gu, Hua; Greenberg, Philip D

    2010-10-01

    The clinical use of adoptive immunotherapy with tumor-reactive T cells to treat established cancers is limited in part by the poor in vivo survival and function of the transferred T cells. Although administration of exogenous cytokines such as IL-2 can promote T cell survival, such strategies have many nonspecific activities and are often associated with toxicity. We show here that abrogating expression of Casitas B-lineage lymphoma b (Cbl-b), a negative regulator of lymphocyte activation, in tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells expanded ex vivo increased the efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy of disseminated leukemia in mice. Mechanistically, Cbl-b abrogation bypassed the requirement for exogenous IL-2 administration for tumor eradication in vivo. In addition, CD8(+) T cells lacking Cbl-b demonstrated a lower threshold for activation, better survival following target recognition and stimulation, and enhanced proliferative responses as a result of both IL-2-dependent and -independent pathways. Importantly, siRNA knockdown of Cbl-b in human CD8(+)CD28- effector T cell clones similarly restored IL-2 production and proliferation following target recognition independent of exogenous IL-2, enhanced IFN-γ production, and increased target avidity. Thus, abrogating Cbl-b expression in effector T cells may improve the efficacy of adoptive therapy of some human malignancies.

  18. Pre-clinical efficacy and dosing of an AAV8 vector expressing human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase in a murine model of methylmalonic acidemia (MMA).

    PubMed

    Chandler, Randy J; Venditti, Charles P

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate that human methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT), delivered using an AAV serotype 8 vector, rescues the lethal phenotype displayed by mice with MMA and provides long-term phenotypic correction. In addition to defining a lower limit of effective dosing, our studies establish that neither a species barrier to mitochondrial processing nor an apparent immune response to MUT limits the murine model as an experimental platform to test the efficacy of human gene therapy vectors for MMA.

  19. PASylation of Murine Leptin Leads to Extended Plasma Half-Life and Enhanced in Vivo Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Morath, Volker; Bolze, Florian; Schlapschy, Martin; Schneider, Sarah; Sedlmayer, Ferdinand; Seyfarth, Katrin; Klingenspor, Martin; Skerra, Arne

    2015-05-04

    Leptin plays a central role in the control of energy homeostasis and appetite and, thus, has attracted attention for therapeutic approaches in spite of its limited pharmacological activity owing to the very short circulation in the body. To improve drug delivery and prolong plasma half-life, we have fused murine leptin with Pro/Ala/Ser (PAS) polypeptides of up to 600 residues, which adopt random coil conformation with expanded hydrodynamic volume in solution and, consequently, retard kidney filtration in a similar manner as polyethylene glycol (PEG). Relative to unmodified leptin, size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering revealed an approximately 21-fold increase in apparent size and a much larger molecular diameter of around 18 nm for PAS(600)-leptin. High receptor-binding activity for all PASylated leptin versions was confirmed in BIAcore measurements and cell-based dual-luciferase assays. Pharmacokinetic studies in mice revealed a much extended plasma half-life after ip injection, from 26 min for the unmodified leptin to 19.6 h for the PAS(600) fusion. In vivo activity was investigated after single ip injection of equimolar doses of each leptin version. Strongly increased and prolonged hypothalamic STAT3 phosphorylation was detected for PAS(600)-leptin. Also, a reduction in daily food intake by up to 60% as well as loss in body weight of >10% lasting for >5 days was observed, whereas unmodified leptin was merely effective for 1 day. Notably, application of a PASylated superactive mouse leptin antagonist (SMLA) led to the opposite effects. Thus, PASylated leptin not only provides a promising reagent to study its physiological role in vivo but also may offer a superior drug candidate for clinical therapy.

  20. Efficacy of Astaxanthin for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihisa, Yoko; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Matsunaga, Kenji; Rehman, Mati Ur; Maoka, Takashi; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease associated with various factors, including immunological abnormalities and exposure to allergens. Astaxanthin (AST) is a xanthophyll carotenoid that has recently been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects and to regulate the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Thus, we investigated whether AST could improve the dermatitis and pruritus in a murine model of AD using NC/Nga mice. In addition to a behavioral evaluation, the effects of AST on the AD were determined by the clinical skin severity score, serum IgE level, histological analyses of skin, and by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting analyses for the expression of inflammation-related factors. AST (100 mg/kg) or vehicle (olive oil) was orally administered once day and three times a week for 26 days. When compared with vehicle-treated group, the administration of AST significantly reduced the clinical skin severity score. In addition, the spontaneous scratching in AD model mice was reduced by AST administration. Moreover, the serum IgE level was markedly decreased by the oral administration of AST compared to that in vehicle-treated mice. The number of eosinophils, total and degranulated mast cells all significantly decreased in the skin of AST-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated mice. The mRNA and protein levels of eotaxin, MIF, IL-4, IL-5 and L-histidine decarboxylase were significantly decreased in the skin of AST-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated mice. These results suggest that AST improves the dermatitis and pruritus in AD via the regulation of the inflammatory effects and the expression of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27023003

  1. Synergistic Efficacy from Gene Therapy with Coreceptor Blockade and a β2-Agonist in Murine Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang-oh; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Koeberl, Dwight

    2015-01-01

    Pompe disease (glycogen storage disease type II; acid maltase deficiency) is a devastating myopathy resulting from acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency in striated and smooth muscle. Despite the availability of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA), the limitations of ERT have prompted the preclinical development of gene therapy. Gene therapy has the advantage of continuously producing GAA, in contrast to ERT, which requires frequent injections of rhGAA. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector containing a muscle-specific promoter, AAV-MHCK7hGAApA, achieved high GAA expression in heart and skeletal muscle in mice with Pompe disease. However, elevated GAA activity was not sufficient to completely clear accumulated glycogen in skeletal muscle. The process of glycogen clearance from lysosomes might require improved trafficking of GAA to the lysosomes in skeletal muscle, previously achieved with the β2-agonist clenbuterol that enhanced glycogen clearance in skeletal muscle without increasing GAA activity. Glycogen clearance was clearly enhanced by treatment with a nondepleting anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD4 mAb) along with muscle-specific GAA expression in cardiac muscle, but that treatment was not effective in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, anti-CD4 mAb treatment along with clenbuterol achieved synergistic therapeutic efficacy in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. This triple therapy increased both muscle strength and weight gain. Overall, triple therapy to enhance GAA trafficking and to suppress immune responses significantly improved the efficacy of muscle-targeted gene therapy in murine Pompe disease. PMID:26417913

  2. Synergistic Efficacy from Gene Therapy with Coreceptor Blockade and a β2-Agonist in Murine Pompe Disease.

    PubMed

    Han, Sang-oh; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Koeberl, Dwight

    2015-11-01

    Pompe disease (glycogen storage disease type II; acid maltase deficiency) is a devastating myopathy resulting from acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency in striated and smooth muscle. Despite the availability of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA), the limitations of ERT have prompted the preclinical development of gene therapy. Gene therapy has the advantage of continuously producing GAA, in contrast to ERT, which requires frequent injections of rhGAA. An adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector containing a muscle-specific promoter, AAV-MHCK7hGAApA, achieved high GAA expression in heart and skeletal muscle in mice with Pompe disease. However, elevated GAA activity was not sufficient to completely clear accumulated glycogen in skeletal muscle. The process of glycogen clearance from lysosomes might require improved trafficking of GAA to the lysosomes in skeletal muscle, previously achieved with the β(2)-agonist clenbuterol that enhanced glycogen clearance in skeletal muscle without increasing GAA activity. Glycogen clearance was clearly enhanced by treatment with a nondepleting anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (anti-CD4 mAb) along with muscle-specific GAA expression in cardiac muscle, but that treatment was not effective in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, anti-CD4 mAb treatment along with clenbuterol achieved synergistic therapeutic efficacy in both cardiac and skeletal muscle. This triple therapy increased both muscle strength and weight gain. Overall, triple therapy to enhance GAA trafficking and to suppress immune responses significantly improved the efficacy of muscle-targeted gene therapy in murine Pompe disease.

  3. Prophylactic efficacy of aerosolized liposomal (AmBisome) and non-liposomal (Fungizone) amphotericin B in murine pulmonary aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Allen, S D; Sorensen, K N; Nejdl, M J; Durrant, C; Proffit, R T

    1994-12-01

    Pulmonary aspergillosis is a serious opportunistic disease in patients with immune suppression. Prophylactic measures would be highly beneficial because treatment often fails after infection occurs. The principle objective of this study was to evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of aerosolized liposomal (AmBisome) and non-liposomal (Fungizone) amphotericin B in a murine model. Immunocompromised mice were treated prophylactically for 3 days with AmBisome or Fungizone using a small particle aerosol generator. Intranasal challenge was with a high (10(8)), medium (10(7)), or low (10(6)) level of Aspergillus fumigatus spores. AmBisome nebulized more uniformly, resulting in very consistent chamber air concentrations. Total dose, however, was nearly the same for each formulation. Survival was prolonged in animals treated with both formulations at the 10(8) and 10(7) challenge levels. Quantitative lung cultures showed that organisms were completely cleared from the lungs in the low challenged group, with both formulations, whereas the high challenge proved overwhelming for both formulations. With the middle challenge, however, AmBisome cleared 80% of the lungs, whereas Fungizone cleared none. Lung drug retention of AmBisome treated animals was more than eight times higher than Fungizone at the time of challenge. BUN and creatinine values in animals treated with both formulations were not elevated. These results suggest that AmBisome is more effective than Fungizone when given as a prophylactic aerosol in this model.

  4. Efficacy of purified lactonase and ciprofloxacin in preventing systemic spread of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in murine burn wound model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Parul; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important etiological agent associated with systemic infection in burn patients. Quorum sensing (QS) mechanism of P. aeruginosa contributes to its virulence. Inhibition of QS signals can serve as an effective anti-virulence strategy. Aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of lactonase alone and in combination with ciprofloxacin in treating P. aeruginosa murine burn wound infection. Topical application of lactonase alone and ciprofloxacin alone prevented systemic spread of P. aeruginosa through burned skin and also reduced the mortality. When lactonase (topical) and ciprofloxacin (I/P) were used in combination, zero mortality was observed. It not only significantly reduced systemic dissemination and severity of histopathologic lesions but also resulted in skin regeneration. Decreased production of pathologic index factors (malondialdehyde and reactive nitrogen intermediates) and interleukins (IL-10, IL-6 and MIP-2) was also observed in comparison to control. The results of present study suggest that combination of lactonase and ciprofloxacin can potentially attenuate the virulence of P. aeruginosa. This is the first report of topical administration of lactonase along with antibiotic for the efficient control of burn wound infection.

  5. Sanitizer Efficacy against Murine Norovirus, a Surrogate for Human Norovirus, on Stainless Steel Surfaces when Using Three Application Methods

    PubMed Central

    Kotwal, Grishma; Harrison, Mark A.; Law, S. Edward; Harrison, Judy A.

    2013-01-01

    Human noroviruses are major etiologic agents of epidemic gastroenteritis. Outbreaks are often accompanied by contamination of environmental surfaces, but since these viruses cannot be routinely propagated in laboratory cultures, their response to surface disinfectants is predicted by using surrogates, such as murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1). This study compared the virucidal efficacies of various liquid treatments (three sanitizer liquids, 5% levulinic acid plus 2% SDS [LEV/SDS], 200 ppm chlorine, and an isopropanol-based quaternary ammonium compound [Alpet D2], and two control liquids, sterile tap water and sterile tap water plus 2% SDS) when delivered to MNV-1-inoculated stainless steel surfaces by conventional hydraulic or air-assisted, induction-charged (AAIC) electrostatic spraying or by wiping with impregnated towelettes. For the spray treatments, LEV/SDS proved effective when applied with hydraulic and AAIC electrostatic spraying, providing virus reductions of 2.71 and 1.66 log PFU/ml, respectively. Alpet D2 provided a 2.23-log PFU/ml reduction with hydraulic spraying, outperforming chlorine (1.16-log PFU/ml reduction). Chlorine and LEV/SDS were equally effective as wipes, reducing the viral load by 7.05 log PFU/ml. Controls reduced the viral load by <1 log with spraying applications and by >3 log PFU/ml with wiping. Results indicated that both sanitizer type and application methods should be carefully considered when choosing a surface disinfectant to best prevent and control environmental contamination by noroviruses. PMID:23263949

  6. Tetracycline-regulated intratumoral expression of interleukin-3 enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy for murine prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C-H; Hong, J-H; Hsieh, K-F; Hsiao, H-W; Chuang, W-L; Lee, C-C; McBride, W H; Chiang, C-S

    2006-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate means of increasing the efficiency with which cancer cell death following local radiation therapy (RT) is translated into the generation of tumor immunity since, if this were to be achieved, it would be expected to enhance the rates of disease-free recurrence and survival. Our investigations centered around the use of interleukin-3 (IL-3), expressed intratumorally using an inducible adenoviral vector, to alter the immunogenicity of established murine TRAMP-C1 prostate cancer receiving a course of fractionated local RT (7 Gy per fraction per day for 5 days). Because high systemic levels of IL-3 can be associated with toxicity, a tetracycline-regulated gene delivery system was employed. The results show that while intratumoral IL-3 expression or RT alone caused a modest delay in TRAMP-C1 tumor growth, the combination was synergistic with 50% of mice being cured and developing a long-term, tumor-specific state of immunity. Immunological analyses performed on splenic lymphocytes demonstrated that, compared to RT or IL-3 alone, combined treatment significantly increased the number of tumor-specific IFN-gamma-secreting and cytotoxic T cells. The study demonstrates that tetracycline-regulated IL-3 gene expression within tumors can enhance the immune response to prostate cancer and this can augment the efficacy of a course of RT without additional side effects.

  7. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of the DAR-901 Booster Vaccine in a Murine Model of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lahey, Timothy; Laddy, Dominick; Hill, Krystal; Schaeffer, Jacqueline; Hogg, Alison; Keeble, James; Dagg, Belinda; Ho, Mei Mei; Arbeit, Robert D.; von Reyn, C. Fordham

    2016-01-01

    Background The development of a novel tuberculosis vaccine is a leading global health priority. SRL172, an inactivated, whole-cell mycobacterial vaccine, was safe, immunogenic and reduced the incidence of culture-confirmed tuberculosis in a phase III trial in HIV-infected and BCG immunized adults in Tanzania. Here we describe the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DAR-901, a booster vaccine against tuberculosis manufactured from the same seed strain using a new scalable method. Methods We evaluated IFN-γ responses by ELISpot and antibody responses by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice after three doses of DAR-901. In an aerosol challenge model, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the DAR-901 booster in C57BL/6 mice primed with BCG and boosted with two doses of DAR-901 at 4 dosage levels in comparison with homologous BCG boost. Results DAR-901 vaccination elicited IFN-γ responses to mycobacterial antigen preparations derived from both DAR-901 and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. DAR-901 immunization enhanced antibody responses to DAR-901 but not Mycobacterium tuberculosis lysate or purified protein derivative. Among animals primed with BCG, boosting with DAR-901 at 1 mg provided greater protection against aerosol challenge than a homologous BCG boost (lungs P = 0.036, spleen P = 0.028). Conclusions DAR-901 induces cellular and humoral immunity and boosts protection from M. tuberculosis compared to a homologous BCG boost. PMID:27997597

  8. Ibrutinib efficacy and tolerability in patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia following allogeneic HCT

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Christine E.; Sahaf, Bita; Logan, Aaron C.; O’Brien, Susan; Byrd, John C.; Hillmen, Peter; Brown, Jennifer R.; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Mato, Anthony R.; Keating, Michael J.; Jaglowski, Samantha; Clow, Fong; Rezvani, Andrew R.; Styles, Lori; Coutre, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Ibrutinib, a potent and irreversible small-molecule inhibitor of both Bruton’s tyrosine kinase and interleukin-2 inducible kinase (ITK), has been used to treat relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with prolongation of progression-free and overall survival. Here, we present 27 patients with relapsed CLL following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) who subsequently received ibrutinib salvage therapy. Sixteen of these patients were part of multi-institutional clinical trials and achieved an overall response rate of 87.5%. An additional 11 patients were treated at Stanford University following US Food and Drug Administration approval of ibrutinib; 7 (64%) achieved a complete response, and 3 (27%) achieved a partial response. Of the 9 patients treated at Stanford who had mixed chimerism–associated CLL relapse, 4 (44%) converted to full donor chimerism following ibrutinib initiation, in association with disease response. Four of 11 (36%) patients evaluated by ClonoSeq achieved minimal residual disease negativity with CLL <1/10 000 white blood cells, which persisted even after ibrutinib was discontinued, in 1 case even after 26 months. None of the 27 patients developed graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) following ibrutinib initiation. We postulate that ibrutinib augments the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) benefit through a T-cell–mediated effect, most likely due to ITK inhibition. To investigate the immune modulatory effects of ibrutinib, we completed comprehensive immune phenotype characterization of peripheral B and T cells from treated patients. Our results show that ibrutinib selectively targets pre–germinal B cells and depletes Th2 helper cells. Furthermore, these effects persisted after drug discontinuation. In total, our results provide evidence that ibrutinib effectively augments GVL without causing GVHD. PMID:27802969

  9. Efficacy of irreversible electroporation in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma: advanced murine model

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Prejesh; Li, Yan; Li, Suping; St Hill, Charles R; Martin, Robert CG

    2015-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a promising cell membrane ablative modality for pancreatic cancer. There have been recent concerns regarding local recurrence and the potential use of IRE as a debulking (partial ablation) modality. We hypothesize that incomplete ablation leads to early recurrence and a more aggressive biology. We created the first ever heterotopic murine model by inoculating BALB/c nude mice in the hindlimb with a subcutaneous injection of Panc-1 cells, an immortalized human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line. Tumors were allowed to grow from 0.75 to 1.5 cm and then treated with the goal of complete ablation or partial ablation using standard IRE settings. Animals were recovered and survived for 2 days (n = 6), 7 (n = 6), 14 (n = 6), 21 (n = 6), 30 (n = 8), and 60 (n = 8) days. All 40 animals/tumors underwent successful IRE under general anesthesia with muscle paralysis. The mean tumor volume of the animals undergoing ablation was 1,447.6 mm3 ± 884). Histologically, in the 14-, 21-, 30-, and 60-day survival groups the entire tumor was nonviable, with a persistent tumor nodule completely replaced fibrosis. In the group treated with partial ablation, incomplete electroporation/recurrences (N = 10 animals) were seen, of which 66% had confluent tumors and this was a significant predictor of recurrence (P < 0.001). Recurrent tumors were also significantly larger (mean 4,578 mm3 ± SD 877 versus completed electroporated tumors 925.8 ± 277, P < 0.001). Recurrent tumors had a steeper growth curve (slope = 0.73) compared with primary tumors (0.60, P = 0.02). Recurrent tumors also had a significantly higher percentage of EpCAM expression, suggestive of stem cell activation. Tumors that recur after incomplete electroporation demonstrate a biologically aggressive tumor that could be more resistant to standard of care chemotherapy. Clinical correlation of this data is limited, but should be considered when IRE of pancreatic cancer is being

  10. Efficacy of Liposomal Amphotericin B and Posaconazole in Intratracheal Models of Murine Mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Guanpingsheng; Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Lee, Hongkyu; French, Samuel W.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Filler, Scott G.

    2013-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening fungal infection almost uniformly affecting diabetics in ketoacidosis or other forms of acidosis and/or immunocompromised patients. Inhalation of Mucorales spores provides the most common natural route of entry into the host. In this study, we developed an intratracheal instillation model of pulmonary mucormycosis that hematogenously disseminates into other organs using diabetic ketoacidotic (DKA) or cyclophosphamide-cortisone acetate-treated mice. Various degrees of lethality were achieved for the DKA or cyclophosphamide-cortisone acetate-treated mice when infected with different clinical isolates of Mucorales. In both DKA and cyclophosphamide-cortisone acetate models, liposomal amphotericin B (LAmB) or posaconazole (POS) treatments were effective in improving survival, reducing lungs and brain fungal burdens, and histologically resolving the infection compared with placebo. These models can be used to study mechanisms of infection, develop immunotherapeutic strategies, and evaluate drug efficacies against life-threatening Mucorales infections. PMID:23650163

  11. Efficacy of Lychnopholide Polymeric Nanocapsules after Oral and Intravenous Administration in Murine Experimental Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    de Mello, Carlos Geraldo Campos; Branquinho, Renata Tupinambá; Oliveira, Maykon Tavares; Milagre, Matheus Marques; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado; Lana, Marta de

    2016-09-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease remains neglected. The compounds available show several limitations, mainly during the chronic phase. Lychnopholide encapsulated in polymeric nanocapsules (LYC-NC) was efficacious in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated by intravenous administration during the acute phase (AP). As the oral route is preferred for treatment of chronic infections, such as Chagas disease, this study evaluated the use of oral LYC-NC in the AP and also compared it with LYC-NC administered to mice by the oral and intravenous routes during the chronic phase (CP). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by fresh blood examination, hemoculture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cure rates in the AP and CP were 62.5% and 55.6%, respectively, upon oral administration of LYC-poly(d,l-lactide)-polyethylene glycol nanocapsules (LYC-PLA-PEG-NC) and 57.0% and 30.0%, respectively, with LYC-poly-ε-caprolactone nanocapsules (LYC-PCL-NC). These cure rates were significantly higher than that of free LYC, which did not cure any animals. LYC-NC formulations administered orally during the AP showed cure rates similar to that of benznidazole, but only LYC-NC cured mice in the CP. Similar results were achieved with intravenous treatment during the CP. The higher cure rates obtained with LYC loaded in PLA-PEG-NC may be due to the smaller particle size of these NC and the presence of PEG, which influence tissue diffusion and the controlled release of LYC. Furthermore, PLA-PEG-NC may improve the stability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract. This work is the first report of cure of experimental Chagas disease via oral administration during the CP. These findings represent a new and important perspective for oral treatment of Chagas disease.

  12. Efficacious Topical Treatment for Murine Cutaneous Leishmaniasis with Ethanolic Formulations of Amphotericin B

    PubMed Central

    Frankenburg, Shoshana; Glick, Dvora; Klaus, Sidney; Barenholz, Yechezkel

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the antileishmanial effects of topically applied lipid-based formulations containing amphotericin B (AmB) in CBA mice as a model for human cutaneous leishmaniasis. Such treatment, if efficacious, is expected to be superior to systemic treatments since, by acting in a localized manner, it will require lower, and therefore less toxic, drug dosages. Three preparations of AmB complexed to polar lipids were tested: Fungizone (mixed micelles composed of AmB and deoxycholate), Amphocil (AmB and cholesteryl sulfate complex), and ABPLC (AmB and phospholipid complex). All these formulations killed parasites in vitro with similar efficacies but were ineffective when they were applied topically. However, Amphocil and ABPLC, but not Fungizone, when dispersed in an aqueous solution containing 5 to 25% ethanol, induced a statistically significant improvement in lesion size from week 2 or 3 onward (a total of 15 mg of AmB per kg of body weight was applied over 3 weeks). AmB biodistribution measurements following topical application of Amphocil, determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography, showed that AmB was detectable in the skin but not in the internal organs. Application of at least 10 times more drug was necessary to obtain detectable levels of AmB in the internal organs. After application of therapeutic doses of ABPLC, very low levels of AmB were detected in the internal organs. These experiments show for the first time that AmB administered topically as a complex either with cholesteryl sulfate or with phospholipids and in the presence of ethanol can penetrate the skin and kill sensitive organisms in a localized manner by using very low total drug concentrations. PMID:9835496

  13. Efficacy of Lychnopholide Polymeric Nanocapsules after Oral and Intravenous Administration in Murine Experimental Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Carlos Geraldo Campos; Branquinho, Renata Tupinambá; Oliveira, Maykon Tavares; Milagre, Matheus Marques; Saúde-Guimarães, Dênia Antunes; Mosqueira, Vanessa Carla Furtado

    2016-01-01

    The etiological treatment of Chagas disease remains neglected. The compounds available show several limitations, mainly during the chronic phase. Lychnopholide encapsulated in polymeric nanocapsules (LYC-NC) was efficacious in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and treated by intravenous administration during the acute phase (AP). As the oral route is preferred for treatment of chronic infections, such as Chagas disease, this study evaluated the use of oral LYC-NC in the AP and also compared it with LYC-NC administered to mice by the oral and intravenous routes during the chronic phase (CP). The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by fresh blood examination, hemoculture, PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The cure rates in the AP and CP were 62.5% and 55.6%, respectively, upon oral administration of LYC–poly(d,l-lactide)–polyethylene glycol nanocapsules (LYC-PLA-PEG-NC) and 57.0% and 30.0%, respectively, with LYC–poly-ε-caprolactone nanocapsules (LYC-PCL-NC). These cure rates were significantly higher than that of free LYC, which did not cure any animals. LYC-NC formulations administered orally during the AP showed cure rates similar to that of benznidazole, but only LYC-NC cured mice in the CP. Similar results were achieved with intravenous treatment during the CP. The higher cure rates obtained with LYC loaded in PLA-PEG-NC may be due to the smaller particle size of these NC and the presence of PEG, which influence tissue diffusion and the controlled release of LYC. Furthermore, PLA-PEG-NC may improve the stability of the drug in the gastrointestinal tract. This work is the first report of cure of experimental Chagas disease via oral administration during the CP. These findings represent a new and important perspective for oral treatment of Chagas disease. PMID:27324760

  14. Genetic control of T cell responsiveness to the Friend murine leukemia virus envelope antigen. Identification of class II loci of the H-2 as immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    T cells primed specifically for the envelope glycoprotein of Friend murine leukemia helper virus (F-MuLV) were prepared by immunizing mice with a recombinant vaccinia virus that expressed the entire env gene of F-MuLV. Significant proliferative responses of F-MuLV envelope- specific, H-2a/b T cells were observed when the T cells were stimulated with antigen-pulsed peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) having the b allele at the K, A beta, A alpha, and E beta loci of the H-2. On the other hand, PEC having only the kappa allele at these loci did not induce the envelope-specific T cell proliferation, even when the PEC had the b allele at the E alpha, S, or D loci. F-MuLV envelope-specific proliferation of H-2a/b T cells under the stimulation of antigen- pulsed, H-2a/b PEC was specifically blocked with anti-I-Ab and anti-I- Ek mAbs but not with anti-Kb, anti-Kk, or anti-I-Ak mAbs. Moreover, (B10.MBR x A/WySn)F1 mice that have the b allele only at the K locus but not in I-A subregion were nonresponders to the envelope glycoprotein, and the bm12 mutation at the A beta locus completely abolished the T cell responsiveness to this antigen. These results indicate that proliferative T cells recognize a limited number of epitopes on F-MuLV envelope protein in the context of I-Ab, hybrid I- Ak/b, and/or hybrid I-Ek/b class II MHC molecules but fail to recognize the same envelope protein in the context of I-Ak or I-Ek molecules. This influence of the H-2I region on T cell recognition of the envelope glycoprotein appeared to control in vivo induction of protective immunity against Friend virus complex after immunization with the vaccinia-F-MuLV env vaccine. Thus, these results provide, for the first time, direct evidence for Ir gene-controlled responder/nonresponder phenotypes influencing the immune response to a pathogenic virus of mice. PMID:3141552

  15. Generation and characterization of a recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus containing the v-myc oncogene of avian MC29 virus: in vitro transformation and in vivo pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Brightman, B K; Pattengale, P K; Fan, H

    1986-01-01

    A new retrovirus consisting of the v-myc oncogene sequences of avian MC29 virus inserted into the genome of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) was generated. This was accomplished by constructing a recombinant DNA clone containing the desired organization, introducing the recombinant DNA into mouse NIH 3T3 cells, and superinfecting the cells with replication-competent M-MuLV. The construction was designed so that an M-MuLV gag-myc fusion protein would be produced. The resulting virus, M-MuLV(myc), morphologically transformed uninfected NIH 3T3 cells. Stocks of M-MuLV(myc)-M-MuLV were infected into secondary mouse embryo cultures. M-MuLV(myc) induced striking growth and proliferation of hematopoietic cells. These cells were of the myeloid lineage by morphology, phagocytic properties, and surface staining with Mac-1 and Mac-2 monoclonal antibodies. They resembled mature macrophages, although they displayed minor properties of immaturity. The myeloid cells were transformed in comparison with uninfected myeloid cells since they were less adherent and had unlimited proliferative capacity and reduced growth factor requirements. The transformed myeloid cells with proliferative potential were actually myeloid progenitors which apparently underwent terminal differentiation to macrophages. It was possible to derive a permanent line of factor-independent macrophages from M-MuLV(myc)-transformed myeloid cells. M-MuLV(myc) also immortalized and morphologically transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts. These in vitro properties closely resembled the biological activity of MC29 virus in avian cells and suggested that the nature of the v-myc oncogene was an important determinant in transformation specificity. Neonatal NIH Swiss mice inoculated intraperitoneally with M-MuLV(myc)-M-MuLV only developed lymphoblastic lymphoma characteristic of the M-MuLV helper alone, and no acute fibrosarcomas or myeloid tumors resulted. In light of the strong myeloid transformation observed in vitro

  16. Lymph node fibroblastic reticular cell transplants show robust therapeutic efficacy in high-mortality murine sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Anne L; Elman, Jessica S; Astarita, Jillian; Murray, Ryan; Saeidi, Nima; D'Rozario, Joshua; Knoblich, Konstantin; Brown, Flavian D; Schildberg, Frank A; Nieves, Janice M; Heng, Tracy S P; Boyd, Richard L; Turley, Shannon J; Parekkadan, Biju

    2014-08-13

    Sepsis is an aggressive inflammatory syndrome and a global health burden estimated to kill 7.3 million people annually. Single-target molecular therapies have not addressed the multiple disease pathways triggered by septic injury. Cell therapies might offer a broader set of mechanisms of action that benefit complex, multifocal disease processes. We describe a population of immune-specialized myofibroblasts derived from lymph node tissue, termed fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs). Because FRCs have an immunoregulatory function in lymph nodes, we hypothesized that ex vivo-expanded FRCs would control inflammation when administered therapeutically. Indeed, a single injection of ex vivo-expanded allogeneic FRCs reduced mortality in mouse models of sepsis when administered at early or late time points after septic onset. Mice treated with FRCs exhibited lower local and systemic concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and reduced bacteremia. When administered 4 hours after induction of lipopolysaccharide endotoxemia, or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) sepsis in mice, FRCs reduced deaths by at least 70%. When administered late in disease (16 hours after CLP), FRCs still conveyed a robust survival advantage (44% survival compared to 0% for controls). FRC therapy was dependent on the metabolic activity of nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) as the primary molecular mechanism of drug action in the mice. Together, these data describe a new anti-inflammatory cell type and provide preclinical evidence for therapeutic efficacy in severe sepsis that warrants further translational study.

  17. Safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of asparaginase in the treatment of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Koprivnikar, Jamie; McCloskey, James; Faderl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are known to have inferior outcomes compared to the pediatric population. Although the reasons for this are likely manyfold, the agents utilized and the increased intensity of pediatric treatments compared to adult treatments are likely significant contributing factors. Asparaginase, an enzyme that converts asparagine to aspartic acid, forms the backbone of almost all pediatric regimens and works by depleting extracellular asparagine, which ALL cells are unable to synthesize. Asparaginase toxicities, which include hypersensitivity reactions, pancreatitis, liver dysfunction, and thrombosis, have hindered its widespread use in the adult population. Here, we review the toxicity and efficacy of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL. With the proper precautions, it is a safe and effective agent in the treatment of younger adults with ALL with response rates in the frontline setting ranging from 78% to 96%, compared to most trials showing a 4-year overall survival of 50% or better. The age cutoff for consideration of treatment with pediatric-inspired regimens is not clear, but recent studies show promise particularly in the adolescent and young adult population. New formulations of asparaginase are actively in development, including erythrocyte-encapsulated asparaginase, which is designed to minimize the toxicity and improve the delivery of the drug. PMID:28331334

  18. Safety, efficacy, and clinical utility of asparaginase in the treatment of adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Koprivnikar, Jamie; McCloskey, James; Faderl, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are known to have inferior outcomes compared to the pediatric population. Although the reasons for this are likely manyfold, the agents utilized and the increased intensity of pediatric treatments compared to adult treatments are likely significant contributing factors. Asparaginase, an enzyme that converts asparagine to aspartic acid, forms the backbone of almost all pediatric regimens and works by depleting extracellular asparagine, which ALL cells are unable to synthesize. Asparaginase toxicities, which include hypersensitivity reactions, pancreatitis, liver dysfunction, and thrombosis, have hindered its widespread use in the adult population. Here, we review the toxicity and efficacy of asparaginase in adult patients with ALL. With the proper precautions, it is a safe and effective agent in the treatment of younger adults with ALL with response rates in the frontline setting ranging from 78% to 96%, compared to most trials showing a 4-year overall survival of 50% or better. The age cutoff for consideration of treatment with pediatric-inspired regimens is not clear, but recent studies show promise particularly in the adolescent and young adult population. New formulations of asparaginase are actively in development, including erythrocyte-encapsulated asparaginase, which is designed to minimize the toxicity and improve the delivery of the drug.

  19. Efficacy of helper-dependent adenovirus vector-mediated gene therapy in murine glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Dwight D; Sun, B; Bird, A; Chen, Y T; Oka, K; Chan, L

    2007-07-01

    Genetic deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) underlies glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia, also known as von Gierke disease; MIM 232200), an autosomal recessive disorder of metabolism associated with life-threatening hypoglycemia and growth retardation. We tested whether helper-dependent adenovirus (HDAd)-mediated hepatic delivery of G6Pase would lead to prolonged survival and sustained correction of the metabolic abnormalities in G6Pase knockout (KO) mice, a model for a severe form of GSD-Ia. An HDAd vector encoding G6Pase was administered intravenously (2 or 5 x 10(12)vector particles/kg) to 2-week-old (w.o.) G6Pase-KO mice. Following HDAd vector administration survival was prolonged to a median of 7 months, in contrast to untreated affected mice that did not survive past 3 weeks of age. G6Pase levels increased more than tenfold between 3 days and 28 weeks after HDAd injection (P < 0.03). The weights of untreated 2 w.o. G6Pase-KO mice were approximately half those of their unaffected littermates, and treatment stimulated their growth to the size of wild-type mice. Severe hypoglycemia and hypercholesterolemia, which are hallmarks of GSD-Ia both in humans and in mice, were also restored to normalcy by the treatment. Glycogen accumulation in the liver was markedly reduced. The efficacy of HDAd-G6Pase treatment in reversing the physiological and biochemical abnormalities associated with GSD-Ia in affected G6Pase-KO mice justifies further preclinical evaluation in murine and canine models of GSD-Ia.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells engineered to express selectin ligands and IL-10 exert enhanced therapeutic efficacy in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wenbin; Pham, Victor; Liu, Linan; Riazifar, Milad; Pone, Egest J; Zhang, Shirley Xian; Ma, Fengxia; Lu, Mengrou; Walsh, Craig M.; Zhao, Weian

    2015-01-01

    Systemic administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) affords the potential to ameliorate the symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in both preclinical and clinical studies. However, the efficacy of MSC-based therapy for MS likely depends on the number of cells that home to inflamed tissues and on the controlled production of paracrine and immunomodulatory factors. Previously, we reported that engineered MSCs expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and Sialyl-Lewisx (SLeX) via mRNA transfection facilitated the targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) to inflamed ear. Here, we evaluated whether targeted delivery of MSCs with triple PSGL1/SLeX/IL-10 engineering improves therapeutic outcomes in mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model for human MS. We found PSGL-1/SLeX mRNA transfection significantly enhanced MSC homing to the inflamed spinal cord. This is consistent with results from in vitro flow chamber assays in which PSGL-1/SleX mRNA transfection significantly increased the percentage of rolling and adherent cells on activated brain microvascular endothelial cells, which mimic the inflamed endothelium of blood brain/spinal cord barrier in EAE. In addition, IL-10-transfected MSCs show significant inhibitory activity on the proliferation of CD4+ T lymphocytes from EAE mice. In vivo treatment with MSCs engineered with PSGL-1/SLeX/IL-10 in EAE mice exhibited a superior therapeutic function over native (unmodified) MSCs, evidenced by significantly improved myelination and decreased lymphocytes infiltration into the white matter of the spinal cord. Our strategy of targeted delivery of performance-enhanced MSCs could potentially be utilized to increase the effectiveness of MSC-based therapy for MS and other central nervous system (CNS) disorders. PMID:26584349

  1. Localization of the labile disulfide bond between SU and TM of the murine leukemia virus envelope protein complex to a highly conserved CWLC motif in SU that resembles the active-site sequence of thiol-disulfide exchange enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, A; Kopelman, R; Li, Z; Kayman, S C; Sanders, D A

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits of the envelope protein (Env) of murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) are joined by a labile disulfide bond that can be stabilized by treatment of virions with thiol-specific reagents. In the present study this observation was extended to the Envs of additional classes of MuLV, and the cysteines of SU involved in this linkage were mapped by proteolytic fragmentation analyses to the CWLC sequence present at the beginning of the C-terminal domain of SU. This sequence is highly conserved across a broad range of distantly related retroviruses and resembles the CXXC motif present at the active site of thiol-disulfide exchange enzymes. A model is proposed in which rearrangements of the SU-TM intersubunit disulfide linkage, mediated by the CWLC sequence, play roles in the assembly and function of the Env complex. PMID:9311907

  2. Efficacy and Toxicity of Intrathecal Liposomal Cytarabine in First-line Therapy of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Levinsen, Mette; Harila-Saari, Arja; Grell, Kathrine; Jonsson, Olafur Gisli; Taskinen, Mervi; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Vettenranta, Kim; Åsberg, Ann; Risteli, Juha; Heldrup, Jesper; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2016-11-01

    We investigated efficacy and toxicity of replacing conventional triple (cytarabine, methotrexate, and hydrocortisone) intrathecal therapy (TIT) with liposomal cytarabine during maintenance therapy among 40 acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Twenty-eight of 29 patients in the TIT arm received TIT and 9/11 in the liposomal cytarabine arm received liposomal cytarabine. Arachnoiditis occurred in all initial 5 patients given liposomal cytarabine and intrathecal prednisolone succinate. Subsequently liposomal cytarabine was given with systemic dexamethasone. Neurotoxicity occurred at 6/27 liposomal cytarabine administrations with concomitant dexamethasone (22%). More liposomal cytarabine-treated patients experienced neurotoxicity in relation to intrathecal therapy during at least 1 cycle compared with TIT-treated patients (6/9 [67%] vs. 3/28 [11%], P=0.002). Apart from intermittent lower extremity sensory pain in 1 liposomal cytarabine-treated patient, no permanent adverse neurological sequelae were observed. In intention-to-treat analysis, projected 5-year event-free survival (pEFS-5y) was borderline higher for patients in the liposomal cytarabine arm compared with the TIT arm (1.0 vs. 0.69, P=0.046). However, pEFS-5y and projected 5-year relapse-free survival did not differ signficantly between patients treated with liposomal cytarabine or TIT (1.0 vs. 0.73, P=0.10; 1.0 vs. 0.76, P=0.12). Larger prospective trials are needed to explore whether liposomal cytarabine should be used as first-line prevention of relapse.

  3. N-Arylsulfonyl-α-amino carboxamides are potent and selective inhibitors of the chemokine receptor CCR10 that show efficacy in the murine DNFB model of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Abeywardane, Asitha; Caviness, Gary; Choi, Younggi; Cogan, Derek; Gao, Amy; Goldberg, Daniel; Heim-Riether, Alexander; Jeanfavre, Debra; Klein, Elliott; Kowalski, Jennifer A; Mao, Wang; Miller, Craig; Moss, Neil; Ramsden, Philip; Raymond, Ernest; Skow, Donna; Smith-Keenan, Lana; Snow, Roger J; Wu, Frank; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Yu, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Compound 1 ((4-amino-3,5-dichlorophenyl)-1-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl)-4-(2-nitroimidazol-1-yl)-1-oxobutane-2-sulfonamido) was discovered to be a 690nM antagonist of human CCR10 Ca(2+) flux. Optimization delivered (2R)-4-(2-cyanopyrrol-1-yl)-S-(1H-indol-4-yl)-1-(4-methylpiperidin-1-yl)-1-oxobutane-2-sulfonamido (eut-22) that is 300 fold more potent a CCR10 antagonist than 1 and eliminates potential toxicity, mutagenicity, and drug-drug-interaction liabilities often associated with nitroaryls and anilines. eut-22 is highly selective over other GPCR's, including a number of other chemokine receptors. Finally, eut-22 is efficacious in the murine DNFB model of contact hypersensitivity. The efficacy of this compound provides further evidence for the role of CCR10 in dermatological inflammatory conditions.

  4. Human papillomavirus 16 L1-E7 chimeric virus like particles show prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy in murine model of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Chandresh; Dey, Bindu; Wahiduzzaman, Mohammed; Singh, Neeta

    2012-08-03

    Cervical cancer is found to be associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, with HPV16 being the most prevalent. An effective vaccine against HPV can thus, be instrumental in controlling cervical cancer. An ideal HPV vaccine should aim to generate both humoral immune response to prevent new infection as well as cell-mediated immunity to eliminate established infection. In this study, we have generated a potential preventive and therapeutic candidate vaccine against HPV16. We expressed and purified recombinant HPV16 L1(ΔN26)-E7(ΔC38) protein in E. coli which was assembled into chimeric virus like particles (CVLPs) in vitro. These CVLPs were able to induce neutralizing antibodies and trigger cell-mediated immune response, in murine model of cervical cancer, exhibiting antitumor efficacy. Hence, this study has aimed to provide a vaccine candidate possessing both, prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy against HPV16 associated cervical cancer.

  5. Efficacy of oral E1210, a new broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action, in murine models of candidiasis, aspergillosis, and fusariosis.

    PubMed

    Hata, Katsura; Horii, Takaaki; Miyazaki, Mamiko; Watanabe, Nao-Aki; Okubo, Miyuki; Sonoda, Jiro; Nakamoto, Kazutaka; Tanaka, Keigo; Shirotori, Syuji; Murai, Norio; Inoue, Satoshi; Matsukura, Masayuki; Abe, Shinya; Yoshimatsu, Kentaro; Asada, Makoto

    2011-10-01

    E1210 is a first-in-class, broad-spectrum antifungal with a novel mechanism of action-inhibition of fungal glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis. In this study, the efficacies of E1210 and reference antifungals were evaluated in murine models of oropharyngeal and disseminated candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. Oral E1210 demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy in infections caused by Candida species, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium solani. In the treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis, E1210 and fluconazole each caused a significantly greater reduction in the number of oral CFU than the control treatment (P < 0.05). In the disseminated candidiasis model, mice treated with E1210, fluconazole, caspofungin, or liposomal amphotericin B showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P < 0.05). E1210 was also highly effective in treating disseminated candidiasis caused by azole-resistant Candida albicans or Candida tropicalis. A 24-h delay in treatment onset minimally affected the efficacy outcome of E1210 in the treatment of disseminated candidiasis. In the Aspergillus flavus pulmonary aspergillosis model, mice treated with E1210, voriconazole, or caspofungin showed significantly higher survival rates than the control mice (P < 0.05). E1210 was also effective in the treatment of Aspergillus fumigatus pulmonary aspergillosis. In contrast to many antifungals, E1210 was also effective against disseminated fusariosis caused by F. solani. In conclusion, E1210 demonstrated consistent efficacy in murine models of oropharyngeal and disseminated candidiasis, pulmonary aspergillosis, and disseminated fusariosis. These data suggest that further studies to determine E1210's potential for the treatment of disseminated fungal infections are indicated.

  6. Biodistribution, kinetics, and efficacy of highly phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated beta-glucuronidase in the murine model of mucopolysaccharidosis VII.

    PubMed

    Sands, M S; Vogler, C A; Ohlemiller, K K; Roberts, M S; Grubb, J H; Levy, B; Sly, W S

    2001-11-16

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has been shown to be effective at reducing the accumulation of undegraded substrates in lysosomal storage diseases. Most ERT studies have been performed with recombinant proteins that are mixtures of phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated enzyme. Because different cell types use different receptors to take up phosphorylated or non-phosphorylated enzyme, it is difficult to determine which form of enzyme contributed to the clinical response. Here we compare the uptake, distribution, and efficacy of highly phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated beta-glucuronidase (GUSB) in the MPS VII mouse. Highly phosphorylated murine GUSB was efficiently taken up by a wide range of tissues. In contrast, non-phosphorylated murine GUSB was taken up primarily by tissues of the reticuloendothelial (RE) system. Although the tissue distribution was different, the half-lives of both enzymes in any particular tissue were similar. Both preparations of enzyme were capable of preventing the accumulation of lysosomal storage in cell types they targeted. An important difference in clinical efficacy emerged in that phosphorylated GUSB was more efficient than non-phosphorylated enzyme at preventing the hearing loss associated with this disease. These data suggest that both forms of enzyme contribute to the clinical responses of ERT in MPS VII mice but that enzyme preparations containing phosphorylated GUSB are more broadly effective than non-phosphorylated enzyme.

  7. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Hairy Cell Leukemia: Introduction Request Permissions Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia: Introduction ... t k e P Types of Cancer Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia Guide ...

  8. Disparate In Vivo Efficacy of FTY720 in Xenograft Models of Philadelphia Positive and Negative B-lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wallington-Beddoe, Craig T.; Don, Anthony S.; Hewson, John; Qiao, Qiao; Papa, Rachael A.; Lock, Richard B.; Bradstock, Kenneth F.; Bendall, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    Most patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) respond well to standard chemotherapy-based treatments. However a significant proportion of patients, particularly adult patients, relapse with the majority dying of leukemia. FTY720 is an immunosuppressive drug that was recently approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and is currently under pre-clinical investigation as a therapy for a number of hematological malignancies. Using human ALL xenografts in NOD/SCIDγc−/− mice, we show for the first time that three Ph+ human ALL xenografts responded to FTY720 with an 80±12% (p = 0.048) reduction in overall disease when treatment was commenced early. In contrast, treatment of mice with FTY720 did not result in reduced leukemia compared to controls using four separate human Ph− ALL xenografts. Although FTY720 reactivated PP2A in vitro, this reactivation was not required for death of Ph− ALL cells. The plasma levels of FTY720 achieved in the mice were in the high nanomolar range. However, the response seen in the Ph+ ALL xenografts when treatment was initiated early implies that in vivo efficacy may be obtained with substantially lower drug concentrations than those required in vitro. Our data suggest that while FTY720 may have potential as a treatment for Ph+ ALL it will not be a useful agent for the treatment of Ph− B-ALL. PMID:22570713

  9. Evaluation of the Efficacies of Amphotericin B, Posaconazole, Voriconazole, and Anidulafungin in a Murine Disseminated Infection by the Emerging Opportunistic Fungus Sarocladium (Acremonium) kiliense

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio; Sutton, Deanna A.; Hernández, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated and compared the efficacies of different antifungal drugs against Sarocladium kiliense (formerly Acremonium kiliense), a clinically relevant opportunistic fungus, in a murine model of systemic infection. Three clinical strains of this fungus were tested, and the therapy administered was as follows: posaconazole at 20 mg/kg of body weight (twice daily), voriconazole at 40 mg/kg, anidulafungin at 10 mg/kg, or amphotericin B at 0.8 mg/kg. The efficacy was evaluated by prolonged animal survival, tissue burden reduction, and (1→3)-β-d-glucan serum levels. In general, the four antifungal drugs showed high MICs and poor in vitro activity. The efficacy of the different treatments was only modest, since survival rates were never higher than 40% and no drug was able to reduce fungal load in all the organs for the three strains tested. Posaconazole, in spite of its high MICs (≥16 μg/ml), showed the highest efficacy. The (1→3)-β-d-glucan serum levels were equally reduced by all drugs evaluated. PMID:24100490

  10. Murine cysticercosis model: influence of the infection time and the time of treatment on the cysticidal efficacy of albendazole and praziquantel.

    PubMed

    Palomares-Alonso, Francisca; Palencia Hernández, Guadalupe; Rojas-Tomé, Irma Susana; Jung-Cook, Helgi; Pinzón-Estrada, Enrique

    2015-02-01

    In the search of new alternatives for neurocysticercosis treatment, Taenia crassiceps ORF strain cysticerci have been used instead of T. solium for in vitro studies. Up to date, the main criteria for the use of the murine cysticercosis model for drug efficacy evaluation have not been assessed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of two of the main variables related to the in vivo efficacy: the length of drug treatment and the starting time of treatment after experimental infection, using albendazole (ABZ) and praziquantel (PZQ) as test drugs. Additionally, the relationship between the number of cysts and the parasite weight was assessed. For the study, female BALB/c mice were experimentally infected with T. crassiceps cysts. Three different post-infection periods (10, 20 and 30 days) and three different lengths of treatment with ABZ or PZQ (10, 20 and 30 days) were selected. The efficacy of each treatment was evaluated by comparison with a control group. Our results show that for in vivo efficacy studies, the best time to start the drug treatment is 10 days post-infection and that a minimum of 20 days of treatment is required when ABZ or PZQ are used as positive control. Moreover, in this model the parasite weight can be used as a rapid tool to measure the in vivo drug activity.

  11. Rictor/mammalian target of rapamycin 2 regulates the development of Notch1 induced murine T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia via forkhead box O3.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chunlan; Guo, Huidong; Bu, Jiachen; Zhou, Mi; Cheng, Hui; He, Fuhong; Wang, Jinhong; Wang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yinchi; Wang, Qianfei; Zhou, Jianfeng; Cheng, Tao; Xu, Mingjiang; Yuan, Weiping

    2014-12-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is composed of two distinct biochemical complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. In response to nutrients and growth factors, mTORC1 is known to control cellular growth by regulating the translational regulators S6 kinase 1 and 4E binding protein 1, whereas mTORC2 mediates cell proliferation and survival by activating Akt through phosphorylation at Ser473. Studies have shown that the deregulation of mTORC2 leads to the development of myeloproliferative disorder and leukemia in the phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN)-deleted mouse model. However, the mechanism by which mTORC2 specifically affects leukemogenesis is still not fully understood. Here, we investigated the role of mTORC2 in NOTCH1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in a Rictor-deficient mouse model. We found that, by deleting Rictor, an essential component of mTORC2, leukemia progression was significantly suppressed by arresting a greater proportion of Rictor(△/△) leukemic cells at the G0 phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, the absence of Rictor led to the overexpression of chemotaxis-related genes, such as CCR2, CCR4 and CXCR4, which contributed to the homing and migration of Rictor-deficient T-ALL cells to the spleen but not the bone marrow. In addition, we demonstrated that inactivation of mTORC2 caused the overexpression of forkhead box O3 and its downstream effectors and eased the progression of leukemia in T-ALL mice. Our study thus indicates that forkhead box O3 could be a potential drug target for the treatment of T-ALL leukemia.

  12. Efficacy of amoxycillin-clavulanate in an experimental model of murine pneumonia caused by AmpC-non-hyperproducing clinical isolates of Escherichia coli resistant to cefoxitin.

    PubMed

    Docobo-Pérez, F; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Pachón-Ibáñez, M E; Pascual, A; Pichardo, C; Martínez-Martínez, L; Pachón, J

    2008-06-01

    The algorithms included in most automated systems used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing (e.g., Vitek 2) consider that Escherichia coli isolates resistant to cefoxitin are AmpC-hyperproducers and, consequently, resistant also to amoxycillin-clavulanate. However, a recent study revealed that 30% of E. coli clinical isolates resistant to cefoxitin remained susceptible in vitro to amoxycillin-clavulanate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in-vivo efficacy of amoxycillin-clavulanate in the treatment of an experimental model of pneumonia, using two clonally related isolates (with identical repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence (REP)-PCR patterns) of AmpC-non-hyperproducing and OmpF-lacking E. coli (Ec985 and Ec571) that were resistant to cefoxitin and susceptible to cefotaxime and amoxycillin-clavulanate. MICs were determined using a microdilution technique, and in-vitro bactericidal activity was tested using time-kill assays. The in-vivo efficacy of amoxycillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime against both isolates was tested in a murine pneumonia model using immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. Ec571 (a TEM-1/2 producer) was resistant to amoxycillin, whereas Ec985 (a TEM-1/2 non-producer) was susceptible. Amoxycillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime were bactericidal for Ec985, and amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime were bactericidal for Ec571 at different concentrations and time-points, as determined using time-kill assays. Treatment with amoxycillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime reduced the bacterial lung concentration of Ec985 compared with non-treated controls (p <0.05), whereas amoxycillin-clavulanate and cefotaxime showed efficacy against Ec571 when compared with the control and amoxycillin groups (p <0.05). Regardless of the exact underlying mechanism(s) of resistance, amoxycillin-clavulanate was effective in the experimental murine model in the treatment of pneumonia caused by AmpC-non-hyperproducing strains of E

  13. Targeting BET proteins improves the therapeutic efficacy of BCL-2 inhibition in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Peirs, S; Frismantas, V; Matthijssens, F; Van Loocke, W; Pieters, T; Vandamme, N; Lintermans, B; Dobay, M P; Berx, G; Poppe, B; Goossens, S; Bornhauser, B C; Bourquin, J-P; Van Vlierberghe, P

    2017-02-03

    Inhibition of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) has recently emerged as a promising new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of a variety of human cancers, including leukemia. Here, we used T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) as a model system to identify novel synergistic drug combinations with the BH3 mimetic venetoclax (ABT-199). In vitro drug screening in primary leukemia specimens that were derived from patients with high risk of relapse or relapse and cell lines revealed synergistic activity between venetoclax and the BET (bromodomain and extraterminal) bromodomain inhibitor JQ1. Notably, this drug synergism was confirmed in vivo using T-ALL cell line and patient-derived xenograft models. Moreover, the therapeutic benefit of this drug combination might, at least in part, be mediated by an acute induction of the pro-apoptotic factor BCL2L11 and concomitant reduction of BCL-2 upon BET bromodomain inhibition, ultimately resulting in an enhanced binding of BIM (encoded by BCL2L11) to BCL-2. Altogether, our work provides a rationale to develop a new type of targeted combination therapy for selected subgroups of high-risk leukemia patients.Leukemia advance online publication, 3 February 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.10.

  14. Efficacy of the clinical agent VT-1161 against fluconazole-sensitive and -resistant Candida albicans in a murine model of vaginal candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Garvey, E P; Hoekstra, W J; Schotzinger, R J; Sobel, J D; Lilly, E A; Fidel, P L

    2015-09-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC) and recurrent VVC (RVVC) remain major health problems for women. VT-1161, a novel fungal CYP51 inhibitor which has potent antifungal activity against fluconazole-sensitive Candida albicans, retained its in vitro potency (MIC50 of ≤0.015 and MIC90 of 0.12 μg/ml) against 10 clinical isolates from VVC or RVVC patients resistant to fluconazole (MIC50 of 8 and MIC90 of 64 μg/ml). VT-1161 pharmacokinetics in mice displayed a high volume of distribution (1.4 liters/kg), high oral absorption (73%), and a long half-life (>48 h) and showed rapid penetration into vaginal tissue. In a murine model of vaginal candidiasis using fluconazole-sensitive yeast, oral doses as low as 4 mg/kg VT-1161 significantly reduced the fungal burden 1 and 4 days posttreatment (P < 0.0001). Similar VT-1161 efficacy was measured when an isolate highly resistant to fluconazole (MIC of 64 μg/ml) but fully sensitive in vitro to VT-1161 was used. When an isolate partially sensitive to VT-1161 (MIC of 0.12 μg/ml) and moderately resistant to fluconazole (MIC of 8 μg/ml) was used, VT-1161 remained efficacious, whereas fluconazole was efficacious on day 1 but did not sustain efficacy 4 days posttreatment. Both agents were inactive in treating an infection with an isolate that demonstrated weaker potency (MICs of 2 and 64 μg/ml for VT-1161 and fluconazole, respectively). Finally, the plasma concentrations of free VT-1161 were predictive of efficacy when in excess of the in vitro MIC values. These data support the clinical development of VT-1161 as a potentially more efficacious treatment for VVC and RVVC.

  15. Preclinical and clinical efficacy of XPO1/CRM1 inhibition by the karyopherin inhibitor KPT-330 in Ph+ leukemias.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christopher J; Oaks, Joshua J; Santhanam, Ramasamy; Neviani, Paolo; Harb, Jason G; Ferenchak, Gregory; Ellis, Justin J; Landesman, Yosef; Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Gabrail, Nash Y; Smith, Carrie L; Caligiuri, Michael A; Hokland, Peter; Roy, Denis Claude; Reid, Alistair; Milojkovic, Dragana; Goldman, John M; Apperley, Jane; Garzon, Ramiro; Marcucci, Guido; Shacham, Sharon; Kauffman, Michael G; Perrotti, Danilo

    2013-10-24

    As tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) fail to induce long-term response in blast crisis chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-BC) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), novel therapies targeting leukemia-dysregulated pathways are necessary. Exportin-1 (XPO1), also known as chromosome maintenance protein 1, regulates cell growth and differentiation by controlling the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of proteins and RNAs, some of which are aberrantly modulated in BCR-ABL1(+) leukemias. Using CD34(+) progenitors from CML, B-ALL, and healthy individuals, we found that XPO1 expression was markedly increased, mostly in a TKI-sensitive manner, in CML-BC and Ph(+) B-ALL. Notably, XPO1 was also elevated in Ph(-) B-ALL. Moreover, the clinically relevant XPO1 inhibitor KPT-330 strongly triggered apoptosis and impaired the clonogenic potential of leukemic, but not normal, CD34(+) progenitors, and increased survival of BCR-ABL1(+) mice, 50% of which remained alive and, mostly, became BCR-ABL1 negative. Moreover, KPT-330 compassionate use in a patient with TKI-resistant CML undergoing disease progression significantly reduced white blood cell count, blast cells, splenomegaly, lactate dehydrogenase levels, and bone pain. Mechanistically, KPT-330 altered the subcellular localization of leukemia-regulated factors including RNA-binding heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 and the oncogene SET, thereby inducing reactivation of protein phosphatase 2A tumor suppressor and inhibition of BCR-ABL1 in CML-BC cells. Because XPO1 is important for leukemic cell survival, KPT-330 may represent an alternative therapy for TKI-refractory Ph(+) leukemias.

  16. Evaluation of Eimeria krijgsmanni as a murine model for testing the efficacy of anti-parasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Toshinori; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Tsujio, Masashi; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Tsuji, Naotoshi; Fujisaki, Kozo; Matsui, Toshihiro; Matsuo, Tomohide

    2015-06-01

    Murine Eimeria spp. have been used as effective models of disease instead of large mammalian hosts such as cattle. We attempted to establish in vivo and in vitro assays using a murine intestinal protozoan, Eimeria krijgsmanni, which we previously isolated, to test anti-parasitic agents. Consequently, when mice were treated with sulfur drugs or toltrazuril, which are commercially available for livestock. Furthermore, sporulated oocysts and excysted sporozoites of E. krijgsmanni were treated with naturally occurring substances (lactoferrin, longicin, and curcumin). Although exposure to these substances did not affect oocyst infectivity, sporozoite viability decreased by 60% with longicin. However, direct injection of sporozoites treated with longicin into mice ceca did not result in any changes in the oocyst shedding pattern compared with control mice. The results suggest that E. krijgsmanni could be resistant to these anti-parasitic agents and might therefore have different characteristics to other apicomplexan parasites.

  17. Effect of preexisting anti-herpes immunity on the efficacy of herpes simplex viral therapy in a murine intraperitoneal tumor model.

    PubMed

    Lambright, E S; Kang, E H; Force, S; Lanuti, M; Caparrelli, D; Kaiser, L R; Albelda, S M; Molnar-Kimber, K L

    2000-10-01

    HSV-1716, a replicating nonneurovirulent herpes simplex virus type 1, has shown efficacy in treating multiple types of human tumors in immunodeficient mice. Since the majority of the human population has been previously exposed to herpes simplex virus, the efficacy of HSV-based oncolytic therapy was investigated in an immunocompetent animal tumor model. EJ-6-2-Bam-6a, a tumor cell line derived from h-ras-transformed murine fibroblast, exhibit a diffuse growth pattern in the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c mice and replicate HSV-1716 to titers observed in human tumors. An established intraperitoneal (ip) tumor model of EJ-6-2-Bam-6a in naive and HSV-immunized mice was used to evaluate the efficacy of single or multiple ip administrations of HSV-1716 (4 x 10(6) pfu/treatment) or of carrier cells, which are irradiated, ex vivo virally infected EJ-6-2-Bam-6a cells that can amplify the viral load in situ. All treated groups significantly prolonged survival versus media control with an approximately 40% long-term survival rate (cure) in the multiply treated, HSV-naive animals. Prior immunization of the mice with HSV did not significantly decrease the median survival of the single or multiply treated HSV-1716 or the carrier cell-treated groups. These studies support the development of replication-selective herpes virus mutants for use in localized intraperitoneal malignancies.

  18. Antibody formation and mannose-6-phosphate receptor expression impact the efficacy of muscle-specific transgene expression in murine Pompe disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Baodong; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Yi, Haiqing; Kemper, Alex; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lysosomal storage disorders such as Pompe disease can be more effectively treated, if immune tolerance to enzyme or gene replacement therapy can be achieved. Alternatively, immune responses against acid α-glucosidase (GAA) might be evaded in Pompe disease through muscle-specific expression of GAA with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors. METHODS An AAV vector containing the MHCK7 regulatory cassette to drive muscle-specific GAA expression was administered to GAA knockout (KO) mice, immune tolerant GAA-KO mice, and mannose-6-phosphate deficient GAA-KO mice. GAA activity and glycogen content were analyzed in striated muscle to determine biochemical efficacy. RESULTS The biochemical efficacy from GAA expression was slightly reduced in GAA-KO mice, as demonstrated by higher residual glycogen content in skeletal muscles. Next immune tolerance to GAA was induced in GAA-KO mice by co-administration of a second AAV vector encoding liver-specific GAA along with the AAV vector encoding muscle-specific GAA. Antibody formation was prevented by liver-specific GAA, and the biochemical efficacy of GAA expression was improved in absence of antibodies as evidenced by significantly reduced glycogen content in the diaphragm. Efficacy was reduced in old GAA-KO mice despite the absence of antibodies. The greatest impact upon gene therapy was observed in GAA-KO mice lacking the mannose-6-phosphate receptor in muscle. The clearance of stored glycogen was markedly impaired despite high GAA expression in receptor-deficient Pompe disease mice. CONCLUSIONS Overall, antibody formation had a subtle effect upon efficacy, while the absence of mannose-6-phosphate receptors markedly impaired muscle-targeted gene therapy in murine Pompe disease. PMID:20967919

  19. Comparative Efficacies of Four Amphotericin B Formulations—Fungizone, Amphotec (Amphocil), AmBisome, and Abelcet—against Systemic Murine Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, Karl V.; Stevens, David A.

    2004-01-01

    We compared various amphotericin B formulations (no treatment or 0.8 mg of Fungizone [conventional deoxycholate amphotericin B] per kg of body weight, or 0.8, 4, or 8 mg of Amphocil, AmBisome, or Abelcet per kg of body weight) for treatment of systemic murine aspergillosis. In two studies, all formulations prolonged survival, with the results for AmBisome nearly equivalent to those for Fungizone; Amphocil and Abelcet were less effective or equivalent depending on the severity of infection. No survivors were cured in both kidneys and brain, but each formulation showed efficacy, especially in the kidneys. Although higher doses could be given, no lipid-based formulation showed consistent superiority over Fungizone or over each other. PMID:14982807

  20. Comparative efficacies of four amphotericin B formulations--Fungizone, amphotec (Amphocil), AmBisome, and Abelcet--against systemic murine aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2004-03-01

    We compared various amphotericin B formulations (no treatment or 0.8 mg of Fungizone [conventional deoxycholate amphotericin B] per kg of body weight, or 0.8, 4, or 8 mg of Amphocil, AmBisome, or Abelcet per kg of body weight) for treatment of systemic murine aspergillosis. In two studies, all formulations prolonged survival, with the results for AmBisome nearly equivalent to those for Fungizone; Amphocil and Abelcet were less effective or equivalent depending on the severity of infection. No survivors were cured in both kidneys and brain, but each formulation showed efficacy, especially in the kidneys. Although higher doses could be given, no lipid-based formulation showed consistent superiority over Fungizone or over each other.

  1. Efficacy and safety of radotinib in chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance or intolerance to BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hyun; Menon, Hari; Jootar, Saengsuree; Saikia, Tapan; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Sohn, Sang-Kyun; Park, Joon Seong; Jeong, Seong Hyun; Kim, Hyeoung Joon; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Oh, Suk Joong; Kim, Hawk; Zang, Dae Young; Chung, Joo Seop; Shin, Ho Jin; Do, Young Rok; Kim, Jeong-A; Kim, Dae-Young; Choi, Chul Won; Park, Sahee; Park, Hye Lin; Lee, Gong Yeal; Cho, Dae Jin; Shin, Jae Soo; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2014-07-01

    Radotinib (IY5511HCL), a novel and selective BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has shown pre-clinical and phase I activity and safety in chronic myeloid leukemia. This phase II study investigated the efficacy and safety of radotinib in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance and/or intolerance to BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Patients received radotinib 400 mg twice daily for 12 cycles based on results from the phase I trial. The primary end point was rate of major cytogenetic response by 12 months. A total of 77 patients were enrolled. Major cytogenetic response was achieved in 50 (65%; cumulative 75%) patients, including 36 (47%) patients with complete cytogenetic response by 12 months. Median time to major cytogenetic response and complete cytogenetic response were 85 days and 256 days, respectively. Major cytogenetic response and complete cytogenetic response rates were similar between imatinib-resistant and imatinib-intolerant patients, but were higher in patients without BCR-ABL1 mutations. Overall and progression-free survival rates at 12 months were 96.1% and 86.3%, respectively. All newly-occurring or worsening grade 3/4 hematologic abnormalities included thrombocytopenia (24.7%) and anemia (5.2%); grade 3/4 drug-related non-hematologic adverse events included fatigue (3.9%), asthenia (3.9%), and nausea (2.6%). The most common biochemistry abnormality was hyperbilirubinemia (grade 3/4 23.4%), and 12 of 18 cases were managed with dose modification. Study findings suggest radotinib is effective and well tolerated in chronic phase-chronic myeloid leukemia patients with resistance and/or intolerance to BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors and may represent a promising alternative for these patients. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01602952).

  2. Effects of 28Si Ions, 56Fe Ions, and Protons on the Induction of Murine Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Michael M.; Ray, F. Andrew; Genik, Paula C.; Yu, Yongjia; McCarthy, Maureen; Fallgren, Christina M.; Ullrich, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of cancer risks posed to space-flight crews by exposure to high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) ions are subject to considerable uncertainty because epidemiological data do not exist for human populations exposed to similar radiation qualities. We assessed the carcinogenic effects of 300 MeV/n 28Si or 600 MeV/n 56Fe ions in a mouse model for radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia and hepatocellular carcinoma. C3H/HeNCrl mice were irradiated with 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, or 1 Gy of 300 MeV/n 28Si ions, 600 MeV/n 56Fe ions or 1 or 2 Gy of protons simulating the 1972 solar particle event (1972SPE) at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Additional mice were irradiated with 137Cs gamma rays at doses of 1, 2, or 3 Gy. All groups were followed until they were moribund or reached 800 days of age. We found that 28Si or 56Fe ions do not appear to be substantially more effective than gamma rays for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia. However, 28Si or 56Fe ion irradiated mice had a much higher incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma than gamma ray irradiated or proton irradiated mice. These data demonstrate a clear difference in the effects of these HZE ions on the induction of leukemia compared to solid tumors, suggesting potentially different mechanisms of tumorigenesis. Also seen in this study was an increase in metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma in the 28Si and 56Fe ion irradiated mice compared with those exposed to gamma rays or 1972SPE protons, a finding with important implications for setting radiation exposure limits for space-flight crew members. PMID:25126721

  3. Leukemia - resources

    MedlinePlus

    The following organizations provide information on the different types of leukemia : Cancer Care -- www.cancercare.org/diagnosis/leukemia National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/types/leukemia The ...

  4. Toxicity and efficacy of intrathecal liposomal cytarabine in children with leukemia/lymphoma relapsing in the central nervous system: a retrospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Parasole, Rosanna; Petruzziello, Fara; Messina, Chiara; Barisone, Elena; Pession, Andrea; Locatelli, Franco; Micalizzi, Concetta; Cesaro, Simone; Testi, Anna Maria; De Matteo, Antonia; Varotto, Stefania; Berger, Massimo; Morello, William; Menna, Giuseppe; Poggi, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    The toxicity and efficacy of intrathecal liposomal cytarabine (LC) were evaluated in children with central nervous system (CNS) relapsed/refractory acute leukemia/lymphoma. Thirty patients (male:female ratio 21:9; median age 9.4 years) with CNS relapsed/resistant disease were treated with intrathecal LC at dosages adjusted for age. Twenty-seven (90%) patients simultaneously received systemic chemotherapy, including concurrent high-dose cytarabine or methotrexate in 21 (70%) cases. Of 28 patients evaluable for response, 25 patients (89%) achieved CNS complete remission and three (11%) partial remission. The median number of intrathecal LC administrations per patient was 4. The cerebrospinal fluid was cleared after a median of 3 intrathecal LC administrations. Neurological toxicity ≥ grade 3 occurred in four (13%) patients. No permanent sequelae were observed. The median overall survival was 20.9 months and the 5-year probability of survival was 46%. These encouraging data suggest that intrathecal LC is well tolerated and effective in children with relapsed/refractory CNS leukemia/lymphoma.

  5. [Efficacy of levocarnitine for tyrosine kinase inhibitor-induced painful muscle cramps in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michiko; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Shimoyama, Saori; Ito, Ryo; Sugama, Yusuke; Sato, Ken; Yamauchi, Natsumi; Horiguchi, Hiroto; Nakamura, Hajime; Hamaguchi, Kota; Abe, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Kato, Junji

    2016-04-01

    Muscle cramps are side effects commonly associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. Patients suffering from muscle cramps are treated with various medications such as calcium, magnesium and vitamin supplements, but these therapies are often ineffective. We report two patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia who developed muscle cramps caused by TKI. These patients were treated successfully with levocarnitine. Both of our cases revealed the beneficial effects of levocarnitine treatment on TKI-induced muscle cramps.

  6. Increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma activity reduces imatinib uptake and efficacy in chronic myeloid leukemia mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jueqiong; Lu, Liu; Kok, Chung H; Saunders, Verity A; Goyne, Jarrad M; Dang, Phuong; Leclercq, Tamara M; Hughes, Timothy P; White, Deborah L

    2017-02-02

    Imatinib is actively transported by OCT-1 influx transporter, and low OCT-1 activity in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia blood mononuclear cells is significantly associated with poor molecular response to imatinib. Here we report that, in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia mononuclear cells and BCR-ABL1+ cell lines, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (GW1929, rosiglitazone, pioglitazone) significantly decrease OCT-1 activity; conversely, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma antagonists (GW9662, T0070907) increase OCT-1 activity. Importantly, these effects can lead to corresponding changes in sensitivity to Bcr-Abl kinase inhibition. Results were confirmed in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-transduced K562 cells. Furthermore, we identified a strong negative correlation between OCT-1 activity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma transcriptional activity in diagnostic chronic myeloid leukemia patients (n=84; p<0.0001), suggesting that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation has a negative impact on the intracellular uptake of imatinib and consequent Bcr-Abl kinase inhibition. The inter-patient variability of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation likely accounts for the heterogeneity observed in patient OCT-1 activity at diagnosis. Recently, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonist pioglitazone was reported to act synergistically with imatinib targeting the residual chronic myeloid leukemia stem cell pool. Our findings suggest that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma ligands have differential effects on circulating mononuclear cells compared to stem cells. Since the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activation on imatinib uptake in mononuclear cells may counteract the clinical benefit of this activation in stem cells, caution should be applied when combining these therapies, especially in patients

  7. Efficacy of Compound Kushen Injection in Combination with Induction Chemotherapy for Treating Adult Patients Newly Diagnosed with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Honglei; Lei, Bo; Meng, Shan; Liu, Hailing; Wei, Yongchang; He, Aili; Zhang, Wanggang

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the clinical effectiveness and safety of CKI (compound Kushen injection) plus standard induction chemotherapy for treating adult acute leukemia (AL). We randomly assigned 332 patients with newly diagnosed AL to control (n = 165, receiving DA (daunorubicin and cytarabine) or hyper-CVAD (fractionated cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and dexamethasone)) or treatment (n = 167, receiving CKI and DA or hyper-CVAD) groups. Posttreatment, treatment group CD3+, CD4+, CD4+/CD8+, natural killer (NK) cell, and immunoglobulin (IgG, IgA, and IgM) levels were significantly higher than those of the control group (p < 0.05), and CD8+ levels were lower in the treatment group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Treatment group interleukin- (IL-) 4 and IL-10 levels were significantly higher compared to the control posttreatment (both p < 0.05) as were complete remission, overall response, and quality of life (QoL) improvement rates (p < 0.05). The control group had more incidences of grade 3/4 hematologic and nonhematologic toxicity (p < 0.05). Responses to induction chemotherapy, QoL improvement, and adverse events incidence between control group patients with acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia were not significantly different. CKI plus standard induction chemotherapy is effective and safe for treating AL, possibly by increasing immunologic function. PMID:27738441

  8. Identification and characterization of the specific murine NK cell subset supporting graft-versus-leukemia- and reducing graft-versus-host-effects

    PubMed Central

    Meinhardt, Kathrin; Kroeger, Irena; Bauer, Ruth; Ganss, Franziska; Ovsiy, Ilja; Rothamer, Johanna; Büttner, Maike; Atreya, Imke; Waldner, Maximilian; Bittrich, Max; Lehmann, Christian HK; Rieger, Michael A; Beilhack, Andreas; Zeiser, Robert; Edinger, Matthias; Dudziak, Diana; Mackensen, Andreas; Rehli, Michael; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies investigating the impact of natural killer (NK) cells in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation settings have yielded promising results. However, NK cells are a functionally and phenotypically heterogeneous population. Therefore, we addressed the functional relevance of specific NK cell subsets distinguished by expression of CD117, CD27 and CD11b surface markers in graft-versus-leukemia (GVL)-reaction and graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). Our results clearly demonstrate that the subset of c-Kit−CD27−CD11b+ NK cells expressed multiple cytotoxic pathway genes and provided optimal graft-versus-leukemia-effects, while significantly reducing T cell proliferation induced by allogeneic dendritic cells. Furthermore, these NK cells migrated to inflamed intestinal tissues where graft-versus-host-colitis was efficiently mitigated. For the first time, we identified the c-Kit−CD27−CD11b+ NK cell population as the specific effector NK cell subset capable of significantly diminishing GVHD in fully mismatched bone marrow transplantation settings. In conclusion, the subset of c-Kit−CD27−CD11b+ NK cells not only supports GVL, but also plays a unique role in the protection against GVHD by migrating to the peripheral GVHD target organs where they exert efficient immunoregulatory activities. These new insights demonstrate the importance of selecting the optimal NK cell subset for cellular immunotherapy following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25949862

  9. Alpha-phellandrene, a natural active monoterpene, influences a murine WEHI-3 leukemia model in vivo by enhancing macrophague phagocytosis and natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lu, Kung-Wen; Ma, Yi-Shih; Tang, Nou-Ying; Wu, Ping-Ping; Wu, Chih-Chung; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2014-01-01

    α-phellandrene (α-PA), a cyclic monoterpene, is a natural compound reported to promote immune responses in normal BALB/c mice. The effects of α-PA on immune responses in a leukemia mouse model were examined. Mice were injected with mouse leukemia WEHI-3 cells and subsequently treated orally with or without α-PA (0, 25 and 50 mg/kg) and olive oil as positive control for two weeks. Leukocytes and splenocytes were isolated and cell markers for CD3, CD19, CD11b and Mac-3, phagocytosis and natural killer cell cytoxicity effects were analyzed by flow cytometry. α-PA increased the percentage of CD3 (T-cell marker), CD19 (B-cell marker) and MAC3 (macrophages) markers but reduced the percentage of CD11b (monocytes) cell surface markers. α-PA (25 and 50 mg/kg) increased phagocytosis of macrophages from blood samples and treatment promoted natural killer cell activity at 25 mg/kg from splenocytes. α-PA at 25 mg/kg also increased B- and T-cell proliferation.

  10. Identification and characterization of the specific murine NK cell subset supporting graft-versus-leukemia- and reducing graft-versus-host-effects.

    PubMed

    Meinhardt, Kathrin; Kroeger, Irena; Bauer, Ruth; Ganss, Franziska; Ovsiy, Ilja; Rothamer, Johanna; Büttner, Maike; Atreya, Imke; Waldner, Maximilian; Bittrich, Max; Lehmann, Christian Hk; Rieger, Michael A; Beilhack, Andreas; Zeiser, Robert; Edinger, Matthias; Dudziak, Diana; Mackensen, Andreas; Rehli, Michael; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies investigating the impact of natural killer (NK) cells in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation settings have yielded promising results. However, NK cells are a functionally and phenotypically heterogeneous population. Therefore, we addressed the functional relevance of specific NK cell subsets distinguished by expression of CD117, CD27 and CD11b surface markers in graft-versus-leukemia (GVL)-reaction and graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD). Our results clearly demonstrate that the subset of c-Kit(-)CD27(-)CD11b(+) NK cells expressed multiple cytotoxic pathway genes and provided optimal graft-versus-leukemia-effects, while significantly reducing T cell proliferation induced by allogeneic dendritic cells. Furthermore, these NK cells migrated to inflamed intestinal tissues where graft-versus-host-colitis was efficiently mitigated. For the first time, we identified the c-Kit(-)CD27(-)CD11b(+) NK cell population as the specific effector NK cell subset capable of significantly diminishing GVHD in fully mismatched bone marrow transplantation settings. In conclusion, the subset of c-Kit(-)CD27(-)CD11b(+) NK cells not only supports GVL, but also plays a unique role in the protection against GVHD by migrating to the peripheral GVHD target organs where they exert efficient immunoregulatory activities. These new insights demonstrate the importance of selecting the optimal NK cell subset for cellular immunotherapy following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  11. Activation of Membrane Fusion by Murine Leukemia Viruses Is Controlled in cis or in trans by Interactions between the Receptor-Binding Domain and a Conserved Disulfide Loop of the Carboxy Terminus of the Surface Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Boson, Bertrand; Russell, Stephen J.; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2001-01-01

    Cell entry of retroviruses is initiated by the recognition of cellular receptors and the subsequent membrane fusion between viral and cellular membranes. These two steps are mediated by the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits of the retroviral envelope glycoprotein (Env), respectively. Determinants regulating membrane fusion have been described throughout SU and TM, but the processes coupling receptor recognition to fusion are still elusive. Here we establish that a critical interaction is formed between the receptor-binding domain (RBD) and the major disulfide loop of the carboxy-terminal domain (C domain) of the murine leukemia virus SU. Receptor binding causes an alteration of this interaction and, in turn, promotes further events of Env fusion activation. We characterize mutations which, by lowering this interaction and reducing the compatibility between the RBD and C domains of Env glycoprotein chimeras, affect both Env fusogenicity and sensitivity to receptor interference. Additionally, we demonstrate that suboptimal interactions in such mutant Env proteins can be compensated in trans by soluble RBDs in a manner that depends on their compatibility with the C domain. Our results therefore indicate that RBD/C domain interactions may occur in cis, via the proper RBD of the viral Env itself, or in trans, via a distinct RBD expressed by virion-free Env glycoproteins expressed endogenously by the infected cells or provided by neighboring Env trimers. PMID:11264358

  12. Nucleotide sequences of gag-pol regions that determine the Fv-1 host range property of BALB/c N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, C.Y.; Boone, L.R.; Koh, C.K.; Tennant, R.W.; Yang, W.K.

    1983-12-01

    Previously, in virto recombinant DNA studies demonstrated that genetic determinants of N-tropism and B-tropism, or Fv-1-related host range properties of murine leukemia viruses, were located in a BamHI-HindIII DNA segment derived from the 5' portion of the coloned viral genome. We sequenced this segment and its immediate 5' region from cloned DNA of two BALB/c mouse C-type viruses (WN1802N and WN1802B) and found base differences at 12 positions out of the otherwise identical 1390-base-pair sequences. Analysis of the most likely reading frame showed that 6 of the 12 base differences would result in four encoded amino acid changes, three of which occur at positions 109 (glutamine in WN1802N versus threonine in WN1802B), 110 (arginine in WN1802N versus glutamic acid in WN1802B), and 159 (glutamic acid in WN1802N versus glycine in WN1802B) of the p30 protein. The remaining one is located at position 36 (threonine in WN1802N versus isoleucine in WN1802B) of the viral polymerase protein. Significant conformational alteration of the p30 protein could be predicted from these amino acid changes.

  13. Apoptotic Efficacy of Etomoxir in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells. Cooperation with Arsenic Trioxide and Glycolytic Inhibitors, and Regulation by Oxidative Stress and Protein Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Estañ, María Cristina; Calviño, Eva; Calvo, Susana; Guillén-Guío, Beatriz; Boyano-Adánez, María del Carmen; de Blas, Elena; Rial, Eduardo; Aller, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are frequently exacerbated in leukemia cells, and may therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention. In this work we analyzed the apoptotic and chemo-sensitizing action of the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Etomoxir caused negligible lethality at concentrations up to 100 µM, but efficaciously cooperated to cause apoptosis with the anti-leukemic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox), and with lower efficacy with other anti-tumour drugs (etoposide, cisplatin), in HL60 cells. Etomoxir-ATO cooperation was also observed in NB4 human acute promyelocytic cells, but not in normal (non-tumour) mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Biochemical determinations in HL60 cells indicated that etomoxir (25–200 µM) dose-dependently inhibited mitochondrial respiration while slightly stimulating glycolysis, and only caused marginal alterations in total ATP content and adenine nucleotide pool distribution. In addition, etomoxir caused oxidative stress (increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, decrease in reduced glutathione content), as well as pro-apoptotic LKB-1/AMPK pathway activation, all of which may in part explain the chemo-sensitizing capacity of the drug. Etomoxir also cooperated with glycolytic inhibitors (2-deoxy-D-glucose, lonidamine) to induce apoptosis in HL60 cells, but not in NB4 cells. The combined etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment did not increase oxidative stress, caused moderate decrease in net ATP content, increased the AMP/ATP ratio with concomitant drop in energy charge, and caused defensive Akt and ERK kinase activation. Apoptosis generation by etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose was further increased by co-incubation with ATO, which is apparently explained by the capacity of ATO to attenuate Akt and ERK activation. In summary, co-treatment with etomoxir may represent an interesting strategy to increase the apoptotic

  14. The in vitro and in vivo efficacy of fluconazole in combination with farnesol against Candida albicans isolates using a murine vulvovaginitis model.

    PubMed

    Bozó, Aliz; Domán, Marianna; Majoros, László; Kardos, Gábor; Varga, István; Kovács, Renátó

    2016-11-01

    Farnesol is a quorum-sensing molecule that inhibits biofilm formation in Candida albicans. Previous in vitro data suggest that, in combination with certain antifungals, farnesol may have an adjuvant anti-biofilm agent. However, the in vivo efficacy of farnesol is very questionable. Therefore, the in vitro and in vivo activity of fluconazole combined with farnesol was evaluated against C. albicans biofilms using fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) determination, time-kill experiments and a murine vulvovaginitis model. The median biofilm MICs of fluconazole-sensitive C. albicans isolates ranged between 4 -> 512 mg/L and 150-300 μM for fluconazole and farnesol, respectively. These values were 512 -> 512 mg/L and > 300 μM for fluconazole-resistant clinical isolates. Farnesol decreased the median MICs of fluconazole by 2-64-fold for biofilms. Based on FICI, synergistic interaction was observed only in the case of the sessile SC5314 reference strain (FICIs: 0.16-0.27). In time-kill studies, only the 512 mg/L fluconazole and 512 mg/L fluconazole + 75 μM farnesol reduced biofilm mass significantly at each time point in the case of all isolates. The combination reduced the metabolic activity of biofilms for all isolates in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Our findings revealed that farnesol alone was not protective in a murine vulvovaginitis model. Farnesol was not beneficial in combination with fluconazole for fluconazole-susceptible isolates, but partially increased fluconazole activity against one fluconazole-resistant isolate, but not the other one.

  15. Therapeutic Efficacy of a {sup 188}Re-Labeled {alpha}-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone Peptide Analog in Murine and Human Melanoma-Bearing Mouse Models

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Owen, Nellie K.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the therapeutic efficacy of {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH in the B16/F1 murine melanoma and TXM13 human melanoma bearing mouse models. Method: (Arg11)CCMSH was synthesized and labeled with {sup 188}Re to form {sup 188}Re-(Agr{sup 11})CCMSH. B16/F1 melanoma tumor bearing mice were administrated with 200 Ci, 600 Ci and 2x400 Ci of {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH via the tail vein, respectively. TXM13 melanoma tumor hearing mice were separately injected with 600 Ci, 2x400 Ci and 1000 Ci of 100Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH through the tail vein. Two groups of 10 mice bearing either B16/F1 or TXM13 tumors were injected with saline as untreated controls. Results: In contrast to the untreated control group, {sup 188}Re(Arg11)CCMSH yielded rapid and lasting therapeutic effects in the treatment groups with either B16/F1 or TXM13 tumors. The tumor growth rate was reduced and the survival rate was prolonged in the treatment groups. Treatment with 2x400 Ci of {sup 188}Re-Arg{sup 11}CCMSH significantly extended the mean life of B16/F1 tumor mice (p<0.05), while the mean life of TXm13 tumor mice was significantly prolonged after treatment with 600 Ci and 1000 Ci doses of {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH (p<0.05 High-dose {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11}))CCMSH produced no observed normal-tissue toxicity. Conclusions: The therapy study results revealed that {sup 188}Re-Arg11 CCMSH yielded significant therapeutic effects in both B16/F1 murine melanoma and TXM13 human melanoma bearing mouse models. {sup 188}Re-(Arg{sup 11})CCMSH appears to be a promising radiolabeled peptide for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

  16. Vaginally delivered tenofovir disoproxil fumarate provides greater protection than tenofovir against genital herpes in a murine model of efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Briana; Jandl, Thomas; Teller, Ryan S; Taneva, Ekaterina; Wang, Yanhua; Nagaraja, Umadevi; Kiser, Patrick F; Herold, Betsy C

    2014-01-01

    Increased susceptibility to genital herpes in medroxyprogesterone-treated mice may provide a surrogate of increased HIV risk and a preclinical biomarker of topical preexposure prophylaxis safety. We evaluated tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) in this murine model because an intravaginal ring eluting this drug is being advanced into clinical trials. To avoid the complications of surgically inserting a ring, hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC)-stable formulations of TDF were prepared. One week of twice-daily 0.3% TDF gel was well tolerated and did not result in any increase in HSV-2 susceptibility but protected mice from herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) disease compared to mice treated with the HEC placebo gel. No significant increase in inflammatory cytokines or chemokines in vaginal washes or change in cytokine, chemokine, or mitochondrial gene expression in RNA extracted from genital tract tissue was detected. To further evaluate efficacy, mice were treated with gel once daily beginning 12 h prior to high-dose HSV-2 challenge or 2 h before and after viral challenge (BAT24 dosing). The 0.3% TDF gel provided significant protection compared to the HEC gel following either daily (in 9/10 versus 1/10 mice, P < 0.01) or BAT24 (in 14/20 versus 4/20 mice, P < 0.01) dosing. In contrast, 1% tenofovir (TFV) gel protected only 4/10 mice treated with either regimen. Significant protection was also observed with daily 0.03% TDF compared to HEC. Protection was associated with greater murine cellular permeability of radiolabeled TDF than of TFV. Together, these findings suggest that TDF is safe, may provide substantially greater protection against HSV than TFV, and support the further clinical development of a TDF ring.

  17. The FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene cooperates with IL-5 to induce murine hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES)/chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL)-like disease.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yoshiyuki; Rothenberg, Marc E; Lee, Andrew W; Akei, Hiroko Saito; Brandt, Eric B; Williams, David A; Cancelas, Jose A

    2006-05-15

    Dysregulated tyrosine kinase activity by the Fip1-like1 (FIP1L1)-platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) (F/P) fusion gene has been identified as a cause of clonal hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES), called F/P-positive chronic eosinophilic leukemia (CEL) in humans. However, transplantation of F/P-transduced hematopoietic stem cells/progenitors (F/P(+) HSCs/Ps) into mice results in a chronic myelogenous leukemia-like disease, which does not resemble HES. Because a subgroup of patients with HES show T-cell-dependent interleukin-5 (IL-5) overexpression, we determined if expression of the F/P fusion gene in the presence of transgenic T-cell IL-5 overexpression in mice induces HES-like disease. Mice that received a transplant of CD2-IL-5-transgenic F/P(+) HSC/Ps (IL-5Tg-F/P) developed intense leukocytosis, strikingly high eosinophilia, and eosinophilic infiltration of nonhematopoietic as well as hematopoietic tissues, a phenotype resembling human HES. The disease phenotype was transferable to secondary transplant recipients of a high cell dose, suggesting involvement of a short-term repopulating stem cell or an early myeloid progenitor. Induction of significant eosinophilia was specific for F/P since expression of another fusion oncogene, p210-BCR/ABL, in the presence of IL-5 overexpression was characterized by a significantly lower eosinophilia than IL-5Tg-F/P recipients. These results suggest that F/P is not sufficient to induce a HES/CEL-like disease but requires a second event associated with IL-5 overexpression.

  18. Understanding Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the leukemia cells crowd out or suppress the development of normal cells. The rate at which leukemia progresses and how the cells replace the normal blood and marrow cells are different with each type of leukemia. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute ...

  19. Killing rates exerted by caspofungin in 50 % serum and its correlation with in vivo efficacy in a neutropenic murine model against Candida krusei and Candida inconspicua.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Renátó; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Berényi, Réka; Domán, Marianna; Kardos, Gábor; Juhász, Béla; Majoros, László

    2014-02-01

    Killing rates (K) of 1-32 µg ml(-1) caspofungin were determined in RPMI-1640 and in 50 % serum using time-kill methodology against three Candida krusei (MICs of all three isolates 0.25 µg ml(-1) in RPMI-1640 and 2 µg ml(-1) in serum) and three Candida inconspicua clinical isolates (MIC ranges 0.06-0.12 µg ml(-1) in RPMI-1640 and 0.25-0.5 µg ml(-1) in serum), against C. krusei ATCC 6258 and against one C. krusei isolate that was resistant to echinocandins (MIC 8 µg ml(-1) in RPMI-1640 and 32 µg ml(-1) in serum). In RPMI-1640, the highest mean K values were observed at 4 (-1.05 h(-1)) and 16 (-0.27 h(-1)) μg ml(-1) caspofungin for C. krusei and C. inconspicua clinical isolates, respectively. In 50 % serum, mean K value ranges at 1-32 and 4-32 µg ml(-1) concentrations for C. inconspicua and C. krusei were -1.12 to -1.44 and -0.42 to -0.57 h(-1), respectively. While K values against C. krusei in RPMI-1640 and 50 % serum were comparable, serum significantly increased the killing rate against C. inconspicua (P<0.0003 for all tested concentrations). In a neutropenic murine model, daily caspofungin at 1, 2, 3, 5 and 15 mg kg(-1) significantly decreased the fungal tissue burden of C. inconspicua in the kidneys (P<0.05-0.001). Against C. krusei, doses of 3, 5 and 15 mg kg(-1) caspofungin were effective (P<0.05-0.01). All effective doses were comparably efficacious for both species. Only the highest 15 mg kg(-1) caspofungin dose was effective even against the echinocandin-resistant C. krusei isolate. In 50 % serum, killing was concentration independent at effective concentrations (≥4 and ≥1 µg ml(-1) for C. krusei and C. inconspicua, respectively), suggesting that the efficacy of dose escalation is questionable. These in vitro results were also supported by the murine model.

  20. Clinical outcome and efficacy of current anti-leukemic therapy for leptomeningeal involvement in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Hyun; Koh, Young-Il; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Park, Seonyang; Kim, Inho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated risk factors and outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with leptomeningeal involvement. Medical records of patients with non-promyelocytic AML at Seoul National University Hospital from January of 2000 to November of 2013 were reviewed. Leptomeningeal involvement was defined as the presence of atypical or malignant hematopoietic cells in the cerebrospinal fluid. Among 775 patients with AML, 141 patients (18.2 %) underwent cerebrospinal fluid examination. Leptomeningeal involvement of AML, confirmed in 38 patients (4.9 %), was associated with high white blood cell count and high level of lactic. There were seven patients in the favorable risk group (19.4 %), 21 in the intermediate risk group (58.3 %), and eight in the adverse risk group (22.2 %). Twenty-eight patients (85.7 %) developed leptomeningeal involvement during relapse status or refractory status. Thirty-one patients (81.6 %) received intrathecal chemotherapy, and whole-brain and/or craniospinal radiotherapy was conducted in 10 patients (27.0 %). The rate of complete remission after induction chemotherapy was 63.2 %. Median overall survival was 9.9 months. Radiotherapy and complete remission after the first induction chemotherapy were associated with longer overall survival. Leptomeningeal involvement in acute myeloid leukemia is rare, but relatively common in relapsed status or refractory status. Craniospinal radiotherapy and complete remission after induction chemotherapy were found to favorable prognostic factors.

  1. AZD1208, a potent and selective pan-Pim kinase inhibitor, demonstrates efficacy in preclinical models of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Keeton, Erika K; McEachern, Kristen; Dillman, Keith S; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Cao, Yichen; Grondine, Michael R; Kaur, Surinder; Wang, Suping; Chen, Yuching; Wu, Allan; Shen, Minhui; Gibbons, Francis D; Lamb, Michelle L; Zheng, Xiaolan; Stone, Richard M; Deangelo, Daniel J; Platanias, Leonidas C; Dakin, Les A; Chen, Huawei; Lyne, Paul D; Huszar, Dennis

    2014-02-06

    Upregulation of Pim kinases is observed in several types of leukemias and lymphomas. Pim-1, -2, and -3 promote cell proliferation and survival downstream of cytokine and growth factor signaling pathways. AZD1208 is a potent, highly selective, and orally available Pim kinase inhibitor that effectively inhibits all three isoforms at <5 nM or <150 nM in enzyme and cell assays, respectively. AZD1208 inhibited the growth of 5 of 14 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines tested, and sensitivity correlates with Pim-1 expression and STAT5 activation. AZD1208 causes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MOLM-16 cells, accompanied by a dose-dependent reduction in phosphorylation of Bcl-2 antagonist of cell death, 4EBP1, p70S6K, and S6, as well as increases in cleaved caspase 3 and p27. Inhibition of p4EBP1 and p-p70S6K and suppression of translation are the most representative effects of Pim inhibition in sensitive AML cell lines. AZD1208 inhibits the growth of MOLM-16 and KG-1a xenograft tumors in vivo with a clear pharmacodynamic-pharmacokinetic relationship. AZD1208 also potently inhibits colony growth and Pim signaling substrates in primary AML cells from bone marrow that are Flt3 wild-type or Flt3 internal tandem duplication mutant. These results underscore the therapeutic potential of Pim kinase inhibition for the treatment of AML.

  2. Efficacy and Biological Correlates of Response in a Phase II Study of Venetoclax Monotherapy in Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Konopleva, Marina; Pollyea, Daniel A; Potluri, Jalaja; Chyla, Brenda; Hogdal, Leah; Busman, Todd; McKeegan, Evelyn; Salem, Ahmed Hamed; Zhu, Ming; Ricker, Justin L; Blum, William; DiNardo, Courtney D; Kadia, Tapan; Dunbar, Martin; Kirby, Rachel; Falotico, Nancy; Leverson, Joel; Humerickhouse, Rod; Mabry, Mack; Stone, Richard; Kantarjian, Hagop; Letai, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    We present a phase II, single-arm study evaluating 800 mg daily venetoclax, a highly selective, oral small-molecule B-cell leukemia/lymphoma-2 (BCL2) inhibitor in patients with high-risk relapsed/refractory acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or unfit for intensive chemotherapy. Responses were evaluated following revised International Working Group (IWG) criteria. The overall response rate was 19%; an additional 19% of patients demonstrated antileukemic activity not meeting IWG criteria (partial bone marrow response and incomplete hematologic recovery). Twelve (38%) patients had isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 mutations, of whom 4 (33%) achieved complete response or complete response with incomplete blood count recovery. Six (19%) patients had BCL2-sensitive protein index at screening, which correlated with time on study. BH3 profiling was consistent with on-target BCL2 inhibition and identified potential resistance mechanisms. Common adverse events included nausea, diarrhea and vomiting (all grades), and febrile neutropenia and hypokalemia (grade 3/4). Venetoclax demonstrated activity and acceptable tolerability in patients with AML and adverse features.

  3. Therapeutic effects of cinnamaldehyde and potentiation of its efficacy in combination with methylcellulose on murine oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yuuki; Hayama, Kazumi; Okada, Masashi; Sagawa, Takehito; Arai, Ryo; Abe, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    We examined the therapeutic effects of cinnamaldehyde and the potentiation of those effects with cassia and cinnamaldehyde when combined with the food additive methylcellulose against murine oral candidiasis. When 19.5mg/ml of cinnamaldehyde was administered in the oral cavity of Candida infected mice, the oral symptoms were improved. Furthermore, when either a cassia or a cinnamaldehyde preparation in combination with methylcellulose was administered to oral candidiasis-inflicted mice, the therapeutic effects of cassia or cinnamaldehyde potentiated. Methylcellulose itself did not affect the oral symptoms or the viable number of C. albicans cells. GC/MS analysis showed that the dose of cinnamaldehyde remaining in the tongue tissue of mice treated with the cinnamaldehyde-methylcellulose mixture was higher than that in mice administered cinnamaldehyde alone, and also showed that cinnamaldehyde was not detected in the blood of any of the tested mice. These findings suggested that the combination of cassia or cinnamaldehyde and methylcellulose may be a useful prophylactic or therapeutic tool against oral candidiasis.

  4. Antitumor efficacy of combination of interferon-gamma-inducible protein 10 gene with gemcitabine, a study in murine model

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Kai; Wang, Lian; Tian, Ling; Yu, Jingrui; Zhang, Zhixuan; Wei, Yuquan

    2008-01-01

    Background Interferon-γ-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) is a potent inhibitor of tumor angiogenesis. It has been reported that the antiangiogenic therapy combined with chemotherapy has synergistic effects. Methods To elucidate the mechanisms of IP-10 gene combined with a chemotherapy agent, we intramuscularly injected pBLAST-IP-10 expression plasmid combined with gemcitabine into tumor-bearing mice. Results The proliferation of endothelial cells was effectively inhibited by IP-10 combined with gemcitabine in vitro. Treatment with pBLAST-IP-10 twice a week for 4 weeks combined with gemcitabine 10 mg/kg (once a week) resulted in sustained high level of IP-10 protein in serum, inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Compared with administration of IP-10 plasmid or gemcitabine alone, the angiogenesis in tumors were apparently inhibited, and the numbers of apoptotic cells and lymphocytes in tumor increased in the combination therapy group. Conclusion Our data indicate that the gene therapy of antiangiogenesis by intramuscular delivery of plasmid DNA encoding IP-10 combined with gemcitabine has synergistic effects on tomor by inhibiting the proliferation of endothelail cells, inducing the apoptosis of tumor cells, and recruiting lymphocytes to tumor in murine models. The present findings provided evidence of antitumor effects of genetherapy combined with chemotherapy. PMID:18983688

  5. Colistin enhances therapeutic efficacy of daptomycin or teicoplanin in a murine model of multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii sepsis.

    PubMed

    Cirioni, Oscar; Simonetti, Oriana; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Barucca, Alessandra; Ghiselli, Roberto; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pelloni, Maria; Trombettoni, Maria Michela Cappelletti; Guerrieri, Mario; Offidani, Annamaria; Giacometti, Andrea; Provinciali, Mauro

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the efficacy of colistin combined with teicoplanin or daptomycin in an experimental mouse model of multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection. Animal received intraperitoneally 1ml saline containing 2×10(10)CFU of A. baumannii. Colistin, daptomycin, teicoplanin, and colistin plus daptomycin or teicoplanin were given by intraperitoneal administration 2h after bacterial challenge. A control group received sodium chloride solution. In the in vitro study A. baumannii showed to be susceptible only to colistin with MIC of 2mg/l. In the in vivo study, colistin alone showed a good antimicrobial efficacy. When combined with teicoplanin or daptomycin, colistin produced the lowest bacterial and the best survival rates. In immunological studies, when colistin was associated to daptomycin or teicoplanin, both the number and the cytotoxic activity of NK cells increased. In conclusion, colistin combined with teicoplanin or daptomycin may improve the therapy of multiresistant A. baumannii infection.

  6. α-Phellandrene alters expression of genes associated with DNA damage, cell cycle, and apoptosis in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Jyh; Yu, Chien-Chih; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chang, Shu-Jen; Yu, Fu-Shun; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2014-08-01

    α-phellandrene (α-PA) is a cyclic monoterpene, present in natural plants such as Schinus molle L. α-PA promotes immune responses in mice in vivo. However, there is no available information on whether α-PA affects gene expression in leukemia cells. The present study determined effects of α-PA on expression levels of genes associated with DNA damage, cell cycle and apoptotic cell death in mouse leukemia WEHI-3 cells. WEHI-3 cells were treated with 10 μM α-PA for 24 h, cells were harvested and total RNA was extracted, and gene expression was analyzed by cDNA microarray. Results indicated that α-PA up-regulated 10 genes 4-fold, 13 by over 3-fold and 175 by over 2-fold; 21 genes were down-regulated by over 4-fold, 26 genes by over 3-fold and expression of 204 genes was altered by at leas 2-fold compared with the untreated control cells. DNA damage-associated genes such as DNA damage-inducer transcript 4 and DNA fragmentation factor were up-regulated by 4-fold and over 2-fold, respectively; cell-cycle check point genes such as cyclin G2 and cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitor 2D and IA (p21) were up-regulated by over 3-fold and over 2-fold, respectively; apoptosis-associated genes such as BCL2/adenovirus EIB interacting protein 3, XIAP-associated factor 1, BCL2 modifying factor, caspase-8 and FADD-like apoptosis regulator were over 2-fold up-regulated. Furthermore, DNA damage-associated gene TATA box binding protein was over 4-fold down-regulated, and D19Ertd652c (DNA segment) over 2-fold down-regulated; cell cycle-associated gene cyclin E2 was over 2-fold down-regulated; apoptosis associated gene growth arrest-specific 5 was over 9-fold down-regulated, Gm5426 (ATP synthase) was over 3-fold down-regulated, and death box polypeptide 33 was over 2-fold down-regulated. Based on these observations, α-PA altered gene expression in WEHI-3 cells in vitro.

  7. Importance of a specific amino acid pairing for murine MLL leukemias driven by MLLT1/3 or AFF1/4.

    PubMed

    Lokken, Alyson A; Achille, Nicholas J; Chang, Ming-Jin; Lin, Jeffrey J; Kuntimaddi, Aravinda; Leach, Benjamin I; Malik, Bhavna; Nesbit, Jacqueline B; Zhang, Shubin; Bushweller, John H; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J; Hemenway, Charles S

    2014-11-01

    Acute leukemias caused by translocations of the MLL gene at chromosome 11 band q23 (11q23) are characterized by a unique gene expression profile. More recently, data from several laboratories indicate that the most commonly encountered MLL fusion proteins, MLLT1, MLLT3, and AFF1 are found within a molecular complex that facilitates the elongation phase of mRNA transcription. Mutational analyses suggest that interaction between the MLLT1/3 proteins and AFF family proteins are required for experimental transformation of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Here, we define a specific pairing of two amino acids that creates a salt bridge between MLLT1/3 and AFF proteins that is critically important for MLL-mediated transformation of HPCs. Our findings, coupled with the newly defined structure of MLLT3 in complex with AFF1, should facilitate the development of small molecules that block this amino acid interaction and interfere with the activity of the most common MLL oncoproteins.

  8. Synergistic Activity of Deguelin and Fludarabine in Cells from Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients and in the New Zealand Black Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rebolleda, Nerea; Losada-Fernandez, Ignacio; Perez-Chacon, Gema; Castejon, Raquel; Rosado, Silvia; Morado, Marta; Vallejo-Cremades, Maria Teresa; Martinez, Andrea; Vargas-Nuñez, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) remains an incurable disease, and despite the improvement achieved by therapeutic regimes developed over the last years still a subset of patients face a rather poor prognosis and will eventually relapse and become refractory to therapy. The natural rotenoid deguelin has been shown to induce apoptosis in several cancer cells and cell lines, including primary human CLL cells, and to act as a chemopreventive agent in animal models of induced carcinogenesis. In this work, we show that deguelin induces apoptosis in vitro in primary human CLL cells and in CLL-like cells from the New Zealand Black (NZB) mouse strain. In both of them, deguelin dowregulates AKT, NFκB and several downstream antiapoptotic proteins (XIAP, cIAP, BCL2, BCL-XL and survivin), activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Moreover, deguelin inhibits stromal cell-mediated c-Myc upregulation and resistance to fludarabine, increasing fludarabine induced DNA damage. We further show that deguelin has activity in vivo against NZB CLL-like cells in an experimental model of CLL in young NZB mice transplanted with spleen cells from aged NZB mice with lymphoproliferation. Moreover, the combination of deguelin and fludarabine in this model prolonged the survival of transplanted mice at doses of both compounds that were ineffective when administered individually. These results suggest deguelin could have potential for the treatment of human CLL. PMID:27101369

  9. Gan-Lu-Yin Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Murine WEHI-3 Leukemia Cells and Tumor Growth in BALB/C Allograft Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fon-Chang; Pan, Chun-Hsu; Lai, Ming-Tsung; Chang, Shu-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung; Wu, Chieh-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the antitumor effect of Gan-Lu-Yin (GLY), a traditional Chinese herbal formula, on leukemia. Ethanolic extract of GLY was applied to evaluate its regulatory mechanisms in proliferation, migration, and differentiation of WEHI-3 leukemic cells as well as antitumor effect on BALB/c mice model. The results showed that GLY markedly reduced cell proliferation and migration with induced differentiation of WEHI-3 cells. The expression level of phosphorylated FAK, Akt, ERK1/2, and Rb was decreased p21 expression while level was increased in WEHI-3 treated with GLY. The results of cell cycle analysis revealed that GLY treatment could markedly induce G1 phase arrest and decrease cell population in S phase. Moreover, experimental results demonstrated that GLY decreased the protein expression and enzyme activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. GLY treatment also reduced WEHI-3 leukemic infiltration in liver and spleen and tumor growth in animal model. Accordingly, GLY demonstrated an inhibitory effect on tumor growth with a regulatory mechanism partially through inhibiting FAK, Akt, and ERK expression in WEHI-3 cells. GLY may provide a promising antileukemic approach in the clinical application. PMID:23573143

  10. Comparative Efficacies, Toxicities, and Tissue Concentrations of Amphotericin B Lipid Formulations in a Murine Pulmonary Aspergillosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Jon A.; Adler-Moore, Jill P.; Schwartz, Julie; Jensen, Gerard M.; Proffitt, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis, an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunosuppressed (IS) patients, is often treated with amphotericin B lipid formulations. In the present study, liposomal amphotericin B (L-AMB) and amphotericin B lipid complex (ABLC) were compared in treatment of murine pulmonary aspergillosis. Uninfected, IS mice were treated for 4 days with 1, 4, 8, or 12 mg L-AMB or ABLC/kg of body weight, and their lungs were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography for drug concentrations. IS mice intranasally challenged with Aspergillus fumigatus were treated with 12, 15, or 20 mg/kg L-AMB or ABLC and monitored for survival, fungal burden (CFU), and tissue drug concentration. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels and kidney histopathology were determined for uninfected and infected mice given 15 or 20 mg/kg L-AMB or ABLC. The results showed that both drugs had therapeutic levels of drug (>3.0 μg/g) in the lungs of uninfected or infected mice, and 24 h after the last dose, ABLC levels were significantly higher than L-AMB levels (P < 0.02). L-AMB and ABLC at 12 mg/kg both produced 57% survival, but only L-AMB at 15 or 20 mg/kg further increased survival to 80 to 90%, with BUN levels and kidney morphology similar to those of controls. Survival at 15 or 20 mg/kg ABLC was not significantly different than that of controls, and BUN levels were significantly elevated, with tubular alterations in uninfected animals and acute necrosis in kidney tubules of infected animals. In conclusion, although both drugs were effective in prolonging survival at 12 mg/kg, the reduced nephrotoxicity of L-AMB increased its therapeutic index, allowing for its safe and effective use at 15 or 20 mg/kg. PMID:16723574

  11. Antibacterial Efficacy of Silver-Impregnated Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Immobilized on a Biological Dressing in a Murine Wound Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Kathleen M.; Agarwal, Ankit; Tackes, Dana S.; Johnson, Kevin W.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Czuprynski, Charles J.; Kierski, Patricia R.; Schurr, Michael J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial effect of augmenting a biological dressing with polymer films containing silver nanoparticles. Background Biological dressings, such as Biobrane, are commonly used for treating partial-thickness wounds and burn injuries. Biological dressings have several advantages over traditional wound dressings. However, as many as 19% of wounds treated with Biobrane become infected, and, once infected, the Biobrane must be removed and a traditional dressing approach should be employed. Silver is a commonly used antimicrobial in wound care products, but current technology uses cytotoxic concentrations of silver in these dressings. We have developed a novel and facile technology that allows immobilization of bioactive molecules on the surfaces of soft materials, demonstrated here by augmentation of Biobrane with nanoparticulate silver. Surfaces modified with nanometer-thick polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) impregnated with silver nanoparticles have been shown previously to result in in vitro antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis at loadings of silver that are noncytotoxic. Methods We demonstrated that silver-impregnated PEMs can be nondestructively immobilized onto the surface of Biobrane (Biobrane-Ag) and determined the in vitro antibacterial activity of Biobrane-Ag with Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, we used an in vivo wound infection model in mice induced by topical inoculation of S aureus onto full-thickness 6-mm diameter wounds. After 72 hours, bacterial quantification was performed. Results Wounds treated with Biobrane-Ag had significantly (P < 0.001) fewer colony-forming units than wounds treated with unmodified Biobrane (more than 4 log10 difference). Conclusions The results of our study indicate that immobilizing silver-impregnated PEMs on the wound-contact surface of Biobrane significantly reduces bacterial bioburden in full-thickness murine skin wounds. Further research will investigate whether

  12. Efficacy of 50 Hz electromagnetic fields on human epidermal stem cell transplantation seeded in collagen sponge scaffolds for wound healing in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wen-Fang; Xu, Wei-Cheng; Zhu, Hong-Xiang; Huang, Hong; Wu, Bo; Zhang, Ming-Sheng

    2017-04-01

    To explore the possible efficacy of electromagnetic fields (EMF) for skin tissue engineering, effects of EMF exposure on epidermal stem cells (ESC) seeded in collagen sponge scaffolds for wound healing in a murine model were investigated. The wound models of a full-thickness defect established with 36 7 ∼ 8-week-old nude mice were randomly divided into three groups: a control group, an ESC-only group, and an ESC with EMF exposure group (frequency of 50 Hz, magnetic induction of 5 mT, 60 min per day for 20 days). ESC were separated from human foreskin and cultured in vitro, and then transplanted with collagen sponge scaffolds as a delivery vehicle to wounds of the ESC-only group, and ESC with EMF exposure group was exposed to EMF after ESC transplantation. Effects of EMF on morphological changes and expression of β1 integrin in regenerated skins were observed. Wound healing rates and healing times were collected to evaluate the efficacy of repairment. Results showed that human ESC were successfully transplanted to nude mice, which facilitated the formation of intact skin on nude mice. In contrast to other groups, the wound healing of ESC with EMF exposure group was the fastest (P < 0.05), the structure of regenerated skins was more mature, and it contained more continuity in the number of viable cell layers and rich hair follicles' structure. These results suggest that the use of 50 Hz EMF as a non-invasive treatment can accelerate wound healing of ESC transplantation, and restore structural integrity of regenerated skin. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:204-212,2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Improvement of Therapeutic Efficacy of Oral Immunotherapy in Combination with Regulatory T Cell-Inducer Kakkonto in a Murine Food Allergy Model

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yuka; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Hayashi, Michie; Hayashi, Shusaku; Kadowaki, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Oral immunotherapy (OIT) has been considered a promising approach for food allergies (FAs). However, the current OIT strategy is limited in terms of the long-term efficacy and safety. We have previously demonstrated that kakkonto, a traditional Japanese herbal medicine, suppresses the occurrence of allergic symptoms in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced FA, which is attributed to the induction of the Foxp3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells. In this study, we established an OIT model using the FA mice with already established allergic symptoms and determined whether kakkonto could improve the efficacy of OIT. The OIT method consisted of initially administrating a very small amount of OVA and slowly increasing the amount. Allergic symptoms decreased in the OIT-treated FA mice. OIT significantly downregulated Th2 immune response-related gene expression in the FA mouse colon, and decreased the level of mouse mast cell protease-1, a marker of mast cell degranulation in the FA mouse plasma. Moreover, the concomitant use of kakkonto significantly enhanced the effectiveness of OIT on the allergic symptoms, and the combination therapy further suppressed the Th2 immune responses and the mast cell degranulation. In addition, OIT significantly increased the population of Foxp3+ CD4+ regulatory T cells in the FA mouse colon, and this population was further increased by OIT in combination with kakkonto. Furthermore, the combined therapy with kakkonto reduced the expression of RA-degrading enzyme CYP26B1 mRNA in the FA mouse colon. These findings indicated that the combination of OIT with kakkonto represents a promising approach for FA treatment. PMID:28107533

  14. Efficacy of High-Dose Meropenem (Six Grams per Day) in Treatment of Experimental Murine Pneumonia Induced by Meropenem-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Iwanaga, Naoki; Takemoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Taiga; Yanagihara, Kastunori; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Mukae, Hiroshi; Kohno, Shigeru; Izumikawa, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    High-dose meropenem (MEPM; 6 g/day) has been approved as a treatment for purulent meningitis; however, little is known regarding its in vivo efficacy in refractory lower respiratory tract infections. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of MEPM at 6 g/day in a murine model of severe pneumonia caused by MEPM-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Experimental pneumonia induced by MEPM-resistant P. aeruginosa was treated with normal-dose MEPM (150 mg/kg of body weight, simulating a 3-g/day regimen in humans) or high-dose MEPM (500 mg/kg, simulating a 6-g/day regimen in humans). Mice treated with high-dose MEPM showed significantly restored survival relative to that of untreated mice and tended to show a survival rate higher than that of mice treated with normal-dose MEPM. The viable bacterial counts (of two clinical isolates) in the lungs decreased significantly in mice treated with high-dose MEPM from those for untreated mice (P < 0.001) or mice treated with normal-dose MEPM (P, <0.01 and <0.05). The number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was also significantly lower in mice treated with high-dose MEPM than in untreated mice. The free MEPM concentration in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) exceeded 16 μg/ml for 85 min in mice treated with high-dose MEPM, but not for mice treated with normal-dose MEPM. Our results demonstrate that high-dose MEPM (6 g/day) might provide better protection against pneumonia caused by MEPM-resistant strains of P. aeruginosa than the dose normally administered (less than 3 g/day).

  15. A pilot study of the therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of artesunate in the MRL/lpr murine model of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ouyang; Zhang, Huayong; Gu, Zhifeng; Zhao, Shengnan; Xu, Ting; Zhou, Kangxing; Jiang, Bo; Wang, Jie; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Sun, Lingyun

    2009-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that artesunate has immunomodulatory properties that might be useful for treating autoimmune disease. In this study, we conducted a pilot study and explored the effect and mechanism of artesunate on the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus using an MRL/lpr murine model. MRL/lpr mice were divided into control, cyclophosphamide (CTX) and artesunate treatment groups. Blood was collected to measure serum levels of creatinine, antinuclear antibody (ANA) and anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibody. Twenty-four-hour urine was collected to measure levels of proteinuria. The concentration of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) in serum and urine was measured. The expression of MCP-1 in kidney was detected by Western blot and immunohistochemistry assay, respectively. The expression of B cell activating factor (BAFF) in spleen was determined by real time-PCR and immunoblotting. We found that artesunate significantly increased the survival rate, body weight and blood leukocyte counts, and reduced the serum levels of ANA and anti-dsDNA antibody titer, 24 h urinary protein, and serum creatinine. Our results indicated that artesunate could decrease MCP-1, major pro-inflammation cytokine, in serum, urine and kidney. We also found that the level of BAFF, the major B cell activation factor, was decreased in artesunate treated MRL/lpr mice. Its efficacy was comparable with that of CTX in this study. Taken together, we have demonstrated that artesunate can inhibit the progression of disease and reverse the pathologic lesion of lupus nephritis.

  16. Utility of the oestrogen-dependent vaginal candidosis murine model in evaluating the efficacy of various therapies against vaginal Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Mawieh; Muta'eb, Enas; Abu-Shaqra, Qasem; Fraij, Abeer; Abu-Elteen, Khaled; Yasin, Salem R

    2006-03-01

    The efficacy of yogurt treatment against vaginal candidosis (VC) was examined using an oestrogen-dependent vaginal candidosis (EDVC) murine model. The EDVC mouse model was constructed by inoculating mice with viable Candida albicans cells under pseudo-oestrus conditions. Vaginal fungal burden in the various mouse groups was evaluated at several time points following the induction of VC. Untreated and yogurt-treated naïve mice exhibited background levels of VC (<6000 CFU per mouse). Candida albicans colonisation in untreated EDVC mice was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that in yogurt-treated EDVC mice at days 20-30. Metronidazole-treated naïve mice developed persistent C. albicans vaginal colonisation at significantly lower levels (P < 0.05) than that in untreated or metronidazole-treated EDVC mice. Lactobacillus was only detected in the reproductive tracts of yogurt-treated naïve and EDVC mice. These findings suggest that the presence of Lactobacillus in the reproductive tract can suppress C. albicans growth and the antibiotics may predispose to VC.

  17. Efficacy of the JAK2 inhibitor INCB16562 in a murine model of MPLW515L-induced thrombocytosis and myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Koppikar, Priya; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Hedvat, Cyrus; Marubayashi, Sachie; Patel, Jay; Goel, Aviva; Kucine, Nicole; Gardner, Jeffrey R.; Combs, Andrew P.; Vaddi, Kris; Haley, Patrick J.; Burn, Timothy C.; Rupar, Mark; Bromberg, Jacqueline F.; Heaney, Mark L.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Fridman, Jordan S.

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of JAK2 and MPL mutations in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) provided important insight into the genetic basis of these disorders and led to the development of JAK2 kinase inhibitors for MPN therapy. Although recent studies have shown that JAK2 kinase inhibitors demonstrate efficacy in a JAK2V617F murine bone marrow transplantation model, the effects of JAK2 inhibitors on MPLW515L-mediated myeloproliferation have not been investigated. In this report, we describe the in vitro and in vivo effects of INCB16562, a small-molecule JAK2 inhibitor. INCB16562 inhibited proliferation and signaling in cell lines transformed by JAK2 and MPL mutations. Compared with vehicle treatment, INCB16562 treatment improved survival, normalized white blood cell counts and platelet counts, and markedly reduced extramedullary hematopoeisis and bone marrow fibrosis. We observed inhibition of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation in vivo consistent with potent inhibition of JAK-STAT signaling. These data suggest JAK2 inhibitor therapy may be of value in the treatment of JAK2V617F-negative MPNs. However, we did not observe a decrease in the size of the malignant clone in the bone marrow of treated mice at the end of therapy, which suggests that JAK2 inhibitor therapy, by itself, was not curative in this MPN model. PMID:20154217

  18. Nano-Encapsulation of Arsenic Trioxide Enhances Efficacy against Murine Lymphoma Model while Minimizing Its Impact on Ovarian Reserve In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Meera R.; Jozefik, Jennifer K.; Spaho, Lidia; Chen, Haimei; Bally, Marcel B.; Mazar, Andrew P.; Avram, Michael J.; Winter, Jane N.; Gordon, Leo I.; Shea, Lonnie D.; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in cancer therapy have increased the rate of survival of young cancer patients; however, female lymphoma patients frequently face a temporary or permanent loss of fertility when treated with traditional cytotoxic agents. The potential loss of fertility is an important concern that can influence treatment decisions for many premenopausal cancer patients. The negative effect of chemotherapeutic agents and treatment protocols to patients’ fertility–referred to as fertotoxicity–are thus an increasingly important cancer survivorship issue. We have developed a novel nanoscale formulation of arsenic trioxide, a potent drug for treatment of hematological malignancies, and demonstrate that it has significantly better activity in a murine lymphoma model than the free drug. In parallel, we have developed a novel in vitro assay of ovarian follicle function that predicts in vivo ovarian toxicity of therapeutic agents. Our results reveal that the nanotherapeutic agent is not only more active against lymphoma, but is fertoprotective, i.e., it is much less deleterious to ovarian function than the parent drug. Thus, our in vitro assay allows rapid evaluation of both established and experimental anticancer drugs on ovarian reserve and can inform the selection of efficacious and fertility-sparing treatment regimens for reproductive-age women diagnosed with cancer. PMID:23526987

  19. In Vitro Activity of Miltefosine against Candida albicans under Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Conditions and In Vivo Efficacy in a Murine Model of Oral Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Rozental, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    The generation of a new antifungal against Candida albicans biofilms has become a major priority, since biofilm formation by this opportunistic pathogenic fungus is usually associated with an increased resistance to azole antifungal drugs and treatment failures. Miltefosine is an alkyl phospholipid with promising antifungal activity. Here, we report that, when tested under planktonic conditions, miltefosine displays potent in vitro activity against multiple fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, including isolates overexpressing efflux pumps and/or with well-characterized Erg11 mutations. Moreover, miltefosine inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation and displays activity against preformed biofilms. Serial passage experiments confirmed that miltefosine has a reduced potential to elicit resistance, and screening of a library of C. albicans transcription factor mutants provided additional insight into the activity of miltefosine against C. albicans growing under planktonic and biofilm conditions. Finally, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of topical treatment with miltefosine in the murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Overall, our results confirm the potential of miltefosine as a promising antifungal drug candidate, in particular for the treatment of azole-resistant and biofilm-associated superficial candidiasis. PMID:26416861

  20. In Vitro Activity of Miltefosine against Candida albicans under Planktonic and Biofilm Growth Conditions and In Vivo Efficacy in a Murine Model of Oral Candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Vila, Taissa Vieira Machado; Chaturvedi, Ashok K; Rozental, Sonia; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L

    2015-12-01

    The generation of a new antifungal against Candida albicans biofilms has become a major priority, since biofilm formation by this opportunistic pathogenic fungus is usually associated with an increased resistance to azole antifungal drugs and treatment failures. Miltefosine is an alkyl phospholipid with promising antifungal activity. Here, we report that, when tested under planktonic conditions, miltefosine displays potent in vitro activity against multiple fluconazole-susceptible and -resistant C. albicans clinical isolates, including isolates overexpressing efflux pumps and/or with well-characterized Erg11 mutations. Moreover, miltefosine inhibits C. albicans biofilm formation and displays activity against preformed biofilms. Serial passage experiments confirmed that miltefosine has a reduced potential to elicit resistance, and screening of a library of C. albicans transcription factor mutants provided additional insight into the activity of miltefosine against C. albicans growing under planktonic and biofilm conditions. Finally, we demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of topical treatment with miltefosine in the murine model of oropharyngeal candidiasis. Overall, our results confirm the potential of miltefosine as a promising antifungal drug candidate, in particular for the treatment of azole-resistant and biofilm-associated superficial candidiasis.

  1. UNC569, a novel small-molecule mer inhibitor with efficacy against acute lymphoblastic leukemia in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Christoph, Sandra; Deryckere, Deborah; Schlegel, Jennifer; Frazer, J Kimble; Batchelor, Lance A; Trakhimets, Alesia Y; Sather, Susan; Hunter, Debra M; Cummings, Christopher T; Liu, Jing; Yang, Chao; Kireev, Dmitri; Simpson, Catherine; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline; Hull-Ryde, Emily A; Janzen, William P; Johnson, Gary L; Wang, Xiaodong; Frye, Stephen V; Earp, H Shelton; Graham, Douglas K

    2013-11-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy in children. Although survival rates have improved, patients with certain biologic subtypes still have suboptimal outcomes. Current chemotherapeutic regimens are associated with short- and long-term toxicities and novel, less toxic therapeutic strategies are needed. Mer receptor tyrosine kinase is ectopically expressed in ALL patient samples and cell lines. Inhibition of Mer expression reduces prosurvival signaling, increases chemosensitivity, and delays development of leukemia in vivo, suggesting that Mer tyrosine kinase inhibitors are excellent candidates for targeted therapies. Brain and spinal tumors are the second most common malignancies in childhood. Multiple chemotherapy approaches and radiotherapies have been attempted, yet overall survival remains dismal. Mer is also abnormally expressed in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT), providing a rationale for targeting Mer as a therapeutic strategy. We have previously described UNC569, the first small-molecule Mer inhibitor. This article describes the biochemical and biologic effects of UNC569 in ALL and AT/RT. UNC569 inhibited Mer activation and downstream signaling through ERK1/2 and AKT, determined by Western blot analysis. Treatment with UNC569 reduced proliferation/survival in liquid culture, decreased colony formation in methylcellulose/soft agar, and increased sensitivity to cytotoxic chemotherapies. MYC transgenic zebrafish with T-ALL were treated with UNC569 (4 μmol/L for two weeks). Fluorescence was quantified as indicator of the distribution of lymphoblasts, which express Mer and enhanced GFP. UNC569 induced more than 50% reduction in tumor burden compared with vehicle- and mock-treated fish. These data support further development of Mer inhibitors as effective therapies in ALL and AT/RT.

  2. Chromatin structure of recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus proviral DNAs that contain tax-responsive sequences from human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II in the presence and absence of tax.

    PubMed Central

    Kitado, H; Fan, H

    1989-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus types I and II (HTLV-I and HTLV-II) are replication-competent retroviruses which contain two additional regulatory proteins, tax and rex. tax is a transcriptional transactivator of the HTLV-I or HTLV-II long terminal repeat (LTR) and also of some heterologous promoters. To investigate the mechanism of tax transactivation, we used chimeric Moloney murine leukemia viruses (M-MuLVs) with LTRs containing tax-responsive sequences from the HTLV-II LTR (nucleotides -273 to -32). Mo+HTLV-II+ M-MuLV contained the HTLV II sequences inserted into the wild-type M-MuLV LTR at nucleotide -150, whereas delta Mo+HTLV-II+ M-MuLV contained the same sequences inserted into an M-MuLV LTR lacking its own enhancer region. HTLV-II tax (tax II)-positive mouse cells (15S-5a) infected with Mo+HTLV-II+ M-MuLV or delta Mo+HTLV-II+ M-MuLV showed higher rates of viral transcription in nuclear run-on assays than did infected tax-negative NIH 3T3 cells. The chromatin structure of these viruses was investigated by high-resolution mapping of DNase I-hypersensitive (HS) sites. Three prominent HS sites were associated with HTLV-II sequences in proviral chromatin both in tax-positive and in tax-negative cells. The spacing resembled that of the 21-base-pair (bp) repeats, but the HS sites were displaced approximately 50 bp upstream of the 21-bp repeats. This suggested that cellular proteins bound to the HTLV-II sequences in the presence or absence of tax. No direct effect of tax on chromatin structure was found. These in vivo results were consistent with results of in vitro DNase footprinting studies performed by other investigators. Images PMID:2786092

  3. Efficacy assessment of sustained intraperitoneal paclitaxel therapy in a murine model of ovarian cancer using bioluminescent imaging.

    PubMed

    Vassileva, V; Moriyama, E H; De Souza, R; Grant, J; Allen, C J; Wilson, B C; Piquette-Miller, M

    2008-12-16

    We evaluated the pre-clinical efficacy of a novel intraperitoneal (i.p.) sustained-release paclitaxel formulation (PTX(ePC)) using bioluminescent imaging (BLI) in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Human ovarian carcinoma cells stably expressing the firefly luciferase gene (SKOV3(Luc)) were injected i.p. into SCID mice. Tumour growth was evaluated during sustained or intermittent courses of i.p. treatment with paclitaxel (PTX). In vitro bioluminescence strongly correlated with cell survival and cytotoxicity. Bioluminescent imaging detected tumours before their macroscopic appearance and strongly correlated with tumour weight and survival. As compared with intermittent therapy with Taxol, sustained PTX(ePC) therapy resulted in significant reduction of tumour proliferation, weight and BLI signal intensity, enhanced apoptosis and increased survival times. Our results demonstrate that BLI is a useful tool in the pre-clinical evaluation of therapeutic interventions for ovarian cancer. Moreover, these results provide evidence of enhanced therapeutic efficacy with the sustained PTX(ePC) implant system, which could potentially translate into successful clinical outcomes.

  4. Extended UVB Exposures Alter Tumorigenesis and Treatment Efficacy in a Murine Model of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Erin M.; Tober, Kathleen L.; Riggenbach, Judith A.; Kusewitt, Donna F.; Young, Gregory S.; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies support a link between cumulative sun exposure and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development. However, the presumed effects of extended ultraviolet light B (UVB) exposure on tumorigenesis in the sexes have not been formally investigated. We examined differences in ultimate tumorigenesis at 25 weeks in mice exposed to UVB for either 10 or 25 weeks. Additionally, we investigated the effect of continued UVB exposure on the efficacy of topical treatment with anti-inflammatory (diclofenac) or antioxidant (C E Ferulic or vitamin E) compounds on modulating tumorigenesis. Vehicle-treated mice in the 25-week UVB exposure model exhibited an increased tumor burden and a higher percentage of malignant tumors compared to mice in the 10-week exposure model, which correlated with increases in total and mutant p53-positive epidermal cells. Only topical diclofenac decreased tumor number and burden in both sexes regardless of UVB exposure length. These data support the commonly assumed but not previously demonstrated fact that increased cumulative UVB exposure increases the risk of UVB-induced SCC development and can also affect therapeutic efficacies. Our study suggests that cessation of UVB exposure by at-risk patients may decrease tumor development and that topical NSAIDs such as diclofenac may be chemopreventive. PMID:24286011

  5. Efficacy of a new fluoroquinolone, JNJ-Q2, in murine models of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae skin, respiratory, and systemic infections.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Jeffrey; Hilliard, Jamese J; Morrow, Brian J; Melton, John L; Flamm, Robert K; Barron, Alfred M; Lynch, A Simon

    2011-12-01

    The in vivo efficacy of JNJ-Q2, a new broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone (FQ), was evaluated in a murine septicemia model with methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and in a Streptococcus pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection model. JNJ-Q2 and comparators were also evaluated in an acute murine skin infection model using a community-acquired MRSA strain and in an established skin infection (ESI) model using a hospital-acquired strain, for which the selection of resistant mutants was also determined. JNJ-Q2 demonstrated activity in the MSSA septicemia model that was comparable to that moxifloxacin (JNJ-Q2 50% effective dose [ED(50)], 0.2 mg/kg of body weight administered subcutaneously [s.c.] and 2 mg/kg administered orally [p.o.]) and activity in the MRSA septicemia model that was superior to that of vancomycin (JNJ-Q2 ED(50), 1.6 mg/kg administered s.c.). In an S. pneumoniae lower respiratory tract infection model, JNJ-Q2 displayed activity (ED(50), 1.9 mg/kg administered s.c. and 7.4 mg/kg administered p.o.) that was comparable to that of gemifloxacin and superior to that of moxifloxacin. In both MRSA skin infection models, treatment with JNJ-Q2 resulted in dose-dependent reductions in bacterial titers in the skin, with the response to JNJ-Q2 at each dose exceeding the responses of the comparators ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, linezolid, and vancomycin. Additionally, in the ESI model, JNJ-Q2 showed a low or nondetectable propensity for ciprofloxacin resistance selection, in contrast to the selection of ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants observed for both ciprofloxacin and moxifloxacin. JNJ-Q2 demonstrated activity that was comparable or superior to the activity of fluoroquinolone or antistaphylococcal comparators in several local and systemic skin infection models performed with both S. aureus and S. pneumoniae and is currently being evaluated in phase II human clinical trials.

  6. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    MedlinePlus

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  7. Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. It is the most common type of childhood cancer. ... blood cells help your body fight infection. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  8. Inhibition of Feline leukemia virus replication by the integrase inhibitor Raltegravir.

    PubMed

    Cattori, Valentino; Weibel, Beatrice; Lutz, Hans

    2011-08-26

    The oncogenic gammaretrovirus Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) has been the leading cause of death among domestic cats until the introduction of efficient diagnostics and vaccines in the late 1980s. So far, no efficient treatment for viremic animals is available. Hence, use of the FeLV model to evaluate antiretroviral therapies applied to HIV is a timely task. The efficacy of the integrase inhibitor Raltegravir, which is widely used for the treatment of HIV in humans, has been assessed in vitro for the FeLV-A/Glasgow-1 strain. EC(50) values for FeLV-A inhibition in feline cell lines are in the range of that observed for HIV and xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related gammaretrovirus. Therefore, Raltegravir may be a potential therapeutical agent for felids with progressive FeLV infection.

  9. The STAT5 Inhibitor Pimozide Displays Efficacy in Models of Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Driven by FLT3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik A.; Walker, Sarah R.; Xiang, Michael; Weisberg, Ellen; Bar-Natan, Michal; Barrett, Rosemary; Liu, Suiyang; Kharbanda, Surender; Christie, Amanda L.; Nicolais, Maria; Griffin, James D.; Stone, Richard M.; Kung, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor STAT5 is essential for the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) containing the FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation. FLT3 ITD is a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that drives the activation of STAT5, leading to the growth and survival of AML cells. Although there has been some success in identifying tyrosine kinase inhibitors that block the function of FLT3 ITD, there remains a continued need for effective treatment of this disease. We have identified the psychotropic drug pimozide as an effective inhibitor of STAT5 function. Pimozide inhibits the tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5, leading to the death of AML cells through the induction of apoptosis. Pimozide shows a combinatorial effect with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors midostaurin (PKC412) and sunitinib in the inhibition of STAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation and the induction of apoptosis. Significantly, pimozide reduces the tumor burden in a mouse model of FLT3-driven AML. Therefore, identifying STAT5 inhibitors may provide a new avenue for the treatment of AML, and these may be effective alone or in combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23264850

  10. Rationale and efficacy of proteasome inhibitor combined with arsenic trioxide in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, S; Alex, A A; Chendamarai, E; Balasundaram, N; Palani, H K; David, S; Kulkarni, U; Aiyaz, M; Mugasimangalam, R; Korula, A; Abraham, A; Srivastava, A; Padua, R A; Chomienne, C; George, B; Balasubramanian, P; Mathews, V

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) mediates PML-RARA (promyelocytic leukemia–retinoic acid receptor-α) oncoprotein degradation via the proteasome pathway and this degradation appears to be critical for achieving cure in acute promyeloytic leukemia (APL). We have previously demonstrated significant micro-environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR) to ATO in APL. Here we demonstrate that this EMDR could be effectively overcome by combining a proteasome inhibitor (bortezomib) with ATO. A synergistic effect on combining these two agents in vitro was noted in both ATO-sensitive and ATO-resistant APL cell lines. The mechanism of this synergy involved downregulation of the nuclear factor-κB pathway, increase in unfolded protein response (UPR) and an increase in reactive oxygen species generation in the malignant cell. We also noted that PML-RARA oncoprotein is effectively cleared with this combination in spite of proteasome inhibition by bortezomib, and that this clearance is mediated through a p62-dependent autophagy pathway. We further demonstrated that proteasome inhibition along with ATO had an additive effect in inducing autophagy. The beneficial effect of this combination was further validated in an animal model and in an on-going clinical trial. This study raises the potential of a non-myelotoxic proteasome inhibitor replacing anthracyclines in the management of high-risk and relapsed APL. PMID:27560113

  11. Efficacy and Toxicity Management of 19-28z CAR T Cell Therapy in B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Davila, Marco L.; Riviere, Isabelle; Wang, Xiuyan; Bartido, Shirley; Park, Jae; Curran, Kevin; Chung, Stephen S.; Stefanski, Jolanta; Borquez-Ojeda, Oriana; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; He, Qing; Fink, Mitsu; Shinglot, Himaly; Youssif, Maher; Satter, Mark; Wang, Yongzeng; Hosey, James; Quintanilla, Hilda; Halton, Elizabeth; Bernal, Yvette; Bouhassira, Diana C. G.; Arcila, Maria E.; Gonen, Mithat; Roboz, Gail J.; Maslak, Peter; Douer, Dan; Frattini, Mark G.; Giralt, Sergio; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2015-01-01

    We report on 16 patients with relapsed or refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) that we treated with autologous T cells expressing the 19-28z chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific to the CD19 antigen. The overall complete response rate was 88%, which allowed us to transition most of these patients to a standard-of-care allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT). This therapy was as effective in high-risk patients with Philadelphia chromosome–positive (Ph+) disease as in those with relapsed disease after previous allo-SCT. Through systematic analysis of clinical data and serum cytokine levels over the first 21 days after T cell infusion, we have defined diagnostic criteria for a severe cytokine release syndrome (sCRS), with the goal of better identifying the subset of patients who will likely require therapeutic intervention with corticosteroids or interleukin-6 receptor blockade to curb the sCRS. Additionally, we found that serum C-reactive protein, a readily available laboratory study, can serve as a reliable indicator for the severity of the CRS. Together, our data provide strong support for conducting a multicenter phase 2 study to further evaluate 19-28z CAR T cells in B-ALL and a road map for patient management at centers now contemplating the use of CAR T cell therapy. PMID:24553386

  12. Impact of ABC single nucleotide polymorphisms upon the efficacy and toxicity of induction chemotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Megías-Vericat, Juan Eduardo; Montesinos, Pau; Herrero, María José; Moscardó, Federico; Bosó, Virginia; Rojas, Luis; Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Hervás, David; Boluda, Blanca; García-Robles, Ana; Rodríguez-Veiga, Rebeca; Martín-Cerezuela, María; Cervera, José; Sendra, Luis; Sanz, Jaime; Miguel, Antonio; Lorenzo, Ignacio; Poveda, José Luis; Sanz, Miguel Ángel; Aliño, Salvador F

    2017-05-01

    Anthracycline uptake could be affected by efflux pumps of the ABC family. The influence of 7 SNPs of ABC genes was evaluated in 225 adult de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. After multivariate logistic regression there were no significant differences in complete remission, though induction death was associated to ABCB1 triple variant haplotype (p = .020). The ABCB1 triple variant haplotype was related to higher nephrotoxicity (p = .016), as well as this haplotype and the variant allele of ABCB1 rs1128503, rs2032582 to hepatotoxicity (p = .001; p = .049; p < .001). Furthermore, the variant allele of ABCC1 rs4148350 was related to severe hepatotoxicity (p = .044), and the variant allele of ABCG2 rs2231142 was associated to greater cardiac (p = .004) and lung toxicities (p = .038). Delayed time to neutropenia recovery was observed with ABCB1 rs2032582 variant (p = .047). This study shows the impact of ABC polymorphisms in AML chemotherapy safety. Further prospective studies with larger population are needed to validate these associations.

  13. Recombinant soluble IFN receptor (sIFNAR2) exhibits intrinsic therapeutic efficacy in a murine model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Suardíaz, M; Clemente, D; Marin-Bañasco, C; Orpez, T; Hurtado-Guerrero, I; Pavía, J; Pinto-Medel, M J; De Castro, F; Leyva, L; Fernández, O; Oliver, B

    2016-11-01

    Endogenous interferon beta (IFNβ) is an important cytokine involved in several chronic inflammatory diseases, such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). In spite of the numerous therapeutic approaches available for MS patients, the administration of recombinant IFNβ continues being one of the first line treatment to these patients. The soluble form of IFNβ receptor (sIFNAR2) could act as critical regulator of the endogenous and the systemically administered IFNβ, but whether it functions as an agonist or antagonist of its ligand is not completely elucidated. Morover, the possible role of sIFNAR2 in autoimmune diseases like MS is still unknown and so far overlooked. Here we evaluated the efficacy of the combined therapy of IFNβ and our recombinant protein analogous to human sIFNAR2 as a treatment in a chronic mice model of MS (CP-EAE). We also tested the effect of the sIFNAR2 administered as a monotherapy over these EAE-animals. The results showed that our recombinant sIFNAR2 protein potentiates the immunomodulatory effects of exogenous IFNβ in CP-EAE by increasing the reduction of the induced inflammation and the tissue damage. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that sIFNAR2 shows intrinsic properties by modulating the CP-EAE progression and the neuroinflammation processes related to this disease. Another intrinsic activity showed by sIFNAR2 is the inhibition of the T cells proliferation, which increase its potential as therapeutic molecule.

  14. [Analysis of the therapeutic efficacy and prognosis for acute myeloid leukemia M2a patients treated by IA and DA regimens].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Yuan, Hai-Long; Duan, Xian-Lin; Wang, Lei; Cao, Hai-Zhou; Xu, Jian-Li; Qu, Jian-Hua

    2014-08-01

    This study was purposed to compare the therapeutic efficacy and prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia M2a (AML-M2a) patients treated by idarubicin (IDA) combined with cytarabine (Ara-C) (IA) and daunorubicin (DNR) combined cytarabine (Ara-C) (DA) regimens. The clinical data of 65 patients with AML-M2a in our hospital were collected from May 2009 to May 2013 and analyzed. The results indicated the complete remission in IA group was slightly higher than that in DA group, there was no statistically significant difference(P > 0.05); leukocyte minimum value in IA group [(0.58 ± 0.40)×10(9)/L] was obviously lower than that in DA group [(0.99 ± 0.67)×10(9)/L] (P < 0.05); neutrophil minimum value in IA group [(0.19 ± 0.09)×10(9)/L] was significantly lower than that in DA group [(0.21 ± 0.16)×10(9)/L] (P < 0.05); the neutropenia duration in IA group (12.59 ± 5.31)d was much longer than that in DA group (9.17 ± 7.04)d (P < 0.05). The median survival time of patients in IA group was 36.67 months, which was obviously longer than that of patients in DA group (21.45 months) (P < 0.05). The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) value and chemotherapy regimens were the independently risk factor affecting the prognosis of AML-M2a patients. It is concluded that as compared with DA regimen, the IA regimen can prolong the median survival time and has better long-term therapeutic efficacy, thus it can be used as the first chemotherapy regimen for treatment of AML-M2a.

  15. Phase 1/2 study to assess the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of barasertib (AZD1152) in patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Muus, Petra; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Rousselot, Philippe; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Ifrah, Norbert; Martinelli, Giovanni; Amadori, Sergio; Berman, Ellin; Sonneveld, Pieter; Jongen-Lavrencic, Mojca; Rigaudeau, Sophie; Stockman, Paul; Goudie, Alison; Faderl, Stefan; Jabbour, Elias; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this 2-part phase 1/2 study was to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) of the potent and selective Aurora B kinase inhibitor barasertib (AZD1152) in patients with newly diagnosed or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Part A determined the MTD of barasertib administered as a continuous 7-day infusion every 21 days. In part B, the efficacy of barasertib was evaluated at the MTD. In part A, 32 patients were treated with barasertib 50 mg (n = 3), 100 mg (n = 3), 200 mg (n = 3), 400 mg (n = 4), 800 mg (n = 7), 1200 mg (n = 6), and 1600 mg (n = 6). Dose-limiting toxicities (stomatitis/mucosal inflammation events) were reported in the 800 mg (n = 1), 1200 mg (n = 1), and 1600 mg (n = 2) groups. The MTD was defined as 1200 mg. In part B, 32 patients received barasertib 1200 mg. In each part of the study, 8 of 32 patients had a hematologic response according to Cheson AML criteria. The most commonly reported grade ≥ 3 events were febrile neutropenia (n = 24) and stomatitis/mucosal inflammation (n = 16). We concluded that the MTD of barasertib is 1200 mg in patients with relapsed or newly diagnosed AML. Toxicity was manageable and barasertib treatment resulted in an overall hematologic response rate of 25%. This study is registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00497991. PMID:21976672

  16. Neuroprotective efficacy of a new brain-penetrating C-Abl inhibitor in a murine Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Imam, Syed Z; Trickler, William; Kimura, Shinya; Binienda, Zbigniew K; Paule, Merle G; Slikker, William; Li, Senlin; Clark, Robert A; Ali, Syed F

    2013-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that oxidative and nitrative mechanisms account for much of the dopaminergic neuronal injury in Parkinson's disease (PD). The ubiquitously expressed non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl is activated by oxidative stress and thus, may play a role in redox-mediated neurodegeneration. Recently, we reported that c-Abl is activated in PD and that a c-Abl inhibitor mitigated neuronal damage in a PD animal model, suggesting a novel neuroprotective therapeutic approach. In the studies presented here, we evaluated the efficacy of a potent and clinically relevant second-generation irreversible Abl kinase inhibitor, INNO-406, as a therapeutic agent for PD. Our studies reveal that INNO-406 is capable of preventing the progression of dopaminergic neuronal damage in a toxin-induced C57 mouse model of PD. Using bovine brain microvessel endothelium as an in vitro blood-brain barrier (BBB) model, we detected rapid and significant transfer of INNO-406. Additionally, pharmacokinetic analyses demonstrated significant nanomolar concentrations of INNO-406 in brain in the presence or absence of MPTP administration, however, INNO-406 did not alter the brain levels of MPP+ in MPTP-treated mice. Finally, we showed that 10 mg/kg of INNO-406 given to C57 mice for one week before MPTP treatment (4×20 mg/kg i.p., every 2 h) and then for one week after MPTP treatment decreased the loss of dopamine in the striatum by 45% and the loss of TH+ neurons in substantia nigra pars compacts by 40%. This treatment regimen also abrogated activation of c-Abl, tyrosine phosphorylation of the Abl substrate and E3-ubiquitin ligase parkin, and accumulation of the toxic parkin substrate AIMP2. We propose that compounds of the INNO-406 class of Abl inhibitors will be useful new neuroprotective drugs for the treatment of PD-like pathology in preclinical systems that should be easily translated to the clinic.

  17. Enhanced efficacy of synergistic combinations of antimicrobial peptides with caspofungin versus Candida albicans in insect and murine models of systemic infection.

    PubMed

    MacCallum, D M; Desbois, A P; Coote, P J

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether combinations of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with caspofungin display enhanced antifungal activity versus Candida albicans in vitro and in vivo. Three conventional AMPs that satisfied criteria favouring their potential development as novel antifungals were selected for investigation. Colistin sulphate was also included as a cyclic peptide antibiotic used in the clinic. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for each antifungal agent and checkerboard assays were used to determine fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) values for dual combinations of AMPs or colistin with caspofungin. Viability assays were performed for the same combinations in order to investigate fungicidal interactions. Synergistic antifungal combinations were then tested for efficacy in vivo and compared to monotherapies in wax moth larva and murine models of systemic C. albicans infection. In combination with caspofungin, each of the AMPs [hMUC7-12, DsS3(1-16), hLF(1-11)] and colistin were synergistic and candidacidal in vitro. The treatment of infected wax moth larvae with combinations of caspofungin with hMUC7-12, DsS3(1-16) or colistin resulted in significant enhancements in survival compared to treatment with monotherapies. Notably, the treatment of C. albicans-infected mice with a combination of caspofungin and DsS3(1-16) resulted in the enhancement of survival compared to groups treated with just the individual agents. This study demonstrates that combination therapies containing caspofungin and AMPs or colistin merit further development as potential novel treatments for C. albicans infections.

  18. UNC569, a novel small molecule Mer inhibitor with efficacy against acute lymphoblastic leukemia in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Christoph, Sandra; DeRyckere, Deborah; Schlegel, Jennifer; Frazer, J. Kimble; Batchelor, Lance A.; Trakhimets, Alesia Y.; Sather, Susan; Hunter, Debra M.; Cummings, Christopher; Liu, Jing; Yang, Chao; Kireev, Dmitri; Simpson, Catherine; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Janzen, William P.; Johnson, Gary L.; Wang, Xiaodong; Frye, Stephen V.; Earp, H. Shelton; Graham, Douglas K.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy in children. Although survival rates have improved, patients with certain biological subtypes still have suboptimal outcomes. Current chemotherapeutic regimens are associated with short- and long-term toxicities and novel, less toxic therapeutic strategies are needed. Mer receptor tyrosine kinase is ectopically expressed in ALL patient samples and cell lines. Inhibition of Mer expression reduces pro-survival signaling, increases chemosensitivity, and delays development of leukaemia in vivo suggesting that Mer tyrosine kinase inhibitors are excellent candidates for targeted therapies. Brain and spinal tumors are the second most common malignancies in childhood. Multiple chemotherapy approaches and radiation have been attempted, yet overall survival remains dismal. Mer is also abnormally expressed in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (ATRT), providing a rationale for targeting Mer as a therapeutic strategy. We have previously described UNC569, the first small molecule Mer inhibitor. This manuscript describes the biochemical and biological effects of UNC569 in ALL and ATRT. UNC569 inhibited Mer activation and downstream signaling through ERK1/2 and AKT, determined by western blot analysis. Treatment with UNC569 reduced proliferation/survival in liquid culture, decreased colony formation in methylcellulose/soft agar, and increased sensitivity to cytotoxic chemotherapies. MYC transgenic zebrafish with T-ALL were treated with UNC569 (4 µM for 2 weeks). Fluorescence was quantified as indicator of the distribution of lymphoblasts, which express Mer and enhanced green fluorescent protein. UNC569 induced >50% reduction in tumor burden compared to vehicle- and mock-treated fish. These data support further development of Mer inhibitors as effective therapies in ALL and ATRT. PMID:23997116

  19. NT1721, a novel epidithiodiketopiperazine, exhibits potent in vitro and in vivo efficacy against acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kowolik, Claudia M.; Lin, Min; Xie, Jun; Overman, Larry E.; Horne, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy characterized by heterogeneous genetic and epigenetic changes in hematopoietic progenitors that lead to abnormal self-renewal and proliferation. Despite high initial remission rates, prognosis remains poor for most AML patients, especially for those harboring internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations in the fms-related tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3). Here, we report that a novel epidithiodiketopiperazine, NT1721, potently decreased the cell viability of FLT3-ITD+ AML cell lines, displaying IC50 values in the low nanomolar range, while leaving normal CD34+ bone marrow cells largely unaffected. The IC50 values for NT1721 were significantly lower than those for clinically used AML drugs (i.e. cytarabine, sorafenib) in all tested AML cell lines regardless of their FLT3 mutation status. Moreover, combinations of NT1721 with sorafenib or cytarabine showed better antileukemic effects than the single agents in vitro. Combining cytarabine with NT1721 also attenuated the cytarabine-induced FLT3 ligand surge that has been linked to resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Mechanistically, NT1721 depleted DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) protein levels, leading to the re-expression of silenced tumor suppressor genes and apoptosis induction. NT1721 concomitantly decreased the expression of EZH2 and BMI1, two genes that are associated with the maintenance of leukemic stem/progenitor cells. In a systemic FLT3-ITD+ AML mouse model, treatment with NT1721 reduced tumor burdens by > 95% compared to the control and significantly increased survival times. Taken together, our results suggest that NT1721 may represent a promising novel agent for the treatment of AML. PMID:27863389

  20. Efficacy of the hypomethylating agents as frontline, salvage, or consolidation therapy in adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Bernard; Sliesoraitis, Sarunas; Lyerly, Susan; Klepin, Heidi D; Lawrence, Julia; Isom, Scott; Ellis, Leslie R; Manuel, Megan; Dralle, Sarah; Berenzon, Dmitriy; Powell, Bayard L; Pardee, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The hypomethylating agents (HAs), azacitidine and decitabine, have emerged as an alternative to initial and salvage therapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Little is known about how AML responds to hypomethylating agents after standard therapy, and the activity of these agents in a real-world setting is not well studied. We retrospectively examined data for 75 consecutive AML patients at Wake Forest from 2002 to 2011 treated with HAs either as first-line (n = 34), salvage (n = 28), or consolidation (n = 13) therapy. We collected data on age, gender, race, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), cytogenetics, type of treatment, complete remission (CR), complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi), and survival. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazards models. Frontline response rate (CR + CRi) was 26.5 %, and median overall survival (OS) was 3.4 months (95 % CI 1.3-7.4), with 18 % alive at 1 year. In the salvage cohort, the response rate was significantly lower compared to frontline (3.6 versus 26.5 %, p = 0.017). Despite the reduced response, OS from time of HA treatment was longer than frontline at 8.2 months (CI 4.8-10.3). In the consolidation cohort, OS was 13.8 months (CI 8.0-21.6) with one patient in remission more than 30 months from diagnosis. These data suggest that prior cytotoxic therapy decreases marrow response rates to HAs but not survival. Furthermore, use of hypomethylating agents for consolidation resulted in a median overall survival over 1 year in a cohort of older patients. This suggests that hypomethylating agents have activity in all phases of AML treatment.

  1. Efficacy of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibitors with diverse isoform selectivity profiles for inhibiting the survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Göckeritz, Elisa; Kerwien, Susan; Baumann, Michael; Wigger, Marion; Vondey, Verena; Neumann, Lars; Landwehr, Thomas; Wendtner, Clemens M; Klein, Christian; Liu, Ningshu; Hallek, Michael; Frenzel, Lukas P; Krause, Günter

    2015-11-01

    Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatiylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated signaling holds great promise for treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Therefore we assessed three structurally related PI3K inhibitors targeting the PI3K-δ isoform for their ability to inhibit the survival of freshly isolated CLL cells. The purely PI3K-δ-selective inhibitor idelalisib was compared to copanlisib (BAY 80-6946) and duvelisib (IPI-145), with isoform target profiles that additionally include PI3K-α or PI3K-γ, respectively. The concentrations leading to half-maximal reduction of the survival of CLL cells were more than ten-fold lower for copanlisib than for idelalisib and duvelisib. At concentrations reflecting the biological availability of the different inhibitors, high levels of apoptotic response among CLL samples were attained more consistently with copanlisib than with idelalisib. Copanlisib selectively reduced the survival of CLL cells compared to T cells and to B cells from healthy donors. In addition copanlisib and duvelisib impaired the migration of CLL cells towards CXCL12 to a greater extent than equimolar idelalisib. Similarly copanlisib and duvelisib reduced the survival of CLL cells in co-cultures with the bone marrow stroma cell line HS-5 more strongly than idelalisib. Survival inhibition by copanlisib and idelalisib was enhanced by the monoclonal CD20 antibodies rituximab and obinutuzumab (GA101), while antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity mediated by alemtuzumab and peripheral blood mononuclear cells was not substantially impaired by both PI3K inhibitors for the CLL-derived JVM-3 cell line as target cells. Taken together, targeting the α- and δ- p110 isoforms with copanlisib may be a useful strategy for the treatment of CLL and warrants further clinical investigation.

  2. Comparative Efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibody-streptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTA-biotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in

  3. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    DOE PAGES

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; ...

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targetingmore » either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0% cured with 177Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion 90Y was therapeutically superior to 177Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT

  4. Efficacy of lenalidomide in relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liang; Zhao, Ming; Zhu, Yuan-Chao; Hu, Xin; Yang, Li-Ping; Liu, Hui

    2016-09-01

    Therapeutic results of relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are very disappointing at present. Lenalidomide has been proved to be effective for relapsed/refractory CLL as a single agent or in combination with various chemo-immunotherapeutic regimens. However, current clinical experience in its usage is still limited. Because of existing considerable variability in different studies, a systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to describe overall response rate (ORR) of lenalidomide in patients with relapsed/refractory CLL. Pooled estimate of cumulative prevalence of total ORR was 42.23 % (95 % confidence interval [CI], 32.49-52.61 %), while pooled ORR in regimen with lenalidomide plus anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAbs) and lenalidomide mono-therapy were 60.01 % (95 % CI, 53.86-65.86 %) and 24.38 % (95 % CI, 16.15-35.06 %), respectively. There was no significant difference between L + R (lenalidomide plus rituximab) group and L + O (lenalidomide plus ofatumumab) group, with pooled ORR of 66.38 % (95 % CI, 57.96-73.87 %) and 57.40 % (95 % CI, 46.46-67.65 %), respectively. When co-administrated with anti-CD20 mAbs, dosage of lenalidomide was not the key factor of ORR in combination therapy. Pooled ORR of patient with high-risk cytogenetic in L + anti-CD20 mAbs group was 56.74 % (95 % CI, 45.53-67.30 %). In comparison with patients without high-risk cytogenetic receiving the same treatment regimen, no significant difference was observed, with relative risk (RR) of 0.87 (95 % CI 0.68-1.11). Our finding demonstrated that lenalidomide plus anti-CD20 mAbs could be an efficient therapy regimen for relapsed/refractory CLL patients, especially for those with high-risk cytogenetic factor.

  5. Relationship between SU subdomains that regulate the receptor-mediated transition from the native (fusion-inhibited) to the fusion-active conformation of the murine leukemia virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Ruggieri, Alessia; Boson, Bertrand; Maurice, Marielle; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2002-10-01

    Envelope glycoproteins (Env) of retroviruses are trimers of SU (surface) and TM (transmembrane) heterodimers and are expressed on virions in fusion-competent forms that are likely to be metastable. Activation of the viral receptor-binding domain (RBD) via its interaction with a cell surface receptor is thought to initiate a cascade of events that lead to refolding of the Env glycoprotein into its stable fusion-active conformation. While the fusion-active conformation of the TM subunit has been described in detail for several retroviruses, little is known about the fusion-competent structure of the retroviral glycoproteins or the molecular events that mediate the transition between the two conformations. By characterizing Env chimeras between the ecotropic and amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) SUs as well as a set of point mutants, we show that alterations of the conformation of the SU glycoprotein strongly elevate Env fusogenicity by disrupting the stability of the Env complex. Compensatory mutations that restored both Env stability and fusion control were also identified, allowing definition of interactions within the Env complex that maintain the stability of the native Env complex. We show that, in the receptor-unbound form, structural interactions between the N terminus of the viral RBD (NTR domain), the proline-rich region (PRR), and the distal part of the C-terminal domain of the SU subunit maintain a conformation of the glycoprotein that is fusion inhibitory. Additionally, we identified mutations that disrupt this fusion-inhibitory conformation and allow fusion activation in the absence of viral receptors, provided that receptor-activated RBD fragments are added in trans during infection. Other mutations were identified that allow fusion activation in the absence of receptors for both the viral glycoprotein and the trans-acting RBD. Finally, we found mutations of the SU that bypass in cis the requirement for the NTR domain in fusion activation. All

  6. Relationship between SU Subdomains That Regulate the Receptor-Mediated Transition from the Native (Fusion-Inhibited) to the Fusion-Active Conformation of the Murine Leukemia Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Lavillette, Dimitri; Ruggieri, Alessia; Boson, Bertrand; Maurice, Marielle; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2002-01-01

    Envelope glycoproteins (Env) of retroviruses are trimers of SU (surface) and TM (transmembrane) heterodimers and are expressed on virions in fusion-competent forms that are likely to be metastable. Activation of the viral receptor-binding domain (RBD) via its interaction with a cell surface receptor is thought to initiate a cascade of events that lead to refolding of the Env glycoprotein into its stable fusion-active conformation. While the fusion-active conformation of the TM subunit has been described in detail for several retroviruses, little is known about the fusion-competent structure of the retroviral glycoproteins or the molecular events that mediate the transition between the two conformations. By characterizing Env chimeras between the ecotropic and amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) SUs as well as a set of point mutants, we show that alterations of the conformation of the SU glycoprotein strongly elevate Env fusogenicity by disrupting the stability of the Env complex. Compensatory mutations that restored both Env stability and fusion control were also identified, allowing definition of interactions within the Env complex that maintain the stability of the native Env complex. We show that, in the receptor-unbound form, structural interactions between the N terminus of the viral RBD (NTR domain), the proline-rich region (PRR), and the distal part of the C-terminal domain of the SU subunit maintain a conformation of the glycoprotein that is fusion inhibitory. Additionally, we identified mutations that disrupt this fusion-inhibitory conformation and allow fusion activation in the absence of viral receptors, provided that receptor-activated RBD fragments are added in trans during infection. Other mutations were identified that allow fusion activation in the absence of receptors for both the viral glycoprotein and the trans-acting RBD. Finally, we found mutations of the SU that bypass in cis the requirement for the NTR domain in fusion activation. All

  7. [Analysis of efficacy and prognosis of induction chemotherapy in 76 elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (non-APL)].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Niu, Jian-Hua; Zhu, Cheng-Ying; Zhang, Qi; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Yao, Zi-Long; Zhou, Min-Hang; Wang, Quan-Shun; Yu, Li; Jing, Yu

    2014-08-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (non-APL). The clinical data of 76 elderly ( ≥ 60 old years) AML (non-APL) patients from January 2000 to January 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. According to treatment methods,the 76 patients were divided into 2 groups: induction chemotherapy group (51 cases) and best supportive treatment group (25 cases). The patients in induction chemotherapy group received the cytarabine-based induction chemotherapy regimens, including DA, MA, HA, IA and CAG; the patients in best supportive treatment group received supportive treatment including hydroxyurea, blood transfusion and so on. The clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis between 2 groups were compared. The results showed that the median survival times of patients in induction chemotherapy and best supportive treatment groups were 5 (0.2-89) and 3 (0.1-17) months respectively, there was significantly statistical difference in median survival time between 2 groups(P < 0.01) suggesting that the induction chemotherapy obviously prolonged the survival time of elderly CML patients. The 5 patients in induction chemotherapy group survived more than 60 months, one of them survived more than nine years. After the first cycle of chemotherapy, the complete remission (CR) rate of patients was 19.6% (10/51), partial remission (PR) rate was 19.6% (10/51), the overall response rate (ORR) was 39.2%, the mortality of patients in induction remission stage was 13.7% (7/51) in induction chemotherapy group; no 1 case in best supportive treatment group reached to CR. The CR rate of patients by using MA regimen was 44.4% and its ORR was 55.5%, which was higher than that by using DA, HA, IA and CAG regimens. The median chemotherapy cycles were 3 (1-14). The follow-up found that the 3 months-survival rate of patients was 65% and 42%, the 6 month-survival rate of patients was 43

  8. Efficacy of Carboplatin Alone and in Combination with ABT888 in Intracranial Murine Models of BRCA-Mutated and BRCA-Wild-Type Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Karginova, Olga; Siegel, Marni B; Van Swearingen, Amanda E D; Deal, Allison M; Adamo, Barbara; Sambade, Maria J; Bazyar, Soha; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Bash, Ryan; O'Neal, Sara; Sandison, Katie; Parker, Joel S; Santos, Charlene; Darr, David; Zamboni, William; Lee, Yueh Z; Miller, C Ryan; Anders, Carey K

    2015-04-01

    Patients with breast cancer brain metastases have extremely limited survival and no approved systemic therapeutics. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) commonly metastasizes to the brain and predicts poor prognosis. TNBC frequently harbors BRCA mutations translating to platinum sensitivity potentially augmented by additional suppression of DNA repair mechanisms through PARP inhibition. We evaluated brain penetrance and efficacy of carboplatin ± the PARP inhibitor ABT888, and investigated gene-expression changes in murine intracranial TNBC models stratified by BRCA and molecular subtype status. Athymic mice were inoculated intracerebrally with BRCA-mutant: SUM149 (basal), MDA-MB-436 (claudin-low); or BRCA-wild-type (wt): MDA-MB-468 (basal), MDA-MB-231BR (claudin-low). TNBC cells were treated with PBS control [intraperitoneal (IP), weekly], carboplatin (50 mg/kg/wk, IP), ABT888 (25 mg/kg/d, oral gavage), or their combination. DNA damage (γ-H2AX), apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3, cC3), and gene expression were measured in intracranial tumors. Carboplatin ± ABT888 significantly improved survival in BRCA-mutant intracranial models compared with control, but did not improve survival in BRCA-wt intracranial models. Carboplatin + ABT888 revealed a modest survival advantage versus carboplatin in BRCA-mutant models. ABT888 yielded a marginal survival benefit in the MDA-MB-436, but not in the SUM149 model. BRCA-mutant SUM149 expression of γ-H2AX and cC3 proteins was elevated in all treatment groups compared with control, whereas BRCA-wt MDA-MB-468 cC3 expression did not increase with treatment. Carboplatin treatment induced common gene-expression changes in BRCA-mutant models. Carboplatin ± ABT888 penetrates the brain and improves survival in BRCA-mutant intracranial TNBC models with corresponding DNA damage and gene-expression changes. Combination therapy represents a potential promising treatment strategy for patients with TNBC brain metastases warranting further

  9. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  10. Comparative Efficacy of Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) Inactivated Whole-Virus Vaccine and Canarypox Virus-Vectored Vaccine during Virulent FeLV Challenge and Immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Patel, M; Carritt, K; Lane, J; Jayappa, H; Stahl, M; Bourgeois, M

    2015-07-01

    Four vaccines for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are available in the United States. This study's purpose was to compare the efficacy of Nobivac feline 2-FeLV (an inactivated, adjuvanted whole-virus vaccine) and PureVax recombinant FeLV (a live, canarypox virus-vectored vaccine) following FeLV challenge. Cats were vaccinated at 9 and 12 weeks with Nobivac feline 2-FeLV (group A, n = 11) or PureVax recombinant FeLV (group B, n = 10). Group C (n = 11) comprised unvaccinated controls. At 3 months postvaccination, cats were immunosuppressed and challenged with FeLV-A/61E. The outcomes measured were persistent antigenemia at 12 weeks postchallenge (PC) and proviral DNA and viral RNA at 3 to 9 weeks PC. Persistent antigenemia was observed in 0 of 11 cats in group A, 5 of 10 cats in group B, and 10 of 11 cats in group C. Group A was significantly protected compared to those in groups B (P < 0.013) and C (P < 0.0001). No difference was found between groups B and C (P > 0.063). The preventable fraction was 100% for group A and 45% for group B. At 9 weeks PC, proviral DNA and viral RNA were detected 1 of 11 cats in group A, 6 of 10 cats in group B, and 9 of 11 cats in group C. Nucleic acid loads were significantly lower in group A than in group C (P < 0.01). Group A had significantly lower proviral DNA loads than group B at weeks 6 to 9 (P < 0.02). The viral RNA loads were significantly lower in group A than in group B at weeks 7 to 9 (P < 0.01). The results demonstrate that Nobivac feline 2-FeLV-vaccinated cats were fully protected against persistent antigenemia and had significantly smaller amounts of proviral DNA and plasma viral RNA loads than PureVax recombinant FeLV-vaccinated cats and unvaccinated controls.

  11. What Is Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Children About Childhood Leukemia What Is Childhood Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells start to grow out ... start making antibodies to fight them. Types of leukemia in children Leukemia is often described as being ...

  12. Murine Typhus

    PubMed Central

    Dzul-Rosado, Karla R; Zavala Velázquez, Jorge Ernesto; Zavala-Castro, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Rickettsia typhi: is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against Rickettsia typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of R. typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus) and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis) are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi. PMID:24893060

  13. Commonly dysregulated genes in murine APL cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wenlin; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Holt, Matthew S.; Link, Daniel C.; Watson, Mark A.; DiPersio, John F.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    To identify genes that are commonly dysregulated in a murine model of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), we first defined gene expression patterns during normal murine myeloid development; serial gene expression profiling studies were performed with primary murine hematopoietic progenitors that were induced to undergo myeloid maturation in vitro with G-CSF. Many genes were reproducibly expressed in restricted developmental “windows,” suggesting a structured hierarchy of expression that is relevant for the induction of developmental fates and/or differentiated cell functions. We compared the normal myeloid developmental transcriptome with that of APL cells derived from mice expressing PML-RARα under control of the murine cathepsin G locus. While many promyelocyte-specific genes were highly expressed in all APL samples, 116 genes were reproducibly dysregulated in many independent APL samples, including Fos, Jun, Egr1, Tnf, and Vcam1. However, this set of commonly dysregulated genes was expressed normally in preleukemic, early myeloid cells from the same mouse model, suggesting that dysregulation occurs as a “downstream” event during disease progression. These studies suggest that the genetic events that lead to APL progression may converge on common pathways that are important for leukemia pathogenesis. PMID:17008535

  14. A review of current murine models of multiple myeloma used to assess the efficacy of therapeutic agents on tumour growth and bone disease.

    PubMed

    Paton-Hough, J; Chantry, A D; Lawson, M A

    2015-08-01

    Pre-clinical in vivo models of multiple myeloma are essential tools for investigating the pathophysiology of multiple myeloma and for testing new therapeutic agents and strategies prior to their potential use in clinical trials. Over the last five decades, several different types of murine models of multiple myeloma have been developed ranging from immunocompetent syngeneic models, e.g. the 5 T series of myeloma cells, to immunocompromised models including the SCID xenograft models, which use human myeloma cell lines or patient-derived cells. Other models include hybrid models featuring the implantation of SCID mice with bone chips (SCID-hu or SCID-rab) or 3-D bone scaffolds (SCID-synth-hu), and mice that have been genetically engineered to develop myeloma. Bearing in mind the differences in these models, it is not surprising that they reflect to varying degrees different aspects of myeloma. Here we review the past and present murine models of myeloma, with particular emphasis on their advantages and limitations, characteristics, and their use in testing therapeutic agents to treat myeloma tumour burden and bone disease.

  15. An automated approach to improve efficacy in detecting residual malignant cancer cell for facilitating prognostic assessment of leukemia: an initial study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yuchen; Lu, Xianglan; Tan, Maxine; Li, Shibo; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of applying automatic interphase FISH cells analysis method for detecting the residual malignancy of post chemotherapy leukemia patients. In the experiment, two clinical specimens with translocation between chromosome No. 9 and 22 or No. 11 and 14 were selected from the patients underwent leukemia diagnosis and treatment. The entire slide of each specimen was first digitalized by a commercial fluorescent microscope using a 40× objective lens. Then, the scanned images were processed by a computer-aided detecting (CAD) scheme to identify the analyzable FISH cells, which is accomplished by applying a series of features including the region size, Brenner gradient and maximum intensity. For each identified cell, the scheme detected and counted the number of the FISH signal dots inside the nucleus, using the adaptive threshold of the region size and distance of the labeled FISH dots. The results showed that the new CAD scheme detected 8093 and 6675 suspicious regions of interest (ROI) in two specimens, among which 4546 and 3807 ROI contain analyzable interphase FISH cell. In these analyzable ROIs, CAD selected 334 and 405 residual malignant cancer cells, which is substantially more than those visually detected in a cytogenetic laboratory of our medical center (334 vs. 122, 405 vs. 160). This investigation indicates that an automatic interphase FISH cell scanning and CAD method has the potential to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the prognostic assessment for leukemia and other genetic related cancer patients in the future.

  16. Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute. Acute childhood leukemias are also divided into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) , depending on ... Bone Marrow Childhood Cancer Neutropenia Stem Cell Transplants Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Chemotherapy Radiation Therapy Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) ...

  17. A Snapshot of Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Discovery Stories of Discovery A Snapshot of Leukemia Incidence and Mortality Leukemia , the second most common ... at the SEER Web site. NCI’s Investment in Leukemia Research To learn more about the research NCI ...

  18. Inoculum effect on the efficacies of amoxicillin-clavulanate, piperacillin-tazobactam, and imipenem against extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in an experimental murine sepsis model.

    PubMed

    Docobo-Pérez, F; López-Cerero, L; López-Rojas, R; Egea, P; Domínguez-Herrera, J; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Pascual, A; Pachón, J

    2013-05-01

    Escherichia coli is commonly involved in infections with a heavy bacterial burden. Piperacillin-tazobactam and carbapenems are among the recommended empirical treatments for health care-associated complicated intra-abdominal infections. In contrast to amoxicillin-clavulanate, both have reduced in vitro activity in the presence of high concentrations of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli bacteria. Our goal was to compare the efficacy of these antimicrobials against different concentrations of two clinical E. coli strains, one an ESBL-producer and the other a non-ESBL-producer, in a murine sepsis model. An experimental sepsis model {~5.5 log10 CFU/g [low inoculum concentration (LI)] or ~7.5 log(10) CFU/g [high inoculum concentration (HI)]} using E. coli strains ATCC 25922 (non-ESBL producer) and Ec1062 (CTX-M-14 producer), which are susceptible to the three antimicrobials, was used. Amoxicillin-clavulanate (50/12.5 mg/kg given intramuscularly [i.m.]), piperacillin-tazobactam (25/3.125 mg/kg given intraperitoneally [i.p.]), and imipenem (30 mg/kg i.m.) were used. Piperacillin-tazobactam and imipenem reduced spleen ATCC 25922 strain concentrations (-2.53 and -2.14 log10 CFU/g [P < 0.05, respectively]) in the HI versus LI groups, while amoxicillin-clavulanate maintained its efficacy (-1.01 log10 CFU/g [no statistically significant difference]). Regarding the Ec1062 strain, the antimicrobials showed lower efficacy in the HI than in the LI groups: -0.73, -1.89, and -1.62 log10 CFU/g (P < 0.05, for piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, and amoxicillin-clavulanate, respectively, although imipenem and amoxicillin-clavulanate were more efficacious than piperacillin-tazobactam). An adapted imipenem treatment (based on the time for which the serum drug concentration remained above the MIC obtained with a HI of the ATCC 25922 strain) improved its efficacy to -1.67 log10 CFU/g (P < 0.05). These results suggest that amoxicillin

  19. Inoculum Effect on the Efficacies of Amoxicillin-Clavulanate, Piperacillin-Tazobactam, and Imipenem against Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL)-Producing and Non-ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli in an Experimental Murine Sepsis Model

    PubMed Central

    López-Cerero, L.; López-Rojas, R.; Egea, P.; Domínguez-Herrera, J.; Rodríguez-Baño, J.; Pascual, A.; Pachón, J.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli is commonly involved in infections with a heavy bacterial burden. Piperacillin-tazobactam and carbapenems are among the recommended empirical treatments for health care-associated complicated intra-abdominal infections. In contrast to amoxicillin-clavulanate, both have reduced in vitro activity in the presence of high concentrations of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli bacteria. Our goal was to compare the efficacy of these antimicrobials against different concentrations of two clinical E. coli strains, one an ESBL-producer and the other a non-ESBL-producer, in a murine sepsis model. An experimental sepsis model {∼5.5 log10 CFU/g [low inoculum concentration (LI)] or ∼7.5 log10 CFU/g [high inoculum concentration (HI)]} using E. coli strains ATCC 25922 (non-ESBL producer) and Ec1062 (CTX-M-14 producer), which are susceptible to the three antimicrobials, was used. Amoxicillin-clavulanate (50/12.5 mg/kg given intramuscularly [i.m.]), piperacillin-tazobactam (25/3.125 mg/kg given intraperitoneally [i.p.]), and imipenem (30 mg/kg i.m.) were used. Piperacillin-tazobactam and imipenem reduced spleen ATCC 25922 strain concentrations (−2.53 and −2.14 log10 CFU/g [P < 0.05, respectively]) in the HI versus LI groups, while amoxicillin-clavulanate maintained its efficacy (−1.01 log10 CFU/g [no statistically significant difference]). Regarding the Ec1062 strain, the antimicrobials showed lower efficacy in the HI than in the LI groups: −0.73, −1.89, and −1.62 log10 CFU/g (P < 0.05, for piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, and amoxicillin-clavulanate, respectively, although imipenem and amoxicillin-clavulanate were more efficacious than piperacillin-tazobactam). An adapted imipenem treatment (based on the time for which the serum drug concentration remained above the MIC obtained with a HI of the ATCC 25922 strain) improved its efficacy to −1.67 log10 CFU/g (P < 0.05). These results suggest that

  20. The pharmacologic basis for the efficacy of high-dose Ara-C and sequential asparaginase in adult acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Capizzi, R. L.; White, C.

    1988-01-01

    Dose-related effects of ara-C include overcoming a relative transport impediment in human leukemia cells. This result then allows intracellular metabolism and incorporation into DNA to proceed to the maximum extent possible. In addition, the increased synthesis of ara-CDP-choline associated with these high doses may serve as an alternate substrate for phosphatidyl choline synthesis, which may contribute to membrane fragility and cell lysis. HiDAC also serves as a "prodrug" for high concentrations of ara-U, which in turn diminishes ara-C catabolism with a prolonged gamma phase of systemic clearance and also causes cytostasis in S-phase with enhanced anabolism and cytotoxicity of subsequent doses of ara-C. This metabolite/drug interaction could be termed "self-potentiation," a feature which contributes to the overall activity of HiDAC. Asparaginase enhances these effects in a schedule-dependent fashion by lowering the cellular pool size of dCTP and consequent enhanced metabolism of ara-C. The therapeutic benefit of these pharmacologic manipulations has been verified in a randomized clinical trial in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. PMID:3163212

  1. Comparative study of the efficacy of Wright-Giemsa stain and Liu's stain in the detection of Auer rods in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yue, Qing Fang; Xiong, Bei; Chen, Wan Xin; Liu, Xin Yue

    2014-07-01

    In view of the importance of Auer rods in the rapid diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia, we compared the results of Wright-Giemsa stain and Liu's stain (a rapid and simple stain, which is also a kind of modified Romanowsky stain) in the detection of Auer rods. This study was based on 53 cases of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Two staining methods were respectively performed on the bone marrow smears of these cases, and presence of Auer rods as well as nuclear features, cytoplasmic features and the degree of granularity of the cytoplasm were compared in each case. Our results showed that the occurrence of Auer rods as well as faggots in leukemic promyelocytes were significantly higher under Liu's stain than under Wright-Giemsa stain. Significant differences also existed in the occurrence of hypergranular cells and cytoplasmic protrusions between smears stained with Liu's stain and Wright-Giemsa stain. Liu's stain is important for the rapid diagnosis of suspicious APL, especially in recognizing Auer rods.

  2. The dual specificity PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PKI-587 displays efficacy against T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).

    PubMed

    Gazi, Mohiuddin; Moharram, Sausan A; Marhäll, Alissa; Kazi, Julhash U

    2017-04-28

    Although significant improvements have been made in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), there is a substantial subset of high-risk T-cell ALL (T-ALL) patients with relatively poor prognosis. Like in other leukemia types, alterations of the PI3K/mTOR pathway are predominant in ALL which is also responsible for treatment failure and relapse. In this study, we show that relapsed T-ALL patients display an enrichment of the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Using a panel of inhibitors targeting multiple components of the PI3K/mTOR pathway, we observed that the dual-specific PI3K/mTOR inhibitor PKI-587 was the most selective inhibitor for T-ALL cells dependent on the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Furthermore, we observed that PKI-587 blocked proliferation and colony formation of T-ALL cell lines. Additionally, PKI-587 selectively abrogated PI3K/mTOR signaling without affecting MAPK signaling both in in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway using PKI-587 delayed tumor progression, reduced tumor load and enhanced the survival rate in immune-deficient mouse xenograft models without inducing weight loss in the inhibitor treated mice. This preclinical study shows beneficial effects of PKI-587 on T-ALL that warrants further investigation in the clinical setting.

  3. Tumor-penetration and antitumor efficacy of cetuximab are enhanced by co-administered iRGD in a murine model of human NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Yang, Jie; Ding, Manhua; Li, Liantao; Lu, Zheng; Zhang, Qing; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality, worldwide. For this reason, novel therapies are required for the treatment of this devastating disease. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is overexpressed in a variety of solid tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The therapeutic efficacy of cetuximab for NSCLC is limited to use as a monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy. The objective of the present study was to develop a novel strategy to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of cetuximab for NSCLC by a co-administration with the tumor-penetrating internalizing RGD peptide (iRGD). Human NSCLC subcutaneous xenograft models established with the A549 cell line in nude mice were treated with 30 mg/kg cetuximab, 4 mg/kg iRGD, cetuximab plus iRGD or phosphate-buffered saline. The tumor-penetration, in vivo therapeutic efficacy and involved mechanism were evaluated. The present study showed that the A549 xenograft model is sensitive to the co-administration of cetuximab and iRGD. Treatment with cetuximab plus iRGD resulted in a significant increase in the tumor-penetration of cetuximab and tumor reduction compared with cetuximab monotherapy. In conclusion, iRGD enhances the effects of co-administered cetuximab in an NSCLC model. The combined application of cetuximab and iRGD may be a novel strategy to enhance the clinical therapeutic efficacy of cetuximab for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27899989

  4. A TLR7 agonist enhances the antitumor efficacy of obinutuzumab in murine lymphoma models via NK cells and CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Cheadle, E J; Lipowska-Bhalla, G; Dovedi, S J; Fagnano, E; Klein, C; Honeychurch, J; Illidge, T M

    2017-01-03

    Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) such as rituximab have been proven to be highly effective at improving outcome in B-cell malignancies. However, many patients ultimately relapse and become refractory to treatment. The glycoengineered anti-CD20 mAb obinutuzumab was developed to induce enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent phagocytosis and direct cell death and was shown to lead to improved outcomes in a randomized study in B-CLL. We hypothesized that immune stimulation through Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonism in combination with obinutuzumab would further enhance lymphoma clearance and the generation of long-term antitumor immune responses. Here we demonstrate, in syngeneic human CD20 (hCD20)-expressing models of lymphoma, that systemic administration of a TLR7 agonist (R848) increases responses when administered in combination with obinutuzumab and protects against disease recurrence. Depletion studies demonstrate that primary antitumor activity is dependent on both NK cells and CD4(+) T cells but not on CD8(+) T cells. However, both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells appear necessary for the generation of protective immunological memory. Importantly, increased tumor-free survival post obinutuzumab and R848 combination therapy was seen in hCD20 transgenic mice, which express hCD20 on normal B cells. These findings provide a rationale for clinical testing of obinutuzumab in combination with systemically administered TLR7 agonists to further improve outcome.Leukemia advance online publication, 3 January 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2016.352.

  5. Increasing aclarubicin dosage of the conventional CAG (low-dose cytarabine and aclarubicin in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) regimen is more efficacious as a salvage therapy than CAG for relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Qu, Qi; Liu, Limin; Zhang, Yanming; Li, Xiaoli; Wu, Depei

    2015-12-01

    The efficacy and safety of a modified CAG (low-dose cytarabine and aclarubicin in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) regimen with an increased aclarubicin dosage [high-dose (HD)-CAG] were observed in 145 patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and compared to the results of 172 patients treated with a conventional CAG regimen. The HD-CAG regimen showed both a higher complete remission (CR) rate (60.7% vs. 46.5%, P=0.013) and overall response (OR) rate (74.5% vs. 63.4%, P=0.039) than CAG. For patients aged <60 years, HD-CAG manifested an efficacy advantage over the CAG regimen (62.6% vs. 47.4%, P=0.015). The 4-year overall survival (OS) rate was 30.3%±13.2% with a median survival time of 19.0±5.4 months for patients re-induced with the HD-CAG regimen, which showed no significant difference compared to the CAG regimen (with a 4-year OS rate of 18.2%±5.3% and a median survival time of 16.0±3.6 months, P=0.485). The main adverse effect was myelosuppression; platelet recovery over 50×10(9)/L was extended by the HD-CAG regimen (15 days vs. 10 days of the CAG regimen, P=0.003), which was tolerable and manageable. HD-CAG can safely improve efficacy compared to the CAG regimen and thus serves as an alternative treatment for R/R AML.

  6. Serial Low Doses of Sorafenib Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy of Adoptive T Cell Therapy in a Murine Model by Improving Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ren-Shyan; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Requirements of large numbers of transferred T cells and various immunosuppressive factors and cells in the tumor microenvironment limit the applications of adoptive T cells therapy (ACT) in clinic. Accumulating evidences show that chemotherapeutic drugs could act as immune supportive instead of immunosuppressive agents when proper dosage is used, and combined with immunotherapy often results in better treatment outcomes than monotherapy. Controversial immunomodulation effects of sorafenib, a multi-kinases inhibitor, at high and low doses have been reported in several types of cancer. However, what is the range of the low-dose sorafenib will influence the host immunity and responses of ACT is still ambiguous. Here we used a well-established E.G7/OT-1 murine model to understand the effects of serial low doses of sorafenib on both tumor microenvironment and transferred CD8+ T cells and the underlying mechanisms. Sorafenib lowered the expressions of immunosuppressive factors, and enhanced functions and migrations of transferred CD8+ T cells through inhibition of STAT3 and other immunosuppressive factors. CD8+ T cells were transduced with granzyme B promoter for driving imaging reporters to visualize the activation and distribution of transferred CD8+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer. Better activations of CD8+ T cells and tumor inhibitions were found in the combinational group compared with CD8+ T cells or sorafenib alone groups. Not only immunosuppressive factors but myeloid derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were decreased in sorafenib-treated group, indicating that augmentation of tumor inhibition and function of CD8+ T cells by serial low doses of sorafenib were via reversing the immunosuppressive microenvironment. These results revealed that the tumor inhibitions of sorafenib not only through eradicating tumor cells but modifying tumor microenvironment, which helps outcomes of ACT significantly. PMID:25333973

  7. Different efficacy of in vivo herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene transduction and ganciclovir treatment on the inhibition of tumor growth of murine and human melanoma cells and rat glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Berenstein, M; Adris, S; Ledda, F; Wolfmann, C; Medina, J; Bravo, A; Mordoh, J; Chernajovsky, Y; Podhajcer, O L

    1999-01-01

    Initial studies have demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy for cancer treatment of in vivo transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment. However, recent studies have questioned the validity of this approach. Using retroviral vector-producing cells (VPC) as a source for in vivo gene transfer, we evaluated the efficacy of in vivo transduction of malignant cells using three different tumor cell models: B16 murine and IIB-MEL-LES human melanomas and a C6 rat glioblastoma. In vitro studies showed a bystander effect only in C6 cells. In vivo studies showed an inhibition of tumor growth in the two melanoma models when tumor cells were coinjected with VPC-producing retroviral vectors carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene, followed by GCV treatment; however, 100% of mice developed tumors in both models. Under similar experimental conditions, 70% (7 of 10) of syngeneic rats completely rejected stereotactically transferred C6 tumor cells; most of them (5 of 10) showed a prolonged survival. Treating established C6 tumors with VPC-producing retroviral vectors carrying the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene and GCV led to the cure of 33% (4 of 12) of the animals. Rats that rejected tumor growth developed an antitumor immune memory, leading to a rejection of a stereotactic contralateral challenge with parental cells. The immune infiltrate, which showed the presence of T lymphocytes, macrophages, and polymorphonuclear cells at the site of the first injection and mainly T lymphocytes and macrophages at the site of tumor challenge, strengthened the importance of the immune system in achieving complete tumor rejection.

  8. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and efficacy of novel FabI inhibitor AFN-1252 against MSSA and MRSA in the murine thigh infection model

    PubMed Central

    Banevicius, Mary A; Kaplan, Nachum; Hafkin, Barry; Nicolau, David P

    2013-01-01

    AFN-1252, a new antimicrobial agent, specifically and potently inhibits fatty acid synthesis in Staphylococcus aureus. We characterized in vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of AFN-1252 administered orally to neutropenic mice inoculated in thighs (∼106 CFU) with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) ATCC 29213. Efficacy was also assessed in mice inoculated with MSSA, hospital-acquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) or community-acquired (CA)-MRSA, and administered AFN-1252 or linezolid orally. Bacterial density was determined after 24 hours and efficacy defined as the change in CFU/thigh versus untreated controls at time 0. With MSSA, antibacterial reductions of ≧1 log were observed at ≧20 mg/kg doses, with ƒAUC/minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) best describing the pharmacodynamic profile of AFN-1252. The 80, 50 and 5% maximum effects were observed with ƒAUC/MIC values of 22·3, 17·0, and 9·6, respectively. Similar values were obtained for CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA. AFN-1252 was 4–40 fold more effective than linezolid against CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA. These data demonstrate the excellent in vivo potency of AFN-1252 against phenotypically diverse S. aureus. PMID:23433441

  9. Leukemia revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E P

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

  10. The leukemias: Epidemiologic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Linet, M.S.

    1984-01-01

    Particularly geared to physicians and cancer researchers, this study of the epidemiology and etiology of leukemia analyzes the four major leukemia subtypes in terms of genetic and familial determinant factors and examines the incidence, distribution and frequency of reported leukemia clusters. Linet discusses the connection between other types of malignancies, their treatments, and the subsequent development of leukemia and evaluates the impact on leukemia onset of such environmental factors as radiation therapy, drugs, and occupational hazards.

  11. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Safety and efficacy of different lenalidomide starting doses in patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia: results of an international multicenter double-blinded randomized phase II trial.

    PubMed

    Wendtner, Clemens M; Hallek, Michael; Fraser, Graeme A M; Michallet, Anne-Sophie; Hillmen, Peter; Dürig, Jan; Kalaycio, Matt; Gribben, John G; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Buhler, Andreas; Kipps, Thomas J; Purse, Brendan; Zhang, Jennie; De Bedout, Sabine; Mei, Jay; Chanan-Khan, Asher

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of different lenalidomide starting doses in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). CLL patients were randomized to receive lenalidomide at initial doses of 5, 10, or 15 mg/d (N = 103). Doses were escalated by 5 mg every 28-d up to a maximum of 25 mg/d; dose reductions in up to 5 mg decrements were permitted. The most common grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs) were neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Ten patients died during therapy (four deaths considered as related to lenalidomide); 12 patients experienced second primary malignancies. The most common cause for treatment discontinuation was AEs. Overall response rates were similar across arms. Progression-free survival and overall survival rates were longer in patients who escalated treatment (to 15 or 20 mg/d) versus those who did not. Lower starting doses allowed subsequent dose escalation of lenalidomide while maintaining an acceptable tolerability profile in patients with relapsed/refractory CLL.

  13. Clinical Safety and Efficacy of Nilotinib or Dasatinib in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic-Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and Pre-existing Liver and/or Renal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Koji; Lahoti, Amit; Jabbour, Elias; Jain, Preetesh; Pierce, Sherry; Borthakur, Gautam; Daver, Naval; Kadia, Tapan; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop; Cortes, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND The safety and efficacy of frontline nilotinib and dasatinib in newly diagnosed chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML-CP) patients with pre-existing liver and/or renal dysfunction are unknown. PATIENTS and METHODS We analyzed adverse event rates, response rates, and survival rates of 215 CML-CP patients with or without renal and/or liver dysfunction who were treated with front-line nilotinib (108 patients) or dasatinib (107 patients). RESULTS Overall median follow-up was 49 months. At baseline, 6 (6%) dasatinib-treated patients had mild renal dysfunction and 13 (12%) had mild liver dysfunction. Eight (7%) nilotinib-treated patients had mild renal dysfunction, 1 (1%) had moderate renal dysfunction, and 9 (8%) mild liver dysfunction. There were no significant differences in the rates of complete cytogenetic response, major molecular response, or MR4.5 between organ function cohorts. Dasatinib- or nilotinib- treated patients with baseline renal dysfunction had a higher incidence of transient reversible acute kidney injury (p=0.011; p<0.001), and nilotinib-treated patients with renal dysfunction had a higher incidence of bleeding (p<0.001). CONCLUSION CML-CP patients with mild to moderate renal or liver dysfunction can be safely treated with frontline dasatinib or nilotinib and can achieve response rates similar to those of CML-CP patients with normal organ function. PMID:26796981

  14. [Clinical efficacy of decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haplo-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen on elderly patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Dou, Li-Ping; Jing, Yu; Wang, Quan-Shun; Mei, Jun-Hui; Yu, Li

    2013-06-01

    This study was aimed to observe the clinical efficacy and adverse effects of decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haploid-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen on elderly patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Five elderly patients with MDS and AML were treated with decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen. Examinations on liver and renal function, electrocardiogram and bone marrow analysis were performed before and after treatment, and adverse effects were observed. The results indicated that after a course of treatment by decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haplo-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen, the total effective rate was 100%, and 4 patients (80%) achieved complete remission, 1 patient achieved partial remission. The dominant clinical adverse effect was bone marrow depression, the median time of neutrophil>0.5×10(9)/L and platelet>20×10(9)/L was 15 d and 16 d respectively for patients without previous MDS. It is concluded that decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haploid-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen may be effective with less adverse effects for elderly primary AML and high risk MDS patients, it is a promising therapeutic methods and worthy to deeply study.

  15. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in a part of ... the body from doing their jobs. Types of leukemia Not all leukemias are the same. There are ...

  16. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  17. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  18. Childhood Cancer: Leukemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Leukemia KidsHealth > For Parents > Leukemia Print A A A ... Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment en español Leucemia About Leukemia The term leukemia refers to cancers of the ...

  19. Interleukin-4 receptor-targeted liposomal doxorubicin as a model for enhancing cellular uptake and antitumor efficacy in murine colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chih-Yung; Liu, Hong-Wen; Tsai, Ya-Ching; Tseng, Ju-Yu; Liang, Shu-Ching; Chen, Chin-Yau; Lian, Wei-Nan; Wei, Ming-Cheng; Lu, Maggie; Lu, Ruey-Hwa; Lin, Chi-Hung; Jiang, Jeng-Kai

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that colorectal tumor has high interleukin-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα) expression, whereas adjacent normal tissue has low or no IL-4Rα expression. We also observed that human atherosclerotic plaque-specific peptide-1 (AP1) can specifically target to IL-4Rα. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic efficacy and systemic toxicity of AP1-conjuagted liposomal doxorubicin. AP1 bound more strongly to and was more efficiently internalized into IL-4Rα-overexpressing CT26 cells than CT26 control cells. Selective cytotoxicity experiment revealed that AP1-conjugated liposomal doxorubicin preferentially killed IL-4Rα-overexpressing CT26 cells. AP1-conjugated liposomal doxorubicin administered intravenously into mice produced significant inhibition of tumor growth and showed decreased cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin. These results indicated that AP1-conjugated liposomal doxorubicin has a potent and selective anticancer potential against IL-4Rα-overexpressing colorectal cancer cells, thus providing a model for targeted anticancer therapy. PMID:26436767

  20. Evaluation of the Efficacy of the H. pylori Protein HP-NAP as a Therapeutic Tool for Treatment of Bladder Cancer in an Orthotopic Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Codolo, Gaia; Munari, Fabio; Fassan, Matteo; de Bernard, Marina

    2015-05-29

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the urogenital tract. Intravesical injection of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is the gold standard treatment for the high-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). However, since the treatment-related side effects are relevant, newer biological response modifiers with a better benefit/side effects ratio are needed. The tumour microenvironment can influence both tumour development and therapy efficacy. In order to obtain a good model, it is desirable to implant tumour cells in the organ from which the cancer originates. In this protocol, we describe a method for establishing a tumour in the bladder cavity of female mice and subsequent delivery of therapeutic agents; the latter are exemplified by our use of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil activating protein (HP-NAP). A preliminary chemical burn of the mucosa, followed by the injection of mouse urothelial carcinoma cell line MB49 via urethral catheterization, enables the cells to attach to the bladder mucosa. After a period, required to allow an initial proliferation of the cells, mice are treated with HP-NAP, administrated again via catheterization. The anti-tumour activity of HP-NAP is evaluated comparing the tumour volume, the extent of necrosis and the degree of vascularization between vehicle- and HP-NAP-treated animals.

  1. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy against murine tuberculosis of a prime-boost regimen with BCG and a DNA vaccine expressing ESAT-6 and Ag85A fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jia; Wang, Chun; Zhou, Zhiguang; Zhang, Ying; Cao, Tingting; Shi, Chunwei; Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Lingxia; Cai, Changxue; Fan, Xionglin

    2011-01-01

    Heterologous prime-boost regimens utilizing BCG as a prime vaccine probably represent the best hope for the development of novel tuberculosis (TB) vaccines. In this study, we examined the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccine (pcD685A) expressing the fusion protein of Ag85A and ESAT-6 (r685A) and its booster effects in BCG-immunized mice. The recombinant r685A fusion protein stimulated higher level of antigen-specific IFN-γ release in tuberculin skin test- (TST-) positive healthy household contacts of active pulmonary TB patients than that in TST-negative population. Vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with pcD685A resulted in significant protection against challenge with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv when compared with the control group. Most importantly, pcD685A could act as a BCG booster and amplify Th1-type cell-mediated immunity in the lung of BCG-vaccinated mice as shown the increased expression of IFN-γ. The most significant reduction in bacterial load of both spleen and lung was obtained in mice vaccinated with BCG prime and pcD685A DNA booster when compared with BCG or pcD685A alone. Thus, our study indicates that pcD685A may be an efficient booster vaccine against TB with a strong ability to enhance prior BCG immunity.

  2. Phase II trial to assess the safety and efficacy of clofarabine in combination with low-dose cytarabine in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cuadrón, David; Montesinos, Pau; Oriol, Albert; Salamero, Olga; Vidriales, Belén; Bergua, Juan; Herrera, Pilar; Vives, Susanna; Sanz, Jaime; Carpio, Cecilia; Rodríguez-Veiga, Rebeca; Moscardó, Federico; Sanz, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) could induce roughly 60 % of complete remissions (CR) with acceptable toxicity and induction mortality in elderly acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients not suitable for intensive chemotherapy. The Programa Español de Tratamientos en Hematología group conducted a trial for patients diagnosed with untreated AML aged 60 years and older, using the combination of clofarabine (20 mg/m(2) × 5 days) plus low-dose cytarabine (20 mg/m(2) × 14 days). The protocol was flexible regarding the use of antifungal and antibacterial prophylaxis, and outpatient induction therapy was allowed. Although the planned recruitment goal was 75 patients, only 11 patients were enrolled (median age, 74 years) after observing high toxicity and unacceptable mortality (46 and 73 % at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively). The response assessment showed three CR (27 %), three resistant diseases (27 %), and five induction deaths (46 %). Induction was administered in an outpatient modality in five patients, while antifungal and antibacterial prophylaxis was not given in seven and five patients, respectively. In our context, induction therapy with the combination of clofarabine (20 mg/m(2)) plus LDAC was associated with high toxicity and unacceptable mortality in elderly AML patients, leading to the early interruption of the trial. Tight patients' clinical monitoring, follow-up, and intensive supportive care seem crucial to achieve at least acceptable clinical outcomes in elderly AML patients receiving clofarabine plus LDAC. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as no. NCT01193400.

  3. Efficacy and Pharmacology of the NLRP3 Inflammasome Inhibitor CP-456,773 (CRID3) in Murine Models of Dermal and Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Primiano, Michael J; Lefker, Bruce A; Bowman, Michael R; Bree, Andrea G; Hubeau, Cedric; Bonin, Paul D; Mangan, Matthew; Dower, Ken; Monks, Brian G; Cushing, Leah; Wang, Stephen; Guzova, Julia; Jiao, Aiping; Lin, Lih-Ling; Latz, Eicke; Hepworth, David; Hall, J Perry

    2016-09-15

    A critical component of innate immune response to infection and tissue damage is the NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, and this pathway and its activation products have been implicated in the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases. NLRP3 inflammasome activation leads to the cleavage of pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18, as well as the subsequent release of biologically active IL-1β, IL-18, and other soluble mediators of inflammation. In this study, we further define the pharmacology of the previously reported NLRP3 inflammasome-selective, IL-1β processing inhibitor CP-456,773 (also known as MCC950), and we demonstrate its efficacy in two in vivo models of inflammation. Specifically, we show that in human and mouse innate immune cells CP-456,773 is an inhibitor of the cellular release of IL-1β, IL-1α, and IL-18, that CP-456,773 prevents inflammasome activation induced by disease-relevant soluble and crystalline NLRP3 stimuli, and that CP-456,773 inhibits R848- and imiquimod-induced IL-1β release. In mice, CP-456,773 demonstrates potent inhibition of the release of proinflammatory cytokines following acute i.p. challenge with LPS plus ATP in a manner that is proportional to the free/unbound concentrations of the drug, thereby establishing an in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for CP-456,773. Furthermore, CP-456,773 reduces ear swelling in an imiquimod cream-induced mouse model of skin inflammation, and it reduces airway inflammation in mice following acute challenge with house dust mite extract. These data implicate the NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathogenesis of dermal and airway inflammation, and they highlight the utility of CP-456,773 for interrogating the contribution of the NLRP3 inflammasome and its outputs in preclinical models of inflammation and disease.

  4. Supportive Care for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Supportive Care for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Supportive care for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is ... Treating Hairy Cell Leukemia More In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  5. Structure, distribution, and expression of an ancient murine endogenous retroviruslike DNA family.

    PubMed Central

    Obata, M M; Khan, A S

    1988-01-01

    An endogenous retroviruslike DNA, B-26, was cloned from a BALB/c mouse embryo gene library by using a generalized murine leukemia virus DNA probe. Southern blot hybridization and nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that B-26 DNA might be a novel member of the GLN DNA family (A. Itin and E. Keshet, J. Virol. 59:301-307, 1986) which contains murine leukemia virus-related pol and env sequences. Northern analysis indicated that B-26-related RNAs of 8.4 and 3.0 kilobases were transcribed in thymus, spleen, brain, and liver tissues of 6-week-old BALB/c mice. Images PMID:3172346

  6. Simultaneous comparison of murine norovirus, feline calicivirus, coliphage MS2, and GII.4 norovirus to evaluate the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite against human norovirus on a fecally soiled stainless steel surface.

    PubMed

    Park, Geun Woo; Sobsey, Mark D

    2011-09-01

    Free chlorine as hypochlorite is recommended to decontaminate fecally contaminated surfaces to control human norovirus (NoV). We evaluated the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite to decontaminate GII.4 NoV and three surrogates of human NoVs, feline calicivirus (FCV), murine norovirus (MNV), and coliphage MS2, on a fecally soiled stainless steel surface. Reduction of infectivity of FCV, MNV, and MS2 was measured by plaque assay and the decline of genomic copy numbers of GII.4 NoV by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Sodium hypochlorite solution at 5000 ppm could inactivate FCV by 3 log(10) plaque forming units after approximately 1.9 minutes of contact time, but required longer exposure times of 3.2 and 4.5 minutes to reduce MNV and MS2 by 3 log(10), respectively. However, detection of viral RNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay may not be reliable to estimate the effectiveness of sodium hypochlorite against human NoV. Of three NoV surrogates, FCV is not the most resistant of the virus tested for inactivation by hypochlorite and thus is not the worst-case model for estimating NoV inactivation. Although the use of 5000 ppm of hypochlorite for fecally soiled surfaces is effective, it may require longer exposure times of ≥3 minutes to control NoVs. Surface precleaning before hypochlorite disinfection is recommended to initially reduce the fecal organic load for better virus inactivation and should be a part of the environmental hygiene response measures during an NoV outbreak or where NoV fecal contamination of environmental surfaces is likely or suspected to be present.

  7. Comparative efficacy of 177Lu and 90Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.; Afrin, Farhat

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (90Y) and lutetium-177 (177Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas 90Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with 177Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either 90Y or 177Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an 90Y- or 177Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for 90Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for 177Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with 90Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with 177Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq 90Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of 177Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with 90Y-PRIT and 0

  8. Enhanced anticancer efficacy of snake venom combined with silica nanoparticles in a murine model of human multiple myeloma: molecular targets for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Al-Sadoon, Mohamed K; Rabah, Danny M; Badr, Gamal

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal disease of plasma cells that reside in the bone marrow (BM). MM is an incurable disease; thus, screening for novel anti-myeloma drugs remains critically important. We recently described a silica nanoparticle-based snake venom delivery model that targets cancer cells, but not normal cells. Using this model, we demonstrated a strong enhancement of the antitumor activity of snake venom extracted from Walterinnesia aegyptia (WEV) in two breast carcinoma cell lines when the venom was combined with silica nanoparticles (WEV+NP). In the present study, we aimed to delineate the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of WEV+NP in an MM-bearing experimental nude mouse model. We found that treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to treatment with NP or vehicle. WEV+NP- and WEV-treated cancer cells exhibited marked elevations in oxidative stress and robust reductions in the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and B cell-activating factor (BAFF). WEV+NP also decreased the surface expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR4 and CXCR6 to a greater extent than WEV alone, and WEV+NP subsequently reduced migration in response to the cognate ligands CXCL10, CXCL12 and CXCL16. Furthermore, we found that WEV+NP strongly inhibited insulin-like growth factor 1 (EGF-1)- and IL-6-mediated MM cell proliferation, altered the cell cycle and enhanced the induction of apoptosis of MM cells. In addition, the results of treatment with WEV+NP or WEV alone revealed that the combination of WEV with NP robustly decreased the expression of cyclin D1, Bcl-2 and the phosphorylation of AKT; increased the expression of cyclin B1; altered the mitochondrial membrane potential; increased the activity of caspase-3, -8 and -9; and sensitized MM cells to growth arrest and apoptosis. Our data reveal the therapeutic potential of the nanoparticle-sustained delivery of snake venom to fight cancer cells.

  9. Next generation XPO1 inhibitor shows improved efficacy and in vivo tolerability in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hing, Zachary A.; Fung, Ho Yee Joyce; Ranganathan, Parvathi; Mitchell, Shaneice; El-Gamal, Dalia; Woyach, Jennifer A.; Williams, Katie; Goettl, Virginia M.; Smith, Jordan; Yu, Xueyan; Meng, Xiaomei; Sun, Qingxiang; Cagatay, Tolga; Lehman, Amy M.; Lucas, David M.; Baloglu, Erkan; Shacham, Sharon; Kauffman, Michael G.; Byrd, John C.; Chook, Yuh Min; Garzon, Ramiro; Lapalombella, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear export receptor, Exportin 1 (XPO1), mediates transport of growth-regulatory proteins including tumor suppressors and is overactive in many cancers, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and aggressive lymphomas. Oral Selective Inhibitor of Nuclear Export (SINE) compounds that block XPO1 function were recently identified and hold promise as a new therapeutic paradigm in many neoplasms. One of these compounds, KPT-330 (selinexor), has made progress in Phase I/II clinical trials, but systemic toxicities limit its administration to twice-per-week and requiring supportive care. We designed a new generation SINE compound, KPT-8602, with a similar mechanism of XPO1 inhibition and potency but considerably improved tolerability. Efficacy of KPT-8602 was evaluated in preclinical animal models of hematologic malignancies including CLL and AML. KPT-8602 shows similar in vitro potency compared to KPT-330 but lower central nervous system penetration which resulted in enhanced tolerability, even when dosed daily, and improved survival in CLL and AML murine models compared to KPT-330. KPT-8602 is a promising compound for further development in hematologic malignancies and other cancers in which upregulation of XPO1 is seen. The wider therapeutic window of KPT-8602 may also allow increased on-target efficacy leading to even more efficacious combinations with other targeted anticancer therapies. PMID:27323910

  10. N-(1'-naphthyl)-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzohydrazide as microtubule destabilizer: Synthesis, cytotoxicity, inhibition of cell migration and in vivo activity against acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Salum, Lívia B; Mascarello, Alessandra; Canevarolo, Rafael R; Altei, Wanessa F; Laranjeira, Angelo B A; Neuenfeldt, Patrícia D; Stumpf, Taisa R; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise D; Vollmer, Laura L; Daghestani, Hikmat N; de Souza Melo, Carolina P; Silveira, André B; Leal, Paulo C; Frederico, Marisa J S; do Nascimento, Leandro F; Santos, Adair R S; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Day, Billy W; Yunes, Rosendo A; Vogt, Andreas; Yunes, José A; Nunes, Ricardo J

    2015-01-01

    Tubulin-interacting agents, like vinca alkaloid and taxanes, play a fundamental role in cancer chemotherapy, making cellular microtubules (MT), one of the few validated anticancer targets. Cancer resistance to classical MT inhibitors has motivated the development of novel molecules with increased efficacy and lower toxicity. Aiming at designing structurally-simple inhibitors of MT assembly, we synthesized a series of thirty-one 3,4,5-trimethoxy-hydrazones and twenty-five derivatives or analogs. Docking simulations suggested that a representative N-acylhydrazone could adopt an appropriate stereochemistry inside the colchicine-binding domain of tubulin. Several of these compounds showed anti-leukemia effects in the nanomolar concentration range. Interference with MT polymerization was validated by the compounds' ability to inhibit MT assembly at the biochemical and cellular level. Selective toxicity investigations done with the most potent compound, a 3,4,5-trimethoxy-hydrazone with a 1-naphthyl group, showed remarkably selective toxicity against leukemia cells in comparison with stimulated normal lymphocytes, and no acute toxicity in vivo. Finally, this molecule was as active as vincristine in a murine model of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia at a weekly dose of 1 mg/kg.

  11. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard for blood to do its work. In acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), also called acute lymphoblastic leukemia, there are too ... of white blood cells called lymphocytes or lymphoblasts. ALL is the most common type of cancer in ...

  12. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  13. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  14. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  15. Identification of ILK as a novel therapeutic target for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Weisberg, Ellen; Muz, Barbara; Nonami, Atsushi; Luderer, Micah; Stone, Richard M; Melo, Junia V; Griffin, James D; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2015-09-09

    Current treatment options as well as clinical efficacy are limited for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In response to the pressing need for more efficacious treatment approaches and strategies to override drug resistance in advanced stage CML, Ph+ ALL, and AML, we investigated the effects of inhibition of ILK as a potentially novel and effective approach to treatment of these challenging malignancies. Using the small molecule ILK inhibitor, Cpd22, and ILK knockdown, we investigated the importance of ILK in the growth and viability of leukemia. Our results suggest that the ILK inhibition may be an effective treatment for CML, Ph+ ALL, and AML as a single therapy, with ILK expression levels positively correlating with the efficacy of ILK inhibition. The identification of ILK as a novel target for leukemia therapy warrants further investigation as a therapeutic approach that could be of potential clinical benefit in both acute and chronic myeloid leukemias.

  16. AMKL chimeric transcription factors are potent inducers of leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dang, J; Nance, S; Ma, J; Cheng, J; Walsh, M P; Vogel, P; Easton, J; Song, G; Rusch, M; Gedman, A L; Koss, C; Downing, J R; Gruber, T A

    2017-03-10

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia in patients without Down syndrome is a rare malignancy with a poor prognosis. RNA sequencing of fourteen pediatric cases previously identified novel fusion transcripts that are predicted to be pathological including CBFA2T3-GLIS2, GATA2-HOXA9, MN1-FLI and NIPBL-HOXB9. In contrast to CBFA2T3-GLIS2, which is insufficient to induce leukemia, we demonstrate that the introduction of GATA2-HOXA9, MN1-FLI1 or NIPBL-HOXB9 into murine bone marrow induces overt disease in syngeneic transplant models. With the exception of MN1, full penetrance was not achieved through the introduction of fusion partner genes alone, suggesting that the chimeric transcripts possess a unique gain-of-function phenotype. Leukemias were found to exhibit elements of the megakaryocyte erythroid progenitor gene expression program, as well as unique leukemia-specific signatures that contribute to transformation. Comprehensive genomic analyses of resultant murine tumors revealed few cooperating mutations confirming the strength of the fusion genes and their role as pathological drivers. These models are critical for both the understanding of the biology of disease as well as providing a tool for the identification of effective therapeutic agents in preclinical studies.Leukemia advance online publication, 10 March 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.51.

  17. Decitabine Compared with Low-Dose Cytarabine for the Treatment of Older Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Pilot Study of Safety, Efficacy, and Cost-Effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Linu A; Aparna, S; Lakshmaiah, K C; Lokanatha, D; Babu, Govind; Babu, Suresh; Appachu, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The incidence of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) increases progressively with age and its treatment is challenging. This prospective case control study was undertaken to compare the safety, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of decitabine with those of cytarabine in older patients with newly diagnosed AML who are not fit for intensive chemotherapy. Materials and Methods. 30 eligible patients above 60 years old with newly diagnosed AML were assigned to receive decitabine or cytarabine. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). The secondary objective was to compare adverse events and cost-effectiveness of therapy in the two study groups. Results. In this study, 15 patients received decitabine and 15 patients received cytarabine. The median OS was 5.5 months for each of the treatment groups. The hazard ratio between the treatment groups was 0.811 with 95% CI of 0.390 to 1.687. Toxicity profile was similar in both groups. Cost per cycle of chemotherapy in INR was 24,200 for decitabine and 1,600 for low-dose cytarabine group. Median of simplified cost-effectiveness ratio was 0.00022 for decitabine group and 0.0034 for low-dose cytarabine group. Conclusions. For elderly patients with AML, decitabine and low-dose cytarabine should be chosen based on the patient's choice and affordability. Our study has shown that both of these agents have similar OS and toxicity. Low-dose cytarabine scores over decitabine in developing countries as it is more cost-effective.

  18. Asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Rytting, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    Cure rates in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia have significantly improved over the past decades. Now, almost 90% of children will survive the disease. The cure rates in adolescents, young adults, and adults have not kept pace with the improvements in younger patients, even though almost an equal proportion of adult patients achieve complete remission as their pediatric counterparts. Differences in treatment regimens might be important. Intensive use of asparaginase has been a key component of successful pediatric therapy. In this review, we focus on the use of asparaginase and the potential of optimizing asparaginase use via monitoring to minimize adverse drug events and improve efficacy of the drug.

  19. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [(68)Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche.

  20. Targeted positron emission tomography imaging of CXCR4 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Herhaus, Peter; Habringer, Stefan; Philipp-Abbrederis, Kathrin; Vag, Tibor; Gerngross, Carlos; Schottelius, Margret; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Steiger, Katja; Altmann, Torben; Weißer, Tanja; Steidle, Sabine; Schick, Markus; Jacobs, Laura; Slawska, Jolanta; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Verbeek, Mareike; Subklewe, Marion; Peschel, Christian; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Schwaiger, Markus; Götze, Katharina; Keller, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia originates from leukemia-initiating cells that reside in the protective bone marrow niche. CXCR4/CXCL12 interaction is crucially involved in recruitment and retention of leukemia-initiating cells within this niche. Various drugs targeting this pathway have entered clinical trials. To evaluate CXCR4 imaging in acute myeloid leukemia, we first tested CXCR4 expression in patient-derived primary blasts. Flow cytometry revealed that high blast counts in patients with acute myeloid leukemia correlate with high CXCR4 expression. The wide range of CXCR4 surface expression in patients was reflected in cell lines of acute myeloid leukemia. Next, we evaluated the CXCR4-specific peptide Pentixafor by positron emission tomography imaging in mice harboring CXCR4 positive and CXCR4 negative leukemia xenografts, and in 10 patients with active disease. [68Ga]Pentixafor-positron emission tomography showed specific measurable disease in murine CXCR4 positive xenografts, but not when CXCR4 was knocked out with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. Five of 10 patients showed tracer uptake correlating well with leukemia infiltration assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. The mean maximal standard uptake value was significantly higher in visually CXCR4 positive patients compared to CXCR4 negative patients. In summary, in vivo molecular CXCR4 imaging by means of positron emission tomography is feasible in acute myeloid leukemia. These data provide a framework for future diagnostic and theranostic approaches targeting the CXCR4/CXCL12-defined leukemia-initiating cell niche. PMID:27175029

  1. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  2. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Treating Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia In recent years, new drugs that target specific ... Typical Treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  3. Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase

    MedlinePlus

    ... CML) Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase Treatment options for people with chronic ... Myeloid Leukemia by Phase More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  4. Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis, and Types Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Leukemia Many of the symptoms of childhood leukemia can ... Child’s Doctor About Childhood Leukemia? More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  5. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic (M3) Leukemia Early diagnosis and treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia ( ... Comes Back After Treatment? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  6. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Comparative analysis of radiation- and virus-induced leukemias in BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, E.W.; Binari, R.; Fleissner, E.

    1985-01-15

    Endogenous murine leukemia virus (MuLV) proviral copies were analyzed in thymomas induced in normal BALB/c (Fv-1b) and in Fv-1n congenic mice by X-irradiation. Both strains of mice developed leukemia with similar kinetics, indicating that N-tropism of endogenous MuLV was not a rate-limiting factor in development of disease. Southern blot analysis, using a probe specific for ecotropic virus and for ecotropic-specific sequences retained in pathogenic, env-recombinant viruses, showed that the majority of radiation leukemias lacked newly acquired, clonally integrated, proviruses. This was in contrast to virus-induced leukemias, which routinely exhibited several new proviral integration sites. When an internal proviral DNA restriction fragment was monitored, some radiation leukemias showed evidence of nonclonal infection, accounting for more frequent isolation of infectious virus from such leukemias. Differences in expression of T-cell surface antigens were found in X-ray-induced and virus-induced leukemias. All radiation leukemias were TL positive, whereas virus-induced leukemias were primarily negative for TL. Some differences were also found in Lyt-1 and Lyt-2 expression. The data as a whole suggest that, in the majority of cases, radiation leukemogenesis is not initiated by a viral route--that is, the sort of viral mechanism for which exogenous infection by known pathogenic MuLV is the paradigm.

  8. Experimental models of lymphoproliferative disease. The mouse as a model for human non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and related leukemias.

    PubMed Central

    Pattengale, P. K.; Taylor, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The present review focuses on the mouse as an experimental immunopathologic model for human non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and related leukemias. Immunomorphologic evidence is presented that clearly demonstrates that B- and T-cell subtypes of mouse (murine) lymphoma/leukemia closely resemble and are analogous to B- and T-cell subtypes of human lymphoma/leukemia as defined by recently proposed immunomorphologic classifications. Further evidence is presented that favors the hypothesis that certain types of murine and human B-cell lymphoma develop out of prodromal, prelymphomatous states, which exhibit antecedent morphologic and immunologic abnormalities. The many experimental advantages of the murine systems are stressed, as well as the concept that the presently defined immunomorphologic approach should be effectively combined with molecular and cytogenetic parameters. Images Table 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 10 Table 9 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:6605691

  9. DOT1L as a therapeutic target for the treatment of DNMT3A-mutant acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Rachel E.; Rodriguez, Benjamin A.; Luo, Min; Jeong, Mira; Rosen, Allison; Rogers, Jason H.; Campbell, Carly T.; Daigle, Scott R.; Deng, Lishing; Song, Yongcheng; Sweet, Steve; Chevassut, Timothy; Andreeff, Michael; Kornblau, Steven M.; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) are common in acute myeloid leukemia and portend a poor prognosis; thus, new therapeutic strategies are needed. The likely mechanism by which DNMT3A loss contributes to leukemogenesis is altered DNA methylation and the attendant gene expression changes; however, our current understanding is incomplete. We observed that murine hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in which Dnmt3a had been conditionally deleted markedly overexpress the histone 3 lysine 79 (H3K79) methyltransferase, Dot1l. We demonstrate that Dnmt3a−/− HSCs have increased H3K79 methylation relative to wild-type (WT) HSCs, with the greatest increases noted at DNA methylation canyons, which are regions highly enriched for genes dysregulated in leukemia and prone to DNA methylation loss with Dnmt3a deletion. These findings led us to explore DOT1L as a therapeutic target for the treatment of DNMT3A-mutant AML. We show that pharmacologic inhibition of DOT1L resulted in decreased expression of oncogenic canyon–associated genes and led to dose- and time-dependent inhibition of proliferation, induction of apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and terminal differentiation in DNMT3A-mutant cell lines in vitro. We show in vivo efficacy of the DOT1L inhibitor EPZ5676 in a nude rat xenograft model of DNMT3A-mutant AML. DOT1L inhibition was also effective against primary patient DNMT3A-mutant AML samples, reducing colony-forming capacity (CFC) and inducing terminal differentiation in vitro. These studies suggest that DOT1L may play a critical role in DNMT3A-mutant leukemia. With pharmacologic inhibitors of DOT1L already in clinical trials, DOT1L could be an immediately actionable therapeutic target for the treatment of this poor prognosis disease. PMID:27335278

  10. Nilotinib and Imatinib Mesylate After Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-09

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. The Family Leukemia Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollitt, Eleanor

    1976-01-01

    An association of families of children with leukemia, the Family Leukemia Association (FLA), was recently established in Toronto. This paper discusses (a) philosophy of the FLA; (b) formative years of this organization; (c) problems encountered by leukemic children and their families; and (d) the FLA's past and future educational and social…

  12. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  13. SCLLTargeting FGFR1 to suppress leukemogenesis in syndromic and de novo AML in murine models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qing; Bhole, Aaron; Qin, Haiyan; Karp, Judith; Malek, Sami; Cowell, John K; Ren, Mingqiang

    2016-08-02

    Although over expression of chimeric FGFR1 kinase consistently leads to the development of AML in the rare Stem Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma syndrome, we now show that overexpression of FGFR1 is also seen in up to 20% of non-syndromic, de novo AML. To determine whether targeting FGFR1 in both of these AML subtypes can suppress leukemogenesis, we evaluated the effects of different FGFR1 inhibitors in a side-by-side comparison for their ability to affect in vitro proliferation in FGFR1 overexpressing murine and human cells lines. Three newly developed pan-FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547, BGJ398 and JNJ42756493, show a significantly improved efficacy over the more established FGFR inhibitors, PD173074 and TKI258. To examine whether targeting FGFR1 suppresses leukemogenesis in de novo AML in vivo, we created xenografts in immunocompromized mice from primary, de novo AML that showed > 3-fold increased expression of FGFR1. Using BGJ398, the most potent inhibitor identified in the in vitro studies, AML progression in these mice was significantly suppressed compared with vehicle treated animals and overall survival improved. Importantly, no difference in disease course or survival was seen in AML xenografts that did not show overexpression of FGFR1. These observations support the idea that FGFR1 is a driver oncogene in de novo, FGFR1-overexpressing AML and that molecularly targeted therapies using FGFR1 inhibitors may provide a valuable therapeutic regimen for all FGFR1-overexpressing AML.

  14. Targeting FGFR1 to suppress leukemogenesis in syndromic and de novo AML in murine models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qing; Bhole, Aaron; Qin, Haiyan; Karp, Judith; Malek, Sami; Cowell, John K; Ren, Mingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Although over expression of chimeric FGFR1 kinase consistently leads to the development of AML in the rare Stem Cell Leukemia and Lymphoma syndrome, we now show that overexpression of FGFR1 is also seen in up to 20% of non-syndromic, de novo AML. To determine whether targeting FGFR1 in both of these AML subtypes can suppress leukemogenesis, we evaluated the effects of different FGFR1 inhibitors in a side-by-side comparison for their ability to affect in vitro proliferation in FGFR1 overexpressing murine and human cells lines. Three newly developed pan-FGFR inhibitors, AZD4547, BGJ398 and JNJ42756493, show a significantly improved efficacy over the more established FGFR inhibitors, PD173074 and TKI258. To examine whether targeting FGFR1 suppresses leukemogenesis in de novo AML in vivo, we created xenografts in immunocompromized mice from primary, de novo AML that showed > 3-fold increased expression of FGFR1. Using BGJ398, the most potent inhibitor identified in the in vitro studies, AML progression in these mice was significantly suppressed compared with vehicle treated animals and overall survival improved. Importantly, no difference in disease course or survival was seen in AML xenografts that did not show overexpression of FGFR1. These observations support the idea that FGFR1 is a driver oncogene in de novo, FGFR1-overexpressing AML and that molecularly targeted therapies using FGFR1 inhibitors may provide a valuable therapeutic regimen for all FGFR1-overexpressing AML. PMID:27391347

  15. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  16. Optimizing Liposomal Cisplatin Efficacy through Membrane Composition Manipulations.

    PubMed

    Zisman, Natalia; Dos Santos, Nancy; Johnstone, Sharon; Tsang, Alan; Bermudes, David; Mayer, Lawrence; Tardi, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The first liposomal formulation of cisplatin to be evaluated clinically was SPI-077. Although the formulation demonstrated enhanced cisplatin tumor accumulation in preclinical models it did not enhance clinical efficacy, possibly due to limited cisplatin release from the formulation localized within the tumor. We have examined a series of liposomal formulations to address the in vivo relationship between cisplatin release rate and formulation efficacy in the P388 murine leukemia model. The base formulation of phosphatidylcholine: phosphatidylglycerol: cholesterol was altered in the C18 and C16 phospholipid content to influence membrane fluidity and thereby impacting drug circulation lifetime and drug retention. Phase transition temperatures (T(m)) ranged from 42-55°C. The high T(m) formulations demonstrated enhanced drug retention properties accompanied by low antitumor activity while the lowest T(m) formulations released the drug too rapidly in the plasma, limiting drug delivery to the tumor which also resulted in low antitumor activity. A formulation composed of DSPC : DPPC : DSPG : Chol; (35 : 35 : 20 : 10) with an intermediate drug release rate and a cisplatin plasma half-life of 8.3 hours showed the greatest antitumor activity. This manuscript highlights the critical role that drug release rates play in the design of an optimized drug delivery vehicle.

  17. Optimizing Liposomal Cisplatin Efficacy through Membrane Composition Manipulations

    PubMed Central

    Zisman, Natalia; Dos Santos, Nancy; Johnstone, Sharon; Tsang, Alan; Bermudes, David; Mayer, Lawrence; Tardi, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The first liposomal formulation of cisplatin to be evaluated clinically was SPI-077. Although the formulation demonstrated enhanced cisplatin tumor accumulation in preclinical models it did not enhance clinical efficacy, possibly due to limited cisplatin release from the formulation localized within the tumor. We have examined a series of liposomal formulations to address the in vivo relationship between cisplatin release rate and formulation efficacy in the P388 murine leukemia model. The base formulation of phosphatidylcholine: phosphatidylglycerol: cholesterol was altered in the C18 and C16 phospholipid content to influence membrane fluidity and thereby impacting drug circulation lifetime and drug retention. Phase transition temperatures (Tm) ranged from 42–55°C. The high Tm formulations demonstrated enhanced drug retention properties accompanied by low antitumor activity while the lowest Tm formulations released the drug too rapidly in the plasma, limiting drug delivery to the tumor which also resulted in low antitumor activity. A formulation composed of DSPC : DPPC : DSPG : Chol; (35 : 35 : 20 : 10) with an intermediate drug release rate and a cisplatin plasma half-life of 8.3 hours showed the greatest antitumor activity. This manuscript highlights the critical role that drug release rates play in the design of an optimized drug delivery vehicle. PMID:22312548

  18. Role of CXCR4-mediated bone marrow colonization in CNS infiltration by T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jost, Tanja Rezzonico; Borga, Chiara; Radaelli, Enrico; Romagnani, Andrea; Perruzza, Lisa; Omodho, Lorna; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Indraccolo, Stefano; Thelen, Marcus; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Infiltration of the central nervous system is a severe trait of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 significantly ameliorates T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in murine models of the disease; however, signaling by CXC chemokine receptor 4 is important in limiting the divagation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells out of the perivascular space into the central nervous system parenchyma. Therefore, Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 potentially may untangle T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from retention outside the brain. Here, we show that leukemic lymphoblasts massively infiltrate cranial bone marrow, with diffusion to the meninges without invasion of the brain parenchyma, in mice that underwent xenotransplantation with human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells or that developed leukemia from transformed hematopoietic progenitors. We tested the hypothesis that T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia neuropathology results from meningeal infiltration through CXC chemokine receptor 4-mediated bone marrow colonization. Inhibition of leukemia engraftment in the bone marrow by pharmacologic CXC chemokine receptor 4 antagonism significantly ameliorated neuropathologic aspects of the disease. Genetic deletion of CXCR4 in murine hematopoietic progenitors abrogated leukemogenesis induced by constitutively active Notch1, whereas lack of CCR6 and CCR7, which have been shown to be involved in T cell and leukemia extravasation into the central nervous system, respectively, did not influence T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development. We hypothesize that lymphoblastic meningeal infiltration as a result of bone marrow colonization is responsible for the degenerative alterations of the neuroparenchyma as well as the alteration of cerebrospinal fluid drainage in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts. Therefore, CXC chemokine receptor 4 may constitute a pharmacologic target for T cell acute lymphoblastic

  19. Lenalidomide and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Ana Pilar; Payer, Angel R.; Acebes-Huerta, Andrea; Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Villa-Alvarez, Monica; Gonzalez-García, Esther; Gonzalez, Segundo

    2013-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an oral immunomodulatory drug used in multiple myeloma and myelodysplastic syndrome and most recently it has shown to be effective in the treatment of various lymphoproliferative disorders such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The mechanism of action of lenalidomide varies depending on the pathology, and in the case of CLL, it appears to primarily act by restoring the damaged mechanisms of tumour immunosurveillance. This review discusses the potential mechanism of action and efficacy of lenalidomide, alone or in combination, in treatment of CLL and its toxic effects such as tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) and tumor flare reaction (TFR), that make its management different from other hematologic malignancies. PMID:24163824

  20. Conventional murine gene targeting.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Albert G; Sun, Yue

    2013-01-01

    Murine gene knockout models engineered over the last two decades have continued to demonstrate their potential as invaluable tools in understanding the role of gene function in the context of normal human development and disease. The more recent elucidation of the human and mouse genomes through sequencing has opened up the capability to elucidate the function of every human gene. State-of-the-art mouse model generation allows, through a multitude of experimental steps requiring careful standardization, gene function to be reliably and predictably ablated in a live model system. The application of these standardized methodologies to directly target gene function through murine gene knockout has to date provided comprehensive and verifiable genetic models that have contributed tremendously to our understanding of the cellular and molecular pathways underlying normal and disease states in humans. The ensuing chapter provides an overview of the latest steps and procedures required to ablate gene function in a murine model.

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mieloide aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  2. How Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed? Many people with CML do not have ... About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  3. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  4. How Is Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Diagnosed? If signs and symptoms suggest you may ... About Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia? More In Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia About Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of leukemia, including AML: Blood disorders, including polycythemia vera , essential thrombocythemia , and myelodysplasia Certain chemicals (for ... More Anemia Bone marrow transplant Chemotherapy Immunodeficiency disorders Polycythemia vera Patient Instructions Bone marrow transplant - discharge Review ...

  6. Drugs Approved for Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the FDA for use in leukemia. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  7. Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Leukemia Treatment of Children With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the ... With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  8. What Are the Key Statistics for Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia What Are the Key Statistics for Childhood Leukemia? Leukemia is the most common cancer in children ... Childhood Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  9. Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia by Risk Group

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Typical Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Treatment options for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) vary ... Treating Hairy Cell Leukemia More In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  10. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.A.; LeBeau, M.M.; Vardiman, J.W.; Rowley, J.D.

    1996-12-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase 11, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11 q23 or 21 q22. The MLL gene at 11 q23 or the AML1 gene at 21 q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 1 1 q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11 q23 or 21 q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. AKT capture by feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Maki; Umehara, Daigo; Odahara, Yuka; Miyake, Ariko; Ngo, Minh Ha; Ohsato, Yoshiharu; Hisasue, Masaharu; Nakaya, Masa-Aki; Watanabe, Shinya; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2016-12-22

    Oncogene-containing retroviruses are generated by recombination events between viral and cellular sequences, a phenomenon called "oncogene capture". The captured cellular genes, referred to as "v-onc" genes, then acquire new oncogenic properties. We report a novel feline leukemia virus (FeLV), designated "FeLV-AKT", that has captured feline c-AKT1 in feline lymphoma. FeLV-AKT contains a gag-AKT fusion gene that encodes the myristoylated Gag matrix protein and the kinase domain of feline c-AKT1, but not its pleckstrin homology domain. Therefore, it differs structurally from the v-Akt gene of murine retrovirus AKT8. AKT may be involved in the mechanisms underlying malignant diseases in cats.

  13. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  14. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Murine embryonic stem cells secrete cytokines/growth modulators that enhance cell survival/anti-apoptosis and stimulate colony formation of murine hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Graham-Evans, Barbara; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2006-04-01

    Stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1/CXCL12, released by murine embryonic stem (ES) cells, enhances survival, chemotaxis, and hematopoietic differentiation of murine ES cells. Conditioned medium (CM) from murine ES cells growing in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) was generated while the ES cells were in an undifferentiated Oct-4 expressing state. ES cell-CM enhanced survival of normal murine bone marrow myeloid progenitors (CFU-GM) subjected to delayed growth factor addition in vitro and decreased apoptosis of murine bone marrow c-kit(+)lin- cells. ES CM contained interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-10, IL-11, macrophage-colony stimulating factor (CSF), oncostatin M, stem cell factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, as well as a number of chemokines and other proteins, some of which are known to enhance survival/anti-apoptosis of progenitors. Irradiation of ES cells enhanced release of some proteins and decreased release of others. IL-6, FGF-9, and TNF-alpha, not detected prior to irradiation was found after ES cells were irradiated. ES cell CM also stimulated CFU-GM colony formation. Thus, undifferentiated murine ES cells growing in the presence of LIF produce/release a number of biologically active interleukins, CSFs, chemokines, and other growth modulatory proteins, results which may be of physiological and/or practical significance.

  16. How Is Childhood Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Childhood Leukemia Diagnosed? Most of the signs and symptoms of ... enlarged spleen or liver. Tests to look for leukemia in children If the doctor thinks your child ...

  17. Anticipation in familial leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Horwitz, M.; Jarvik, G.P.; Goode, E.L.

    1996-11-01

    Anticipation refers to worsening severity or earlier age at onset with each generation for an inherited disease and primarily has been described for neurodegenerative illnesses resulting from expansion of trinucleotide repeats. We have tested for evidence of anticipation in familial leukemia. Of 49 affected individuals in nine families transmitting autosomal dominant acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), the mean age at onset is 57 years in the grandparental generation, 32 years in the parental generation, and 13 years in the youngest generation (P < .001). Of 21 parent-child pairs with AML, 19 show younger ages at onset in the child and demonstrate a mean decline in age at onset of 28 years (P < .001). Of 18 affected individuals from seven pedigrees with autosomal dominant chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), the mean age at onset in the parental generation is 66 years versus 51 years in the youngest generation (P = .008). Of nine parent-child pairs with CLL, eight show younger ages at onset in the child and reveal a mean decline in age at onset of 21 years (P = .001). Inspection of rare pedigrees transmitting acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, multiple types of leukemia, and lymphoma is also compatible with anticipation. Sampling bias is unlikely to explain these findings. This suggests that dynamic mutation of unstable DNA sequence repeats could be a common mechanism of inherited hematopoietic malignancy with implications for the role of somatic mutation in the more frequent sporadic cases. We speculate on three possible candidate genes for familial leukemia with anticipation: a locus on 21q22.1-22.2, CBL2 on 11q23.3, and CBFB or a nearby gene on 16q22. 55 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Hematopoietic overexpression of the transcription factor Erg induces lymphoid and erythro-megakaryocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Catherine L.; Metcalf, Donald; Henley, Katya J.; Kruse, Elizabeth A.; Di Rago, Ladina; Mifsud, Sandra; Alexander, Warren S.; Kile, Benjamin T.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor encoded by the E-twenty-six (ETS)-related gene, ERG, is an essential regulator of hematopoietic stem cell function and a potent human oncoprotein. Enforced expression of ERG in murine hematopoietic cells leads to the development of a well-characterized lymphoid leukemia and a less well-defined non lymphoid disease. To clarify the latter, we generated murine bone marrow chimeras with enforced Erg expression in engrafted hematopoietic progenitor cells. As expected, these mice developed lymphoid leukemia. However, the previously reported non lymphoid disease that developed was shown to be a uniform, transplantable leukemia with both erythroid and megakaryocytic characteristics. In vivo, this disease had the overall appearance of an erythroleukemia, with an accumulation of immature erythroblasts that infiltrated the bone marrow, spleen, liver, and lung. However, when stimulated in vitro, leukemic cell clones exhibited both erythroid and megakaryocytic differentiation, suggesting that transformation occurred in a bipotential progenitor. Thus, in mice, Erg overexpression induces the development of not only lymphoid leukemia but also erythro-megakaryocytic leukemia. PMID:22936051

  19. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: molecular genetics and animal models.

    PubMed

    Pekarsky, Y; Calin, G A; Aqeilan, R

    2005-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia accounts for almost 30% of all adult leukemia cases in the United States and Western Europe. Although several common genomic abnormalities in CLL have been identified, mutational and functional analysis of corresponding genes so far have not proved their involvement in CLL. Our latest studies demonstrated functional involvement of Tcl1 oncoprotein and microRNA genes in the pathogenesis of CLL. Deregulated expression of Tcl1 in transgenic mice resulted in CLL. These CLL tumors showed abnormalities in expression of murine microRNA genes mmu-mir-15a and mmu-mir-16-1. Interestingly, human homologs of these genes, mir-15a and mir-16-1, located at the chromosome 13q14 are also deleted in human CLL samples. In this review we summarize and discuss these new developments. These recently emerged insights into the molecular mechanisms of CLL will allow for the development of new approaches to treat this disease.

  20. Identification of leukemia cell surface proteins in clams

    SciTech Connect

    Reinisch, C.L.; Smolowitz, R.; Miosky, D. Marine Biological Lab., Woods Hole, MA )

    1988-09-01

    Soft-shell clams, Mya arenaria, develop leukemias which, in the advanced stages of disease, kill the host. The authors laboratory has developed an extensive panel of murine monoclonal antibodies to leukemia cells of Mya, and has used these powerful reagents to diagnose the disease with extreme accuracy. They have now ascertained that one membrane-associated protein of approximately 200kD is immunodominant. The function of this protein, regulation of its production and potential site of synthesis are being evaluated. Monoclonal antibodies have also permitted the exploration of the mechanism of leukemogensis. They have evaluated the specific staining pattern of one monoclonal antibody, and have concluded that at least one ontogenic source of leukemic cells may be connective tissue cells lining the sinusoids. Whether or not exposure to severely polluted sites such as New Bedford Harbor stimulates the export of immature hemocytes which then become transformed is at least one possibility amenable to testing using the monoclonal reagents.

  1. Final Report: Comparative Studies in the Field of Mouse and Human Leukemia, June 1, 1991 - October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Martin

    1998-12-01

    Early in the work on this grant the authors established that the growth factor-dependence of radiation-induced thymic leukemia cells was dependent on the autocrine/paracrine growth factor IL-4. Localized, thymic leukemias always grew by virtue of an IL-4-driven autocrine/paracrine pathway. They continued and investigated the mechanism of progression of the thymic leukemias to the later, disseminate disease. Linking the generation of disseminated leukemias to their growth factor-dependent status [10,11], they found that the development of growth factor-independence was associated with the dissemination of the leukemia from the thymus to other sites, e.g. spleen, lymphnodes, liver and kidney [9,8]. Indeed, all disseminated leukemias were composed of growth factor-independent cells. The generation of disseminated radiation-induced leukemia is associated with the loss of specific differentiation antigens and the mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. The thymic, growth factor-independent leukemia carried non-mutated, wild type p53 [4]. These results suggested that it might be possible to influence the dissemination [6,7] of leukemia cell propagation in vivo by the re-introduction of wild type p53 into the leukemias cells. They could show that the transduction of genes encoding specific mutant p53 proteins enhanced their dissemination potential and, in addition, the transduction of constructs encoding wild type p53 reversed the disseminated phenotype--and the leukemic phenotype--of murine and human acute leukemia cells. As a result of the DOE grant, and to further study the gene-transduction approach for the inhibition of leukemia and other cancer cells, they developed an acute retroviral gene transfer system that was capable of the rapid generation of high-titer retroviral virions that were non-mutated and non-deleted [12]. This system has been supplied to dozens of laboratories in the country and is widely used in many research laboratories.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of murine p75-Fc fusion protein and MP6-XT22 anti-murine TNF-alpha mAb in mice.

    PubMed

    Filler, Scott G; Solis, Norma V; Guo, Jane; Doellgast, George; Ruiz-Garcia, Ana; Pan, Wei-Jian

    2007-05-01

    Immunologic limitations make it difficult to study the pharmacokinetic effects of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers in murine models. To counter this, we have studied the pharmacokinetics in mice of two murine analogs of human TNF blockers, a murine p75-FC fusion protein (analogous to etanercept), and the rat MP6-XT22 anti-murine TNF mAb (analogous to infliximab). We analyzed the pharmacokinetics of the murine p75-Fc protein and MP6-XT22 antibody in mice that were uninfected and in mice with disseminated candidiasis in order to confirm dosing strategies and interpret future studies evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of these agents in mice. We propose that, while conducting safety or efficacy studies in murine disease models, it is reasonable to administer the murine p75-Fc protein to mice at <10 mg/kg every 4-5 days, and the MP6-XT22 antibody at 10-20 mg/kg every 4-5 days.

  3. Activation of a promyelocytic leukemia-tumor protein 53 axis underlies acute promyelocytic leukemia cure.

    PubMed

    Ablain, Julien; Rice, Kim; Soilihi, Hassane; de Reynies, Aurélien; Minucci, Saverio; de Thé, Hugues

    2014-02-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by the promyelocytic leukemia (PML)-retinoic acid receptor-α (PML-RARA) fusion protein, which interferes with nuclear receptor signaling and PML nuclear body (NB) assembly. APL is the only malignancy definitively cured by targeted therapies: retinoic acid (RA) and/or arsenic trioxide, which both trigger PML-RARA degradation through nonoverlapping pathways. Yet, the cellular and molecular determinants of treatment efficacy remain disputed. We demonstrate that a functional Pml-transformation-related protein 53 (Trp53) axis is required to eradicate leukemia-initiating cells in a mouse model of APL. Upon RA-induced PML-RARA degradation, normal Pml elicits NB reformation and induces a Trp53 response exhibiting features of senescence but not apoptosis, ultimately abrogating APL-initiating activity. Apart from triggering PML-RARA degradation, arsenic trioxide also targets normal PML to enhance NB reformation, which may explain its clinical potency, alone or with RA. This Pml-Trp53 checkpoint initiated by therapy-triggered NB restoration is specific for PML-RARA-driven APL, but not the RA-resistant promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF)-RARA variant. Yet, as NB biogenesis is druggable, it could be therapeutically exploited in non-APL malignancies.

  4. Obatoclax, Fludarabine, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

  5. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  6. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  7. Leukemia in benzene workers.

    PubMed

    Rinsky, R A; Young, R J; Smith, A B

    1981-01-01

    To evaluate the possible association between occupational exposure to benzene and subsequent death from leukemia, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a retrospective cohort mortality study of workers who had been exposed to benzene in the manufacture of rubber hydrochloride at two locations in Ohio. Ascertainment of vital status was accomplished for 98% of the cohort. Among 748 workers who had at least one day of exposure to benzene between 1940 and 1950, seven deaths from leukemia occurred; from United States death rates standardized for sex, age, and calendar time period, only 1.25 leukemia deaths would have been expected (standardized mortality ratio = 560; p less than 0.001). Mean duration of exposure to benzene was brief, and 437 (58%) of the cohort were exposed for less than 1 year. Evaluation of leukemia mortality for those workers exposed five or more years showed an SMR of 2100. All leukemia deaths were myelocytic or monocytic in cell type. Four additional cases of leukemia have been reorganized in workers at the study locations, but occurred in persons not encompassed by the strict definition of the cohort. Reconstruction of past exposures to benzene at the two locations indicates that in some areas of the plant airborne benzene concentrations rose occasionally to several hundred parts per million (ppm), but that for the most part, employee eight-hour time-weighted averages (TWA) fell within the limits considered permissible at the time of exposure. These data corroborate an initial analysis of the same cohort by Infante et al, and indicate that benzene is a human carcinogen at a range of exposures not greatly above the current legal standard.

  8. Chemopreventive effects of dietary eicosapentaenoic acid supplementation in experimental myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Emily R.; Kudva, Avinash K.; Quickel, Michael D.; Goodfield, Laura L.; Kennett, Mary J.; Whelan, Jay; Paulson, Robert F.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Current therapies for treatment of myeloid leukemia do not eliminate leukemia stem cells (LSC), leading to disease relapse. In this study, we supplemented mice with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5), a polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid, at pharmacological levels, to examine if the endogenous metabolite, cyclopentenone prostaglandin delta-12 PGJ3 (Δ12-PGJ3), was effective in targeting LSCs in experimental leukemia. EPA supplementation for eight weeks resulted in enhanced endogenous production of Δ12-PGJ3 that was blocked by indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Using a murine model of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) induced by bone marrow transplantation of BCR-ABL-expressing hematopoietic stem cells, mice supplemented with EPA showed a decrease in the LSC population, reduced splenomegaly and leukocytosis, when compared to mice on an oleic acid diet. Supplementation of CML mice carrying the T315I mutation (in BCR-ABL) with EPA resulted in a similar effect. Indomethacin blocked the EPA effect and increased the severity of BCR-ABL-induced CML and decreased apoptosis. Δ12-PGJ3 rescued indomethacin-treated BCR-ABL mice and decreased LSCs. Inhibition of hematopoietic-prostaglandin D synthase (H-PGDS) by HQL-79 in EPA-supplemented CML mice also blocked the effect of EPA. In addition, EPA supplementation was effective in a murine model of acute myeloid leukemia. Supplemented mice exhibited a decrease in leukemia burden and a decrease in the LSC colony-forming unit (LSC-CFU). The decrease in LSCs was confirmed through serial transplantation assays in all disease models. The results support a chemopreventive role for EPA in myeloid leukemia, which is dependent on the ability to efficiently convert EPA to endogenous cyclooxygenase-derived prostanoids, including Δ12-PGJ3. PMID:26290393

  9. AMPK protects leukemia-initiating cells in myeloid leukemias from metabolic stress in the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yusuke; Chapple, Richard H.; Lin, Angelique; Kitano, Ayumi; Nakada, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY How cancer cells adapt to metabolically adverse conditions in patients and strive to proliferate is a fundamental question in cancer biology. Here we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic checkpoint kinase, confers metabolic stress resistance to leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) and promotes leukemogenesis. Upon dietary restriction, MLL-AF9-induced murine AML activated AMPK and maintained leukemogenic potential. AMPK deletion significantly delayed leukemogenesis and depleted LICs by reducing the expression of glucose transporter 1 (Glut1), compromising glucose flux, and increasing oxidative stress and DNA damage. LICs were particularly dependent on AMPK to suppress oxidative stress in the hypoglycemic bone marrow environment. Strikingly, AMPK inhibition synergized with physiological metabolic stress caused by dietary restriction and profoundly suppressed leukemogenesis. Our results indicate that AMPK protects LICs from metabolic stress, and that combining AMPK inhibition with physiological metabolic stress potently suppresses AML by inducing oxidative stress and DNA damage. PMID:26440282

  10. Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... made. Life-threatening symptoms can occur as normal blood counts drop. Causes Most of the time, no clear cause can be found for ALL. The following factors may play a role in the development of all types of leukemia: Certain chromosome problems Exposure to radiation, ...

  11. Cloning and characterization of a murine SIL gene

    SciTech Connect

    Collazo-Garcia, N.; Scherer, P.; Aplan, P.D.

    1995-12-10

    The human SIL gene is disrupted by a site-specific interstitial deletion in 25% of children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since transcriptionally active genes are prone to recombination events, the recurrent nature of this lesion suggests that the SIL gene product is transcriptionally active in the cell type that undergoes this interstitial deletion and that the SIL gene product may play a role in normal lymphoid development. To facilitate studies of SIL gene function, we have cloned and characterized a murine SIL gene. The predicted murine SIL protein is 75% identical to the human gene, with good homology throughout the open reading frame. An in vitro translated SIL cDNA generated a protein slightly larger than the predicted 139-kDa protein. Although a prior report detected SIL mRNA expression exclusively in hematopoietic tissues, a sensitive RT-PCR assay demonstrated SIL expression to be ubiquitous, detectable in all tissues examined. Since the RT-PCR assay suggested that SIL mRNA expression was higher in rapidly proliferating tissues, we assayed SIL mRNA expression using a murine erythroleukemia model of terminal differentiation and found it to be dramatically decreased in conjunction with terminal differentiation. These studies demonstrate that the human SIL gene product is quite well conserved in rodents and suggest that the SIL gene product may play a role in cell proliferation. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Frequencies and prognostic impact of RAS mutations in MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Emma M.C.; van Roon, Eddy H.J.; Spijkers-Hagelstein, Jill A.P.; Schneider, Pauline; de Lorenzo, Paola; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants represents an aggressive malignancy associated with a high incidence (approx. 80%) of translocations involving the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. Attempts to mimic Mixed Lineage Leukemia fusion driven leukemogenesis in mice raised the question whether these fusion proteins require secondary hits. RAS mutations are suggested as candidates. Earlier results on the incidence of RAS mutations in Mixed Lineage Leukemia-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia are inconclusive. Therefore, we studied frequencies and relation with clinical parameters of RAS mutations in a large cohort of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Using conventional sequencing analysis, we screened neuroblastoma RAS viral (v-ras) oncogene homolog gene (NRAS), v-Ki-ras Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog gene (KRAS), and v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 gene (BRAF) for mutations in a large cohort (n=109) of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients and studied the mutations in relation to several clinical parameters, and in relation to Homeobox gene A9 expression and the presence of ALL1 fused gene 4-Mixed Lineage Leukemia (AF4-MLL). Mutations were detected in approximately 14% of all cases, with a higher frequency of approximately 24% in t(4;11)-positive patients (P=0.04). Furthermore, we identified RAS mutations as an independent predictor (P=0.019) for poor outcome in Mixed Lineage Leukemia-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia, with a hazard ratio of 3.194 (95% confidence interval (CI):1.211–8.429). Also, RAS-mutated infants have higher white blood cell counts at diagnosis (P=0.013), and are more resistant to glucocorticoids in vitro (P<0.05). Finally, we demonstrate that RAS mutations, and not the lack of Homeobox gene A9 expression nor the expression of AF4-MLL are associated with poor outcome in t(4;11)-rearranged infants. We conclude that the presence of RAS mutations in Mixed Lineage Leukemia

  13. Leukemia and Benzene

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Excessive exposure to benzene has been known for more than a century to damage the bone marrow resulting in decreases in the numbers of circulating blood cells, and ultimately, aplastic anemia. Of more recent vintage has been the appreciation that an alternative outcome of benzene exposure has been the development of one or more types of leukemia. While many investigators agree that the array of toxic metabolites, generated in the liver or in the bone marrow, can lead to traumatic bone marrow injury, the more subtle mechanisms leading to leukemia have yet to be critically dissected. This problem appears to have more general interest because of the recognition that so-called “second cancer” that results from prior treatment with alkylating agents to yield tumor remissions, often results in a type of leukemia reminiscent of benzene-induced leukemia. Furthermore, there is a growing literature attempting to characterize the fine structure of the marrow and the identification of so called “niches” that house a variety of stem cells and other types of cells. Some of these “niches” may harbor cells capable of initiating leukemias. The control of stem cell differentiation and proliferation via both inter- and intra-cellular signaling will ultimately determine the fate of these transformed stem cells. The ability of these cells to avoid checkpoints that would prevent them from contributing to the leukemogenic response is an additional area for study. Much of the study of benzene-induced bone marrow damage has concentrated on determining which of the benzene metabolites lead to leukemogenesis. The emphasis now should be directed to understanding how benzene metabolites alter bone marrow cell biology. PMID:23066403

  14. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (ALL) What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for acute lymphocytic ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  15. Do We Know What Causes Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Do We Know What Causes Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia? Some cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) are ... Myelomonocytic Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia About Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  16. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Myeloid Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for leukemia in ... Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  17. What Are the Key Statistics for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Key Statistics for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? The American Cancer Society's estimates for leukemia in ... Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  18. General Approach to Treatment of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia General Approach to Treatment of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Stem cell transplant (SCT) is the only way ... of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia More In Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia About Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  19. Pharmacologic inhibition of fatty acid oxidation sensitizes human leukemia cells to apoptosis induction

    PubMed Central

    Samudio, Ismael; Harmancey, Romain; Fiegl, Michael; Kantarjian, Hagop; Konopleva, Marina; Korchin, Borys; Kaluarachchi, Kumar; Bornmann, William; Duvvuri, Seshagiri; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Andreeff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The traditional view is that cancer cells predominately produce ATP by glycolysis, rather than by oxidation of energy-providing substrates. Mitochondrial uncoupling — the continuing reduction of oxygen without ATP synthesis — has recently been shown in leukemia cells to circumvent the ability of oxygen to inhibit glycolysis, and may promote the metabolic preference for glycolysis by shifting from pyruvate oxidation to fatty acid oxidation (FAO). Here we have demonstrated that pharmacologic inhibition of FAO with etomoxir or ranolazine inhibited proliferation and sensitized human leukemia cells — cultured alone or on bone marrow stromal cells — to apoptosis induction by ABT-737, a molecule that releases proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins such as Bak from antiapoptotic family members. Likewise, treatment with the fatty acid synthase/lipolysis inhibitor orlistat also sensitized leukemia cells to ABT-737, which supports the notion that fatty acids promote cell survival. Mechanistically, we generated evidence suggesting that FAO regulates the activity of Bak-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition. Importantly, etomoxir decreased the number of quiescent leukemia progenitor cells in approximately 50% of primary human acute myeloid leukemia samples and, when combined with either ABT-737 or cytosine arabinoside, provided substantial therapeutic benefit in a murine model of leukemia. The results support the concept of FAO inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy in hematological malignancies. PMID:20038799

  20. Radiation-induced leukemia: Comparative studies in mouse and man

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, M.

    1991-01-01

    We now have a clear understanding of the mechanism by which radiation-induced (T-cell) leukemia occurs. In irradiated mice (radiation-induced thymic leukemia) and in man (acute lymphoblastic T-cell leukemia, T-ALL) the mechanism of leukemogenesis is surprisingly similar. Expressed in the most elementary terms, T-cell leukemia occurs when T-cell differentiation is inhibited by a mutation, and pre-T cells attempt but fail to differentiate in the thymus. Instead of leaving the thymus for the periphery as functional T-cells they continue to proliferate in the thymus. The proliferating pre- (pro-) T-cells constitute the (early) acute T-cell leukemia (A-TCL). This model for the mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis accounts for all the properties of both murine and human A-TCL. Important support for the model has recently come from work by Ilan Kirsch and others, who have shown that mutations/deletions in the genes SCL (TAL), SIL, and LCK constitute primary events in the development of T-ALL, by inhibiting differentiation of thymic pre- (pro-) T-cells. This mechanism of T-cell leukemogenesis brings several specific questions into focus: How do early A-TCL cells progress to become potently tumorigenic and poorly treatable Is it feasible to genetically suppress early and/or progressed A-TCL cells What is the mechanism by which the differentiation-inhibited (leukemic) pre-T cells proliferate During the first grant year we have worked on aspects of all three questions.

  1. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Bioluminescence and 19F magnetic resonance imaging visualize the efficacy of lysostaphin alone and in combination with oxacillin against Staphylococcus aureus in murine thigh and catheter-associated infection models.

    PubMed

    Hertlein, Tobias; Sturm, Volker; Lorenz, Udo; Sumathy, K; Jakob, Peter; Ohlsen, Knut

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increasingly, they resist antibiotic treatment owing to the development of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in most strains. Therefore, the activity and efficacy of recombinant lysostaphin as a drug against this pathogen have been evaluated. Lysostaphin exerts high levels of activity against antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The therapeutic value of lysostaphin has been analyzed in two different clinically relevant in vivo models, a catheter-associated infection model and a thigh infection model. We infected mice with luciferase-expressing S. aureus Xen 29, and the efficacies of lysostaphin, vancomycin, oxacillin, and combined lysostaphin-oxacillin were investigated by determining numbers of CFU, detecting bioluminescent signals, and measuring the accumulation of perfluorocarbon emulsion at the site of infection by (19)F magnetic resonance imaging. Lysostaphin treatment significantly reduced the bacterial burden in infected thigh muscles and, after systemic spreading from the catheter, in inner organs. The efficiency of lysostaphin treatment was even more pronounced in combinatorial therapy with oxacillin. These results suggest that recombinant lysostaphin may have potential as an anti-S. aureus drug worthy of further clinical development. In addition, both imaging technologies demonstrated efficacy patterns similar to that of CFU determination, although they proved to be less sensitive. Nonetheless, they served as powerful tools to provide additional information about the course and gravity of infection in a noninvasive manner, possibly allowing a reduction in the number of animals needed for research evaluation of new antibiotics in future studies.

  4. Bioluminescence and 19F Magnetic Resonance Imaging Visualize the Efficacy of Lysostaphin Alone and in Combination with Oxacillin against Staphylococcus aureus in Murine Thigh and Catheter-Associated Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Hertlein, Tobias; Sturm, Volker; Lorenz, Udo; Sumathy, K.; Jakob, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increasingly, they resist antibiotic treatment owing to the development of multiple antibiotic resistance mechanisms in most strains. Therefore, the activity and efficacy of recombinant lysostaphin as a drug against this pathogen have been evaluated. Lysostaphin exerts high levels of activity against antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The therapeutic value of lysostaphin has been analyzed in two different clinically relevant in vivo models, a catheter-associated infection model and a thigh infection model. We infected mice with luciferase-expressing S. aureus Xen 29, and the efficacies of lysostaphin, vancomycin, oxacillin, and combined lysostaphin-oxacillin were investigated by determining numbers of CFU, detecting bioluminescent signals, and measuring the accumulation of perfluorocarbon emulsion at the site of infection by 19F magnetic resonance imaging. Lysostaphin treatment significantly reduced the bacterial burden in infected thigh muscles and, after systemic spreading from the catheter, in inner organs. The efficiency of lysostaphin treatment was even more pronounced in combinatorial therapy with oxacillin. These results suggest that recombinant lysostaphin may have potential as an anti-S. aureus drug worthy of further clinical development. In addition, both imaging technologies demonstrated efficacy patterns similar to that of CFU determination, although they proved to be less sensitive. Nonetheless, they served as powerful tools to provide additional information about the course and gravity of infection in a noninvasive manner, possibly allowing a reduction in the number of animals needed for research evaluation of new antibiotics in future studies. PMID:24366730

  5. Immunomodulatory Drugs: Immune Checkpoint Agents in Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Hanna A.; Kanakry, Christopher G.; Luznik, Leo; Gojo, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic immune responses to acute leukemia are inhibited by a variety of mechanisms, such as aberrant antigen expression by leukemia cells, secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and expression of inhibitory enzymes in the tumor microenvironment, expansion of immunoregulatory cells, and activation of immune checkpoint pathways, all leading to T cell dysfunction and/or exhaustion. Leukemic cells, similar to other tumor cells, hijack these inhibitory pathways to evade immune recognition and destruction by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, blockade of immune checkpoints has emerged as a highly promising approach to augment innate anti-tumor immunity in order to treat malignancies. Most evidence for the clinical efficacy of this immunotherapeutic strategy has been seen in patients with metastatic melanoma, where anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 antibodies have recently revolutionized treatment of this lethal disease with otherwise limited treatment options. To meet the high demand for new treatment strategies in acute leukemia, clinical testing of these promising therapies is commencing. Herein, we review the biology of multiple inhibitory checkpoints (including CTLA-4, PD-1, TIM-3, LAG-3, BTLA, and CD200R) and their contribution to immune evasion by acute leukemias. In addition, we discuss the current state of preclinical and clinical studies of immune checkpoint inhibition in acute leukemia, which seek to harness the body’s own immune system to fight leukemic cells. PMID:25981611

  6. Immunomodulatory Drugs: Immune Checkpoint Agents in Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Hanna A; Kanakry, Christopher G; Luznik, Leo; Gojo, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsic immune responses to acute leukemia are inhibited by a variety of mechanisms, such as aberrant antigen expression by leukemia cells, secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and expression of inhibitory enzymes in the tumor microenvironment, expansion of immunoregulatory cells, and activation of immune checkpoint pathways, all leading to T cell dysfunction and/or exhaustion. Leukemic cells, similar to other tumor cells, hijack these inhibitory pathways to evade immune recognition and destruction by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, blockade of immune checkpoints has emerged as a highly promising approach to augment innate anti-tumor immunity in order to treat malignancies. Most evidence for the clinical efficacy of this immunotherapeutic strategy has been seen in patients with metastatic melanoma, where anti-CTLA-4 and anti-PD-1 antibodies have recently revolutionized treatment of this lethal disease with otherwise limited treatment options. To meet the high demand for new treatment strategies in acute leukemia, clinical testing of these promising therapies is commencing. Herein, we review the biology of multiple inhibitory checkpoints (including CTLA-4, PD-1, TIM-3, LAG-3, BTLA, and CD200R) and their contribution to immune evasion by acute leukemias. In addition, we discuss the current state of preclinical and clinical studies of immune checkpoint inhibition in acute leukemia, which seek to harness the body's own immune system to fight leukemic cells.

  7. Imatinib Mesylate and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  8. Temsirolimus and Imatinib Mesylate in Treating Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  9. MLL1 and DOT1L cooperate with meningioma-1 to induce acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Simone S.; Haladyna, Jessica N.; Bezzant, Matthew; Stevens, Brett; Pollyea, Daniel A.; Sinha, Amit U.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Wei, Qi; Pollock, Roy M.; Daigle, Scott R.; Jordan, Craig T.; Ernst, Patricia; Bernt, Kathrin M.

    2016-01-01

    Meningioma-1 (MN1) overexpression is frequently observed in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is predictive of poor prognosis. In murine models, forced expression of MN1 in hematopoietic progenitors induces an aggressive myeloid leukemia that is strictly dependent on a defined gene expression program in the cell of origin, which includes the homeobox genes Hoxa9 and Meis1 as key components. Here, we have shown that this program is controlled by two histone methyltransferases, MLL1 and DOT1L, as deletion of either Mll1 or Dot1l in MN1-expressing cells abrogated the cell of origin–derived gene expression program, including the expression of Hoxa cluster genes. In murine models, genetic inactivation of either Mll1 or Dot1l impaired MN1-mediated leukemogenesis. We determined that HOXA9 and MEIS1 are coexpressed with MN1 in a subset of clinical MN1hi leukemia, and human MN1hi/HOXA9hi leukemias were sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition of DOT1L. Together, these data point to DOT1L as a potential therapeutic target in MN1hi AML. In addition, our findings suggest that epigenetic modulation of the interplay between an oncogenic lesion and its cooperating developmental program has therapeutic potential in AML. PMID:26927674

  10. Donor cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Arguelles, Alejandro

    2012-04-01

    Minimal residual disease refers to the tumour cells that are still present in a given patient after completion of a therapeutic scheme. The demonstration and quantification of residual neoplastic cells has a crucial impact in clinical decision making, for it might prompt continuation of treatment, while the absence of such cells might serve as evidence to withdraw therapy. Therefore, both sensitivity and specificity of the methods used to unravel residual neoplastic cells must be highly reliable and robust. Flow cytometry has been widely used for this purpose, and its clinical performance depends mainly on the criteria of interpretation, rather than in the technique by itself; molecular biology techniques have proved to be highly sensitive and specific but unfortunately they cannot be used in all patients or in all types of leukemia. Finally, the development of donor cell leukemia in transplanted patients, might mimic residual disease and add more confusion to an already controversial issue. These topics are discussed in this paper.

  11. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  12. Phase 1 Study of Terameprocol (EM-1421) in Patients With Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-20

    Leukemias; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL); Adult T Cell Leukemia (ATL); Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-BP); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia (CMML)

  13. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Acute myeloid leukemia creates an arginase-dependent immunosuppressive microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Mussai, Francis; De Santo, Carmela; Abu-Dayyeh, Issa; Booth, Sarah; Quek, Lynn; McEwen-Smith, Rosanna M.; Qureshi, Amrana; Dazzi, Francesco; Vyas, Paresh

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults and the second most common frequent leukemia of childhood. Patients may present with lymphopenia or pancytopenia at diagnosis. We investigated the mechanisms by which AML causes pancytopenia and suppresses patients’ immune response. This study identified for the first time that AML blasts alter the immune microenvironment through enhanced arginine metabolism. Arginase II is expressed and released from AML blasts and is present at high concentrations in the plasma of patients with AML, resulting in suppression of T-cell proliferation. We extended these results by demonstrating an arginase-dependent ability of AML blasts to polarize surrounding monocytes into a suppressive M2-like phenotype in vitro and in engrafted nonobese diabetic–severe combined immunodeficiency mice. In addition, AML blasts can suppress the proliferation and differentiation of murine granulocyte-monocyte progenitors and human CD34+ progenitors. Finally, the study showed that the immunosuppressive activity of AML blasts can be modulated through small-molecule inhibitors of arginase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, suggesting a novel therapeutic target in AML. The results strongly support the hypothesis that AML creates an immunosuppressive microenvironment that contributes to the pancytopenia observed at diagnosis. PMID:23733335

  15. Childhood Leukemia and Primary Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Todd P.; Metayer, Catherine; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Singer, Amanda W.; Miller, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common pediatric cancer, affecting 3,800 children per year in the United States. Its annual incidence has increased over the last decades, especially among Latinos. Although most children diagnosed with leukemia are now cured, many suffer long-term complications, and primary prevention efforts are urgently needed. The early onset of leukemia – usually before age five – and the presence at birth of “pre-leukemic” genetic signatures indicate that pre- and postnatal events are critical to the development of the disease. In contrast to most pediatric cancers, there is a growing body of literature – in the United States and internationally – that has implicated several environmental, infectious, and dietary risk factors in the etiology of childhood leukemia, mainly for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common subtype. For example, exposures to pesticides, tobacco smoke, solvents, and traffic emissions have consistently demonstrated positive associations with the risk of developing childhood leukemia. In contrast, intake of vitamins and folate supplementation during the pre-conception period or pregnancy, breastfeeding, and exposure to routine childhood infections have been shown to reduce the risk of childhood leukemia. Some children may be especially vulnerable to these risk factors, as demonstrated by a disproportionate burden of childhood leukemia in the Latino population of California. The evidence supporting the associations between childhood leukemia and its risk factors – including pooled analyses from around the world and systematic reviews – is strong; however, the dissemination of this knowledge to clinicians has been limited. To protect children’s health, it is prudent to initiate programs designed to alter exposure to well-established leukemia risk factors rather than to suspend judgement until no uncertainty remains. Primary prevention programs for childhood leukemia would also result in the significant co

  16. A screening-based approach to circumvent tumor microenvironment-driven intrinsic resistance to BCR-ABL+ inhibitors in Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpreet; Shelat, Anang A; Singh, Amandeep; Boulos, Nidal; Williams, Richard T; Guy, R Kiplin

    2014-01-01

    Signaling by the BCR-ABL fusion kinase drives Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Despite their clinical activity in many patients with CML, the BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors (BCR-ABL-KIs) imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib provide only transient leukemia reduction in patients with Ph+ ALL. While host-derived growth factors in the leukemia microenvironment have been invoked to explain this drug resistance, their relative contribution remains uncertain. Using genetically defined murine Ph+ ALL cells, we identified interleukin 7 (IL-7) as the dominant host factor that attenuates response to BCR-ABL-KIs. To identify potential combination drugs that could overcome this IL-7-dependent BCR-ABL-KI-resistant phenotype, we screened a small-molecule library including Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs. Among the validated hits, the well-tolerated antimalarial drug dihydroartemisinin (DHA) displayed potent activity in vitro and modest in vivo monotherapy activity against engineered murine BCR-ABL-KI-resistant Ph+ ALL. Strikingly, cotreatment with DHA and dasatinib in vivo strongly reduced primary leukemia burden and improved long-term survival in a murine model that faithfully captures the BCR-ABL-KI-resistant phenotype of human Ph+ ALL. This cotreatment protocol durably cured 90% of treated animals, suggesting that this cell-based screening approach efficiently identified drugs that could be rapidly moved to human clinical testing.

  17. Developmental Outcome of Childhood Leukemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coniglio, Susan J.; Blackman, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on developmental and psychosocial outcomes of childhood leukemia is reviewed, focusing on preschool-age children. Studies are categorized in terms of outcome measures: intelligence/achievement, neuropsychological, memory/attention, and psychosocial tests. Evidence suggests that preschool children with leukemia are at high risk for…

  18. Obinutuzumab in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Jehan

    2015-09-01

    Obinutuzumab is the second next-generation monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody (after ofatumumab) to enter clinical practice in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Its superiority in association with chlorambucil as compared with chlorambucil alone has led to its approval as a first-line treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, for patients who are not candidates for a more intensive treatment.

  19. Protection efficacy of the Brucella abortus ghost vaccine candidate lysed by the N-terminal 24-amino acid fragment (GI24) of the 36-amino acid peptide PMAP-36 (porcine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 36) in murine models

    PubMed Central

    KWON, Ae Jeong; MOON, Ja Young; KIM, Won Kyong; KIM, Suk; HUR, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus cells were lysed by the N-terminal 24-amino acid fragment (GI24) of the 36-amino acid peptide PMAP-36 (porcine myeloid antimicrobial peptide 36). Next, the protection efficacy of the lysed fragment as a vaccine candidate was evaluated. Group A mice were immunized with sterile PBS, group B mice were intraperitoneally (ip) immunized with 3 × 108 colony-forming units (CFUs) of B. abortus strain RB51, group C mice were immunized ip with 3 × 108 cells of the B. abortus vaccine candidate, and group D mice were orally immunized with 3 × 109 cells of the B. abortus vaccine candidate. Brucella lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-specific serum IgG titers were considerably higher in groups C and D than in group A. The levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) were significantly higher in groups B–D than in group A. After an ip challenge with B. abortus 544, only group C mice showed a significant level of protection as compared to group A. Overall, these results show that ip immunization with a vaccine candidate lysed by GI24 can effectively protect mice from systemic infection with virulent B. abortus. PMID:27349900

  20. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mielomonocítica juvenil About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  1. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mielógena crónica About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  2. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  3. In vivo efficacy of biapenem with ME1071, a novel metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) inhibitor, in a murine model mimicking ventilator-associated pneumonia caused by MBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Koichi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kaku, Norihito; Harada, Yosuke; Migiyama, Yohei; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Yasuoka, Akira; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-09-01

    ME1071, a maleic acid derivative, is a novel, specific inhibitor of metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs). In vitro, ME1071 can potentiate the activity of carbapenems against MBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To confirm the clinical efficacy of ME1071 in ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by MBL-producing P. aeruginosa, a mouse model that mimics VAP by placement of a plastic tube in the bronchus was used. Biapenem (100 mg/kg) or ME1071 plus biapenem (each 100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally every 12 h beginning at 12 h after inoculation. Survival was evaluated over 7 days. At 30 h post infection, mice were sacrificed and the numbers of viable bacteria in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were compared. Histopathological analysis of lung specimens was also performed. The pharmacokinetics of ME1071 was analysed after initial treatment. The ME1071 plus biapenem combination group displayed significantly longer survival compared with the control and biapenem monotherapy groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, the number of viable bacteria in the lungs was significantly lower in the combination group (P<0.05). Histopathological examination of lung specimens indicated that progression of lung inflammation was prevented in the combination group. Furthermore, total cell and neutrophil counts, as well as cytokine levels, in BALF were significantly decreased (P<0.05) in the combination group. The percentage time above the MIC (%T>MIC) for biapenem without ME1071 was 0% in plasma; however, this value was elevated to 10.8% with ME1071. These results suggest that ME1071 is potent and effective for treatment of VAP caused by MBL-producing P. aeruginosa.

  4. Intravenous administration of the selective toll-like receptor 7 agonist DSR-29133 leads to anti-tumor efficacy in murine solid tumor models which can be potentiated by combination with fractionated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dovedi, Simon J.; Adlard, Amy L.; Ota, Yosuke; Murata, Masashi; Sugaru, Eiji; Koga-Yamakawa, Erina; Eguchi, Ken; Hirose, Yuko; Yamamoto, Setsuko; Umehara, Hiroki; Honeychurch, Jamie; Cheadle, Eleanor J.; Hughes, Gareth; Jewsbury, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies to augment anti-cancer immune responses have recently demonstrated therapeutic utility. To date clinical success has been achieved through targeting co-inhibitory checkpoints such as CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1. However, approaches that target co-activatory pathways are also being actively being developed. Here we report that the novel TLR7-selective agonist DSR-29133 is well tolerated in mice and leads to acute immune activation. Administration of DSR-29133 leads to the induction of IFNα/γ, IP-10, TNFα, IL-1Ra and IL-12p70, and to a reduction in tumor burden in syngeneic models of renal cancer (Renca), metastatic osteosarcoma (LM8) and colorectal cancer (CT26). Moreover, we show that the efficacy of DSR-29133 was significantly improved when administered in combination with low-dose fractionated radiotherapy (RT). Effective combination therapy required weekly administration of DSR-29133 commencing on day 1 of a fractionated RT treatment cycle, whereas no enhancement of radiation response was observed when DSR-29133 was administered at the end of the fractionated RT cycle. Combined therapy resulted in curative responses in a high proportion of mice bearing established CT26 tumors which was dependent on the activity of CD8+ T-cells but independent of CD4+ T-cells and NK/NKT cells. Moreover, long-term surviving mice originally treated with DSR-29133 and RT were protected by a tumor-specific memory immune response which could prevent tumor growth upon rechallenge. These results demonstrate that DSR-29133 is a potent selective TLR7 agonist that when administered intravenously can induce anti-tumor immune responses that can be further enhanced through combination with low-dose fractionated RT. PMID:26959743

  5. Intravenous administration of the selective toll-like receptor 7 agonist DSR-29133 leads to anti-tumor efficacy in murine solid tumor models which can be potentiated by combination with fractionated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dovedi, Simon J; Adlard, Amy L; Ota, Yosuke; Murata, Masashi; Sugaru, Eiji; Koga-Yamakawa, Erina; Eguchi, Ken; Hirose, Yuko; Yamamoto, Setsuko; Umehara, Hiroki; Honeychurch, Jamie; Cheadle, Eleanor J; Hughes, Gareth; Jewsbury, Philip J; Wilkinson, Robert W; Stratford, Ian J; Illidge, Timothy M

    2016-03-29

    Strategies to augment anti-cancer immune responses have recently demonstrated therapeutic utility. To date clinical success has been achieved through targeting co-inhibitory checkpoints such as CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1. However, approaches that target co-activatory pathways are also being actively being developed. Here we report that the novel TLR7-selective agonist DSR-29133 is well tolerated in mice and leads to acute immune activation. Administration of DSR-29133 leads to the induction of IFNα/γ, IP-10, TNFα, IL-1Ra and IL-12p70, and to a reduction in tumor burden in syngeneic models of renal cancer (Renca), metastatic osteosarcoma (LM8) and colorectal cancer (CT26). Moreover, we show that the efficacy of DSR-29133 was significantly improved when administered in combination with low-dose fractionated radiotherapy (RT). Effective combination therapy required weekly administration of DSR-29133 commencing on day 1 of a fractionated RT treatment cycle, whereas no enhancement of radiation response was observed when DSR-29133 was administered at the end of the fractionated RT cycle. Combined therapy resulted in curative responses in a high proportion of mice bearing established CT26 tumors which was dependent on the activity of CD8+ T-cells but independent of CD4+ T-cells and NK/NKT cells. Moreover, long-term surviving mice originally treated with DSR-29133 and RT were protected by a tumor-specific memory immune response which could prevent tumor growth upon rechallenge. These results demonstrate that DSR-29133 is a potent selective TLR7 agonist that when administered intravenously can induce anti-tumor immune responses that can be further enhanced through combination with low-dose fractionated RT.

  6. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. In vitro proteolytic cleavage of Gazdar murine sarcoma virus p65gag.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, S; Arlinghaus, R B

    1981-09-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus, disrupted in concentrations of 0.1 to 0.5% Nonidet P-40, catalyzed the cleavage of p65, the gag gene polyprotein of the Gazdar strain of murine sarcoma virus, into polypeptides with sizes and antigenic determinants of murine leukemia virus-specified p30, p15, pp12, and p10. Cleavage performed in the presence of 0.15% Nonidet P-40 in water yielded polypeptides of approximately 40,000 (P40) and 25,000 (P25) Mr. In vitro cleavage performed in a buffered solution containing dithiothreitol in addition to 0.1% Nonidet P-40 allowed the efficient processing of P40 to p30 and a band migrating with p10. Immunoprecipitation with monospecific sera indicated that P40 contained p30 and p10, whereas P25 contained p15 and pp12 determinants. P40 and P25 are similar in size and antigenic properties to Pr40gag and Pr25gag observed in infected cells (Naso et al, J. Virol. 32:187-198, 1979).

  8. Eltrombopag inhibits the proliferation of leukemia cells via reduction of intracellular iron and induction of differentiation.

    PubMed

    Roth, Michael; Will, Britta; Simkin, Guillermo; Narayanagari, Swathi; Barreyro, Laura; Bartholdy, Boris; Tamari, Roni; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Verma, Amit; Steidl, Ulrich

    2012-07-12

    Eltrombopag (EP) is a small-molecule, nonpeptide thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R) agonist that has been approved recently for the treatment of thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Prior studies have shown that EP stimulates megakaryopoiesis in BM cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, and the results also suggested that it may inhibit leukemia cell growth. In the present study, we studied the effects of EP on leukemia cell proliferation and the mechanism of its antiproliferative effects. We found that EP leads to a decreased cell division rate, a block in G(1) phase of cell cycle, and increased differentiation in human and murine leukemia cells. Because EP is species specific in that it can only bind TPO-R in human and primate cells, these findings further suggested that the antileukemic effect is independent of TPO-R. We found that treatment with EP leads to a reduction in free intracellular iron in leukemic cells in a dose-dependent manner. Experimental increase of intracellular iron abrogated the antiproliferative and differentiation-inducing effects of EP, demonstrating that its antileukemic effects are mediated through modulation of intracellular iron content. Finally, determination of EP's antileukemic activity in vivo demonstrated its ability to prolong survival in 2 mouse models of leukemia.

  9. Complementing mutations in core binding factor leukemias: from mouse models to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Müller, A M S; Duque, J; Shizuru, J A; Lübbert, M

    2008-10-02

    A great proportion of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs) display cytogenetic abnormalities including chromosomal aberrations and/or submicroscopic mutations. These abnormalities significantly influence the prognosis of the disease. Hence, a thorough genetic work-up is an essential constituent of standard diagnostic procedures. Core binding factor (CBF) leukemias denote AMLs with chromosomal aberrations disrupting one of the CBF transcription factor genes; the most common examples are translocation t(8;21) and inversion inv(16), which result in the generation of the AML1-ETO and CBFbeta-MYH11 fusion proteins, respectively. However, in murine models, these alterations alone do not suffice to generate full-blown leukemia, but rather, complementary events are required. In fact, a substantial proportion of primary CBF leukemias display additional activating mutations, mostly of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) c-KIT. The awareness of the impact and prognostic relevance of these 'second hits' is increasing with a wider range of mutations tested in clinical trials. Furthermore, novel agents targeting RTKs are emanating rapidly and entering therapeutic regimens. Here, we present a concise review on complementing mutations in CBF leukemias including pathophysiology, mouse models, and clinical implications.

  10. Selective targeting of JAK/STAT signaling is potentiated by Bcl-xL blockade in IL-2–dependent adult T-cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meili; Mathews Griner, Lesley A.; Ju, Wei; Duveau, Damien Y.; Guha, Rajarshi; Petrus, Michael N.; Wen, Bernard; Maeda, Michiyuki; Shinn, Paul; Ferrer, Marc; Conlon, Kevin D.; Bamford, Richard N.; O’Shea, John J.; Thomas, Craig J.; Waldmann, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) develops in individuals infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1). Presently there is no curative therapy for ATL. HTLV-1–encoded protein Tax (transactivator from the X-gene region) up-regulates Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large) expression and activates interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-9, and IL-15 autocrine/paracrine systems, resulting in amplified JAK/STAT signaling. Inhibition of JAK signaling reduces cytokine-dependent ex vivo proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from ATL patients in smoldering/chronic stages. Currently, two JAK inhibitors are approved for human use. In this study, we examined activity of multiple JAK inhibitors in ATL cell lines. The selective JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib was examined in a high-throughput matrix screen combined with >450 potential therapeutic agents, and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor navitoclax was identified as a strong candidate for multicomponent therapy. The combination was noted to strongly activate BAX (Bcl-2-associated X protein), effect mitochondrial depolarization, and increase caspase 3/7 activities that lead to cleavage of PARP (poly ADP ribose polymerase) and Mcl-1 (myeloid cell leukemia 1). Ruxolitinib and navitoclax independently demonstrated modest antitumor efficacy, whereas the combination dramatically lowered tumor burden and prolonged survival in an ATL murine model. This combination strongly blocked ex vivo proliferation of five ATL patients’ PBMCs. These studies provide support for a therapeutic trial in patients with smoldering/chronic ATL using a drug combination that inhibits JAK signaling and antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL. PMID:26396258

  11. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Undifferentiated Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-26

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase of Disease; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Recurrent Disease

  12. Targeted therapy: The new lease on life for acute promyelocytic leukemia, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sai-Juan; Zhou, Guang-Biao

    2012-08-01

    Leukemia, a group of hematological malignancies characterized by abnormal proliferation, decreased apoptosis, and blocked differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, is a disease involving dynamic change in the genome. Chromosomal translocation and point mutation are the major mechanisms in leukemia, which lead to production of oncogenes with dominant gain of function and tumor suppressor genes with recessive loss of function. Targeted therapy refers to treatment strategies perturbing the molecules critical for leukemia pathogenesis. The t(15;17) which generates PML-RARα, t(8;21) that produces AML1-ETO, and t(9;22) which generates BCR-ABL are the three most frequently seen chromosomal translocations in myeloid leukemia. The past two to three decades have witnessed tremendous success in development of targeted therapies for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia caused by the three fusion proteins. Here, we review the therapeutic efficacies and the mechanisms of action of targeted therapies for myeloid leukemia and show how this strategy significantly improve the clinical outcome of patients and even turn acute promyelocytic leukemia from highly fatal to highly curable.

  13. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of Brucella abortus recombinant protein cocktail (rOmp19+rP39) against B. abortus 544 and B. melitensis 16M infection in murine model.

    PubMed

    Tadepalli, Ganesh; Singh, Amit Kumar; Balakrishna, Konduru; Murali, Harishchandra Sripathy; Batra, Harsh Vardhan

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of recombinant proteins Omp19 (rO) and P39 (rP) from Brucella abortus were evaluated individually and compared with the cocktail protein (rO+rP) against B. abortus 544 and Brucella melitensis 16M infection in BALB/c mouse model. Intra-peritoneal (I.P.) immunization with rO+rP cocktail developed substantially higher antibody titers predominant with Th1 mediated isotypes (IgG2a/2b). Western blot analysis using anti-rO+rP antibodies showed specific reactivity with native Omp19 (19 kDa) and P39 (39 kDa) among whole cell proteins of B. abortus and B. melitensis. Splenocytes extracted from rO+rP immunized mice induced significantly (P<0.001) higher proliferative responses at 30 μg/ml with considerable expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-12) than rO and rP. Macrophage cell (RAW 264.7) monolayer supplemented with anti-rO+rP polysera exhibited enhanced viability against challenge with B. abortus 544 (72.27%) and B. melitensis 16M (68.57%). On the other hand, individual anti-rO and anti-rP polysera resulted in relatively lesser protection against the pathogens (64.79%, 54.45% and 47.13%, 45.11%, respectively). Immunized group of mice when I.P. challenged with 5 × 10(4) CFU of B. abortus 544 and B. melitensis 16M were found significantly (P<0.001) protected in the rO+rP group (log units of protection, spleen: 2.38, 2.12; liver: 1.04, 0.81, respectively) than in rO (spleen: 1.43, 1.21; liver: 0.7, 0.47) and rP (spleen: 1.24, 1.17; liver: 0.65, 0.34). Findings from this study depicted that rO+rP cocktail is highly immunogenic with the Th1 predominant serum antibody titers and T-cell mediated immune protection, would be a valuable intervention in the development of a safer and improved Brucella vaccine.

  14. The allometry of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Jorge M; Traulsen, Arne; Dingli, David

    2009-08-07

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is an acquired neoplastic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) disorder characterized by the expression of the BCR-ABL oncoprotein. This gene product is necessary and sufficient to explain the chronic phase of CML. The only known cause of CML is radiation exposure leading to a mutation of at least one HSC, although the vast majority of patients with CML do not have a history of radiation exposure. Nonetheless, in humans, significant radiation exposure (after exposure to atomic bomb fallout) leads to disease diagnosis in 3-5 years. In murine models, disease dynamics are much faster and CML is fatal over the span of a few months. Our objective is to develop a model that accounts for CML across all mammals. In the following, we combine a model of CML dynamics in humans with allometric scaling of hematopoiesis across mammals to illustrate the natural history of chronic phase CML in various mammals. We show how a single cell can lead to a fatal illness in mice and humans but a higher burden of CML stem cells is necessary to induce disease in larger mammals such as elephants. The different dynamics of the disease is rationalized in terms of mammalian mass. Our work illustrates the relevance of animal models to understand human disease and highlights the importance of considering the re-scaling of the dynamics that accrues to the same biological process when planning experiments involving different species.

  15. Management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Furman, Richard R; Zent, Clive S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL) is usually diagnosed in asymptomatic patients with early-stage disease. The standard management approach is careful observation, irrespective of risk factors unless patients meet the International Workshop on CLL (IWCLL) criteria for "active disease," which requires treatment. The initial standard therapy for most patients combines an anti-CD20 antibody (such as rituximab, ofatumumab, or obinutuzumab) with chemotherapy (fludarabine/cyclophosphamide [FC], bendamustine, or chlorambucil) depending on multiple factors including the physical fitness of the patient. However, patients with very high-risk CLL because of a 17p13 deletion (17p-) with or without mutation of TP53 (17p-/TP53mut) have poor responses to chemoimmunotherapy and require alternative treatment regimens containing B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway inhibitors. The BCR signaling pathway inhibitors (ibrutinib targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase [BTK] and idelalisib targeting phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase delta [PI3K-delta], respectively) are currently approved for the treatment of relapsed/refractory CLL and all patients with 17p- (ibrutinib), and in combination with rituximab for relapsed/refractory patients (idelalisib). These agents offer great efficacy, even in chemotherapy refractory CLL, with increased tolerability, safety, and survival. Ongoing studies aim to determine the best therapy combinations with the goal of achieving long-term disease control and the possibility of developing a curative regimen for some patients. CLL is associated with a wide range of infectious, autoimmune, and malignant complications. These complications result in considerable morbidity and mortality that can be minimized by early detection and aggressive management. This active monitoring requires ongoing patient education, provider vigilance, and a team approach to patient care.

  16. A targeted mutation within the feline leukemia virus (FeLV) envelope protein immunosuppressive domain to improve a canarypox virus-vectored FeLV vaccine.

    PubMed

    Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine; Mangeney, Marianne; El-Garch, Hanane; Lacombe, Valérie; Poulet, Hervé; Heidmann, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    We previously delineated a highly conserved immunosuppressive (IS) domain within murine and primate retroviral envelope proteins that is critical for virus propagation in vivo. The envelope-mediated immunosuppression was assessed by the ability of the proteins, when expressed by allogeneic tumor cells normally rejected by engrafted mice, to allow these cells to escape, at least transiently, immune rejection. Using this approach, we identified key residues whose mutation (i) specifically abolishes immunosuppressive activity without affecting the "mechanical" function of the envelope protein and (ii) significantly enhances humoral and cellular immune responses elicited against the virus. The objective of this work was to study the immunosuppressive activity of the envelope protein (p15E) of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and evaluate the effect of its abolition on the efficacy of a vaccine against FeLV. Here we demonstrate that the FeLV envelope protein is immunosuppressive in vivo and that this immunosuppressive activity can be "switched off" by targeted mutation of a specific amino acid. As a result of the introduction of the mutated envelope sequence into a previously well characterized canarypox virus-vectored vaccine (ALVAC-FeLV), the frequency of vaccine-induced FeLV-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells was increased, whereas conversely, the frequency of vaccine-induced FeLV-specific interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing cells was reduced. This shift in the IFN-γ/IL-10 response was associated with a higher efficacy of ALVAC-FeLV against FeLV infection. This study demonstrates that FeLV p15E is immunosuppressive in vivo, that the immunosuppressive domain of p15E can modulate the FeLV-specific immune response, and that the efficacy of FeLV vaccines can be enhanced by inhibiting the immunosuppressive activity of the IS domain through an appropriate mutation.

  17. A Targeted Mutation within the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) Envelope Protein Immunosuppressive Domain To Improve a Canarypox Virus-Vectored FeLV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht-Louf, Géraldine; Mangeney, Marianne; El-Garch, Hanane; Lacombe, Valérie; Poulet, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    We previously delineated a highly conserved immunosuppressive (IS) domain within murine and primate retroviral envelope proteins that is critical for virus propagation in vivo. The envelope-mediated immunosuppression was assessed by the ability of the proteins, when expressed by allogeneic tumor cells normally rejected by engrafted mice, to allow these cells to escape, at least transiently, immune rejection. Using this approach, we identified key residues whose mutation (i) specifically abolishes immunosuppressive activity without affecting the “mechanical” function of the envelope protein and (ii) significantly enhances humoral and cellular immune responses elicited against the virus. The objective of this work was to study the immunosuppressive activity of the envelope protein (p15E) of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and evaluate the effect of its abolition on the efficacy of a vaccine against FeLV. Here we demonstrate that the FeLV envelope protein is immunosuppressive in vivo and that this immunosuppressive activity can be “switched off” by targeted mutation of a specific amino acid. As a result of the introduction of the mutated envelope sequence into a previously well characterized canarypox virus-vectored vaccine (ALVAC-FeLV), the frequency of vaccine-induced FeLV-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells was increased, whereas conversely, the frequency of vaccine-induced FeLV-specific interleukin-10 (IL-10)-producing cells was reduced. This shift in the IFN-γ/IL-10 response was associated with a higher efficacy of ALVAC-FeLV against FeLV infection. This study demonstrates that FeLV p15E is immunosuppressive in vivo, that the immunosuppressive domain of p15E can modulate the FeLV-specific immune response, and that the efficacy of FeLV vaccines can be enhanced by inhibiting the immunosuppressive activity of the IS domain through an appropriate mutation. PMID:24198407

  18. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Marrow transplantation for leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, E.D.

    1981-07-01

    Marrow transplantation for selected patients with leukemia, as for patients with severe combined immunologic deficiency or severe aplastic anemia, has now become an accepted clinical procedure. For patients with acute leukemia who have relapsed after achieving a remission of chemotherapy, marrow grafting from an identical twin or an HLA-identical sibling has now been demonstrated to produce median remissions as long as or longer than any reported for combination chemotherapy. In contrast to chemotherapy, marrow transplantation offers the possibility of cure for a small but significant fraction of these patients. Marrow transplantation for patients with ANL in first remission has now resulted in median survivals much longer than any reported with chemotherapy. Although it now appears that more than 50% of these patients can be cured with marrow transplantation, a much longer follow-up is indicated since some patients who achieve a complete remission with combination chemotherapy are now living for a long time, and some of these patients (less than 20%) may also be cured. Current intensive research with new modalities such as interferon, Acyclovir, Cyclosporin A, and monoclonal antibodies can reasonably be expected to improve the overall results of marrow transplantation.

  20. Dasatinib-loaded albumin nanoparticles possess diminished endothelial cell barrier disruption and retain potent anti-leukemia cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Shetty, Sreerama; Fu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Dasatinib (DAS), a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is highly effective in treating chronic myeloid leukemia and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, its clinical use is limited due to serious adverse effects. DAS can disrupt endothelial barrier integrity and increase endothelial permeability which may cause peripheral edema and pleural effusion. Albumin nanoparticles (NPs) as a drug carrier may serve as a useful tool for cell-selective drug delivery to reduce DAS-induced endothelial hyperpermeability and maintain endothelial barrier integrity. In this study, we reported that DAS-loaded NPs exhibited potent anti-leukemia efficacy as DAS alone. Importantly, albumin NPs as a drug carrier markedly reduced DAS-induced endothelial hyperpermeability by restraining the inhibition of Lyn kinase signaling pathway in endothelial cells. Therefore, albumin NPs could be a potential tool to improve anti-leukemia efficacy of DAS through its cell-selective effects. PMID:27391073

  1. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  2. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. What's New in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia What's New in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? Many ... person's outlook and whether they will need treatment. New drugs for chronic lymphocytic leukemia Dozens of new ...

  4. What Are the Risk Factors for Childhood Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Childhood Leukemia? A risk factor is anything that affects a ... of leukemia. Having a brother or sister with leukemia Siblings (brothers and sisters) of children with leukemia ...

  5. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should You Ask Your Doctor About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? As you cope with cancer and cancer treatment, ... About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? More In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  6. Do We Know What Causes Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Do We Know What Causes Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? The exact cause of most cases of chronic ... Lymphocytic Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  7. What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects a ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  8. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Should You Ask Your Doctor About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? As you cope with cancer and cancer treatment, ... About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? More In Chronic Myeloid Leukemia About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  9. What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects a ... Lymphocytic Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  10. Murine typhus in travelers returning from Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Parola, P.; Vogelaers, D.; Roure, C.; Janbon, F.; Raoult, D.

    1998-01-01

    We report the first three documented cases of murine typhus imported into Europe from Indonesia, discuss clues for the diagnosis of the disease, and urge that murine fever be considered in the diagnosis of febrile disease in travelers. PMID:9866749

  11. Murine typhus in travelers returning from Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Parola, P; Vogelaers, D; Roure, C; Janbon, F; Raoult, D

    1998-01-01

    We report the first three documented cases of murine typhus imported into Europe from Indonesia, discuss clues for the diagnosis of the disease, and urge that murine fever be considered in the diagnosis of febrile disease in travelers.

  12. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Isolated Hoxa9 overexpression predisposes to the development of lymphoid but not myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Beachy, Sarah H; Onozawa, Masahiro; Silverman, Deborah; Chung, Yang Jo; Rivera, Mariela Martinez; Aplan, Peter D

    2013-06-01

    Hoxa9 is expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, although this expression is usually diminished as these cells undergo differentiation. In addition, aberrant expression of Hoxa9 is strongly associated with both T cell and myeloid leukemia in mice and humans. Despite this strong association, enforced expression of Hoxa9 in murine bone marrow or thymus has only shown a modest ability to transform cells. To investigate this question, we used Vav regulatory elements to generate a transgenic mouse that targets Hoxa9 overexpression to all hematopoietic tissues. High-level expression of the Hoxa9 transgene in the hematopoietic compartment was associated with embryonic lethality, as no pups from founders that expressed high levels of the transgene were born live. However, offspring of an additional founder line, which expressed lower levels of Hoxa9, developed a precursor T cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma, accompanied by spontaneous Notch1 mutations. In contrast to most murine models of leukemia associated with Hoxa9 overexpression, the Vav-Hoxa9 mice did not overexpress other Hoxa cluster genes, mir196b (a microRNA that is embedded in the Hoxa locus), Meis1, or Pbx3. The Hoxa9 transgenic mouse reported in this study provides a suitable system for the study of Hoxa9 collaborators that drive myeloid and lymphoid malignant transformation.

  14. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  15. PROGRESS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady gains in clinical research and a renaissance of genomics in leukemia have led to improved outcomes. The recognition of tremendous heterogeneity in AML has allowed individualized treatments of specific disease entities within the context of patient age, cytogenetics, and mutational analysis. The following is a comprehensive review of the current state of AML therapy and a roadmap of our approach to these distinct disease entities. PMID:25441110

  16. Altered transcription of genes coding for class I histocompatibility antigens in murine tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Three murine tumors induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MLV) which exhibited loss of some or all H-2 class I antigens at the cell surface were analyzed at the DNA and RNA level with molecular probes specific of H-2 heavy chains and beta 2-microglobulin sequences. No observable difference could be detected at the DNA level between the tumors and the parent animals. However, a decrease in H-2 mRNA was observed, especially in phenotypically H-2 negative tumor, BM5R, where H-2 transcripts were at least 30-fold less abundant. These results show that an H-2-negative character may result from a general alteration in the transcription of H-2 genes, which could reflect some kind of regulatory process. PMID:6311935

  17. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Long terminal repeat of murine retroviral DNAs: sequence analysis, host-proviral junctions, and preintegration site.

    PubMed Central

    Van Beveren, C; Rands, E; Chattopadhyay, S K; Lowy, D R; Verma, I M

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of three murine retroviral DNAs has been determined. The data indicate that the U5 region (sequences originating from the 5' end of the genome) of various LTRs is more conserved than the U3 region (sequences from the 3' end of the genome). The location and sequence of the control elements such as the 5' cap, "TATA-like" sequences, "CCAAT-box," and presumptive polyadenylic acid addition signal AATAAA in the various LTRs are nearly identical. Some murine retroviral DNAs contain a duplication of sequences within the LTR ranging in size from 58 to 100 base pairs. A variant of molecularly cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus DNA in which one of the two LTRs integrated into the viral DNA was also analyzed. A 4-base-pair duplication was generated at the site of integration of LTR in the viral DNA. The host-viral junction of two molecularly cloned AKR-murine leukemia virus DNAs (clones 623 and 614) was determined. In the case of AKR-623 DNA, a 3- or 4-base-pair direct repeat of cellular sequences flanking the viral DNA was observed. However, AKR-614 DNA contained a 5-base-pair repeat of cellular sequences. The nucleotide sequence of the preintegration site of AKR-623 DNA revealed that the cellular sequences duplicated during integration are present only once. Finally, a striking homology between the sequences flanking the preintegration site and viral LTRs was observed. Images PMID:6281466

  19. Suppression of retroviral propagation and disease by suramin in murine systems.

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, R M; Rossoni, L D; Haseltine, W A; Broder, S

    1985-01-01

    Retroviral propagation crucially depends on reverse transcriptase (RT). We have developed murine models to test the biological effectiveness of the RT inhibitor suramin. The drug was active in our assay system, which includes (i) inhibition of RT activity in the murine T-cell tropic virus SL3-3 and Rauscher murine leukemia virus (MuLV), (ii) inhibition of plaque formation in the XC plaque assay, (iii) inhibition of viral infection of cultured murine T cells, and (iv) inhibition of splenomegaly induced by Rauscher MuLV in BALB/c mice. Suramin decreases viral titers significantly, even if started 36 hr after infection. Viral titers and number of infected cells increased to control levels after removal of the drug. BALB/c mice treated i.v. with 40 mg of suramin per kg twice per week following infection with Rauscher MuLV showed a 35% decrease in splenomegaly. Suramin is an active antiretroviral agent whose effect on retroviral propagation is reversible. We conclude that it acts as a virustatic drug and that long-term administration of suramin will be necessary if it is used for experimental treatment of human retroviral illnesses such as the acquired immune deficiency syndrome. PMID:2415971

  20. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Antimicrobial proteins of murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, P S; Eisenhauer, P B; Harwig, S S; van den Barselaar, M T; van Furth, R; Lehrer, R I

    1993-01-01

    Three murine microbicidal proteins (MUMPs) were purified from cells of the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 that had been activated by gamma interferon. Similar proteins were also present in nonactivated RAW264.7 cells, in cells of the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1, and in resident and activated murine peritoneal macrophages. MUMP-1, MUMP-2, and MUMP-3 killed Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro. MUMP-1 resembled an H1 histone but was unusual because its N-terminal residue (serine) was not N acetylated. Although MUMP-2 was N terminally blocked, its high lysine/arginine ratio and its reactivity with an antibody to H1 histones suggested that it also belonged to the H1 histone family. MUMP-3 was identical to histone H2B in 30 of 30 amino-terminal residues. Although the antimicrobial properties of histones have been recognized for decades, this is the first evidence that such proteins may endow the lysosomal apparatus of macrophages with nonoxidative antimicrobial potential. Other MUMPs, including some with a more restricted antimicrobial spectrum and one that appeared to be induced in RAW264.7 cells after gamma interferon stimulation, were noted but remain to be characterized. Images PMID:8514411

  2. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  4. Phase I/II Study of Nilotinib/Ruxolitinb Therapy for TKI Resistant Ph-Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-04

    Chronic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia; Philadelphia Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Resistant to Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Therapy

  5. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis.

    PubMed

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R

    2015-08-15

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodies were conspicuous on biopsy and may serve as a morphologic clue to lymphocytic differentiation while molecular and immunophenotypic studies are pending. The patient was successfully treated with local radiation therapy and oral ponatinib.

  6. ChREBP promotes the differentiation of leukemia-initiating cells to inhibit leukemogenesis through the TXNIP/RUNX1 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hongxiang; Gu, Hao; Chen, Chiqi; Li, Minle; Xia, Fangzhen; Xie, Li; Liu, Xiaoye; Zhang, Feifei; Tong, Xuemei; Wang, Jiangbo; Yu, Zhuo; Zheng, Junke

    2016-01-01

    Targeting leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) is the key to eradicating leukemia and preventing its relapse. Recent studies have indicated that metabolic regulation may play a critical role in the maintenance of stemness in LICs, although the detailed mechanisms are poorly understood. Herein, we provide intriguing evidence showing that a glucose-responsive transcription factor, carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP), served as a tumor suppressor rather than an oncogene, as previously described, to inhibit the development of acute myeloid leukemia by promoting the differentiation of LICs. Using an MLL-AF9-induced murine leukemia model, we demonstrated that the deletion of ChREBP resulted in the blockage of the differentiation of LICs and significantly reduced survival in ChREBP-null leukemic mice. However, ChREBP was not required for the normal repopulation abilities of hematopoietic stem cells. ChREBP promoted leukemia cell differentiation through the direct inhibition of RUNX1 or the transactivation of TXNIP to downregulate the RUNX1 level and ROS generation. Moreover, knockdown of ChREBP in human leukemia THP1 cells led to markedly enhanced proliferation and decreased differentiation upon PMA treatment. Collectively, we unraveled an unexpected role of ChREBP in leukemogenesis, which may provide valuable clues for developing novel metabolic strategies for leukemia treatment. PMID:27224916

  7. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms can suggest that ... described below. Tests used to diagnose and classify ALL If your doctor thinks you have leukemia, he ...

  8. How Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia Diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms might suggest that ... of samples used to test for acute myeloid leukemia If signs and symptoms and/or the results ...

  9. General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Hairy ...

  10. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Option Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Hairy ...

  11. Childhood leukemia in Woburn, Massachusetts.

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, J J; Parker, G S; Rosen, S; Prenney, B; Healey, R; Caldwell, G G

    1986-01-01

    Possible associations between environmental hazards and the occurrence of childhood leukemia were investigated in Woburn, MA, for the period 1969-79. Residents of Woburn were concerned over what they perceived to be a large number of childhood leukemia cases; at the same time there was extensive publicity about uncontrolled hazardous waste sites in Woburn, which resulted in its being placed on the Superfund list. Many believed that the elevated rate of childhood leukemia was related to these sites or to two city water wells that had been closed in 1979 when they were found to be contaminated by organic chemicals. An occurrence was defined as childhood leukemia when it was diagnosed in a Woburn resident less than 20 years old between 1969 and 1979 and confirmed by review of hospital and pathology records. This investigation confirmed an increase in incidence which was distributed uniformly over the 11-year period. Six of the persons with leukemia were located close to each other in one census tract, 7.5 times the expected number. Parents of the children and of two matched control groups were interviewed about medical history, mother's pregnancy history, school history, and environmental exposures. There were no significant differences between the leukemia victims and persons in the control groups. No leukemia sufferer had contact with a hazardous waste site. While the contaminants of Wells G and H, which had been closed, are not known leukemogens, it is not possible to rule out exposure to this water as a factor, particularly in the eastern Woburn residents. PMID:3083476

  12. The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Metayer, Catherine; Milne, Elizabeth; Clavel, Jacqueline; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Petridou, Eleni; Taylor, Malcolm; Schüz, Joachim; Spector, Logan G.; Dockerty, John D.; Magnani, Corrado; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Sinnett, Daniel; Murphy, Michael; Roman, Eve; Monge, Patricia; Ezzat, Sameera; Mueller, Beth A.; Scheurer, Michael E.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Birch, Jill; Kaatsch, Peter; Koifman, Sergio; Lightfoot, Tracy; Bhatti, Parveen; Bondy, Melissa L.; Rudant, Jérémie; O’Neill, Kate; Miligi, Lucia; Dessypris, Nick; Kang, Alice Y.; Buffler, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case–control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene–environment interactions. Objectives The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene–environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962–present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31 000 cases and 50 000 controls. Of these, 19 case–control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child–parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene–environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic

  13. SPARC promotes leukemic cell growth and predicts acute myeloid leukemia outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alachkar, Houda; Santhanam, Ramasamy; Maharry, Kati; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Huang, Xiaomeng; Kohlschmidt, Jessica; Mendler, Jason H.; Benito, Juliana M.; Hickey, Christopher; Neviani, Paolo; Dorrance, Adrienne M.; Anghelina, Mirela; Khalife, Jihane; Tarighat, Somayeh S.; Volinia, Stefano; Whitman, Susan P.; Paschka, Peter; Hoellerbauer, Pia; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Han, Lina; Bolon, Brad N.; Blum, William; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Carroll, Andrew J.; Perrotti, Danilo; Andreeff, Michael; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Konopleva, Marina; Garzon, Ramiro; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Marcucci, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (osteonectin) (SPARC) gene, which encodes a matricellular protein that participates in normal tissue remodeling, is associated with a variety of diseases including cancer, but the contribution of SPARC to malignant growth remains controversial. We previously reported that SPARC was among the most upregulated genes in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients with gene-expression profiles predictive of unfavorable outcome, such as mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2-R172) and overexpression of the oncogenes brain and acute leukemia, cytoplasmic (BAALC) and v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (ERG). In contrast, SPARC was downregulated in CN-AML patients harboring mutations in nucleophosmin (NPM1) that are associated with favorable prognosis. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that SPARC expression is clinically relevant in AML. Here, we found that SPARC overexpression is associated with adverse outcome in CN-AML patients and promotes aggressive leukemia growth in murine models of AML. In leukemia cells, SPARC expression was mediated by the SP1/NF-κB transactivation complex. Furthermore, secreted SPARC activated the integrin-linked kinase/AKT (ILK/AKT) pathway, likely via integrin interaction, and subsequent β-catenin signaling, which is involved in leukemia cell self-renewal. Pharmacologic inhibition of the SP1/NF-κB complex resulted in SPARC downregulation and leukemia growth inhibition. Together, our data indicate that evaluation of SPARC expression has prognosticative value and SPARC is a potential therapeutic target for AML. PMID:24590286

  14. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  15. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  16. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  17. Optimized Treatment Schedules for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    He, Qie; Dingli, David; Foo, Jasmine; Leder, Kevin Zox

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, several targeted therapies (e.g. imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib) have been developed to treat Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML). Despite an initial response to therapy, drug resistance remains a problem for some CML patients. Recent studies have shown that resistance mutations that preexist treatment can be detected in a substantial number of patients, and that this may be associated with eventual treatment failure. One proposed method to extend treatment efficacy is to use a combination of multiple targeted therapies. However, the design of such combination therapies (timing, sequence, etc.) remains an open challenge. In this work we mathematically model the dynamics of CML response to combination therapy and analyze the impact of combination treatment schedules on treatment efficacy in patients with preexisting resistance. We then propose an optimization problem to find the best schedule of multiple therapies based on the evolution of CML according to our ordinary differential equation model. This resulting optimization problem is nontrivial due to the presence of ordinary different equation constraints and integer variables. Our model also incorporates drug toxicity constraints by tracking the dynamics of patient neutrophil counts in response to therapy. We determine optimal combination strategies that maximize time until treatment failure on hypothetical patients, using parameters estimated from clinical data in the literature. PMID:27764087

  18. Feline leukemia virus infection requires a post-receptor binding envelope-dependent cellular component.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Naveen; Thickett, Kelly R; Na, Hong; Leung, Cherry; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2011-12-01

    Gammaretrovirus receptors have been suggested to contain the necessary determinants to mediate virus binding and entry. Here, we show that murine NIH 3T3 and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing receptors for subgroup A, B, and C feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) are weakly susceptible (10(1) to 10(2) CFU/ml) to FeLV pseudotype viruses containing murine leukemia virus (MLV) core (Gag-Pol) proteins, whereas FeLV receptor-expressing murine Mus dunni tail fibroblast (MDTF) cells are highly susceptible (10(4) to 10(6) CFU/ml). However, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the FeLV subgroup B receptor PiT1 are highly susceptible to gibbon ape leukemia virus pseudotype virus, which differs from the FeLV pseudotype viruses only in the envelope protein. FeLV resistance is not caused by a defect in envelope binding, low receptor expression levels, or N-linked glycosylation. Resistance is not alleviated by substitution of the MLV core in the FeLV pseudotype virus with FeLV core proteins. Interestingly, FeLV resistance is alleviated by fusion of receptor-expressing NIH 3T3 and BHK cells with MDTF or human TE671 cells, suggesting the absence of an additional cellular component in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells that is required for FeLV infection. The putative FeLV-specific cellular component is not a secreted factor, as MDTF conditioned medium does not alleviate the block to FeLV infection. Together, our findings suggest that FeLV infection requires an additional envelope-dependent cellular component that is absent in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells but that is present in MDTF and TE671 cells.

  19. Divergent effects of supraphysiologic Notch signals on leukemia stem cells and hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Mark Y; Shestova, Olga; Xu, Lanwei; Aster, Jon C; Pear, Warren S

    2013-02-07

    The leukemia stem cell (LSC) hypothesis proposes that a subset of cells in the bulk leukemia population propagates the leukemia.We tested the LSC hypothesis in a mouse model of Notch-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) in which the tumor cells were largely CD4+ CD8+ T cells. LSC activity was enriched but rare in the CD8+ CD4 HSA(hi) immature single-positive T-cell subset. Although our murine T-ALL model relies on transduction of HSCs, we were unable to isolate Notch-activated HSCs to test for LSC activity. Further analysis showed that Notch activation in HSCs caused an initial expansion of hematopoietic and T-cell progenitors and loss of stem cell quiescence, which was followed by progressive loss of long-term HSCs and T-cell production over several weeks. Similar results were obtained in a conditional transgenic model in which Notch activation is induced in HSCs by Cre recombinase. We conclude that although supraphysiologic Notch signaling in HSCs promotes LSC activity in T-cell progenitors, it extinguishes self-renewal of LT-HSCs. These results provide further evidence for therapeutically targeting T-cell progenitors in T-ALL while also underscoring the need to tightly regulate Notch signaling to expand normal HSC populations for clinical applications.

  20. ELL and EAF1 are Cajal Body Components That Are Disrupted in MLL-ELL Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Paul E.; Simone, Federico; Kaberlein, Joseph J.; Luo, Roger T.; Thirman, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The (11;19)(q23;p13.1) translocation in acute leukemia results in the formation of a chimeric MLL-ELL fusion protein. ELL is an RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) transcriptional elongation factor that interacts with the recently identified EAF1 protein. Here, we show that ELL and EAF1 are components of Cajal bodies (CBs). Although ELL and EAF1 colocalize with p80 coilin, the signature protein of CBs, ELL and EAF1 do not exhibit a direct physical interaction with p80 coilin. Treatment of cells with actinomycin D, DRB, or α-amanitin, specific inhibitors of Pol II, disperses ELL and EAF1 from CBs, indicating that localization of ELL and EAF1 in CBs is dependent on active transcription by Pol II. The concentration of ELL and EAF1 in CBs links the transcriptional elongation activity of ELL to the RNA processing functions previously identified in CBs. Strikingly, CBs are disrupted in MLL-ELL leukemia. EAF1 and p80 coilin are delocalized from CBs in murine MLL-ELL leukemia cells and in HeLa cells transiently transfected with MLL-ELL. Nuclear and cytoplasmic fractionation revealed diminished expression of p80 coilin and EAF1 are not present in the nuclei of MLL-ELL leukemia cells. These studies are the first demonstration of a direct role of CB components in leukemogenesis. PMID:12686606