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Sample records for murine sarcoma virus

  1. Conditions for Copackaging Rous Sarcoma Virus and Murine Leukemia Virus Gag Proteins during Retroviral Budding

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Robert P.; Wills, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and murine leukemia virus (MLV) are examples of distantly related retroviruses that normally do not encounter one another in nature. Their Gag proteins direct particle assembly at the plasma membrane but possess very little sequence similarity. As expected, coexpression of these two Gag proteins did not result in particles that contain both. However, when the N-terminal membrane-binding domain of each molecule was replaced with that of the Src oncoprotein, which is also targeted to the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane, efficient copackaging was observed in genetic complementation and coimmunoprecipitation assays. We hypothesize that the RSV and MLV Gag proteins normally use distinct locations on the plasma membrane for particle assembly but otherwise have assembly domains that are sufficiently similar in function (but not sequence) to allow heterologous interactions when these proteins are redirected to a common membrane location. PMID:9971785

  2. Sensitivity to. gamma. rays of avian sarcoma and murine leukemia viruses. [/sup 60/Co, uv

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoshima, K.; Niwa, O.; Yutsudo, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Tahara, S.; Sugahara, T.

    1980-09-01

    The direct inactivation of avian and murine oncoviruses by ..gamma.. rays was examined using /sup 60/Co as a ..gamma..-ray source. The inactivation of murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) followed single-hit kinetics while the subgroup D Schmidt-Ruppin strain of avian sarcoma virus (SR-RSV D) showed multihit inactivation kinetics with an extrapolation number of 5. The two viruses showed similar uv-inactivation kinetics. The genomic RNA of the SR-RSV D strain was degraded by ..gamma.. irradiation faster than its infectivity, but viral clones isolated from the foci formed after ..gamma.. irradiation had a complete genome. These results suggest that SR-RSV D has a strong repair function, possibly connected with reverse transcriptase activity.

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the transforming gene of m1 murine sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Brow, M A; Sen, A; Sutcliffe, J G

    1984-01-01

    The v-mosm1 nucleotide sequence codes for a protein that is 376 amino acids long. Although the N-terminus is homologous with that of the v-mos124 protein, the C-terminus is substantially different from the C-termini of all other examined mos proteins, suggesting that this region is nonessential and perhaps cleaved. Overall, v-mosm1 has greater homology with c-mos than does v-mos124, but mutually exclusive differences between c-mos and each of the v-mos genes preclude linear descent and suggest a common ancestral murine sarcoma virus. PMID:6319757

  4. TUMOR INDUCTION BY MURINE SARCOMA VIRUS IN AKR AND C58 MICE

    PubMed Central

    Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi; Colombatti, Alfonso; Collavo, Dino; Sendo, Fujiro; Aoki, Tadao; Fischinger, Peter J.

    1974-01-01

    Adult AKR and C58 mice injected intramuscularly with murine sarcoma virus, Moloney isolate (M-MSV), developed high incidence of nonregressing local tumors. Histologically, these tumors revealed the typical pleomorphism of M-MSV sarcomas; in some cases, however, neoplastic tissue showed a nodular or diffuse growth of monomorphic myoblastlike cells, reminiscent of clonal aggregates. No depression of immune reactivity was found in M-MSV-injected mice as evaluated by direct hemolytic plaque-forming cells against SRBC and by virus-neutralizing antibody production. The MSV recovered from the induced tumors proved to be, by neutralization assay, a Gross (G)-MSV pseudotype. Moreover, tumor cell suspensions absorbed out cytotoxic antibody directed against G-cell surface antigens. Therefore, the conclusion was drawn that MSV with envelope characteristics of endogenous G leukemia virus had formed in vivo through a phenotypic mixing phenomenon. The failure of tumors to regress has been interpreted as mainly due to the partial unresponsiveness of host immune reactivity towards G-MuLV specified antigens. Since MSV-tumors arose in AKR mice after a very long latent period, the possibility was considered that this relative resistance might depend on immunologic mechanisms. In fact, M-MSV-injected AKR mice immunodepressed by goat antimouse lymphocyte serum or rendered partially tolerant by neonatal M-MuLV inoculation developed sarcomas with higher incidence and with a shorter latency. Furthermore, the MSV recovered from these early tumors proved to be the original Moloney pseudotype. PMID:4608945

  5. In vitro proteolytic cleavage of Gazdar murine sarcoma virus p65gag.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, S; Arlinghaus, R B

    1981-09-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus, disrupted in concentrations of 0.1 to 0.5% Nonidet P-40, catalyzed the cleavage of p65, the gag gene polyprotein of the Gazdar strain of murine sarcoma virus, into polypeptides with sizes and antigenic determinants of murine leukemia virus-specified p30, p15, pp12, and p10. Cleavage performed in the presence of 0.15% Nonidet P-40 in water yielded polypeptides of approximately 40,000 (P40) and 25,000 (P25) Mr. In vitro cleavage performed in a buffered solution containing dithiothreitol in addition to 0.1% Nonidet P-40 allowed the efficient processing of P40 to p30 and a band migrating with p10. Immunoprecipitation with monospecific sera indicated that P40 contained p30 and p10, whereas P25 contained p15 and pp12 determinants. P40 and P25 are similar in size and antigenic properties to Pr40gag and Pr25gag observed in infected cells (Naso et al, J. Virol. 32:187-198, 1979).

  6. Relationship Between Moloney Murine Leukemia and Sarcoma Virus RNAs: Purification and Hybridization Map of Complementary DNAs from Defined Regions of Moloney Murine Sarcoma Virus 124

    PubMed Central

    Dina, Dino; Beemon, Karen

    1977-01-01

    Complementary DNAs (cDNA's) specific for various regions of the Moloney murine sarcoma virus (MSV) 124 RNA genome were prepared by cross-hybridization techniques. A cDNA specific for the first 1,000 nucleotides adjacent to the RNA 3′ end (cDNA 3′) was prepared and shown to also be complementary to the 3′-terminal 1,000 nucleotides of a related Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) genome. A cDNA complementary to the “MSV-specific” portion of the MSV 124 genome was prepared. This cDNA was shown not to anneal to Moloney MLV RNA and to anneal to a portion of the viral RNA of about 1,500 to 1,800 nucleotides in length, located 1,000 nucleotides from the 3′ end of MSV RNA. A cDNA common to the genome of MSV and MLV was also obtained and shown to anneal to the 5′-terminal two-thirds, as well as to the 3′-terminal 1,000 nucleotides, of the MSV RNA genome. This cDNA also annealed to the RNA from MLV and mainly to the 5′-terminal half of the MLV genome. It is concluded that the 6-kilobase Moloney MSV 124 RNA genome has a sequence arrangement that includes (i) a 3′ portion of about 1,000 nucleotides, which is also present at the 3′ terminus of MLV; (ii) an MSV-specific region, not shared with MLV, which extends between 1,000 and 2,500 nucleotides from the 3′ terminus; and (iii) a second “common” region, again shared with MLV, which extends from 2,500 nucleotides to the 5′ terminus. This second common region appears to be located in the 5′ half of the 10-kilobase MLV genome as well. Experiments in which a large excess of cold MLV cDNA was annealed to 3H-labeled polyadenylic acid-containing fragments of MSV RNA gave results consistent with this arrangement of the MSV genome. PMID:197259

  7. Temperature-sensitive viral RNA expression in Moloney murine sarcoma virus ts110-infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hamelin, R; Brizzard, B L; Nash, M A; Murphy, E C; Arlinghaus, R B

    1985-01-01

    We examined the mos-specific intracellular RNA species in 6m2 cells, an NRK cell line nonproductively infected with the ts110 mutant of Moloney murine sarcoma virus. These cells present a normal phenotype at 39 degrees C and a transformed phenotype at 28 or 33 degrees C, expressing two viral proteins, termed P85gag-mos and P58gag, at 28 to 33 degrees C, whereas only P58gag is expressed at 39 degrees C. It has been previously shown that 6m2 cells contain two virus-specific RNA species, a 4.0-kilobase (kb) RNA coding for P58gag and a 3.5-kb RNA coding for P85gag-mos. Using both Northern blot and S1 nuclease analyses, we show here that the 3.5-kb RNA is the predominant viral RNA species in 6m2 cells grown at 28 degrees C, whereas only the 4.0-kb RNA is detected at 39 degrees C. During temperature shift experiments, the 3.5-kb RNA species disappears after a shift from 28 to 39 degrees C and is detected again after a shift back from 39 to 28 degrees C. By Southern blot analysis, we have detected only one ts110 proviral DNA in the 6m2 genome. This observation, as well as previously published heteroduplex and S1 nuclease analyses which showed that the 3.5-kb RNA species lacks about 430 bases found at the gag gene-mos gene junction in the 4.0-kb RNA, suggests that the 3.5-kb RNA is a splicing product of the 4.0-kb RNA. The absence of the 3.5-kb RNA when 6m2 cells are grown at 39 degrees C indicates that the splicing reaction is thermosensitive. The splicing defect of the ts110 Moloney murine sarcoma virus viral RNA in 6m2 cells cannot be complemented by acute Moloney murine leukemia virus superinfection, since no 3.5-kb ts110 RNA was detected in acutely superinfected 6m2 cells maintained at 39 degrees C. The spliced Moloney murine leukemia virus env mRNA, however, is found in acutely infected cells maintained at 39 degrees C, suggesting that the lack of ts110 viral RNA splicing at 39 degrees C is not due to an obvious host defect. In sharp contrast, however, 6m2 cells

  8. Detection of human C-type "helper" viruses in human leukemic bone marrow with murine sarcoma virus-transformed human and rat non-producer cells.

    PubMed

    Nooter, K; Bentvelzen, P; Zurcher, C; Rhim, J

    1977-01-01

    Bone-marrow cells from two leukemic children were co-cultivated with the leukemic children A 7573. In early passages, C-type oncornaviruses were released as detected by extracellular reverse transcriptase assay. Co-cultivation of the infected canine cells with the non-producing cell lines R-970-5 (human) or K-NRK (rat) both transformed by Kirsten mouse sarcoma virus (MSV) yielded a new pseudotype of MSV that could transform rat embryo, rabbit SIRC and human kidney cells but not mouse embryo cells. The focur formation could be inhibited by an antiserum to the simian sarcoma virus but not by a serum directed against murine leukemia virus. A cell line derived from a focus of transformed cells became a highe virus is related to the simian sarcoma virus. It is concluded that the leukemic bone-marrow cells produce a C-type oncornavirus that can serve as a helper virus to the defective MSV.

  9. Tumour-Associated Transplantation Antigens of Neoplasms Induced by a Naturally Occurring Murine Sarcoma Virus (FBJ-MSV)

    PubMed Central

    Jones, David B.; Moore, Michael

    1973-01-01

    FBJ osteosarcoma virus (FBJ-MSV) isolated originally from a spontaneously arising osteosarcoma in a CF1 mouse is the only known naturally occurring murine sarcoma virus (MSV). It is unique among strains of MSV in producing primarily sarcomata in mice. The capacity of tumour cells transformed in vivo by this agent to elicit specific transplantation immunity in syngeneic hosts was investigated. A low level of resistance (104-105 cells) was consistently induced by implantation of x-irradiated (15,000 rad) tumours or surgical excision of developing subcutaneous grafts. By contrast intraperitoneal inoculation of virus containing cellfree extracts of FBJ-MSV sarcomata was a far less effective immunization procedure. Confirmatory evidence for the antigenicity of these neoplasms was obtained in tests in which preincubation of tumour cells with lymphoid cells from specifically immune donors inhibited in vivo outgrowth of the FBJ-MSV cells in untreated syngeneic recipients. The induction of host resistance to FBJ-MSV cells by immunization with identical and independently-induced FBJ-MSV tumours established that FBJ-MSV cells possess common cell surface antigenic specificities in a manner analogous to those of experimental neoplasms induced by other oncogenic DNA and RNA viruses. Since FBJ-MSV cells release infectious virus it was not possible in this system to establish whether the tumour-rejection antigen was cellular or virion in nature. The antigenic weakness of FBJ-MSV cells in syngeneic hosts is comparable with that of virus-induced murine leukaemias of the Gross (G) or “wild” type subgroup to which category FBJ-MSV also belongs. These features suggest that FBJ-MSV exemplifies naturally occurring sarcomagenic viruses more closely than those of the Friend-Moloney-Rauscher-Graffi (FMRGr) subgroup which in general induce highly antigenic neoplasms. PMID:4516007

  10. Detection and identification of cancerous murine fibroblasts, transformed by murine sarcoma virus in culture, using Raman spectroscopy and advanced statistical methods.

    PubMed

    Salman, A; Shufan, E; Zeiri, L; Huleihel, M

    2013-03-01

    Cancer is one of the leading worldwide causes of death. It may be induced by a variety of factors, including carcinogens, radiation, genetic factors, or DNA and RNA viruses. The early detection of cancer is critical for its successful therapy, which can result in complete recovery from some types of cancer. Raman spectroscopy has been widely used in medicine and biology. It is a noninvasive, nondestructive, and water-insensitive technique that can detect changes in cells and tissues that are caused by different disorders, such as cancer. In this study, Raman spectroscopy was used for the identification and characterization of murine fibroblast cell lines (NIH/3T3) and malignant fibroblast cells transformed by murine sarcoma virus (NIH-MuSV) cells. Using principal component analysis and LDA it was possible to differentiate between the NIH/3T3 and NIH-MuSV cells with an 80-85% success rate based on their Raman shift spectra. The best results for differentiation were achieved from spectra that were obtained from the rich membrane sites. Because of its homogeneity and complete control of most factors affecting its growth, cell culture is a preferred model for the detection and identification of specific biomarkers related to cancer transformation or other cellular modifications.

  11. Monoclonal antibody against IFN-gamma inhibits Moloney murine sarcoma virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zanovello, P.; Vallerani, E.; Biasi, G.; Landolfo, S.; Collavo, D.

    1988-02-15

    The role of autochthonous IFN- production was evaluated in immune reactions to Moloney murine sarcoma virus (M-MSV)-induced tumors which are characterized by spontaneous regression mainly caused by virus-specific CTL activity. A functional IFN- depletion, induced by repeated administration of mAb anti-IFN- at the site of virus inoculation, prevented tumor regression in M-MSV-injected mice. Moreover, this antibody inhibited in vitro both proliferation and differentiation of M-MSV-specific T lymphocytes obtained in bulk cultures, but not growth and lytic activity of the already differentiated virus-specific CTL clone CHM-14 stimulated with rIL-2 and relevant tumor Ag. In addition, in mice receiving mAb treatment the frequency of M-MSV-specific CTL precursors, evaluated by means of limiting dilution analysis, was strongly reduced in comparison with that of control mice injected only with virus. Because CTL secrete IFN- following antigenic stimulation, the possibility that non-T effector cells recruited by this lymphokine might mediate tumor regression was also considered. Adoptive immunotherapy experiments, performed in T cell-deficient (Tx + BM) and in sublethally irradiated mice, demonstrated that transfer of CHM-14 CTL clone, which secretes IFN-, was able to counteract M-MSV tumor growth despite the local mAb anti-IFN- treatment which may have prevented host cell recruitment. Moreover, repeated local rIFN- inoculations in Tx + BM mice did not counteract M-MSV tumor progression, thus confirming that other IFN- properties such as non-T cell recruitment, antiviral or anti-proliferative IFN- activities have little or no relevance when M-MSV-specific CTL are lacking. On the whole, these results indicate that in M-MSV-injected mice, tumor enhancement after mAb anti-IFN- treatment is principally caused by impaired differentiation of virus-specific CTL precursors.

  12. Characterization of hyaluronate binding proteins isolated from 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus transformed 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, E.A.; Moore, D.; Hayden, L.J.

    1987-06-02

    A hyaluronic acid binding fraction was purified from the supernatant media of both 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus (MSV) transformed 3T3 cultures by hyaluronate and immunoaffinity chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis resolved the hyaluronate affinity-purified fraction into three major protein bands of estimated molecular weight (M/sub r,e/) 70K, 66K, and 56K which contained hyaluronate binding activity and which were termed hyaluronate binding proteins (HABP). Hyaluronate affinity chromatography combined with immunoaffinity chromatography, using antibody directed against the larger HABP, allowed a 20-fold purification of HABP. Fractions isolated from 3T3 supernatant medium also contained additional binding molecules in the molecular weight range of 20K. This material was present in vanishingly small amounts and was not detected with a silver stain or with (/sup 35/S)methionine label. The three protein species isolated by hyaluronate affinity chromatography (M/sub r,e/ 70K, 66K, and 56K) were related to one another since they shared antigenic determinants and exhibited similar pI values. In isocratic conditions, HABP occurred as aggregates of up to 580 kilodaltons. Their glycoprotein nature was indicated by their incorporation of /sup 3/H-sugars. Enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay showed they were antigenically distinct from other hyaluronate binding proteins such as fibronectin, cartilage link protein, and the hyaluronate binding region of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The results are discussed with regard both to the functional significance of hyaluronate-cell surface interactions in transformed as well as normal cells and to the relationship of HABP to other reported hyaluronate binding proteins.

  13. Induction of murine tumors in adult mice by a combination of either avian sarcoma virus or human adenovirus and syngeneic mouse embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, M; Nitta, K

    1983-01-01

    Primary murine Rous sarcoma was produced in adult mice of seven strains, C57BL/6, DBA/2, BALB/c, C3H/He, CBAJ, AKR, and DDD, by s.c. inoculation of a mixture of 5 X 10(6) chicken tumor cells containing Schmidt-Ruppin Rous sarcoma virus and 9- to 12-day-old mouse embryo cells (MEC) (2 X 10(6) ) of the syngeneic strain. The sarcoma developed at the site of injection in almost all mice tested, but there were some differences in the latent period and the survival time among mouse strains. When the number of cells inoculated was reduced to 5 X 10(4) for chicken tumor cells induced by the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus (SR-CTC) and 2 X 10(4) for MEC, no tumor was produced in C3H/He mice. These tumors had strain specificity and the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus genome in masked form. The tumor at the site of injection originated in the embryo cells injected along with SR-CTC. This was confirmed by CBAT6/T6 marker chromosome analysis of the tumor cells of CBA mice induced with SR-CTC plus CBAT6/T6 MEC and also confirmed by transplantation of a C57BL/6 X C3H/He F1 tumor which had been induced with SR-CTC plus C3H/He or C57BL/6 MEC. Tumor induction in adult mouse by a mixture of virus and syngeneic 9- to 14-day-old embryo cells was tested for human adenovirus serotype 12 (Ad12) and simian virus 40. Primary Ad12 tumor was also induced in adult CBA, C3H/He, and DDD mice by 4 X 10(5 to 6) 50% tissue culture infective dose of Ad12 with 5 X 10(6) syngeneic embryo cells. This tumor contained Ad12 T-antigen-positive particles in cells. But in the case of simian virus 40, the tumor did not appear for about 300 days of observation.

  14. Expression of the v-mos gene alters a Mr 55,000 protein during acute infection by Moloney murine sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, B; Sparrow, J T; Hedge, A M; Arlinghaus, R B

    1986-01-01

    Infection of the rat myoblast cell line, L6E9, with Moloney murine sarcoma virus (Mo-MuSV) clone 124, altered a cellular protein of Mr 55,000 (P55) within 2 days of infection. The alteration of P55 was observed as a reduction in its steady-state level in cell extracts. The reduction of P55 correlated with the appearance of p37mos in infected cells. Except for P55 and one other protein, no change was detected in the total protein pattern of infected cells compared to uninfected cells, as judged by either immunoblots of one-dimensional NaDodSO4 gels or direct two-dimensional gel analysis. P55 levels were unchanged when L6E9 cells were infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus or several different transforming retroviruses. To determine the specificity of this v-mos-induced effect on P55, L6E9 cells were acutely infected with a temperature-sensitive variant (ts110) of Mo-MuSV. When these cells were shifted from 39 degrees C to 33 degrees C, which activates the gag-mos gene product, the P55 level dropped by greater than 50% within 2-3 hr. Conversely, with a shift in temperature from 33 degrees C to 39 degrees C, the cells' P55 level returned to normal within 5 hr, starting at 30 min after shift. These results clearly show that v-mos expression in acutely infected L6E9 cells alters the cellular protein, P55. Images PMID:3012522

  15. Oncolytic Maraba Virus MG1 as a Treatment for Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Selman, Mohammed; Son, Hwan Hee; Bergeron, Anabel; Chen, Andrew; Tsang, Jovian; Butterwick, Derek; Arulanandam, Rozanne; Forbes, Nicole E; Tzelepis, Fanny; Bell, John C; Werier, Joel; Abdelbary, Hesham; Diallo, Jean-Simon

    2017-09-15

    The poor prognosis of patients with advanced bone and soft-tissue sarcoma has not changed in the past several decades, highlighting the necessity for new therapeutic approaches. Immunotherapies, including oncolytic viral (OV) therapy, have shown great promise in a number of clinical trials for a variety of tumor types. However, the effective application of OV in treating sarcoma still remains to be demonstrated. Although few pre-clinical studies using distinct OVs have been performed and demonstrated therapeutic benefit in sarcoma models, a side-by-side comparison of clinically relevant OV platforms has not been performed. Four clinically relevant OV platforms (Reovirus, Vaccinia virus, Herpes-simplex virus and Rhabdovirus) were screened for their ability to infect and kill human and canine sarcoma cell lines in vitro, and human sarcoma specimens ex vivo. In vivo treatment efficacy was tested in a murine model. The rhabdovirus MG1 demonstrated the highest potency in vitro. Ex vivo, MG1 productively infected more than 80% of human sarcoma tissues tested, and treatment in vivo led to a significant increase in long-lasting cures in sarcoma-bearing mice. Importantly, MG1 treatment induced the generation of memory immune response that provided protection against a subsequent tumor challenge. This study opens the door for the use of MG1-based oncolytic immunotherapy strategies as treatment for sarcoma or as a component of a combined therapy. © 2017 UICC.

  16. Multiple defects, including premature apoptosis, prevent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication in murine cells.

    PubMed

    Austgen, Kathryn; Oakes, Scott A; Ganem, Don

    2012-02-01

    The development of a mouse model for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection has been impeded by the limited host range of the virus. Here, we have examined the molecular basis of this host range restriction. KSHV efficiently enters murine cells and establishes latency. However, ectopic expression of the lytic switch protein RTA (replication and transcription activator) in these cells induces little viral gene expression and no virus production. Upon treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors, KSHV-infected murine cells display more extensive but aberrant viral transcription and do not support either viral DNA synthesis or the production of infectious virions. These aberrantly infected cells also display markedly enhanced apoptosis. Genetic ablation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in these cells prolongs their survival and permits viral DNA replication but does not rescue the generation of virions. We conclude that multiple defects, both prior to and following DNA synthesis, restrict lytic KSHV infection in murine cells.

  17. Transplacental cancerization by Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed

    Nastac, E; Stoian, M; Hozoc, M; Athanasiu, P

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data obtained in the mouse are presented, pointing to the possibility of transplacental transmission of the genetic information contained in the genome of Rous sarcoma virus(RSV), by either intact RSV virions or nucleic acids extracted from infectant suspensions of tumors induced by the Carr(Ziber) on Bryan RSV strains.

  18. Anoxia-inducible rat VL30 elements and their relationship to ras-containing sarcoma viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Firulli, B A; Anderson, G R; Stoler, D L; Estes, S D

    1993-01-01

    VL30 elements are associated with cancer by their overexpression in rodent malignancies, their induction in a fibroblast response to anoxia which shares features with the malignant phenotype, and their presence recombined into Harvey murine sarcoma virus (HaSV) and Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. These sarcoma viruses contain ras oncogenes flanked on both sides by retrotransposon VL30 element sequences, in turn flanked by mouse leukemia virus sequences. Three very basic questions have existed about the VL30 element sequences found in sarcoma viruses: (i) how did they become recombined, (ii) what are their exact boundaries, and (iii) why are they there? To help decipher the nature of VL30 elements in sarcoma viruses, we examined VL30 clones isolated from an anoxic fibroblast cDNA library and independently by polymerase chain reaction cloning from rat cell DNA. Sequence comparisons with HaSV revealed that HaSV was formed by the substitution of 0.7 kb of VL30 sequences by 0.9 kb of c-Ha-ras sequences, with this event possibly facilitated by the presence of an identical Alu-like repeat found upstream of the 5' recombination point in both the VL30 element and c-Ha-ras. Recombination occurred 42 bases beyond the Alu-like sequences in VL30 and 1596 bases beyond them in c-Ha-ras, at position 926 of HaSV. The 3' ras-VL30 recombination event in HaSV occurred within a seven-base region of shared sequence identity, between HaSV bases 1825 and 1825 and 1831. Recombination between Moloney leukemia virus (MoLV) and VL30 appears to have occurred at a point corresponding to base 218 or 219 of MoLV and was near a TAR-like VL30 sequence; such recombination at the 3' end was between positions 7445 and 7456 of MoLV (HaSV positions 4694 to 4703). Kirsten murine sarcoma virus was found to be closely analogous to HaSV, and limited similar features were also seen with Rasheed sarcoma virus. Images PMID:8411389

  19. Activation of thermosensitive RNA splicing and production of a heat-labile P85gag-mos kinase by the introduction of a specific deletion in murine sarcoma virus-124 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    de Mars, M; Cizdziel, P E; Murphy, E C

    1988-01-01

    Murine sarcoma virus ts110 (MuSVts110) is a conditionally transformation-defective MuSV mutant lacking 1,487 bases found in its wild-type parent, MuSV-349 (MuSV-124). Expression of the MuSVts110 v-mos gene product, P85gag-mos, requires splicing of the viral transcript to align the gag and mos genes in frame. However, this splice event is restricted to growth temperatures of 33 degrees C or lower. No splicing of the viral RNA, no production of P85gag-mos, and, hence, no cell transformation is observed at growth temperatures above 33 degrees C. To determine whether thermosensitive splicing is an intrinsic property of To determine whether thermosensitive splicing is an intrinsic property of MuSVts110 RNA specified by the 1,487-base deletion or a result of a cellular defect, we examined an "equivalent" or MuSVts110 DNA (designated ts32 DNA) constructed by combining wild-type MuSV-124 DNA fragments with a synthetic oligonucleotide to yield an otherwise wild-type viral DNA containing the same 1,487-base deletion as authentic MuSVts110. As observed in control cells (6m2 cells) infected with the authentic MuSVts110 virus, NIH 3T3 cells transfected with ts32 DNA appeared morphologically transformed when grown at 33 degrees C, but were converted to a more normal, flattened shape within a few hours of a shift to 39 degrees C. In concert with these morphological changes, both the processing of the ts32 RNA transcripts and the production of ts32 p85gag-mos kinase were found to be optimal at growth temperatures from 28 to 33 degrees C, but dramatically reduced at 37 to 41 degrees C. Like authentic P85gag-mos, the ts32 P85gag-mos kinase activity was rapidly inactivated by brief exposure to 39 degrees C. These results suggested that the MuSVts110 equivalent is functionally indistinguishable from authentic MuSVts110 and that the novel temperature-sensitive splicing of MuSVts110 transcripts is specified by an intrinsic property of the viral RNA. Images PMID:2835496

  20. No activation of new initiation points for deoxyribonucleic acid replication in BALB/c 3T3 cells transformed by Kirsten sarcoma virus

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheim, A.; Horowitz, A.T.

    1981-08-01

    BALB/c 3T3 cells were transformed by Kirsten sarcoma virus, and five clones were isolated in soft agar. Average replicon sizes of the transformed cell lines were stimated by the method of fiber-autoradiography and found to be the same size as the nontransformed 3T3 cells, analyzed in parallel. The results indicate that, unlike simian virus 40 and Epstein-Barr virus, Kirsten sarcoma virus does not activate new initiation points for cellular deoxyribonucleic acid replication in murine sarcome virus-transformed BALB/c 3T3 cells.

  1. v-mos proteins encoded by myeloproliferative sarcoma virus and its ts159 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, B; Stocking, C; Walker, R; Yang, Y D; Ostertag, W; Arlinghaus, R B

    1992-01-01

    The myeloproliferative sarcoma virus (MPSV) v-mos protein was predicted to be identical in size to p39c-mos because of an observed one-base deletion in the seventh codon of the env-mos open reading frame, which would allow translation to initiate at the methionine equivalent to codon 32 of the env-mos gene. On the basis of published results, p39c-mos is known to have greatly reduced in vitro protein kinase activity compared with p37env-mos encoded by Moloney murine sarcoma virus. Unexpectedly, the relative activity of the MPSV v-mos protein kinase was comparable to that of p37env-mos. Consistent with this finding, the size of MPSV v-mos protein was found to be similar to the size of p37env-mos. Moreover, the pattern and sizes of phosphorylated bands produced by autophosphorylation of the MPSV v-mos protein were similar to those of p37env-mos. These results were confirmed by in vitro transcription-translation of the MPSV v-mos gene. Resequencing portions of the MPSV mos gene failed to show the deletion within codon 7. Except for the codon 262 deletion, other mutations characteristic of MPSV and temperature-sensitive MPSV v-mos genes were confirmed. A glycine-to-arginine mutation at residue 338 of the MPSV env-mos sequence, previously shown to cause thermosensitivity of the mutant virus (termed ts159) transforming function, yielded a v-mos protein that had significantly reduced protein kinase activity in vitro. These findings indicate that MPSV, like other Moloney murine sarcoma virus strains, also encodes a functional env-mos protein. Images PMID:1309903

  2. Suppression of Moloney sarcoma virus immunity following sensitization with attenuated virus.

    PubMed

    Wood, G W

    1976-12-01

    Murine sarcoma virus (Moloney strain) (MSV-M)-induced tumors are unusual in that they regularly appear less than 2 weeks after virus inoculation, progress for 1 to 2 weeks, and are rejected by normal adult BALB/c mice. Rejectio leaves the animals immune to tumor induction. In the present study, presensitization of normal adult BALB/c mice with attenuated MSV-M resulted in an altered pattern of tumor immunity. Injection of active MSV-M into the presensitized animals resulted in tumor induction and rejection similar to that observed in normal animals, but rejection failed to produce protection against the secondary inoculation with MSV-M. After the second inoculation with active MSV-M, tumors appeared and progressed but ultimately were rejected. Over 80% of the mice died, 25% after the primary challenge and the remainder after the secondary challenge. At death, all mice had histological evidence of leukemia which was the probable cause of death. The animals that died following the secondary challenge also had evidence of disseminated MSV-M. Solid tumor nodules were found in skeletal muscle distant from the original site of inoculation, and active MSV-M was isolated from spleen and lungs. The possibility that the results were produced by specific suppression of MSV-Moloney leukemia virus immunity is discussed.

  3. Nature and distribution of feline sarcoma virus nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, A E; Gilbert, J H; Porzig, K J; Scolnick, E M; Aaronson, S A

    1979-01-01

    The genomes of three independent isolates of feline sarcoma virus (FeSV) were compared by molecular hybridization techniques. Using complementary DNAs prepared from two strains, SM- and ST-FeSV, common complementary DNA'S were selected by sequential hybridization to FeSV and feline leukemia virus RNAs. These DNAs were shown to be highly related among the three independent sarcoma virus isolates. FeSV-specific complementary DNAs were prepared by selection for hybridization by the homologous FeSV RNA and against hybridization by fline leukemia virus RNA. Sarcoma virus-specific sequences of SM-FeSV were shown to differ from those of either ST- or GA-FeSV strains, whereas ST-FeSV-specific DNA shared extensive sequence homology with GA-FeSV. By molecular hybridization, each set of FeSV-specific sequences was demonstrated to be present in normal cat cellular DNA in approximately one copy per haploid genome and was conserved throughout Felidae. In contrast, FeSV-common sequences were present in multiple DNA copies and were found only in Mediterranean cats. The present results are consistent with the concept that each FeSV strain has arisen by a mechanism involving recombination between feline leukemia virus and cat cellular DNA sequences, the latter represented within the cat genome in a manner analogous to that of a cellular gene. PMID:225544

  4. Decreased mortality of Norman murine sarcoma in mice treated with the immunomodulator, Acemannan.

    PubMed

    Peng, S Y; Norman, J; Curtin, G; Corrier, D; McDaniel, H R; Busbee, D

    1991-06-01

    An extract from the parenchyma of Aloe barbadensis Miller shown to contain long chain polydispersed beta (1,4)-linked mannan polymers with random O-acetyl groups (acemannan, Carrisyn) was found to initiate the phagocyte production of monokines that supported antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity and stimulated blastogenesis in thymocytes. Acemannan, in both enriched and highly purified forms, was administered intraperitoneally to female CFW mice into which murine sarcoma cells had been subcutaneously implanted. The rapidly growing, highly malignant and invasive sarcoma grew in 100% of implanted control animals, resulting in mortality in 20 to 46 days, dependent on the number of cells implanted. Approximately 40% of animals treated with acemannan at the time of tumor cell implantation (1.5 x 10(6) cells) survived. Tumors in acemannan-treated animals exhibited vascular congestion, edema, polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, and central necrosing foci with hemorrhage and peripheral fibrosis. The data indicate that in vivo treatment of peritoneal macrophages stimulates the macrophage production of monokines, including interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor. The data further indicate that sarcomas in animals treated i.p. with acemannan at the time of tumor cell implantation were infiltrated by immune system cells, became necrotic, and regressed. The combined data suggest that acemannan-stimulated synthesis of monokines resulted in the initiation of immune attack, necrosis, and regression of implanted sarcomas in mice.

  5. Reversion in Hamster Cells Transformed by Rous Sarcoma Virus.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, I

    1965-06-25

    Hamster cells of the BHK-21 line are transformable by Rous sarcoma virus (Schmidt-Ruppin strain). The transformed cells form colonies in agar suspension culture, grow on glass in disarray, and initiate tumors in hamsters and chickens, but extracts do not induce tumors in chickens. Chickens bearing tumors develop neutralizing antibody against the virus. Transformed cell clones give rise to "revertants" which form colonies on glass with cells oriented parallel to each other like the original uninfected cells. These revertants do not grow in agar or initiate chicken tumors, and they regain the original low transplantability of untransformed cells in hamsters.

  6. Cellular Moloney murine sarcoma (c-mos) sequences are hypermethylated and transcriptionally silent in normal and transformed rodent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gattoni, S.; Kirschmeier, P.; Weinstein, I.B.; Escobedo, J.; Dina, D.

    1982-01-01

    Moloney murine sarcoma virus carries an oncogenic sequence (v-mos) which is homologous to a single copy gene (c-mos) present in the normal cells of several vertebrate species. Because of the possible significance of c-mos sequences in normal development and malignant transformation induced by physical or chemical agents, the authors examined the state of integration, methylation, and transcriptional activity of c-mos sequences in a variety of normal rodent tissues, normal cell lines, or cell lines transformed by radiation or chemical carcinogens. DNA-DNA hybridization, utilizing the Southern blotting technique and a plasmid-derived DNA probe representing the v-mos sequence, gave no evidence for rearrangements of the c-mos sequence in the DNAs obtained from these diverse cell types. Parallel studies employing the restriction enzyme isoschizomers HpaII and MspI indicated that in all of these cell types the c-mos sequences were heavily methylated. In addition, analysis of cellular RNAs by blot hybridization with the v-mos probe failed to detect evidence of transcription of the c-mos sequences in any of these cell types. This was in contrast to a Moloney sarcoma virus-transformed cell line in which they found that the integrated v-mos sequence was both undermethylated and extensively transcribed. Thus, it would appear that c-mos sequences do not play a role in the transformation of rodent cells by chemical or physical agents, although the possible role of other endogenous onc sequences remains to be determined.

  7. Walleye Dermal Sarcoma Virus: Molecular Biology and Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rovnak, Joel; Quackenbush, Sandra L.

    2010-01-01

    Retroviruses have been detected in most vertebrate species and are etiologic agents of a variety of neoplastic diseases. The study of retroviruses has been instrumental in uncovering the molecular mechanisms responsible for oncogenesis. Retroviruses have been isolated from three neoplastic diseases in fish, two of which affect the dermis and regress naturally coincident with spawning. This feature provides a unique model to study mechanisms of tumor development and regression. Three complex retroviruses, isolated from walleye (Sander vitreus) with dermal sarcoma and epidermal hyperplasia, are the members of the newest retroviral genus, Epsilonretrovirus. Three accessory proteins, encoded by walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV), function in the regulation of host and viral gene expression and cell cycle, alter cell-signaling pathways to promote cell proliferation and block apoptosis, and, finally, induce apoptosis through dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:21994717

  8. Comparison between the viral transforming gene (src) of recovered avian sarcoma virus and its cellular homolog.

    PubMed Central

    Takeya, T; Hanafusa, H; Junghans, R P; Ju, G; Skalka, A M

    1981-01-01

    Recovered avian sarcoma viruses are recombinants between transformation-defective mutants of Rous sarcoma virus and the chicken cellular gene homologous to the src gene of Rous sarcoma virus. We have constructed and analyzed molecular clones of viral deoxyribonucleic acid from recovered avian sarcoma virus and its transformation-competent progenitor, the Schmidt-Ruppin A strain of Rous sarcoma virus. A 2.0-megadalton EcoRI fragment containing the entire src gene from each of these clones was subcloned and characterized. These fragments were also used as probes to isolate recombinant phage clones containing the cellular counterpart of the viral src gene, termed cellular src, from a lambda library of chicken deoxyribonucleic acid. The structure of cellular src was analyzed by restriction endonuclease mapping and electron microscopy. Restriction endonuclease mapping revealed extensive similarity between the src regions of Rous sarcoma virus and recovered avian sarcoma virus, but striking differences between the viral src's and cellular src. Electron microscopic analysis of heteroduplexes between recovered virus src and cellular src revealed a 1.8-kilobase region of homology. In the cellular gene, the homologous region was interrupted by seven nonhomologous regions which we interpret to be intervening sequences. We estimate the minimum length of cellular src to be about 7.2 kilobases. These findings have implications concerning the mechanism of formation of recovered virus src and possibly other cell-derived retrovirus transforming genes. Images PMID:6287213

  9. Modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism by Rous sarcoma virus

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, K.; Aderem, A.; Hanafusa, H. )

    1989-07-01

    Arachidonic acid (C{sub 20:4}) metabolites were released constitutively from wild-type Rous sarcoma virus-transformed chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF). {sup 3}H-labeled C{sub 20:4} and its metabolites were released from unstimulated and uninfected CEF only in response to stimuli such as serum, phorbol ester, or the calcium ionophore A23187. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis showed that the radioactivity released from ({sup 3}H)arachidonate-labeled transformed cells was contained in free arachidonate and in the cyclooxygenase products prostaglandin E{sub 2} and prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha; no lipoxygenase products were identified. The release of C{sub 20:4} and its metabolites from CEF infected with pp60{sup src} deletion mutants was correlated with serum-independent DNA synthesis and with the expression of the mRNA for 9E3, a gene expressed in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells which has homology with several mitogenic and inflammatory peptides. {sup 3}H-labeled C{sub 20:4} release was not correlated with p36 phosphorylation, which argues against a role for this protein as a phospholipase A{sub 2} inhibitor. CEF infected with other oncogenic viruses encoding a tyrosine kinase also released C{sub 20:4}, as did CEF infected with viruses that contained mos and ras; however, infection with a crk-containing virus did not result in stimulation of {sup 3}H-labeled C{sub 20:4} release, suggesting that utilization of this signaling pathway is specific for particular transformation stimuli.

  10. Fujinami sarcoma virus: An avian RNA tumor virus with a unique transforming gene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Hwa; Bister, Klaus; Pawson, Anthony; Robins, Terry; Moscovici, Carlo; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1980-01-01

    The oncogenic properties and RNA of the Fujinami avian sarcoma virus (FSV) and the protein it encodes were investigated and compared to those of other avian tumor viruses with sarcomagenic properties such as Rous sarcoma virus and the acute leukemia viruses MC29 and erythroblastosis virus. Cloned stocks of FSV caused sarcomas in all chickens inoculated and were found to contain a 4.5-kilobase (kb) and an 8.5-kb RNA species. The 4.5-kb RNA was identified as the genome of defective FSV because it was absent from nondefective FSV-associated helper virus and because the titer of focus-forming units increased with the ratio of 4.5-kb to 8.5-kb RNA in virus preparations. This is, then, the smallest known tumor virus RNA with a transforming function. Comparisons with other viral RNAs, based on oligonucleotide mapping and molecular hybridization, indicated that 4.5-kb FSV RNA contains a 5′ gag gene-related sequence of 1 kb, an internal specific sequence of about 3 kb that is unrelated to Rous sarcoma virus, MC29, and erythroblastosis virus, and a 3′-terminal sequence of about 0.5 kb related to the conserved C region of avian tumor viruses. The lack of some or all nucleotide sequences of the essential virion genes, gag, pol, and env, and the isolation of FSV-transformed nonproducer cell clones indicated that FSV is replication defective. A 140,000-dalton, gag-related non-structural protein was found in FSV-transformed producer and nonproducer cells and was translated in vitro from full-length FSV RNA. This protein is expected to have a transforming function both because its intracellular concentration showed a positive correlation with the percentage of transformed cells in a culture and because FSV is unlikely to code for major additional proteins since the genetic complexities of FSV RNA and the FSV protein are almost the same. It is concluded that the transforming onc gene of FSV is distinct from that of Rous sarcoma virus and other avian tumor viruses with

  11. Extracts of Lycoris aurea induce apoptosis in murine sarcoma S180 cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, Na; Ao, Mingzhang; Zhang, Peng; Yu, Longjiang

    2012-03-26

    Lycoris species have been known since long ago as a multi-utility ethnomedicinal herbal in China. It has been reported to exhibit a number of properties such as anticancer, neuroprotective, and antibacterial activities. In the present study, the anticancer efficacy of dichloromethane extracts of Lycoris aurea (DELA), was evaluated both in vivo and in vitro using murine sarcoma 180 cells. To evaluate the effects of DELA on apoptotic cell death, flow cytometry and Western blotting were performed. DELA demonstrated promising inhibition effects on sarcoma 180 cells in vitro and a 53.49% inhibitory rate on cancer cells in vivo. DELA treatment increased thymus indices and spleen indices in vivo, indicating that it reduced tumours, but did not damage the main immune organs. The DELA-evoked increase in apoptotic cell death was accompanied by occurrence of cleaved caspase-3 and decreases in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax. Further purification and LCMS analysis showed DELA contained homolycorine, 2α-hydroxyoduline, oduline, hippeastrine, 2α-hydroxy-6-O- methyloduline, and 2α-methoxy-6-O-methyloduline. These results indicate that DELA exerted its anticancer effects, at least in part, by inducing cancer cell apoptosis and thus can be considered as a potential candidate agent for treatment of cancer.

  12. COMPARATIVE STUDIES IN ROUS SARCOMA WITH VIRUS, TUMOR CELLS, AND CHICK EMBRYO CELLS TRANSFORMED IN VITRO BY VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Erichsen, Stian; Eng, Jan; Morgan, Herbert R.

    1961-01-01

    The chick embryo fibroblast infected by Rous sarcoma virus in vitro acquires the capacity to produce the acid mucopolysaccharides which are found in the tumors caused by this virus and which are also produced by tumor cells in vitro. The transformed cell acquires synthetic as well as morphologic, metabolic, and proliferative properties characteristic of Rous sarcoma tumor cells in vivo and in vitro and the transformed cell may be analogous to the tumor cell produced by virus infection in vivo. PMID:19867193

  13. COMPARATIVE STUDIES IN ROUS SARCOMA WITH VIRUS, TUMOR CELLS, AND CHICK EMBRYO CELLS TRANSFORMED IN VITRO BY VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Robert M.; Morgan, Herbert R.

    1962-01-01

    Chick embryo fibroblasts infected in vitro with Rous sarcoma virus have properties similar to tumor cells when injected into virus-immune chickens. When such virus-transformed fibroblasts are injected into normal chickens, they apparently participate in the production of tumors independent of their release of virus and are thus apparently malignant in vivo. PMID:13887519

  14. Mechanism of Oncogenic Transformation by Rous Sarcoma Virus

    PubMed Central

    Balduzzi, Piero; Morgan, Herbert R.

    1970-01-01

    Chick embryo fibroblasts brought into stationary phase of growth by maintenance in serum-free Eagle's MEM medium were infected with the Bryan strain of Rous sarcoma virus (B-RSV) and incubated for 18 hr in the presence of 5-bromo-deoxyuridine (BUdR). The cells were then allowed to resume growth and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis by addition of an enriched F12 medium containing serum and RSV antibody to prevent spread of viral infection. After 48 hr, the cultures were exposed for various periods to visible light, overlaid with solid culture medium, and observed for the appearance of foci of transformed cells. In cultures treated with BUdR at the time of infection, exposure to light resulted in a suppression of focus formation of from 50 to 90% in various experiments. Treatment with BUdR for 18 hr before infection or on the day after infection, followed by exposure to light, had no effect on focus formation. In cultures in which almost all cells were infected, treatment with BUdR followed by exposure to light did not result in cell death. This suggests that suppression of transformation is not due to selective killing of infected cells by this treatment but rather to the intracellular inactivation of the transforming ability of Rous sarcoma proviral DNA. Images PMID:4318089

  15. Herpes virus-like sequences are specifically found in Kaposi sarcoma lesions.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, E; Henson, T H; Ghorbani, A J; Land, M A; Webber, B L; Garcia, J V

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To detect the prevalence of herpes virus-like DNA sequences in AIDS associated Kaposi sarcoma (KSHV) lesions and normal tissue. METHODS: KSHV detection was performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using four different sets of primers. PCR products were cloned, sequenced, and analysed. RESULTS: All of four biopsies of Kaposi sarcoma lesions and all of three paraffin embedded Kaposi sarcoma tissues were positive for KSHV, while normal tissue from the same patients was negative. Sequence analysis of amplification products revealed polymorphisms that result in amino acid changes of the predicted sequence. CONCLUSIONS: KSHV is prevalent in tissues from Kaposi sarcoma, suggesting a role in the development of the tumour. On this basis, anti-herpes virus agents should be considered to control Kaposi sarcoma. Images PMID:8655706

  16. Crystal structure of the Rous sarcoma virus intasome

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Zhiqi; Shi, Ke; Banerjee, Surajit; Pandey, Krishan K.; Bera, Sibes; Grandgenett, Duane P.; Aihara, Hideki

    2016-02-17

    Integration of the reverse-transcribed viral DNA into the host genome is an essential step in the life cycle of retroviruses. Retrovirus integrase catalyses insertions of both ends of the linear viral DNA into a host chromosome. Integrase from HIV-1 and closely related retroviruses share the three-domain organization, consisting of a catalytic core domain flanked by amino- and carboxy-terminal domains essential for the concerted integration reaction. Although structures of the tetrameric integrase–DNA complexes have been reported for integrase from prototype foamy virus featuring an additional DNA-binding domain and longer interdomain linkers, the architecture of a canonical three-domain integrase bound to DNA remained elusive. In this paper, we report a crystal structure of the three-domain integrase from Rous sarcoma virus in complex with viral and target DNAs. The structure shows an octameric assembly of integrase, in which a pair of integrase dimers engage viral DNA ends for catalysis while another pair of non-catalytic integrase dimers bridge between the two viral DNA molecules and help capture target DNA. The individual domains of the eight integrase molecules play varying roles to hold the complex together, making an extensive network of protein–DNA and protein–protein contacts that show both conserved and distinct features compared with those observed for prototype foamy virus integrase. Finally, our work highlights the diversity of retrovirus intasome assembly and provides insights into the mechanisms of integration by HIV-1 and related retroviruses.

  17. Specificity of Rous sarcoma virus nucleocapsid protein in genomic RNA packaging.

    PubMed Central

    Dupraz, P; Spahr, P F

    1992-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis has shown that the nucleocapsid (NC) protein of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) is required for packaging and dimerization of viral RNA. However, it has not been possible to demonstrate, in vivo or in vitro, specific binding of viral RNA sequences by NC. To determine whether specific packaging of viral RNA is mediated by NC in vivo, we have constructed RSV mutants carrying sequences of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV). Either the NC coding region alone, the psi RNA packaging sequence, or both the NC and psi sequences of MoMuLV were substituted for the corresponding regions of a full-length RSV clone to yield chimeric plasmid pAPrcMNC, pAPrc psi M, or pAPrcM psi M, respectively. In addition, a mutant of RSV in which the NC is completely deleted was tested as a control. Upon transfection, each of the chimeric mutants produced viral particles containing processed core proteins but were noninfectious. Thus, MoMuLV NC can replace RSV NC functionally in the assembly and release of mature virions but not in infectivity. Surprisingly, the full-deletion mutant showed a strong block in virus release, suggesting that NC is involved in virus assembly. Mutant PrcMNC packaged 50- to 100-fold less RSV RNA than did the wild type; in cotransfection experiments, MoMuLV RNA was preferentially packaged. This result suggests that the specific recognition of viral RNA during virus assembly involves, at least in part, the NC protein. Images PMID:1378506

  18. Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Expressing Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen (LANA) Reveals both Functional Conservation and Divergence in LANA Homologs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Arundhati; Oldenburg, Darby G; Salinas, Eduardo; White, Douglas W; Forrest, J Craig

    2017-10-01

    Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) is a multifunctional protein encoded by members of the Rhadinovirus genus of gammaherpesviruses. Studies using murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) demonstrated that LANA is important for acute replication, latency establishment, and reactivation in vivo Despite structural similarities in their DNA-binding domains (DBDs), LANA homologs from Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and MHV68 exhibit considerable sequence divergence. We sought to determine if KSHV and MHV68 LANA homologs are functionally interchangeable. We generated an MHV68 virus that encodes KSHV LANA (kLANA) in place of MHV68 LANA (mLANA) and evaluated the virus's capacity to replicate, establish and maintain latency, and reactivate. kLANA knock-in (KLKI) MHV68 was replication competent in vitro and in vivo but exhibited slower growth kinetics and lower titers than wild-type (WT) MHV68. Following inoculation of mice, KLKI MHV68 established and maintained latency in splenocytes and peritoneal cells but did not reactivate efficiently ex vivo kLANA repressed the MHV68 promoter for ORF50, the gene that encodes the major lytic transactivator protein RTA, while mLANA did not, suggesting a likely mechanism for the KLKI MHV68 phenotypes. Bypassing this repression by providing MHV68 RTA in trans rescued KLKI MHV68 replication in tissue culture and enabled detection of KLKI MHV68 reactivation ex vivo These data demonstrate that kLANA and mLANA are functionally interchangeable for establishment and maintenance of latency and suggest that repression of lytic replication by kLANA, as previously shown with KSHV, is a kLANA-specific function that is transferable to MHV68.IMPORTANCE Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) are members of the Rhadinovirus genus of gammaherpesviruses. These viruses establish lifelong infections that place their respective human and murine hosts at risk for cancer. Latency-associated nuclear

  19. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis in a human immunodeficiency negative-virus patient.

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Kilani, Houda; Bouassida, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Moufida; Chalbi, Emna; Siai, Karima; Ezzine, Heykel; Touinsi, Hassen; Azzouz, Mohamed M'saddak; Sassi, Sadok

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of immunomodulator therapy in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative heterosexual man.

  20. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release.

    PubMed

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-04-18

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements.

  1. ESCRT Requirements for Murine Leukemia Virus Release

    PubMed Central

    Bartusch, Christina; Prange, Reinhild

    2016-01-01

    The Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV) is a gammaretrovirus that hijack host components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) for budding. To determine the minimal requirements for ESCRT factors in MLV viral and viral-like particles (VLP) release, an siRNA knockdown screen of ESCRT(-associated) proteins was performed in MLV-producing human cells. We found that MLV VLPs and virions primarily engage the ESCRT-I factor Tsg101 and marginally the ESCRT-associated adaptors Nedd4-1 and Alix to enter the ESCRT pathway. Conversely, the inactivation of ESCRT-II had no impact on VLP and virion egress. By analyzing the effects of individual ESCRT-III knockdowns, VLP and virion release was profoundly inhibited in CHMP2A- and CHMP4B-knockdown cells. In contrast, neither the CHMP2B and CHMP4A isoforms nor CHMP3, CHMP5, and CHMP6 were found to be essential. In case of CHMP1, we unexpectedly observed that the CHMP1A isoform was specifically required for virus budding, but dispensable for VLP release. Hence, MLV utilizes only a subset of ESCRT factors, and viral and viral-like particles differ in ESCRT-III factor requirements. PMID:27096867

  2. Crystal structure of the Rous sarcoma virus intasome

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhiqi; Shi, Ke; Banerjee, Surajit; Pandey, Krishan K.; Bera, Sibes; Grandgenett, Duane P.; Aihara, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Integration of the reverse-transcribed viral DNA into the host genome is an essential step in the lifecycle of retroviruses. Retrovirus integrase (IN) catalyzes insertions of both ends of the linear viral DNA into a host chromosome 1. IN from HIV-1 and closely related retroviruses share the three-domain organization, consisting of a catalytic core domain flanked by N- and C-terminal domains essential for the concerted integration reaction. Although structures of the tetrameric IN-DNA complexes have been reported for IN from prototype foamy virus (PFV) featuring an additional DNA-binding domain and longer interdomain linkers 2–5, the architecture of a canonical three-domain IN bound to DNA remained elusive. Here we report a crystal structure of the three-domain IN from Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) in complex with viral and target DNAs. The structure shows an octameric assembly of IN, in which a pair of IN dimers engage viral DNA ends for catalysis while another pair of non-catalytic IN dimers bridge between the two viral DNA molecules and help capture target DNA. The individual domains of the eight IN molecules play varying roles to hold the complex together, making an extensive network of protein-DNA and protein-protein contacts that show both conserved and distinct features compared to those observed for PFV IN. Our work highlights diversity of retrovirus intasome assembly and provides insights into the mechanisms of integration by HIV-1 and related retroviruses. PMID:26887497

  3. When viruses were not in style: parallels in the histories of chicken sarcoma viruses and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Neeraja

    2014-12-01

    The discovery that cancer may be caused by viruses occurred in the early twentieth century, a time when the very concept of viruses as we understand it today was in a considerable state of flux. Although certain features were agreed upon, viruses, more commonly referred to as 'filterable viruses' were not considered much different from other microbes such as bacteria except for their extremely small size, which rendered them ultramicroscopic and filterable. For a long time, in fact, viruses were defined rather by what they were not and what they could not do, rather than any known properties that set them apart from other microbes. Consequently when Peyton Rous suggested in 1912 that the causative agent of a transmissible sarcoma tumor of chickens was a virus, the medical research community was reluctant to accept his assessment on the grounds that cancer was not infectious and was caused by a physiological change within the cells. This difference in the bacteriological and physiological styles of thinking appears to have been prevalent in the wider research community, for when in 1917 Felix d'Herelle suggested that a transmissible lysis in bacteria, which he called bacteriophagy, was caused by a virus, his ideas were also opposed on similar grounds. It was not until the 1950s when when André Lwoff explained the phenomenon of lysogeny through his prophage hypothesis that the viral identities of the sarcoma-inducing agent and the bacteriophages were accepted. This paper examines the trajectories of the curiously parallel histories of the cancer viruses and highlights the similarities and differences between the ways in which prevailing ideas about the nature of viruses, heredity and infection drove researchers from disparate disciplines and geographic locations to develop their ideas and achieve some consensus about the nature of cancer viruses and bacteriophages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Crystal structure of the Rous sarcoma virus intasome

    DOE PAGES

    Yin, Zhiqi; Shi, Ke; Banerjee, Surajit; ...

    2016-02-17

    Integration of the reverse-transcribed viral DNA into the host genome is an essential step in the life cycle of retroviruses. Retrovirus integrase catalyses insertions of both ends of the linear viral DNA into a host chromosome. Integrase from HIV-1 and closely related retroviruses share the three-domain organization, consisting of a catalytic core domain flanked by amino- and carboxy-terminal domains essential for the concerted integration reaction. Although structures of the tetrameric integrase–DNA complexes have been reported for integrase from prototype foamy virus featuring an additional DNA-binding domain and longer interdomain linkers, the architecture of a canonical three-domain integrase bound to DNAmore » remained elusive. In this paper, we report a crystal structure of the three-domain integrase from Rous sarcoma virus in complex with viral and target DNAs. The structure shows an octameric assembly of integrase, in which a pair of integrase dimers engage viral DNA ends for catalysis while another pair of non-catalytic integrase dimers bridge between the two viral DNA molecules and help capture target DNA. The individual domains of the eight integrase molecules play varying roles to hold the complex together, making an extensive network of protein–DNA and protein–protein contacts that show both conserved and distinct features compared with those observed for prototype foamy virus integrase. Finally, our work highlights the diversity of retrovirus intasome assembly and provides insights into the mechanisms of integration by HIV-1 and related retroviruses.« less

  5. Electrogene therapy with p53 of murine sarcomas alone or combined with electrochemotherapy using cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Grosel, Alenka; Sersa, Gregor; Kranjc, Simona; Cemazar, Maja

    2006-12-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate feasibility and therapeutic potential of electrogene therapy with p53 alone or combined with electrochemotherapy using cisplatin on two murine sarcomas with different p53 status. Antitumor effectiveness of three consecutive electrogene treatments with p53 was more effective in wild-type LPB tumors than mutated SA-1 tumors, resulting in 21.4% of tumor cures in LPB tumors and 12.5% in SA-1 tumors. Pretreatment of tumors with electrogene therapy with p53 enhanced chemosensitivity of both tumor models treated by electrochemotherapy with cisplatin. After only one application of this treatment combination in the LPB tumor model, specific tumor growth delay was prolonged in the combined treatment group compared to electrogene therapy with p53 or electrochemotherapy with cisplatin alone, whereas in SA-1 tumors this treatment combination resulted in 31.6% of cured animals. Results of our study show that electrogene therapy with p53 alone or combined with electrochemotherapy is feasible and effective treatment of tumors. The combination of electrogene therapy and electrochemotherapy after only one application resulted in complete regression of tumors.

  6. Characterization of Rous sarcoma virus polyadenylation site use in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Maciolek, Nicole L.; McNally, Mark T.

    2008-05-10

    Polyadenylation of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) RNA is inefficient, as approximately 15% of RSV RNAs represent read-through transcripts that use a downstream cellular polyadenylation site (poly(A) site). Read-through transcription has implications for the virus and the host since it is associated with oncogene capture and tumor induction. To explore the basis of inefficient RSV RNA 3'-end formation, we characterized RSV polyadenylation in vitro using HeLa cell nuclear extracts and HEK293 whole cell extracts. RSV polyadenylation substrates composed of the natural 3' end of viral RNA and various lengths of upstream sequence showed little or no polyadenylation, indicating that the RSV poly(A) site is suboptimal. Efficiently used poly(A) sites often have identifiable upstream and downstream elements (USEs and DSEs) in close proximity to the conserved AAUAAA signal. The sequences upstream and downstream of the RSV poly(A) site deviate from those found in efficiently used poly(A) sites, which may explain inefficient RSV polyadenylation. To assess the quality of the RSV USEs and DSEs, the well-characterized SV40 late USEs and/or DSEs were substituted for the RSV elements and vice versa, which showed that the USEs and DSEs from RSV are suboptimal but functional. CstF interacted poorly with the RSV polyadenylation substrate, and the inactivity of the RSV poly(A) site was at least in part due to poor CstF binding since tethering CstF to the RSV substrate activated polyadenylation. Our data are consistent with poor polyadenylation factor binding sites in both the USE and DSE as the basis for inefficient use of the RSV poly(A) site and point to the importance of additional elements within RSV RNA in promoting 3' end formation.

  7. Effect of vegf gene knockdown on growth of the murine sarcoma cell line MS-K.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiu Y; Yoshioka, Asami; Mashio, Yuka; Ikeda, Toru; Jiang, Huijie; Touma, Maki; Wu, Qiong; Wang, ChangLiu; Sugimoto, Kenkichi

    2011-06-01

    The murine sarcoma cell line MS-K was previously established as a Ki-ras-positive cell line. Inoculation of this cell line under the flank of C3H/HeN mice results in the growth of large tumors with well-developed blood vessels within day 30 of transplantation without any metastasis because MS-K cells produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). To elucidate the role of VEGF in tumor formation in vivo, stable vegf-knockdown-MS-K clones were obtained using plasmid-based knockdown vectors. Interestingly, tumorigenesis was completely suppressed in a vegf-A-knockdown-MS-K clone [designated MS-K (A-KD)]. Proliferation and colony formation capacity of the MS-K (A-KD) cells in a semi-solid medium under low serum conditions was significantly lower than that of control MS-K (SCR) cells; however, the expression of vegf-receptor 1 (vegf-r-1) was not changed. Addition of the recombinant VEGF-A(165) partially restored the colony formation capacity of MS-K (A-KD) cells and caused the phosphorylation of VEGF-r-1 (Flt-1) in MS-K (Normal) cells. Furthermore, tumorigenicity of the vegf-r-1-knockdown-MS-K clone [designated MS-K (R1-KD)] had obviously delayed or strongly suppressed compared with the MS-K (Normal). These results indicate that Vascular endothelial growth factor-A, produced from MS-K, acts as a growth factor for MS-K cells itself and supports tumor formation in vivo by inducing the blood vessel formation. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 by the Molecular Biology Society of Japan/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Chemical Modification of Recombinant Interleukin 2 by Polyethylene Glycol Increases Its Potency in the Murine Meth A Sarcoma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katre, Nandini V.; Knauf, Michael J.; Laird, Walter J.

    1987-03-01

    Recombinant human interleukin 2 purified from Escherichia coli has limited solubility at neutral pH and a short circulatory half-life. This recombinant interleukin 2 was chemically modified by an active ester of polyethylene glycol. The modified interleukin 2 was purified by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. This conjugate was compared to unmodified recombinant interleukin 2 in vitro and in vivo. Covalent attachment of the hydrophilic polymer polyethylene glycol enhanced the solubility of interleukin 2, decreased its plasma clearance, and increased its antitumor potency in the Meth A murine sarcoma model.

  9. Preclinical Evaluation of Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus for Therapy of Canine Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Josupeit, Rafael; Rudolph, Stephan; Ehrig, Klaas; Donat, Ulrike; Weibel, Stephanie; Chen, Nanhai G.; Yu, Yong A.; Zhang, Qian; Heisig, Martin; Thamm, Douglas; Stritzker, Jochen; MacNeill, Amy; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2012-01-01

    Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV) strains is one promising new strategy for canine cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of an in vivo model of canine soft tissue sarcoma (CSTS) using the new isolated cell line STSA-1 and the analysis of the virus-mediated oncolytic and immunological effects of two different Lister VACV LIVP1.1.1 and GLV-1h68 strains against CSTS. Cell culture data demonstrated that both tested VACV strains efficiently infected and destroyed cells of the canine soft tissue sarcoma line STSA-1. In addition, in our new canine sarcoma tumor xenograft mouse model, systemic administration of LIVP1.1.1 or GLV-1h68 viruses led to significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to control mice. Furthermore, LIVP1.1.1 mediated therapy resulted in almost complete tumor regression and resulted in long-term survival of sarcoma-bearing mice. The replication of the tested VACV strains in tumor tissues led to strong oncolytic effects accompanied by an intense intratumoral infiltration of host immune cells, mainly neutrophils. These findings suggest that the direct viral oncolysis of tumor cells and the virus-dependent activation of tumor-associated host immune cells could be crucial parts of anti-tumor mechanism in STSA-1 xenografts. In summary, the data showed that both tested vaccinia virus strains and especially LIVP1.1.1 have great potential for effective treatment of CSTS. PMID:22615950

  10. [Significance of v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homologue B1 in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Jin, Y J; Sun, L; Yang, L; Xing, R; Liu, X Y

    2016-12-18

    To detect serum v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homologue B1 (BRAF) protein levels and to investigate their clinical significance in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Serum samples were obtained from 78 RA patients, 32 osteoarthritis (OA) patients, 16 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, 16 gout patients, 16 ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients, 16 Sjogren syndrome (SS) patients and 30 healthy controls. BRAF protein in the sera was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The associations between BRAF levels and the clinical features including age, sex, disease duration, swelling joints, tenderness joints, duration of moning stiffness, joint deformity, visual assessment scale (VAS) and extra articular manifestations and laboratory parameters including erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF), disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibody, antikeratin antibody, antnuclear antibody (ANA), immunoglobulin and cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17A in RA patients were evaluated. Data analyses were performed by using SPSS 19.0 program. The serum BRAF protein levels in the RA patients were significantly higher than those of other rheumatic diseases groups including OA, SLE, AS, SS, gout patients and healthy controls, the P value was 0.002, <0.001, <0.001, <0.001, 0.001 and <0.001 respectively. The level of serum BRAF protein in the RA patients showed a positive correlation with the rheumatoid factor (P=0.009) and IgA levels (P=0.006), but no correlation with clinical features, such as age and duration or other laboratory parameters, including CRP, ESR, anti-CCP antibody, IgM, IgG, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-17A. The RA patients were further divided into normal levels of BRAF protein group and elevated levels of BRAF protein group. Compared with the clinical features and laboratory indexes of normal and elevated levels of BRAF protein

  11. Moloney murine leukemia virus activates NF-kappa B.

    PubMed Central

    Pak, J; Faller, D V

    1996-01-01

    Nonacutely transforming retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV), differ from transforming viruses in their mechanisms of tumor induction. While the transforming viruses cause tumors by transduction of oncogenes, the leukemia retroviruses, lacking oncogenes, employ other mechanisms, including promoter insertion and enhancer activation. Although these two mechanisms occur in many tumors induced by leukemia viruses, a substantial proportion of such tumors do not show site-specific proviral insertions. Thus, other, unidentified virus-driven mechanisms may participate in tumorigenesis. In these studies, we show that infection of cells by M-MuLV activates expression of Rel family transcription factors. In murine cells chronically infected with M-MuLV, gel shift analyses with kappaB DNA-binding motifs from the murine immunoglobulin kappa light chain enhancer demonstrated induction of at least two distinct kappaB enhancer-binding complexes. Supershifting and immunoblotting analyses defined p50, p52, RelB, and c-Rel subunits as constituents of these virus-induced protein complexes. Transient transfections performed with kappaB-dependent reporter plasmids showed transcriptional activation in M-MuLV-infected cells relative to uninfected cells. Induction of Rel/NF-kappaB transcription factor activity by M-MuLV infection may prove relevant to the mechanism of M-MuLV-induced leukemia. PMID:8648762

  12. New procedure for isolation of Rous sarcoma virus-specific RNA from infected cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, P A; Spahr, P F; Darlix, J L

    1979-01-01

    The use of mercurated "strong stop" complementary DNA (complementary to the 5'-terminal 101 nucleotides of Rous sarcoma virus RNA) in the isolation of virus-specific RNA from infected chicken embryo fibroblasts is described. Strong stop Rous sarcoma virus complementary DNA was mercurated chemically, and, as a result of the low complexity of this DNA, short hybridization times (up to 15 min) and heating in the absence of formamide were found to be adequate conditions for the isolation of virus-specific RNA. The purity of the isolated RNA was demonstrated by analysis of labeled RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The isolated RNA could be translated in the in vitro protein synthesis system derived from rabbit reticulocytes, and an analysis of polypeptides programmed by isolated RNA before and after immunoprecipitation further demonstrated both the purity of the isolated mRNA and the quantitative nature of the isolation procedure. Images PMID:228062

  13. Hepatic follicular dendritic cell sarcoma without Epstein-Barr virus expression.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ulises; Hawkins, William G; Antonescu, Cristina R; DeMatteo, Ronald P

    2005-11-01

    Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma of the liver is an uncommon pathologic entity, and only 5 cases have been reported previously. Herein, we report the first case, to our knowledge, of hepatic follicular dendritic cell sarcoma without evidence of Epstein-Barr virus infection. The patient is an elderly man who was found to have an incidental liver mass and then developed weight loss and fever. The diagnosis was based on the typical morphologic appearance of spindle cell proliferation associated with a brisk lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate and strong immunoreactivity to CD21 and CD35. Based on our experience and a review of the published reports, we summarize the clinical and pathologic features of hepatic follicular dendritic cell sarcoma and its surgical management.

  14. Detection of phosphotyrosine-containing 34,000-dalton protein in the framework of cells transformed with Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y S; Chen, L B

    1981-01-01

    Phosphotyrosine-containing 34,000-dalton protein is detected by treatment of a two-dimensional gel of cellular framework with 1 M NaOH at 40 degrees C for 1 hr. The alkali-resistant 32PO4-labeled 34,000-dalton protein is detected in various cell lines transformed by Rous sarcoma virus but not in lines transformed by simian virus 40, polyoma virus, herpes simplex II virus, adenovirus type 2, or chemical carcinogens. In addition, interferons or fibronectin matrices have no detectable effect on the phosphorylation of the 34,000-dalton protein in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells. Images PMID:6166009

  15. Comparative studies in Rous sarcoma with virus, tumor cells, and chick embryo cells transformed in vitro by virus. II. Response of normal and immunized chicks.

    PubMed

    DOUGHERTY, R M; MORGAN, H R

    1962-01-01

    Chick embryo fibroblasts infected in vitro with Rous sarcoma virus have properties similar to tumor cells when injected into virus-immune chickens. When such virus-transformed fibroblasts are injected into normal chickens, they apparently participate in the production of tumors independent of their release of virus and are thus apparently malignant in vivo.

  16. Expression of the EWS/FLI-1 oncogene in murine primary bone-derived cells Results in EWS/FLI-1-dependent, ewing sarcoma-like tumors.

    PubMed

    Castillero-Trejo, Yeny; Eliazer, Susan; Xiang, Lilin; Richardson, James A; Ilaria, Robert L

    2005-10-01

    Ewing sarcoma is the second most common malignant pediatric bone tumor. Over 80% of Ewing sarcoma contain the oncogene EWS/FLI-1, which encodes the EWS/FLI-1 oncoprotein, a hybrid transcription factor comprised of NH2-terminal sequences from the RNA-binding protein EWS and the DNA-binding and COOH-terminal regions of the Ets transcription factor FLI-1. Although numerous genes are dysregulated by EWS/FLI-1, advances in Ewing sarcoma cancer biology have been hindered by the lack of an animal model because of EWS/FLI-1-mediated cytotoxicity. In this study, we have developed conditions for the isolation and propagation of murine primary bone-derived cells (mPBDC) that stably express EWS/FLI-1. Early-passage EWS/FLI-1 mPBDCs were immortalized in culture but inefficient at tumor induction, whereas later-passage cells formed sarcomatous tumors in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. Murine EWS/FLI-1 tumors contained morphologically primitive cells that lacked definitive lineage markers. Molecular characterization of murine EWS/FLI-1 tumors revealed that some but not all had acquired a novel, clonal in-frame p53 mutation associated with a constitutive loss of p21 expression. Despite indications that secondary events facilitated EWS/FLI-1 mPBDC tumorigenesis, cells remained highly dependent on EWS/FLI-1 for efficient transformation in clonogenic assays. This Ewing sarcoma animal model will be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular pathogenesis of Ewing sarcoma and provides rationale for the broader use of organ-specific progenitor cell populations for the study of human sarcoma.

  17. Selective inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 suppresses metastatic disease without affecting primary tumor growth in a murine model of Ewing sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gendy, Amir S; Lipskar, Aaron; Glick, Richard D; Steinberg, Bettie M; Edelman, Morris; Soffer, Samuel Z

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin suppression by rapamycin inhibits tumor growth and neovascularization via cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) downregulation with no effect on lung metastases. We hypothesize that combining a selective COX-2 antagonist (celecoxib) with rapamycin would decrease lung metastases. Ewing sarcoma cells (SK-NEP-1) were surgically implanted into the left kidney of athymic mice (n = 40). The mice were divided into 4 treatment groups (control, rapamycin only, celecoxib only, and combination) and then killed at 6 weeks. Primary tumors were weighed. Vasculature was examined using lectin angiography and immunohistochemistry, and lung metastases were examined using H&E and CD99 immunostaining. Tumor weight and lung metastases were analyzed. Mean primary tumor weights were significantly reduced in the rapamycin-treated groups but not in the celecoxib-only group. Lectin angiography and endothelial markers immunostaining showed markedly decreased vascularity in the rapamycin-treated groups but not in the celecoxib-only group. Celecoxib-treated groups showed significantly fewer mice with lung metastases than non-celecoxib-treated groups. Celecoxib prevents lung metastasis in a murine model of Ewing sarcoma with no effect on tumor size or neovascularization. Cyclooxygenase-2 may represent a future potential target for metastatic disease prevention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Palmitoylation of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Transmembrane Glycoprotein Is Required for Protein Stability and Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Miller, David C.; Roberts, Charles R.; Rhee, Sung S.; Hunter, Eric

    2001-01-01

    The Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) transmembrane (TM) glycoprotein is modified by the addition of palmitic acid. To identify whether conserved cysteines within the hydrophobic anchor region are the site(s) of palmitoylation, and to determine the role of acylation in glycoprotein function, cysteines at residues 164 and 167 of the TM protein were mutated to glycine (C164G, C167G, and C164G/C167G). In CV-1 cells, palmitate was added to env gene products containing single mutations but was absent in the double-mutant Env. Although mutant Pr95 Env precursors were synthesized with wild-type kinetics, the phenotypes of the mutants differed markedly. Env-C164G had properties similar to those of the wild type, while Env-C167G was degraded faster, and Env containing the double mutant C164G/C167G was very rapidly degraded. Degradation occurred after transient plasma membrane expression. The decrease in steady-state surface expression and increased rate of internalization into endosomes and lysosomes paralleled the decrease in palmitoylation observed for the mutants. The phenotypes of mutant viruses were assessed in avian cells in the context of the pATV8R proviral genome. Virus containing the C164G mutation replicated with wild-type kinetics but exhibited reduced peak reverse transcriptase levels. In contrast, viruses containing either the C167G or the C164G/C167G mutation were poorly infectious or noninfectious, respectively. These phenotypes correlated with different degrees of glycoprotein incorporation into virions. Infectious revertants of the double mutant demonstrated the importance of cysteine-167 for efficient plasma membrane expression and Env incorporation. The observation that both cysteines within the membrane-spanning domain are accessible for acylation has implications for the topology of this region, and a model is proposed. PMID:11689636

  19. The transforming proteins of PRCII virus and Rous sarcoma virus form a complex with the same two cellular phosphoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Adkins, B; Hunter, T; Sefton, B M

    1982-01-01

    P105 and P110, the presumptive transforming proteins of PRCII avian sarcoma virus, have been found to be present in transformed chicken cells in two forms: as monomers and as part of a complex which contains both a 50,000-dalton and a 90,000-dalton cellular phosphoprotein. The 90,000-dalton cellular protein was found to be identical to one of the proteins in chicken cells whose synthesis is induced by stress. The 50,000-dalton protein was found to contain phosphotyrosine when isolated from the complex and therefore may be a substrate for the tyrosine protein kinase activity which is associated with P105 and P110. These same two cellular phosphoproteins have previously been shown to be present in a complex with pp60src, the tyrosine protein kinase which is the transforming protein of Rous sarcoma virus. However, not all avian sarcoma virus transforming proteins with associated tyrosine protein kinase activities form a complex efficiently with these cellular proteins. Little if any of P90, the putative transforming protein of Yamaguchi 73 virus, was found in a complex with the 50,000-dalton and 90,000-dalton cellular phosphoproteins. Images PMID:6180178

  20. Mutations in the spacer peptide and adjoining sequences in Rous sarcoma virus Gag lead to tubular budding.

    PubMed

    Keller, Paul W; Johnson, Marc C; Vogt, Volker M

    2008-07-01

    All orthoretroviruses encode a single structural protein, Gag, which is necessary and sufficient for the assembly and budding of enveloped virus-like particles from the cell. The Gag proteins of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contain a short spacer peptide (SP or SP1, respectively) separating the capsid (CA) and nucleocapsid (NC) domains. SP or SP1 and the residues immediately upstream are known to be critical for proper assembly. Using mutagenesis and electron microscopy analysis of insect cells or chicken cells overexpressing RSV Gag, we defined the SP assembly domain to include the last 8 residues of CA, all 12 residues of SP, and the first 4 residues of NC. Five- or two-amino acid glycine-rich insertions or substitutions in this critical region uniformly resulted in the budding of abnormal, long tubular particles. The equivalent SP1-containing HIV-1 Gag sequence was unable to functionally replace the RSV sequence in supporting normal RSV spherical assembly. According to secondary structure predictions, RSV and HIV-1 SP/SP1 and adjoining residues may form an alpha helix, and what is likely the functionally equivalent sequence in murine leukemia virus Gag has been inferred by mutational analysis to form an amphipathic alpha helix. However, our alanine insertion mutagenesis did not provide evidence for an amphipathic helix in RSV Gag. Taken together, these results define a short assembly domain between the folded portions of CA and NC, which is essential for formation of the immature Gag shell.

  1. Immune enhancement of pulmonary bactericidal activity in murine virus pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Jakab, G J; Green, G M

    1973-11-01

    Bacterial multiplication in the lung associated with murine Sendai virus pneumonia is caused by virus-induced defects in pulmonary bactericidal mechanisms. The nature of this effect has been studied in animals immunized against the challenge bacteria. Mice were immunized against Proteus mirabilis by intraperitoneal inoculation and by aerosol inhalation. After the development of immunity, mice were infected aerogenically with 10(4) TCID(50) of Sendai virus. 7 days later, during the height of the bronchial inflammation and pulmonary consolidation, the mice were challenged with an aerosol of viable (35)S-labeled Proteus mirabilis or (32)P-labeled Staphylococcus aureus.Nonimmunized virus-infected animals showed marked impairment of pulmonary bactericidal activity with subsequent multiplication of the bacterial strain in the case of Proteus mirabilis. Immunized nonvirus-infected animals showed enhancement of pulmonary bactericidal activity for the homologous and heterologous strains in comparison with nonimmunized animals. Virus-infected animals immunized by aerosol showed enhanced bactericidal activity against the homologous but not the heterologous bacterial strain. Neither virus infection nor immunization had a significant effect on the transport of particles in the lung. The data demonstrated that the bacterial multiplication associated with the virus pneumonia was prevented by preceding immunization against the homologous challenge organism. The data suggest a mechanism for controlling bacterial multiplication associated with virus pneumonias.

  2. Detection of Human Herpes Virus 8 in Kaposi's sarcoma tissues at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.

    PubMed

    Tembo, Rabecca; Kaile, Trevor; Kafita, Doris; Chisanga, Chrispin; Kalonda, Annie; Zulu, Ephraim; Samutela, Mulemba; Polepole, Pascal; Kwenda, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Human herpes virus-8, a γ2-herpes virus, is the aetiological agent of Kaposi sarcoma. Recently, Kaposi's sarcoma cases have increased in Zambia. However, the diagnosis of this disease is based on morphological appearance of affected tissues using histological techniques, and the association with its causative agent, Human Herpes virus 8 is not sought. This means poor prognosis for affected patients since the causative agent is not targeted during diagnosis and KS lesions may be mistaken for other reactive and neoplastic vascular proliferations when only histological techniques are used. Therefore, this study was aimed at providing evidence of Human Herpes virus 8 infection in Kaposi's sarcoma tissues at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. One hundred and twenty suspected Kaposi's sarcoma archival formalin-fixed paraffin-wax embedded tissues stored from January 2013 to December 2014 in the Histopathology Laboratory at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia were analysed using histology and Polymerase Chain Reaction targeting the ORF26 gene of Human Herpes virus 8. The predominant histological type of Kaposi's sarcoma detected was the Nodular type (60.7%) followed by the plaque type (22.6%) and patch type (16.7%). The nodular lesion was identified mostly in males (40.5%, 34/84) than females (20.2%, 17/84) (p=0.041). Human Herpes virus 8 DNA was detected in 53.6% (45/84) and mostly in the nodular KS lesions (60%, 27/84) (p=0.035). The findings in this study show that the Human Herpes virus-8 is detectable in Kaposi's sarcoma tissues, and, as previously reported in other settings, is closely associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. The study has provided important baseline data for use in the diagnosis of this disease and the identification of the virus in the tissues will aid in targeted therapy.

  3. Kaposi Sarcoma in an Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Seronegative Mediterranean Female: Report of a Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriou, Marios; Kofina, Konstantinia E.; Ioannidis, Aristeidis; Gerasimidou, Domniki K.; Efthimiadis, Christoforos; Zaramboukas, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 57 Final Diagnosis: Classic Kaposi sarcoma Symptoms: Skin Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Biopsy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Kaposi sarcoma is a malignancy commonly linked to HIV infection or immunosuppression. An association with human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) infection has also been reported. We present a case of classic Kaposi sarcoma in a female Mediterranean patient. Case Report: A 57-year-old white female of Greek ethnicity, with no history of HIV infection or immunosuppression, presented to the Surgical Out-patient Department of our Center, with complaints of extensive discolored skin lesion on both legs, initially considered as chronic vein insufficiency. Histopathological findings from skin biopsies revealed Kaposi sarcoma. Conclusions: Non-HIV-related Kaposi sarcoma is an HHV-8-related, angioproliferating skin cancer that can cause pain, disfigurement, and limb dysfunction. High suspicion of this condition can lead to early treatment and delay progression. PMID:28743856

  4. pp60v-src tyrosine kinase is expressed and active in sarcoma-free avian embryos microinjected with Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, A R; Carter, V C; Martin, G S; Bissell, M J

    1988-01-01

    Early embryonic avian tissue is resistant to transformation by Rous sarcoma virus. To determine the nature of this resistance, we examined the expression and properties of the Rous sarcoma virus transforming protein pp60v-src, in infected embryonic chicken limbs in ovo. Lysates from Rous sarcoma virus-infected limbs contained the viral structural protein p19gag, as detected by immunoblot analysis, and showed pp60v-src kinase activity in vitro. Immunoblot analysis of lysates with anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies revealed a number of phosphotyrosine-containing proteins present in lysates of Rous sarcoma virus-infected embryos but not in lysates of control, uninfected embryos. Anti-phosphotyrosine immunoreactivity was observed in frozen sections in the same cell types that expressed pp60v-src and p19gag. These studies demonstrate that pp60v-src is co-expressed with viral structural determinants in infected embryonic avian tissue. Furthermore, pp60v-src is active in ovo as a tyrosine-specific phosphotransferase, despite the apparent lack of sarcoma induction. The localization pattern of the major src gene substrate p36 (calpactin I) was compared with that of p19gag by double-label immunofluorescence and found to be generally nonoverlapping. These observations are consistent with the concept that the induction of tumors in ovo requires complementation between viral determinants and host factors. These host factors, which may be critical substrates of pp60v-src, are subject to developmental regulation in the avian embryo. Images PMID:2845414

  5. Characterization of Ribosomal Frameshifting in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus.

    PubMed

    Finch, Leanne K; Ling, Roger; Napthine, Sawsan; Olspert, Allan; Michiels, Thomas; Lardinois, Cécile; Bell, Susanne; Loughran, Gary; Brierley, Ian; Firth, Andew E

    2015-08-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is a member of the genus Cardiovirus in the Picornaviridae, a family of positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Previously, we demonstrated that in the related cardiovirus, Encephalomyocarditis virus, a programmed-1 ribosomal frameshift (1 PRF) occurs at a conserved G_GUU_UUU sequence within the 2B-encoding region of the polyprotein open reading frame (ORF). Here we show that-1 PRF occurs at a similar site during translation of the TMEV genome. In addition, we demonstrate that a predicted 3= RNA stem-loop structure at a noncanonical spacing downstream of the shift site is required for efficient frameshifting in TMEV and that frameshifting also requires virus infection. Mutating the G_GUU_UUU shift site to inhibit frameshifting results in an attenuated virus with reduced growth kinetics and a small-plaque phenotype. Frameshifting in the virus context was found to be extremely efficient at 74 to 82%, which, to our knowledge, is the highest frameshifting efficiency recorded to date for any virus. We propose that highly efficient-1 PRF in TMEV provides a mechanism to escape the confines of equimolar expression normally inherent in the single-polyprotein expression strategy of picornaviruses.

  6. Recombinant bacteriophages containing the integrated transforming provirus of Gardner--Arnstein feline sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, L A; Even, J; Garon, C F; Donner, L; Sherr, C J

    1981-01-01

    The integrated DNA provirus of the Gardner-Arnstein (GA) strain of feline sarcoma virus (FeSV) was molecularly cloned in a bacteriophage lambda vector. The cloned DNA fragment is 14.4 kilobase pairs long and contains a 6.7-kilobase provirus flanked by cellular sequences derived from nonproductively transformed mink cells. Transfection of mouse NIH/3T3 cells with the cloned DNA fragment induced foci of transformation at efficiencies of 10(4) focus-forming units/pmol of sarcoma virus DNA. Restriction endonuclease mapping and heteroduplex analyses were used to compare the GA-FeSV provirus with that of Snyder-Theilen (ST)-FeSV, a second strain that contains homologous transformation-specific sequences (v-fes). Both viruses have the general structure 5'-gag-fes-env-c region-3', each having retained portions of the feline leukemia virus (FeLV) gag and env genes. In addition to segments shared by the two sarcoma viruses, GA-FeSV contains 1.7 kilobases of extra sequences not found in ST-FeSV. Of these, at least 400-500 base pairs located near the 5' end of v-fes encode a portion of the GA-FeSV polyprotein; the remaining 1.2 kilobases are derived from the FeLV env gene but do not appear to encode any detectable product related to the FeLV envelope glycoprotein. The close homology of the v-fes sequences shows that GA- and ST-FeSV were formed by recombination of FeLV with similar portions of a cat cellular gene (c-fes). Images PMID:6270655

  7. Novel Monoclonal Antibody Directed at the Receptor Binding Site on the Avian Sarcoma and Leukosis Virus Env Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Delos, Sue E.; Accavitti, Mary Ann; White, Judith M.; Hunter, Eric

    2002-01-01

    We report here on the generation of a mouse monoclonal antibody directed against Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) subgroup A Env that will be useful in functional and structural analysis of RSV Env, as well as in approaches employing the RCAS/Tva system for gene targeting. BALB/c mice were primed and given boosters twice with EnvA-expressing NIH 3T3 cells. Resulting hybridomas were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against RCANBP virions and SU-A-immunoglobulin G immunoadhesin. One highly reactive hybridoma clone, mc8C5, was subcloned and tested in immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation (IP), and Western blotting assays. In all three assays, mc8C5-4 subgroup-specifically recognizes SR-A Env, through the SU domain, expressed from different vectors in both avian and mammalian cells. This multifunctionality is notable for a mouse monoclonal. We furthermore observed a preference for binding to terminally glycosylated Env over core-glycosylated Env precursor in IPs, suggesting that the epitope is at least partially conformational and dependent on glycosylation. Most importantly, we found mc8C5-4 inhibited Env function: in vitro, the monoclonal not only interferes with binding of the EnvA receptor, Tva, but it also blocks the Tva-induced conformational change required for activation of the fusion peptide, without inducing that change itself. Infection of Tva-expressing avian or mammalian cells by avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) or EnvA-pseudotyped murine leukemia virus, respectively, is efficiently inhibited by mc8C5-4. The apparent interference of the monoclonal with the EnvA-Tva complex formation suggests that the epitope seen by mc8C5 overlaps with the receptor binding site. This is supported by the observation that mutations of basic residues in hr2 or of the downstream glycosylation site, which both impair Tva-binding to EnvA, have similar effects on the binding of mc8C5. Thus, anti-ASLV-SU-A mc8C5-4 proves to be a unique new immunoreagent that targets

  8. The C-terminal half of TSG101 blocks Rous sarcoma virus budding and sequesters Gag into unique nonendosomal structures.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Marc C; Spidel, Jared L; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Wills, John W; Vogt, Volker M

    2005-03-01

    Retroviral late domains (L domains) are short amino acid sequences in the Gag protein that facilitate the process of budding. L domains act by recruiting the ESCRT complexes, which normally function in the formation of multivesicular bodies. The PTAP late domain of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is believed to specifically recruit this machinery by binding the ESCRT protein TSG101. It was recently demonstrated that expression of a C-terminal fragment of TSG101 (TSG-3') blocked the budding of both PTAP-dependent and PPPY-dependent retroviruses. We show here that TSG-3' expression leads to the formation of large spherical entities that we call TICS (TSG-3'-induced cellular structures) in the cytoplasm. Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and murine leukemia virus (MLV) Gag proteins are selectively recruited to these structures, but HIV type 1 Gag is completely excluded. Experiments with various HIV and RSV vector constructs as well as HIV and RSV chimeras suggest that recruitment to the TICS is late domain independent and does not involve recognition of any single amino acid sequence. TICS appear to have no limiting membrane and do not colocalize with markers for any membranous cellular compartment. Wild-type TSG101 is also recruited to TICS, but most other ESCRT proteins are excluded. These structures are similar in nature to aggresomes, colocalize with the aggresome marker GFP-250, and are highly enriched in ubiquitin but in other ways do not fully meet the description of aggresomes. We conclude that the block to retroviral budding by TSG-3' may be the result of its sequestration of Gag, depletion of free TSG101, or depletion of free ubiquitin.

  9. Characterization of Ribosomal Frameshifting in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Leanne K.; Ling, Roger; Napthine, Sawsan; Olspert, Allan; Michiels, Thomas; Lardinois, Cécile; Bell, Susanne; Loughran, Gary; Brierley, Ian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) is a member of the genus Cardiovirus in the Picornaviridae, a family of positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Previously, we demonstrated that in the related cardiovirus, Encephalomyocarditis virus, a programmed −1 ribosomal frameshift (−1 PRF) occurs at a conserved G_GUU_UUU sequence within the 2B-encoding region of the polyprotein open reading frame (ORF). Here we show that −1 PRF occurs at a similar site during translation of the TMEV genome. In addition, we demonstrate that a predicted 3′ RNA stem-loop structure at a noncanonical spacing downstream of the shift site is required for efficient frameshifting in TMEV and that frameshifting also requires virus infection. Mutating the G_GUU_UUU shift site to inhibit frameshifting results in an attenuated virus with reduced growth kinetics and a small-plaque phenotype. Frameshifting in the virus context was found to be extremely efficient at 74 to 82%, which, to our knowledge, is the highest frameshifting efficiency recorded to date for any virus. We propose that highly efficient −1 PRF in TMEV provides a mechanism to escape the confines of equimolar expression normally inherent in the single-polyprotein expression strategy of picornaviruses. IMPORTANCE Many viruses utilize programmed −1 ribosomal frameshifting (−1 PRF) to produce different protein products at a defined ratio, or to translate overlapping ORFs to increase coding capacity. With few exceptions, −1 PRF occurs on specific “slippery” heptanucleotide sequences and is stimulated by RNA structure beginning 5 to 9 nucleotides (nt) downstream of the slippery site. Here we describe an unusual case of −1 PRF in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) that is extraordinarily efficient (74 to 82% of ribosomes shift into the alternative reading frame) and, in stark contrast to other examples of −1 PRF, is dependent upon a stem-loop structure beginning 14 nt downstream of

  10. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J.; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA ‘off-target’ effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host–pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host–virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host–virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  11. Inhibition of RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of Rous sarcoma virus by thiosemicarbazones and several cations.

    PubMed

    Levinson, W; Faras, A; Woodson, B; Jackson, J; Bishop, J M

    1973-01-01

    The RNA-dependent DNA polymerase of Rous sarcoma virus is inhibited by N-methyl isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone and by thiosemicarbazide, but not by semicarbazide. These inhibitors also inactivate, upon contact with the virion, the transforming ability of Rous sarcoma virus. Sulfhydryl donors, such as 2-mercapto-ethanol, can prevent these effects. The RNA-directed activity of the purified polymerase is inhibited to a greater degree than is the DNA-directed activity. Two cations, Cu(++) and Hg(++), can inhibit RNA-dependent DNA polymerase and inactivate the transforming ability of the virus. Synergism between N-methyl isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone and Cu(++) occurs, since treatment of the virus with a low dose of either N-methyl isatin beta-thiosemicarbazone or Cu(++) has little effect; however, when the two compounds are mixed together, significant inactivation occurs. This observation supports the hypothesis that the antiviral action of thiosemicarbazones is a function of their ability to act as a ligand for metallic ions. Several cations (Ag(+), Co(++), Zn(++), Cd(++), and Ni(++)) significantly inactivate the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, but have little effect on the transforming ability. In view of this result, the conclusion that the enzyme activity is required for transformation remains open to question.

  12. Nuclear entry and CRM1-dependent nuclear export of the Rous sarcoma virus Gag polyprotein

    PubMed Central

    Scheifele, Lisa Z.; Garbitt, Rachel A.; Rhoads, Jonathan D.; Parent, Leslie J.

    2002-01-01

    The retroviral Gag polyprotein directs budding from the plasma membrane of infected cells. Until now, it was believed that Gag proteins of type C retroviruses, including the prototypic oncoretrovirus Rous sarcoma virus, were synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and targeted directly to the plasma membrane. Here we reveal a previously unknown step in the subcellular trafficking of the Gag protein, that of transient nuclear localization. We have identified a targeting signal within the N-terminal matrix domain that facilitates active nuclear import of the Gag polyprotein. We also found that Gag is transported out of the nucleus through the CRM1 nuclear export pathway, based on observations that treatment of virus-expressing cells with leptomycin B resulted in the redistribution of Gag proteins from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Internal deletion of the C-terminal portion of the Gag p10 region resulted in the nuclear sequestration of Gag and markedly diminished budding, suggesting that the nuclear export signal might reside within p10. Finally, we observed that a previously described matrix mutant, Myr1E, was insensitive to the effects of leptomycin B, apparently bypassing the nuclear compartment during virus assembly. Myr1E has a defect in genomic RNA packaging, implying that nuclear localization of Gag might be involved in viral RNA interactions. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that nuclear entry and egress of the Gag polyprotein are intrinsic components of the Rous sarcoma virus assembly pathway. PMID:11891341

  13. Functional chimeras of the Rous sarcoma virus and human immunodeficiency virus gag proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, R P; Nelle, T D; Wills, J W

    1993-01-01

    The Gag protein encoded by Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) is the only viral product required for the process of budding whereby virus particles are formed at the plasma membrane. Deletion analysis of this Gag molecule has revealed several regions (assembly domains) that are important for budding. One of these domains is located at the amino terminus and is needed for membrane binding. Another is located within the carboxy-terminal third of the protein. Though there is little sequence homology among the Gag proteins of unrelated retroviruses, it seemed possible that their assembly domains might be functionally conserved, and to explore this idea, numerous Gag chimeras were made. The results indicate that the first 10 amino acids of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag protein can suppress the block to budding caused by deletions in the RSV MA sequence, much as described previously for the first 10 residues from the Src oncoprotein (J.W. Wills, R.C. Craven, R. A. Weldon, Jr., T. D. Nelle, and C.R. Erdie, J. Virol. 65:3804-3812, 1991). In addition, the carboxy-terminal half of the HIV Gag protein was fused to a truncated RSV Gag molecule, mutant Bg-Bs, which is unable to direct core assembly. This chimera was able to produce particles at a rate identical to that of RSV and of a density similar to that of authentic virions. Deletion analysis of the carboxy-terminal chimera revealed two small regions within the HIV NC protein that were sufficient for endowing mutant Bg-Bs with these properties. Chimeras lacking both regions produced particles of a low density, suggesting that these sequences may be involved in the tight packing of Gag molecules during assembly. In a related set of experiments, replacement of the RSV protease with that of HIV resulted in premature processing within the RSV sequence and a block to budding. Particle assembly was restored when the HIV PR activity was inactivated by mutagenesis. Collectively, the data presented here illustrate the functional

  14. Radiosensitizing effect of intratumoral interleukin-12 gene electrotransfer in murine sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sedlar, Ales; Kranjc, Simona; Dolinsek, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Coer, Andrej; Sersa, Gregor

    2013-01-29

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) based radiosensitization is an effective way of tumor treatment. Local cytokine production, without systemic shedding, might provide clinical benefit in radiation treatment of sarcomas. Therefore, the aim was to stimulate intratumoral IL-12 production by gene electrotransfer of plasmid coding for mouse IL-12 (mIL-12) into the tumors, in order to explore its radiosensitizing effect after single or multiple intratumoral gene electrotransfer. Solid SA-1 fibrosarcoma tumors, on the back of A/J mice, were treated intratumorally by mIL-12 gene electrotransfer and 24 h later irradiated with a single dose. Treatment effectiveness was measured by tumor growth delay and local tumor control assay (TCD(50) assay). With respect to therapeutic index, skin reaction in the radiation field was scored. The tumor and serum concentrations of cytokines mIL-12 and mouse interferon γ (mIFNγ) were measured. Besides single, also multiple intratumoral mIL-12 gene electrotransfer before and after tumor irradiation was evaluated. Single intratumoral mIL-12 gene electrotransfer resulted in increased intratumoral but not serum mIL-12 and mIFNγ concentrations, and had good antitumor (7.1% tumor cures) and radiosensitizing effect (21.4% tumor cures). Combined treatment resulted in the radiation dose-modifying factor of 2.16. Multiple mIL-12 gene electrotransfer had an even more pronounced antitumor (50% tumor cures) and radiosensitizing (86.7% tumor cures) effect. Single or multiple intratumoral mIL-12 gene electrotransfer resulted in increased intratumoral mIL-12 and mIFNγ cytokine level, and may provide an efficient treatment modality for soft tissue sarcoma as single or adjuvant therapy to tumor irradiation.

  15. Radiosensitizing effect of intratumoral interleukin-12 gene electrotransfer in murine sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interleukin-12 (IL-12) based radiosensitization is an effective way of tumor treatment. Local cytokine production, without systemic shedding, might provide clinical benefit in radiation treatment of sarcomas. Therefore, the aim was to stimulate intratumoral IL-12 production by gene electrotransfer of plasmid coding for mouse IL-12 (mIL-12) into the tumors, in order to explore its radiosensitizing effect after single or multiple intratumoral gene electrotransfer. Methods Solid SA-1 fibrosarcoma tumors, on the back of A/J mice, were treated intratumorally by mIL-12 gene electrotransfer and 24 h later irradiated with a single dose. Treatment effectiveness was measured by tumor growth delay and local tumor control assay (TCD50 assay). With respect to therapeutic index, skin reaction in the radiation field was scored. The tumor and serum concentrations of cytokines mIL-12 and mouse interferon γ (mIFNγ) were measured. Besides single, also multiple intratumoral mIL-12 gene electrotransfer before and after tumor irradiation was evaluated. Results Single intratumoral mIL-12 gene electrotransfer resulted in increased intratumoral but not serum mIL-12 and mIFNγ concentrations, and had good antitumor (7.1% tumor cures) and radiosensitizing effect (21.4% tumor cures). Combined treatment resulted in the radiation dose-modifying factor of 2.16. Multiple mIL-12 gene electrotransfer had an even more pronounced antitumor (50% tumor cures) and radiosensitizing (86.7% tumor cures) effect. Conclusions Single or multiple intratumoral mIL-12 gene electrotransfer resulted in increased intratumoral mIL-12 and mIFNγ cytokine level, and may provide an efficient treatment modality for soft tissue sarcoma as single or adjuvant therapy to tumor irradiation. PMID:23360213

  16. Murine Models of Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Elshafa Hassan; Baiocchi, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a B-lymphotropic gamma herpes virus associated with a number of malignancies. Most EBV-related cancers present complex medical management challenges; thus it has been essential to develop preclinical in vivo models allowing for the study of pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment of these diseases. Early in vivo models used nonhuman primates; however, such models were limited by the inability of EBV to achieve viral latency, availability, and cost. Immunodeficient mouse strains emerged as efficient models that allow for engraftment of human mononuclear cells and controlled evaluation of EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). By using highly immunodeficient strains of mice such as severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) and NOD/LtSz-scid ILrg(-/-)(NOG) mice, investigators have developed efficient platforms for evaluating pathogenesis of benign (HLH) and malignant (EBV-LPD) diseases associated with EBV. Humanized murine chimeric models have been essential tools for evaluating preventive strategies with vaccine and adoptive cellular approaches, as well as development of experimental therapeutic strategies. Manipulation of the human immune cells before engraftment or mutation of viral lytic and latent genes has enhanced our understanding of the oncogenic nature of EBV and the complexity of human immune responses to EBV. In this review, we discuss how the EBV murine models have evolved to become essential tools for studying the virology of EBV as it relates to human EBV-LPD pathogenesis, the immunobiology of innate and adaptive responses, and limitations of these models.

  17. Association between malaria exposure and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus seropositivity in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nalwoga, Angela; Cose, Stephen; Wakeham, Katie; Miley, Wendell; Ndibazza, Juliet; Drakeley, Christopher; Elliott, Alison; Whitby, Denise; Newton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Unlike other herpes viruses, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) is not ubiquitous worldwide and is most prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. The reasons for this are unclear. As part of a wider investigation of factors that facilitate transmission in Uganda, a high prevalence country, we examined the association between antimalaria antibodies and seropositivity against KSHV. Methods Antibodies against P. falciparum merozoite surface protein (PfMSP)-1, P. falciparum apical membrane antigen (PfAMA)-1 and KSHV antigens (ORF73 and K8.1) were measured in samples from 1164 mothers and 1227 children. Results Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus seroprevalence was 69% among mothers and 15% children. Among mothers, KSHV seroprevalence increased with malaria antibody titres: from 60% to 82% and from 54% to 77%, comparing those with the lowest and highest titres for PfMSP-1 and PfAMA-1, respectively (P < 0.0001). Among children, only antibodies to PfAMA-1 were significantly associated with KSHV seropositivity, (P < 0.0001). In both mothers and children, anti-ORF73 antibodies were more strongly associated with malaria antibodies than anti-K8.1 antibodies. Conclusion The association between malaria exposure and KSHV seropositivity suggests that malaria is a cofactor for KSHV infection or reactivation. PMID:25611008

  18. Autogenous regulation of RNA translation and packaging by Rous sarcoma virus Pr76gag.

    PubMed Central

    Sonstegard, T S; Hackett, P B

    1996-01-01

    Unspliced cytoplasmic retroviral RNA in chronically infected cells either is encapsidated by Gag proteins in the manufacture of virus or is used to direct synthesis of Gag proteins. Several models have been suggested to explain the sorting of viral RNA for these two purposes. Here we present evidence supporting a simple biochemical mechanism that accounts for the routing of retroviral RNA. Our results indicate that ribosomes compete with the Gag proteins to determine the fate of nascent retroviral RNA. Although the integrity of the entire Rous sarcoma virus leader sequence is important for retroviral packaging and translation, the RNA structure around the third small open reading frame, which neighbors the psi site required for packaging of the RNA, is particularly critical for maintenance of the balance between translation and packaging. These results support the hypothesis that Gag proteins autogenously regulate their synthesis and encapsidation of retroviral RNA and that an equilibrium exists between RNA destined for translation and packaging that is based on the intracellular levels of Gag proteins and ribosomes. To test the model, mRNAs with natural or mutated 5' leader sequences from Rous sarcoma virus were expressed in avian cells in the presence and absence of Pr76gag. We demonstrate that Pr76gag acts as a translational repressor of these mRNAs in a dose-dependent manner, supporting the hypothesis that Pr76gag can sort retroviral RNA for translation and encapsidation. PMID:8794299

  19. Simian Sarcoma-Associated Virus Fails To Infect Chinese Hamster Cells despite the Presence of Functional Gibbon Ape Leukemia Virus Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Yuan-Tsang; Wilson, Carolyn A.; Farrell, Karen B.; Chaudry, G. Jilani; Eiden, Maribeth V.

    1998-01-01

    We have sequenced the envelope genes from each of the five members of the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) family of type C retroviruses. Four of the GALVs, including GALV strain SEATO (GALV-S), were originally isolated from gibbon apes, whereas the fifth member of this family, simian sarcoma-associated virus (SSAV), was isolated from a woolly monkey and shares 78% amino acid identity with GALV-S. To determine whether these viruses have identical host ranges, we evaluated the susceptibility of several cell lines to either GALV-S or SSAV infection. GALV-S and SSAV have the same host range with the exception of Chinese hamster lung E36 cells, which are susceptible to GALV-S but not SSAV. We used retroviral vectors that differ only in their envelope composition (e.g., they contain either SSAV or GALV-S envelope protein) to show that the envelope of SSAV restricts entry into E36 cells. Although unable to infect E36 cells, SSAV infects GALV-resistant murine cells expressing the E36-derived viral receptor, HaPit2. These results suggest that the receptors present on E36 cells function for SSAV. We have constructed several vectors containing GALV-S/SSAV chimeric envelope proteins to map the region of the SSAV envelope that blocks infection of E36 cells. Vectors bearing chimeric envelopes comprised of the N-terminal region of the GALV-S SU protein and the C-terminal region of SSAV infect E36 cells, whereas vectors containing the N-terminal portion of the SSAV SU protein and C-terminal portion of GALV-S fail to infect E36 cells. This finding indicates that the region of the SSAV envelope protein responsible for restricting SSAV infection of E36 cells lies within its amino-terminal region. PMID:9811678

  20. Mucocutaneous presentation of Kaposi sarcoma in an asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-positive man.

    PubMed

    Martorano, Lisa M; Cannella, Jonathan D; Lloyd, Jenifer R

    2015-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a malignant proliferation of endothelial cells within the skin. The clinical presentation is characterized by clusters of violaceous macules and papules that often appear on the distal extremities or trunk with or without oral mucosal involvement. Mucocutaneous lesions are present at onset of diagnosis in a minority of cases. The lesions can evolve to include the mucous membranes of the gastric mucosa and the lungs. We present a unique case of KS in a 45-year-old, asymptomatic, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive man with mucocutaneous involvement to highlight the importance of recognizing KS in immunocompromised patients.

  1. Kaposi Sarcoma in an Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Seronegative Mediterranean Female: Report of a Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Grigoriou, Marios; Kofina, Konstantinia E; Ioannidis, Aristeidis; Gerasimidou, Domniki K; Efthymiadis, Christoforos; Zaramboukas, Thomas

    2017-07-26

    BACKGROUND Kaposi sarcoma is a malignancy commonly linked to HIV infection or immunosuppression. An association with human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) infection has also been reported. We present a case of classic Kaposi sarcoma in a female Mediterranean patient. CASE REPORT A 57-year-old white female of Greek ethnicity, with no history of HIV infection or immunosuppression, presented to the Surgical Out-patient Department of our Center, with complaints of extensive discolored skin lesion on both legs, initially considered as chronic vein insufficiency. Histopathological findings from skin biopsies revealed Kaposi sarcoma. CONCLUSIONS Non-HIV-related Kaposi sarcoma is an HHV-8-related, angioproliferating skin cancer that can cause pain, disfigurement, and limb dysfunction. High suspicion of this condition can lead to early treatment and delay progression.

  2. Chemokine receptor CCR7 contributes to a rapid and efficient clearance of lytic murine gamma-herpes virus 68 from the lung, whereas bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue harbors virus during latency.

    PubMed

    Kocks, Jessica R; Adler, Heiko; Danzer, Heike; Hoffmann, Katharina; Jonigk, Danny; Lehmann, Ulrich; Förster, Reinhold

    2009-06-01

    Murine gamma-herpes virus 68 is a natural rodent pathogen closely related to the human gamma-herpes viruses Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus and EBV. By intranasally infecting wild-type and CCR7-deficient mice, we investigated whether CCR7 is necessary for viral clearance from the lung and the establishment of latency. We found during the lytic phase of infection that inflammation in lungs of CCR7(-/-) mice was more severe and viral load significantly higher compared with wild-type littermates. In addition, activation of T cells was delayed and clearance of the inflammation was retarded in mutant lungs, demonstrating that CCR7 is necessary for a rapid and efficient immune response. However, for the establishment of splenomegaly and latency, the presence of CCR7 was dispensable. Finally, by microdissecting BALT, we could demonstrate that these ectopic lymphoid structures are a place in the lung where virus resides during latency.

  3. A Multicenter Blinded Analysis Indicates No Association between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis and either Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus or Polytropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Harvey J.; Mikovits, Judy A.; Switzer, William M.; Ruscetti, Francis W.; Lo, Shyh-Ching; Klimas, Nancy; Komaroff, Anthony L.; Montoya, Jose G.; Bateman, Lucinda; Levine, Susan; Peterson, Daniel; Levin, Bruce; Hanson, Maureen R.; Genfi, Afia; Bhat, Meera; Zheng, HaoQiang; Wang, Richard; Li, Bingjie; Hung, Guo-Chiuan; Lee, Li Ling; Sameroff, Stephen; Heneine, Walid; Coffin, John; Hornig, Mady; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disabling disorder known as chronic fatigue syndrome or myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) has been linked in two independent studies to infection with xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and polytropic murine leukemia virus (pMLV). Although the associations were not confirmed in subsequent studies by other investigators, patients continue to question the consensus of the scientific community in rejecting the validity of the association. Here we report blinded analysis of peripheral blood from a rigorously characterized, geographically diverse population of 147 patients with CFS/ME and 146 healthy subjects by the investigators describing the original association. This analysis reveals no evidence of either XMRV or pMLV infection. PMID:22991430

  4. Dynein Regulators Are Important for Ecotropic Murine Leukemia Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Valle-Tenney, Roger; Opazo, Tatiana; Cancino, Jorge; Goff, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT During the early steps of infection, retroviruses must direct the movement of the viral genome into the nucleus to complete their replication cycle. This process is mediated by cellular proteins that interact first with the reverse transcription complex and later with the preintegration complex (PIC), allowing it to reach and enter the nucleus. For simple retroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), the identities of the cellular proteins involved in trafficking of the PIC in infection are unknown. To identify cellular proteins that interact with the MLV PIC, we developed a replication-competent MLV in which the integrase protein was tagged with a FLAG epitope. Using a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we established that the microtubule motor dynein regulator DCTN2/p50/dynamitin interacts with the MLV preintegration complex early in infection, suggesting a direct interaction between the incoming viral particles and the dynein complex regulators. Further experiments showed that RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of either DCTN2/p50/dynamitin or another dynein regulator, NudEL, profoundly reduced the efficiency of infection by ecotropic, but not amphotropic, MLV reporters. We propose that the cytoplasmic dynein regulators are a critical component of the host machinery needed for infection by the retroviruses entering the cell via the ecotropic envelope pathway. IMPORTANCE Retroviruses must access the chromatin of host cells to integrate the viral DNA, but before this crucial event, they must reach the nucleus. The movement through the cytoplasm—a crowded environment where diffusion is slow—is thought to utilize retrograde transport along the microtubule network by the dynein complex. Different viruses use different components of this multisubunit complex. We found that the preintegration complex of murine leukemia virus (MLV) interacts with the dynein complex and that regulators of this complex are essential for

  5. Activation of DNA Damage Response Induced by the Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpes Virus

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Toma, Luigi; Bordignon, Valentina; Trento, Elisabetta; D’Agosto, Giovanna; Cordiali-Fei, Paola; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), can infect endothelial cells often leading to cell transformation and to the development of tumors, namely Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and the plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman’s disease. KSHV is prevalent in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa and the Mediterranean region presenting distinct genotypes, which appear to be associated with differences in disease manifestation, according to geographical areas. In infected cells, KSHV persists in a latent episomal form. However, in a limited number of cells, it undergoes spontaneous lytic reactivation to ensure the production of new virions. During both the latent and the lytic cycle, KSHV is programmed to express genes which selectively modulate the DNA damage response (DDR) through the activation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) pathway and by phosphorylating factors associated with the DDR, including the major tumor suppressor protein p53 tumor suppressor p53. This review will focus on the interplay between the KSHV and the DDR response pathway throughout the viral lifecycle, exploring the putative molecular mechanism/s that may contribute to malignant transformation of host cells. PMID:27258263

  6. Activation of DNA Damage Response Induced by the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpes Virus.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Toma, Luigi; Bordignon, Valentina; Trento, Elisabetta; D'Agosto, Giovanna; Cordiali-Fei, Paola; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2016-06-01

    The human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), can infect endothelial cells often leading to cell transformation and to the development of tumors, namely Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and the plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV is prevalent in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa and the Mediterranean region presenting distinct genotypes, which appear to be associated with differences in disease manifestation, according to geographical areas. In infected cells, KSHV persists in a latent episomal form. However, in a limited number of cells, it undergoes spontaneous lytic reactivation to ensure the production of new virions. During both the latent and the lytic cycle, KSHV is programmed to express genes which selectively modulate the DNA damage response (DDR) through the activation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) pathway and by phosphorylating factors associated with the DDR, including the major tumor suppressor protein p53 tumor suppressor p53. This review will focus on the interplay between the KSHV and the DDR response pathway throughout the viral lifecycle, exploring the putative molecular mechanism/s that may contribute to malignant transformation of host cells.

  7. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Tesh, Robert B.; Azar, Sasha R.; Muruato, Antonio E.; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Auguste, Albert J.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain–Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼107 plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  8. Adjuvant TNF-α therapy to electrochemotherapy with intravenous cisplatin in murine sarcoma exerts synergistic antitumor effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Cemazar, Maja; Todorovic, Vesna; Scancar, Janez; Lampreht, Ursa; Stimac, Monika; Kamensek, Urska; Kranjc, Simona; Coer, Andrej; Sersa, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Background Electrochemotherapy is a tumour ablation modality, based on electroporation of the cell membrane, allowing non-permeant anticancer drugs to enter the cell, thus augmenting their cytotoxicity by orders of magnitude. In preclinical studies, bleomycin and cisplatin proved to be the most suitable for clinical use. Intravenous administration of cisplatin for electrochemotherapy is still not widely accepted in the clinics, presumably due to its lower antitumor effectiveness, but adjuvant therapy by immunomodulatory or vascular-targeting agents could provide a way for its potentiation. Hence, the aim of the present study was to explore the possibility of adjuvant tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) therapy to potentiate antitumor effectiveness of electrochemotherapy with intravenous cisplatin administration in murine sarcoma. Materials and methods In vivo study was designed to evaluate the effect of TNF-α applied before or after the electrochemotherapy and to evaluate the effect of adjuvant TNF-α on electrochemotherapy with different cisplatin doses. Results A synergistic interaction between TNF-α and electrochemotherapy was observed. Administration of TNF-α before the electrochemotherapy resulted in longer tumour growth delay and increased tumour curability, and was significantly more effective than TNF-α administration after the electrochemotherapy. Tumour analysis revealed increased platinum content in tumours, TNF-α induced blood vessel damage and increased tumour necrosis after combination of TNF-α and electrochemotherapy, indicating an anti-vascular action of TNF-α. In addition, immunomodulatory effect might have contributed to curability rate of the tumours. Conclusion Adjuvant intratumoural TNF-α therapy synergistically contributes to electrochemotherapy with intravenous cisplatin administration. Due to its potentiation at all doses of cisplatin, the combined treatment is predicted to be effective also in tumours, where the drug concentration is

  9. Role of H7 hemagglutinin in murine infectivity of influenza viruses following ocular inoculation.

    PubMed

    Belser, Jessica A; Sun, Xiangjie; Creager, Hannah M; Johnson, Adam; Ridenour, Callie; Chen, Li-Mei; Tumpey, Terrence M; Maines, Taronna R

    2017-02-01

    H7 subtype influenza viruses have demonstrated an ocular tropism in humans, causing conjunctivitis and not respiratory symptoms in many infected individuals. However, the molecular determinants which confer ocular tropism are still poorly understood. Here, we used a murine model of ocular inoculation to demonstrate that H7 influenza viruses are more likely to cause infection following ocular exposure than are non-H7 subtype viruses. We included investigation regarding the potential role of several properties of influenza viruses with murine infectivity following ocular inoculation, including virus lineage, pathogenicity, and HA cleavage site composition. Furthermore, we examined the potential contribution of internal proteins to murine ocular infectivity. These studies establish a link between H7 subtype viruses and the risk of heightened infectivity in a mammalian species following ocular exposure, and support the development of non-traditional inoculation methods and models to best understand the human risk posed by influenza viruses of all subtypes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Limits in virus filtration capability? Impact of virus quality and spike level on virus removal with xenotropic murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Roush, David J; Myrold, Adam; Burnham, Michael S; And, Joseph V; Hughes, Joseph V

    2015-01-01

    Virus filtration (VF) is a key step in an overall viral clearance process since it has been demonstrated to effectively clear a wide range of mammalian viruses with a log reduction value (LRV) > 4. The potential to achieve higher LRV from virus retentive filters has historically been examined using bacteriophage surrogates, which commonly demonstrated a potential of > 9 LRV when using high titer spikes (e.g. 10(10) PFU/mL). However, as the filter loading increases, one typically experiences significant decreases in performance and LRV. The 9 LRV value is markedly higher than the current expected range of 4-5 LRV when utilizing mammalian retroviruses on virus removal filters (Miesegaes et al., Dev Biol (Basel) 2010;133:3-101). Recent values have been reported in the literature (Stuckey et al., Biotech Progr 2014;30:79-85) of LRV in excess of 6 for PPV and XMuLV although this result appears to be atypical. LRV for VF with therapeutic proteins could be limited by several factors including process limits (flux decay, load matrix), virus spike level and the analytical methods used for virus detection (i.e. the Limits of Quantitation), as well as the virus spike quality. Research was conducted using the Xenotropic-Murine Leukemia Virus (XMuLV) for its direct relevance to the most commonly cited document, the International Conference of Harmonization (ICH) Q5A (International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use, Geneva, Switzerland, 1999) for viral safety evaluations. A unique aspect of this work is the independent evaluation of the impact of retrovirus quality and virus spike level on VF performance and LRV. The VF studies used XMuLV preparations purified by either ultracentrifugation (Ultra 1) or by chromatographic processes that yielded a more highly purified virus stock (Ultra 2). Two monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) with markedly different filtration characteristics and with similar levels of

  11. Functional and Structural Characterization of Novel Type of Linker Connecting Capsid and Nucleocapsid Protein Domains in Murine Leukemia Virus.

    PubMed

    Doležal, Michal; Hadravová, Romana; Kožíšek, Milan; Bednárová, Lucie; Langerová, Hana; Ruml, Tomáš; Rumlová, Michaela

    2016-09-23

    The assembly of immature retroviral particles is initiated in the cytoplasm by the binding of the structural polyprotein precursor Gag with viral genomic RNA. The protein interactions necessary for assembly are mediated predominantly by the capsid (CA) and nucleocapsid (NC) domains, which have conserved structures. In contrast, the structural arrangement of the CA-NC connecting region differs between retroviral species. In HIV-1 and Rous sarcoma virus, this region forms a rod-like structure that separates the CA and NC domains, whereas in Mason-Pfizer monkey virus, this region is densely packed, thus holding the CA and NC domains in close proximity. Interestingly, the sequence connecting the CA and NC domains in gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), is unique. The sequence is called a charged assembly helix (CAH) due to a high number of positively and negatively charged residues. Although both computational and deletion analyses suggested that the MLV CAH forms a helical conformation, no structural or biochemical data supporting this hypothesis have been published. Using an in vitro assembly assay, alanine scanning mutagenesis, and biophysical techniques (circular dichroism, NMR, microcalorimetry, and electrophoretic mobility shift assay), we have characterized the structure and function of the MLV CAH. We provide experimental evidence that the MLV CAH belongs to a group of charged, E(R/K)-rich, single α-helices. This is the first single α-helix motif identified in viral proteins.

  12. Dengue virus protein recognition by virus-specific murine CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, A L; Kurane, I; Lai, C J; Bray, M; Falgout, B; Men, R; Ennis, F A

    1993-01-01

    The identification of the protein targets for dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes may be useful for planning the development of subunit vaccines against dengue. We studied the recognition by murine dengue virus-specific major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) of dengue virus proteins using recombinant vaccinia viruses containing segments of the dengue virus genome. CTL from H-2k mice recognized a single serotype-cross-reactive epitope on the nonstructural (NS) protein NS3. CTL from H-2b mice recognized a serotype-cross-reactive epitope that was localized to NS4a or NS4b. CTL from H-2d mice recognized at least three epitopes: a serotype-specific epitope on one of the structural proteins, a serotype-cross-reactive epitope on NS3, and a serotype-cross-reactive epitope on NS1 or NS2a. Our findings demonstrate the limited recognition of dengue virus proteins by CTL from three inbred mouse strains and the predominance of CTL epitopes on dengue virus nonstructural proteins, particularly NS3. Since human dengue virus-specific CTL show similar patterns of recognition, these findings suggest that nonstructural proteins should be considered in designing vaccines against dengue. PMID:7678307

  13. Suppression of infectious murine leukemia virus in wild mice (Mus musculus) by passive immunization.

    PubMed

    Gardner, M B; Klement, V; Estes, J D; Gilden, R V; Toni, R; Huebner, R J

    1977-06-01

    Passive immunization with heterologous antivirus antiserum beginning at birth successfully suppressed infectious murine leukemia virus expression in Lake Casitas wild mice (Musmusculus) at 5-7 weeks of age.

  14. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Münk, Carsten; Löhler, Jürgen; Prassolov, Vladimir; Just, Ursula; Stockschläder, Marcus; Stocking, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed. PMID:9159161

  15. Human APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kremer, Melanie; Schnierle, Barbara S. . E-mail: schba@pei.de

    2005-06-20

    The human APOBEC3G protein exhibits broad antiretroviral activity against a variety of retroviruses. It is packaged into viral particles and executes its antiviral function in the target cell. The packaging of APOBEC3G into different viral particles requires a mechanism that confers this promiscuity. Here, APOBEC3G incorporation into murine leukemia virus (MLV) was studied using retroviral vectors. APOBEC3G uptake did not require either its cytidine deaminase activity or the presence of a retroviral vector genome. Results from immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies of APOBEC3G with a MLV Gag-CFP (cyan fluorescent protein) fusion protein imply an interaction between both proteins. RNase A treatment did not inhibit the co-precipitation of Gag-CFP and APOBEC3G, suggesting that the interaction is RNA independent. Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag, the MLV Gag precursor protein appears to interact with APOBEC3G, indicating that Gag contains conserved structures which are used to encapsidate APOBEC3G into different retroviral particles.

  16. Contributions of Charged Residues in Structurally Dynamic Capsid Surface Loops to Rous Sarcoma Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Heyrana, Katrina J.; Goh, Boon Chong; Nguyen, Tam-Linh N.; England, Matthew R.; Bewley, Maria C.; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extensive studies of orthoretroviral capsids have shown that many regions of the CA protein play unique roles at different points in the virus life cycle. The N-terminal domain (NTD) flexible-loop (FL) region is one such example: exposed on the outer capsid surface, it has been implicated in Gag-mediated particle assembly, capsid maturation, and early replication events. We have now defined the contributions of charged residues in the FL region of the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA to particle assembly. Effects of mutations on assembly were assessed in vivo and in vitro and analyzed in light of new RSV Gag lattice models. Virus replication was strongly dependent on the preservation of charge at a few critical positions in Gag-Gag interfaces. In particular, a cluster of charges at the beginning of FL contributes to an extensive electrostatic network that is important for robust Gag assembly and subsequent capsid maturation. Second-site suppressor analysis suggests that one of these charged residues, D87, has distal influence on interhexamer interactions involving helix α7. Overall, the tolerance of FL to most mutations is consistent with current models of Gag lattice structures. However, the results support the interpretation that virus evolution has achieved a charge distribution across the capsid surface that (i) permits the packing of NTD domains in the outer layer of the Gag shell, (ii) directs the maturational rearrangements of the NTDs that yield a functional core structure, and (iii) supports capsid function during the early stages of virus infection. IMPORTANCE The production of infectious retrovirus particles is a complex process, a choreography of protein and nucleic acid that occurs in two distinct stages: formation and release from the cell of an immature particle followed by an extracellular maturation phase during which the virion proteins and nucleic acids undergo major rearrangements that activate the infectious potential of the virion. This

  17. Solution structure of a Bcl-2 homolog from Kaposi sarcoma virus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiulong; Petros, Andrew M.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Fesik, Stephen W.; Olejniczak, Edward T.

    2002-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) contains a gene that has functional and sequence homology to the apoptotic Bcl-2 family of proteins [Sarid, R., Sato, T., Bohenzky, R. A., Russo, J. J. & Chang, Y. (1997) Nat. Med. 3, 293–298]. The viral Bcl-2 protein promotes survival of infected cells and may contribute to the development of Kaposi sarcoma tumors [Boshoff, C. & Chang, Y. (2001) Annu. Rev. Med. 52, 453–470]. Here we describe the solution structure of the viral Bcl-2 homolog from KSHV. Comparison of the KSHV Bcl-2 structure to that of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL shows that although the overall fold is the same, there are key differences in the lengths of the helices and loops. Binding studies on peptides derived from the Bcl-2 homology region 3 of proapoptotic family members indicate that the specificity of the viral protein is very different from what was previously observed for Bcl-xL and Bcl-2, suggesting that the viral protein has evolved to have a different mechanism of action than the host proteins. PMID:11904405

  18. Hexagonal organization of Moloney murine leukemia virus capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Keith; McDermott, Jason; Barklis, Eric

    2002-06-20

    To help elucidate the mechanisms by which retrovirus structural proteins associate to form virus particles, we have examined membrane-bound assemblies of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) capsid (CA) proteins. Electron microscopy and image reconstruction techniques showed that CA dimers appear to function as organizational subunits of the cage-like, membrane-bound protein arrays. However, new three-dimensional (3D) data also were consistent with hexagonal (p6) assembly models. The p6 3D reconstructions of membrane-bound M-MuLV CA proteins gave unit cells of a = b = 80.3 A, c = 110 A, gamma = 120 degrees, in which six dimer units formed a cage lattice. Neighbor cage hole-to-hole distances were 45 A, while distances between hexagonal cage holes corresponded to unit cell lengths (80.3 A). The hexagonal model predicts two types of cage holes (trimer and hexamer holes), uses symmetric head-to-head dimer building blocks, and permits the introduction of lattice curvature by conversion of hexamer to pentamer units. The M-MuLV CA lattice is similar to those formed in helical tubes by HIV CA in that hexamer units surround cage holes of 25-30 A, but differs in that M-MuLV hexamer units appear to be CA dimers, whereas HIV CA units appear to be monomers. These results suggest that while general assembly principles apply to different retroviruses, clear assembly distinctions exist between these virus types. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  19. A Structural Basis for BRD2/4-Mediated Host Chromatin Interaction and Oligomer Assembly of Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus and Murine Gammaherpesvirus LANA Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Krausze, Joern; Richter, Ulrike; Adler, Heiko; Fedorov, Roman; Pietrek, Marcel; Rückert, Jessica; Ritter, Christiane; Schulz, Thomas F.; Lührs, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes a lifelong latent infection and causes several malignancies in humans. Murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) is a related γ2-herpesvirus frequently used as a model to study the biology of γ-herpesviruses in vivo. The KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (kLANA) and the MHV68 mLANA (orf73) protein are required for latent viral replication and persistence. Latent episomal KSHV genomes and kLANA form nuclear microdomains, termed ‘LANA speckles’, which also contain cellular chromatin proteins, including BRD2 and BRD4, members of the BRD/BET family of chromatin modulators. We solved the X-ray crystal structure of the C-terminal DNA binding domains (CTD) of kLANA and MHV-68 mLANA. While these structures share the overall fold with the EBNA1 protein of Epstein-Barr virus, they differ substantially in their surface characteristics. Opposite to the DNA binding site, both kLANA and mLANA CTD contain a characteristic lysine-rich positively charged surface patch, which appears to be a unique feature of γ2-herpesviral LANA proteins. Importantly, kLANA and mLANA CTD dimers undergo higher order oligomerization. Using NMR spectroscopy we identified a specific binding site for the ET domains of BRD2/4 on kLANA. Functional studies employing multiple kLANA mutants indicate that the oligomerization of native kLANA CTD dimers, the characteristic basic patch and the ET binding site on the kLANA surface are required for the formation of kLANA ‘nuclear speckles’ and latent replication. Similarly, the basic patch on mLANA contributes to the establishment of MHV-68 latency in spleen cells in vivo. In summary, our data provide a structural basis for the formation of higher order LANA oligomers, which is required for nuclear speckle formation, latent replication and viral persistence. PMID:24146614

  20. Endogenous CD317/Tetherin limits replication of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus in rodent cells and is resistant to antagonists from primate viruses.

    PubMed

    Goffinet, Christine; Schmidt, Sarah; Kern, Christian; Oberbremer, Lena; Keppler, Oliver T

    2010-11-01

    Human CD317 (BST-2/tetherin) is an intrinsic immunity factor that blocks the release of retroviruses, filoviruses, herpesviruses, and arenaviruses. It is unclear whether CD317 expressed endogenously in rodent cells has the capacity to interfere with the replication of the retroviral rodent pathogen murine leukemia virus (MLV) or, in the context of small-animal model development, contributes to the well-established late-phase restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we show that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CD317 relieved a virion release restriction and markedly enhanced the egress of HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in rat cells, including primary macrophages. Moreover, rodent CD317 potently inhibited MLV release, and siRNA-mediated depletion of CD317 in a mouse T-cell line resulted in the accelerated spread of MLV. Several virus-encoded antagonists have recently been reported to overcome the restriction imposed by human or monkey CD317, including HIV-1 Vpu, envelope glycoproteins of HIV-2 and Ebola virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K5, and SIV Nef. In contrast, both rat and mouse CD317 showed a high degree of resistance to these viral antagonists. These data suggest that CD317 is a broadly acting and conserved mediator of innate control of retroviral infection and pathogenesis that restricts the release of retroviruses and lentiviruses in rodents. The high degree of resistance of the rodent CD317 restriction factors to antagonists from primate viruses has implications for HIV-1 small-animal model development and may guide the design of novel antiviral interventions.

  1. Avian sarcoma and leukosis virus-receptor interactions: From classical genetics to novel insights into virus-cell membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, R.J.O.; Elleder, D.; Young, J.A.T. . E-mail: jyoung@salk.edu

    2006-01-05

    For over 40 years, avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV)-receptor interactions have been employed as a useful model system to study the mechanism of retroviral entry into cells. Pioneering studies on this system focused upon the genetic basis of the differential susceptibilities of different lines of chickens to infection by distinct subgroups of ASLV. These studies led to the definition of three distinct autosomal recessive genes that were predicted to encode cellular receptors for different viral subgroups. They also led to the concept of viral interference, i.e. the mechanism by which infection by one virus can render cells resistant to reinfection by other viruses that use the same cellular receptor. Here, we review the contributions that analyses of the ASLV-receptor system have made in unraveling the mechanisms of retroviral entry into cells and focus on key findings such as identification and characterization of the ASLV receptor genes and the subsequent elucidation of an unprecedented mechanism of virus-cell fusion. Since many of the initial findings on this system were published in the early volumes of Virology, this subject is especially well suited to this special anniversary issue of the journal.

  2. Properties of a ribonucleoprotein particle isolated from Nonidet P-40-treated Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed

    Davis, N L; Rueckert, R R

    1972-11-01

    A ribonucleoprotein particle containing about 20% ribonucleic acid (RNA), and containing little if any phospholipid or glucosamine, was recovered in high yield after treatment of Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus and B77 virus with the nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40. This structure, which probably derives from the internal ribonucleoprotein filament described in electron microscopy studies, contained 80 to 90% of the viral 60 to 70S RNA and only about 10% of the protein present in intact virions. It sedimented in glycerol density gradients at approximately 130S and had a buoyant density in sucrose of about 1.34 g/ml. Studies with (32)P-labeled virus indicated that the ribonucleoprotein particle contained approximately 30 4S RNA molecules per 10(7) daltons of high-molecular-weight viral RNA. Intact virions contained about 70 4S RNA molecules per 10(7) daltons of high-molecular-weight RNA. Electrophoretic studies in dodecyl sulfate-containing polyacrylamide gels showed that the ribonucleoprotein particle contained only 5 of the 11 polypeptides found in the virion; of these the major component was a polypeptide weighing 14,000 daltons.

  3. Mass Determination of Rous Sarcoma Virus Virions by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Volker M.; Simon, Martha N.

    1999-01-01

    The internal structural protein of retroviruses, Gag, comprises most of the mass of the virion, and Gag itself can give rise to virus-like particles when expressed in appropriate cells. Previously the stoichiometry of Gag in virions was inferred from indirect measurements carried out 2 decades ago. We now have directly determined the masses of individual particles of the prototypic avian retrovirus, Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), by using scanning transmission electron microscopy. In this technique, the number of scattered electrons in the dark-field image integrated over an individual freeze-dried virus particle on a grid is directly proportional to its mass. The RSV virions had a mean mass of 2.5 × 108 Da, corresponding to about 1,500 Gag molecules per virion. The population of virions was not homogeneous, with about one-third to two-thirds of the virions deviating from the mean by more than 10% of the mass in two respective preparations. The mean masses for virions carrying genomes of 7.4 or 9.3 kb were indistinguishable, suggesting that mass variability is not due to differences in RNA incorporation. PMID:10400808

  4. Viral DNA Synthesis Defects in Assembly-Competent Rous Sarcoma Virus CA Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Tina M.; Craven, Rebecca C.

    2001-01-01

    The major structural protein of the retroviral core (CA) contains a conserved sequence motif shared with the CA-like proteins of distantly related transposable elements. The function of this major region of homology (MHR) has not been defined, in part due to the baffling array of phenotypes in mutants of several viruses and the yeast TY3. This report describes new mutations in the CA protein of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) that were designed to test whether these different phenotypes might indicate distinct functional subdomains in the MHR. A comparison of 25 substitutions at 10 positions in the RSV conserved motif argues against this possibility. Most of the replacements destroyed virus infectivity, although either of two lethal phenotypes was obtained depending on the residue introduced. At most of the positions, one or more replacements (generally the more conservative substitutions) caused a severe replication defect without having any obvious effects on virus assembly, budding, Gag-Pol and genome incorporation, or protein processing. The mutant particles exhibited a defect in endogenous viral DNA synthesis and showed increased sensitivity of the core proteins to detergent, indicating that the mutations interfere with the formation and/or activity of the virion core. The distribution of these mutations across the MHR, with no evidence of clustering, suggests that the entire region is important for a critical postbudding function. In contrast, a second class of lethal substitutions (those that destroyed virus assembly and release) consists of alterations that are expected to cause severe effects on protein structure by disruption either of the hydrophobic core of the CA carboxyl-terminal domain or of the hydrogen bond network that stabilizes the domain. We suggest that this duality of phenotypes is consistent with a role for the MHR in the maturation process that links the two parts of the life cycle. PMID:11119594

  5. Virus - tumor cell relationships. In vivo cocultivation of para-influenza type 1 (Sendai) virus and of Rous sarcoma virus (Schmidt-Ruppin strain) in mouse Ehrlich ascites carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nastac, E; Chira, M; Suru, M; Repanovici, R; Anghelescu, S

    1985-01-01

    Co-infection of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC)-bearing mice with Sendai virus and Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) did not result in the formation of complete RSV. Sendai virus could be, however, propagated in this system over 8 serial passages. As demonstrated by immunofluorescence and complement fixation reactions, antigens specific to each virus were synthesized in EAC cells following either single or mixed virus infection. The virus progens also contained antigenic fractions incorporated from the host cell. The incomplete progens synthesized when RSV inoculation preceded that of Sendai virus possessed three polypeptide fractions characteristic of Sendai virus and one RSV-specific fraction.

  6. Abelson murine leukemia virus: structural requirements for transforming gene function.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, A; Dunn, C Y; Yuasa, Y; Devare, S G; Reddy, E P; Aaronson, S A

    1982-01-01

    The integrated Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) genome cloned in bacteriophage lambda gtWES.lambda B was used to localize viral genetic sequences required for transformation. Comparison of the biological activity of cloned A-MuLV genomic and subgenomic fragments showed that subgenomic clones that lacked the 5' long terminal repeat and adjoining sequences (300 base pairs downstream of the repeat) were not biologically active. In contrast, subgenomic clones that lacked the 3' long terminal repeat and as much as 1.3 kilobase pairs of the A-MuLV cell-derived abl gene were as efficient as wild-type viral DNA in transformation. The A-MuLV-encoded polyprotein P120 and its associated protein kinase activity were detected in transformants obtained by transfection with Cla I, BamHI, and HindIII subgenomic clones. In contrast, individual transformants obtained with subgenomic Sal I clones expressed A-MuLV proteins ranging in size from 82,000 to 95,000 daltons. Each demonstrated an associated protein kinase activity. These results provide direct genetic evidence that only the proximal 40% of abl with its associated 5' helper viral sequences is required for fibroblast transformation. Images PMID:6291048

  7. A Block to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Assembly in Murine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, Roberto; Rutter, Gabriel; Harris, Matthew E.; Hope, Thomas J.; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Landau, Nathaniel R.

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) does not replicate in murine cells. We investigated the basis of this block by infecting a murine NIH 3T3 reporter cell line that stably expressed human CD4, CCR5, and cyclin T1 and contained a transactivatable HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) cassette. Although the virus entered efficiently, formed provirus, and was expressed at a level close to that in a highly permissive human cell line, the murine cells did not support M-tropic HIV-1 replication. To determine why the virus failed to replicate, the efficiency of each postentry step in the virus replication cycle was analyzed using vesicular stomatitis virus G pseudotypes. The murine cells supported reverse transcription and integration at levels comparable to those in the human osteosarcoma-derived cell line GHOST.R5, and human cyclin T1 restored provirus expression, consistent with earlier findings of others. The infected murine cells contained nearly as much virion protein as did the human cells but released less than 1/500 the amount of p24gag into the culture medium. A small amount of p24gag was released and was in the form of fully infectious virus. Electron microscopy suggested that aberrantly assembled virion protein had accumulated in cytoplasmic vesicular structures. Virions assembling at the cell membrane were observed but were rare. The entry of M-tropic JR.FL-pseudotyped reporter virus was moderately reduced in the murine cells, suggesting a minor reduction in coreceptor function. A small reduction in the abundance of full-length viral mRNA transcripts was also noted; however, the major block was at virion assembly. This could have been due to a failure of Gag to target to the cell membrane. This block must be overcome before a murine model for HIV-1 replication can be developed. PMID:10729160

  8. Molecular cloning of osteoma-inducing replication-competent murine leukemia viruses from the RFB osteoma virus stock.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, L; Behnisch, W; Schmidt, J; Luz, A; Pedersen, F S; Erfle, V; Strauss, P G

    1992-01-01

    We report the molecular cloning of two replication-competent osteoma-inducing murine leukemia viruses from the RFB osteoma virus stock (M. P. Finkel, C. A. Reilly, Jr., B. O. Biskis, and I. L. Greco, p. 353-366, in C. H. G. Price and F. G. M. Ross, ed., Bone--Certain Aspects of Neoplasia, 1973). Like the original RFB osteoma virus stock, viruses derived from the molecular RFB clones induced multiple osteomas in mice of the CBA/Ca strain. The cloned RFB viruses were indistinguishable by restriction enzyme analysis and by nucleotide sequence analysis of their long-terminal-repeat regions and showed close relatedness to the Akv murine leukemia virus. Images PMID:1326664

  9. Differential Susceptibility of Spleen Focus-Forming Virus and Murine Leukemia Viruses to Ansamycin Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Horoszewicz, Julius S.; Leong, Susan S.; Carter, William A.

    1977-01-01

    The streptovaricin complex (SvCx) and rifamycin SV derivatives display potent antiviral activity against the polycythemic strain of Friend leukemia virus (FV-P), as measured by a reduction in the number of spleen foci produced in mice. Such reductions may be explained by inactivation of functions of (i) the spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV), (ii) its “helper” murine leukemia virus (MuLV), or (iii) both viruses normally present in FV-P. We noted that preincubation of FV-P with fractionation products of SvCx, or derivatives of rifamycin SV, at low concentrations (3 to 5 μg/ml) reduces the number of spleen foci 80 to 97%, whereas titers of MuLV (from the same inoculum) remain unaffected (MuLV titers were measured by XC, S+L−, and “helper activity” assays). Our findings indicate a remarkable biological selectivity of ansamycins, as well as nonansamycin components of SvCx, against the transforming and defective spleen focus-forming virus as compared to MuLV. Thus, the drugs might be useful in distinguishing other types of oncornaviruses. PMID:18986

  10. Nearest-neighbor interactions of the major RNA tumor virus glycoprotein on murine cell surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, L J; Fox, C F; Jensen, F C; Elder, J H; Lerner, R A

    1978-01-01

    Formaldehyde-fixed Staphylococcus aureus and monospecific antiserum to gp70, the major envelope glycoprotein of murine leukemia virus, were used to immunoadsorb gp70 from Nonidet P40 extracts prepared from surface-radioiodinated murine cells. The labeled gp70 molecules in these cells were linked to a protein of approximately 15,000 daltons via native disulfide bonding. Prior treatment of cells with the reversible, bifunctional, crosslinking reagent dimethyl-3,3'-dithiobispropionimidate, followed by immunoadsorption and two-dimensional diagonal electrophoresis, revealed apparent homodimers and homotrimers of the 85,000-dalton complex. Identical treatment of purified type C RNA tumor virus from murine cells also revealed homodimeric and homotrimeric species, demonstrating similar self-associating tendencies of this glycoprotein in both intact virus and the plasma membrane of nonproducing murine cells. One cross-linked product consistently detected on the surfaces of murine cells was not present after crosslinking of a representative strain of murine leukemia virus. Images PMID:211503

  11. ANTIGENS OF LEUKEMIAS INDUCED BY NATURALLY OCCURRING MURINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS: THEIR RELATION TO THE ANTIGENS OF GROSS VIRUS AND OTHER MURINE LEUKEMIA VIRUSES

    PubMed Central

    Geering, Gayla; Old, Lloyd J.; Boyse, Edward A.

    1966-01-01

    Leukemias can be induced in W/Fu inbred rats by neonatal inoculation of normal thymus cells of C58 mice. These leukemias are not transplantable to C58 mice or to adult W/Fu rats, but they can be kept in passage in W/Fu rats aged 0 to 7 days. Adult W/Fu rats inoculated repeatedly with these isogenic leukemias produce cytotoxic and precipitating antibodies. These antisera are of particular value in the analysis of the antigens of leukemia cells and of leukemia viruses because their mode of preparation precludes the formation of antibody against any normal constituents of the cell. Analysis based on the cytotoxic test indicates the presence of 2 distinct cell surface antigens in leukemias induced by Passage A Gross virus or occurring spontaneously in mice of high-incidence strains. All leukemias and other tissues known to contain G (Gross) leukemia antigen have both determinants, but certain leukemias of low-incidence strains have only 1 of them and so were previously classified G-. Immunoprecipitation with these antisera reveals the presence of a cellular antigen common to G+ cells and absent from G- cells; the same antigen can be demonstrated in ether-treated Gross virus, but not in intact virus. This antigen is present also in ether-treated preparations of the Friend, Moloney, and Rauscher leukemia viruses, but not in Bittner (mammary tumor) virus. Thus it may be regarded as a group-specific antigen of murine leukemia viruses, in contrast to the type-specific cellular antigens demonstrable by the cytotoxic test. Four additional antigens associated with leukemias induced by wild-type Gross virus have been demonstrated by immunoprecipitation, but their relation to viral and cellular antigens has not been determined. PMID:4288480

  12. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus antibody response and viremia following highly active antiretroviral therapy in the Swiss HIV Cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Sheena G; Hirsch, Hans H; Franceschi, Silvia; Steffen, Ingrid; Amari, Emmanuelle Boffi El; Mueller, Nicolas J; Magkouras, Ioannis; Biggar, Robert J; Rickenbach, Martin; Clifford, Gary M

    2010-09-10

    To describe the effect of HAART on Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) antibody response and viremia among HIV-positive MSM. A follow-up study of 272 HIV-positive MSM (including 22 with Kaposi sarcoma) who first initiated HAART between January 1996 and July 2004 in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study. For each individual, two serum samples, one at HAART initiation and another 24 months later, were tested for latent and lytic KSHV antibodies using immunofluorescence assays, and for KSHV viremia using PCR. Factors associated with changes in KSHV antibody titers and viremia were evaluated. At HAART initiation, 69.1 and 75.0% of patients were seropositive to latent and lytic KSHV antibodies, respectively. Seropositivity was associated with the presence of Kaposi sarcoma, older age, lower CD8 cell count and higher CD4/CD8 ratio. Prevalence of KSHV viremia at HAART initiation was 6.4%, being significantly higher among patients with Kaposi sarcoma (35.0%), and those with HIV viral loads 100 000 copies/ml (11.7%) or higher. At 24-month follow-up, geometric mean titers (GMTs) among KSHV seropositive patients increased and antibody seroprevalence was higher. Having Kaposi sarcoma and/or CD4 cell counts less than 50 cells/microl at HAART initiation was associated both with higher probability for antibody titers to increase (including seroconversion) and larger increases in GMTs. Only one of 17 viremic patients at HAART initiation had viremia at 24-month follow-up. HAART increases KSHV-specific humoral immune response and clearance of viremia among HIV-infected MSM, consistent with the dramatic protection offered by HAART against Kaposi sarcoma.

  13. Biochemical Characterization of Rous Sarcoma Virus MA Protein Interaction with Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Amanda K.; Murray, Paul S.; Murray, Diana; Vogt, Volker M.

    2005-01-01

    The MA domain of retroviral Gag proteins mediates association with the host cell membrane during assembly. The biochemical nature of this interaction is not well understood. We have used an in vitro flotation assay to directly measure Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) MA-membrane interaction in the absence of host cell factors. The association of purified MA and MA-containing proteins with liposomes of defined composition was electrostatic in nature and depended upon the presence of a biologically relevant concentration of negatively charged lipids. A mutant MA protein known to be unable to promote Gag membrane association and budding in vivo failed to bind to liposomes. These results were supported by computational modeling. The intrinsic affinity of RSV MA for negatively charged membranes appears insufficient to promote efficient plasma membrane binding during assembly. However, an artificially dimerized form of MA bound to liposomes by at least an order of magnitude more tightly than monomeric MA. This result suggests that the clustering of MA domains, via Gag-Gag interactions during virus assembly, drives membrane association in vivo. PMID:15858007

  14. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize the transforming proteins of avian sarcoma viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Lipsich, L A; Lewis, A J; Brugge, J S

    1983-01-01

    Thirteen clones of hybrid cells which synthesize antibodies directed against the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) transforming protein, pp60src, were isolated. Mouse myeloma cells were fused with spleen cells from mice that had been immunized with purified pp60src from bacterial recombinants which direct the synthesis of the RSV src gene. The hybridomas which survived the selection medium were screened by immunoprecipitation of pp60src from 32P-labeled lysates of RSV-transformed cells. Monoclonal antibodies produced by subclones derived from 13 hybridomas recognized pp60src encoded by the Schmidt-Ruppin and Prague strains of RSV and the cellular homolog of pp60src. Antibody from clone 261 had a high affinity for the viral yes gene product, and antibodies from clones 443 and 463 recognized the transforming proteins encoded by viruses containing the related transforming genes fps and ros. Several other clones had a low affinity for the viral yes, fps, and ros gene products which could be detected by in vitro phosphorylation of the transforming proteins after immunoprecipitation with the monoclonal antibody. All of the monoclonal antibodies allowed phosphorylation of pp60src and casein in an immune complex-bound reaction. Images PMID:6312092

  15. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome complicated by multicentric castleman disease and kaposi sarcoma in a HIV-negative immunocompetent patient: an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bomi; Jeon, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Chul Woo

    2009-10-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus-8, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Kaposi sarcoma (KS), multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) of the plasma cell type, and primary effusion lymphoma. KSHV is rarely associated with the hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS), but when it does occur, it most occurs in immunocompromised patients. We report herein an unusual case of KSHV-associated HPS in an immunocompetent patient. A previously healthy 62-yr-old male was referred for evaluation of leukocytopenia and multiple lymphadenopathies. After a lymph node biopsy, he was diagnosed with MCD of the plasma cell type. KSHV DNA was detected in the lymph node tissue by polymerase chain reaction. Following a short-term response of the leukocytopenia to prednisolone, mental change, left side weakness, fever, thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and renal failure developed. Despite intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and plasmapheresis, he expired. The lymph nodes were infiltrated by hemophagocytic histiocytes in the sinuses. Pulmonary nodules and gastric erosions were shown to be KS. KSHV DNA was detected in the stomach, lung, and liver. This is the first case of multiple KSHV associated diseases including MCD and KS with KSHV-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in an HIV-negative, non-transplant, immunocompetent patient.

  16. Kaposi Sarcoma Herpes Virus-associated Hemophagocytic Syndrome Complicated by Multicentric Castleman Disease and Kaposi Sarcoma in a HIV-negative Immunocompetent Patient: An Autopsy Case

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bomi; Kim, Chul Woo

    2009-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus-8, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Kaposi sarcoma (KS), multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) of the plasma cell type, and primary effusion lymphoma. KSHV is rarely associated with the hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS), but when it does occur, it most occurs in immunocompromised patients. We report herein an unusual case of KSHV-associated HPS in an immunocompetent patient. A previously healthy 62-yr-old male was referred for evaluation of leukocytopenia and multiple lymphadenopathies. After a lymph node biopsy, he was diagnosed with MCD of the plasma cell type. KSHV DNA was detected in the lymph node tissue by polymerase chain reaction. Following a short-term response of the leukocytopenia to prednisolone, mental change, left side weakness, fever, thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, and renal failure developed. Despite intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and plasmapheresis, he expired. The lymph nodes were infiltrated by hemophagocytic histiocytes in the sinuses. Pulmonary nodules and gastric erosions were shown to be KS. KSHV DNA was detected in the stomach, lung, and liver. This is the first case of multiple KSHV associated diseases including MCD and KS with KSHV-associated hemophagocytic syndrome in an HIV-negative, non-transplant, immunocompetent patient. PMID:19795003

  17. An avian leukosis virus subgroup J isolate with a Rous sarcoma virus-like 5'-LTR shows enhanced replication capability.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanni; Guan, Xiaolu; Liu, Yongzhen; Li, Xiaofei; Yun, Bingling; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) was first isolated from meat-producing chickens that had developed myeloid leukosis. However, ALV-J infections associated with hemangiomas have occurred in egg-producing (layer) flocks in China. In this study, we identified an ALV-J layer isolate (HLJ13SH01) as a recombinant of ALV-J and a Rous sarcoma virus Schmidt-Ruppin B strain (RSV-SRB), which contained the RSV-SRB 5'-LTR and the other genes of ALV-J. Replication kinetic testing indicated that the HLJ13SH01 strain replicated faster than other ALV-J layer isolates in vitro. Sequence analysis indicated that the main difference between the two isolates was the 5'-LTR sequences, particularly the U3 sequences. A 19 nt insertion was uniquely found in the U3 region of the HLJ13SH01 strain. The results of a Dual-Glo luciferase assay revealed that the 19 nt insertion in the HLJ13SH01 strain increased the enhancer activity of the U3 region. Moreover, an additional CCAAT/enhancer element was found in the 19 nt insertion and the luciferase assay indicated that this element played a key role in increasing the enhancer activity of the 5'-U3 region. To confirm the potentiation effect of the 19 nt insertion and the CCAAT/enhancer element on virus replication, three infectious clones with 5'-U3 region variations were constructed and rescued. Replication kinetic testing of the rescued viruses demonstrated that the CCAAT/enhancer element in the 19 nt insertion enhanced the replication capacity of the ALV-J recombinant in vitro.

  18. Inducible nitric oxide synthase in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Oleszak, E L; Katsetos, C D; Kuzmak, J; Varadhachary, A

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection of susceptible (SJL) and resistant (C57BL/6 [B6]) strains of mice. TMEV is an excellent model of virus-induced demyelinating disease, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Previous studies of others have suggested that NO may play a role in the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. The presence and level of iNOS were determined in the brains and spinal cords of SJL and B6 TMEV-infected mice by the following methods: (i) PCR amplification of iNOS transcripts, followed by Southern blotting with an iNOS-specific probe, and (ii) immunohistochemical staining with an anti-iNOS-specific affinity-purified rabbit antibody. iNOS-specific transcripts were determined in the brains and spinal cord of both SJL and B6 TMEV-infected mice on days 0 (control), days 3, 6, and 10 (encephalitic stage of disease), and days 39 to 42, 66, and 180 (demyelinating phase) postinfection (p.i.). iNOS-specific transcripts were found in the brains and spinal cords of both SJL and B6 TMEV-infected mice at 6, 10, and 39 (SJL) days p.i., but they were absent in mock-infected mice and in TMEV-infected SJL and B6 mice at 0, 3, 66, and 180 days p.i. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the presence of iNOS protein in both TMEV-infected SJL and B6 mice at days 6 and 10 p.i., but not at days 0, 3, 66, and 180 days p.i. Weak iNOS staining was also observed in TMEV-infected SJL mice at 42 days p.i. iNOS-positive staining was found in reactive astrocytes surrounding areas of necrotizing inflammation, particularly in the midbrain. Weak iNOS staining was also observed in cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage in areas of parenchymal inflammation and necrosis (mesencephalon) and in leptomeningeal and white matter perivascular infiltrates of the spinal cord. Rod-shaped microglia-like cells and foamy macrophages (myelin-laden) were iNOS negative. These results suggest that NO does not

  19. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a γ retrovirus that has been associated with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and prostate cancer. The search for viral causes of these syndromes was reignited by the finding that RNase L activity was low in hereditary prostate cancer and some CFS patients. The six strains of XMRV that have been sequenced have greater than 99% identity, indicating a new human infection rather than laboratory contamination. DNA, RNA, and proteins from XMRV have been detected in 50% to 67% of CFS patients and in about 3.7% of healthy controls. XMRV infections could be transmitted to permissive cell lines from CFS plasma, suggesting the potential for communicable and blood-borne spread of the virus and potentially CFS. This troubling concept is currently under intense evaluation. The most important steps now are to independently confirm the initial findings; develop reliable assays of biomarkers; and to move on to investigations of XMRV pathophysiology and treatment in CFS, prostate cancer, and potentially other virus-related syndromes, if they exist. PMID:20425007

  20. Antiretroviral activities of protease inhibitors against murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus in tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Black, P L; Downs, M B; Lewis, M G; Ussery, M A; Dreyer, G B; Petteway, S R; Lambert, D M

    1993-01-01

    Rationally designed synthetic inhibitors of retroviral proteases inhibit the processing of viral polyproteins in cultures of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected T lymphocytes and, as a result, inhibit the infectivity of HIV-1 for such cultures. The ability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors to suppress replication of the C-type retrovirus Rauscher murine leukemia virus (R-MuLV) and the HIV-related lentivirus simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was examined in plaque reduction assays and syncytium reduction assays, respectively. Three of seven compounds examined blocked production of infectious R-MuLV, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of < or = 1 microM. Little or no cellular cytotoxicity was detectable at concentrations up to 100 microM. The same compounds which inhibited the infectivity of HIV-1 also produced activity against SIV and R-MuLV. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of many virions with atypical morphologies in cultures treated with the active compounds. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that the active compounds reduced the number of membrane-associated virus particles. These results demonstrate that synthetic peptide analog inhibitors of retroviral proteases significantly inhibit proteolytic processing of the gag polyproteins of R-MuLV and SIV and inhibit the replication of these retroviruses. These results are similar to those for inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity by these compounds, and thus, R-MuLV and SIV might be suitable models for the in vivo evaluation of the antiretroviral activities of these protease inhibitors.

  1. Antiretroviral activities of protease inhibitors against murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus in tissue culture.

    PubMed Central

    Black, P L; Downs, M B; Lewis, M G; Ussery, M A; Dreyer, G B; Petteway, S R; Lambert, D M

    1993-01-01

    Rationally designed synthetic inhibitors of retroviral proteases inhibit the processing of viral polyproteins in cultures of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected T lymphocytes and, as a result, inhibit the infectivity of HIV-1 for such cultures. The ability of HIV-1 protease inhibitors to suppress replication of the C-type retrovirus Rauscher murine leukemia virus (R-MuLV) and the HIV-related lentivirus simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) was examined in plaque reduction assays and syncytium reduction assays, respectively. Three of seven compounds examined blocked production of infectious R-MuLV, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of < or = 1 microM. Little or no cellular cytotoxicity was detectable at concentrations up to 100 microM. The same compounds which inhibited the infectivity of HIV-1 also produced activity against SIV and R-MuLV. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of many virions with atypical morphologies in cultures treated with the active compounds. Morphometric analysis demonstrated that the active compounds reduced the number of membrane-associated virus particles. These results demonstrate that synthetic peptide analog inhibitors of retroviral proteases significantly inhibit proteolytic processing of the gag polyproteins of R-MuLV and SIV and inhibit the replication of these retroviruses. These results are similar to those for inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity by these compounds, and thus, R-MuLV and SIV might be suitable models for the in vivo evaluation of the antiretroviral activities of these protease inhibitors. Images PMID:8381640

  2. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Agnihothram, Sudhakar S; Basco, Maria D S; Mullis, Lisa; Foley, Steven L; Hart, Mark E; Sung, Kidon; Azevedo, Marli P

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV). We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together.

  3. Comparative analysis of the transforming mechanisms of Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, and Herpesvirus saimiri.

    PubMed

    Damania, B; Jung, J U

    2001-01-01

    Members of the gamma herpesvirus family include the lymphocryptoviruses (gamma-1 herpesviruses) and the rhadinoviruses (gamma-2 herpesviruses). Gammaherpesvirinae uniformly establish long-term, latent, reactivatable infection of lymphocytes, and several members of the gamma herpesviruses are associated with lymphoproliferative diseases. Epstein-Barr virus is a lymphocryptovirus, whereas Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Herpesvirus saimiri are members of the rhadinovirus family. Genes encoded by these viruses are involved in a diverse array of cellular signaling pathways. This review attempts to cover our understanding of how viral proteins deregulate cellular signaling pathways that ultimately contribute to the conversion of normal cells to cancerous cells.

  4. Cell-free synthesis of two proteins unique to RNA of transforming virions of Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Kamine, J; Buchanan, J M

    1977-01-01

    We have utilized a reticulocyte lysate system to translate the 35S RNA of Rous sarcoma virus. Autoradiograms of the protein products separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels reveal a heterogeneous mixture of proteins of sizes ranging from 13,000 to 180,000 daltons. In comparing the translational products from 35S RNA of Prague B Rous sarcoma virus with those formed from the RNA of a transformation-defective deletion mutant derived from Prague B, we have found that two proteins, 25,000 and 18,000 daltons, are missing from the latter. Neither of these proteins is immunoprecipitated by monospecific antisera against the structural proteins of avian RNA tumor viruses. The combined atomic mass of 43,000 daltons corresponds to the amount of genetic coding capacity (40,000-50,000 daltons in terms of protein products) deleted from the RNA of the transformation-defective viruses. We propose that these proteins are coded for by the putative oncogene (onc) or sarc (src) gene and that one or both of them may be responsible for the oncogenic transformation caused by these viruses in infected cells. Images PMID:194246

  5. Isolation and Characterization of Mink Cell Focus-Inducing Murine Leukemia Viruses with Xenotropic Host Range from Mouse Strain SL

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Akio; Sakai, Koji; Ishimoto, Akinori

    1983-01-01

    A new type of mink cell focus-inducing virus was persistently isolated from the leukemic tissues of SL mice. In contrast to the dual tropic mink cell focus-inducing viruses reported to date, the new virus has the host range of the xenotropic murine leukemia virus. Analysis of RNase T1 fingerprints of genomic RNAs suggested that the mink cell focus-inducing virus with the xenotropic host range isolated from SL mice is a recombinant virus deriving from xenotropic murine leukemia virus. Images PMID:6296452

  6. Analysis of the src gene of sarcoma viruses generated by recombination between transformation-defective mutants and quail cellular sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L H; Moscovici, C; Karess, R E; Hanafusa, H

    1979-01-01

    Tumors were produced in quails about 2 months after injection with a transformation-defective mutant of the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus, subgroup A (SR-A), that retains a small portion of the src gene. Sarcoma viruses were isolated from each of five such tumors. A transformation-defective mutant which has a nearly complete deletion of the src gene was unable to induce tumors. The avian sarcoma viruses recovered from quail tumors (rASV-Q) had biological properties similar to those of the avian sarcoma viruses previously acquired from chicken tumors (rASV-C); these chicken tumors had been induced by the same transformation-defective mutants. Both rASV-Q and rASV-C transformed cells in culture with similar focus morphology and produced tumors within 7 to 14 days after injection into chickens or quails. The size of rASV-Q genomic RNA was indistinguishable from that of SR-A by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The sequences of rASV-Q RNA genomes were analyzed and compared with those of the parental transformation-defective virus, SR-A and of rASV-C by RNase T1 fingerprinting and oligonucleotide mapping. We found that the src sequences of all five isolates of rASV-Q were identical to each other but different from those of SR-A and rASV-C. Of 13 oligonucleotides of rASV-Q identified as src specific, two were not found in either SR-A or rASV-C RNA. Furthermore, some oligonucleotides present in SR-A or rASV-C or both were absent in rASV-Q. No differences were found for the sequences outside the src region in any of the viruses examined. In addition, rASV-Q-infected cells possessed a 60,000-dalton protein specifically precipitable by rabbit serum raised against SR-D-induced tumors. The facts that the src sequences are essentially the same for rASV's recovered from one animal species and different for rASV's obtained from different species provide conclusive evidence that cellular sequences of normal birds were inserted into the viral genome and supplied to

  7. Simian sarcoma virus-encoded gag-related protein: in vitro cleavage by Friend leukemia virus-associated proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Hafenrichter, R; Thiel, H J

    1985-05-01

    The simian sarcoma virus (SSV) encodes a gag-related 65,000-Da protein (SSV p65) which is not processed in SSV nonproducer cells (SSV-NP cells) (H.-J. Thiel, T. J. Matthews, E. M. Broughton, K. J. Weinhold, D. P. Bolognesi, T. Graf, and H. Beug (1981a), Virology 114, 124-131). In order to cleave SSV p65, retroviral particles containing this antigen were incubated with extracts from the heterologous helper virus Friend leukemia virus (FLV). Superinfection of SSV-NP cells by FLV has been previously shown to result in processing of SSV p65 in vivo (H.-J. Thiel, F. Weiland, R. Hafenrichter, T. J. Matthews, and K. J. Weinhold (1982), Virology 123, 229-234). In vitro cleavage was most efficient in the presence of a nonionic detergent (greater than 0.1% Nonidet-P40) and a reducing agent (greater than 5 mM dithiothreitol) at a pH of 7.0. The products, termed SSV p55 (p15, p12, p30), SSV p30, SSV p25 (p15, p12), and SSV p10, were characterized by (1) molecular weight, (2) kinetics experiments, (3) incorporation of different radiolabeled amino acids, and (4) comparison with SSAV structural proteins. Kinetics experiments with two amino acids ([3H]leucine, [35S]cysteine) revealed that initial processing of SSV p65 produced SSV p55 and SSV p10, with subsequent processing of SSV p55 occurring thereafter. In contrast to the Moloney system, the major intermediate p40 (p30, p10) could not be clearly demonstrated. A direct comparison of SSAV p10 and the cleavage product SSV p10 by SDS-PAGE suggests that SSAV pr65gag and SSV p65 differ slightly by molecular weight.

  8. Tissue selectivity of murine leukemia virus infection is determined by long terminal repeat sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, C A; Haseltine, W A; Lenz, J; Ruprecht, R; Cloyd, M W

    1985-01-01

    Here we show that the tissue specificity of murine retrovirus infections is determined by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of an otherwise isogenic set of viruses. The isogenic viruses used for this study contain the coding gag, pol, and env genes of the avirulent Akv virus. Recombinant viruses that contain the LTR of a virus that induces T-cell leukemia lymphoma preferentially infect T lymphocytes. Viruses that carry the LTR of a virus that induces erythroleukemia preferentially infect non-T lymphoblastoid cell lines in the marrow and spleen. The Akv virus itself displays no tissue preference for hematopoietic cells. These experiments suggest that retroviruses that carry appropriate enhancer-promoters can be used to infect selectively specific target cells in animals. PMID:2991605

  9. The Kaposi's-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus orf35 gene product is required for efficient lytic virus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Bergson, Shir; Itzhak, Inbal; Wasserman, Talya; Gelgor, Anastasia; Kalt, Inna; Sarid, Ronit

    2016-12-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is implicated in the etiology of several human malignancies. KSHV open reading frame (orf) 35 encodes a conserved gammaherpesvirus protein with an, as yet, unknown function. Employing the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) system, we generated a recombinant viral clone that fails to express ORF35 (BAC16-ORF35-stop) but preserves intact adjacent and overlapping reading frames. Using this construct, we studied the role of this previously uncharacterized gene product during lytic reactivation of KSHV. Upon lytic reactivation, the ORF35-stop recombinant virus displayed significantly reduced lytic viral gene expression, viral DNA replication, and progeny virus production as compared to control wild-type virus. Exogenous expression of ORF35-Flag reversed the effects of ORF35 deficiency. These results demonstrate that ORF35 is important for efficient lytic virus reactivation.

  10. The structure and function of the rous sarcoma virus RNA stability element.

    PubMed

    Withers, Johanna B; Beemon, Karen L

    2011-11-01

    For simple retroviruses, such as the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), post-transcriptional control elements regulate viral RNA splicing, export, stability, and packaging into virions. These RNA sequences interact with cellular host proteins to regulate and facilitate productive viral infections. One such element, known as the RSV stability element (RSE), is required for maintaining stability of the full-length unspliced RNA. This viral RNA serves as the mRNA for the Gag and Pol proteins and also as the genome packaged in progeny virions. When the RSE is deleted from the viral RNA, the unspliced RNA becomes unstable and is degraded in a Upf1-dependent manner. Current evidence suggests that the RSE inhibits recognition of the viral gag termination codon by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. We believe that the RSE acts as an insulator to NMD, thereby preventing at least one of the required functional steps that target an mRNA for degradation. Here, we discuss the history of the RSE and the current model of how the RSE is interacting with cellular NMD factors. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. GROWTH REGULATION IN ROUS SARCOMA VIRUS INFECTED CHICKEN EMBRYO FIBROBLASTS: THE ROLE OF THE src GENE

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, G.; Bartholomew, J.A.; Blssell, M.J.

    1980-07-01

    We report here a study of the mechanisms leading to loss of growth control in chicken embryo fibroblasts transformed by Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). We have been particularly concerned with the role of the src gene in this process, and have used RSV mutants temperature sensitive (ts) for transformation to investigate the nature of the growth regulatory lesion. The two principal findings were (1) the stationary phase of the cell cycle (G{sub 1}) in chick embryo fibroblasts seems to have two distinct regulatory compartments (using the terminology of Brooks et al. we refer to these as 'Q' and 'A' states). When rendered stationary at 41.5 C by serum deprivation, normal cells enter a Q state, but cells infected with the ts-mutant occupy an A state. (2) Whereas normal cells can occupy either state depending on culture conditions, the ts-infected cells, at 41.5 C, do not seem to enter Q even though a known src gene product, a kinase, is reported to be inactive at this temperature. We discuss the possibility that viral factors other than the active src protein kinase influence growth control in infected cultures.

  12. Nonsense codons within the Rous sarcoma virus gag gene decrease the stability of unspliced viral RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, G F; Beemon, K

    1991-01-01

    The intracellular accumulation of the unspliced RNA of Rous sarcoma virus was decreased when translation was prematurely terminated by the introduction of nonsense codons within its 5' proximal gene, the gag gene. In contrast, the levels of spliced viral RNAs were not affected in our transient expression assays in chicken cells. Experiments using the transcription inhibitor dactinomycin showed that mutant unspliced RNAs were degraded more rapidly than wild-type RNA. Furthermore, mutant RNAs could be partially stabilized by coexpression of wild-type gag proteins in trans; however, intact gag proteins were not required to maintain the stability of RNAs which did not contain premature termination codons. Thus, termination codons seemed to destabilize the RNA not because of their effect on gag protein function but instead because they disrupted the process of translating the gag region of the RNA. Analysis of double-mutant constructs containing both deletions and termination codons within the gag gene also suggested that the stability of the unspliced RNA was affected by a cis-acting interaction between the RNA and ribosomes. Images PMID:1850103

  13. Structural Characterization of the Rous Sarcoma Virus RNA Stability Element▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Jason E.; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Beemon, Karen L.

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, an mRNA bearing a premature termination codon (PTC) or an abnormally long 3′ untranslated region (UTR) is often degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. Despite the presence of a 5- to 7-kb 3′ UTR, unspliced retroviral RNA escapes this degradation. We previously identified the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) stability element (RSE), an RNA element downstream of the gag natural translation termination codon that prevents degradation of the unspliced viral RNA. Insertion of this element downstream of a PTC in the RSV gag gene also inhibits NMD. Using partial RNase digestion and selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) chemistry, we determined the secondary structure of this element. Incorporating RNase and SHAPE data into structural prediction programs definitively shows that the RSE contains an AU-rich stretch of about 30 single-stranded nucleotides near the 5′ end and two substantial stem-loop structures. The overall secondary structure of the RSE appears to be conserved among 20 different avian retroviruses. The structural aspects of this element will serve as a tool in the future design of cis mutants in addressing the mechanism of stabilization. PMID:19091866

  14. Mediation of wound-related Rous sarcoma virus tumorigenesis by TFG (transforming growth factor)-. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sieweke, M.H.; Bissell, M.J. ); Thompson, N.L.; Sporn, M.B. )

    1990-06-29

    In Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-infected chickens, wounding leads to tumor formation with nearly 100% frequency in tissues that would otherwise remain tumor-free. Identifying molecular mediators of this phenomenon should yield important clues to the mechanisms involved in RSV tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that TGF-{beta} is present locally shortly after wounding, but not in unwounded controls. In addition, subcutaneous administration of recombinant transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) could substitute completely for wounding in tumor induction. A treatment protocol of four doses of 800 nanograms of TGF-{beta} resulted in v-src-expressing tumors with 100% frequency; four doses of only 10 nanograms still led to tumor formation in 80% of the animals. This effect was specific, as other growth factors with suggested roles in would healing did not elicit the same response. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) or TGF-{alpha} had no effect, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) yielded only occasional tumors after longer latency. TGF-{beta} release during the would-healing response may thus be a critical event that creates a conducive environment for RSV tumorigenesis and may act as a cofactor for transformation in this system. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Mutational analysis of the subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus putative fusion peptide domain.

    PubMed

    Balliet, J W; Gendron, K; Bates, P

    2000-04-01

    Short hydrophobic regions referred to as fusion peptide domains (FPDs) at or near the amino terminus of the membrane-anchoring subunit of viral glycoproteins are believed to insert into the host membrane during the initial stage of enveloped viral entry. Avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses (ASLV) are unusual among retroviruses in that the region in the envelope glycoprotein (EnvA) proposed to be the FPD is internal and contains a centrally located proline residue. To begin analyzing the function of this region of EnvA, 20 substitution mutations were introduced into the putative FPD. The mutant envelope glycoproteins were evaluated for effects on virion incorporation, receptor binding, and infection. Interestingly, most of the single-substitution mutations had little effect on any of these processes. In contrast, a bulky hydrophobic substitution for the central proline reduced viral titers 15-fold without affecting virion incorporation or receptor binding, whereas substitution of glycine for the proline had only a nominal effect on EnvA function. Similar to other viral FPDs, the putative ASLV FPD has been modeled as an amphipathic helix where most of the bulky hydrophobic residues form a patch on one face of the helix. A series of alanine insertion mutations designed to interrupt the hydrophobic patch on the helix had differential effects on infectivity, and the results of that analysis together with the results observed with the substitution mutations suggest no correlation between maintenance of the hydrophobic patch and glycoprotein function.

  16. Clinical activity of lenalidomide in visceral human immunodeficiency virus-related Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Steff, Maud; Joly, Véronique; Di Lucca, Julie; Feldman, Judith; Burg, Samuel; Sarda-Mantel, Laure; Peytavin, Gilles; Marinho, Eduardo; Crickx, Béatrice; Raymond, Eric; Lariven, Sylvie; Maubec, Eve

    2013-11-01

    Curative treatment of aggressive Kaposi sarcoma (KS) with conventional chemotherapy in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients remains difficult. The administration of thalidomide, an immunomodulatory drug with antiangiogenic effects, is limited by its toxicity. This engenders interest in evaluating thalidomide analogues such as lenalidomide with better toxicity profiles. To our knowledge, we describe for the first time a patient with visceral KS successfully treated with lenalidomide. A man with advanced visceral HIV-related KS progressing after 11 months of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and 2 lines of conventional chemotherapy (pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and docetaxel) was treated with lenalidomide on a compassionate use basis. He showed a rapid partial response without any substantial adverse effect but experienced relapse after 5 months of treatment, in a context of virologic failure. Similar to our observation, good partial response without toxic effects has been reported in 3 patients with only skin involvement. Because immune reconstitution syndrome may occur in HIV-infected patients with KS undergoing HAART, KS improvement may be partly explained by immune recovery. An ongoing US phase 1/2 trial will better evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of lenalidomide in patients with HIV-related KS with and without visceral involvement.

  17. The Structure and Function of the Rous Sarcoma virus RNA Stability Element

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Johanna B.; Beemon, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    For simple retroviruses, such as the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), post-transcriptional control elements regulate viral RNA splicing, export, stability, and packaging into virions. These RNA sequences interact with cellular host proteins to regulate and facilitate productive viral infections. One such element, known as the RSV stability element (RSE), is required for maintaining stability of the full-length unspliced RNA. This viral RNA serves as the mRNA for the Gag and Pol proteins and also as the genome packaged in progeny virions. When the RSE is deleted from the viral RNA, the unspliced RNA becomes unstable and is degraded in a Upf1-dependent manner. Current evidence suggests that the RSE inhibits recognition of the viral gag termination codon by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. We believe that the RSE acts as an insulator to NMD, thereby preventing at least one of the required functional steps that target an mRNA for degradation. Here, we discuss the history of the RSE and the current model of how the RSE is interacting with cellular NMD factors. PMID:21769913

  18. Biochemical, inhibition and inhibitor resistance studies of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Ndongwe, Tanyaradzwa P.; Adedeji, Adeyemi O.; Michailidis, Eleftherios; Ong, Yee Tsuey; Hachiya, Atsuko; Marchand, Bruno; Ryan, Emily M.; Rai, Devendra K.; Kirby, Karen A.; Whatley, Angela S.; Burke, Donald H.; Johnson, Marc; Ding, Shilei; Zheng, Yi-Min; Liu, Shan-Lu; Kodama, Ei-Ichi; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A.; Pathak, Vinay K.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Parniak, Michael A.; Singh, Kamalendra; Sarafianos, Stefan G.

    2012-01-01

    We report key mechanistic differences between the reverse transcriptases (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) and of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), a gammaretrovirus that can infect human cells. Steady and pre-steady state kinetics demonstrated that XMRV RT is significantly less efficient in DNA synthesis and in unblocking chain-terminated primers. Surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the gammaretroviral enzyme has a remarkably higher dissociation rate (koff) from DNA, which also results in lower processivity than HIV-1 RT. Transient kinetics of mismatch incorporation revealed that XMRV RT has higher fidelity than HIV-1 RT. We identified RNA aptamers that potently inhibit XMRV, but not HIV-1 RT. XMRV RT is highly susceptible to some nucleoside RT inhibitors, including Translocation Deficient RT inhibitors, but not to non-nucleoside RT inhibitors. We demonstrated that XMRV RT mutants K103R and Q190M, which are equivalent to HIV-1 mutants that are resistant to tenofovir (K65R) and AZT (Q151M), are also resistant to the respective drugs, suggesting that XMRV can acquire resistance to these compounds through the decreased incorporation mechanism reported in HIV-1. PMID:21908397

  19. Structural and biochemical characterization of the inhibitor complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Matúz, Krisztina; Tözsér, Jozsef; Namwong, Sirilak; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-10-23

    Interactions between the protease (PR) encoded by the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus and a number of potential inhibitors have been investigated by biochemical and structural techniques. It was observed that several inhibitors used clinically against HIV PR exhibit nanomolar or even subnanomolar values of K{sub i}, depending on the exact experimental conditions. Both TL-3, a universal inhibitor of retroviral PRs, and some inhibitors originally shown to inhibit plasmepsins were also quite potent, whereas inhibition by pepstatin A was considerably weaker. Crystal structures of the complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus PR with TL-3, amprenavir and pepstatin A were solved at high resolution and compared with the structures of complexes of these inhibitors with other retropepsins. Whereas TL-3 and amprenavir bound in a predictable manner, spanning the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, two molecules of pepstatin A bound simultaneously in an unprecedented manner, leaving the catalytic water molecule in place.

  20. Structural Model of the Tubular Assembly of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Capsid Protein.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jaekyun; Qiao, Xin; Hung, Ivan; Mitra, Alok K; Desfosses, Ambroise; Huang, Daniel; Gor'kov, Peter L; Craven, Rebecca C; Kingston, Richard L; Gan, Zhehong; Zhu, Fangqiang; Chen, Bo

    2017-02-08

    The orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA) assembles into polymorphic capsids, whose architecture, assembly, and stability are still being investigated. The N-terminal and C-terminal domains of CA (NTD and CTD, respectively) engage in both homotypic and heterotypic interactions to create the capsid. Hexameric turrets formed by the NTD decorate the majority of the capsid surface. We report nearly complete solid-state NMR (ssNMR) resonance assignments of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA, assembled into hexamer tubes that mimic the authentic capsid. The ssNMR assignments show that, upon assembly, large conformational changes occur in loops connecting helices, as well as the short 310 helix initiating the CTD. The interdomain linker becomes statically disordered. Combining constraints from ssNMR and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we establish an atomic resolution model of the RSV CA tubular assembly using molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) simulations. On the basis of comparison of this MDFF model with an earlier-derived crystallographic model for the planar assembly, the induction of curvature into the RSV CA hexamer lattice arises predominantly from reconfiguration of the NTD-CTD and CTD trimer interfaces. The CTD dimer and CTD trimer interfaces are also intrinsically variable. Hence, deformation of the CA hexamer lattice results from the variable displacement of the CTDs that surround each hexameric turret. Pervasive H-bonding is found at all interdomain interfaces, which may contribute to their malleability. Finally, we find helices at the interfaces of HIV and RSV CA assemblies have very different contact angles, which may reflect differences in the capsid assembly pathway for these viruses.

  1. An assembly domain of the Rous sarcoma virus Gag protein required late in budding.

    PubMed Central

    Wills, J W; Cameron, C E; Wilson, C B; Xiang, Y; Bennett, R P; Leis, J

    1994-01-01

    The Gag protein of Rous sarcoma virus has the ability to direct particle assembly at the plasma membrane in the absence of all the other virus-encoded components. An extensive deletion analysis has revealed that very large regions of this protein can be deleted without impairing budding and has suggested that the essential functions map to three discrete regions. In the studies reported here, we establish the location of assembly domain 2 (AD2) within the proline-rich p2b sequence of this Gag protein. AD2 mutants lacking the p2b sequence were completely defective for particle release even though their Gag proteins were tightly associated with the membrane fraction and exhibited high levels of protease activity. Mutations that inactivate the viral protease did not restore budding to wild-type levels for these mutants, indicating that the defect is not due simply to a loss of protease regulation. AD2 mutants could be rescued into dense particles in genetic complementation assays, indicating that their defect is not due to a gross alteration of the overall conformation of the protein and that the assembly function is not needed on every Gag molecule in the population. Several mutants with amino acid substitutions in the p2b sequence were found to have an intermediate capacity for budding. Inactivation of the protease of these mutants stabilized the Gag polyprotein within the cells and allowed an increase in particle release; however, the rate of budding remained slow. We favor the idea that AD2 is a dynamic region of movement, perhaps serving as a molecular hinge to allow the particle to emerge from the surface of the cell during budding. Images PMID:8083996

  2. EWS/FLI-l peptide-pulsed dendritic cells induces the antitumor immunity in a murine Ewing's sarcoma cell model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Huang, Xunwu; Yang, Dazhi

    2014-08-01

    An increasing number of T-cell epitopes derived from various tumor-associated antigens have been reported, and they proved to play significant roles for tumor rejection both in vivo and in vitro. Over 85% of Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFTs) express tumor-specific chimeric protein EWS/FLI-1, making it an attractive target for therapeutic cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. Here, we identified a novel peptide epitope derived from the EWS/FLI-1 protein and demonstrated that effectors induced by the peptide could specifically secrete IFN-γ and lyse the tumor cell line of EWS/FLI-1-positive and HLA-matched cells. In addition, mice treated with dendritic cells pulsed with the EWS/FLI-1 epitope were able to reject a lethal tumor inoculation of the Ewing's sarcoma A673 cells. Therefore, these data provide evidence for the use of the EWS/FLI-l peptide epitope in T cell-based immunotherapeutic concepts against Ewing's sarcoma cell in vitro and in vivo.

  3. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Ayako; Okamura, Hideyasu; Morishita, Ryo; Matsunaga, Satoko; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kodaki, Tsutomu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Ryo, Akihide; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protease (PR) of XMR virus (XMRV) was successfully synthesized with cell-free system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interface of XMRV PR with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), was identified with NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is induced for two PR protomers in the APV:PR = 1:2 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is transmitted even to distant regions from the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-range transmission of structural change may be utilized for drug discovery. -- Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially {sup 15}N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting's method, with which the amino acid types of the [{sup 1}H, {sup 15}N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) . A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR = 1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR has

  4. Second-Site Suppressors of Rous Sarcoma Virus CA Mutations: Evidence for Interdomain Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bowzard, J. Bradford; Wills, John W.; Craven, Rebecca C.

    2001-01-01

    The capsid (CA) protein, the major structural component of retroviruses, forms a shell that encases the ribonucleoprotein complex in the virion core. The most conserved region of CA, ∼20 amino acids of the major homology region (MHR), lies within the carboxy-terminal domain of the protein. Structural and sequence similarities among CA proteins of retroviruses and the CA-like proteins of hepatitis B virus and various retrotransposons suggest that the MHR is involved in an aspect of replication common to these reverse-transcribing elements. Conservative substitutions in this region of the Rous sarcoma virus protein were lethal due to a severe deficiency in reverse transcription, in spite of the presence of an intact genome and active reverse transcriptase in the particles. This finding suggests that the mutations interfered with normal interactions among these constituents. A total of four genetic suppressors of three lethal MHR mutations have now been identified. All four map to the sequence encoding the CA-spacer peptide (SP) region of Gag. The F167Y mutation in the MHR was fully suppressed by a single amino acid change in the alpha helix immediately downstream of the MHR, a region that forms the major dimer interface in human immunodeficiency virus CA. This finding suggests that the F167Y mutation indirectly interfered with dimerization. The F167Y defect could also be repaired by a second, independent suppressor in the C-terminal SP that was removed from CA during maturation. This single residue change, which increased the rate of SP cleavage, apparently corrected the F167Y defect by modifying the maturation pathway. More surprising was the isolation of suppressors of the R170Q and L171V MHR mutations, which mapped to the N-terminal domain of the CA protein. This finding suggests that the two domains, which in the monomeric protein are separated by a flexible linker, must communicate with each other at some unidentified point in the viral replication cycle. PMID

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Clone pKV(37-1)

    PubMed Central

    Libbey, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome encoded by the pKV(37-1) clone was sequenced to completion. The regulatory region harbored a mutation not previously reported. The protein coding regions (large and small T antigens, viral proteins 1 to 3) showed multiple regions of high amino acid identity to the human, simian, and bovine polyomaviruses. PMID:27198030

  6. Therapeutic effects of garenoxacin in murine experimental secondary pneumonia by Streptococcus pneumoniae after influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Yoshiko; Furuya, Yuri; Nozaki, Yusuke; Takahata, Masahiro; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Mitsuyama, Junichi

    2014-02-01

    In a pneumococcal pneumonia murine model following influenza virus infection, garenoxacin was more effective than other fluoroquinolones and demonstrated high levels of bacterial eradication in the lung, low mortality, and potent histopathological improvements. Garenoxacin could potentially be used for the treatment of secondary pneumococcal pneumonia following influenza.

  7. Genome Sequences of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Detected in Wild House Mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Nicole; Moens, Ugo; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2016-01-21

    Using generic PCR, we identified a variant of murine pneumotropic virus (MptV) (family Polyomaviridae) in 3 wild house mice (Mus musculus). The fully amplified and sequenced genomes display considerable differences from the MptV genomes published previously and enlighten us on the natural diversity of rodent polyomaviruses.

  8. Origin of pathogenic determinants of recombinant murine leukemia viruses: analysis of Bxv-1-related xenotropic viruses from CWD mice.

    PubMed Central

    Massey, A C; Coppola, M A; Thomas, C Y

    1990-01-01

    The acquisition of U3 region sequences derived from the endogenous xenotropic provirus Bxv-1 appears to be an important step in the generation of leukemogenic recombinant viruses in AKR, HRS, C58, and some CWD mice. We report here that each of three CWD lymphomas produced infectious xenotropic murine leukemia virus related to Bxv-1. In Southern blot experiments, these proviruses hybridized to probes that were specific for the xenotropic envelope and Bxv-1 U3 region sequences. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a cloned CWD xenotropic provirus, CWM-S-5X, revealed that the envelope gene was closely related to but distinct from those of other known xenotropic viruses. In addition, the U3 region of CWM-S-5X contained a viral enhancer sequence that was identical to that found in MCF 247, a recombinant AKR virus that is thought to contain the Bxv-1 enhancer. Finally, restriction enzyme sites in the CWM-S-5X provirus were analogous to those reported within Bxv-1. These results establish that the virus progeny of Bxv-1 have the potential to donate pathogenic enhancer sequences to recombinant polytropic murine leukemia viruses. Interestingly, the three CWD polytropic viruses that were isolated from the same tumor cells that produced the Bxv-1-like viruses had not incorporated Bxv-1 sequences into the U3 region. Images PMID:2170683

  9. Genes determining the course of virus persistence in the liver: lessons from murine infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus.

    PubMed

    Lang, Philipp A; Recher, Mike; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Karl S

    2010-01-01

    More than 500 million people worldwide are persistently infected with either hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV). Although both viruses are poorly cytopathic, persistent infection causes severe immunopathologic damage to liver tissue; histologically, such damage is characterized by fatty liver disease, liver fibrosis, and a higher likelihood of hepatocellular carcinoma. Virus-specific CD8+ T cells play a crucial role during infection with hepatitis viruses. On the one hand, rapid activation of CD8+ T cells can control the virus and therefore inhibit its persistence. On the other hand, once the virus persists in the liver, the chronic activation of virus-specific T cells leads to continued liver cell damage. This double-edged role of CD8+ T cells determines the final outcome of infection. In half of cases of human HCV infection, the virus persists; in the other half, the virus is controlled. Additional insights into the molecular mechanisms that determine the course of the disease may be gained from the study of appropriate murine models. This review discusses the similarities and differences between infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) in mice and chronic infection with hepatitis virus in humans.

  10. Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, Keith R.; Diem, Kurt; Huang, Meei-Li; Selke, Stacy; Corey, Lawrence; Buchwald, Dedra

    2011-01-01

    A recent report suggested an association between xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). If confirmed, this would suggest that antiretroviral therapy might benefit patients suffering from CFS. We validated a set of assays for XMRV, and evaluated the prevalence of XMRV in a cohort of monozygotic twins discordant for CFS. Stored PBMC were tested with 3 separate PCR assays (one of which was nested) for XMRV DNA, and serum/plasma was tested for XMRV RNA by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. None of the PBMC samples from the twins with CFS or their unaffected co-twins were positive for XMRV, by any of the assays. One plasma sample, from an unaffected co-twin, was reproducibly positive by RT-PCR. However, serum from the same day was negative, as was a followup plasma sample obtained 2 days after the positive specimen. These data do not support an association of XMRV with CFS. PMID:21795004

  11. Characterization of Moloney murine leukaemia virus/avian myeloblastosis virus chimeric reverse transcriptases.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Mizuno, Masaki; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2009-03-01

    Reverse transcriptases (RTs) from Moloney murine leukaemia virus (MMLV) and avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) contain all the fingers, palm, thumb, connection and RNase H domains. The fingers, palm and thumb domains are thought to be involved in the reverse transcription activity, and the RNase H domain is in the RNase H activity. In this study, we characterized four chimeric RTs which comprise one of the fingers, palm, thumb and RNase H domains originated from AMV RT and the other three and connection domains originated from MMLV RT. Unexpectedly, all chimeric RTs exhibited the same characteristics: their specific reverse transcription activities decreased to less than 0.1% of that of MMLV RT, while their specific RNase H activities were approximately 20% of that of MMLV RT. The decreases in the two activities of the chimeric RTs were ascribed to the decreases in k(cat). Based on that the reverse transcription activity of MMLV RT was impaired by substituting its RNase H domain with that from AMV RT, we propose that in MMLV RT, there might be an interaction between the fingers/palm/thumb domain and the RNase H domain.

  12. Immunological responsiveness against tumors induced by avian sarcoma virus: reduced expression of pp60src kinase activity in regressing tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, L; Grisé-Miron, L; Wainberg, M A

    1985-01-01

    Tumors which are induced in chickens by avian sarcoma virus frequently grow progressively for several weeks and then regress. We showed that tumor cells which are derived from the progressively growing phase of tumor growth produce large quantities of progeny-transforming virus, are reactive with antiviral antibody, and are susceptible to lysis in cell-mediated cytotoxicity assays by splenic lymphocytes of sensitized hosts. In contrast, tumor cells derived from regressing sarcomas are poor producers of progeny virus and are relatively unreactive with both antiviral antibody and sensitized lymphocytes. We further found that pp60src kinase activity was reduced by about 75% in regressing compared with progressively growing tumor cells. The half-lives of directly precipitable pp60src in tumor cells derived from progressively growing and regressing neoplasms were 6 and 1.5 h, respectively. Studies on each of three other cellular enzymes did not reveal any regression-associated decreases in enzyme activity. These data support the notion that expression of adequate levels of long-lived pp60src kinase activity is essential to progressive tumor growth. Images PMID:2579245

  13. Cellular and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus microRNAs in sepsis and surgical trauma

    PubMed Central

    Tudor, S; Giza, D E; Lin, H Y; Fabris, L; Yoshiaki, K; D'Abundo, L; Toale, K M; Shimizu, M; Ferracin, M; Challagundla, K B; Angelica Cortez, M; Fuentes-Mattei, E; Tulbure, D; Gonzalez, C; Henderson, J; Row, M; Rice, T W; Ivan, C; Negrini, M; Fabbri, M; Morris, J S; Yeung, S-C J; Vasilescu, C; Calin, G A

    2014-01-01

    Once a patient is in septic shock, survival rates drop by 7.6% for every hour of delay in antibiotic therapy. Biomarkers based on the molecular mechanism of sepsis are important for timely diagnosis and triage. Here, we study the potential roles of a panel of cellular and viral miRNAs as sepsis biomarkers. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling in leukocytes from septic patients and nonseptic controls, combined with quantitative RT-PCR in plasmas from two cohorts of septic patients, two cohorts of nonseptic surgical patients and healthy volunteers. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, miRNA transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation were used to study the effects of Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) miRNAs on interleukin's secretion. Differences related to sepsis etiology were noted for plasma levels of 10 cellular and 2 KSHV miRNAs (miR-K-10b and miR-K-12-12*) between septic and nonseptic patients. All the sepsis groups had high KSHV miRNAs levels compared with controls; Afro-American patients had higher levels of KSHV-miR-K12-12* than non-Afro-American patients. Both KSHV miRNAs were increased on postoperative day 1, but returned to baseline on day 7; they acted as direct agonists of Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8), which might explain the increased secretion of the IL-6 and IL-10. Cellular and KSHV miRNAs are differentially expressed in sepsis and early postsurgical patients and may be exploited for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Increased miR-K-10b and miR-K12-12* are functionally involved in sepsis as agonists of TLR8, forming a positive feedback that may lead to cytokine dysregulation. PMID:25476907

  14. trans-Acting Inhibition of Genomic RNA Dimerization by Rous Sarcoma Virus Matrix Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Garbitt, Rachel A.; Albert, Jessica A.; Kessler, Michelle D.; Parent, Leslie J.

    2001-01-01

    The genomic RNA of retroviruses exists within the virion as a noncovalently linked dimer. Previously, we identified a mutant of the viral matrix (MA) protein of Rous sarcoma virus that disrupts viral RNA dimerization. This mutant, Myr1E, is modified at the N terminus of MA by the addition of 10 amino acids from the Src protein, resulting in the production of particles containing monomeric RNA. Dimerization is reestablished by a single amino acid substitution that abolishes myristylation (Myr1E−). To distinguish between cis and trans effects involving Myr1E, additional mutations were generated. In Myr1E.cc and Myr1E−.cc, different nucleotides were utilized to encode the same protein as Myr1E and Myr1E−, respectively. The alterations in RNA sequence did not change the properties of the viral mutants. Myr1E.ATG− was constructed so that translation began at the gag AUG, resulting in synthesis of the wild-type Gag protein but maintenance of the src RNA sequence. This mutant had normal infectivity and dimeric RNA, indicating that the src sequence did not prevent dimer formation. All of the src-containing RNA sequences formed dimers in vitro. Examination of MA-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins revealed that the wild-type and mutant MA proteins Myr1E.ATG−, Myr1E−, and Myr1E−.cc had distinctly different patterns of subcellular localization compared with Myr1E and Myr1E.cc MA proteins. This finding suggests that proper localization of the MA protein may be required for RNA dimer formation and infectivity. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the genomic RNA dimerization defect is due to a trans-acting effect of the mutant MA proteins. PMID:11119596

  15. Molecular mechanics calculations on Rous sarcoma virus protease with peptide substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, I. T.; Harrison, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular models of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) protease and 20 peptide substrates with single amino acid substitutions at positions from P4 to P3', where the scissile bond is between P1 and P1'. were built and compared with kinetic measurements. The unsubstituted peptide substrate. Pro-Ala-Val-Ser-Leu-Ala-Met-Thr, represents the NC-PR cleavage site of RSV protease. Models were built of two intermediates in the catalytic reaction, RSV protease with peptide substrate and with the tetrahedral intermediate. The energy minimization used an algorithm that increased the speed and eliminated a cutoff for nonbonded interactions. The calculated protease-substrate interaction energies showed correlation with the relative catalytic efficiency of peptide hydrolysis. The calculated interaction energies for the 8 RSV protease-substrate models with changes in P1 to P1' next to the scissile bond gave the highest correlation coefficient of 0.79 with the kinetic measurements, whereas all 20 substrates showed the lower, but still significant correlation of 0.46. Models of the tetrahedral reaction intermediates gave a correlation of 0.72 for the 8 substrates with changes next to the scissile bond, whereas a correlation coefficient of only 0.34 was observed for all 20 substrates. The differences between the energies calculated for the tetrahedral intermediate and the bound peptide gave the most significant correlation coefficients of 0.90 for models with changes in P1 and P1', and 0.56 for all substrates. These results are compared to those from similar calculations on HIV-1 protease and discussed in relation to the rate-limiting steps in the catalytic mechanism and the entropic contributions. PMID:9385639

  16. Effect of Multimerization on Membrane Association of Rous Sarcoma Virus and HIV-1 Matrix Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Robert A.; Kamynina, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In most retroviruses, plasma membrane (PM) association of the Gag structural protein is a critical step in viral assembly, relying in part on interaction between the highly basic Gag MA domain and the negatively charged inner leaflet of the PM. Assembly is thought to begin with Gag dimerization followed by multimerization, resulting in a hexameric lattice. To directly address the role of multimerization in membrane binding, we fused the MA domains of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and HIV-1 to the chemically inducible dimerization domain FK506-binding protein (FKBP) or to the hexameric protein CcmK4 from cyanobacteria. The cellular localization of the resulting green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged chimeric proteins was examined by fluorescence imaging, and the association of the proteins with liposomes was quantified by flotation in sucrose gradients, following synthesis in a reticulocyte extract or as purified proteins. Four lipid compositions were tested, representative of liposomes commonly reported in flotation experiments. By themselves, GFP-tagged RSV and HIV-1 MA proteins were largely cytoplasmic, but both hexamerized proteins were highly concentrated at the PM. Dimerization led to partial PM localization for HIV-1 MA. These in vivo effects of multimerization were reproduced in vitro. In flotation analyses, the intact RSV and HIV-1 Gag proteins were more similar to multimerized MA than to monomeric MA. RNA is reported to compete with acidic liposomes for HIV-1 Gag binding, and thus we also examined the effects of RNase treatment or tRNA addition on flotation. tRNA competed with liposomes in the case of some but not all lipid compositions and ionic strengths. Taken together, our results further underpin the model that multimerization is critical for PM association of retroviral Gag proteins. In addition, they suggest that the modulation of membrane binding by RNA, as previously reported for HIV-1, may not hold for RSV. PMID:24109216

  17. Cellular and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus microRNAs in sepsis and surgical trauma.

    PubMed

    Tudor, S; Giza, D E; Lin, H Y; Fabris, L; Yoshiaki, K; D'Abundo, L; Toale, K M; Shimizu, M; Ferracin, M; Challagundla, K B; Cortez, M Angelica; Fuentes-Mattei, E; Tulbure, D; Gonzalez, C; Henderson, J; Row, M; Rice, T W; Ivan, C; Negrini, M; Fabbri, M; Morris, J S; Yeung, S-C J; Vasilescu, C; Calin, G A

    2014-12-04

    Once a patient is in septic shock, survival rates drop by 7.6% for every hour of delay in antibiotic therapy. Biomarkers based on the molecular mechanism of sepsis are important for timely diagnosis and triage. Here, we study the potential roles of a panel of cellular and viral miRNAs as sepsis biomarkers. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling in leukocytes from septic patients and nonseptic controls, combined with quantitative RT-PCR in plasmas from two cohorts of septic patients, two cohorts of nonseptic surgical patients and healthy volunteers. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, miRNA transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation were used to study the effects of Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) miRNAs on interleukin's secretion. Differences related to sepsis etiology were noted for plasma levels of 10 cellular and 2 KSHV miRNAs (miR-K-10b and miR-K-12-12*) between septic and nonseptic patients. All the sepsis groups had high KSHV miRNAs levels compared with controls; Afro-American patients had higher levels of KSHV-miR-K12-12* than non-Afro-American patients. Both KSHV miRNAs were increased on postoperative day 1, but returned to baseline on day 7; they acted as direct agonists of Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8), which might explain the increased secretion of the IL-6 and IL-10. Cellular and KSHV miRNAs are differentially expressed in sepsis and early postsurgical patients and may be exploited for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Increased miR-K-10b and miR-K12-12* are functionally involved in sepsis as agonists of TLR8, forming a positive feedback that may lead to cytokine dysregulation.

  18. Large-scale purification of gp70 from Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Pyle, S W; Chabot, D J; Miller, T L; Serabyn, S A; Bess, J W; Arthur, L O

    1991-05-01

    The external envelope glycoprotein, gp70, of the Moloney murine leukemia virus was extracted from NIH 3T3 cells utilizing the detergent n-octyl-beta-D-glycopyranoside. The extracted gp70 was sequentially purified utilizing lectin-affinity, anion-exchange, and molecular-exclusion chromatography techniques. Approximately 10 mg of gp70 was purified by this method and shown to be 95% homogeneous, as assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The presence of purified gp70 from Moloney murine leukemia virus was confirmed by amino acid analysis, amino-terminal sequencing, and immunoreactivity with a monoclonal antibody raised against gp70. The procedure is rapid, utilizes commercially available media, and can be used to purify large amounts of retroviral envelope glycoprotein from virus.

  19. Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, Robert A.; Datta, Siddhartha A. K.; Nanda, Hirsh; Fang, Xianyang; Wen, Yi; Barros, Marilia; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan; Vogt, Volker M.; Sundquist, W. I.

    2016-05-06

    Previously, no retroviral Gag protein has been highly purified in milligram quantities and in a biologically relevant and active form. We have purified Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag protein and in parallel several truncation mutants of Gag and have studied their biophysical properties and membrane interactionsin vitro. RSV Gag is unusual in that it is not naturally myristoylated. From its ability to assemble into virus-like particlesin vitro, we infer that RSV Gag is biologically active. By size exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering, Gag in solution appears extended and flexible, in contrast to previous reports on unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag, which is compact. However, by neutron reflectometry measurements of RSV Gag bound to a supported bilayer, the protein appears to adopt a more compact, folded-over conformation. At physiological ionic strength, purified Gag binds strongly to liposomes containing acidic lipids. This interaction is stimulated by physiological levels of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and by cholesterol. However, unlike HIV-1 Gag, RSV Gag shows no sensitivity to acyl chain saturation. In contrast with full-length RSV Gag, the purified MA domain of Gag binds to liposomes only weakly. Similarly, both an N-terminally truncated version of Gag that is missing the MA domain and a C-terminally truncated version that is missing the NC domain bind only weakly. These results imply that NC contributes to membrane interactionin vitro, either by directly contacting acidic lipids or by promoting Gag multimerization.

    Retroviruses like HIV assemble at and bud from the plasma membrane of cells. Assembly requires the interaction between thousands of Gag molecules to form a lattice. Previous work indicated that lattice formation at the plasma membrane is influenced by the conformation of monomeric HIV. We have extended this work to the more tractable RSV Gag. Our

  20. Mapping RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides of avian tumor virus RNAs: sarcoma-specific oligonucleotides are near the poly(A) end and oligonucleotides common to sarcoma and transformation-defective viruses are at the poly(A) end.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L H; Duesberg, P; Beemon, K; Vogt, P K

    1975-01-01

    The large RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides of the nondefective (nd) Rous sarcoma virus (RSV): Prague RSV of subgroup B (PR-B), PR-C and B77 of subgroup C; of their transformation-defective (td0 deletion mutants: td PR-B, td PR-C, and td B77; and of replication-defective (rd) RSV(-) were completely or partially mapped on the 30 to 40S viral RNAs. The location of a given oligonucleotide relative to the poly(A) terminus of the viral RNAs was directly deduced from the smallest size of the poly(A)-tagged RNA fragment from which it could be isolated. Identification of distinct oligonucleotides was based on their location in the electrophoretic/chromatographic fingerprint pattern and on analysis of their RNase A-resistant fragments. The following results were obtained. (i) The number of large oligonucleotides per poly(A)-tagged ffagment increased with increasing size of the fragment. This implies that the genetic map is linear and that a given RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides has, relative to the poly(A) end, the same location on all 30 to 40S RNA subunits of a given 60 to 70S viral RNA complex, (ii) Three sarcoma-specific oligonucleotides were identified in the RNAs of Pr-B, PR-C and B77 by comparison with the RNAs of the corresponding td viruses... Images PMID:170411

  1. Action of temperature-sensitive mutants of myeloproliferative sarcoma virus suggests that fibroblast-transforming and hematopoietic transforming viral properties are related.

    PubMed

    Ostertag, W; Freshney, M; Vehmeyer, K; Jasmin, C; Rutter, G

    1984-01-01

    The myeloproliferative sarcoma virus is molecularly related to the Moloney sarcoma virus (Pragnell et al., J. Virol. 38:952-957, 1981), but causes both fibroblast transformation in vitro and leukemic changes--including spleen focus formation--in adult mice. The fibroblast transforming properties of myeloproliferative sarcoma virus were used to select viral temperature-sensitive mutants at 39.5 degrees C, the nonpermissive temperature. These mutants are temperature sensitive in the maintenance of the transformed state. This was also shown by cytoskeletal changes of the infected cells at permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. Viruses released from cells maintained at both the permissive and nonpermissive temperature are temperature sensitive in fibroblast transformation functions. All temperature-sensitive mutants show only a low reversion rate to wild-type transforming function. The myeloproliferative sarcoma virus temperature-sensitive mutants are inefficient in causing leukemic transformation (spleen enlargement, focus formation) in mice at the normal temperature. A method to maintain a low body temperature (33 to 34 degrees C) in mice is described. One temperature-sensitive mutant was checked at low body temperature and did not induce leukemia. These data thus indicate that the same or related viral functions are responsible for hematopoietic and fibroblast transformation.

  2. Action of temperature-sensitive mutants of myeloproliferative sarcoma virus suggests that fibroblast-transforming and hematopoietic transforming viral properties are related.

    PubMed Central

    Ostertag, W; Freshney, M; Vehmeyer, K; Jasmin, C; Rutter, G

    1984-01-01

    The myeloproliferative sarcoma virus is molecularly related to the Moloney sarcoma virus (Pragnell et al., J. Virol. 38:952-957, 1981), but causes both fibroblast transformation in vitro and leukemic changes--including spleen focus formation--in adult mice. The fibroblast transforming properties of myeloproliferative sarcoma virus were used to select viral temperature-sensitive mutants at 39.5 degrees C, the nonpermissive temperature. These mutants are temperature sensitive in the maintenance of the transformed state. This was also shown by cytoskeletal changes of the infected cells at permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. Viruses released from cells maintained at both the permissive and nonpermissive temperature are temperature sensitive in fibroblast transformation functions. All temperature-sensitive mutants show only a low reversion rate to wild-type transforming function. The myeloproliferative sarcoma virus temperature-sensitive mutants are inefficient in causing leukemic transformation (spleen enlargement, focus formation) in mice at the normal temperature. A method to maintain a low body temperature (33 to 34 degrees C) in mice is described. One temperature-sensitive mutant was checked at low body temperature and did not induce leukemia. These data thus indicate that the same or related viral functions are responsible for hematopoietic and fibroblast transformation. Images PMID:6537818

  3. In Vitro Synthesis of Rous Sarcoma Virus-Specific RNA is Catalyzed by a DNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Rymo, L.; Parsons, J. T.; Coffin, J. M.; Weissmann, C.

    1974-01-01

    Synthesis of Rous sarcoma virus RNA was examined in vitro with a new assay for radioactive virus-specific RNA. Nuclei from infected and uninfected cells were incubated with ribonucleoside [α-32P]triphosphates, Mn++, Mg++ and (NH4)2SO4. Incorporation into total and viral RNA proceeded with similar kinetics for up to 25 min at 37°. About 0.5% of the RNA synthesized by the infected system was scored as virus-specific, compared to 0.03% of the RNA from the uninfected system and 0.005% of the RNA synthesized by monkey kidney cell nuclei. Preincubation with DNase or actinomycin D completely suppressed total and virus-specific RNA synthesis. α-Amanitin, a specific inhibitor of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II, completely inhibited virus-specific RNA synthesis, while reducing total RNA synthesis by only 50%. We conclude that tumor virus-specific RNA is synthesized on a DNA template, most probably by the host's RNA polymerase II. PMID:4368801

  4. 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase expression in a murine virus-induced myeloproliferative syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marcovistz, R; Le Bousse-Kerdiles, M C; Maillere, B; Smadja-Joffe, F; Poirrier, V; Jasmin, C

    1991-11-01

    The myeloproliferative sarcoma virus (MPSV) infection in DBA/2 mice leads to important quantitative and qualitative changes in their hemopoiesis. These findings suggest a disturbance in the production and action of a certain hemopoietic factor similar to IL3. Here, we show that the level of the 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20 alpha-SDH) expression, which can be induced by IL3, is dramatically increased in spleen and thymus of MPSV-infected mice. Our results suggest that quantification of 20 alpha-SDH activity can be used to indicate abnormal production of a growth factor similar to IL3 in hemopoietic system diseases.

  5. In vitro expanded bone marrow-derived murine (C57Bl/KaLwRij) mesenchymal stem cells can acquire CD34 expression and induce sarcoma formation in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Song; De Becker, Ann; De Raeve, Hendrik; Van Camp, Ben; Vanderkerken, Karin; Van Riet, Ivan

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Murine MSCs can undergo spontaneously malignant transformation and form sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acquisition of CD34 is a transformation type for MSCs into sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch/Hh/Wnt pathways are related to the malignant phenotype of transformed MSCs. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have currently generated numerous interests in pre-clinical and clinical applications due to their multiple lineages differentiation potential and immunomodulary effects. However, accumulating evidence indicates that MSCs, especially murine MSCs (mMSCs), can undergo spontaneous transformation after long-term in vitro culturing, which might reduce the therapeutic application possibilities of these stem cells. In the present study, we observed that in vitro expanded bone marrow (BM) derived mMSCs from the C57Bl/KaLwRij mouse strain can lose their specific stem cells markers (CD90 and CD105) and acquire CD34 expression, accompanied with an altered morphology and an impaired tri-lineages differentiation capacity. Compared to normal mMSCs, these transformed mMSCs exhibited an increased proliferation rate, an enhanced colony formation and migration ability as well as a higher sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs. Transformed mMSCs were highly tumorigenic in vivo, resulting in aggressive sarcoma formation when transplanted in non-immunocompromised mice. Furthermore, we found that Notch signaling downstream genes (hey1, hey2 and heyL) were significantly upregulated in transformed mMSCs, while Hedgehog signaling downstream genes Gli1 and Ptch1 and the Wnt signaling downstream gene beta-catenin were all decreased. Taken together, we observed that murine in vitro expanded BM-MSCs can transform into CD34 expressing cells that induce sarcoma formation in vivo. We assume that dysregulation of the Notch(+)/Hh(-)/Wnt(-) signaling pathway is associated with the malignant phenotype of the transformed mMSCs.

  6. RNA-binding properties of the matrix protein (p19gag) of avian sarcoma and leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Steeg, C M; Vogt, V M

    1990-01-01

    We have reinvestigated the ability of the matrix protein (MA) (p19gag) of avian sarcoma and leukemia viruses to interact with RNA. Previous reports claimed on the one hand that MA can bind tightly and with a high degree of specificity to avian sarcoma and leukemia virus RNA in vitro and on the other that it cannot bind to RNA at all. We found that MA purified by any of several methods does bind to RNA, as measured by its ability to cause retention of radioactive RNA on nitrocellulose membranes in a filtration assay. However, this interaction is weak and lacks specificity. The interaction of MA with RNA was barely detectable by classical sedimentation analysis, and from this observation we estimate that the intrinsic MA-RNA association constant is ca. 10(3) M-1, at least 3 orders of magnitude smaller than the constant describing the interaction of the viral nucleocapsid protein (NC) (p12gag) with RNA, ca. 10(6) M-1. Separately purified phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated MA species bound RNA equally. We also found that MA can bind to DNA with an affinity similar to that for RNA. The large quantitative discrepancy between our results and earlier published reports can be traced in part to methods of data analysis. Images PMID:2153248

  7. Restoration of immune surface molecules in Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus infected cells by lenalidomide and pomalidomide.

    PubMed

    Davis, David A; Mishra, Suraj; Anagho, Holda A; Aisabor, Ashley I; Shrestha, Prabha; Wang, Victoria; Takamatsu, Yuki; Maeda, Kenji; Mitsuya, Hiroaki; Zeldis, Jerome B; Yarchoan, Robert

    2017-08-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the cause of several tumors, including Kaposi sarcoma and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). Most viruses have evolved means of escaping immune recognition. KSHV downregulates MHC-I expression during lytic infection, and expression of ICAM-1 and B7-2 (CD86) during latent infection, allowing evasion of T cell and natural killer immunity respectively. These effects are largely mediated by two KSHV-encoded proteins, K3 and K5. We show here that lenalidomide (Len) and pomalidomide (Pom) prevent down-regulation of MHC-I during lytic activation, and restore ICAM-1 and B7-2 surface expression in latently infected PEL cells. Importantly, these changes occurred at clinically achievable concentrations and prior to any cytotoxic effects. Exploration of the mechanism revealed that Pom blocked lytic down-regulation of MHC-I induced by transfection with K3 but not K5. Although Pom alone did not significantly increase HLA mRNA expression in PEL cells, it did blunt the butyrate-induced decrease in MHC-I mRNA expression and decreased the upregulation of K3 mRNA in lytic cells. Virus-induced tumors express foreign antigens, but immunotherapy can be thwarted by viral strategies to evade immune recognition. The effects of Pom and Len described here can prevent these strategies and support the use of these drugs to treat KSHV-induced tumors.

  8. Cytocidal effects of misonidazole, Ro 03-8799, and RSU-1164 on euoxic and hypoxic BP-8 murine sarcoma cells at normal and elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Hofer, K G; Lakkis, M; Hofer, M G

    1989-04-15

    Euoxic and hypoxic BP-8 murine sarcoma cells were exposed for up to 3 hours to various concentrations of three nitroimidazole derivatives (misonidazole, Ro 03-8799, RSU-1164) at normal or elevated incubation temperatures. Cell survival was monitored with the iodine 125 (125I)-iododeoxyuridine prelabeling assay. When cell lethality was evaluated as a function of drug molarity, the three nitroimidazoles displayed widely different toxicities, but when expressed in terms of toxicity ratio between euoxic and hypoxic cells, all three drugs showed nearly identical toxicity differentials of 16 to 18 in 1-hour drug incubation experiments. Prolonging the treatment period to 3 hours did not change the euoxic/hypoxic toxicity ratio for misonidazole and Ro 03-8799, but with RSU-1164 the toxicity ratio was increased significantly from 16 (1 hour) to 73 (3 hours). This increase was attributed to the bifunctional action of RSU-1164 as a combined electron-affinic and alkylating agent, with the alkylation component of cell killing becoming more pronounced after prolonged drug incubation under hypoxic conditions. Combined administration of hyperthermia and nitroimidazoles increased drug-induced cell lethality for all three agents, but did not materially change the relative toxicity differential between euoxic and hypoxic cells. In short, based on cellular toxicity data, Ro 03-8799 appears to offer no advantage over misonidazole as a selective cytocidal agent for hypoxic cells, but RSU-1164 does provide a moderate therapeutic advantage.

  9. Deoxyribonucleic Acid Polymerase of Rous Sarcoma Virus: Reaction Conditions and Analysis of the Reaction Product Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, D. H. L.; Ruprecht, Ruth; Simpson, R. W.; Spiegelman, S.

    1971-01-01

    Reaction conditions for Rous sarcoma virus ribonucleic acid (RNA)-instructed deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymerase activity are described whereby the viral RNA is relatively protected from endogenous or added nuclease activity. Three analyses of reaction product nucleic acids (3H-RNA, 32P-DNA) were compared, namely, gel electrophoresis, Cs2SO4 gradient centrifugation, and hydroxyapatite column chromatography. It was found that hydroxyapatite analysis could be misleading unless the state of the template RNA was monitored concomitantly with the DNA analysis. Gel electrophoresis and Cs2SO4 gradient centrifugation gave comparable results. It was concluded that analyses of the product of reverse transcriptase reactions should not only refer to the template RNA and product DNA species, but also be performed with virus or viral RNA which do not have or obtain nicks in the 60S RNA. Otherwise, interpretation of the results would have the ambiguity of potential artifacts caused by those degraded RNA molecules. PMID:4332143

  10. Intracerebral hemorrhages and syncytium formation induced by endothelial cell infection with a murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Park, B H; Lavi, E; Blank, K J; Gaulton, G N

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of endothelial cell damage that lead to cerebral hemorrhage are not completely understood. In this study, a cloned murine retrovirus, TR1.3, that uniformly induced stroke in neonatal BALB/c mice is described. Restriction digest mapping suggests that TR1.3 is part of the Friend murine leukemia virus (FMuLV) family. However, unlike mice exposed to other FMuLVs, mice infected with TR1.3 virus developed tremors and seizures within 8 to 18 days postinoculation. This was uniformly followed by paralysis and death within 1 to 2 days. Postmortem examination of TR1.3-inoculated mice revealed edematous brain tissue with large areas of intracerebral hemorrhage. Histologic analysis revealed prominent small vessel pathology including syncytium formation of endothelial cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of frozen brain sections using double fluorescence staining demonstrated that TR1.3 virus specifically infected small vessel endothelial cells. Although infection of vessel endothelial cells was detected in several organs, only brain endothelial cells displayed viral infection associated with hemorrhage. The primary determinant of TR1.3-induced neuropathogenicity was found to reside within a 3.0-kb fragment containing the 3' end of the pol gene, the env gene, and the U3 region of the long terminal repeat. The restricted tropism and acute pathogenicity of this cloned murine retrovirus provide a model for studying virus-induced stroke and for elucidating the mechanisms involved in syncytium formation by retroviruses in vivo. Images PMID:8396666

  11. Ewing sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    Bone cancer - Ewing sarcoma; Ewing family of tumors; Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET); Bone neoplasm - Ewing sarcoma ... Ewing sarcoma can occur anytime during childhood and young adulthood. But it usually develops during puberty, when bones ...

  12. Ludwik Gross, Sarah Stewart, and the 1950s discoveries of Gross murine leukemia virus and polyoma virus.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Gregory J

    2014-12-01

    The Polish-American scientist Ludwik Gross made two important discoveries in the early 1950s. He showed that two viruses - murine leukemia virus and parotid tumor virus - could cause cancer when they were injected into susceptible animals. At first, Gross's discoveries were greeted with skepticism: it seemed implausible that viruses could cause a disease as complex as cancer. Inspired by Gross's initial experiments, similar results were obtained by Sarah Stewart and Bernice Eddy who later renamed the parotid tumor virus SE polyoma virus after finding it could cause many different types of tumors in mice, hamsters, and rats. Eventually the "SE" was dropped and virologists adopted the name "polyoma virus." After Gross's work was published, additional viruses capable of causing solid tumors or blood-borne tumors in mice were described by Arnold Graffi, Charlotte Friend, John Moloney and others. By 1961, sufficient data had been accumulated for Gross to confidently publish an extensive monograph--Oncogenic Viruses--the first history of tumor virology, which became a standard reference work and marked the emergence of tumor virology as a distinct, legitimate field of study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma as the initial presentation of human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Tasnim F.; Al-Khateeb, Ziyaad; Jung, Jin; Peters, Stephen; Dever, Lisa L.

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually presents in HIV-infected patients with cutaneous lesions that may advance to extensive visceral disease. There have been only a few documented cases in which the initial presentation of Kaposi's sarcoma involved the bronchopulmonary system. We describe a newly diagnosed patient who presented with pulmonary KS as his initial presentation of the disease. Our report is intended to increase clinicians’ awareness that pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma should be considered in HIV-infected patients who present with respiratory symptoms, even if they do not manifest the typical mucocutaneous manifestations of KS or have low CD4 counts. Early diagnosis and therapy are essential in improving outcomes as this condition carries a high mortality. PMID:26839780

  14. Pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma as the initial presentation of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Imran, Tasnim F; Al-Khateeb, Ziyaad; Jung, Jin; Peters, Stephen; Dever, Lisa L

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually presents in HIV-infected patients with cutaneous lesions that may advance to extensive visceral disease. There have been only a few documented cases in which the initial presentation of Kaposi's sarcoma involved the bronchopulmonary system. We describe a newly diagnosed patient who presented with pulmonary KS as his initial presentation of the disease. Our report is intended to increase clinicians' awareness that pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma should be considered in HIV-infected patients who present with respiratory symptoms, even if they do not manifest the typical mucocutaneous manifestations of KS or have low CD4 counts. Early diagnosis and therapy are essential in improving outcomes as this condition carries a high mortality.

  15. Intronic deletions of tva receptor gene decrease the susceptibility to infection by subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The group of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) in chickens contains six highly related subgroups, A to E and J. Four genetic loci, tva, tvb, tvc and tvj, encode for corresponding receptors that determine the susceptibility to the ASLV subgroups. The prevalence of ASLV in hosts may have imposed...

  16. Generation of glucocorticoid-responsive Moloney murine leukemia virus by insertion of regulatory sequences from murine mammary tumor virus into the long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Overhauser, J; Fan, H

    1985-01-01

    The glucocorticoid-regulatory sequences from the murine mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR) were introduced into the LTR of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) by recombinant DNA techniques. The site of insertion was in the M-MuLV LTR U3 region at -150 base pairs with respect to the RNA cap site. Infectious M-MuLVs carrying the altered LTRs (Mo + MMTV M-MuLVs) were recovered by transfection of proviral clones into NIH-3T3 cells. The Mo + MMTV M-MuLVs were hormonally responsive in that infection was 3 logs more efficient when performed in the presence of dexamethasone, irrespective of the orientation of the inserted MMTV sequences. However, even in the presence of hormone, the Mo + MMTV M-MuLVs were less infectious than wild-type M-MuLV. In contrast to the large effect on infectivity, dexamethasone induced virus-specific RNA levels in chronically Mo + MMTV M-MuLV-infected cells only two- to fourfold. Fusion plasmids between the altered LTRs and the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene allowed the investigation of LTR promoter strength by the transient chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression assay. The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays indicated that the insertion of MMTV sequences into the M-MuLV LTR reduced promoter activity in the absence of glucocorticoids but that promoter activity could be induced two- to fivefold by dexamethasone. The Mo + MMTV M-MuLVs were also tested for the possibility that viral DNA synthesis or integration during initial infection was enhanced by dexamethasone. However, no significant difference was detected between cultures infected in the presence or absence of hormone. The insertion of MMTV sequences into an M-MuLV LTR deleted of its enhancer sequences did not yield infectious virus or active promoters, even in the presence of dexamethasone. Images PMID:2983110

  17. Angiogenesis inhibition using an oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing endostatin in a murine lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Jonathan M; Schmitt, Anthony D; McGinn, Christopher M; Fuchs, Bryan C; Kuruppu, Darshini; Tanabe, Kenneth K; Lanuti, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Herpes-mediated viral oncolysis alone is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors. In this study we used a replication conditional, endostatin-expressing herpes simplex virus-1 mutant (HSV-Endo) in a murine lung cancer model. We hypothesized that the anti-angiogenic action of endostatin would improve upon the oncolytic effect of HSV-1. HSV-Endo was evaluated in a pulmonary metastases and orthotopic flank model, where there was significantly less tumor burden and reduced microvessel density compared to a control virus. Endostatin expression appears to improve the anti-tumor effect of HSV-1 in a lung cancer model.

  18. Defective virus is associated with induction of murine retrovirus-induced immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, S K; Morse, H C; Makino, M; Ruscetti, S K; Hartley, J W

    1989-01-01

    C57BL/6 mice infected with a mixture of murine leukemia viruses (MuLV) develop a syndrome characterized by lymphoproliferation and profound immunodeficiency. Analyses of this viral mixture (LP-BM5 MuLV) showed that it includes replication-competent ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing MuLV and defective viruses with genome sizes of 3.8-6.5 kilobases. The ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing MuLV biologically cloned from the mixture did not induce disease, whereas viral preparations containing the ecotropic MuLV and 4.8-kilobase defective virus were active. Cells producing the 4.8-kilobase defective virus expressed an unusual gag-encoded polyprotein of Mr 60,000. Images PMID:2542949

  19. Mouse thymic necrosis virus: a novel murine lymphotropic agent.

    PubMed

    Morse, S S

    1987-12-01

    Mouse thymic necrosis virus (TA), one of two naturally occurring herpesviruses in laboratory mice, was first described in 1961. TA has received relatively little attention even though the virus has been isolated independently from various mouse colonies. This neglect is probably due, at least in part, to the lack of suitable cell culture systems. This review summarizes current knowledge concerning thymic necrosis virus, including new results from the author's laboratory. In vivo, TA causes massive thymic necrosis in newborn mice, with temporary ablation of thymocyte precursors for most T lymphocyte classes except T suppressor cells. All strains of laboratory mice appear susceptible. Severe immunosuppression has been demonstrated in acutely infected mice. Most infected animals survive and shed TA chronically from salivary glands and possibly other glandular tissues. In adult mice, primary infection results in persistent salivary gland infection without overt thymic lesions. Infection appears lifelong, with few clinical signs, but possible effects of chronic TA infection on immune function have been studied little. Recent evidence from the author's laboratory suggests that chronic infection may involve T lymphocytes. The name mouse T lymphotropic virus (abbreviation MTLV) is proposed.

  20. Alternate Polypurine Tracts (PPTs) Affect the Rous Sarcoma Virus RNase H Cleavage Specificity and Reveal a Preferential Cleavage following a GA Dinucleotide Sequence at the PPT-U3 Junction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kevin W.; Julias, John G.; Alvord, W. Gregory; Oh, Jangsuk; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2005-01-01

    Retroviral polypurine tracts (PPTs) serve as primers for plus-strand DNA synthesis during reverse transcription. The generation and removal of the PPT primer requires specific cleavages by the RNase H activity of reverse transcriptases; removal of the PPT primer defines the left end of the linear viral DNA. We replaced the endogenous PPT from RSVP(A)Z, a replication-competent shuttle vector based on Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), with alternate retroviral PPTs and the duck hepatitis B virus “PPT.” Viruses in which the endogenous RSV PPT was replaced with alternate PPTs had lower relative titers than the wild-type virus. 2-LTR circle junction analysis showed that the alternate PPTs caused significant decreases in the fraction of viral DNAs with complete (consensus) ends and significant increases in the insertion of part or all of the PPT at the 2-LTR circle junctions. The last two nucleotides in the 3′ end of the RSV PPT are GA. Examination of the (mis)cleavages of the alternate PPTs revealed preferential cleavages after GA dinucleotide sequences. Replacement of the terminal 3′ A of the RSV PPT with G caused a preferential miscleavage at a GA sequence spanning the PPT-U3 boundary, resulting in the deletion of the terminal adenine normally present at the 5′ end of the U3. A reciprocal G-to-A substitution at the 3′ end of the murine leukemia virus PPT increased the relative titer of the chimeric RSV-based virus and the fraction of consensus 2-LTR circle junctions. PMID:16227289

  1. Alternate polypurine tracts (PPTs) affect the rous sarcoma virus RNase H cleavage specificity and reveal a preferential cleavage following a GA dinucleotide sequence at the PPT-U3 junction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kevin W; Julias, John G; Alvord, W Gregory; Oh, Jangsuk; Hughes, Stephen H

    2005-11-01

    Retroviral polypurine tracts (PPTs) serve as primers for plus-strand DNA synthesis during reverse transcription. The generation and removal of the PPT primer requires specific cleavages by the RNase H activity of reverse transcriptases; removal of the PPT primer defines the left end of the linear viral DNA. We replaced the endogenous PPT from RSVP(A)Z, a replication-competent shuttle vector based on Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), with alternate retroviral PPTs and the duck hepatitis B virus "PPT." Viruses in which the endogenous RSV PPT was replaced with alternate PPTs had lower relative titers than the wild-type virus. 2-LTR circle junction analysis showed that the alternate PPTs caused significant decreases in the fraction of viral DNAs with complete (consensus) ends and significant increases in the insertion of part or all of the PPT at the 2-LTR circle junctions. The last two nucleotides in the 3' end of the RSV PPT are GA. Examination of the (mis)cleavages of the alternate PPTs revealed preferential cleavages after GA dinucleotide sequences. Replacement of the terminal 3' A of the RSV PPT with G caused a preferential miscleavage at a GA sequence spanning the PPT-U3 boundary, resulting in the deletion of the terminal adenine normally present at the 5' end of the U3. A reciprocal G-to-A substitution at the 3' end of the murine leukemia virus PPT increased the relative titer of the chimeric RSV-based virus and the fraction of consensus 2-LTR circle junctions.

  2. Isolated limb perfusion with melphalan, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and oncolytic vaccinia virus improves tumour targeting and prolongs survival in a rat model of advanced extremity sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Pencavel, Tim D; Wilkinson, Michelle J; Mansfield, David C; Khan, Aadil A; Seth, Rohit; Karapanagiotou, Eleni M; Roulstone, Victoria; Aguilar, Richard J; Chen, Nanhai G; Szalay, Aladar A; Hayes, Andrew J; Harrington, Kevin J

    2015-02-15

    Isolated limb perfusion (ILP) is a treatment for advanced extremity sarcoma and in-transit melanoma. Advancing this procedure by investigating the addition of novel agents, such as cancer-selective oncolytic viruses, may improve both the therapeutic efficacy of ILP and the tumour-targeted delivery of oncolytic virotherapy. Standard in vitro assays were used to characterise single agent and combinatorial activities of melphalan, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Lister strain vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68) against BN175 rat sarcoma cells. An orthotopic model of advanced extremity sarcoma was used to evaluate survival of animals after ILP with combinations of TNF-α, melphalan and GLV-1h68. We investigated the efficiency of viral tumour delivery by ILP compared to intravenous therapy, the locoregional and systemic biodistribution of virus after ILP, and the effect of mode of administration on antibody response. The combination of melphalan and GLV-1h68 was synergistic in vitro. The addition of virus to standard ILP regimens was well tolerated and demonstrated superior tumour targeting compared to intravenous administration. Triple therapy (melphalan/TNF-α/GLV-1h68) resulted in increased tumour growth delay and enhanced survival compared to other treatment regimens. Live virus was recovered in large amounts from perfused regions, but in smaller amounts from systemic organs. The addition of oncolytic vaccinia virus to existing TNF-α/melphalan-based ILP strategies results in survival advantage in an immunocompetent rat model of advanced extremity sarcoma. Virus administered by ILP has superior tumour targeting compared to intravenous delivery. Further evaluation and clinical translation of this approach is warranted.

  3. Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV)-based Coronavirus Spike-pseudotyped Particle Production and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Jean Kaoru; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2016-01-01

    Viral pseudotyped particles (pp) are enveloped virus particles, typically derived from retroviruses or rhabdoviruses, that harbor heterologous envelope glycoproteins on their surface and a genome lacking essential genes. These synthetic viral particles are safer surrogates of native viruses and acquire the tropism and host entry pathway characteristics governed by the heterologous envelope glycoprotein used. They have proven to be very useful tools used in research with many applications, such as enabling the study of entry pathways of enveloped viruses and to generate effective gene-delivery vectors. The basis for their generation lies in the capacity of some viruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), to incorporate envelope glycoproteins of other viruses into a pseudotyped virus particle. These can be engineered to contain reporter genes such as luciferase, enabling quantification of virus entry events upon pseudotyped particle infection with susceptible cells. Here, we detail a protocol enabling generation of MLV-based pseudotyped particles, using the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) spike (S) as an example of a heterologous envelope glycoprotein to be incorporated. We also describe how these particles are used to infect susceptible cells and to perform a quantitative infectivity readout by a luciferase assay. PMID:28018942

  4. An activation domain within the walleye dermal sarcoma virus retroviral cyclin protein is essential for inhibition of the viral promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Rovnak, Joel; Hronek, Brett W.; Ryan, Sean O.; Cai, Sumin; Quackenbush, Sandra L. . E-mail: sandra.quackenbush@colostate.edu

    2005-11-25

    Walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV) is a complex retrovirus associated with seasonal dermal sarcomas. Developing tumors have low levels of accessory gene transcripts, A1 and B, and regressing tumors have high levels of full-length and spliced transcripts. Transcript A1 encodes a retroviral cyclin (rv-cyclin) with limited homology to host cyclins. The rv-cyclin is physically linked to components of the transcriptional co-activator complex, Mediator, and regulates transcription. In walleye fibroblasts, it inhibits the WDSV promoter independently of cis-acting DNA sequences. The rv-cyclin activates transcription from GAL4 promoters when fused to the GAL4 DNA binding domain. A 30 a.a. activation domain in the carboxy region can be inactivated by single point mutations, and these mutations diminish the ability of the rv-cyclin to inhibit the WDSV promoter. When fused to glutathione S-transferase, the rv-cyclin, its carboxy region, and the activation domain pull down components of transcription complexes from nuclear extracts, and pulldown is lost by mutation of the activation domain.

  5. Walleye dermal sarcoma virus Orf B functions through receptor for activated C kinase (RACK1) and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, Candelaria C.; Rovnak, Joel; Quackenbush, Sandra L.

    2008-06-05

    Walleye dermal sarcoma virus is a complex retrovirus that is associated with walleye dermal sarcomas that are seasonal in nature. Fall developing tumors contain low levels of spliced accessory gene transcripts A and B, suggesting a role for the encoded proteins, Orf A and Orf B, in oncogenesis. In explanted tumor cells the 35 kDa Orf B accessory protein is localized to the cell periphery in structures similar to focal adhesions and along actin stress fibers. Similar localization was observed in mammalian cells. The cellular protein, receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), bound Orf B in yeast two-hybrid assays and in cell culture. Sequence analysis of walleye RACK1 demonstrated high conservation to other known RACK1 sequences. RACK1 binds to activated protein kinase C (PKC). Orf B associates with PKC{alpha}, which is constitutively activated and localized at the membrane. Activated PKC promoted cell survival, proliferation, and increased cell viability in Orf B-expressing cells.

  6. Bronchopulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Nada; Innes, Nicholas; Orrell, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a highly vascular tumour, which was first described by the Hungarian dermatologist Moritz Kaposi Kohn before the discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Historically, KS has been linked to immunosuppression or to elderly male patients, especially in relation to diffuse cutaneous KS. We describe a case of Bronchopulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with AIDS who was successfully treated with HAART and Liposomal Doxorubicin chemotherapy.

  7. Bronchopulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Bashar, Nada; Innes, Nicholas; Orrell, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a highly vascular tumour, which was first described by the Hungarian dermatologist Moritz Kaposi Kohn before the discovery of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Historically, KS has been linked to immunosuppression or to elderly male patients, especially in relation to diffuse cutaneous KS. We describe a case of Bronchopulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with AIDS who was successfully treated with HAART and Liposomal Doxorubicin chemotherapy. PMID:26236600

  8. Immunotherapy of murine sarcomas with auto-anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies which bind to tumor-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Nelson, K A; George, E; Swenson, C; Forstrom, J W; Hellström, K E

    1987-09-15

    Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were obtained from BALB/c mice immunized against either of two transplanted, chemically induced syngeneic sarcomas, MCA-1490 or MCA-1511. Two mAb, 4.72 and 5.96, were obtained, one from each immunization. They were found to have apparent anti-idiotypic specificity in that they, when injected s.c., primed naive BALB/c mice for delayed-type hypersensitivity that was specific for the immunizing tumor and required homology at genes linked to the Igh-1 allotype locus. Neither mAb bound tumor antigen. When mice with established transplants of MCA-1490 or MCA-1511 were treated by repeated i.p. injections of the appropriate anti-idiotypic mAb (4.72 and 5.96, respectively), a significant reduction in tumor growth was observed in those mice that had received the appropriate mAb. The idiotope defined by mAb 4.72 was expressed by T cells in mice responding to MCA-1490. mAb 4.72 bound to T cell suppressor factors that were specific for MCA-1490 and were derived from T cell hybridomas or sera of mice bearing MCA-1490. mAb 4.72 also bound to cells from lymph nodes draining the area of a growing MCA-1490 tumor. It was used, in combination with cell sorting, to establish a T cell line, which mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity to MCA-1490 and inhibited the outgrowth of MCA-1490 in BALB/c mice. Thus, mAb specific for idiotopes on T cells responding to syngeneic tumor antigen had both direct immunotherapeutic activity and could be used to establish cultures of tumor-reactive T cells.

  9. Malignant Transformation of Mouse Primary Keratinocytes by Harvey Sarcoma Virus and Its Modulation by Surrounding Normal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotto, Gian Paolo; Weinberg, Robert A.; Ariza, Aurelio

    1988-09-01

    The activated ras oncogene that is present in Harvey sarcoma virus is able to induce malignant transformation of pure cultures of mouse primary keratinocytes. Malignant transformation of these cells is demonstrated by their ability to form carcinomas when grafted back onto syngeneic animals. However, expression of the malignant phenotype by the ras-transformed keratinocytes is drastically inhibited by the presence of normal dermal fibroblasts. This inhibitory effect depends on the ratio of fibroblasts to keratinocytes. It can be observed with mitomycin C-treated growth-arrested dermal fibroblasts and not with other cells, such as normal keratinocytes or established fibroblasts. Thus, a cellular environment approximating normal tissue can suppress tumor formation triggered by a single oncogene.

  10. Highly specific antibody to Rous sarcoma virus src gene product recognizes nuclear and nucleolar antigens in human cells.

    PubMed Central

    David-Pfeuty, T; Nouvian-Dooghe, Y

    1995-01-01

    An antiserum to the Rous sarcoma virus-transforming protein pp60v-src, raised in rabbits immunized with the bacterially produced protein alpha p60 serum (M. D. Resh and R. L. Erikson, J. Cell Biol. 100:409-417, 1985) previously reported to detect very specifically a novel population of pp60v-src and pp60c-src molecules associated with juxtareticular nuclear membranes in normal and Rous sarcoma virus-infected cells of avian and mammalian origin, was used here to investigate by immunofluorescence microscopy localization patterns of Src molecules in human cell lines, either normal or derived from spontaneous tumors. We found that the alpha p60 serum reveals nuclear and nucleolar concentrations of antigens in all the human cell lines tested and in two rat and mouse hepatoma cell lines derived from adult tumorous tissues but not in any established rat and mouse cell lines either untransformed or transformed by the src and ras oncogenes. Both the nuclear and nucleolar stainings can be totally extinguished by preincubation of the serum with highly purified chicken c-Src. We show also that the partitioning of the alpha p60-reactive proteins among the whole nucleus and the nucleolus depends mostly on two different parameters: the position in the cell cycle and the degree of cell confluency. Our observations raise the attractive possibility that, in differentiated cells, pp60c-src and related proteins might be involved not only in mediating the transduction of mitogenic signals at the plasma membrane level but also in controlling progression through the cell cycle and entry in mitosis by interacting with cell division cycle regulatory components at the nuclear level. PMID:7853507

  11. A cellular protein that associates with the transforming protein of Rous sarcoma virus is also a heat-shock protein.

    PubMed Central

    Oppermann, H; Levinson, W; Bishop, J M

    1981-01-01

    A single viral protein (pp60src) mediates neoplastic transformation of cells infected with Rous sarcoma virus. Immunoprecipitation of pp60src has revealed two cellular proteins (Mr 50,000 and 89,000) that appear to associate with pp60src in a specific manner. Neither of the cellular proteins has been well characterized, but it is thought that both may participate in the function of pp60src. Treatment of avian cells with unphysiological temperature or certain chemical agents amplifies the production of several proteins in the manner of the "heat shock" response earlier described for Drosophila. We report here that one of these proteins, with a molecular weight of 89,000 is identical to the 89-kilodalton protein found associated with pp60src. The 89-kilodalton protein is a major constituent of both uninfected and infected cells, even in the absence of inducing agents, but only a small fraction of this protein appears to associate with pp60src in cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus. The complex containing pp60src and the 89-kilodalton protein can be precipitated by an immune reaction involving pp60src alone. The complexed form of the 89-kilodalton protein did not react directly with antibodies but regained its reactivity subsequent to release from the complex. We conclude that the 89-kilodalton protein is bound to pp60src in a relatively stable complex. We suggest that the 89-kilodalton protein may have overlapping roles in viral oncogenesis and the heat shock response, and that evidence on the function of the protein in either setting may illuminate its function in the other. In addition, it may prove profitable to search for other overlaps between the cellular response to heat shock and the neoplastic transformation of cells by pp60src. Images PMID:6262754

  12. The Epidemiology of Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Sarcomas account for over 20% of all pediatric solid malignant cancers and less than 1% of all adult solid malignant cancers. The vast majority of diagnosed sarcomas will be soft tissue sarcomas, while malignant bone tumors make up just over 10% of sarcomas. The risks for sarcoma are not well-understood. We evaluated the existing literature on the epidemiology and etiology of sarcoma. Risks for sarcoma development can be divided into environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, and an interaction between the two. HIV-positive individuals are at an increased risk for Kaposi’s sarcoma, even though HHV8 is the causative virus. Radiation exposure from radiotherapy has been strongly associated with secondary sarcoma development in certain cancer patients. In fact, the risk of malignant bone tumors increases as the cumulative dose of radiation to the bone increases (p for trend <0.001). A recent meta-analysis reported that children with a history of hernias have a greater risk of developing Ewing’s sarcoma (adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.9, 5.7). Bone development during pubertal growth spurts has been associated with osteosarcoma development. Occupational factors such as job type, industry, and exposures to chemicals such as herbicides and chlorophenols have been suggested as risk factors for sarcomas. A case-control study found a significant increase in soft tissue sarcoma risk among gardeners (adjusted OR 4.1, 95% CI 1.00, 14.00), but not among those strictly involved in farming. A European-based study reported an increased risk in bone tumors among blacksmiths, toolmakers, or machine-tool operators (adjusted OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.08, 4.26). Maternal and paternal characteristics such as occupation, age, smoking status, and health conditions experienced during pregnancy also have been suggested as sarcoma risk factors and would be important to assess in future studies. The limited studies we identified demonstrate significant relationships with sarcoma risk, but many of

  13. Three-dimensional structure of Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus (BeAn strain).

    PubMed Central

    Luo, M; He, C; Toth, K S; Zhang, C X; Lipton, H L

    1992-01-01

    Depending on the strain, Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) may cause acute encephalitis or chronic demyelinating disease, which is associated with viral persistence in mice. Persistent central nervous system infection and demyelination by the less-virulent TMEV has provided a useful animal model for the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. The less-virulent BeAn strain of TMEV was crystallized and its atomic structure was determined by x-ray crystallography. The alpha-carbon coordinates of the closely related Mengo virus were used to calculate the initial phases to 3.5 A resolution and the interpretable electron density map was produced by 10 cycles of 30-fold noncrystallographic molecular replacement averaging. The structure revealed a high degree of overall structural similarity to Mengo virus as well as substantial differences in the surface loops. These structural changes might be correlated with TMEV host-specific recognition, pH-related stability, and neurovirulence. Images PMID:1312722

  14. The presence of complement fixing antibodies to Rous sarcoma virus (Schmidt-Ruppin strain) in patients with various forms of neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Nastac, E; Stoian, M; Lungu, M; Ionescu, T; Athanasiu, P

    1975-01-01

    The presence in men of antibodies to Rous sarcoma virus, an oncogenic virus of avian origin, was demonstrated. The highest antibody incidence was found in patients with various forms of cancer (34.4%, as against the value of 12% recorded in blood donors); these patients also showed an increased antibody level - 1/64 titers were detected in 43 out of 7 patients. The possibility of a human infection with animal oncogenic viruses is discussed, without excluding the hypothesis of a paraimmune reaction.

  15. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kakoki, Katsura; Kamiyama, Haruka; Izumida, Mai; Yashima, Yuka; Hayashi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Naoki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV.

  16. LEUKEMIA-ASSOCIATED TRANSPLANTATION ANTIGENS RELATED TO MURINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H.; Boyse, E. A.; Aoki, T.; Iritani, C.; Old, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Two BALB radiation leukemias are strongly rejected by hybrids of BALB with certain other mouse strains, although BALB mice themselves exhibit no detectable resistance whatever. Hybrids immunized with progressively increased inocula are resistant to 200 x 106 or more leukemia cells; their serum is cytotoxic for the leukemia cells in vitro and protects BALB mice against challenge with these BALB leukemias. The antigenic system thus identified has been named X.1. In (BALB x B6) hybrids the major determinant of resistance was shown to be a B6 gene in the K region of H-2. This is likely to be the Rgv-1 (Resistance to gross virus) locus of Lilly, which may thus be identified in this case as an Ir (Immune response) allele conferring ability to respond to X.1 antigen on MuLV and leukemia cells, and so responsible for production of X.1 antibody and the rejection of X.1+ leukemia cells by hybrid mice. Immunoelectron microscopy with X.1 antiserum (from immunized hybrids) shows labeling both on the cell surface and on virions produced by the leukemia cells. It is not known whether X.1 comprises only one or more than one antigen. Three radiation-induced BALB leukemias, one A strain radiation-induced leukemia, and 15/15 AKR primary spontaneous leukemias were typed X.1+ by the cytotoxicity test. Several other leukemias, including one induced by passage A Gross virus and one long-transplanted AKR ascites leukemia carried in (B6 x AKR)F1 hybrids, were X.1-. Normal mice of strains with a high incidence of leukemia and one other strain (129) express X.1 antigen, but evidently in amounts too small for certain detection in vitro; by the method of absorption in vivo, however, these strains could be typed X.1+ and other strains X.1-. We ascribe the X.1 antigen system tentatively to a sub-type of MuLV that is not passage A Gross virus and is probably not the dominant sub-type in strains with a high incidence of leukemia. After repeated passage in hybrids, one of the BALB leukemias became

  17. Identification of cardioviruses related to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus in human infections

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Charles Y.; Greninger, Alexander L.; Kanada, Kimberly; Kwok, Thomas; Fischer, Kael F.; Runckel, Charles; Louie, Janice K.; Glaser, Carol A.; Yagi, Shigeo; Schnurr, David P.; Haggerty, Tom D.; Parsonnet, Julie; Ganem, Don; DeRisi, Joseph L.

    2008-01-01

    Cardioviruses comprise a genus of picornaviruses that cause severe illnesses in rodents, but little is known about the prevalence, diversity, or spectrum of disease of such agents among humans. A single cardiovirus isolate, Saffold virus, was cultured in 1981 in stool from an infant with fever. Here, we describe the identification of a group of human cardioviruses that have been cloned directly from patient specimens, the first of which was detected using a pan-viral microarray in respiratory secretions from a child with influenza-like illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the nearly complete viral genome (7961 bp) revealed that this virus belongs to the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) subgroup of cardioviruses and is most closely related to Saffold virus. Subsequent screening by RT-PCR of 719 additional respiratory specimens [637 (89%) from patients with acute respiratory illness] and 400 cerebrospinal fluid specimens from patients with neurological disease (aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, and multiple sclerosis) revealed no evidence of cardiovirus infection. However, screening of 751 stool specimens from 498 individuals in a gastroenteritis cohort resulted in the detection of 6 additional cardioviruses (1.2%). Although all 8 human cardioviruses (including Saffold virus) clustered together by phylogenetic analysis, significant sequence diversity was observed in the VP1 gene (66.9%–100% pairwise amino acid identities). These findings suggest that there exists a diverse group of novel human Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-like cardioviruses that hitherto have gone largely undetected, are found primarily in the gastrointestinal tract, can be shed asymptomatically, and have potential links to enteric and extraintestinal disease. PMID:18768820

  18. Identification of cardioviruses related to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus in human infections.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Charles Y; Greninger, Alexander L; Kanada, Kimberly; Kwok, Thomas; Fischer, Kael F; Runckel, Charles; Louie, Janice K; Glaser, Carol A; Yagi, Shigeo; Schnurr, David P; Haggerty, Tom D; Parsonnet, Julie; Ganem, Don; DeRisi, Joseph L

    2008-09-16

    Cardioviruses comprise a genus of picornaviruses that cause severe illnesses in rodents, but little is known about the prevalence, diversity, or spectrum of disease of such agents among humans. A single cardiovirus isolate, Saffold virus, was cultured in 1981 in stool from an infant with fever. Here, we describe the identification of a group of human cardioviruses that have been cloned directly from patient specimens, the first of which was detected using a pan-viral microarray in respiratory secretions from a child with influenza-like illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the nearly complete viral genome (7961 bp) revealed that this virus belongs to the Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) subgroup of cardioviruses and is most closely related to Saffold virus. Subsequent screening by RT-PCR of 719 additional respiratory specimens [637 (89%) from patients with acute respiratory illness] and 400 cerebrospinal fluid specimens from patients with neurological disease (aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, and multiple sclerosis) revealed no evidence of cardiovirus infection. However, screening of 751 stool specimens from 498 individuals in a gastroenteritis cohort resulted in the detection of 6 additional cardioviruses (1.2%). Although all 8 human cardioviruses (including Saffold virus) clustered together by phylogenetic analysis, significant sequence diversity was observed in the VP1 gene (66.9%-100% pairwise amino acid identities). These findings suggest that there exists a diverse group of novel human Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-like cardioviruses that hitherto have gone largely undetected, are found primarily in the gastrointestinal tract, can be shed asymptomatically, and have potential links to enteric and extraintestinal disease.

  19. Targeting of a Nuclease to Murine Leukemia Virus Capsids Inhibits Viral Multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natsoulis, Georges; Seshaiah, Partha; Federspiel, Mark J.; Rein, Alan; Hughes, Stephen H.; Boeke, Jef D.

    1995-01-01

    Capsid-targeted viral inactivation is an antiviral strategy in which toxic fusion proteins are targeted to virions, where they inhibit viral multiplication by destroying viral components. These fusion proteins consist of a virion structural protein moiety and an enzymatic moiety such as a nuclease. Such fusion proteins can severely inhibit transposition of yeast retrotransposon Ty1, an element whose transposition mechanistically resembles retroviral multiplication. We demonstrate that expression of a murine retrovirus capsid-staphylococcal nuclease fusion protein inhibits multiplication of the corresponding murine leukemia virus by 30- to 100-fold. Staphylococcal nuclease is apparently inactive intracellularly and hence nontoxic to the host cell, but it is active extracellularly because of its requirement for high concentrations of Ca2+ ions. Virions assembled in and shed from cells expressing the fusion protein contain very small amounts of intact viral RNA, as would be predicted for nuclease-mediated inhibition of viral multiplication.

  20. Effect of polymerase mutations on packaging of primer tRNAPro during murine leukemia virus assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, J G; Seidman, J G

    1981-01-01

    The role of reverse transcriptase in selective encapsidation of the murine leukemia virus (MuLV) tRNA primer, tRNAPro, was investigated by examining the tRNA composition of several nonconditional pol mutants. One mutant, clone 23, which contains an altered polymerase about 40% smaller than the wild-type enzyme (B. I. Gerwin et al., J. Virol. 31:741-751, 1979) had a typical viral tRNA pattern, including normal levels of tRNAPro in free and 70S-associated 4S RNA. Another class of mutants, produced by Moloney murine leukemia virus-infected cell clone M13 and subclone M13/1, does not contain any detectable polymerase protein (A. Shields et al., Cell 14:601-609, 1978) and was found to have reduced amounts of tRNAPro in free 4S RNA. However, the level of tRNAPro associated with the genome was normal in the mutant virions. These results suggest that the reverse transcriptase protein is involved in the initial selection of tRNA primer during virus assembly, but not in the subsequent association of this tRNA with genomic RNA. Images PMID:6165833

  1. Transcriptional Silencing of Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus in Human Embryonic Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gary Z; Goff, Stephen P

    2017-01-01

    Embryonic carcinoma (EC) cells are malignant counterparts of embryonic stem (ES) cells and serve as useful models for investigating cellular differentiation and human embryogenesis. Though the susceptibility of murine EC cells to retroviral infection has been extensively analyzed, few studies of retrovirus infection of human EC cells have been performed. We tested the susceptibility of human EC cells to transduction by retroviral vectors derived from three different retroviral genera. We show that human EC cells efficiently express reporter genes delivered by vectors based on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) but not Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV). In human EC cells, MLV integration occurs normally, but no viral gene expression is observed. The block to MLV expression of MLV genomes is relieved upon cellular differentiation. The lack of gene expression is correlated with transcriptional silencing of the MLV promoter through the deposition of repressive histone marks as well as DNA methylation. Moreover, depletion of SETDB1, a histone methyltransferase, resulted in a loss of transcriptional silencing and upregulation of MLV gene expression. Finally, we provide evidence showing that the lack of MLV gene expression may be attributed in part to the lack of MLV enhancer function in human EC cells.

  2. Viral genome RNA serves as messenger early in the infectious cycle of murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Shurtz, R; Dolev, S; Aboud, M; Salzberg, S

    1979-01-01

    When NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts were infected with the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus, part of the viral genome RNA molecules were detected in polyribosomes of the infected cells early in the infectious cycle. The binding appears to be specific, since we could demonstrate the release of viral RNA from polyribosomes with EDTA. Moreover, when infection occurred in the presence of cycloheximide, most viral RNA molecules were detected in the free cytoplasm. Size analysis on polyribosomal viral RNA molecules indicated that two size class molecules, 38S and 23S, are present in polyribosomes at 3 h after infection. Analysis of the polyriboadenylate [poly(rA)] content of viral RNA extracted from infected polyribosomes demonstrated that such molecules bind with greatest abundance at 3 h after infection, as has been detected with total viral RNA. No molecules lacking poly(rA) stretches could be detected in polyribosomes. Furthermore, when a similar analysis was performed on unbound molecules present in the free cytoplasm, identical results were obtained. We conclude that no selection towards poly(rA)-containing viral molecules is evident on binding to polyribosomes. These findings suggest that the incoming viral genome of the Moloney strain of murine leukemia virus may serve as a messenger for the synthesis of one or more virus-specific proteins early after infection of mouse fibroblasts. PMID:117118

  3. Pediatric Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, Regan F; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Gosain, Ankush

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors accounting for approximately 10% of childhood solid tumors. Treatment is focused on multimodality therapy, which has improved the prognosis over the past two decades. Current regimens focus on decreasing treatment for low-risk patients to decrease the long-term side effects while maximizing therapy for patients with metastatic disease to improve survival. Pediatric sarcomas can be divided into soft tissue sarcomas and osseous tumors. Soft tissue sarcomas are further delineated into rhabdomyosarcomas, which affect young children and nonrhabdomyosarcomas, which are most common in adolescents. The most common bone sarcomas are osteosarcomas and Ewing's sarcoma.

  4. Survival of Murine Norovirus, Tulane Virus, and Hepatitis A Virus on Alfalfa Seeds and Sprouts during Storage and Germination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing; Hirneisen, Kirsten A.; Markland, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Human norovirus (huNoV) and hepatitis A virus (HAV) have been involved in several produce-associated outbreaks and identified as major food-borne viral etiologies. In this study, the survival of huNoV surrogates (murine norovirus [MNV] and Tulane virus [TV]) and HAV was investigated on alfalfa seeds during storage and postgermination. Alfalfa seeds were inoculated with MNV, TV, or HAV with titers of 6.46 ± 0.06 log PFU/g, 3.87 ± 0.38 log PFU/g, or 7.01 ± 0.07 log 50% tissue culture infectious doses (TCID50)/g, respectively. Inoculated seeds were stored for up to 50 days at 22°C and sampled during that storage period on days 0, 2, 5, 10, and 15. Following storage, virus presence was monitored over a 1-week germination period. Viruses remained infectious after 50 days, with titers of 1.61 ± 0.19 log PFU/g, 0.85 ± 0.21 log PFU/g, and 3.43 ± 0.21 log TCID50/g for MNV, TV, and HAV, respectively. HAV demonstrated greater persistence than MNV and TV, without a statistically significant reduction over 20 days (<1 log TCID50/g); however, relatively high levels of genomic copies of all viruses persisted over the testing time period. Low titers of viruses were found on sprouts and were located in all tissues as well as in sprout-spent water sampled on days 1, 3, and 6 following seed planting. Results revealed the persistence of viruses in seeds for a prolonged period of time, and perhaps of greater importance these data suggest the ease of which virus may transfer from seeds to sprouts and spent water during germination. These findings highlight the importance of sanitation and prevention procedures before and during germination. PMID:24014537

  5. Interactions of Host Proteins with the Murine Leukemia Virus Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Studamire, Barbara; Goff, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Retroviral infections cause a variety of cancers in animals and a number of diverse diseases in humans such as leukemia and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Productive and efficient proviral integration is critical for retroviral function and is the key step in establishing a stable and productive infection, as well as the mechanism by which host genes are activated in leukemogenesis. Host factors are widely anticipated to be involved in all stages of the retroviral life cycle, and the identification of integrase interacting factors has the potential to increase our understanding of mechanisms by which the incoming virus might appropriate cellular proteins to target and capture host DNA sequences. Identification of MoMLV integrase interacting host factors may be key to designing efficient and benign retroviral-based gene therapy vectors; key to understanding the basic mechanism of integration; and key in designing efficient integrase inhibitors. In this review, we discuss current progress in the field of MoMLV integrase interacting proteins and possible roles for these proteins in integration. PMID:21637732

  6. IL-10 Signaling Blockade Controls Murine West Nile Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fengwei; Wang, Penghua; Kamanaka, Masahito; Connolly, Tarah M.; Gate, David; Montgomery, Ruth R.; Flavell, Richard A.; Fikrig, Erol

    2009-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-borne single-stranded RNA flavivirus, can cause significant human morbidity and mortality. Our data show that interleukin-10 (IL-10) is dramatically elevated both in vitro and in vivo following WNV infection. Consistent with an etiologic role of IL-10 in WNV pathogenesis, we find that WNV infection is markedly diminished in IL-10 deficient (IL-10−/−) mice, and pharmacologic blockade of IL-10 signaling by IL-10 neutralizing antibody increases survival of WNV-infected mice. Increased production of antiviral cytokines in IL-10−/− mice is associated with more efficient control of WNV infection. Moreover, CD4+ T cells produce copious amounts of IL-10, and may be an important cellular source of IL-10 during WNV infection in vivo. In conclusion, IL-10 signaling plays a negative role in immunity against WNV infection, and blockade of IL-10 signaling by genetic or pharmacologic means helps to control viral infection, suggesting a novel anti-WNV therapeutic strategy. PMID:19816558

  7. Murine leukemia virus uses NXF1 for nuclear export of spliced and unspliced viral transcripts.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Toshie; Davila, Jaime I; Malcolm, Jessica A; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A; Tonne, Jason M; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    Intron-containing mRNAs are subject to restricted nuclear export in higher eukaryotes. Retroviral replication requires the nucleocytoplasmic transport of both spliced and unspliced RNA transcripts, and RNA export mechanisms of gammaretroviruses are poorly characterized. Here, we report the involvement of the nuclear export receptor NXF1/TAP in the nuclear export of gammaretroviral RNA transcripts. We identified a conserved cis-acting element in the pol gene of gammaretroviruses, including murine leukemia virus (MLV) and xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMRV), named the CAE (cytoplasmic accumulation element). The CAE enhanced the cytoplasmic accumulation of viral RNA transcripts and the expression of viral proteins without significantly affecting the stability, splicing, or translation efficiency of the transcripts. Insertion of the CAE sequence also facilitated Rev-independent HIV Gag expression. We found that the CAE sequence interacted with NXF1, whereas disruption of NXF1 ablated CAE function. Thus, the CAE sequence mediates the cytoplasmic accumulation of gammaretroviral transcripts in an NXF1-dependent manner. Disruption of NXF1 expression impaired cytoplasmic accumulations of both spliced and unspliced RNA transcripts of XMRV and MLV, resulting in their nuclear retention or degradation. Thus, our results demonstrate that gammaretroviruses use NXF1 for the cytoplasmic accumulation of both spliced and nonspliced viral RNA transcripts. Murine leukemia virus (MLV) has been studied as one of the classic models of retrovirology. Although unspliced host messenger RNAs are rarely exported from the nucleus, MLV actively exports unspliced viral RNAs to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive studies, how MLV achieves this difficult task has remained a mystery. Here, we have studied the RNA export mechanism of MLV and found that (i) the genome contains a sequence which supports the efficient nuclear export of viral RNAs, (ii) the cellular factor NXF1 is involved in the

  8. Induction of lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus by herpes simplex virus type 1: involvement of IL-10 and IL-4.

    PubMed

    Qin, Di; Zeng, Yi; Qian, Chao; Huang, Zan; Lv, Zhigang; Cheng, Lin; Yao, Shuihong; Tang, Qiao; Chen, Xiuying; Lu, Chun

    2008-03-01

    Previously, we identified that both human herpesvirus 6 and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat were important cofactors that activated lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Here, we further investigated the potential of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) to influence KSHV replication. We demonstrated that HSV-1 was a potentially important factor in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, as determined by production of lytic phase mRNA transcripts, viral proteins and infectious viral particles in BCBL-1 cells. These results were further confirmed by an RNA interference experiment using small interfering RNA targeting KSHV ORF50 and a luciferase reporter assay testing ORF50 promoter-driven luciferase activity. Finally, we discovered that production of human interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-4 partially contributed to HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. Our data present the first direct evidence that HSV-1 can activate KSHV lytic replication and suggest a role of HSV-1 in KSHV pathogenesis.

  9. Antibodies against lytic and latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus antigens and lymphoma in the European EpiLymph case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Y; Mbisa, G; Labo, N; Casabonne, D; Becker, N; Maynadie, M; Foretova, L; Cocco, P L; Nieters, A; Staines, A; Bofetta, P; Brennan, P; Whitby, D; de Sanjosé, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus is associated with primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. Methods: Seropositivity to lytic and latent Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) antigens were examined in 2083 lymphomas and 2013 controls from six European countries. Results: Antibodies against KSHV latent and lytic antigens were detectable in 4.5% and 3.4% of controls, respectively, and 3.6% of cases (P>0.05). The KSHV seropositivity was associated with splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) (odds ratio (OR)=4.11, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.57–10.83) and multiple myeloma (OR=0.31, 95% CI=0.11–0.85). Conclusion: The KSHV is unlikely to contribute importantly to lymphomagenesis among immunocompetent subjects. However, the observed association with SMZL may underline a chronic antigen mechanism in its aetiology. PMID:21952625

  10. Comparative Analysis of HIV-1 and Murine Leukemia Virus Three-Dimensional Nuclear Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Quercioli, Valentina; Di Primio, Cristina; Casini, Antonio; Mulder, Lubbertus C. F.; Vranckx, Lenard S.; Borrenberghs, Doortje; Gijsbers, Rik; Debyser, Zeger

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy allow three-dimensional analysis of HIV-1 preintegration complexes in the nuclei of infected cells. To extend this investigation to gammaretroviruses, we engineered a fluorescent Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) system consisting of MLV-integrase fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (MLV-IN-EGFP). A comparative analysis of lentiviral (HIV-1) and gammaretroviral (MLV) fluorescent complexes in the nuclei of infected cells revealed their different spatial distributions. This research tool has the potential to achieve new insight into the nuclear biology of these retroviruses. PMID:26962222

  11. A Novel Subgenomic Murine Leukemia Virus RNA Transcript Results from Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Déjardin, Jérôme; Bompard-Maréchal, Guillaume; Audit, Muriel; Hope, Thomas J.; Sitbon, Marc; Mougel, Marylène

    2000-01-01

    Here we show the existence of a novel subgenomic 4.4-kb RNA in cells infected with the prototypic replication-competent Friend or Moloney murine leukemia viruses (MuLV). This RNA derives by splicing from an alternative donor site (SD′) within the capsid-coding region to the canonical envelope splice acceptor site. The position and the sequence of SD′ was highly conserved among mammalian type C and D oncoviruses. Point mutations used to inactivate SD′ without changing the capsid-coding ability affected viral RNA splicing and reduced viral replication in infected cells. PMID:10729146

  12. Structural features in the Rous sarcoma virus RNA stability element are necessary for sensing the correct termination codon

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) is an mRNA quality control mechanism that selectively recognizes and targets for degradation mRNAs containing premature termination codons. Retroviral full-length RNA is presented to the host translation machinery with characteristics rarely observed among host cell mRNAs: a long 3' UTR, retained introns, and multiple open reading frames. As a result, the viral RNA is predicted to be recognized by the host NMD machinery and degraded. In the case of the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), we identified a stability element (RSE), which resides immediately downstream of the gag termination codon and facilitates NMD evasion. Results We defined key RNA features of the RSE through directed mutagenesis of the virus. These data suggest that the minimal RSE is 155 nucleotides (nts) and functions independently of the nucleotide sequence of the stop codon or the first nucleotide following the stop codon. Further data suggested that the 3'UTRs of the RSV pol and src may also function as stability elements. Conclusions We propose that these stability elements in RSV may be acting as NMD insulators to mask the preceding stop codon from the NMD machinery. PMID:20687936

  13. Attenuation of ribosomal protein S6 phosphatase activity in chicken embryo fibroblasts transformed by Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Belandia, B; Brautigan, D; Martín-Pérez, J

    1994-01-01

    In chicken embryo fibroblasts, phosphorylation of the 40S ribosomal protein S6 increases during G1 but returns to basal level by mitosis. In contrast, in Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-transformed fibroblasts, S6 remains highly phosphorylated throughout mitosis. This study investigated the mechanism by which RSV alters the pattern of S6 phosphorylation. Pulse-chase experiments demonstrate that phosphate turnover in S6 is rapid in normal cells and in cells infected with an RSV transformation-defective virus. In contrast, phosphate turnover in S6 is severely reduced in cells infected with temperature-sensitive RSV at a temperature permissive for transformation, indicating a diminished S6 phosphatase activity. Fractionation of cell lysates by DEAE chromatography showed an almost threefold lower S6 phosphatase activity in RSV-transformed versus normal cells. The S6 phosphatase was sensitive to inhibitor 2 and specifically recognized by an antibody to type 1 phosphatase (PP1). The S6 phosphatase activity recovered by immunoprecipitation of PP1 was threefold lower in transformed cells, but the steady-state level of expression and the rate of synthesis of PP1 were not altered by oncogenic transformation. Together, the results show that transformation by RSV reduced the S6-PP1 activity. Images PMID:8264587

  14. No evidence for a role of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus and BK virus in prostate cancer of German patients.

    PubMed

    Akgül, Baki; Pfister, David; Knüchel, Ruth; Heidenreich, Axel; Wieland, Ulrike; Pfister, Herbert

    2012-05-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent types of cancer in men. Controversial data exist concerning the role of BKPyV and the xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related gammaretrovirus (XMRV) in prostate cancer development. We therefore assessed the association between prostate cancer and viral infections. We could detect BKPyV in only 1 out of 85 prostate cancer samples, whereas none of the tissue samples showed evidence for XMRV positivity. Lack of detection of BKPyV and XMRV in prostate cancer tissues suggests that these viruses do not play a role in the pathogenesis of this type of cancer.

  15. Feline Calicivirus, Murine Norovirus, Porcine Sapovirus, and Tulane Virus Survival on Postharvest Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Esseili, Malak A; Saif, Linda J; Farkas, Tibor; Wang, Qiuhong

    2015-08-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses, with an increasing number of outbreaks associated with leafy greens. Because HuNoV cannot be routinely cultured, culturable feline calicivirus (FCV), murine norovirus (MNV), porcine sapovirus (SaV), and Tulane virus (TV) have been used as surrogates. These viruses are generated in different cell lines as infected cell lysates, which may differentially affect their stability. Our objective was to uniformly compare the survival of these viruses on postharvest lettuce while evaluating the effects of cell lysates on their survival. Viruses were semipurified from cell lysates by ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation followed by resuspension in sterile water. Virus survival was examined before and after semipurification: in suspension at room temperature (RT) until day 28 and on lettuce leaves stored at RT for 3 days or at 4°C for 7 and 14 days. In suspension, both methods significantly enhanced the survival of all viruses. On lettuce, the survival of MNV in cell lysates was similar to that in water, under all storage conditions. In contrast, the survival of FCV, SaV, and TV was differentially enhanced, under different storage conditions, by removing cell lysates. Following semipurification, viruses showed similar persistence to each other on lettuce stored under all conditions, with the exception of ultracentrifugation-purified FCV, which showed a higher inactivation rate than MNV at 4°C for 14 days. In conclusion, the presence of cell lysates in viral suspensions underestimated the survivability of these surrogate viruses, while viral semipurification revealed similar survivabilities on postharvest lettuce leaves.

  16. Feline Calicivirus, Murine Norovirus, Porcine Sapovirus, and Tulane Virus Survival on Postharvest Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Esseili, Malak A.; Saif, Linda J.; Farkas, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus (HuNoV) is the leading cause of foodborne illnesses, with an increasing number of outbreaks associated with leafy greens. Because HuNoV cannot be routinely cultured, culturable feline calicivirus (FCV), murine norovirus (MNV), porcine sapovirus (SaV), and Tulane virus (TV) have been used as surrogates. These viruses are generated in different cell lines as infected cell lysates, which may differentially affect their stability. Our objective was to uniformly compare the survival of these viruses on postharvest lettuce while evaluating the effects of cell lysates on their survival. Viruses were semipurified from cell lysates by ultrafiltration or ultracentrifugation followed by resuspension in sterile water. Virus survival was examined before and after semipurification: in suspension at room temperature (RT) until day 28 and on lettuce leaves stored at RT for 3 days or at 4°C for 7 and 14 days. In suspension, both methods significantly enhanced the survival of all viruses. On lettuce, the survival of MNV in cell lysates was similar to that in water, under all storage conditions. In contrast, the survival of FCV, SaV, and TV was differentially enhanced, under different storage conditions, by removing cell lysates. Following semipurification, viruses showed similar persistence to each other on lettuce stored under all conditions, with the exception of ultracentrifugation-purified FCV, which showed a higher inactivation rate than MNV at 4°C for 14 days. In conclusion, the presence of cell lysates in viral suspensions underestimated the survivability of these surrogate viruses, while viral semipurification revealed similar survivabilities on postharvest lettuce leaves. PMID:26002891

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transcripts identified in HIV-related psoriasis and Kaposi's sarcoma lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, S E; Duvic, M; Nickoloff, B J; Minshall, M; Smith, L C; Griffiths, C E; Paddock, S W; Lewis, D E

    1991-01-01

    Persons with HIV infection sometimes develop aggressive psoriasis or Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) not usually seen in other immunosuppressed patients. However, a specific and direct pathophysiological role for HIV-1 in these AIDS-associated disorders remains unclear since HIV has not been easily detected in these skin lesions. By combining in situ hybridization with the sensitive detection technique of confocal laser scanning microscopy, we have demonstrated HIV RNA transcripts in 5 of 15 lesional skin biopsies from HIV-infected psoriasis patients, and in 3 of 8 Kaposi's sarcoma biopsies from HIV-infected patients. HIV transcripts were not detected in normal appearing skin from HIV-infected patients or in psoriatic and normal skin biopsies from uninfected individuals (P = 0.006). Although previous attempts to demonstrate viral sequences in psoriasis and KS lesions have been unsuccessful, in situ hybridization with confocal microscopy has shown the presence of HIV RNA transcripts predominantly within CD4+, Factor XIIIa positive dermal dendrocytes. HIV or cytokines produced by infected cells in skin lesions may therefore play a direct role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated psoriasis and KS. Images PMID:1676036

  18. Kaposi sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    Kaposi's sarcoma; HIV - Kaposi; AIDS - Kaposi ... Before the HIV/AIDS epidemic, Kaposi sarcoma was seen mainly in older Italian and Jewish men, and rarely, in older women. Among this group, the tumors developed slowly. In ...

  19. Potent Inhibition of Junín Virus Infection by Interferon in Murine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Cheng; Walker, Aida G.; Grant, Ashley M.; Kolokoltsova, Olga A.; Yun, Nadezhda E.; Seregin, Alexey V.; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    The new world arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV) is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, a lethal human infectious disease. Adult laboratory mice are generally resistant to peripheral infection by JUNV. The mechanism underlying the mouse resistance to JUNV infection is largely unknown. We have reported that interferon receptor knockout mice succumb to JUNV infection, indicating the critical role of interferon in restricting JUNV infection in mice. Here we report that the pathogenic and vaccine strains of JUNV were highly sensitive to interferon in murine primary cells. Treatment with low concentrations of interferon abrogated viral NP protein expression in murine cells. The replication of both JUNVs was enhanced in IRF3/IRF7 deficient cells. In addition, the vaccine strain of JUNV displayed impaired growth in primary murine cells. Our data suggested a direct and potent role of host interferon response in restricting JUNV replication in mice. The defect in viral growth for vaccine JUNV might also partially explain its attenuation in mice. PMID:24901990

  20. Potent inhibition of Junín virus infection by interferon in murine cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Walker, Aida G; Grant, Ashley M; Kolokoltsova, Olga A; Yun, Nadezhda E; Seregin, Alexey V; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-06-01

    The new world arenavirus Junín virus (JUNV) is the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, a lethal human infectious disease. Adult laboratory mice are generally resistant to peripheral infection by JUNV. The mechanism underlying the mouse resistance to JUNV infection is largely unknown. We have reported that interferon receptor knockout mice succumb to JUNV infection, indicating the critical role of interferon in restricting JUNV infection in mice. Here we report that the pathogenic and vaccine strains of JUNV were highly sensitive to interferon in murine primary cells. Treatment with low concentrations of interferon abrogated viral NP protein expression in murine cells. The replication of both JUNVs was enhanced in IRF3/IRF7 deficient cells. In addition, the vaccine strain of JUNV displayed impaired growth in primary murine cells. Our data suggested a direct and potent role of host interferon response in restricting JUNV replication in mice. The defect in viral growth for vaccine JUNV might also partially explain its attenuation in mice.

  1. Multiple steps are required for the induction of tumors by Abelson murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Green, P L; Kaehler, D A; Bennett, L M; Risser, R

    1989-01-01

    Helper virus-free Abelson murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) was used to induce monoclonal pre-B-cell tumors in mice. The clonality, patterns of immunoglobulin heavy-chain gene rearrangement, tumorigenicity, and v-abl oncogene expression in individual preleukemic and leukemic colonies were compared. Our results indicate that A-MuLV preleukemic cells with low or undetectable tumorigenic potential give rise to leukemic cells with high tumorigenic potential by a process of subclone selection. The levels of v-abl oncogene product in preleukemic and leukemic cell populations were not significantly different. These results suggest that an additional event(s) unrelated to the level of the v-abl protein product is required for A-MuLV-transformed cells to become fully malignant. Images PMID:2539498

  2. Characterization of murine hepatitis virus (JHM) RNA from rats with experimental encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D P; Percy, D H; Morris, V L

    1984-09-01

    When Wistar Furth rats are inoculated intracerebrally with the murine hepatitis virus JHM they often develop a demyelinating disease with resulting hind leg paralysis. Using an RNA transfer procedure and hybridization kinetic analysis, the virus-specific RNA in these rats was characterized. The pattern of JHM-specific RNA varied with individual infections of Wistar Furth rats. However, two species of JHM-specific RNA, the nucleocapsid and a 2.1-2.4 X 10(6)-Da RNA species were generally present. A general decrease in JHM-specific RNA in brains and spinal cord samples taken later than 20 days postinoculation was observed; however, JHM-specific RNA persisted in the spinal cord longer than in the brain of these rats.

  3. Removal of xenotropic murine leukemia virus by nanocellulose based filter paper.

    PubMed

    Asper, M; Hanrieder, T; Quellmalz, A; Mihranyan, A

    2015-11-01

    The removal of xenotrpic murine leukemia virus (xMuLV) by size-exclusion filter paper composed of 100% naturally derived cellulose was validated. The filter paper was produced using cellulose nanofibers derived from Cladophora sp. algae. The filter paper was characterized using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, helium pycnometry, and model tracer (100 nm latex beads and 50 nm gold nanoparticles) retention tests. Following the filtration of xMuLV spiked solutions, LRV ≥5.25 log10 TCID50 was observed, as limited by the virus titre in the feed solution and sensitivity of the tissue infectivity test. The results of the validation study suggest that the nanocellulose filter paper is useful for removal of endogenous rodent retroviruses and retrovirus-like particles during the production of recombinant proteins.

  4. Second site mutation in the virus envelope expands the host range of a cytopathic variant of Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Ferrarone, John; Knoper, Ryan C; Li, Randolph; Kozak, Christine A

    2012-11-10

    Spl574 MLV (murine leukemia virus) is a variant of Moloney ecotropic MLV (MoMLV) that is cytopathic in Mus dunni cells and restricted by other mouse cells. Its host range and cytopathicity are due to a mutation, S82F, at a site critical for binding to the CAT-1 receptor. To identify residues that affect affinity for receptor variants, virus with S82F was passed in restrictive cells. The env genes of the adapted viruses contained 18 novel mutations, including one, E114G, present in 6 of 30 sequenced envs. MoMLV-E114G efficiently infected all mouse cells as well as ecotropic MLV resistant Chinese hamster cells. Virus with E114G and S82F induced large multinucleated syncytia in NIH 3T3 and SC-1 cells as well as M. dunni cells. Inoculation of Mo-S82F,E114G into mice produced lymphomas typical of MoMLV. Residues at env position 114 are thus important determinants of host range, and E114G suppresses host range restriction due to S82F, but does not affect S82F-governed cytopathicity.

  5. Comparative study of different latent infections of herpes simplex virus type I in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Zhao, Ping; Chen, Xiao; Li, Ping; Zhao, Gaonian; Xu, Mingming; Chen, Xiuying; Xie, Peng

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to compare the different latent infections of herpes simplex virus type I in a murine model. One hundred and twenty BALB/c mice were randomly assigned into either of three groups: intravenous inoculation group, ocular abrasion group, and intranasal inoculation group. Six weeks later, the trigeminal ganglia (TG) were removed to detect the expression of HSV-I antigen. HSV DNA in TG was also detected by polymerase chain reaction to confirm latent infection. The rate of HSV DNA in TG detected in the intravenous inoculation group was 18/22 and 22/26 in the ocular abrasion group, both of which were higher than the rate detected in the intranasal inoculation group (18/30). The expression of HSV antigen in TG in these three groups was all negative. Mortality rate in the intravenous inoculation group was 8/30, which was much higher than those of the two other groups. Intranasal virus dripping, cornea abrasion, and intravenous injection can detect latent HSV-I infection in a murine model. Compared to two other groups, the cornea abrasion group showed less severe signs, a quicker recovery rate in acute infection, and higher incidence rate of latent infection. Therefore, it is an ideal method in the presence of latent HSV-I infection.

  6. Effect of internal genomic sequences of the Moloney murine leukemia virus on replication

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, I.K.; Lobanova, A.B.; Voitenok, N.N.

    1995-11-01

    Construction and use of retrovirus vectors derived from the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) are described. These vectors, designated minimal vectors, contain the left and right long terminal repeats (LTRs), a binding site for proline tRNA, a polypurine tract (PPT), and a dominant marker for selective introduction of vectors into a packaging cell line, but lack the internal sequences of the virus genome. The experiments showed that the minimal vectors can be replicated and that their titer was approximately 1500-fold lower than that of wild-type vectors. The minimal vectors were shown to contain all the cis-acting sequences necessary for correct reverse transcription. One infectious virion, like wild-type viruses, produced only one provirus. Unlike the avian reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), {Psi}{sup +} and {Psi}{sup {minus}} genomes of MoMuLV did not compete for virion proteins in the {Psi}2 packaging cell line. When an insert was introduced into a central part of the LTR U5 region, the titer of the minimal vector remained the same, while the titer of the wild-type vector decreased approximately 40-fold. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Two base changes restore infectivity to a noninfectious molecular clone of Moloney murine Leukemia virus (pMLV-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.D.; Verma, I.M.

    1984-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a molecular clone of Moloney murine leukemia virus (pMLV-1) has previously been reported. However, pMLV-1 does not generate infectious virus after transfection into cells. The lesion in pMLV-1 has been localized by determining the biological activity of recombinants containing DNA from kilobase pair region which spans the gag-pol junction of pMLV-1 with the corresponding DNA fragment from the infectious clone (pMLV-48) and pMLV-1 reveals two single base pair changes. The mutation in the pol gene does not affect the production of infectious virus but renders them XC negative, whereas the mutation in the gag gene appears to be lethal. The complete nucleotide sequence of an infectious clone of Moloney murine leukemia virus can now be deduced.

  8. Effects of murine leukemia viruses on the function of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, D I; Roberts, M S; Harvey, J J; Botcherby, M; Bedford, P A; Knight, S C

    1993-11-01

    In asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection T cells respond normally to allogeneic dendritic cells (DC), but DC show reduced stimulatory capacity. By contrast in HTLV-1 infection no significant changes in allogeneic stimulation were seen but DC-stimulated activity of autologous T cells. In seeking animal models relevant to these diseases the effects of two murine leukemia retroviruses, Rauscher leukemia virus (RLV) and Moloney leukemia virus (MLV) on the function of dendritic cells and T cells in a primary mixed leucocyte reaction have been tested. Treatment by RLV in vitro suppressed the ability of DC to stimulate allogeneic T cells from healthy animals. MLV at the same concentration did not significantly affect the ability of DC to stimulate allogeneic T cells, but provoked considerable enhancement of the low level stimulation by DC in the syngeneic system. Similar results were obtained following in vivo exposure to viruses. Two pieces of evidence suggested that these effects were due to impairment of DC function and were not operating through infection of T cells. Firstly, exposure of T cells directly to virus in vitro and in vivo before stimulation with untreated allogeneic DC caused no significant alteration in T cell activity. Secondly, the impact of murine leukemia virus on DC function was not abrogated when infected DC were added to normal T cells and cultured in the presence of zidovudine. Treatment of DC by RLV caused a decrease of cluster formation with allogeneic T cells. No statistically significant influence of MLV was observed on cluster formation after 3-h of incubation in the allogeneic system. However, after 18-h incubation MLV-treated DC formed fewer clusters with T cells than untreated DC. At the same time a stimulatory effect of MLV on DC cluster formation with syngeneic T cells was found. Considerable decrease was found in major histocompatibility complex class II antigen and LFA-1 receptor expression on the DC surface in mice

  9. Genetic rearrangements occurring during a single cycle of murine leukemia virus vector replication: characterization and implications.

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathi, S; Varela-Echavarría, A; Ron, Y; Preston, B D; Dougherty, J P

    1995-01-01

    Retroviruses evolve at rapid rates, which is presumably advantageous for responding to selective pressures. Understanding the basic mutational processes involved during retroviral replication is important for comprehending the ability of retroviruses to escape immunosurveillance and antiviral drug treatment. Moreover, since retroviral vectors are important vehicles for somatic cell gene therapy, knowledge of the mechanism of retroviral variation is critical for anticipating untoward mutational events occurring during retrovirus-medicated gene transfer. The focus of this report is to examine the spectrum of genomic rearrangements arising during a single cycle of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) vector virus replication. An MoMLV vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (tk) gene was constructed. MoMLV vector virus was produced in packaging lines, and target cells were infected. From a total of 224 mutant proviruses analyzed, 114 had gross rearrangements readily detectable by Southern blotting. The remaining proviruses were of parental size. PCR and DNA sequence analysis of 73 of the grossly rearranged mutant proviruses indicated they resulted from deletions, combined with insertions, duplications, and complex mutations that were a result of multiple genomic alterations in the same provirus. Complex hypermutations distinct from those previously described for spleen necrosis virus and human immunodeficiency virus were detected. There was a correlation between the mutation breakpoints and single-stranded regions in the predicted viral RNA secondary structure. The results also confirmed that the tk gene is inactivated at an average rate of about 8.8% per cycle of retroviral replication, which corresponds to a rate of mutation of 3%/kbp. PMID:7494312

  10. Inoculation of newborn SWR/J females with an ecotropic murine leukemia virus can produce transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Panthier, J J; Condamine, H; Jacob, F

    1988-02-01

    Endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia proviruses that were not present in the parental stock are acquired by the progeny of some SWR/J X RF/J hybrid females. We have made a stock of an ecotropic murine leukemia virus produced by such a hybrid female and inoculated newborn SWR/J females with it. We show that upon crossing of the inoculated females to SWR/J males, some of their progeny acquire ecotropic proviruses. Although most of these proviruses appear to be distributed in somatic tissues in a mosaic way, some are transmitted through the germ line. Thus an exogenous infection is able to mimic the phenomenon observed in SWR/J X RF/J hybrid mice. Available evidence suggests that this infection occurs during oogenesis in the recipient female. Our results document the conversion of an exogenous infectious ecotropic murine leukemia virus to an endogenous provirus without any manipulation of either eggs or embryos.

  11. Adult soft tissue sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    STS; Leiomyosarcoma; Hemangiosarcoma; Kaposi's sarcoma; Lymphangiosarcoma; Synovial sarcoma; Neurofibrosarcoma; Liposarcoma; Fibrosarcoma; Malignant fibrous histiocytoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma; Angiosarcoma

  12. A role for MALT1 activity in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus latency and growth of primary effusion lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bonsignore, L; Passelli, K; Pelzer, C; Perroud, M; Konrad, A; Thurau, M; Stürzl, M; Dai, L; Trillo-Tinoco, J; Del Valle, L; Qin, Z; Thome, M

    2017-03-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an incurable malignancy that develops in immunodeficient patients as a consequence of latent infection of B-cells with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV). Malignant growth of KSHV-infected B cells requires the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which controls maintenance of viral latency and suppression of the viral lytic program. Here we show that the KSHV proteins K13 and K15 promote NF-κB activation via the protease mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein-1 (MALT1), a key driver of NF-κB activation in lymphocytes. Inhibition of the MALT1 protease activity induced a switch from the latent to the lytic stage of viral infection, and led to reduced growth and survival of PEL cell lines in vitro and in a xenograft model. These results demonstrate a key role for the proteolytic activity of MALT1 in PEL, and provide a rationale for the pharmacological targeting of MALT1 in PEL therapy.

  13. A role for MALT1 activity in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus latency and growth of primary effusion lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bonsignore, L; Passelli, K; Pelzer, C; Perroud, M; Konrad, A; Thurau, M; Stürzl, M; Dai, L; Trillo-Tinoco, J; Del Valle, L; Qin, Z; Thome, M

    2017-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an incurable malignancy that develops in immunodeficient patients as a consequence of latent infection of B-cells with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV). Malignant growth of KSHV-infected B cells requires the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which controls maintenance of viral latency and suppression of the viral lytic program. Here we show that the KSHV proteins K13 and K15 promote NF-κB activation via the protease mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein-1 (MALT1), a key driver of NF-κB activation in lymphocytes. Inhibition of the MALT1 protease activity induced a switch from the latent to the lytic stage of viral infection, and led to reduced growth and survival of PEL cell lines in vitro and in a xenograft model. These results demonstrate a key role for the proteolytic activity of MALT1 in PEL, and provide a rationale for the pharmacological targeting of MALT1 in PEL therapy. PMID:27538487

  14. Rous Sarcoma Virus RNA Stability Element Inhibits Deadenylation of mRNAs with Long 3′UTRs

    PubMed Central

    Balagopal, Vidya; Beemon, Karen L.

    2017-01-01

    All retroviruses use their full-length primary transcript as the major mRNA for Group-specific antigen (Gag) capsid proteins. This results in a long 3′ untranslated region (UTR) downstream of the termination codon. In the case of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), there is a 7 kb 3′UTR downstream of the gag terminator, containing the pol, env, and src genes. mRNAs containing long 3′UTRs, like those with premature termination codons, are frequently recognized by the cellular nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) machinery and targeted for degradation. To prevent this, RSV has evolved an RNA stability element (RSE) in the RNA immediately downstream of the gag termination codon. This 400-nt RNA sequence stabilizes premature termination codons (PTCs) in gag. It also stabilizes globin mRNAs with long 3′UTRs, when placed downstream of the termination codon. It is not clear how the RSE stabilizes the mRNA and prevents decay. We show here that the presence of RSE inhibits deadenylation severely. In addition, the RSE also impairs decapping (DCP2) and 5′-3′ exonucleolytic (XRN1) function in knockdown experiments in human cells. PMID:28763028

  15. Prevention of Contamination by Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus: Susceptibility to Alcohol-Based Disinfectants and Environmental Stability

    PubMed Central

    Palesch, David; Khalid, Mohammad; Stürzel, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) represents a novel γ-retrovirus that is capable of infecting human cells and has been classified as a biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) organism. Hence, XMRV represents a potential risk for personnel in laboratories worldwide. Here, we measured the stability of XMRV and its susceptibility to alcohol-based disinfectants. To this end, we exposed an infectious XMRV reporter virus encoding a secretable luciferase to different temperatures, pH values, and disinfectants and infected XMRV-permissive Raji B cells to measure residual viral infectivity. We found that 1 min treatment of XMRV particles at 60°C is sufficient to reduce infectivity by 99.9%. XMRV infectivity was maximal at a neutral pH but was reduced by 86% at pH 4 and 99.9% at pH 10. The common hand and surface disinfectants ethanol and isopropanol as well as the cell fixation reagent paraformaldehyde abrogated XMRV infectivity entirely, as indicated by a reduction of infectivity exceeding 99.99%. Our findings provide evidence of specific means to inactivate XMRV. Their application will help to prevent unintended XMRV contamination of cell cultures in laboratories and minimize the risk for laboratory personnel and health care workers to become infected with this biosafety level 2 organism. PMID:24532072

  16. Prevention of contamination by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus: susceptibility to alcohol-based disinfectants and environmental stability.

    PubMed

    Palesch, David; Khalid, Mohammad; Stürzel, Christina M; Münch, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) represents a novel γ-retrovirus that is capable of infecting human cells and has been classified as a biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) organism. Hence, XMRV represents a potential risk for personnel in laboratories worldwide. Here, we measured the stability of XMRV and its susceptibility to alcohol-based disinfectants. To this end, we exposed an infectious XMRV reporter virus encoding a secretable luciferase to different temperatures, pH values, and disinfectants and infected XMRV-permissive Raji B cells to measure residual viral infectivity. We found that 1 min treatment of XMRV particles at 60°C is sufficient to reduce infectivity by 99.9%. XMRV infectivity was maximal at a neutral pH but was reduced by 86% at pH 4 and 99.9% at pH 10. The common hand and surface disinfectants ethanol and isopropanol as well as the cell fixation reagent paraformaldehyde abrogated XMRV infectivity entirely, as indicated by a reduction of infectivity exceeding 99.99%. Our findings provide evidence of specific means to inactivate XMRV. Their application will help to prevent unintended XMRV contamination of cell cultures in laboratories and minimize the risk for laboratory personnel and health care workers to become infected with this biosafety level 2 organism.

  17. HUMAN SARCOMAS IN CULTURE

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, Gaetano; Beth, Elke; Hirshaut, Yashar; Aoki, Tadao; Old, Lloyd J.; Boyse, Edward A.; Chopra, Harish C.

    1971-01-01

    In a study of human sarcomas maintained in culture for periods up to two years, the following observations were made. The most prominent cell type in serially cultured osteosarcomas was fibroblastic in appearance. After 16–20 wk in culture some lines spontaneously developed foci of altered cells resembling the foci produced in monolayer cultures by oncogenic viruses. The presence of these foci in the sarcoma cultures was transient, and usually they did not reappear; but in one instance they recurred with a characteristic periodicity of several weeks. From one of the sarcoma lines, in which foci appeared after 5 months in culture, two subcultures were established from stored frozen cells and these both exhibited foci after approximately the same lapse of time. The same phenomenon has been seen with another line, suggesting that the time of appearance of foci is characteristic for particular sarcomas. Foci of similar type could sometimes be induced in monolayer cultures of human fibroblasts by filtered medium from cultured sarcomas; this bore no relation to the presence or absence of foci in the sarcoma cultures at the time the filtrate was prepared. Electron microscopy of the spontaneous and induced foci, and of the sarcoma cultures, revealed no demonstrable virus. 12 out of 15 sarcoma cultures contained an antigen (S) demonstrable by indirect immunofluorescence with human sera. It was not present in any of the original sarcoma specimens, nor in any culture lines other than sarcomas. At least 3–4 wk in culture appear to be required for its demonstration. The antigen was cytoplasmic, occurred in only a small proportion of the cells, and was unpredictably variable in its expression, even in the same culture line. It could be induced in monolayer cultures of human fibroblasts by filtrates of medium from sarcoma cultures. As with the foci, the induction of S antigen in indicator cultures was not dependent upon the expression of antigen in the sarcoma line from which

  18. Fv-1 determinants in xenotropic murine leukemia viruses studied with biological assay systems: Isolation of xenotropic virus with N-tropic Fv-1 activity in the cryptic form.

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, K; Narita, H; Adachi, A; Tsuruta, S; Yorifuji, T; Ishimoto, A

    1982-01-01

    By a biological assay system using phenotypically mixed ecotropic and xenotropic murine leukemia viruses, we investigated whether in the virions of a xenotropic virus there is N- or B-tropic Fv-1 determinant in active form. The existence of N-tropic Fv-1 determinant was demonstrated in SL-XT-1 xenotropic virus isolated from the spleen of a 3-month-old SL mouse, and the N-tropic Fv-1 tropism was confirmed by analysis of the phenotypically mixed viruses harvested from clonal SC-1 cells doubly infected with the SL-XT-1 and B-tropic ecotropic viruses. However, neither N- nor B-tropic Fv-1 determinant was demonstrated in any xenotropic viruses isolated from embryo cells of BALB/c, NZB, or DBA/2 mice, or Cas E #1-IU, and xenotropic-like virus isolated from a wild mouse. PMID:6283153

  19. Heptad repeat 2-based peptides inhibit avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup a infection and identify a fusion intermediate.

    PubMed

    Netter, Robert C; Amberg, Sean M; Balliet, John W; Biscone, Mark J; Vermeulen, Arwen; Earp, Laurie J; White, Judith M; Bates, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Fusion proteins of enveloped viruses categorized as class I are typified by two distinct heptad repeat domains within the transmembrane subunit. These repeats are important structural elements that assemble into the six-helix bundles characteristic of the fusion-activated envelope trimer. Peptides derived from these domains can be potent and specific inhibitors of membrane fusion and virus infection. To facilitate our understanding of retroviral entry, peptides corresponding to the two heptad repeat domains of the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A (ASLV-A) TM subunit of the envelope protein were characterized. Two peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR2), offset from one another by three residues, were effective inhibitors of infection, while two overlapping peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (HR1) were not. Analysis of envelope mutants containing substitutions within the HR1 domain revealed that a single amino acid change, L62A, significantly reduced sensitivity to peptide inhibition. Virus bound to cells at 4 degrees C became sensitive to peptide within the first 5 min of elevating the temperature to 37 degrees C and lost sensitivity to peptide after 15 to 30 min, consistent with a transient intermediate in which the peptide binding site is exposed. In cell-cell fusion experiments, peptide inhibitor sensitivity occurred prior to a fusion-enhancing low-pH pulse. Soluble receptor for ASLV-A induces a lipophilic character in the envelope which can be measured by stable liposome binding, and this activation was found to be unaffected by inhibitory HR2 peptide. Finally, receptor-triggered conformational changes in the TM subunit were also found to be unaffected by inhibitory peptide. These changes are marked by a dramatic shift in mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from a subunit of 37 kDa to a complex of about 80 kDa. Biotinylated HR2 peptide bound specifically to the 80-kDa complex

  20. Murine Leukemia Virus Uses NXF1 for Nuclear Export of Spliced and Unspliced Viral Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Toshie; Davila, Jaime I.; Malcolm, Jessica A.; Kocher, Jean-Pierre A.; Tonne, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intron-containing mRNAs are subject to restricted nuclear export in higher eukaryotes. Retroviral replication requires the nucleocytoplasmic transport of both spliced and unspliced RNA transcripts, and RNA export mechanisms of gammaretroviruses are poorly characterized. Here, we report the involvement of the nuclear export receptor NXF1/TAP in the nuclear export of gammaretroviral RNA transcripts. We identified a conserved cis-acting element in the pol gene of gammaretroviruses, including murine leukemia virus (MLV) and xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMRV), named the CAE (cytoplasmic accumulation element). The CAE enhanced the cytoplasmic accumulation of viral RNA transcripts and the expression of viral proteins without significantly affecting the stability, splicing, or translation efficiency of the transcripts. Insertion of the CAE sequence also facilitated Rev-independent HIV Gag expression. We found that the CAE sequence interacted with NXF1, whereas disruption of NXF1 ablated CAE function. Thus, the CAE sequence mediates the cytoplasmic accumulation of gammaretroviral transcripts in an NXF1-dependent manner. Disruption of NXF1 expression impaired cytoplasmic accumulations of both spliced and unspliced RNA transcripts of XMRV and MLV, resulting in their nuclear retention or degradation. Thus, our results demonstrate that gammaretroviruses use NXF1 for the cytoplasmic accumulation of both spliced and nonspliced viral RNA transcripts. IMPORTANCE Murine leukemia virus (MLV) has been studied as one of the classic models of retrovirology. Although unspliced host messenger RNAs are rarely exported from the nucleus, MLV actively exports unspliced viral RNAs to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive studies, how MLV achieves this difficult task has remained a mystery. Here, we have studied the RNA export mechanism of MLV and found that (i) the genome contains a sequence which supports the efficient nuclear export of viral RNAs, (ii) the cellular factor NXF1 is

  1. Bovine vaccinia: Inactivated Vaccinia virus vaccine induces protection in murine model.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Costa, Erica Azevedo; Costa, Aristoteles Gomes; Silva, Natalia Lopes da; Lage, Andrey Pereira; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2017-05-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV), caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), is a zoonosis characterized by exanthematous lesions on the teats of dairy cows and the milkers' hands. Since 1999, due to the occurrence of many BV outbreaks in dairy farms across all Brazilian regions, there is a need to improve the control and prevention measures of the disease. Vaccination is one of the major tools to prevent viral diseases, and it could be an alternative for BV prevention. The main objective of this study was the development of vaccine formulations against BV using the inactivated VACV strain GP2 as antigen combined with different adjuvants. Potency tests were performed in mice, which were vaccinated with two doses at a 21-day interval, and then challenged with the vaccine homologous virus. VACV strain GP2 inactivated by beta-propiolactone (BPL) in association with adjuvants was effective in inducing a humoral immune response against VACV, as measured by neutralizing antibody (NA) titers, and was variable depending on the adjuvant used in each vaccine formulation. The vaccine formulation containing aluminum hydroxide (AH) associated with saponin as adjuvant induced the production of high NA titers in all vaccinated mice, giving 100% protection in Balb/c murine model after challenge with homologous virus. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Murine leukemia virus infects early bone marrow progenitors in immunocompetent mice.

    PubMed

    Tumas-Brundage, K M; Garret, W; Blank, K; Prystowsky, M B

    1996-10-15

    Chronic murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) are retroviruses which induce leukemias/lymphomas after long latency periods. The induction of leukemia by MuLVs is complex, requiring multiple steps beginning with infection of an appropriate target cell. A number of investigators have proposed a bone marrow-thymus axis in the development of retrovirus induced T-cell lymphoma in which cells are initially infected in the bone marrow. These bone marrow cells or their progeny migrate to the thymus during the disease process. In our system using adult, immunocompetent BALB.K mice infected with E-55(+) MuLV, a similar pattern is seen; integrated virus is initially detectable in the bone marrow and spleen and only later in the thymus. In order to better understand the leukemic process, we analyzed the bone marrow from adult, immunocompetent BALB.K mice infected with the E-55(+) MuLV in bone marrow colony assays. The results from these assays demonstrate that either a pluripotent progenitor cell or an early progenitor cell is a target in the bone marrow for the virus.

  3. Improved transduction of primary murine hepatocytes by recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 vectors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L; Li, W; Yang, Z; Chen, L; Li, Y; Qing, K; Weigel-Kelley, K A; Yoder, M C; Shou, W; Srivastava, A

    2004-07-01

    Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV) vectors are currently in use in Phase I/II clinical trials for gene therapy of cystic fibrosis and hemophilia B. Although 100% of murine hepatocytes can be targeted by AAV vectors, the transgene expression is limited to approximately 5% of hepatocytes. Since the viral genome is a single-stranded DNA, and single strands of both polarities are encapsidated with equal frequency, it has been suggested that failure to undergo DNA strand-annealing accounts for the lack of efficient transgene expression. We and others, on the other hand, have proposed that failure to undergo viral second-strand DNA synthesis attributes to the observed low efficiency of transgene expression. We have previously documented that a cellular protein, designated FKBP52, when present in phosphorylated forms, inhibits the viral second-strand DNA synthesis, and consequently, limits transgene expression in nonhepatic cells, whereas unphosphorylated forms of FKBP52 have no effect. To further evaluate whether phosphorylated FKBP52 is also involved in regulating AAV-mediated transgene expression in murine hepatocytes, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing the cellular T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) protein, known to catalyze dephosphorylation of FKBP52, as well as mice deficient in FKBP52. We demonstrate here that dephosphorylation of FKBP52 in TC-PTP transgenic (TC-PTP-TG) mice, and removal of FKBP52 in FKBP52-knockout (FKBP52-KO) mice results in efficient transduction of murine hepatocytes following tail-vein injection of recombinant AAV vectors. We also document efficient viral second-strand DNA synthesis in hepatocytes from both TC-PTP-TG and FKBP52-KO mice. Thus, our data strongly support the contention that the viral second-strand DNA synthesis, rather than DNA strand-annealing, is the rate-limiting step in the efficient transduction of hepatocytes, which should have implications in the optimal use of recombinant AAV vectors in human gene therapy.

  4. Localization of actin in Moloney murine leukemia virus by immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nermut, M V; Wallengren, K; Pager, J

    1999-07-20

    Immunoelectron microscopy was used to detect actin in wild-type (wt) Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) and in virus-like particles (VLP) produced by recombinant Semliki Forest virus expressing only the MoMuLV gag polyprotein. Gold immunolabeling revealed the presence of actin on the surface of delipidized VLP and delipidized wt virus particles. Statistical evaluation of the number of colloidal gold particles per VLP revealed a large range of values and a prevalence of VLP with small numbers of gold particles. Labeling for actin was lost after prolonged treatment of VLP with 1% Nonidet-P40, high-pH buffer, or gelsolin. Gold immunolabeling with antibodies to gag proteins p15 (MA) and p12 and p30 (CA) was abundant and was not affected by treatment of VLP or wt virus with 1% Nonidet or gelsolin. VLP treated with a mixture of detergent and aldehyde fixatives showed more uniform and consistent labeling for actin than without fixatives. Negative staining or heavy metal shadowing revealed a globular surface of delipidized VLP. Stereomicrographs of gold-immunolabeled VLP showed that p15gag and p12gag were associated with the globular projections. Delipidized VLP were also well labeled with antibody to p30gag, which indicated that the gag shell permitted access of antibodies to p30gag and was therefore not a closely packed structure. Labeling for actin-binding proteins moesin and ezrin was negative in both the wt virus and the VLP. The absence of Gaussian distribution of actin in the sample of VLP suggests that actin is not a structural protein and its presence in MuLV virus particles may be fortuitous. This, however, does not rule out any possible role of actin in transport, assembly, budding, or release of virus particles, events which take place in the cytoplasm or at the plasma membrane. The site of actin in VLP is discussed in relation to the present knowledge of the molecular organization of the MuLV gag shell.

  5. Effects of murine leukemia virus env gene proteins on macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapes, S. K.; Takemoto, L. J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    F5b Tumor cells were incubated with concentrated culture supernatants taken from cells resistant (F5m) or sensitive (F5b) to contact-dependent macrophage cytotoxicity. Macrophage cell line B6MP102 and murine peritoneal macrophages killed targets incubated with supernatants taken from sensitive cells but poorly killed cells incubated in supernatants isolated from resistant cells. Membranes from cells resistant to macrophage killing, F5m, were fused into F5b cells. The fused F5b cells were killed significantly less than F5b cells fused with F5b cell membranes or untreated F5b cells. The decreased killing of F5b cells corresponded to increased concentrations of gp70(a) molecules on F5b cells. Affinity purified gp70(a) was added to cytotoxicity assays but failed to inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. P15E molecules were detectable on both F5b and F5m cells. In addition, a synthetic peptide found to exhibit the inhibitory properties of p15E was added to cytotoxicity assays. P15E synthetic peptide also did not inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity. Therefore, env gene proteins of murine leukemia virus do not appear responsible for inducing tumor cell resistance to activated macrophage contact-dependent cytotoxicity.

  6. Seroprevalence of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus in normal and retrovirus-infected blood donors.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiaoxing; Swanson, Priscilla; Tang, Ning; Leckie, Gregor W; Devare, Sushil G; Schochetman, Gerald; Hackett, John

    2012-02-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) has been reported in patients with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome. Although results have been conflicting, the potential of XMRV as an infectious human retrovirus has raised concerns about transfusion safety. To address this issue, normal and retrovirus-infected blood donors were screened for evidence of XMRV infection. Plasma from 1000 US, 100 human immunodeficiency virus Type 1-infected Cameroonian, and 642 human T-lymphotropic virus Type I (HTLV-I)-infected or uninfected Japanese blood donors as well as 311 sexually transmitted disease diagnostic specimens were screened for antibodies to XMRV gp70 and p15E using chemiluminescent immunoassays (CMIAs). CMIA-reactive samples were evaluated by p30 CMIA, Western blot, and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. XMRV seroreactivity was low (0%-0.6%) with the exception of the HTLV-I-infected donors (4.9%). Antibody was detected against only a single XMRV protein (p15E or gp70); none of the seroreactive samples had detectable XMRV pol or env sequences. The elevated seroreactivity in HTLV-I-infected donors was due to an increased p15E seroreactive rate (4.1%). Inspection of XMRV and HTLV sequences revealed a high level of conservation within the immunodominant region (IDR) of the transmembrane protein. In some cases, HTLV IDR peptide competitively reduced the XMRV p15E signal. Based on the low prevalence of seroreactivity, detection of antibody to only a single XMRV protein and the absence of XMRV sequences, this study finds no compelling evidence of XMRV in normal or retrovirus-infected blood donors. The increased p15E seroreactivity observed in HTLV infection is likely due to cross-reactive antibodies. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  7. The xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related retrovirus debate continues at first international workshop.

    PubMed

    Stoye, Jonathan P; Silverman, Robert H; Boucher, Charles A; Le Grice, Stuart F J

    2010-12-22

    The 1st International Workshop on Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Retrovirus (XMRV), co-sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, The Department of Health and Human Services and Abbott Diagnostics, was convened on September 7/8, 2010 on the NIH campus, Bethesda, MD. Attracting an international audience of over 200 participants, the 2-day event combined a series of plenary talks with updates on different aspects of XMRV research, addressing basic gammaretrovirus biology, host response, association of XMRV with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer, assay development and epidemiology. The current status of XMRV research, concerns among the scientific community and suggestions for future actions are summarized in this meeting report.

  8. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of mouse hepatitis virus and mycoplasma pulmonis infection with murine antiserum.

    PubMed

    Liang, C T; Wu, S C; Huang, Y T; Lin, Y C; Chang, W J; Chou, J Y; Liang, S C; Liu, C H

    2004-01-01

    This study established a modified alkaline phosphatase-labelled avidin-biotin-complex (ABC-AP) method for diagnosis of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) and Mycoplasma pulmonis infection from formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded sections, murine antibody-positive serum being used as the primary reagent. With this method, MHV antigen in cAnNCrj.Cg-Foxn1(nu)/Foxn1(nu) mice and M. pulmonis antigen in Wistar rats were immunolabelled in tissue sections. MHV antigen was clearly detected in samples of liver, stomach, caecal and colonic mucosa, and spleen. M. pulmonis antigen was demonstrated on the luminal surface of bronchiolar epithelial cells. This method may prove useful in diagnosis when commercial antisera are unavailable or when immunosuppression prevents serological diagnosis.

  9. Glucocorticoid exposure alters the pathogenesis of Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus during acute infection

    PubMed Central

    Young, Erin E.; Prentice, Thomas W.; Satterlee, Danielle; McCullough, Heath; Sieve, Amy N.; Johnson, Robin R.; Welsh, Thomas H.; Welsh, C. Jane R.; Meagher, Mary W.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown that chronic restraint stress exacerbates Theiler’s virus infection, a murine model for CNS inflammation and multiple sclerosis. The current set of experiments was designed to evaluate the potential role of glucocorticoids in the deleterious effects of restraint stress on acute CNS inflammatory disease. Exposure to chronic restraint stress resulted in elevated levels of corticosterone as well as increased clinical scores and weight loss (Experiment 1). In addition, corticosterone administration alone exacerbated behavioral signs of TMEV-induced sickness (i.e. decreased body weight, increased symptoms of encephalitis, and increased mortality) and reduced inflammation in the CNS (Experiment 2). Infected subjects receiving exogenous corticosterone showed exacerbation of acute phase measures of sickness and severe mortality as well as decreased viral clearance from CNS (Experiment 3). These findings indicate that corticosterone exposure alone is sufficient to exacerbate acute CNS inflammatory disease. PMID:18538803

  10. Organization, distribution, and stability of endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia virus DNA sequences in chromosomes of Mus musculus.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, N A; Copeland, N G; Taylor, B A; Lee, B K

    1982-01-01

    The endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia virus DNA content and integration sites were characterized for 54 inbred strains and substrains of mice by restriction enzyme digestion, Southern blotting, and hybridization with an ecotropic murine leukemia virus DNA-specific probe. More than 75% of these strains carried endogenous ecotropic proviruses which were located in at least 29 distinct integration sites in chromosomes of Mus musculus. Fourteen of these proviruses have been assigned specific locus designations. Most, but not all, of the endogenous ecotropic proviruses were structurally indistinguishable by this analysis from the prototype AKR ecotropic virus, and the distribution of these proviruses followed known relationships among the inbred strains and substrains of mice. These results suggest that, in general, viral DNA integration preceded the establishment of inbred mouse strains and that these integrations are relatively stable. Images PMID:6287001

  11. Viral Bcl-2 Encoded by the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Is Vital for Virus Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Gelgor, Anastasia; Kalt, Inna; Bergson, Shir; Brulois, Kevin F.; Jung, Jae U.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) open reading frame 16 (orf16) encodes a viral Bcl-2 (vBcl-2) protein which shares sequence and functional homology with the Bcl-2 family. Like its cellular homologs, vBcl-2 protects various cell types from apoptosis and can also negatively regulate autophagy. vBcl-2 is transcribed during lytic infection; however, its exact function has not been determined to date. By using bacterial artificial chromosome 16 (BAC16) clone carrying the full-length KSHV genome, we have generated recombinant KSHV mutants that fail to express vBcl-2 or express mCherry-tagged vBcl-2. We show that the vBcl-2 protein is expressed at relatively low levels during lytic induction and that a lack of vBcl-2 largely reduces the efficiency of KSHV reactivation in terms of lytic gene expression, viral DNA replication, and production of infectious particles. In contrast, the establishment of latency was not affected by the absence of vBcl-2. Our findings suggest an important role for vBcl-2 during initial phases of lytic reactivation and/or during subsequent viral propagation. Given the known functions of vBcl-2 in regulating apoptosis and autophagy, which involve its direct interaction with cellular proteins and thus require high levels of protein expression, it appears that vBcl-2 may have additional regulatory functions that do not depend on high levels of protein expression. IMPORTANCE The present study shows for the first time the expression of endogenous vBcl-2 protein in KSHV-infected cell lines and demonstrates the importance of vBcl-2 during the initial phases of lytic reactivation and/or during its subsequent propagation. It is suggested that vBcl-2 has additional regulatory functions beyond apoptosis and autophagy repression that do not depend on high levels of protein expression. PMID:25740992

  12. Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated-Herpes Virus (KSHV) Seroprevalence in Pregnant Women in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Factors previously associated with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) transmission in Africa include sexual, familial, and proximity to river water. We measured the seroprevalence of KSHV in relation to HIV, syphilis, and demographic factors among pregnant women attending public antenatal clinics in the Gauteng province of South Africa. Methods We tested for antibodies to KSHV lytic K8.1 and latent Orf73 antigens in 1740 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics who contributed blood to the "National HIV and Syphilis Sero-Prevalence Survey - South Africa, 2001". Information on HIV and syphilis serology, age, education, residential area, gravidity, and parity was anonymously linked to evaluate risk factors for KSHV seropositivity. Clinics were grouped by municipality regions and their proximity to the two main river catchments defined. Results KSHV seropositivity (reactive to either lytic K8.1 and latent Orf73) was nearly twice that of HIV (44.6% vs. 23.1%). HIV and syphilis seropositivity was 12.7% and 14.9% in women without KSHV, and 36.1% and 19.9% respectively in those with KSHV. Women who are KSHV seropositive were 4 times more likely to be HIV positive than those who were KSHV seronegative (AOR 4.1 95%CI: 3.4 - 5.7). Although, women with HIV infection were more likely to be syphilis seropositive (AOR 1.8 95%CI: 1.3 - 2.4), no association between KSHV and syphilis seropositivity was observed. Those with higher levels of education had lower levels of KSHV seropositivity compared to those with lower education levels. KSHV seropositivity showed a heterogeneous pattern of prevalence in some localities. Conclusions The association between KSHV and HIV seropositivity and a lack of common association with syphilis, suggests that KSHV transmission may involve geographical and cultural factors other than sexual transmission. PMID:20807396

  13. Ecotropic Murine Leukemia Virus Infection of Glial Progenitors Interferes with Oligodendrocyte Differentiation: Implications for Neurovirulence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Dunphy, Jaclyn M.; Pedraza, Carlos E.; Lynch, Connor R.; Cardona, Sandra M.; Macklin, Wendy B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Certain murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) are capable of inducing fatal progressive spongiform motor neuron disease in mice that is largely mediated by viral Env glycoprotein expression within central nervous system (CNS) glia. While the etiologic mechanisms and the glial subtypes involved remain unresolved, infection of NG2 glia was recently observed to correlate spatially and temporally with altered neuronal physiology and spongiogenesis. Since one role of NG2 cells is to serve as oligodendrocyte (OL) progenitor cells (OPCs), we examined here whether their infection by neurovirulent (FrCasE) or nonneurovirulent (Fr57E) ecotropic MLVs influenced their viability and/or differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that OPCs, but not OLs, are major CNS targets of both FrCasE and Fr57E. We also show that MLV infection of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in culture did not affect survival, proliferation, or OPC progenitor marker expression but suppressed certain glial differentiation markers. Assessment of glial differentiation in vivo using transplanted transgenic NPCs showed that, while MLVs did not affect cellular engraftment or survival, they did inhibit OL differentiation, irrespective of MLV neurovirulence. In addition, in chimeric brains, where FrCasE-infected NPC transplants caused neurodegeneration, the transplanted NPCs proliferated. These results suggest that MLV infection is not directly cytotoxic to OPCs but rather acts to interfere with OL differentiation. Since both FrCasE and Fr57E viruses restrict OL differentiation but only FrCasE induces overt neurodegeneration, restriction of OL maturation alone cannot account for neuropathogenesis. Instead neurodegeneration may involve a two-hit scenario where interference with OPC differentiation combined with glial Env-induced neuronal hyperexcitability precipitates disease. IMPORTANCE A variety of human and animal retroviruses are capable of causing central nervous system (CNS) neurodegeneration manifested as motor

  14. Membrane Binding of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein Is Cooperative and Dependent on the Spacer Peptide Assembly Domain

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Jin, Danni; Lösche, Mathias; Vogt, Volker M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The principles underlying membrane binding and assembly of retroviral Gag proteins into a lattice are understood. However, little is known about how these processes are related. Using purified Rous sarcoma virus Gag and Gag truncations, we studied the interrelation of Gag-Gag interaction and Gag-membrane interaction. Both by liposome binding and by surface plasmon resonance on a supported bilayer, Gag bound to membranes much more tightly than did matrix (MA), the isolated membrane binding domain. In principle, this difference could be explained either by protein-protein interactions leading to cooperativity in membrane binding or by the simultaneous interaction of the N-terminal MA and the C-terminal nucleocapsid (NC) of Gag with the bilayer, since both are highly basic. However, we found that NC was not required for strong membrane binding. Instead, the spacer peptide assembly domain (SPA), a putative 24-residue helical sequence comprising the 12-residue SP segment of Gag and overlapping the capsid (CA) C terminus and the NC N terminus, was required. SPA is known to be critical for proper assembly of the immature Gag lattice. A single amino acid mutation in SPA that abrogates assembly in vitro dramatically reduced binding of Gag to liposomes. In vivo, plasma membrane localization was dependent on SPA. Disulfide cross-linking based on ectopic Cys residues showed that the contacts between Gag proteins on the membrane are similar to the known contacts in virus-like particles. Taken together, we interpret these results to mean that Gag membrane interaction is cooperative in that it depends on the ability of Gag to multimerize. IMPORTANCE The retroviral structural protein Gag has three major domains. The N-terminal MA domain interacts directly with the plasma membrane (PM) of cells. The central CA domain, together with immediately adjoining sequences, facilitates the assembly of thousands of Gag molecules into a lattice. The C-terminal NC domain interacts with

  15. Can Kaposi Sarcoma Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kaposi Sarcoma Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Kaposi Sarcoma Be Prevented? Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is caused ... Sarcoma? Can Kaposi Sarcoma Be Prevented? More In Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  16. Crystal structures of the reverse transcriptase-associated ribonuclease H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia-virus related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dongwen; Chung, Suhman; Miller, Maria; Le Grice, Stuart F.J.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-06-19

    The ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain of retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) plays a critical role in the life cycle by degrading the RNA strands of DNA/RNA hybrids. In addition, RNase H activity is required to precisely remove the RNA primers from nascent (-) and (+) strand DNA. We report here three crystal structures of the RNase H domain of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) RT, namely (i) the previously identified construct from which helix C was deleted, (ii) the intact domain, and (iii) the intact domain complexed with an active site {alpha}-hydroxytropolone inhibitor. Enzymatic assays showed that the intact RNase H domain retained catalytic activity, whereas the variant lacking helix C was only marginally active, corroborating the importance of this helix for enzymatic activity. Modeling of the enzyme-substrate complex elucidated the essential role of helix C in binding a DNA/RNA hybrid and its likely mode of recognition. The crystal structure of the RNase H domain complexed with {beta}-thujaplicinol clearly showed that coordination by two divalent cations mediates recognition of the inhibitor.

  17. Fidelity of Target Site Duplication and Sequence Preference during Integration of Xenotropic Murine Leukemia Virus-Related Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sanggu; Rusmevichientong, Alice; Dong, Beihua; Remenyi, Roland; Silverman, Robert H.; Chow, Samson A.

    2010-01-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus (XMRV) is a new human retrovirus associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome. The causal relationship of XMRV infection to human disease and the mechanism of pathogenicity have not been established. During retrovirus replication, integration of the cDNA copy of the viral RNA genome into the host cell chromosome is an essential step and involves coordinated joining of the two ends of the linear viral DNA into staggered sites on target DNA. Correct integration produces proviruses that are flanked by a short direct repeat, which varies from 4 to 6 bp among the retroviruses but is invariant for each particular retrovirus. Uncoordinated joining of the two viral DNA ends into target DNA can cause insertions, deletions, or other genomic alterations at the integration site. To determine the fidelity of XMRV integration, cells infected with XMRV were clonally expanded and DNA sequences at the viral-host DNA junctions were determined and analyzed. We found that a majority of the provirus ends were correctly processed and flanked by a 4-bp direct repeat of host DNA. A weak consensus sequence was also detected at the XMRV integration sites. We conclude that integration of XMRV DNA involves a coordinated joining of two viral DNA ends that are spaced 4 bp apart on the target DNA and proceeds with high fidelity. PMID:20421928

  18. Detection of receptor-specific murine leukemia virus binding to cells by immunofluorescence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Kadan, M J; Sturm, S; Anderson, W F; Eglitis, M A

    1992-01-01

    Four classes of murine leukemia virus (MuLV) which display distinct cellular tropisms and bind to different retrovirus receptors to initiate virus infection have been described. In the present study, we describe a rapid, sensitive immunofluorescence assay useful for characterizing the initial binding of MuLV to cells. By using the rat monoclonal antibody 83A25 (L. H. Evans, R. P. Morrison, F. G. Malik, J. Portis, and W. J. Britt, J. Virol. 64:6176-6183, 1990), which recognizes an epitope of the envelope gp70 molecule common to the different classes of MuLV, it is possible to analyse the binding of ecotropic, amphotropic, or xenotropic MuLV by using only a single combination of primary and secondary antibodies. The MuLV binding detected by this assay is envelope receptor specific and matches the susceptibility to infection determined for cells from a variety of species. The binding of amphotropic MuLV to NIH 3T3 cells was shown to be rapid, saturable, and temperature dependent. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells normally lack the ability to bind ecotropic virus and are not infectible by ecotropic vectors. Expression of the cloned ecotropic retrovirus receptor gene (Rec) in CHO-K1 cells confers high levels of ecotropic virus-specific binding and confers susceptibility to infection. Characterization of MuLV binding to primary cells may provide insight into the infectibility of cells by retroviruses and aid in the selection of appropriate vectors for gene transfer experiments. PMID:1312632

  19. Frequent detection of infectious xenotropic murine leukemia virus (XMLV) in human cultures established from mouse xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-An; Maitra, Anirban; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Rudin, Charles M; Peacock, Craig D; Karikari, Collins; Brekken, Rolf A; Stastny, Victor; Gao, Boning; Girard, Luc; Wistuba, Ignacio; Frenkel, Eugene; Minna, John D

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the frequency of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) presence in human cell lines established from mouse xenografts and to search for the evidence of horizontal viral spread to other cell lines. Results Six of 23 (26%) mouse DNA free xenograft cultures were strongly positive for MLV and their sequences had greater than 99% homology to known MLV strains. Four of five available supernatant fluids from these viral positive cultures were strongly positive for RT activity. Three of these supernatant fluids were studied to confirm the infectivity of the released virions for other human culture cells. Of the 78 non-xenograft derived cell lines maintained in the xenograft culture-containing facilities, 13 (17%) were positive for MLV, including XMRV, a virus strain first identified in human tissues. By contrast, all 50 cultures maintained in a xenograft culture-free facility were negative for viral sequences. Methodology We examined xenograft tumor cell lines from seven independent laboratories and 128 non-xenografted tumor cell lines. Cell line DNA was examined for mouse DNA contamination, and by 3 Taqman qPCR assays targeting the gag, env or pol regions of MLV. Sequencing was used for viral strain identification. Supernatant fluids were tested for reverse transcriptase (RT) activity. Conclusions Human cultures derived after mouse xenografting frequently contain and release highly infectious xenotropic MLV viruses. Laboratories working with xenograft-derived human cultures should be aware of the risk of contamination with potentially biohazardous human-tropic mouse viruses and their horizontal spread to other cultures. PMID:21750403

  20. Survival of murine norovirus and hepatitis A virus in different types of manure and biosolids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Jin, Yan; Sims, Tom; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2010-08-01

    Noroviruses and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are common causes of foodborne disease. They are usually shed in feces and have been found in sewage water, biosolids, and animal manures. With the wide application of manure and biosolids on agricultural lands, there is an increasing interest in investigating virus survival in manure and biosolids. In this study, Murine norovirus-1 (MNV) and HAV were inoculated into different types of animal manure and three types of differently treated biosolids at 20 degrees C and 4 degrees C for up to 60 days. Both HAV and MNV viral genomes degraded immediately in high pH biosolids type 2 and 3 at time zero. For other types of manure and biosolids, HAV RNA was significantly reduced in biosolids type 1 and in liquid dairy manure (DM) after 60 days stored at 20 degrees C, but was stable in all types of manure and biosolids type 1 at 4 degrees C. MNV RNA was unstable in pelletized poultry litter and biosolids type 1 at 20 degrees C, and less stable in liquid DM at both temperatures. For MNV infectivity, there was no significant difference among pelletized poultry litter, alum-treated poultry litter, raw poultry litter, and swine manure at either 20 degrees C or 4 degrees C after 60 days of storage. However, HAV stored in swine manure and raw poultry litter had significantly higher infectivity levels than HAV stored in alum-treated poultry litter at both 20 degrees C and 4 degrees C. Overall, both viruses were inactivated rapidly in alkaline pH biosolids and unstable in liquid DM, but alum added in poultry litter had different effects on the two viruses: alum inactivated some HAV at both temperatures but had no effect on MNV.

  1. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of Fujinami Sarcoma Virus: Tumorigenicity and Reversible Phosphorylation of the Transforming p140 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Hwa; Bister, Klaus; Moscovici, Carlo; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1981-01-01

    Several clones of Fujinami sarcoma virus (FSV) isolated from a laboratory stock or from mutagenized virus were temperature sensitive (ts) in transformation of cells in culture. When shifted from the permissive (37°C) to the nonpermissive (41.5°C) temperature, the cellular phenotype reverted to normal within 2 h, but it required about 48 h at 37°C to revert back to the transformed morphology. A temperature-resistant (tr) FSV clone was isolated from a tumor of an animal. All ts mutants were tumorigenic in animals but induced tumors only after latent periods of 12 to 25 days, compared to 5 to 6 days with tr virus. The ts lesions of the FSV mutants affected 90% of the phosphorylation of the nonstructural, gag-related 140,000-kilodalton phosphoprotein coded by FSV (p140), but did not affect virus replication or the synthesis of p140. Upon shifting from the permissive to the nonpermissive temperature, p140 was 90% dephosphorylated with an approximate 32P half-life of 20 min. When shifted back to the permissive temperature, the preexisting p140 was rephosphorylated in the absence of protein synthesis within a 90-min test period. Likewise, most of the phosphate of fully phosphorylated p140 was exchanged at the permissive temperature within 30 to 90 min even when protein synthesis was inhibited. However, the protein structure of p140 had a half-life of 5 h at both temperatures. These results prove p140 to be a substrate of reversible phosphorylation. Superinfection and transformation of ts FSV-infected cells maintained at the nonpermissive temperature with acute leukemia virus MC29 failed to phosphorylate p140. It would follow that in vivo phosphorylation of ts p140 is controlled by an FSV-specific mechanism and is a prerequisite, not a consequence, of transformation. p140 of ts FSV recovered from cells maintained at 41.5°C with anti-gag serum was over 10 times less phosphorylated by associated kinase than the same protein recovered from cells at 37°C if assayed in

  2. Generation of high-titre virus stocks using BrK.219, a B-cell line infected stably with recombinant Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Kati, Semra; Hage, Elias; Mynarek, Martin; Ganzenmueller, Tina; Indenbirken, Daniela; Grundhoff, Adam; Schulz, Thomas F

    2015-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a gamma-2-lymphotropic human oncogenic herpesvirus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and two B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD). KSHV establishes latency soon after infection in vivo and in vitro. Consequently, it is technically difficult to generate high-titre virus stocks required for infection experiments in tissue culture. Currently used methods of KSHV stock production involve induction of the lytic/productive cycle in PEL cell lines or in adherent cell lines harbouring recombinant KSHV genomes. In this study, the BJAB-derived B-cell line BrK.219, which is infected latently with a recombinant KSHV (rKSHV.219), is used to produce high-titre virus stocks. BrK.219 cells enter the lytic KSHV replication cycle upon cross-linking of B-cell receptors (BCRs) with anti-IgM antibodies without the need for additional, potentially toxic chemical inducers. High cell concentrations can be cultured and induced easily in spinner flasks, saving time and resources. The established protocol allows the generation of KSHV virus stocks with titres of up to 10(6) IU/ml in unconcentrated culture supernatants, representing a 10(3)-10(4)-fold improvement compared to conventional methods.

  3. Salivary production of IgA and IgG to human herpes virus 8 latent and lytic antigens by patients in whom Kaposi's sarcoma has regressed.

    PubMed

    Mbopi-Keou, Francois-Xavier; Legoff, Jerome; Piketty, Christophe; Hocini, Hakim; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Inoue, Naoki; Scully, Crispian M; Porter, Stephen R; Teo, Chong-Gee; Belec, Laurent

    2004-01-23

    IgG and IgA antibodies with specificities to a latent and a lytic antigen of human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) were detectable in the saliva and serum of eight patients whose Kaposi's sarcoma had regressed, seven of whom were HIV-1 infected. The measurement of antibody-specific activity and secretion rate, and the detection of secretory IgA all indicate anti-HHV-8 antibody activity in saliva. The specific humoral responses possibly influence mucosal replication of HHV-8, and in turn, that of HIV.

  4. Changes in Rous Sarcoma Virus RNA Secondary Structure near the Primer Binding Site upon tRNATrp Primer Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Shannon; Leis, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    Predicted secondary-structure elements encompassing the primer binding site in the 5′ untranslated region of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) RNA play an integral role in multiple viral replications steps including reverse transcription, DNA integration, and RNA packaging (A. Aiyar, D. Cobrinik, Z. Ge, H. J. Kung, and J. Leis, J. Virol. 66:2464–2472, 1992; D. Cobrinik, A. Aiyar, Z. Ge, M. Katzman, H. Huang, and J. Leis, J. Virol. 65:3864–3872, 1991; J. T. Miller, Z. Ge, S. Morris, K. Das, and J. Leis, J. Virol. 71:7648–7656, 1997). These elements include the U5-Leader stem, U5-IR stem-loop, and U5-TΨC interaction region. Limited digestion of the 5′ untranslated region of wild-type and mutant RSV RNAs with structure- and/or sequence-specific RNases detects the presence of the U5-Leader stem and the U5-IR stem-loop. When a tRNATrp primer is annealed to wild-type RNAs in vitro, limited nuclease mapping indicates that the U5-IR stem becomes partially unwound. This is not observed when mutant RNAs with altered U5-IR stem-loop structures are substituted for wild-type RNAs. The U5-Leader stem also becomes destabilized when the tRNA primer is annealed to either wild-type or mutant RNA fragments. Nuclease mapping studies of tRNATrp, as well as the viral RNA, indicate that the U5-TΨC helix does form in vitro upon primer annealing. Collectively, these data suggest that the various structural elements near the RSV primer binding site undergo significant changes during the process of primer annealing. PMID:10400722

  5. Cellular RNA homologous to the Abelson murine leukemia virus transforming gene: expression and relationship to the viral sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J Y; Baltimore, D

    1983-01-01

    To examine the expression of the cellular homolog of the Abelson murine leukemia virus transforming gene (the v-abl sequence), a DNA probe representing the v-abl sequence was prepared. The probe detected two cytoplasmic polyadenylic acid-containing c-abl RNAs of about 6.5 and 5.5 kilobases in a variety of rodent cells, and slightly larger RNAs were detected in human cells. These two RNA species were found in all normal tissues or cell lines examined, but at differing concentrations: liver cells had the least, fibroblastic cell lines had the most. By using a probe able to detect the cellular but not the viral gene, the two RNAs were shown to be present in Abelson murine leukemia virus-transformed cells at levels found either in their untransformed counterparts or in similar cell types transformed by other means. The target cells of the virus have a somewhat elevated level of the two RNAs although expression of the c-abl gene is not restricted to these cells. The v-abl sequence lacks 0.35 and 0.85 kilobases of the c-abl RNA on the 5' and 3' ends, respectively. Thus, the Abelson murine leukemia virus transforming gene is an internal fragment of the transcript of a normal cellular gene. Images PMID:6306446

  6. Expression of IMP1 enhances production of murine leukemia virus vector by facilitating viral genomic RNA packaging.

    PubMed

    Mai, Yun; Gao, Guangxia

    2010-12-29

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based retroviral vector is widely used for gene transfer. Efficient packaging of the genomic RNA is critical for production of high-titer virus. Here, we report that expression of the insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 1 (IMP1) enhanced the production of infectious MLV vector. Overexpression of IMP1 increased the stability of viral genomic RNA in virus producer cells and packaging of the RNA into progeny virus in a dose-dependent manner. Downregulation of IMP1 in virus producer cells resulted in reduced production of the retroviral vector. These results indicate that IMP1 plays a role in regulating the packaging of MLV genomic RNA and can be used for improving production of retroviral vectors.

  7. A locus that enhances the induction of endogenous ecotropic murine leukemia viruses is distinct from genome-length ecotropic proviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, J M; Risser, R

    1982-01-01

    The segregation of genes that enhance the induction of ecotropic murine leukemia viruses (In loci) has been compared with the segregation of ecotropic-specific nucleotide sequences in 12 low-leukemic mouse strains and 18 recombinant inbred strains. Endogenous ecotropic viruses of these strains are of genome length and structurally similar to AKR ecotropic proviruses. Low-leukemic strains of related pedigree contain ecotropic proviruses at common integration sites. Loci previously identified which enhance induction of ecotropic viruses (In genes) were correlated with the inheritance of ecotropic viral sequences in inbred low-leukemic mouse strains and in CXB recombinant inbred mouse strains. However, four BXH recombinant inbred strains were observed to possess an In gene(s) yet lack the probed envelope gene region for the corresponding endogenous ecotropic virus. These observations indicate that at least one gene that enhances ecotropic virus expression in vitro is encoded by DNA sequences outside ecotropic proviruses or by subgenomic viral sequences. Images PMID:6294342

  8. Effect of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus and cytokines on cultured oligodendrocytes and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Y; Dal Canto, M C

    1996-08-15

    The pathogenesis of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease is still controversial. Our hypothesis is that primary infection of oligodendrocytes (OLGs) is not a crucial event in the pathogenesis of demyelination in this model. In fact, it has been proposed that myelin may be destroyed, as an innocent bystander, following an antiviral delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. This hypothesis would not need widespread oligodendroglial infection, because virus present in other cells would be sufficient to trigger a DTH response. The present study demonstrates that cultured OLGs and astrocytes from susceptible strains of mice (SJL and DBA) and immortalized OLGs can be infected with TMEV in vitro. Infection of OLGs, however, is at very low levels and does not result in overt cytolytic effect. In contrast, infection of immortalized OLGs is very efficient and results in clear cytolysis. Because an important characteristic of DTH responses is the liberation of potentially injurious cytokines into adjacent tissues, we also examined the effects of mouse recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) on cultured OLGs and immortalized OLGs. We found that TNF-alpha caused immortalized OLG cytotoxicity in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In contrast, no cytotoxicity was observed on primary OLGs with any of the above cytokines. To determine whether functional effects could be demonstrated on primary OLGs by either virus or cytokines, we measured mRNA expression of different myelin proteins in primary and immortalized OLGs exposed to virus or TNF-alpha. Neither the BeAn strain or the GDVII strain of TMEV interfered with myelin protein mRNA expression in primary OLGs, whereas GDVII virus dramatically reduced myelin OLG glycoprotein (MOG) mRNA in immortalized OLGs. Interestingly, although even high concentrations of TNF-alpha (10,000 U/ml) did not produce primary OLG

  9. Greying with age in mice: relation to expression of murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed

    Morse, H C; Yetter, R A; Stimpfling, J H; Pitts, O M; Fredrickson, T N; Hartley, J W

    1985-06-01

    Some strains of C57BL/10 H-2-congenic mice were found to exhibit greying with age, whereas others did not. Two patterns of greying were observed, diffuse greying beginning at 4 to 6 months of age and patterned greying beginning at 4 to 6 weeks. Strains exhibiting either greying pattern expressed high levels of infectious ecotropic and mink cell focus-inducing murine leukemia viruses (MuLV) in tests of thymus and spleen and in cultures from skin or tail biopsies, whereas nongreying strains expressed little virus until late in life. Electron microscopy demonstrated large accumulations of MuLV in grey, but not in black areas, of skin from a mouse with patterned greying. Infectious MuLV was produced spontaneously by embryos of greying, but not of nongreying, mice and pups of nongreying strains fostered on greying mothers turned grey after 3 months. These results suggest that greying with age results from melanocyte dysfunction that occurs subsequent to pre- or early postnatal infection with MuLV.

  10. Functional Characterization of the N Termini of Murine Leukemia Virus Envelope Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chi-Wei; Roth, Monica J.

    2001-01-01

    The function of the N terminus of the murine leukemia virus (MuLV) surface (SU) protein was examined. A series of five chimeric envelope proteins (Env) were generated in which the N terminus of amphotropic 4070A was replaced by equivalent sequences from ecotropic Moloney MuLV (M-MuLV). Viral titers of these chimeras indicate that exchange with homologous sequences could be tolerated, up to V17eco/T15ampho (crossover III). Constructs encoding the first 28 amino acids (aa) of ecotropic M-MuLV resulted in Env expression and binding to the receptor; however, the virus titer was reduced 5- to 45-fold, indicating a postbinding block. Additional exchange beyond the first 28 aa of ecotropic MuLV Env resulted in defective protein expression. These N-terminal chimeras were also introduced into the AE4 chimeric Env backbone containing the amphotropic receptor binding domain joined at the hinge region to the ecotropic SU C terminus. In this backbone, introduction of the first 17 aa of the ecotropic Env protein significantly increased the titer compared to that of its parental chimera AE4, implying a functional coordination between the N terminus of SU and the C terminus of the SU and/or transmembrane proteins. These data functionally dissect the N-terminal sequence of the MuLV Env protein and identify differential effects on receptor-mediated entry. PMID:11287584

  11. Insights into the nuclear export of murine leukemia virus intron-containing RNA.

    PubMed

    Pessel-Vivares, Lucie; Houzet, Laurent; Lainé, Sébastien; Mougel, Marylène

    2015-01-01

    The retroviral genome consists of an intron-containing transcript that has essential cytoplasmic functions in the infected cell. This viral transcript can escape splicing, circumvent the nuclear checkpoint mechanisms and be transported to the cytoplasm by hijacking the host machinery. Once in the cytoplasm, viral unspliced RNA acts as mRNA to be translated and as genomic RNA to be packaged into nascent viruses. The murine leukemia virus (MLV) is among the first retroviruses discovered and is classified as simple Retroviridae due to its minimal encoding capacity. The oncogenic and transduction abilities of MLV are extensively studied, whereas surprisingly the crucial step of its nuclear export has remained unsolved until 2014. Recent work has revealed the recruitment by MLV of the cellular NXF1/Tap-dependent pathway for export. Unconventionally, MLV uses of Tap to export both spliced and unspliced viral RNAs. Unlike other retroviruses, MLV does not harbor a unique RNA signal for export. Indeed, multiple sequences throughout the MLV genome appear to promote export of the unspliced MLV RNA. We review here the current understanding of the export mechanism and highlight the determinants that influence MLV export. As the molecular mechanism of MLV export is elucidated, we will gain insight into the contribution of the export pathway to the cytoplasmic fate of the viral RNA.

  12. Insights into the nuclear export of murine leukemia virus intron-containing RNA

    PubMed Central

    Pessel-Vivares, Lucie; Houzet, Laurent; Lainé, Sébastien; Mougel, Marylène

    2015-01-01

    The retroviral genome consists of an intron-containing transcript that has essential cytoplasmic functions in the infected cell. This viral transcript can escape splicing, circumvent the nuclear checkpoint mechanisms and be transported to the cytoplasm by hijacking the host machinery. Once in the cytoplasm, viral unspliced RNA acts as mRNA to be translated and as genomic RNA to be packaged into nascent viruses. The murine leukemia virus (MLV) is among the first retroviruses discovered and is classified as simple Retroviridae due to its minimal encoding capacity. The oncogenic and transduction abilities of MLV are extensively studied, whereas surprisingly the crucial step of its nuclear export has remained unsolved until 2014. Recent work has revealed the recruitment by MLV of the cellular NXF1/Tap-dependent pathway for export. Unconventionally, MLV uses of Tap to export both spliced and unspliced viral RNAs. Unlike other retroviruses, MLV does not harbor a unique RNA signal for export. Indeed, multiple sequences throughout the MLV genome appear to promote export of the unspliced MLV RNA. We review here the current understanding of the export mechanism and highlight the determinants that influence MLV export. As the molecular mechanism of MLV export is elucidated, we will gain insight into the contribution of the export pathway to the cytoplasmic fate of the viral RNA. PMID:26158194

  13. Physical removal and transfer of murine norovirus and hepatitis A virus from contaminated produce by scrubbing and peeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Erickson, Marilyn C; Ortega, Ynes; Cannon, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Human noroviruses and hepatitis A virus are responsible for numerous outbreaks associated with handling fresh produce. In this study, physical removal of hepatitis A virus and murine norovirus, a human norovirus surrogate, from contaminated produce items (honeydew melons, cantaloupes, carrots, and celery) by scrubbing under running water with a nylon brush or scouring pad and by peeling (carrots and celery) with a peeler was investigated. The degree and extent of utensil contamination with viruses during these operations in the presence and absence of food residue also was investigated. Scrubbing or peeling produce initially inoculated with ∼5.5 log PFU of each virus resulted in significant levels of virus removal, ranging from 0.93 to 2.85 log PFU. However, utensil cross-contamination occurred, with >2 log PFU of virus transferred from a single produce item. After preparation of a contaminated produce item, utensil cross-contamination resulted in virus detection on seven successively prepared produce items. Produce residue accumulation on utensils variably impacted virus transfer to utensil surfaces. Results indicate that scrubbing and peeling produce can reduce levels of viruses on contaminated produce, but the importance of utensil sanitation to prevent cross-contamination is highlighted. Findings also provide important information for modeling virus cross-contamination during food preparation.

  14. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Persistence in Murine Macrophages Impairs IFN-β Response but Not Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Toledo, Evelyn; Torres-González, Laura; Gómez, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Type-I interferon (IFN-I) production is an early response to viral infection and pathogenic viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade this cellular defense. Some viruses can establish and maintain persistent infections by altering the IFN-I signaling pathway. Here, we studied IFN-I synthesis and response in an in vitro model of persistent infection by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in a murine macrophage-like cell line. In this model, interferon regulatory factor 3 was constitutively active and located at nuclei of persistently infected cells, inducing expression of IFN-beta mRNA and protein. However, persistently infected macrophages did not respond in an autocrine manner to the secreted-IFN-beta or to recombinant-IFN-beta, since phosphorylated-STAT1 was not detected by western blot and transcription of the interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) Mx1 and ISG56 was not induced. Treatment of non-infected macrophages with supernatants from persistently infected cells induced STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression, mediated by the IFN-I present in the supernatants, because blocking the IFN-I receptor inhibited STAT1 phosphorylation. Results suggest that the lack of autocrine response to IFN-I by the host cell may be one mechanism for maintenance of RSV persistence. Furthermore, STAT1 phosphorylation and ISGs expression induced in non-infected cells by supernatants from persistently infected macrophages suggest that RSV persistence may trigger a proinflammatory phenotype in non-infected cells as part of the pathogenesis of RSV infection. PMID:26501312

  15. Abelson murine leukemia virus transformation-defective mutants with impaired P120-associated protein kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, F H; Van de Ven, W J; Stephenson, J R

    1980-01-01

    Several transformation-defective (td) mutants of Abelson murine leukemia virus (AbLV) are described. Cells nonproductively infected with such mutants exhibited a high degree of growth contact inhibition, failed to form colonies in soft agar, lacked rescuable transforming virus, and were as susceptible as uninfected control cells to transformation by wild-type (wt) AbLV pseudotype virus. In addition, each of several td AbLV nonproductively infected cell clones analyzed was found to be nontumorigenic in vivo. Biochemical analysis of td mutant AbLV-infected clones revealed levels of expression of the major AbLV translational product, P120, and a highly related 80,000-Mr AbLV-encoded protein, P80, at concentrations analogous to those in wt AbLV-transformed cells. Although the AbLV-specific 120,000-Mr polyproteins expressed in td mutant AbLV-infected clones were indistinguishable from those in wt AbLV-transformed lines with respect to molecular weight and [35S]methionine tryptic peptide composition, they each differed from wt AbLV P120 in their patterns of post-translational phosphorylation. A previously described AbLV-associated protein kinase activity is shown to recognize as substrate a major tyrosine-specific acceptor site(s) contained within a single well-resolved tryptic peptide common to both AbLV P120 and P80. In vitro [gamma-32P]ATP-mediated labeling of this phosphorylation site was reduced to below detectable levels in td mutant nonproductively infected cell clones. These findings establish that the AbLV-encoded polyprotein P120 and its associated protein kinase activity are involved in AbLV tumorigenesis. Images PMID:6253663

  16. Characterization of producer cell-dependent restriction of murine leukemia virus replication.

    PubMed

    Serhan, Fatima; Jourdan, Nathalie; Saleun, Sylvie; Moullier, Philippe; Duisit, Ghislaine

    2002-07-01

    We previously reported that the human bronchocarcinoma cell line A549 produces poorly infectious gibbon ape leukemia virus-pseudotyped Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV). In contrast, similar amounts of virions recovered from human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells result in 10-fold-higher transduction rates (G. Duisit, A. Salvetti, P. Moullier, and F. Cosset, Hum. Gene Ther. 10:189-200, 1999). We have now extended this initial observation to other type-C envelope (Env) pseudotypes and analyzed the mechanism involved. Structural and morphological analysis showed that viral particles recovered from A549 (A549-MLV) and HT1080 (HT1080-MLV) cells were normal and indistinguishable from each other. They expressed equivalent levels of mature Env proteins and bound similarly to the target cells. Furthermore, incoming particles reached the cytosol and directed the synthesis of linear viral DNA equally efficiently. However, almost no detectable circular DNAs could be detected in A549-MLV-infected cells, indicating that the block of infection resulted from defective nuclear translocation of the preintegration complex. Interestingly, pseudotyping of A549-MLV with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G restored the amount of circular DNA forms as well as the transduction rates to HT1080-MLV levels, suggesting that the postentry blockage could be overcome by endocytic delivery of the core particles downstream of the restriction point. Thus, in contrast to the previously described target cell-dependent Fv-1 (or Fv1-like) restriction in mammalian cells (P. Pryciak and H. E. Varmus, J. Virol. 66:5959-5966, 1992; G. Towers, M. Bock, S. Martin, Y. Takeuchi, J. P. Stoye, and O. Danos, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97:12295-12299, 2000), we report here a new restriction of MLV replication that relies only on the producer cell type.

  17. Mink Cell Focus-Forming Murine Leukemia Virus Killing of Mink Cells Involves Apoptosis and Superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Fayth K.; Wang, Tao; Nanua, Suparna

    2001-01-01

    Induction of apoptosis by different types of pathogenic retroviruses is an important step in disease development. We have observed that infection of thymic lymphocytes by the mink cell focus-forming murine leukemia virus (MCF MLV) during the preleukemic period resulted in an enhancement of apoptosis of these cells. To further study the ability of MCF MLVs to induce apoptosis and the role of this process in viral pathogenesis, we have developed an in vitro system of virus-induced apoptosis. MCF13 MLV infection of mink epithelial cells resulted in the production of cytopathic foci. In contrast, infection of mink cells with the 4070A amphotropic MLV did not produce any cytopathic effects. Staining of MCF13 MLV-infected cells with propidium iodide and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate indicated that virus-induced cell death was due to apoptosis. At 6 days postinfection, the percentage of apoptotic MCF13 MLV-infected cells was 27% compared with 2 to 3% for mock- or amphotropic MLV-infected cells, representing a 9- to 14-fold difference. Assays for caspase-3 activation confirmed the detection by flow cytometry of apoptosis of MCF13 MLV-infected cells. Large amounts of unintegrated linear viral DNA were detectable by Southern blot analysis during the acute phase of infection, which indicated that MCF13 MLV is able to superinfect mink cells. Unintegrated viral DNA of only the linear form was detectable in thymic lymphocytes isolated from MCF13 MLV-inoculated mice during the preleukemic period. These results indicated that the ability of MCF13 MLV to induce apoptosis is correlated with its ability to superinfect cells and that this occurs as an early step in thymic lymphoma development. PMID:11390602

  18. Gene expression profiling of microglia infected by a highly neurovirulent murine leukemia virus: implications for neuropathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dimcheff, Derek E; Volkert, L Gwenn; Li, Ying; DeLucia, Angelo L; Lynch, William P

    2006-01-01

    Background Certain murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) are capable of inducing progressive spongiform motor neuron disease in susceptible mice upon infection of the central nervous system (CNS). The major CNS parenchymal target of these neurovirulent retroviruses (NVs) are the microglia, whose infection is largely coincident with neuropathological changes. Despite this close association, the role of microglial infection in disease induction is still unknown. In this paper, we investigate the interaction of the highly virulent MLV, FrCasE, with microglia ex vivo to evaluate whether infection induces specific changes that could account for neurodegeneration. Specifically, we compared microglia infected with FrCasE, a related non-neurovirulent virus (NN) F43/Fr57E, or mock-infected, both at a basic virological level, and at the level of cellular gene expression using quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Afffymetrix 430A mouse gene chips. Results Basic virological comparison of NN, NV, and mock-infected microglia in culture did not reveal differences in virus expression that provided insight into neuropathogenesis. Therefore, microglial analysis was extended to ER stress gene induction based on previous experiments demonstrating ER stress induction in NV-infected mouse brains and cultured fibroblasts. Analysis of message levels for the ER stress genes BiP (grp78), CHOP (Gadd153), calreticulin, and grp58 in cultured microglia, and BiP and CHOP in microglia enriched fractions from infected mouse brains, indicated that FrCasE infection did not induce these ER stress genes either in vitro or in vivo. To broadly identify physiological changes resulting from NV infection of microglia in vitro, we undertook a gene array screen of more than 14,000 well-characterized murine genes and expressed sequence tags (ESTs). This analysis revealed only a small set of gene expression changes between infected and uninfected cells (<18). Remarkably, gene array comparison of NN- and NV

  19. Comparative kinetic analyses of interaction of inhibitors with Rauscher murine leukemia virus and human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptases.

    PubMed Central

    Cherrington, J M; Fuller, M D; Mulato, A S; Allen, S J; Kunder, S C; Ussery, M A; Lesnikowski, Z; Schinazi, R F; Sommadossi, J P; Chen, M S

    1996-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of several nucleoside triphosphate analogs on Rauscher murine leukemia virus (RMuLV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 reverse transcriptases (RTs) were studied. With RNA as the template, the apparent K(m) and apparent K(i) values of HIV RT toward its substrates and inhibitors are 12 to 500 times lower than the corresponding values for RMuLV RT. However, the k(i)/k(m) ratios (inhibition efficiencies) for HIV and RMuLV RTs'are similar for AZTTP (zidovudine triphosphate), d4TTP [3'-deoxythymidine-2'-ene-(3'-deoxy-2',3'-didehydrothymidine) triphosphate], PMEADP [9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine diphosphate], FIAUTP [1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-iodouracil triphosphate], and HPMPCDP [(S)-1-(3-hydroxy-2-phosphylmethoxypropyl) cytosine diphosphate]. With DNA as the template, the K(m) values are similar for HIV and RMuLV RTs. However, the K(i)/K(m) values of HIV and RMuLV RTs are significantly different for ddCTP, ddATP, and 3TCTP (2',3'-dideoxy-3'-thiacytidine). The RTs of RMuLV and HIV are sufficiently different from one another that the kinetic inhibition constants for a particular antiviral compounds should be determined to indicate whether anti-RMuLV activity is likely to be predictive for the anti-HIV activity of the compound. This information, in conjunction with species-specific drug metabolism differences and tissue culture antiviral activity, is important in determining the suitability of a particular animal model. PMID:8723481

  20. Suppression subtractive hybridization method for the identification of a new strain of murine hepatitis virus from xenografted SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammed M; Toohey, Brendan; Purcell, Damian F J; Kannourakis, George

    2015-12-01

    During attempts to clone retroviral determinants associated with a mouse model of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used to identify unique viruses in the liver of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice transplanted with LCH tissues. A partial genomic sequence of a murine coronavirus was identified, and the whole genome (31428 bp) of the coronavirus was subsequently sequenced using PCR cloning techniques. Nucleotide sequence comparisons revealed that the genome sequence of the new virus was 91-93% identical to those of known murine hepatitis viruses (MHVs). The predicted open reading frame from the nucleotide sequence encoded all known proteins of MHVs. Analysis at the protein level showed that the virus was closely related to the highly virulent MHV-JHM strain. The virus strain was named MHV-MI. No type D retroviruses were found. Degenerate PCR targeting of type D retrovirus and 5'-RACE targeting of other types of retroviruses confirmed the absence of any retroviral association with the LCH xenografted SCID mice.

  1. Epidemic Kaposi Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kaposi sarcoma is found in patients who have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemic Kaposi sarcoma occurs in patients who have ... combines treatment for Kaposi sarcoma with treatment for AIDS. For the treatment of epidemic Kaposi sarcoma, combined ...

  2. What Is Kaposi Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma What Is Kaposi Sarcoma? Cancer starts when cells in the body ... the lungs may cause trouble breathing. Types of Kaposi sarcoma The different types of KS are defined ...

  3. A Rare Case of Epstein-Barr Virus Negative Inflammatory Pseudotumor-like Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma Presenting as a Solitary Colonic Mass in a 53-Year-Old Woman; Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Kazemimood, Rossana; Saei Hamedani, Farid; Sharif, Asma; Gaitonde, Sujata; Wiley, Elizabeth; Giulianotti, Pier Cristoforo; Groth, John Vincent

    2016-06-13

    Follicular dendritic cell (FDC) sarcoma is a rare neoplasm that occurs predominantly in lymph nodes. One third of FDC sarcomas happens in extranodal sites. There are 2 morphologic variants of this tumor: conventional and inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT)-like. IPT-like FDC sarcomas are reported mostly in females and usually involve the spleen and liver. In all cases of IPT-like FDC sarcoma the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was positive by in situ hybridization except one instance. We report a case of 53-year-old woman who presented with abdominal discomfort. Colonoscopy identified a sessile polypoid mass. Microscopically, there was a prominent lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Interspersed among the reactive lymphoid cells were large, pleomorphic stromal cells with marked atypia, irregular and multilobed nuclei, and hyperchromatic smudged chromatin. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated the atypical stromal cells to be strongly positive for CD10 and D2-40, but negative for CD21, CD23, Clusterin, and epidermal growth factor receptor. EBV-encoded mRNA was negative. A diagnosis of IPT-like FDC sarcoma was rendered. To our knowledge, this is the second case of EBV-negative IPT-like FDC sarcoma reported so far in the literature.

  4. A humanised murine monoclonal antibody protects mice from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Everglades virus and Mucambo virus when administered up to 48 h after airborne challenge

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Lyn M. Goodchild, Sarah A.; Phillpotts, Robert J.; Perkins, Stuart D.

    2012-05-10

    Currently there are no licensed antiviral treatments for the Alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), Everglades virus and Mucambo virus. We previously developed a humanised version of the mouse monoclonal antibody 1A3B-7 (Hu1A3B-7) which exhibited a wide range of reactivity in vitro and was able to protect mice from infection with VEEV. Continued work with the humanised antibody has now demonstrated that it has the potential to be a new human therapeutic. Hu1A3B-7 successfully protected mice from infection with multiple Alphaviruses. The effectiveness of the humanisation process was determined by assessing proliferation responses in human T-cells to peptides derived from the murine and humanised versions of the V{sub H} and V{sub L} domains. This analysis showed that the number of human T-cell epitopes within the humanised antibody had been substantially reduced, indicating that Hu1A3B-7 may have reduced immunogenicity in vivo.

  5. A humanised murine monoclonal antibody protects mice from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Everglades virus and Mucambo virus when administered up to 48 h after airborne challenge.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Lyn M; Goodchild, Sarah A; Phillpotts, Robert J; Perkins, Stuart D

    2012-05-10

    Currently there are no licensed antiviral treatments for the Alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), Everglades virus and Mucambo virus. We previously developed a humanised version of the mouse monoclonal antibody 1A3B-7 (Hu1A3B-7) which exhibited a wide range of reactivity in vitro and was able to protect mice from infection with VEEV. Continued work with the humanised antibody has now demonstrated that it has the potential to be a new human therapeutic. Hu1A3B-7 successfully protected mice from infection with multiple Alphaviruses. The effectiveness of the humanisation process was determined by assessing proliferation responses in human T-cells to peptides derived from the murine and humanised versions of the V(H) and V(L) domains. This analysis showed that the number of human T-cell epitopes within the humanised antibody had been substantially reduced, indicating that Hu1A3B-7 may have reduced immunogenicity in vivo. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Uterine sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Churchill Livingstone; 2014:chap 88. Crum CP, Laury AR, Hirsch MS, Quick CM, Peters WA. Undifferentiated uterine sarcoma. In: Crum CP, Quick CM, Laury AR, Peters WA, Hirsch MS, eds. Gynecologic and Obstetric ...

  7. Dengue virus-specific murine T-lymphocyte proliferation: serotype specificity and response to recombinant viral proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Rothman, A L; Kurane, I; Zhang, Y M; Lai, C J; Ennis, F A

    1989-01-01

    Definition of the T-lymphocyte responses to dengue viruses should aid in the development of safe and effective vaccines and help to explain the pathophysiology of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. In this study, we demonstrated that dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes were detected in spleen cells from dengue virus-immune mice using an in vitro proliferation assay. Following immunization with a single dose of infectious dengue virus, murine lymphocytes showed increased proliferation when incubated in the presence of viral antigens of the same serotype but not in the presence of control antigens. Depletion experiments with antibody and complement showed that the population of responding cells expressed the Thy1+ L3T4+ Lyt2- phenotype. This indicates that the predominant proliferating cells are T lymphocytes of the helper-inducer phenotype. Dengue virus-specific memory lymphocyte responses were detectable for at least 22 weeks after immunization. The response to primary infection was primarily serotype specific, with some serotype cross-reactivity present at a low level. We demonstrated that lymphocytes from mice immunized with dengue 4 virus proliferate in response to a combination of dengue 4 virus C, pre-M, E, NS1, and NS2a proteins expressed in Sf9 cells with a recombinant baculovirus, and, to a lesser extent, to the dengue 4 virus E protein alone. PMID:2786087

  8. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  9. Construction and characterization of the recombinant Moloney murine leukemia viruses bearing the mouse Fv-4 env gene.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, M; Yoshikura, H

    1990-01-01

    A nucleotide sequence of the mouse Fv-4 env gene was completed. Structural comparison revealed a close relationship of Fv-4 to the ecotropic Cas-Br-E murine leukemia virus isolated from a wild mouse in southern California. Various portions of the env gene of Moloney murine leukemia virus were replaced by the corresponding Fv-4 env sequence to construct recombinant murine leukemia virus clones. Infectivity of these recombinants was checked by the S+L- cell focus induction assay and the XC cell syncytium formation assay. Recombinants bearing the following Fv-4 env sequence retained ecotropic infectivity; the AccI-BamHI and BamHI-BalI regions coding for the N- and C-terminal halves of Fv-4 gp70SU, respectively; and the BalI-NcoI region encoding the cleavage site between gp70SU and p15(E)TM of the Fv-4 env. However, when the Fv-4 sequence was substituted for the p15(E)TM-coding NcoI-EcoRV region or the AccI-EcoRV region covering almost the entire env gene, infectivity was undetectable in our assays. The recombinant clone containing the Fv-4 AccI-EcoRV region, i.e., almost the entire Fv-4 env sequence, was introduced with pSV2neo into NIH 3T3 cells, and a G418r cell line named NIH(Fv4)-2 was isolated. The NIH(Fv4)-2 cell released viral particles that contained reverse transcriptase, Fv-4 env molecules as well as the other viral proteins, and viral genomic RNA. However, proviral DNA synthesis was not detected upon inoculation of this virus in NIH 3T3 cells. The loss of infectivity of the recombinant virus bearing the Fv-4 AccI-EcoRV region appeared to be caused by failure in an early step of replication. Images PMID:2304138

  10. mRNA Molecules Containing Murine Leukemia Virus Packaging Signals Are Encapsidated as Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Hibbert, Catherine S.; Mirro, Jane; Rein, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Prior work by others has shown that insertion of ψ (i.e., leader) sequences from the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV) genome into the 3′ untranslated region of a nonviral mRNA leads to the specific encapsidation of this RNA in MLV particles. We now report that these RNAs are, like genomic RNAs, encapsidated as dimers. These dimers have the same thermostability as MLV genomic RNA dimers; like them, these dimers are more stable if isolated from mature virions than from immature virions. We characterized encapsidated mRNAs containing deletions or truncations of MLV ψ or with ψ sequences from MLV-related acute transforming viruses. The results indicate that the dimeric linkage in genomic RNA can be completely attributed to the ψ region of the genome. While this conclusion agrees with earlier electron microscopic studies on mature MLV dimers, it is the first evidence as to the site of the linkage in immature dimers for any retrovirus. Since the Ψ+ mRNA is not encapsidated as well as genomic RNA, it is only present in a minority of virions. The fact that it is nevertheless dimeric argues strongly that two of these molecules are packaged into particles together. We also found that the kissing loop is unnecessary for this coencapsidation or for the stability of mature dimers but makes a major contribution to the stability of immature dimers. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the packaging signal involves a dimeric structure in which the RNAs are joined by intermolecular interactions between GACG loops. PMID:15452213

  11. Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus establishes an efficient spreading infection and exhibits enhanced transcriptional activity in prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jason J; Goff, Stephen P

    2010-03-01

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel human gammaretrovirus discovered in association with human prostate tumors. XMRV was first identified in prostate stromal cells surrounding the tumors of patients carrying a mutation in the HPC1 gene locus. To determine the tropism of XMRV in cell culture, we tested the ability of XMRV to spread and replicate in various prostate and nonprostate cell lines. We found that although the expression of XMRV viral proteins and the spread of infectious virus were minimal in a variety of cell lines, XMRV displayed robust expression and infection in LNCaP prostate tumor cells. The transcriptional activity of the XMRV long terminal repeat (LTR) was found to be higher than the Moloney murine leukemia virus LTRs in both LNCaP and WPMY-1 (simian virus 40-transformed prostate stromal cells). The U3 promoter of XMRV and a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) within the U3 were required for the transcriptional activity in LNCaP cells. Coexpression of the androgen receptor and stimulation with dihydrotestosterone stimulated XMRV-LTR-dependent transcription in 293T cells, and the GRE was required for this activity. These data suggest that XMRV may replicate more efficiently in LNCaP cells in part due to the transcriptional environment in LNCaP cells.

  12. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-06-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins.

  13. Efficient N-tailing of blunt DNA ends by Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka

    2017-01-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase (MMLV-RT) is a widely used enzyme for cDNA synthesis. Here we show that MMLV-RT has a strong template-independent polymerase activity using blunt DNA ends as substrate that generates 3′ overhangs of A, C, G, or T. Nucleotides were appended efficiently in the order A > G > T > C, and tail lengths varied from 4 to 5, 2 to 7, 2 to 4, and 2 to 3 for A, C, G, and T, respectively. The activity was so strong that nearly all our test DNA ends were appended with at least one A, C, G, or T. The N-tailing activity of MMLV-RT was enhanced in the presence of Mn2+, and the G-, C-, and T-tailing activities were further enhanced by dCMP, dGMP, and dAMP, respectively. This is the first report of an enzymatic activity that almost thoroughly appends two or more As, or one or more Cs, Gs, or Ts to the 3′ end of double-stranded DNA, which would enable exhaustive analysis of DNA samples. The N-tailing activity of MMLV-RT is potentially useful in many biotechnological applications. PMID:28150748

  14. Solution Properties of Murine Leukemia Virus Gag Protein: Differences from HIV-1 Gag

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Zuo, Xiaobing; Clark, Patrick K.; Campbell, Stephen J.; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan

    2012-05-09

    Immature retrovirus particles are assembled from the multidomain Gag protein. In these particles, the Gag proteins are arranged radially as elongated rods. We have previously characterized the properties of HIV-1 Gag in solution. In the absence of nucleic acid, HIV-1 Gag displays moderately weak interprotein interactions, existing in monomer-dimer equilibrium. Neutron scattering and hydrodynamic studies suggest that the protein is compact, and biochemical studies indicate that the two ends can approach close in three-dimensional space, implying the need for a significant conformational change during assembly. We now describe the properties of the Gag protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), a gammaretrovirus. We found that this protein is very different from HIV-1 Gag: it has much weaker protein-protein interaction and is predominantly monomeric in solution. This has allowed us to study the protein by small-angle X-ray scattering and to build a low-resolution molecular envelope for the protein. We found that MLV Gag is extended in solution, with an axial ratio of {approx}7, comparable to its dimensions in immature particles. Mutational analysis suggests that runs of prolines in its matrix and p12 domains and the highly charged stretch at the C terminus of its capsid domain all contribute to this extended conformation. These differences between MLV Gag and HIV-1 Gag and their implications for retroviral assembly are discussed.

  15. Efficient N-tailing of blunt DNA ends by Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka

    2017-02-02

    Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase (MMLV-RT) is a widely used enzyme for cDNA synthesis. Here we show that MMLV-RT has a strong template-independent polymerase activity using blunt DNA ends as substrate that generates 3' overhangs of A, C, G, or T. Nucleotides were appended efficiently in the order A > G > T > C, and tail lengths varied from 4 to 5, 2 to 7, 2 to 4, and 2 to 3 for A, C, G, and T, respectively. The activity was so strong that nearly all our test DNA ends were appended with at least one A, C, G, or T. The N-tailing activity of MMLV-RT was enhanced in the presence of Mn(2+), and the G-, C-, and T-tailing activities were further enhanced by dCMP, dGMP, and dAMP, respectively. This is the first report of an enzymatic activity that almost thoroughly appends two or more As, or one or more Cs, Gs, or Ts to the 3' end of double-stranded DNA, which would enable exhaustive analysis of DNA samples. The N-tailing activity of MMLV-RT is potentially useful in many biotechnological applications.

  16. Nitric oxide mediates murine cytomegalovirus-associated pneumonitis in lungs that are free of the virus.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, K; Nakazawa, H; Okada, K; Umezawa, K; Fukuyama, N; Koga, Y

    1997-01-01

    4 wk after intraperitoneal inoculation of 0.2 LD50 (50% lethal dose) of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) in adult BALB/c mice, MCMV remained detectable in the salivary glands, but not in the lungs or other organs. When the T cells of these mice were activated in vivo by a single injection of anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, interstitial pneumonitis was induced in the lungs that were free of the virus with an excessive production of the cytokines. In the lungs of such mice persistently infected with MCMV, the mRNA of the cytokines such as IL-2, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma were abundantly expressed 3 h after the anti-CD3 injection, and the elevated levels continued thereafter. A marked expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) was then noted in the lungs, suggesting that such cytokines as TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma may have induced iNOS. Although the increase in NO formation was demonstrated by the significant elevation of the serum levels of nitrite and nitrate, the interstitial pneumonitis was not associated with either increased superoxide formation or peroxynitrite-induced tyrosine nitration. Nevertheless, the administration of an NO antagonist also alleviated the interstitial pneumonitis provoked by anti-CD3 mAb. Based on these findings, it was concluded that MCMV-associated pneumonitis is mediated by a molecule of cytokine-induced NO other than peroxynitrite. PMID:9312183

  17. Murine leukemia virus uses TREX components for efficient nuclear export of unspliced viral transcripts.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Toshie; Tonne, Jason M; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-10

    Previously we reported that nuclear export of both unspliced and spliced murine leukemia virus (MLV) transcripts depends on the nuclear export factor (NXF1) pathway. Although the mRNA export complex TREX, which contains Aly/REF, UAP56, and the THO complex, is involved in the NXF1-mediated nuclear export of cellular mRNAs, its contribution to the export of MLV mRNA transcripts remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the involvement of TREX components in the export of MLV transcripts. Depletion of UAP56, but not Aly/REF, reduced the level of both unspliced and spliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, depletion of THO components, including THOC5 and THOC7, affected only unspliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed that only the unspliced viral transcript interacted with THOC5. These results imply that MLV requires UAP56, THOC5 and THOC7, in addition to NXF1, for nuclear export of viral transcripts. Given that naturally intronless mRNAs, but not bulk mRNAs, require THOC5 for nuclear export, it is plausible that THOC5 plays a key role in the export of unspliced MLV transcripts.

  18. Detection of antibodies against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus GDVII strain in experimental guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Häger, C; Glage, S; Held, N; Bleich, E M; Burghard, A; Mähler, M; Bleich, André

    2016-10-01

    A disease affecting guinea pigs called 'guinea pig lameness' characterized by clinical signs of depression, lameness of limbs, flaccid paralysis, weight loss and death within a few weeks was first described by Römer in 1911. After a research group in our facility kept laboratory guinea pigs from two different origins together in one room, lameness was observed in two animals. Further investigations revealed a serological immune response against Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV; GDVII strain) in these animals. Histopathology of the lumbar spinal cord of these animals showed mononuclear cell infiltration and necrotic neurons in the anterior horn. Therefore, all guinea pigs from this contaminated animal unit, from other units in our facility, as well as from different European institutions and breeding centres were screened for antibodies directed against GDVII. Our investigations showed that approximately 80% of all guinea pigs from the contaminated animal unit were seropositive for GDVII, whereas animals from other separate units were completely negative. In addition, 43% of tested sera from the different European institutions and breeding centres contained antibodies against GDVII. The present data confirm that an unknown viral infection causes an immune response in experimental guinea pigs leading to seroconversion against GDVII and that guinea pigs from a commercial breeder are the source of the infection. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag–Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins. PMID:27329342

  20. Gut dysbiosis and neuroimmune responses to brain infection with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Mestre, L; Mecha, M; Feliú, A; Del Campo, R; Villarrubia, N; Espejo, C; Montalbán, X; Álvarez-Cermeño, J C; Villar, L M; Guaza, C

    2017-03-14

    Recent studies have begun to point out the contribution of microbiota to multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) is a model of progressive MS. Here, we first analyze the effect of intracerebral infection with TMEV on commensal microbiota and secondly, whether the early microbiota depletion influences the immune responses to TMEV on the acute phase (14 dpi) and its impact on the chronic phase (85 dpi). The intracranial inoculation of TMEV was associated with a moderate dysbiosis. The oral administration of antibiotics (ABX) of broad spectrum modified neuroimmune responses to TMEV dampening brain CD4(+) and CD8(+) T infiltration during the acute phase. The expression of cytokines, chemokines and VP2 capsid protein was enhanced and accompanied by clusters of activated microglia disseminated throughout the brain. Furthermore, ABX treated mice displayed lower levels of CD4(+) and CD8(+)T cells in cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes. Increased mortality to TMEV was observed after ABX cessation at day 28pi. On the chronic phase, mice that survived after ABX withdrawal and recovered microbiota diversity showed subtle changes in brain cell infiltrates, microglia and gene expression of cytokines. Accordingly, the surviving mice of the group ABX-TMEV displayed similar disease severity than TMEV mice.

  1. Autophagy Genes Enhance Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Reactivation From Latency by Preventing Virus-induced Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sunmin; Buck, Michael D.; Desai, Chandni; Zhang, Xin; Loginicheva, Ekaterina; Martinez, Jennifer; Freeman, Michael L.; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Akira, Shizuo; Guan, Jun-Lin; He, You-Wen; Blackman, Marcia A.; Handley, Scott A.; Levine, Beth; Green, Douglas R.; Reese, Tiffany A.; Artyomov, Maxim N.; Virgin, Herbert W.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Host genes that regulate systemic inflammation upon chronic viral infection are incompletely understood. Murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68) infection is characterized by latency in macrophages, and reactivation is inhibited by Interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Using a Lysozyme-M-cre (LysMcre) expression system, we show that deletion of autophagy-related (Atg) genes Fip200, beclin 1, Atg14, Atg16L1, Atg7, Atg3, and Atg5, in the myeloid compartment, inhibited MHV68 reactivation in macrophages. Atg5-deficiency did not alter reactivation from B cells, and effects on reactivation from macrophages were not explained by alterations in productive viral replication or the establishment of latency. Rather, chronic MHV68 infection triggered increased systemic inflammation, increased T cell production of IFN-γ and an IFN-γ-induced transcriptional signature in macrophages from Atg gene-deficient mice. The Atg5-related reactivation defect was partially reversed by neutralization of IFN-γ. Thus Atg genes in myeloid cells dampen virus-induced systemic inflammation, creating an environment that fosters efficient MHV68 reactivation from latency. PMID:26764599

  2. Small synthetic ligands for the enrichment of viral particles pseudotyped with amphotropic murine leukemia virus envelope.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Cláudia S M; Castro, Rute; Coroadinha, Ana Sofia; Roque, A Cecília A

    2016-03-18

    Retroviral vectors gained popularity toward other viral vectors as they integrate their genome into hosts' genome, a characteristic required for the modification of stem cells. However, the production of viable particles for gene therapy is hampered by the low ratio of infectious to non-infectious viral particles after purification, low titers and limited number of competent viral receptors. We have developed de novo two fully synthetic triazine-based ligands that can selectively bind retroviral particles pseudotyped with amphotropic murine leukemia virus envelope (AMPHO4070A). A 78-membered library of triazine-based ligands was designed in silico and was virtually screened against the modeled structure of the AMPHO4070A protein. Ligands displaying the highest energy of binding were synthesized on cross-linked agarose and experimentally tested. Adsorbents containing ligands A5A10 and A10A11 showed selectivity toward viral particles containing the target protein (VLP-AMPHO), binding 19 ± 5 μg/g support and 47 ± 13 μg/g support, respectively. The elution conditions for both ligands were mild and with high recovery yields (80-100%), in comparison with common purification practices. These results were based on a lab-scale experimental setting with VLP integrity being confirmed through TEM. In particular, the elution buffer containing 12 mM imidazole allowed the recovery of intact amphotropic viral particles.

  3. Gut dysbiosis and neuroimmune responses to brain infection with Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo-Salinas, F. J.; Mestre, L.; Mecha, M.; Feliú, A.; del Campo, R.; Villarrubia, N.; Espejo, C.; Montalbán, X.; Álvarez-Cermeño, J. C.; Villar, L. M.; Guaza, C.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have begun to point out the contribution of microbiota to multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) is a model of progressive MS. Here, we first analyze the effect of intracerebral infection with TMEV on commensal microbiota and secondly, whether the early microbiota depletion influences the immune responses to TMEV on the acute phase (14 dpi) and its impact on the chronic phase (85 dpi). The intracranial inoculation of TMEV was associated with a moderate dysbiosis. The oral administration of antibiotics (ABX) of broad spectrum modified neuroimmune responses to TMEV dampening brain CD4+ and CD8+ T infiltration during the acute phase. The expression of cytokines, chemokines and VP2 capsid protein was enhanced and accompanied by clusters of activated microglia disseminated throughout the brain. Furthermore, ABX treated mice displayed lower levels of CD4+ and CD8+T cells in cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes. Increased mortality to TMEV was observed after ABX cessation at day 28pi. On the chronic phase, mice that survived after ABX withdrawal and recovered microbiota diversity showed subtle changes in brain cell infiltrates, microglia and gene expression of cytokines. Accordingly, the surviving mice of the group ABX-TMEV displayed similar disease severity than TMEV mice. PMID:28290524

  4. Kaposi sarcoma: review and medical management update.

    PubMed

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms involved, the true nature of Kaposi sarcoma remains an enigma. Four clinical variants have been described for the disease, differing in natural history, site of predilection, and prognosis. All forms of Kaposi sarcoma may manifest in the oral cavity and Kaposi sarcoma-associated virus appears essential to development of all clinical variants. The spectrum of therapeutic strategies is broad and selection of appropriate intervention mandates a thorough understanding of disease spread and the patient's symptomatology, as well as risks and benefits of therapy. This article provides an overview of epidemiology, subtypes, clinical course, pathogenesis, and management strategies for Kaposi sarcoma.

  5. Determinants of Moloney murine leukemia virus Gag-Pol and genomic RNA proportions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Silas F; Collins, John T; D'Souza, Victoria M; Telesnitsky, Alice

    2014-07-01

    The Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) ribonucleoprotein complex is composed of an approximately 20:1 mixture of Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins plus a single genomic RNA (gRNA) dimer. The mechanisms that regulate these proportions are unknown. Here, we examined whether virion proportions of Gag, Gag-Pol, and gRNA were determined by sampling (that is, if they reflected expression ratios or intracellular concentrations) or more specific recruitment. To this end, MoMLV Gag, Gag-Pol, and gRNA were expressed separately or together in various ratios. Varying the expression ratios of Gag and Gag-Pol revealed that Gag-Pol incorporation was stochastic and that the conserved 20:1 Gag/Gag-Pol ratio coincided with maximal particle production. When skewed expression ratios resulted in excess Gag-Pol, the released virions maintained the intracellular Gag/Gag-Pol ratios and the infectivity per virion was largely maintained, but virion production decreased sharply with high levels of Gag-Pol. The determinants of gRNA proportions were addressed by manipulating the amounts and contexts of functional nucleocapsid (NC) and the ratios of Gag to gRNA. The results showed that the NC domain of either Gag or Gag-Pol could provide gRNA packaging functions equally well. Unlike Gag-Pol, gRNA incorporation was saturable. An upper limit of gRNA incorporation was observed, and particle production was not disrupted by excess gRNA expression. These results indicate that the determinants of Gag/Gag-Pol proportions differ from those for Gag/gRNA. On the basis of the assumption that MoMLV evolved to produce virion components in optimal proportions, these data provide a means of estimating the proportion of unspliced MoMLV RNA that serves as genomic RNA. Viruses assemble their progeny from within the cells that they parasitize, where they must sort through a rich milieu of host proteins and nucleic acids to gather together their own building blocks, which are also proteins and nucleic acids. The

  6. Surgery for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tissue Sarcomas Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Targeted Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment of Soft Tissue Sarcomas, by Stage ... Cancer Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics ...

  7. Molecular Epidemiology of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpes Virus, and Risk Factors in HIV-infected Patients in Tehran, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Hesamizadeh, Khashayar; Keyvani, Hossein; Bokharaei-Salim, Farah; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Esghaei, Maryam; Jahanbakhsh Sefidi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) remains the most common malignancy among HIV-infected patients. Human herpesvirus type-8 (HHV-8) is regarded as the infectious etiological agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KSHV). Diagnostic procedures associated with KSHV are not routinely performed in HIV-infected subjects. Objectives The main objective of this study is to obtain information on KSHV epidemiology in Iranian HIV-infected individuals. Patients and Methods In the present cross-sectional study, 109 patients with established HIV infection, who visited a governmental and referral center for HIV screening in Tehran (Tehran west health center (TWHC)) between May 2014 and July 2015 were enrolled according to the convenience sample strategy. After peripheral blood collection, isolation of plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) compartments, DNA extraction was performed. KSHV DNA was analyzed by nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) using primers from ORF-26 (virus minor capsid). Results Among all 109 HIV-infected patients, 67 (61.5%) were male, with an age range of 2 - 64 years (mean ± standard deviation 35.8 ± 13.3). KSHV DNA was found in PBMC and plasma samples of six (5.5%) and four (3.6%) patients, respectively. Conclusions This study revealed a considerable prevalence of KSHV DNA, during latent and lytic phases, among HIV-infected patients. Risk factors for KSHV infection acquisition and concurrent. 0+infection with HIV were also evaluated. Diagnosis of KSHV in the group could be helpful for prognosis of Kaposi’s sarcoma and clinical management. PMID:28191343

  8. Biochemical analysis of murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced leukemias of strain BALB/c

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.W.; Hopkins, N.; Fleissner, E.

    1980-02-01

    Murine leukemia viruses isolated from radiation-induced BALB/c leukemias were characterized with respect to viral proteins and RNA. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral structural proteins revealed that for p12, p15, p30, and gp70, three to four electrophoretic variants of each could be detected. There was no correlation found between any of these mobilities and N- or B-tropism of the viruses. Proteins of all xenotropic viral isolates were identical in their gel electrophoretic profiles. The similar phenotypes of multiple viral clones from individual leukemias and of isolates grown in different cells suggest that the polymorphism of ecotropic viruses was generated in vivo rather than during in vitro virus growth. By two-dimensional fingerprinting of RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides from 70S viral RNA, the previously reported association of N- and B-tropism with two distinct oligonucleotides was confirmed. The presence of two other oligonucleotides was correlated with positive and negative phenotypes of the virus-coded G/sub IX/ cell surface antigen. The RNAs of two B-tropic isolates with distinctive p15 and p12 phenotypes differed from the RNA of a prototype N-tropic virus by the absence of three oligonucleotides mapping in the 5' portion (gag region) of the prototype RNA. In addition, one small-plaque B-tropic virus displayed extensive changes in the RNA sequences associated with the env region of the prototype.

  9. Regulation of RNA splicing in gag-deficient mutants of Moloney murine sarcoma virus MuSVts110.

    PubMed Central

    De Mars, M; Sterner, D A; Chiocca, S M; Biggart, N W; Murphy, E C

    1990-01-01

    We investigated whether the MuSVts110 gag gene product (P58gag) can regulate the novel growth temperature dependence of MuSVts110 RNA splicing. MuSVts110 mutants with either frameshifts or deletions in the gag gene were tested for their ability to maintain the MuSVts110 splicing phenotype. Only small decreases in splicing efficiency and no changes in the thermosensitivity of viral RNA splicing were observed in MuSVts110 gag gene frameshift mutants. Deletions within the gag gene, however, variably decreased MuSVts110 splicing efficiency but had no effect on its thermosensitivity. Another class of MuSVts110 splicing mutants generated by treatment of MuSVts110-infected cells with NiCl2 was also examined. In these "nickel revertants," P58gag is made, but splicing of the viral transcript is nearly complete at all growth temperatures. The splicing of "tagged" viral RNA transcribed from a modified MuSVts110 DNA introduced into nickel revertant cells remained thermosensitive, arguing against trans effects of viral gene products on splicing efficiency. These experiments indicated that neither the MuSVts110 P58gag protein nor any other viral gene product acts in trans to regulate MuSVts110 splicing. Images PMID:2157036

  10. Nucleotide Sequence of the Envelope Gene of Gardner-Arnstein Feline Leukemia Virus B Reveals Unique Sequence Homologies with a Murine Mink Cell Focus-Forming Virus

    PubMed Central

    Elder, John H.; Mullins, James I.

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the envelope gene and the adjacent 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR) of Gardner-Arnstein feline leukemia virus of subgroup B (GA-FeLV-B) has been determined. Comparison of the derived amino acid sequence of the gp70-p15E polyprotein to those of several previously reported murine retroviruses revealed striking homologies between GA-FeLV-B gp70 and the gp70 of a Moloney virus-derived mink cell focus-forming virus. These homologies were located within the substituted (presumably xenotropic) portion of the mink cell focus-forming virus envelope gene and comprised amino acid sequences not present in three ecotropic virus gp70s. In addition, areas of insertions and deletions, in general, were the same between GA-FeLV-B and Moloney mink cell focus-forming virus, although the sizes of the insertions and deletions differed. Homologies between GA-FeLV-B and mink cell focus-forming virus gp70s is functionally significant in that they both possess expanded host ranges, a property dictated by gp70. The amino acid sequence of FeLV-B contains 12 Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequences, indicating 12 possible sites of N-linked glycosylation as compared with 7 or 8 for its murine counterparts. Comparison of the 3′ LTR of GA-FeLV-B to AKR and Moloney virus LTRs revealed extensive conservation in several regions including the “CCAAT” and Goldberg-Hogness (TATA) boxes thought to be involved in promotion of transcription and in the repeat region of the LTR. The inverted repeats that flanked the LTR of GA-FeLV-B were identical to the murine inverted repeats, but were one base longer than the latter. The region of U3 corresponding to the approximately 75-nucleotide “enhancer sequence” is present in GA-FeLV-B, but contains deletions relative to AKR and Moloney virus and is not repeated. An interesting pallindrome in the repeat region immediately 3′ to the U3 region was noted in all the LTRs, but was particularly pronounced in GA-FeLV-B. Possible roles for this

  11. Six distinct nuclear factors interact with the 75-base-pair repeat of the Moloney murine leukemia virus enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Speck, N A; Baltimore, D

    1987-01-01

    Binding sites for six distinct nuclear factors on the 75-base-pair repeat of the Moloney murine leukemia virus enhancer have been identified by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay combined with methylation interference. Three of these factors, found in WEHI 231 nuclear extracts, which we have named LVa, LVb, and LVc (for leukemia virus factors a, b, and c) have not been previously identified. Nuclear factors that bind to the conserved simian virus 40 corelike motif, the NF-1 motif, and the glucocorticoid response element were also detected. Testing of multiple cell lines showed that most factors appeared ubiquitous, except that the NF-1 binding factor was found neither in nuclear extracts from MEL cells nor in the embryonal carcinoma cell lines PCC4 and F9, and core-binding factor was relatively depleted from MEL and F9 nuclear extracts. Images PMID:3561410

  12. Tumorigenic Potential of a Recombinant Retrovirus Containing Sequences from Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus and Feline Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Starkey, C. R.; Lobelle-Rich, P. A.; Granger, S.; Brightman, B. K.; Fan, H.; Levy, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    A recombinant retrovirus, termed MoFe2-MuLV, was constructed in which the U3 region of T-lymphomagenic Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) was replaced by that of FeLV-945, a provirus of unique long terminal repeat (LTR) structure identified only in non-T-cell, non-B-cell lymphomas of the domestic cat. The LTR of FeLV-945 is unusual in that it contains only a single copy of the transcriptional enhancer followed 25 bp downstream by a 21-bp sequence in triplicate in tandem. Infectivity of MoFe2-MuLV was demonstrated in vitro in SC-1 cells and in vivo in neonatal NIH-Swiss mice. Tumors occurred in MoFe2-MuLV-infected animals following a latency period of 4 to 10 months (average, 6 months). The results of Southern blot analysis of the T-cell receptor beta locus demonstrated that all tumors were lymphomas of T-cell origin. MoFe2-MuLV LTRs were amplified by PCR from tumor DNA and were characterized by nucleotide sequence analysis. LTRs from the tumors that occurred with relatively shorter latency predominantly retained the original MoFe2-MuLV sequence intact and unaltered. Tumors that occurred with relatively longer latency contained LTRs that also retained the 21-bp sequence triplication characteristic of the original virus but had acquired various duplications of enhancer sequences. The repeated identification of enhancer duplications in late-appearing tumors suggests that the duplication affords a selective advantage, although apparently not in the efficient induction of T-cell lymphoma. Proto-oncogenes known to be targets of insertional mutagenesis in the majority of Mo-MuLV-induced tumors or in feline non-T-cell, non-B-cell lymphomas were shown not to be rearranged in any tumor examined. Mink cell focus-inducing (MCF) proviral DNA was readily detectable in some, but not all, tumors. The presence or absence of MCF did not correlate with the kinetics of tumor induction. These studies indicate that the single-enhancer, triplication-containing FeLV LTR, typical of

  13. Kaposin-B Enhances the PROX1 mRNA Stability during Lymphatic Reprogramming of Vascular Endothelial Cells by Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpes Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jaehyuk; Kang, Jinjoo; Lee, Ha Neul; Aguilar, Berenice; Kafka, Darren; Lee, Sunju; Choi, Inho; Lee, Juneyong; Ramu, Swapnika; Haas, Juergen; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common cancer among HIV-positive patients. Histogenetic origin of KS has long been elusive due to a mixed expression of both blood and lymphatic endothelial markers in KS tumor cells. However, we and others discovered that Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) induces lymphatic reprogramming of blood vascular endothelial cells by upregulating PROX1, which functions as the master regulator for lymphatic endothelial differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that the KSHV latent gene kaposin-B enhances the PROX1 mRNA stability and plays an important role in KSHV-mediated PROX1 upregulation. We found that PROX1 mRNA contains a canonical AU-rich element (ARE) in its 3′-untranslated region that promotes PROX1 mRNA turnover and that kaposin-B stimulates cytoplasmic accumulation of the ARE-binding protein HuR through activation of the p38/MK2 pathway. Moreover, HuR binds to and stabilizes PROX1 mRNA through its ARE and is necessary for KSHV-mediated PROX1 mRNA stabilization. Together, our study demonstrates that kaposin-B plays a key role in PROX1 upregulation during lymphatic reprogramming of blood vascular endothelial cells by KSHV. PMID:20730087

  14. Transgenic Expression of Walleye Dermal Sarcoma Virus rv-cyclin (orfA) in Zebrafish does not Result in Tissue Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Thomas A.; Rovnak, Joel; Quackenbush, Sandra L.; Whitlock, Kathleen; Zhan, Huiqing; Gong, Zhiyuan; Spitsbergen, Jan; Bowser, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Walleye dermal sarcoma (WDS) is a benign tumor of walleye fish that develops and completely regresses seasonally. The retrovirus associated with this disease, walleye dermal sarcoma virus, encodes three accessory genes, two of which, rv-cyclin (orfA) and orfb, are thought to play a role in tumor development. In this study, we attempted to recapitulate WDS development by expressing rv-cyclin in chimeric and stable transgenic zebrafish. Six stable transgenic lines expressing rv-cyclin from the constitutive CMVtk promoter were generated. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction demonstrate that rv-cyclin is widely expressed in different tissues in these fish. These lines were viable and histologically normal for up to 2 years. No increase in tumors or tissue proliferation was observed following N-ethyl N-nitrosourea exposure or following tail wounding and subsequent tissue regeneration compared to controls. These data indicate that rvcyclin is not independently sufficient for tumor induction in zebrafish. PMID:20349325

  15. The Role of the MHV Receptor and Related Glycoproteins in Murine Hepatitis Virus Infection of Murine Cell Lines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-04-13

    Chinese hamster ovary ( CHO ) cells (Asanaka and Lai, 1993). The fusion event can be controlled at multiple levels. As mentioned above, some receptor...receptor can mediate virus infection, since transfection of the receptor cDNA clone into MHV - resistant hamster or human cell lines confers MHV...expressed in MHV - resistant cells such as baby hamster kidney cells (BHK-21) or human RD cell lines, the cells became susceptible to infection by

  16. The fate of murine norovirus and hepatitis A virus during preparation of fresh produce by cutting and grating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Erickson, Marilyn; Ortega, Ynes R; Cannon, Jennifer L

    2013-03-01

    Human noroviruses and hepatitis A virus (HAV) are commonly associated with outbreaks occurring in restaurant establishments and catered events. Food handlers are major contributing factors to foodborne illnesses initiated in the kitchen setting. In this study, transfer of HAV and murine norovirus (MNV-1), a human norovirus surrogate, between produce (cucumbers, strawberries, tomatoes, cantaloupes, carrots, and honeydew melons) and common kitchen utensils (graters and knives) was investigated. The extent of virus transfer to produce during utensil application, in the presence and the absence of food residue, and the impact of knife surface properties (sharp, dull, serrated) was also investigated. Transfer of MNV-1 and HAV from produce items, initially contaminated with ~5.5 log PFU, to knives and graters during application ranged from 0.9 to 5.1 log PFU. MNV-1 transfer to knives was the greatest for cucumbers, strawberries, and tomatoes, and the least for honeydew melons, while transfer of HAV to knives was greater for tomatoes and honeydew melons than strawberries, cantaloupes, and cucumbers. After preparation of a contaminated produce item, knife cross-contamination easily occurred as viruses were detected on almost all of the seven produce items successively prepared. Produce residues on utensils often resulted in less virus transfer when compared to utensils without residue accumulation. Knife surface properties did not impact virus transfer. The ease of virus transfer between produce and utensils demonstrated by the current study highlights the importance of efforts aimed toward preventing cross-contamination in the kitchen environment.

  17. Identification of a subdomain in the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope protein involved in receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    MacKrell, A J; Soong, N W; Curtis, C M; Anderson, W F

    1996-01-01

    We have mutated amino acids within the receptor-binding domain of Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope in order to identify residues involved in receptor binding. Analysis of mutations in the region of amino acids 81 to 88 indicates that this region is important for specific envelope-receptor interactions. None of the aspartate 84 (D-84) mutants studied bind measurably, although they are efficiently incorporated into particles. D-84 mutants have titers that correspond to the severity of the substitution. This observation suggests that D-84 may provide a direct receptor contact. Mutations in the other charged amino acids in this domain (R-83, E-86, and E-87) yield titers similar to those of wild-type envelope, but the affinity of the mutant envelope in the binding assay is decreased by nonconservative substitutions in parallel to the severity of the change. These other amino acids may either provide secondary receptor contacts or assist in maintaining a structure in the domain that favors efficient binding. We also studied other regions of high hydrophilicity. Our initial characterization indicates that amino acids 106 to 111 and 170 to 188 do not play a major role in receptor binding. Measurements of relative binding affinity and titer indicate that most mutations in the region of amino acids 120 to 131 did not significantly affect receptor binding. However, SU encoded by mutants H123V, R124L, and C131A as well as C81A could not be detected in particles and therefore did not bind measurably. Therefore, the region encompassed by amino acids 81 to 88 appears to be directly involved in receptor binding. PMID:8627699

  18. The TIM-3 pathway ameliorates Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Kaneyama, Tomoki; Tomiki, Hiroki; Tsugane, Sayaka; Inaba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Motoki; Akiba, Hisaya; Yagita, Hideo; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2014-07-01

    Infection by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in the central nervous system (CNS) induces an immune-mediated demyelinating disease in susceptible mouse strains and serves as a relevant infection model for human multiple sclerosis. T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-3 (TIM-3) has been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. In this study, we examined the regulatory role of the TIM-3 pathway in the development of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD). The expression of TIM-3 was increased at both protein and mRNA levels in the spinal cords of mice with TMEV-IDD compared with naive controls. In addition, by utilizing a blocking mAb, we demonstrate that TIM-3 negatively regulates TMEV-specific ex vivo production of IFN-γ and IL-10 by CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ by CD8(+) T cells from the CNS of mice with TMEV-IDD at 36 days post-infection (dpi). In vivo blockade of TIM-3 by using the anti-TIM-3 mAb resulted in significant exacerbation of the development of TMEV-IDD both clinically and histologically. The number of infiltrating mononuclear cells in the CNS was also increased in mice administered with anti-TIM-3 mAb both at the induction phase (10 dpi) and at the effector phase (36 dpi). Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular cytokines revealed that the number of CD4(+) T cells producing TNF, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17 was significantly increased at the effector phase in the CNS of anti-TIM-3 mAb-treated mice. These results suggest that the TIM-3 pathway plays a critical role in the regulation of TMEV-IDD.

  19. Splicing of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus env-mRNA Enhances Its Ability to Form Polysomes

    PubMed Central

    Machinaga, Akihito; Ishihara, Syuhei; Shirai, Akiko; Takase-Yoden, Sayaka

    2016-01-01

    Friend murine leukemia virus (MLV) belongs to the gamma retroviruses of the Retroviridae family. The positive-sense RNA of its genome contains a 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR), 5′ leader sequence, gag, pol, env, and 3′ LTR. Transcription from proviral DNA begins from the R region of the 5′ LTR and ends at the polyadenylation signal located at the R region of the other end of the 3′ LTR. There is a 5′ splice site in the 5′ leader sequence and a 3′ splice site at the 3′ end of the pol region. Both full-length unspliced mRNAs and a singly spliced mRNA (env-mRNA) are produced in MLV-infected cells. The MLV Env protein plays important roles both in viral adsorption to host cells and in neuropathogenic disease in MLV-infected mice and rats. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms controlling Env expression is important for determining the functions of the Env protein. We have previously shown that splicing increases env-mRNA stability and translation efficiency. Generally, mRNA polysome formation correlates with translation efficiency. Therefore, here we investigated the effects of env-mRNA splicing on polysome formation to identify mechanisms for Env up-regulation due to splicing. We performed polysome profile analyses using Env-expression plasmids producing spliced or unspliced env-mRNA and showed that the former formed polysomes more efficiently than the latter. Thus, splicing of env-mRNA facilitated polysome formation, suggesting that this contributes to up-regulation of Env expression. We replaced the env region of the expression plasmids with a luciferase (luc) gene, and found that in this case both unspliced and spliced luc-mRNA formed polysomes to a similar extent. Thus, we conclude that whether mRNA polysome formation is affected by splicing depends on the structure of gene in question. PMID:26909075

  20. Phenotypes of murine leukemia virus-induced tumors: influence of 3' viral coding sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Ott, D E; Keller, J; Sill, K; Rein, A

    1992-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) induce leukemias and lymphomas in mice. We have used fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis to determine the hematopoietic phenotypes of tumor cells induced by a number of MuLVs. Tumor cells induced by ecotropic Moloney, amphotropic 4070A, and 10A1 MuLVs and by two chimeric MuLVs, Mo(4070A) and Mo(10A1), were examined with antibodies to 13 lineage-specific cell surface markers found on myeloid cell, T-cell, and B-cell lineages. The chimeric Mo(4070A) and Mo(10A1) MuLVs, consisting of Moloney MuLV with the carboxy half of the Pol region and nearly all of the Env region of 4070A and 10A1, respectively, were constructed to examine the possible influence of these sequences on Moloney MuLV-induced tumor cell phenotypes. In some instances, these phenotypic analyses were supplemented by Southern blot analysis for lymphoid cell-specific genomic DNA rearrangements at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain, the T-cell receptor gamma, and the T-cell receptor beta loci. The results of our analysis showed that Moloney MuLV, 4070A, Mo(4070A), and Mo(10A1) induced mostly T-cell tumors. Moloney MuLV and Mo(4070A) induced a wide variety of T-cell phenotypes, ranging from immature to mature phenotypes, while 4070A induced mostly prothymocyte and double-negative (CD4- CD8-) T-cell tumors. The tumor phenotypes obtained with 10A1 and Mo(10A1) were each less variable than those obtained with the other MuLVs tested. 10A1 uniformly induced a tumor consisting of lineage marker-negative cells that lack lymphoid cell-specific DNA rearrangements and histologically appear to be early undifferentiated erythroid cell-like precursors. The Mo(10A1) chimera consistently induced an intermediate T-cell tumor. The chimeric constructions demonstrated that while 4070A 3' pol and env sequences apparently did not influence the observed tumor cell phenotypes, the 10A1 half of pol and env had a strong effect on the phenotypes induced by Mo(10A1) that resulted in a phenotypic

  1. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated giant conjunctival Kaposi's sarcoma: complete remission with antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Eduardo-Sánchez, Y W; Fernández-Agrafojo, D

    2017-09-05

    A 35-year-old male patient with a large unilateral haemorrhagic conjunctival tumour lesion and another contralateral haemorrhagic conjunctival flat lesion associated with violaceous cutaneous macules on the extremities and angiomatous lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract as initial clinical manifestation of HIV-related immunodeficiency. Cutaneous, gastric mucosal and conjunctival biopsy was consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma with complete remission after highly active antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy. HIV-related conjunctival Kaposi's sarcoma, even a large one, can have a good response to antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy without any additional topical eye treatment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Organization of pp60src and selected cytoskeletal proteins within adhesion plaques and junctions of Rous sarcoma virus-transformed rat cells

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    The localization of pp60src within adhesion structures of epithelioid rat kidney cells transformed by the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus was compared to the organization of actin, alpha-actinin, vinculin (a 130,000-dalton protein), tubulin, and the 58,000-dalton intermediate filament protein. The adhesion structures included both adhesion plaques and previously uncharacterized adhesive regions formed at cell-cell junctions. We have termed these latter structures "adhesion junctions." Both adhesion plaques and adhesion junctions were identified by interference-reflection microscopy and compared to the location of pp60src and the various cytoskeletal proteins by double fluorescence. The results demonstrated that the src gene product was found within both adhesion plaques and the adhesion junctions. In addition, actin, alpha-actinin, and vinculin were also localized within the same pp60src-containing adhesion structures. In contrast, tubulin and the 58,000-dalton intermediate filament protein were not associated with either adhesion plaques or adhesion junctions. Both adhesion plaques and adhesion junctions were isolated as substratum-bound structures and characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence revealed that pp60src, actin, alpha-actinin, and vinculin were organized within specific regions of the adhesion junctions. Heavy accumulations of actin and alpha-actinin were found on both sides of the junctions with a narrow gap of unstained material at the midline, whereas pp60src stain was more intense in this central region. Antibody to vinculin stained double narrow lines defining the periphery of the junctional complexes but was excluded from the intervening region. In addition, the distribution of vinculin relative to pp60src within adhesion plaques suggested an inverse relationship between the presence of these two proteins. Overall, these results establish a close link between the src gene product and components of the

  3. Pulmonary Kaposi Sarcoma with Osseous Metastases in an Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Patient: A Remarkable Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dirweesh, Ahmed; Khan, Muhammad Yasir; Hamiz, Shaikh Fawad; Karabulut, Nigahus

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 34 Final Diagnosis: Pulmonary Kaposi’s sarcoma with bony metastatses Symptoms: Cough • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is known to involve the mucocutaneous tissues and the aero-digestive tracts. In acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, KS has an aggressive course and carries poor prognosis. We present a case of pulmonary KS with osseous metastases as the first presentation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a young male. The lesions impressively decreased in size and numbers following initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Case Report: A 34-year-old heterosexual male presented with a one month history of cough and 15–20 pound weight loss within six months. Examination revealed oral thrush, decreased breath sounds and crackles on the right lower lung base. Imaging showed a large right perihilar mass with multiple lytic lesions involving thoracic and lumber vertebrae, ribs, sternum, and clavicles. Blood and sputum cultures, smears for acid fast bacilli, and a QUANTIferon gold test were all negative. He tested positive for HIV and his CD4 count was 7 cells/uL. Bronchoscopy with biopsy was unrevealing. Pathology of the right hilar mass was diagnostic of KS. Following initiation of antiretroviral therapy his condition dramatically improved; repeat chest CT scan showed marked regression of the bony and pulmonary lesions. Conclusions: The dual action of HAART on the recovery of the immune system and against human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) may essentially cause regression of KS lesions. PMID:28216610

  4. Capsid Structure of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus, a Gammaherpesvirus, Compared to Those of an Alphaherpesvirus, Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1, and a Betaherpesvirus, Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Trus, Benes L.; Heymann, J. Bernard; Nealon, Karin; Cheng, Naiqian; Newcomb, William W.; Brown, Jay C.; Kedes, Dean H.; Steven, Alasdair C.

    2001-01-01

    The capsid of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) was visualized at 24-Å resolution by cryoelectron microscopy. Despite limited sequence similarity between corresponding capsid proteins, KSHV has the same T=16 triangulation number and much the same capsid architecture as herpes simplex virus (HSV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV). Its capsomers are hexamers and pentamers of the major capsid protein, forming a shell with a flat, close-packed, inner surface (the “floor”) and chimney-like external protrusions. Overlying the floor at trigonal positions are (αβ2) heterotrimers called triplexes. The floor structure is well conserved over all three viruses, and the most variable capsid features reside on the outer surface, i.e., in the shapes of the protrusions and triplexes, in which KSHV resembles CMV and differs from HSV. Major capsid protein sequences from the three subfamilies have some similarity, which is closer between KSHV and CMV than between either virus and HSV. The triplex proteins are less highly conserved, but sequence analysis identifies relatively conserved tracts. In alphaherpesviruses, the α-subunit (VP19c in HSV) has a 100-residue N-terminal extension and an insertion near the C terminus. The small basic capsid protein sequences are highly divergent: whereas the HSV and CMV proteins bind only to hexons, difference mapping suggests that the KSHV protein, ORF65, binds around the tips of both hexons and pentons. PMID:11222713

  5. Amino acid substitutions within the 2C coding sequence of Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis virus alter virus growth and affect protein distribution.

    PubMed

    Murray, Lindsay; Luke, Garry A; Ryan, Martin D; Wileman, Thomas; Knox, Caroline

    2009-09-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) was used to investigate the distribution of P2 proteins in host cells and examine the effect of amino acid substitutions in conserved residues of the 2C protein on virus growth. The distribution of viral proteins 2B, 2C and 2BC with marker proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and/or Golgi suggest an association with membranes of the secretory pathway. Similar results were obtained for truncated 2C and 2BC proteins with C-terminal deletions suggesting that the N-terminal region of the 2C protein is important in dictating distribution patterns. The significance of the high degree of conservation of this 2C region throughout the Picornaviridae was investigated by substituting conserved amino acid residues for alanine to create six mutant strains. Substitution mutations E(8)A, W(18)A and W(29)A abolished the ability of the virus to induce cytopathic effect (CPE) in BHK-21 cells. K(14)A, R(4)A and I(23)A delayed the onset and progression of CPE compared to the wild-type (WT) virus, and decreased virus yield. Immunofluorescence analysis of cells transiently expressing mutant 2C proteins revealed that the distribution of 2C was affected by substituting K(14), W(18) and I(23) for alanine indicating that specific conserved residues in 2C dictate protein distribution and virus growth.

  6. Purification of core-binding factor, a protein that binds the conserved core site in murine leukemia virus enhancers.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, S W; Speck, N A

    1992-01-01

    The Moloney murine leukemia virus causes thymic leukemias when injected into newborn mice. A major genetic determinant of the thymic disease specificity of the Moloney virus genetically maps to two protein binding sites in the Moloney virus enhancer, the leukemia virus factor b site and the adjacent core site. Point mutations introduced into either of these sites significantly shifts the disease specificity of the Moloney virus from thymic leukemia to erythroleukemia (N. A. Speck, B. Renjifo, E. Golemis, T. Frederickson, J. Hartley, and N. Hopkins, Genes Dev. 4:233-242, 1990). We have purified several polypeptides that bind to the core site in the Moloney virus enhancer. These proteins were purified from calf thymus nuclear extracts by selective pH denaturation, followed by chromatography on heparin-Sepharose, nonspecific double-stranded DNA-cellulose, and core oligonucleotide-coupled affinity columns. We have achieved greater than 13,000-fold purification of the core-binding factors (CBFs), with an overall yield of approximately 19%. Analysis of purified protein fractions by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis reveals more than 10 polypeptides. Each of the polypeptides was recovered from an SDS-polyacrylamide gel, and those in the molecular size range of 19 to 35 kDa were demonstrated to have core-binding activity. The purified CBFs were shown by DNase I footprint analyses to bind the core site in the Moloney virus enhancer specifically, and also to core motifs in the enhancers from a simian immunodeficiency virus, the immunoglobulin mu chain, and T-cell receptor gamma-chain genes. Images PMID:1309596

  7. Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Radu, Oana; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2013-02-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a low-grade vascular tumor associated with Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 (KSHV/HHV8) infection. Kaposi sarcoma lesions predominantly present at mucocutaneous sites, but may involve all organs and anatomic locations. Recognized epidemiologic-clinical forms of KS include classic, African (endemic), AIDS-associated (epidemic), and iatrogenic KS. New clinical manifestations have been described, such as antiretroviral therapy-related KS regression or flares. Kaposi sarcoma lesions evolve from early (patch stage) macules into plaques (plaque stage) that grow into larger nodules (tumor stage). Newer histologic variants include anaplastic, hyperkeratotic, lymphangioma-like, bullous, telangiectatic, ecchymotic, keloidal, pyogenic granuloma-like, micronodular, intravascular, glomeruloid and pigmented KS, as well as KS with sarcoidlike granulomas and KS with myoid nodules. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (HHV8) is the most specific immunohistochemical marker available to help distinguish KS from its mimics. Since KS remains one of the most common AIDS-defining malignancies, it is important that pathologists be able to recognize KS and its contemporary manifestations.

  8. Persistent infections of a field strain of rabies virus in murine neuroblastoma (NA-C1300) cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, W A; Charlton, K M; Casey, G A

    1989-01-01

    Rabies virus from the brain of a striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) from Ontario was inoculated into murine neuroblastoma (NA-C1300) cell cultures. These cultures were incubated and the cells were subcultured every three to four days. The presence of viral antigen in the cell cultures was monitored by direct immunofluorescent staining and in the culture fluids by titration in either baby hamster kidney (BHK/C13) or NA cells or in experimental mice. The virus-infected NA cultures evolved from an initial high viral concentration in supernatant fluid through a period of decreasing titers of infectious virus in the supernatant fluids to a final phase where no infectious virus has been found following cell culture and animal inoculation methods attempted although the persistently infected cells remained 95-100% viral nucleocapsid antigen-positive. Possible mechanisms involved in the perpetuation of this infection are discussed. This is the first report of a persistent infection of cell cultures by a field strain of rabies virus. PMID:2590871

  9. Evidence that a downstream pseudoknot is required for translational read-through of the Moloney murine leukemia virus gag stop codon.

    PubMed Central

    Wills, N M; Gesteland, R F; Atkins, J F

    1991-01-01

    Approximately 5% of the ribosomes translating the gag gene of murine leukemia viruses read through the UAG terminator and translate the in-frame pol gene to produce the gag-pol fusion polyprotein, the sole source of the pol gene products. We show that a pseudoknot located eight nucleotides 3' of the UAG codon in the Moloney murine leukemia virus is required for read-through. This requirement is markedly different from that known to be involved in other cases of read-through but surprisingly similar to some stimulatory sequences known to promote ribosomal frameshifting. Images PMID:1871115

  10. Endotoxin contamination of Agaricus blazei Murrill extract enhances murine immunologic responses and inhibits the growth of sarcoma 180 implants in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Masumoto, Junya

    2010-01-01

    Agaricus blazei Murrill, a native mushroom of Brazil, has been reported to be an immunoreactant with anti-tumor effect. There are many reports on the anti-tumor effect of Agaricus blazei Murrill; however, the precise mechanism of its effect is not fully understood. In this study, we tried to confirm the anti-tumor effect of Agaricus blazei Murrill against Sarcoma 180 cells in a mouse model and found that an inhibitory effect on tumor growth was induced by peritoneal injection of a freeze-dried, hot water extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill (FAG). We noted that there were differences among each sample in terms of anti-tumor activity. We hypothesized that this was because some contaminants of FAG were affecting the anti-tumor activity. We evaluated cytokine secretion from mouse peritoneal cells incubated with FAG. While high interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α secretions were observed in response to crude FAG, they were dramatically decreased by the removal of endotoxin from the FAG using an endotoxin-specific polymyxin B-conjugated affinity column. The reductions were synergistically recovered by adding an amount of lipopolysaccharide equivalent to the amount of contaminated endotoxin. Thus, these data suggest that the contaminated endotoxin of Agaricus blazei Murrill may act as an immunomodulator of anti-tumor activity.

  11. The murine AIDS virus Gag precursor protein binds to the SH3 domain of c-Abl.

    PubMed Central

    Dupraz, P; Rebai, N; Klein, S J; Beaulieu, N; Jolicoeur, P

    1997-01-01

    The Pr60gag protein of the murine AIDS (MAIDS) defective virus promotes the proliferation of the infected target B cells and is responsible for inducing a severe immunodeficiency disease. Using the yeast two-hybrid system, we identified the SH3 domain of c-Abl as interacting with the proline-rich p12 domain of Pr60gag. The two proteins were shown to associate in vitro and in vivo in MAIDS virus-infected B cells. Overexpression of Pr60(gag) in these cells led to a detectable increase of the levels of c-Abl protein and to its translocation at the membrane. These results suggest that this viral protein serves as a docking site for signaling molecules and that c-Abl may be involved in the proliferation of infected B cells. PMID:9060613

  12. Kaposi's sarcoma following immune suppressive therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Deschênes, Isabelle; Dion, Louise; Beauchesne, Claude; de Brum-Fernandes, Artur

    2003-03-01

    The association between Kaposi's sarcoma and infection with human herpesvirus 8 is now well recognized. Immunologic impairment is associated with 2 forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, epidemic [associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection] and iatrogenic (associated with immunosuppressive treatment); both forms have become more common during the last decade. We describe an HIV negative 54-year-old man who developed Kaposi's sarcoma 2 months after the beginning of immuno-suppressive therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). With tapering of medication, complete remission of Kaposi's sarcoma was achieved in one year. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of iatrogenic Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with WG.

  13. Sarcomas other than Kaposi sarcoma occurring in immunodeficiency: interpretations from a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Kishor; Shiels, Meredith S; Berg, Alexandra; Engels, Eric A

    2012-09-01

    In immunodeficiency, an increased sarcoma risk is confirmed for Kaposi's sarcoma. Whether rates of other sarcoma subtypes are elevated in the setting of immunodeficiency is not known. We therefore reviewed published case reports on HIV and AIDS patients and organ transplant recipients with sarcomas. For comparison, we assessed sarcomas in the U.S. general population using Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER) data. A total of 176 non-Kaposi sarcoma were identified, 75 in people with HIV and AIDS and 101 in transplant recipients. Leiomyosarcomas (n = 101) were the most frequently reported sarcomas, followed by angiosarcomas (n = 23) and fibrohistiocytic tumors (n = 17). Leiomyosarcomas were reported with two age peaks, in children and young adults. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected in the tumor cells in 85 and 88% of leiomyosarcomas in HIV-infected people and transplant recipients, respectively. Angiosarcomas and fibrohistiocytic tumors were most frequently reported in men. Among kidney transplant recipients, 20% of sarcomas arose at the site of an arteriovenous fistula. In comparison, leiomyoscarcomas, angiosarcomas, and fibrohistiocytic tumors comprised 16.9, 3.8, and 18.7% of sarcomas in the U.S. general population. Leiomyosarcoma and angiosarcoma may occur disproportionately in immunodeficiency. Leiomyosarcomas appear causatively linked to EBV, whereas angiosarcomas might be correlated with an arteriovenous fistula. Additional studies are necessary to understand the contribution of immunodeficiency to the cause of these sarcomas.

  14. Immunotherapy of murine sarcomas using lymphokine activated killer cells: optimization of the schedule and route of administration of recombinant interleukin-2

    SciTech Connect

    Ettinghausen, S.E.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1986-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) at high doses or at low doses in concert with lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells can produce regression of established pulmonary and hepatic metastases from a variety of tumors in mice. IL-2 appears to mediate its antitumor effect through the generation of LAK cells in vivo from endogenous lymphocytes and by the stimulation of host and transferred LAK cell proliferation in tissues. In this paper we have investigated different strategies for IL-2 administration to determine which regimen produced maximal in vivo proliferation and optimal immunotherapeutic efficacy of LAK cells. Tissue expansion of lymphoid cells was assessed using an assay of in vivo labeling of dividing cells by the thymidine analogue, 5-(/sup 125/I)iododeoxyuridine. The therapeutic effect of the different IL-2 administration protocols was determined by evaluating their efficacy in the treatment of established, 3-day pulmonary metastases from sarcomas in mice. The selection of IL-2 injection regimens for evaluation was based upon pharmacokinetic studies of IL-2 in mice. A single i.v. or i.p. dose yielded high peak IL-2 levels that could be measured for only a few hours after injection, while IL-2 given i.p. thrice daily produced titers that were detectable throughout the study periods (greater than or equal to 6 units/ml of serum after 100,000 units of IL-2 i.p. thrice daily). Using the proliferation and therapy models, we tested the same cumulative daily doses of IL-2 administered by i.v. or i.p. once daily, or i.p. thrice daily regimens. The i.p. thrice daily protocol stimulated greater lymphoid cell proliferation in the lungs, for example, than did the other regimens.

  15. Role of gag sequence in the biochemical properties and transforming activity of the avian sarcoma virus UR2-encoded gag-ros fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Jong, S M; Wang, L H

    1990-01-01

    The transforming protein P68gag-ros of avian sarcoma virus UR2 is a transmembrane tyrosine protein kinase molecule with the gag portion protruding extracellularly. To investigate the role of the gag moiety in the biochemical properties and biological functions of the P68gag-ros fusion protein, retroviruses containing the ros coding sequence of UR2 were constructed and analyzed. The gag-free ros protein was expressed from one of the mutant retroviruses at a level 10 to 50% of that of the wild-type UR2. However, the gag-free ros-containing viruses were not able to either transform chicken embryo fibroblasts or induce tumors in chickens. The specific tyrosine protein kinase activity of gag-free ros protein is about 10- to 20-fold reduced as judged by in vitro autophosphorylation. The gag-free ros protein is still capable of associating with membrane fractions including the plasma membrane, indicating that sequences essential for recognition and binding membranes must be located within ros. Upon passages of the gag-free mutants, transforming and tumorigenic variants occasionally emerged. The variants were found to have regained the gag sequence fused to the 5' end of the ros, apparently via recombination with the helper virus or through intramolecular recombination between ros and upstream gag sequences in the same virus construct. All three variants analyzed code for gag-ros fusion protein larger than 68 kDa. The gag-ros recombination junction of one of the transforming variants was sequenced and found to consist of a p19-p10-p27-ros fusion sequence. We conclude that the gag sequence is essential for the transforming activity of P68gag-ros but is not important for its membrane association. Images PMID:2173777

  16. Two Different Molecular Defects in the Tva Receptor Gene Explain the Resistance of Two tvar Lines of Chickens to Infection by Subgroup A Avian Sarcoma and Leukosis Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Elleder, Daniel; Melder, Deborah C.; Trejbalova, Katerina; Svoboda, Jan; Federspiel, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    The subgroup A to E avian sarcoma and leukosis viruses (ASLVs) are highly related and are thought to have evolved from a common ancestor. These viruses use distinct cell surface proteins as receptors to gain entry into avian cells. Chickens have evolved resistance to infection by the ASLVs. We have identified the mutations responsible for the block to virus entry in chicken lines resistant to infection by subgroup A ASLVs [ASLV(A)]. The tva genetic locus determines the susceptibility of chicken cells to ASLV(A) viruses. In quail, the ASLV(A) susceptibility allele tvas encodes two forms of the Tva receptor; these proteins are translated from alternatively spliced mRNAs. The normal cellular function of the Tva receptor is unknown; however, the extracellular domain contains a 40-amino-acid, cysteine-rich region that is homologous to the ligand binding region of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) proteins. The chicken tvas cDNAs had not yet been fully characterized; we cloned the chicken tva cDNAs from two lines of subgroup A-susceptible chickens, line H6 and line 0. Two types of chicken tvas cDNAs were obtained. These cDNAs encode a longer and shorter form of the Tva receptor homologous to the Tva forms in quail. Two different defects were identified in cDNAs cloned from two different ASLV(A)-resistant inbred chickens, line C and line 72. Line C tvar contains a single base pair substitution, resulting in a cysteine-to-tryptophan change in the LDLR-like region of Tva. This mutation drastically reduces the binding affinity of TvaR for the ASLV(A) envelope glycoproteins. Line 72 tvar2 contains a 4-bp insertion in exon 1 that causes a change in the reading frame, which blocks expression of the Tva receptor. PMID:15564460

  17. Gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma with appendiceal involvement.

    PubMed

    Egwuonwu, Steve; Gatto-Weis, Cara; Miranda, Roberto; Casas, Luis De Las

    2011-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a vascular tumor manifesting as nodular lesions on skin, mucous membranes, or internal organs. This is a case of a 42-year-old human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV) positive bisexual male, not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) since diagnosis four years ago. He presented with a three-day history of abdominal pains, fever, vomiting, and a one-week history of melena stools. Endoscopy revealed Kaposi sarcoma in the stomach and duodenum. Postendoscopy, he developed acute abdomen. Exploratory laparotomy revealed extensive Kaposi sarcoma of the gastrointestinal tract with appendiceal involvement. The patient underwent appendectomy and had an uneventful recovery. A review of the literature discusses appendiceal Kaposi sarcoma with appendicitis, a rare but critical manifestation of gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma.

  18. Tap and Dbp5, but not Gag, are involved in DR-mediated nuclear export of unspliced Rous sarcoma virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, Jason J.; Uddowla, Sabena; Abraham, Benjamin; Clatterbuck, Sarah; Beemon, Karen L. . E-mail: KLB@jhu.edu

    2007-07-05

    All retroviruses must circumvent cellular restrictions on the export of unspliced RNAs from the nucleus. While the unspliced RNA export pathways for HIV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus are well characterized, that of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) is not. We have previously reported that the RSV direct repeat (DR) elements are involved in the cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced viral RNA. Here, using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), we demonstrate that unspliced viral RNAs bearing a single point mutation (G8863C) in the DR exhibit a restricted cellular localization in and around the nucleus. In contrast, wild type unspliced viral RNA had a diffuse localization throughout the nucleus and cytoplasm. Since the RSV Gag protein has a transient localization in the nucleus, we examined the effect of Gag over-expression on a DR-mediated reporter construct. While Gag did not enhance DR-mediated nuclear export, the dominant-negative expression of two cellular export factors, Tap and Dbp5, inhibited expression of the same reporter construct. Furthermore, FISH studies using the dominant-negative Dbp5 demonstrated that unspliced wild type RSV RNA was retained within the nucleus. Taken together, these results further implicate the DR in nuclear RNA export through interactions with Tap and Dbp5.

  19. The effects of alternate polypurine tracts (PPTs) and mutations of sequences adjacent to the PPT on viral replication and cleavage specificity of the Rous sarcoma virus reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kevin W; Oh, Jangsuk; Alvord, W Gregory; Hughes, Stephen H

    2008-09-01

    We previously reported that a mutant Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) with an alternate polypurine tract (PPT), DuckHepBFlipPPT, had unexpectedly high titers and that the PPT was miscleaved primarily at one position following a GA dinucleotide by the RNase H of reverse transcriptase (RT). This miscleavage resulted in a portion of the 3' end of the PPT (5'-ATGTA) being added to the end of U3 of the linear viral DNA. To better understand the RNase H cleavage by RSV RT, we made a number of mutations within the DuckHepBFlipPPT and in the sequences adjacent to the PPT. Deleting the entire ATGTA sequence from the DuckHepBFlipPPT increased the relative titer to wild-type levels, while point mutations within the ATGTA sequence reduced the relative titer but had minimal effects on the cleavage specificity. However, mutating a sequence 5' of ATGTA affected the relative titer of the virus and caused the RNase H of RSV RT to lose the ability to cleave the PPT specifically. In addition, although mutations in the conserved stretch of thymidine residues upstream of the PPT did not affect the relative titer or cleavage specificity, the mutation of some of the nucleotides immediately upstream of the PPT did affect the titer and cleavage specificity. Taken together, our studies show that the structure of the PPT in the context of the cognate RT, rather than a specific sequence, is important for the proper cleavage by RSV RT.

  20. The hr1 and Fusion Peptide Regions of the Subgroup B Avian Sarcoma and Leukosis Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Influence Low pH-Dependent Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Babel, Angeline Rose; Bruce, James; Young, John A.T.

    2007-01-01

    The avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) envelope glycoprotein (Env) is activated to trigger fusion by a two-step mechanism involving receptor-priming and low pH fusion activation. In order to identify regions of ASLV Env that can regulate this process, a genetic selection method was used to identify subgroup B (ASLV-B) virus-infected cells resistant to low pH-triggered fusion when incubated with cells expressing the cognate TVB receptor. The subgroup B viral Env (envB) genes were then isolated from these cells and characterized by DNA sequencing. This led to identification of two frequent EnvB alterations which allowed TVB receptor-binding but altered the pH-threshold of membrane fusion activation: a 13 amino acid deletion in the host range 1 (hr1) region of the surface (SU) EnvB subunit, and the A32V amino acid change within the fusion peptide of the transmembrane (TM) EnvB subunit. These data indicate that these two regions of EnvB can influence the pH threshold of fusion activation. PMID:17245447

  1. Accelerated appearance of multiple B cell lymphoma types in NFS/N mice congenic for ecotropic murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed

    Hartley, J W; Chattopadhyay, S K; Lander, M R; Taddesse-Heath, L; Naghashfar, Z; Morse, H C; Fredrickson, T N

    2000-02-01

    Spontaneous lymphomas occur at high frequency in NFS x V+ mice, strains congenic for ecotropic murine leukemia virus (MuLV) proviral genes and expressing virus at high titer. In the present study, a total of 703 NFS x V+ lymphomas were studied by histopathology, immunophenotypic analysis, immunoglobulin heavy chain or T cell receptor beta chain rearrangements, and somatic ecotropic MuLV integrations; 90% of the lymphomas tested were of B cell lineage. Low-grade tumors included small lymphocytic, follicular, and splenic marginal zone lymphomas, while high-grade tumors comprised diffuse large-cell (centroblastic and immunoblastic types), splenic marginal zone, and lymphoblastic lymphomas. Comparison of mice of similar genetic background except for presence (NFS x V+) or absence (NFS x V-) of functional ecotropic MuLV genomes showed that NFS x V-clonal lymphomas developed at about one-half the rate of those occurring in NFS x V+ mice, and most were low-grade B cell lymphomas with extended latent periods. In NFS x V+ mice, clonal outgrowth, defined by Ig gene rearrangements, was associated with acquisition of somatic ecotropic proviral integrations, suggesting that, although generation of B cell clones can be virus independent, ecotropic virus may act to increase the rate of generation of clones and speed their evolution to lymphoma. The mechanism remains undefined, because only rare rearrangements were detected in several cellular loci previously associated with MuLV insertional mutagenesis.

  2. Functional Interplay Between Murine Leukemia Virus Glycogag, Serinc5, and Surface Glycoprotein Governs Virus Entry, with Opposite Effects on Gammaretroviral and Ebolavirus Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Ahi, Yadvinder S.; Zhang, Shu; Thappeta, Yashna; Denman, Audrey; Feizpour, Amin; Reinhard, Bjoern; Muriaux, Delphine; Fivash, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia viruses (MLVs), encode, in addition to the canonical Gag, Pol, and Env proteins that will form progeny virus particles, a protein called “glycogag” (glycosylated Gag). MLV glycogag contains the entire Gag sequence plus an 88-residue N-terminal extension. It has recently been reported that glycogag, like the Nef protein of HIV-1, counteracts the antiviral effects of the cellular protein Serinc5. We have found, in agreement with prior work, that glycogag strongly enhances the infectivity of MLVs with some Env proteins but not those with others. In contrast, however, glycogag was detrimental to MLVs carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. Glycogag could be replaced, with respect to viral infectivity, by the unrelated S2 protein of equine infectious anemia virus. We devised an assay for viral entry in which virus particles deliver the Cre recombinase into cells, leading to the expression of a reporter. Data from this assay showed that both the positive and the negative effects of glycogag and S2 upon MLV infectivity are exerted at the level of virus entry. Moreover, transfection of the virus-producing cells with a Serinc5 expression plasmid reduced the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying xenotropic MLV Env, particularly in the absence of glycogag. Conversely, Serinc5 expression abrogated the negative effects of glycogag upon the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. As Serinc5 may influence cellular phospholipid metabolism, it seems possible that all of these effects on virus entry derive from changes in the lipid composition of viral membranes. PMID:27879338

  3. Functional Interplay Between Murine Leukemia Virus Glycogag, Serinc5, and Surface Glycoprotein Governs Virus Entry, with Opposite Effects on Gammaretroviral and Ebolavirus Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ahi, Yadvinder S; Zhang, Shu; Thappeta, Yashna; Denman, Audrey; Feizpour, Amin; Gummuluru, Suryaram; Reinhard, Bjoern; Muriaux, Delphine; Fivash, Matthew J; Rein, Alan

    2016-11-22

    Gammaretroviruses, such as murine leukemia viruses (MLVs), encode, in addition to the canonical Gag, Pol, and Env proteins that will form progeny virus particles, a protein called "glycogag" (glycosylated Gag). MLV glycogag contains the entire Gag sequence plus an 88-residue N-terminal extension. It has recently been reported that glycogag, like the Nef protein of HIV-1, counteracts the antiviral effects of the cellular protein Serinc5. We have found, in agreement with prior work, that glycogag strongly enhances the infectivity of MLVs with some Env proteins but not those with others. In contrast, however, glycogag was detrimental to MLVs carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. Glycogag could be replaced, with respect to viral infectivity, by the unrelated S2 protein of equine infectious anemia virus. We devised an assay for viral entry in which virus particles deliver the Cre recombinase into cells, leading to the expression of a reporter. Data from this assay showed that both the positive and the negative effects of glycogag and S2 upon MLV infectivity are exerted at the level of virus entry. Moreover, transfection of the virus-producing cells with a Serinc5 expression plasmid reduced the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying xenotropic MLV Env, particularly in the absence of glycogag. Conversely, Serinc5 expression abrogated the negative effects of glycogag upon the infectivity and entry capability of MLV carrying Ebolavirus glycoprotein. As Serinc5 may influence cellular phospholipid metabolism, it seems possible that all of these effects on virus entry derive from changes in the lipid composition of viral membranes.

  4. Formation of Viral Ribonucleic Acid and Virus in Cells that are Permissive or Nonpermissive for Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (GDVII) 1

    PubMed Central

    Sturman, Lawrence S.; Tamm, Igor

    1969-01-01

    GDVII virus growth in BHK-21 cells, a permissive host for the virus, resembled productive infections with other picornaviruses. Virus yields ranged from 100 to 600 plaque-forming units (PFU)/cell. Virus replication in HeLa cells, a nonpermissive host for GDVII virus, was characterized by virus yields of only 0.1 to 5 PFU/cell. Similar low yields of virus have been obtained from HeLa cells at all multiplicities of input up to 6,000 per cell. The progeny particles from HeLa cells were, like the infecting particles, restricted in the HeLa cell host. Despite the great difference in final yields of virus from BHK-21 and HeLa cells, the times when maximal yields were reached were similar. GDVII virus stock grown in BHK-21 cells was designated HeLa-. A variant of GDVII virus which is capable of extensive growth in HeLa cells was obtained. This variant, designated HeLa+ GDVII virus, was passaged serially in HeLa cells. Virus yields of 50 to 150 infective virus particles per cell were obtained from infection of HeLa cells with HeLa+ GDVII virus. The major species of HeLa+ virus-specific ribonucleic acid (RNA) produced was single stranded and sedimented with an S value of 35S. The rate of accumulation of HeLa+ virus-specific RNA in HeLa cell cultures was about four times that of HeLa- RNA. The amount of virus-specific HeLa+ RNA formed in HeLa cells was several-fold greater than that of HeLa- RNA. With HeLa- parent GDVII virus undergoing productive replication in BHK-21 cells or abortive replication in HeLa cells, the major species of virus-specific RNA produced was single stranded and sedimented with an approximate S value of 35S. The amount of HeLa- virus-specific RNA extracted from BHK-21 cells was several-fold greater than the amount obtained from HeLa cells. PMID:4306304

  5. Antigenic structure of human hepatitis A virus defined by analysis of escape mutants selected against murine monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Ping, L H; Lemon, S M

    1992-01-01

    We examined the antigenic structure of human hepatitis A virus (HAV) by characterizing a series of 21 murine monoclonal-antibody-resistant neutralization escape mutants derived from the HM175 virus strain. The escape phenotype of each mutant was associated with reduced antibody binding in radioimmunofocus assays. Neutralization escape mutations were identified at the Asp-70 and Gln-74 residues of the capsid protein VP3, as well as at Ser-102, Val-171, Ala-176, and Lys-221 of VP1. With the exception of the Lys-221 mutants, substantial cross-resistance was evident among escape mutants tested against a panel of 22 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, suggesting that the involved residues contribute to epitopes composing a single antigenic site. As mutations at one or more of these residues conferred resistance to 20 of 22 murine antibodies, this site appears to be immunodominant in the mouse. However, multiple mutants selected independently against any one monoclonal antibody had mutations at only one or, at the most, two amino acid residues within the capsid proteins, confirming that there are multiple epitopes within this antigenic site and suggesting that single-amino-acid residues contributing to these epitopes may play key roles in the binding of individual antibodies. A second, potentially independent antigenic site was identified by three escape mutants with different substitutions at Lys-221 of VP1. These mutants were resistant only to antibody H7C27, while H7C27 effectively neutralized all other escape mutants. These data support the existence of an immunodominant neutralization site in the antigenic structure of hepatitis A virus which involves residues of VP3 and VP1 and a second, potentially independent site involving residue 221 of VP1. PMID:1312628

  6. Transmission of avian H9N2 influenza viruses in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Wu, Rui; Sui, Zhiwei; Liu, Zewen; Liang, Wangwang; Yang, Keli; Xiong, Zhongliang; Xu, Diping

    2010-05-19

    Avian H9N2 influenza viruses have circulated widely in domestic poultry around the world, resulting in occasional transmission of virus from infected poultry to humans. However, it is unknown whether H9N2 influenza virus has acquired the ability to be transmitted from human to human. Here, we report that mouse-adapted H9N2 influenza viruses can replicate efficiently and are lethal for several strains of mice. To evaluate the transmissibility of mouse-adapted H9N2 influenza viruses, we carried out transmission studies in mice using both contact and respiratory droplet routes. Our results indicate that mouse-adapted H9N2 influenza viruses can replicate efficiently and be transmitted between mice. This suggests that once H9N2 influenza viruses adapt to new host, they should present potential public health risks, therefore, urgent attention should be paid to H9N2 influenza viruses.

  7. Mutations altering the moloney murine leukemia virus p12 Gag protein affect virion production and early events of the virus life cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, B; Li, X; Goff, S P

    1999-01-01

    The p12 Gag protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus is a small polypeptide of unknown function, containing two proline-rich motifs. To determine its role in replication, we introduced a series of deletion and alanine-scanning substitution mutations throughout the p12 coding region of a proviral DNA, and characterized the phenotypes of the resulting mutant viruses. Complete deletion of p12 and mutations affecting the PPPY motif caused substantial reduction in the yield of virions and a modest reduction in Gag processing. Proteolytic cleavage of the R-peptide from the cytoplasmic tail of the envelope protein TM was abolished in these mutants, suggesting that the PPPY motif is crucial for the viral protease to access the TM tail. The resulting virions were non-infectious, and unable to initiate DNA synthesis in infected cells. Mutants with alterations in both the N- and C-terminal portions of p12 exhibited a distinct phenotype. The production of virions and processing of Gag, Pol and Env precursors were normal. The viruses were able to direct synthesis of linear viral DNA, but there was almost no detectable circular DNAs or LTR-LTR junction. These data suggest that p12 plays a critical role in the early events of the virus life cycle. PMID:10469649

  8. Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sandra; Schulz, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), taxonomical name human gammaherpesvirus 8, is a phylogenetically old human virus that co-evolved with human populations, but is now only common (seroprevalence greater than 10%) in sub-Saharan Africa, around the Mediterranean Sea, parts of South America and in a few ethnic communities. KSHV causes three human malignancies, Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and many cases of the plasmablastic form of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) as well as occasional cases of plasmablastic lymphoma arising from MCD; it has also been linked to rare cases of bone marrow failure and hepatitis. As it has colonized humans physiologically for many thousand years, cofactors are needed to allow it to unfold its pathogenic potential. In most cases, these include immune defects of genetic, iatrogenic or infectious origin, and inflammation appears to play an important role in disease development. Our much improved understanding of its life cycle and its role in pathogenesis should now allow us to develop new therapeutic strategies directed against key viral proteins or intracellular pathways that are crucial for virus replication or persistence. Likewise, its limited (for a herpesvirus) distribution and transmission should offer an opportunity for the development and use of a vaccine to prevent transmission. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human oncogenic viruses’. PMID:28893942

  9. Viral determinants that control the neuropathogenicity of PVC-211 murine leukemia virus in vivo determine brain capillary endothelial cell tropism of the virus in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, M; Hoffman, P M; Ruscetti, S K

    1993-01-01

    PVC-211 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is a neuropathogenic, weakly leukemogenic variant of the nonneuropathogenic, highly leukemogenic Friend MuLV (F-MuLV). Chimeric viruses constructed from PVC-211 MuLV clone 3d and F-MuLV clone 57 indicate that the env gene of PVC-211 MuLV contains the determinant(s) responsible for pathological changes in the central nervous system. However, sequences within the 5' one-third (AatII-EcoRI region) of the PVC-211 MuLV genome, which include the 5' leader sequence, the gag gene, and the 5' quarter of the pol gene, are also needed in conjunction with the env gene determinant(s) to cause clinically evident neurological disease in the majority of virus-infected animals after a short latency. In the presence of the AatII-EcoRI region of the PVC-211 MuLV genome, the PVC-211 MuLV env gene sequences encoding the amino-terminal half of the SU protein, which contains the receptor-binding region of the protein, were sufficient to cause rapidly progressive neurological disease. When PVC-211 MuLV, F-MuLV, and various chimeric viruses were tested for their ability to replicate in cultured brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC), the primary site of PVC-211 MuLV replication within the central nervous system, there was a direct correlation between the replication efficiency of a virus in BCEC in vitro and its ability to cause neurological disease in vivo. This observation indicates that the sequences in PVC-211 MuLV that render it neuropathogenic affect its replication in BCEC and suggests that rapid and efficient replication of the virus in BCEC is crucial for the pathological changes in the central nervous system that result in development of neurological disease. Images PMID:8392599

  10. Prevalence and predictors of kaposi sarcoma herpes virus seropositivity: a cross-sectional analysis of HIV-infected adults initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is the most common AIDS-defining tumour in HIV-infected individuals in Africa. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) infection precedes development of KS. KSHV co-infection may be associated with worse outcomes in HIV disease and elevated KSHV viral load may be an early marker for advanced HIV disease among untreated patients. We examined the prevalence of KSHV among adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) and compared immunological, demographic and clinical factors between patients seropositive and seronegative for KSHV. Results We analyzed cross-sectional data collected from 404 HIV-infected treatment-naïve adults initiating ART at the Themba Lethu Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa between November 2008 and March 2009. Subjects were screened at ART initiation for antibodies to KSHV lytic K8.1 and latent Orf73 antigens. Seropositivity to KSHV was defined as positive to either lytic KSHV K8.1 or latent KSHV Orf73 antibodies. KSHV viremia was determined by quantitative PCR and CD3, 4 and 8 lymphocyte counts were determined with flow cytometry. Of the 404 participants, 193 (48%) tested positive for KSHV at ART initiation; with 76 (39%) reactive to lytic K8.1, 35 (18%) to latent Orf73 and 82 (42%) to both. One individual presented with clinical KS at ART initiation. The KSHV infected group was similar to those without KSHV in terms of age, race, gender, ethnicity, smoking and alcohol use. KSHV infected individuals presented with slightly higher median CD3 (817 vs. 726 cells/mm3) and CD4 (90 vs. 80 cells/mm3) counts than KSHV negative subjects. We found no associations between KSHV seropositivity and body mass index, tuberculosis status, WHO stage, HIV RNA levels, full blood count or liver function tests at initiation. Those with detectable KSHV viremia (n = 19), however, appeared to present with signs of more advanced HIV disease including anemia and WHO stage 3 or 4 defining conditions compared to those in whom the virus was

  11. Specificity of coxsackievirus B3 interaction with human, but not murine, decay-accelerating factor: replacement of a single residue within short consensus repeat 2 prevents virus attachment.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jieyan; Zhang, Lili; Organtini, Lindsey J; Hafenstein, Susan; Bergelson, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-15

    Many coxsackievirus B (CVB) isolates bind to human decay-accelerating factor (DAF) as well as to the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR). However, the virus does not interact with murine DAF. To understand why CVB3 binds specifically to human DAF, we constructed a series of chimeric molecules in which specific regions of the human DAF molecule were replaced by the corresponding murine sequences. We found that replacement of human short consensus repeat 2 (SCR2) with murine SCR2 ablated virus binding to human DAF, as did deletion of human SCR2. Although replacement of human SCR4 had a partial inhibitory effect, deletion of SCR4 had no effect. Within human SCR2, replacement of serine 104 (S104) with the proline residue found in murine DAF eliminated virus binding. On the basis of the structure of the CVB3-DAF complex determined by cryo-electron microscopy, DAF S104 is in close contact with a viral capsid residue, a threonine at VP1 position 271. Replacement of this capsid residue with larger amino acids specifically eliminated virus attachment to human DAF but had no effect on attachment to CAR or replication in HeLa cells. Taken together, these results support the current model of virus-DAF interaction and point to a specific role for VP1 T271 and DAF S104 at the virus-DAF interface. The results of the present study point to a specific role for VP1 T271 and DAF S104 at the interface between CVB3 and DAF, and they demonstrate how subtle structural changes can dramatically influence virus-receptor interactions. In addition, the results support a recent pseudoatomic model of the CVB3-DAF interaction obtained by cryo-electron microscopy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Intra articular synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Radha; Tameem, Afroz; Vidyasagar, J V S

    2010-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue neoplasm with a characteristic biphasic pattern. Incidence in soft tissues is 5-10%. Intra articularly synovial sarcoma is extremely rare. Fewer than 5% of all synovial sarcomas arise within the joint space. We report a case of intra articular synovial sarcoma in a young male who presented as internal derangement of the knee.

  13. Immunotherapy of murine leukemia. Efficacy of passive serum therapy of Friend leukemia virus-induced disease in immunocompromised mice

    SciTech Connect

    Genovesi, E.V.; Livnat, D.; Collins, J.J.

    1983-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the passive therapy of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MuLV)-induced disease with chimpanzee anti-F-MuLV serum is accompanied by the development of host antiviral humoral and cellular immunity, the latter measurable in adoptive transfer protocols and by the ability of serum-protected mice to resist virus rechallenge. The present study was designed to further examine the contribution of various compartments of the host immune system to serum therapy itself, as well as to the acquired antiviral immunity that develops in serum-protected mice, through the use of naturally immunocompromised animals (e.g., nude athymic mice and natural killer (NK)-deficient beige mutant mice) or mice treated with immunoabrogating agents such as sublethal irradiation, cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan (Cy)), cortisone, and /sup 89/Sr. The studies in nude mice indicate that while mature T-cells are not needed for effective serum therapy, they do appear to be necessary for the long-term resistance of serum-protected mice to virus rechallenge and for the generation of the cell population(s) responsible for adoptive transfer of antiviral immunity. Furthermore, this acquired resistance is not due to virus neutralization by serum antibodies since antibody-negative, Cy-treated, serum-protected mice still reject the secondary virus infection. Lastly, while the immunocompromise systems examined did effect various host antiviral immune responses, none of them, including the NK-deficient beige mutation, significantly diminished the efficacy of the passive serum therapy of F-MuLV-induced disease.

  14. Efficacy of common disinfectant/cleaning agents in inactivating murine norovirus and feline calicivirus as surrogate viruses for human norovirus.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Stephanie; Skura, Brenton; Petric, Martin; McIntyre, Lorraine; Gamage, Bruce; Isaac-Renton, Judith

    2015-11-01

    The efficacies of disinfection by sodium hypochlorite, accelerated hydrogen peroxide (AHP), and quaternary ammonium compound (QUAT) commonly used in health care facilities were determined using the surrogate viruses murine norovirus (MNV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV). A virus suspension of known concentration (with or without a soil load) was deposited onto stainless steel discs under wet or dry load conditions and exposed to defined concentrations of the disinfectant/cleaning agent for 1-, 5-, or 10-minute contact time using the quantitative carrier test (QCT-2) method. Virus inactivation was determined by plaque assay. At an exposure time of 1 minute, sodium hypochlorite at 2,700 ppm was able to inactivate MNV-1 and FCV with a >5 log10 reduction. After 10 minutes, MNV-1 was inactivated by AHP at 35,000 ppm, whereas FCV was inactivated at 3,500 ppm. MNV-1 was not inactivated by QUAT at 2,800 ppm. A QUAT-alcohol formulation containing 2,000 ppm QUAT and 70% ethanol was effective in inactivating MNV-1 after 5 minutes, but resulted in only a <3 log10 reduction of FCV after 10 minutes. AHP and QUAT products were less effective than sodium hypochlorite for the inactivation of MNV-1 and FCV. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of AKR murine leukemia virus sequences in AKR mouse substrains and structure of integrated recombinant genomes in tumor tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Quint, W; Quax, W; van der Putten, H; Berns, A

    1981-01-01

    A specific cDNA probe of AKR murine leukemia virus (AKR-MLV) was prepared to detect AKR-MLV sequences in normal and tumor tissues in a variety of AKR mouse substrains. AKR strains contained up to six endogenous AKR-MLV genomes. All substrains tested had one AKR-MLV locus in common, and closely related substrains had several proviruses integrated in an identical site. Virus-induced tumors in the AKR/FuRdA and AKR/JS strains showed a reintegration pattern of AKR-MLV sequences unique for the individual animal, suggesting a monoclonal origin for the outgrown tumors. An analysis of tumor DNAs from the AKR/FuRdA and AKR/JS substrains with restriction enzymes cleaving within the proviral genome revealed a new EcoRI restriction site and BamHI restriction site not present in normal tissues. The positions of these sites corresponded both with cleavage sites of EcoRI and BamHI in integrated Moloney recombinants and with the structure of isolated AKR mink cell focus-forming viruses. All tumors analyzed to data contain nearly identical integrated recombinant genomes, suggesting a causal relationship between the formation of recombinants and the leukemogenic process. Images PMID:6268802

  16. Nuclease S1-sensitive sites on superhelical DNA molecules carrying the LTR region of Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Takeya, T

    1987-04-29

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) from proviral DNA of Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) was cloned on a derivative of pBR322, and after introducing superhelical torsions into the resulting recombinant, the sites of conformational transition were investigated by the nuclease S1-digestion method. With an increase in the negative linking differences, fourteen dominant cutting sites were identified, of which two were mapped inside the LTR and one at the 3' end of the LTR. By searching the sequence data, all these sites were localized in the regions having either palindromic sequences or AT-rich sequences. Free energy calculation for the local secondary structure on one strand indicated that nuclease S1 attacked the palindromic sequence regions which could form relatively stable hairpin structures. Under the conditions used, no correlation was found between the S1-sensitive sites and the potential Z-DNA-forming regions, including those within the enhancer sequence.

  17. Exosomes in human semen restrict HIV-1 transmission by vaginal cells and block intravaginal replication of LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus complex

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Marisa N.; Jones, Philip H.; Okeoma, Chioma M.

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are membranous extracellular nanovesicles secreted by diverse cell types. Exosomes from healthy human semen have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication and to impair progeny virus infectivity. In this study, we examined the ability of healthy human semen exosomes to restrict HIV-1 and LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus transmission in three different model systems. We show that vaginal cells internalize exosomes with concomitant transfer of functional mRNA. Semen exosomes blocked the spread of HIV-1 from vaginal epithelial cells to target cells in our cell-to-cell infection model and suppressed transmission of HIV-1 across the vaginal epithelial barrier in our trans-well model. Our in vivo model shows that human semen exosomes restrict intravaginal transmission and propagation of murine AIDS virus. Our study highlights an antiretroviral role for semen exosomes that may be harnessed for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat HIV-1 transmission. PMID:25880110

  18. No Evidence for Xenotropic Murine Leukemia-Related Virus Infection in Sweden Using Internally Controlled Multiepitope Suspension Array Serology

    PubMed Central

    Blomberg, Fredrik; Sjösten, Anna; Sheikholvaezin, Ali; Bölin-Wiener, Agnes; Elfaitouri, Amal; Hessel, Sanna; Gottfries, Carl-Gerhard; Zachrisson, Olof; Öhrmalm, Christina; Jobs, Magnus; Pipkorn, Rüdiger

    2012-01-01

    Many syndromes have a large number of differential diagnoses, a situation which calls for multiplex diagnostic systems. Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME), also named chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), is a common disease of unknown etiology. A mouse retrovirus, xenotropic murine leukemia-related virus (XMRV), was found in ME/CFS patients and blood donors, but this was not corroborated. However, the paucity of serological investigations on XMRV in humans prompted us to develop a serological assay which cover many aspects of XMRV antigenicity. It is a novel suspension array method, using a multiplex IgG assay with nine recombinant proteins from the env and gag genes of XMRV and 38 peptides based on known epitopes of vertebrate gammaretroviruses. IgG antibodies were sought in 520 blood donors and 85 ME/CFS patients and in positive- and negative-control sera from animals. We found no differences in seroreactivity between blood donors and ME/CFS patients for any of the antigens. This did not support an association between ME/CFS and XMRV infection. The multiplex serological system had several advantages: (i) biotinylated protein G allowed us to run both human and animal sera, which is essential because of a lack of XMRV-positive humans; (ii) a novel quality control was a pan-peptide positive-control rabbit serum; and (iii) synthetic XMRV Gag peptides with degenerate positions covering most of the variation of murine leukemia-like viruses did not give higher background than nondegenerate analogs. The principle may be used for creation of variant tolerant peptide serologies. Thus, our system allows rational large-scale serological assays with built-in quality control. PMID:22787191

  19. Protective Immunity against Murine Hepatitis Virus (MHV) Induced by Intranasal or Subcutaneous Administration of Hybrids of Tobacco Mosaic Virus That Carries an MHV Epitope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Moses; Bendahmane, Mohammed; Lettieri, Gerard A.; Paoletti, Alyssa D.; Lane, Thomas E.; Fitchen, John H.; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Beachy, Roger N.

    1999-07-01

    Hybrids of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) were constructed with the use of fusion to the coat protein peptides of 10 or 15 amino acids, containing the 5B19 epitope from the spike protein of murine hepatitis virus (MHV) and giving rise to TMV-5B19 and TMV-5B19L, respectively. The TMV hybrids were propagated in tobacco plants, and the virus particles were purified. Immunogold labeling, with the use of the monoclonal MAb5B19 antibody, showed specific decoration of hybrid TMV particles, confirming the expression and display of the MHV epitope on the surface of the TMV. Mice were immunized with purified hybrid viruses after several regimens of immunization. Mice that received TMV-5B19L intranasally developed serum IgG and IgA specific for the 5B19 epitope and for the TMV coat protein. Hybrid TMV-5B19, administered by subcutaneous injections, elicited high titers of serum IgG that was specific for the 5B19 epitope and for coat protein, but IgA that was specific against 5B19 was not observed. Mice that were immunized with hybrid virus by subcutaneous or intranasal routes of administration survived challenge with a lethal dose (10 × LD50) of MHV strain JHM, whereas mice administered wild-type TMV died 10 d post challenge. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the dose of administered immunogen and protection against MHV infection. These studies show that TMV can be an effective vaccine delivery vehicle for parenteral and mucosal immunization and for protection from challenge with viral infection.

  20. Elevation of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels, but not angiopoietin 2, in the plasma of human immunodeficiency virus-infected African women with clinical Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Graham, Susan M; Rajwans, Nimerta; Richardson, Barbra A; Jaoko, Walter; McClelland, R Scott; Overbaugh, Julie; Liles, W Conrad

    2014-10-01

    Circulating levels of endothelial activation biomarkers are elevated in during infection with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and may also be increased in Kaposi sarcoma (KS). We compared 23 HIV-1-seropositive women with clinically diagnosed KS with 46 randomly selected controls matched for visit year, CD4 count, and antiretroviral therapy status. Conditional logistic regression was used to identify differences between cases and controls. The odds of clinical KS increased with increasing plasma viral load and with intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) levels above or equal to the median. There was a borderline association between increasing plasma angiopoietin 2 levels and KS. In multivariable modeling including plasma viral load, angiopoietin 2, and ICAM-1, plasma ICAM-1 levels above or equal to the median remained associated with clinical KS (odds ratio = 14.2, 95% confidence interval = 2.3-87.7). Circulating ICAM-1 levels should be evaluated as a potential biomarker for disease progression and treatment response among HIV-infected KS patients.

  1. Role of natural killer cells in the mechanism of the antitumor effect of interferon on Moloney sarcoma virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Fresa, K L; Murasko, D M

    1986-01-01

    The growth of tumors induced by inoculation of cells transformed by Moloney sarcoma virus can be inhibited by in situ administration of interferon (IFN) beginning one day after tumor challenge and continuing for 2 or 3 additional days. Inhibition of tumor growth by IFN was associated with a marked augmentation of natural killer (NK) cell activity, both in the spleen and at the site of tumor challenge, by day 5 after tumor challenge. However, using optimal conditions for IFN treatment, depletion of NK cells by in vivo treatment with anti-asialo GM1 prior to tumor challenge had no significant effect on inhibition of tumor growth by IFN. When the tumor load was greater or when IFN treatment was shorter, treatment with anti-asialo-GM1 partially abrogated the inhibition of tumor growth by IFN. In vitro assays gave no evidence of IFN enhancement of specific T-cell or activated macrophage antitumor effect. These results suggest that under optimal treatment conditions, the mechanism of the antitumor effect of IFN was independent of augmentation of NK activity, but under suboptimal conditions NK cells play a role in the mechanism of the antitumor effect of IFN.

  2. Visualization of the two-step fusion process of the retrovirus avian sarcoma/leukosis virus by cryo-electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Cardone, Giovanni; Brecher, Matthew; Fontana, Juan; Winkler, Dennis C; Butan, Carmen; White, Judith M; Steven, Alasdair C

    2012-11-01

    Retrovirus infection starts with the binding of envelope glycoproteins to host cell receptors. Subsequently, conformational changes in the glycoproteins trigger fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. Some retroviruses, such as avian sarcoma/leukosis virus (ASLV), employ a two-step mechanism in which receptor binding precedes low-pH activation and fusion. We used cryo-electron tomography to study virion/receptor/liposome complexes that simulate the interactions of ASLV virions with cells. Binding the soluble receptor at neutral pH resulted in virions capable of binding liposomes tightly enough to alter their curvature. At virion-liposome interfaces, the glycoproteins are ∼3-fold more concentrated than elsewhere in the viral envelope, indicating specific recruitment to these sites. Subtomogram averaging showed that the oblate globular domain in the prehairpin intermediate (presumably the receptor-binding domain) is connected to both the target and the viral membrane by 2.5-nm-long stalks and is partially disordered, compared with its native conformation. Upon lowering the pH, fusion took place. Fusion is a stochastic process that, once initiated, must be rapid, as only final (postfusion) products were observed. These fusion products showed glycoprotein spikes on their surface, with their interiors occupied by patches of dense material but without capsids, implying their disassembly. In addition, some of the products presented a density layer underlying and resolved from the viral membrane, which may represent detachment of the matrix protein to facilitate the fusion process.

  3. Oncolytic vaccinia virus combined with radiotherapy induces apoptotic cell death in sarcoma cells by down-regulating the inhibitors of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Michelle J.; Smith, Henry G.; McEntee, Gráinne; Kyula-Currie, Joan; Mansfield, David C.; Khan, Aadil A.; Roulstone, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Advanced extremity melanoma and sarcoma present a significant therapeutic challenge, requiring multimodality therapy to treat or even palliate disease. These aggressive tumours are relatively chemo-resistant, therefore new treatment approaches are urgently required. We have previously reported on the efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy (OV) delivered by isolated limb perfusion. In this report, we have improved therapeutic outcomes by combining OV with radiotherapy. In vitro, the combination of oncolytic vaccinia virus (GLV-1h68) and radiotherapy demonstrated synergistic cytotoxicity. This effect was not due to increased viral replication, but mediated through induction of intrinsic apoptosis. GLV-1h68 therapy downregulated the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins (MCL-1 and BCL-XL) and the downstream inhibitors of apoptosis, resulting in cleavage of effector caspases 3 and 7. In an in vivo ILP model, the combination of OV and radiotherapy significantly delayed tumour growth and prolonged survival compared to single agent therapy. These data suggest that the virally-mediated down-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins may increase the sensitivity of tumour cells to the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation. Oncolytic virotherapy represents an exciting candidate for clinical development when delivered by ILP. Its ability to overcome anti-apoptotic signals within tumour cells points the way to further development in combination with conventional anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27783991

  4. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus latency associated nuclear antigen protein release the G2/M cell cycle blocks by modulating ATM/ATR mediated checkpoint pathway.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Sahu, Sushil Kumar; Mohanty, Suchitra; Chakrabarti, Sudipta; Maji, Santanu; Reddy, R Rajendra; Jha, Asutosh K; Goswami, Chandan; Kundu, Chanakya N; Rajasubramaniam, Shanmugam; Verma, Subhash C; Choudhuri, Tathagata

    2014-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infects the human population and maintains latency stage of viral life cycle in a variety of cell types including cells of epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial origin. The establishment of latent infection by KSHV requires the expression of an unique repertoire of genes among which latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA) plays a critical role in the replication of the viral genome. LANA regulates the transcription of a number of viral and cellular genes essential for the survival of the virus in the host cell. The present study demonstrates the disruption of the host G2/M cell cycle checkpoint regulation as an associated function of LANA. DNA profile of LANA expressing human B-cells demonstrated the ability of this nuclear antigen in relieving the drug (Nocodazole) induced G2/M checkpoint arrest. Caffeine suppressed nocodazole induced G2/M arrest indicating involvement of the ATM/ATR. Notably, we have also shown the direct interaction of LANA with Chk2, the ATM/ATR signalling effector and is responsible for the release of the G2/M cell cycle block.

  5. Comparative murine norovirus studies reveal a lack of correlation between intestinal virus titers and enteric pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Shannon M.; Liu, Guangliang; Reinhard, Mary K.; Hsu, Charlie C.; Livingston, Robert S.; Karst, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Human noroviruses are significant emerging pathogens, causing the majority of non-bacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. The recent discovery of 30 murine norovirus strains is beginning to facilitate a detailed investigation of norovirus pathogenesis. Here, we have performed an in vivo comparative analysis of two murine norovirus strains, MNV-1 and MNV-3. In immunocompetent mice, MNV-1 caused modest intestinal pathology whereas MNV-3 was attenuated compared to MNV-1. Surprisingly though, MNV-3 reached higher titers in intestinal tissue than MNV-1. MNV-3 also displayed attenuation in mice deficient in the critical interferon signaling molecule STAT-1, demonstrating that MNV-3 attenuation is not a result of increased interferon sensitivity. Importantly, MNV-3-infected mice lost weight and developed gastric bloating and diarrhea in STAT1−/− mice, from which all animals recovered. This disease profile recapitulates several key features of acute gastroenteritis experienced by people infected with a human norovirus. PMID:22018636

  6. The antiviral action of common household disinfectants and antiseptics against murine hepatitis virus, a potential surrogate for SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Dellanno, Christine; Vega, Quinn; Boesenberg, Diane

    2009-10-01

    The 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infected over 8000 people and killed 774. Transmission of SARS occurred through direct and indirect contact and large droplet nuclei. The World Health Organization recommended the use of household disinfectants, which have not been previously tested against SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), to disinfect potentially contaminated environmental surfaces. There is a need for a surrogate test system given the limited availability of the SARS-CoV for testing and biosafety requirements necessary to safely handle it. In this study, the antiviral activity of standard household products was assayed against murine hepatitis virus (MHV), as a potential surrogate for SARS-CoV. A surface test method, which involves drying an amount of virus on a surface and then applying the product for a specific contact time, was used to determine the virucidal activity. The virus titers and log reductions were determined by the Reed and Muench tissue culture infective dose (TCID)50 end point method. When tested as directed, common household disinfectants or antiseptics, containing either 0.050% of triclosan, 0.12% of PCMX, 0.21% of sodium hypochlorite, 0.23% of pine oil, or 0.10% of a quaternary compound with 79% of ethanol, demonstrated a 3-log reduction or better against MHV without any virus recovered in a 30-second contact time. Common household disinfectants and antiseptics were effective at inactivating MHV, a possible surrogate for SARS-CoV, from surfaces when used as directed. In an outbreak caused by novel agents, it is important to know the effectiveness of disinfectants and antiseptics to prevent or reduce the possibility of human-to-human transmission via surfaces.

  7. The Effects of Alternate Polypurine Tracts (PPTs) and Mutations of Sequences Adjacent to the PPT on Viral Replication and Cleavage Specificity of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Reverse Transcriptase▿

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kevin W.; Oh, Jangsuk; Alvord, W. Gregory; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that a mutant Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) with an alternate polypurine tract (PPT), DuckHepBFlipPPT, had unexpectedly high titers and that the PPT was miscleaved primarily at one position following a GA dinucleotide by the RNase H of reverse transcriptase (RT). This miscleavage resulted in a portion of the 3′ end of the PPT (5′-ATGTA) being added to the end of U3 of the linear viral DNA. To better understand the RNase H cleavage by RSV RT, we made a number of mutations within the DuckHepBFlipPPT and in the sequences adjacent to the PPT. Deleting the entire ATGTA sequence from the DuckHepBFlipPPT increased the relative titer to wild-type levels, while point mutations within the ATGTA sequence reduced the relative titer but had minimal effects on the cleavage specificity. However, mutating a sequence 5′ of ATGTA affected the relative titer of the virus and caused the RNase H of RSV RT to lose the ability to cleave the PPT specifically. In addition, although mutations in the conserved stretch of thymidine residues upstream of the PPT did not affect the relative titer or cleavage specificity, the mutation of some of the nucleotides immediately upstream of the PPT did affect the titer and cleavage specificity. Taken together, our studies show that the structure of the PPT in the context of the cognate RT, rather than a specific sequence, is important for the proper cleavage by RSV RT. PMID:18562520

  8. A C-terminal "Tail" Region in the Rous Sarcoma Virus Integrase Provides High Plasticity of Functional Integrase Oligomerization during Intasome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Krishan K; Bera, Sibes; Shi, Ke; Aihara, Hideki; Grandgenett, Duane P

    2017-03-24

    The retrovirus integrase (IN) inserts the viral cDNA into the host DNA genome. Atomic structures of five different retrovirus INs complexed with their respective viral DNA or branched viral/target DNA substrates have indicated these intasomes are composed of IN subunits ranging from tetramers, to octamers, or to hexadecamers. IN precursors are monomers, dimers, or tetramers in solution. But how intasome assembly is controlled remains unclear. Therefore, we sought to unravel the functional mechanisms in different intasomes. We produced kinetically stabilized Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) intasomes with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strand transfer inhibitors that interact simultaneously with IN and viral DNA within intasomes. We examined the ability of RSV IN dimers to assemble two viral DNA molecules into intasomes containing IN tetramers in contrast to one possessing IN octamers. We observed that the last 18 residues of the C terminus ("tail" region) of IN (residues 1-286) determined whether an IN tetramer or octamer assembled with viral DNA. A series of truncations of the tail region indicated that these 18 residues are critical for the assembly of an intasome containing IN octamers but not for an intasome containing IN tetramers. The C-terminally truncated IN (residues 1-269) produced an intasome that contained tetramers but failed to produce an intasome with octamers. Both intasomes have similar catalytic activities. The results suggest a high degree of plasticity for functional multimerization and reveal a critical role of the C-terminal tail region of IN in higher order oligomerization of intasomes, potentially informing future strategies to prevent retroviral integration.

  9. Piracy of prostaglandin E2/EP receptor-mediated signaling by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (HHV-8) for latency gene expression: strategy of a successful pathogen.

    PubMed

    George Paul, Arun; Sharma-Walia, Neelam; Kerur, Nagaraj; White, Carl; Chandran, Bala

    2010-05-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) is implicated in the pathogenesis of KS, a chronic inflammation-associated malignancy. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), two pivotal proinflammatory/oncogeneic molecules, are proposed to play roles in the expression of major KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen-1 (LANA-1). Microsomal PGE2 synthase, PGE2, and its receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) were detected in KS lesions with the distinct staining of EP2/EP4 in KS lesions. In latently infected endothelial TIVE-LTC cells, EP receptor antagonists downregulated LANA-1 expression as well as Ca(2+), p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCzeta/lambda, and p-NF-kappaB, which are also some of the signal molecules proposed to be important in KS pathogenesis. Exogenous PGE2 and EP receptor agonists induced the LANA-1 promoter in 293 cells, and YY1, Sp1, Oct-1, Oct-6, C/EBP, and c-Jun transcription factors seem to be involved in this induction. PGE2/EP receptor-induced LANA-1 promoter activity was downregulated significantly by the inhibition of Ca(2+), p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCzeta/lambda, and p-NF-kappaB. These findings implicate the inflammatory PGE2/EP receptors and the associated signal molecules in herpes virus latency and uncover a novel paradigm that shows the evolution of KSHV genome plasticity to use inflammatory response for its survival advantage of maintaining latent gene expression. These data also suggest that potential use of anti-COX-2 and anti-EP receptor therapy may not only ameliorate the chronic inflammation associated with KS but could also lead to elimination of the KSHV latent infection and the associated KS lesions.

  10. A Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 ORF50 deletion mutant is defective for reactivation of latent virus and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiyang; AuCoin, David P; Huete, Alicia Rodriguez; Cei, Sylvia A; Hanson, Lisa J; Pari, Gregory S

    2005-03-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (also called human herpesvirus type 8 [HHV8]) latently infects a number of cell types. Reactivation of latent virus can occur by treatment with the phorbol ester tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) or with the transfection of plasmids expressing the lytic switch activator protein K-Rta, the gene product of ORF50. K-Rta expression is sufficient for the activation of the entire lytic cycle and the transactivation of viral genes necessary for DNA replication. In addition, recent evidence has suggested that K-Rta may participate directly in the initiation of lytic DNA synthesis. We have now generated a recombinant HHV8 bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) with a large deletion within the ORF50 locus. This BAC, BAC36Delta50, failed to produce infectious virus upon treatment with TPA and was defective for DNA synthesis. Expression of K-Rta in trans in BAC36Delta50-containing cells was able to abolish both defects. Real-time PCR revealed that K-bZIP, ORF40/41, and K8.1 were not expressed when BAC36Delta50-containing cells were induced with TPA. However, the mRNA levels of ORF57 were over fivefold higher in TPA-treated BAC36Delta50-containing cells than those observed in similarly treated wild-type BAC-containing cells. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis showed that while the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) was expressed in the mutant BAC-containing cells, ORF59 and K8.1 expression was not detected in TPA-induced BAC36Delta50-containing cells. These results showed that K-Rta is essential for lytic viral reactivation and transactivation of viral genes contributing to DNA replication.

  11. ORF33 and ORF38 of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Interact and Are Required for Optimal Production of Infectious Progeny Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-jun; Avey, Denis; Li, Wenwei; Gillen, Joseph; Fu, Bishi; Miley, Wendell; Whitby, Denise

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently showed that the interaction between Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) tegument proteins ORF33 and ORF45 is crucial for progeny virion production, but the exact functions of KSHV ORF33 during lytic replication were unknown (J. Gillen, W. Li, Q. Liang, D. Avey, J. Wu, F. Wu, J. Myoung, and F. Zhu, J Virol 89:4918–4931, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02925-14). Therefore, here we investigated the relationship between ORF33 and ORF38, whose counterparts in both alpha- and betaherpesviruses interact with each other. Using specific monoclonal antibodies, we found that both proteins are expressed during the late lytic cycle with similar kinetics and that both are present in mature virions as components of the tegument. Furthermore, we confirmed that ORF33 interacts with ORF38. Interestingly, we observed that ORF33 tightly associates with the capsid, whereas ORF38 associates with the envelope. We generated ORF33-null, ORF38-null, and double-null mutants and found that these mutants apparently have identical phenotypes: the mutations caused no apparent effect on viral gene expression but reduced the yield of progeny virion by about 10-fold. The progeny virions also lack certain virion component proteins, including ORF45. During viral lytic replication, the virions associate with cytoplasmic vesicles. We also observed that ORF38 associates with the membranes of vesicles and colocalizes with the Golgi membrane or early endosome membrane. Further analyses of ORF33/ORF38 mutants revealed the reduced production of virion-containing vesicles, suggesting that ORF33 and ORF38 are involved in the transport of newly assembled viral particles into cytoplasmic vesicles, a process important for viral maturation and egress. IMPORTANCE Herpesvirus assembly is an essential step in virus propagation that leads to the generation of progeny virions. It is a complicated process that depends on the delicate regulation of interactions among virion

  12. General Information about Kaposi Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kaposi sarcoma is found in patients who have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Epidemic Kaposi sarcoma occurs in patients who have ... combines treatment for Kaposi sarcoma with treatment for AIDS. For the treatment of epidemic Kaposi sarcoma, combined ...

  13. Nucleotide sequences related to the transforming gene of avian sarcoma virus are present in DNA of uninfected vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Spector, D H; Varmus, H E; Bishop, J M

    1978-09-01

    We have detected nucleotide sequences related to the transforming gene of avian sarcoma vius (ASV) in the DNA of uninfected vertebrates. Purified radioactive DNA (cDNAsarc) complementary to most of all of the gene (src) required for transformation of fibroblasts by ASV was annealed with DNA from a variety of normal species. Under conditions that facilitate pairing of partially matched nucleotide sequences (1.5 M NaCl, 59 degrees), cDNAsarc formed duplexes with chicken, human, calf, mouse, and salmon DNA but not with DNA from sea urchin, Drosophila, or Escherichia coli. The kinetics of duplex formation indicated that cDNAsarc was reacting with nucleotide sequences present in a single copy or at most a few copies per cell. In contrast to the preceding findings, nucleotide sequences complementary to the remainder of the ASV genome were observed only in chicken DNA. Thermal denaturation studies of the duplexes formed with cDNAsarc indicated a high degree of conservation of the nucleotide sequences related to src in vertebrate DNAs; the reductions in melting temperature suggested about 3--4% mismatching of cDNAsarc with chicken DNA and 8--10% mismatching of cDNAsarc with the other vertebrate DNAs.

  14. Cyclooxygenase-2-prostaglandin E2-eicosanoid receptor inflammatory axis: a key player in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus associated malignancies.

    PubMed

    Paul, Arun George; Chandran, Bala; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2013-08-01

    The role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), its lipid metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and Eicosanoid (EP) receptors (EP; 1-4) underlying the proinflammatory mechanistic aspects of Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, cervical cancer, prostate cancer, colon cancer, and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an active area of investigation. The tumorigenic potential of COX-2 and PGE2 through EP receptors forms the mechanistic context underlying the chemotherapeutic potential of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although role of the COX-2 is described in several viral associated malignancies, the biological significance of the COX-2/PGE2/EP receptor inflammatory axis is extensively studied only in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV/HHV-8) associated malignancies such as KS, a multifocal endothelial cell tumor and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), a B cell-proliferative disorder. The purpose of this review is to summarize the salient findings delineating the molecular mechanisms downstream of COX-2 involving PGE2 secretion and its autocrine and paracrine interactions with EP receptors (EP1-4), COX-2/PGE2/EP receptor signaling regulating KSHV pathogenesis and latency. KSHV infection induces COX-2, PGE2 secretion, and EP receptor activation. The resulting signal cascades modulate the expression of KSHV latency genes (latency associated nuclear antigen-1 [LANA-1] and viral-Fas (TNFRSF6)-associated via death domain like interferon converting enzyme-like- inhibitory protein [vFLIP]). vFLIP was also shown to be crucial for the maintenance of COX-2 activation. The mutually interdependent interactions between viral proteins (LANA-1/vFLIP) and COX-2/PGE2/EP receptors was shown to play key roles in the biological mechanisms involved in KS and PEL pathogenesis such as blockage of apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, transformation, proliferation, angiogenesis, adhesion, invasion, and immune-suppression. Understanding the COX-2/PGE2/EP axis is very important to

  15. Genetic determinants of morphological differentiation in a lymphoma-sarcoma hybrid.

    PubMed

    Cochran, A L; Harris, H; Wiener, F; Klein, G

    1975-01-01

    Hybrid cells, YACIR/MSWBS were produced by fusion of the cells of a methylcholanthrene induced murine sarcoma MSWBS and a virus induced murine lymphoma YACIR. The hybrid cells were maintained in vitro and syngenic mice challenged at various periods after fusion. Karyological analysis has been performed on the cell line, and on the tumours which arose in vivo. The tumours were also examined histologically. Over the 2 yr following fusion there was a progressive loss of chromosomes but biarmed MSWBS derived chromosomes were selectively retained. Tumours could be divided into those whith a chromosome complement similar to that of the early line in vitro, those in which chromosome loss had occurred and those in which karyology showed a mixture of the two foregoing types. Histology showed a minority of sarcoma-like tumours reminiscent of MSWBS and the majority of these showed little chromsome loss. Most tumours showed an intermediate morphology and the great majority of these had lost moderate numbers of chromosomes. There was a very small number of lymphomatoid tumours in which chromosome loss was marked.

  16. Two paths for dissemination of Herpes simplex virus from infected trigeminal ganglion to the murine cornea.

    PubMed

    Ohara, P T; Tauscher, A N; LaVail, J H

    2001-04-27

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV) was introduced into the mouse trigeminal ganglion by stereotaxic injection. We examined the form in which the virus was transported anterograde within axons and the spread of virus to glial and endoneurial cells of the nerve using EM immunocytochemistry. Our results indicate that viral dissemination in the trigeminal nerve may occur both within the axon and in the extracellular space of the endoneurium. HSV is intraaxonally transported at least in part as a nucleocapsid, i.e., with neither viral envelope nor additional cellular membranes. Schwann cells are infected as a result of spread in the endoneurium, as well as by nearby axons.

  17. Modulation of proinflammatory NF-κB signaling by ectromelia virus in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Struzik, Justyna; Szulc-Dąbrowska, Lidia; Papiernik, Diana; Winnicka, Anna; Niemiałtowski, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Macrophages are antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that play a crucial role in the innate immune response and may be involved in both clearance and spread of viruses. Stimulation of macrophages via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) results in activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines. In this work, we show modulation of proinflammatory NF-κB signaling by a member of the family Poxviridae, genus Orthopoxvirus--ectromelia virus (ECTV)--in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. ECTV interfered with p65 NF-κB nuclear translocation induced by TLR ligands such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (TLR4), polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) (TLR3) and diacylated lipopeptide Pam2CSK4 (TLR2/6). We observed that ECTV modulates phosphorylation of Ser32 of inhibitor of κB (IκBα) and Ser536 of p65. Interference of ECTV with TLR signaling pathways implied that proinflammatory cytokine synthesis was inhibited. Our studies provide new insights into the strategies of proinflammatory signaling modulation by orthopoxviruses during their replication cycle in immune cells. Understanding important immune interactions between viral pathogens and APCs might contribute to the identification of drug targets and the development of vaccines.

  18. Fv-1 restriction of murine leukemia viruses: a model for studying host genetic control of retroviral gene movement and leukemogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, W.K.; Boone, L.R.; Tennant, R.W.; Brown, A.

    1983-01-01

    Since the first isolation of a murine leukemia, it has been noted that transmission of the leukemic disease is very much dependent on the mouse strain selected for the virus inoculation. There are many different genetic determinants that may render the most resistant to viral leukemogenesis. The most well-defined among these resistance genes is the Fv-1 locus, which is present in laboratory strains as well as in wild populations of the mouse. The Fv-1 locus, with its fundamental biology and genetics well established, is ideal for biochemical studies. The molecular mechanism elucidated for this restriction system may provide information useful for further studies to understand the complex genetic factors related to the control of carcinogenesis. Recent understanding of the interaction between host Fv-1 gene and the restricted virus may be summarized as follows: there are dominantly expressed Fv-1 gene products in the cell; there are specific target molecules in the virion; the restriction is an intracellular event which leads to failure of proviral DNA integration. On the basis of these basic facts as well as results of our detailed analysis of retroviral DNA intermediates in the Fv-1 restrictive cells, we have constructed a working hypothesis for the molecular mechanism of Fv-1 gene restriction, which places particular emphasis on the structural and functional behavior of long terminal repeats (LTR) during the early phase of retrovirus infection.

  19. Four Moloney murine leukemia virus-infected rat cell clones producing replication-defective particles: protein and nucleic acid analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, F K; Yamamura, J M

    1981-01-01

    Four cloned rat cell lines (NX-1 to -4) infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus and defective in virus replication were found to be all different by viral protein and nucleic acid analyses. All four clones produced noninfectious particles and, except for NX-2, at about the same level as wild type. Compared with wild-type virions these defective particles contained larger amounts of gag precursor proteins and very little or no p30 or p15. Analysis of intracellular precursor proteins revealed that NX-2 to -4 synthesized normal Pr65gag, whereas NX-1 produced a slightly smaller precursor. Both NX-1 and NX-4 synthesized an intracellular polyprotein with a size similar to that of wild-type Pr180 gag-pol. Restriction endonuclease analysis of NX-1 to -4 cellular DNA showed that each clone contained a single integrated provirus which possessed large terminal repeat sequences at both the 5' and 3' ends. The proviruses of NX-1 to -3 appeared normal by restriction endonuclease analysis, but NX-4 provirus had a deletion of 1,700 base pairs comprising part of the polymerase region. The noninfectious particles produced by all four clones packaged Moloney viral RNAs and rat RNAs of two different sizes. Images PMID:6165841

  20. Epithelial Barriers in Murine Skin during Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection: The Role of Tight Junction Formation.

    PubMed

    Rahn, Elena; Thier, Katharina; Petermann, Philipp; Rübsam, Matthias; Staeheli, Peter; Iden, Sandra; Niessen, Carien M; Knebel-Mörsdorf, Dagmar

    2017-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 has to overcome skin or mucosa barriers to infect its human host. The impact of the various barrier functions on successful viral invasion is not known. On ex vivo infection of murine skin, we observed efficient invasion only via the basal epidermal layer when the dermis was removed. Here, we investigated how wounding and intercellular junction formation control successful viral entry. After wounding of skin samples or removal of the stratum corneum, infected cells were rarely detected. On the basis of infection studies in epidermis from IFN-stimulated mice, we assume that mechanical wounding does not lead to an antiviral state that impedes infection. When we infected human skin equivalents, we observed entry only into unstratified keratinocytes or after wounding of fully stratified cultures. Reduced infection of keratinocytes after calcium-induced stratification confirmed the impact of junction formation. To assess the effect of functional tight junctions, stratified cultures of polarity regulator partitioning-defective-3- or E-cadherin-deficient keratinocytes were infected. As the number of infected cells strongly increased with enhanced paracellular permeability, we conclude that the formation of functional tight junctions interferes with viral entry indicating that next to the stratum corneum tight junctions are a major physical barrier for herpes simplex virus 1 invasion into tissue. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The 17 Nucleotides Downstream from the env Gene Stop Codon Are Important for Murine Leukemia Virus Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Shin Yu, Seung; Kim, Jong-Mook; Kim, Sunyoung

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a previously unknown nucleotide sequence important for the packaging of murine leukemia virus. This nucleotide sequence is located downstream from the stop codon of the env gene but does not overlap the polypurine tract. Deletion of 17 bp from this region resulted in a more than 10-fold decrease in viral titer. Consistent with this result, the deletion mutant showed a 20- to 30-fold drop in the amount of virion RNA in the culture supernatant. The total amount of virion protein in the culture supernatant was comparable for the deletion mutant and the parental virus, suggesting that the mutant construct could release the empty viral particles. These results suggested that the packaging signal sequence might be present at the two extreme sites of the viral genome, one in the region around the splice donor sequence downstream from the 5′ long terminal repeat (LTR) and the other immediately upstream from the 3′ LTR. Implications for gene therapy, especially in regard to construction of retroviral vectors and packaging constructs, are discussed. PMID:10954583

  2. Single-particle tracking of murine polyoma virus-like particles on live cells and artificial membranes.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Helge; Smith, Alicia E; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Lilie, Hauke; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Helenius, Ari

    2005-10-18

    The lateral mobility of individual murine polyoma virus-like particles (VLPs) bound to live cells and artificial lipid bilayers was studied by single fluorescent particle tracking using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The particle trajectories were analyzed in terms of diffusion rates and modes of motion as described by the moment scaling spectrum. Although VLPs bound to their ganglioside receptor in lipid bilayers exhibited only free diffusion, analysis of trajectories on live 3T6 mouse fibroblasts revealed three distinct modes of mobility: rapid random motion, confined movement in small zones (30-60 nm in diameter), and confined movement in zones with a slow drift. After binding to the cell surface, particles typically underwent free diffusion for 5-10 s, and then they were confined in an actin filament-dependent manner without involvement of clathrin-coated pits or caveolae. Depletion of cholesterol dramatically reduced mobility of VLPs independently of actin, whereas inhibition of tyrosine kinases had no effect on confinement. The results suggested that clustering of ganglioside molecules by the multivalent VLPs induced transmembrane coupling that led to confinement of the virus/receptor complex by cortical actin filaments.

  3. Analysis of Murine CD8+ T-Cell Clones Specific for the Dengue Virus NS3 Protein: Flavivirus Cross-Reactivity and Influence of Infecting Serotype

    PubMed Central

    Spaulding, Anne C.; Kurane, Ichiro; Ennis, Francis A.; Rothman, Alan L.

    1999-01-01

    Serotype-cross-reactive dengue virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) induced during a primary dengue virus infection are thought to play a role in the immunopathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) during a secondary dengue virus infection. Although there is no animal model of DHF, we previously reported that murine dengue virus-specific CTL responses are qualitatively similar to human dengue virus-specific CTL responses. We used BALB/c mice to study the specificity of the CTL response to an immunodominant epitope on the dengue virus NS3 protein. We mapped the minimal H-2Kd-restricted CTL epitope to residues 298 to 306 of the dengue type 2 virus NS3 protein. In short-term T-cell lines and clones, the predominant CD8+ CTL to this epitope in mice immunized with dengue type 2 virus or vaccinia virus expressing the dengue type 4 virus NS3 protein were cross-reactive with dengue type 2 or type 4 virus, while broadly serotype-cross-reactive CTL were a minority population. In dengue type 3 virus-immunized mice, the predominant CTL response to this epitope was broadly serotype cross-reactive. All of the dengue virus-specific CTL clones studied also recognized the homologous NS3 sequences of one or more closely related flaviviruses, such as Kunjin virus. The critical contact residues for the CTL clones with different specificities were mapped with peptides having single amino acid substitutions. These data demonstrate that primary dengue virus infection induces a complex population of flavivirus-cross-reactive NS3-specific CTL clones in mice and suggest that CTL responses are influenced by the viral serotype. These findings suggest an additional mechanism by which the order of sequential flavivirus infections may influence disease manifestations. PMID:9847344

  4. Substitution of Feline Leukemia Virus Long Terminal Repeat Sequences into Murine Leukemia Virus Alters the Pattern of Insertional Activation and Identifies New Common Insertion Sites

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Chassidy; Lobelle-Rich, Patricia A.; Puetter, Adriane; Levy, Laura S.

    2005-01-01

    The recombinant retrovirus, MoFe2-MuLV (MoFe2), was constructed by replacing the U3 region of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) with homologous sequences from the FeLV-945 LTR. NIH/Swiss mice neonatally inoculated with MoFe2 developed T-cell lymphomas of immature thymocyte surface phenotype. MoFe2 integrated infrequently (0 to 9%) near common insertion sites (CISs) previously identified for either parent virus. Using three different strategies, CISs in MoFe2-induced tumors were identified at six loci, none of which had been previously reported as CISs in tumors induced by either parent virus in wild-type animals. Two of the newly identified CISs had not previously been implicated in lymphoma in any retrovirus model. One of these, designated 3-19, encodes the p101 regulatory subunit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase-gamma. The other, designated Rw1, is predicted to encode a protein that functions in the immune response to virus infection. Thus, substitution of FeLV-945 U3 sequences into the M-MuLV long terminal repeat (LTR) did not alter the target tissue for M-MuLV transformation but significantly altered the pattern of CIS utilization in the induction of T-cell lymphoma. These observations support a growing body of evidence that the distinctive sequence and/or structure of the retroviral LTR determines its pattern of insertional activation. The findings also demonstrate the oligoclonal nature of retrovirus-induced lymphomas by demonstrating proviral insertions at CISs in subdominant populations in the tumor mass. Finally, the findings demonstrate the utility of novel recombinant retroviruses such as MoFe2 to contribute new genes potentially relevant to the induction of lymphoid malignancy. PMID:15596801

  5. Stages of Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... soft tissue sarcomas: Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treatment Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment ... Sarcoma Home Page Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treatment Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment ...

  6. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... soft tissue sarcomas: Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treatment Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment ... Sarcoma Home Page Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treatment Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment ...

  7. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... soft tissue sarcomas: Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treatment Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment ... Sarcoma Home Page Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumors Treatment Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment ...

  8. Do We Know What Causes Kaposi Sarcoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Factors, and Prevention Do We Know What Causes Kaposi Sarcoma? Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is caused by infection ... Sarcoma? Can Kaposi Sarcoma Be Prevented? More In Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  9. Ewing's sarcoma precursors are highly enriched in embryonic osteochondrogenic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Miwa; Yamazaki, Yukari; Kanno, Yohei; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Kanno, Jun; Nakamura, Takuro

    2014-07-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a highly malignant bone tumor found in children and adolescents, and the origin of this malignancy is not well understood. Here, we introduced a Ewing's sarcoma-associated genetic fusion of the genes encoding the RNA-binding protein EWS and the transcription factor ETS (EWS-ETS) into a fraction of cells enriched for osteochondrogenic progenitors derived from the embryonic superficial zone (eSZ) of long bones collected from late gestational murine embryos. EWS-ETS fusions efficiently induced Ewing's sarcoma-like small round cell sarcoma formation by these cells. Analysis of the eSZ revealed a fraction of a precursor cells that express growth/differentiation factor 5 (Gdf5), the transcription factor Erg, and parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh), and selection of the Pthlh-positive fraction alone further enhanced EWS-ETS-dependent tumor induction. Genes downstream of the EWS-ETS fusion protein were quite transcriptionally active in eSZ cells, especially in regions in which the chromatin structure of the ETS-responsive locus was open. Inhibition of β-catenin, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), or enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) suppressed cell growth in a murine model of Ewing's sarcoma, suggesting the utility of the current system as a preclinical model. These results indicate that eSZ cells are highly enriched in precursors to Ewing's sarcoma and provide clues to the histogenesis of Ewing's sarcoma in bone.

  10. Isolation of an endogenous C-type RNA virus from Mus musculus molossinus.

    PubMed

    Bedigian, H G; Meier, H

    1975-10-01

    We isolated a type-C RNA virus from the Japanese field mouse, Mus musculus molossinus. M. musculus musculus and M. musculus molossinus are two different subspecies of Mus and thus only distantly related. The virus grew only on cells foreign to the host, was xenotropic, and readily rescued the murine sarcoma (MuSV) genome from a normal rat kidney cell line transformed nonproductively by the Harvey strain of MuSV. The virus banded at a density of 1.16 g/ml and contained an RNA-dependent DNA polymerase.

  11. Activation and repression of Epstein-Barr Virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic cycles by short- and medium-chain fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Gorres, Kelly L; Daigle, Derek; Mohanram, Sudharshan; Miller, George

    2014-07-01

    The lytic cycles of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are induced in cell culture by sodium butyrate (NaB), a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Valproic acid (VPA), another SCFA and an HDAC inhibitor, induces the lytic cycle of KSHV but blocks EBV lytic reactivation. To explore the hypothesis that structural differences between NaB and VPA account for their functional effects on the two related viruses, we investigated the capacity of 16 structurally related short- and medium-chain fatty acids to promote or prevent lytic cycle reactivation. SCFAs differentially affected EBV and KSHV reactivation. KSHV was reactivated by all SCFAs that are HDAC inhibitors, including phenylbutyrate. However, several fatty acid HDAC inhibitors, such as isobutyrate and phenylbutyrate, did not reactivate EBV. Reactivation of KSHV lytic transcripts could not be blocked completely by any fatty acid tested. In contrast, several medium-chain fatty acids inhibited lytic activation of EBV. Fatty acids that blocked EBV reactivation were more lipophilic than those that activated EBV. VPA blocked activation of the BZLF1 promoter by NaB but did not block the transcriptional function of ZEBRA. VPA also blocked activation of the DNA damage response that accompanies EBV lytic cycle activation. Properties of SCFAs in addition to their effects on chromatin are likely to explain activation or repression of EBV. We concluded that fatty acids stimulate the two related human gammaherpesviruses to enter the lytic cycle through different pathways. Importance: Lytic reactivation of EBV and KSHV is needed for persistence of these viruses and plays a role in carcinogenesis. Our direct comparison highlights the mechanistic differences in lytic reactivation between related human oncogenic gammaherpesviruses. Our findings have therapeutic implications, as fatty acids are found in the diet and produced by the human microbiota. Small

  12. Activation and Repression of Epstein-Barr Virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Cycles by Short- and Medium-Chain Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gorres, Kelly L.; Daigle, Derek; Mohanram, Sudharshan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The lytic cycles of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are induced in cell culture by sodium butyrate (NaB), a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Valproic acid (VPA), another SCFA and an HDAC inhibitor, induces the lytic cycle of KSHV but blocks EBV lytic reactivation. To explore the hypothesis that structural differences between NaB and VPA account for their functional effects on the two related viruses, we investigated the capacity of 16 structurally related short- and medium-chain fatty acids to promote or prevent lytic cycle reactivation. SCFAs differentially affected EBV and KSHV reactivation. KSHV was reactivated by all SCFAs that are HDAC inhibitors, including phenylbutyrate. However, several fatty acid HDAC inhibitors, such as isobutyrate and phenylbutyrate, did not reactivate EBV. Reactivation of KSHV lytic transcripts could not be blocked completely by any fatty acid tested. In contrast, several medium-chain fatty acids inhibited lytic activation of EBV. Fatty acids that blocked EBV reactivation were more lipophilic than those that activated EBV. VPA blocked activation of the BZLF1 promoter by NaB but did not block the transcriptional function of ZEBRA. VPA also blocked activation of the DNA damage response that accompanies EBV lytic cycle activation. Properties of SCFAs in addition to their effects on chromatin are likely to explain activation or repression of EBV. We concluded that fatty acids stimulate the two related human gammaherpesviruses to enter the lytic cycle through different pathways. IMPORTANCE Lytic reactivation of EBV and KSHV is needed for persistence of these viruses and plays a role in carcinogenesis. Our direct comparison highlights the mechanistic differences in lytic reactivation between related human oncogenic gammaherpesviruses. Our findings have therapeutic implications, as fatty acids are found in the diet and produced by the human microbiota

  13. The Avian Retrovirus Avian Sarcoma/Leukosis Virus Subtype A Reaches the Lipid Mixing Stage of Fusion at Neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Laurie J.; Delos, Sue E.; Netter, Robert C.; Bates, Paul; White, Judith M.

    2003-01-01

    We previously showed that the envelope glycoprotein (EnvA) of avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subtype A (ASLV-A) binds to liposomes at neutral pH following incubation with its receptor, Tva, at ≥22°C. We also provided evidence that ASLV-C fuses with cells at neutral pH. These findings suggested that receptor binding at neutral pH and ≥22°C is sufficient to activate Env for fusion. A recent study suggested that two steps are necessary to activate avian retroviral Envs: receptor binding at neutral pH, followed by exposure to low pH (W. Mothes et al., Cell 103:679-689, 2000). Therefore, we evaluated the requirements for intact ASLV-A particles to bind to target bilayers and fuse with cells. We found that ASLV-A particles bind stably to liposomes in a receptor- and temperature-dependent manner at neutral pH. Using ASLV-A particles biosynthetically labeled with pyrene, we found that ASLV-A mixes its lipid envelope with cells within 5 to 10 min at 37°C. Lipid mixing was neither inhibited nor enhanced by incubation at low pH. Lipid mixing of ASLV-A was inhibited by a peptide designed to prevent six-helix bundle formation in EnvA; the same peptide inhibits virus infection and EnvA-mediated cell-cell fusion (at both neutral and low pHs). Bafilomycin and dominant-negative dynamin inhibited lipid mixing of Sindbis virus (which requires low pH for fusion), but not of ASLV-A, with host cells. Finally, we found that, although EnvA-induced cell-cell fusion is enhanced at low pH, a mutant EnvA that is severely compromised in its ability to support infection still induced massive syncytia at low pH. Our results indicate that receptor binding at neutral pH is sufficient to activate EnvA, such that ASLV-A particles bind hydrophobically to and merge their membranes with target cells. Possible roles for low pH at subsequent stages of viral entry are discussed. PMID:12584331

  14. Ductal variant of prostate adenocarcinoma harbor Xenotropic murine leukemia virus related virus (XMRV) infection: a novel finding in subtype of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baig, Faraz Ahmed; Mirza, Talat; Hamid, Amna; Syed, Serajuddaula; Jamal, Qamar

    2017-01-01

    Objective Xenotropic murine leukemia virus related virus (XMRV), is the first gammaretrovirus identified a decade ago, in human tissue bearing adenocarcinoma of prostate, followed by several researches documenting little or no prevalence of XMRV in prostate cancer samples. However, the status of XMRV within subtype of prostate adenocarcinoma has not been investigated yet. In this study, we investigated the relationship between XMRV and broad spectrum morphological entities of prostate adenocarcinoma, including acinar, ductal and other rare subtypes. Material and methods The prevalence of XMRV DNA in different histological subtypes of prostate adenocarcinoma was examined after characterizing the tumors into groups, using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples from newly diagnosed prostate adenocarcinomas and archival prostate cancer tissue from our XMRV case control analysis. Broad-spectrum XMRV DNA amplification was performed by end-point polymerase chain reaction, using commercially available primer set. Results The study included 100 patients with prostate cancer. XMRV DNA was detected in 4 of 8 (50%) ductal adenocarcinomas, exhibiting papillary and cribriform histological features. XMRV DNA was not detected in any other variant of adenocarcinoma including acinar (0/91) and mucinous carcinomas (0/1). Majority of XMRV positive cases were biologically aggressive and present cancer at an early age upon diagnosis. Conclusion Ductal adenocarcinomas demonstrate a significant association of XMRV DNA while other histological variants of prostate adenocarcinoma seem unrelated to XMRV infection. PMID:28861296

  15. Reversal of Fv-1 host range by in vitro restriction endonuclease fragment exchange between molecular clones of N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia virus genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, L.R.; Myer, F.E.; Yang, D.M.; Ou, C.Y.; Koh, C.K.; Roberson, L.E.; Tennant, R.W.; Yang, W.K.

    1983-10-01

    Unintegrated viral DNA of the BALB/c endogenous N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia retroviruses and invitro passaged N-tropic Gross (passage A) murine leukemia retroviruses were molecularly cloned. Recombinant genomes were constructed in vitro by exchanging homologous restriction enzyme fragments from N- or B-tropic parents and subsequent recloning. Infectious virus was recovered after transfection of these recombinant genomes into NIH-3T3 cells and cocultivation with the Fv-1 nonrestrictive SC-1 cells. XC plaque assays of recombinant virus progeny on Fv-1/sup n/ and Fv-1/sup b/ cells indicated the the Fv-1 host range was determined by sequences located between the BamHI site in the p30 region of the gag gene (1.6 kilobase pairs from the left end of the map) and the HindIII site located in the pol gene (2.9 kilobase pairs from the left end of the map.

  16. Reversal of Fv-1 host range by in vitro restriction endonuclease fragment exchange between molecular clones of N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia virus genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, L.R.; Myer, F.E.; Yang, D.M.; Ou, C.Y.; Koh, C.K.; Roberson, L.E.; Tennant, R.W.; Yang, W.K.

    1983-10-01

    The authors molecularly cloned unintegrated viral DNA of the BALB/c endogenous N-tropic and B-tropic murine leukemia retroviruses and in vitro passage N-tropic Gross (passage A) murine leukemia retroviruses. Recombinant genomes were constructed in vitro by exchanging homologous restriction enzyme fragments from N- or B-tropic parents and subsequent recloning. Infectious virus was recovered after transfection of these recombinant genomes into NIH-3T3 cells and cocultivation with the Fv-1 nonrestrictive SC-1 cells. XC plaque assays of recombinant virus progeny on Fv-1/sup n/ and Fv-1/sup b/ cells indicated that the Fv-1 host range was determined by sequences located between the BamHI site in the p30 region of the gag gene (1.6 kilobase pairs from the left end of the map) and the HindIII site located in pol gene (2.9 kilobase pairs from the left end of the map).

  17. Domain structure of the Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase: mutational analysis and separate expression of the DNA polymerase and RNase H activities.

    PubMed Central

    Tanese, N; Goff, S P

    1988-01-01

    The reverse transcriptase of Moloney murine leukemia virus, like that of all retroviruses, exhibits a DNA polymerase activity capable of synthesis on RNA or DNA templates and an RNase H activity with specificity for RNA in the form of an RNA.DNA hybrid. We have generated a library of linker insertion mutants of the Moloney murine leukemia virus enzyme expressed in bacteria and assayed these mutants for both enzymatic activities. Those mutations affecting the DNA polymerase activity were clustered in the 5'-proximal two-thirds of the gene, and those affecting RNase H were in the remaining 3' one-third. Based on these maps, plasmids were made that expressed each one of the domains separately; assays of the proteins encoded by these plasmids showed that each domain exhibited only the expected activity. Images PMID:2450347

  18. [AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma: 22 cases].

    PubMed

    Dhrif, Asma Sioud; Kilani, Badreddine; Ammari, Lamia; Kanoun, Fakher; Tiouri, H; Ben Chaaben, Taoufik

    2007-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is the most common acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated malignancy. Our aim was to analyse the epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic findings in AIDS patients with Kaposi's sarcoma. This was a retrospective chart review of AIDS patients with Kaposi's sarcoma diagnosed between 1991 and 2005. Epidemiological data, the stage of human immunodeficiency virus's (HIV) infection, clinical characteristics of Kaposi's sarcoma, treatment rendered and outcome were collected. The search of HHV8 was not done. Twenty two patients were included. They were 17 men and 5 females (sex-ratio=3.4/ 1) with a mean age of 33.6 years at the diagnosis of HIV infection. The Kaposi's sarcoma appeared after a period varying between 0 and 10 years. The Kaposi's sarcoma uncovered the infection in 5 cases. There were 6 homosexual men. The mean rate of CD4 was 216 21/mm3 at the diagnosis of Kaposi's sarcoma. All patients had skin lesions. Mucocutaneous lesions were isolated in 12 cases and associated with visceral involvement in 10 cases; lung (10 cases), gastrointestinal tract (5 cases), lymphadenopathy (5 cases), liver (4 cases), spleen (2 cases). Antiretroviral therapy was prescribed for 13 patients. Six patients received chemotherapy and 3 others radiotherapy. Outcome was favourable in 4 cases with a partial improvement of the skin lesions in 3 cases and a complete regression in 1 case. Twelve patients died. AIDS associated Kaposi's sarcoma is a severe condition because of visceral localisations and the field of immunodeficiency. It requires a precocious diagnosis and collaboration. The identification of HHV8 in the aetiopathogenic mechanism of Kaposi's sarcoma can lead to the development new therapeutic approaches.

  19. Sequences responsible for erythroid and lymphoid leukemia in the long terminal repeats of Friend-mink cell focus-forming and Moloney murine leukemia viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, A; Takimoto, M; Adachi, A; Kakuyama, M; Kato, S; Kakimi, K; Fukuoka, K; Ogiu, T; Matsuyama, M

    1987-01-01

    Despite the high degree of homology (91%) between the nucleotide sequences of the Friend-mink cell focus-forming (MCF) and the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV) genomic long terminal repeats (LTRs), the pathogenicities determined by the LTR sequences of the two viruses are quite different. Friend-MCF MuLV is an erythroid leukemia virus, and Moloney MuLV is a lymphoid leukemia virus. To map the LTR sequences responsible for the different disease specificities, we constructed nine viruses with LTRs recombinant between the Friend-MCF and Moloney MuLVs. Analysis of the leukemia induced with the recombinant viruses showed that a 195-base-pair nucleotide sequence, including a 75-base-pair nucleotide Moloney enhancer, is responsible for the tissue-specific leukemogenicity of Moloney MuLV. However, not only the enhancer but also its downstream sequences appear to be necessary. The Moloney virus enhancer and its downstream sequence exerted a dominant effect over that of the Friend-MCF virus, but the enhancer sequence alone did not. The results that three of the nine recombinant viruses induced both erythroid and lymphoid leukemias supported the hypothesis that multiple viral genetic determinants control both the ability to cause leukemia and the type of leukemia induced. PMID:3033317

  20. [Viruses and the neuroendocrine system: model of murine obesity induced by cerebral infection by canine distemper virus].

    PubMed

    Bernard, A; Akaoka, H; Giraudon, P; Belin, M

    1999-05-01

    It is currently well established that the nervous, endocrine and immune systems inter-communicate using biologically active soluble factors, synthesised and produced by these three systems themselves (e.g. immunomodulator effect of hormones, effect of substances secreted by immune cells on endocrine function.). In addition, these systems jointly express receptors for hormones, peptides, growth factors and cytokines. Immuno-neuroendocrine interactions therefore underlie physiological processes and their deregulation can result in various pathological states. By entering into complex relationships with the specialized and differentiated cells of these three systems viruses can alter inter-cellular communication and result in the appearance of pathological processes directly linked to these disturbances. In order to understand the role of viruses in the genesis of neuroimmunoendocrine pathologies, we have developed a cerebral infection model using canine distemper virus (CDV). In infected mice, this paramyxovirus, closely related to the human measles virus, induces early neurological pathologies (encephalitis) which are associated with active viral replication. Mice surviving the acute phase of infection exhibit motor deficits (paralysis and turning behaviour) or obesity during the viral persistence phase, despite the fact that the virus is no longer detectable. The obesity is characterised by hyperinsulinaemia, hyperleptinaemia and hyperplasia of the adipocytes, associated with decreased expression of the OB-Rb hypothalamic leptin receptor and modulated expression of hypothalamic monoamines and neuropeptides. These results support the viral "hit and run" theory, since the initial viral impact in the hypothalamus may be the origin of the changes in later immunoneuroendocrine communication. Thus, certain human neurodegenerative or neuroendocrine diseases may have a previous viral infection aetiology without it being possible to clearly identify the agent responsible.

  1. Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscles, tendons, fat, and blood vessels. Soft tissue sarcoma is a cancer of these soft tissues. There ... have certain genetic diseases. Doctors diagnose soft tissue sarcomas with a biopsy. Treatments include surgery to remove ...

  2. Sarcoma Foundation of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Make a Donation Matching Gifts Sarcoma Dedication Page Stocks and Securities Workplace Giving FAQ's Dedications Join Donate ... Make a Donation Matching Gifts Sarcoma Dedication Page Stocks and Securities Workplace Giving

  3. Germ-line reinsertions of AKR murine leukemia virus genomes in Akv-1 congenic mice.

    PubMed

    Rowe, W P; Kozak, C A

    1980-08-01

    Congenic mouse strains NIH,Akv-1 and NIH,Akv-2 carry the two high ecotropic virus-inducing loci of the AKR mouse on the NIH Swiss genetic background. Progeny tests of animals in three separate congenic families show that both Avk-1 and Akv-2 are stably transmitted as classical mendelian loci in these mice. However, during the process of inbreeding, additional chromosomal viral loci were detected in several NIH.Akv-1 sublines. These loci appeared only in the progeny of virus-positive females. They segregate with mendelian ratios, are unlinked to markers on chromsome 7 near Akv-1, and are phenotypically expressed as high-virus-inducing loci. The generation of new loci for viurs induction, no doubt resulting from the rare germ-line reintegration of the endogenous ectropic provirus, represents a unique form of gene duplication and rearrangement.

  4. Cell Surface Antigen Induced by Friend Murine Leukemia Virus Is also in the Virion

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Maureen; Lilly, Frank; Nathenson, Stanley G.

    1974-01-01

    Intact particles of Friend leukemia virus derived from infectious mouse serum absorb only trace amounts of cytotoxic anti-FMR antibodies, but physical disruption of the virions by freezing and thawing, by ether extraction or by detergent treatment releases large amounts of FMR antigenic activity. Thus this antigen, previously considered to occur mainly as a neo-antigen on the surfaces of virus-infected cells and as a soluble substance in the serum of infected mice, may be primarily a virion component. PMID:4431079

  5. Convergence of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus reactivation with Epstein-Barr virus latency and cellular growth mediated by the notch signaling pathway in coinfected cells.

    PubMed

    Spadavecchia, Sophia; Gonzalez-Lopez, Olga; Carroll, Kyla Driscoll; Palmeri, Diana; Lukac, David M

    2010-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). All PEL cell lines are infected with KSHV, and 70% are coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). KSHV reactivation from latency requires promoter-specific transactivation by the KSHV Rta protein through interactions with RBP-Jk (CSL), the cellular DNA-binding component of the Notch signal transduction pathway. EBV transformation of primary B cells requires EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2) to interact with RBP-Jk to direct the latent viral and cellular gene expression program. Although KSHV Rta and EBV EBNA-2 both require RBP-Jk for transactivation, previous studies have suggested that RBP-Jk-dependent transactivators do not function identically. We have found that the EBV latent protein LMP-1 is expressed in less than 5% of KSHV(+)/EBV(+) PEL cells but is induced in an Rta-dependent fashion when KSHV reactivates. KSHV Rta transactivates the EBV latency promoters in an RBP-Jk-dependent fashion and forms a ternary complex with RBP-Jk on the promoters. In B cells that are conditionally transformed by EBV alone, we show that KSHV Rta complements a short-term EBNA-2 growth deficiency in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Complementation of EBNA-2 deficiency by Rta depends on RBP-Jk and LMP-1, and Rta transactivation is required for optimal growth of KSHV(+)/EBV(+) PEL lines. Our data suggest that Rta can contribute to EBV-driven cellular growth by transactivating RBP-Jk-dependent EBV latency genes. However, our data also suggest that EBNA-2 and Rta induce distinct alterations in the cellular proteomes that contribute to the growth of infected cells.

  6. Frameshift mutations in the v-src gene of avian sarcoma virus act in cis to specifically reduce v-src mRNA levels.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, S B; Stoltzfus, C M

    1994-01-01

    A portion of the avian sarcoma virus (ASV) primary RNA transcripts is alternatively spliced in chicken embryo fibroblast cells to two different messages, the src and env mRNAs. Frameshift mutations of the viral genome causing premature translation termination within the src gene result in a decreased steady-state level of the src mRNA. In marked contrast, frameshift mutations at various positions of the env gene do not decrease the level of the env mRNA. We show that the src gene product is not required in trans for splicing and accumulation of src mRNA. Conversely, the truncated Src proteins do not act negatively in trans to decrease specifically the levels of src mRNA. Taken together, these results indicate that the frameshift mutations act in cis to reduce src mRNA levels. A double mutant with a lesion in the src initiator AUG and a frameshift within the src gene demonstrated wild-type RNA levels, indicating that the src mRNA must be recognized as a translatable mRNA for the effect on src mRNA levels to occur. Our results indicate that the reduced levels do not result from decreased cytoplasmic stability of the mature src mRNA. We also show that the src gene frameshift mutations affect src mRNA levels when expressed from intronless src cDNA clones. We conclude that the reduction of src mRNA levels triggered by the presence of frameshift mutations within the src gene occurs while it is associated with the nucleus. Our data also strongly suggest that this occurs at a step of RNA processing or transport independent of RNA splicing. Images PMID:8114716

  7. Peptide motifs of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule explain the striking MHC-determined response to Rous sarcoma virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Wallny, Hans-Joachim; Avila, David; Hunt, Lawrence G; Powell, Timothy J; Riegert, Patricia; Salomonsen, Jan; Skjødt, Karsten; Vainio, Olli; Vilbois, Francis; Wiles, Michael V; Kaufman, Jim

    2006-01-31

    Compared with the MHC of typical mammals, the chicken MHC is smaller and simpler, with only two class I genes found in the B12 haplotype. We make five points to show that there is a single-dominantly expressed class I molecule that can have a strong effect on MHC function. First, we find only one cDNA for two MHC haplotypes (B14 and B15) and cDNAs corresponding to two genes for the other six (B2, B4, B6, B12, B19, and B21). Second, we find, for the B4, B12, and B15 haplotypes, that one cDNA is at least 10-fold more abundant than the other. Third, we use 2D gel electrophoresis of class I molecules from pulse-labeled cells to show that there is only one heavy chain spot for the B4 and B15 haplotypes, and one major spot for the B12 haplotype. Fourth, we determine the peptide motifs for B4, B12, and B15 cells in detail, including pool sequences and individual peptides, and show that the motifs are consistent with the peptides binding to models of the class I molecule encoded by the abundant cDNA. Finally, having shown for three haplotypes that there is a single dominantly expressed class I molecule at the level of RNA, protein, and antigenic peptide, we show that the motifs can explain the striking MHC-determined resistance and susceptibility to Rous sarcoma virus. These results are consistent with the concept of a "minimal essential MHC" for chickens, in strong contrast to typical mammals.

  8. Peptide motifs of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule explain the striking MHC-determined response to Rous sarcoma virus in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Wallny, Hans-Joachim; Avila, David; Hunt, Lawrence G.; Powell, Timothy J.; Riegert, Patricia; Salomonsen, Jan; Skjødt, Karsten; Vainio, Olli; Vilbois, Francis; Wiles, Michael V.; Kaufman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    Compared with the MHC of typical mammals, the chicken MHC is smaller and simpler, with only two class I genes found in the B12 haplotype. We make five points to show that there is a single-dominantly expressed class I molecule that can have a strong effect on MHC function. First, we find only one cDNA for two MHC haplotypes (B14 and B15) and cDNAs corresponding to two genes for the other six (B2, B4, B6, B12, B19, and B21). Second, we find, for the B4, B12, and B15 haplotypes, that one cDNA is at least 10-fold more abundant than the other. Third, we use 2D gel electrophoresis of class I molecules from pulse-labeled cells to show that there is only one heavy chain spot for the B4 and B15 haplotypes, and one major spot for the B12 haplotype. Fourth, we determine the peptide motifs for B4, B12, and B15 cells in detail, including pool sequences and individual peptides, and show that the motifs are consistent with the peptides binding to models of the class I molecule encoded by the abundant cDNA. Finally, having shown for three haplotypes that there is a single dominantly expressed class I molecule at the level of RNA, protein, and antigenic peptide, we show that the motifs can explain the striking MHC-determined resistance and susceptibility to Rous sarcoma virus. These results are consistent with the concept of a “minimal essential MHC” for chickens, in strong contrast to typical mammals. PMID:16432226

  9. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen 1 Mimics Epstein-Barr Virus EBNA1 Immune Evasion through Central Repeat Domain Effects on Protein Processing▿

    PubMed Central

    Kwun, Hyun Jin; da Silva, Suzane Ramos; Shah, Ishita M.; Blake, Neil; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2007-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/human herpesvirus 8 [HHV8]) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV/HHV4) are distantly related gammaherpesviruses causing tumors in humans. KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen 1 (LANA1) is functionally similar to the EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) protein expressed during viral latency, although they have no amino acid similarities. EBNA1 escapes cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) antigen processing by inhibiting its own proteosomal degradation and retarding its own synthesis to reduce defective ribosomal product processing. We show here that the LANA1 QED-rich central repeat (CR) region, particularly the CR2CR3 subdomain, also retards LANA1 synthesis and markedly enhances LANA1 stability in vitro and in vivo. LANA1 isoforms have half-lives greater than 24 h, and fusion of the LANA1 CR2CR3 domain to a destabilized heterologous protein markedly decreases protein turnover. Unlike EBNA1, the LANA1 CR2CR3 subdomain retards translation regardless of whether it is fused to the 5′ or 3′ end of a heterologous gene construct. Manipulation of sequence order, orientation, and composition of the CR2 and CR3 subdomains suggests that specific peptide sequences rather than RNA structures are responsible for synthesis retardation. Although mechanistic differences exist between LANA1 and EBNA1, the primary structures of both proteins have evolved to minimize provoking CTL immune responses. Simple strategies to eliminate these viral inhibitory regions may markedly improve vaccine effectiveness by maximizing CTL responses. PMID:17522213

  10. High-resolution cryo-electron microscopy structures of murine norovirus 1 and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus reveal marked flexibility in the receptor binding domains.

    PubMed

    Katpally, Umesh; Voss, Neil R; Cavazza, Tommaso; Taube, Stefan; Rubin, John R; Young, Vivienne L; Stuckey, Jeanne; Ward, Vernon K; Virgin, Herbert W; Wobus, Christiane E; Smith, Thomas J

    2010-06-01

    Our previous structural studies on intact, infectious murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) virions demonstrated that the receptor binding protruding (P) domains are lifted off the inner shell of the virus. Here, the three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of recombinant rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (rRHDV) virus-like particles (VLPs) and intact MNV-1 were determined to approximately 8-A resolution. rRHDV also has a raised P domain, and therefore, this conformation is independent of infectivity and genus. The atomic structure of the MNV-1 P domain was used to interpret the MNV-1 reconstruction. Connections between the P and shell domains and between the floating P domains were modeled. This observed P-domain flexibility likely facilitates virus-host receptor interactions.

  11. Rapid detection of hepatitis A virus and murine norovirus in hemocytes of contaminated oysters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The human enteric pathogens, hepatitis A virus and human norovirus, have been shown to contaminate molluscan shellfish and cause foodborne disease in consumers. Rapid viral extraction methods are needed to replace current time consuming methods, which use whole oysters or dissected tissues. In our ...

  12. Pseudorabies virus glycoprotein gIII is a major target antigen for murine and swine virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zuckermann, F A; Zsak, L; Mettenleiter, T C; Ben-Porat, T

    1990-01-01

    stimulate the secondary anti-PrV CTL response. Cultures of both murine or swine lymphocytes that had been stimulated with gIII- virus contained only approximately half as many lytic units as did those stimulated with either wild-type virus, a gX- virus mutant, or a gI-/gp63- virus mutant. Thus, a large proportion of the PrV-specific CTLs that are induced by immunization with PrV of both mice and pigs are directed against gIII. Furthermore, glycoproteins gI, gp63, and gX play at most a minor role in the CTL response of these animals to PrV. PMID:2153244

  13. Interferon induced by UV-irradiated murine cytomegalovirus decreases type C virus expression in BALB/c cells treated by 5-iodo-deoxyuridine or cycloheximide

    SciTech Connect

    Sergiescu, D.

    1983-01-01

    UV-irradiated mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) activates at low incidence (2.0 X 10(-4) - 8.0 X 10(-4)) a xenotropic type C virus in Kirsten sarcoma virus-transformed nonproducer BALB 3T3 (KBALB) cells. When KBALB cells are treated with UV-MCMV and subsequently with potent chemical inducers, such as 5-Iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) or cycloheximide, the activation frequencies of type C virus are significantly lower than in controls exposed to the chemical inducers alone: 60% for IdUrd and 44% for cycloheximide. This decrease of activation appears to be mediated by endogenous interferon (IFN) induced by UV-MCMV in KBALB cells, as could be proven by neutralization of the inhibitory activity. Indeed, after exposure of UV-MCMV-infected cells to anti-IFN gamma globulin, the level of C type virus increases, reaching values obtained with IdUrd or cycloheximide in the absence of UV-MCMV. The inhibitory activity associated with UV-MCMV is dose-dependent and the xenotropic type C virus appears to be more sensitive than the ecotropic (N-tropic) retrovirus of BALB/c cells.

  14. Pathology of Equine Influenza virus (H3N8) in Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Pavulraj, Selvaraj; Bera, Bidhan Chandra; Joshi, Alok; Anand, Taruna; Virmani, Meenakshi; Vaid, Rajesh Kumar; Shanmugasundaram, Karuppusamy; Gulati, Baldev Raj; Rajukumar, K; Singh, Rajendra; Misri, Jyoti; Singh, Raj Kumar; Tripathi, Bhupendra Nath; Virmani, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Equine influenza viruses (EIV)-H3N8 continue to circulate in equine population throughout the world. They evolve by the process of antigenic drift that leads to substantial change in the antigenicity of the virus, thereby necessitating substitution of virus strain in the vaccines. This requires frequent testing of the new vaccines in the in vivo system; however, lack of an appropriate laboratory animal challenge model for testing protective efficacy of equine influenza vaccine candidates hinders the screening of new vaccines and other therapeutic approaches. In the present investigation, BALB/c mouse were explored for suitability for conducting pathogenecity studies for EIV. The BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally @ 2×106.24 EID50 with EIV (H3N8) belonging to Clade 2 of Florida sublineage and monitored for setting up of infection and associated parameters. All mice inoculated with EIV exhibited clinical signs viz. loss in body weights, lethargy, dyspnea, etc, between 3 and 5 days which commensurate with lesions observed in the respiratory tract including rhinitis, tracheitis, bronchitis, bronchiolitis, alveolitis and diffuse interstitial pneumonia. Transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, virus quantification through titration and qRT-PCR demonstrated active viral infection in the upper and lower respiratory tract. Serology revealed rise in serum lactate dehydrogenase levels along with sero-conversion. The pattern of disease progression, pathological lesions and virus recovery from nasal washings and lungs in the present investigations in mice were comparable to natural and experimental EIV infection in equines. The findings establish BALB/c mice as small animal model for studying EIV (H3N8) infection and will have immense potential for dissecting viral pathogenesis, vaccine efficacy studies, preliminary screening of vaccine candidates and antiviral therapeutics against EIV.

  15. Pathology of Equine Influenza virus (H3N8) in Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Pavulraj, Selvaraj; Bera, Bidhan Chandra; Joshi, Alok; Anand, Taruna; Virmani, Meenakshi; Vaid, Rajesh Kumar; Shanmugasundaram, Karuppusamy; Gulati, Baldev Raj; Rajukumar, K.; Singh, Rajendra; Misri, Jyoti; Singh, Raj Kumar; Tripathi, Bhupendra Nath; Virmani, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Equine influenza viruses (EIV)—H3N8 continue to circulate in equine population throughout the world. They evolve by the process of antigenic drift that leads to substantial change in the antigenicity of the virus, thereby necessitating substitution of virus strain in the vaccines. This requires frequent testing of the new vaccines in the in vivo system; however, lack of an appropriate laboratory animal challenge model for testing protective efficacy of equine influenza vaccine candidates hinders the screening of new vaccines and other therapeutic approaches. In the present investigation, BALB/c mouse were explored for suitability for conducting pathogenecity studies for EIV. The BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally @ 2×106.24 EID50 with EIV (H3N8) belonging to Clade 2 of Florida sublineage and monitored for setting up of infection and associated parameters. All mice inoculated with EIV exhibited clinical signs viz. loss in body weights, lethargy, dyspnea, etc, between 3 and 5 days which commensurate with lesions observed in the respiratory tract including rhinitis, tracheitis, bronchitis, bronchiolitis, alveolitis and diffuse interstitial pneumonia. Transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, virus quantification through titration and qRT-PCR demonstrated active viral infection in the upper and lower respiratory tract. Serology revealed rise in serum lactate dehydrogenase levels along with sero-conversion. The pattern of disease progression, pathological lesions and virus recovery from nasal washings and lungs in the present investigations in mice were comparable to natural and experimental EIV infection in equines. The findings establish BALB/c mice as small animal model for studying EIV (H3N8) infection and will have immense potential for dissecting viral pathogenesis, vaccine efficacy studies, preliminary screening of vaccine candidates and antiviral therapeutics against EIV. PMID:26587990

  16. Neurovirulent Murine Coronavirus JHM.SD Uses Cellular Zinc Metalloproteases for Virus Entry and Cell-Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Judith M; Gallagher, Tom; Weiss, Susan R

    2017-04-15

    The coronavirus (CoV) S protein requires cleavage by host cell proteases to mediate virus-cell and cell-cell fusion. Many strains of the murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) have distinct, S-dependent organ and tissue tropisms despite using a common receptor, suggesting that they employ different cellular proteases for fusion. In support of this hypothesis, we found that inhibition of endosomal acidification only modestly decreased entry, and overexpression of the cell surface protease TMPRSS2 greatly enhanced entry, of the highly neurovirulent MHV strain JHM.SD relative to their effects on the reference strain, A59. However, TMPRSS2 overexpression decreased MHV structural protein expression, release of infectious particles, and syncytium formation, and endogenous serine protease activity did not contribute greatly to infection. We therefore investigated the importance of other classes of cellular proteases and found that inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)- and a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)-family zinc metalloproteases markedly decreased both entry and cell-cell fusion. Suppression of virus by metalloprotease inhibition varied among tested cell lines and MHV S proteins, suggesting a role for metalloprotease use in strain-dependent tropism. We conclude that zinc metalloproteases must be considered potential contributors to coronavirus fusion.IMPORTANCE The family Coronaviridae includes viruses that cause two emerging diseases of humans, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), as well as a number of important animal pathogens. Because coronaviruses depend on host protease-mediated cleavage of their S proteins for entry, a number of protease inhibitors have been proposed as antiviral agents. However, it is unclear which proteases mediate in vivo infection. For example, SARS-CoV infection of cultured cells depends on endosomal acid pH-dependent proteases rather than on the cell surface acid p

  17. Selective Packaging of Host tRNA's by Murine Leukemia Virus Particles Does Not Require Genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Judith G.; Seidman, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    The 4S RNA contained in RNA tumor virus particles consists of a selected population of host tRNA's. However, the mechanism by which virions select host tRNA's has not been elucidated. We have considered a model which specifies that 35S genomic RNA determines which tRNA's are to be encapsidated as well as the relative amounts of these tRNA's within the virion. The model was tested by comparing the free 4S RNA composition of normal murine leukemia virus (MuLV) particles and noninfectious virions from actinomycin D (ActD)-treated cells, which are deficient in genomic RNA (ActD virions). Viral 4S RNA was analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Surprisingly, the patterns obtained for control and ActD 4S RNA were identical to each other and were clearly distinct from the cell 4S RNA pattern. The viral patterns had three prominent areas of radioactivity. One of the spots was identified on the basis of its oligonucleotide fingerprint as tRNA Pro, the primer for MuLV RNA-directed DNA synthesis. These results were obtained with two different MuLV strains, AKR and Moloney, each grown in SC-1 cells. The demonstration that ActD virions contain primer tRNA and in general exhibit the characteristic MuLV tRNA pattern rather than the complete representation of cell 4S RNA leads to the conclusion that genomic RNA is not the major determinant in selective packaging of host tRNA's. A possible role for one or more viral proteins, including reverse transcriptase, is suggested. Images PMID:219227

  18. Characterization of a progressive neurodegenerative disease induced by a temperature-sensitive Moloney murine leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bilello, J A; Pitts, O M; Hoffman, P M

    1986-01-01

    A progressive neurodegenerative disease occurred following infection of mice with a temperature-sensitive (ts) isolate of Moloney (Mo) murine leukemia virus (MuLV), ts Mo BA-1 MuLV. This NB-tropic ecotropic MuLV, which was ts for a late function, induced a syndrome of tremor, weakness of the hind limbs, and spasticity following infection of several strains of laboratory neonatal mice, including NFS, C3H/He, CBA, SJL, and BALB/c. The latent period of 8 to 16 weeks was considerably longer than that observed for the acute paralytic diseases observed following neonatal infection with other ts Mo-MuLV, rat-passaged Friend MuLV, and some wild mouse ecotropic MuLVs. Spongiform pathology without inflammation and degeneration of neurons devoid of budding virions occurred in the cerebellar grey matter, brain stem, and upper spinal cord; but lower spinal cord anterior horn cells were less obviously affected than in other MuLV-associated neuroparalytic syndromes. ts Mo BA-1 MuLV differed from other ts Mo-MuLV mutants that are capable of inducing a neuroparalytic syndrome in that while infected nervous system tissue contained high levels of MuLV p30 and gp70, no evidence of precursor accumulation or abnormal processing of MuLV p30 or gp70 could be demonstrated. The localization of virus within the nervous system suggests that direct neuronal infection may not be the etiologic mechanism in this MuLV-induced neurodegenerative disease. Images PMID:3735486

  19. A procedure to deliver herpes simplex virus to the murine trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, John L; Ohara, Peter T; Tauscher, Andrew N; LaVail, Jennifer H

    2003-08-01

    Although initial herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections of the cornea are relatively easily treated, recurrent infections following reactivation of latent virus in the sensory ganglion cells are more difficult to treat. Untreated infections may result in severe consequences, including corneal scarring, glaucoma, and encephalitis. To develop such treatments, an experimental in vivo model was needed in which HSV can be applied directly to trigeminal ganglion cells. We have previously developed such a model to examine the mechanisms of HSV spread from trigeminal neurons to corneal epithelial cells. The current paper describes in detail the technical steps required for implementation of that model. Immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy have been used to validate the efficacy of the described procedures. This technique will be useful for future in vivo studies of neurotrophic viral infections of trigeminal ganglion cells.

  20. A MURINE VIRUS (JHM) CAUSING DISSEMINATED ENCEPHALOMYELITIS WITH EXTENSIVE DESTRUCTION OF MYELIN

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Orville T.; Pappenheimer, Alwin M.; Cheever, F. Sargent; Daniels, Joan B.

    1949-01-01

    A description has been given of the pathologic changes produced experimentally in animals by the inoculation of a virus material obtained from a mouse with spontaneous encephalomyelitis. The most distinctive feature of the lesions in the central nervous system is the widespread destruction of myelin. Giant cells derived from a variety of tissue elements characterize the early lesions. The liver in the majority of cases is the seat of focal necrosis. In some mice, infected with large doses by the intravenous route, there is produced massive necrosis of the liver, with fat infiltration and calcification. Giant cells are occasionally found in lymphatic tissue, but no significant changes were noted in other organs. Inclusions or elementary bodies were not demonstrated in the lesions. Similar lesions were produced by the inoculation of mouse virus into hamsters. In rats, the lesions were of a more chronic character. The relation of this disease to other demyelinating diseases of man and animals is discussed. PMID:19871701

  1. Chromatin states shape insertion profiles of the piggyBac, Tol2 and Sleeping Beauty transposons and murine leukemia virus

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Junko; Akagi, Keiko; Misawa, Ryo; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Horie, Kyoji

    2017-01-01

    DNA transposons and retroviruses are versatile tools in functional genomics and gene therapy. To facilitate their application, we conducted a genome-wide insertion site profiling of the piggyBac (PB), Tol2 and Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposons and the murine leukemia virus (MLV) in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). PB and MLV preferred highly expressed genes, whereas Tol2 and SB preferred weakly expressed genes. However, correlations with DNase I hypersensitive sites were different for all vectors, indicating that chromatin accessibility is not the sole determinant. Therefore, we analysed various chromatin states. PB and MLV highly correlated with Cohesin, Mediator and ESC-specific transcription factors. Notably, CTCF sites were correlated with PB but not with MLV, suggesting MLV prefers smaller promoter–enhancer loops, whereas PB insertion encompasses larger chromatin loops termed topologically associating domains. Tol2 also correlated with Cohesin and CTCF. However, correlations with ESC-specific transcription factors were weaker, suggesting that Tol2 prefers transcriptionally weak chromatin loops. Consistently, Tol2 insertions were associated with bivalent histone modifications characteristic of silent and inducible loci. SB showed minimum preference to all chromatin states, suggesting the least adverse effect on adjacent genes. These results will be useful for vector selection for various applications. PMID:28252665

  2. Oral Vaccination With Adeno-associated Virus Vectors Expressing the Neu Oncogene Inhibits the Growth of Murine Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Steel, Jason C; Di Pasquale, Giovanni; Ramlogan, Charmaine A; Patel, Vyomesh; Chiorini, John A; Morris, John C

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have been used for therapeutic gene transfer. These vectors offer a number of advantages including resistance to the effects of pH, a broad cellular tropism, efficient gene transfer, persistence of gene expression, and little toxicity. AAV vectors; however, at high doses can induce humoral and cellular immune responses. While potentially problematic for replacement gene therapy, this effect may be advantageous for antitumor vaccination. We examined the activity of an oral and intramuscular antitumor vaccination using AAV serotypes 5 and 6 expressing a truncated neu oncogene in a neu-positive murine TUBO breast cancer model. Mice receiving a single oral administration of AAV5-neu or AAV6-neu demonstrated improved survival. Oral vaccination significantly improved survivals compared with intramuscular vaccination. Mice vaccinated with AAV6-neu survived longer than those treated with AAV5-neu. Vaccination with AAV5-neu or AAV6-neu induced both humoral and cellular immune responses against the NEU antigen. These responses were more robust in the mice undergoing oral vaccination compared with mice receiving the intramuscular vaccination. Protection from tumor was long lasting with 80% of the animals treated with oral AAV6-neu surviving a re-challenge with TUBO cells at 120 and 320 days post-vaccination. Further evaluation of AAV-based vectors as tumor vaccines is warranted. PMID:23295951

  3. Strategies of NF-κB signaling modulation by ectromelia virus in BALB/3T3 murine fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Struzik, Justyna; Szulc-Dąbrowska, Lidia; Winnicka, Anna; Niemiałtowski, Marek

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is a pleiotropic transcription factor that regulates the expression of immune response genes. NF-κB signaling can be disrupted by pathogens that prevent host immune response. In this work, we examined the influence of ectromelia (mousepox) virus (ECTV) on NF-κB signaling in murine BALB/3T3 fibroblasts. Activation of NF-κB via tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 (TNFR1) in these cells induces proinflammatory cytokine secretion. We show that ECTV does not recruit NF-κB to viral factories or induce NF-κB nuclear translocation in BALB/3T3 cells. Additionally, ECTV counteracts TNF-α-induced p65 NF-κB nuclear translocation during the course of infection. Inhibition of TNF-α-induced p65 nuclear translocation was also observed in neighboring cells that underwent fusion with ECTV-infected cells. ECTV inhibits the key step of NF-κB activation, i.e. Ser32 phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor κBα (IκBα) induced by TNF-α. We also observed that ECTV prevents TNF-α-induced Ser536 of p65 phosphorylation in BALB/3T3 cells. Studying TNFR1 signaling provides information about regulation of inflammatory response and cell survival. Unraveling poxviral immunomodulatory strategies may be helpful in drug target identification as well as in vaccine development.

  4. The Spread of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 from Trigeminal Neurons to the Murine Cornea: an Immunoelectron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Ohara, Peter T.; Chin, Marian S.; LaVail, Jennifer H.

    2000-01-01

    An animal model has been developed to clarify the mechanism for spread of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from neuron to epithelial cells in herpetic epithelial keratitis. HSV was introduced into the murine trigeminal ganglion via stereotaxic guided injection. After 2 to 5 days, the animals were euthanized. Ganglia and corneas were prepared for light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry with antisera to HSV. At 2 days, labeled axons were identified in the stromal layer. At 3 days, we could detect immunoreactive profiles of trigeminal ganglion cell axons that contained many vesicular structures. By 3 and 4 days, the infection had spread to all layers of epithelium, and the center of a region of infected epithelium appeared thinned. At 5 day, fewer basal cells appeared infected, although infection persisted in superficial cells where it had expanded laterally. Mature HSV was found in the extracellular space surrounding wing and squamous cells. Viral antigen was expressed in small pits along the apical surfaces of wing and squamous cells but not at the basal surface of these cells or on basal cells. This polarized expression of viral antigen resulted in the spread of HSV to superficial cells and limited lateral spread to neighboring basal cells. The pathogenesis of HSV infection in these mice may serve as a model of the human recurrent epithelial disease in the progression of focal sites of infection and transfer from basal to superficial cells. PMID:10775616

  5. The spread of herpes simplex virus type 1 from trigeminal neurons to the murine cornea: an immunoelectron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ohara, P T; Chin, M S; LaVail, J H

    2000-05-01

    An animal model has been developed to clarify the mechanism for spread of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from neuron to epithelial cells in herpetic epithelial keratitis. HSV was introduced into the murine trigeminal ganglion via stereotaxic guided injection. After 2 to 5 days, the animals were euthanized. Ganglia and corneas were prepared for light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry with antisera to HSV. At 2 days, labeled axons were identified in the stromal layer. At 3 days, we could detect immunoreactive profiles of trigeminal ganglion cell axons that contained many vesicular structures. By 3 and 4 days, the infection had spread to all layers of epithelium, and the center of a region of infected epithelium appeared thinned. At 5 day, fewer basal cells appeared infected, although infection persisted in superficial cells where it had expanded laterally. Mature HSV was found in the extracellular space surrounding wing and squamous cells. Viral antigen was expressed in small pits along the apical surfaces of wing and squamous cells but not at the basal surface of these cells or on basal cells. This polarized expression of viral antigen resulted in the spread of HSV to superficial cells and limited lateral spread to neighboring basal cells. The pathogenesis of HSV infection in these mice may serve as a model of the human recurrent epithelial disease in the progression of focal sites of infection and transfer from basal to superficial cells.

  6. Supramolecular organization of immature and mature murine leukemia virus revealed by electron cryo-microscopy: Implications for retroviral assembly mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Mark; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M.; Weiner, Scott G.; Brown, Patrick O.; Rein, Alan

    1998-01-01

    We have used electron cryo-microscopy and image analysis to examine the native structure of immature, protease-deficient (PR−) and mature, wild-type (WT) Moloney murine leukemia virus (MuLV). Maturational cleavage of the Gag polyprotein by the viral protease is associated with striking morphological changes. The PR− MuLV particles exhibit a rounded central core, which has a characteristic track-like shell on its surface, whereas the WT MuLV cores display a polygonal surface with loss of the track-like feature. The pleomorphic shape and inability to refine unique orientation angles suggest that neither the PR− nor the WT MuLV adheres to strict icosahedral symmetry. Nevertheless, the PR− MuLV particles do exhibit paracrystalline order with a spacing between Gag molecules of ≈45 Å and a length of ≈200 Å. Because of the pleomorphic shape and paracrystalline packing of the Gag–RNA complexes, we raise the possibility that assembly of MuLV is driven by protein–RNA, as well as protein–protein, interactions. The maturation process involves a dramatic reorganization of the packing arrangements within the ribonucleoprotein core with disordering and loosening of the individual protein components. PMID:9636143

  7. Murine hypothalamic destruction with vascular cell apoptosis subsequent to combined administration of human papilloma virus vaccine and pertussis toxin

    PubMed Central

    Aratani, Satoko; Fujita, Hidetoshi; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki; Usui, Chie; Yokota, Shumpei; Nakamura, Ikuro; Nishioka, Kusuki; Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination is the most powerful way to prevent human beings from contracting infectious diseases including viruses. In the case of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, an unexpectedly novel disease entity, HPV vaccination associated neuro-immunopathetic syndrome (HANS), has been reported and remains to be carefully verified. To elucidate the mechanism of HANS, we applied a strategy similar to the active experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) model - one of the most popular animal models used to induce maximum immunological change in the central nervous system. Surprisingly, mice vaccinated with pertussis toxin showed neurological phenotypes that include low responsiveness of the tail reflex and locomotive mobility. Pathological analyses revealed the damage to the hypothalamus and circumventricular regions around the third ventricle, and these regions contained apoptotic vascular endothelial cells. These data suggested that HPV-vaccinated donners that are susceptible to the HPV vaccine might develop HANS under certain environmental factors. These results will give us the new insight into the murine pathological model of HANS and help us to find a way to treat of patients suffering from HANS. PMID:27833142

  8. Chromatin states shape insertion profiles of the piggyBac, Tol2 and Sleeping Beauty transposons and murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Junko; Akagi, Keiko; Misawa, Ryo; Kokubu, Chikara; Takeda, Junji; Horie, Kyoji

    2017-03-02

    DNA transposons and retroviruses are versatile tools in functional genomics and gene therapy. To facilitate their application, we conducted a genome-wide insertion site profiling of the piggyBac (PB), Tol2 and Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposons and the murine leukemia virus (MLV) in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). PB and MLV preferred highly expressed genes, whereas Tol2 and SB preferred weakly expressed genes. However, correlations with DNase I hypersensitive sites were different for all vectors, indicating that chromatin accessibility is not the sole determinant. Therefore, we analysed various chromatin states. PB and MLV highly correlated with Cohesin, Mediator and ESC-specific transcription factors. Notably, CTCF sites were correlated with PB but not with MLV, suggesting MLV prefers smaller promoter-enhancer loops, whereas PB insertion encompasses larger chromatin loops termed topologically associating domains. Tol2 also correlated with Cohesin and CTCF. However, correlations with ESC-specific transcription factors were weaker, suggesting that Tol2 prefers transcriptionally weak chromatin loops. Consistently, Tol2 insertions were associated with bivalent histone modifications characteristic of silent and inducible loci. SB showed minimum preference to all chromatin states, suggesting the least adverse effect on adjacent genes. These results will be useful for vector selection for various applications.

  9. Specific sequence deletions in two classes of murine leukemia virus-related proviruses in the mouse genome.

    PubMed

    Ch'ang, L Y; Yang, W K; Myer, F E; Koh, C K; Boone, L R

    1989-02-01

    Characteristic long terminal repeats (LTR) of approximately 700 and 750 bp were found, respectively, in the two classes (polytropic and modified polytropic) of murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related nonecotropic nonxenotropic proviral sequences in eight individual molecular clones of RFM/Un mouse chromosomal DNA fragments. Three proviral clones, two polytropic and one modified polytropic, contained sequence deletions in the viral structural genes. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that 7-bp direct repeats occur at both ends of deleted sequences in intact structures and one of the repeats remains in genomes with the deletion. Specifically, the deleted sequences were a 1487-bp gag-pol sequence with ACTGCCC repeat, a 113-bp mid-pol sequence with CAGGCAA repeat, and a 1811-bp env sequence with GGTCCAG repeat. The same specific sequence deletions were found in both classes of MuLV-related proviral structures. Examination of chromosomal DNA from eight inbred laboratory mouse strains and six wild mouse species showed that a minor population of proviruses with these specific deletions were present in Mus musculus and Mus spretus, all of which contain prominent 700-bp LTR polytropic proviral structures. The 750-bp LTR modified polytropic proviral structures were phylogenetically more restricted, being equally predominant in Mus musculus domesticus mice, but minor to undetectable in Mus spretus subspecies, and absent in other wild mouse populations.

  10. Interactions of Murine Leukemia Virus Core Components: Characterization of Reverse Transcriptase Packaged in the Absence of 70S Genomic RNA

    PubMed Central

    Gerwin, Brenda I.; Levin, Judith G.

    1977-01-01

    Virions produced by cells in the presence of actinomycin D (Act D virions) contain reverse transcriptase but are deficient in 70S genomic RNA. To assess the role of genomic RNA in encapsidation of a functional reverse transcriptase and to study the interaction of the enzyme and its template in the cores of intact virions, the reverse transcriptase enzymes of normal and Act D virions were compared. The enzymes were indistinguishable by column chromatography, sedimentation velocity, or template/primer preferences. In addition, these enzymes showed equal sensitivity to inactivation by antibodies directed against Rauscher murine leukemia virus DNA polymerase. The enzymes from Act D and normal virions had similar thermal decay rates and were both protected against heat denaturation by natural and synthetic template/primers. By these criteria, the DNA polymerase molecules synthesized and assembled into virions in the absence of genomic RNA are identical to those packaged under normal conditions. Additional studies designed to measure protection of reverse transcriptase by genomic RNA were carried out by comparing the thermal lability of the enzyme in intact Act D and normal virions. The thermal decay rate of reverse transcriptase in Act D virions was identical to that in control virions. In contrast to the lability of the virion-associated enzyme, however, genomic RNA in control virions was stable to heat treatment. PMID:72160

  11. Enhancement of the pro-apoptotic properties of Newcastle disease virus promotes tumor remission in syngeneic murine cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Cuadrado-Castano, Sara; Ayllon, Juan; Mansour, Mena; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Jordan, Stefan; Tripathi, Shashank; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Villar, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is considered a promising agent for cancer therapy due to its oncolytic properties. These include preferential replication in transformed cells, induction of innate and adaptive immune responses within tumors and cytopathic effects in infected tumor cells due to the activation of apoptosis. In order to enhance the latter and thus possibly enhance the overall oncolytic activity of NDV, we generated a recombinant NDV encoding the human TNF receptor Fas (rNDV-B1/Fas). rNDV-B1/Fas replicates to similar titers as its wild type (rNDV-B1) counterpart, however overexpression of Fas in infected cells leads to higher levels of cytotoxicity correlated with faster and increased apoptosis responses in which both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways are activated earlier. Furthermore, in vivo studies in syngeneic murine melanoma model show an enhancement of the oncolytic properties of rNDV-B1/Fas, with major improvements in survival and tumor remission. Altogether, our data suggest that up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic function of NDV is a viable approach to enhance its anti-tumor properties, and adds to the currently known, rationally-based strategies to design optimized therapeutic viral vectors for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25761895

  12. Single-particle tracking of murine polyoma virus-like particles on live cells and artificial membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ewers, Helge; Smith, Alicia E.; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Lilie, Hauke; Koumoutsakos, Petros; Helenius, Ari

    2005-01-01

    The lateral mobility of individual murine polyoma virus–like particles (VLPs) bound to live cells and artificial lipid bilayers was studied by single fluorescent particle tracking using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The particle trajectories were analyzed in terms of diffusion rates and modes of motion as described by the moment scaling spectrum. Although VLPs bound to their ganglioside receptor in lipid bilayers exhibited only free diffusion, analysis of trajectories on live 3T6 mouse fibroblasts revealed three distinct modes of mobility: rapid random motion, confined movement in small zones (30–60 nm in diameter), and confined movement in zones with a slow drift. After binding to the cell surface, particles typically underwent free diffusion for 5–10 s, and then they were confined in an actin filament-dependent manner without involvement of clathrin-coated pits or caveolae. Depletion of cholesterol dramatically reduced mobility of VLPs independently of actin, whereas inhibition of tyrosine kinases had no effect on confinement. The results suggested that clustering of ganglioside molecules by the multivalent VLPs induced transmembrane coupling that led to confinement of the virus/receptor complex by cortical actin filaments. PMID:16219700

  13. Role of the Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) pathway in regulation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Sho; Kaneyama, Tomoki; Tsugane, Sayaka; Takeichi, Naoya; Yanagisawa, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Motoki; Yagita, Hideo; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2014-09-15

    Programmed death-1 (PD-1) belongs to the CD28 family of co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory molecules and regulates adaptive immunity. This molecule induces the development of regulatory T cells, T cell tolerance, or apoptosis. We examined the role of PD-1 pathway in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) mice. Up-regulation of PD-1 and PD-1 ligand-1 (PD-L1) mRNA expression in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells were induced by TMEV infection in vitro. Furthermore, PD-1 and PD-L1 mRNA expression was increased in the spinal cords of the TMEV-infected mice in vivo. Treatment with a blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) against PD-1, especially during the effector phase, resulted in significant deterioration of the TMEV-IDD both clinically and histologically. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a dramatically increase of CD4(+) T cells producing Th1 cytokines such as IFN-γ and TNF-α in the spinal cord of anti-PD-1 mAb-treated mice. These results indicate that the PD-1 pathway plays a pivotal regulatory role in the development of TMEV-IDD.

  14. Targeted therapy for sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Forscher, Charles; Mita, Monica; Figlin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are tumors of mesenchymal origin that make up approximately 1% of human cancers. They may arise as primary tumors in either bone or soft tissue, with approximately 11,280 soft tissue tumors and 2,650 bone tumors diagnosed each year in the United States. There are at least 50 different subtypes of soft tissue sarcoma, with new ones described with ever-increasing frequency. One way to look at sarcomas is to divide them into categories on the basis of their genetic make-up. One group of sarcomas has an identifiable, relatively simple genetic signature, such as the X:18 translocation seen in synovial sarcoma or the 11:22 translocation seen in Ewing’s sarcoma. These specific abnormalities often lead to the presence of fusion proteins, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing’s sarcoma, which are helpful as diagnostic tools and may become therapeutic targets in the future. Another group of sarcomas is characterized by complex genetic abnormalities as seen in leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. It is important to keep these distinctions in mind when contemplating the development of targeted agents for sarcomas. Different abnormalities in sarcoma could be divided by tumor subtype or by the molecular or pathway abnormality. However, some existing drugs or drugs in development may interfere with or alter more than one of the presented pathways. PMID:24669185

  15. Generation and characterization of a recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus containing the v-myc oncogene of avian MC29 virus: in vitro transformation and in vivo pathogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Brightman, B K; Pattengale, P K; Fan, H

    1986-01-01

    A new retrovirus consisting of the v-myc oncogene sequences of avian MC29 virus inserted into the genome of Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) was generated. This was accomplished by constructing a recombinant DNA clone containing the desired organization, introducing the recombinant DNA into mouse NIH 3T3 cells, and superinfecting the cells with replication-competent M-MuLV. The construction was designed so that an M-MuLV gag-myc fusion protein would be produced. The resulting virus, M-MuLV(myc), morphologically transformed uninfected NIH 3T3 cells. Stocks of M-MuLV(myc)-M-MuLV were infected into secondary mouse embryo cultures. M-MuLV(myc) induced striking growth and proliferation of hematopoietic cells. These cells were of the myeloid lineage by morphology, phagocytic properties, and surface staining with Mac-1 and Mac-2 monoclonal antibodies. They resembled mature macrophages, although they displayed minor properties of immaturity. The myeloid cells were transformed in comparison with uninfected myeloid cells since they were less adherent and had unlimited proliferative capacity and reduced growth factor requirements. The transformed myeloid cells with proliferative potential were actually myeloid progenitors which apparently underwent terminal differentiation to macrophages. It was possible to derive a permanent line of factor-independent macrophages from M-MuLV(myc)-transformed myeloid cells. M-MuLV(myc) also immortalized and morphologically transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts. These in vitro properties closely resembled the biological activity of MC29 virus in avian cells and suggested that the nature of the v-myc oncogene was an important determinant in transformation specificity. Neonatal NIH Swiss mice inoculated intraperitoneally with M-MuLV(myc)-M-MuLV only developed lymphoblastic lymphoma characteristic of the M-MuLV helper alone, and no acute fibrosarcomas or myeloid tumors resulted. In light of the strong myeloid transformation observed in vitro

  16. Long terminal repeat of murine retroviral DNAs: sequence analysis, host-proviral junctions, and preintegration site.

    PubMed Central

    Van Beveren, C; Rands, E; Chattopadhyay, S K; Lowy, D R; Verma, I M

    1982-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the long terminal repeat (LTR) of three murine retroviral DNAs has been determined. The data indicate that the U5 region (sequences originating from the 5' end of the genome) of various LTRs is more conserved than the U3 region (sequences from the 3' end of the genome). The location and sequence of the control elements such as the 5' cap, "TATA-like" sequences, "CCAAT-box," and presumptive polyadenylic acid addition signal AATAAA in the various LTRs are nearly identical. Some murine retroviral DNAs contain a duplication of sequences within the LTR ranging in size from 58 to 100 base pairs. A variant of molecularly cloned Moloney murine sarcoma virus DNA in which one of the two LTRs integrated into the viral DNA was also analyzed. A 4-base-pair duplication was generated at the site of integration of LTR in the viral DNA. The host-viral junction of two molecularly cloned AKR-murine leukemia virus DNAs (clones 623 and 614) was determined. In the case of AKR-623 DNA, a 3- or 4-base-pair direct repeat of cellular sequences flanking the viral DNA was observed. However, AKR-614 DNA contained a 5-base-pair repeat of cellular sequences. The nucleotide sequence of the preintegration site of AKR-623 DNA revealed that the cellular sequences duplicated during integration are present only once. Finally, a striking homology between the sequences flanking the preintegration site and viral LTRs was observed. Images PMID:6281466

  17. Hepatitis C Virus Stimulates Murine CD8α-Like Dendritic Cells to Produce Type I Interferon in a TRIF-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Detje, Claudia N.; Riebesehl, Nina; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Steinmann, Eike; Kalinke, Ulrich; Pietschmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces interferon (IFN) stimulated genes in the liver despite of distinct innate immune evasion mechanisms, suggesting that beyond HCV infected cells other cell types contribute to innate immune activation. Upon coculture with HCV replicating cells, human CD141+ myeloid dendritic cells (DC) produce type III IFN, whereas plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) mount type I IFN responses. Due to limitations in the genetic manipulation of primary human DCs, we explored HCV mediated stimulation of murine DC subsets. Coculture of HCV RNA transfected human or murine hepatoma cells with murine bone marrow-derived DC cultures revealed that only Flt3-L DC cultures, but not GM-CSF DC cultures responded with IFN production. Cells transfected with full length or subgenomic viral RNA stimulated IFN release indicating that infectious virus particle formation is not essential in this process. Use of differentiated DC from mice with genetic lesions in innate immune signalling showed that IFN secretion by HCV-stimulated murine DC was independent of MyD88 and CARDIF, but dependent on TRIF and IFNAR signalling. Separating Flt3-L DC cultures into pDC and conventional CD11b-like and CD8α-like DC revealed that the CD8α-like DC, homologous to the human CD141+ DC, release interferon upon stimulation by HCV replicating cells. In contrast, the other cell types and in particular the pDC did not. Injection of human HCV subgenomic replicon cells into IFN-β reporter mice confirmed the interferon induction upon HCV replication in vivo. These results indicate that HCV-replicating cells stimulate IFN secretion from murine CD8α-like DC independent of infectious virus production. Thus, this work defines basic principles of viral recognition by murine DC populations. Moreover, this model should be useful to explore the interaction between dendritic cells during HCV replication and to define how viral signatures are delivered to and recognized by immune cells to trigger IFN

  18. Fine Mapping of Murine Antibody Responses to Immunization with a Novel Soluble Form of Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ruwona, Tinashe B.; Giang, Erick; Nieusma, Travis

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E1E2 complex is a candidate vaccine antigen. Previous immunization studies of E1E2 have yielded various results on its ability to induce virus-neutralizing antibodies in animal models and humans. The murine model has become a vital tool for HCV research owing to the development of humanized mice susceptible to HCV infection. In this study, we investigated the antibody responses of mice immunized with E1E2 and a novel soluble form of E1E2 (sE1E2) by a DNA prime and protein boost strategy. The results showed that sE1E2 elicited higher antibody titers and a greater breadth of reactivity than the wild-type cell-associated E1E2. However, immune sera elicited by either immunogen were only weakly neutralizing. In order to understand the contrasting results of binding and serum neutralizing activities, epitopes targeted by the polyclonal antibody responses were mapped and monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were generated. The results showed that the majority of serum antibodies were directed to the E1 region 211 to 250 and the E2 regions 421 to 469, 512 to 539, 568 to 609, and 638 to 651, instead of the well-known immunodominant E2 hypervariable region 1 (HVR1). Unexpectedly, in MAb analysis, ∼12% of MAbs isolated were specific to the conserved E2 antigenic site 412 to 423, and 85% of them cross-neutralized multiple HCV isolates. The epitopes recognized by these MAbs are similar but distinct from the previously reported HCV1 and AP33 broadly neutralizing epitopes. In conclusion, E1E2 can prime B cells specific to conserved neutralizing epitopes, but the levels of serum neutralizing antibodies elicited are insufficient for effective virus neutralization. The sE1E2 constructs described in this study can be a useful template for rational antigen engineering. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus infects 2 to 3% of the world's population and is a leading cause of liver failures and the need for liver transplantation. The virus

  19. Evaluation of cellular determinants required for in vitro xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus entry into human prostate cancer and noncancerous cells.

    PubMed

    Bhosle, Sushma; Suppiah, Suganthi; Molinaro, Ross; Liang, Yuying; Arnold, Rebecca; Diehl, William; Makarova, Natalia; Blackwell, Jerry; Petros, John; Liotta, Dennis; Hunter, Eric; Ly, Hinh

    2010-07-01

    The newly identified retrovirus-the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV)-has recently been shown to be strongly associated with familial prostate cancer in humans (A. Urisman et al., PLoS Pathog. 2:e25, 2006). While that study showed evidence of XMRV infection exclusively in the prostatic stromal fibroblasts, a recent study found XMRV protein antigens mainly in malignant prostate epithelial cells (R. Schlaberg et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 106:16351-16356, 2009). To help elucidate the mechanisms behind XMRV infection, we show that prostatic fibroblast cells express Xpr1, a known receptor of XMRV, but its expression is absent in other cell lines of the prostate (i.e., epithelial and stromal smooth muscle cells). We also show that certain amino acid residues located within the predicted extracellular loop (ECL3 and ECL4) sequences of Xpr1 are required for efficient XMRV entry. Although we found strong evidence to support XMRV infection of prostatic fibroblast cell lines via Xpr1, we learned that XMRV was indeed capable of infecting cells that did not necessarily express Xpr1, such as those of the prostatic epithelial and smooth muscle origins. Further studies suggest that the expression of Xpr1 and certain genotypes of the RNASEL gene, which could restrict XMRV infection, may play important roles in defining XMRV tropisms in certain cell types. Collectively, our data reveal important cellular determinants required for XMRV entry into different human prostate cells in vitro, which may provide important insights into the possible role of XMRV as an etiologic agent in human prostate cancer.

  20. Replicon particles of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus as a reductionist murine model for encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Alexandra; Whitmore, Alan C; Konopka, Jennifer L; Johnston, Robert E

    2009-05-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particles (VRP) were used to model the initial phase of VEE-induced encephalitis in the mouse brain. VRP can target and infect cells as VEE, but VRP do not propagate beyond the first infected cell due to the absence of the structural genes. Direct intracranial inoculation of VRP into mice induced acute encephalitis with signs similar to the neuronal phase of wild-type VEE infection and other models of virus-induced encephalitis. Using the previously established VRP-mRNP tagging system, a new method to distinguish the host responses in infected cells from those in uninfected bystander cell populations, we detected a robust and rapid innate immune response in the central nervous system (CNS) by infected neurons and uninfected bystander cells. Moreover, this innate immune response in the CNS compromised blood-brain barrier integrity, created an inflammatory response, and directed an adaptive immune response characterized by proliferation and activation of microglia cells and infiltration of inflammatory monocytes, in addition to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that a naïve CNS has an intrinsic potential to induce an innate immune response that could be crucial to the outcome of the infection by determining the composition and dynamics of the adaptive immune response. Furthermore, these results establish a model for neurotropic virus infection to identify host and viral factors that contribute to invasion of the brain, the mechanism(s) whereby the adaptive immune response can clear the infection, and the role of the host innate response in these processes.

  1. Replicon Particles of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus as a Reductionist Murine Model for Encephalitis▿

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Alexandra; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particles (VRP) were used to model the initial phase of VEE-induced encephalitis in the mouse brain. VRP can target and infect cells as VEE, but VRP do not propagate beyond the first infected cell due to the absence of the structural genes. Direct intracranial inoculation of VRP into mice induced acute encephalitis with signs similar to the neuronal phase of wild-type VEE infection and other models of virus-induced encephalitis. Using the previously established VRP-mRNP tagging system, a new method to distinguish the host responses in infected cells from those in uninfected bystander cell populations, we detected a robust and rapid innate immune response in the central nervous system (CNS) by infected neurons and uninfected bystander cells. Moreover, this innate immune response in the CNS compromised blood-brain barrier integrity, created an inflammatory response, and directed an adaptive immune response characterized by proliferation and activation of microglia cells and infiltration of inflammatory monocytes, in addition to CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that a naïve CNS has an intrinsic potential to induce an innate immune response that could be crucial to the outcome of the infection by determining the composition and dynamics of the adaptive immune response. Furthermore, these results establish a model for neurotropic virus infection to identify host and viral factors that contribute to invasion of the brain, the mechanism(s) whereby the adaptive immune response can clear the infection, and the role of the host innate response in these processes. PMID:19225006

  2. Differential antiviral activity of two TIBO derivatives against the human immunodeficiency and murine leukemia viruses alone and in combination with other anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Buckheit, R W; Germany-Decker, J; Hollingshead, M G; Allen, L B; Shannon, W M; Janssen, P A; Chirigos, M A

    1993-11-01

    R82913 and R86183, two derivatives of tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione (TIBO), were found to potently and selectively inhibit the replication and cell killing effects of a panel of biologically diverse laboratory and clinical strains of HIV-1. The two compounds exhibited significant activity in all human cell lines tested, as well as in fresh human peripheral blood lymphocytes and macrophages. One of these two compounds (R82913) was found to significantly inhibit the replication of a murine retrovirus (Rauscher murine leukemia virus) in both UV-XC plaque formation and virus yield reduction assays. R86183, despite differing from R82913 only in the positioning of a single chlorine molecule, was not active against the murine retrovirus but was 10-fold more potent in inhibiting HIV-1 replication. Combination antiviral assays with other reverse transcriptase inhibitors, including AZT, ddC, and carbovir, yielded synergistic anti-HIV activity with both TIBO derivatives. Additive to slightly synergistic results were obtained in combinations with ddI and phosphonoformic acid whereas additive to antagonistic activity was detected in combination with dextran sulfate.

  3. Neuroimmune mechanisms of behavioral alterations in a syngeneic murine model of human papilloma virus-related head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Vichaya, Elisabeth G; Vermeer, Daniel W; Christian, Diana L; Molkentine, Jessica M; Mason, Kathy A; Lee, John H; Dantzer, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Patients with cancer often experience a high symptom burden prior to the start of treatment. As disease- and treatment-related neurotoxicities appear to be additive, targeting disease-related symptoms may attenuate overall symptom burden for cancer patients and improve the tolerability of treatment. It has been hypothesized that disease-related symptoms are a consequence of tumor-induced inflammation. We tested this hypothesis using a syngeneic heterotopic murine model of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer. This model has the advantage of being mildly aggressive and not causing cachexia or weight loss. We previously showed that this tumor leads to increased IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α expression in the liver and increased IL-1β expression in the brain. The current study confirmed these features and demonstrated that the tumor itself exhibits high inflammatory cytokine expression (e.g., IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) compared to healthy tissue. While there is a clear relationship between cytokine levels and behavioral deficits in this model, the behavioral changes are surprisingly mild. Therefore, we sought to confirm the relationship between behavior and inflammation by amplifying the effect using a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg). In tumor-bearing mice LPS induced deficits in nest building, tail suspension, and locomotor activity approximately 24h after LPS. However, these mice did not display an exacerbation of LPS-induced weight loss, anorexia, or anhedonia. Further, while heightened serum IL-6 was observed there was minimal priming of liver or brain cytokine expression. Next we sought to inhibit tumor-induced burrowing deficits by reducing inflammation using minocycline. Minocycline (∼50mg/kg/day in drinking water) was able to attenuate tumor-induced inflammation and burrowing deficits. These data provide evidence in favor of an inflammatory-like mechanism for the behavioral alterations associated with tumor growth in a syngeneic

  4. Inhibitory effect of ferulic acid and isoferulic acid on murine interleukin-8 production in response to influenza virus infections in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, T; Ochiai, H; Sakai, S; Nakajima, K; Terasawa, K

    1995-06-01

    We investigated the effect of ferulic acid (FA) and isoferulic acid (IFA), which are active components of the rhizoma of Cimicifuga species used frequently as anti-inflammatory drugs in Japanese Oriental medicines, on murine interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in response to influenza virus infections in vitro and in vivo by antibody-sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the in vitro study, the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 was infected with influenza virus at a dose of 10 plaque forming units (PFU)/cell and cultured in the presence or absence of drugs. Both FA and IFA reduced the IL-8 levels in the 20-h conditioned medium in comparison with control in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of IFA was greater than that of FA: IL-8 levels were reduced to 43% and 56% of the control in the presence of 100 micrograms/ml of IFA and FA, respectively. In the in vivo study, mice were infected with 1,000 PFU of virus and received daily oral administrations of Cimicifuga heracleifolia extract (5 mg/mouse/day), FA (0.5 mg/mouse/day), IFA (0.125 mg/mouse/day), or phosphate buffered saline. The three drugs showed a tendency to reduce IL-8 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) obtained 2 days after infection. Moreover, both FA and IFA also significantly reduced the number of exuded neutrophils into BAL. However, the drug administrations did not affect the virus yields in BAL. These data suggest that FA and IFA are novel and potent inhibitors of murine IL-8 production and might act as one of the main components of anti-inflammatory rhizoma of Cimicifuga species.

  5. Can Soft Tissue Sarcomas Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tissue Sarcoma Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Soft Tissue Sarcomas Be Found Early? People who have ... Your Doctor About Soft Tissue Sarcomas? More In Soft Tissue Sarcoma About Soft Tissue Sarcoma Causes, Risk ...

  6. Interplay of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 with NF-kappaB Signaling of the Host

    PubMed Central

    Cieniewicz, Brandon; Santana, Alexis L.; Minkah, Nana; Krug, Laurie T.

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviruses establish a chronic infection in the host characterized by intervals of lytic replication, quiescent latency, and reactivation from latency. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) naturally infects small rodents and has genetic and biologic parallels with the human gammaherpesviruses (gHVs), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein–Barr virus. The murine gammaherpesvirus model pathogen system provides a platform to apply cutting-edge approaches to dissect the interplay of gammaherpesvirus and host determinants that enable colonization of the host, and that shape the latent or lytic fate of an infected cell. This knowledge is critical for the development of novel therapeutic interventions against the oncogenic gHVs. The nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway is well-known for its role in the promotion of inflammation and many aspects of B cell biology. Here, we review key aspects of the virus lifecycle in the host, with an emphasis on the route that the virus takes to gain access to the B cell latency reservoir. We highlight how the murine gammaherpesvirus requires components of the NF-κB signaling pathway to promote replication, latency establishment, and maintenance of latency. These studies emphasize the complexity of gammaherpesvirus interactions with NF-κB signaling components that direct innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Importantly, multiple facets of NF-κB signaling have been identified that might be targeted to reduce the burden of gammaherpesvirus-associated diseases. PMID:27582728

  7. Recapitulation of the hepatitis C virus life-cycle in engineered murine cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Alexander; Scull, Margaret A.; Friling, Tamar; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Donovan, Bridget M.; Dorner, Marcus; Gerold, Gisa; Labitt, Rachael N.; Rice, Charles M.; Ploss, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a major medical problem. In-depth study of HCV pathogenesis and immune responses is hampered by the lack of suitable small animal models. The narrow host range of HCV remains incompletely understood. We demonstrate that the entire HCV life-cycle can be recapitulated in mouse cells. We show that antiviral signaling interferes with HCV RNA replication in mouse cells. We were able to infect mouse cells expressing human CD81 and occludin (OCLN) - the minimal set of entry factor factors required for HCV uptake into mouse cells. Infected mouse cells sustain HCV RNA replication in the presence of miR122 and release infectious particles when mouse apoE is supplied. Our data demonstrate that the barriers of HCV interspecies transmission can be overcome by engineering a suitable cellular environment and provide a blue-print towards constructing a small animal model for HCV infection. PMID:23777661

  8. Recapitulation of the hepatitis C virus life-cycle in engineered murine cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Alexander; Scull, Margaret A; Friling, Tamar; Horwitz, Joshua A; Donovan, Bridget M; Dorner, Marcus; Gerold, Gisa; Labitt, Rachael N; Rice, Charles M; Ploss, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a major medical problem. In-depth study of HCV pathogenesis and immune responses is hampered by the lack of suitable small animal models. The narrow host range of HCV remains incompletely understood. We demonstrate that the entire HCV life-cycle can be recapitulated in mouse cells. We show that antiviral signaling interferes with HCV RNA replication in mouse cells. We were able to infect mouse cells expressing human CD81 and occludin (OCLN)-the minimal set of entry factor factors required for HCV uptake into mouse cells. Infected mouse cells sustain HCV RNA replication in the presence of miR122 and release infectious particles when mouse apoE is supplied. Our data demonstrate that the barriers of HCV interspecies transmission can be overcome by engineering a suitable cellular environment and provide a blue-print towards constructing a small animal model for HCV infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  10. Murine viral hepatitis involves NK cell depletion associated with virus-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    LEHOUX, M; JACQUES, A; LUSIGNAN, S; LAMONTAGNE, L

    2004-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus type 3 (MHV3), a coronavirus, is an excellent animal model for the study of immunological disorders related to acute and chronic hepatitis. In this study, we have verified if the fulminant hepatitis induced by MHV3 could be related to an impairment of innate immunity. Groups of three C57BL/6 mice were infected with the pathogenic L2-MHV3 or attenuated YAC-MHV3 viruses, and the natural killer (NK) cell populations from liver, spleen and bone marrow were analysed. The percentage of intrahepatic NK1·1+T cell receptor (TCR)− cells did not increase while NK1·1+TCRinter cells decreased in both L2-MHV3- and YAC-MHV3-infected mice. Concurrently, splenic and myeloid NK1·1+ cells decreased in L2-MHV3-infected mice. However, the cytotoxic activity of NK cells increased in liver and decreased in bone marrow from pathogenic L2-MHV3-infected mice while no modification was detected in YAC-MHV3-infected mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that both normal and larger splenic or myeloid NK cells decreased more in pathogenic L2-MHV3-infected mice than in attenuated YAC-MHV3-infected mice. In vitro viral infections of interleukin (IL)-15-stimulated lymphoid cells from liver and bone marrow revealed that L2-MHV3 induced higher decreases in cell viability of NK1·1+ cells than the YAC-MHV3 variant. The NK cell decreases were due to the viral permissivity leading to cytopathic effects characterized by cell rounding, syncytia formation and apoptosis. Larger NK+ syncytia were observed in L2-MHV3-infected cells than in YAC-MHV3-infected cells. These results suggest that NK cell production is impaired by viral infection favouring fulminant hepatitis. PMID:15196242

  11. Vaccinia virus Transmission through Experimentally Contaminated Milk Using a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Izabelle Silva; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Fraiha, Ana Luiza Soares; Costa, Aristóteles Gomes; Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Fiúza, Aparecida Tatiane Lino; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela

    2015-01-01

    Bovine vaccinia (BV) is a zoonosis caused by Vaccinia virus (VACV), which affects dairy cattle and humans. Previous studies have detected the presence of viable virus particles in bovine milk samples naturally and experimentally contaminated with VACV. However, it is not known whether milk contaminated with VACV could be a route of viral transmission. However, anti-Orthopoxvirus antibodies were detected in humans from BV endemic areas, whom had no contact with affected cows, which suggest that other VACV transmission routes are possible, such as consumption of contaminated milk and dairy products. Therefore, it is important to study the possibility of VACV transmission by contaminated milk. This study aimed to examine VACV transmission, pathogenesis and shedding in mice orally inoculated with experimentally contaminated milk. Thirty mice were orally inoculated with milk containing 107 PFU/ml of VACV, and ten mice were orally inoculated with uncontaminated milk. Clinical examinations were performed for 30 consecutive days, and fecal samples and oral swabs (OSs) were collected every other day. Mice were euthanized on predetermined days, and tissue and blood samples were collected. Nested-PCR, plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), viral isolation, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods were performed on the collected samples. No clinical changes were observed in the animals. Viral DNA was detected in feces, blood, OSs and tissues, at least in one of the times tested. The lungs displayed moderate to severe interstitial lymphohistiocytic infiltrates, and only the heart, tonsils, tongue, and stomach did not show immunostaining at the IHC analysis. Neutralizing antibodies were detected at the 20th and 30th days post infection in 50% of infected mice. The results revealed that VACV contaminated milk could be a route of viral transmission in mice experimentally infected, showing systemic distribution and shedding through feces and oral mucosa, albeit

  12. Molecular piracy of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Choi, J; Means, R E; Damania, B; Jung, J U

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the most recently discovered human tumor virus and is associated with the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and Multicentric Casttleman's disease. KSHV contains numerous open reading frames with striking homology to cellular genes. These viral gene products play a variety of roles in KSHV-associated pathogenesis by disrupting cellular signal transduction pathways, which include interferon-mediated anti-viral responses, cytokine-regulated cell growth, apoptosis, and cell cycle control. In this review, we will attempt to cover our understanding of how viral proteins deregulate cellular signaling pathways, which ultimately contribute to the conversion of normal cells to cancerous cells.

  13. Sarcoma derived from cultured mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tolar, Jakub; Nauta, Alma J; Osborn, Mark J; Panoskaltsis Mortari, Angela; McElmurry, Ron T; Bell, Scott; Xia, Lily; Zhou, Ning; Riddle, Megan; Schroeder, Tania M; Westendorf, Jennifer J; McIvor, R Scott; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Szuhai, Karoly; Oseth, Leann; Hirsch, Betsy; Yant, Stephen R; Kay, Mark A; Peister, Alexandra; Prockop, Darwin J; Fibbe, Willem E; Blazar, Bruce R

    2007-02-01

    To study the biodistribution of MSCs, we labeled adult murine C57BL/6 MSCs with firefly luciferase and DsRed2 fluorescent protein using nonviral Sleeping Beauty transposons and coinfused labeled MSCs with bone marrow into irradiated allogeneic recipients. Using in vivo whole-body imaging, luciferase signals were shown to be increased between weeks 3 and 12. Unexpectedly, some mice with the highest luciferase signals died and all surviving mice developed foci of sarcoma in their lungs. Two mice also developed sarcomas in their extremities. Common cytogenetic abnormalities were identified in tumor cells isolated from different animals. Original MSC cultures not labeled with transposons, as well as independently isolated cultured MSCs, were found to be cytogenetically abnormal. Moreover, primary MSCs derived from the bone marrow of both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice showed cytogenetic aberrations after several passages in vitro, showing that transformation was not a strain-specific nor rare event. Clonal evolution was observed in vivo, suggesting that the critical transformation event(s) occurred before infusion. Mapping of the transposition insertion sites did not identify an obvious transposon-related genetic abnormality, and p53 was not overexpressed. Infusion of MSC-derived sarcoma cells resulted in malignant lesions in secondary recipients. This new sarcoma cell line, S1, is unique in having a cytogenetic profile similar to human sarcoma and contains bioluminescent and fluorescent genes, making it useful for investigations of cellular biodistribution and tumor response to therapy in vivo. More importantly, our study indicates that sarcoma can evolve from MSC cultures.

  14. Remodeling of the fibroblast cytoskeletal architecture during the replication cycle of Ectromelia virus: A morphological in vitro study in a murine cell line.

    PubMed

    Szulc-Dabrowska, Lidia; Gregorczyk, Karolina P; Struzik, Justyna; Boratynska-Jasinska, Anna; Szczepanowska, Joanna; Wyzewski, Zbigniew; Toka, Felix N; Gierynska, Malgorzata; Ostrowska, Agnieszka; Niemialtowski, Marek G

    2016-08-01

    Ectromelia virus (ECTV, the causative agent of mousepox), which represents the same genus as variola virus (VARV, the agent responsible for smallpox in humans), has served for years as a model virus for studying mechanisms of poxvirus-induced disease. Despite increasing knowledge on the interaction between ECTV and its natural host-the mouse-surprisingly, still little is known about the cell biology of ECTV infection. Because pathogen interaction with the cytoskeleton is still a growing area of research in the virus-host cell interplay, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the consequences of ECTV infection on the cytoskeleton in a murine fibroblast cell line. The viral effect on the cytoskeleton was reflected by changes in migration of the cells and rearrangement of the architecture of tubulin, vimentin, and actin filaments. The virus-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements observed in these studies contributed to the efficient cell-to-cell spread of infection, which is an important feature of ECTV virulence. Additionally, during later stages of infection L929 cells produced two main types of actin-based cellular protrusions: short (actin tails and "dendrites") and long (cytoplasmic corridors). Due to diversity of filopodial extensions induced by the virus, we suggest that ECTV represents a valuable new model for studying processes and pathways that regulate the formation of cytoskeleton-based cellular structures. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Role of Murine Leukemia Virus Reverse Transcriptase Deoxyribonucleoside Triphosphate-Binding Site in Retroviral Replication and In Vivo Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Halvas, Elias K.; Svarovskaia, Evguenia S.; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2000-01-01

    Retroviral populations exhibit a high evolutionary potential, giving rise to extensive genetic variation. Error-prone DNA synthesis catalyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT) generates variation in retroviral populations. Structural features within RTs are likely to contribute to the high rate of errors that occur during reverse transcription. We sought to determine whether amino acids within murine leukemia virus (MLV) RT that contact the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate are important for in vivo fidelity of reverse transcription. We utilized the previously described ANGIE P encapsidating cell line, which expresses the amphotropic MLV envelope and a retroviral vector (pGA-1). pGA-1 expresses the bacterial β-galactosidase gene (lacZ), which serves as a reporter of mutations. Extensive mutagenesis was performed on residues likely to interact with the dNTP substrate, and the effects of these mutations on the fidelity of reverse transcription were determined. As expected, most substitution mutations of amino acids that directly interact with the dNTP substrate significantly reduced viral titers (>10,000-fold), indicating that these residues played a critical role in catalysis and viral replication. However, the D153A and A154S substitutions, which are predicted to affect the interactions with the triphosphate, resulted in statistically significant increases in the mutation rate. In addition, the conservative substitution F155W, which may affect interactions with the base and the ribose, increased the mutation rate 2.8-fold. Substitutions of residues in the vicinity of the dNTP-binding site also resulted in statistically significant decreases in fidelity (1.3- to 2.4-fold). These results suggest that mutations of residues that contact the substrate dNTP can affect viral replication as well as alter the fidelity of reverse transcription. PMID:11044079

  16. Activation of the prolactin receptor gene by promoter insertion in a Moloney murine leukemia virus-induced rat thymoma.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, C S; Bear, S E; Keler, T; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Yeung, R S; Tsichlis, P N

    1992-01-01

    The prolactin receptor (Prlr) and growth hormone receptor (Ghr) genes and the Moloney murine leukemia virus integration-2 (Mlvi-2) locus were mapped to mouse chromosome 15 and human chromosome 5 bands p12-p14. To examine the potential relationship between Mlvi-2 and the genes encoding the growth hormone receptor and the prolactin receptor, we determined the chromosomal location of all three loci in the rat, using a panel of rat-mouse somatic cell hybrids, and in the mouse, using a panel of (C57BL/6J x Mus spretus)F1 x C57BL/6J interspecific backcross mice. These analyses revealed that Ghr, Prlr, and Mlvi-2 map to chromosome 2 in the rat and to chromosome 15 in the mouse, in close proximity with each other. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of rat genomic DNA showed no overlaps between the gene encoding the prolactin receptor and the remaining loci. Moreover, expression of the prolactin receptor was not affected by provirus insertion in Mlvi-2. During these studies, however, we detected one T-cell lymphoma line (2779) in which the prolactin receptor gene was activated by provirus integration. Sequence analysis of polymerase chain reaction-derived cDNA clones showed that the prolactin receptor RNA message initiates at the 5' long terminal repeat and utilizes the splice donor site 5' of the gag gene to splice the viral sequences onto exon 1 of the prolactin receptor. This message is predicted to encode the intact prolactin receptor protein product. Exposure of the T-cell lymphoma line 2779 to prolactin promoted cellular proliferation. Images PMID:1404614

  17. Lactobacillus acidophilus induces virus immune defence genes in murine dendritic cells by a Toll-like receptor-2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Gudrun; Rasmussen, Simon; Zeuthen, Louise Hjerrild; Nielsen, Birgit Nøhr; Jarmer, Hanne; Jespersen, Lene; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2010-10-01

    Lactobacilli are probiotics that, among other health-promoting effects, have been ascribed immunostimulating and virus-preventive properties. Certain Lactobacillus spp. have been shown to possess strong interleukin-12 (IL-12) -inducing properties. As IL-12 production depends on the up-regulation of type I interferons (IFNs), we hypothesized that the strong IL-12-inducing capacity of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM in murine bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) is caused by an up-regulation of IFN-β, which subsequently induces IL-12 and the double-stranded RNA binding Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR-3). The expression of the genes encoding IFN-β, TLR-3, IL-12 and IL-10 in DCs upon stimulation with L. acidophilus NCFM was determined. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM induced a much stronger expression of Ifn-β, Il-12 and Il-10 compared with the synthetic double-stranded RNA ligand Poly I:C, whereas the levels of expressed Tlr-3 were similar. Whole genome microarray gene expression analysis revealed that other genes related to viral defence were significantly up-regulated and among the strongest induced genes in DCs stimulated with L. acidophilus NCFM. The ability to induce IFN-β was also detected in another L. acidophilus strain (X37), but was not a property of other probiotic strains tested, i.e. Bifidobacterium bifidum Z9 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. The IFN-β expression was markedly reduced in TLR-2(-/-) DCs, dependent on endocytosis, and the major c