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Sample records for muscle glycogen synthase

  1. Kinetic studies on muscle glycogen synthase.

    PubMed

    Salsas, E; Larner, J

    1975-05-10

    Using the I form of rabbit muscle glycogen synthase essentially free of glycogen, the kinetics and mechanism of action was investigated. No evidence for an exchange between [14C]UDP and UDP-glucose was found. The bisubstrate kinetics of the enzyme for UDP-glucose and glycogen, as well as for UDP-glucose and maltose, was determined. An intersecting pattern in the double reciprocal plot (velocity versus substrate concentration) suggestive of a sequential mechanism (ordered or random) was found in all cases. The K-m for UDP-glucose (45 to 48 mM) was the same with either maltose or glycogen as acceptor. The K-m for maltose (230 mM) and for glycogen (1.5 mug/ml) differed.

  2. Kinetic mechanism of rabbit muscle glycogen synthase I.

    PubMed

    Gold, A M

    1980-08-05

    The kinetic mechanism of rabbit muscle glycogen synthase I was investigated by determining isotope-exchange rates at chemical equilibrium between uridine diphosphoglucose (UDPG) and glycogen and between UDPG and uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP). The rates were followed simultaneously by use of UDPG labeled with 14C in the glucose moiety and with 3H in the uracil group. They were found to be independent of the concentrations of glycogen and the UDPG-UDP pair, averaging 6 X 10(-9) mol min-1 mg-1, with a ratio of UDPG-glycogen exchange to UDPG-UDP exchange of 0.85-0.95. The conclusion is that glycogen synthase has a rapid equilibrium random bi bi mechanism. The previously reported slow activation of glycogen-free synthase in the presence of glycogen was examined kinetically. The activation rate appears to be independent of glycogen concentration over a wide range, while the maximum activation is related to the third or fourth root of the glycogen concentration. This suggest that the slow bimolecular reaction mechanism proposed for human polymorphonuclear leucocyte glycogen synthase I [Sølling, H., & Esmann, V. (1977) Eur. J. Biochem. 81, 129] does not apply to rabbit muscle synthase I. The rate of exchange of glycogen molecules in the complex between glycogen and rabbit muscle synthase I under conditions where the enzyme is catalytically active was estimated by a novel method. The enzyme-glycogen complex was treated with [glucose-14C]UDPG and glycogen of different molecular weight. The distribution of isotope between the two forms of glycogen was determined after their separation by agarose gel chromatography. A rate constant of 0.3 min-1 was estimated for the exchange. It can be calculated, on the basis of the specific activity of the enzyme (20 mumol min-1 mg-1) and its action pattern, that hundreds of individual chains in the glycogen molecule must be available to the enzyme during the average lifetime of the complex. A mechanism is proposed for this process.

  3. Hexokinase 2, Glycogen Synthase and Phosphorylase Play a Key Role in Muscle Glycogen Supercompensation

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, José M.; Rovira, Jordi; Nielsen, Jakob N.; Guerrero, Mario; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F. P.; Cussó, Roser

    2012-01-01

    Background Glycogen-depleting exercise can lead to supercompensation of muscle glycogen stores, but the biochemical mechanisms of this phenomenon are still not completely understood. Methods Using chronic low-frequency stimulation (CLFS) as an exercise model, the tibialis anterior muscle of rabbits was stimulated for either 1 or 24 hours, inducing a reduction in glycogen of 90% and 50% respectively. Glycogen recovery was subsequently monitored during 24 hours of rest. Results In muscles stimulated for 1 hour, glycogen recovered basal levels during the rest period. However, in those stimulated for 24 hours, glycogen was supercompensated and its levels remained 50% higher than basal levels after 6 hours of rest, although the newly synthesized glycogen had fewer branches. This increase in glycogen correlated with an increase in hexokinase-2 expression and activity, a reduction in the glycogen phosphorylase activity ratio and an increase in the glycogen synthase activity ratio, due to dephosphorylation of site 3a, even in the presence of elevated glycogen stores. During supercompensation there was also an increase in 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, correlating with a stable reduction in ATP and total purine nucleotide levels. Conclusions Glycogen supercompensation requires a coordinated chain of events at two levels in the context of decreased cell energy balance: First, an increase in the glucose phosphorylation capacity of the muscle and secondly, control of the enzymes directly involved in the synthesis and degradation of the glycogen molecule. However, supercompensated glycogen has fewer branches. PMID:22860128

  4. Multiple defects in muscle glycogen synthase activity contribute to reduced glycogen synthesis in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed Central

    Thorburn, A W; Gumbiner, B; Bulacan, F; Brechtel, G; Henry, R R

    1991-01-01

    To define the mechanisms of impaired muscle glycogen synthase and reduced glycogen formation in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM), glycogen synthase activity was kinetically analyzed during the basal state and three glucose clamp studies (insulin approximately equal to 300, 700, and 33,400 pmol/liter) in eight matched nonobese NIDDM and eight control subjects. Muscle glycogen content was measured in the basal state and following clamps at insulin levels of 33,400 pmol/liter. NIDDM subjects had glucose uptake matched to controls in each clamp by raising serum glucose to 15-20 mmol/liter. The insulin concentration required to half-maximally activate glycogen synthase (ED50) was approximately fourfold greater for NIDDM than control subjects (1,004 +/- 264 vs. 257 +/- 110 pmol/liter, P less than 0.02) but the maximal insulin effect was similar. Total glycogen synthase activity was reduced approximately 38% and glycogen content was approximately 30% lower in NIDDM. A positive correlation was present between glycogen content and glycogen synthase activity (r = 0.51, P less than 0.01). In summary, defects in muscle glycogen synthase activity and reduced glycogen content are present in NIDDM. NIDDM subjects also have less total glycogen synthase activity consistent with reduced functional mass of the enzyme. These findings and the correlation between glycogen synthase activity and glycogen content support the theory that multiple defects in glycogen synthase activity combine to cause reduced glycogen formation in NIDDM. PMID:1899428

  5. In vivo regulation of muscle glycogen synthase and the control of glycogen synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, R G; Bloch, G; Rothman, D L

    1995-01-01

    The activity of glycogen synthase (GSase; EC 2.4.1.11) is regulated by covalent phosphorylation. Because of this regulation, GSase has generally been considered to control the rate of glycogen synthesis. This hypothesis is examined in light of recent in vivo NMR experiments on rat and human muscle and is found to be quantitatively inconsistent with the data under conditions of glycogen synthesis. Our first experiments showed that muscle glycogen synthesis was slower in non-insulin-dependent diabetics compared to normals and that their defect was in the glucose transporter/hexokinase (GT/HK) part of the pathway. From these and other in vivo NMR results a quantitative model is proposed in which the GT/HK steps control the rate of glycogen synthesis in normal humans and rat muscle. The flux through GSase is regulated to match the proximal steps by "feed forward" to glucose 6-phosphate, which is a positive allosteric effector of all forms of GSase. Recent in vivo NMR experiments specifically designed to test the model are analyzed by metabolic control theory and it is shown quantitatively that the GT/HK step controls the rate of glycogen synthesis. Preliminary evidence favors the transporter step. Several conclusions are significant: (i) glucose transport/hexokinase controls the glycogen synthesis flux; (ii) the role of covalent phosphorylation of GSase is to adapt the activity of the enzyme to the flux and to control the metabolite levels not the flux; (iii) the quantitative data needed for inferring and testing the present model of flux control depended upon advances of in vivo NMR methods that accurately measured the concentration of glucose 6-phosphate and the rate of glycogen synthesis. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7567971

  6. Additive effect of contraction and insulin on glucose uptake and glycogen synthase in muscle with different glycogen contents.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Chiang; Zarrinpashneh, Elham; Jensen, Jørgen

    2010-05-01

    Insulin and contraction regulate glucose uptake and glycogen synthase (GS) via distinct mechanisms in skeletal muscles, and an additive effect has been reported. Glycogen content is known to influence both contraction- and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GS activity. Our study reports that contraction and insulin additively stimulate glucose uptake in rat epitrochlearis muscles with normal (NG) and high (HG) glycogen contents, but the additive effect was only partial. In muscles with low glycogen (LG) content no additive effect was seen, but glucose uptake was higher in LG than in NG and HG during contraction, insulin stimulation, and when the two stimuli were combined. In LG, contraction-stimulated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and insulin-stimulated PKB phosphorylation were higher than in NG and HG, but phosphorylation of Akt substrate of 160 kDa was not elevated correspondingly. GLUT4 content was 50% increased in LG (rats fasted 24 h), which may explain the increased glucose uptake. Contraction and insulin also additively increased GS fractional activity in NG and HG but not in LG. GS fractional activity correlated most strongly with GS Ser641 phosphorylation (R -0.94, P<0.001). GS fractional activity also correlated with GS Ser7,10 phosphorylation, but insulin did not reduce GS Ser7,10 phosphorylation. In conclusion, an additive effect of contraction and insulin on glucose uptake and GS activity occurs in muscles with normal and high glycogen content but not in muscles with low glycogen content. Furthermore, contraction, insulin, and glycogen content all regulate GS Ser641 phosphorylation and GS fractional activity in concert.

  7. Glycogen synthase (GYS1) mutation causes a novel skeletal muscle glycogenosis.

    PubMed

    McCue, Molly E; Valberg, Stephanie J; Miller, Michael B; Wade, Claire; DiMauro, Salvatore; Akman, Hasan O; Mickelson, James R

    2008-05-01

    Polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) is a novel glycogenosis in horses characterized by abnormal glycogen accumulation in skeletal muscle and muscle damage with exertion. It is unlike glycogen storage diseases resulting from known defects in glycogenolysis, glycolysis, and glycogen synthesis that have been described in humans and domestic animals. A genome-wide association identified GYS1, encoding skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (GS), as a candidate gene for PSSM. DNA sequence analysis revealed a mutation resulting in an arginine-to-histidine substitution in a highly conserved region of GS. Functional analysis demonstrated an elevated GS activity in PSSM horses, and haplotype analysis and allele age estimation demonstrated that this mutation is identical by descent among horse breeds. This is the first report of a gain-of-function mutation in GYS1 resulting in a glycogenosis.

  8. Glycogen synthase (GYS1) mutation causes a novel skeletal muscle glycogenosis

    PubMed Central

    McCue, Molly E; Valberg, Stephanie J; Miller, Michael B; Wade, Claire; DiMauro, Salvatore; Akman, Hasan O; Mickelson, James R

    2008-01-01

    Summary We describe a gain of function mutation in the skeletal muscle glycogen synthase gene that is responsible for a novel myopathy, and is highly prevalent in multiple breeds of horses because it arose before the founding of many modern breeds. Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy (PSSM) is a novel glycogenosis in horses characterized by abnormal glycogen accumulation in skeletal muscle and muscle damage with exertion. It is unlike glycogen storage diseases resulting from known defects in glycogenolysis, glycolysis and glycogen synthesis that have been described in humans and domestic animals. A genome wide association identified GYS1, encoding skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (GS), as a candidate gene for PSSM. DNA sequence analysis revealed a mutation resulting in an arginine to histidine substitution in a highly conserved region of GS. Functional analysis demonstrated an elevated GS activity in PSSM horses and haplotype analysis and allele age estimation demonstrated that this mutation is identical by descent among horse breeds. This is the first report of a gain of function mutation in GYS1 resulting in a glycogenosis. PMID:18358695

  9. Chloroquine stimulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthase in muscle cells through activation of Akt.

    PubMed

    Halaby, Marie-Jo; Kastein, Brandon K; Yang, Da-Qing

    2013-06-14

    Chloroquine is a pharmaceutical agent that has been widely used to treat patients with malaria. Chloroquine has also been reported to have hypoglycemic effects on humans and animal models of diabetes. Despite many previous studies, the mechanism responsible for its hypoglycemic effect is still unclear. Chloroquine was recently reported to be an activator of ATM, the protein deficient in the Ataxia-telagiectasia (A-T) disease. Since ATM is also known as an insulin responsive protein that mediates Akt activation, we tested the effect of chloroquine on the activity of Akt and its downstream targets. In L6 muscle cells treated with insulin and chloroquine, the phosphorylation of Akt and glucose uptake were dramatically increased compared to cells treated with insulin alone, suggesting that chloroquine is a potent activator of Akt and glucose uptake in these cells. We also found that the reduction of insulin-mediated Akt activity in muscle tissues of insulin resistant rats was partially reversed by chloroquine treatment. Moreover, insulin-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β in L6 cells was greatly enhanced by chloroquine. A substantial decrease in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase was also observed in chloroquine-treated L6 cells, indicating enhanced activity of glycogen synthase. Taken together, our results not only show that chloroquine is a novel activator of Akt that stimulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthase, but also validate chloroquine as a potential therapeutic agent for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Aerobic Exercise Plus Weight Loss Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Increases Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Synthase Activity in Older Men

    PubMed Central

    Katzel, Leslie I.; Prior, Steven J.; McLenithan, John C.; Goldberg, Andrew P.; Ortmeyer, Heidi K.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 6-month aerobic exercise training + weight loss (AEX + WL) on basal and insulin activation of glycogen synthase, basal citrate synthase activity, and Akt and AS160 phosphorylation in older, overweight/obese insulin-resistant men (n = 14; 63 ± 2 years; body mass index, 32 ± kg/m2). Muscle samples of the vastus lateralis were collected before and during a 3-hour 80 mU/m2/min hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. AEX + WL increased VO2max by 11% (p < .05) and decreased body weight (−9%, p < .001). AEX + WL increased basal citrate synthase activity by 46% (p < .01) and insulin activation of independent (2.9-fold) and fractional (2.3-fold) activities (both p < .001) of glycogen synthase. AEX + WL had no effect on phosphorylation of Akt or AS160. Glucose utilization (M) improved 25% (p < .01), and the change tended to be related to the increase in insulin activation of glycogen synthase fractional activity (r = .50, p = .08) following AEX + WL. In summary, AEX + WL has a robust effect on insulin activation of skeletal muscle glycogen synthase activity that likely contributes to improved glucose utilization in older insulin-resistant men. PMID:24357038

  11. Aerobic exercise plus weight loss improves insulin sensitivity and increases skeletal muscle glycogen synthase activity in older men.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Alice S; Katzel, Leslie I; Prior, Steven J; McLenithan, John C; Goldberg, Andrew P; Ortmeyer, Heidi K

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 6-month aerobic exercise training + weight loss (AEX + WL) on basal and insulin activation of glycogen synthase, basal citrate synthase activity, and Akt and AS160 phosphorylation in older, overweight/obese insulin-resistant men (n = 14; 63 ± 2 years; body mass index, 32 ± kg/m(2)). Muscle samples of the vastus lateralis were collected before and during a 3-hour 80 mU/m(2)/min hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. AEX + WL increased VO2max by 11% (p < .05) and decreased body weight (-9%, p < .001). AEX + WL increased basal citrate synthase activity by 46% (p < .01) and insulin activation of independent (2.9-fold) and fractional (2.3-fold) activities (both p < .001) of glycogen synthase. AEX + WL had no effect on phosphorylation of Akt or AS160. Glucose utilization (M) improved 25% (p < .01), and the change tended to be related to the increase in insulin activation of glycogen synthase fractional activity (r = .50, p = .08) following AEX + WL. In summary, AEX + WL has a robust effect on insulin activation of skeletal muscle glycogen synthase activity that likely contributes to improved glucose utilization in older insulin-resistant men.

  12. Nuclear glycogen and glycogen synthase kinase 3.

    PubMed

    Ragano-Caracciolo, M; Berlin, W K; Miller, M W; Hanover, J A

    1998-08-19

    Glycogen is the principal storage form of glucose in animal cells. It accumulates in electron-dense cytoplasmic granules and is synthesized by glycogen synthase (GS), the rate-limiting enzyme of glycogen deposition. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a protein kinase that phosphorylates GS. Two nearly identical forms of GSK-3 exist: GSK-3 alpha and GSK-3 beta. Both are constitutively active in resting cells and their activity can be modulated by hormones and growth factors. GSK-3 is implicated in the regulation of many physiological responses in mammalian cells by phosphorylating substrates including neuronal cell adhesion molecule, neurofilaments, synapsin I, and tau. Recent observations point to functions for glycogen and glycogen metabolism in the nucleus. GSK-3 phosphorylates several transcription factors, and we have recently shown that it modifies the major nuclear pore protein p62. It also regulates PK1, a protein kinase required for maintaining the interphase state and for DNA replication in cycling Xenopus egg extracts. Recently, glycogen was shown to be required for nuclear reformation in vitro using ovulated Xenopus laevis egg lysates. Because neither glycogen nor GSK-3 has been localized to the nuclear envelope or intranuclear sites, glycogen and GSK-3 activites were measured in rat liver nuclei and nuclear reformation extracts. Significant quantities of glycogen-like material co-purified with the rat-liver nuclear envelope. GSK-3 is also highly enriched in the glycogen pellet of egg extracts of Xenopus that is required for nuclear assembly in vitro. Based on the finding that enzymes of glycogen metabolism copurify with glycogen, we propose that glycogen may serve a structural role as a scaffold for nuclear assembly and sequestration of critical kinases and phosphatases in the nucleus. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  13. Regulation of skeletal muscle plasticity by glycogen synthase kinase-3β: a potential target for the treatment of muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Verhees, Koen J P; Pansters, Nicholas A M; Schols, Annemie M W J; Langen, Ramon C J

    2013-01-01

    Muscle wasting is a prevalent and disabling condition in chronic disease and cancer and has been associated with increased mortality and impaired efficacy of surgical and medical interventions. Pharmacological therapies to combat muscle wasting are currently limited but considered as an important unmet medical need. Muscle wasting has been attributed to increased muscle proteolysis, and in particular ubiquitin 26S-proteasome system (UPS)-dependent protein breakdown. However, rates of muscle protein synthesis are also subject to extensive (patho) physiological regulation, and the balance between synthesis and degradation ultimately determines net muscle protein turnover. As multinucleated muscle fibers accommodate threshold changes in muscle protein content by the accretion and loss of muscle nuclei, myonuclear turnover may additionally determine muscle mass. Current insights in the mechanisms dictating muscle mass plasticity not only reveal intricate interactions and crosstalk between these processes, but imply the existence of signaling molecules that act as molecular switchboards, which coordinate and integrate cellular responses upon conditions that evoke changes in muscle mass. These "master regulators" of skeletal muscle mass plasticity are preferred targets for pharmacological modulation of skeletal muscle wasting. In this review Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is highlighted as a master regulator of muscle mass plasticity since, in addition to its role in UPS-mediated muscle protein degradation, it also controls protein synthesis, and influences myonuclear accretion and cell death. Moreover, the regulation of GSK-3β activity as well as currently available pharmacological inhibitors are described and discussed in the context of multimodal treatment strategies aimed at the inhibition of GSK-3β, and optimal exploitation of its potential role as a central regulator of skeletal muscle mass plasticity for the treatment of muscle wasting.

  14. Skeletal muscle glycogen synthase subcellular localization: effects of insulin and PPAR-alpha agonist (K-111) administration in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ortmeyer, Heidi K; Adall, Yohannes; Marciani, Karina R; Katsiaras, Andreas; Ryan, Alice S; Bodkin, Noni L; Hansen, Barbara C

    2005-06-01

    Insulin covalently and allosterically regulates glycogen synthase (GS) and may also cause the translocation of GS from glycogen-poor to glycogen-rich locations. We examined the possible role of subcellular localization of GS and glycogen in insulin activation of GS in skeletal muscle of six obese monkeys and determined whether 1) insulin stimulation during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and/or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha agonist treatment (K-111, 3 mg.kg(-1).day(-1); Kowa) induced translocation of GS and 2) translocation of GS was associated with insulin activation of GS. GS and glycogen were present in all fractions obtained by differential centrifugation, except for the cytosolic fraction, under both basal and insulin-stimulated conditions. We found no evidence for translocation of GS by insulin. GS total (GST) activity was strongly associated with glycogen content (r = 0.70, P < 0.001). Six weeks of treatment with K-111 increased GST activity in all fractions, except the cytosolic fraction, and mean GST activity, GS independent activity, and glycogen content were significantly higher in the insulin-stimulated samples compared with basal samples, effects not seen with vehicle. The increase in GST activity was strongly related to the increase in glycogen content during the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp after K-111 administration (r = 0.74, P < 0.001). Neither GS protein expression nor GS gene expression was affected by insulin or by K-111 treatment. We conclude that 1) in vivo insulin does not cause translocation of GS from a glycogen-poor to a glycogen-rich location in primate skeletal muscle and 2) the mechanism of action of K-111 to improve insulin sensitivity includes an increase in GST activity without an increase in GS gene or protein expression.

  15. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  16. Parallel evolution of the glycogen synthase 1 (muscle) gene Gys1 between Old World and New World fruit bats (Order: Chiroptera).

    PubMed

    Fang, Lu; Shen, Bin; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Shuyi

    2014-10-01

    Glycogen synthase, which catalyzes the synthesis of glycogen, is especially important for Old World (Pteropodidae) and New World (Phyllostomidae) fruit bats that ingest high-carbohydrate diets. Glycogen synthase 1, encoded by the Gys1 gene, is the glycogen synthase isozyme that functions in muscles. To determine whether Gys1 has undergone adaptive evolution in bats with carbohydrate-rich diets, in comparison to insect-eating sister bat taxa, we sequenced the coding region of the Gys1 gene from 10 species of bats, including two Old World fruit bats (Pteropodidae) and a New World fruit bat (Phyllostomidae). Our results show no evidence for positive selection in the Gys1 coding sequence on the ancestral Old World and the New World Artibeus lituratus branches. Tests for convergent evolution indicated convergence of the sequences and one parallel amino acid substitution (T395A) was detected on these branches, which was likely driven by natural selection.

  17. Inhibition of glycogen synthesis by increased lipid availability is associated with subcellular redistribution of glycogen synthase.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A J; Ye, J-M; Schmitz-Peiffer, C

    2006-01-01

    Increased lipid availability is associated with diminished insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in muscle, but it is not clear whether alterations in glycogen synthase activity itself play a direct role. Because intracellular localization of this enzyme is involved in its regulation, we investigated whether fat oversupply causes an inhibitory redistribution. We examined the recovery of glycogen synthase in subcellular fractions from muscle of insulin-resistant, fat-fed rats and chow-fed controls, either maintained in the basal state or after a euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp. Although glycogen synthase protein and activity were mostly recovered in an insoluble fraction, insulin caused translocation of activity from the smaller soluble pool to the insoluble fraction. Fat-feeding, which led to a reduction in glycogen synthesis during the clamp, was associated with a depletion in the soluble pool, consistent with an important role for this component. A similar depletion was also observed in cytosolic fractions of muscles from obese db/db mice, another model of lipid-induced insulin resistance. To investigate this in more detail, we employed lipid-pretreated L6 myotubes, which exhibited a reduction in insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis independently of alterations in glucose flux or insulin signalling through protein kinase B. In control cells, insulin caused redistribution of a minor cytosolic pool of glycogen synthase to an insoluble fraction, which was again forestalled by lipid pretreatment. Glycogen synthase recovered in the insoluble fraction from pre-treated cells exhibited a low fractional velocity that was not increased in response to insulin. Our results suggest that the initial localization of glycogen synthase in a soluble pool plays an important role in glycogen synthesis, and that its sequestration in an insulin-resistant insoluble pool may explain in part the reduced glycogen synthesis caused by lipid oversupply.

  18. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle hypertrophy: roles of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huan; Hershenson, Marc B; Lei, Jing; Anyanwu, Anuli C; Pinsky, David J; Bentley, J Kelley

    2010-06-01

    Increased medial arterial thickness is a structural change in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The role of smooth muscle hypertrophy in this process has not been well studied. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, serotonin (or 5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT), and endothelin (ET)-1 have been implicated in PAH pathogenesis. We examined the effect of these mediators on human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell size, contractile protein expression, and contractile function, as well on the roles of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K), two proteins involved in translational control, in this process. Unlike epidermal growth factor, BMP-4, TGF-beta1, 5-HT, and ET-1 each increased smooth muscle cell size, contractile protein expression, fractional cell shortening, and GSK-3beta phosphorylation. GSK-3beta inhibition by lithium or SB-216763 increased cell size, protein synthesis, and contractile protein expression. Expression of a non-phosphorylatable GSK-3beta mutant blocked BMP-4-, TGF-beta1-, 5-HT-, and ET-1-induced cell size enlargement, suggesting that GSK-3beta phosphorylation is required and sufficient for cellular hypertrophy. However, BMP-4, TGF-beta1, 5-HT, and ET-1 stimulation was accompanied by an increase in serum response factor transcriptional activation but not eIF2 phosphorylation, suggesting that GSK-3beta-mediated hypertrophy occurs via transcriptional, not translational, control. Finally, BMP-4, TGF-beta1, 5-HT, and ET-1 treatment induced phosphorylation of p70S6K and ribosomal protein S6, and siRNAs against p70S6K and S6 blocked the hypertrophic response. We conclude that mediators implicated in the pathogenesis of PAH induce pulmonary arterial smooth muscle hypertrophy. Identification of the signaling pathways regulating vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy may define new therapeutic targets for PAH.

  19. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle hypertrophy: roles of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huan; Hershenson, Marc B.; Lei, Jing; Anyanwu, Anuli C.; Pinsky, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Increased medial arterial thickness is a structural change in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The role of smooth muscle hypertrophy in this process has not been well studied. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, serotonin (or 5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT), and endothelin (ET)-1 have been implicated in PAH pathogenesis. We examined the effect of these mediators on human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell size, contractile protein expression, and contractile function, as well on the roles of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K), two proteins involved in translational control, in this process. Unlike epidermal growth factor, BMP-4, TGF-β1, 5-HT, and ET-1 each increased smooth muscle cell size, contractile protein expression, fractional cell shortening, and GSK-3β phosphorylation. GSK-3β inhibition by lithium or SB-216763 increased cell size, protein synthesis, and contractile protein expression. Expression of a non-phosphorylatable GSK-3β mutant blocked BMP-4-, TGF-β1-, 5-HT-, and ET-1-induced cell size enlargement, suggesting that GSK-3β phosphorylation is required and sufficient for cellular hypertrophy. However, BMP-4, TGF-β1, 5-HT, and ET-1 stimulation was accompanied by an increase in serum response factor transcriptional activation but not eIF2 phosphorylation, suggesting that GSK-3β-mediated hypertrophy occurs via transcriptional, not translational, control. Finally, BMP-4, TGF-β1, 5-HT, and ET-1 treatment induced phosphorylation of p70S6K and ribosomal protein S6, and siRNAs against p70S6K and S6 blocked the hypertrophic response. We conclude that mediators implicated in the pathogenesis of PAH induce pulmonary arterial smooth muscle hypertrophy. Identification of the signaling pathways regulating vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy may define new therapeutic targets for PAH. PMID:20190034

  20. Airway smooth muscle hyperplasia and hypertrophy correlate with glycogen synthase kinase-3(beta) phosphorylation in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J Kelley; Deng, Huan; Linn, Marisa J; Lei, Jing; Dokshin, Gregoriy A; Fingar, Diane C; Bitar, Khalil N; Henderson, William R; Hershenson, Marc B

    2009-02-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass, a characteristic finding in asthma, may be caused by hyperplasia or hypertrophy. Cell growth requires increased translation of contractile apparatus mRNA, which is controlled, in part, by glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta, a constitutively active kinase that inhibits eukaryotic initiation factor-2 activity and binding of methionyl tRNA to the ribosome. Phosphorylation of GSK-3beta inactivates it, enhancing translation. We sought to quantify the contributions of hyperplasia and hypertrophy to increased ASM mass in ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized and -challenged BALB/c mice and the role of GSK-3beta in this process. Immunofluorescent probes, confocal microscopy, and stereological methods were used to analyze the number and volume of cells expressing alpha-smooth muscle actin and phospho-Ser(9) GSK-3beta (pGSK). OVA treatment caused a 3-fold increase in ASM fractional unit volume or volume density (Vv) (PBS, 0.006 +/- 0.0003; OVA, 0.014 +/- 0.001), a 1.5-fold increase in ASM number per unit volume (Nv), and a 59% increase in volume per cell (Vv/Nv) (PBS, 824 +/- 76 microm(3); OVA, 1,310 +/- 183 mum(3)). In OVA-treated mice, there was a 12-fold increase in the Vv of pGSK (+) ASM, a 5-fold increase in the Nv of pGSK (+) ASM, and a 1.6-fold increase in Vv/Nv. Lung homogenates from OVA-treated mice showed increased GSK-3beta phosphorylation and lower GSK-3beta activity. Both hyperplasia and hypertrophy are responsible for increased ASM mass in OVA-treated mice. Phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3beta are associated with ASM hypertrophy, suggesting that this kinase may play a role in asthmatic airway remodeling.

  1. Analysis of the in vivo phosphorylation state of rabbit skeletal muscle glycogen synthase by fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Poulter, L; Ang, S G; Gibson, B W; Williams, D H; Holmes, C F; Caudwell, F B; Pitcher, J; Cohen, P

    1988-08-15

    The in vivo phosphorylation state of glycogen synthase was re-examined by fast-atom-bombardment mass spectrometry and a procedure in which phosphoserine residues are first converted to S-ethylcysteine. In animals injected with the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol, the phosphorylation sites in the N-terminal (N) and C-terminal (C) cyanogen bromide peptides were identified as the serine residues at N7, the region C28-C39, C42, C46 and C100. In animals injected with adrenalin, the phosphorylation of N7 increased from 0.6 to 0.8 mol/mol, the region C28-C39 from 0.7 to 1.2 mol/mol and C100 from 0.3 to 0.6 mol/mol. The phosphorylation states of C42 (0.7 mol/mol) and C46 (0.9 mol/mol) were unchanged. In addition, two further serine residues became phosphorylated at positions N10 (0.5 mol/mol) and C87 (0.5 mol/mol), which were not phosphorylated in the absence of adrenalin. Residues N10 and C42 have not been recognized as in vivo sites of phosphorylation previously. The results suggest that N10 is phosphorylated by a novel protein kinase which may be activated by cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. The phosphorylation of C42 is likely to be catalysed by glycogen synthase kinase 3. The protein kinases responsible for phosphorylating N7, the region C28-C39, C46, C87 and C100 in vivo and the molecular mechanisms by which adrenalin inactivates glycogen synthase in vivo are discussed. Residue N3, a major site phosphorylated by casein kinase-I in vitro is not phosphorylated in vivo. This and other evidence indicates that casein kinase-I is not a glycogen synthase kinase in vivo.

  2. Exercise regulates Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 activities in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kei; Arnolds, David E W; Ekberg, Ingvar; Thorell, Anders; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2004-06-25

    Activation of Akt and deactivation of GSK3 are critical signals regulating a number of cellular processes in multiple systems. Whether physical exercise alters Akt and GSK3 activity in human skeletal muscle is controversial. beta-Catenin, a GSK3 substrate and important Wnt signaling protein that alters gene transcription, has not been investigated in human skeletal muscle. In the present study, eight healthy human subjects performed 30min of cycling exercise at 75% of maximum workload (submaximal) followed by 6 bouts of 60s at 125% maximum workload (maximal). Biopsies of vastus lateralis muscle were taken at rest (basal), and within 15s following cessation of the submaximal and maximal exercise bouts. Exercise at both submaximal and maximal intensities significantly increased Akt activity (40% and 110%, respectively). Increases in Akt activity were accompanied by increases in Akt Thr(308) and Ser(473) phosphorylation, decreased GSK3alpha activity ( approximately 30% at both intensities), and increased phosphorylation of GSK3alpha Ser(21). Exercise at both intensities also decreased beta-catenin Ser(33/37)Thr(41) phosphorylation (50-60% at both intensities). These results demonstrate that Akt, GSK3, and beta-catenin signaling are regulated by exercise in human skeletal muscle, and as such identify them as possible molecular mediators of exercise's effect on metabolic and transcriptional processes in skeletal muscle.

  3. Hypoxia Promotes Glycogen Accumulation through Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF)-Mediated Induction of Glycogen Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Pescador, Nuria; Garcia-Rocha, Mar; Ortiz-Barahona, Amaya; Vazquez, Silvia; Ordoñez, Angel; Cuevas, Yolanda; Saez-Morales, David; Garcia-Bermejo, Maria Laura; Landazuri, Manuel O.; Guinovart, Joan; del Peso, Luis

    2010-01-01

    When oxygen becomes limiting, cells reduce mitochondrial respiration and increase ATP production through anaerobic fermentation of glucose. The Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs) play a key role in this metabolic shift by regulating the transcription of key enzymes of glucose metabolism. Here we show that oxygen regulates the expression of the muscle glycogen synthase (GYS1). Hypoxic GYS1 induction requires HIF activity and a Hypoxia Response Element within its promoter. GYS1 gene induction correlated with a significant increase in glycogen synthase activity and glycogen accumulation in cells exposed to hypoxia. Significantly, knockdown of either HIF1α or GYS1 attenuated hypoxia-induced glycogen accumulation, while GYS1 overexpression was sufficient to mimic this effect. Altogether, these results indicate that GYS1 regulation by HIF plays a central role in the hypoxic accumulation of glycogen. Importantly, we found that hypoxia also upregulates the expression of UTP:glucose-1-phosphate urydylyltransferase (UGP2) and 1,4-α glucan branching enzyme (GBE1), two enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of glycogen. Therefore, hypoxia regulates almost all the enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism in a coordinated fashion, leading to its accumulation. Finally, we demonstrated that abrogation of glycogen synthesis, by knock-down of GYS1 expression, impairs hypoxic preconditioning, suggesting a physiological role for the glycogen accumulated during chronic hypoxia. In summary, our results uncover a novel effect of hypoxia on glucose metabolism, further supporting the central importance of metabolic reprogramming in the cellular adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:20300197

  4. Effects of adrenaline on whole-body glucose metabolism and insulin-mediated regulation of glycogen synthase and PKB phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jørgen; Ruge, Toralph; Lai, Yu-Chiang; Svensson, Maria K; Eriksson, Jan W

    2011-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of adrenaline on insulin-mediated regulation of glucose and fat metabolism with focus on regulation of skeletal muscle PKB, GSK-3, and glycogen synthase (GS) phosphorylation. Ten healthy subjects (5 men and 5 women) received a 240-minute intravenous infusion of adrenaline (0.05 μg/[kg min]) or saline; after 120 minutes, a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp was added. Adrenaline infusion increased blood glucose concentration by approximately 50%, but the hyperinsulinemic clamp normalized blood glucose within 30 minutes. Glucose infusion rate during the last hour was approximately 60% lower during adrenaline infusion compared with saline (4.3 ± 0.5 vs 11.2 ± 0.6 mg/kg lean body mass per minute). Insulin increased PKB Ser⁴⁷³, PKB Thr³⁰⁸, and GSK-3β Ser⁹ phosphorylation in skeletal muscles; coinfusion of adrenaline did not influence insulin-stimulated PKB and GSK-3 phosphorylation. Adrenaline alone did not influence phosphorylation of PKB and GSK-3β. Insulin increased GS fractional activity and decreased GS Ser⁶⁴¹ and Ser⁶⁴⁵,⁶⁴⁹,⁶⁵³,⁶⁵⁷ phosphorylation. In the presence of adrenaline, insulin did neither activate GS nor dephosphorylate GS Ser⁶⁴¹. Surprisingly, GS Ser⁷ phosphorylation was not influenced by adrenaline. Adrenaline increased plasma lactate concentration; and muscle glycogen content was reduced in skeletal muscle the day after adrenaline infusion, supporting that insulin does not stimulate glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscles when adrenaline is present. In conclusion, adrenaline did not influence basal or insulin-stimulated PKB and GSK-3β phosphorylation in muscles, but completely blocked insulin-mediated GS activation and Ser⁶⁴¹ dephosphorylation. Still, insulin normalized adrenaline-mediated hyperglycemia.

  5. AJS1669, a novel small-molecule muscle glycogen synthase activator, improves glucose metabolism and reduces body fat mass in mice.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Kazuhiro; Takeshita, Sen; Kawasaki, Noriko; Miyanaga, Wataru; Okamatsu, Yoriko; Dohi, Mizuki; Nakagawa, Tadakiyo

    2017-04-01

    Impaired glycogen synthesis and turnover are common in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. As glycogen synthase (GS) is a key enzyme involved in the synthetic process, it presents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In the present study, we identified a novel, potent and orally available GS activator AJS1669 {sodium 2-[[5-[[4-(4,5-difluoro-2-methylsulfanyl-phenyl)phenoxy] methyl]furan-2-carbonyl]-(2-furylmethyl)amino] acetate}. In vitro, we performed a glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) activation assay for screening GS activators and identified that the activity of AJS1669 was further potentiated in the presence of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). In vivo, we used ob/ob mice to evaluate the novel anti-diabetic effects of AJS1669 by measuring basal blood glucose levels, glucose tolerance and body fat mass index. Repeated administration of AJS1669 over 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels in ob/ob mice. AJS1669 also improved glucose tolerance in a dose-dependent manner, and decreased body fat mass. The mRNA levels of genes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis were elevated in skeletal muscle tissue following AJS1669 treatment. Hepatic tissue of treated mice also exhibited elevated expression of genes associated with fatty acid oxidation. In contrast to ob/ob mice, in C57Bl/6 mice AJS1669 administration did not alter body weight or reduce glucose levels. These results demonstrate that pharmacological agents that activate GYS1, the main GS subtype found in skeletal muscle, have potential for use as novel treatments for diabetes that improve glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle.

  6. AJS1669, a novel small-molecule muscle glycogen synthase activator, improves glucose metabolism and reduces body fat mass in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Kazuhiro; Takeshita, Sen; Kawasaki, Noriko; Miyanaga, Wataru; Okamatsu, Yoriko; Dohi, Mizuki; Nakagawa, Tadakiyo

    2017-01-01

    Impaired glycogen synthesis and turnover are common in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. As glycogen synthase (GS) is a key enzyme involved in the synthetic process, it presents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In the present study, we identified a novel, potent and orally available GS activator AJS1669 {sodium 2-[[5-[[4-(4,5-difluoro-2-methylsulfanyl-phenyl) phenoxy] methyl]furan-2-carbonyl]-(2-furylmethyl)amino] acetate}. In vitro, we performed a glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) activation assay for screening GS activators and identified that the activity of AJS1669 was further potentiated in the presence of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). In vivo, we used ob/ob mice to evaluate the novel anti-diabetic effects of AJS1669 by measuring basal blood glucose levels, glucose tolerance and body fat mass index. Repeated administration of AJS1669 over 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels in ob/ob mice. AJS1669 also improved glucose tolerance in a dose-dependent manner, and decreased body fat mass. The mRNA levels of genes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis were elevated in skeletal muscle tissue following AJS1669 treatment. Hepatic tissue of treated mice also exhibited elevated expression of genes associated with fatty acid oxidation. In contrast to ob/ob mice, in C57Bl/6 mice AJS1669 administration did not alter body weight or reduce glucose levels. These results demonstrate that pharmacological agents that activate GYS1, the main GS subtype found in skeletal muscle, have potential for use as novel treatments for diabetes that improve glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. PMID:28290602

  7. Oligosaccharide Binding in Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Yep, Alejandra; Feng, Lei; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2010-11-17

    Glycogen/starch synthase elongates glucan chains and is the key enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants. Cocrystallization of Escherichia coli wild-type glycogen synthase (GS) with substrate ADPGlc and the glucan acceptor mimic HEPPSO produced a closed form of GS and suggests that domain-domain closure accompanies glycogen synthesis. Cocrystallization of the inactive GS mutant E377A with substrate ADPGlc and oligosaccharide results in the first oligosaccharide-bound glycogen synthase structure. Four bound oligosaccharides are observed, one in the interdomain cleft (G6a) and three on the N-terminal domain surface (G6b, G6c, and G6d). Extending from the center of the enzyme to the interdomain cleft opening, G6a mostly interacts with the highly conserved N-terminal domain residues lining the cleft of GS. The surface-bound oligosaccharides G6c and G6d have less interaction with enzyme and exhibit a more curled, helixlike structural arrangement. The observation that oligosaccharides bind only to the N-terminal domain of GS suggests that glycogen in vivo probably binds to only one side of the enzyme to ensure unencumbered interdomain movement, which is required for efficient, continuous glucan-chain synthesis.

  8. Glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in muscles from immobilized limbs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, W. F.; Watson, P. A.; Booth, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Defects in glucose metabolism in muscles of immobilized limbs of mice were related to alterations in insulin binding, insulin responsiveness, glucose supply, and insulin activation of glycogen synthase. These were tested by in vitro methodology. A significant lessening in the insulin-induced maximal response of 2-deoxyglucose uptake into the mouse soleus muscle occurred between the 3rd and 8th h of limb immobilization, suggesting a decreased insulin responsiveness. Lack of change in the specific binding of insulin to muscles of 24-h immobilized limbs indicates that a change in insulin receptor number did not play a role in the failure of insulin to stimulate glucose metabolism. Its inability to stimulate glycogen synthesis in muscle from immobilized limbs is due, in part, to a lack of glucose supply to glycogen synthesis and also to the ineffectiveness of insulin to increase the percentage of glycogen synthase in its active form in muscles from 24-h immobilized limbs.

  9. Effect of insulin and contraction on glycogen synthase phosphorylation and kinetic properties in epitrochlearis muscles from lean and obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang Chin; Bolling, Astrid; Stuenæs, Jorid T; Cumming, Kristoffer T; Ingvaldsen, Ada; Lai, Yu-Chiang; Ivy, John L; Jensen, Jørgen

    2012-05-15

    In the present study, the effects of insulin and contraction on glycogen synthase (GS) kinetic properties and phosphorylation were investigated in epitrochlearis muscles from lean and obese Zucker rats. Total GS activity and protein expression were ~15% lower in epitrochlearis from obese rats compared with lean rats. Insulin-stimulated GS fractional activity and affinity for UDP-glucose were lower (higher K(m)) in muscles from obese rats. GS Ser(641) and Ser(645,649,653,657) phosphorylation was higher in insulin-stimulated muscles from obese rats, which agreed with lower GS activation. Contraction-mediated GS dephosphorylation of Ser(641), Ser(641+645), Ser(645,649,653,657), and Ser(7+10) was normal in muscles from obese Zucker rats, and GS fractional activity increased to similar levels in epitrochlearis muscles from lean and obese rats. GS affinity for UDP glucose was ~0.8, ~0.4, and ~0.1 mM with assay buffers containing 0, 0.17, and 12 mM glucose 6-phosphate, respectively. Contraction increased affinity for UDP-glucose (reduced K(m)) at a physiological concentration of glucose 6-phosphate (0.17 mM) to ~0.2 mM in muscles from both lean and obese rats. Interestingly, in the absence of glucose 6-phosphate in the assay buffer, contraction (and insulin) did not influence GS affinity for UDP-glucose, indicating that affinity is regulated by sensitivity for glucose 6-phosphate. In conclusion, contraction-mediated activation and dephosphorylation of GS were normal in muscles from obese Zucker rats, whereas insulin-mediated GS activation and dephosphorylation were impaired.

  10. Dysfunctional Muscle and Liver Glycogen Metabolism in mdx Dystrophic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, David I.; Lau, Xianzhong; Flores, Marcelo; Trieu, Jennifer; Gehrig, Stefan M.; Chee, Annabel; Naim, Timur; Lynch, Gordon S.; Koopman, René

    2014-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe, genetic muscle wasting disorder characterised by progressive muscle weakness. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (dmd) gene resulting in very low levels or a complete absence of the dystrophin protein, a key structural element of muscle fibres which is responsible for the proper transmission of force. In the absence of dystrophin, muscle fibres become damaged easily during contraction resulting in their degeneration. DMD patients and mdx mice (an animal model of DMD) exhibit altered metabolic disturbances that cannot be attributed to the loss of dystrophin directly. We tested the hypothesis that glycogen metabolism is defective in mdx dystrophic mice. Results Dystrophic mdx mice had increased skeletal muscle glycogen (79%, (P<0.01)). Skeletal muscle glycogen synthesis is initiated by glycogenin, the expression of which was increased by 50% in mdx mice (P<0.0001). Glycogen synthase activity was 12% higher (P<0.05) but glycogen branching enzyme activity was 70% lower (P<0.01) in mdx compared with wild-type mice. The rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen breakdown, glycogen phosphorylase, had 62% lower activity (P<0.01) in mdx mice resulting from a 24% reduction in PKA activity (P<0.01). In mdx mice glycogen debranching enzyme expression was 50% higher (P<0.001) together with starch-binding domain protein 1 (219% higher; P<0.01). In addition, mdx mice were glucose intolerant (P<0.01) and had 30% less liver glycogen (P<0.05) compared with control mice. Subsequent analysis of the enzymes dysregulated in skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism in mdx mice identified reduced glycogenin protein expression (46% less; P<0.05) as a possible cause of this phenotype. Conclusion We identified that mdx mice were glucose intolerant, and had increased skeletal muscle glycogen but reduced amounts of liver glycogen. PMID:24626262

  11. Assignment of the gene encoding glycogen synthase (GYS) to human chromosome 19, band q13,3

    SciTech Connect

    Lehto, M. Helsinki Univ. ); Stoffel, M.; Espinosa, R. III; Beau, M.M. le; Bell, G.I. ); Groop, L. )

    1993-02-01

    The enzyme glycogen synthase (UDP glocose:glycogen 4-[alpha]-D-glucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.11) catalyzes the formation of glycogen from uridine diphosphate glucose (UPDG). Impaired activation of muscle glycogen synthase by insulin has been noted in patients with genetic risk of developing non-insulin-dependent diabets mellitus (NIDDM) and this may represent an early defect in the pathogenesis of this disorder. As such, glycogen synthase represents a candidate gene for contributing to genetic susceptibility. As a first step in studying the role of glycogen synthase in the genetics of NIDDM, we have isolated a cosmid encoding the human glycogen synthase gene (gene symbol GYS) and determined its chromosomal localization by fluorescence in situ hybridization. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Exercise training-induced adaptations associated with increases in skeletal muscle glycogen content.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Yasuko; Gollisch, Katja S C; Holton, Laura; Kim, Young-Bum; Brandauer, Josef; Fujii, Nobuharu L; Hirshman, Michael F; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2013-02-01

    Chronic exercise training results in numerous skeletal muscle adaptations, including increases in insulin sensitivity and glycogen content. To understand the mechanism leading to increased muscle glycogen, we studied the effects of exercise training on glycogen regulatory proteins in rat skeletal muscle. Female Sprague Dawley rats performed voluntary wheel running for 1, 4 or 7 weeks. After 7 weeks of training, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was increased in epitrochlearis muscle. As compared with sedentary control rats, muscle glycogen did not change after 1 week of training, but increased significantly after 4 and 7 weeks. The increases in muscle glycogen were accompanied by elevated glycogen synthase activity and protein expression. To assess the regulation of glycogen synthase, we examined its major activator, protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), and its major deactivator, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3. Consistent with glycogen synthase activity, PP1 activity was unchanged after 1 week of training but significantly increased after 4 and 7 weeks of training. Protein expression of R(GL)(G(M)), another regulatory PP1 subunit, significantly decreased after 4 and 7 weeks of training. Unlike PP1 activity, GSK-3 phosphorylation did not follow the pattern of glycogen synthase activity. The ~ 40% decrease in GSK-3α phosphorylation after 1 week of exercise training persisted until 7 weeks, and may function as a negative feedback mechanism in response to elevated glycogen. Our findings suggest that exercise training-induced increases in muscle glycogen content could be regulated by multiple mechanisms, including enhanced insulin sensitivity, glycogen synthase expression, allosteric activation of glycogen synthase, and PP1 activity.

  13. Mechanical Stretch Up-regulates MicroRNA-26a and Induces Human Airway Smooth Muscle Hypertrophy by Suppressing Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β*

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Junaith S.; Lopez, Michael A.; Boriek, Aladin M.

    2010-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle hypertrophy is one of the hallmarks of airway remodeling in severe asthma. Several human diseases have been now associated with dysregulated microRNA (miRNA) expression. miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs, which negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we identify miR-26a as a hypertrophic miRNA of human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). We show that stretch selectively induces the transcription of miR-26a located in the locus 3p21.3 of human chromosome 3. The transcription factor CCAAT enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) directly activates miR-26a expression through the transcriptional machinery upon stretch. Furthermore, stretch or enforced expression of miR-26a induces HASMC hypertrophy, and miR-26 knockdown reverses this effect, suggesting that miR-26a is a hypertrophic gene. We identify glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), an anti-hypertrophic protein, as a target gene of miR-26a. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrate that miR-26a directly interact with the 3′-untranslated repeat of the GSK-3β mRNA. Stretch or enforced expression of miR-26a attenuates the endogenous GSK-3β protein levels followed by the induction of HASMC hypertrophy. miR-26 knockdown reverses this effect, suggesting that miR-26a-induced hypertrophy occurs via its target gene GSK-3β. Overall, as a first time, our study unveils that miR-26a is a mechanosensitive gene, and it plays an important role in the regulation of HASMC hypertrophy. PMID:20525681

  14. Mechanical stretch up-regulates microRNA-26a and induces human airway smooth muscle hypertrophy by suppressing glycogen synthase kinase-3β.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Junaith S; Lopez, Michael A; Boriek, Aladin M

    2010-09-17

    Airway smooth muscle hypertrophy is one of the hallmarks of airway remodeling in severe asthma. Several human diseases have been now associated with dysregulated microRNA (miRNA) expression. miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs, which negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we identify miR-26a as a hypertrophic miRNA of human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). We show that stretch selectively induces the transcription of miR-26a located in the locus 3p21.3 of human chromosome 3. The transcription factor CCAAT enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) directly activates miR-26a expression through the transcriptional machinery upon stretch. Furthermore, stretch or enforced expression of miR-26a induces HASMC hypertrophy, and miR-26 knockdown reverses this effect, suggesting that miR-26a is a hypertrophic gene. We identify glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), an anti-hypertrophic protein, as a target gene of miR-26a. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrate that miR-26a directly interact with the 3'-untranslated repeat of the GSK-3β mRNA. Stretch or enforced expression of miR-26a attenuates the endogenous GSK-3β protein levels followed by the induction of HASMC hypertrophy. miR-26 knockdown reverses this effect, suggesting that miR-26a-induced hypertrophy occurs via its target gene GSK-3β. Overall, as a first time, our study unveils that miR-26a is a mechanosensitive gene, and it plays an important role in the regulation of HASMC hypertrophy.

  15. A New Muscle Glycogen Storage Disease Associated with Glycogenin-1 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Malfatti, Edoardo; Nilsson, Johanna; Hedberg-Oldfors, Carola; Hernandez-Lain, Aurelio; Michel, Fabrice; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Cristina; Viennet, Gabriel; Akman, H. Orhan; Kornblum, Cornelia; den Bergh, Peter Van; Romero, Norma B.; Engel, Andrew G.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Oldfors, Anders

    2015-01-01

    We describe a slowly progressive myopathy in 7 unrelated adult patients with storage of polyglucosan in muscle fibers. Genetic investigation revealed homozygous or compound heterozygous deleterious variants in the glycogenin-1 gene (GYG1). Most patients showed depletion of glycogenin-1 in skeletal muscle, whereas 1 showed presence of glycogenin-1 lacking the C-terminal that normally binds glycogen synthase. Our results indicate that either depletion of glycogenin-1 or impaired interaction with glycogen synthase underlies this new form of glycogen storage disease that differs from a previously reported patient with GYG1 mutations who showed profound glycogen depletion in skeletal muscle and accumulation of glycogenin-1. PMID:25272951

  16. Glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} regulation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform c1 in the vascular smooth muscle cell response to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Chow Winsion; Hou Guangpei; Bendeck, Michelle P.

    2008-10-01

    The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) are critical events in neointima formation during atherosclerosis and restenosis. The transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T-cells-isoform c1 (NFATc1) is regulated by atherogenic cytokines, and has been implicated in the migratory and proliferative responses of vSMCs through the regulation of gene expression. In T-cells, calcineurin de-phosphorylates NFATc1, leading to its nuclear import, while glycogen synthase kinase 3 {beta} (GSK3{beta}) phosphorylates NFATc1 and promotes its nuclear export. However, the relationship between NFATc1 and GSK3{beta} has not been studied during SMC migration and proliferation. We investigated this by scrape wounding vSMCs in vitro, and studying wound repair. NFATc1 protein was transiently increased, reaching a peak at 8 h after wounding. Cell fractionation and immunocytochemistry revealed that NFATc1 accumulation in the nucleus was maximal at 4 h after injury, and this was coincident with a significant 9 fold increase in transcriptional activity. Silencing NFATc1 expression with siRNA or inhibition of NFAT with cyclosporin A (CsA) attenuated wound closure by vSMCs. Phospho-GSK3{beta} (inactive) increased to a peak at 30 min after injury, preceding the nuclear accumulation of NFATc1. Overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3{beta} delayed the nuclear accumulation of NFATc1, caused a 50% decrease in NFAT transcriptional activity, and attenuated vSMC wound repair. We conclude that NFATc1 promotes the vSMC response to injury, and that inhibition of GSK3{beta} is required for the activation of NFAT during wound repair.

  17. Multiple Glycogen-binding Sites in Eukaryotic Glycogen Synthase Are Required for High Catalytic Efficiency toward Glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Chikwana, Vimbai M.; Contreras, Christopher J.; Davis, Keri D.; Wilson, Wayne A.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2012-12-10

    Glycogen synthase is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of glycogen and has an essential role in glucose homeostasis. The three-dimensional structures of yeast glycogen synthase (Gsy2p) complexed with maltooctaose identified four conserved maltodextrin-binding sites distributed across the surface of the enzyme. Site-1 is positioned on the N-terminal domain, site-2 and site-3 are present on the C-terminal domain, and site-4 is located in an interdomain cleft adjacent to the active site. Mutation of these surface sites decreased glycogen binding and catalytic efficiency toward glycogen. Mutations within site-1 and site-2 reduced the V{sub max}/S{sub 0.5} for glycogen by 40- and 70-fold, respectively. Combined mutation of site-1 and site-2 decreased the V{sub max}/S{sub 0.5} for glycogen by >3000-fold. Consistent with the in vitro data, glycogen accumulation in glycogen synthase-deficient yeast cells ({Delta}gsy1-gsy2) transformed with the site-1, site-2, combined site-1/site-2, or site-4 mutant form of Gsy2p was decreased by up to 40-fold. In contrast to the glycogen results, the ability to utilize maltooctaose as an in vitro substrate was unaffected in the site-2 mutant, moderately affected in the site-1 mutant, and almost completely abolished in the site-4 mutant. These data show that the ability to utilize maltooctaose as a substrate can be independent of the ability to utilize glycogen. Our data support the hypothesis that site-1 and site-2 provide a 'toehold mechanism,' keeping glycogen synthase tightly associated with the glycogen particle, whereas site-4 is more closely associated with positioning of the nonreducing end during catalysis.

  18. Mechanisms limiting glycogen storage in muscle during prolonged insulin stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, E.A.; Hansen, S.A.; Hansen, B.F. )

    1988-11-01

    The extent to which muscle glycogen concentrations can be increased during exposure to maximal insulin concentrations and abundant glucose was investigated in the isolated perfused rat hindquarter preparation. Perfusion for 7 h in the presence of 20,000 {mu}U/ml insulin and 11-13 mM glucose increased muscle glycogen concentrations to maximal values 2, 3, and 3.5 times above normal fed levels in fast-twitch white, slow-twitch red, and fast-twitch red fibers, respectively. Glucose uptake decreased from 34.9 {mu}mol{center dot}g{sup {minus}1}{center dot}h{sup {minus}1} at 0 h to 7.5 after 7 h of perfusion. During the perfusion muscle glycogen synthase activity decreased and free intracellular glucose and glucose 6-phosphate increased indicating that glucose disposal was impaired. However, glucose transport as measured by the uptake of 3-O-({sup 14}C)methyl-D-glucose was also markedly decreased after 5 and 7 h of perfusion compared with initial values. Total muscle water concentration decreased during glycogen loading of the muscles. Mechanisms limiting glycogen storage under maximal insulin stimulation include impaired insulin-stimulated membrane transport of glucose as well as impaired intracellular glucose disposal.

  19. Single fiber analyses of glycogen-related proteins reveal their differential association with glycogen in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robyn M; Xu, Hongyang; Latchman, Heidy; Larkins, Noni T; Gooley, Paul R; Stapleton, David I

    2012-12-01

    To understand how glycogen affects skeletal muscle physiology, we examined enzymes essential for muscle glycogen synthesis and degradation using single fibers from quiescent and stimulated rat skeletal muscle. Presenting a shift in paradigm, we show these proteins are differentially associated with glycogen granules. Protein diffusibility and/or abundance of glycogenin, glycogen branching enzyme (GBE), debranching enzyme (GDE), phosphorylase (GP), and synthase (GS) were examined in fibers isolated from rat fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus (SOL) muscle. GDE and GP proteins were more abundant (~10- to 100-fold) in fibers from EDL compared with SOL muscle. GS and glycogenin proteins were similar between muscles while GBE had an approximately fourfold greater abundance in SOL muscle. Mechanically skinned fibers exposed to physiological buffer for 10 min showed ~70% total pools of GBE and GP were diffusible (nonbound), whereas GDE and GS were considerably less diffusible. Intense in vitro stimulation, sufficient to elicit a ~50% decrease in intracellular glycogen, increased diffusibility of GDE, GP, and GS (~15-60%) and decreased GBE diffusibility (~20%). Amylase treatment, which breaks α-1,4 linkages of glycogen, indicated differential diffusibilities and hence glycogen associations of GDE and GS. Membrane solubilization (1% Triton-X-100) allowed a small additional amount of GDE and GS to diffuse from fibers, suggesting the majority of nonglycogen-associated GDE/GS is associated with myofibrillar/contractile network of muscle rather than membranes. Given differences in enzymes required for glycogen metabolism, the current findings suggest glycogen particles have fiber-type-dependent structures. The greater catabolic potential of glycogen breakdown in fast-twitch fibers may account for different contraction induced rates of glycogen utilization.

  20. Glycogen synthase can use glucose as an acceptor.

    PubMed

    Salsas, E; Larner, J

    1975-03-10

    Glycogen synthase purified to homogeneity from rabbit skeletal muscle is essentially free of carbohydrate and shows no activity in the absence of added acceptor. It can use glucose as a substrate converting it to a glucose disaccharide in the presence of UDP-glucose as cosubstrate. The reaction is dependent on time, and on UDP-glucose, glucose, and enzyme concentrations. The product of the single step reaction co-chromatographs in two solvent systems with maltose. The glucose disaccharide produced in the reaction with UDP-[14-C]glucose and nonradioactive glucose as well as with nonradioactive UDP-glucoes and [14-C]glucose is labeled asymmetrically. The linkage is characterized as alpha-1,4 and therefore the disaccharide is identified as maltose.

  1. Allosteric regulation of glycogen synthase in liver. A physiological dilemma.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, F Q; Gannon, M C

    1993-06-25

    Glycogen synthase catalyzes the transfer of the glucosyl moiety from UDP-glucose to the terminal branch of the glycogen molecule and is considered to be the rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen synthesis. However, under ideal assay conditions, i.e. 37 degrees C with saturating concentrations of UDP-glucose and the activator, glucose-6-P, the maximal catalytic activity of glycogen synthase was only 78% of the in vivo glycogen synthetic rate. Using concentrations of UDP-glucose and glucose-6-P likely to be present in vivo, the rate was only approximately 30%. This prompted us to reassess a possible role of allosteric effectors on synthase activity. Glycogen synthase was assayed at 37 degrees C using dilute, pH 7.0, buffered extracts, initial rate conditions, and UDP-glucose and glucose-6-P concentrations, which approximate those calculated to be present in total liver cell water. Several allosteric effectors were tested. Magnesium and AMP had little effect on activity. Pi, ADP, ATP, and UTP inhibited activity. When a combination of effectors were added at concentrations approximating those present in cell water, synthase activity could account for only 2% of the glycogen synthetic rate. Thus, although allosteric effectors are likely to be playing a major role in regulating synthase enzymic activity in liver cells, to date, a metabolite that can stimulate activity and/or overcome nucleotide inhibition has yet to be identified. If such a metabolite cannot be identified, an additional or alternative pathway for glycogen synthesis must be considered.

  2. Expression and characterization of glycogen synthase kinase-3 mutants and their effect on glycogen synthase activity in intact cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eldar-Finkelman, H; Argast, G M; Foord, O; Fischer, E H; Krebs, E G

    1996-01-01

    In these studies we expressed and characterized wild-type (WT) GSK-3 (glycogen synthase kinase-3) and its mutants, and examined their physiological effect on glycogen synthase activity. The GSK-3 mutants included mutation at serine-9 either to alanine (S9A) or glutamic acid (S9E) and an inactive mutant, K85,86MA. Expression of WT and the various mutants in a cell-free system indicated that S9A and S9E exhibit increased kinase activity as compared with WT. Subsequently, 293 cells were transiently transfected with WT GSK-3 and mutants. Cells expressing the S9A mutant exhibited higher kinase activity (2.6-fold of control cells) as compared with cells expressing WT and S9E (1.8- and 2.0-fold, respectively, of control cells). Combined, these results suggest serine-9 as a key regulatory site of GSK-3 inactivation, and indicate that glutamic acid cannot mimic the function of the phosphorylated residue. The GSK-3-expressing cell system enabled us to examine whether GSK-3 can induce changes in the endogenous glycogen synthase activity. A decrease in glycogen synthase activity (50%) was observed in cells expressing the S9A mutant. Similarly, glycogen synthase activity was suppressed in cells expressing WT and the S9E mutant (20-30%, respectively). These studies indicate that activation of GSK-3 is sufficient to inhibit glycogen synthase in intact cells, and provide evidence supporting a physiological role for GSK-3 in regulating glycogen synthase and glycogen metabolism. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8816781

  3. Glycogen synthase kinase-3: cryoprotection and glycogen metabolism in the freeze-tolerant wood frog.

    PubMed

    Dieni, Christopher A; Bouffard, Melanie C; Storey, Kenneth B

    2012-02-01

    The terrestrial anuran Rana sylvatica tolerates extended periods of whole-body freezing during the winter. Freezing survival is facilitated by extensive glycogen hydrolysis and distribution of high concentrations of the cryoprotectant glucose into blood and all tissues. As glycogenesis is both an energy-expensive process and counter-productive to maintaining sustained high cryoprotectant levels, we proposed that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) would be activated when wood frogs froze and would phosphorylate its downstream substrates to inactivate glycogen synthesis. Western blot analysis determined that the amount of phosphorylated (inactive) GSK-3 decreased in all five tissues tested in 24 h frozen frogs compared with unfrozen controls. Total GSK-3 protein levels did not change, with the exception of heart GSK-3, indicating that post-translational modification was the primary regulatory mechanism for this kinase. Kinetic properties of skeletal muscle GSK-3 from control and frozen frogs displayed differential responses to a temperature change (22 versus 4°C) and high glucose. For example, when assayed at 4°C, the K(m) for the GSK-3 substrate peptide was ∼44% lower for frozen frogs than the corresponding value in control frogs, indicating greater GSK-3 affinity for its substrates in the frozen state. This indicates that at temperatures similar to the environment encountered by frogs, GSK-3 in frozen frogs will phosphorylate its downstream targets more readily than in unfrozen controls. GSK-3 from skeletal muscle of control frogs was also allosterically regulated. AMP and phosphoenolpyruvate activated GSK-3 whereas inhibitors included glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, pyruvate, ATP, glutamate, glutamine, glycerol, NH(4)Cl, NaCl and KCl. The combination of phosphorylation and allosteric control argues for a regulatory role of GSK-3 in inactivating glycogenesis to preserve high glucose cryoprotectant levels throughout each freezing bout.

  4. Purification, characterization and partial amino acid sequence of glycogen synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Carabaza, A; Arino, J; Fox, J W; Villar-Palasi, C; Guinovart, J J

    1990-01-01

    Glycogen synthase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme showed a subunit molecular mass of 80 kDa. The holoenzyme appears to be a tetramer. Antibodies developed against purified yeast glycogen synthase inactivated the enzyme in yeast extracts and allowed the detection of the protein in Western blots. Amino acid analysis showed that the enzyme is very rich in glutamate and/or glutamine residues. The N-terminal sequence (11 amino acid residues) was determined. In addition, selected tryptic-digest peptides were purified by reverse-phase h.p.l.c. and submitted to gas-phase sequencing. Up to eight sequences (79 amino acid residues) could be aligned with the human muscle enzyme sequence. Levels of identity range between 37 and 100%, indicating that, although human and yeast glycogen synthases probably share some conserved regions, significant differences in their primary structure should be expected. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:2114092

  5. Carbohydrates, Muscle Glycogen, and Improved Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, W. Mike

    1987-01-01

    One way to improve athletic performance without harming the athlete's health is diet manipulation. This article explores the relationship between muscular endurance and muscle glycogen and discusses a diet and training approach to competition. (Author/MT)

  6. A highly prevalent equine glycogen storage disease is explained by constitutive activation of a mutant glycogen synthase.

    PubMed

    Maile, C A; Hingst, J R; Mahalingan, K K; O'Reilly, A O; Cleasby, M E; Mickelson, J R; McCue, M E; Anderson, S M; Hurley, T D; Wojtaszewski, J F P; Piercy, R J

    2017-01-01

    Equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1) is associated with a missense mutation (R309H) in the glycogen synthase (GYS1) gene, enhanced glycogen synthase (GS) activity and excessive glycogen and amylopectate inclusions in muscle. Equine muscle biochemical and recombinant enzyme kinetic assays in vitro and homology modelling in silico, were used to investigate the hypothesis that higher GS activity in affected horse muscle is caused by higher GS expression, dysregulation, or constitutive activation via a conformational change. PSSM1-affected horse muscle had significantly higher glycogen content than control horse muscle despite no difference in GS expression. GS activity was significantly higher in muscle from homozygous mutants than from heterozygote and control horses, in the absence and presence of the allosteric regulator, glucose 6 phosphate (G6P). Muscle from homozygous mutant horses also had significantly increased GS phosphorylation at sites 2+2a and significantly higher AMPKα1 (an upstream kinase) expression than controls, likely reflecting a physiological attempt to reduce GS enzyme activity. Recombinant mutant GS was highly active with a considerably lower Km for UDP-glucose, in the presence and absence of G6P, when compared to wild type GS, and despite its phosphorylation. Elevated activity of the mutant enzyme is associated with ineffective regulation via phosphorylation rendering it constitutively active. Modelling suggested that the mutation disrupts a salt bridge that normally stabilises the basal state, shifting the equilibrium to the enzyme's active state. This study explains the gain of function pathogenesis in this highly prevalent polyglucosan myopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Insulin stimulation of glycogen synthase in cultured human diploid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, H; Howard, B V; Kosmakos, F C; Fields, R M; Craig, J W; Bennett, P H; Larner, J

    1980-10-01

    The effect of insulin on glycogen synthase activity in human diploid fibroblasts has been studied. As little as 2 X 10(-10) M insulin increased the glycogen synthase / activity without changing the total activity. Stimulation occurred within 5 min and became maximal in 30 min. A half-maximal increase of / activity was achieved at 3 X 10(-9) M insulin. Glucose starvation increased the magnitude of response of glycogen synthase to insulin but did not change the insulin concentration necessary to give a half-maximal stimulation. Glucose increased the basal level of / activity in human diploid fibroblasts; the effect of insulin was additive. During in vitro senescence the total glycogen synthase activity declined, but the concentration of insulin that produced a half-maximal stimulation remained unchanged. These data indicate that regulation of glycogen synthase activity in human diploid fibroblasts is responsive to physiologic insulin levels and that the system provides a useful model for the in vitro study of insulin sensitivity.

  8. Glycogen synthase from the parabasalian parasite Trichomonas vaginalis: An unusual member of the starch/glycogen synthase family.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Wayne A; Pradhan, Prajakta; Madhan, Nayasha; Gist, Galen C; Brittingham, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a parasitic protist, is the causative agent of the common sexually-transmitted infection trichomoniasis. The organism has long been known to synthesize substantial glycogen as a storage polysaccharide, presumably mobilizing this compound during periods of carbohydrate limitation, such as might be encountered during transmission between hosts. However, little is known regarding the enzymes of glycogen metabolism in T. vaginalis. We had previously described the identification and characterization of two forms of glycogen phosphorylase in the organism. Here, we measure UDP-glucose-dependent glycogen synthase activity in cell-free extracts of T. vaginalis. We then demonstrate that the TVAG_258220 open reading frame encodes a glycosyltransferase that is presumably responsible for this synthetic activity. We show that expression of TVAG_258220 in a yeast strain lacking endogenous glycogen synthase activity is sufficient to restore glycogen accumulation. Furthermore, when TVAG_258220 is expressed in bacteria, the resulting recombinant protein has glycogen synthase activity in vitro, transferring glucose from either UDP-glucose or ADP-glucose to glycogen and using both substrates with similar affinity. This protein is also able to transfer glucose from UDP-glucose or ADP-glucose to maltose and longer oligomers of glucose but not to glucose itself. However, with these substrates, there is no evidence of processivity and sugar transfer is limited to between one and three glucose residues. Taken together with our earlier work on glycogen phosphorylase, we are now well positioned to define both how T. vaginalis synthesizes and utilizes glycogen, and how these processes are regulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Glycogen supercompensation in rat soleus muscle during recovery from nonweight bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Kirby, Christopher R.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    Events leading to the normalization of the glycogen metabolism in the soleus muscle of rat, altered by 72-h three days of hind-limb suspension, were investigated during the 72-h recovery period when the animals were allowed to bear weight on all four limbs. Relative importance of the factors affecting glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle during the recovery period was also examined. Glycogen concentration was found to decrease within 15 min and up to 2 h of recovery, while muscle glucose 6-phosphate, and the fractional activities of glycogen phosphorylase and glycogen synthase increased. From 2 to 4 h, when the glycogen synthase activity remained elevated and the phosphorylase activity declined, glycogen concentration increased, until it reached maximum values at about 24 h, after which it started to decrease, reaching control values by 72 h. At 12 and 24 h, the inverse relationship between glycogen concentration and the synthase activity ratio was lost, indicating that the reloading transiently uncoupled glycogen control of this enzyme.

  10. Glycogen supercompensation in rat soleus muscle during recovery from nonweight bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Kirby, Christopher R.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    Events leading to the normalization of the glycogen metabolism in the soleus muscle of rat, altered by 72-h three days of hind-limb suspension, were investigated during the 72-h recovery period when the animals were allowed to bear weight on all four limbs. Relative importance of the factors affecting glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle during the recovery period was also examined. Glycogen concentration was found to decrease within 15 min and up to 2 h of recovery, while muscle glucose 6-phosphate, and the fractional activities of glycogen phosphorylase and glycogen synthase increased. From 2 to 4 h, when the glycogen synthase activity remained elevated and the phosphorylase activity declined, glycogen concentration increased, until it reached maximum values at about 24 h, after which it started to decrease, reaching control values by 72 h. At 12 and 24 h, the inverse relationship between glycogen concentration and the synthase activity ratio was lost, indicating that the reloading transiently uncoupled glycogen control of this enzyme.

  11. Baicalin attenuates high fat diet-induced insulin resistance and ectopic fat storage in skeletal muscle, through modulating the protein kinase B/Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta pathway.

    PubMed

    Xi, You-Li; Li, Hong-Xia; Chen, Chen; Liu, Ya-Qun; Lv, Hong-Mei; Dong, Shi-Qi; Luo, Er-Fei; Gu, Ming-Bo; Liu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the pathophysiological basis of many diseases. Overcoming early insulin resistance highly significant in prevention diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver, and atherosclerosis. The present study aimed at evaluating the therapeutic effects of baicalin on insulin resistance and skeletal muscle ectopic fat storage in high fat diet-induced mice, and exploring the potential molecular mechanisms. Insulin resistance in mice was induced with a high fat diet for 16 weeks. Animals were then treated with three different doses of baicalin (100, 200, and 400 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) for 14 weeks. Fasting blood glucose, fasting serum insulin, glucose tolerance test (GTT), insulin tolerance test (ITT), and skeletal muscle lipid deposition were measured. Additionally, the AMP-activated protein kinase/acetyl-CoA carboxylase and protein kinase B/Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta pathways in skeletal muscle were further evaluated. Baicalin significantly reduced the levels of fasting blood glucose and fasting serum insulin and attenuated high fat diet induced glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance. Moreover, insulin resistance was significantly reversed. Pathological analysis revealed baicalin dose-dependently decreased the degree of the ectopic fat storage in skeletal muscle. The properties of baicalin were mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of the AMPK/ACC pathway, a key regulator of de novo lipogenesis and activation of the Akt/GSK-3β pathway, a key regulator of Glycogen synthesis. These data suggest that baicalin, at dose up to 400 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), is safe and able to attenuate insulin resistance and skeletal muscle ectopic fat storage, through modulating the skeletal muscle AMPK/ACC pathway and Akt/GSK-3β pathway.

  12. Post-Exercise Muscle Glycogen Repletion in the Extreme: Effect of Food Absence and Active Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Paul A.; Fairchild, Timothy J.; Ferreira, Luis D.; Bräu, Lambert

    2004-01-01

    Glycogen plays a major role in supporting the energy demands of skeletal muscles during high intensity exercise. Despite its importance, the amount of glycogen stored in skeletal muscles is so small that a large fraction of it can be depleted in response to a single bout of high intensity exercise. For this reason, it is generally recommended to ingest food after exercise to replenish rapidly muscle glycogen stores, otherwise one’s ability to engage in high intensity activity might be compromised. But what if food is not available? It is now well established that, even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. This is facilitated, in part, by the transient dephosphorylation-mediated activation of glycogen synthase and inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase. There is also evidence that muscle glycogen synthesis occurs even under conditions conducive to an increased oxidation of lactate post-exercise, such as during active recovery from high intensity exercise. Indeed, although during active recovery glycogen resynthesis is impaired in skeletal muscle as a whole because of increased lactate oxidation, muscle glycogen stores are replenished in Type IIa and IIb fibers while being broken down in Type I fibers of active muscles. This unique ability of Type II fibers to replenish their glycogen stores during exercise should not come as a surprise given the advantages in maintaining adequate muscle glycogen stores in those fibers that play a major role in fight or flight responses. Key Points Even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. During active recovery from exercise, skeletal muscles rich in type II fibers replenish part of their glycogen stores even in the absence of food intake. Post-exercise muscle glycogen synthesis in the

  13. Shared control of hepatic glycogen synthesis by glycogen synthase and glucokinase.

    PubMed Central

    Gomis, R R; Ferrer, J C; Guinovart, J J

    2000-01-01

    We have used recombinant adenoviruses (AdCMV-RLGS and AdCMV-GK) to overexpress the liver isoforms of glycogen synthase (GS) and glucokinase (GK) in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. Glucose activated overexpressed GS in a dose-dependent manner and caused the accumulation of larger amounts of glycogen in the AdCMV-RLGS-treated hepatocytes. The concentration of intermediate metabolites of the glycogenic pathway, such as glucose 6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) and UDP-glucose, were not significantly altered. GK overexpression also conferred on the hepatocyte an enhanced capacity to synthesize glycogen in response to glucose, as described previously [Seoane, Gómez-Foix, O'Doherty, Gómez-Ara, Newgard and Guinovart (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 23756-23760], although, in this case, they accumulated Glc-6-P. When GS and GK were simultaneously overexpressed, the accumulation of glycogen was enhanced in comparison with cells overexpressing either GS or GK. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that liver GS catalyses the rate-limiting step of hepatic glycogen synthesis. However, hepatic glycogen deposition from glucose is submitted to a system of shared control in which the 'controller', GS, is, in turn, controlled by GK. This control is indirectly exerted through Glc-6-P, which 'switches on' GS dephosphorylation and activation. PMID:11042138

  14. Dichloroacetate inhibits glycolysis and augments insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis in rat muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A S; Mitch, W E; Goodman, M N; Fagan, J M; Goheer, M A; Curnow, R T

    1987-01-01

    The decrease in plasma lactate during dichloroacetate (DCA) treatment is attributed to stimulation of lactate oxidation. To determine whether DCA also inhibits lactate production, we measured glucose metabolism in muscles of fed and fasted rats incubated with DCA and insulin. DCA increased glucose-6-phosphate, an allosteric modifier of glycogen synthase, approximately 50% and increased muscle glycogen synthesis and glycogen content greater than 25%. Lactate release fell; inhibition of glycolysis accounted for greater than 80% of the decrease. This was associated with a decrease in intracellular AMP, but no change in citrate or ATP. When lactate oxidation was increased by raising extracellular lactate, glycolysis decreased (r = - 0.91), suggesting that lactate oxidation regulates glycolysis. When muscle lactate production was greatly stimulated by thermal injury, DCA increased glycogen synthesis, normalized glycogen content, and inhibited glycolysis, thereby reducing lactate release. The major effect of DCA on lactate metabolism in muscle is to inhibit glycolysis. PMID:3543056

  15. Impaired glucose tolerance and predisposition to the fasted state in liver glycogen synthase knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Jose M; Meyer, Catalina M; Peper, Caron L; Zhai, Lanmin; Bock, Cheryl B; Previs, Stephen F; McGuinness, Owen P; DePaoli-Roach, Anna; Roach, Peter J

    2010-04-23

    Conversion to glycogen is a major fate of ingested glucose in the body. A rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen is glycogen synthase encoded by two genes, GYS1, expressed in muscle and other tissues, and GYS2, primarily expressed in liver (liver glycogen synthase). Defects in GYS2 cause the inherited monogenic disease glycogen storage disease 0. We have generated mice with a liver-specific disruption of the Gys2 gene (liver glycogen synthase knock-out (LGSKO) mice), using Lox-P/Cre technology. Conditional mice carrying floxed Gys2 were crossed with mice expressing Cre recombinase under the albumin promoter. The resulting LGSKO mice are viable, develop liver glycogen synthase deficiency, and have a 95% reduction in fed liver glycogen content. They have mild hypoglycemia but dispose glucose less well in a glucose tolerance test. Fed, LGSKO mice also have a reduced capacity for exhaustive exercise compared with mice carrying floxed alleles, but the difference disappears after an overnight fast. Upon fasting, LGSKO mice reach within 4 h decreased blood glucose levels attained by control floxed mice only after 24 h of food deprivation. The LGSKO mice maintain this low blood glucose for at least 24 h. Basal gluconeogenesis is increased in LGSKO mice, and insulin suppression of endogenous glucose production is impaired as assessed by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. This observation correlates with an increase in the liver gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression and activity. This mouse model mimics the pathophysiology of glycogen storage disease 0 patients and highlights the importance of liver glycogen stores in whole body glucose homeostasis.

  16. [Experimental models of diabetes mellitus of the 1st and 2nd types in rats: regulation of activity of glycogen synthase by peptides of the insulin superfamily and by epidermal growth factor in skeletal muscles].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, L A; Chistiakova, O V

    2012-01-01

    The regulatory effect of peptides of the insulin hyperfamily--insulin, insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), and relaxin, as well as of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on activity of glycogen synthase (GS) in rat skeletal muscles was studied in norm and in experimental diabetes mellitus of the 1st and 2nd types (DM1, DM2). In norm, peptides in vitro stimulated maximally the GS activity at a concentration of 10-8 M. The row of efficiency of the peptide action was as follows: insulin > IGF-1 > relaxin. In DM1 the basal GS activity did not change, while effect of insulin in vitro was decreased more sharply as compared with action of IGF-1 and relaxin at the 30th day of development of diabetes, i. e., the efficiency row was as follows: IGF-1 = relaxin > insulin. Administration of insulin in vivo did not restore sensitivity of the enzyme to the action of hormone in DM1. In DM2, the GS activity (both the total and active form) decreased. while the stimulatory effect ofpeptides and EGF on the enzyme was absent. Insulin introduced in vitro did not lead to restoration of the enzyme reaction. The conclusion has been made that the insulin resistance affects the basal GS activity in rat skeletal muscles as well as the regulation of the enzyme by peptides of the insulin nature and by EGF, which is more obvious in DM2, than in DM1.

  17. Structural basis for glucose-6-phosphate activation of glycogen synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Roach, Peter J.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2010-11-22

    Regulation of the storage of glycogen, one of the major energy reserves, is of utmost metabolic importance. In eukaryotes, this regulation is accomplished through glucose-6-phosphate levels and protein phosphorylation. Glycogen synthase homologs in bacteria and archaea lack regulation, while the eukaryotic enzymes are inhibited by protein kinase mediated phosphorylation and activated by protein phosphatases and glucose-6-phosphate binding. We determined the crystal structures corresponding to the basal activity state and glucose-6-phosphate activated state of yeast glycogen synthase-2. The enzyme is assembled into an unusual tetramer by an insertion unique to the eukaryotic enzymes, and this subunit interface is rearranged by the binding of glucose-6-phosphate, which frees the active site cleft and facilitates catalysis. Using both mutagenesis and intein-mediated phospho-peptide ligation experiments, we demonstrate that the enzyme's response to glucose-6-phosphate is controlled by Arg583 and Arg587, while four additional arginine residues present within the same regulatory helix regulate the response to phosphorylation.

  18. Glycogen synthesis from lactate in a chronically active muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, R.J.; Scheide, J.I.; Silverman, H.

    1989-05-01

    In response to neural overactivity (pseudomyotonia), gastrocnemius muscle fibers from C57Bl/6Jdy2J/dy2J mice have different metabolic profiles compared with normal mice. A population of fibers in the fast-twitch superficial region of the dy2J gastrocnemius stores unusually high amounts of glycogen, leading to an increased glycogen storage in the whole muscle. The dy2J muscle also contains twice as much lactate as normal muscle. A (/sup 14/C)lactate intraperitoneal injection leads to preferential /sup 14/C incorporation into glycogen in the dy2J muscle compared with normal muscle. To determine whether skeletal muscles were incorporating lactate into glycogen without body organ (liver, kidney) input, gastrocnemius muscles were bathed in 10 mM (/sup 14/C)lactate with intact neural and arterial supply but with impeded venous return. The contralateral gastrocnemius serves as a control for body organ input. By using this in situ procedure, we demonstrate that under conditions of high lactate both normal and dy2J muscle can directly synthesize glycogen from lactate. In this case, normal whole muscle incorporates (14C) lactate into glycogen at a higher rate than dy2J whole muscle. Autoradiography, however, suggests that the high-glycogen-containing muscle fibers in the dy2J muscle incorporate lactate into glycogen at nearly four times the rate of normal or surrounding muscle fibers.

  19. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 is involved in glycogen metabolism control and embryogenesis of Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Mury, Flávia B; Lugon, Magda D; DA Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Silva, Jose R; Berni, Mateus; Araujo, Helena M; Fontenele, Marcio Ribeiro; Abreu, Leonardo Araujo DE; Dansa, Marílvia; Braz, Glória; Masuda, Hatisaburo; Logullo, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Rhodnius prolixus is a blood-feeding insect that transmits Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli to vertebrate hosts. Rhodnius prolixus is also a classical model in insect physiology, and the recent availability of R. prolixus genome has opened new avenues on triatomine research. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is classically described as a key enzyme involved in glycogen metabolism, also acting as a downstream component of the Wnt pathway during embryogenesis. GSK-3 has been shown to be highly conserved among several organisms, mainly in the catalytic domain region. Meanwhile, the role of GSK-3 during R. prolixus embryogenesis or glycogen metabolism has not been investigated. Here we show that chemical inhibition of GSK-3 by alsterpaullone, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of GSK3, does not affect adult survival rate, though it alters oviposition and egg hatching. Specific GSK-3 gene silencing by dsRNA injection in adult females showed a similar phenotype. Furthermore, bright field and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining analysis revealed that ovaries and eggs from dsGSK-3 injected females exhibited specific morphological defects. We also demonstrate that glycogen content was inversely related to activity and transcription levels of GSK-3 during embryogenesis. Lastly, after GSK-3 knockdown, we observed changes in the expression of the Wingless (Wnt) downstream target β-catenin as well as in members of other pathways such as the receptor Notch. Taken together, our results show that GSK-3 regulation is essential for R. prolixus oogenesis and embryogenesis.

  20. Rat skeletal muscle glycogen degradation pathways reveal differential association of glycogen-related proteins with glycogen granules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hongyang; Stapleton, David; Murphy, Robyn M

    2015-06-01

    Glycogenin, glycogen-debranching enzyme (GDE) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) are important enzymes that contribute to glycogen particle metabolism. In Long-Evans Hooded rat whole muscle homogenates prepared from extensor digitorum longus (EDL, fast-twitch) and soleus (SOL, oxidative, predominantly slow twitch), it was necessary to include α-amylase, which releases glucosyl units from glycogen, to detect glycogenin but not GDE or GP. Up to ∼12 % of intramuscular glycogen pool was broken down using either in vitro electrical stimulation or leaving muscle at room temperature >3 h (delayed, post-mortem). Electrical stimulation did not reveal glycogenin unless α-amylase was added, although in post-mortem muscle ∼50 and ∼30 % of glycogenin in EDL and SOL muscles, respectively, was detected compared to the amount detected with α-amylase treatment. Single muscle fibres were dissected from fresh or post-mortem EDL muscles, mechanically skinned to remove surface membrane and the presence of glycogenin, GDE and GP as freely diffusible proteins (i.e. cytoplasmic localization) compared by Western blotting. Diffusibility of glycogenin (∼20 %) and GP (∼60 %) was not different between muscles, although GDE increased from ∼15 % diffusible in fresh muscle to ∼60 % in post-mortem muscle. Under physiologically relevant circumstances, in rat muscle and within detection limits: (1) The total cellular pool of glycogenin is always associated with glycogen granules, (2) GDE is associated with glycogen granules with over half the total pool associated with the outer tiers of glycogen, (3) GP is only ever weakly associated with glycogen granules and (4) addition of α-amylase is necessary in order to detect glycogenin, but not GDE or GP.

  1. Brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like protein-1 cooperates with glycogen synthase kinase-3β to regulate osteogenesis of bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoguang; Liu, Na; Wang, Yizhu; Liu, Jinglong; Shi, Haigang; Qu, Zhenzhen; Du, Tingting; Guo, Bin; Gu, Bin

    2017-01-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with inhibited osteogenesis of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Brain and muscle ARNT-like protein 1 (BMAL1) has been linked to the T2DM-related bone remodeling, however, the specific mechanism is still unclear. Herein, we aimed to determine the role of BMAL1 in T2DM-induced suppression of BMSCs osteogenesis. Inhibited osteogenesis and BMAL1 expression were showed in diabetic BMSCs. And while β-catenin and T cell factor (TCF) expression were decreased, the glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and nemo-like kinase (NLK) expression were increased in diabetic BMSCs. Moreover, over-expression of BMAL1 led to recovered osteogenesis ability and activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, which was partially due to inhibition of GSK-3β caused by over-expression of BMAL1. Taken together, our findings provide new insights into the role of BMAL1 in T2DM-induced suppression of BMSCs osteogenesis. Over-expressed BMAL1 could recover BMSCs osteogenesis in T2DM partially by decreasing GSK-3β expression to activate Wnt/β-catenin pathway. BMAL1 may have a potential use in repairing diabetic bone metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 in the world of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tong; Rodriguez, Marbelys; Kim, Leung

    2009-12-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is one of the few master switch kinases that regulate many aspects of cell functions. Recent studies on cell polarization and migration have shown that GSK3 is also essential for proper regulation of these processes. GSK3 influences cell migration as one of the regulators of the spatiotemporally controlled dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton, microtubules, and cell-to-matrix adhesions. In this mini-review, the effects of GSK3 on these three aspects of cell migration will be discussed.

  3. Relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism of glycogen synthase gene of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and its glycogen content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siwei; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng

    2017-02-01

    Glycogen is important not only for the energy supplementary of oysters, but also for human consumption. High glycogen content can improve the stress survival of oyster. A key enzyme in glycogenesis is glycogen synthase that is encoded by glycogen synthase gene GYS. In this study, the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in coding regions of Crassostrea gigas GYS (Cg-GYS) and individual glycogen content was investigated with 321 individuals from five full-sib families. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) procedure was combined with sequencing to confirm individual SNP genotypes of Cg-GYS. Least-square analysis of variance was performed to assess the relationship of variation in glycogen content of C. gigas with single SNP genotype and SNP haplotype. As a consequence, six SNPs were found in coding regions to be significantly associated with glycogen content ( P < 0.01), from which we constructed four main haplotypes due to linkage disequilibrium. Furthermore, the most effective haplotype H2 (GAGGAT) had extremely significant relationship with high glycogen content ( P < 0.0001). These findings revealed the potential influence of Cg-GYS polymorphism on the glycogen content and provided molecular biological information for the selective breeding of good quality traits of C. gigas.

  4. Skeletal muscle respiratory capacity, endurance, and glycogen utilization.

    PubMed

    Fitts, R H; Booth, F W; Winder, W W; Holloszy, J O

    1975-04-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between physical performance capacity and the mitochondrial content of skeletal muscle. Four groups of rats were trained by means of treadmill running 5 days/wk for 13 wk. One group ran 10 min/day, a second group ran 30 min/day, a third group ran 60 min/day, and a fourth group ran 120 min/day. The magnitude of the exercise-induced adaptive increase in gastrocnemius muscle respiratory capacity varied over a twofold range in the four groups. There were significant correlations between the levels of three mitochondrial markers (cytochrome c, citrate synthase, respiratory capacity) in the animals' gastrocnemius muscles and the duration of a run to exhaustion. There was also a significant correlation between the amounts of glycogen remaining in liver and skeletal muscle after a 30-min-long exercise test and the respiratory capacity of the animal's leg muscles. These findings are compatible with the interpretation that a close relationshiop exists between skeletal muscle mitochondrial content and the capacity to perform endurance exercise.

  5. Gene expression profiling of mice with genetically modified muscle glycogen content.

    PubMed

    Parker, Gretchen E; Pederson, Bartholomew A; Obayashi, Mariko; Schroeder, Jill M; Harris, Robert A; Roach, Peter J

    2006-04-01

    Glycogen, a branched polymer of glucose, forms an energy re-serve in numerous organisms. In mammals, the two largest glyco-gen stores are in skeletal muscle and liver, which express tissue-specific glycogen synthase isoforms. MGSKO mice, in which mGys1 (mouse glycogen synthase) is disrupted, are devoid of muscle glycogen [Pederson, Chen, Schroeder, Shou, DePaoli-Roach and Roach (2004) Mol. Cell. Biol. 24, 7179-7187]. The GSL30 mouse line hyper-accumulates glycogen in muscle [Manchester, Skurat, Roach, Hauschka and Lawrence (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 93, 10707-10711]. We performed a microarray analysis of mRNA from the anterior tibialis, medial gastrocnemius and liver of MGSKO mice, and from the gastroc-nemius of GSL30 mice. In MGSKO mice, transcripts of 79 genes varied in their expression in the same direction in both the anterior tibialis and gastrocnemius. These included several genes encoding proteins proximally involved in glycogen metabolism. The Ppp1r1a [protein phosphatase 1 regulatory (inhibitor) sub-unit 1A] gene underwent the greatest amount of downregulation. In muscle, the downregulation of Pfkfb1 and Pfkfb3, encoding isoforms of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphospha-tase, is consistent with decreased glycolysis. Pathways for branched-chain amino acid, and ketone body utilization appear to be downregulated, as is the capacity to form the gluconeogenic precursors alanine, lactate and glutamine. Expression changes among several members of the Wnt signalling pathway were identified, suggesting an as yet unexplained role in glycogen meta-bolism. In liver, the upregulation of Pfkfb1 and Pfkfb3 expression is consistent with increased glycolysis, perhaps as an adaptation to altered muscle metabolism. By comparing changes in muscle expression between MGSKO and GSL30 mice, we found a subset of 44 genes, the expression of which varied as a function of muscle glycogen content. These genes are candidates for regulation by glycogen levels

  6. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3)-Targeted Therapy and Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Mukesh K.; DeGrado, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is associated with various key biological processes, including glucose regulation, apoptosis, protein synthesis, cell signaling, cellular transport, gene transcription, proliferation, and intracellular communication. Accordingly, GSK-3 has been implicated in a wide variety of diseases and specifically targeted for both therapeutic and imaging applications by a large number of academic laboratories and pharmaceutical companies. Here, we review the structure, function, expression levels, and ligand-binding properties of GSK-3 and its connection to various diseases. A selected list of highly potent GSK-3 inhibitors, with IC50 <20 nM for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-competitive inhibitors and IC50 <5 μM for non-ATP-competitive inhibitors, were analyzed for structure activity relationships. Furthermore, ubiquitous expression of GSK-3 and its possible impact on therapy and imaging are also highlighted. Finally, a rational perspective and possible route to selective and effective GSK-3 inhibitors is discussed. PMID:26941849

  7. Hyperactivity: glycogen synthase kinase-3 as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Mines, Marjelo A

    2013-05-15

    The diagnosis of hyperactivity-associated disorders has increased within the past few years. The prevalence of hyperactivity-associated disorders is indicative of the need to more fully understand the underlying causes and to develop improved therapeutic interventions. There is increasing evidence that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) mediates locomotor hyperactivity in a number of animal models, and therefore may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in hyperactivity-associated behaviors. In this review, we discuss 1) the effect of manipulations of GSK3 in the absence of drugs and disorders on locomotor activity, 2) the role of GSK3 in drug-induced hyperactivity in rodents, and 3) regulation of locomotor activity by GSK3 in transgenic mouse models related to specific disorders. These studies link GSK3 regulation and activity to hyperactivity-associated behaviors and disease pathologies.

  8. Immunochemical Study of the Effect of F2Glc on Glycogen Synthase Translocation and Glycogen Synthesis in Isolated Rat Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Novell, J M; Díaz-Lobo, M

    2017-09-16

    The compound 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-α-D-glucopyranosyl fluoride (F2Glc), which is a nonmetabolized superior glucose analogue, is a potent inhibitor of glycogen phosphorylase and pharmacological properties are reported. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and glycogen synthase (GS) are responsible of the degradation and synthesis, respectively, of glycogen which is a polymer of glucose units that provides a readily available source of energy in mammals. GP and GS are two key enzymes that modulate cellular glucose and glycogen levels; therefore, these proteins are suggested as potential targets for the treatment of diseases related to glycogen metabolism disorders. We studied by Western Blot technique that F2Glc decreased GP activity, and we also showed that F2Glc did not affect GS activity and its translocation from a uniform cytosolic distribution to the hepatocyte periphery, which is crucial for glycogen synthesis, using immunoblotting and immunofluorescence labeling techniques. F2Glc specifically inhibits glycogenolysis pathway and permits a greater deposition of glycogen. These observations open up the possibility of further develop drugs that act specifically on GP. The ability to selectively inhibit GP, which is a key enzyme for the release of glucose from the hepatic glycogen reserve, may represent a new approach for the treatment of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes.

  9. Evidence of Positive Selection for a Glycogen Synthase (GYS1) Mutation in Domestic Horse Populations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A dominantly inherited gain-of-function mutation in the glycogen synthase (GYS1) gene, resulting in excess skeletal muscle glycogen, has been identified in more than 30 horse breeds. This mutation is associated with the disease Equine Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy Type 1, yet persists at high frequency in some breeds. Under historical conditions of daily work and limited feed, excess muscle glycogen may have been advantageous, driving the increase in frequency of this allele. Fine-scale DNA sequencing in 80 horses and genotype assays in 279 horses revealed a paucity of haplotypes carrying the mutant allele when compared with the wild-type allele. Additionally, we found increased linkage disequilibrium, measured by relative extended haplotype homozygosity, in haplotypes carrying the mutation compared with haplotypes carrying the wild-type allele. Coalescent simulations of Belgian horse populations demonstrated that the high frequency and extended haplotype associated with the GYS1 mutation were unlikely to have arisen under neutrality or due to population demography. In contrast, in Quarter Horses, elevated relative extended haplotype homozygosity was associated with multiple haplotypes and may be the result of recent population expansion or a popular sire effect. These data suggest that the GYS1 mutation underwent historical selection in the Belgian, but not in the Quarter Horse. PMID:24215078

  10. Hepatic overexpression of a constitutively active form of liver glycogen synthase improves glucose homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ros, Susana; Zafra, Delia; Valles-Ortega, Jordi; García-Rocha, Mar; Forrow, Stephen; Domínguez, Jorge; Calbó, Joaquim; Guinovart, Joan J

    2010-11-26

    In this study, we tested the efficacy of increasing liver glycogen synthase to improve blood glucose homeostasis. The overexpression of wild-type liver glycogen synthase in rats had no effect on blood glucose homeostasis in either the fed or the fasted state. In contrast, the expression of a constitutively active mutant form of the enzyme caused a significant lowering of blood glucose in the former but not the latter state. Moreover, it markedly enhanced the clearance of blood glucose when fasted rats were challenged with a glucose load. Hepatic glycogen stores in rats overexpressing the activated mutant form of liver glycogen synthase were enhanced in the fed state and in response to an oral glucose load but showed a net decline during fasting. In order to test whether these effects were maintained during long term activation of liver glycogen synthase, we generated liver-specific transgenic mice expressing the constitutively active LGS form. These mice also showed an enhanced capacity to store glycogen in the fed state and an improved glucose tolerance when challenged with a glucose load. Thus, we conclude that the activation of liver glycogen synthase improves glucose tolerance in the fed state without compromising glycogenolysis in the postabsorptive state. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the activation of liver glycogen synthase may provide a potential strategy for improvement of glucose tolerance in the postprandial state.

  11. Stimulation of glycogen synthesis by heat shock in L6 skeletal-muscle cells: regulatory role of site-specific phosphorylation of glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Byoung; Duddy, Noreen; Ragolia, Louis; Begum, Najma

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1(G)) is essential for basal and exercise-induced glycogen synthesis, which is mediated in part by dephosphorylation and activation of glycogen synthase (GS). In the present study, we examined the potential role of site-specific phosphorylation of PP-1(G) in heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. L6 rat skeletal-muscle cells were stably transfected with wild-type PP-1(G) or with PP-1(G) mutants in which site-1 (S1) Ser(48) and site-2 (S2) Ser(67) residues were substituted with Ala. Cells expressing wild-type and PP-1(G) mutants, S1, S2 and S1/S2, were examined for potential alterations in glycogen synthesis after a 60 min heat shock at 45 degrees C, followed by analysis of [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen at 37 degrees C. PP-1(G) S1 mutation caused a 90% increase in glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment, whereas the PP-1(G) S2 mutant was not sensitive to heat stress. The S1/S2 double mutant was comparable with wild-type, which showed a 30% increase over basal. Heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis was accompanied by increased PP-1 and GS activities. The highest activation was observed in S1 mutant. Heat shock also resulted in a rapid and sustained Akt/ glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3 beta) phosphorylation. Wortmannin blocked heat-shock-induced Akt/GSK-3 beta phosphorylation, prevented 2-deoxyglucose uptake and abolished the heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. Muscle glycogen levels regulate GS activity and glycogen synthesis and were found to be markedly depleted in S1 mutant on heat-shock treatment, suggesting that PP-1(G) S1 Ser phosphorylation may inhibit glycogen degradation during thermal stimulation, as S1 mutation resulted in excessive glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment. In contrast, PP-1(G) S2 Ser phosphorylation may promote glycogen breakdown under stressful conditions. Heat-shock-induced glycogenesis appears to be mediated via phosphoinositide 3

  12. Leptin promotes osteoblast differentiation and mineralization of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Zeadin, Melec G.; Butcher, Martin K.; Shaughnessy, Stephen G.; Werstuck, Geoff H.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Leptin promotes osteoblast differentiation of primary smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Leptin regulates the expression of genes involved in osteoblast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Constitutively active GSK-3{beta} attenuates leptin-induced osteoblast differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This suggests that leptin signals through GSK-3{beta} to promote osteoblast differentiation. -- Abstract: In this study, we begin to investigate the underlying mechanism of leptin-induced vascular calcification. We found that treatment of cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle cells (BASMCs) with leptin (0.5-4 {mu}g/ml) induced osteoblast differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that leptin significantly increased the mRNA expression of osteopontin and bone sialoprotein, while down-regulating matrix gla protein (MGP) expression in BASMCs. Key factors implicated in osteoblast differentiation, including members of the Wnt signaling pathway, were examined. Exposure to leptin enhanced phosphorylation of GSK-3{beta} on serine-9 thereby inhibiting activity and promoting the nuclear accumulation of {beta}-catenin. Transfection of BASMCs with an adenovirus that expressed constitutively active GSK-3{beta} (Ad-GSK-3{beta} S9A) resulted in a >2-fold increase in GSK-3{beta} activity and a significant decrease in leptin-induced alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. In addition, qRT-PCR analysis showed that GSK-3{beta} activation resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of osteopontin and bone sialoprotein, but a marked increase in MGP mRNA expression. When taken together, our results suggest a mechanism by which leptin promotes osteoblast differentiation and vascular calcification in vivo.

  13. Investigation of potential glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors using pharmacophore mapping and virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Dessalew, Nigus; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2006-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has attracted significant drug discovery attention in recent years. To investigate the identification of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors, a pharmacophore mapping study was carried out using a set of 21 structurally diverse glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. A hypothesis containing four features: two hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond donor and another hydrogen bond acceptor was found to be the best from the 10 common feature hypotheses produced by HipHop module of Catalyst. The best hypothesis has a high cost of 156.592 and higher best fit values were obtained for the 21 inhibitors using this best hypothesis than the other HipHop hypotheses. The best hypothesis was then used to screen electronically the NCI2000 database. The hits obtained were docked into glycogen synthase kinase-3beta active site. A total of five novel potential leads were proposed after: (i) visual examination of how well they dock into the glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site, (ii) comparative analysis of their FlexX, G-Score, PMF-Score, ChemScore and D-Scores values, (iii) comparison of their best fit value with the known inhibitors and (iv) examination of the how the hits retain interactions with the important amino acid residues of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta-binding site.

  14. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors: Rescuers of cognitive impairments

    PubMed Central

    King, Margaret K.; Pardo, Marta; Cheng, Yuyan; Downey, Kimberlee; Jope, Richard S.; Beurel, Eléonore

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of cognitive processes is a devastating outcome of many diseases, injuries, and drugs affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Most often, very little can be done by available therapeutic interventions to improve cognitive functions. Here we review evidence that inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) ameliorates cognitive deficits in a wide variety of animal models of CNS diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Fragile X syndrome, Down syndrome, Parkinson's disease, spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, traumatic brain injury, and others. GSK3 inhibitors also improve cognition following impairments caused by therapeutic interventions, such as cranial irradiation for brain tumors. These findings demonstrate that GSK3 inhibitors are able to ameliorate cognitive impairments caused by a diverse array of diseases, injury, and treatments. The improvements in impaired cognition instilled by administration of GSK3 inhibitors appear to involve a variety of different mechanisms, such as supporting long-term potentiation and diminishing long-term depression, promotion of neurogenesis, reduction of inflammation, and increasing a number of neuroprotective mechanisms. The potential for GSK3 inhibitors to repair cognitive deficits associated with many conditions warrants further investigation of their potential for therapeutic interventions, particularly considering the current dearth of treatments available to reduce loss of cognitive functions. PMID:23916593

  15. Pivotal roles of glycogen synthase-3 in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cervello, Melchiorre; Augello, Giuseppa; Cusimano, Antonella; Emma, Maria Rita; Balasus, Daniele; Azzolina, Antonina; McCubrey, James A; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2017-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers in the world, and represents the second most frequently cancer and third most common cause of death from cancer worldwide. At advanced stage, HCC is a highly aggressive tumor with a poor prognosis and with very limited response to common therapies. Therefore, there is still the need for new effective and well-tolerated therapeutic strategies. Molecular-targeted therapies hold promise for HCC treatment. One promising molecular target is the multifunctional serine/threonine kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3). The roles of GSK-3β in HCC remain controversial, several studies suggested a possible role of GSK-3β as a tumor suppressor gene in HCC, whereas, other studies indicate that GSK-3β is a potential therapeutic target for this neoplasia. In this review, we will focus on the different roles that GSK-3 plays in HCC and its interaction with signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of HCC, such as Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF), Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, Hedgehog (HH), and TGF-β pathways. In addition, the pivotal roles of GSK3 in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion and metastasis will be also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Koros, Eliza; Dorner-Ciossek, Cornelia

    2007-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta is recognized as a ubiquitous multifunctional enzyme involved in the modulation of many aspects of neuronal function. Inhibitory control of GSK-3beta has been identified to be crucial for the phosphoinositide 3'-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (Akt)-mediated cell survival. Several lines of evidence converge in implicating abnormal GSK-3beta activity in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Preclinical evidence showing that both typical and atypical antipsychotics can indirectly inhibit the activity of GSK-3beta, has pointed to GSK-3beta as a possible therapeutic target for schizophrenia. It is well known that GSK-3beta can be indirectly inhibited via regulation of several intracellular signaling cascades, including the canonical Wnt, Reelin and tyrosine kinase receptor (Trk)-PI3K-Akt. Recently, direct inhibition of GSK-3beta has emerged as a possible option in the pharmacotherapy of several neuropsychiatric disorders. There is, however, a number of issues that need to be considered regarding therapeutic utility of GSK-3beta inhibitors. This article reviews the evidence supporting the possible role of aberrant GSK-3beta in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and thus suggesting GSK-3beta to be a potential therapeutic target for this disorder.

  17. [Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type IIIA by detecting glycogen debranching enzyme activity, glycogen content and structure in muscle].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; We, Min; Song, Hong-mei; Qiu, Zheng-qing; Zhang, Wei-min; Wu, Xiao-yan; Lu, Chao-xia; Qi, Jun-ming; Jing, Hong; Li, Fan

    2009-08-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) gene (AGL gene) mutation resulting in hepatomegaly, hypoglycemia, short stature and hyperlipidemia. GSD IIIA, involves both liver and muscle, and accounts for up to 80% of GSD III. The definitive diagnosis depends on either mutation analysis or liver and muscle glycogen debranching enzyme activity tests. This study aimed to establish enzymologic diagnostic method for GSD IIIA firstly in China by detecting muscular GDE activity, glycogen content and structure and to determine the normal range of muscular GDE activity, glycogen content and structure in Chinese children. Muscle samples were collected from normal controls (male 15, female 20; 12-78 years old), molecularly confirmed GSD III A patients (male 8, female 4, 2-27 years old) and other myopathy patients (male 9, 2-19 years old). Glycogen in the muscle homogenate was degraded into glucose by amyloglucosidase and phosphorylase respectively. The glycogen content and structure were identified by glucose yield determination. The debranching enzyme activity was determined using limit dextrin as substrate. Independent samples Kruskal-Wallis H test, Nemenyi-Wilcoxson-Wilcox test, and Chi-square test were used for statistical analyses by SPSS 11.5. (1) GSD III A patients' glycogen content were higher, but G1P/G ratio and GDE activity were lower than those of the other two groups (P < 0.01). In all of the three parameters, there were no significant difference between normal controls and other myopathy patients. (2) The range of normal values: glycogen content 0.31%-0.43%, G1P/G ratio 22.37%- 26.43%, GDE activity 0.234-0.284 micromol/(g. min). (3) Enzymologic diagnostic method had a power similar to that of gene analysis in diagnosis of GSD-IIIA patients. The sensitivity and specificity of enzymologic diagnostic method and mutation detection were 91.7% and 100% respectively. Enzymologic diagnostic

  18. The inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 by insulin or insulin-like growth factor 1 in the rat skeletal muscle cell line L6 is blocked by wortmannin, but not by rapamycin: evidence that wortmannin blocks activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in L6 cells between Ras and Raf.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, D A; Alessi, D R; Vandenheede, J R; McDowell, H E; Hundal, H S; Cohen, P

    1994-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is inactivated in vitro by p70 S6 kinase or MAP kinase-activated protein kinase-1 beta (MAPKAP kinase-1 beta; also known as Rsk-2). Here we show that GSK3 isoforms are inhibited by 40% within minutes after stimulation of the rat skeletal-muscle cell line L6 with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) or insulin. GSK3 was similarly inhibited in rabbit skeletal muscle after an intravenous injection of insulin. Inhibition resulted from increased phosphorylation of GSK3, probably at a serine/threonine residue(s), because it was reversed by incubation with protein phosphatase-2A. Rapamycin blocked the activation of p70 S6 kinase by IGF-1 in L6 cells, but had no effect on the inhibition of GSK3 or the activation of MAPKAP kinase-1 beta. In contrast, wortmannin, a potent inhibitor of PtdIns 3-kinase, prevented the inactivation of GSK3 and the activation of MAPKAP kinase-1 beta and p70 S6 kinase by IGF-1 or insulin. Wortmannin also blocked the activation of p74raf-1. MAP kinase kinase and p42 MAP kinase, but not the formation of GTP-Ras by IGF-1. The results suggest that the stimulation of glycogen synthase by insulin/IGF-1 in skeletal muscle involves the MAP-KAP kinase-1-catalysed inhibition of GSK3, as well as the previously described activation of the glycogen-associated form of protein phosphatase-1. Images Figure 1 PMID:7945242

  19. GLUT4 and Glycogen Synthase Are Key Players in Bed Rest–Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Biensø, Rasmus S.; Ringholm, Stine; Kiilerich, Kristian; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels-Jacob; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Guerra, Borja; Plomgaard, Peter; van Hall, Gerrit; Treebak, Jonas T.; Saltin, Bengt; Lundby, Carsten; Calbet, Jose A.L.; Pilegaard, Henriette; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F.P.

    2012-01-01

    To elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind physical inactivity–induced insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, 12 young, healthy male subjects completed 7 days of bed rest with vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained before and after. In six of the subjects, muscle biopsies were taken from both legs before and after a 3-h hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp performed 3 h after a 45-min, one-legged exercise. Blood samples were obtained from one femoral artery and both femoral veins before and during the clamp. Glucose infusion rate and leg glucose extraction during the clamp were lower after than before bed rest. This bed rest–induced insulin resistance occurred together with reduced muscle GLUT4, hexokinase II, protein kinase B/Akt1, and Akt2 protein level, and a tendency for reduced 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity. The ability of insulin to phosphorylate Akt and activate glycogen synthase (GS) was reduced with normal GS site 3 but abnormal GS site 2+2a phosphorylation after bed rest. Exercise enhanced insulin-stimulated leg glucose extraction both before and after bed rest, which was accompanied by higher GS activity in the prior-exercised leg than the rested leg. The present findings demonstrate that physical inactivity–induced insulin resistance in muscle is associated with lower content/activity of key proteins in glucose transport/phosphorylation and storage. PMID:22403297

  20. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates glycogen synthase activity in 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.P.; Bowen-Pope, D.F.; Ross, R.; Krebs, E.G.

    1986-05-01

    Hormonal regulation of glycogen synthase, an enzyme that can be phosphorylated on multiple sites, is often associated with changes in its phosphorylation state. Enzyme activation is conventionally monitored by determining the synthase activity ratio ((activity in the absence of glucose 6-P)/(activity in the presence of glucose 6-P)). Insulin causes an activation of glycogen synthase with a concomitant decrease in its phosphate content. In a previous report, the authors showed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) increases the glycogen synthase activity ratio in Swiss 3T3 cells. The time and dose-dependency of this response was similar to that of insulin. Their recent results indicate that PDGF also stimulates glycogen synthase activity. Enzyme activation was maximal after 30 min. of incubation with PDGF; the time course observed was very similar to that with insulin and EGF. At 1 ng/ml (0.03nM), PDGF caused a maximal stimulation of 4-fold in synthase activity ratio. Half-maximal stimulation was observed at 0.2 ng/ml (6 pM). The time course of changes in enzyme activity ratio closely followed that of /sup 125/I-PDGF binding. The authors data suggest that PDGF, as well as EFG and insulin, may be important in regulating glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation mechanisms.

  1. Postexercise muscle glycogen synthesis with combined glucose and fructose ingestion.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Gareth A; Hulston, Carl J; Mann, Christopher H; Roper, Helen P; Tipton, Kevin D; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2008-10-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of using combined glucose and fructose (GF) ingestion as a means to stimulate short-term (4 h) postexercise muscle glycogen synthesis compared to glucose only (G). On two separate occasions, six endurance-trained men performed an exhaustive glycogen-depleting exercise bout followed by a 4-h recovery period. Muscle biopsy samples were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle at 0, 1, and 4 h after exercise. Subjects ingested carbohydrate solutions containing G (90 g x h(-1)) or GF (G = 60 g x h(-1); F = 30 g x h(-1)) commencing immediately after exercise and every 30 min thereafter. Immediate postexercise muscle glycogen concentrations were similar in both trials (G = 128 +/- 25 mmol x kg(-1) dry muscle (dm) vs GF = 112 +/- 16 mmol x kg(-1) dm; P > 0.05). Total glycogen storage during the 4-h recovery period was 176 +/- 33 and 155 +/- 31 mmol x kg(-1) dm for G and GF, respectively (G vs GF, P > 0.05). Hence, mean muscle glycogen synthesis rates during the 4-h recovery period did not differ between the two conditions (G = 44 +/- 8 mmol x kg(-1) dm x h(-1) vs GF = 39 +/- 8 mmol x kg(-1) dm x h(-1), P > 0.05). Plasma glucose and serum insulin responses during the recovery period were similar in both conditions, although plasma lactate concentrations were significantly elevated during GF compared to G (by approximately 0.8 mmol x L(-1), P < 0.05). Glucose and glucose/fructose (2:1 ratio) solutions, ingested at a rate of 90 g x h(-1), are equally effective at restoring muscle glycogen in exercised muscles during the recovery from exhaustive exercise.

  2. Restoration of muscle functionality by genetic suppression of glycogen synthesis in a murine model of Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Douillard-Guilloux, Gaelle; Raben, Nina; Takikita, Shoichi; Ferry, Arnaud; Vignaud, Alban; Guillet-Deniau, Isabelle; Favier, Maryline; Thurberg, Beth L; Roach, Peter J; Caillaud, Catherine; Richard, Emmanuel

    2010-02-15

    Glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) or Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency, leading to lysosomal glycogen accumulation. Affected individuals store glycogen mainly in cardiac and skeletal muscle tissues resulting in fatal hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and respiratory failure in the most severe infantile form. Enzyme replacement therapy has already proved some efficacy, but results remain variable especially in skeletal muscle. Substrate reduction therapy was successfully used to improve the phenotype in several lysosomal storage disorders. We have recently demonstrated that shRNA-mediated reduction of glycogen synthesis led to a significant reduction of glycogen accumulation in skeletal muscle of GSDII mice. In this paper, we analyzed the effect of a complete genetic elimination of glycogen synthesis in the same GSDII model. GAA and glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) KO mice were inter-crossed to generate a new double-KO model. GAA/GYS1-KO mice exhibited a profound reduction of the amount of glycogen in the heart and skeletal muscles, a significant decrease in lysosomal swelling and autophagic build-up as well as a complete correction of cardiomegaly. In addition, the abnormalities in glucose metabolism and insulin tolerance observed in the GSDII model were corrected in double-KO mice. Muscle atrophy observed in 11-month-old GSDII mice was less pronounced in GAA/GYS1-KO mice, resulting in improved exercise capacity. These data demonstrate that long-term elimination of muscle glycogen synthesis leads to a significant improvement of structural, metabolic and functional defects in GSDII mice and offers a new perspective for the treatment of Pompe disease.

  3. Muscle Glycogen Remodeling and Glycogen Phosphate Metabolism following Exhaustive Exercise of Wild Type and Laforin Knockout Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Jose M.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.; Meyer, Catalina M.; Segvich, Dyann M.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen, the repository of glucose in many cell types, contains small amounts of covalent phosphate, of uncertain function and poorly understood metabolism. Loss-of-function mutations in the laforin gene cause the fatal neurodegenerative disorder, Lafora disease, characterized by increased glycogen phosphorylation and the formation of abnormal deposits of glycogen-like material called Lafora bodies. It is generally accepted that the phosphate is removed by the laforin phosphatase. To study the dynamics of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylation in vivo under physiological conditions, mice were subjected to glycogen-depleting exercise and then monitored while they resynthesized glycogen. Depletion of glycogen by exercise was associated with a substantial reduction in total glycogen phosphate and the newly resynthesized glycogen was less branched and less phosphorylated. Branching returned to normal on a time frame of days, whereas phosphorylation remained suppressed over a longer period of time. We observed no change in markers of autophagy. Exercise of 3-month-old laforin knock-out mice caused a similar depletion of glycogen but no loss of glycogen phosphate. Furthermore, remodeling of glycogen to restore the basal branching pattern was delayed in the knock-out animals. From these results, we infer that 1) laforin is responsible for glycogen dephosphorylation during exercise and acts during the cytosolic degradation of glycogen, 2) excess glycogen phosphorylation in the absence of laforin delays the normal remodeling of the branching structure, and 3) the accumulation of glycogen phosphate is a relatively slow process involving multiple cycles of glycogen synthesis-degradation, consistent with the slow onset of the symptoms of Lafora disease. PMID:26216881

  4. Isolation of a glycogen synthase I kinase that is independent of adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Schlender, K K; Reimann, E M

    1975-01-01

    Three protein kinases (ATP:protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37) were detected when the soluble fraction of rabbit kidney medulla was chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose with a linear NaC1 gradient. The first two kinases eluted (Peak 1 and Peak II) were cyclic-AMP-dependent, wheras Peak III was cyclic-AMP-independent. A procedure was developed to separate the catalytic subunit of Peak II cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase (representing the bulk of the histone kinase activity) from Peak III protein kinase. In contrast to the catalytic subunit, Peak III protein kinase phosphorylated casein more rapidly than histone. Peak III was insensitive to the heat-stable protein inhibitor of cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinases and appeared to have a higher requirement for ATP than did the catalytic subunit. Peak III catalyzed the conversion of glycogen synthase (UDPglucose:glycogen alpha-4-glucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.11) from the I (glucose-6-phosphate-independent) to the D (glucose-6-phosphate-dependent) form. This conversion was dependent on Mg-2+ and ATP and was unaffected by cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or the protein inhibitor. Glycogen synthase I in the soluble fraction of kidney medulla could be converted to the D form by endogenous glycogen synthase I kinase if Mg-2+ and ATP were added. Most of this glycogen synthase I kinase activity was unaffected by cyclic AMP or by the protein inhibitor, suggesting that Peak III may be of major importance in the regulation of glycogen synthase in vivo. PMID:166380

  5. Mutations in the liver glycogen synthase gene in children with hypoglycemia due to glycogen storage disease type 0.

    PubMed Central

    Orho, M; Bosshard, N U; Buist, N R; Gitzelmann, R; Aynsley-Green, A; Blümel, P; Gannon, M C; Nuttall, F Q; Groop, L C

    1998-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type 0 (GSD-0) is a rare form of fasting hypoglycemia presenting in infancy or early childhood and accompanied by high blood ketones and low alanine and lactate concentrations. Although feeding relieves symptoms, it often results in postprandial hyperglycemia and hyperlactatemia. The glycogen synthase (GS) activity has been low or immeasurable in liver biopsies, whereas the liver glycogen content has been only moderately decreased. To investigate whether mutations in the liver GS gene (GYS2) on chromosome 12p12.2 were involved in GSD-0, we determined the exon-intron structure of the GYS2 gene and examined nine affected children from five families for linkage of GSD-0 to the GYS2 gene. Mutation screening of the 16 GYS2 exons was done by single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and direct sequencing. Liver GS deficiency was diagnosed from liver biopsies (GS activity and glycogen content). GS activity in the liver of the affected children was extremely low or nil, resulting in subnormal glycogen content. After suggestive linkage to the GYS2 gene had been established (LOD score = 2.9; P < 0.01), mutation screening revealed several different mutations in these families, including a premature stop codon in exon 5 (Arg246X), a 5'-donor splice site mutation in intron 6 (G+1T--> CT), and missense mutations Asn39Ser, Ala339Pro, His446Asp, Pro479Gln, Ser483Pro, and Met491Arg. Seven of the affected children carried mutations on both alleles. The mutations could not be found in 200 healthy persons. Expression of the mutated enzymes in COS7 cells indicated severely impaired GS activity. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that GSD-0 is caused by different mutations in the GYS2 gene. PMID:9691087

  6. Hypohydration Does Not Impair Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Resynthesis After Exercise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    AD-A262 085 9 3 -0 6 4 1 1 Hypohydration does not impair skeletal muscle glycogen resynthesis after exercise P. DARRELL NEUFER , MICHAEL N. SAWKA...5007 NEUFER , P. DARRELL, MICHAEL N. SAWKA, ANDREW J. for the restoration of preexercise glycogen levels, More- YOUNG, MARK D. QUIGLEY, WILLIAM A...Scand. S. Clin. Lab. Invest. 38:5.57 -560. 1978. tory Integratiue (’omp. Physiol. 14l: R25--R31, 198.3.19. NEUFER . P. D., A. J. YOUNG, AND M. N. SAWKA

  7. Piperidine and pyrrolidine analogs as glycogen synthase activators; a patent evaluation (WO2011058122).

    PubMed

    Uto, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    A small series of piperidine analogs that effectively activate glycogen synthase (GS) was prepared in WO2011058122. The treatment or prophylaxis of metabolic disease and disorders by these novel GS activators is claimed. These compounds represent further variations around a structural motif explored in the prior patent publications by Roche.

  8. Nrf2-Mediated Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yagishita, Yoko; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Kitajima, Yasuo; Nunomiya, Aki; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Pi, Jingbo; Biswal, Shyam S.

    2016-01-01

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) contributes to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis in vivo. Nrf2 suppresses blood glucose levels by protecting pancreatic β cells from oxidative stress and improving peripheral tissue glucose utilization. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which Nrf2 contributes to the maintenance of glucose homeostasis, we generated skeletal muscle (SkM)-specific Keap1 knockout (Keap1MuKO) mice that express abundant Nrf2 in their SkM and then examined Nrf2 target gene expression in that tissue. In Keap1MuKO mice, blood glucose levels were significantly downregulated and the levels of the glycogen branching enzyme (Gbe1) and muscle-type PhKα subunit (Phka1) mRNAs, along with those of the glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) and the phosphorylase b kinase α subunit (PhKα) protein, were significantly upregulated in mouse SkM. Consistent with this result, chemical Nrf2 inducers promoted Gbe1 and Phka1 mRNA expression in both mouse SkM and C2C12 myotubes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that Nrf2 binds the Gbe1 and Phka1 upstream promoter regions. In Keap1MuKO mice, muscle glycogen content was strongly reduced and forced GBE expression in C2C12 myotubes promoted glucose uptake. Therefore, our results demonstrate that Nrf2 induction in SkM increases GBE and PhKα expression and reduces muscle glycogen content, resulting in improved glucose tolerance. Our results also indicate that Nrf2 differentially regulates glycogen metabolism in SkM and the liver. PMID:27044864

  9. Hypohydration does not impair skeletal muscle glycogen resynthesis after exercise.

    PubMed

    Neufer, P D; Sawka, M N; Young, A J; Quigley, M D; Latzka, W A; Levine, L

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of moderate hypohydration (HY) on skeletal muscle glycogen resynthesis after exhaustive exercise. On two occasions, eight males completed 2 h of intermittent cycle ergometer exercise (4 bouts of 17 min at 60% and 3 min at 80% of maximal O2 consumption/10 min rest) to reduce muscle glycogen concentrations (control values 711 +/- 41 mumol/g dry wt). During one trial, cycle exercise was followed by several hours of light upper body exercise in the heat without fluid replacement to induce HY (-5% body wt); in the second trial, sufficient water was ingested during the upper body exercise and heat exposure to maintain euhydration (EU). In both trials, 400 g of carbohydrate were ingested at the completion of exercise and followed by 15 h of rest while the desired hydration level was maintained. Muscle biopsy samples were obtained from the vastus lateralis immediately after intermittent cycle exercise (T1) and after 15 h of rest (T2). During the HY trial, the muscle water content was lower (P less than 0.05) at T1 and T2 (288 +/- 9 and 265 +/- 5 ml/100 g dry wt, respectively; NS) than during EU (313 +/- 8 and 301 +/- 4 ml/100 g dry wt, respectively; NS). Muscle glycogen concentration was not significantly different during EU and HY at T1 (200 +/- 35 vs. 251 +/- 50 mumol/g dry wt) or T2 (452 +/- 34 vs. 491 +/- 35 mumol/g dry wt). These data indicate that, despite reduced water content during the first 15 h after heavy exercise, skeletal muscle glycogen resynthesis is not impaired.

  10. Mitochondrial distribution and glycogen dynamics suggest diffusion constraints in muscle fibers of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Kim-Laura; Dillaman, Richard M; Kinsey, Stephen T

    2003-05-01

    The scaling of mitochondrial distribution, citrate synthase activity, and post-contractile glycogen recovery was examined in muscle fibers of the blue crab, Callinectes sapidus. The fast-twitch muscle fibers of C. sapidus can reach extremely large dimensions, which may impose constraints on aerobic metabolic processes. However, muscle cells from small crabs are not giant, meaning that during development muscle fibers cross and greatly exceed the surface area to volume (SAV) and diffusion threshold that is adhered to by the cells of most organisms. Cell diameters in the smallest size class were approximately 100 microm, while the largest size class had cell diameters in excess of 500 microm. In the smallest cells, the fractional area of subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar mitochondria was similar. However, in the largest cells, mitochondria were almost exclusively subsarcolemmal. Total fractional area of mitochondria was highest in the largest cells due to a proliferation of subsarcolemmal mitochondria. In contrast, citrate synthase activity decreased as cell size increased. Following burst contractile activity, glycogen concentrations decreased significantly and remained depressed for several hours in muscle comprised of giant cells, consistent with previous findings that anaerobic glycogenolysis fuels certain components of post-contractile recovery. However, in muscle composed of the smallest muscle cells, glycogen levels did not decrease significantly following burst activity. While normal scaling of aerobic metabolism would predict a slower aerobic recovery in larger animals, the present results suggest that cellular organization, SAV, and intracellular diffusion distances also impose constraints on aerobic processes in C. sapidus.

  11. Glucose-induced glycogenesis in the liver involves the glucose-6-phosphate-dependent dephosphorylation of glycogen synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Cadefau, J; Bollen, M; Stalmans, W

    1997-01-01

    Non-metabolized glucose derivatives may cause inactivation of phosphorylase but, unlike glucose, they are unable to elicit activation of glycogen synthase in isolated hepatocytes. We report here that, after the previous inactivation of phosphorylase by one of these glucose derivatives (2-deoxy-2-fluoro-alpha-glucosyl fluoride), glycogen synthase was progressively activated by addition of increasing concentrations of glucose. Under these conditions, the degree of activation of glycogen synthase was linearly correlated with the intracellular glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) concentration. Addition of glucosamine, an inhibitor of glucokinase, decreased both parameters in parallel. Further experiments using an inhibitor of either protein kinases (5-iodotubercidin) or protein phosphatases (microcystin) in isolated hepatocytes indicated that Glc-6-P does not affect glycogen-synthase kinase activity but enhances the glycogen-synthase phosphatase reaction. Experiments in vitro showed that the synthase phosphatase activity of glycogen-bound type-1 protein phosphatase was increased by physiological concentrations of Glc-6-P (0.1-0.5 mM), but not by 2.5 mM fructose-6-P, fructose-1-P or glucose-1-P. At physiological ionic strength, the glycogen-associated synthase phosphatase activity was nearly entirely Glc-6-P-dependent, but Glc-6-P did not relieve the strong inhibitory effect of phosphorylase a. The large stimulatory effects of 2.5 mM Glc-6-P, with glycogen synthase b and phosphorylase a as substrates, appeared to be mostly substrate-directed, while the modest effects observed with casein and histone IIA pointed to an additional stimulation of glycogen-bound protein phosphatase-1 by Glc-6-P. We conclude that glucose elicits hepatic synthase phosphatase activity both by removal of the inhibitor, phosphorylase a, and by generation of the stimulator, Glc-6-P. PMID:9148744

  12. Glucose-induced glycogenesis in the liver involves the glucose-6-phosphate-dependent dephosphorylation of glycogen synthase.

    PubMed

    Cadefau, J; Bollen, M; Stalmans, W

    1997-03-15

    Non-metabolized glucose derivatives may cause inactivation of phosphorylase but, unlike glucose, they are unable to elicit activation of glycogen synthase in isolated hepatocytes. We report here that, after the previous inactivation of phosphorylase by one of these glucose derivatives (2-deoxy-2-fluoro-alpha-glucosyl fluoride), glycogen synthase was progressively activated by addition of increasing concentrations of glucose. Under these conditions, the degree of activation of glycogen synthase was linearly correlated with the intracellular glucose-6-phosphate (Glc-6-P) concentration. Addition of glucosamine, an inhibitor of glucokinase, decreased both parameters in parallel. Further experiments using an inhibitor of either protein kinases (5-iodotubercidin) or protein phosphatases (microcystin) in isolated hepatocytes indicated that Glc-6-P does not affect glycogen-synthase kinase activity but enhances the glycogen-synthase phosphatase reaction. Experiments in vitro showed that the synthase phosphatase activity of glycogen-bound type-1 protein phosphatase was increased by physiological concentrations of Glc-6-P (0.1-0.5 mM), but not by 2.5 mM fructose-6-P, fructose-1-P or glucose-1-P. At physiological ionic strength, the glycogen-associated synthase phosphatase activity was nearly entirely Glc-6-P-dependent, but Glc-6-P did not relieve the strong inhibitory effect of phosphorylase a. The large stimulatory effects of 2.5 mM Glc-6-P, with glycogen synthase b and phosphorylase a as substrates, appeared to be mostly substrate-directed, while the modest effects observed with casein and histone IIA pointed to an additional stimulation of glycogen-bound protein phosphatase-1 by Glc-6-P. We conclude that glucose elicits hepatic synthase phosphatase activity both by removal of the inhibitor, phosphorylase a, and by generation of the stimulator, Glc-6-P.

  13. Pre-eclampsia is associated with an increase in trophoblast glycogen content and glycogen synthase activity, similar to that found in hydatidiform moles.

    PubMed Central

    Arkwright, P D; Rademacher, T W; Dwek, R A; Redman, C W

    1993-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a placental disorder, but until now, biochemical details of dysfunction have been lacking. During an analysis of the oligosaccharide content of syncytiotrophoblast microvesicles purified from the placental chorionic villi of 10 primigravid women with proteinuric pre-eclampsia, we found an excess of glycogen breakdown products. Further investigation revealed a 10-fold increase in glycogen content (223 +/- 117 micrograms glycogen/mg protein), when compared with controls matched for gestational age at delivery (23 +/- 18 micrograms glycogen/mg protein) (P < 0.01). This was confirmed by examination of electron micrographs of chorionic villous tissue stained for glycogen. The increase in glycogen content was associated with 16 times more glycogen synthase (1,323 +/- 1,013 relative to 83 +/- 96 pmol glucose/mg protein per min) (P < 0.001), and a threefold increase in glycogen phosphorylase activity (2,280 +/- 1,360 relative to 700 +/- 540 pmol glucose/mg protein per min; P < 0.05). Similar changes in glycogen metabolism were found in trophoblast microvesicles derived from hydatidiform moles. Glycogen accumulation in villous syncytiotrophoblast may be a metabolic marker of immaturity of this cell which is unable to divide. The implications of these findings with regard to the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia are discussed. Images PMID:8514882

  14. Influence of Skeletal Muscle Glycogen on Passive Rewarming after Hypothermia,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    D-A186 451 INFLUENCE OF SKETA MUCL GLCGNOASV REWIRRNING AFTER NYPOTHERNIALU) ARMY RESEARCH INST OF ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE NATICK MA P D NEUFER ET AL...SecurityClassification) (U) Influence of skeletal muscle glycogen on passive rewarming after hypothermia 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) P. Darrell Neufer , Andrew J. Young...Include Area Code) 22c OFFICE SYMBOL P. Darrell Neufer (617) 651-4834 SGRD-UE-MEP Abstract "Individuals performing work and athletes competing in cold

  15. Characterization of Function of the GlgA2 Glycogen/Starch Synthase in Cyanobacterium sp. Clg1 Highlights Convergent Evolution of Glycogen Metabolism into Starch Granule Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kadouche, Derifa; Ducatez, Mathieu; Cenci, Ugo; Tirtiaux, Catherine; Suzuki, Eiji; Nakamura, Yasunori; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Terrasson, Amandine Durand; Diaz-Troya, Sandra; Florencio, Francisco Javier; Arias, Maria Cecilia; Striebeck, Alexander; Palcic, Monica; Ball, Steven G; Colleoni, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    At variance with the starch-accumulating plants and most of the glycogen-accumulating cyanobacteria, Cyanobacterium sp. CLg1 synthesizes both glycogen and starch. We now report the selection of a starchless mutant of this cyanobacterium that retains wild-type amounts of glycogen. Unlike other mutants of this type found in plants and cyanobacteria, this mutant proved to be selectively defective for one of the two types of glycogen/starch synthase: GlgA2. This enzyme is phylogenetically related to the previously reported SSIII/SSIV starch synthase that is thought to be involved in starch granule seeding in plants. This suggests that, in addition to the selective polysaccharide debranching demonstrated to be responsible for starch rather than glycogen synthesis, the nature and properties of the elongation enzyme define a novel determinant of starch versus glycogen accumulation. We show that the phylogenies of GlgA2 and of 16S ribosomal RNA display significant congruence. This suggests that this enzyme evolved together with cyanobacteria when they diversified over 2 billion years ago. However, cyanobacteria can be ruled out as direct progenitors of the SSIII/SSIV ancestral gene found in Archaeplastida. Hence, both cyanobacteria and plants recruited similar enzymes independently to perform analogous tasks, further emphasizing the importance of convergent evolution in the appearance of starch from a preexisting glycogen metabolism network.

  16. Validation of musculoskeletal ultrasound to assess and quantify muscle glycogen content. A novel approach.

    PubMed

    Hill, John C; Millán, Iñigo San

    2014-09-01

    Glycogen storage is essential for exercise performance. The ability to assess muscle glycogen levels should be an important advantage for performance. However, skeletal muscle glycogen assessment has only been available and validated through muscle biopsy. We have developed a new methodology using high-frequency ultrasound to assess skeletal muscle glycogen content in a rapid, portable, and noninvasive way using MuscleSound (MuscleSound, LCC, Denver, CO) technology. To validate the utilization of high-frequency musculoskeletal ultrasound for muscle glycogen assessment and correlate it with histochemical glycogen quantification through muscle biopsy. Twenty-two male competitive cyclists (categories: Pro, 1-4; average height, 183.7 ± 4.9 cm; average weight, 76.8 ± 7.8 kg) performed a steady-state test on a cyclergometer for 90 minutes at a moderate to high exercise intensity, eliciting a carbohydrate oxidation of 2-3 g·min⁻¹ and a blood lactate concentration of 2 to 3 mM. Pre- and post-exercise glycogen content from rectus femoris muscle was measured using histochemical analysis through muscle biopsy and through high-frequency ultrasound scans using MuscleSound technology. Correlations between muscle biopsy glycogen histochemical quantification (mmol·kg⁻¹) and high-frequency ultrasound methodology through MuscleSound technology were r = 0.93 (P < 0.0001) pre-exercise and r = 0.94 (P < 0.0001) post-exercise. The correlation between muscle biopsy glycogen quantification and high-frequency ultrasound methodology for the change in glycogen from pre- and post-exercise was r = 0.81 (P < 0.0001). These results demonstrate that skeletal muscle glycogen can be measured quickly and noninvasively through high-frequency ultrasound using MuscleSound technology.

  17. Benzisoxazole analogs as glycogen synthase activators, a patent evaluation (WO2011057956).

    PubMed

    Uto, Yoshikazu

    2012-06-01

    A small series of benzisoxazole analogs that effectively activate glycogen synthase (GS) was prepared in WO2011057956. These novel GS activators are claimed to be beneficial for the treatment or prophylaxis of metabolic disease and disorders. The 1,2-benzisoxazole-3-ol moiety is utilized in the present patent as a bioisoster of benzoic acid, which has often been employed in prior examples of the GS activators.

  18. Pathological glycogenesis through glycogen synthase 1 and suppression of excessive AMP kinase activity in myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Bhanot, Haymanti; Reddy, Mamatha M; Nonami, Atsushi; Weisberg, Ellen L; Bonal, Dennis; Kirschmeier, Paul T; Salgia, Sabrina; Podar, Klaus; Galinsky, Ilene; Chowdary, Tirumala K; Neuberg, Donna; Tonon, Giovanni; Stone, Richard M; Asara, John; Griffin, James D; Sattler, Martin

    2015-07-01

    The rapid proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells is highly dependent on increased glucose metabolism. Through an unbiased metabolomics analysis of leukemia cells, we found that the glycogenic precursor UDP-D-glucose is pervasively upregulated, despite low glycogen levels. Targeting the rate-limiting glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) not only decreased glycolytic flux but also increased activation of the glycogen-responsive AMP kinase (AMPK), leading to significant growth suppression. Further, genetic and pharmacological hyper-activation of AMPK was sufficient to induce the changes observed with GYS1 targeting. Cancer genomics data also indicate that elevated levels of the glycogenic enzymes GYS1/2 or GBE1 (glycogen branching enzyme 1) are associated with poor survival in AML. These results suggest a novel mechanism whereby leukemic cells sustain aberrant proliferation by suppressing excess AMPK activity through elevated glycogenic flux and provide a therapeutic entry point for targeting leukemia cell metabolism.

  19. Pathological glycogenesis through glycogen synthase 1 and suppression of excessive AMP kinase activity in myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Nonami, Atsushi; Weisberg, Ellen L.; Bonal, Dennis; Kirschmeier, Paul T.; Salgia, Sabrina; Podar, Klaus; Galinsky, Ilene; Chowdary, Tirumala K.; Neuberg, Donna; Tonon, Giovanni; Stone, Richard M.; Asara, John; Griffin, James D.; Sattler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The rapid proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells is highly dependent on increased glucose metabolism. Through an unbiased metabolomics analysis of leukemia cells, we found that the glycogenic precursor UDP-D-glucose is pervasively upregulated, despite low glycogen levels. Targeting the rate-limiting glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) not only decreased glycolytic flux but also increased activation of the glycogen-responsive AMPK (AMP kinase), leading to significant growth suppression. Further, genetic and pharmacological hyper-activation of AMPK was sufficient to induce the changes observed with GYS1 targeting. Cancer genomics data also indicate that elevated levels of the glycogenic enzymes GYS1/2 or GBE1 (glycogen branching enzyme 1) are associated with poor survival in AML. These results suggest a novel mechanism whereby leukemic cells sustain aberrant proliferation by suppressing excess AMPK activity through elevated glycogenic flux and provide a therapeutic entry point for targeting leukemia cell metabolism. PMID:25703587

  20. Effect of carbohydrate-protein supplementation postexercise on rat muscle glycogen synthesis and phosphorylation of proteins controlling glucose storage.

    PubMed

    Hara, Daisuke; Morrison, Paul J; Ding, Zhenping; Ivy, John L

    2011-10-01

    To examine whether addition of protein to a carbohydrate supplement enhances muscle glycogen synthesis, we compared the muscle glycogen concentrations of rats that had been depleted of their muscle glycogen stores with a 3-hour swim and immediately supplemented with a placebo (Con), carbohydrate (CHO), or carbohydrate plus protein supplement (C+P). Rats were given either 0.9 g carbohydrate per kilogram body mass for the CHO group or 0.9 g carbohydrate + 0.3 g protein per kilogram body mass for the C+P groups. Muscle samples of the red and white quadriceps were excised immediately, 30 minutes, or 90 minutes postexercise. Glycogen concentration of the C+P group was greater than that of the CHO group at 90 minutes postexercise in both red (C+P, 28.3 ± 2.6 µmol/g vs CHO, 22.4 ± 2.0 µmol/g; P < .05) and white (C+P, 24.9 ± 2.4 µmol/g vs CHO, 17.64 ± 1.5 µmol/g; P < .01) quadriceps. Protein kinase B phosphorylation was greater in the C+P-30 group (the number following treatment group abbreviation refers to time [in minutes] of euthanasia following exercise) than the sedentary control and exercised control groups in red quadriceps at 30 minutes and in white quadriceps at 90 minutes postexercise. This difference was not observed in the CHO group. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase was significantly reduced 30 minutes postexercise and returned to baseline levels by 90 minutes postexercise in both CHO- and C+P-supplemented groups, with no difference between supplements. These results demonstrated that the addition of protein to a carbohydrate supplement will enhance the rate of muscle glycogen restoration postexercise and may involve facilitation of the glucose transport process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Beneficial effect of swimming in thermal waters on muscle glycogen depletion].

    PubMed

    D'Amelio, G; Boninsegna, A; Calzavara, M; Bertolini, M

    1991-05-01

    The effect of swimming in the termal water on muscle glycogen stores was studied. After 30 min the muscle glycogen results in a diminution, but it is not depleted. On the contrary, 30 min of swimming in normal water results in a depletion of muscle glycogene stores. The glycemic homeostasis is well maintained in thermal water, and hypoglicemia occurs only after swimming in normal water.

  2. Detection of human muscle glycogen by natural abundance /sup 13/C NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Avison, M.J.; Rothman, D.L.; Nadel, E.; Shulman, R.G.

    1988-03-01

    Natural abundance /sup 13/C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect signals from glycogen in the human gastrocnemius muscle. The reproducibility of the measurement was demonstrated, and the ability to detect dynamic changes was confirmed by measuring a decrease in muscle glycogen levels after exercise and its subsequent repletion. Single frequency gated /sup 1/H decoupling was used to obtain decoupled natural abundance /sup 13/C NMR spectra of the C-1 position of muscle glycogen.

  3. Influence of skeletal muscle glycogen on passive rewarming after hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Neufer, P D; Young, A J; Sawka, M N; Muza, S R

    1988-08-01

    To examine the influence of muscle glycogen on the thermal responses to passive rewarming subsequent to mild hypothermia, eight subjects completed two cold-water immersions (18 degrees C), followed by 75 min of passive rewarming (24 degrees C air, resting in blanket). The experiments followed several days of different exercise-diet regimens eliciting either low (LMG; 141.0 +/- 10.5 mmol.kg.dry wt-1) or normal (NMG; 526.2 +/- 44.2 mmol.kg.dry wt-1) prewarming muscle glycogen levels. Cold-water immersion was performed for 180 min or to a rectal temperature (Tre) of 35.5 degrees C. In four subjects (group A, body fat = 20 +/- 1%), postimmersion Tre was similar to preimmersion Tre for both trials (36.73 +/- 0.18 vs. 37.26 +/- 0.18 degrees C, respectively). Passive rewarming in group A resulted in an increase in Tre of only 0.13 +/- 0.08 degrees C. Conversely, initial rewarming Tre for the other four subjects (group B, body fat = 12 +/- 1%) averaged 35.50 +/- 0.05 degrees C for both trials. Rewarming increased Tre similarly in group B during both LMG (0.76 +/- 0.25 degrees C) and NMG (0.89 +/- 0.13 degrees C). Afterdrop responses, evident only in those individuals whose body core cooled during immersion (group B), were not different between LMG and NMG. These data support the contention that Tre responses during passive rewarming are related to body insulation. Furthermore these results indicate that low muscle glycogen levels do not impair rewarming time nor alter after-drop responses during passive rewarming after mild-to-moderate hypothermia.

  4. Regulation of glycogen resynthesis following exercise. Dietary considerations.

    PubMed

    Friedman, J E; Neufer, P D; Dohm, G L

    1991-04-01

    With the cessation of exercise, glycogen repletion begins to take place rapidly in skeletal muscle and can result in glycogen levels higher than those present before exercise. Understanding the rate-limiting steps that regulate glycogen synthesis will provide us with strategies to increase the resynthesis of glycogen during recovery from exercise, and thus improve performance. Given the importance of muscle glycogen to endurance performance, various factors which may optimise glycogen resynthesis rate and insure complete restoration have been of interest to both the scientist and athlete. The time required for complete muscle glycogen resynthesis after prolonged moderate intensity exercise is generally considered to be 24 hours provided approximately 500 to 700g of carbohydrate is ingested. Muscle glycogen synthesis rate is highest during the first 2 hours after exercise. Ingestion of 0.70g glucose/kg bodyweight every 2 hours appears to maximise glycogen resynthesis rate at approximately 5 to 6 mumol/g wet weight/h during the first 4 to 6 hours after exhaustive exercise. Further enhancement of glycogen resynthesis rate with ingestion of greater than 0.70g glucose/kg bodyweight appears to be limited by the constraints imposed by gastric emptying. Ingestion of glucose or sucrose results in similar muscle glycogen resynthesis rates while glycogen synthesis in liver is better served with the ingestion of fructose. Also, increases in muscle glycogen content during the first 4 to 6 hours after exercise are greater with ingestion of simple as compared with complex carbohydrate. Glycogen synthase activity is a key component in the regulation of glycogen resynthesis. Glycogen synthase enzyme exists in 2 states: the less active, more phosphorylated (D) form which is under allosteric control of glucose-6-phosphate, and the more active, less phosphorylated (I) form which is independent of glucose-6-phosphate. There is generally an inverse relationship between glycogen content

  5. Fgk3 glycogen synthase kinase is important for development, pathogenesis, and stress responses in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jun; Wang, Guanghui; Jiang, Cong; Xu, Jin-Rong; Wang, Chenfang

    2015-01-01

    Wheat scab caused by Fusarium graminearum is an important disease. In a previous study, the FGK3 glycogen synthase kinase gene orthologous to mammalian GSK3 was identified as an important virulence factor. Although GSK3 orthologs are well-conserved, none of them have been functionally characterized in fungal pathogens. In this study, we further characterized the roles of FGK3 gene. The Δfgk3 mutant had pleiotropic defects in growth rate, conidium morphology, germination, and perithecium formation. It was non-pathogenic in infection assays and blocked in DON production. Glycogen accumulation was increased in the Δfgk3 mutant, confirming the inhibitory role of Fgk3 on glycogen synthase. In FGK3-GFP transformants, GFP signals mainly localized to the cytoplasm in conidia but to the cytoplasm and nucleus in hyphae. Moreover, the expression level of FGK3 increased in response to cold, H2O2, and SDS stresses. In the Δfgk3 mutant, cold, heat, and salt stresses failed to induce the expression of the stress response-related genes FgGRE2, FgGPD1, FgCTT1, and FgMSN2. In the presence of 80 mM LiCl, a GSK3 kinase inhibitor, the wild type displayed similar defects to the Δfgk3 mutant. Overall, our results indicate that FGK3 is important for growth, conidiogenesis, DON production, pathogenicity, and stress responses in F. graminearum. PMID:25703795

  6. Effects of genetic and environmental factors on muscle glycogen content in Japanese Black cattle

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Tomohiko; Shoji, Noriaki; Saito, Kunihiko; Suzuki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    Monosaccharides such as glucose contribute to the development of meat flavor upon heating via the Maillard reaction; therefore, monosaccharide content is related to beef palatability. Here, we analyzed the effects of genetic and environmental factors on the content of glycogen, one of the precursors of monosaccharides, in the muscles of 958 fattened Japanese Black cattle from Yamagata Prefecture. Analysis of variance showed that muscle glycogen content was affected by the farm and postmortem periods, but not by sex, slaughter age, slaughter month or number of days detained at the slaughter yard. Additionally, consumption of digestible brown rice feed elevated muscle glycogen levels. Glycogen heritability was estimated to be 0.34, and genetic correlations between glycogen and carcass weight (CW) or beef marbling standard (BMS) were weak. The predicted breeding values varied among paternal lines. These results demonstrated that genetic factors might improve muscle glycogen content and therefore beef palatability, but do not influence CW or BMS. PMID:24716455

  7. Glycogen hyperaccumulation in white muscle fibres of RN- carrier pigs. A biochemical and ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Estrade, M; Vignon, X; Rock, E; Monin, G

    1993-02-01

    1. The dominant RN- gene affects meat quality of pigs by increasing the glycogen content of muscle. Glycogen localization was studied in Longissimus dorsi muscle from RN- carrier pigs (RN- pigs) and rn+ rn+ homozygous pigs (rn+ pigs). 2. Ultrastructural study showed an excess of glycogen in the sarcoplasm of white fibres from RN- pigs as compared to rn+ pigs. 3. Lysosome-enriched fractions extracted from muscles contained 6% of the tissue glycogen content in both types of pigs. The distribution of the glycogen particles between sarcoplasm and lysosomes appeared to be similar in both RN- and rn+ pig tissues. 4. White fibres from RN- pigs with an increased glycogen level showed two ultrastructural alterations: the sarcoplasmic compartment was abnormally enlarged and a large proportion of mitochondria was morphologically modified. 5. The RN- gene seems, therefore, to be associated with alterations in the glycolytic metabolism, in the distribution of proteic compartments and in the oxidative metabolism of white muscle fibres.

  8. Analysis of Mesorhizobium loti glycogen operon: effect of phosphoglucomutase (pgm) and glycogen synthase (g/gA) null mutants on nodulation of Lotus tenuis.

    PubMed

    Lepek, Viviana C; D'Antuono, Alejandra L; Tomatis, Pablo E; Ugalde, Juan E; Giambiagi, Susana; Ugalde, Rodolfo A

    2002-04-01

    The phosphoglucomutase (pgm) gene codes for a key enzyme required for the formation of UDP-glucose and ADP-glucose, the sugar donors for the biosynthesis of glucose containing polysaccharides. A Mesorhizobium loti pgm null mutant obtained in this study contains an altered form of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lacks exopolysaccharide (EPS), beta cyclic glucan, and glycogen and is unable to nodulate Lotus tenuis. The nonnodulating phenotype of the pgm mutant was not due to the absence of glycogen, since a glycogen synthase (glgA) null mutant effectively nodulates this legume. In M. loti, pgm is part of the glycogen metabolism gene cluster formed by GlgP (glycogen phosphorylase), glgB (glycogen branching), glgC (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase), glgA, pgm, and glgX (glycogen debranching). The genes are transcribed as a single transcript from glgP to at least pgm under the control of a strong promoter (promoter I) upstream of glgP. An alternative promoter (promoter II), mapping in a 154-bp DNA fragment spanning 85 bp upstream of the glgA start codon and the first 69 bp of the glgA coding region, controls the expression of glgA and pgm, independently of the rest of the upstream genes. Primer extension experiments showed that transcription starts 19 bp upstream of the glgA start codon.

  9. Possible mechanism for changes in glycogen metabolism in unloaded soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Tischler, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism has been shown to be affected in a number of ways by different models of hypokinesia. In vivo glycogen levels in the soleus muscle are known to be increased by short-term denervation and harness suspension. In addition, exposure to 7 days of hypogravity also caused a dramatic increase in glycogen concentration in this muscle. The biochemical alterations caused by unloading that may bring about these increases in glycogen storage in the soleus were sought.

  10. Possible mechanism for changes in glycogen metabolism in unloaded soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Tischler, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism has been shown to be affected in a number of ways by different models of hypokinesia. In vivo glycogen levels in the soleus muscle are known to be increased by short-term denervation and harness suspension. In addition, exposure to 7 days of hypogravity also caused a dramatic increase in glycogen concentration in this muscle. The biochemical alterations caused by unloading that may bring about these increases in glycogen storage in the soleus were sought.

  11. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase involved in variations of muscle glycogen and breast meat quality between lean and fat chickens.

    PubMed

    Sibut, V; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Tesseraud, S; Godet, E; Bordeau, T; Cailleau-Audouin, E; Chartrin, P; Duclos, M J; Berri, C

    2008-11-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the molecular mechanisms associated with the differences in muscle glycogen content and breast meat quality between 2 experimental lines of chicken divergently selected on abdominal fatness. The glycogen at death (estimated through the glycolytic potential) of the pectoralis major muscle and the quality of the resulting meat were estimated in the 2 lines. The fat chickens exhibited greater glycolytic potential, and in turn lower ultimate pH than the lean chickens. Consequently, the breast meat of fat birds was paler and less colored (i.e., less red and yellow), and exhibited greater drip loss compared with that of lean birds. In relation to these variations, transcription and activation levels of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) were investigated. The main difference observed between lines was a 3-fold greater level of AMPK activation, evaluated through phosphorylation of AMPKalpha-(Thr(172)), in the muscle of lean birds. At the transcriptional level, data indicated concomitant down- and upregulation for the gamma1 and gamma2 AMPK subunit isoforms, respectively, in the muscle of lean chickens. Transcriptional levels of enzymes directly involved in glycogen turnover were also investigated. Data showed greater gene expression for glycogen synthase, glycogen phosphorylase, and the gamma subunit of phosphorylase kinase in lean birds. Together, these data indicate that selection on body fatness in chicken alters the muscle glycogen turnover and content and consequently the quality traits of the resulting meat. Alterations of AMPK activity could play a key role in these changes.

  12. Glucose uptake and transport in contracting, perfused rat muscle with different pre-contraction glycogen concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Hespel, P; Richter, E A

    1990-01-01

    1. Glucose uptake and transport, muscle glycogen, free glucose and glucose-6-phosphate concentrations were studied in perfused resting and contracting rat skeletal muscle with different pre-contraction glycogen concentrations. Rats were pre-conditioned by a combination of swimming exercise and diet, resulting in either low (glycogen-depleted rats), normal (control rats) or high (supercompensated rats) muscle glycogen concentrations at the time their hindlimbs were perfused. 2. Compared with control rats, pre-contraction muscle glycogen concentration was approximately 40% lower in glycogen-depleted rats, whereas it was 40% higher in supercompensated rats. Muscle glycogen break-down correlated positively (r = 0.76; P less than 0.001) with pre-contraction muscle glycogen concentration. 3. Glucose uptake during contractions was approximately 50% higher in glycogen-depleted hindquarters than in control hindquarters; in supercompensated hindquarters it was 30% lower. When rats with similar muscle glycogen concentrations were compared, glucose uptake in hindquarters from rats that had exercised on the preceding day was approximately 20% higher than in hindquarters from rats that had not exercised on the preceding day. 4. Muscle membrane glucose transport, as measured by the rate of accumulation of 14C-3-O-methylglucose in the contracting muscles, was 25% lower in supercompensated than in glycogen-depleted muscles at the onset as well as at the end of the 15 min contraction period. 5. Intracellular concentrations of free glucose and glucose-6-phosphate were higher at rest and during the entire 15-min stimulation period in supercompensated muscles than in glycogen-depleted muscles, and glucose uptake during contractions correlated negatively with free glucose (r = -0.52; P less than 0.01) as well as with glucose-6-phosphate (r = -0.49; P less than 0.01) concentrations. 6. It is concluded that: (a) The rate of glucose uptake in contracting skeletal muscle is dependent on the

  13. Excess glycogen does not resolve high ultimate pH of oxidative muscle.

    PubMed

    England, Eric M; Matarneh, Sulaiman K; Oliver, Emily M; Apaoblaza, Ariel; Scheffler, Tracy L; Shi, Hao; Gerrard, David E

    2016-04-01

    Skeletal muscle glycogen content can impact the extent of postmortem pH decline. Compared to glycolytic muscles, oxidative muscles contain lower glycogen levels antemortem which may contribute to the higher ultimate pH. In an effort to explore further the participation of glycogen in postmortem metabolism, we postulated that increasing the availability of glycogen would drive additional pH decline in oxidative muscles to equivalent pH values similar to the ultimate pH of glycolytic muscles. Glycolysis and pH declines were compared in porcine longissimus lumborum (glycolytic) and masseter (oxidative) muscles using an in vitro system in the presence of excess glycogen. The ultimate pH of the system containing longissimus lumborum reached a value similar to that observed in intact muscle. The pH decline of the system containing masseter samples stopped prematurely resulting in a higher ultimate pH which was similar to that of intact masseter muscle. To investigate further, we titrated powdered longissimus lumborum and masseter samples in the reaction buffer. As the percentage of glycolytic sample increased, the ultimate pH decreased. These data show that oxidative muscle produces meat with a high ultimate pH regardless of glycogen content and suggest that inherent muscle factors associated with glycolytic muscle control the extent of pH decline in pig muscles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Glycogen synthesis in muscle fibers during active recovery from intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Timothy J; Armstrong, Alex A; Rao, Arjun; Liu, Hawk; Lawrence, Steve; Fournier, Paul A

    2003-04-01

    There is evidence that active recovery impairs glycogen repletion in skeletal muscles of fasted individuals. Our main goal was to examine the impact of active recovery on the glycogen stores of the different muscle fiber types. Eight endurance-trained individuals cycled for 2.5 min at 130% [OV0312]O(2peak) followed by a 30-s all-out cycling sprint. After exercise, the participants were subjected to either a passive recovery or an active recovery protocol that consisted of pedalling for 45 min at 40% [OV0312]O(2peak). During active recovery, blood lactate and pH returned more rapidly toward preexercise levels than during passive recovery. In contrast, average muscle glycogen content remained at stable levels during active recovery (209 +/- 32 and 202 +/- 30 mmol.kg-1 at 0 and 45 min of recovery, respectively) but increased significantly in response to passive recovery (from 185 +/- 27 to 283 +/- 42 mmol.kg-1). The pattern of change in periodic acid-Schiff staining intensity across muscle fibers suggests that the impact of active recovery on average muscle glycogen content is different from that observed at the levels of the individual muscle fibers, with active recovery having no effect on glycogen resynthesis in Type II muscle fibers but causing glycogen breakdown in Type I muscle fibers. Although active recovery was also associated with higher plasma catecholamines and lower insulin levels, such an unfavorable hormonal environment had no effect on glycogen resynthesis in Type II muscle fibers. Active recovery in comparison to passive recovery does not affect glycogen resynthesis in Type II muscle fibers despite being associated with an unfavorable hormonal environment but results in a marked glycogen mobilization in Type I muscle fibers.

  15. Neurodegeneration and functional impairments associated with glycogen synthase accumulation in a mouse model of Lafora disease

    PubMed Central

    Valles-Ortega, Jordi; Duran, Jordi; Garcia-Rocha, Mar; Bosch, Carles; Saez, Isabel; Pujadas, Lluís; Serafin, Anna; Cañas, Xavier; Soriano, Eduardo; Delgado-García, José M; Gruart, Agnès; Guinovart, Joan J

    2011-01-01

    Lafora disease (LD) is caused by mutations in either the laforin or malin gene. The hallmark of the disease is the accumulation of polyglucosan inclusions called Lafora Bodies (LBs). Malin knockout (KO) mice present polyglucosan accumulations in several brain areas, as do patients of LD. These structures are abundant in the cerebellum and hippocampus. Here, we report a large increase in glycogen synthase (GS) in these mice, in which the enzyme accumulates in LBs. Our study focused on the hippocampus where, under physiological conditions, astrocytes and parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons expressed GS and malin. Although LBs have been described only in neurons, we found this polyglucosan accumulation in the astrocytes of the KO mice. They also had LBs in the soma and some processes of PV+ interneurons. This phenomenon was accompanied by the progressive loss of these neuronal cells and, importantly, neurophysiological alterations potentially related to impairment of hippocampal function. Our results emphasize the relevance of the laforin–malin complex in the control of glycogen metabolism and highlight altered glycogen accumulation as a key contributor to neurodegeneration in LD. PMID:21882344

  16. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Interaction Protein Functions as an A-kinase Anchoring Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Hundsrucker, Christian; Skroblin, Philipp; Christian, Frank; Zenn, Hans-Michael; Popara, Viola; Joshi, Mangesh; Eichhorst, Jenny; Wiesner, Burkhard; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Reif, Bernd; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussmann, Enno

    2010-01-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) include a family of scaffolding proteins that target protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling proteins to cellular compartments and thereby confine the activities of the associated proteins to distinct regions within cells. AKAPs bind PKA directly. The interaction is mediated by the dimerization and docking domain of regulatory subunits of PKA and the PKA-binding domain of AKAPs. Analysis of the interactions between the dimerization and docking domain and various PKA-binding domains yielded a generalized motif allowing the identification of AKAPs. Our bioinformatics and peptide array screening approaches based on this signature motif identified GSKIP (glycogen synthase kinase 3β interaction protein) as an AKAP. GSKIP directly interacts with PKA and GSK3β (glycogen synthase kinase 3β). It is widely expressed and facilitates phosphorylation and thus inactivation of GSK3β by PKA. GSKIP contains the evolutionarily conserved domain of unknown function 727. We show here that this domain of GSKIP and its vertebrate orthologues binds both PKA and GSK3β and thereby provides a mechanism for the integration of PKA and GSK3β signaling pathways. PMID:20007971

  17. Monte Carlo method based QSAR modeling of maleimide derivatives as glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Živković, Jelena V; Trutić, Nataša V; Veselinović, Jovana B; Nikolić, Goran M; Veselinović, Aleksandar M

    2015-09-01

    The Monte Carlo method was used for QSAR modeling of maleimide derivatives as glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitors. The first QSAR model was developed for a series of 74 3-anilino-4-arylmaleimide derivatives. The second QSAR model was developed for a series of 177 maleimide derivatives. QSAR models were calculated with the representation of the molecular structure by the simplified molecular input-line entry system. Two splits have been examined: one split into the training and test set for the first QSAR model, and one split into the training, test and validation set for the second. The statistical quality of the developed model is very good. The calculated model for 3-anilino-4-arylmaleimide derivatives had following statistical parameters: r(2)=0.8617 for the training set; r(2)=0.8659, and r(m)(2)=0.7361 for the test set. The calculated model for maleimide derivatives had following statistical parameters: r(2)=0.9435, for the training, r(2)=0.9262 and r(m)(2)=0.8199 for the test and r(2)=0.8418, r(av)(m)(2)=0.7469 and ∆r(m)(2)=0.1476 for the validation set. Structural indicators considered as molecular fragments responsible for the increase and decrease in the inhibition activity have been defined. The computer-aided design of new potential glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitors has been presented by using defined structural alerts.

  18. The Crystal Structures of the Open and Catalytically Competent Closed Conformation of Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Fang; Jia, Xiaofei; Yep, Alejandra; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.

    2009-07-06

    Escherichia coli glycogen synthase (EcGS, EC 2.4.1.21) is a retaining glycosyltransferase (GT) that transfers glucose from adenosine diphosphate glucose to a glucan chain acceptor with retention of configuration at the anomeric carbon. EcGS belongs to the GT-B structural superfamily. Here we report several EcGS x-ray structures that together shed considerable light on the structure and function of these enzymes. The structure of the wild-type enzyme bound to ADP and glucose revealed a 15.2 degrees overall domain-domain closure and provided for the first time the structure of the catalytically active, closed conformation of a glycogen synthase. The main chain carbonyl group of His-161, Arg-300, and Lys-305 are suggested by the structure to act as critical catalytic residues in the transglycosylation. Glu-377, previously thought to be catalytic is found on the alpha-face of the glucose and plays an electrostatic role in the active site and as a glucose ring locator. This is also consistent with the structure of the EcGS(E377A)-ADP-HEPPSO complex where the glucose moiety is either absent or disordered in the active site

  19. Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta as a target for the therapy of shock and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dugo, Laura; Collin, Marika; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2007-02-01

    After the discovery that glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3beta plays a fundamental role in the regulation of the activity of nuclear factor kappaB, a number of studies have investigated the effects of this protein kinase in the regulation of the inflammatory process. The GSK-3beta inhibition, using genetically modified cells and chemically different pharmacological inhibitors, affects the regulation of various inflammatory mediators in vitro and in vivo. Insulin, an endogenous inhibitor of GSK-3 in the pathway leading to the regulation of glycogen synthase activity, has recently been clinically used in the therapy for septic shock. The beneficial anti-inflammatory effects of insulin in preclinical and clinical studies could possibly be due, at least in part, to the inhibition of GSK-3 and not directly correlated to the regulation of blood glucose. We describe the latest studies describing the effects of GSK-3 inhibition as potential target of the therapy for diseases associated with inflammation, ischemia/reperfusion, and shock.

  20. Transcriptional regulation of pig GYS1 gene by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilin; Wang, Yan; Zhong, Tao; Guo, Jiazhong; Li, Li; Zhang, Hongping; Wang, Linjie

    2017-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a ubiquitous serine/threonine kinase and has important roles in glycogen metabolism biosynthesis. Studies have revealed that GSK3β can directly regulate the glycogen synthase activity, yet little is known about the regulation of GSK3β on GYS1 gene transcription. Here, we show that overexpression of GSK3β decreased the mRNA expression level of GYS1. Then we cloned approximately 1.5 kb of pig GYS1 gene promoter region, generated sequential deletion constructs, and evaluated their activity. A gradual increase of the promoter activity was seen with increasing length of the promoter sequence, reaching its highest activity to the sequence corresponding to nt -350 to +224, and then decreased. However, the activities of constructed promoter fragments show different responses to GSK3β co-transfection. By analyzing a series of GYS1 promoter reporter constructs, we have defined two crucial regions (-1488 to -539, -350 to -147) that are responsible for GSK3β-induced transcriptional repression. Furthermore, the ChIP results revealed that only the first and second NF-κB sites of GYS1 promoter could bind to p65, and overexpression of GSK3β induced a significant decrease in p65 binding to the second NF-κB binding site, suggesting that GSK3β may regulate expression of GYS1 gene through binding to the second rather than the first NF-κB site. These data suggest that the NF-κB plays important roles in the transcriptional activity of pig GYS1 gene regulated by GSK3β.

  1. Local depletion of glycogen with supramaximal exercise in human skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Gejl, Kasper D; Ørtenblad, Niels; Andersson, Erik; Plomgaard, Peter; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Nielsen, Joachim

    2017-05-01

    Glycogen is stored in local spatially distinct compartments within skeletal muscle fibres and is the main energy source during supramaximal exercise. Using quantitative electron microscopy, we show that supramaximal exercise induces a differential depletion of glycogen from these compartments and also demonstrate how this varies with fibre types. Repeated exercise alters this compartmentalized glycogen depletion. The results obtained in the present study help us understand the muscle metabolic dynamics of whole body repeated supramaximal exercise, and suggest that the muscle has a compartmentalized local adaptation to repeated exercise, which affects glycogen depletion. Skeletal muscle glycogen is heterogeneously distributed in three separated compartments (intramyofibrillar, intermyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal). Although only constituting 3-13% of the total glycogen volume, the availability of intramyofibrillar glycogen is of particular importance to muscle function. The present study aimed to investigate the depletion of these three subcellular glycogen compartments during repeated supramaximal exercise in elite athletes. Ten elite cross-country skiers (aged 25 ± 4 years, V̇O2 max : 65 ± 4 ml kg(-1)  min(-1) ; mean ± SD) performed four ∼4 min supramaximal sprint time trials (STT 1-4) with 45 min of recovery. The subcellular glycogen volumes in musculus triceps brachii were quantified from electron microscopy images before and after both STT 1 and 4. During STT 1, the depletion of intramyofibrillar glycogen was higher in type 1 fibres [-52%; (-89:-15%)] than type 2 fibres [-15% (-52:22%)] (P = 0.02), whereas the depletion of intermyofibrillar glycogen [main effect: -19% (-33:0%), P = 0.006] and subsarcolemmal glycogen [main effect: -35% (-66:0%), P = 0.03] was similar between fibre types. By contrast, only intermyofibrillar glycogen volume was significantly reduced during STT 4, in both fibre types [main effect: -31% (-50:-11%), P = 0

  2. Ambient pH controls glycogen levels by regulating glycogen synthase gene expression in Neurospora crassa. New insights into the pH signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; de Paula, Renato Magalhães; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a polysaccharide widely distributed in microorganisms and animal cells and its metabolism is under intricate regulation. Its accumulation in a specific situation results from the balance between glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase activities that control synthesis and degradation, respectively. These enzymes are highly regulated at transcriptional and post-translational levels. The existence of a DNA motif for the Aspergillus nidulans pH responsive transcription factor PacC in the promoter of the gene encoding glycogen synthase (gsn) in Neurospora crassa prompted us to investigate whether this transcription factor regulates glycogen accumulation. Transcription factors such as PacC in A. nidulans and Rim101p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae play a role in the signaling pathway that mediates adaptation to ambient pH by inducing the expression of alkaline genes and repressing acidic genes. We showed here that at pH 7.8 pacC was over-expressed and gsn was down-regulated in wild-type N. crassa coinciding with low glycogen accumulation. In the pacC(KO) strain the glycogen levels and gsn expression at alkaline pH were, respectively, similar to and higher than the wild-type strain at normal pH (5.8). These results characterize gsn as an acidic gene and suggest a regulatory role for PACC in gsn expression. The truncated recombinant protein, containing the DNA-binding domain specifically bound to a gsn DNA fragment containing the PacC motif. DNA-protein complexes were observed with extracts from cells grown at normal and alkaline pH and confirmed by ChIP-PCR analysis. The PACC present in these extracts showed equal molecular mass, indicating that the protein is already processed at normal pH, in contrast to A. nidulans. Together, these results show that the pH signaling pathway controls glycogen accumulation by regulating gsn expression and suggest the existence of a different mechanism for PACC activation in N. crassa.

  3. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3ß Enhances Cognitive Recovery after Stroke: The Role of TAK1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venna, Venugopal Reddy; Benashski, Sharon E.; Chauhan, Anjali; McCullough, Louise D.

    2015-01-01

    Memory deficits are common among stroke survivors. Identifying neuroprotective agents that can prevent memory impairment or improve memory recovery is a vital area of research. Glycogen synthase kinase-3ß (GSK-3ß) is involved in several essential intracellular signaling pathways. Unlike many other kinases, GSK-3ß is active only when…

  4. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3ß Enhances Cognitive Recovery after Stroke: The Role of TAK1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venna, Venugopal Reddy; Benashski, Sharon E.; Chauhan, Anjali; McCullough, Louise D.

    2015-01-01

    Memory deficits are common among stroke survivors. Identifying neuroprotective agents that can prevent memory impairment or improve memory recovery is a vital area of research. Glycogen synthase kinase-3ß (GSK-3ß) is involved in several essential intracellular signaling pathways. Unlike many other kinases, GSK-3ß is active only when…

  5. Chelation of extracellular calcium-induced cell death was prevented by glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Takadera, Tsuneo; Ohtsuka, Megumi; Aoki, Haruka

    2010-03-01

    Calcium ion is a secondary messenger that mediates a variety of physiological responses of neurons, including cell survival responses. To determine the role of calcium in regulating neuronal survival and death, we examined whether chelation of extracellular calcium with EGTA induces caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death and whether glycogen synthase kinase-3 is involved in EGTA-induced cell death in PC12 cells. EGTA increased apoptotic cell death with morphological changes characterized by cell shrinkage and nuclear condensation and fragmentation accompanied by caspase activation. EGTA increased GRP78 protein expression, suggesting that EGTA induces ER stress. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors prevented EGTA-induced apoptosis. In addition, nerve growth factor and insulin growth factor-I completely blocked EGTA-induced cell death. Moreover, caspase-3 activation was inhibited by glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors. These results suggest that chelation of extracellular calcium with EGTA induces caspase-dependent apoptosis, and the activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 is involved in the death of PC12 cells.

  6. Critical role of glycogen synthase kinase-3ß in regulating the avian heterophil response to Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A microarray-assisted gene expression screen of chicken heterophils revealed glycogen synthase kinase-3ß (GSK-3ß), a multifunctional Ser/Thr kinase, to be consistently up-regulated 30-180 min following stimulation with Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis). The present study was ...

  7. Creatine supplementation does not affect human skeletal muscle glycogen content in the absence of prior exercise.

    PubMed

    Sewell, Dean A; Robinson, Tristan M; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2008-02-01

    Due to the current lack of clarity, we examined whether 5 days of dietary creatine (Cr) supplementation per se can influence the glycogen content of human skeletal muscle. Six healthy male volunteers participated in the study, reporting to the laboratory on four occasions to exercise to the point of volitional exhaustion, each after 3 days of a controlled normal habitual dietary intake. After a familiarization visit, participants cycled to exhaustion in the absence of any supplementation (N), and then 2 wk later again they cycled to exhaustion after 5 days of supplementation with simple sugars (CHO). Finally, after a further 2 wk, they again cycled to exhaustion after 5 days of Cr supplementation. Muscle samples were taken at rest before exercise, at the time point of exhaustion in visit 1, and at subsequent visit time of exhaustion. There was a treatment effect on muscle total Cr content in Cr compared with N and CHO supplementation (P < 0.01). Resting muscle glycogen content was elevated above N following CHO (P < 0.05) but not after Cr. At exhaustion following N, glycogen content was no different from CHO and Cr measured at the same time point during exercise. Cr supplementation under conditions of controlled habitual dietary intake had no effect on muscle glycogen content at rest or after exhaustive exercise. We suggest that any Cr-associated increases in muscle glycogen storage are the result of an interaction between Cr supplementation and other mediators of muscle glycogen storage.

  8. Restoration of anabolic deficit and muscle glycogen consumption in competitive orienteering.

    PubMed

    Johansson, C; Tsai, L; Hultman, E; Tegelman, R; Pousette, A

    1990-06-01

    Consumption and restoration of muscle glycogen and changes in anabolic and catabolic steroid hormones were analyzed in five male elite orienteers during and after an orienteering competition. The magnitude of glycogen consumption and pronounced increase in serum-cortisol during the orienteering race reflect the great muscular output demands during forest running. The free testosterone/cortisol ratio was normalized to the initial level within four hours post-exercise. Synchronously, only 25% of the muscle glycogen loss was restored. Within 24 hours post-exercise all runners showed normalized levels of testosterone, cortisol and free testosterone/cortisol ratio. The glycogen content was also restored except in one of the runners. We conclude that daily orienteering competitions per se do not seem to create risks for developing a state of hormonal imbalance or significant decrease in glycogen when the carbohydrate supply is appropriate.

  9. Evaluation of Improved Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3α Inhibitors in Models of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Theresa; Benajiba, Lina; Göring, Stefan; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Schmidt, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The challenge for Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibitor design lies in achieving high selectivity for one isoform over the other. The therapy of certain diseases, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may require α-isoform specific targeting. The scorpion shaped GSK-3 inhibitors developed by our group achieved the highest GSK-3α selectivity reported so far, but suffered from insufficient aqueous solubility. This work presents the solubility-driven optimization of our isoform-selective inhibitors using a scorpion shaped lead. Among 15 novel compounds, compound 27 showed high activity against GSK-3α/β with the highest GSK-3α selectivity reported to date. Compound 27 was profiled for bioavailability and toxicity in a zebrafish embryo phenotype assay. Selective GSK-3α targeting in AML cell lines was achieved with compound 27, resulting in a strong differentiation phenotype and colony formation impairment, confirming the potential of GSK-3α inhibition in AML therapy. PMID:26496242

  10. Regulation of persistent sodium currents by glycogen synthase kinase 3 encodes daily rhythms of neuronal excitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jodi R.; Dewoskin, Daniel; McMeekin, Laura J.; Cowell, Rita M.; Forger, Daniel B.; Gamble, Karen L.

    2016-11-01

    How neurons encode intracellular biochemical signalling cascades into electrical signals is not fully understood. Neurons in the central circadian clock in mammals provide a model system to investigate electrical encoding of biochemical timing signals. Here, using experimental and modelling approaches, we show how the activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) contributes to neuronal excitability through regulation of the persistent sodium current (INaP). INaP exhibits a day/night difference in peak magnitude and is regulated by GSK3. Using mathematical modelling, we predict and confirm that GSK3 activation of INaP affects the action potential afterhyperpolarization, which increases the spontaneous firing rate without affecting the resting membrane potential. Together, these results demonstrate a crucial link between the molecular circadian clock and electrical activity, providing examples of kinase regulation of electrical activity and the propagation of intracellular signals in neuronal networks.

  11. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylates kinesin light chains and negatively regulates kinesin-based motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfini, Gerardo; Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Elluru, Ravindhra; Ratner, Nancy; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane-bounded organelles (MBOs) are delivered to different domains in neurons by fast axonal transport. The importance of kinesin for fast antero grade transport is well established, but mechanisms for regulating kinesin-based motility are largely unknown. In this report, we provide biochemical and in vivo evidence that kinesin light chains (KLCs) interact with and are in vivo substrates for glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Active GSK3 inhibited anterograde, but not retrograde, transport in squid axoplasm and reduced the amount of kinesin bound to MBOs. Kinesin microtubule binding and microtubule-stimulated ATPase activities were unaffected by GSK3 phosphorylation of KLCs. Active GSK3 was also localized preferentially to regions known to be sites of membrane delivery. These data suggest that GSK3 can regulate fast anterograde axonal transport and targeting of cargos to specific subcellular domains in neurons.

  12. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha phosphorylates and regulates the osteogenic activity of Osterix.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyan; Jeong, Hyung Min; Choi, You Hee; Lee, Sung Ho; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl

    2013-05-10

    Osteoblast-specific transcription factor Osterix is a zinc-finger transcription factor that required for osteoblast differentiation and new bone formation. The function of Osterix can be modulated by post-translational modification. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha (GSK3α) is a multifunctional serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a role in the Wnt signaling pathways and is implicated in the control of several regulatory proteins and transcription factors. In the present study, we investigated how GSK3α regulates Osterix during osteoblast differentiation. Wide type GSK3α up-regulated the protein level, protein stability and transcriptional activity of Osterix. These results suggest that GSK3α regulates osteogenic activity of Osterix.

  13. Regulation of persistent sodium currents by glycogen synthase kinase 3 encodes daily rhythms of neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Jodi R.; DeWoskin, Daniel; McMeekin, Laura J.; Cowell, Rita M.; Forger, Daniel B.; Gamble, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    How neurons encode intracellular biochemical signalling cascades into electrical signals is not fully understood. Neurons in the central circadian clock in mammals provide a model system to investigate electrical encoding of biochemical timing signals. Here, using experimental and modelling approaches, we show how the activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) contributes to neuronal excitability through regulation of the persistent sodium current (INaP). INaP exhibits a day/night difference in peak magnitude and is regulated by GSK3. Using mathematical modelling, we predict and confirm that GSK3 activation of INaP affects the action potential afterhyperpolarization, which increases the spontaneous firing rate without affecting the resting membrane potential. Together, these results demonstrate a crucial link between the molecular circadian clock and electrical activity, providing examples of kinase regulation of electrical activity and the propagation of intracellular signals in neuronal networks. PMID:27841351

  14. Role of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta in the inflammatory response caused by bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) plays a fundamental role during the inflammatory response induced by bacteria. Depending on the pathogen and its virulence factors, the type of cell and probably the context in which the interaction between host cells and bacteria takes place, GSK3β may promote or inhibit inflammation. The goal of this review is to discuss recent findings on the role of the inhibition or activation of GSK3β and its modulation of the inflammatory signaling in monocytes/macrophages and epithelial cells at the transcriptional level, mainly through the regulation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activity. Also included is a brief overview on the importance of GSK3 in non-inflammatory processes during bacterial infection. PMID:22691598

  15. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylates kinesin light chains and negatively regulates kinesin-based motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morfini, Gerardo; Szebenyi, Gyorgyi; Elluru, Ravindhra; Ratner, Nancy; Brady, Scott T.

    2002-01-01

    Membrane-bounded organelles (MBOs) are delivered to different domains in neurons by fast axonal transport. The importance of kinesin for fast antero grade transport is well established, but mechanisms for regulating kinesin-based motility are largely unknown. In this report, we provide biochemical and in vivo evidence that kinesin light chains (KLCs) interact with and are in vivo substrates for glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Active GSK3 inhibited anterograde, but not retrograde, transport in squid axoplasm and reduced the amount of kinesin bound to MBOs. Kinesin microtubule binding and microtubule-stimulated ATPase activities were unaffected by GSK3 phosphorylation of KLCs. Active GSK3 was also localized preferentially to regions known to be sites of membrane delivery. These data suggest that GSK3 can regulate fast anterograde axonal transport and targeting of cargos to specific subcellular domains in neurons.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Ribosomes: Translational Control of mRNA populations by Glycogen Synthase GYS1

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Gabriele; Diges, Camille; Kohlstaedt, Lori A.; Wehner, Karen A.; Sarnow, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Ribosomes exist as a heterogenous pool of macromolecular complexes composed of ribosomal RNA molecules, ribosomal proteins and numerous associated, “non-ribosomal” proteins. To identify non-ribosomal proteins that may modulate ribosome activity, we examined the composition of translationally active and inactive ribosomes using a proteomic multidimensional protein identification technology. Notably, the phosphorylated isoform of glycogen synthase, GYS1, was preferentially associated with elongating ribosomes. Depletion of GYS1 affected the translation of a subset of cellular mRNAs, some of which encode proteins that modulate protein biosynthesis. These findings argue that GYS1 abundance, and by virtue of its ribosomal association, provide a feedback loop between the energy state of the cells and the translation machinery. PMID:21570405

  17. Expression and regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Giambelluca, Miriam S; Cloutier, Nathalie; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Boilard, Eric; Pouliot, Marc

    2013-11-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine kinase involved in the regulation of cellular processes ranging from glycogen metabolism to cell cycle regulation. Its two known isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues throughout the body and exert distinct but often overlapping functions. GSK-3 is typically active in resting cells, inhibition by phosphorylation of Ser21 (GSK-3α) or Ser9 (GSK-3β) being the most common regulatory mechanism. GSK-3 activity has been linked recently with immune system function, yet little is known about the role of this enzyme in neutrophils, the most abundant leukocyte type. In the present study, we examined GSK-3 expression and regulation in human neutrophils. GSK-3α was found to be the predominant isoform, it was constitutively expressed and cell stimulation with different agonists did not alter its expression. Stimulation by fMLP, LPS, GM-CSF, Fcγ receptor engagement, or adenosine A2A receptor engagement all resulted in phosphorylation of Ser21. The use of metabolic inhibitors revealed that combinations of Src kinase, PKC, PI3K/AKT, ERK/RSK and PKA signaling pathways could mediate phosphorylation, depending on the agonist. Neither PLC nor p38 were involved. We conclude that GSK-3α is the main isoform expressed in neutrophils and that many different pathways can converge to inhibit GSK-3α activity via Ser21-phosphorylation. GSK-3α thus might be a hub of cellular regulation.

  18. Reproducibility and Absolute Quantification of Muscle Glycogen in Patients with Glycogen Storage Disease by 13C NMR Spectroscopy at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Romain, Nadine; Cheshkov, Sergey; Ren, Jimin; Malloy, Craig R.; Haller, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) offers a noninvasive method to assess glycogen levels in skeletal muscle and to identify excess glycogen accumulation in patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD). Despite the clinical potential of the method, it is currently not widely used for diagnosis or for follow-up of treatment. While it is possible to perform acceptable 13C MRS at lower fields, the low natural abundance of 13C and the inherently low signal-to-noise ratio of 13C MRS makes it desirable to utilize the advantage of increased signal strength offered by ultra-high fields for more accurate measurements. Concomitant with this advantage, however, ultra-high fields present unique technical challenges that need to be addressed when studying glycogen. In particular, the question of measurement reproducibility needs to be answered so as to give investigators insight into meaningful inter-subject glycogen differences. We measured muscle glycogen levels in vivo in the calf muscle in three patients with McArdle disease (MD), one patient with phosphofructokinase deficiency (PFKD) and four healthy controls by performing 13C MRS at 7T. Absolute quantification of the MRS signal was achieved by using a reference phantom with known concentration of metabolites. Muscle glycogen concentration was increased in GSD patients (31.5±2.9 g/kg w. w.) compared with controls (12.4±2.2 g/kg w. w.). In three GSD patients glycogen was also determined biochemically in muscle homogenates from needle biopsies and showed a similar 2.5-fold increase in muscle glycogen concentration in GSD patients compared with controls. Repeated inter-subject glycogen measurements yield a coefficient of variability of 5.18%, while repeated phantom measurements yield a lower 3.2% system variability. We conclude that noninvasive ultra-high field 13C MRS provides a valuable, highly reproducible tool for quantitative assessment of glycogen levels in health and disease. PMID:25296331

  19. L-leucine availability regulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, p70 S6 kinase and glycogen synthase kinase-3 activity in L6 muscle cells: evidence for the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the L-leucine-induced up-regulation of system A amino acid transport.

    PubMed Central

    Peyrollier, K; Hajduch, E; Blair, A S; Hyde, R; Hundal, H S

    2000-01-01

    Amino acid availability is known to regulate diverse cell processes including the activation of p70 S6 kinase, initiation factors involved in mRNA translation, gene expression and cellular amino acid uptake. Essential amino acids, in particular the branched-chain amino acids (e.g. leucine), have been shown to be the dominant players in mediating these effects, although the precise nature by which they regulate these processes remain poorly understood. In this study we have investigated the mechanisms involved in the leucine-induced modulation of p70 S6 kinase and addressed whether this kinase participates in the up-regulation of the System A amino acid transporter in L6 muscle cells. Incubation of muscle cells that had been amino acid-deprived for 1 h with L-leucine (2 mM) led to a rapid (>2-fold) activation of p70 S6 kinase, which was suppressed by both wortmannin and rapamycin. Consistent with this finding, addition of leucine caused a rapid ( approximately 5-fold) but transient stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). PI3K activation was inhibited by wortmannin and was not dependent upon insulin receptor substrate-1 activation. Unlike stimulation by insulin, activation of neither protein kinase B nor p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase accompanied the leucine-induced stimulation of PI3K. However, the leucine-induced activation of PI3K and p70 S6 kinase did result in the concomitant inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). Leucine enhanced System A transport by approximately 50%. We have shown previously that this stimulation is protein-synthesis-dependent and in the current study we show that it was blocked by both wortmannin and rapamycin. Our findings indicate that PI3K and the mammalian target of rapamycin are components of a nutrient signalling pathway that regulates the activation of p70 S6 kinase and induction of System A in L6 cells. The activation of this pathway by leucine is also responsible for the inactivation of GSK-3

  20. Thermoregulation during Cold Water Immersion is Unimpaired by Muscle Glycogen Depletion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    water Immersion is Unimpaired by Muscle Glycogen Depletion 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Andrew J. Young, Michael N. Sawka, P. Darrell Neufer , Stephen R. Muza...GLYCOGEN DEPLETION Andrew J. Young, Michael N. Sawka, P. Darrell Neufer , Stephen R. Muza, Eldon W. Askew and Kent B. Pandolf U.S. Army Research...Hodgess, E.T.Roche, M.S. Rose, E.W. Askew, A.J. Young and P.D. Neufer . Manipulation of muscle glycogen concentrations using high and low carbohydrate diets

  1. GLYCOGEN SYNTHASE KINASE-3 REGULATES MICROGLIAL MIGRATION, INFLAMMATION, AND INFLAMMATION-INDUCED NEUROTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Yuskaitis, Christopher J.; Jope, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Microglia play a prominent role in the brain’s inflammatory response to injury or infection by migrating to affected locations, secreting inflammatory molecules, and phagocytosing damaged tissue. However, because severe or chronic neuroinflammation exacerbates many neurological conditions, controlling microglia actions may provide therapeutic benefits in a diverse array of diseases. Since glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) promotes inflammatory responses in peripheral immune cells, we investigated if inhibitors of GSK3 attenuated microglia responses to inflammatory stimuli. Treatment of BV-2 microglia with GSK3 inhibitors greatly reduced the migration of microglia in both a scratch assay and in a transwell migration assay. Treatment of BV-2 microglia with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated the production of interleukin-6 and increased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NO production. Each of these microglia responses to inflammatory stimulation were greatly attenuated by GSK3 inhibitors. However, GSK3 inhibitors did not cause a general impairment of microglia functions, as the LPS-induced stimulated expression of cylcooxygenase-2 was unaltered. Regulation of microglia functions were also evident in cultured mouse hippocampal slices where GSK3 inhibitors reduced cytokine production and microglial migration, and provided protection from inflammation-induced neuronal toxicity. These findings demonstrate that GSK3 promotes microglial responses to inflammation and that the utilization of GSK3 inhibitors provides a means to limit the inflammatory actions of microglia. PMID:19007880

  2. NMR studies of muscle glycogen synthesis in insulin-resistant offspring of parents with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus immediately after glycogen-depleting exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Price, T B; Perseghin, G; Duleba, A; Chen, W; Chase, J; Rothman, D L; Shulman, R G; Shulman, G I

    1996-01-01

    To examine the impact of insulin resistance on the insulin-dependent and insulin-independent portions of muscle glycogen synthesis during recovery from exercise, we studied eight young, lean, normoglycemic insulin-resistant (IR) offspring of individuals with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and eight age-weight matched control (CON) subjects after plantar flexion exercise that lowered muscle glycogen to approximately 25% of resting concentration. After approximately 20 min of exercise, intramuscular glucose 6-phosphate and glycogen were simultaneously monitored with 31P and 13C NMR spectroscopies. The postexercise rate of glycogen resynthesis was nonlinear. Glycogen synthesis rates during the initial insulin independent portion (0-1 hr of recovery) were similar in the two groups (IR, 15.5 +/- 1.3 mM/hr and CON, 15.8 +/- 1.7 mM/hr); however, over the next 4 hr, insulin-dependent glycogen synthesis was significantly reduced in the IR group [IR, 0.1 +/- 0.5 mM/hr and CON, 2.9 +/- 0.2 mM/hr; (P < or = 0.001)]. After exercise there was an initial rise in glucose 6-phosphate concentrations that returned to baseline after the first hour of recovery in both groups. In summary, we found that following muscle glycogen-depleting exercise, IR offspring of parents with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus had (i) normal rates of muscle glycogen synthesis during the insulin-independent phase of recovery from exercise and (ii) severely diminished rates of muscle glycogen synthesis during the subsequent recovery period (2-5 hr), which has previously been shown to be insulin-dependent in normal CON subjects. These data provide evidence that exercise and insulin stimulate muscle glycogen synthesis in humans by different mechanisms and that in the IR subjects the early response to stimulation by exercise is normal. PMID:8643574

  3. Influence of differing macronutrient intakes on muscle glycogen resynthesis after resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Roy, B D; Tarnopolsky, M A

    1998-03-01

    The provision of additional protein (Pro) to a carbohydrate (CHO) supplement resulted in an enhanced rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis after endurance exercise (Zawadzki et al., J. Appl. Physiol. 72: 1854-1859, 1992). A comparison of isoenergetic CHO and CHO/Pro formula drinks on muscle glycogen resynthesis has not been examined after either endurance or resistance exercise. We studied the effect of isoenergetic CHO (1 g/kg) and CHO/Pro/fat (66% CHO, 23% Pro, 11% fat) defined formula drinks and placebo (Pl) given immediately (t = 0 h) and 1 h (t = +1 h) after resistance exercise in 10 healthy young men. They performed a whole body workout (9 exercises/3 sets at 80% 1 repetition maximum) with unilateral knee extension exercise [exercise (Ex) and control (Con) leg]. The CHO/Pro/fat and CHO trials resulted in significantly greater (P < 0. 05) plasma insulin and glucose concentration compared with Pl. Muscle glycogen was significantly lower (P < 0.05) for the Ex vs. Con leg immediately postexercise for all three conditions. The rate of glycogen resynthesis was significantly greater (P < 0.05) for both CHO/Pro/fat and CHO (23.0 +/- 4.5 and 19.3 +/- 6.1 mmol . kg dry muscle-1 . h-1, respectively) vs. Pl (Ex = 2.8 +/- 2.3 and Con = 1.4 +/- 3.6 mmol . kg dry muscle-1 . h-1). These results demonstrated that a bout of resistance exercise resulted in a significant decrease in muscle glycogen and that consumption of an isoenergetic CHO or CHO/Pro/fat formula drink resulted in similar rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis after resistance exercise. This suggests that total energy content and CHO content are important in the resynthesis of muscle glycogen.

  4. Dietary tools to modulate glycogen storage in gilthead seabream muscle: glycerol supplementation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tomé S; Matos, Elisabete; Cordeiro, Odete D; Colen, Rita; Wulff, Tune; Sampaio, Eduardo; Sousa, Vera; Valente, Luisa M P; Gonçalves, Amparo; Silva, Joana M G; Bandarra, Narcisa; Nunes, Maria Leonor; Dinis, Maria Teresa; Dias, Jorge; Jessen, Flemming; Rodrigues, Pedro M

    2012-10-24

    The quality and shelf life of fish meat products depend on the skeletal muscle's energetic state at slaughter, as meat decomposition processes can be exacerbated by energy depletion. In this study, we tested dietary glycerol as a way of replenishing muscle glycogen reserves of farmed gilthead seabream. Two diets were tested in duplicate (n = 42/tank). Results show 5% inclusion of crude glycerol in gilthead seabream diets induces increased muscle glycogen, ATP levels and firmness, with no deleterious effects in terms of growth, proximate composition, fatty acid profile, oxidative state, and organoleptic properties (aroma and color). Proteomic analysis showed a low impact of glycerol-supplementation on muscle metabolism, with most changes probably reflecting increased stress coping capacity in glycerol-fed fish. This suggests inclusion of crude glycerol in gilthead seabream diets (particularly in the finishing phase) seems like a viable strategy to increase glycogen deposition in muscle without negatively impacting fish welfare and quality.

  5. Transcriptional activation of the IL-6 gene in human contracting skeletal muscle: influence of muscle glycogen content.

    PubMed

    Keller, C; Steensberg, A; Pilegaard, H; Osada, T; Saltin, B; Pedersen, B K; Neufer, P D

    2001-12-01

    In humans, the plasma interleukin 6 (IL-6) concentration increases dramatically during low-intensity exercise. Measurements across the working limb indicate that skeletal muscle is the source of IL-6 production. To determine whether energy availability influences the regulation of IL-6 expression during prolonged exercise, six male subjects completed two trials consisting of 180 min of two-legged dynamic knee extensor with either normal or low (~60% of control) pre-exercise muscle glycogen levels. Increases in plasma IL-6 during exercise were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the low-glycogen (16-fold) trial verses the control (10-fold) trial. Transcriptional activation of the IL-6 gene in skeletal muscle was also higher in the low-glycogen trial; it increased by about 40-fold after 90 min of exercise and about 60-fold after 180 min of exercise. Muscle IL-6 mRNA followed a similar but delayed pattern, increasing by more than 100-fold in the low-glycogen trial and by about 30-fold in the control trial. These data demonstrate that exercise activates transcription of the IL-6 gene in working skeletal muscle, a response that is dramatically enhanced when glycogen levels are low. These findings also support the hypothesis that IL-6 may be produced by contracting myofibers when glycogen levels become critically low as a means of signaling the liver to increase glucose production.

  6. Subcellular distribution of glycogen and decreased tetanic Ca2+ in fatigued single intact mouse muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Joachim; Cheng, Arthur J; Ørtenblad, Niels; Westerblad, Hakan

    2014-05-01

    In skeletal muscle fibres, glycogen has been shown to be stored at different subcellular locations: (i) between the myofibrils (intermyofibrillar); (ii) within the myofibrils (intramyofibrillar); and (iii) subsarcolemmal. Of these, intramyofibrillar glycogen has been implied as a critical regulator of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release. The aim of the present study was to test directly how the decrease in cytoplasmic free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) during repeated tetanic contractions relates to the subcellular glycogen distribution. Single fibres of mouse flexor digitorum brevis muscles were fatigued with 70 Hz, 350 ms tetani given at 2 s (high-intensity fatigue, HIF) or 10 s (low-intensity fatigue, LIF) intervals, while force and [Ca(2+)]i were measured. Stimulation continued until force decreased to 30% of its initial value. Fibres were then prepared for analyses of subcellular glycogen distribution by transmission electron microscopy. At fatigue, tetanic [Ca(2+)]i was reduced to 70 ± 4% and 54 ± 4% of the initial in HIF (P < 0.01, n = 9) and LIF (P < 0.01, n = 5) fibres, respectively. At fatigue, the mean inter- and intramyofibrillar glycogen content was 60-75% lower than in rested control fibres (P < 0.05), whereas subsarcolemmal glycogen was similar to control. Individual fibres showed a good correlation between the fatigue-induced decrease in tetanic [Ca(2+)]i and the reduction in intermyofibrillar (P = 0.051) and intramyofibrillar (P = 0.0008) glycogen. In conclusion, the fatigue-induced decrease in tetanic [Ca(2+)]i, and hence force, is accompanied by major reductions in inter- and intramyofibrillar glycogen. The stronger correlation between decreased tetanic [Ca(2+)]i and reduced intramyofibrillar glycogen implies that sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release critically depends on energy supply from the intramyofibrillar glycogen pool.

  7. Glycogen and triglyceride utilization in relation to muscle metabolic characteristics in men performing heavy-resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Essén-Gustavsson, B; Tesch, P A

    1990-01-01

    Nine bodybuilders performed heavy-resistance exercise activating the quadriceps femoris muscle. Intermittent 30-s exhaustive exercise bouts comprising 6-12 repetitions were interspersed with 60-s periods for 30 min. Venous blood samples were taken repeatedly during and after exercise for analyses of plasma free fatty acid (FFA) and glycerol concentration. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle before and after exercise and assayed for glycogen, glycerol-3-phosphate, lactate and triglyceride (TG) content. The activities of citrate synthase (CS), lactate dehydrogenase, hexokinase (HK), myokinase, creatine kinase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD), were analysed. Histochemical staining procedures were used to assess fibre type composition, fibre area and capillary density. TG content before and after exercise averaged (SD) 23.9 (13.3) and 16.7 (6.4) mmol kg-1 dry wt. The basal triglyceride content varied sixfold among individuals and the higher the levels the greater was the change during exercise. The glycogen content decreased (P less than 0.001) from 690 (82) to 495 (95) mmol kg-1 dry wt. and lactate and glycerol-3-phosphate increased (P less than 0.001) to 79.5 (5.5) and 14.5 (7.3) mmol kg-1 dry wt., respectively, after exercise. The HK and HAD/CS content respectively correlated with glycogen or TG content at rest and with changes in these metabolites during exercise. FFA and glycerol concentrations increased slightly (P less than 0.001) during exercise. Lipolysis may, therefore, provide energy during heavy-resistance exercise of relatively short duration. Also, storage and utilization of intramuscular substrates appear to be influenced by the metabolic profile of muscle.

  8. Glycogen synthesis in liver and skeletal muscle after exercise: participation of the gluconeogenic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Hepatic glycogenesis occurs by both the uptake of plasma glucose (direct pathway) as well as from gluconeogenesis (indirect pathway). In vitro studies suggest that skeletal muscle can also synthesize glycogen from lactate. The purpose of the present studies was to assess the contribution of the indirect pathway to liver and muscle glycogen synthesis after exercise with various substrata infusions. The authors hypothesis was the contribution of the indirect pathway of hepatic glycogenesis would increase after exercise. To this end, fasted rats were depleted of glycogen by exhaustive exercise; a second group of fasted rats remained rested. Both groups were then infused intravenously with glucose containing tracer quantities of (6-/sup 3/H) and (U-/sup 14/C) glucose for 4 hrs. The ensuing hyperglycemic response was exaggerated in post-exercised rats; whereas, plasma lactate levels were lower than those of nonexercised rats. The percent of hepatic glycogen synthesized from gluconeogenic precursors did not differ between exercised (39%) and nonexercised (36%) rats.

  9. Postexercise cold-water immersion does not attenuate muscle glycogen resynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gregson, Warren; Allan, Robert; Holden, Susan; Phibbs, Padraic; Doran, Dominic; Campbell, Iain; Waldron, Sarah; Joo, Chang Hwa; Morton, James P

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that postexercise cold-water immersion (CWI, via its associated reductions in skeletal muscle blood flow) attenuates muscle glycogen resynthesis during short-term recovery from exhaustive exercise. In a repeated-measures design, nine recreationally active men performed an exhaustive glycogen depleting cycling protocol (consisting of intermittent exercise the night before and steady-state exercise on the subsequent morning of the main trial) followed by 10 min of lower-limb CWI (8°C) or remained seated in normal ambient conditions (CONT). Subjects were fed carbohydrate (CHO) at an ingestion rate of 0.6 g·kg body mass at 30 min postexercise and at 1, 2, and 3 h postexercise. Reductions in thigh skin temperature and muscle temperature during postexercise recovery were greater in CWI compared with CONT (P < 0.01). In addition, norepinephrine and blood glucose concentrations were increased and decreased, respectively, during recovery in CWI compared with CONT (P < 0.01). Postexercise muscle glycogen (CONT and CWI postexercise = 76 ± 43 and 77 ± 26 mmol·kg dry weight [dw], respectively; mean ± SD) progressively increased (P < 0.01) during recovery, although rates of resynthesis did not differ (P = 0.719) between conditions (CONT and CWI 4 h postexercise = 160 ± 34 and 157 ± 59 mmol·kg dw, respectively). Total glycogen synthesis during recovery was comparable (CONT and CWI = 83 ± 43 and 79 ± 58 mmol·kg dw, respectively). Postexercise CWI does not attenuate muscle glycogen resynthesis rates during short-term recovery even when CHO availability is considered suboptimal. Athletes who regularly incorporate CWI as a recovery strategy to alleviate symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage should therefore not be concerned with potential negative effects of the associated reductions in muscle blood flow on the restoration of muscle glycogen stores.

  10. ¹³C MRS reveals a small diurnal variation in the glycogen content of human thigh muscle.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kamei, Akiko; Osawa, Takuya; Kawahara, Takashi; Takizawa, Osamu; Maruyama, Katsuya

    2015-06-01

    There is marked diurnal variation in the glycogen content of skeletal muscles of animals, but few studies have addressed such variations in human muscles. (13)C MRS can be used to noninvasively measure the glycogen content of human skeletal muscle, but no study has explored the diurnal variations in this parameter. This study aimed to investigate whether a diurnal variation in glycogen content occurs in human muscles and, if so, to what extent it can be identified using (13)C MRS. Six male volunteers were instructed to maintain their normal diet and not to perform strenuous exercise for at least 3 days before and during the experiment. Muscle glycogen and blood glucose concentrations were measured six times in 24 h under normal conditions in these subjects. The glycogen content in the thigh muscle was determined noninvasively by natural abundance (13)C MRS using a clinical MR system at 3 T. Nutritional analysis revealed that the subjects' mean carbohydrate intake was 463 ± 137 g, being approximately 6.8 ± 2.4 g/kg body weight. The average sleeping time was 5.9 ± 1.0 h. The glycogen content in the thigh muscle at the starting point was 64.8 ± 20.6 mM. Although absolute and relative individual variations in muscle glycogen content were 7.0 ± 2.1 mM and 11.3 ± 4.6%, respectively, no significant difference in glycogen content was observed among the different time points. This study demonstrates that normal food intake (not fat and/or carbohydrate rich), sleep and other daily activities have a negligible influence on thigh muscle glycogen content, and that the diurnal variation of the glycogen content in human muscles is markedly smaller than that in animal muscles. Moreover, the present results also support the reproducibility and availability of (13)C MRS for the evaluation of the glycogen content in human muscles.

  11. Unfolded protein response activates glycogen synthase kinase-3 via selective lysosomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Nijholt, Diana A T; Nölle, Anna; van Haastert, Elise S; Edelijn, Hessel; Toonen, Ruud F; Hoozemans, Jeroen J M; Scheper, Wiep

    2013-07-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress response that is activated upon disturbed homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum. In Alzheimer's disease, as well as in other tauopathies, the UPR is activated in neurons that contain early tau pathology. A recent genome-wide association study identified genetic variation in a UPR transducer as a risk factor for tauopathy, supporting a functional connection between UPR activation and tau pathology. Here we show that UPR activation increases the activity of the major tau kinase glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 in vitro via a selective removal of inactive GSK-3 phosphorylated at Ser(21/9). We demonstrate that this is mediated by the autophagy/lysosomal pathway. In brain tissue from patients with different tauopathies, lysosomal accumulations of pSer(21/9) GSK-3 are found in neurons with markers for UPR activation. Our data indicate that UPR activation increases the activity of GSK-3 by a novel mechanism, the lysosomal degradation of the inactive pSer(21/9) GSK-3. This may provide a functional explanation for the close association between UPR activation and early tau pathology in neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Role and regulation of Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta in bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Belenky, Michael; Breitbart, Haim

    2017-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is a master switch that regulates a multitude of cellular pathways, including the acrosome reaction in sperm. In epididymal sperm cells, for example, GSK-3 activity correlates with inhibition of motility-yet no direct pathways connecting GSK-3 activation with loss of motility have been described. Indeed, the details of how GSK-3 is regulated during sperm capacitation and the acrosome reaction remains obscure. To this end, we addressed the involvement of the GSK-3 beta isoform in several known pathways that contribute to motility and the acrosome reaction. We established that Protein kinase A (PKA) is the main regulator of GSK-3β in sperm, as pre-treatment of cells with a GSK-3 inhibitor prior to addition of H89, an inhibitor of PKA, attenuated the motility loss induced by blocking PKA activity. Both induced and spontaneous acrosome reactions also occurred less frequently in sperm treated with GSK-3 inhibitors. Finally, we observed a slow decline in phosphorylation of GSK-3β on Ser 9, which represents an inhibited state, during sperm capacitation; this phenotype is reversed during the induced acrosome reaction, in parallel to activation of Protein phosphatase 1. These results suggest that maintenance of sperm motility and acrosome reaction timing are mediated by PKA through the regulation of GSK-3 beta activity. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 84: 8-18, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Accelerated Liver Regeneration after Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Poudel, Samikshya; Manley, Michael W; Roy, Nairita; Apte, Udayan

    2017-03-01

    Overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) is the leading cause of acute liver failure (ALF) in the United States. Timely initiation of compensatory liver regeneration after APAP hepatotoxicity is critical for final recovery, but the mechanisms of liver regeneration after APAP-induced ALF have not been extensively explored yet. Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that activation of β-catenin signaling after APAP overdose is associated with timely liver regeneration. Herein, we investigated the role of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) in liver regeneration after APAP hepatotoxicity using a pharmacological inhibition strategy in mice. Treatment with specific GSK3 inhibitor (L803-mts), starting from 4 hours after 600 mg/kg dose of APAP, resulted in early initiation of liver regeneration in a dose-dependent manner, without modifying the peak regenerative response. Acceleration of liver regeneration was not secondary to alteration of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, which remained unchanged after GSK3 inhibition. Early cell cycle initiation in hepatocytes after GSK3 inhibition was because of rapid induction of cyclin D1 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. This was associated with increased activation of β-catenin signaling after GSK3 inhibition. Taken together, our study has revealed a novel role of GSK3 in liver regeneration after APAP overdose and identified GSK3 as a potential therapeutic target to improve liver regeneration after APAP-induced ALF. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The PPLA motif of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta is required for interaction with Fe65.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jeoung; Hyun, Sunghee; Chun, Jaesun; Shin, Sung Hwa; Lee, Kyung Eun; Yeon, Kwang Hum; Park, Tae Yoon; Kang, Sang Sun

    2008-07-31

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK 3 beta) is a serine/ threonine kinase that phosphorylates substrates such as beta-catenin and is involved in a variety of biological processes, including embryonic development, metabolism, tumorigenesis, and cell death. Here, we present evidence that human GSK 3beta is associated with Fe65, which has the characteristics of an adaptor protein, possessing a WW domain, and two phosphotyrosine interaction domains, PID1 and PID2. The GSK 3beta catalytic domain also contains a putative WW domain binding motif ((371)PPLA(374)), and we observed, using a pull down approach and co-immuno-precipitation, that it interacts physically with Fe65 via this motif. In addition, we detected co-localization of GSK 3beta and Fe65 by confocal microscopy, and this co-localization was disrupted by mutation of the putative WW domain binding motif of GSK 3beta.Finally, in transient transfection assays interaction of GSK 3 beta (wt) with Fe65 induced substantial cell apoptosis, whereas interaction with the GSK 3beta AALA mutant ((371)AALA(374)) did not, and we noted that phosphorylation of the Tyr 216 residue of the GSK 3beta AALA mutant was significantly reduced compared to that of GSK 3beta wild type. Thus, our observations indicate that GSK 3beta binds to Fe65 through its (371)PPLA(374) motif and that this interaction regulates apoptosis and phosphorylation of Tyr 216 of GSK 3beta.

  15. Glycogen synthase kinase-3/Shaggy mediates ethanol-induced excitotoxic cell death of Drosophila olfactory neurons

    PubMed Central

    French, Rachael L.; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    It has long been known that heavy alcohol consumption leads to neuropathology and neuronal death. While the response of neurons to an ethanol insult is strongly influenced by genetic background, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that even a single intoxicating exposure to ethanol causes non-cell-autonomous apoptotic death specifically of Drosophila olfactory neurons, which is accompanied by a loss of a behavioral response to the smell of ethanol and a blackening of the third antennal segment. The Drosophila homolog of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3)β, Shaggy, is required for ethanol-induced apoptosis. Consistent with this requirement, the GSK-3β inhibitor lithium protects against the neurotoxic effects of ethanol, indicating the possibility for pharmacological intervention in cases of alcohol-induced neurodegeneration. Ethanol-induced death of olfactory neurons requires both their neural activity and functional NMDA receptors. This system will allow the investigation of the genetic and molecular basis of ethanol-induced apoptosis in general and provide an understanding of the molecular role of GSK-3β in programmed cell death. PMID:19923438

  16. Molecular Pathways: Revisiting Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β as a target for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Walz, Amy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Chandra, Sunandana; Kozikowski, Alan; Carneiro, Benedito A; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Giles, Francis J; Billadeau, Daniel D; Mazar, Andrew P

    2017-01-04

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a complex regulator of numerous cellular functions. GSK-3β is a unique kinase which is constitutively active in resting and non-stimulated cells. GSK-3β has been implicated in a wide range of diseases including neurodegeneration, inflammation and fibrosis, noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and cancer. It is a regulator of NF-κB-mediated survival of cancer cells, which provided a rationale for the development of GSK-3 inhibitors targeting malignant tumors. Recent studies, many of them reported over the past decade, have identified GSK-3β as a potential therapeutic target in at over 15 different types of cancer. Whereas only active GSK-3β is expressed in cancer cell nucleus, aberrant nuclear accumulation of GSK-3β has been identified as a hallmark of cancer cells in malignant tumors of different origin. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of GSK-3 inhibitors, and the potential therapeutic impact of targeting GSK-3β in human cancer.

  17. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β suppresses polyglutamine aggregation by inhibiting Vaccinia-related kinase 2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunju; Ryu, Hye Guk; Kim, Sangjune; Lee, Dohyun; Jeong, Young-Hun; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an abnormal expansion of polyglutamine repeats in the N-terminal of huntingtin. The amount of aggregate-prone protein is controlled by various mechanisms, including molecular chaperones. Vaccinia-related kinase 2 (VRK2) is known to negatively regulate chaperonin TRiC, and VRK2-facilitated degradation of TRiC increases polyQ protein aggregation, which is involved in HD. We found that VRK2 activity was negatively controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). GSK3β directly bound to VRK2 and inhibited the catalytic activity of VRK2 in a kinase activity-independent manner. Furthermore, GSK3β increased the stability of TRiC and decreased the formation of HttQ103-GFP aggregates by inhibiting VRK2. These results indicate that GSK3β signaling may be a regulatory mechanism of HD progression and suggest targets for further therapeutic trials for HD. PMID:27377031

  18. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Dictates Podocyte Motility and Focal Adhesion Turnover by Modulating Paxillin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weiwei; Ge, Yan; Liu, Zhihong; Gong, Rujun

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant focal adhesion turnover is centrally involved in podocyte actin cytoskeleton disorganization and foot process effacement. The structural and dynamic integrity of focal adhesions is orchestrated by multiple cell signaling molecules, including glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a multitasking kinase lately identified as a mediator of kidney injury. However, the role of GSK3β in podocytopathy remains obscure. In doxorubicin (Adriamycin)-injured podocytes, lithium, a GSK3β inhibitor and neuroprotective mood stabilizer, obliterated the accelerated focal adhesion turnover, rectified podocyte hypermotility, and restored actin cytoskeleton integrity. Mechanistically, lithium counteracted the doxorubicin-elicited GSK3β overactivity and the hyperphosphorylation and overactivation of paxillin, a focal adhesion–associated adaptor protein. Moreover, forced expression of a dominant negative kinase dead mutant of GSK3β highly mimicked, whereas ectopic expression of a constitutively active GSK3β mutant abolished, the effect of lithium in doxorubicin-injured podocytes, suggesting that the effect of lithium is mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of GSK3β. Furthermore, paxillin interacted with GSK3β and served as its substrate. In mice with doxorubicin nephropathy, a single low dose of lithium ameliorated proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. Consistently, lithium therapy abrogated GSK3β overactivity, blunted paxillin hyperphosphorylation, and reinstated actin cytoskeleton integrity in glomeruli associated with an early attenuation of podocyte foot process effacement. Thus, GSK3β-modulated focal adhesion dynamics might serve as a novel therapeutic target for podocytopathy. PMID:25239564

  19. Aberrant spindle dynamics and cytokinesis in Dictyostelium discoideum cells that lack glycogen synthase kinase 3.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Adrian J; Forde-Thomas, Josephine E; Williams, Hazel; Samereier, Matthias; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell division requires the co-ordinated assembly and disassembly of the mitotic spindle, accurate chromosome segregation and temporal control of cytokinesis to generate two daughter cells. While the absolute details of these processes differ between organisms, there are evolutionarily conserved core components common to all eukaryotic cells, whose identification will reveal the key processes that control cell division. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is a major protein kinase found throughout the eukaryotes and regulates many processes, including cell differentiation, growth, motility and apoptosis. In animals, GSK-3 associates with mitotic spindles and its inhibition causes mis-regulation of chromosome segregation. Two suppressor screens in yeast point to a more general effect of GSK-3 on cell division, however the direct role of GSK-3 in control of mitosis has not been explored outside the animal kingdom. Here we report that the Dictyostelium discoideum GSK-3 orthologue, GskA, associates with the mitotic spindle during cell division, as seen for its mammalian counterparts. Dictyostelium possesses only a single GSK-3 gene that can be deleted to eliminate all GSK-3 activity. We found that gskA-null mutants failed to elongate their mitotic spindle and were unable to divide in shaking culture, but have no chromosome segregation defect. These results suggest further conservation for the role of GSK-3 in the regulation of spindle dynamics during mitosis, but also reveal differences in the mechanisms ensuring accurate chromosome segregation.

  20. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Inhibitors as Potent Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. Because the current therapies only lead to temporary, limited improvement and have severe side effects, new approaches to treat PD need to be developed. To discover new targets for potential therapeutic intervention, a chemical genetic approach involving the use of small molecules as pharmacological tools has been implemented. First, a screening of an in-house chemical library on a well-established cellular model of PD was done followed by a detailed pharmacological analysis of the hits. Here, we report the results found for the small heterocyclic derivative called SC001, which after different enzymatic assays was revealed to be a new glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibitor with IC50 = 3.38 ± 0.08 μM. To confirm that GSK-3 could be a good target for PD, the evaluation of a set of structurally diverse GSK-3 inhibitors as neuroprotective agents for PD was performed. Results show that inhibitors of GSK-3 have neuroprotective effects in vitro representing a new pharmacological option for the disease-modifying treatment of PD. Furthermore, we show that SC001 is able to cross the blood–brain barrier, protects dopaminergic neurons, and reduces microglia activation in in vivo models of Parkinson disease, being a good candidate for further drug development. PMID:23421686

  1. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 by glycogen synthase kinase 3 impairs insulin action

    PubMed Central

    Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit; Krebs, Edwin G.

    1997-01-01

    The phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) on tyrosine residues by the insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase is involved in most of the biological responses of insulin. IRS-1 mediates insulin signaling by recruiting SH2 proteins through its multiple tyrosine phosphorylation sites. The phosphorylation of IRS-1 on serine/threonine residues also occurs in cells; however, the particular protein kinase(s) promoting this type of phosphorylation are unknown. Here we report that glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is capable of phosphorylating IRS-1 and that this modification converts IRS-1 into an inhibitor of IR tyrosine kinase activity in vitro. Expression of wild-type GSK-3 or an “unregulated” mutant of the kinase (S9A) in CHO cells overexpressing IRS-1 and IR, resulted in increased serine phosphorylation levels of IRS-1, suggesting that IRS-1 is a cellular target of GSK-3. Furthermore, insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IR was markedly suppressed in cells expressing wild-type or the S9A mutant, indicating that expression of GSK-3 impairs IR tyrosine kinase activity. Taken together, our studies suggest a new role for GSK-3 in attenuating insulin signaling via its phosphorylation of IRS-1 and may provide new insight into mechanisms important in insulin resistance. PMID:9275179

  2. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 increases the cytotoxicity of enzastaurin.

    PubMed

    Rovedo, Mark A; Krett, Nancy L; Rosen, Steven T

    2011-07-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) represent a spectrum of several distinct non-Hodgkin's lymphomas that are characterized by an invasion of the skin by malignant, clonal lymphocytes. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that the protein kinase C (PKC) β inhibitor Enzastaurin increases apoptosis in malignant lymphocytes of CTCL. These results directly led to a clinical trial for Enzastaurin in CTCL in which it was well tolerated and showed modest activity. To ascertain a means of improving the efficacy of Enzastaurin, we investigated complementary signaling pathways and identified glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) as important in survival signaling in CTCL. Enzastaurin combined with GSK3 inhibitors demonstrated an enhancement of cytotoxicity. Treatment with a combination of Enzastaurin and the GSK3 inhibitor AR-A014418 resulted in upregulation of β-catenin total protein and β-catenin-mediated transcription. Inhibition of β-catenin-mediated transcription or small hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown of β-catenin decreased the cytotoxic effects of Enzastaurin plus AR-A014418. In addition, treatment with Enzastaurin and AR-A014418 decreased the mRNA levels and surface expression of CD44. shRNA knockdown of β-catenin also restored CD44 surface expression. Our observations provide a rationale for the combined targeting of PKC and GSK3 signaling pathways in CTCL to enhance the therapeutic outcome.

  3. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Haploinsufficiency Mimics the Behavioral and Molecular Effects of Lithium

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, W. Timothy; Harper, Amber DeAra; Jové, Fernando; Woodgett, James R.; Maretto, Silvia; Piccolo, Stefano; Klein, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium is widely used to treat bipolar disorder, but its mechanism of action in this disorder is unknown. Several molecular targets of lithium have been identified, but these putative targets have not been shown to be responsible for the behavioral effects of lithium in vivo. A robust model for the effects of chronic lithium on behavior in mice would greatly facilitate the characterization of lithium action. We describe behaviors in mice that are robustly affected by chronic lithium. Remarkably, these lithium-sensitive behaviors are also observed in mice lacking one copy of the gene encoding glycogen synthase kinase-3β (Gsk-3β), a well established direct target of lithium. In addition, chronic lithium induces molecular changes consistent with inhibition of GSK-3 within regions of the brain that are paralleled in Gsk-3β+/− heterozygous mice. We also show that lithium therapy activates Wnt signaling in vivo, as measured by increased Wnt-dependent gene expression in the amygdala, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. These observations support a central role for GSK-3β in mediating behavioral responses to lithium. PMID:15282284

  4. Inhibition of glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 by different divalent metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J.

    1987-05-01

    The specificity of glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 (CK-1) for different divalent metal ions was explored in this study. Of the eight metal ions (Mg, Mn, Zn, Cu, Ca, Ni, Co, Fe) tested only Mg/sup 2 +/ supported significant kinase activity. Several of the other metals, however, inhibited the Mg/sup 2 +/-stimulated kinase activity. Half-maximal inhibition by Zn, Mn, Co, Fe and Ni were observed at 50, 55, 110, 125 and 300 ..mu..M, respectively. Kinetic analyses using Zn/sup 2 +/ indicate that at a constant (ATP) Zn/sup 2 +/ increases the K/sub m/ for casein, the V/sub max/ being unaffected +/- Zn/sup 2 +/. At a constant (casein), Zn/sup 2 +/ decreased the V/sub max/ for ATP, the K/sub m/ remaining unchanged +/- Zn/sup 2 +/. The inhibition of CK-1 by the different metals is reversed by EGTA or EDTA. These results suggest that divalent metal ions such as Zn/sup 2 +/ and Mn/sup 2 +/ that do not support CK-1 activity may serve as inhibitors of the kinase in vivo.

  5. Inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3 mitigates the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Lento, William E; Castle, Katherine D; Chao, Nelson J; Kirsch, David G

    2014-05-01

    Exposure to a nuclear accident or radiological attack can cause death from acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which results from radiation injury to vital organs such as the hematopoietic system. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved any medical countermeasures for this specific purpose. With growing concern over nuclear terrorism, there is an urgent need to develop small molecule deliverables that mitigate mortality from ARS. One emerging modulator of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) activity is glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). The inhibition of GSK-3 has been shown to augment hematopoietic repopulation in mouse models of bone marrow transplantation. In this study, we performed an in vitro screen using irradiated bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to test the effects of four GSK-3 inhibitors: CHIR99021; 6-Bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO); SB415286; and SB216763. This screen showed that SB216763 significantly increased the frequency of c-Kit(+) Lin(-) Sca1(+) (KLS) cells and hematopoietic colony-forming cells in irradiated BM-MNCs. Importantly, administration of a single dose of SB216763 to C57BL/6J mice by subcutaneous injection 24 h after total-body irradiation significantly improved hematopoietic recovery and mitigated hematopoietic ARS. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the GSK-3 inhibitor SB216763 is an effective medical countermeasure against acute radiation injury of the hematopoietic system.

  6. Inhibiting Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Mitigates the Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Lento, William E.; Castle, Katherine D.; Chao, Nelson J.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to a nuclear accident or radiological attack can cause death from acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which results from radiation injury to vital organs such as the hematopoietic system. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved any medical countermeasures for this specific purpose. With growing concern over nuclear terrorism, there is an urgent need to develop small molecule deliverables that mitigate mortality from ARS. One emerging modulator of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) activity is glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). The inhibition of GSK-3 has been shown to augment hematopoietic repopulation in mouse models of bone marrow transplantation. In this study, we performed an in vitro screen using irradiated bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to test the effects of four GSK-3 inhibitors: CHIR99021; 6-Bromoindirubin-3′-oxime (BIO); SB415286; and SB216763. This screen showed that SB216763 significantly increased the frequency of c-Kit+ Lin− Sca1+ (KLS) cells and hematopoietic colony-forming cells in irradiated BM-MNCs. Importantly, administration of a single dose of SB216763 to C57BL/6J mice by subcutaneous injection 24 h after total-body irradiation significantly improved hematopoietic recovery and mitigated hematopoietic ARS. Collectively, our results demonstrate that the GSK-3 inhibitor SB216763 is an effective medical countermeasure against acute radiation injury of the hematopoietic system. PMID:24720754

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β and cyclin D1 expression in cervical carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyunsoo; Lee, Myunghwa; Kim, Dae Woon; Hong, Seo Yoo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is a pluripotent protein kinase involved in the development of cancers through regulation of numerous oncogenic molecules. Cyclin D1, an important regulator of G1 to S phase transition in various cells, is one of target proteins that GSK3β regulate. Our objective was to assess the expression of GSK3β and cyclin D1 in cervical neoplasm of different histologic grades and to identify their correlation in cervical carcinogenesis. Methods Immunohistochemical analysis of GSK3β and cyclin D1 was performed in a total of 137 patients with 12 normal, 62 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) (31 CIN1 and 31 CIN3) and 63 invasive cancers including 56 squamous cell carcinomas and 7 adenocarcinomas. Results The expression of GSK3β increased in parallel with the lesion grade, while that of cyclin D1 decreased with severity of the lesion (P<0.001). There was a significant inverse correlation between GSK3β and cyclin D1 expression in overall cervical neoplasia (Φ=-0.413, P<0.001). GSK3β expression was higher in squamous cell carcinoma than in adenocarcinoma (P=0.049). Conclusion These results suggest that the expressional increase in GSK3β plays a role in cervical carcinogenesis and has inverse correlation with cyclin D1 expression in this process. In addition, GSK3β expression appears to be associated with the histologic type of cervical cancer, especially squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27896249

  8. Rapid Detection of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Activity in Mouse Sperm Using Fluorescent Gel Shift Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoseok; Choi, Bomi; Seo, Ju Tae; Lee, Kyung Jin; Gye, Myung Chan; Kim, Young-Pil

    2016-01-01

    Assaying the glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) activity in sperm is of great importance because it is closely implicated in sperm motility and male infertility. While a number of studies on GSK3 activity have relied on labor-intensive immunoblotting to identify phosphorylated GSK3, here we report the simple and rapid detection of GSK3 activity in mouse sperm using conventional agarose gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent peptide substrate. When a dye-tethered and prephosphorylated (primed) peptide substrate for GSK3 was employed, a distinct mobility shift in the fluorescent bands on the agarose was observed by GSK3-induced phosphorylation of the primed peptides. The GSK3 activity in mouse testes and sperm were quantifiable by gel shift assay with low sample consumption and were significantly correlated with the expression levels of GSK3 and p-GSK3. We suggest that our assay can be used for reliable and rapid detection of GSK3 activity in cells and tissue extracts. PMID:27092510

  9. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 is an Intermediate Modulator of Serotonin Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Polter, Abigail M.; Li, Xiaohua

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin is a neurotransmitter with broad functions in brain development, neuronal activity, and behaviors; and serotonin is the prominent drug target in several major neuropsychiatric diseases. The multiple actions of serotonin are mediated by diverse serotonin receptor subtypes and associated signaling pathways. However, the key signaling components that mediate specific function of serotonin neurotransmission have not been fully identified. This review will provide evidence from biochemical, pharmacological, and animal behavioral studies showing that serotonin regulates the activation states of brain glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) via type 1 and type 2 serotonin receptors. In return, GSK3 directly interacts with serotonin receptors in a highly selective manner, with a prominent effect on modulating serotonin 1B receptor activity. Therefore, GSK3 acts as an intermediate modulator in the serotonin neurotransmission system, and balanced GSK3 activity is essential for serotonin-regulated brain function and behaviors. Particularly important, several classes of serotonin-modulating drugs, such as antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics, regulate GSK3 by inhibiting its activity in brain, which reinforces the importance of GSK3 as a potential therapeutic target in neuropsychiatric diseases associated with abnormal serotonin function. PMID:22028682

  10. Identification of glycogen synthase kinase 3α as a therapeutic target in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V.; Sharma, Arati; Gowda, Raghavendra; Robertson, Gavin P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Deregulated expression or activity of kinases can lead to melanomas, but often the particular kinase isoform causing the effect is not well established, making identification and validation of different isoforms regulating disease development especially important. To accomplish this objective, an siRNA screen was undertaken that which identified glycogen synthase kinase 3α (GSK3α) as an important melanoma growth regulator. Melanocytes and melanoma cell lines representing various stages of melanoma tumor progression expressed both GSK3α and GSK3β, but analysis of tumors in patients with melanoma showed elevated expression of GSK3α in 72% of samples, which was not observed for GSK3β. Furthermore, 80% of tumors in patients with melanoma expressed elevated levels of catalytically active phosphorylated GSK3α (pGSK3αY279), but not phosphorylated GSK3β (pGSK3βY216). siRNA-mediated reduction in GSK3α protein levels reduced melanoma cell survival and proliferation, sensitized cells to apoptosis-inducing agents and decreased xenografted tumor development by up to 56%. Mechanistically, inhibiting GSK3α expression using siRNA or the pharmacological agent AR-A014418 arrested melanoma cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle and induced apoptotic death to retard tumorigenesis. Therefore, GSK3α is a key therapeutic target in melanoma. PMID:24034838

  11. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β promotes cyst expansion in polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shixin; Kakade, Vijayakumar; Woodgett, James; Pandey, Pankaj; Suderman, Erin; Rajagopal, Madhumitha; Rao, Reena

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic kidney diseases (PKDs) are inherited disorders characterized by the formation of fluid filled renal cysts. Elevated cAMP levels in PKDs stimulate progressive cyst enlargement involving cell proliferation and transepithelial fluid secretion often leading to end stage renal disease. The glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) family of protein kinases consists of GSK3α and GSK3β isoforms and plays a crucial role in multiple cellular signaling pathways. We previously found that GSK3β, a regulator of cell proliferation, is also crucial for cAMP generation and vasopressin mediated urine concentration by the kidneys. However, the role of GSK3β in the pathogenesis of PKDs is not known. Here we found that GSK3β expression and activity were markedly up-regulated and associated with cyst-lining epithelia in the kidneys of mice and humans with PKD. Renal collecting duct specific gene knockout of GSK3β or pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 effectively slowed the progression of PKD in mouse models of autosomal recessive or autosomal dominant PKD. GSK3 inactivation inhibited cAMP generation and cell proliferation resulting in reduced cyst expansion, improved renal function and extended lifespan. GSK3β inhibition also reduced pERK, c-Myc and Cyclin-D1, known mitogens in proliferation of cystic epithelial cells. Thus, GSK3β plays a novel functional role in PKD pathophysiology and its inhibition may be therapeutically useful to slow cyst expansion and progression of PKD. PMID:25629553

  12. Rapid Detection of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Activity in Mouse Sperm Using Fluorescent Gel Shift Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoseok; Choi, Bomi; Seo, Ju Tae; Lee, Kyung Jin; Gye, Myung Chan; Kim, Young-Pil

    2016-04-16

    Assaying the glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) activity in sperm is of great importance because it is closely implicated in sperm motility and male infertility. While a number of studies on GSK3 activity have relied on labor-intensive immunoblotting to identify phosphorylated GSK3, here we report the simple and rapid detection of GSK3 activity in mouse sperm using conventional agarose gel electrophoresis and a fluorescent peptide substrate. When a dye-tethered and prephosphorylated (primed) peptide substrate for GSK3 was employed, a distinct mobility shift in the fluorescent bands on the agarose was observed by GSK3-induced phosphorylation of the primed peptides. The GSK3 activity in mouse testes and sperm were quantifiable by gel shift assay with low sample consumption and were significantly correlated with the expression levels of GSK3 and p-GSK3. We suggest that our assay can be used for reliable and rapid detection of GSK3 activity in cells and tissue extracts.

  13. A mutation in PRKAG3 associated with excess glycogen content in pig skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Milan, D; Jeon, J T; Looft, C; Amarger, V; Robic, A; Thelander, M; Rogel-Gaillard, C; Paul, S; Iannuccelli, N; Rask, L; Ronne, H; Lundström, K; Reinsch, N; Gellin, J; Kalm, E; Roy, P L; Chardon, P; Andersson, L

    2000-05-19

    A high proportion of purebred Hampshire pigs carries the dominant RN- mutation, which causes high glycogen content in skeletal muscle. The mutation has beneficial effects on meat content but detrimental effects on processing yield. Here, it is shown that the mutation is a nonconservative substitution (R200Q) in the PRKAG3 gene, which encodes a muscle-specific isoform of the regulatory gamma subunit of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Loss-of-function mutations in the homologous gene in yeast (SNF4) cause defects in glucose metabolism, including glycogen storage. Further analysis of the PRKAG3 signaling pathway may provide insights into muscle physiology as well as the pathogenesis of noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in humans, a metabolic disorder associated with impaired glycogen synthesis.

  14. Manipulation of Muscle Creatine and Glycogen Changes Dual X-ray Absorptiometry Estimates of Body Composition.

    PubMed

    Bone, Julia L; Ross, Megan L; Tomcik, Kristyen A; Jeacocke, Nikki A; Hopkins, Will G; Burke, Louise M

    2017-05-01

    Standardizing a dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) protocol is thought to provide a reliable measurement of body composition. We investigated the effects of manipulating muscle glycogen and creatine content independently and additively on DXA estimates of lean mass. Eighteen well-trained male cyclists undertook a parallel group application of creatine loading (n = 9) (20 g·d for 5 d loading; 3 g·d maintenance) or placebo (n = 9) with crossover application of glycogen loading (12 v 6 g·kg BM per day for 48 h) as part of a larger study involving a glycogen-depleting exercise protocol. Body composition, total body water, muscle glycogen and creatine content were assessed via DXA, bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy and standard biopsy techniques. Changes in the mean were assessed using the following effect-size scale: >0.2 small, >0.6, moderate, >1.2 large and compared with the threshold for the smallest worthwhile effect of the treatment. Glycogen loading, both with and without creatine loading, resulted in substantial increases in estimates of lean body mass (mean ± SD; 3.0% ± 0.7% and 2.0% ± 0.9%) and leg lean mass (3.1% ± 1.8% and 2.6% ± 1.0%) respectively. A substantial decrease in leg lean mass was observed after the glycogen depleting condition (-1.4% ± 1.6%). Total body water showed substantial increases after glycogen loading (2.3% ± 2.3%), creatine loading (1.4% ± 1.9%) and the combined treatment (2.3% ± 1.1%). Changes in muscle metabolites and water content alter DXA estimates of lean mass during periods in which minimal change in muscle protein mass is likely. This information needs to be considered in interpreting the results of DXA-derived estimates of body composition in athletes.

  15. Carbohydrate supplementation during prolonged cycling exercise spares muscle glycogen but does not affect intramyocellular lipid use.

    PubMed

    Stellingwerff, Trent; Boon, Hanneke; Gijsen, Annemie P; Stegen, Jos H C H; Kuipers, Harm; van Loon, Luc J C

    2007-07-01

    Using contemporary stable-isotope methodology and fluorescence microscopy, we assessed the impact of carbohydrate supplementation on whole-body and fiber-type-specific intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG) and glycogen use during prolonged endurance exercise. Ten endurance-trained male subjects were studied twice during 3 h of cycling at 63 +/- 4% of maximal O(2) uptake with either glucose ingestion (CHO trial; 0.7 g CHO kg(-1) h(-1)) or without (CON placebo trial; water only). Continuous infusions with [U-(13)C] palmitate and [6,6-(2)H(2)] glucose were applied to quantify plasma free fatty acids (FFA) and glucose oxidation rates and to estimate intramyocellular lipid and glycogen use. Before and after exercise, muscle biopsy samples were taken to quantify fiber-type-specific IMTG and glycogen content. Plasma glucose rate of appearance (R (a)) and carbohydrate oxidation rates were substantially greater in the CHO vs CON trial. Carbohydrate supplementation resulted in a lower muscle glycogen use during the first hour of exercise in the CHO vs CON trial, resulting in a 38 +/- 19 and 57 +/- 22% decreased utilization in type I and II muscle-fiber glycogen content, respectively. In the CHO trial, both plasma FFA R (a) and subsequent plasma FFA concentrations were lower, resulting in a 34 +/- 12% reduction in plasma FFA oxidation rates during exercise (P < 0.05). Carbohydrate intake did not augment IMTG utilization, as fluorescence microscopy revealed a 76 +/- 21 and 78 +/- 22% reduction in type I muscle-fiber lipid content in the CHO and CON trial, respectively. We conclude that carbohydrate supplementation during prolonged cycling exercise does not modulate IMTG use but spares muscle glycogen use during the initial stages of exercise in endurance-trained men.

  16. Effect of exercise-diet manipulation on muscle glycogen and its subsequent utilization during performance.

    PubMed

    Sherman, W M; Costill, D L; Fink, W J; Miller, J M

    1981-05-01

    This study examined the effect of three exercise-diet regimens on muscle glycogen supercompensation and subsequent performance during a 20.9-km run. A diet containing 15% carbohydrate (CHO,L), 50% CHO (M), or 70% (CHO (H) was arranged in three trials as follows: trial A = 3 days L, 3 days H; trial B = 3 days M, 3 days H; trial C = 6 days M. For each trial a 5-day depletion-taper exercise sequence was conducted on the treadmill at 73% VO2 max. The runs were 90, 40, 40, 20, and 20 min, respectively. A day of rest preceded the 20.9-km performance run. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the gastrocnemius on days 4 and 7 (both prior to and after the performance run). Trials A, B, and C elevated muscle glycogen to 207, 203, and 159 mmol glucosyl units/kg wet tissue (mmG), respectively. The performance run in both trials A and B utilized significantly more glycogen than in trial C: 5.0 and 5.1 mmG/km vs. 3.1 mmG/km. There were, however, no differences in either performance run times or post-performance run glycogen levels between the trials. These data demonstrate that (1) muscle glycogen can be elevated to high levels with a moderate exercise-diet regimen; (2) initial muscle glycogen levels influence the amount subsequently utilized during exercise; (3) carbohydrate loading is of no benefit to performance for trained runners during a 20.9-km run.

  17. Impact of Muscle Glycogen Availability on the Capacity for Repeated Exercise in Man.

    PubMed

    Alghannam, Abdullah F; Jedrzejewski, Dawid; Tweddle, Mark G; Gribble, Hannah; Bilzon, James; Thompson, Dylan; Tsintzas, Kostas; Betts, James A

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to examine whether muscle glycogen availability is associated with fatigue in a repeated exercise bout following short-term recovery. Ten endurance-trained individuals underwent two trials in a repeated-measures experimental design, each involving an initial run to exhaustion at 70% of VO2max (Run 1) followed by a 4-h recovery and a subsequent run to exhaustion at 70% of VO2max (Run 2). A low-carbohydrate (L-CHO; 0.3 g · kg body mass(-1) · h(-1)) or high-carbohydrate (H-CHO; 1.2 g · kg body mass(-1) · h(-1)) beverage was ingested at 30-min intervals during recovery. Muscle biopsies were taken upon cessation of Run 1, after recovery, and at exhaustion during Run 2 in L-CHO (F2). In H-CHO, muscle biopsies were obtained after recovery, at the time point coincident with fatigue in L-CHO (F2), and at the point of fatigue during the subsequent exercise bout (F3). Run 2 was more prolonged for participants on H-CHO (80 ± 16 min) than for participants on L-CHO (48 ± 11 min; P < 0.001). Muscle glycogen concentrations were higher at the end of recovery for participants on H-CHO (269 ± 84 mmol · kg dry mass(-1)) than for participants on L-CHO (157 ± 37 mmol · kg dry mass(-1); P = 0.001). The rate of muscle glycogen degradation during Run 2 was higher with H-CHO (3.1 ± 1.5 mmol · kg dry mass(-1) · min(-1)) than with L-CHO (1.6 ± 1.3 mmol · kg dry mass(-1) · min(-1); P = 0.05). The concentration of muscle glycogen was higher with H-CHO than with L-CHO at F2 (123 ± 28 mmol · kg dry mass(-1); P < 0.01), but no differences were observed between treatments at the respective points of exhaustion (78 ± 22 mmol · kg dry mass(-1) · min(-1 )for H-CHO vs 72 ± 21 mmol · kg dry mass(-1) · min(-1) for L-CHO). Increasing carbohydrate intake during short-term recovery accelerates glycogen repletion in previously exercised muscles and thus improves the capacity for repeated exercise. The availability of skeletal muscle glycogen is therefore an important

  18. Enhanced glycogen synthase kinase-3β activity mediates podocyte apoptosis under diabetic conditions.

    PubMed

    Paeng, Jisun; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lee, Sun Ha; Nam, Bo Young; Kang, Hye-Young; Kim, Seonghun; Oh, Hyung Jung; Park, Jung Tak; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook

    2014-12-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is involved in the pathogenesis of various kidney diseases. This study was undertaken to examine the changes in GSK-3β activity in podocytes under diabetic conditions and to elucidate the functional role of GSK-3β in podocyte apoptosis. In vivo, 32 rats were injected with either diluent (n = 16, C) or with streptozotocin intraperitoneally (n = 16, DM), and 8 rats from each group were treated with 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO) for 3 months. In vitro, immortalized mouse podocytes were exposed to 5.6 mM glucose or 30 mM glucose (HG) with or without 10 μM BIO. Western blot analysis and TUNEL or Hoechst 33342 staining were performed to identify apoptosis. Urinary albumin excretion was significantly higher in DM rats, and this increase was significantly abrogated in DM rats by BIO treatment. The protein expression of Tyr216-phospho-GSK-3β was significantly increased in DM glomeruli and in cultured podocytes exposed to HG. Western blot analysis revealed that the protein expression of Bax and active fragments of caspase-3 were significantly increased, whereas phospho-Akt, β-catenin, and Bcl-2 protein expression were significantly decreased in DM glomeruli and HG-stimulated podocytes. Apoptosis, determined by TUNEL assay and Hoechst 33342 staining, was also significantly increased in podocytes under diabetic conditions. The changes in the expression of apoptosis-related molecules and the increase in the number of apoptotic cells in DM glomeruli as well as in HG-stimulated podocytes were significantly ameliorated by BIO. These findings suggest that enhanced GSK-3β activity within podocytes under diabetic conditions is associated with podocyte loss in diabetic nephropathy.

  19. Glycogen synthase kinase 3α regulates urine concentrating mechanism in mice.

    PubMed

    Nørregaard, Rikke; Tao, Shixin; Nilsson, Line; Woodgett, James R; Kakade, Vijayakumar; Yu, Alan S L; Howard, Christiana; Rao, Reena

    2015-03-15

    In mammals, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 comprises GSK3α and GSK3β isoforms. GSK3β has been shown to play a role in the ability of kidneys to concentrate urine by regulating vasopressin-mediated water permeability of collecting ducts, whereas the role of GSK3α has yet to be discerned. To investigate the role of GSK3α in urine concentration, we compared GSK3α knockout (GSK3αKO) mice with wild-type (WT) littermates. Under normal conditions, GSK3αKO mice had higher water intake and urine output. GSK3αKO mice also showed reduced urine osmolality and aquaporin-2 levels but higher urinary vasopressin. When water deprived, they failed to concentrate their urine to the same level as WT littermates. The addition of 1-desamino-8-d-arginine vasopressin to isolated inner medullary collecting ducts increased the cAMP response in WT mice, but this response was reduced in GSK3αKO mice, suggesting reduced responsiveness to vasopressin. Gene silencing of GSK3α in mpkCCD cells also reduced forskolin-induced aquaporin-2 expression. When treated with LiCl, an isoform nonselective inhibitor of GSK3 and known inducer of polyuria, WT mice developed significant polyuria within 6 days. However, in GSK3αKO mice, the polyuric response was markedly reduced. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that GSK3α could play a crucial role in renal urine concentration and suggest that GSK3α might be one of the initial targets of Li(+) in LiCl-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

  20. Identification of a Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3[beta] Inhibitor that Attenuates Hyperactivity in CLOCK Mutant Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kozikowski, Alan P.; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Guo, Songpo; Gaisina, Irina N.; Walter, Richard L.; Ketcherside, Ariel; McClung, Colleen A.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Caldarone, Barbara

    2012-05-02

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by a cycle of mania and depression, which affects approximately 5 million people in the United States. Current treatment regimes include the so-called 'mood-stabilizing drugs', such as lithium and valproate that are relatively dated drugs with various known side effects. Glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) plays a central role in regulating circadian rhythms, and lithium is known to be a direct inhibitor of GSK-3{beta}. We designed a series of second generation benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimides containing a piperidine ring that possess IC{sub 50} values in the range of 4 to 680 nM against human GSK-3{beta}. One of these compounds exhibits reasonable kinase selectivity and promising preliminary absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) data. The administration of this compound at doses of 10 to 25 mg kg{sup -1} resulted in the attenuation of hyperactivity in amphetamine/chlordiazepoxide-induced manic-like mice together with enhancement of prepulse inhibition, similar to the effects found for valproate (400 mg kg{sup -1}) and the antipsychotic haloperidol (1 mg kg{sup -1}). We also tested this compound in mice carrying a mutation in the central transcriptional activator of molecular rhythms, the CLOCK gene, and found that the same compound attenuates locomotor hyperactivity in response to novelty. This study further demonstrates the use of inhibitors of GSK-3{beta} in the treatment of manic episodes of bipolar/mood disorders, thus further validating GSK-3{beta} as a relevant therapeutic target in the identification of new therapies for bipolar patients.

  1. Decreased glycogen synthase kinase-3 levels and activity contribute to Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Nogales, Marta; Hernández, Félix; Miguez, Andrés; Alberch, Jordi; Ginés, Silvia; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Lucas, José J

    2015-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder characterized by brain atrophy particularly in striatum leading to personality changes, chorea and dementia. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine kinase in the crossroad of many signaling pathways that is highly pleiotropic as it phosphorylates more than hundred substrates including structural, metabolic, and signaling proteins. Increased GSK-3 activity is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and GSK-3 inhibitors have been postulated as therapeutic agents for neurodegeneration. Regarding HD, GSK-3 inhibitors have shown beneficial effects in cell and invertebrate animal models but no evident efficacy in mouse models. Intriguingly, those studies were performed without interrogating GSK-3 level and activity in HD brain. Here we aim to explore the level and also the enzymatic activity of GSK-3 in the striatum and other less affected brain regions of HD patients and of the R6/1 mouse model to then elucidate the possible contribution of its alteration to HD pathogenesis by genetic manipulation in mice. We report a dramatic decrease in GSK-3 levels and activity in striatum and cortex of HD patients with similar results in the mouse model. Correction of the GSK-3 deficit in HD mice, by combining with transgenic mice with conditional GSK-3 expression, resulted in amelioration of their brain atrophy and behavioral motor and learning deficits. Thus, our results demonstrate that decreased brain GSK-3 contributes to HD neurological phenotype and open new therapeutic opportunities based on increasing GSK-3 activity or attenuating the harmful consequences of its decrease.

  2. Loss of glycogen synthase kinase 3 isoforms during murine oocyte growth induces offspring cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Monteiro da Rocha, André; Ding, Jun; Slawny, Nicole; Wolf, Amber M; Smith, Gary D

    2015-05-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is a constitutively active serine threonine kinase with 1) two isoforms (GSK3A and GSK3B) that have unique and overlapping functions, 2) multiple molecular intracellular mechanisms that involve phosphorylation of diverse substrates, and 3) implications in pathogenesis of many diseases. Insulin causes phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK3 and mammalian oocytes have a functional insulin-signaling pathway whereby prolonged elevated insulin during follicle/oocyte development causes GSK3 hyperphosphorylation, reduced GSK3 activity, and altered oocyte chromatin remodeling. Periconceptional diabetes and chronic hyperinsulinemia are associated with congenital malformations and onset of adult diseases of cardiovascular origin. Objectives were to produce transgenic mice with individual or concomitant loss of GSK3A and/or GSK3B and investigate the in vivo role of oocyte GSK3 on fertility, fetal development, and offspring health. Wild-type males bred to females with individual or concomitant loss of oocyte GSK3 isoforms did not have reduced fertility. However, concomitant loss of GSK3A and GSK3B in the oocyte significantly increased neonatal death rate due to congestive heart failure secondary to ventricular hyperplasia. Individual loss of oocyte GSK3A or GSK3B did not induce this lethal phenotype. In conclusion, absence of oocyte GSK3 in the periconceptional period does not alter fertility yet causes offspring cardiac hyperplasia, cardiovascular defects, and significant neonatal death. These results support a developmental mechanism by which periconceptional hyperinsulinemia associated with maternal metabolic syndrome, obesity, and/or diabetes can act on the oocyte and affect offspring cardiovascular development, function, and congenital heart malformation.

  3. Identification of a glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor that attenuates hyperactivity in CLOCK mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Kozikowski, Alan P; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Guo, Songpo; Gaisina, Irina N; Walter, Richard L; Ketcherside, Ariel; McClung, Colleen A; Mesecar, Andrew D; Caldarone, Barbara

    2011-09-05

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by a cycle of mania and depression, which affects approximately 5 million people in the United States. Current treatment regimes include the so-called "mood-stabilizing drugs", such as lithium and valproate that are relatively dated drugs with various known side effects. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) plays a central role in regulating circadian rhythms, and lithium is known to be a direct inhibitor of GSK-3β. We designed a series of second generation benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimides containing a piperidine ring that possess IC₅₀ values in the range of 4 to 680 nM against human GSK-3β. One of these compounds exhibits reasonable kinase selectivity and promising preliminary absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) data. The administration of this compound at doses of 10 to 25 mg kg⁻¹ resulted in the attenuation of hyperactivity in amphetamine/chlordiazepoxide-induced manic-like mice together with enhancement of prepulse inhibition, similar to the effects found for valproate (400 mg kg⁻¹) and the antipsychotic haloperidol (1 mg kg⁻¹). We also tested this compound in mice carrying a mutation in the central transcriptional activator of molecular rhythms, the CLOCK gene, and found that the same compound attenuates locomotor hyperactivity in response to novelty. This study further demonstrates the use of inhibitors of GSK-3β in the treatment of manic episodes of bipolar/mood disorders, thus further validating GSK-3β as a relevant therapeutic target in the identification of new therapies for bipolar patients.

  4. Efficacy of glycogen synthase kinase-3β targeting against osteosarcoma via activation of β-catenin

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Norio; Nishida, Hideji; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kimura, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Miwa, Shinji; Igarashi, Kentaro; Kato, Takashi; Aoki, Yu; Higuchi, Takashi; Hirose, Mayumi; Hoffman, Robert M; Minamoto, Toshinari; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Development of innovative more effective therapy is required for refractory osteosarcoma patients. We previously established that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK- 3β) is a therapeutic target in various cancer types. In the present study, we explored the therapeutic efficacy of GSK-3β inhibition against osteosarcoma and the underlying molecular mechanisms in an orthotopic mouse model. Expression and phosphorylation of GSK-3β in osteosarcoma and normal osteoblast cell lines was examined, together with efficacy of GSK-3β inhibition on cell survival, proliferation and apoptosis and on the growth of orthotopically-transplanted human osteosarcoma in nude mice. We also investigated changes in expression, phosphorylation and co-transcriptional activity of β-catenin in osteosarcoma cells following GSK-3β inhibition. Expression of the active form of GSK- 3β (tyrosine 216-phosphorylated) was higher in osteosarcoma than osteoblast cells. Inhibition of GSK-3β activity by pharmacological inhibitors or of its expression by RNA interference suppressed proliferation of osteosarcoma cells and induced apoptosis. Treatment with GSK-3β-specific inhibitors attenuated the growth of orthotopic osteosaroma in mice. Inhibition of GSK-3β reduced phosphorylation at GSK- 3β-phospho-acceptor sites in β-catenin and increased β-catenin expression, nuclear localization and co-transcriptional activity. These results suggest the efficacy of GSK-3β inhibitors is associated with activation of β-catenin, a putative tumor suppressor in bone and soft tissue sarcoma and an important component of osteogenesis. Our study thereby demonstrates a critical role for GSK-3β in sustaining survival and proliferation of osteosarcoma cells, and identifies this kinase as a potential therapeutic target against osteosarcoma. PMID:27780915

  5. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 regulates photic signaling in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jodi R; McKeown, Alex S; Davis, Jennifer A; Totsch, Stacie K; Mintz, Eric M; Kraft, Timothy W; Cowell, Rita M; Gamble, Karen L

    2017-04-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a serine-threonine kinase that regulates mammalian circadian rhythms at the behavioral, molecular and neurophysiological levels. In the central circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK3 exhibits a rhythm across the 24 h day. We have recently shown that GSK3 is capable of influencing both the molecular clock and SCN neuronal activity rhythms. However, it is not known whether GSK3 regulates the response to environmental cues such as light. The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that GSK3 activation mediates light-induced SCN excitability and photic entrainment. Immunofluorescence staining in the SCN of mice showed that late-night light exposure significantly increased GSK3 activity (decreased pGSK3β levels) 30-60 min after the light-pulse. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 blocked the expected light-induced excitability in SCN neurons; however, this effect was not associated with changes in resting membrane potential or input resistance. Behaviorally, mice with constitutively active GSK3 (GSK3-KI) re-entrained to a 6-h phase advance in the light-dark cycle in significantly fewer days than WT control animals. Furthermore, the behavioral and SCN neuronal activity of GSK3-KI mice was phase-advanced compared to WT, in both normal and light-exposed conditions. Finally, GSK3-KI mice exhibited normal negative-masking behavior and electroretinographic responses to light, suggesting that the enhanced photic entrainment is not due to an overall increased sensitivity to light in these animals. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that GSK3 activation contributes to light-induced phase-resetting at both the neurophysiological and behavioral levels. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Modulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β following TRAIL combinatorial treatment in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Santha, Sreevidya; Davaakhuu, Gantulga; Basu, Aninda; Ke, Rong; Das, Subhasis; Rana, Ajay; Rana, Basabi

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK3β) is a serine/threonine kinase, known to regulate various cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, survival, apoptosis as well as TRAIL-resistance. Thus pathways that can modulate GSK3β axis are important targets for cancer drug development. Our earlier studies have shown that combinatorial treatment with Troglitazone (TZD) and TRAIL can induce apoptosis in TRAIL-resistant cancer cells. The current studies were undertaken to investigate whether GSK3β pathway was modulated during this apoptosis. Our results indicated an increase in inhibitory GSK3βSer9 phosphorylation during apoptosis, mediated via AKT. At a later time, however, TZD alone and TRAIL-TZD combination produced a dramatic reduction of GSK3β expression, which was abolished by cycloheximide. Luciferase assays with GSK3β-luc promoter reporter showed that TZD can effectively antagonize GSK3β promoter activity. Since TZD is a ligand for transcription factor PPARγ and can activate AMPK, we determined their roles on antagonism of GSK3β. Knockdown of PPARγ was unable to restore GSK3β expression or antagonize GSK3βSer9 phosphorylation. Although pretreatment with Compound C (pharmacological inhibitor of AMPK) partially rescued GSK3β expression, knockdown of AMPKα1 or α2 alone or in combination were ineffective. These studies suggested a novel PPARγ-AMPK-independent mechanism of targeting GSK3β by TZD, elucidation of which might provide newer insights to improve our understanding of TRAIL-resistance. PMID:27602497

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β is a pivotal mediator of cancer invasion and resistance to therapy.

    PubMed

    Domoto, Takahiro; Pyko, Ilya V; Furuta, Takuya; Miyashita, Katsuyoshi; Uehara, Masahiro; Shimasaki, Takeo; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Minamoto, Toshinari

    2016-10-01

    Tumor cell invasion and resistance to therapy are the most intractable biological characteristics of cancer and, therefore, the most challenging for current cancer research and treatment paradigms. Refractory cancers, including pancreatic cancer and glioblastoma, show an inextricable association between the highly invasive behavior of tumor cells and their resistance to chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapies. These aggressive properties of cancer share distinct cellular pathways that are connected to each other by several molecular hubs. There is increasing evidence to show that glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β is aberrantly activated in various cancer types and this has emerged as a potential therapeutic target. In many but not all cancer types, aberrant GSK3β sustains the survival, immortalization, proliferation and invasion of tumor cells, while also rendering them insensitive or resistant to chemotherapeutic agents and radiation. Here we review studies that describe associations between therapeutic stimuli/resistance and the induction of pro-invasive phenotypes in various cancer types. Such cancers are largely responsive to treatment that targets GSK3β. This review focuses on the role of GSK3β as a molecular hub that connects pathways responsible for tumor invasion and resistance to therapy, thus highlighting its potential as a major cancer therapeutic target. We also discuss the putative involvement of GSK3β in determining tumor cell stemness that underpins both tumor invasion and therapy resistance, leading to intractable and refractory cancer with dismal patient outcomes. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  8. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 increased subventricular zone stem cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pachenari, Narges; Kiani, Sahar; Javan, Mohammad

    2017-09-01

    The effects of Wnt signaling modifiers on cell proliferation, seem to be cell specific. Enhancing the proliferation of subventricular zone (SVZ) progenitors has been in the focus of research in recent years. Here we investigate the effect of CHIR99021, a Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSk-3) inhibitor, on SVZ progenitor's proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. Neural stem cells were extracted from the adult C57bl/6 by mincing and trypsin treatment followed by culturing in specific medium. Sphere cells formed within about 7-10days and were characterized by immunostaining. Number of spheres and their size was assessed following exposure to different concentration of CHIR99021 or vehicle. For in vivo studies, animals received intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of CHIR99021 or vehicle for four days. A subgroup of animals, after 4days treatment with CHIR99021 received intranasal kainic acid to induce local neurodegeneration in CA3 area of hippocampus. Inhibition of GSk-3 by CHIR99021 increased neural progenitor proliferation and the effect of CHIR99021 was long lasting so that the treated cells showed higher proliferation even after CHIR99021 removal. In vivo administration of CHIR99021 increased the number of neural progenitors at the rims of lateral ventricles especially when the treatment was followed by kainic acid administration which induces neural insult. Results showed that direct administration of CHIR99021 into the culture medium or animal brain increased the number of SVZ progenitors, especially when a neural insult was induced in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Examination of methylphenidate-mediated behavior regulation by glycogen synthase kinase-3 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mines, Marjelo A.; Beurel, Eleonore; Jope, Richard S.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormalities in dopaminergic activity have been implicated in psychiatric diseases, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and are treated with therapeutic stimulants, commonly methylphenidate or amphetamine. Amphetamine administration increases glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) activation, which is necessary for certain acute behavioral responses to amphetamine, including increased locomotor activity and impaired sensorimotor gating. Here, we tested if modulating GSK3 by administration of the GSK3 inhibitor lithium or expression of constitutively active GSK3 altered behavioral responses to methylphenidate administered to mice acutely or daily for 8 days. Methylphenidate or amphetamine was administered to mice intraperitoneally for 1 or 8 days. Open-field activity and pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) were measured. In contrast to lithium’s blockade of acute amphetamine-induced locomotor hyperactivity, lithium treatment did not significantly reduce methylphenidate-induced locomotor hyperactivity in wild-type mice after acute or 8 days of repeated methylphenidate administration. Lithium treatment significantly increased the impairment in PPI caused by methylphenidate, but significantly reduced the amphetamine-induced PPI deficit. In GSK3 knockin mice, expression of constitutively active GSK3β, but not GSK3α, significantly increased locomotor hyperactivity after acute methylphenidate treatment, and significantly impaired PPI, preventing further methylphenidate-induced impairment of PPI that was evident in wild-type mice and GSK3α knockin mice. Lithium does not counteract locomotor activity and PPI responses to methylphenidate as it does these responses to amphetamine, indicating that different mechanisms mediate these behavioral responses to methylphenidate and amphetamine. Only active GSK3β, not GSK3α, modulates behavioral responses to MPH, indicating selectivity in the actions of GSK3 isoforms. PMID:23099259

  10. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β modulation of glucocorticoid responsiveness in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Roland F.; Durham, Andrew L.; Marwick, John A.; Brandenburg, Simone M.; de Bruin, Harold G.; Jonker, Marnix R.; Rossios, Christos; Tsitsiou, Eleni; Caramori, Gaetano; Contoli, Marco; Casolari, Paolo; Monaco, Francesco; Andò, Filippo; Speciale, Giuseppe; Kilty, Iain; Chung, Kian F.; Papi, Alberto; Lindsay, Mark A.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; van den Berge, Maarten; Timens, Wim; Barnes, Peter J.; van Oosterhout, Antoon J.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Heijink, Irene H.

    2015-01-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), oxidative stress regulates the inflammatory response of bronchial epithelium and monocytes/macrophages through kinase modulation and has been linked to glucocorticoid unresponsiveness. Glycogen synthase-3β (GSK3β) inactivation plays a key role in mediating signaling processes upon reactive oxygen species (ROS) exposure. We hypothesized that GSK3β is involved in oxidative stress-induced glucocorticoid insensitivity in COPD. We studied levels of phospho-GSK3β-Ser9, a marker of GSK3β inactivation, in lung sections and cultured monocytes and bronchial epithelial cells of COPD patients, control smokers, and nonsmokers. We observed increased levels of phospho-GSK3β-Ser9 in monocytes, alveolar macrophages, and bronchial epithelial cells from COPD patients and control smokers compared with nonsmokers. Pharmacological inactivation of GSK3β did not affect CXCL8 or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) expression but resulted in glucocorticoid insensitivity in vitro in both inflammatory and structural cells. Further mechanistic studies in monocyte and bronchial epithelial cell lines showed that GSK3β inactivation is a common effector of oxidative stress-induced activation of the MEK/ERK-1/2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathways leading to glucocorticoid unresponsiveness. In primary monocytes, the mechanism involved modulation of histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) activity in response to GSK3β inactivation. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that ROS-induced glucocorticoid unresponsiveness in COPD is mediated through GSK3β, acting as a ROS-sensitive hub. PMID:26320152

  11. Glycogen synthase kinase-3: a potential preventive target for prostate cancer management.

    PubMed

    Li, Benyi; Thrasher, James Brantley; Terranova, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Prostate cancers are the frequently diagnosed cancers in men, and patients with metastatic disease only have 28% chance for 5-year survival. Patients with low-risk tumors are subjected to active surveillance, whereas high-risk cases are actively treated. Unfortunately, there is no cure for patients with late-stage disease. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3, α and β) is a protein serine/threonine kinase and has diverse cellular functions and numerous substrates. We sought to summarize all the studies done with GSK-3 in prostate cancers and to provide a prospective direction for future work. A comprehensive search of the literature on the electronic databases PubMed was conducted for the subject terms of GSK-3 and prostate cancer. Gene mutation and expression information was extracted from Oncomine and COSMIC databases. Case reports were not included. Accumulating evidence indicates that GSK-3α is mainly expressed in low-risk prostate cancers and is related to hormone-dependent androgen receptor (AR)-mediated gene expression, whereas GSK-3β is mainly expressed in high-risk prostate cancers and is related to hormone-independent AR-mediated gene expression. GSK-3 has been demonstrated as a positive regulator in AR transactivation and prostate cancer growth independent of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Different types of GSK-3inhibitors including lithium show promising results in suppressing tumor growth in different animal models of prostate cancer. Importantly, clinical use of lithium is associated with reduced cancer incidence in psychiatric patients. Taken together, GSK-3 inhibition might be implicated in prostate cancer management as a preventive treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 is a potential drug target for African trypanosomiasis therapy.

    PubMed

    Ojo, Kayode K; Gillespie, J Robert; Riechers, Aaron J; Napuli, Alberto J; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Buckner, Frederick S; Gelb, Michael H; Domostoj, Mathias M; Wells, Susan J; Scheer, Alexander; Wells, Timothy N C; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2008-10-01

    Development of a safe, effective, and inexpensive therapy for African trypanosomiasis is an urgent priority. In this study, we evaluated the validity of Trypanosoma brucei glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) as a potential drug target. Interference with the RNA of either of two GSK-3 homologues in bloodstream-form T. brucei parasites led to growth arrest and altered parasite morphology, demonstrating their requirement for cell survival. Since the growth arrest after RNA interference appeared to be more profound for T. brucei GSK-3 "short" (Tb10.161.3140) than for T. brucei GSK-3 "long" (Tb927.7.2420), we focused on T. brucei GSK-3 short for further studies. T. brucei GSK-3 short with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein fusion was cloned, expressed, and purified in a functional form. The potency of a GSK-3-focused inhibitor library against the recombinant enzyme of T. brucei GSK-3 short, as well as bloodstream-form parasites, was evaluated with the aim of determining if compounds that inhibit enzyme activity could also block the parasites' growth and proliferation. Among the compounds active against the cell, there was an excellent correlation between activity inhibiting the T. brucei GSK-3 short enzyme and the inhibition of T. brucei growth. Thus, there is reasonable genetic and chemical validation of GSK-3 short as a drug target for T. brucei. Finally, selective inhibition may be required for therapy targeting the GSK-3 enzyme, and a molecular model of the T. brucei GSK-3 short enzyme suggests that compounds that selectively inhibit T. brucei GSK-3 short over the human GSK-3 enzymes can be found.

  13. Disruption of glycogen synthase kinase-3-beta activity leads to abnormalities in physiological measures in mice.

    PubMed

    Ahnaou, A; Drinkenburg, W H I M

    2011-08-01

    Dysregulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3-beta (GSK-3β) signaling pathways is thought to underlie the pathophysiology of mood disorders. In order to demonstrate that the loss of normal GSK-3β activity results in disturbances of physiological measures, we attempted to determine whether sleep-wake architecture, circadian rhythms of core body temperature and activity were altered in transgenic mice overexpressing GSK-3β activity specifically in the brain. Cortical electroencephalographic activity, body temperature (BT) and body locomotor activity (LMA) were continuously monitored using a biopotential telemetry probe. Normal circadian patterns were maintained for different measurements in both genotypes. No differences were found in total time spent asleep and waking over the 24-h recording session. However, transgenic animals overexpressing GSK-3β showed alteration in sleep continuity characterized by an increases in number of non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep episodes (GSK-3β, 227.2 ± 1.7 vs. WT, 172.6 ± 1.4, p < 0.05) and decreases in mean episode duration (GSK-3β, 3.0 ± 0.1 vs. WT, 4.4 ± 0.2, p < 0.05). Additionally, transgenic animals exhibited marked enhancement of basal LMA and BT levels during the first part of the dark period, under both light-dark and free running dark-dark circadian cycles. Our findings indicate that transgenic mice overexpressing GSK-3β activity exhibit severe fragmentation of sleep-wake cycle during both the light and dark periods, without showing deviancy in total durations of vigilance states. The results strongly suggest that GSK-3β activity is elemental for the maintenance of circadian motor behavior levels required for proper regulation of BT and sleep-wake organization.

  14. The Antimalarial Effect of Curcumin Is Mediated by the Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amatul Hamizah; Sudi, Suhaini; Basir, Rusliza; Embi, Noor; Sidek, Hasidah Mohd

    2017-02-01

    Curcumin, a bioactive compound in Curcuma longa, exhibits various pharmacological activities, including antimalarial effects. In silico docking simulation studies suggest that curcumin possesses glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β)-inhibitory properties. The involvement of GSK3 in the antimalarial effects in vivo is yet to be demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether the antimalarial effects of curcumin involve phosphorylation of host GSK3β. Intraperitoneal administration of curcumin into Plasmodium berghei NK65-infected mice resulted in dose-dependent chemosuppression of parasitemia development. At the highest dose tested (30 mg/kg body weight), both therapeutic and prophylactic administrations of curcumin resulted in suppression exceeding 50% and improved median survival time of infected mice compared to control. Western analysis revealed a 5.5-fold (therapeutic group) and 1.8-fold (prophylactic group) increase in phosphorylation of Ser 9 GSK3β and 1.6-fold (therapeutic group) and 1.7-fold (prophylactic group) increase in Ser 473 Akt in liver of curcumin-treated infected animals. Following P. berghei infection, levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-4 were elevated by 7.5-, 35.0-, 33.0-, and 2.2-fold, respectively. Curcumin treatment (therapeutic) caused a significant decrease (by 6.0- and 2.0-fold, respectively) in serum TNF-α and IFN-γ level, while IL-10 and IL-4 were elevated (by 1.4- and 1.8-fold). Findings from the present study demonstrate for the first time that the antimalarial action of curcumin involved inhibition of GSK3β.

  15. Identification of a Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Inhibitor that Attenuates Hyperactivity in CLOCK Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kozikowski, Alan P.; Gunosewoyo, Hendra; Guo, Songpo; Gaisina, Irina N.; Walter, Richard L.; Ketcherside, Ariel; McClung, Colleen A.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Caldarone, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by a cycle of mania and depression, which affects approximately 5 million people in the United States. Current treatment regimes include the so-called “mood-stabilizing drugs”, such as lithium and valproate that are relatively dated drugs with various known side effects. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) plays a central role in regulating circadian rhythms, and lithium is known to be a direct inhibitor of GSK-3β. We designed a series of second generation benzofuran-3-yl-(indol-3-yl)maleimides containing a piperidine ring that possess IC50 values in the range of 4 to 680 nm against human GSK-3β. One of these compounds exhibits reasonable kinase selectivity and promising preliminary absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) data. The administration of this compound at doses of 10 to 25 mgkg−1 resulted in the attenuation of hyperactivity in amphetamine/ chlordiazepoxide-induced manic-like mice together with enhancement of prepulse inhibition, similar to the effects found for valproate (400 mgkg−1) and the antipsychotic haloperidol (1 mgkg−1). We also tested this compound in mice carrying a mutation in the central transcriptional activator of molecular rhythms, the CLOCK gene, and found that the same compound attenuates locomotor hyperactivity in response to novelty. This study further demonstrates the use of inhibitors of GSK-3β in the treatment of manic episodes of bipolar/mood disorders, thus further validating GSK-3β as a relevant therapeutic target in the identification of new therapies for bipolar patients. PMID:21732538

  16. Predicting glycogen concentration in the foot muscle of abalone using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS).

    PubMed

    Fluckiger, Miriam; Brown, Malcolm R; Ward, Louise R; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A

    2011-06-15

    Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to predict glycogen concentrations in the foot muscle of cultured abalone. NIR spectra of live, shucked and freeze-dried abalones were modelled against chemically measured glycogen data (range: 0.77-40.9% of dry weight (DW)) using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The calibration models were then used to predict glycogen concentrations of test abalone samples and model robustness was assessed from coefficient of determination of the validation (R2(val)) and standard error of prediction (SEP) values. The model for freeze-dried abalone gave the best prediction (R2(val) 0.97, SEP=1.71), making it suitable for quantifying glycogen. Models for live and shucked abalones had R2(val) of 0.86 and 0.90, and SEP of 3.46 and 3.07 respectively, making them suitable for producing estimations of glycogen concentration. As glycogen is a taste-active component associated with palatability in abalone, this study demonstrated the potential of NIRS as a rapid method to monitor the factors associated with abalone quality. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Exercise with calorie restriction improves insulin sensitivity and glycogen synthase activity in obese postmenopausal women with impaired glucose tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ortmeyer, Heidi K.; Sorkin, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to compare the effects of in vivo insulin on skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (GS) activity in normal (NGT) vs. impaired glucose-tolerant (IGT) obese postmenopausal women and to determine whether an increase in insulin activation of GS is associated with an improvement in insulin sensitivity (M) following calorie restriction (CR) and/or aerobic exercise plus calorie restriction (AEX + CR) in women with NGT and IGT. We did a longitudinal, clinical intervention study of CR compared with AEX + CR. Overweight and obese women, 49–76 yr old, completed 6 mo of CR (n = 46) or AEX + CR (n = 50) with V̇o2 max, body composition, and glucose tolerance testing. Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic (80 mU·m−2·min−1) clamps (n = 73) and skeletal muscle biopsies (before and during clamp) (n = 58) were performed before and after the interventions (n = 50). After 120 min of hyperinsulinemia during the clamp, GS fractional activity and insulin's effect to increase GS fractional activity (insulin − basal) were significantly lower in IGT vs. NGT (P < 0.01) at baseline. GS total activity increased during the clamp in NGT (P < 0.05), but not IGT, at baseline. CR and AEX + CR resulted in a significant 8% weight loss with reductions in total fat mass, visceral fat, subcutaneous fat, and intramuscular fat. Overall, M increased (P < 0.01), and the change in M (postintervention − preintervention) was associated with the change in insulin-stimulated GS fractional activity (partial r = 0.44, P < 0.005). In IGT, the change (postintervention − preintervention) in insulin-stimulated GS total activity was greater following AEX + CR than CR alone (P < 0.05). In IGT, insulin-stimulated GS-independent (P < 0.005) and fractional activity (P = 0.06) increased following AEX + CR. We conclude that the greatest benefits at the whole body and cellular level (insulin activation of GS) in older women at highest risk for diabetes are derived from a lifestyle intervention that

  18. Muscle glycogen levels and blood metabolites in reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus L.) after transport and lairage.

    PubMed

    Wiklund, E; Andersson, A; Malmfors, G; Lundström, K

    1996-01-01

    A total of 66 reindeer cows and calves were included in a study on the effects of supplementary feeding, transport and lairage on muscle glycogen content, ultimate pH and blood metabolite values. Thirty reindeer (10 not transported, 20 transported 800 km) received no supplementary feed (groups A-C), another 30 animals (10 not transported, 20 transported 1000 km) were given a supplementary reindeer feed mixture 2 months prior to slaughter (groups D-F) and six animals, which had been part of a feeding experiment, were fed for 5 months and slaughtered at the research unit. Glycogen determinations and pH measurements were made in m. longissimus, m. biceps femoris and m. triceps brachii. Blood samples were collected at slaughter and muscle samples were taken 30 min after slaughter. Ultimate pH was measured 30 hr post mortem. The glycogen content in the muscles of groups A-C was very low (100-200 mmol/kg). In groups D-G, the glycogen content was equivalent to normal beef muscle values (300-500 mmol/kg). The values of the blood metabolites urea and creatinine, both of which could indicate protein catabolism caused by stress, were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in animals not having received supplemental feed (groups A-C). Alkaline phosphatase values were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in supplemental fed animals (groups D-G), indicating that their nutritional status was good. Total protein values were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in groups A, D, E and F compared to the other groups. Lorry transport did not significantly (p > 0.05) reduce the muscle glycogen content. Lairage (groups C and F) showed no negative effect on the parameters examined. These results suggest that the animals' physical condition and nutritional status have a considerable effect on their ability to tolerate various stress factors, such as lorry transport and lairage.

  19. Fiber type-specific muscle glycogen sparing due to carbohydrate intake before and during exercise.

    PubMed

    De Bock, K; Derave, W; Ramaekers, M; Richter, E A; Hespel, P

    2007-01-01

    The effect of carbohydrate intake before and during exercise on muscle glycogen content was investigated. According to a randomized crossover study design, eight young healthy volunteers (n = 8) participated in two experimental sessions with an interval of 3 wk. In each session subjects performed 2 h of constant-load bicycle exercise ( approximately 75% maximal oxygen uptake). On one occasion (CHO), they received carbohydrates before ( approximately 150 g) and during (1 g.kg body weight(-1).h(-1)) exercise. On the other occasion they exercised after an overnight fast (F). Fiber type-specific relative glycogen content was determined by periodic acid Schiff staining combined with immunofluorescence in needle biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle before and immediately after exercise. Preexercise glycogen content was higher in type IIa fibers [9.1 +/- 1 x 10(-2) optical density (OD)/microm(2)] than in type I fibers (8.0 +/- 1 x 10(-2) OD/microm(2); P < 0.0001). Type IIa fiber glycogen content decreased during F from 9.6 +/- 1 x 10(-2) OD/microm(2) to 4.5 +/- 1 x 10(-2) OD/microm(2) (P = 0.001), but it did not significantly change during CHO (P = 0.29). Conversely, in type I fibers during CHO and F the exercise bout decreased glycogen content to the same degree. We conclude that the combination of carbohydrate intake both before and during moderate- to high-intensity endurance exercise results in glycogen sparing in type IIa muscle fibers.

  20. Chronic Treatment with the AMP-Kinase Activator AICAR Increases Glycogen Storage and Fatty Acid Oxidation in Skeletal Muscles but Does Not Reduce Hyperglucagonemia and Hyperglycemia in Insulin Deficient Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vitzel, Kaio F.; Bikopoulos, George; Hung, Steven; Pistor, Kathryn E.; Patterson, Jessica D.; Curi, Rui; Ceddia, Rolando B.

    2013-01-01

    This study tested whether the glycogen-accumulating effect of chronic in vivo pharmacological 5′AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation could improve glycemic control under conditions of insulin deficiency. Male Wistar rats were rendered diabetic through the administration of streptozotocin (STZ) and then treated for 7 consecutive days with the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR). Subsequently, glycogen content and synthesis, glucose oxidation, and fatty acid oxidation (FAO) were determined in oxidative and glycolytic skeletal muscles. Glycemia, insulinemia, glucagonemia, and circulating triglycerides (TG) and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) were measured after AICAR treatment. Insulin was almost undetectable in STZ rats and these animals were severely hyperglycemic. Glycogen content was markedly low mainly in glycolytic muscles of STZ rats and AICAR treatment restored it to control values. No differences were found among all muscles studied with regards to the content and phosphorylation of Akt/protein kinase B and glycogen synthase kinase 3. Even though glycogen synthase content was reduced in all muscles from STZ rats, insulin-induced dephosphorylation/activation of this enzyme was preserved and unaffected by AICAR treatment. Glucagon and NEFAS were 2- and 7.4-fold fold higher in STZ rats than controls, respectively. AICAR did not affect hyperglycemia and hyperglucagonemia in STZ rats; however, it normalized circulating NEFAs and significantly increased FAO in glycolytic muscles. In conclusion, even though AICAR-induced AMPK activation enhanced glycogen accumulation in glycolytic muscles and normalized circulating NEFAs and TG levels, the hyperglycemic effects of glucagon likely offset the potentially glucose-lowering effects of AICAR, resulting in no improvement of glycemic control in insulin-deficient rats. PMID:23620811

  1. Small molecules targeting glycogen synthase kinase 3 as potential drug candidates for the treatment of retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Marchena, Miguel; Villarejo-Zori, Beatriz; Zaldivar-Diez, Josefa; Palomo, Valle; Gil, Carmen; Hernández-Sánchez, Catalina; Martínez, Ana; de la Rosa, Enrique J

    2017-12-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy that courses with progressive degeneration of retinal tissue and loss of vision. Currently, RP is an unpreventable, incurable condition. We propose glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) inhibitors as potential leads for retinal cell neuroprotection, since the retina is also a part of the central nervous system and GSK-3 inhibitors are potent neuroprotectant agents. Using a chemical genetic approach, diverse small molecules with different potency and binding mode to GSK-3 have been used to validate and confirm GSK-3 as a pharmacological target for RP. Moreover, this medicinal chemistry approach has provided new leads for the future disease-modifying treatment of RP.

  2. Evaluating glycogen signal contamination in muscle by (13)C MRS of the liver.

    PubMed

    Tomiyasu, Moyoko; Obata, Takayuki; Nonaka, Hiroi; Nishi, Yukio; Nakamoto, Hiromitsu; Takayama, Yukihisa; Ikehira, Hiroo; Kanno, Iwao

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the contamination of glycogen signal synthesized in skeletal muscle by that in the liver, long-term monitoring of over 7 h of in vivo [1-(13)C] glycogen synthesis/degradation at the right abdomen and left shoulder was achieved using a 3.0-T clinical MR system. (13)C MR spectra without localization were obtained from five healthy volunteers before and after oral administration of 85 g of d-glucose, including 10 g of 99% [1-(13)C] glucose. In all volunteers, the relative signal intensities at the abdomen to those at shoulder were about two- to fivefold, and those of time-course changes at the abdomen and shoulder were dissimilar. It is considered that the quantity of muscle-synthesized glycogen signal at the abdomen is less than that at the shoulder because of the lesser muscle volume at the abdomen, and it may be less affected for evaluating glycogen synthesis/degradation in the liver even without localization pulses.

  3. Phenotype Selection Reveals Coevolution of Muscle Glycogen and Protein and PTEN as a Gate Keeper for the Accretion of Muscle Mass in Adult Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sawitzky, Mandy; Zeissler, Anja; Langhammer, Martina; Bielohuby, Maximilian; Stock, Peggy; Hammon, Harald M.; Görs, Solvig; Metges, Cornelia C.; Stoehr, Barbara J. M.; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Fromm-Dornieden, Carolin; Baumgartner, Bernhard G.; Christ, Bruno; Brenig, Bertram; Binder, Gerhard; Metzger, Friedrich; Renne, Ulla; Hoeflich, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated molecular mechanisms for muscle mass accretion in a non-inbred mouse model (DU6P mice) characterized by extreme muscle mass. This extreme muscle mass was developed during 138 generations of phenotype selection for high protein content. Due to the repeated trait selection a complex setting of different mechanisms was expected to be enriched during the selection experiment. In muscle from 29-week female DU6P mice we have identified robust increases of protein kinase B activation (AKT, Ser-473, up to 2-fold) if compared to 11- and 54-week DU6P mice or controls. While a number of accepted effectors of AKT activation, including IGF-I, IGF-II, insulin/IGF-receptor, myostatin or integrin-linked kinase (ILK), were not correlated with this increase, phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) was down-regulated in 29-week female DU6P mice. In addition, higher levels of PTEN phosphorylation were found identifying a second mechanism of PTEN inhibition. Inhibition of PTEN and activation of AKT correlated with specific activation of p70S6 kinase and ribosomal protein S6, reduced phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) and higher rates of protein synthesis in 29-week female DU6P mice. On the other hand, AKT activation also translated into specific inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase 3ß (GSK3ß) and an increase of muscular glycogen. In muscles from 29-week female DU6P mice a significant increase of protein/DNA was identified, which was not due to a reduction of protein breakdown or to specific increases of translation initiation. Instead our data support the conclusion that a higher rate of protein translation is contributing to the higher muscle mass in mid-aged female DU6P mice. Our results further reveal coevolution of high protein and high glycogen content during the selection experiment and identify PTEN as gate keeper for muscle mass in mid-aged female DU6P mice. PMID:22768110

  4. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β, NF-κB Signaling, and Tumorigenesis of Human Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qing-Lian; Xie, Xian-Biao; Wang, Jin; Chen, Qiong; Han, An-Jia; Zou, Chang-Ye; Yin, Jun-Qiang; Liu, Da-Wei; Liang, Yi; Zhao, Zhi-Qiang; Yong, Bi-Cheng; Zhang, Ru-Hua; Feng, Qi-Sheng; Deng, Wu-Guo; Zhu, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, Binhua P.; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine protein kinase, may function as a tumor suppressor or an oncogene, depending on the tumor type. We sought to determine the biological function of GSK-3β in osteosarcoma, a rare pediatric cancer for which the identification of new therapeutic targets is urgent. Methods We used cell viability assays, colony formation assays, and apoptosis assays to analyze the effects of altered GSK-3β expression in U2OS, MG63, SAOS2, U2OS/MTX300, and ZOS osteosarcoma cell lines. Nude mice (n = 5–8 mice per group) were injected with U2OS/MTX300, and ZOS cells to assess the role of GSK-3β in osteosarcoma growth in vivo and to evaluate the effects of inhibitors and/or anticancer drugs on tumor growth. We used an antibody array, polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and a luciferase reporter assay to establish the effect of GSK-3β inhibition on the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. Immunochemistry was performed on primary tumor specimens from osteosarcoma patients (n = 74) to determine the relationship of GSK-3β activity with overall survival. Results Osteosarcoma cells with low levels of inactive p-Ser9-GSK-3β formed colonies in vitro and tumors in vivo more readily than cells with higher levels and cells in which GSK-3β had been silenced formed fewer colonies and smaller tumors than parental cells. Silencing or pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3β resulted in apoptosis of osteosarcoma cells. Inhibition of GSK-3β resulted in inhibition of the NF-κB pathway and reduction of NF-κB-mediated transcription. Combination treatments with GSK-3β inhibitors, NF-κB inhibitors, and chemotherapy drugs increased the effectiveness of chemotherapy drugs in vitro and in vivo. Patients whose osteosarcoma specimens had hyperactive GSK-3β, and nuclear NF-κB had a shorter median overall survival time (49.2 months) compared with patients whose tumors had inactive GSK-3β and NF-κB (109.2 months). Conclusion GSK

  5. Identification and characterization of two wheat Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3/ SHAGGY-like kinases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3/ SHAGGY-like kinases (GSKs) have been implicated in numerous biological processes ranging from embryonic, flower, stomata development to stress and wound responses. They are key regulators of brassinosteroid signaling and are also involved in the cross-talk between auxin and brassinosteroid pathways. In contrast to the human genome that contains two genes, plant GSKs are encoded by a multigene family. Little is known about Liliopsida resp. Poaceae in comparison to Brassicaceae GSKs. Here, we report the identification and structural characterization of two GSK homologs named TaSK1 and TaSK2 in the hexaploid wheat genome as well as a widespread phylogenetic analysis of land plant GSKs. Results Genomic and cDNA sequence alignments as well as chromosome localization using nullisomic-tetrasomic lines provided strong evidence for three expressed gene copies located on homoeolog chromosomes for TaSK1 as well as for TaSK2. Predicted proteins displayed a clear GSK signature. In vitro kinase assays showed that TaSK1 and TaSK2 possessed kinase activity. A phylogenetic analysis of land plant GSKs indicated that TaSK1 and TaSK2 belong to clade II of plant GSKs, the Arabidopsis members of which are all involved in Brassinosteroid signaling. Based on a single ancestral gene in the last common ancestor of all land plants, paralogs were acquired and retained through paleopolyploidization events, resulting in six to eight genes in angiosperms. More recent duplication events have increased the number up to ten in some lineages. Conclusions To account for plant diversity in terms of functionality, morphology and development, attention has to be devoted to Liliopsida resp Poaceae GSKs in addition to Arabidopsis GSKs. In this study, molecular characterization, chromosome localization, kinase activity test and phylogenetic analysis (1) clarified the homologous/paralogous versus homoeologous status of TaSK sequences, (2) pointed out their

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β in patients with bipolar I disorder: results from a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Anne S; Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj; Joaquim, Helena Gp; Talib, Leda L; Gattaz, Wagner F; Kessing, Lars V

    2016-06-01

    The enzyme glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is involved in the mechanisms of action of lithium and may play a role in relation to affective states in bipolar disorder. The objectives of the present study were to compare the activity of GSK-3β (measured as levels of phosphorylated GSK-3β [p-GSK-3β]) between patients with bipolar disorder in the euthymic state and healthy control subjects, and to investigate whether GSK-3β activity varies with affective states in patients with bipolar I disorder. In a prospective 6-12-month follow-up study, we investigated state-specific, intraindividual alterations in the activity of GSK-3β in 60 patients with bipolar I disorder with an acute severe manic index episode and in subsequent euthymic, depressive and manic states and compared this with repeated measurements in healthy control subjects. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects models. From baseline to the end of follow-up, blood samples were drawn from the 60 patients during 181 affective states, comprising 60 manic, 11 mixed, 23 depressive, and 87 states of euthymia. A total of 69 blood samples were drawn from 35 healthy control subjects, with two samples from the same subject taken three months apart. In mixed-model analysis, p-GSK-3β was decreased in the euthymic state of subjects with bipolar disorder compared with healthy control subjects (b=0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.42-0.96, P=.03). In addition, p-GSK-3β varied with affective states, being increased in depressive (b=1.68, 95% CI: 1.08-2.62, P=.02) and mixed (b=2.07, 95% CI: 1.12-3.84, P=.02) states but not in mania compared with euthymia. The activity of GSK-3β is altered in euthymic bipolar disorder compared with healthy control subjects and varies with affective states. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Effect of passive and active recovery on the resynthesis of muscle glycogen.

    PubMed

    Choi, D; Cole, K J; Goodpaster, B H; Fink, W J; Costill, D L

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of passive and active recovery on the resynthesis of muscle glycogen after high-intensity cycle ergometer exercise in untrained subjects. In a cross-over design, six college-aged males performed three, 1-min exercise bouts at approximately 130% VO2max with a 4-min rest period between each work bout. The exercise protocol for each trial was identical, while the recovery following exercise was either active (30 min at 40-50% VO2max, 30-min seated rest) or passive (60-min seated rest). Initial muscle glycogen values averaged 144.2 +/- 3.8 mmol.kg-1 w.w. for the active trial and 158.7 +/- 8.0 mmol.kg-1 w.w. for the passive trial. Corresponding immediate postexercise glycogen contents were 97.7 +/- 5.4 and 106.8 +/- 4.7 mmol.kg-1 w.w., respectively. These differences between treatments were not significant. However, mean muscle glycogen after 60 min of passive recovery increased 15.0 +/- 4.9 mmol.kg-1 w.w., whereas it decreased 6.3 +/- 3.7 mmol.kg-1 w.w. following the 60 min active recovery protocol (P < 0.05). Also, the decrease in blood lactate concentration during active recovery was greater than during passive recovery and significantly different at 10 and 30 min of the recovery period (P < 0.05). These data suggest that the use of passive recovery following intense exercise results in a greater amount of muscle glycogen resynthesis than active recovery over the same duration.

  8. Enhanced Glycogen Storage of a Subcellular Hot Spot in Human Skeletal Muscle during Early Recovery from Eccentric Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Joachim; Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Vissing, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise is accompanied by muscle damage and impaired glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis during subsequent recovery. Recently, it was shown that the role and regulation of glycogen in skeletal muscle are dependent on its subcellular localization, and that glycogen synthesis, as described by the product of glycogen particle size and number, is dependent on the time course of recovery after exercise and carbohydrate availability. In the present study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of glycogen in fibers with high (type I) and low (type II) mitochondrial content during post-exercise recovery from eccentric contractions. Analysis was completed on five male subjects performing an exercise bout consisting of 15 x 10 maximal eccentric contractions. Carbohydrate-rich drinks were subsequently ingested throughout a 48 h recovery period and muscle biopsies for analysis included time points 3, 24 and 48 h post exercise from the exercising leg, whereas biopsies corresponding to prior to and at 48 h after the exercise bout were collected from the non-exercising, control leg. Quantitative imaging by transmission electron microscopy revealed an early (post 3 and 24 h) enhanced storage of intramyofibrillar glycogen (defined as glycogen particles located within the myofibrils) of type I fibers, which was associated with an increase in the number of particles. In contrast, late in recovery (post 48 h), intermyofibrillar, intramyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal glycogen in both type I and II fibers were lower in the exercise leg compared with the control leg, and this was associated with a smaller size of the glycogen particles. We conclude that in the carbohydrate-supplemented state, the effect of eccentric contractions on glycogen metabolism depends on the subcellular localization, muscle fiber’s oxidative capacity, and the time course of recovery. The early enhanced storage of intramyofibrillar glycogen after the eccentric contractions may

  9. The experimental type 2 diabetes therapy glycogen phosphorylase inhibition can impair aerobic muscle function during prolonged contraction.

    PubMed

    Baker, David J; Greenhaff, Paul L; MacInnes, Alan; Timmons, James A

    2006-06-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase inhibition represents a promising strategy to suppress inappropriate hepatic glucose output, while muscle glycogen is a major source of fuel during contraction. Glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors (GPi) currently being investigated for the treatment of type 2 diabetes do not demonstrate hepatic versus muscle glycogen phosphorylase isoform selectivity and may therefore impair patient aerobic exercise capabilities. Skeletal muscle energy metabolism and function are not impaired by GPi during high-intensity contraction in rat skeletal muscle; however, it is unknown whether glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors would impair function during prolonged lower-intensity contraction. Utilizing a novel red cell-perfused rodent gastrocnemius-plantaris-soleus system, muscle was pretreated for 60 min with either 3 micromol/l free drug GPi (n=8) or vehicle control (n=7). During 60 min of aerobic contraction, GPi treatment resulted in approximately 35% greater fatigue. Muscle glycogen phosphorylase a form (P<0.01) and maximal activity (P<0.01) were reduced in the GPi group, and postcontraction glycogen (121.8 +/- 16.1 vs. 168.3 +/- 8.5 mmol/kg dry muscle, P<0.05) was greater. Furthermore, lower muscle lactate efflux and glucose uptake (P<0.01), yet higher muscle Vo(2), support the conclusion that carbohydrate utilization was impaired during contraction. Our data provide new confirmation that muscle glycogen plays an essential role during submaximal contraction. Given the critical role of exercise prescription in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, it will be important to monitor endurance capacity during the clinical evaluation of nonselective GPi. Alternatively, greater effort should be devoted toward the discovery of hepatic-selective GPi, hepatic-specific drug delivery strategies, and/or alternative strategies for controlling excess hepatic glucose production in type 2 diabetes.

  10. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) regulates multiple signaling pathways by enhancing glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activity.

    PubMed

    Valvezan, Alexander J; Zhang, Fang; Diehl, J Alan; Klein, Peter S

    2012-02-03

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is essential for many signaling pathways and cellular processes. As Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) functions in many of the same processes, we investigated a role for APC in the regulation of GSK-3-dependent signaling. We find that APC directly enhances GSK-3 activity. Furthermore, knockdown of APC mimics inhibition of GSK-3 by reducing phosphorylation of glycogen synthase and by activating mTOR, revealing novel roles for APC in the regulation of these enzymes. Wnt signaling inhibits GSK-3 through an unknown mechanism, and this results in both stabilization of β-catenin and activation of mTOR. We therefore hypothesized that Wnts may regulate GSK-3 by disrupting the interaction between APC and the Axin-GSK-3 complex. We find that Wnts rapidly induce APC dissociation from Axin, correlating with β-catenin stabilization. Furthermore, Axin interaction with the Wnt co-receptor LRP6 causes APC dissociation from Axin. We propose that APC regulates multiple signaling pathways by enhancing GSK-3 activity, and that Wnts induce APC dissociation from Axin to reduce GSK-3 activity and activate downstream signaling. APC regulation of GSK-3 also provides a novel mechanism for Wnt regulation of multiple downstream effectors, including β-catenin and mTOR.

  11. Effects of commercially available pneumatic compression on muscle glycogen recovery after exercise.

    PubMed

    Keck, Nathan A; Cuddy, John S; Hailes, Walter S; Dumke, Charles L; Ruby, Brent C

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of pneumatic compression pants on postexercise glycogen resynthesis. Active male subjects (n = 10) completed 2 trials consisting of a 90-minute glycogen depleting ride, followed by 4 hours of recovery with either a pneumatic compression device (PCD) or passive recovery (PR) in a random counterbalanced order. A carbohydrate beverage (1.8 g·kg bodyweight) was provided at 0 and 2 hours after exercise. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were obtained immediately and 4 hours after exercise for glycogen analyses. Blood samples were collected throughout recovery to measure glucose and insulin. Eight fingerstick blood samples for lactate were collected in the last 20 minutes of the exercise period and during the initial portion of the recovery period. Heart rate was monitored throughout the trial. During the PCD trial, subjects recovered using a commercially available recovery device (NormaTec PCD) operational at 0-60 and 120-180 minutes into recovery period. The same PCD was worn during the PR trial but was not turned on to create pulsatile pressures. There was no difference in muscle glycogen resynthesis during the recovery period (6.9 ± 0.8 and 6.9 ± 0.5 mmol·kg wet wt·h for the PR and PCD trials, respectively). Blood glucose, insulin, and lactate concentrations changed with respect to time but were not different between trials (p > 0.05). The use of PCD did not alter the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis, blood lactate, or blood glucose and insulin concentrations associated with a postexercise oral glucose load.

  12. Carbohydrate ingestion and muscle glycogen depletion during marathon and ultramarathon racing.

    PubMed

    Noakes, T D; Lambert, E V; Lambert, M I; McArthur, P S; Myburgh, K H; Benade, A J

    1988-01-01

    Two studies were undertaken to characterize the effects of carbohydrate ingestion on fuel/hormone response to exercise and muscle glycogen utilization during prolonged competitive exercise. In study 1, eighteen subjects were divided into three groups, matched for maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max) and blood lactate turnpoint. All subjects underwent a 3-day carbohydrate (CHO) depletion phase, followed by 3 days of CHO loading (500-600 g.day-1). During the race, the groups drank either 2% glucose (G), 8% glucose polymer (GP), or 8% fructose (F). Muscle biopsies were performed before and after the race and venous blood was sampled before and at regular intervals during the race. In study 2, eighteen subjects divided into 2 matched groups ingested either a 4% G or 10% GP solution during a 56 km race. Despite significantly greater CHO ingestion by GP and F in study 1 and by GP in study 2, blood glucose, free fatty acids and insulin concentrations, muscle glycogen utilization and running performance were not different between groups. These studies show (i) that hypoglycaemia is uncommon in athletes competing in races of up to 56 km provided they CHO-load before and ingest a minimum of 10 g CHO.h-1 during competition; (ii) that neither the amount (10 g vs 40 g.h-1) nor the type of carbohydrate (G vs GP vs F) has any effect on the extent of muscle glycogen depletion or running performance in matched subjects racing over distances up to 56 km.

  13. Long-term effects of rapamycin treatment on insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB and glycogen synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, Shailly; Shrivastav, Anuraag; Changela, Sheena; Khandelwal, Ramji L.

    2008-04-01

    Protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) is a Ser/Thr kinase that is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation/survival through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the regulation of glycogen metabolism through glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and glycogen synthase (GS). Rapamycin is an inhibitor of mTOR. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin pretreatment on the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB phosphorylation and GS activity in parental HepG2 and HepG2 cells with overexpression of constitutively active Akt1/PKB-{alpha} (HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB). Rapamycin pretreatment resulted in a decrease (20-30%) in the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 (Ser 473) in parental HepG2 cells but showed an upregulation of phosphorylation in HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Rictor levels were decreased (20-50%) in parental HepG2 cells but were not significantly altered in the HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Furthermore, rictor knockdown decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser 473) by 40-60% upon rapamycin pretreatment. GS activity followed similar trends as that of phosphorylated Akt and so with rictor levels in these cells pretreated with rapamycin; parental HepG2 cells showed a decrease in GS activity, whereas as HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells showed an increase in GS activity. The changes in the levels of phosphorylated Akt/PKB (Ser 473) correlated with GS and protein phoshatase-1 activity.

  14. Correction of glycogen storage disease type II by an adeno-associated virus vector containing a muscle-specific promoter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baodong; Zhang, Haoyue; Franco, Luis M; Brown, Talmage; Bird, Andrew; Schneider, Ayn; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2005-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease) causes death in infancy from cardiorespiratory failure due to acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA; acid maltase) deficiency. An AAV2 vector pseudotyped as AAV6 (AAV2/6 vector) transiently expressed high-level human GAA in GAA-knockout (GAA-KO) mice without reducing glycogen storage; however, in immunodeficient GAA-KO/SCID mice the AAV2/6 vector expressed high-level GAA and reduced the glycogen content of the injected muscle for 24 weeks. A CD4+/CD8+ lymphocytic infiltrate was observed in response to the AAV2/6 vector in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice. When a muscle-specific creatine kinase promoter was substituted for the CB promoter (AAV-MCKhGAApA), that AAV2/6 vector expressed high-level GAA and reduced glycogen content in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice. Muscle-restricted expression of hGAA provoked only a humoral (not cellular) immune response. Intravenous administration of a high number of particles of AAV-MCKhGAApA as AAV2/7 reduced the glycogen content of the heart and skeletal muscle and corrected individual myofibers in immunocompetent GAA-KO mice 24 weeks postinjection. In summary, persistent correction of muscle glycogen content was achieved with an AAV vector containing a muscle-specific promoter in GAA-KO mice, and this approach should be considered for muscle-targeted gene therapy in Pompe disease.

  15. Effect of green tea extract supplementation on glycogen replenishment in exercised human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tsen-Wei; Chang, Chia-Chen; Liao, Su-Fen; Liao, Yi-Hung; Hou, Chien-Wen; Tsao, Jung-Piao; Cheng, I-Shiung

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 8-week green tea extract (GTE) supplementation on promoting postexercise muscle glycogen resynthesis and systemic energy substrate utilisation in young college students. A total of eight healthy male participants (age: 22·0 (se 1·0) years, BMI: 24·2 (se 0·7) kg/m2, VO2max: 43·2 (se 2·4) ml/kg per min) participated in this study. GTE (500 mg/d for 8 weeks) was compared with placebo in participants in a double-blind/placebo-controlled and crossover study design with an 8-week washout period. Thereafter, all participants performed a 60-min cycling exercise (75 % VO2max) and consumed a carbohydrate-enriched meal immediately after exercise. Vastus lateralis muscle samples were collected immediately (0 h) and 3 h after exercise, and blood and gaseous samples were collected during the 3-h postexercise recovery period. An 8-week oral GTE supplementation had no effects on further promoting muscle glycogen resynthesis in exercised human skeletal muscle, but the exercise-induced muscle GLUT type 4 (GLUT4) protein content was greater in the GTE supplementation trial (P<0·05). We observed that, during the postexercise recovery period, GTE supplementation elicited an increase in energy reliance on fat oxidation compared with the placebo trial (P<0·05), although there were no differences in blood glucose and insulin responses between the two trials. In summary, 8-week oral GTE supplementation increases postexercise systemic fat oxidation and exercise-induced muscle GLUT4 protein content in response to an acute bout of endurance exercise. However, GTE supplementation has no further benefit on promoting muscle glycogen resynthesis during the postexercise period.

  16. Effect of fat emulsion infusion and fat feeding on muscle glycogen utilization during cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Vukovich, M D; Costill, D L; Hickey, M S; Trappe, S W; Cole, K J; Fink, W J

    1993-10-01

    Elevated plasma fatty acids have been shown to spare muscle glycogen during exercise. However, on the basis of recent findings, the saturation of fatty acids may influence this response. The purpose of this study was to determine whether saturated or unsaturated fatty acids affected muscle glycogenolysis to varying degrees during cycle exercise. Five healthy men completed three 60-min cycle ergometer trials (EX) at approximately 70% maximal O2 uptake (VO2max). Triglyceride levels were elevated by a fat feeding (FF) composed of 90% saturated fatty acids (heavy whipping cream, 90 g) or by the infusion of Intralipid (IL; Clintec Nutrition; 45 ml/h of 20% IL, 9.0 g), which was 85% unsaturated. A control trial (CON) consisted of a light breakfast (43 g carbohydrate and 1 g fat). Heparin (2,000 U) was administered 15 min before EX in FF and IL trials, resulting in one- and threefold increases in free fatty acid (FFA) levels in IL and FF, respectively. Pre-EX muscle glycogen did not differ. The utilization of muscle glycogen during 60 min of EX was less (P < 0.05) during the FF (60.0 +/- 5.2 mmol/kg wet wt) and IL (58.6 +/- 6.2 mmol/kg wet wt) compared with CON (81.8 +/- 7.5 mmol/kg wet wt). There was no difference between FF and IL in the amount of glycogen utilized. Serum triglyceride levels were greater (P < 0.05) at preheparin in FF (1.58 +/- 0.37 mmol/l) and IL (0.98 +/- 0.13 mmol/l) compared with CON (0.47 +/- 0.14 mmol/l).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Neuromuscular responses to mild-muscle damaging eccentric exercise in a low glycogen state.

    PubMed

    Gavin, James P; Myers, Stephen D; Willems, Mark E T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low muscle glycogen on the neuromuscular responses to maximal eccentric contractions. Fourteen healthy men (22 ± 3 years) performed single-leg cycling (20 min at ~75% maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2 max); eight 90 s sprints at a 1:1 work-to-rest ratio (5% decrements from 90% to 55% V̇O2 max until exhaustion) the evening before 100 eccentric (1.57 rads(-1)) with reduced (RED) and normal glycogen (NORM). Neuromuscular responses were measured during and up to 48 h after with maximal voluntary and involuntary (twitch, 20 Hz and 50 Hz) isometric contractions. During eccentric contractions, peak torque decreased (RED: -16.1 ± 2.5%; NORM: -6.2 ± 5.1%) and EMG frequency increased according to muscle length. EMG activity decreased for RED only. After eccentric contractions, maximal isometric force was reduced up to 24h for NORM (-13.5 ± 5.8%) and 48 h for RED (-7.4 ± 10.9%). Twelve hours after eccentric contractions, twitch force and the 20:50 Hz ratio were decreased for RED but not for NORM. Immediate involuntary with prolonged voluntary force loss suggests that reduced glycogen is associated with increased susceptibility to mild muscle-damaging eccentric exercise with contributions of peripheral and central mechanisms to be different during recovery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Muscle protein and glycogen responses to recovery from hypogravity and unloading by tail-cast suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Tischler, M. E.; Jacob, S.; Cook, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory using the tail-bast hindlimb suspension model have shown that there are specific changes in protein and carbohydrate metabolism in the soleus muscle due to unloading. For example, 6 days of unloading caused a 27% decrease in mass and a 60% increase in glycogen content in the soleus muscle, while the extensor digitorum longus muscle was unaffected. Also, fresh tissue tyrosine and its in vitro release from the muscle are increased in the unloaded soleus, indicating that this condition causes a more negative protein balance. With these results in mind, studies to investigate the effect of hypogravity on protein and carbohydrate metabolism in a number of rat hindlimb muscles were carried out.

  19. Muscle protein and glycogen responses to recovery from hypogravity and unloading by tail-cast suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Tischler, M. E.; Jacob, S.; Cook, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory using the tail-bast hindlimb suspension model have shown that there are specific changes in protein and carbohydrate metabolism in the soleus muscle due to unloading. For example, 6 days of unloading caused a 27 percent decrease in mass and a 60 percent increse in glycogen content in the soleus muscle, while the extensor digitorum longus muscle was unaffected. Also, fresh tissue tyrosine and its in vitro release from the muscle are increased in the unloaded soleus, indicating that this condition causes a more negative protein balance. With these results in mind, studies to investigate the effect of hypogravity on protein and carbohydrate metabolism in a number of rat hindlimb muscles were carried out.

  20. The Role of Post-Exercise Nutrient Administration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Glycogen Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Chris; Wilborn, Colin; Taylor, Lem; Kerksick, Chad

    2010-01-01

    Nutrient administration following an exercise bout vastly affects anabolic processes within the human body, irrespective of exercise mode. Of particular importance are protein and carbohydrates whereby these two macronutrients portray distinct functions as anabolic agents. It has been confirmed that protein and/or amino acid ingestion following resistance training is required to reach a positive protein/nitrogen balance, and carbohydrate intake during recovery is the most important consideration to replenish glycogen stores from an exhaustive exercise bout. Several factors play significant roles in determining the effectiveness of protein and carbohydrate supplementation on post-exercise protein and glycogen synthesis. Improper application of these factors can limit the body’s ability to reach an anabolic status. The provided evidence clearly denotes the importance these two macronutrients have in regards to post-exercise nutrition and anabolism. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of dietary protein and carbohydrate intake during the recovery state on muscle protein synthesis and glycogen synthesis. Key points Post-exercise nutrient intake is essential for promoting protein synthesis and glycogen synthesis. The timing and amount of protein and/or carbohydrate ingested affects the rate and amount of synthesis. The type/form of protein and/or carbohydrate ingested after exercise alters anabolic processes during the recovery period. PMID:24149627

  1. Leucine modulates dynamic phosphorylation events in insulin signaling pathway and enhances insulin-dependent glycogen synthesis in human skeletal muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Branched-chain amino acids, especially leucine, are known to interact with insulin signaling pathway and glucose metabolism. However, the mechanism by which this is exerted, remain to be clearly defined. In order to examine the effect of leucine on muscle insulin signaling, a set of experiments was carried out to quantitate phosphorylation events along the insulin signaling pathway in human skeletal muscle cell cultures. Cells were exposed to insulin, leucine or both, and phosphorylation events of key insulin signaling molecules were tracked over time so as to monitor time-related responses that characterize the signaling events and could be missed by a single sampling strategy limited to pre/post stimulus events. Results Leucine is shown to increase the magnitude of insulin-dependent phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) at Ser473 and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3β) at Ser21-9. Glycogen synthesis follows the same pattern of GSK3β, with a significant increase at 100 μM leucine plus insulin stimulus. Moreover, data do not show any statistically significant increase of pGSK3β and glycogen synthesis at higher leucine concentrations. Leucine is also shown to increase the magnitude of insulin-mediated extracellularly regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation; however, differently from AKT and GSK3β, ERK shows a transient behavior, with an early peak response, followed by a return to the baseline condition. Conclusions These experiments demonstrate a complementary effect of leucine on insulin signaling in a human skeletal muscle cell culture, promoting insulin-activated GSK3β phosphorylation and glycogen synthesis. PMID:24646332

  2. Glycogen Metabolic Genes Are Involved in Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase-Mediated Regulation of Pathogenicity by the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard A.; Wang, Zheng-Yi; Kershaw, Michael J.; Talbot, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of rice blast disease. Here we show that glycogen metabolic genes play an important role in plant infection by M. oryzae. Targeted deletion of AGL1 and GPH1, which encode amyloglucosidase and glycogen phosphorylase, respectively, prevented mobilisation of glycogen stores during appressorium development and caused a significant reduction in the ability of M. oryzae to cause rice blast disease. By contrast, targeted mutation of GSN1, which encodes glycogen synthase, significantly reduced the synthesis of intracellular glycogen, but had no effect on fungal pathogenicity. We found that loss of AGL1 and GPH1 led to a reduction in expression of TPS1 and TPS3, which encode components of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase complex, that acts as a genetic switch in M. oryzae. Tps1 responds to glucose-6-phosphate levels and the balance of NADP/NADPH to regulate virulence-associated gene expression, in association with Nmr transcriptional inhibitors. We show that deletion of the NMR3 transcriptional inhibitor gene partially restores virulence to a Δagl1Δgph1 mutant, suggesting that glycogen metabolic genes are necessary for operation of the NADPH-dependent genetic switch in M. oryzae. PMID:24098112

  3. Glycogen content regulates peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-∂ (PPAR-∂) activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Philp, Andrew; MacKenzie, Matthew G; Belew, Micah Y; Towler, Mhairi C; Corstorphine, Alan; Papalamprou, Angela; Hardie, D Grahame; Baar, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Performing exercise in a glycogen depleted state increases skeletal muscle lipid utilization and the transcription of genes regulating mitochondrial β-oxidation. Potential candidates for glycogen-mediated metabolic adaptation are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and the transcription factor/nuclear receptor PPAR-∂. It was therefore the aim of the present study to examine whether acute exercise with or without glycogen manipulation affects PGC-1α and PPAR-∂ function in rodent skeletal muscle. Twenty female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 5 experimental groups (n = 4): control [CON]; normal glycogen control [NG-C]; normal glycogen exercise [NG-E]; low glycogen control [LG-C]; and low glycogen exercise [LG-E]). Gastrocnemius (GTN) muscles were collected immediately following exercise and analyzed for glycogen content, PPAR-∂ activity via chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, AMPK α1/α2 kinase activity, and the localization of AMPK and PGC-1α. Exercise reduced muscle glycogen by 47 and 75% relative to CON in the NG-E and LG-E groups, respectively. Exercise that started with low glycogen (LG-E) finished with higher AMPK-α2 activity (147%, p<0.05), nuclear AMPK-α2 and PGC-1α, but no difference in AMPK-α1 activity compared to CON. In addition, PPAR-∂ binding to the CPT1 promoter was significantly increased only in the LG-E group. Finally, cell reporter studies in contracting C2C12 myotubes indicated that PPAR-∂ activity following contraction is sensitive to glucose availability, providing mechanistic insight into the association between PPAR-∂ and glycogen content/substrate availability. The present study is the first to examine PPAR-∂ activity in skeletal muscle in response to an acute bout of endurance exercise. Our data would suggest that a factor associated with muscle contraction and/or glycogen depletion activates PPAR-∂ and initiates AMPK translocation in skeletal muscle in

  4. Probing the PI3K/Akt/mTor pathway using 31P-NMR spectroscopy: routes to glycogen synthase kinase 3

    PubMed Central

    Phyu, Su M.; Tseng, Chih-Chung; Fleming, Ian N.; Smith, Tim A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Akt is an intracellular signalling pathway that serves as an essential link between cell surface receptors and cellular processes including proliferation, development and survival. The pathway has many downstream targets including glycogen synthase kinase3 which is a major regulatory kinase for cell cycle transit as well as controlling glycogen synthase activity. The Akt pathway is frequently up-regulated in cancer due to overexpression of receptors such as the epidermal growth factor receptor, or mutation of signalling pathway kinases resulting in inappropriate survival and proliferation. Consequently anticancer drugs have been developed that target this pathway. MDA-MB-468 breast and HCT8 colorectal cancer cells were treated with inhibitors including LY294002, MK2206, rapamycin, AZD8055 targeting key kinases in/associated with Akt pathway and the consistency of changes in 31P-NMR-detecatable metabolite content of tumour cells was examined. Treatment with the Akt inhibitor MK2206 reduced phosphocholine levels in MDA-MB-468 cells. Treatment with either the phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002 and pan-mTOR inhibitor, AZD8055 but not pan-Akt inhibitor MK2206 increased uridine-5′-diphosphate-hexose cell content which was suppressed by co-treatment with glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitor SB216763. This suggests that there is an Akt-independent link between phosphoinositol-3-kinase and glycogen synthase kinase3 and demonstrates the potential of 31P-NMR to probe intracellular signalling pathways. PMID:27811956

  5. Impaired autophagy contributes to muscle atrophy in glycogen storage disease type II patients.

    PubMed

    Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Fanin, Marina; Masiero, Eva; Angelini, Corrado; Sandri, Marco

    2012-11-01

    The autophagy-lysosome system is essential for muscle cell homeostasis and its dysfunction has been linked to muscle disorders that are typically distinguished by massive autophagic buildup. Among them, glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is characterized by the presence of large glycogen-filled lysosomes in the skeletal muscle, due to a defect in the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA). The accumulation of autophagosomes is believed to be detrimental for myofiber function. However, the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of GSDII is still unclear. To address this issue we monitored autophagy in muscle biopsies and myotubes of early and late-onset GSDII patients at different time points of disease progression. Moreover we also analyzed muscles from patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Our data suggest that autophagy is a protective mechanism that is required for myofiber survival in late-onset forms of GSDII. Importantly, our findings suggest that a normal autophagy flux is important for a correct maturation of GAA and for the uptake of recombinant human GAA. In conclusion, autophagy failure plays an important role in GSDII disease progression, and the development of new drugs to restore the autophagic flux should be considered to improve ERT efficacy.

  6. Effect of eccentric exercise with reduced muscle glycogen on plasma interleukin-6 and neuromuscular responses of musculus quadriceps femoris.

    PubMed

    Gavin, James P; Myers, Stephen D; Willems, Mark E T

    2016-07-01

    Eccentric exercise can result in muscle damage and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion. Glycogen availability is a potent stimulator of IL-6 secretion. We examined effects of eccentric exercise in a low-glycogen state on neuromuscular function and plasma IL-6 secretion. Twelve active men (23 ± 4 yr, 179 ± 5 cm, 77 ± 10 kg, means ± SD) completed two downhill treadmill runs (gradient, -12%, 5 × 8 min; speed, 12.1 ± 1.1 km/h) with normal (NG) and reduced muscle glycogen (RG) in randomized order and at least 6 wk apart. Muscle glycogen was reduced using an established cycling protocol until exhaustion and dietary manipulation the evening before the morning run. Physiological responses were measured up to 48 h after the downhill runs. During recovery, force deficits of musculus quadriceps femoris by maximal isometric contractions were similar. Changes in low-frequency fatigue were larger with RG. Voluntary activation and plasma IL-6 levels were similar in recovery between conditions. It is concluded that unaccustomed, damaging eccentric exercise with low muscle glycogen of the m. quadriceps femoris 1) exacerbated low-frequency fatigue but 2) had no additional effect on IL-6 secretion. Neuromuscular impairment after eccentric exercise with low muscle glycogen appears to have a greater peripheral component in early recovery.

  7. Homogenization-dependent responses of acid-soluble and acid-insoluble glycogen to exercise and refeeding in human muscles.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Phillip D; Singh, Anish; Fournier, Paul A

    2009-12-01

    Muscle glycogen exists as acid-insoluble (AIG) and acid-soluble (ASG) forms, with AIG levels reported in most recent studies in humans to be the most responsive to exercise and refeeding. Because the muscle samples in these studies were not homogenized to extract glycogen, such homogenization-free protocols might have resulted in a suboptimal yield of ASG. Our goal, therefore, was to determine whether similar findings can be achieved using homogenized muscle samples by comparing the effect of exercise and refeeding on ASG and AIG levels. Eight male participants cycled for 60 minutes at 70% Vo(2peak) before ingesting 10.9 +/- 0.6 g carbohydrate per kilogram body mass over 24 hours. Muscle biopsies were taken before exercise and after 0, 2, and 24 hours of recovery. Using a homogenization-dependent protocol to extract glycogen, 77% to 91% of it was extracted as ASG, compared with 11% to 24% with a homogenization-free protocol. In response to exercise, muscle glycogen levels fell from 366 +/- 24 to 184 +/- 46 mmol/kg dry weight and returned to 232 +/- 32 and 503 +/- 59 mmol/kg dry weight after 2 and 24 hours, respectively. Acid-soluble glycogen but not AIG accounted for all the changes in total glycogen during exercise and refeeding when extracted using a homogenization-dependent protocol, but AIG was the most responsive fraction when extracted using a homogenization-free protocol. In conclusion, the patterns of response of ASG and AIG levels to changes in glycogen concentrations in human muscles are highly dependent on the protocol used to acid-extract glycogen, with the physiologic significance of the many previous studies on AIG and ASG being in need of revision.

  8. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β regulates leucine-309 demethylation of protein phosphatase-2A via PPMT1 and PME-1.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiu-Qing; Li, Xia-Chun; Zhang, Xiao-Xue; Yin, Yang-Yang; Liu, Bin; Luo, Dan-Ju; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2012-07-30

    Protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) activity is significantly suppressed in Alzheimer's disease. We have reported that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibits PP2A via upregulating the phosphorylation of PP2A catalytic subunit (PP2A(C)). Here we studied the effects of GSK-3β on the inhibitory demethylation of PP2A at leucine-309 (dmL309-PP2A(C)). We found that GSK-3β regulates dmL309-PP2A(C) level by regulating PME-1 and PPMT1. Knockdown of PME-1 or PPMT1 eliminated the effects of GSK-3β on PP2A(C). GSK-3 could negatively regulate PP2A regulatory subunit protein level. We conclude that GSK-3β can inhibit PP2A by increasing the inhibitory L309-demethylation involving upregulation of PME-1 and inhibition of PPMT1.

  9. Marine Fungi as Producers of Benzocoumarins, a New Class of Inhibitors of Glycogen-Synthase-Kinase 3β

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Jutta; Imhoff, Johannes F.; Gulder, Tobias A. M.; Labes, Antje; Schmaljohann, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    The glycogen-synthase-kinase 3 (GSK-3) is an important target in drug discovery. This enzyme is involved in the signaling pathways of type 2 diabetes, neurological disorders, cancer, and other diseases. Therefore, inhibitors of GSK-3 are promising drug candidates for the treatment of a broad range of diseases. Here we report pannorin (1), alternariol (2), and alternariol-9-methylether (3) to be promising inhibitors of the isoform GSK-3β showing sub-μM IC50 values. The in vitro inhibition is in the range of the known highly active GSK-3β inhibitor TDZD-8. Compounds 1–3 have a highly oxygenated benzocoumarin core structure in common, which suggests that this may be a new structural feature for efficient GSK-3β inhibition. PMID:27801816

  10. Cyclin-Dependent kinase 5 targeting prevents β-Amyloid aggregation involving glycogen synthase kinase 3β and phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alvarez, John Fredy; Uribe-Arias, Alejandro; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria Patricia

    2015-08-01

    Inappropriate activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) resulting from proteolytic release of the activator fragment p25 from the membrane contributes to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, β-amyloid (βA) aggregation, and chronic neurodegeneration. At 18 months of age, 3× Tg-AD mice were sacrificed after either 3 weeks (short term) or 1 year (long term) of CDK5 knockdown. In short-term-treated animals, CDK5 knockdown reversed βA aggregation in the hippocampi via inhibitory phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β Ser9 and activation of phosphatase PP2A. In long-term-treated animals, CDK5 knockdown induced a persistent reduction in CDK5 and prevented βA aggregation, but the effect on amyloid precursor protein processing was reduced, suggesting that yearly booster therapy would be required. These findings further validate CDK5 as a target for preventing or blocking amyloidosis in older transgenic mice.

  11. Marine Fungi as Producers of Benzocoumarins, a New Class of Inhibitors of Glycogen-Synthase-Kinase 3β.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Jutta; Imhoff, Johannes F; Gulder, Tobias A M; Labes, Antje; Schmaljohann, Rolf

    2016-10-28

    The glycogen-synthase-kinase 3 (GSK-3) is an important target in drug discovery. This enzyme is involved in the signaling pathways of type 2 diabetes, neurological disorders, cancer, and other diseases. Therefore, inhibitors of GSK-3 are promising drug candidates for the treatment of a broad range of diseases. Here we report pannorin (1), alternariol (2), and alternariol-9-methylether (3) to be promising inhibitors of the isoform GSK-3β showing sub-μM IC50 values. The in vitro inhibition is in the range of the known highly active GSK-3β inhibitor TDZD-8. Compounds 1-3 have a highly oxygenated benzocoumarin core structure in common, which suggests that this may be a new structural feature for efficient GSK-3β inhibition.

  12. Identification of lead small molecule inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta using a fragment-linking strategy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinhee; Moon, Yonghoon; Hong, Sungwoo

    2016-12-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3β) kinase serves as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of various human diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, and Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we report lead GSK3β inhibitors identified using a fragment-linking strategy. Through the systematic exploration, a six-atom chain unit bearing the rigid double bond was found to be a suitable linker connecting two fragments, which enables favorable contacts with backbone groups of residues in the pockets. As a consequence, potent GSK3β inhibitor 9i was found with IC50 values of 19nM. The binding mode analysis indicates that the activities of the inhibitors appear to be achieved by the establishment of multiple hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions in the ATP-binding site of GSK3β. The good biochemical potencies and structural uniqueness of the inhibitors support consideration in the further study to optimize the biological activity.

  13. Effect of alcohol intake on muscle glycogen storage after prolonged exercise.

    PubMed

    Burke, Louise M; Collier, Greg R; Broad, Elizabeth M; Davis, Peter G; Martin, David T; Sanigorski, Andrew J; Hargreaves, Mark

    2003-09-01

    We studied the effects of alcohol intake on postexercise muscle glycogen restoration with samples from vastus lateralis being collected immediately after glycogen-depleting cycling and after a set recovery period. Six well-trained cyclists undertook a study of 8-h recovery (2 meals), and another nine cyclists undertook a separate 24-h protocol (4 meals). In each study, subjects completed three trials in crossover order: control (C) diet [meals providing carbohydrate (CHO) of 1.75 g/kg]; alcohol-displacement (A) diet (1.5 g/kg alcohol displacing CHO energy from C) and alcohol + CHO (AC) diet (C + 1.5 g/kg alcohol). Alcohol intake reduced postmeal glycemia especially in A trial and 24-h study, although insulin responses were maintained. Alcohol intake increased serum triglycerides, particularly in the 24-h study and AC trial. Glycogen storage was decreased in A diets compared with C at 8 h (24.4 +/- 7 vs. 44.6 +/- 6 mmol/kg wet wt, means +/- SE, P < 0.05) and 24 h (68 +/- 5 vs. 82 +/- 5 mmol/kg wet wt, P < 0.05). There was a trend to reduced glycogen storage with AC in 8 h (36.2 +/- 8 mmol/kg wet wt, P = 0.1) but no difference in 24 h (85 +/- 9 mmol/kg wet wt). We conclude that 1). the direct effect of alcohol on postexercise glycogen synthesis is unclear, and 2). the main effect of alcohol intake is indirect, by displacing CHO intake from optimal recovery nutrition practices.

  14. The glycogen synthase 2 gene (Gys2) displays parallel evolution between Old World and New World fruit bats.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yamin; Fang, Tao; Shen, Bin; Zhang, Shuyi

    2014-01-01

    Frugivorous and nectarivorous bats rely largely on hepatic glycogenesis and glycogenolysis for postprandial blood glucose disposal and maintenance of glucose homeostasis during short time starvation, respectively. The glycogen synthase 2 encoded by the Gys2 gene plays a critical role in liver glycogen synthesis. To test whether the Gys2 gene has undergone adaptive evolution in bats with carbohydrate-rich diets in relation to their insect-eating sister taxa, we sequenced the coding region of the Gys2 gene in a number of bat species, including three Old World fruit bats (OWFBs) (Pteropodidae) and two New World fruit bats (NWFBs) (Phyllostomidae). Our results showed that the Gys2 coding sequences are highly conserved across all bat species we examined, and no evidence of positive selection was detected in the ancestral branches leading to OWFBs and NWFBs. Our explicit convergence test showed that posterior probabilities of convergence between several branches of OWFBs, and the NWFBs were markedly higher than that of divergence. Three parallel amino acid substitutions (Q72H, K371Q, and E666D) were detected among branches of OWFBs and NWFBs. Tests for parallel evolution showed that two parallel substitutions (Q72H and E666D) were driven by natural selection, while the K371Q was more likely to be fixed randomly. Thus, our results suggested that the Gys2 gene has undergone parallel evolution on amino acid level between OWFBs and NWFBs in relation to their carbohydrate metabolism.

  15. Insulin alters cAMP-activated lipolysis but not cAMP-inhibited glycogen synthase in permeabilized adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mooney, R.A.; Wisniewski, J.L.

    1986-05-01

    Lipolysis and, to a lesser extent, glycogen synthase activity are regulated in adipocytes by cellular cAMP and counter-regulated by insulin. These activities were measured in situ in digitonin (20 ..mu..g/ml) permeabilized rat adipocytes. Incorporation of /sup 3/H UDP-glucose into endogenous glycogen in the presence of KF, EDTA and 10mM glucose-6-phosphate was the basis of the G.S. assay. Cellular GS activity determined by this technique was 1.4 +/- 0.2 fold greater than that of matched homogenates. Insulin treatment of intact cells prior to permeabilization increased GS activity ratio (-/+ G-6-P) 2.5 fold when subsequently measured by the in situ assay. Following digitonin permeabilization, addition of cAMP to the suspension medium increased lipolysis 7 fold and decreased GS activity ratio to 0.38 +/- 0.01 from a basal value of 0.44 +/- 0.06. ATP had a negligible effect on lipolysis but decreased GS to 0.16 +/- 0.04. ATP plus cAMP was only slightly more effective on GS than ATP alone. Insulin at 10/sup -9/M inhibited cAMP-dependent lipolysis by 27% but had no effect on the cAMP- or ATP-dependent decrease in GS. These results suggest that insulin's counter-regulatory mechanisms on these two cAMP-dependent processes may be different.

  16. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and Nuclear Factor Kappa-B (NFKB) in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Cristian Fabian Layton; Zerón, Hugo Mendieta; Romero, Maria Del Socorro Camarillo; Sánchez, Yanko V Fabila; Romero, Isidoro Tejocote

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is the most common hematologic malignancy in early childhood. In children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the activity of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3β) has been associated with changes in the transcriptional activity and expression of nuclear factor kappa beta (NFKB) in the mononuclear cells of bone marrow. The aim of the study was to determine the possible role of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3β) and nuclear factor kappa beta (NFKB) as prognostic variables in pediatric patients with ALL. This was a descriptive, transversal, and observational study. Bone marrow and blood samples were obtained from 30 children with newly-diagnosed ALL, who were seen at the Hematology-Oncology Service, Hospital para el Niño (HPN), Toluca, Mexico, from 2014‒2015. Anthropometric variables, clinical lab results, immunophenotype and cytogenetic abnormalities were registered. GSK-3β was evaluated through immunohistochemistry, and NFKB messenger RNA (mRNA) with real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The cases of ALL were classified into two groups of risk: high and habitual. Thirty patients were included in this study, with a mean age of 7.1 years (range 2‒13 years). Twenty-one were male and 9 female. Employing the morphological classification, 26 patients had type L1 ALL and the remaining 4 patients had type L2 ALL. Abnormal genes were found in 7 (23.33%) patients, ETV-RUNX1 in 3, followed by TCF3-PBX1 (two), STL1-TAL1 (one), and BCR-ABL1 (one). NFKB relative expression levels, in comparison to the GSK-3β immunohistochemistry results of the bone marrow samples, showed significant differences between positive and negative cases (p = 0.001) and between weak-positive and negative cases (p = 0.002). These results suggest that GSK-3β may be a prognostic biomarker in childhood ALL.

  17. Anti-obesity effects of 3-hydroxychromone derivative, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sooho; Yang, Woo Kyeom; Song, Ji Ho; Ra, Young Min; Jeong, Jin-Hyun; Choe, Wonchae; Kang, Insug; Kim, Sung-Soo; Ha, Joohun

    2013-04-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) plays a central role in cellular energy metabolism, and dysregulation of GSK-3 activity is implicated in a variety of metabolic disorders, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. Hence, GSK-3 has emerged as an attractive target molecule for the treatment of metabolic disorders. Therefore, this research focused on identification and characterization of a novel small-molecule GSK-3 inhibitor. Compound 1a, a structure based on 3-hydroxychromone bearing isothiazolidine-1,1-dione, was identified from chemical library as a highly potent GSK-3 inhibitor. An in vitro kinase assay utilizing a panel of kinases demonstrated that compound 1a strongly inhibits GSK-3β. The potential effects of compound 1a on the inactivation of GSK-3 were confirmed in human liver HepG2 and human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Stabilization of glycogen synthase and β-catenin, which are direct targets of GSK-3, by compound 1a was assessed in comparison with two other GSK-3 inhibitors: LiCl and SB-415286. In mouse 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, compound 1a markedly blocked adipocyte differentiation. Consistently, intraperitoneal administration of compound 1a to diet-induced obese mice significantly ameliorated their key symptoms such as body weight gain, increased adiposity, dyslipidemia, and hepatic steatosis due to the marked reduction of whole-body lipid level. In vitro and in vivo effects were accompanied by upregulation of β-catenin stability and downregulation of the expression of several critical genes related to lipid metabolism. From these results, it can be concluded that compound 1a, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of GSK-3, has potential as a new class of therapeutic agent for obesity treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of pre-exercise muscle glycogen content on exercise-induced transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Keller, Charlotte; Steensberg, Adam; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P Darrell

    2002-05-15

    Transcription of metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise in skeletal muscle of humans. To determine whether pre-exercise muscle glycogen content influences the magnitude and/or duration of this adaptive response, six male subjects performed one-legged cycling exercise to lower muscle glycogen content in one leg and then, the following day, completed 2.5 h low intensity two-legged cycling exercise. Nuclei and mRNA were isolated from biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of the control and reduced glycogen (pre-exercise glycogen = 609 +/- 47 and 337 +/- 33 mmol kg(-1) dry weight, respectively) legs before and after 0, 2 and 5 h of recovery. Exercise induced a significant (P < 0.05) increase (2- to 3-fold) in transcription of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) genes in the reduced glycogen leg only. Although PDK4, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hexokinase II (HKII) mRNA were elevated in the reduced glycogen leg before exercise, no consistent difference was found between the two legs in response to exercise. In a second study, six subjects completed two trials (separated by 2 weeks) consisting of 3 h of two-legged knee extensor exercise with either control (398 +/- 52 mmol kg(-1) dry weight) or low (240 +/- 38 mmol kg(-1) dry weight) pre-exercise muscle glycogen. Exercise induced a significantly greater increase in PDK4 transcription in the low glycogen (> 6-fold) than in the control (< 3-fold) trial. Induction of PDK4 and UCP3 mRNA in response to exercise was also significantly higher in the low glycogen (11.4- and 3.5-fold, respectively) than in the control (5.0- and 1.7-fold, respectively) trial. These data indicate that low muscle glycogen content enhances the transcriptional activation of some metabolic genes in response to exercise, raising the possibility that signalling mechanisms sensitive to glycogen content and/or FFA availability may be linked to the transcriptional control of

  19. Influence of pre-exercise muscle glycogen content on exercise-induced transcriptional regulation of metabolic genes

    PubMed Central

    Pilegaard, Henriette; Keller, Charlotte; Steensberg, Adam; Wulff Helge, Jørn; Klarlund Pedersen, Bente; Saltin, Bengt; Neufer, P Darrell

    2002-01-01

    Transcription of metabolic genes is transiently induced during recovery from exercise in skeletal muscle of humans. To determine whether pre-exercise muscle glycogen content influences the magnitude and/or duration of this adaptive response, six male subjects performed one-legged cycling exercise to lower muscle glycogen content in one leg and then, the following day, completed 2.5 h low intensity two-legged cycling exercise. Nuclei and mRNA were isolated from biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of the control and reduced glycogen (pre-exercise glycogen = 609 ± 47 and 337 ± 33 mmol kg−1 dry weight, respectively) legs before and after 0, 2 and 5 h of recovery. Exercise induced a significant (P < 0.05) increase (2- to 3-fold) in transcription of the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) genes in the reduced glycogen leg only. Although PDK4, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hexokinase II (HKII) mRNA were elevated in the reduced glycogen leg before exercise, no consistent difference was found between the two legs in response to exercise. In a second study, six subjects completed two trials (separated by 2 weeks) consisting of 3 h of two-legged knee extensor exercise with either control (398 ± 52 mmol kg−1 dry weight) or low (240 ± 38 mmol kg−1 dry weight) pre-exercise muscle glycogen. Exercise induced a significantly greater increase in PDK4 transcription in the low glycogen (> 6-fold) than in the control (< 3-fold) trial. Induction of PDK4 and UCP3 mRNA in response to exercise was also signficantly higher in the low glycogen (11.4- and 3.5-fold, respectively) than in the control (5.0- and 1.7-fold, respectively) trial. These data indicate that low muscle glycogen content enhances the transcriptional activation of some metabolic genes in response to exercise, raising the possibility that signalling mechanisms sensitive to glycogen content and/or FFA availability may be linked to the transcriptional control of

  20. TFEB overexpression promotes glycogen clearance of Pompe disease iPSC-derived skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yohei; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Takashi; Shimada, Yohta; Ida, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Toya

    2016-01-01

    Pompe disease (PD) is a lysosomal disorder caused by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency. Progressive muscular weakness is the major symptom of PD, and enzyme replacement therapy can improve the clinical outcome. However, to achieve a better clinical outcome, alternative therapeutic strategies are being investigated, including gene therapy and pharmacological chaperones. We previously used lentiviral vector-mediated GAA gene transfer in PD patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells. Some therapeutic efficacy was observed, although glycogen accumulation was not normalized. Transcription factor EB is a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and autophagy that has recently been associated with muscular pathology, and is now a potential therapeutic target in PD model mice. Here, we differentiated skeletal muscle from PD patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells by forced MyoD expression. Lentiviral vector-mediated GAA and transcription factor EB gene transfer independently improved GAA enzyme activity and reduced glycogen content in skeletal muscle derived from PD-induced pluripotent stem cells. Interestingly, GAA and transcription factor EB cooperatively improved skeletal muscle pathology, both biochemically and morphologically. Thus, our findings show that abnormal lysosomal biogenesis is associated with the muscular pathology of PD, and transcription factor EB gene transfer is effective as an add-on strategy to GAA gene transfer. PMID:27556060

  1. High rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis after exhaustive exercise when carbohydrate is coingested with caffeine.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, David J; Lessard, Sarah J; Coffey, Vernon G; Churchley, Emmanuel G; Wootton, Andrew M; Ng, They; Watt, Matthew J; Hawley, John A

    2008-07-01

    We determined the effect of coingestion of caffeine (Caff) with carbohydrate (CHO) on rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis during recovery from exhaustive exercise in seven trained subjects who completed two experimental trials in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. The evening before an experiment subjects performed intermittent exhaustive cycling and then consumed a low-CHO meal. The next morning subjects rode until volitional fatigue. On completion of this ride subjects consumed either CHO [4 g/kg body mass (BM)] or the same amount of CHO + Caff (8 mg/kg BM) during 4 h of passive recovery. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken at regular intervals throughout recovery. Muscle glycogen levels were similar at exhaustion [ approximately 75 mmol/kg dry wt (dw)] and increased by a similar amount ( approximately 80%) after 1 h of recovery (133 +/- 37.8 vs. 149 +/- 48 mmol/kg dw for CHO and Caff, respectively). After 4 h of recovery Caff resulted in higher glycogen accumulation (313 +/- 69 vs. 234 +/- 50 mmol/kg dw, P < 0.001). Accordingly, the overall rate of resynthesis for the 4-h recovery period was 66% higher in Caff compared with CHO (57.7 +/- 18.5 vs. 38.0 +/- 7.7 mmol x kg dw(-1) x h(-1), P < 0.05). After 1 h of recovery plasma Caff levels had increased to 31 +/- 11 microM (P < 0.001) and at the end of the recovery reached 77 +/- 11 microM (P < 0.001) with Caff. Phosphorylation of CaMK(Thr286) was similar after exercise and after 1 h of recovery, but after 4 h CaMK(Thr286) phosphorylation was higher in Caff than CHO (P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)(Thr172) and Akt(Ser473) was similar for both treatments at all time points. We provide the first evidence that in trained subjects coingestion of large amounts of Caff (8 mg/kg BM) with CHO has an additive effect on rates of postexercise muscle glycogen accumulation compared with consumption of CHO alone.

  2. Low muscle glycogen concentration does not suppress the anabolic response to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Camera, Donny M; West, Daniel W D; Burd, Nicholas A; Phillips, Stuart M; Garnham, Andrew P; Hawley, John A; Coffey, Vernon G

    2012-07-01

    We determined the effect of muscle glycogen concentration and postexercise nutrition on anabolic signaling and rates of myofibrillar protein synthesis after resistance exercise (REX). Sixteen young, healthy men matched for age, body mass, peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2peak)) and strength (one repetition maximum; 1RM) were randomly assigned to either a nutrient or placebo group. After 48 h diet and exercise control, subjects undertook a glycogen-depletion protocol consisting of one-leg cycling to fatigue (LOW), whereas the other leg rested (NORM). The next morning following an overnight fast, a primed, constant infusion of l-[ring-(13)C(6)] phenylalanine was commenced and subjects completed 8 sets of 5 unilateral leg press repetitions at 80% 1RM. Immediately after REX and 2 h later, subjects consumed a 500 ml bolus of a protein/CHO (20 g whey + 40 g maltodextrin) or placebo beverage. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis of both legs were taken at rest and 1 and 4 h after REX. Muscle glycogen concentration was higher in the NORM than LOW at all time points in both nutrient and placebo groups (P < 0.05). Postexercise Akt-p70S6K-rpS6 phosphorylation increased in both groups with no differences between legs (P < 0.05). mTOR(Ser2448) phosphorylation in placebo increased 1 h after exercise in NORM (P < 0.05), whereas mTOR increased ~4-fold in LOW (P < 0.01) and ~11 fold in NORM with nutrient (P < 0.01; different between legs P < 0.05). Post-exercise rates of MPS were not different between NORM and LOW in nutrient (0.070 ± 0.022 vs. 0.068 ± 0.018 %/h) or placebo (0.045 ± 0.021 vs. 0.049 ± 0.017 %/h). We conclude that commencing high-intensity REX with low muscle glycogen availability does not compromise the anabolic signal and subsequent rates of MPS, at least during the early (4 h) postexercise recovery period.

  3. Muscle Ultrasound in Patients with Glycogen Storage Disease Types I and III.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Renate J; Sentner, Christiaan P; Smit, G Peter A; Maurits, Natasha M; Derks, Terry G J; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Sival, Deborah A

    2016-01-01

    In glycogen storage diseases (GSDs), improved longevity has resulted in the need for neuromuscular surveillance. In 12 children and 14 adults with the "hepatic" (GSD-I) and "myopathic" (GSD-III) phenotypes, we cross-sectionally assessed muscle ultrasound density (MUD) and muscle force. Children with both "hepatic" and "myopathic" GSD phenotypes had elevated MUD values (MUD Z-scores: GSD-I > 2.5 SD vs. GSD-III > 1 SD, p < 0.05) and muscle weakness (GSD-I muscle force; p < 0.05) of myopathic distribution. In "hepatic" GSD-I adults, MUD stabilized (GSD-I adults vs. GSD-I children, not significant), concurring with moderate muscle weakness (GSD-I adults vs. healthy matched pairs, p < 0.05). In "myopathic" GSD-III adults, MUD increased with age (MUD-GSD III vs. age: r = 0.71-0.83, GSD-III adults > GSD-III children, p < 0.05), concurring with pronounced muscle weakness (GSD-III adults vs. GSD-I adults, p < 0.05) of myopathic distribution. Children with "hepatic" and "myopathic" GSD phenotypes were both found to have myopathy. Myopathy stabilizes in "hepatic" GSD-I adults, whereas it progresses in "myopathic" GSD-III adults. Muscle ultrasonography provides an excellent, non-invasive tool for neuromuscular surveillance per GSD phenotype. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Selective glycogen depletion pattern in human muscle fibres after exercise of varying intensity and at varying pedalling rates

    PubMed Central

    Gollnick, P. D.; Piehl, Karin; Saltin, B.

    1974-01-01

    1. Glycogen depletion pattern in human skeletal muscle fibres was studied after bicycle exercise of varying intensity performed at different pedalling rates. Work intensities studied were equivalent to 30-150% of V̇O2 max. with pedalling rates of 30-120 rev/min. 2. Glycogen depletion increased dramatically with increasing exercise intensity; depletion was 2·7 and 7·4 times greater respectively at workloads demanding 64 and 84% V̇O2 max. than at workloads calling for 31% V̇O2 max. Even greater rates of glycogen utilization occurred at supramaximal loads. 3. Slow twitch, high oxidative (ST) fibres were the first to lose glycogen (reduced PAS staining) at all workloads below V̇O2 max. Progressive glycogen depletion occurred in fast twitch (FT) fibres as work continued. Large quantities of glycogen remained in the muscle after 3 hr of exercise at low exercise intensity. This was almost exclusively found in FT fibres. At workloads exceeding maximal aerobic power, there was an initial depletion of glycogen in both fibre types. Varying the pedalling rate and, thus, the total force exerted in each pedal thrust had no effect on the pattern of glycogen depletion in the fibres. 4. Results point to primary reliance upon ST fibres during submaximal endurance exercise, FT fibres being recruited after ST fibres are depleted of glycogen. During exertion requiring energy expenditure greater than the maximal aerobic power, both fibre types appeared to be continuously involved in carrying out the exercise. ImagesPlate 2Plate 1 PMID:4278539

  5. Role of NADH/NAD+ transport activity and glycogen store on skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise: in silico studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanjun; Dash, Ranjan K.; Kim, Jaeyeon; Saidel, Gerald M.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can maintain ATP concentration constant during the transition from rest to exercise, whereas metabolic reaction rates may increase substantially. Among the key regulatory factors of skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise, the dynamics of cytosolic and mitochondrial NADH and NAD+ have not been characterized. To quantify these regulatory factors, we have developed a physiologically based computational model of skeletal muscle energy metabolism. This model integrates transport and reaction fluxes in distinct capillary, cytosolic, and mitochondrial domains and investigates the roles of mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ transport (shuttling) activity and muscle glycogen concentration (stores) during moderate intensity exercise (60% maximal O2 consumption). The underlying hypothesis is that the cytosolic redox state (NADH/NAD+) is much more sensitive to a metabolic disturbance in contracting skeletal muscle than the mitochondrial redox state. This hypothesis was tested by simulating the dynamic metabolic responses of skeletal muscle to exercise while altering the transport rate of reducing equivalents (NADH and NAD+) between cytosol and mitochondria and muscle glycogen stores. Simulations with optimal parameter estimates showed good agreement with the available experimental data from muscle biopsies in human subjects. Compared with these simulations, a 20% increase (or ∼20% decrease) in mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ shuttling activity led to an ∼70% decrease (or ∼3-fold increase) in cytosolic redox state and an ∼35% decrease (or ∼25% increase) in muscle lactate level. Doubling (or halving) muscle glycogen concentration resulted in an ∼50% increase (or ∼35% decrease) in cytosolic redox state and an ∼30% increase (or ∼25% decrease) in muscle lactate concentration. In both cases, changes in mitochondrial redox state were minimal. In conclusion, the model simulations of exercise response are consistent with the hypothesis that mitochondrial NADH

  6. Role of NADH/NAD+ transport activity and glycogen store on skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise: in silico studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjun; Dash, Ranjan K; Kim, Jaeyeon; Saidel, Gerald M; Cabrera, Marco E

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can maintain ATP concentration constant during the transition from rest to exercise, whereas metabolic reaction rates may increase substantially. Among the key regulatory factors of skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise, the dynamics of cytosolic and mitochondrial NADH and NAD+ have not been characterized. To quantify these regulatory factors, we have developed a physiologically based computational model of skeletal muscle energy metabolism. This model integrates transport and reaction fluxes in distinct capillary, cytosolic, and mitochondrial domains and investigates the roles of mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ transport (shuttling) activity and muscle glycogen concentration (stores) during moderate intensity exercise (60% maximal O2 consumption). The underlying hypothesis is that the cytosolic redox state (NADH/NAD+) is much more sensitive to a metabolic disturbance in contracting skeletal muscle than the mitochondrial redox state. This hypothesis was tested by simulating the dynamic metabolic responses of skeletal muscle to exercise while altering the transport rate of reducing equivalents (NADH and NAD+) between cytosol and mitochondria and muscle glycogen stores. Simulations with optimal parameter estimates showed good agreement with the available experimental data from muscle biopsies in human subjects. Compared with these simulations, a 20% increase (or approximately 20% decrease) in mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ shuttling activity led to an approximately 70% decrease (or approximately 3-fold increase) in cytosolic redox state and an approximately 35% decrease (or approximately 25% increase) in muscle lactate level. Doubling (or halving) muscle glycogen concentration resulted in an approximately 50% increase (or approximately 35% decrease) in cytosolic redox state and an approximately 30% increase (or approximately 25% decrease) in muscle lactate concentration. In both cases, changes in mitochondrial redox state were minimal. In conclusion, the

  7. Hindlimb muscle fibre size and glycogen stores in bank voles with increased aerobic exercise metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jaromin, Ewa; Wyszkowska, Julia; Labecka, Anna Maria; Sadowska, Edyta Teresa; Koteja, Paweł

    2016-02-01

    To test hypotheses concerning physiological factors limiting the rate of aerobic exercise metabolism, we used a unique experimental evolution model: lines of bank voles selected for high swim-induced aerobic metabolism (A) and unselected, control lines (C). We investigated putative adaptations that result in the increased performance of the hindlimb muscle (gastrocnemius joined with plantaris). The body mass-adjusted muscle mass was higher in A-lines (0.093 g) than in C-lines (0.083 g; P=0.01). However, selection did not affect mean muscle fibre cross-sectional area (P=0.34) or glycogen content assessed with a histochemical periodic acid-Schiff reaction (PAS; P=0.82). The results suggest that the increased aerobic performance is achieved by an increase of total muscle mass, without major qualitative changes in the muscle fibre architecture. However, such a conclusion should be treated with caution, because other modifications, such as increased density of capillaries or mitochondria, could occur.

  8. Muscle glycogen utilisation during Rugby match play: Effects of pre-game carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Warren J; Morehen, James C; Haigh, Julian; Clarke, Jon; Donovan, Timothy F; Twist, Craig; Cotton, Caroline; Shepherd, Sam; Cocks, Matthew; Sharma, Asheesh; Impey, Samuel G; Cooper, Robert G; Maclaren, Don P M; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2016-12-01

    Although the physical demands of Rugby League (RL) match-play are well-known, the fuel sources supporting energy-production are poorly understood. We therefore assessed muscle glycogen utilisation and plasma metabolite responses to RL match-play after a relatively high (HCHO) or relatively low CHO (LCHO) diet. Sixteen (mean±SD age; 18±1 years, body-mass; 88±12kg, height 180±8cm) professional players completed a RL match after 36-h consuming a non-isocaloric high carbohydrate (n=8; 6gkgday(-1)) or low carbohydrate (n=8; 3gkgday(-1)) diet. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were obtained pre- and post-match, alongside external and internal loads quantified using Global Positioning System technology and heart rate, respectively. Data were analysed using effects sizes ±90% CI and magnitude-based inferences. Differences in pre-match muscle glycogen between high and low carbohydrate conditions (449±51 and 444±81mmolkg(-1)d.w.) were unclear. High (243±43mmolkg(-1)d.w.) and low carbohydrate groups (298±130mmolkg(-1)d.w.) were most and very likely reduced post-match, respectively. For both groups, differences in pre-match NEFA and glycerol were unclear, with a most likely increase in NEFA and glycerol post-match. NEFA was likely lower in the high compared with low carbohydrate group post-match (0.95±0.39mmoll(-1) and 1.45±0.51mmoll(-1), respectively), whereas differences between the 2 groups for glycerol were unclear (98.1±33.6mmoll(-1) and 123.1±39.6mmoll(-1)) in the high and low carbohydrate groups, respectively. Professional RL players can utilise ∼40% of their muscle glycogen during a competitive match regardless of their carbohydrate consumption in the preceding 36-h. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Intermittent-sprint performance and muscle glycogen after 30 h of sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Skein, Melissa; Duffield, Rob; Edge, Johann; Short, Michael J; Mündel, Toby

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 30 h of sleep deprivation on consecutive-day intermittent-sprint performance and muscle glycogen content. Ten male, team-sport athletes performed a single-day "baseline" session and two consecutive-day experimental trials separated either by a normal night's sleep (CONT1 and CONT2) or no sleep (SDEP1 and SDEP2). Each session included a 30-min graded exercise run and 50-min intermittent-sprint exercise protocol, including a 15-m maximal sprint every minute and self-paced exercise bouts of varying intensities. Muscle biopsies were extracted before and after exercise during the baseline session and before exercise on day 2 during experimental trials. Voluntary force and activation of the right quadriceps, nude mass, HR, core temperature, capillary blood lactate and glucose, RPE, and a modified POMS were recorded before, after, and during the exercise protocols. Mean sprint times were slower on SDEP2 (2.78±0.17 s) compared with SDEP1 (2.70±0.16 s) and CONT2 (2.74±0.15 s, P<0.05). Distance covered during self-paced exercise was reduced during SDEP2 during the initial 10 min compared with SDEP1 and during the final 10 min compared with CONT2 (P<0.05). Muscle glycogen concentration was lower before exercise on SDEP2 (209±60 mmol·kg dry weight) compared with CONT2 (274±54 mmol·kg dry weight, P=0.05). Voluntary force and activation were reduced on day 2 of both conditions; however, both were lower in SDEP2 compared with CONT2 (P<0.05). Sleep loss did not affect RPE but negatively affected POMS ratings (P<0.05). Sleep loss and associated reductions in muscle glycogen and perceptual stress reduced sprint performance and slowed pacing strategies during intermittent-sprint exercise for male team-sport athletes.

  10. Skeletal muscle fat and carbohydrate metabolism during recovery from glycogen-depleting exercise in humans

    PubMed Central

    Kimber, Nicholas E; Heigenhauser, George J F; Spriet, Lawrence L; Dyck, David J

    2003-01-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to determine whether intramuscular triacylglycerol (IMTG) utilization contributed significantly to the increase in lipid oxidation during recovery from exercise, as determined from the muscle biopsy technique. In addition, we also examined the regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHa) and changes in muscle acetyl units during an 18 h recovery period after glycogen-depleting exercise. Eight endurance-trained males completed an exhaustive bout of exercise (∼90 min) on a cycle ergometer followed by ingestion of carbohydrate (CHO)-rich meals (64–70 % of energy from carbohydrate) at 1, 4 and 7 h of recovery. Duplicate muscle biopsies were obtained at exhaustion, and 3, 6 and 18 h of recovery. Despite the large intake of CHO during recovery (491 ± 28 g or 6.8 ± 0.3 g kg−1), respiratory exchange ratio values of 0.77 to 0.84 indicated a greater reliance on lipid as an oxidative fuel. However, there was no net IMTG utilization during recovery. IMTG content at exhaustion was 23.5 ± 3.5 mmol (kg dry wt)−1, and remained constant at 24.6 ± 2.6, 25.7 ± 2.8 and 28.4 ± 3.0 mmol (kg dry wt)−1 after 3, 6 and 18 h of recovery. Muscle glycogen increased significantly from 37 ± 11 mmol (kg dry wt)−1 at exhaustion, to 165 ± 13, 250 ± 18, and 424 ± 22 mmol (kg dry wt)−1 at 3, 6 and 18 h of recovery, respectively. PDHa was reduced at 6 and 18 h when compared to exhaustion, but did not change during the recovery period. Acetyl-CoA, acetylcarnitine and pyruvate contents declined significantly after 3 h of recovery compared to exhaustion, and thereafter remained unchanged. We conclude that IMTG has a negligible role in contributing to the enhanced fat oxidation during recovery from exhaustive exercise. Despite the elevation of glucose and insulin following high-CHO meals during recovery, CHO oxidation and PDH activation were decreased, supporting the hypothesis that glycogen resynthesis is of high metabolic priority. Plasma

  11. Brain glucagon-like peptide–1 increases insulin secretion and muscle insulin resistance to favor hepatic glycogen storage

    PubMed Central

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D.; Perrin, Christophe; Iglesias, Miguel A.; Maury, Jean François; Bernard, Elodie; Benhamed, Fadilha; Grémeaux, Thierry; Drucker, Daniel J.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Girard, Jean; Tanti, Jean François; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Postic, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal glucagon-like peptide–1 (GLP-1) is a hormone released into the hepatoportal circulation that stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion. GLP-1 also acts as a neuropeptide to control food intake and cardiovascular functions, but its neural role in glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show that brain GLP-1 controlled whole-body glucose fate during hyperglycemic conditions. In mice undergoing a hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, icv administration of the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9–39 (Ex9) increased muscle glucose utilization and glycogen content. This effect did not require muscle insulin action, as it also occurred in muscle insulin receptor KO mice. Conversely, icv infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin 4 (Ex4) reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose utilization. In hyperglycemia achieved by i.v. infusion of glucose, icv Ex4, but not Ex9, caused a 4-fold increase in insulin secretion and enhanced liver glycogen storage. However, when glucose was infused intragastrically, icv Ex9 infusion lowered insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen levels, whereas no effects of icv Ex4 were observed. In diabetic mice fed a high-fat diet, a 1-month chronic i.p. Ex9 treatment improved glucose tolerance and fasting glycemia. Our data show that during hyperglycemia, brain GLP-1 inhibited muscle glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion to favor hepatic glycogen stores, preparing efficiently for the next fasting state. PMID:16322793

  12. Brain glucagon-like peptide-1 increases insulin secretion and muscle insulin resistance to favor hepatic glycogen storage.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D; Perrin, Christophe; Iglesias, Miguel A; Maury, Jean François; Bernard, Elodie; Benhamed, Fadilha; Grémeaux, Thierry; Drucker, Daniel J; Kahn, C Ronald; Girard, Jean; Tanti, Jean François; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Postic, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2005-12-01

    Intestinal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone released into the hepatoportal circulation that stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion. GLP-1 also acts as a neuropeptide to control food intake and cardiovascular functions, but its neural role in glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show that brain GLP-1 controlled whole-body glucose fate during hyperglycemic conditions. In mice undergoing a hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, icv administration of the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39 (Ex9) increased muscle glucose utilization and glycogen content. This effect did not require muscle insulin action, as it also occurred in muscle insulin receptor KO mice. Conversely, icv infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin 4 (Ex4) reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose utilization. In hyperglycemia achieved by i.v. infusion of glucose, icv Ex4, but not Ex9, caused a 4-fold increase in insulin secretion and enhanced liver glycogen storage. However, when glucose was infused intragastrically, icv Ex9 infusion lowered insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen levels, whereas no effects of icv Ex4 were observed. In diabetic mice fed a high-fat diet, a 1-month chronic i.p. Ex9 treatment improved glucose tolerance and fasting glycemia. Our data show that during hyperglycemia, brain GLP-1 inhibited muscle glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion to favor hepatic glycogen stores, preparing efficiently for the next fasting state.

  13. Fluid and electrolyte supplementation after prolonged moderate-intensity exercise enhances muscle glycogen resynthesis in Standardbred horses.

    PubMed

    Waller, Amanda P; Heigenhauser, George J F; Geor, Raymond J; Spriet, Lawrence L; Lindinger, Michael I

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that postexercise rehydration using a hypotonic electrolyte solution will increase the rate of recovery of whole body hydration, and that this is associated with increased muscle glycogen and electrolyte recovery in horses. Gluteus medius biopsies and jugular venous blood were sampled from six exercise-conditioned Standardbreds on two separate occasions, at rest and for 24 h following a competitive exercise test (CET) designed to simulate the speed and endurance test of a 3-day event. After the CETs, horses were given water ad libitum, and either a hypotonic commercial electrolyte solution (electrolyte) via nasogastric tube, followed by a typical hay/grain meal, or a hay/grain meal alone (control). The CET resulted in decreased total body water and muscle glycogen concentration of 8.4 +/- 0.3 liters and 22.6%, respectively, in the control treatment, and 8.2 +/- 0.4 liters and 21.9% in the electrolyte treatment. Electrolyte resulted in an enhanced rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis and faster restoration of hydration (as evidenced by faster recovery of plasma protein concentration, maintenance of plasma osmolality, and greater muscle intracellular fluid volume) during the recovery period compared with control. There were no differences in muscle Na, K, Cl, or Mg contents between the two treatments. It is concluded that oral administration of a hypotonic electrolyte solution after prolonged moderate-intensity exercise enhanced the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis during the recovery period compared with control. It is speculated that postexercise dehydration may be one key contributor to the slow muscle glycogen replenishment in horses.

  14. Hypothalamic glycogen synthase kinase 3β has a central role in the regulation of food intake and glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Benzler, Jonas; Ganjam, Goutham K; Krüger, Manon; Pinkenburg, Olaf; Kutschke, Maria; Stöhr, Sigrid; Steger, Juliane; Koch, Christiane E; Ölkrug, Rebecca; Schwartz, Michael W; Shepherd, Peter R; Grattan, David R; Tups, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    GSK3β (glycogen synthase kinase 3β) is a ubiquitous kinase that plays a key role in multiple intracellular signalling pathways, and increased GSK3β activity is implicated in disorders ranging from cancer to Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, we provide the first evidence of increased hypothalamic signalling via GSK3β in leptin-deficient Lep(ob/ob) mice and show that intracerebroventricular injection of a GSK3β inhibitor acutely improves glucose tolerance in these mice. The beneficial effect of the GSK3β inhibitor was dependent on hypothalamic signalling via PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase), a key intracellular mediator of both leptin and insulin action. Conversely, neuron-specific overexpression of GSK3β in the mediobasal hypothalamus exacerbated the hyperphagia, obesity and impairment of glucose tolerance induced by a high-fat diet, while having little effect in controls fed standard chow. These results demonstrate that increased hypothalamic GSK3β signalling contributes to deleterious effects of leptin deficiency and exacerbates high-fat diet-induced weight gain and glucose intolerance.

  15. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibition promotes lysosomal biogenesis and autophagic degradation of the amyloid-β precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Parr, Callum; Carzaniga, Raffaela; Gentleman, Steve M; Van Leuven, Fred; Walter, Jochen; Sastre, Magdalena

    2012-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been associated with altered activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) isozymes, which are proposed to contribute to both neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaque formation. However, the molecular basis by which GSK3 affects the formation of Aβ remains unknown. Our aim was to identify the underlying mechanisms of GSK3-dependent effects on the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). For this purpose, N2a cells stably expressing APP carrying the Swedish mutation were treated with specific GSK3 inhibitors or transfected with GSK3α/β short interfering RNA. We show that inhibition of GSK3 leads to decreased expression of APP by enhancing its degradation via an increase in the number of lysosomes. This induction of the lysosomal/autophagy pathway was associated with nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis. Our data indicate that GSK3 inhibition reduces Aβ through an increase of the degradation of APP and its carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF) by activation of the lysosomal/autophagy pathway. These results suggest that an increased propensity toward autophagic/lysosomal alterations in AD patients could have consequences for neuronal function.

  16. Progesterone receptor A stability is mediated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β in the Brca1-deficient mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaohui; Li, Ying; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Lee, Sou-Ying; Kim, Yoon; Lee, Eva Y-H P

    2013-09-06

    Germ line mutations of the BRCA1 gene increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, but the basis of this tissue-specific tumor predisposition is not fully understood. Previously, we reported that the progesterone receptors are stabilized in Brca1-deficient mammary epithelial cells, and treating with anti-progesterone delays mammary tumorigenesis in Brca1/p53 conditional knock-out mice, suggesting that the progesterone has a critical role in breast carcinogenesis. To further explore how the stability of progesterone receptor is modulated, here, we have found that glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β phosphorylation of progesterone receptor-A (PR-A) facilitates its ubiquitination. GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of serine 390 in PR-A regulates its subsequent ubiquitination and protein stability. Expression of PR-A(S390A) mutant in the human breast epithelial cells, MCF-10A, results in enhanced proliferation and formation of aberrant acini structure in the three-dimensional culture. Consistently, reduction of phosphorylation of serine 390 of PR-A and GSK-3β activity is observed in the Brca1-deficient mammary gland. Taken together, these results provide important aspects of tissue specificity of BRCA1-mediated suppression of breast carcinogenesis.

  17. Association of cellular localization of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta in the digestive tract with cancer development.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Shibata, Kenichiro; Sekine, Ichiro

    2009-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase involved in several signaling pathways. Recently, we reported the polarized localization of GSK-3beta on the apical membrane of normal colon epithelium. To investigate the functions of this molecule, we studied stomach and colorectal cancer tissues. In normal simple columnar epithelium, GSK-3beta was localized with tight junction-associated protein ZO-1 in a single line at the apical cell border. GSK-3beta and ZO-1 were localized in the apical regions of tubular adenocarcinoma, similar to their localization in normal epithelium; however, their localization was different at the invasive front of the cancer and was found to be associated with lymphatic invasion. In signet-ring cell carcinoma of the stomach, the expression of these proteins was reduced and dot-like expression was observed in each cell of the signet-ring cell carcinoma. We speculated that GSK-3beta is involved in glandular structure formation and that the non-apical localization of membrane-localized GSK-3beta in tubular adenocarcinoma is associated with cancer development.

  18. Progesterone Receptor A Stability Is Mediated by Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in the Brca1-deficient Mammary Gland*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Li, Ying; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Lee, Sou-Ying; Kim, Yoon; Lee, Eva Y.-H. P.

    2013-01-01

    Germ line mutations of the BRCA1 gene increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, but the basis of this tissue-specific tumor predisposition is not fully understood. Previously, we reported that the progesterone receptors are stabilized in Brca1-deficient mammary epithelial cells, and treating with anti-progesterone delays mammary tumorigenesis in Brca1/p53 conditional knock-out mice, suggesting that the progesterone has a critical role in breast carcinogenesis. To further explore how the stability of progesterone receptor is modulated, here, we have found that glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β phosphorylation of progesterone receptor-A (PR-A) facilitates its ubiquitination. GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of serine 390 in PR-A regulates its subsequent ubiquitination and protein stability. Expression of PR-AS390A mutant in the human breast epithelial cells, MCF-10A, results in enhanced proliferation and formation of aberrant acini structure in the three-dimensional culture. Consistently, reduction of phosphorylation of serine 390 of PR-A and GSK-3β activity is observed in the Brca1-deficient mammary gland. Taken together, these results provide important aspects of tissue specificity of BRCA1-mediated suppression of breast carcinogenesis. PMID:23880761

  19. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) Signaling via Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (Gsk-3) Regulates DNA Methylation of Imprinted Loci*

    PubMed Central

    Popkie, Anthony P.; Zeidner, Leigh C.; Albrecht, Ashley M.; D'Ippolito, Anthony; Eckardt, Sigrid; Newsom, David E.; Groden, Joanna; Doble, Bradley W.; Aronow, Bruce; McLaughlin, K. John; White, Peter; Phiel, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (Gsk-3) isoforms, Gsk-3α and Gsk-3β, are constitutively active, largely inhibitory kinases involved in signal transduction. Underscoring their biological significance, altered Gsk-3 activity has been implicated in diabetes, Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of both Gsk-3α and Gsk-3β in mouse embryonic stem cells results in reduced expression of the de novo DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a2, causing misexpression of the imprinted genes Igf2, H19, and Igf2r and hypomethylation of their corresponding imprinted control regions. Treatment of wild-type embryonic stem cells and neural stem cells with the Gsk-3 inhibitor, lithium, phenocopies the DNA hypomethylation at these imprinted loci. We show that inhibition of Gsk-3 by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated activation of Akt also results in reduced DNA methylation at these imprinted loci. Finally, we find that N-Myc is a potent Gsk-3-dependent regulator of Dnmt3a2 expression. In summary, we have identified a signal transduction pathway that is capable of altering the DNA methylation of imprinted loci. PMID:21047779

  20. Functional Interactions between Heterologously Expressed Starch-Branching Enzymes of Maize and the Glycogen Synthases of Brewer's Yeast1

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Beom-seok; Kim, Seungtaek; Scott, M. Paul; Singletary, George W.; Wong, Kit-sum; James, Martha G.; Myers, Alan M.

    2002-01-01

    Starch-branching enzymes (SBEs) catalyze the formation of α(1→6) glycoside bonds in glucan polymers, thus, affecting the structure of amylopectin and starch granules. Two distinct classes of SBE are generally conserved in higher plants, although the specific role(s) of each isoform in determination of starch structure is not clearly understood. This study used a heterologous in vivo system to isolate the function of each of the three known SBE isoforms of maize (Zea mays) away from the other plant enzymes involved in starch biosynthesis. The ascomycete Brewer's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was employed as the host species. All possible combinations of maize SBEs were expressed in the absence of the endogenous glucan-branching enzyme. Each maize SBE was functional in yeast cells, although SBEI had a significant effect only if SBEIIa and SBEIIb also were present. SBEI by itself did not support glucan accumulation, whereas SBEIIa and SBEIIb both functioned along with the native glycogen synthases (GSs) to produce significant quantities of α-glucan polymers. SBEIIa was phenotypically dominant to SBEIIb in terms of glucan structure. The specific branching enzyme present had a significant effect on the molecular weight of the product. From these data we suggest that SBEs and GSs work in a cyclically interdependent fashion, such that SBE action is needed for optimal GS activity; and GS, in turn, influences the further effects of SBE. Also, SBEIIa and SBEIIb appear to act before SBEI during polymer assembly in this heterologous system. PMID:11950968

  1. Regulation of autophagic cell death by glycogen synthase kinase-3β in adult hippocampal neural stem cells following insulin withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Ha, Shinwon; Ryu, Hye Young; Chung, Kyung Min; Baek, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Yu, Seong-Woon

    2015-05-19

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) hold great potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, programmed cell death (PCD) provoked by the harsh conditions evident in the diseased brain greatly undermines the potential of NSCs. Currently, the mechanisms of PCD that effect NSCs remain largely unknown. We have previously reported that hippocampal neural stem (HCN) cells derived from the adult rat brain undergo autopahgic cell death (ACD) following insulin withdrawal without hallmarks of apoptosis despite their normal apoptotic capabilities. In this study, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) induces ACD in insulin-deprived HCN cells. Both pharmacological and genetic inactivation of GSK-3β significantly decreased ACD, while activation of GSK-3β increased autophagic flux and caused more cell death without inducing apoptosis following insulin withdrawal. In contrast, knockdown of GSK-3α barely affected ACD, lending further support to the critical role of GSK-3β. Collectively, these data demonstrate that GSK-3β is a key regulator of ACD in HCN cells following insulin withdrawal. The absence of apoptotic indices in GSK-3β-induced cell death in insulin-deprived HCN cells corroborates the notion that HCN cell death following insulin withdrawal represents the genuine model of ACD in apoptosis-intact mammalian cells and identifies GSK-3β as a key negative effector of NSC survival downstream of insulin signaling.

  2. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) influences epithelial barrier function by regulating Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Severson, Eric A.; Kwon, Mike; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2010-07-02

    The Apical Junctional Complex (AJC) encompassing the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) plays a pivotal role in regulating epithelial barrier function and epithelial cell proliferative processes through signaling events that remain poorly characterized. A potential regulator of AJC protein expression is Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3). GSK-3 is a constitutively active kinase that is repressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report that GSK-3 activity regulates the structure and function of the AJC in polarized model intestinal (SK-CO15) and kidney (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK)) epithelial cells. Reduction of GSK-3 activity, either by small molecule inhibitors or siRNA targeting GSK-3 alpha and beta mRNA, resulted in increased permeability to both ions and bulk solutes. Immunofluorescence labeling and immunoblot analyses revealed that the barrier defects correlated with decreased protein expression of AJC transmembrane proteins Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin without influencing other TJ proteins, Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A). The decrease in Occludin and E-cadherin protein expression correlated with downregulation of the corresponding mRNA levels for these respective proteins following GSK-3 inhibition. These observations implicate an important role of GSK-3 in the regulation of the structure and function of the AJC that is mediated by differential modulation of mRNA transcription of key AJC proteins, Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin.

  3. Biological basis and clinical study of glycogen synthase kinase- 3β-targeted therapy by drug repositioning for glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Takuya; Sabit, Hemragul; Dong, Yu; Miyashita, Katsuyoshi; Kinoshita, Masashi; Uchiyama, Naoyuki; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Hayashi, Yutaka; Minamoto, Toshinari; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β has emerged as an appealing therapeutic target for glioblastoma (GBM). Here, we investigated the therapeutic effect of the current approved drugs against GBM via inhibition of GSK3β activity both, in experimental setting and in a clinical study for recurrent GBM patients by repositioning existent drugs in combination with temozolomide (TMZ). Materials and Methods Progression-free and overall survival rates were compared between patients with low or high expression of active GSK3β in the primary tumor. GBM cells and a mouse model were examined for the effects of GSK3β-inhibitory drugs, cimetidine, lithium, olanzapine, and valproate. The safety and efficacy of the cocktail of these drugs (CLOVA cocktail) in combination with TMZ were tested in the mouse model and in a clinical study for recurrent GBM patients. Results Activation of GSK3β in the tumor inversely correlated with patient survival as an independent prognostic factor. CLOVA cocktail significantly inhibited cell invasion and proliferation. The patients treated with CLOVA cocktail in combination with TMZ showed increased survival compared to the control group treated with TMZ alone. Conclusions Repositioning of the GSK3β-inhibitory drugs improved the prognosis of refractory GBM patients with active GSK3β in tumors. Combination of CLOVA cocktail and TMZ is a promising approach for recurrent GBM. PMID:28423558

  4. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) influences epithelial barrier function by regulating Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Eric A.; Kwon, Mike; Hilgarth, Roland S; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2010-01-01

    The apical junctional complex (AJC) encompassing the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) plays a pivotal role in regulating epithelial barrier function and epithelial cell proliferative processes through signaling events that remain poorly characterized. A potential regulator of AJC protein expression is Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3). GSK-3 is a constitutively active kinase that is repressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report that GSK-3 activity regulates the structure and function of the AJC in polarized model intestinal (SK-CO15) and kidney (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK)) epithelial cells. Reduction of GSK-3 activity, either by small molecule inhibitors or siRNA targeting GSK-3 alpha and beta mRNA, resulted in increased permeability to both ions and bulk solutes. Immunofluorescence labeling and immunoblot analyses revealed that the barrier defects correlated with decreased protein expression of AJC transmembrane proteins Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin without influencing other TJ proteins, Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A). The decrease in Occludin and E-cadherin protein expression correlated with downregulation of the corresponding mRNA levels for these respective proteins following GSK-3 inhibition. These observations implicate an important role of GSK-3 in the regulation of the structure and function of the AJC that is mediated by differential modulation of mRNA transcription of key AJC proteins, Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin. PMID:20617560

  5. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 influences cell motility and chemotaxis by regulating PI3K membrane localization in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tong; Kim, Bohye; Kim, Lou W

    2013-10-01

    Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK3) is a multifunctional kinase involved in diverse cellular activities such as metabolism, differentiation, and morphogenesis. Recent studies showed that GSK3 in Dictyostelium affects chemotaxis via TorC2 pathway and Daydreamer. Now we report that GSK3 affects PI3K membrane localization, of which the mechanism has remained to be fully understood in Dictyostelium. The membrane localization domain (LD) of Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase 1 (PI3K1) is phosphorylated on serine residues in a GSK3 dependent mechanism and PI3K1-LD exhibited biased membrane localization in gsk3(-) cells compared to the wild type cells. Furthermore, multiple GSK3-phosphorylation consensus sites exist in PI3K1-LD, of which phosphomimetic substitutions restored cAMP induced transient membrane localization of PI3K1-LD in gsk3(-) cells. Serine to alanine substitution mutants of PI3K1-LD, in contrast, displayed constitutive membrane localization in wild type cells. Biochemical analysis revealed that GSK3 dependent serine phosphorylation of PI3K1-LD is constitutive during the course of cAMP stimulation. Together, these data suggest that GSK3 dependent serine phosphorylation is a prerequisite for chemoattractant cAMP induced PI3K membrane localization.

  6. Up-regulation of insulin-like growth factor 2 by ketamine requires glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Grieco, Steven F; Cheng, Yuyan; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit; Jope, Richard S; Beurel, Eléonore

    2017-01-04

    An antidepressant dose of the rapidly-acting ketamine inhibits glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) in mouse hippocampus, and this inhibition is required for the antidepressant effect of ketamine in learned helplessness depression-like behavior. Here we report that treatment with an antidepressant dose of ketamine (10mg/kg) increased expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) in mouse hippocampus, an effect that required ketamine-induced inhibition of GSK3. Ketamine also inhibited hippocampal GSK3 and increased expression of hippocampal IGF2 in mice when administered after the induction of learned helplessness. Treatment with the specific GSK3 inhibitor L803-mts was sufficient to up-regulate hippocampal IGF2 expression. Administration of IGF2 siRNA reduced ketamine's antidepressant effect in the learned helplessness paradigm. Mice subjected to the learned helplessness paradigm were separated into two groups, those that were resilient (non-depressed) and those that were susceptible (depressed). Non-depressed resilient mice displayed higher expression of IGF2 than susceptible mice. These results indicate that IGF2 contributes to ketamine's antidepressant effect and that IGF2 may confer resilience to depression-like behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 enhances the differentiation and reduces the proliferation of adult human olfactory epithelium neural precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Manceur, Aziza P.; Tseng, Michael; Holowacz, Tamara; Witterick, Ian; Weksberg, Rosanna; McCurdy, Richard D.; Warsh, Jerry J.; Audet, Julie

    2011-09-10

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) contains neural precursor cells which can be easily harvested from a minimally invasive nasal biopsy, making them a valuable cell source to study human neural cell lineages in health and disease. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has been implicated in the etiology and treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders and also in the regulation of murine neural precursor cell fate in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we examined the impact of decreased GSK-3 activity on the fate of adult human OE neural precursors in vitro. GSK-3 inhibition was achieved using ATP-competitive (6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime and CHIR99021) or substrate-competitive (TAT-eIF2B) inhibitors to eliminate potential confounding effects on cell fate due to off-target kinase inhibition. GSK-3 inhibitors decreased the number of neural precursor cells in OE cell cultures through a reduction in proliferation. Decreased proliferation was not associated with a reduction in cell survival but was accompanied by a reduction in nestin expression and a substantial increase in the expression of the neuronal differentiation markers MAP1B and neurofilament (NF-M) after 10 days in culture. Taken together, these results suggest that GSK-3 inhibition promotes the early stages of neuronal differentiation in cultures of adult human neural precursors and provide insights into the mechanisms by which alterations in GSK-3 signaling affect adult human neurogenesis, a cellular process strongly suspected to play a role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  8. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β in the nucleus accumbens core is critical for methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Jun; Wu, Ping; Xue, Yan-Xue; Zhu, Wei-Li; Li, Qian-Qian; Zhai, Hai-Feng; Shi, Jie; Lu, Lin

    2011-07-01

    As a ubiquitous serine/threonine protein kinase, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) has been considered to be important in the synaptic plasticity that underlies dopamine-related behaviors and diseases. We recently found that GSK-3β activity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core is critically involved in cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization. The present study further explored the association between the changes in GSK-3β activity in the NAc and the chronic administration of methamphetamine. We also examined whether blocking GSK-3β activity in the NAc could alter the initiation and expression of methamphetamine (1 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced locomotor sensitization in rats using systemic administration of lithium chloride (LiCl, 100 mg/kg, i.p) and brain region-specific administration of the GSK-3β inhibitor SB216763 (1 ng/side). We found that GSK-3β activity increased in the NAc core, but not NAc shell, after chronic methamphetamine administration. The initiation and expression of methamphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization was attenuated by systemic administration of LiCl and direct infusion of SB216763 into the NAc core, but not NAc shell. These results indicate that GSK-3β activity in the NAc core mediates the initiation and expression of methamphetamine-induced locomotor sensitization, suggesting that GSK-3β may be a potential target for the treatment of psychostimulant addiction.

  9. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 influences cell motility and chemotaxis by regulating PI3K membrane localization in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tong; Kim, Bohye; Kim, Lou W.

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK3) is a multifunctional kinase involved in diverse cellular activities such as metabolism, differentiation, and morphogenesis. Recent studies showed that GSK3 in Dictyostelium affects chemotaxis via TorC2 pathway and Daydreamer. Now we report that GSK3 affects PI3K membrane localization, of which mechanism has remained to be fully understood in Dictyostelium. The membrane localization domain (LD) of Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase 1 (PI3K1) is phosphorylated on serine residues in a GSK3 dependent mechanism and PI3K1-LD exhibited biased membrane localization in gsk3− cells compared to the wild type cells. Furthermore, multiple GSK3-phosphorylation consensus sites exist in PI3K1-LD, of which phosphomimetic substitutions restored cAMP induced transient membrane localization of PI3K1-LD in gsk3− cells. Serine to alanine substitution mutants of PI3K1-LD, in contrast, displayed constitutive membrane localization in wild type cells. Biochemical analysis revealed that GSK3 dependent serine phosphorylation of PI3K1-LD is constitutive during the course of cAMP stimulation. Together, these data suggest that GSK3 dependent serine phosphorylation is a prerequisite for chemoattractant cAMP induced PI3K membrane localization. PMID:24102085

  10. A role for Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 as integrators of dopamine and serotonin neurotransmission in mental health

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2012-01-01

    Mental illnesses, such as bipolar disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, depression and schizophrenia are a major public health concern worldwide. Several pharmacologic agents acting on monoamine neurotransmission are used for the management of these disorders. However, there is still little understanding of the ultimate molecular mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effects of these drugs or their relations with disease etiology. Here I provide an overview of recent advances on the involvement of the signalling molecules Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) in the regulation of behaviour by the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT). I examine the possible participation of these signalling molecules to the effects of antidepressants, lithium and antipsychotics, as well as their possible contribution to mental disorders. Regulation of Akt and GSK3 may constitute an important signalling hub in the subcellular integration of 5-HT and DA neurotransmission. It may also provide a link between the action of these neurotransmitters and gene products, like disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) and neuregulin (NRG), that are associated with increased risk for mental disorders. However, changes in Akt and GSK3 signalling are not restricted to a single disorder, and their contribution to specific behavioural symptoms or therapeutic effects may be modulated by broader changes in biologic contexts or signalling landscapes. Understanding these interactions may provide a better understanding of mental illnesses, leading to better efficacy of new therapeutic approaches. PMID:21711983

  11. Elevated glycogen synthase kinase-3 activity in Fragile X mice: key metabolic regulator with evidence for treatment potential.

    PubMed

    Min, Wenzhong William; Yuskaitis, Christopher J; Yan, Qijiang; Sikorski, Christopher; Chen, Shengqiang; Jope, Richard S; Bauchwitz, Robert P

    2009-02-01

    Significant advances have been made in understanding the underlying defects of and developing potential treatments for Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common heritable mental retardation. It has been shown that neuronal metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-mediated signaling is affected in FX animal models, with consequent alterations in activity-dependent protein translation and synaptic spine functionality. We demonstrate here that a central metabolic regulatory enzyme, glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is present in a form indicating elevated activity in several regions of the FX mouse brain. Furthermore, we show that selective GSK3 inhibitors, as well as lithium, are able to revert mutant phenotypes of the FX mouse. Lithium, in particular, remained effective with chronic administration, although its effects were reversible even when given from birth. The combination of an mGluR5 antagonist and GSK3 inhibitors was not additive. Instead, it was discovered that mGluR5 signaling and GSK3 activation in the FX mouse are coordinately elevated, with inhibition of mGluR5 leading to inhibition of GSK3. These findings raise the possibility that GSK3 is a fundamental and central component of FXS pathology, with a substantial treatment potential.

  12. Elevated glycogen synthase kinase-3 activity in Fragile X mice: Key metabolic regulator with evidence for treatment potential

    PubMed Central

    Min, Wenzhong William; Yuskaitis, Christopher J.; Yan, Qijiang; Sikorski, Christopher; Chen, Shengqiang; Jope, Richard S.; Bauchwitz, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in understanding the underlying defects of and developing potential treatments for Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common heritable mental retardation. It has been shown that neuronal metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-mediated signaling is affected in FX animal models, with consequent alterations in activity-dependent protein translation and synaptic spine functionality. We demonstrate here that a central metabolic regulatory enzyme, glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is present in a form indicating elevated activity in several regions of the FX mouse brain. Furthermore, we show that selective GSK3 inhibitors, as well as lithium, are able to revert mutant phenotypes of the FX mouse. Lithium, in particular, remained effective with chronic administration, although its effects were reversible even when given from birth. The combination of an mGluR5 antagonist and GSK3 inhibitors was not additive. Instead, it was discovered that mGluR5 signaling and GSK3 activation in the FX mouse are coordinately elevated, with inhibition of mGluR5 leading to inhibition of GSK3. These findings raise the possibility that GSK3 is a fundamental and central component of FXS pathology, with a substantial treatment potential. PMID:18952114

  13. Wound healing activity and docking of glycogen-synthase-kinase-3-beta-protein with isolated triterpenoid lupeol in rats.

    PubMed

    Harish, B G; Krishna, V; Santosh Kumar, H S; Khadeer Ahamed, B M; Sharath, R; Kumara Swamy, H M

    2008-09-01

    A triterpene compound lupeol isolated from petroleum ether extract of leaves of Celastrus paniculatus was screened for wound healing activity (8 mg/ml of 0.2% sodium alginate gel) by excision, incision and dead space wound models on Swiss Albino rats (175-225 g). In lupeol treated groups wound healing activity was more significant (17.83+/-0.48) than the standard skin ointment nitrofurazone (18.33+/-0.42). Epithelialization of the incision wound was faster with a high rate of wound contraction (571.50+/-5.07) as compared with the control group. In dead space wound model also the weight of the granulation tissue of the lupeol treated animal was increased indicating increase of collagenation and absence of monocytes. The comparative docking of isolated lupeol molecule and standard drug nitrofurazone to glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta protein by Wnt signaling pathway also supported the wound healing property of lupeol. The activation domain of GSK3-beta consisted of Tyr216, with residues Asn64, Gly65, Ser66, Phe67, Gly68, Val70, Lys85, Leu132, Val135, Asp181 in the active pocket docked with lupeol at the torsional degree of freedom 0.5 units with Lamarckian genetic algorithm showed the inhibition constant of 1.38 x 10(-7). The inhibition constant of nitrofurazone was only 1.35 x 10(-4).

  14. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β enhances cognitive recovery after stroke: the role of TAK1

    PubMed Central

    Venna, Venugopal Reddy; Benashski, Sharon E.; Chauhan, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Memory deficits are common among stroke survivors. Identifying neuroprotective agents that can prevent memory impairment or improve memory recovery is a vital area of research. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is involved in several essential intracellular signaling pathways. Unlike many other kinases, GSK-3β is active only when dephosphorylated and activation promotes inflammation and apoptosis. In contrast, increased phosphorylation leads to reduced GSK-3β (pGSK-3β) activity. GSK-3β inhibition has beneficial effects on memory in other disease models. GSK-3β regulates both the 5′AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) and transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase (TAK1) pathways. In this work, we examined the effect of GSK-3β inhibition, both independently, in conjunction with a TAK inhibitor, and in AMPK-α2 deficient mice, after stroke to investigate mechanistic interactions between these pathways. GSK-3β inhibition was neuroprotective and ameliorated stroke-induced cognitive impairments. This was independent of AMPK signaling as the protective effects of GSK-3β inhibition were seen in AMPK deficient mice. However, GSK-3β inhibition provided no additive protection in mice treated with a TAK inhibitor suggesting that TAK1 is an upstream regulator of GSK-3β. Targeting GSK-3β could be a novel therapeutic strategy for post-stroke cognitive deficits. PMID:26077686

  15. Lithium Blocks the c-Jun Stress Response and Protects Neurons via Its Action on Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3

    PubMed Central

    Hongisto, Vesa; Smeds, Nina; Brecht, Stephan; Herdegen, Thomas; Courtney, Michael J.; Coffey, Eleanor T.

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has been used as an effective mood-stabilizing drug for the treatment of manic episodes and depression for 50 years. More recently, lithium has been found to protect neurons from death induced by a wide array of neurotoxic insults. However, the molecular basis for the prophylactic effects of lithium have remained obscure. A target of lithium, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3), is implicated in neuronal death after trophic deprivation. The mechanism whereby GSK-3 exerts its neurotoxic effects is also unknown. Here we show that lithium blocks the canonical c-Jun apoptotic pathway in cerebellar granule neurons deprived of trophic support. This effect is mimicked by the structurally independent inhibitors of GSK-3, FRAT1, and indirubin. Like lithium, these prevent the stress induced c-Jun protein increase and subsequent apoptosis. These events are downstream of c-Jun transactivation, since GSK-3 inhibitors block neuronal death induced by constitutively active c-Jun (Ser/Thr→Asp) and FRAT1 expression inhibits AP1 reporter activity. Consistent with this, AP1-dependent expression of proapoptotic Bim requires GSK-3-like activity. These data suggest that a GSK-3-like kinase acts in tandem with c-Jun N-terminal kinase to coordinate the full execution of the c-Jun stress response and neuronal death in response to trophic deprivation. PMID:12917327

  16. Lithium Regulates Keratinocyte Proliferation Via Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 and NFAT2 (Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells 2)

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, Philip J; Jans, Ralph; Flockhart, Ross J; Parker, Graeme; Reynolds, Nick J

    2012-01-01

    Certain environmental factors including drugs exacerbate or precipitate psoriasis. Lithium is the commonest cause of drug-induced psoriasis but underlying mechanisms are currently unknown. Lithium inhibits glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3). As lithium does not exacerbate other T-cell-mediated chronic inflammatory diseases, we investigated whether lithium may be acting directly on epidermal keratinocytes by inhibiting GSK-3. We report that lithium-induced keratinocyte proliferation at therapeutically relevant doses (1–2 mM) and increased the proportion of cells in S phase of the cell cycle. Inhibition of GSK-3 in keratinocytes by retroviral transduction of GSK-binding protein (an endogenous inhibitory protein) or through a highly selective pharmacological inhibitor also resulted in increased keratinocyte proliferation. Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is an important substrate for GSK-3 and for cyclosporin, an effective treatment for psoriasis that inhibits NFAT activation in keratinocytes as well as in lymphocytes. Both lithium and genetic/pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 resulted in increased nuclear localization of NFAT2 (NFATc1) and increased NFAT transcriptional activation. Finally, retroviral transduction of NFAT2 increased keratinocyte proliferation whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of NFAT2 reduced keratinocyte proliferation and decreased epidermal thickness in an organotypic skin equivalent model. Taken together, these data identify GSK-3 and NFAT2 as key regulators of keratinocyte proliferation and as potential molecular targets relevant to lithium-provoked psoriasis. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 1529–1537, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21678407

  17. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Is Positively Regulated by Protein Kinase Cζ-Mediated Phosphorylation Induced by Wnt Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Tejeda-Muñoz, Nydia; González-Aguilar, Héctor; Santoyo-Ramos, Paula; Castañeda-Patlán, M. Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The molecular events that drive Wnt-induced regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) activity are poorly defined. In this study, we found that protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ) and GSK-3β interact mainly in colon cancer cells. Wnt stimulation induced a rapid GSK-3β redistribution from the cytoplasm to the nuclei in malignant cells and a transient PKC-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3β at a different site from serine 9. In addition, while Wnt treatment induced a decrease in PKC-mediated phosphorylation of GSK-3β in nonmalignant cells, in malignant cells, this phosphorylation was increased. Pharmacological inhibition and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of PKCζ abolished all of these effects, but unexpectedly, it also abolished the constitutive basal activity of GSK-3β. In vitro activity assays demonstrated that GSK-3β phosphorylation mediated by PKCζ enhanced GSK-3β activity. We mapped Ser147 of GSK-3β as the site phosphorylated by PKCζ, i.e., its mutation into alanine abolished GSK-3β activity, resulting in β-catenin stabilization and increased transcriptional activity, whereas phosphomimetic replacement of Ser147 by glutamic acid maintained GSK-3β basal activity. Thus, we found that PKCζ phosphorylates GSK-3β at Ser147 to maintain its constitutive activity in resting cells and that Wnt stimulation modifies the phosphorylation of Ser147 to regulate GSK-3β activity in opposite manners in normal and malignant colon cells. PMID:26711256

  18. Lithium Chloride Promotes Apoptosis in Human Leukemia NB4 Cells by Inhibiting Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 Beta.

    PubMed

    Li, Liu; Song, Hao; Zhong, Liang; Yang, Rong; Yang, Xiao-Qun; Jiang, Kai-Ling; Liu, Bei-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). With the application of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO), APL becomes one of best prognosis of leukemia. However, ATRA and ATO are not effective against all APLs. Therefore, a new strategy for APL treatment is necessary. Here, we investigated whether lithium chloride (LiCl), a drug used for the treatment of mental illness, could promote apoptosis in human leukemia NB4 cells. We observed that treatment with LiCl significantly accelerated apoptosis in NB4 cells and led to cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. Moreover, LiCl significantly increased the level of Ser9-phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3β(p-GSK-3β), and decreased the level of Akt1 protein in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, LiCl inhibition of c-Myc also enhanced cell death with a concomitant increase in β-catnin. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that LiCl promoted apoptosis in NB4 cells through the Akt signaling pathway and that G2/M phase arrest was induced by increase of p-GSK-3β(S9).

  19. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibition by 3-anilino-4-phenylmaleimides: insights from 3D-QSAR and docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanna, Sivaprakasam; Daga, Pankaj R.; Xie, Aihua; Doerksen, Robert J.

    2009-02-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3, a serine/threonine kinase, has been implicated in a wide variety of pathological conditions such as diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, stroke, bipolar disorder, malaria and cancer. Herein we report 3D-QSAR analyses using CoMFA and CoMSIA and molecular docking studies on 3-anilino-4-phenylmaleimides as GSK-3α inhibitors, in order to better understand the mechanism of action and structure-activity relationship of these compounds. Comparison of the active site residues of GSK-3α and GSK-3β isoforms shows that all the key amino acids involved in polar interactions with the maleimides for the β isoform are the same in the α isoform, except that Asp133 in the β isoform is replaced by Glu196 in the α isoform. We prepared a homology model for GSK-3α, and showed that the change from Asp to Glu should not affect maleimide binding significantly. Docking studies revealed the binding poses of three subclasses of these ligands, namely anilino, N-methylanilino and indoline derivatives, within the active site of the β isoform, and helped to explain the difference in their inhibitory activity.

  20. New applications for known drugs: Human glycogen synthase kinase 3 inhibitors as modulators of Aspergillus fumigatus growth.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Víctor; Manoli, Maria-Tsampika; Pérez, Daniel I; Gil, Carmen; Mellado, Emilia; Martínez, Ana; Espeso, Eduardo A; Campillo, Nuria E

    2016-06-30

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) is one of the most severe forms of fungi infection. IA disease is mainly due to Aspergillus fumigatus, an air-borne opportunistic pathogen. Mortality rate caused by IA is still very high (50-95%), because of difficulty in early diagnostics and reduced antifungal treatment options, thus new and efficient drugs are necessary. The aim of this work is, using Aspergillus nidulans as non-pathogen model, to develop efficient drugs to treat IA. The recent discovered role of glycogen synthase kinase-3 homologue, GskA, in A. fumigatus human infection and our previous experience on human GSK-3 inhibitors focus our attention on this kinase as a target for the development of antifungal drugs. With the aim to identify effective inhibitors of colonial growth of A. fumigatus we use A. nidulans as an accurate model for in vivo and in silico studies. Several well-known human GSK-3β inhibitors were tested for inhibition of A. nidulans colony growth. Computational tools as docking studies and binding site prediction was used to explain the different biological profile of the tested inhibitors. Three of the five tested hGSK3β inhibitors are able to reduce completely the colonial growth by covalent bind to the enzyme. Therefore these compounds may be useful in different applications to eradicate IA.

  1. Cross-sectional retrospective study of muscle function in patients with glycogen storage disease type III.

    PubMed

    Decostre, Valérie; Laforêt, Pascal; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; De Antonio, Marie; Leveugle, Sylvain; Ollivier, Gwenn; Canal, Aurélie; Kachetel, Kahina; Petit, François; Eymard, Bruno; Behin, Anthony; Wahbi, Karim; Labrune, Philippe; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by liver and muscle impairment. This study aimed to identify promising muscle function measures for future studies on natural disease progression and therapeutic trials. The age-effect on the manual muscle testing (MMT), the hand-held dynamometry (HHD), the motor function measure (MFM) and the Purdue pegboard test was evaluated by regression analysis in a cross-sectional retrospective single site study. In patients aged between 13 and 56 years old, the Purdue pegboard test and dynamometry of key pinch and knee extension strength were age-sensitive with annual losses of 1.49, 1.10 and 0.70% of the predicted values (%pred), respectively. The MFM score and handgrip strength were also age-sensitive but only in patients older than 29 and 37 years old with annual losses of 1.42 and 1.84%pred, respectively. Muscle strength assessed by MMT and elbow extension measured by HHD demonstrated an annual loss of less than 0.50%pred and are thus unlikely to be promising outcome measures for future clinical trials. In conclusion, our results identified age-sensitive outcomes from retrospective data and may serve for future longitudinal studies in which an estimation of the minimal number of subjects is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) regulates TNF production and haemocyte phagocytosis in the immune response of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Jia, Zhihao; Wang, Weilin; Wang, Lingling; Liu, Zhaoqun; Yang, Bin; Jia, Yunke; Song, Xiaorui; Yi, Qilin; Qiu, Limei; Song, Linsheng

    2017-03-29

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is a serine/threonine protein kinase firstly identified as a regulator of glycogen synthesis. Recently, it has been proved to be a key regulator of the immune reaction. In the present study, a GSK3 homolog gene (designated as EsGSK3) was cloned from Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis. The open reading frame (ORF) was 1824 bp, which encoded a predicted polypeptide of 607 amino acids. There was a conserved Serine/Threonine Kinase domain and a DNA binding domain found in EsGSK3. Phylogenetic analysis showed that EsGSK3 was firstly clustered with GSK3-β from oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense in the invertebrate branch, while GSK3s from vertebrates formed the other distinct branch. EsGSK3 mRNA transcripts could be detected in all tested tissues of the crab including haepatopancreas, eyestalk, muscle, gonad, haemocytes and haematopoietic tissue with the highest expression level in haepatopancreas. And EsGSK3 protein was mostly detected in the cytoplasm of haemocyte by immunofluorescence analysis. The expression levels of EsGSK3 mRNA increased significantly at 6 h after Aeromonas hydrophila challenge (p < 0.05) in comparison with control group, and then gradually decreased to the initial level at 48 h (p > 0.05). The mRNA expression of lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α factor (EsLITAF) was also induced by A. hydrophila challenge. However, the mRNA expression of EsLITAF and TNF-α production was significantly suppressed after EsGSK3 was blocked in vivo with specific inhibitor lithium, while the phagocytosis of crab haemocytes was significantly promoted. These results collectively demonstrated that EsGSK3 could regulate the innate immune responses of E. sinensis by promoting TNF-α production and inhibiting haemocyte phagocytosis.

  3. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β is required for epithelial-mesenchymal transition and barrier dysfunction in mouse podocytes under high glucose conditions

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jia; Yang, Lili; Qiao, Yingjin; Liu, Zhangsuo

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is important for diabetic nephropathy (DN). Podocytes are specialized epithelial cells, which form a major component of the glomerular filtration barrier. Podocyte damage has been suggested to be the primary mechanism behind the albuminuria associated with DN. The present study aimed to determine the function of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β in EMT and barrier dysfunction of mouse podocytes exposed to high glucose (HG) conditions. Matured and differentiated podocytes were treated with normal glucose (NG), HG or NG + mannitol. Podocytes were also transfected with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against GSK-3β or a scrambled siRNA, or were treated with lithium chloride (LiCl), a GSK-3β inhibitor, under NG or HG conditions. The expression levels of the epithelial cell markers, nephrin and podocin, and the myofibroblast cell markers, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and fibronectin, in podocytes by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The monolayer barrier function was assessed by albumin inflow. The phosphorylation and activity levels of GSK-3β were also quantified. It was observed that HG promotes EMT in podocytes, due to the increased levels of podocin and nephrin expression and the reduced α-SMA and fibronectin expression levels. HG also induced barrier dysfunction and increased the expression level of total GSK-3β, Try216-phosphorylated-GSK-3β and the GSK-3β activity in podocytes. Transfection of GSK-3β siRNA or treatment with LiCl reversed the HG-induced EMT and barrier dysfunction in podocytes. In conclusion, the present study determined that GSK-3β is required for EMT and barrier dysfunction in podocytes under HG conditions; therefore, GSK-3β may be a novel target for the treatment of DN. PMID:27748847

  4. Glucocorticoids and hepatic glycogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stalmans, W; Laloux, M

    1979-01-01

    The steady accumulation of glycogen in fetal rat liver during the last fifth of gestation is elicited by a transient rise in the level of circulating corticosterone. One effect of glucocorticoids is to induce glycogen synthase. The actual deposition of glycogen, however, depends on the appearance of a small amount of glycogen synthase in the active, dephosphorylated form. Induction of glycogen synthase phosphatase by glucocorticoids may explain the latter crucial process. Insulin enhances further the rate of glycogen deposition. The effect of insulin requires a previous exposure of the fetal liver to glucocorticoids. It is exerted on the enzyme interconversion system and appears not to involve new protein synthesis. Administration of glucocorticoids to adult fed or fasted animals causes within 3 h an intensive deposition of glycogen in the liver. This phenomenon is ultimately explained by both an activation of glycogen synthase and an inactivation of glycogen phosphorylase. The latter process may be due to an enhanced activity of phosphorylase phosphatase, or possibly of phosphorylase kinase phosphatase. The activation of glycogen synthase is explained by an enhanced activity of glycogen synthase phosphatase. The latter enzyme is normally profoundly inhibited by phosphorylase a; glucocorticoids cause the appearance in the liver of a protein factor that decreases and eventually cancels this inhibitory effect of phosphorylase a. It remains to be established whether or not some part of the glucocorticoid effect on adult liver is mediated by insulin.

  5. Lithium Enhances Axonal Regeneration in Peripheral Nerve by Inhibiting Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Activation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Huanxing; Yuan, Qiuju; Qin, Dajiang; Yang, Xiaoying; So, Kwok-Fai; Wu, Wutian

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury often involves traumatic root avulsion resulting in permanent paralysis of the innervated muscles. The lack of sufficient regeneration from spinal motoneurons to the peripheral nerve (PN) is considered to be one of the major causes of the unsatisfactory outcome of various surgical interventions for repair of the devastating injury. The present study was undertaken to investigate potential inhibitory signals which influence axonal regeneration after root avulsion injury. The results of the study showed that root avulsion triggered GSK-3β activation in the injured motoneurons and remaining axons in the ventral funiculus. Systemic application of a clinical dose of lithium suppressed activated GSK-3β in the lesioned spinal cord to the normal level and induced extensive axonal regeneration into replanted ventral roots. Our study suggests that GSK-3β activity is involved in negative regulation for axonal elongation and regeneration and lithium, the specific GSK-3β inhibitor, enhances motoneuron regeneration from CNS to PNS. PMID:24967390

  6. Genetic and Pharmacologic Targeting of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Reinforces the Nrf2 Antioxidant Defense against Podocytopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sijie; Wang, Pei; Qiao, Yingjin; Ge, Yan; Wang, Yingzi; Quan, Songxia; Yao, Ricky; Zhuang, Shougang; Wang, Li Juan; Du, Yong; Liu, Zhangsuo; Gong, Rujun

    2016-08-01

    Evidence suggests that the glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3)-dictated nuclear exclusion and degradation of Nrf2 is pivotal in switching off the self-protective antioxidant stress response after injury. Here, we examined the mechanisms underlying this regulation in glomerular disease. In primary podocytes, doxorubicin elicited cell death and actin cytoskeleton disorganization, concomitant with overactivation of GSK3β (the predominant GSK3 isoform expressed in glomerular podocytes) and minimal Nrf2 activation. SB216763, a highly selective small molecule inhibitor of GSK3, exerted a protective effect that depended on the potentiated Nrf2 antioxidant response, marked by increased Nrf2 expression and nuclear accumulation and augmented production of the Nrf2 target heme oxygenase-1. Ectopic expression of the kinase-dead mutant of GSK3β in cultured podocytes reinforced the doxorubicin-induced Nrf2 activation and prevented podocyte injury. Conversely, a constitutively active GSK3β mutant blunted the doxorubicin-induced Nrf2 response and exacerbated podocyte injury, which could be abolished by treatment with SB216763. In murine models of doxorubicin nephropathy or nephrotoxic serum nephritis, genetic targeting of GSK3β by doxycycline-inducible podocyte-specific knockout or pharmacologic targeting by SB216763 significantly attenuated albuminuria and ameliorated histologic signs of podocyte injury, including podocytopenia, loss of podocyte markers, podocyte de novo expression of desmin, and ultrastructural lesions of podocytopathy (such as foot process effacement). This beneficial outcome was likely attributable to an enhanced Nrf2 antioxidant response in glomerular podocytes because the selective Nrf2 antagonist trigonelline abolished the proteinuria-reducing and podocyte-protective effect. Collectively, our results suggest the GSK3β-regulated Nrf2 antioxidant response as a novel therapeutic target for protecting podocytes and treating proteinuric glomerulopathies.

  7. Utilizing glycogen synthase kinase-3β as a marker for the diagnosis of graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Orbach, A; Bassan-Levin, T; Dan, P; Hihinashvilli, B; Marx, S

    2013-06-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a deadly complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Timely diagnosis is critical, because mortality rates for GVHD are high, increasing with disease severity. A diagnostic tool to predict GVHD before the onset of clinical symptoms could save many lives. On the cellular level, GVHD occurs when T cells from the transplant attack the tissues of the host, after perceiving them to be foreign. T-cell proliferation occurs even before clinical symptoms appear. Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β is a protein which regulates proliferation in many cell types including T-cells. GSK-3β has never been directly connected with GVHD and we applied GSK-3β as a novel marker for GVHD prediction, seeking herein to determine whether GSK-3β can be utilized as a marker for the early diagnosis of GVHD. For the mouse model of acute GVHD, irradiated mice underwent allogeneic splenocyte transplantation and GSK-3β expression levels and phosphorylation states were monitored in harvested spleens by western blot. FACS analysis was used to measure the number of T cells within the harvested spleens. Mice developed observable GVHD symptoms by day 5 post-transplantation, with severe symptoms on day 6 requiring mice to be killed for humane reasons. A significantly increased number of T cells in the allogeneic mice correlated with GVHD development. GSK-3β protein expression levels and phosphorylation levels were significantly lower in allogeneic (GVHD) mice compared with negative (untreated) and positive (syngeneic transplant; non-GVHD) controls over time. GSK-3β was directly connected with the onset and progression of GVHD. Therefore, it can be utilized as a marker for GVHD diagnosis in animals and potentially in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 is essential for β-arrestin-2 complex formation and lithium-sensitive behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, W. Timothy; Huang, Jian; Buccafusca, Roberto; Garskof, Julie; Valvezan, Alexander J.; Berry, Gerard T.; Klein, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    Lithium is the first-line therapy for bipolar disorder. However, its therapeutic target remains controversial. Candidates include inositol monophosphatases, glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), and a β-arrestin-2/AKT/protein phosphatase 2A (β-arrestin-2/AKT/PP2A) complex that is known to be required for lithium-sensitive behaviors. Defining the direct target(s) is critical for the development of new therapies and for elucidating the molecular pathogenesis of this major psychiatric disorder. Here, we show what we believe to be a new link between GSK-3 and the β-arrestin-2 complex in mice and propose an integrated mechanism that accounts for the effects of lithium on multiple behaviors. GSK-3β (Gsk3b) overexpression reversed behavioral defects observed in lithium-treated mice and similar behaviors observed in Gsk3b+/– mice. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation of striatial tissue from WT mice revealed that lithium disrupted the β-arrestin-2/Akt/PP2A complex by directly inhibiting GSK-3. GSK-3 inhibitors or loss of one copy of the Gsk3b gene reduced β-arrestin-2/Akt/PP2A complex formation in mice, while overexpression of Gsk3b restored complex formation in lithium-treated mice. Thus, GSK-3 regulates the stability of the β-arrestin-2/Akt/PP2A complex, and lithium disrupts the complex through direct inhibition of GSK-3. We believe these findings reveal a new role for GSK-3 within the β-arrestin complex and demonstrate that GSK-3 is a critical target of lithium in mammalian behaviors. PMID:21821916

  9. Brain derived neurotrophic factor is involved in the regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) signalling.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vivek; Chitranshi, Nitin; You, Yuyi; Gupta, Veer; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart

    2014-11-21

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is involved in several biochemical processes in neurons regulating cellular survival, gene expression, cell fate determination, metabolism and proliferation. GSK3β activity is inhibited through the phosphorylation of its Ser-9 residue. In this study we sought to investigate the role of BDNF/TrkB signalling in the modulation of GSK3β activity. BDNF/TrkB signalling regulates the GSK3β activity both in vivo in the retinal tissue as well as in the neuronal cells under culture conditions. We report here for the first time that BDNF can also regulate GSK3β activity independent of its effects through the TrkB receptor signalling. Knockdown of BDNF lead to a decline in GSK3β phosphorylation without having a detectable effect on the TrkB activity or its downstream effectors Akt and Erk1/2. Treatment with TrkB receptor agonist had a stimulating effect on the GSK3β phosphorylation, but the effect was significantly less pronounced in the cells in which BDNF was knocked down. The use of TrkB receptor antagonist similarly, manifested itself in the form of downregulation of GSK3β phosphorylation, but a combined TrkB inhibition and BDNF knockdown exhibited a much stronger negative effect. In vivo, we observed reduced levels of GSK3β phosphorylation in the retinal tissues of the BDNF(+/-) animals implicating critical role of BDNF in the regulation of the GSK3β activity. Concluding, BDNF/TrkB axis strongly regulates the GSK3β activity and BDNF also exhibits GSK3β regulatory effect independent of its actions through the TrkB receptor signalling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lithium and neuropsychiatric therapeutics: neuroplasticity via glycogen synthase kinase-3beta, beta-catenin, and neurotrophin cascades.

    PubMed

    Wada, Akihiko

    2009-05-01

    Mood disorders are not merely attributed to the functional defect of neurotransmission, but also are due to the structural impairment of neuroplasticity. Chronic stress decreases neurotrophin levels, precipitating or exacerbating depression; conversely, antidepressants increase expression of various neurotrophins (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vascular endothelial growth factor), thereby blocking or reversing structural and functional pathologies via promoting neurogenesis. Since the worldwide approval of lithium therapy in 1970, lithium has been used for its anti-manic, antidepressant, and anti-suicidal effects, yet the therapeutic mechanisms at the cellular level remain not-fully defined. During the last five years, multiple lines of evidence have shown that the mood stabilization and neurogenesis by lithium are due to the lithium-induced inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), allowing accumulation of beta-catenin and beta-catenin-dependent gene transcriptional events. Altered levels of GSK-3beta and beta-catenin are associated with various neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, while various classical neuropsychiatric drugs inhibit GSK-3beta and up-regulate beta-catenin expression. In addition, evidence has emerged that insulin-like growth factor-I enhances antidepression, anti-anxiety, memory, neurogenesis, and angiogenesis; antidepressants up-regulate expression of insulin-like growth factor-I, while insulin-like growth factor-I up-regulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression and its receptor TrkB level, as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced synaptic protein levels. More importantly, physical exercise and healthy diet raise transport of peripheral circulating insulin-like growth factor I into the brain, reinforcing the expression of neurotrophins (e.g., brain-derived neurotrophic factor) and the strength of cell survival signalings (e.g., phosphoinositide 3-kinase / Akt / GSK-3beta pathway

  11. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β: Variation over Time and the Possible Association with Mood and Cognition in Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Munkholm, Klaus; Lenskjold, Toke; Jacoby, Anne Sophie; Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica; Vinberg, Maj; Joaquim, Helena Giroud Passarelli; Talib, Leda Leme; Gattaz, Wagner Farid; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates a role for glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and in cognitive disturbances; however, the natural variation in GSK-3β activity over time is unknown. We aimed to investigate GSK-3β activity over time and its possible correlation with emotional lability, subjective mood fluctuations and cognitive function in healthy individuals. Thirty-seven healthy subjects were evaluated with neuropsychological tests and blood samples at baseline and 12-week follow-up. Total GSK-3β and serine-9-phosphorylated GSK-3β in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were quantitated using enzyme immunometric assays. The activity of GSK-3β (serine-9-phosphorylated GSK-3β/total GSK-3β) was lower at baseline compared with follow-up. No significant mean change over time was observed in levels of total GSK-3β and serine-9-phosphorylated GSK-3β. Exploratory analysis revealed lower activity of GSK-3β in spring and summer compared with the fall season. No correlation was observed between GSK-3β activity and emotional lability, subjective mood fluctuations or cognitive function. The results suggest that intra- and interindividual variation in GSK-3β activity over time could contribute to the heterogeneity of findings in clinical studies. The stability of GSK-3β activity and the role of potential moderators of GSK-3β activity warrant further investigation. Clinical studies of GSK-3β should consider including repeated measures of both cases and healthy individuals. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. CB1 cannabinoid receptors increase neuronal precursor proliferation through AKT/glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Trazzi, Stefania; Steger, Martin; Mitrugno, Valentina Maria; Bartesaghi, Renata; Ciani, Elisabetta

    2010-03-26

    The endocannabinoid system is involved in the regulation of many physiological effects in the central and peripheral nervous system. Recent findings have demonstrated the presence of a functional endocannabinoid system within neuronal progenitors located in the hippocampus and ventricular/subventricular zone that participates in the regulation of cell proliferation. It is presently unknown whether the endocannabinoid system exerts a widespread effect on neuronal precursors from different neurogenic regions, and very little is known about the signaling by which it regulates neuronal precursor proliferation. Herein, we demonstrate the presence of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in granule cell precursors (GCPs) during early cerebellar development. Activation of CB(1) receptors by HU-210 promoted GCP proliferation in vitro, an effect that was prevented by a selective CB(1) antagonist. Accordingly, in vivo experiments showed that GCP proliferation was increased by chronic HU-210 treatment and that in CB(1)-deficient mice cell proliferation was significantly lower than in wild-type littermates, indicating that the endocannabinoid system is physiologically involved in regulation of GCP proliferation. The pro-proliferative effect of cannabinoids in GCPs was mediated through the CB(1)/AKT/glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin pathway. Involvement of this pathway was also observed in cultures of neuronal precursors from the subventricular zone, suggesting that this pathway may be a general mechanism by which endocannabinoids regulate proliferation of neuronal precursors. These observations suggest that endocannabinoids constitute a new family of lipid signaling cues that may exert a widespread effect on neuronal precursor proliferation during brain development.

  13. Tissue kallikrein promotes neovascularization and improves cardiac function by the Akt-glycogen synthase kinase-3β pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yu-Yu; Yin, Hang; Shen, Bo; Smith, Robert S.; Liu, Yuying; Gao, Lin; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Aims We investigated the role of the Akt-glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β signalling pathway in mediating the protective effects of tissue kallikrein on myocardial injury by promoting angiogenesis and blood flow in rats after myocardial infarction (MI). Methods and results Human tissue kallikrein gene in an adenoviral vector, with or without co-administration of dominant-negative Akt (Ad.DN-Akt) or constitutively active GSK-3β (Ad.GSK-3βS9A), was injected into rat myocardium after MI. The expression of recombinant human kallikrein in rat heart significantly improved cardiac function and reduced infarct size 10 days after gene delivery. Kallikrein administration significantly increased myocardial blood flow as well as capillary and arteriole densities in the infarcted myocardium. Kallikrein increased cardiac Akt and GSK-3β phosphorylation in conjunction with decreased GSK-3β activity and the upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR-2). All of kallikrein’s effects on the myocardium were abrogated by Ad.DN-Akt and Ad.GSK-3βS9A. Moreover, in cultured human aortic endothelial cells, tissue kallikrein stimulated capillary tube formation and promoted cell migration; however, these effects were blocked by Ad.DN-Akt, Ad.GSK-3βS9A, icatibant (a kinin B2 receptor antagonist), Tki (a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor), and a neutralizing VEGF antibody. In addition, tissue kallikrein decreased GSK-3β activity via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt pathway and enhanced VEGF and VEGFR-2 expression in endothelial cells. Conclusion These data provide the first direct evidence that tissue kallikrein protects against acute-phase MI by promoting neovascularization, restoring regional blood flow and improving cardiac function through the kinin B2 receptor-Akt-GSK-3β and VEGF signalling pathways. PMID:18689794

  14. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta activity with lithium prevents and attenuates paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mei; Yan, Xisheng; Weng, Han-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Paclitaxel (taxol) is a first-line chemotherapy-drug used to treat many types of cancers. Neuropathic pain and sensory dysfunction are the major toxicities, which are dose-limiting and significantly reduce the quality of life in patients. Two known critical spinal mechanisms underlying taxol-induced neuropathic pain are an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and suppressed glial glutamate transporter activities. In this study, we uncovered that increased activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3β) in the spinal dorsal horn was concurrently associated with increased protein expressions of GFAP, IL-1β and a decreased protein expression of glial glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1), as well as the development and maintenance of taxol-induced neuropathic pain. The enhanced GSK3β activities were supported by the concurrently decreased AKT and mTOR activities. The changes of all these biomarkers were basically prevented when animals received pre-emptive lithium (a GSK3β inhibitor) treatment, which also prevented the development of taxol-induced neuropathic pain. Further, chronic lithium treatment, which began on day 11 after the first taxol injection, reversed the existing mechanical and thermal allodynia induced by taxol. The taxol-induced increased GSK3β activities and decreased AKT and mTOR activities in the spinal dorsal horn were also reversed by lithium. Meanwhile, protein expressions of GLT-1, GFAP and IL-1β in the spinal dorsal horn were improved. Hence, suppression of spinal GSK3β activities is a key mechanism used by lithium to reduce taxol-induced neuropathic pain, and targeting spinal GSK3β is an effective approach to ameliorate GLT-1 expression and suppress activation of astrocytes and IL-1β over-production in the spinal dorsal horn. PMID:24070631

  15. Dihydromyricetin protects neurons in an MPTP-induced model of Parkinson's disease by suppressing glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta activity

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhao-xiang; Zhao, Ya-fei; Cao, Ting; Zhen, Xue-chu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: It is general believed that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress play critical roles in the pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Dihydromyricetin (DHM), a natural flavonoid extracted from Ampelopsis grossedentata, has recently been found to elicit potent anti-oxidative effects. In the present study, we explored the role of DHM in protecting dopaminergic neurons. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1-methyl4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) for 7 d to induce PD. Additionally, mice were treated with either 5 or 10 mg/kg DHM for a total of 13 d (3 d before the start of MPTP, during MPTP administration (7 d) and 3 d after the end of MPTP). For the saline or DHM alone treatment groups, mice were injected with saline or DHM for 13 d. On d 14, behavioral tests (locomotor activity, the rotarod test and the pole test) were administered. After the behavioral tests, the mice were sacrificed, and brain tissue was collected for immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. In addition, MES23.5 cells were treated with MPP+ and DHM, and evaluated using cell viability assays, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements, apoptosis analysis and Western blotting. Results: DHM significantly attenuated MPTP-induced mouse behavioral impairments and dopaminergic neuron loss. In the MES23.5 cells, DHM attenuated MPP+-induced cell injury and ROS production in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, DHM increased glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which may be associated with DHM-induced dopaminergic neuronal protection. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that DHM is a potent neuroprotective agent for DA neurons by modulating the Akt/GSK-3β pathway, which suggests that DHM may be a promising therapeutic candidate for PD. PMID:27374489

  16. Lovastatin Modulates Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Pathway and Inhibits Mossy Fiber Sprouting after Pilocarpine-Induced Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun-Yao; Jaw, Thomas; Tseng, Huan-Chin; Chen, I-Chun; Liou, Horng-Huei

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assay the effect of lovastatin on the glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) and collapsin responsive mediator protein-2 (CRMP-2) signaling pathway and mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) in epileptic rats. MFS in the dentate gyrus (DG) is an important feature of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and is highly related to the severity and the frequency of spontaneous recurrent seizures. However, the molecular mechanism of MFS is mostly unknown. GSK-3β and CRMP-2 are the genes responsible for axonal growth and neuronal polarity in the hippocampus, therefore this pathway is a potential target to investigate MFS. Pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus animal model was taken as our researching material. Western blot, histological and electrophysiological techniques were used as the studying tools. The results showed that the expression level of GSK-3β and CRMP-2 were elevated after seizure induction, and the administration of lovastatin reversed this effect and significantly reduced the extent of MFS in both DG and CA3 region in the hippocampus. The alteration of expression level of GSK-3β and CRMP-2 after seizure induction proposes that GSK-3β and CRMP-2 are crucial for MFS and epiletogenesis. The fact that lovastatin reversed the expression level of GSK-3β and CRMP-2 indicated that GSK-3β and CRMP-2 are possible to be a novel mechanism of lovatstain to suppress MFS and revealed a new therapeutic target and researching direction for studying the mechanism of MFS and epileptogenesis. PMID:22761705

  17. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β gene polymorphisms may be associated with bipolar I disorder and the therapeutic response to lithium.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Feng; Huang, Ming-Chyi; Liu, Hsing-Cheng

    2013-05-01

    Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK-3β) is thought to be a key feature in the therapeutic mechanism of mood stabilizers (e.g., lithium). Overexpression of GSK-3β might play a role in the pathogenesis of bipolar I disorder. Within the GSK-3β gene, a promoter single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs334558 was identified associated with transcriptional strength, and an intronic SNP rs6438552 was found to regulate selection of splice acceptor sites. The aim of this study is to test the association between the two polymorphisms and bipolar I disorder. We genotyped the two SNPs in 138 Taiwanese bipolar I disorder patients and 131 controls. Lithium treatment efficacy was evaluated for 83 patients who had been treated with lithium carbonate for at least 24 months. We found no association between each of the two SNPs and the risk of bipolar I disorder. Following correction for multiple testing, CT genotype at rs6438552 was associated with an older age of onset than other genotypes (P=0.042) in female patients. Patients with genotype TT at rs334558 (P=0.044) had poorer response to lithium treatment. There was a trend that haplotype C-T increased the risk for bipolar I disorder (adjusted OR=4.22, corrected P=0.084), and patients with haplotype T-T had poorer treatment response to lithium than those with haplotype C-C. Limitations included small sample size, retrospective data collection, and a potential sampling bias. Despite the several limitations of the study, our results suggested GSK-3β genetic variants may be associated with the risk of bipolar I disorder, age of disease onset in females, and the therapeutic response to lithium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Constitutive glycogen synthase kinase-3α/β activity protects against chronic β-adrenergic remodelling of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Ian G.; Nishino, Yasuhiro; Clark, James E.; Murdoch, Colin; Walker, Simon J.; Makowski, Marcus R.; Botnar, Rene M.; Redwood, Simon R.; Shah, Ajay M.; Marber, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) signalling is implicated in the growth of the heart during development and in response to stress. However, its precise role remains unclear. We set out to characterize developmental growth and response to chronic isoproterenol (ISO) stress in knockin (KI) mice lacking the critical N-terminal serines, 21 of GSK-3α and 9 of GSK-3β respectively, required for inactivation by upstream kinases. Methods and results Between 5 and 15 weeks, KI mice grew more rapidly, but normalized heart weight and contractile performance were similar to wild-type (WT) mice. Isolated hearts of both genotypes responded comparably to acute ISO infusion with increases in heart rate and contractility. In WT mice, chronic subcutaneous ISO infusion over 14 days resulted in cardiac hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and impaired contractility, accompanied by foetal gene reactivation. These effects were all significantly attenuated in KI mice. Indeed, ISO-treated KI hearts demonstrated reversible physiological remodelling traits with increased stroke volume and a preserved contractile response to acute adrenergic stimulation. Furthermore, simultaneous pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3 in KI mice treated with chronic subcutaneous ISO recapitulated the adverse remodelling phenotype seen in WT hearts. Conclusion Expression of inactivation-resistant GSK-3α/β does not affect eutrophic myocardial growth but protects against pathological hypertrophy induced by chronic adrenergic stimulation, maintaining cardiac function and attenuating interstitial fibrosis. Accordingly, strategies to prevent phosphorylation of Ser-21/9, and consequent inactivation of GSK-3α/β, may enable a sustained cardiac response to chronic β-agonist stimulation while preventing pathological remodelling. PMID:20299330

  19. Altered Wnt signalling in the teenage suicide brain: focus on glycogen synthase kinase-3β and β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xinguo; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Khan, Mansoor A; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Pandey, Ghanshyam N

    2013-06-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β and β-catenin are important components of the Wnt signalling pathway, which is involved in numerous physiological functions such as cognition, brain development and cell survival. Their abnormalities have been implicated in mood disorders and schizophrenia. Teenage suicide is a major public health concern; however, very little is known about its neurobiology. In order to examine if abnormalities of GSK-3β and β-catenin are associated with teenage suicide, we determined the gene and protein expression of GSK-3β and β-catenin in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus obtained from 24 teenage suicide victims and 24 normal control subjects. Protein expression was determined using Western blot with specific antibodies and gene expression (mRNA levels) was determined using the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. No significant change was observed in the GSK-3β protein levels either in the PFC or hippocampus of suicide victims compared to controls. However, protein levels of pGSK-3β-ser(9) were significantly decreased in the PFC and hippocampus of suicide victims compared to normal controls. We also found that GSK-3β mRNA levels were significantly decreased in the PFC but not in the hippocampus of teenage suicide victims compared to controls. Mean protein and mRNA levels of β-catenin were significantly decreased in both the PFC and hippocampus of teenage suicide group compared to controls. The observation that there is a decrease in β-catenin and pGSK-3β-ser(9) in the PFC and hippocampus of teenage suicide victims does indicate a disturbance in the Wnt signalling pathway in teenage suicide.

  20. Valproate Inhibits Methamphetamine Induced Hyperactivity via Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens Core.

    PubMed

    Xing, Bo; Liang, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Yan; Chu, Zheng; Dang, Yong-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Valproate (VPA) has recently been shown to influence the behavioral effects of psycho-stimulants. Although glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) signaling in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) plays a key role in mediating dopamine (DA)-dependent behaviors, there is less direct evidence that how VPA acts on the GSK3β signaling in the functionally distinct sub-regions of the NAc, the NAc core (NAcC) and the NAc shell (NAcSh), during psycho-stimulant-induced hyperactivity. In the present study, we applied locomotion test after acute methamphetamine (MA) (2 mg/kg) injection to identify the locomotor activity of rats received repeated VPA (300 mg/kg) pretreatment. We next measured phosphor-GSK3β at serine 9 and total GSK3β levels in NAcC and NAcSh respectively to determine the relationship between the effect of VPA on MA-induced hyperlocomotor and changes in GSK3β activity. We further investigated whether microinjection of VPA (300 μg/0.5 μl/side, once daily for 7 consecutive days) into NAcC or NAcSh could affect hyperactivity induced by MA. Our data indicated that repeated VPA treatment attenuated MA-induced hyperlocomotor, and the effect was associated with decreased levels of phosphorylated GSK3β at Ser 9 in the NAcC. Moreover, repeated bilateral intra-NAcC, but not intra-NAcSh VPA treatment, significantly attenuated MA-induced hyperactivity. Our results suggested that GSK3β activity in NAcC contributes to the inhibitory effects of VPA on MA-induced hyperactivity.

  1. Calcineurin B homologous protein 3 negatively regulates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Soushi; Nakamura, Tomoe Y; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is a leading cause of serious heart diseases. Although many signaling molecules are involved in hypertrophy, the functions of some proteins in this process are still unknown. Calcineurin B homologous protein 3 (CHP3)/tescalcin is an EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein that is abundantly expressed in the heart; however, the function of CHP3 is unclear. Here, we aimed to identify the cardiac functions of CHP3. CHP3 was expressed in hearts at a wide range of developmental stages and was specifically detected in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) but not in cardiac fibroblasts in culture. Moreover, knockdown of CHP3 expression using adenoviral-based RNA interference in NRVMs resulted in enlargement of cardiomyocyte size, concomitant with increased expression of a pathological hypertrophy marker ANP. This same treatment elevated glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3α/β) phosphorylation, which is known to inhibit GSK3 function. In contrast, CHP3 overexpression blocked the insulin-induced phosphorylation of GSK3α/β without affecting the phosphorylation of Akt, which is an upstream kinase of GSK3α/β, in HEK293 cells, and it inhibited both IGF-1-induced phosphorylation of GSK3β and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in NRVMs. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that GSK3β interacted with CHP3. However, a Ca(2+)-binding-defective mutation of CHP3 (CHP3-D123A) also interacted with GSK3β and had the same inhibitory effect on GSK3α/β phosphorylation, suggesting that the action of CHP3 was independent of Ca(2+). These findings suggest that CHP3 functions as a novel negative regulator of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via inhibition of GSK3α/β phosphorylation and subsequent enzymatic activation of GSK3α/β. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of Post-Exercise Carbohydrate-Protein Ingestion on Muscle Glycogen Metabolism in Recovery and Subsequent Running Exercise.

    PubMed

    Alghannam, Abdullah F; Jedrzejewski, Dawid; Bilzon, James; Thompson, Dylan; Tsintzas, Kostas; Betts, James A

    2016-12-01

    We examined whether carbohydrate-protein ingestion influences muscle glycogen metabolism during short-term recovery from exhaustive treadmill running and subsequent exercise. Six endurance-trained individuals underwent two trials in a randomized double-blind design, each involving an initial run-to-exhaustion at 70% VO2max (Run-1) followed by 4-h recovery (REC) and subsequent run-to-exhaustion at 70% VO2max (Run-2). Carbohydrate-protein (CHO-P; 0.8 g carbohydrate·kg body mass [BM(-1)]·h(-1) plus 0.4 g protein·kg BM(-1)·h(-1)) or isocaloric carbohydrate (CHO; 1.2 g carbohydrate·kg BM(-1)·h(-1)) beverages were ingested at 30-min intervals during recovery. Muscle biopsies were taken upon cessation of Run-1, postrecovery and fatigue in Run-2. Time-to-exhaustion in Run-1 was similar with CHO and CHO-P (81 ± 17 and 84 ± 19 min, respectively). Muscle glycogen concentrations were similar between treatments after Run-1 (99 ± 3 mmol·kg dry mass [dm(-1)]). During REC, muscle glycogen concentrations increased to 252 ± 45 mmol·kg dm(-1) in CHO and 266 ± 30 mmol·kg dm(-1) in CHO-P (p = .44). Muscle glycogen degradation during Run-2 was similar between trials (3.3 ± 1.4 versus 3.5 ± 1.9 mmol·kg dm(-1)·min(-1) in CHO and CHO-P, respectively) and no differences were observed at the respective points of exhaustion (93 ± 21 versus 100 ± 11 mmol·kg dm(-1); CHO and CHO-P, respectively). Similarly, time-to-exhaustion was not different between treatments in Run-2 (51 ± 13 and 49 ± 15 min in CHO and CHO-P, respectively). Carbohydrate-protein ingestion equally accelerates muscle glycogen resynthesis during short-term recovery from exhaustive running as when 1.2 g carbohydrate·kg BM(-1)·h(-1) are ingested. The addition of protein did not alter muscle glycogen utilization or time to fatigue during repeated exhaustive running.

  3. Discovery of novel potent and highly selective glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease: design, synthesis, and characterization of pyrazines.

    PubMed

    Berg, Stefan; Bergh, Margareta; Hellberg, Sven; Högdin, Katharina; Lo-Alfredsson, Yvonne; Söderman, Peter; von Berg, Stefan; Weigelt, Tatjana; Ormö, Mats; Xue, Yafeng; Tucker, Julie; Neelissen, Jan; Jerning, Eva; Nilsson, Yvonne; Bhat, Ratan

    2012-11-08

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β, also called tau phosphorylating kinase, is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase which was originally identified due to its role in glycogen metabolism. Active forms of GSK3β localize to pretangle pathology including dystrophic neuritis and neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. By using a high throughput screening (HTS) approach to search for new chemical series and cocrystallization of key analogues to guide the optimization and synthesis of our pyrazine series, we have developed highly potent and selective inhibitors showing cellular efficacy and blood-brain barrier penetrance. The inhibitors are suitable for in vivo efficacy testing and may serve as a new treatment strategy for Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation in glycogen muscle reserves because of ingestion of ethanol: a study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Limoni, Ederson Luís; de Arruda, Eder João

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the effects of alcoholic ingestion and neurostimulation on the muscle glycogen reserve, body weight, blood sugar, and weight of the soleus muscle. Methods: Twenty male rats were distributed into four experimental groups (n=5), namely, Control, Ethanol, Electrostimulated, and Ethanol+Electrostimulated. The study lasted for 22 days. The groups submitted to the use of ethanol received the substance diluted in water, which was consumed during the entire experimental period. The groups that received electrostimulation, undersedationfor the procedure, had their left hind leg shaved, and the current was applied daily for 7 days, in 20-minute sessions. Next, after induced alcoholism and electrical stimulation in the corresponding groups, the animals were euthanized so that their muscles could be sent for glycogen analysis. Results: The Ethanol group displayed a lower body weight when compared to the Control and Electrostimulated groups; the Ethanol+Electrostimulated groups had a lower body weight compared to the Control and Electrostimulated groups, but were in a better situation when compared to the Ethanol group. As to glycogen capture, it was noted that the Ethanol group demonstrated resistance to blood glucose capture, whereas the Ethanol Electrostimulated group showed better capture than the other groups. As to muscle weight, it was observed that the Ethanol group had a lower weight than did the Controls, and that the Electrostimulated group weight greater when compared to the Control and Ethanol groups, respectively. On the other hand, the Ethanol+Electrostimulated groups showed no significant difference relative to the Controls, but had better results when compared to the Ethanol group. Conclusion: Chronic exposure to alcohol showed a direct relationship with reduced muscle and body weight, and in glycogen capture and muscle reserves, besides favoring innumerous organic disorders, thus interfering in rehabilitation processes. PMID

  5. Skeletal muscle metabolism is impaired during exercise in glycogen storage disease type III.

    PubMed

    Preisler, Nicolai; Laforêt, Pascal; Madsen, Karen Lindhardt; Prahm, Kira Philipsen; Hedermann, Gitte; Vissing, Christoffer Rasmus; Galbo, Henrik; Vissing, John

    2015-04-28

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSDIIIa) is classically regarded as a glycogenosis with fixed weakness, but we hypothesized that exercise intolerance in GSDIIIa is related to muscle energy failure and that oral fructose ingestion could improve exercise tolerance in this metabolic myopathy. We challenged metabolism with cycle-ergometer exercise and measured substrate turnover and oxidation rates using stable isotope methodology and indirect calorimetry in 3 patients and 6 age-matched controls on 1 day, and examined the effect of fructose ingestion on exercise tolerance in the patients on another day. Total fatty acid oxidation rates during exercise were higher in patients than controls, 32.1 (SE 1.2) vs 20.7 (SE 0.5; range 15.8-29.3) μmol/kg/min (p = 0.048), and oxidation of carbohydrates was lower in patients, 1.0 (SE 5.4) vs 38.4 (SE 8.0; range 23.0-77.1) μmol/kg/min (p = 0.024). Fructose ingestion improved exercise tolerance in the patients. Similar to patients with McArdle disease, in whom muscle glycogenolysis is also impaired, GSDIIIa is associated with a reduced skeletal muscle oxidation of carbohydrates and a compensatory increase in fatty acid oxidation, and fructose ingestion improves exercise tolerance. Our results indicate that GSDIIIa should not only be viewed as a glycogenosis with fixed skeletal muscle weakness, but should also be considered among the glycogenoses presenting with exercise-related dynamic symptoms caused by muscular energy deficiency. This study provides Class IV evidence that ingestion of fructose improves exercise tolerance in patients with GSDIIIa. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. State-of-the-Art Methods for Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Analysis in Athletes—The Need for Novel Non-Invasive Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Jacob; Louis, Julien; Korostynska, Olga; Mason, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Muscle glycogen levels have a profound impact on an athlete’s sporting performance, thus measurement is vital. Carbohydrate manipulation is a fundamental component in an athlete’s lifestyle and is a critical part of elite performance, since it can provide necessary training adaptations. This paper provides a critical review of the current invasive and non-invasive methods for measuring skeletal muscle glycogen levels. These include the gold standard muscle biopsy, histochemical analysis, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and musculoskeletal high frequency ultrasound, as well as pursuing future application of electromagnetic sensors in the pursuit of portable non-invasive quantification of muscle glycogen. This paper will be of interest to researchers who wish to understand the current and most appropriate techniques in measuring skeletal muscle glycogen. This will have applications both in the lab and in the field by improving the accuracy of research protocols and following the physiological adaptations to exercise. PMID:28241495

  7. State-of-the-Art Methods for Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Analysis in Athletes-The Need for Novel Non-Invasive Techniques.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jacob; Louis, Julien; Korostynska, Olga; Mason, Alex

    2017-02-23

    Muscle glycogen levels have a profound impact on an athlete's sporting performance, thus measurement is vital. Carbohydrate manipulation is a fundamental component in an athlete's lifestyle and is a critical part of elite performance, since it can provide necessary training adaptations. This paper provides a critical review of the current invasive and non-invasive methods for measuring skeletal muscle glycogen levels. These include the gold standard muscle biopsy, histochemical analysis, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and musculoskeletal high frequency ultrasound, as well as pursuing future application of electromagnetic sensors in the pursuit of portable non-invasive quantification of muscle glycogen. This paper will be of interest to researchers who wish to understand the current and most appropriate techniques in measuring skeletal muscle glycogen. This will have applications both in the lab and in the field by improving the accuracy of research protocols and following the physiological adaptations to exercise.

  8. Role of Autophagy in Glycogen Breakdown and Its Relevance to Chloroquine Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zirin, Jonathan; Nieuwenhuis, Joppe; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Several myopathies are associated with defects in autophagic and lysosomal degradation of glycogen, but it remains unclear how glycogen is targeted to the lysosome and what significance this process has for muscle cells. We have established a Drosophila melanogaster model to study glycogen autophagy in skeletal muscles, using chloroquine (CQ) to simulate a vacuolar myopathy that is completely dependent on the core autophagy genes. We show that autophagy is required for the most efficient degradation of glycogen in response to starvation. Furthermore, we show that CQ-induced myopathy can be improved by reduction of either autophagy or glycogen synthesis, the latter possibly due to a direct role of Glycogen Synthase in regulating autophagy through its interaction with Atg8. PMID:24265594

  9. Palmitate acutely raises glycogen synthesis in rat soleus muscle by a mechanism that requires its metabolization (Randle cycle).

    PubMed

    Massao Hirabara, Sandro; de Oliveira Carvalho, Carla Roberta; Mendonça, José Roberto; Piltcher Haber, Esther; Fernandes, Luiz Claudio; Curi, Rui

    2003-04-24

    The acute effect of palmitate on glucose metabolism in rat skeletal muscle was examined. Soleus muscles from Wistar male rats were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer, for 1 h, in the absence or presence of 10 mU/ml insulin and 0, 50 or 100 microM palmitate. Palmitate increased the insulin-stimulated [(14)C]glycogen synthesis, decreased lactate production, and did not alter D-[U-(14)C]glucose decarboxylation and 2-deoxy-D-[2,6-(3)H]glucose uptake. This fatty acid decreased the conversion of pyruvate to lactate and [1-(14)C]pyruvate decarboxylation and increased (14)CO(2) produced from [2-(14)C]pyruvate. Palmitate reduced insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1/2, Akt, and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases. Bromopalmitate, a non-metabolizable analogue of palmitate, reduced [(14)C]glycogen synthesis. A strong correlation was found between [U-(14)C]palmitate decarboxylation and [(14)C]glycogen synthesis (r=0.99). Also, palmitate increased intracellular content of glucose 6-phosphate in the presence of insulin. These results led us to postulate that palmitate acutely potentiates insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis by a mechanism that requires its metabolization (Randle cycle). The inhibitory effect of palmitate on insulin-stimulated protein phosphorylation might play an important role for the development of insulin resistance in conditions of chronic exposure to high levels of fatty acids.

  10. Muscle Glycogen Depletion Following 75-km of Cycling Is Not Linked to Increased Muscle IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 mRNA Expression and Protein Content

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, David C.; Zwetsloot, Kevin A.; Lomiwes, Dominic D.; Meaney, Mary P.; Hurst, Roger D.

    2016-01-01

    The cytokine response to heavy exertion varies widely for unknown reasons, and this study evaluated the relative importance of glycogen depletion, muscle damage, and stress hormone changes on blood and muscle cytokine measures. Cyclists (N = 20) participated in a 75-km cycling time trial (168 ± 26.0 min), with blood and vastus lateralis muscle samples collected before and after. Muscle glycogen decreased 77.2 ± 17.4%, muscle IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 mRNA increased 18.5 ± 2.8−, 45.3 ± 7.8−, and 8.25 ± 1.75-fold, and muscle IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 protein increased 70.5 ± 14.1%, 347 ± 68.1%, and 148 ± 21.3%, respectively (all, P < 0.001). Serum myoglobin and cortisol increased 32.1 ± 3.3 to 242 ± 48.3 mg/mL, and 295 ± 27.6 to 784 ± 63.5 nmol/L, respectively (both P < 0.001). Plasma IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 increased 0.42 ± 0.07 to 18.5 ± 3.8, 4.07 ± 0.37 to 17.0 ± 1.8, and 96.5 ± 3.7 to 240 ± 21.6 pg/mL, respectively (all P < 0.001). Increases in muscle IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 mRNA were unrelated to any of the outcome measures. Muscle glycogen depletion was related to change in plasma IL-6 (r = 0.462, P = 0.040), with change in myoglobin related to plasma IL-8 (r = 0.582, P = 0.007) and plasma MCP-1 (r = 0.457, P = 0.043), and muscle MCP-1 protein (r = 0.588, P = 0.017); cortisol was related to plasma IL-8 (r = 0.613, P = 0.004), muscle IL-8 protein (r = 0.681, P = 0.004), and plasma MCP-1 (r = 0.442, P = 0.050). In summary, this study showed that muscle IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 mRNA expression after 75-km cycling was unrelated to glycogen depletion and muscle damage, with change in muscle glycogen related to plasma IL-6, and changes in serum myoglobin and cortisol related to the chemotactic cytokines IL-8 and MCP-1. PMID:27729872

  11. The Design and Synthesis of Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 for the Treatment of Human African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a genetically validated drug target for human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), also called African sleeping sickness. We report the synthesis and biological evaluation of aminopyrazole derivatives as Trypanosoma brucei GSK3 short inhibitors. Low nanomolar inhibitors, which had high selectivity over the off-target human CDK2 and good selectivity over human GSK3β enzyme, have been prepared. These potent kinase inhibitors demonstrated low micromolar levels of inhibition of the Trypanosoma brucei brucei parasite grown in culture. PMID:25198388

  12. Novel method for detection of glycogen in cells.

    PubMed

    Skurat, Alexander V; Segvich, Dyann M; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A; Roach, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    Glycogen, a branched polymer of glucose, functions as an energy reserve in many living organisms. Abnormalities in glycogen metabolism, usually excessive accumulation, can be caused genetically, most often through mutation of the enzymes directly involved in synthesis and degradation of the polymer leading to a variety of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs). Microscopic visualization of glycogen deposits in cells and tissues is important for the study of normal glycogen metabolism as well as diagnosis of GSDs. Here, we describe a method for the detection of glycogen using a renewable, recombinant protein which contains the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) from starch-binding domain containing protein 1 (Stbd1). We generated a fusion protein containing g lutathione S-transferase, a cM c eptitope and the tbd1 BM (GYSC) for use as a glycogen-binding probe, which can be detected with secondary antibodies against glutathione S-transferase or cMyc. By enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we demonstrate that GYSC binds glycogen and two other polymers of glucose, amylopectin and amylose. Immunofluorescence staining of cultured cells indicate a GYSC-specific signal that is co-localized with signals obtained with anti-glycogen or anti-glycogen synthase antibodies. GYSC-positive staining inside of lysosomes is observed in individual muscle fibers isolated from mice deficient in lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase, a well-characterized model of GSD II (Pompe disease). Co-localized GYSC and glycogen signals are also found in muscle fibers isolated from mice deficient in malin, a model for Lafora disease. These data indicate that GYSC is a novel probe that can be used to study glycogen metabolism under normal and pathological conditions.

  13. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3α Limits Ischemic Injury, Cardiac Rupture, Post–Myocardial Infarction Remodeling and Death

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Hind; Zhou, Jibin; Ahmad, Firdos; Zaka, Raihana; Vagnozzi, Ronald J.; DeCaul, Morgan; Woodgett, James; Gao, Erhe; Force, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background The molecular pathways that regulate the extent of ischemic injury and post–myocardial infarction (MI) remodeling are not well understood. We recently demonstrated that glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α) is critical to the heart’s response to pressure overload. However, the role, if any, of GSK-3α in regulating ischemic injury and its consequences is not known. Methods and Results MI was induced in wild-type (WT) versus GSK-3α(−/−) (KO) littermates by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. Pre-MI, WT, and KO hearts had comparable chamber dimensions and ventricular function, but as early as 1 week post-MI, KO mice had significantly more left ventricular dilatation and dysfunction than WT mice. KO mice also had increased mortality during the first 10 days post-MI (43% versus 22%; P=0.04), and postmortem examination confirmed cardiac rupture as the cause of most of the deaths. In the mice that survived the first 10 days, left ventricular dilatation and dysfunction remained worse in the KO mice throughout the study (8 weeks). Hypertrophy, fibrosis, and heart failure were all increased in the KO mice. Given the early deaths due to rupture and the significant reduction in left ventricular function evident as early as 1 week post-MI, we examined infarct size following a 48-hour coronary artery ligation and found it to be increased in the KO mice. This was accompanied by increased apoptosis in the border zone of the MI. This increased susceptibility to ischemic injury–induced apoptosis was also seen in cardiomyocytes isolated from the KO mice that were exposed to hypoxia. Finally, Bax translocation to the mitochondria and cytochrome C release into the cytosol were increased in the KO mice. Conclusion GSK-3α confers resistance to ischemic injury, at least in part, via limiting apoptosis. Loss of GSK-3α promotes ischemic injury, increases risk of cardiac rupture, accentuates post-MI remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction, and

  14. Anti-malarial Activities of Two Soil Actinomycete Isolates from Sabah via Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β

    PubMed Central

    Dahari, Dhiana Efani; Salleh, Raifana Mohamad; Mahmud, Fauze; Chin, Lee Ping; Embi, Noor; Sidek, Hasidah Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Exploiting natural resources for bioactive compounds is an attractive drug discovery strategy in search for new anti-malarial drugs with novel modes of action. Initial screening efforts in our laboratory revealed two preparations of soil-derived actinomycetes (H11809 and FH025) with potent anti-malarial activities. Both crude extracts showed glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β)-inhibitory activities in a yeast-based kinase assay. We have previously shown that the GSK3 inhibitor, lithium chloride (LiCl), was able to suppress parasitaemia development in a rodent model of malarial infection. The present study aims to evaluate whether anti-malarial activities of H11809 and FH025 involve the inhibition of GSK3β. The acetone crude extracts of H11809 and FH025 each exerted strong inhibition on the growth of Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 in vitro with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.57 ± 0.09 and 1.28 ± 0.11 µg/mL, respectively. The tested extracts exhibited Selectivity Index (SI) values exceeding 10 for the 3D7 strain. Both H11809 and FH025 showed dosage-dependent chemo-suppressive activities in vivo and improved animal survivability compared to non-treated infected mice. Western analysis revealed increased phosphorylation of serine (Ser 9) GSK3β (by 6.79 to 6.83-fold) in liver samples from infected mice treated with H11809 or FH025 compared to samples from non-infected or non-treated infected mice. A compound already identified in H11809 (data not shown), dibutyl phthalate (DBP) showed active anti-plasmodial activity against 3D7 (IC50 4.87 ± 1.26 µg/mL which is equivalent to 17.50 µM) and good chemo-suppressive activity in vivo (60.80% chemo-suppression at 300 mg/kg body weight [bw] dosage). DBP administration also resulted in increased phosphorylation of Ser 9 GSK3β compared to controls. Findings from the present study demonstrate that the potent anti-malarial activities of H11809 and FH025 were mediated via inhibition of host GSK3β. In addition

  15. Brain derived neurotrophic factor is involved in the regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vivek; Chitranshi, Nitin; You, Yuyi; Gupta, Veer; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • BDNF knockdown leads to activation of GSK3β in the neuronal cells. • BDNF knockdown can induce GSK3β activation beyond TrkB mediated effects. • BDNF impairment in vivo leads to age dependent activation of GSK3β in the retina. • Systemic treatment with TrkB agonist induces inhibition of retinal GSK3β. - Abstract: Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is involved in several biochemical processes in neurons regulating cellular survival, gene expression, cell fate determination, metabolism and proliferation. GSK3β activity is inhibited through the phosphorylation of its Ser-9 residue. In this study we sought to investigate the role of BDNF/TrkB signalling in the modulation of GSK3β activity. BDNF/TrkB signalling regulates the GSK3β activity both in vivo in the retinal tissue as well as in the neuronal cells under culture conditions. We report here for the first time that BDNF can also regulate GSK3β activity independent of its effects through the TrkB receptor signalling. Knockdown of BDNF lead to a decline in GSK3β phosphorylation without having a detectable effect on the TrkB activity or its downstream effectors Akt and Erk1/2. Treatment with TrkB receptor agonist had a stimulating effect on the GSK3β phosphorylation, but the effect was significantly less pronounced in the cells in which BDNF was knocked down. The use of TrkB receptor antagonist similarly, manifested itself in the form of downregulation of GSK3β phosphorylation, but a combined TrkB inhibition and BDNF knockdown exhibited a much stronger negative effect. In vivo, we observed reduced levels of GSK3β phosphorylation in the retinal tissues of the BDNF{sup +/−} animals implicating critical role of BDNF in the regulation of the GSK3β activity. Concluding, BDNF/TrkB axis strongly regulates the GSK3β activity and BDNF also exhibits GSK3β regulatory effect independent of its actions through the TrkB receptor signalling.

  16. Investigation and management of the hepatic glycogen storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kaustuv

    2015-07-01

    The glycogen storage diseases (GSD) comprise a group of disorders that involve the disruption of metabolism of glycogen. Glycogen is stored in various organs including skeletal muscle, the kidneys and liver. The liver stores glycogen to supply the rest of the body with glucose when required. Therefore, disruption of this process can lead to hypoglycaemia. If glycogen is not broken down effectively, this can lead to hepatomegaly. Glycogen synthase deficiency leads to impaired glycogen synthesis and consequently the liver is small. Glycogen brancher deficiency can lead to abnormal glycogen being stored in the liver leading to a quite different disorder of progressive liver dysfunction. Understanding the physiology of GSD I, III, VI and IX guides dietary treatments and the provision of appropriate amounts and types of carbohydrates. There has been recent re-emergence in the literature of the use of ketones in therapy, either in the form of the salt D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate or medium chain triglyceride (MCT). High protein diets have also been advocated. Alternative waxy maize based starches seem to show promising early data of efficacy. There are many complications of each of these disorders and they need to be prospectively surveyed and managed. Liver and kidney transplantation is still indicated in severe refractory disease.

  17. Investigation and management of the hepatic glycogen storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The glycogen storage diseases (GSD) comprise a group of disorders that involve the disruption of metabolism of glycogen. Glycogen is stored in various organs including skeletal muscle, the kidneys and liver. The liver stores glycogen to supply the rest of the body with glucose when required. Therefore, disruption of this process can lead to hypoglycaemia. If glycogen is not broken down effectively, this can lead to hepatomegaly. Glycogen synthase deficiency leads to impaired glycogen synthesis and consequently the liver is small. Glycogen brancher deficiency can lead to abnormal glycogen being stored in the liver leading to a quite different disorder of progressive liver dysfunction. Understanding the physiology of GSD I, III, VI and IX guides dietary treatments and the provision of appropriate amounts and types of carbohydrates. There has been recent re-emergence in the literature of the use of ketones in therapy, either in the form of the salt D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate or medium chain triglyceride (MCT). High protein diets have also been advocated. Alternative waxy maize based starches seem to show promising early data of efficacy. There are many complications of each of these disorders and they need to be prospectively surveyed and managed. Liver and kidney transplantation is still indicated in severe refractory disease. PMID:26835382

  18. A negative feedback control of transforming growth factor-beta signaling by glycogen synthase kinase 3-mediated Smad3 linker phosphorylation at Ser-204.

    PubMed

    Millet, Caroline; Yamashita, Motozo; Heller, Mary; Yu, Li-Rong; Veenstra, Timothy D; Zhang, Ying E

    2009-07-24

    Through the action of its membrane-bound type I receptor, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) elicits a wide range of cellular responses that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and apo ptosis. Many of these signaling responses are mediated by Smad proteins. As such, controlling Smad activity is crucial for proper signaling by TGF-beta and its related factors. Here, we show that TGF-beta induces phosphorylation at three sites in the Smad3 linker region in addition to the two C-terminal residues, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 is responsible for phosphorylation at one of these sites, namely Ser-204. Alanine substitution at Ser-204 and/or the neighboring Ser-208, the priming site for glycogen synthase kinase 3 in vivo activity, strengthened the affinity of Smad3 to CREB-binding protein, suggesting that linker phosphorylation may be part of a negative feedback loop that modulates Smad3 transcriptional activity. Thus, our findings reveal a novel aspect of the Smad3 signaling mechanism that controls the final amplitude of cellular responses to TGF-beta.

  19. Characterization of Recombinant UDP- and ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylases and Glycogen Synthase To Elucidate Glucose-1-Phosphate Partitioning into Oligo- and Polysaccharides in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Asención Diez, Matías D.; Peirú, Salvador; Demonte, Ana M.; Gramajo, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor exhibits a major secondary metabolism, deriving important amounts of glucose to synthesize pigmented antibiotics. Understanding the pathways occurring in the bacterium with respect to synthesis of oligo- and polysaccharides is of relevance to determine a plausible scenario for the partitioning of glucose-1-phosphate into different metabolic fates. We report the molecular cloning of the genes coding for UDP- and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases as well as for glycogen synthase from genomic DNA of S. coelicolor A3(2). Each gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli cells to produce and purify to electrophoretic homogeneity the respective enzymes. UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UDP-Glc PPase) was characterized as a dimer exhibiting a relatively high Vmax in catalyzing UDP-glucose synthesis (270 units/mg) and with respect to dTDP-glucose (94 units/mg). ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) was found to be tetrameric in structure and specific in utilizing ATP as a substrate, reaching similar activities in the directions of ADP-glucose synthesis or pyrophosphorolysis (Vmax of 0.15 and 0.27 units/mg, respectively). Glycogen synthase was arranged as a dimer and exhibited specificity in the use of ADP-glucose to elongate α-1,4-glucan chains in the polysaccharide. ADP-Glc PPase was the only of the three enzymes exhibiting sensitivity to allosteric regulation by different metabolites. Mannose-6-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate, fructose-6-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate behaved as major activators, whereas NADPH was a main inhibitor of ADP-Glc PPase. The results support a metabolic picture where glycogen synthesis occurs via ADP-glucose in S. coelicolor, with the pathway being strictly regulated in connection with other routes involved with oligo- and polysaccharides, as well as with antibiotic synthesis in the bacterium. PMID:22210767

  20. Prior Exercise Training Prevent Hyperglycemia in STZ Mice by Increasing Hepatic Glycogen and Mitochondrial Function on Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Afonso Kopczynski; da Silva, Sabrina; Serafini, Edenir; de Souza, Daniela Roxo; Farias, Hemelin Resende; de Bem Silveira, Gustavo; Silveira, Paulo Cesar Lock; de Souza, Claudio Teodoro; Portela, Luis Valmor; Muller, Alexandre Pastoris

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by hyperglycemia. We investigated the effect of a prior 30 days voluntary exercise protocol on STZ-diabetic CF1 mice. Glycemia, and the liver and skeletal muscle glycogen, mitochondrial function, and redox status were analyzed up to 5 days after STZ injection. Animals were engaged in the following groups: Sedentary vehicle (Sed Veh), Sedentary STZ (Sed STZ), Exercise Vehicle (Ex Veh), and Exercise STZ (Ex STZ). Exercise prevented fasting hyperglycemia in the Ex STZ group. In the liver, there was decreased on glycogen level in Sed STZ group but not in EX STZ group. STZ groups showed decreased mitochondrial oxygen consumption compared to vehicle groups, whereas mitochondrial H2 O2 production was not different between groups. Addition of ADP to the medium did not decrease H2 O2 production in Sed STZ mice. Exercise increased GSH level. Sed STZ group increased nitrite levels compared to other groups. In quadriceps muscle, glycogen level was similar between groups. The Sed STZ group displayed decreased O2 consumption, and exercise prevented this reduction. The H2 O2 production was higher in Ex STZ when compared to other groups. Also, GSH level decreased whereas nitrite levels increased in the Sed STZ compared to other groups. The PGC1 α levels increased in Sed STZ, Ex Veh, and Ex STZ groups. In summary, prior exercise training prevents hyperglycemia in STZ-mice diabetic associated with increased liver glycogen storage, and oxygen consumption by the mitochondria of skeletal muscle implying in increased oxidative/biogenesis capacity, and improved redox status of both tissues. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 678-685, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effects of Petrol Exposure on Glucose, Liver and Muscle glycogen levels in the Common African toad Bufo regularis.

    PubMed

    Isehunwa, G O; Yusuf, I O; Alada, A Ar

    2017-03-06

    This study investigated the effects of exposure to petrol on blood glucose, liver and muscle glycogen levels in the common African toad Bufo regularis. A total of 126 adult toads of either sex weighing between 70-100g were used for this study. The experiment was divided into three phases. The phase 1 experiment the acute toxicity test consisted of animals divided into six groups of 10 toads per group and were exposed to water (H2O), H2O + Tween 80, 2ml/l, 3ml/l, 5ml/l, and 10ml/l of petrol respectively for 96 hours using the static renewal bioassay system. In the Phase 2 experiment, the animals were exposed to H2O, H2O + Tween 80, 0.14ml/l, 0.3ml/l, 0.6ml/l, and 1.13ml/l of petrol respectively for 3 days; while in phase 3 experiment they were exposed to petrol solutions for 14 days. After the various exposures, the blood glucose, liver and muscle glycogen contents were determined using standard methods. The results of the study showed that the median lethal concentration of petrol (96 hours LC50) was 4.5ml/l and sub-lethal concentration of petrol caused mortality of animals. Exposure to petrol solutions for 3 days had no significant effect on blood glucose level of the animals but caused significant decrease in the liver and muscle glycogen levels at high concentrations. In the animals exposed to petrol solutions for 14 days, there was a significant increase in glucose levels and significant reduction in liver and muscle glycogen levels at high concentrations when compared with the control. The results show that sub-lethal concentrations of petrol can cause mortality of animals, hyperglycemia and reduction in liver and muscle glycogen levels. The effects of petrol exposure on carbohydrate metabolism depend on the concentration and duration of exposure.

  2. Subcutaneous liraglutide ameliorates methylglyoxal-induced Alzheimer-like tau pathology and cognitive impairment by modulating tau hyperphosphorylation and glycogen synthase kinase-3β

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Liqin; Chen, Zhou; Wang, Yanping; Liu, Xiaoying; Liu, Xiaohong; Ke, Linfang; Zheng, Zhongjie; Lin, Xiaowei; Zhou, Yu; Wu, Lijuan; Liu, Libin

    2017-01-01

    Memory deterioration and synapse damage with accumulation of β-amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau are hallmark lesions of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methylglyoxal (MG), a key intermediate of glucose metabolism, is elevated in AD brains and modifies Aβ42, increasing misfolding and leading to the accumulation of senile plaques. Liraglutide, an analog of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), is neurotrophic and neuroprotective. However, whether liraglutide can protect against AD-like memory-related deficits and tau hyperphosphorylation caused by MG in vivo is not known. Here, we report that MG induces tau hyperphosphorylation and causes ultrastructural hippocampal damage and cognitive impairment in C57BL/6J mice. Liraglutide reduced these effects via activation of the protein kinase B and glycogen synthase kinase-3β pathways. Our data reveal that liraglutide may alleviate AD-like cognitive impairment by decreasing the phosphorylation of tau. PMID:28337257

  3. Discovery of a highly selective glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitor (PF-04802367) that modulates tau phosphorylation in brain: Translation for PET neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Steven H.; Chen, Jinshan Michael; Normandin, Marc D.; Chang, Jeanne S.; Chang, George C.; Taylor, Christine K.; Trapa, Patrick; Plummer, Mark S.; Para, Kimberly S.; Conn, Edward L.; Lopresti-Morrow, Lori; Lanyon, Lorraine F.; Cook, James M.; Richter, Karl E. G.; Nolan, Charlie E.; Schachter, Joel B.; Janat, Fouad; Che, Ye; Shanmugasundaram, Veerabahu; Lefker, Bruce A.; Enerson, Bradley E.; Livni, Elijahu; Wang, Lu; Guehl, Nicolas; Patnaik, Debasis; Wagner, Florence F.; Perlis, Roy; Holson, Edward B.; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Fakhri, Georges El

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) regulates multiple cellular processes in diabetes, oncology and neurology. We have identified N-(3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propyl)-5-(3-chloro-4-methoxyphenyl)oxazole-4-carboxamide (PF-04802367 or PF-367) as a highly potent inhibitor, which is among the most selective antagonists of GSK-3 to date. We demonstrated its efficacy in modulation of tau phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Whereas the kinetics of PF-367 binding in brain tissues are too fast for an effective therapeutic agent, the pharmacokinetic profile of PF-367 is ideal for discovery of radiopharmaceuticals for GSK-3 in the central nervous system. A 11C-isotopologue of PF-367 was synthesized and preliminary PET imaging studies in non-human primates confirmed that we have overcome the two major obstacles for imaging GSK-3, namely, reasonable brain permeability and displaceable binding. PMID:27355874

  4. Novel, Starch-Like Polysaccharides Are Synthesized by an Unbound Form of Granule-Bound Starch Synthase in Glycogen-Accumulating Mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1

    PubMed Central

    Dauvillée, David; Colleoni, Christophe; Shaw, Eudean; Mouille, Gregory; D'Hulst, Christophe; Morell, Matthew; Samuel, Michael S.; Bouchet, Brigitte; Gallant, Daniel J.; Sinskey, Anthony; Ball, Steven

    1999-01-01

    In vascular plants, mutations leading to a defect in debranching enzyme lead to the simultaneous synthesis of glycogen-like material and normal starch. In Chlamydomonas reinhardtii comparable defects lead to the replacement of starch by phytoglycogen. Therefore, debranching was proposed to define a mandatory step for starch biosynthesis. We now report the characterization of small amounts of an insoluble, amylose-like material found in the mutant algae. This novel, starch-like material was shown to be entirely dependent on the presence of granule-bound starch synthase (GBSSI), the enzyme responsible for amylose synthesis in plants. However, enzyme activity assays, solubilization of proteins from the granule, and western blots all failed to detect GBSSI within the insoluble polysaccharide matrix. The glycogen-like polysaccharides produced in the absence of GBSSI were proved to be qualitatively and quantitatively identical to those produced in its presence. Therefore, we propose that GBSSI requires the presence of crystalline amylopectin for granule binding and that the synthesis of amylose-like material can proceed at low levels without the binding of GBSSI to the polysaccharide matrix. Our results confirm that amylopectin synthesis is completely blocked in debranching-enzyme-defective mutants of C. reinhardtii. PMID:9880375

  5. The marine natural-derived inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3β phenylmethylene hydantoins: In vitro and in vivo activities and pharmacophore modeling

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Asal, Bilal Abu; Mudit, Mudit; Kaddoumi, Amal; El Sayed, Khalid A.

    2009-01-01

    The Red Sea sponge Hemimycale arabica afforded the known (Z)-5-(4-hydroxybenzylidene)-hydantoin (1). This natural phenylmethylene hydantoin (PMH) 1 and the synthetic (Z)-5-(4-(ethylthio)benzylidene)-hydantoin (2) showed potent in vitro and in vivo anti-growth and anti-invasive properties against PC-3M prostate cancer cells in MTT, spheroid disaggregation, and in mice models. To explore a possible molecular target of PMHs, the most potent synthetic analogue 2 has been virtually screened against various protein kinases. Molecular modeling study has shown that 2 can be successfully docked within the binding pocket of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3β) similar to the well-known GSK-3β inhibitor I-5. Several PMHs showed potent in vitro GSK-3β inhibitory activity with an IC50 range of 4–20 µM. The most potent analogue 3 showed a significant increase in liver glycogen level at the 5, 15, and 25 mg/kg dose levels, in vivo. Pharmacophore model was built and validated using in-house database of active and inactive GSK-3β inhibitors. The GSK-3β inhibitory activity of PMHs entitles them to be potential leads for the treatment of cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, bipolar disorders, stroke, different tau pathologies, and type-2 diabetes. PMID:19616957

  6. Treadmill exercise decreases incidence of Alzheimer's disease by suppressing glycogen synthase kinase-3β expression in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Young; Jung, Sun-Young; Kim, Tae-Woon; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Kijeong

    2015-04-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic disorder, and it is considered as a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we evaluated whether treadmill exercise ameliorates progression of AD in relation with glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activity using streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. For this study, step-down avoidance task, immunohistochemistry for glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and tau, and western blot for phosphor-phosphoinositide 3 kinase (p-PI3K)/PI3K and phosphor-Akt (p-Akt)/Akt were performed. Diabetes mellitus was induced by intraperitoneal injection of STZ. The rats in the exercise groups were made to run on the treadmill for 30 min per one day, five times a week, during 12 weeks. The present results showed that short-term and long-term latencies in the step-down avoidance task were decreased by induction of diabetes, and treadmill exercise inhibited these latencies in the diabetic rats. Induction of diabetes suppressed the ratio of p-PI3K to PI3K and the ratio of p-Akt to Akt, and treadmill exercise increased these ratios in the diabetic rats. The numbers of GSK-3β-positive and tau-positive cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus was higher in the diabetes-induction group than that in the control group, and treadmill exercise inhibited these numbers in the diabetic rats. In the present study, treadmill exercise suppressed hyperphosphorylation of tau in the hippocampus by decreased GSK-3β activity through PI3K/Akt pathway activation in the diabetic rats. Based on the present results, treadmill exercise may helpful to prevent diabetes-associated AD occurrence.

  7. Silencing Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Inhibits Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity and Attenuates JNK Activation and Loss of Glutamate Cysteine Ligase and Myeloid Cell Leukemia Sequence 1*

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Mie; Ybanez, Maria D.; Win, Sanda; Than, Tin Aung; Jain, Shilpa; Gaarde, William A.; Han, Derick; Kaplowitz, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) plays a central role in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury. In the current work, we examined other possible signaling pathways that may also contribute to APAP hepatotoxicity. APAP treatment to mice caused glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activation and translocation to mitochondria during the initial phase of APAP-induced liver injury (∼1 h). The silencing of GSK-3β, but not Akt-2 (protein kinase B) or glycogen synthase kinase-3α (GSK-3α), using antisense significantly protected mice from APAP-induced liver injury. The silencing of GSK-3β affected several key pathways important in conferring protection against APAP-induced liver injury. APAP treatment was observed to promote the loss of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL, rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis) in liver. The silencing of GSK-3β decreased the loss of hepatic GCL, and promoted greater GSH recovery in liver following APAP treatment. Silencing JNK1 and -2 also prevented the loss of GCL. APAP treatment also resulted in GSK-3β translocation to mitochondria and the degradation of myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) in mitochondrial membranes in liver. The silencing of GSK-3β reduced Mcl-1 degradation caused by APAP treatment. The silencing of GSK-3β also resulted in an inhibition of the early phase (0–2 h), and blunted the late phase (after 4 h) of JNK activation and translocation to mitochondria in liver following APAP treatment. Taken together our results suggest that activation of GSK-3β is a key mediator of the initial phase of APAP-induced liver injury through modulating GCL and Mcl-1 degradation, as well as JNK activation in liver. PMID:20061376

  8. An acute increase in fructose concentration increases hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase mRNA via mechanisms that are independent of glycogen synthase kinase-3 in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuren; Bizeau, Michael E; Pagliassotti, Michael J

    2004-03-01

    It appears that low amounts of fructose improve, whereas increased concentrations impair glucose tolerance and hepatic glucose metabolism. In this study, we compared directly the effects of low vs. high portal vein fructose concentrations on hepatic glucose metabolism in rats, using glucose-6-phosphatase gene expression as an endpoint. In the control group (C; n = 7), pancreatic clamps were performed using somatostatin and replacement of insulin such that basal glucose levels were maintained. In the experimental groups (n = 8/group), hyperglycemic, hyperinsulinemic pancreatic clamps were performed in which glucose (G) or glucose + fructose was infused into a jejunal vein. Fructose was infused to achieve either low (F1; <0.3 mmol/L) or high (F2; >1.0 mmol/L) portal vein concentrations. Total sugar load to the liver was equalized among the 3 experimental groups. Compared with C, liver glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit mRNA was reduced by approximately 55% in G and F1, whereas it was increased approximately 180% in F2. F2 did not differentially affect glucose-6-phosphate translocase or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase mRNA levels in liver, nor kidney glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit mRNA. Livers from the F2 group were characterized by an accumulation of pentose phosphate intermediates and reduced phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (active form). However, in separate studies (n = 5/group), the infusion of a glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitor did not prevent the effects of F2 on glucose-6-phosphatase gene expression. We hypothesize that elevated fructose concentrations, similar to levels achieved after ingestion of sucrose- or fructose-enriched meals, initiate signals within the liver that elicit selective changes in hepatic gene expression.

  9. Arabidopsis Brassinosteroid-Insensitive dwarf12 Mutants Are Semidominant and Defective in a Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β-Like Kinase1

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Sunghwa; Schmitz, Robert J.; Fujioka, Shozo; Takatsuto, Suguru; Lee, Mi-Ok; Yoshida, Shigeo; Feldmann, Kenneth A.; Tax, Frans E.

    2002-01-01

    Mutants defective in the biosynthesis or signaling of brassinosteroids (BRs), plant steroid hormones, display dwarfism. Loss-of-function mutants for the gene encoding the plasma membrane-located BR receptor BRI1 are resistant to exogenous application of BRs, and characterization of this protein has contributed significantly to the understanding of BR signaling. We have isolated two new BR-insensitive mutants (dwarf12-1D and dwf12-2D) after screening Arabidopsis ethyl methanesulfonate mutant populations. dwf12 mutants displayed the characteristic morphology of previously reported BR dwarfs including short stature, short round leaves, infertility, and abnormal de-etiolation. In addition, dwf12 mutants exhibited several unique phenotypes, including severe downward curling of the leaves. Genetic analysis indicates that the two mutations are semidominant in that heterozygous plants show a semidwarf phenotype whose height is intermediate between wild-type and homozygous mutant plants. Unlike BR biosynthetic mutants, dwf12 plants were not rescued by high doses of exogenously applied BRs. Like bri1 mutants, dwf12 plants accumulated castasterone and brassinolide, 43- and 15-fold higher, respectively, providing further evidence that DWF12 is a component of the BR signaling pathway that includes BRI1. Map-based cloning of the DWF12 gene revealed that DWF12 belongs to a member of the glycogen synthase kinase 3β family. Unlike human glycogen synthase kinase 3β, DWF12 lacks the conserved serine-9 residue in the auto-inhibitory N terminus. In addition, dwf12-1D and dwf12-2D encode changes in consecutive glutamate residues in a highly conserved TREE domain. Together with previous reports that both bin2 and ucu1 mutants contain mutations in this TREE domain, this provides evidence that the TREE domain is of critical importance for proper function of DWF12/BIN2/UCU1 in BR signal transduction pathways. PMID:12428015

  10. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition reduces muscle inflammation and necrosis in modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizza, F. X.; Hernandez, I. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of nitric oxide in muscle inflammation, fiber necrosis, and apoptosis of inflammatory cells in vivo. The effects of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition on the concentrations of neutrophils, ED1+ and ED2+ macrophages, apoptotic inflammatory cells, and necrotic muscle fibers in rats subjected to 10 days of hindlimb unloading and 2 days of reloading were determined. Administration of NOS inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) significantly reduced the concentrations of neutrophils, ED1+ and ED2+ macrophages, and necrotic fibers in soleus muscle relative to water-treated controls. The concentration of apoptotic inflammatory cells was also significantly lower for L-NAME-treated animals compared with water-treated controls. However, the proportion of the inflammatory cell population that was apoptotic did not differ between L-NAME-treated and control animals, suggesting that L-NAME treatment did not decrease inflammatory cell populations by increasing the frequency of apoptosis. Thus, nitric oxide or one of its intermediates promotes muscle inflammation and fiber necrosis during modified muscle use and plays no more than a minor role in the resolution of muscle inflammation by inducing apoptosis of inflammatory cells.

  11. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition reduces muscle inflammation and necrosis in modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pizza, F. X.; Hernandez, I. J.; Tidball, J. G.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of nitric oxide in muscle inflammation, fiber necrosis, and apoptosis of inflammatory cells in vivo. The effects of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition on the concentrations of neutrophils, ED1+ and ED2+ macrophages, apoptotic inflammatory cells, and necrotic muscle fibers in rats subjected to 10 days of hindlimb unloading and 2 days of reloading were determined. Administration of NOS inhibitor N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) significantly reduced the concentrations of neutrophils, ED1+ and ED2+ macrophages, and necrotic fibers in soleus muscle relative to water-treated controls. The concentration of apoptotic inflammatory cells was also significantly lower for L-NAME-treated animals compared with water-treated controls. However, the proportion of the inflammatory cell population that was apoptotic did not differ between L-NAME-treated and control animals, suggesting that L-NAME treatment did not decrease inflammatory cell populations by increasing the frequency of apoptosis. Thus, nitric oxide or one of its intermediates promotes muscle inflammation and fiber necrosis during modified muscle use and plays no more than a minor role in the resolution of muscle inflammation by inducing apoptosis of inflammatory cells.

  12. Menstrual cycle phase and sex influence muscle glycogen utilization and glucose turnover during moderate-intensity endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Devries, Michaela C; Hamadeh, Mazen J; Phillips, Stuart M; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2006-10-01

    Numerous studies from our and other laboratories have shown that women have a lower respiratory exchange ratio (RER) during exercise than equally trained men, indicating a greater reliance on fat oxidation. Differences in estrogen concentration between men and women likely play a role in this sex difference. Differing estrogen and progesterone concentrations during the follicular (FP) and luteal (LP) phases of the female menstrual cycle suggest that fuel use may also vary between phases. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effect of menstrual cycle phase and sex upon glucose turnover and muscle glycogen utilization during endurance exercise. Healthy, recreationally active young women (n = 13) and men (n = 11) underwent a primed constant infusion of [6,6-2H]glucose with muscle biopsies taken before and after a 90-min cycling bout at 65% peak O2 consumption. LP women had lower glucose rate of appearance (Ra, P = 0.03), rate of disappearance (Rd, P = 0.03), and metabolic clearance rate (MCR, P = 0.04) at 90 min of exercise and lower proglycogen (P = 0.04), macroglycogen (P = 0.04), and total glycogen (P = 0.02) utilization during exercise compared with FP women. Men had a higher RER (P = 0.02), glucose Ra (P = 0.03), Rd (P = 0.03), and MCR (P = 0.01) during exercise compared with FP women, and men had a higher RER at 75 and 90 min of exercise (P = 0.04), glucose Ra (P = 0.01), Rd (P = 0.01), and MCR (P = 0.001) and a greater PG utilization (P = 0.05) compared with LP women. We conclude that sex, and to a lesser extent menstrual cycle, influence glucose turnover and glycogen utilization during moderate-intensity endurance exercise.

  13. Ingestion of glucose or sucrose prevents liver but not muscle glycogen depletion during prolonged endurance-type exercise in trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Javier T; Fuchs, Cas J; Smith, Fiona E; Thelwall, Pete E; Taylor, Roy; Stevenson, Emma J; Trenell, Michael I; Cermak, Naomi M; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to define the effect of glucose ingestion compared with sucrose ingestion on liver and muscle glycogen depletion during prolonged endurance-type exercise. Fourteen cyclists completed two 3-h bouts of cycling at 50% of peak power output while ingesting either glucose or sucrose at a rate of 1.7 g/min (102 g/h). Four cyclists performed an additional third test for reference in which only water was consumed. We employed (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine liver and muscle glycogen concentrations before and after exercise. Expired breath was sampled during exercise to estimate whole body substrate use. After glucose and sucrose ingestion, liver glycogen levels did not show a significant decline after exercise (from 325 ± 168 to 345 ± 205 and 321 ± 177 to 348 ± 170 mmol/l, respectively; P > 0.05), with no differences between treatments. Muscle glycogen concentrations declined (from 101 ± 49 to 60 ± 34 and 114 ± 48 to 67 ± 34 mmol/l, respectively; P < 0.05), with no differences between treatments. Whole body carbohydrate utilization was greater with sucrose (2.03 ± 0.43 g/min) vs. glucose (1.66 ± 0.36 g/min; P < 0.05) ingestion. Both liver (from 454 ± 33 to 283 ± 82 mmol/l; P < 0.05) and muscle (from 111 ± 46 to 67 ± 31 mmol/l; P < 0.01) glycogen concentrations declined during exercise when only water was ingested. Both glucose and sucrose ingestion prevent liver glycogen depletion during prolonged endurance-type exercise. Sucrose ingestion does not preserve liver glycogen concentrations more than glucose ingestion. However, sucrose ingestion does increase whole body carbohydrate utilization compared with glucose ingestion. This trial was registered at https://www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02110836. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Insulin resistance after a 72-h fast is associated with impaired AS160 phosphorylation and accumulation of lipid and glycogen in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Vendelbo, M H; Clasen, B F F; Treebak, J T; Møller, L; Krusenstjerna-Hafstrøm, T; Madsen, M; Nielsen, T S; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, H; Pedersen, S B; Jørgensen, J O L; Goodyear, L J; Wojtaszewski, J F P; Møller, N; Jessen, N

    2012-01-15

    During fasting, human skeletal muscle depends on lipid oxidation for its energy substrate metabolism. This is associated with the development of insulin resistance and a subsequent reduction of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. The underlying mechanisms controlling insulin action on skeletal muscle under these conditions are unresolved. In a randomized design, we investigated eight healthy subjects after a 72-h fast compared with a 10-h overnight fast. Insulin action on skeletal muscle was assessed by a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and by determining insulin signaling to glucose transport. In addition, substrate oxidation, skeletal muscle lipid content, regulation of glycogen synthesis, and AMPK signaling were assessed. Skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity was reduced profoundly in response to a 72-h fast and substrate oxidation shifted to predominantly lipid oxidation. This was associated with accumulation of both lipid and glycogen in skeletal muscle. Intracellular insulin signaling to glucose transport was impaired by regulation of phosphorylation at specific sites on AS160 but not TBC1D1, both key regulators of glucose uptake. In contrast, fasting did not impact phosphorylation of AMPK or insulin regulation of Akt, both of which are established upstream kinases of AS160. These findings show that insulin resistance in muscles from healthy individuals is associated with suppression of site-specific phosphorylation of AS160, without Akt or AMPK being affected. This impairment of AS160 phosphorylation, in combination with glycogen accumulation and increased intramuscular lipid content, may provide the underlying mechanisms for resistance to insulin in skeletal muscle after a prolonged fast.

  15. Systemic correction of the muscle disorder glycogen storage disease type II after hepatic targeting of a modified adenovirus vector encoding human acid-α-glucosidase

    PubMed Central

    Amalfitano, A.; McVie-Wylie, A. J.; Hu, H.; Dawson, T. L.; Raben, N.; Plotz, P.; Chen, Y. T.

    1999-01-01

    This report demonstrates that a single intravenous administration of a gene therapy vector can potentially result in the correction of all affected muscles in a mouse model of a human genetic muscle disease. These results were achieved by capitalizing both on the positive attributes of modified adenovirus-based vectoring systems and receptor-mediated lysosomal targeting of enzymes. The muscle disease treated, glycogen storage disease type II, is a lysosomal storage disorder that manifests as a progressive myopathy, secondary to massive glycogen accumulations in the skeletal and/or cardiac muscles of affected individuals. We demonstrated that a single intravenous administration of a modified Ad vector encoding human acid α-glucosidase (GAA) resulted in efficient hepatic transduction and secretion of high levels of the precursor GAA proenzyme into the plasma of treated animals. Subsequently, systemic distribution and uptake of the proenzyme into the skeletal and cardiac muscles of the GAA-knockout mouse was confirmed. As a result, systemic decreases (and correction) of the glycogen accumulations in a variety of muscle tissues was demonstrated. This model can potentially be expanded to include the treatment of other lysosomal enzyme disorders. Lessons learned from systemic genetic therapy of muscle disorders also should have implications for other muscle diseases, such as the muscular dystrophies. PMID:10430861

  16. Effects of gestation and transition diets, piglet birth weight, and fasting time on depletion of glycogen pools in liver and 3 muscles of newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    Theil, P K; Cordero, G; Henckel, P; Puggaard, L; Oksbjerg, N; Sørensen, M T

    2011-06-01

    The experiment was conducted to assess the effects of maternal nutrition in late gestation on glycogen pools of newborn piglets of different birth weights and to assess how rapidly the glycogen pools in the liver and 3 muscles are mobilized during fasting. Until d 108 of gestation, 48 sows were fed a gestation standard diet (GSD) with low dietary fiber (DF, 17.1%), or 1 of 3 diets with high DF (32.3 to 40.4%) consisting of pectin residue (GPR), potato pulp (GPP), or sugar-beet pulp (GSP). From d 108 until farrowing, sows were fed 1 of 6 transition diets with low or high dietary fat: one group received a standard diet (TSD; control) containing 3% animal fat, another group received the TSD diet + 2.5 g/d of hydroxy-methyl butyrate as topdressing (THB), and 4 other groups received diets with 8% added fat from coconut oil (TCO), sunflower oil (TSO), fish oil (TFO), or 4% octanoic acid + 4% fish oil (TOA). Two piglets per litter (the second and fifth born) were blood sampled, and 1 was killed immediately after birth, whereas the other, depending on the litter, was killed after 12, 24, or 28.5 to 36 h (mean 32.5 h) of fasting. Samples of liver, LM, M. semimembranousus (SM), and M. diaphragm (DP) were collected and analyzed for glycogen concentration. No dietary effects (P > 0.20) on glycogen concentrations in liver, LM, SM, or DP were observed. The weight of the liver was affected by gestation diet (P < 0.05) and was greater in GSD and GSP piglets (36.7 and 36.3 g) than in GPR piglets (32.6 g), and intermediate (33.6 g) in GPP piglets. Liver weight, estimated muscle mass, and glycogen pools (P < 0.001) were affected by birth weight, whereas glycogen concentrations in liver and LM, SM, and DP muscles were not (P > 0.05). Liver weight; glycogen concentrations in liver, LM, SM, and DP; and glycogen pools in liver and muscles decreased (P < 0.001) with increasing duration of fasting, and at 32.5 h of fasting, glycogen concentration was reduced by 80% in liver, 64% in DP, 46

  17. Synthesis and evaluation of 8-amino-[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyridin-3(2H)-one derivatives as glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chun, Kwangwoo; Park, Ji-Seon; Lee, Han-Chang; Kim, Young-Ha; Ye, In-Hea; Kim, Kang-Jeon; Ku, Il-Whea; Noh, Min-Young; Cho, Goang-Won; Kim, Heejaung; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jeongmin

    2013-07-01

    New potent glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) inhibitors, 8-amino-[1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-a]pyridin-3(2H)-one derivatives, were designed by modeling, synthesized and evaluated in vitro. Compound 17c showed good potency in enzyme and cell-based assays (IC50=111 nM, EC50=1.78 μM). Moreover, it has demonstrated desirable water solubility, PK profile, and moderate brain penetration.

  18. Ingestion of a high-glycemic index meal increases muscle glycogen storage at rest but augments its utilization during subsequent exercise.

    PubMed

    Wee, Shiou-Liang; Williams, Clyde; Tsintzas, Kostas; Boobis, Leslie

    2005-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of preexercise breakfast containing high- and low-glycemic index (GI) carbohydrate (CHO) (2.5g CHO/kg body mass) on muscle glycogen metabolism. On two occasions, 14 days apart, seven trained men ran at 71% maximal oxygen uptake for 30 min on a treadmill. Three hours before exercise, in a randomized order, subjects consumed either isoenergetic high- (HGI) or low-GI (LGI) CHO breakfasts that provided (per 70 kg body mass) 3.43 MJ energy, 175 g CHO, 21 g protein, and 4 g fat. The incremental areas under the 3-h plasma glucose and serum insulin response curves after the HGI meal were 3.9- (P < 0.05) and 1.4-fold greater (P < 0.001), respectively, than those after the LGI meal. During the 3-h postprandial period, muscle glycogen concentration increased by 15% (P < 0.05) after the HGI meal but remained unchanged after the LGI meal. Muscle glycogen utilization during exercise was greater in the HGI (129.1 +/- 16.1 mmol/kg dry mass) compared with the LGI (87.9 +/- 15.1 mmol/kg dry mass; P < 0.01) trial. Although the LGI meal contributed less CHO to muscle glycogen synthesis in the 3-h postprandial period compared with the HGI meal, a sparing of muscle glycogen utilization during subsequent exercise was observed in the LGI trial, most likely as a result of better maintained fat oxidation.

  19. Protein kinase A negatively modulates the nuclear accumulation of NF-ATc1 by priming for subsequent phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase-3.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Colleen M; Heist, E Kevin; Beals, Chan R; Crabtree, Gerald R; Gardner, Phyllis

    2002-12-13

    The nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of the NF-ATc family of transcription factors, essential to many developmental, differentiation, and adaptation processes, are determined by the opposing activities of the phosphatase calcineurin, which promotes nuclear accumulation of NF-ATc, and several kinases, which promote cytoplasmic accumulation. Many reports suggest that protein kinase A (PKA) negatively modulates calcineurin-mediated NF-ATc activation. Here we show that overexpression of PKA causes phosphorylation and cytoplasmic accumulation of NF-ATc1 in direct opposition to calcineurin by phosphorylating Ser-245, Ser-269, and Ser-294 in the conserved serine-proline repeat domain, and that mutation of these serines blocks the effect of PKA. Activation of endogenous PKA is similarly able to promote phosphorylation of these sites on NF-ATc1 in two lymphoid cell lines. We further show that a complete block of NF-ATc1 nuclear localization by PKA requires a second kinase activity that can be supplied by glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), and that mutation of either the PKA phosphorylation sites or the upstream GSK-3 sites prevents the effect of PKA. Thus, we propose that PKA functions cooperatively as a priming kinase for further phosphorylation by GSK-3 to oppose calcineurin-mediated nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity of NF-ATc1 and that, through this mechanism, PKA may be an important modulator of many NF-ATc-dependent processes.

  20. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 regulates expression of nuclear factor-erythroid-2 related transcription factor-1 (Nrf1) and inhibits pro-survival function of Nrf1

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Madhurima; Kwong, Erick K.; Park, Eujean; Nagra, Parminder; Chan, Jefferson Y.

    2013-08-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor-1 (Nrf1) is a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that is known to regulate antioxidant and cytoprotective gene expression. It was recently shown that Nrf1 is regulated by SCF–Fbw7 ubiquitin ligase. However our knowledge of upstream signals that targets Nrf1 for degradation by the UPS is not known. We report here that Nrf1 expression is negatively regulated by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) in Fbw7-dependent manner. We show that GSK3 interacts with Nrf1 and phosphorylates the Cdc4 phosphodegron domain (CPD) in Nrf1. Mutation of serine residue in the CPD of Nrf1 to alanine (S350A), blocks Nrf1 from phosphorylation by GSK3, and stabilizes Nrf1. Knockdown of Nrf1 and expression of a constitutively active form of GSK3 results in increased apoptosis in neuronal cells in response to ER stress, while expression of the GSK3 phosphorylation resistant S350A–Nrf1 attenuates apoptotic cell death. Together these data suggest that GSK3 regulates Nrf1 expression and cell survival function in response to stress activation. Highlights: • The effect of GSK3 on Nrf1 expression was examined. • GSK3 destabilizes Nrf1 protein via Fbw7 ubiquitin ligase. • GSK3 binds and phosphorylates Nrf1. • Protection from stress-induced apoptosis by Nrf1 is inhibited by GSK3.

  1. Screening of inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3β from traditional Chinese medicines using enzyme-immobilized magnetic beads combined with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfang; Xu, Jia; Chen, Yu; Mei, Zhinan; Xiao, Yuxiu

    2015-12-18

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) was immobilized on magnetic beads (MBs) by affinity method for the first time. The enzyme-immobilized MBs were coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) technique to establish a cost-effective and reliable method for screening of inhibitors of GSK-3β. A peptide substrate of GSK-3β containing a tyrosine residue was employed since it can be sensitively detected by UV detector at 214nm. The substrate and its phosphorylated product were separated by baseline within 10min. The enzyme activity was determined by the quantification of peak area of the product. Parameters including enzyme immobilization, enzyme reaction and the performance of immobilized-enzyme were investigated. The immobilized enzyme can be reused for 10 times and remain stable for 4 days at 4°C. The inhibitory activities of extracts of 15 traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) were screened. As a result, three of them including Euonymus fortunei, Amygdalus communis and Garcinia xanthochymus were found possessing high inhibitory activities (inhibition rate >90%). From G. xanthochymus, a new inhibitor of GSK-3β, fukugetin, was discovered with an IC50 value of 3.18±0.07μM. Enzyme kinetics and molecular docking experiments further revealed the inhibitory mechanism, indicating fukugetin was a non-ATP competitive inhibitor interacting with the phosphate recognizing substrate binding site of GSK-3β.

  2. Protein Kinase A Opposes the Phosphorylation-dependent Recruitment of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β to A-kinase Anchoring Protein 220*

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Jennifer L.; Nygren, Patrick J.; Tunquist, Brian J.; Langeberg, Lorene K.; Seternes, Ole-Morten; Scott, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The proximity of an enzyme to its substrate can influence rate and magnitude of catalysis. A-kinase anchoring protein 220 (AKAP220) is a multivalent anchoring protein that can sequester a variety of signal transduction enzymes. These include protein kinase A (PKA) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Using a combination of molecular and cellular approaches we show that GSK3β phosphorylation of Thr-1132 on AKAP220 initiates recruitment of this kinase into the enzyme scaffold. We also find that AKAP220 anchors GSK3β and its substrate β-catenin in membrane ruffles. Interestingly, GSK3β can be released from the multienzyme complex in response to PKA phosphorylation on serine 9, which suppresses GSK3β activity. The signaling scaffold may enhance this regulatory mechanism, as AKAP220 has the capacity to anchor two PKA holoenzymes. Site 1 on AKAP220 (residues 610–623) preferentially interacts with RII, whereas site 2 (residues 1633–1646) exhibits a dual specificity for RI and RII. In vitro affinity measurements revealed that site 2 on AKAP220 binds RII with ∼10-fold higher affinity than site 1. Occupancy of both R subunit binding sites on AKAP220 could provide a mechanism to amplify local cAMP responses and enable cross-talk between PKA and GSK3β. PMID:26088133

  3. Trypanosoma brucei Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3, A Target for Anti-Trypanosomal Drug Development: A Public-Private Partnership to Identify Novel Leads

    PubMed Central

    Oduor, Richard O.; Ojo, Kayode K.; Williams, Gareth P.; Bertelli, Francois; Mills, James; Maes, Louis; Pryde, David C.; Parkinson, Tanya; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Holler, Tod P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), expresses two proteins with homology to human glycogen synthase kinase 3β (HsGSK-3) designated TbruGSK-3 short and TbruGSK-3 long. TbruGSK-3 short has previously been validated as a potential drug target and since this enzyme has also been pursued as a human drug target, a large number of inhibitors are available for screening against the parasite enzyme. A collaborative industrial/academic partnership facilitated by the World Health Organisation Tropical Diseases Research division (WHO TDR) was initiated to stimulate research aimed at identifying new drugs for treating HAT. Methodology/Principal Findings A subset of over 16,000 inhibitors of HsGSK-3 β from the Pfizer compound collection was screened against the shorter of two orthologues of TbruGSK-3. The resulting active compounds were tested for selectivity versus HsGSK-3β and a panel of human kinases, as well as in vitro anti-trypanosomal activity. Structural analysis of the human and trypanosomal enzymes was also performed. Conclusions/Significance We identified potent and selective compounds representing potential attractive starting points for a drug discovery program. Structural analysis of the human and trypanosomal enzymes also revealed hypotheses for further improving selectivity of the compounds. PMID:21483717

  4. Hyperinsulinemia enhances interleukin-17-induced inflammation to promote prostate cancer development in obese mice through inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of interleukin-17 receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sen; Zhang, Qiuyang; Chen, Chong; Ge, Dongxia; Qu, Yine; Chen, Rongyi; Fan, Yi-Ming; Li, Nan; Tang, Wendell W; Zhang, Wensheng; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Alun R; Rowan, Brian G; Hill, Steven M; Sartor, Oliver; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B; Myers, Leann; Lin, Qishan; You, Zongbing

    2016-03-22

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) plays important roles in inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and some cancers. Obese people are in a chronic inflammatory state with increased serum levels of IL-17, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). How these factors contribute to the chronic inflammatory status that promotes development of aggressive prostate cancer in obese men is largely unknown. We found that, in obese mice, hyperinsulinemia enhanced IL-17-induced expression of downstream proinflammatory genes with increased levels of IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA), resulting in development of more invasive prostate cancer. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) constitutively bound to and phosphorylated IL-17RA at T780, leading to ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of IL-17RA, thus inhibiting IL-17-mediated inflammation. IL-17RA phosphorylation was reduced, while the IL-17RA levels were increased in the proliferative human prostate cancer cells compared to the normal cells. Insulin and IGF1 enhanced IL-17-induced inflammatory responses through suppressing GSK3, which was shown in the cultured cell lines in vitro and obese mouse models of prostate cancer in vivo. These findings reveal a mechanism underlying the intensified inflammation in obesity and obesity-associated development of aggressive prostate cancer, suggesting that targeting GSK3 may be a potential therapeutic approach to suppress IL-17-mediated inflammation in the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer, particularly in obese men.

  5. Hyperinsulinemia enhances interleukin-17-induced inflammation to promote prostate cancer development in obese mice through inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of interleukin-17 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chong; Ge, Dongxia; Qu, Yine; Chen, Rongyi; Fan, Yi-Ming; Li, Nan; Tang, Wendell W.; Zhang, Wensheng; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Alun R.; Rowan, Brian G.; Hill, Steven M.; Sartor, Oliver; Abdel, Asim B.; Myers, Leann; Lin, Qishan; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) plays important roles in inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and some cancers. Obese people are in a chronic inflammatory state with increased serum levels of IL-17, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). How these factors contribute to the chronic inflammatory status that promotes development of aggressive prostate cancer in obese men is largely unknown. We found that, in obese mice, hyperinsulinemia enhanced IL-17-induced expression of downstream proinflammatory genes with increased levels of IL-17 receptor A (IL-17RA), resulting in development of more invasive prostate cancer. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) constitutively bound to and phosphorylated IL-17RA at T780, leading to ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of IL-17RA, thus inhibiting IL-17-mediated inflammation. IL-17RA phosphorylation was reduced, while the IL-17RA levels were increased in the proliferative human prostate cancer cells compared to the normal cells. Insulin and IGF1 enhanced IL-17-induced inflammatory responses through suppressing GSK3, which was shown in the cultured cell lines in vitro and obese mouse models of prostate cancer in vivo. These findings reveal a mechanism underlying the intensified inflammation in obesity and obesity-associated development of aggressive prostate cancer, suggesting that targeting GSK3 may be a potential therapeutic approach to suppress IL-17-mediated inflammation in the prevention and treatment of prostate cancer, particularly in obese men. PMID:26871944

  6. Fine-tuning of NFκB by Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β directs the fate of glomerular podocytes upon injury

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hui; Ge, Yan; Peng, Ai; Gong, Rujun

    2014-01-01

    NFκB is regulated by a myriad of signaling cascades including glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3β and plays a Janus role in podocyte injury. In vitro, lipopolysaccharide or adriamycin elicited podocyte injury and cytoskeletal disruption, associated with NFκB activation and induced expression of NFκB target molecules, including pro-survival Bcl-xL and podocytopathic mediators like MCP-1, cathepsin L and B7-1. Broad range inhibition of NFκB diminished the expression of all NFκB target genes, restored cytoskeleton integrity, but potentiated apoptosis. In contrast, blockade of GSK3β by lithium or TDZD-8, mitigated the expression of podocytopathic mediators, ameliorated podocyte injury, but barely affected Bcl-xL expression or sensitized apoptosis. Mechanistically, GSK3β was sufficient and essential for RelA/p65 phosphorylation specifically at serine 467, which specifies the expression of selective NFκB target molecules, including podocytopathic mediators, but not Bcl-xL. In vivo, lithium or TDZD-8 therapy improved podocyte injury and proteinuria in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide or adriamycin, concomitant with suppression of podocytopathic mediators but retained Bcl-xL in glomerulus. Broad range inhibition of NFκB conferred similar but much weakened antiproteinuric and podoprotective effects accompanied with a blunted glomerular expression of Bcl-xL and marked podocyte apoptosis. Thus, the GSK3β dictated fine-tuning of NFκB may serve as a novel therapeutic target for podocytopathy. PMID:25629551

  7. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK3β) Negatively Regulates PTTG1/Human Securin Protein Stability, and GSK3β Inactivation Correlates with Securin Accumulation in Breast Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Santos, Mar; Limón-Mortés, M. Cristina; Giráldez, Servando; Herrero-Ruiz, Joaquín; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel Á.; Tortolero, Maria; Romero, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    PTTG1, also known as securin, is an inactivating partner of separase, the major effector for chromosome segregation during mitosis. At the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, securin is targeted for proteasomal destruction by the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome, allowing activation of separase. In addition, securin is overexpressed in metastatic or genomically instable tumors, suggesting a relevant role for securin in tumor progression. Stability of securin is regulated by phosphorylation; some phosphorylated forms are degraded out of mitosis, by the action of the SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) complex. The kinases targeting securin for proteolysis have not been identified, and mechanistic insight into the cause of securin accumulation in human cancers is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) phosphorylates securin to promote its proteolysis via SCFβTrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase. Importantly, a strong correlation between securin accumulation and GSK3β inactivation was observed in breast cancer tissues, indicating that GSK3β inactivation may account for securin accumulation in breast cancers. PMID:21757741

  8. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta) negatively regulates PTTG1/human securin protein stability, and GSK3beta inactivation correlates with securin accumulation in breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Mora-Santos, Mar; Limón-Mortés, M Cristina; Giráldez, Servando; Herrero-Ruiz, Joaquín; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel Á; Tortolero, Maria; Romero, Francisco

    2011-08-26

    PTTG1, also known as securin, is an inactivating partner of separase, the major effector for chromosome segregation during mitosis. At the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, securin is targeted for proteasomal destruction by the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome, allowing activation of separase. In addition, securin is overexpressed in metastatic or genomically instable tumors, suggesting a relevant role for securin in tumor progression. Stability of securin is regulated by phosphorylation; some phosphorylated forms are degraded out of mitosis, by the action of the SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) complex. The kinases targeting securin for proteolysis have not been identified, and mechanistic insight into the cause of securin accumulation in human cancers is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) phosphorylates securin to promote its proteolysis via SCF(βTrCP) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Importantly, a strong correlation between securin accumulation and GSK3β inactivation was observed in breast cancer tissues, indicating that GSK3β inactivation may account for securin accumulation in breast cancers.

  9. N-(4-bromophenethyl) Caffeamide Inhibits Melanogenesis by Regulating AKT/Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Beta/Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor and Tyrosinase-related Protein 1/Tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Chen, Chien-Chia; Lin, Ping; You, Ya-Jhen; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Skin color is primarily produced by melanin, which is a crucial pigment that protects the skin from UV-induced damage and prevents carcinogenesis. However, accumulated melanin in the skin may cause hyperpigmentation and related disorders. Melanin synthesis comprises consecutive oxidative reactions, and tyrosinase is the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting process of melanogenesis. In this study, tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1) and TRP-2 contributed to melanin formation. N-(4-bromophenethyl) caffeamide ((E)-N-(4-bromophenethyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)acrylamide; K36H), a caffeic acid phenyl amide derivative, inhibited α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-induced melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity in B16F0 cells. In addition, K36H reduced the protein expression of the phospho-cAMP response element binding protein (p-CREB), microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase, and TRP-1. Moreover, K36H promoted AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting MITF transcription activity. Thus, K36H attenuated α-MSH-induced cAMP pathways, contributing to hypopigmentation. The results of a safety assay revealed that K36H did not exhibit cytotoxicity or irritate the skin or eyes. According to these results, K36H may have the potential to be used as a whitening agent in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

  10. Focal adhesion kinase-mediated activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β regulates IL-33 receptor internalization and IL-33 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Bowser, Rachel K; Traister, Russell S; Fan, Ming-Hui; Zhao, Yutong

    2015-01-15

    IL-33, a relatively new member of the IL-1 cytokine family, plays a crucial role in allergic inflammation and acute lung injury. Long form ST2 (ST2L), the receptor for IL-33, is expressed on immune effector cells and lung epithelia and plays a critical role in triggering inflammation. We have previously shown that ST2L stability is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system; however, its upstream internalization has not been studied. In this study, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) regulates ST2L internalization and IL-33 signaling. IL-33 treatment induced ST2L internalization, and an effect was attenuated by inhibition or downregulation of GSK3β. GSK3β was found to interact with ST2L on serine residue 446 in response to IL-33 treatment. GSK3β binding site mutant (ST2L(S446A)) and phosphorylation site mutant (ST2L(S442A)) are resistant to IL-33-induced ST2L internalization. We also found that IL-33 activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Inhibition of FAK impaired IL-33-induced GSK3β activation and ST2L internalization. Furthermore, inhibition of ST2L internalization enhanced IL-33-induced cytokine release in lung epithelial cells. These results suggest that modulation of the ST2L internalization by FAK/GSK3β might serve as a unique strategy to lessen pulmonary inflammation.

  11. Measurement of effector protein injection by type III and type IV secretion systems by using a 13-residue phosphorylatable glycogen synthase kinase tag.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Julie Torruellas; Ferracci, Franco; Jackson, Michael W; Joseph, Sabrina S; Pattis, Isabelle; Plano, Lisa R W; Fischer, Wolfgang; Plano, Gregory V

    2006-10-01

    Numerous bacterial pathogens use type III secretion systems (T3SSs) or T4SSs to inject or translocate virulence proteins into eukaryotic cells. Several different reporter systems have been developed to measure the translocation of these proteins. In this study, a peptide tag-based reporter system was developed and used to monitor the injection of T3S and T4S substrates. The glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) tag is a 13-residue phosphorylatable peptide tag derived from the human GSK-3beta kinase. Translocation of a GSK-tagged protein into a eukaryotic cell results in host cell protein kinase-dependent phosphorylation of the tag, which can be detected with phosphospecific GSK-3beta antibodies. A series of expression plasmids encoding Yop-GSK fusion proteins were constructed to evaluate the ability of the GSK tag to measure the injection of Yops by the Yersinia pestis T3SS. GSK-tagged YopE, YopH, LcrQ, YopK, YopN, and YopJ were efficiently phosphorylated when translocated into HeLa cells. Similarly, the injection of GSK-CagA by the Helicobacter pylori T4SS into different cell types was measured via phosphorylation of the GSK tag. The GSK tag provides a simple method to monitor the translocation of T3S and T4S substrates.

  12. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β positively regulates protein synthesis and cell proliferation through the regulation of translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Shin, S; Wolgamott, L; Tcherkezian, J; Vallabhapurapu, S; Yu, Y; Roux, P P; Yoon, S-O

    2014-03-27

    Protein synthesis has a key role in the control of cell proliferation, and its deregulation is associated with pathological conditions, notably cancer. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), was known to inhibit protein synthesis. However, it does not substantially inhibit protein synthesis and cell proliferation in many cancer types. We were interested in finding a novel target in rapamycin-resistant cancer. The rate-limiting factor for translation is eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), which is negatively regulated by eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). Here, we provide evidence that glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β promotes cell proliferation through positive regulation of protein synthesis. We found that GSK-3β phosphorylates and inactivates 4E-BP1, thereby increasing eIF4E-dependent protein synthesis. Considering the clinical relevance of pathways regulating protein synthesis, our study provides a promising new strategy and target for cancer therapy.

  13. Neuropilin 2 Signaling Is Involved in Cell Positioning of Adult-born Neurons through Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK3β).

    PubMed

    Ng, Teclise; Hor, Catherine H H; Chew, Benjamin; Zhao, Jing; Zhong, Zhong; Ryu, Jae Ryun; Goh, Eyleen L K

    2016-11-25

    Proper positioning of neurons is fundamental for brain functions. However, little is known on how adult-born neurons generated in the hilar side of hippocampal dentate gyrus migrate into the granular cell layer. Because class 3 Semaphorins (Sema3) are involved in dendritic growth of these newborn neurons, we examined whether they are essential for cell positioning. We disrupted Sema3 signaling by silencing neuropilin 1 (NRP1) or 2 (NRP2), the main receptors for Sema3A and Sema3F, in neural progenitors of adult mouse dentate gyrus. Silencing of NRP2, but not NRP1, affected cell positioning of adult newborn neurons. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) knockdown phenocopied this NRP2 silencing-mediated cell positioning defect, but did not affect dendritic growth. Furthermore, GSK3β is activated upon stimulation with Sema3F, and GSK3β overexpression rescued the cell positioning phenotypes seen in NRP2-deficient neurons. These results point to a new role for NRP2 in the positioning of neurons during adult hippocampal neurogenesis, acting via the GSK3β signaling pathway. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Selective deletion of forebrain glycogen synthase kinase 3β reveals a central role in serotonin-sensitive anxiety and social behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Latapy, Camille; Rioux, Véronique; Guitton, Matthieu J.; Beaulieu, Jean-Martin

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission is thought to underlie mental illnesses, such as bipolar disorder, depression, autism and schizophrenia. Independent studies have indicated that 5-HT or drugs acting on 5-HT neurotransmission regulate the serine/threonine kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β). Furthermore, GSK3β inhibition rescues behavioural abnormalities in 5-HT-deficient mice with a loss-of-function mutation equivalent to the human variant (R441H) of tryptophan hydroxylase 2. In an effort to define neuroanatomical correlates of GSK3β activity in the regulation of behaviour, we generated CamKIIcre-floxGSK3β mice in which the gsk3b gene is postnatally inactivated in forebrain pyramidal neurons. Behavioural characterization showed that suppression of GSK3β in these brain areas has anxiolytic and pro-social effects. However, while a global reduction of GSK2β expression reduced responsiveness to amphetamine and increased resilience to social defeat, these behavioural effects were not found in CamKIIcre-floxGSK3β mice. These findings demonstrate a dissociation of behavioural effects related to GSK3 inhibition, with forebrain GSK3β being involved in the regulation of anxiety and sociability while social preference, resilience and responsiveness to psychostimulants would involve a function of this kinase in subcortical areas such as the hippocampus and striatum. PMID:22826345

  15. Maintained activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} despite of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in okadaic acid-induced neurodegenerative model

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong-Whan; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Choi, Jung-Eun; Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Hui-Sun; Choe, Han; Lee, Seung-Chul; Kim, Dong-Hou

    2010-04-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK3{beta}) is recognized as one of major kinases to phosphorylate tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD), thus lots of AD drug discoveries target GSK3{beta}. However, the inactive form of GSK3{beta} which is phosphorylated at serine-9 is increased in AD brains. This is also inconsistent with phosphorylation status of other GSK3{beta} substrates, such as {beta}-catenin and collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) since their phosphorylation is all increased in AD brains. Thus, we addressed this paradoxical condition of AD in rat neurons treated with okadaic acid (OA) which inhibits protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A) and induces tau hyperphosphorylation and cell death. Interestingly, OA also induces phosphorylation of GSK3{beta} at serine-9 and other substrates including tau, {beta}-catenin and CRMP2 like in AD brains. In this context, we observed that GSK3{beta} inhibitors such as lithium chloride and 6-bromoindirubin-3'-monoxime (6-BIO) reversed those phosphorylation events and protected neurons. These data suggest that GSK3{beta} may still have its kinase activity despite increase of its phosphorylation at serine-9 in AD brains at least in PP2A-compromised conditions and that GSK3{beta} inhibitors could be a valuable drug candidate in AD.

  16. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β dictates podocyte motility and focal adhesion turnover by modulating paxillin activity: implications for the protective effect of low-dose lithium in podocytopathy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiwei; Ge, Yan; Liu, Zhihong; Gong, Rujun

    2014-10-01

    Aberrant focal adhesion turnover is centrally involved in podocyte actin cytoskeleton disorganization and foot process effacement. The structural and dynamic integrity of focal adhesions is orchestrated by multiple cell signaling molecules, including glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a multitasking kinase lately identified as a mediator of kidney injury. However, the role of GSK3β in podocytopathy remains obscure. In doxorubicin (Adriamycin)-injured podocytes, lithium, a GSK3β inhibitor and neuroprotective mood stabilizer, obliterated the accelerated focal adhesion turnover, rectified podocyte hypermotility, and restored actin cytoskeleton integrity. Mechanistically, lithium counteracted the doxorubicin-elicited GSK3β overactivity and the hyperphosphorylation and overactivation of paxillin, a focal adhesion-associated adaptor protein. Moreover, forced expression of a dominant negative kinase dead mutant of GSK3β highly mimicked, whereas ectopic expression of a constitutively active GSK3β mutant abolished, the effect of lithium in doxorubicin-injured podocytes, suggesting that the effect of lithium is mediated, at least in part, through inhibition of GSK3β. Furthermore, paxillin interacted with GSK3β and served as its substrate. In mice with doxorubicin nephropathy, a single low dose of lithium ameliorated proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis. Consistently, lithium therapy abrogated GSK3β overactivity, blunted paxillin hyperphosphorylation, and reinstated actin cytoskeleton integrity in glomeruli associated with an early attenuation of podocyte foot process effacement. Thus, GSK3β-modulated focal adhesion dynamics might serve as a novel therapeutic target for podocytopathy.

  17. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inactivation and stabilization of beta-catenin induce nephron differentiation in isolated mouse and rat kidney mesenchymes.

    PubMed

    Kuure, Satu; Popsueva, Anna; Jakobson, Madis; Sainio, Kirsi; Sariola, Hannu

    2007-04-01

    Wnt proteins are required for induction of nephrons in mouse metanephric kidneys, but the downstream pathways that mediate tubule induction and epithelial differentiation have remained obscure. The intracellular mechanisms by which Wnt signaling mediates nephron induction in embryonic kidney mesenchymes were studied. First is shown that transient exposure of isolated kidney mesenchymes to structurally different glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) inhibitors lithium or 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime results in abundant epithelial differentiation and full segregation of nephrons. Shown further by mice with genetically disrupted ureteric bud or Wolffian duct development is that this nephrogenic competence arises independent of the influence of Wolffian duct-derived epithelia. Analysis of the intracellular signaling cascades downstream of GSK3 inhibition revealed stabilization of beta-catenin and upregulation of Lef1 and Tcf1, both events that are associated with the active canonical Wnt signaling. Last, genetic evidence that metanephric mesenchyme-specific stabilization of beta-catenin is sufficient to induce nephron differentiation in isolated kidney mesenchymes, similar to that induced by GSK3 inhibitors, is provided. These data show that activation of canonical Wnt pathway is sufficient to induce nephrogenesis and suggest that this pathway mediates the nephron induction in murine kidney mesenchymes.

  18. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK-3β) as potent therapeutic strategy to ameliorates L-dopa-induced dyskinesia in 6-OHDA parkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Cheng-long; Lin, Jing-Ya; Wang, Mei-Hua; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Su-fang; Wang, Xi-Jin; Liu, Zhen-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Levodopa (L-dopa) is the dominating therapy drug for exogenous dopaminergic substitution and can alleviate most of the manifestations of Parkinson’s disease (PD), but long-term therapy is associated with the emergence of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). Evidence points towards an involvement of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK-3β) in development of LID. In the present study, we found that animals rendered dyskinetic by L-dopa treatment, administration of TDZD8 (2mg/kg) obviously prevented the severity of AIM score, as well as improvement in motor function (P < 0.05). Moreover, the TDZD8-induced reduction in dyskinetic behavior correlated with a reduction in molecular correlates of LID. TDZD8 reduced the phosphorylation levels of tau, DARPP32, ERK and PKA protein, which represent molecular markers of LID, as well as reduced L-dopa-induced FosB mRNA and PPEB mRNA levels in the lesioned striatum. In addition, we found that TDZD8 antidyskinetic properties were overcome by D1 receptor, as pretreatment with SKF38393 (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, reapectively), a D1 receptor agonist, blocked TDZD8 antidyskinetic actions. This study supported the hypothesis that GSK-3β played an important role in the development and expression of LID. Inhibition of GSK-3β with TDZD8 reduced the development of ALO AIM score and associated molecular changes in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. PMID:26997328

  19. Inhibition of hippocampal long-term potentiation by high-fat diets: is it related to an effect of palmitic acid involving glycogen synthase kinase-3?

    PubMed

    Contreras, Ana; Del Rio, Danila; Martínez, Ana; Gil, Carmen; Morales, Lidia; Ruiz-Gayo, Mariano; Del Olmo, Nuria

    2017-04-12

    High-fat diets (HFD) impair hippocampal-dependent learning and memory and produce important changes in synaptic transmission by enhancing glutamate uptake, decreasing synaptic efficacy, and inhibiting plasticity mechanisms such as N-methyl-D-aspartate-mediated long-term depression (LTD) within the hippocampus. Adolescent animals seem to be particularly susceptible to the detrimental effect of HFD as dietary treatments carried out between weaning and early adulthood are much more efficient in terms of hippocampal damage that those carried out during the adult period. As palmitic acid is the most abundant saturated fatty acid in HFD, its effect on hippocampal function needs to be studied. However, glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), a pleiotropic enzyme highly expressed in the central nervous system, modulates both hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and LTD, and has been implicated in neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we have characterized in mice hippocampus the effect of (i) a 48 h HFD intervention and (ii) in-vitro palmitic acid, as well as the possible involvement of GSK-3 in the above-mentioned plasticity mechanisms. Our results show that both 48 h HFD and palmitic acid inhibit LTP in hippocampal slices, whereas no effect on LTD was observed. Moreover, tideglusib, an ATP-noncompetitive inhibitor of GSK-3, induced hippocampal LTP and partially reversed the impairment of LTP induced by palmitic acid.

  20. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta regulates Snail and β-catenin expression during Fas-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haoxuan; Li, Wenjing; Wang, Yadong; Liu, Zhizhong; Cai, Yidong; Xie, Tingting; Shi, Meng; Wang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Fas signalling has been shown to induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to promote gastrointestinal (GI) cancer metastasis, but its mechanism of action is still unknown. The effects of Fas-ligand (FasL) treatment and inhibition of Fas signalling on GI cancer cells were tested using invasion assay, immunofluorescence, immunoblot, Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assay. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyse the EMT-associated molecules in GI cancer specimens. FasL treatment inhibited E-cadherin transcription by upregulation of Snail in GI cancer cells. The nuclear expression and transcriptional activity of Snail and β-catenin were increased by inhibitory phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) at Ser9 by FasL-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling. Snail associated with β-catenin in the nucleus and, thus, increased β-catenin transcriptional activity. Evaluation of human GI cancer specimens showed that the expression of FasL, phospho-GSK-3β, Snail and β-catenin increase during GI cancer progression. An EMT phenotype was shown to correlate with an advanced cancer stage, and a non-EMT phenotype significantly correlated with a better prognosis. Collectively, these data indicate that GSK-3β regulates Snail and β-catenin expression during Fas-induced EMT in gastrointestinal cancer.

  1. Effect of Imipramine, Paroxetine, and Lithium Carbonate on Neurobehavioral Changes of Streptozotocin in Rats: Impact on Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 and Blood Glucose Level.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Rania I; Ahmed, Hebatalla I; El-Denshary, Ezz-El-Din S

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a scrutinized association of diabetes mellitus with depressive symptoms and major depression. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a protein kinase enzyme constitutively active in non-stimulated cells and in multiple signalings. Independent lines of research provide a converging evidence for an involvement of GSK-3 in the regulation of behavior and hyperglycemia. The present study revealed that streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats were found to show lengthened duration of immobility in the forced-swimming test (FST) and reduced locomotor and exploratory activities in the open-field test (OFT). Imipramine (15 mg/kg), Paroxetine (10 mg/kg) and lithium carbonate (36.94 mg/kg) for 14 days reduced immobility behavior in FST. Paroxetine and lithium carbonate increased the locomotor and exploratory activities, while imipramine decreased the locomotor activity in the OFT. Imipramine and lithium carbonate reduced the blood glucose level while paroxetine didn't alter it. STZ-induced diabetes increased GSK-3 gene expression which was determined using the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction test, while the three drugs decreased its expression. It can be concluded that lithium carbonate and imipramine can control both hyperglycemia and the associated symptoms of depression at the same time by inhibiting GSK-3 activity. On the other hand, paroxetine may only manage the depressive-like symptoms associated with diabetes through modulating the enzyme GSK-3, without changing blood glucose levels.

  2. Valproic Acid Modifies Synaptic Structure and Accelerates Neurite Outgrowth Via the Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Signaling Pathway in an Alzheimer's Disease Model.

    PubMed

    Long, Zhi-Min; Zhao, Lei; Jiang, Rong; Wang, Ke-Jian; Luo, Shi-Fang; Zheng, Min; Li, Xiao-Feng; He, Gui-Qiong

    2015-11-01

    Tau hyperphosphorylation and amyloid β-peptide overproduction, caused by altered localization or abnormal activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), is a pathogenic mechanism in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Valproic acid (VPA) attenuates senile plaques and neuronal loss. Here, we confirmed that VPA treatment improved spatial memory in amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin 1 (PS 1) double-transgenic mice and investigated the effect of VPA on synaptic structure and neurite outgrowth. We used ultrastructural analysis, immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence staining, and Western blot analysis to assess the effect of VPA treatment in mice. VPA treatment thickened the postsynaptic density, increased the number of presynaptic vesicles, and upregulated the expression of synaptic markers PSD-95 and GAP43. VPA increased neurite length of hippocampal neurons in vivo and in vitro. In VPA-treated AD mouse brain, inactivated GSK-3β (pSer9-GSK-3β) was markedly increased, while hyperphosphorylation of tau at Ser396 and Ser262 was decreased; total tau levels remained similar. VPA treatment notably improved pSer133-cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels, which are associated with synaptic function and neurite outgrowth. VPA improves behavioral deficits in AD, modifies synaptic structure, and accelerates neurite outgrowth, by inhibiting the activity of GSK-3β, decreasing hyperphosphorylated tau, enhancing CREB and BDNF expression. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Expression pattern of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), p53, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase-3β in the striatum of rats treated with 3-nitropropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Duran-Vilaregut, Joaquim; Manich, Gemma; Del Valle, Jaume; Camins, Antoni; Pallàs, Mercè; Vilaplana, Jordi; Pelegrí, Carme

    2012-09-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NPA) is a mitochondrial toxin used in the laboratory to replicate neurodegenerative conditions that are accompanied by degeneration of the caudate-putamen. 3-NPA induces depletion in ATP production, reactive oxygen species production, and secondary excitotoxicity mediated by activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors that culminates in the triggering of cell death mechanisms, including apoptosis. We here examined by immunohistochemical methods whether cellular expression of phospho(Ser1981) -ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), phospho(Ser15) -p53, phospho(Ser473) -Akt, and phospho(Ser9) -glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), which are key signal molecules that play a critical role in regulating cellular processes related to cell survival and demise, were involved in the striatal neurodegeneration in the brains of rats treated with 3-NPA. Our results indicate that the toxin induced the activation of ATM and p53 only in astrocytes, and a role for these proteins in neuronal degeneration was ruled out. On the other hand, striatal neurons lost the active form of Akt as soon as they began to appear pyknotic, indicating impairment of the PI3K/Akt/GSK3 pathway in their degenerative process. The inactive form of GSK3β was detected extensively, mainly in the rim of the striatal lesions around degenerating neurons, which could be attributed to a cell death or cell survival response.

  4. Tanshinone I Enhances Neurogenesis in the Mouse Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus via Increasing Wnt-3, Phosphorylated Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β and β-Catenin Immunoreactivities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bai Hui; Park, Joon Ha; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Lee, Jae Chul; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun Jin; Shin, Bich Na; Kim, Jong-Dai; Kang, Il Jun; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Yun Lyul

    2016-08-01

    Tanshinone I (TsI), a lipophilic diterpene extracted from Danshan (Radix Salvia miltiorrhizae), exerts neuroprotection in cerebrovascular diseases including transient ischemic attack. In this study, we examined effects of TsI on cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the mouse dentate gyrus (DG) using Ki-67, BrdU and doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry. Mice were treated with 1 and 2 mg/kg TsI for 28 days. In the 1 mg/kg TsI-treated-group, distribution patterns of BrdU, Ki-67 and DCX positive ((+)) cells in the SGZ were similar to those in the vehicle-treated-group. However, in the 2 mg/kg TsI-treated-group, double labeled BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) cells, which are mature neurons, as well as Ki-67(+), DCX(+) and BrdU(+) cells were significantly increased compared with those in the vehicle-treated-group. On the other hand, immunoreactivities and protein levels of Wnt-3, β-catenin and serine-9-glycogen synthase kinase-3β (p-GSK-3β), which are related with morphogenesis, were significantly increased in the granule cell layer of the DG only in the 2 mg/kg TsI-treated-group. Therefore, these findings indicate that TsI can promote neurogenesis in the mouse DG and that the neurogenesis is related with increases of Wnt-3, p-GSK-3β and β-catenin immunoreactivities.

  5. Intracellular domains of amyloid precursor-like protein 2 interact with CP2 transcription factor in the nucleus and induce glycogen synthase kinase-3beta expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Kim, H-S; Joo, Y; Choi, Y; Chang, K-A; Park, C H; Shin, K-Y; Kim, S; Cheon, Y-H; Baik, T-K; Kim, J-H; Suh, Y-H

    2007-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is a member of a gene family that includes two APP-like proteins, APLP1 and 2. Recently, it has been reported that APLP1 and 2 undergo presenilin-dependent gamma-secretase cleavage, as does APP, resulting in the release of an approximately 6 kDa intracellular C-terminal domain (ICD), which can translocate into the nucleus. In this study, we demonstrate that the APLP2-ICDs interact with CP2/LSF/LBP1 (CP2) transcription factor in the nucleus and induce the expression of glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta), which has broad-ranged substrates such as tau- and beta-catenin. The significance of this finding is substantiated by the in vivo evidence of the increase in the immunoreactivities for the nuclear C-terminal fragments of APLP2, and for GSK-3beta in the AD patients' brain. Taken together, these results suggest that APLP2-ICDs contribute to the AD pathogenesis, by inducing GSK-3beta expression through the interaction with CP2 transcription factor in the nucleus.

  6. Protective Effects of Kaempferol against Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Isolated Rat Heart via Antioxidant Activity and Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mingjie; Ren, Huanhuan; Han, Jichun; Wang, Wenjuan; Zheng, Qiusheng; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of kaempferol against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rats. Method. Left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) and its maximum up/down rate (±dp/dtmax) were recorded as myocardial function. Infarct size was detected with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was determined using terminal deoxynucleotidyl nick-end labeling (TUNEL). The levels of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) ratio, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were determined using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Moreover, total glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), phospho-GSK-3β (P-GSK-3β), precaspase-3, cleaved caspase-3, and cytoplasm cytochrome C were assayed using Western blot analysis. Results. Pretreatment with kaempferol significantly improved the recovery of LVDP and ±dp/dtmax, as well as increased the levels of SOD and P-GSK-3β and GSH/GSSG ratio. However, the pretreatment reduced myocardial infarct size and TUNEL-positive cell rate, as well as decreased the levels of cleaved caspase-3, cytoplasm cytochrome C, CK, LDH, MDA, and TNF-α. Conclusion. These results suggested that kaempferol provides cardioprotection via antioxidant activity and inhibition of GSK-3β activity in rats with I/R. PMID:26265983

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β facilitates cell apoptosis induced by high fluence low-power laser irradiation through acceleration of Bax translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Wu, Shengnan; Xing, Da

    2011-03-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is a critical activator of cell apoptosis induced by a diverse array of insults. However, the effects of GSK-3β on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell (ASTC-a-1) apoptosis induced by high fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) are not clear. Here, we showed that GSK-3β was constantly translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus and activated during HF-LPLI-induced cell apoptosis. In addition, we found that co-overexpression of YFP-GSK-3β and CFP-Bax in ASTC-a-1 cells accelerated both Bax translocations to mitochondria and cell apoptosis, compared to the cells expressed CFP-Bax only under HF-LPLI treatment, indicating that GSK-3β facilitated ASTC-a-1 cells apoptosis through acceleration mitochondrial translocation of Bax. Our results demonstrate that GSK-3β exerts some of its pro-apoptotic effects in ASTC-a-1 cells by regulating the mitochondrial localization of Bax, a key component of the intrinsic apoptotic cascade.

  8. Nimbolide, a neem limonoid inhibits Phosphatidyl Inositol-3 Kinase to activate Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β in a hamster model of oral oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sophia, Josephraj; Kiran Kishore T., Kranthi; Kowshik, Jaganathan; Mishra, Rajakishore; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a serine/threonine kinase is frequently inactivated by the oncogenic signalling kinases PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK in diverse malignancies. The present study was designed to investigate GSK-3β signalling circuits in the 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis model and the therapeutic potential of the neem limonoid nimbolide. Inactivation of GSK-3β by phosphorylation at serine 9 and activation of PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK and β-catenin was associated with increased cell proliferation and apoptosis evasion during stepwise evolution of HBP carcinomas. Administration of nimbolide inhibited PI3K/Akt signalling with consequent activation of GSK-3β thereby inducing trafficking of β-catenin away from the nucleus and enhancing the expression of miR-126 and let-7. Molecular docking studies confirmed interaction of nimbolide with PI3K, Akt, ERK and GSK-3β. Furthermore, nimbolide attenuated cell proliferation and induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased p-cyclin D1Thr286 and pro-apoptotic proteins. The present study has unravelled aberrant phosphorylation as a key determinant for oncogenic signalling and acquisition of cancer hallmarks in the HBP model. The study has also provided mechanistic insights into the chemotherapeutic potential of nimbolide that may be a useful addition to the armamentarium of natural compounds targeting PI3K for oral cancer treatment. PMID:26902162

  9. Adjunctive β2-agonist treatment reduces glycogen independently of receptor-mediated acid α-glucosidase uptake in the limb muscles of mice with Pompe disease

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Benjamin L.; Madden, Lauran; Li, Songtao; Nance, Sierra; Bird, Andrew; Bursac, Nenad; Yen, Paul M.; Young, Sarah P.; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme or gene replacement therapy with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) has achieved only partial efficacy in Pompe disease. We evaluated the effect of adjunctive clenbuterol treatment on cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR)-mediated uptake and intracellular trafficking of GAA during muscle-specific GAA expression with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in GAA-knockout (KO) mice. Clenbuterol, which increases expression of CI-MPR in muscle, was administered with the AAV vector. This combination therapy increased latency during rotarod and wirehang testing at 12 wk, in comparison with vector alone. The mean urinary glucose tetrasaccharide (Glc4), a urinary biomarker, was lower in GAA-KO mice following combination therapy, compared with vector alone. Similarly, glycogen content was lower in cardiac and skeletal muscle following 12 wk of combination therapy in heart, quadriceps, diaphragm, and soleus, compared with vector alone. These data suggested that clenbuterol treatment enhanced trafficking of GAA to lysosomes, given that GAA was expressed within myofibers. The integral role of CI-MPR was demonstrated by the lack of effectiveness from clenbuterol in GAA-KO mice that lacked CI-MPR in muscle, where it failed to reverse the high glycogen content of the heart and diaphragm or impaired wirehang performance. However, the glycogen content of skeletal muscle was reduced by the addition of clenbuterol in the absence of CI-MPR, as was lysosomal vacuolation, which correlated with increased AKT signaling. In summary, β2-agonist treatment enhanced CI-MPR-mediated uptake and trafficking of GAA in mice with Pompe disease, and a similarly enhanced benefit might be expected in other lysosomal storage disorders.—Farah, B. L., Madden, L., Li, S., Nance, S., Bird, A., Bursac, N., Yen, P. M., Young, S. P., Koeberl, D. D. Adjunctive β2-agonist treatment reduces glycogen independently of receptor-mediated acid α-glucosidase uptake in the limb muscles of mice with

  10. Dysregulation of multiple facets of glycogen metabolism in a murine model of Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kristin M; Meyers, Elizabeth; Phipps, Michael; Kishnani, Priya S; Cheng, Seng H; Scheule, Ronald K; Moreland, Rodney J

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease, also known as glycogen storage disease (GSD) type II, is caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase (GAA). The resulting glycogen accumulation causes a spectrum of disease severity ranging from a rapidly progressive course that is typically fatal by 1 to 2 years of age to a slower progressive course that causes significant morbidity and early mortality in children and adults. The aim of this study is to better understand the biochemical consequences of glycogen accumulation in the Pompe mouse. We evaluated glycogen metabolism in heart, triceps, quadriceps, and liver from wild type and several strains of GAA(-/-) mice. Unexpectedly, we observed that lysosomal glycogen storage correlated with a robust increase in factors that normally promote glycogen biosynthesis. The GAA(-/-) mouse strains were found to have elevated glycogen synthase (GS), glycogenin, hexokinase, and glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P, the allosteric activator of GS). Treating GAA(-/-) mice with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA) led to a dramatic reduction in the levels of glycogen, GS, glycogenin, and G-6-P. Lysosomal glycogen storage also correlated with a dysregulation of phosphorylase, which normally breaks down cytoplasmic glycogen. Analysis of phosphorylase activity confirmed a previous report that, although phosphorylase protein levels are identical in muscle lysates from wild type and GAA(-/-) mice, phosphorylase activity is suppressed in the GAA(-/-) mice in the absence of AMP. This reduction in phosphorylase activity likely exacerbates lysosomal glycogen accumulation. If the dysregulation in glycogen metabolism observed in the mouse model of Pompe disease also occurs in Pompe patients, it may contribute to the observed broad spectrum of disease severity.

  11. Dysregulation of Multiple Facets of Glycogen Metabolism in a Murine Model of Pompe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kristin M.; Meyers, Elizabeth; Phipps, Michael; Kishnani, Priya S.; Cheng, Seng H.; Scheule, Ronald K.; Moreland, Rodney J.

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease, also known as glycogen storage disease (GSD) type II, is caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase (GAA). The resulting glycogen accumulation causes a spectrum of disease severity ranging from a rapidly progressive course that is typically fatal by 1 to 2 years of age to a slower progressive course that causes significant morbidity and early mortality in children and adults. The aim of this study is to better understand the biochemical consequences of glycogen accumulation in the Pompe mouse. We evaluated glycogen metabolism in heart, triceps, quadriceps, and liver from wild type and several strains of GAA−/− mice. Unexpectedly, we observed that lysosomal glycogen storage correlated with a robust increase in factors that normally promote glycogen biosynthesis. The GAA−/− mouse strains were found to have elevated glycogen synthase (GS), glycogenin, hexokinase, and glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P, the allosteric activator of GS). Treating GAA−/− mice with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA) led to a dramatic reduction in the levels of glycogen, GS, glycogenin, and G-6-P. Lysosomal glycogen storage also correlated with a dysregulation of phosphorylase, which normally breaks down cytoplasmic glycogen. Analysis of phosphorylase activity confirmed a previous report that, although phosphorylase protein levels are identical in muscle lysates from wild type and GAA−/− mice, phosphorylase activity is suppressed in the GAA−/− mice in the absence of AMP. This reduction in phosphorylase activity likely exacerbates lysosomal glycogen accumulation. If the dysregulation in glycogen metabolism observed in the mouse model of Pompe disease also occurs in Pompe patients, it may contribute to the observed broad spectrum of disease severity. PMID:23457523

  12. Glycogen Phosphorylation and Lafora disease

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Covalent phosphorylation of glycogen, first described 35 years ago, was put on firm ground through the work of the Whelan laboratory in the 1990s. But glycogen phosphorylation lay fallow until interest was rekindled in the mid 2000s by the finding that it could be removed by a glycogen-binding phosphatase, laforin, and that mutations in laforin cause a fatal teenage-onset epilepsy, called Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylation is due to phosphomonoesters at C2, C3 and C6 of glucose residues. Phosphate is rare, ranging from 1:500 - 1:5000 phosphates/glucose depending on the glycogen source. The mechanisms of glycogen phosphorylation remain under investigation but one hypothesis to explain C2 and perhaps C3 phosphate is that it results from a rare side reaction of the normal synthetic enzyme glycogen synthase. Lafora disease is likely caused by over-accumulation of abnormal glycogen in insoluble deposits termed Lafora bodies in neurons. The abnormality in the glycogen correlates with elevated phosphorylation (at C2, C3 and C6), reduced branching, insolubility and an enhanced tendency to aggregate and become insoluble. Hyperphosphorylation of glycogen is emerging as an important feature of this deadly childhood disease PMID:26278984

  13. Preexercise carbohydrate ingestion, glucose kinetics, and muscle glycogen use: effect of the glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Febbraio, M A; Keenan, J; Angus, D J; Campbell, S E; Garnham, A P

    2000-11-01

    Eight trained men cycled at 70% peak oxygen uptake for 120 min followed by a 30-min performance cycle after ingesting either a high-glycemic index (HGI), low-glycemic index (LGI), or placebo (Con) meal 30 min before exercise. Ingestion of HGI resulted in an elevated (P<0.01) blood glucose concentration compared with LGI and Con. At the onset of exercise, blood glucose fell (P<0.05) such that it was lower (P<0.05) in HGI compared with LGI and Con at 15 and 30 min during exercise. Plasma insulin concentration was higher (P<0.01) throughout the rest period after ingestion of HGI compared with LGI and Con. Plasma free fatty acid concentrations were lower (P<0.05) throughout exercise in HGI compared with LGI and Con. The rates of [6,6-(2)H]glucose appearance and disappearance were higher (P<0.05) at rest after ingestion and throughout exercise in HGI compared with LGI and Con. Carbohydrate oxidation was higher (P<0.05) throughout exercise, whereas glycogen use tended (P = 0.07) to be higher in HGI compared with LGI and Con. No differences were observed in work output during the performance cycle when comparing the three trials. These results demonstrate that preexercise carbohydrate feeding with a HGI, but not a LGI, meal augments carbohydrate utilization during exercise but does not effect exercise performance.

  14. Functional muscle ischemia in neuronal nitric oxide synthase-deficient skeletal muscle of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Mikael; Chavoshan, Bahman; Harris, Shannon A.; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Stull, James T.; Thomas, Gail D.; Victor, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease caused by mutation of the gene encoding the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. Despite a wealth of recent information about the molecular basis of DMD, effective treatment for this disease does not exist because the mechanism by which dystrophin deficiency produces the clinical phenotype is unknown. In both mouse and human skeletal muscle, dystrophin deficiency results in loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, which normally is localized to the sarcolemma as part of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex. Recent studies in mice suggest that skeletal muscle-derived nitric oxide may play a key role in the regulation of blood flow within exercising skeletal muscle by blunting the vasoconstrictor response to α-adrenergic receptor activation. Here we report that this protective mechanism is defective in children with DMD, because the vasoconstrictor response (measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation) to reflex sympathetic activation was not blunted during exercise of the dystrophic muscles. In contrast, this protective mechanism is intact in healthy children and those with polymyositis or limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, muscle diseases that do not result in loss of neuronal nitric oxide synthase. This clinical investigation suggests that unopposed sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising human skeletal muscle may constitute a heretofore unappreciated vascular mechanism contributing to the pathogenesis of DMD. PMID:11087833

  15. Increased Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β and Hexose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Expression in Adipose Tissue May Contribute to Glucocorticoid-Induced Mouse Visceral Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chaoying; Yang, Huabing; Wang, Ying; Dong, Yunzhou; Yu, Fei; Wu, Yong; Wang, Wei; Ume, Adaku; Lutfy, Kabirullah; Friedman, Theodore C.; Tian, Shiliu; Liu, Yanjun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Increased adiposity in visceral depots is a crucial feature associated with glucocorticoid (GC) excess. The action of GCs in target tissue is regulated by GC receptor (GR) and 11ß-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11ß-HSD1) coupled with hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6pdh). Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is known to be a crucial mediator of ligand-dependent gene transcription. We hypothesized that the major effects of corticosteroids on adipose fat accumulation are in part medicated by changes in GSK3β and H6pdh. METHODS We characterized the alterations of GSK3β and GC metabolic enzymes, and determined the impact of GR antagonist mifepristone on obesity-related genes and the expression of H6pdh and 11ß-HSD1 in adipose tissue of mice exposed to excess GC as well as in in vitro studies using 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with GCs. RESULTS Corticosterone (CORT) exposure increased abdominal fat mass and induced expression of lipid synthase ACC and ACL with activation of GSK3β phosphorylation in abdominal adipose tissue of C57BL/6J mice. Increased pSer9 GSK3β was correlated with induction of H6pdh and 11ß-HSD1. Additionally, mifepristone treatment reversed the production of H6pdh and attenuated CORT-mediated production of 11ß-HSD1 and lipogenic gene expression with reduction of pSer9 GSK3β, thereby leading to improvement of phenotype of adiposity within adipose tissue in mice treated with excess GCs. Suppression of pSer9 GSK3β by mifepristone was accompanied by activation of pThr308 Akt and blockade of CORT-induced adipogenic transcriptor C/EBPα and PPARγ. In addition, mifepristone also attenuated CORT-mediated activation of IRE1α/XBP1. Additionally, reduction of H6pdh by shRNA showed comparable effects to mifepristone on attenuating CORT-induced expression of GC metabolic enzymes and improved lipid accumulation in vitro in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. CONCLUSION These findings suggest that elevated adipose GSK3β and H6pdh expression contribute

  16. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 and Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Pathways Contribute to DNA Synthesis, Cell Cycle Progression, and Proliferation in Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Remedi, Maria S.; Pappan, Kirk L.; Kwon, Guim; Rohatgi, Nidhi; Marshall, Connie A.; McDaniel, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Our previous studies demonstrated that nutrient regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling promotes regenerative processes in rodent islets but rarely in human islets. Our objective was to extend these findings by using therapeutic agents to determine whether the regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3)/β-catenin and mTOR signaling represent key components necessary for effecting a positive impact on human β-cell mass relevant to type 1 and 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Primary adult human and rat islets were treated with the GSK-3 inhibitors, LiCl and the highly potent 1-azakenpaullone (1-Akp), and with nutrients. DNA synthesis, cell cycle progression, and proliferation of β-cells were assessed. Measurement of insulin secretion and content and Western blot analysis of GSK-3 and mTOR signaling components were performed. RESULTS—Human islets treated for 4 days with LiCl or 1-Akp exhibited significant increases in DNA synthesis, cell cycle progression, and proliferation of β-cells that displayed varying degrees of sensitivity to rapamycin. Intermediate glucose (8 mmol/l) produced a striking degree of synergism in combination with GSK-3 inhibition to enhance bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and Ki-67 expression in human β-cells. Nuclear translocation of β-catenin responsible for cell proliferation was found to be particularly sensitive to rapamycin. CONCLUSIONS—A combination of GSK-3 inhibition and nutrient activation of mTOR contributes to enhanced DNA synthesis, cell cycle progression, and proliferation of human β-cells. Identification of therapeutic agents that appropriately regulate GSK-3 and mTOR signaling may provide a feasible and available approach to enhance human islet growth and proliferation. PMID:19073772

  17. Temozolomide downregulates P-glycoprotein expression in glioblastoma stem cells by interfering with the Wnt3a/glycogen synthase-3 kinase/β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Riganti, Chiara; Salaroglio, Iris Chiara; Caldera, Valentina; Campia, Ivana; Kopecka, Joanna; Mellai, Marta; Annovazzi, Laura; Bosia, Amalia; Ghigo, Dario; Schiffer, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme stem cells display a highly chemoresistant phenotype, whose molecular basis is poorly known. We aim to clarify this issue and to investigate the effects of temozolomide on chemoresistant stem cells. Methods A panel of human glioblastoma cultures, grown as stem cells (neurospheres) and adherent cells, was used. Results Neurospheres had a multidrug resistant phenotype compared with adherent cells. Such chemoresistance was overcome by apparently noncytotoxic doses of temozolomide, which chemosensitized glioblastoma cells to doxorubicin, vinblastine, and etoposide. This effect was selective for P-glycoprotein (Pgp) substrates and for stem cells, leading to an investigation of whether there was a correlation between the expression of Pgp and the activity of typical stemness pathways. We found that Wnt3a and ABCB1, which encodes for Pgp, were both highly expressed in glioblastoma stem cells and reduced by temozolomide. Temozolomide-treated cells had increased methylation of the cytosine–phosphate–guanine islands in the Wnt3a gene promoter, decreased expression of Wnt3a, disrupted glycogen synthase-3 kinase/β-catenin axis, reduced transcriptional activation of ABCB1, and a lower amount and activity of Pgp. Wnt3a overexpression was sufficient to transform adherent cells into neurospheres and to simultaneously increase proliferation and ABCB1 expression. On the contrary, glioblastoma stem cells silenced for Wnt3a lost the ability to form neurospheres and reduced at the same time the proliferation rate and ABCB1 levels. Conclusions Our work suggests that Wnt3a is an autocrine mediator of stemness, proliferation, and chemoresistance in human glioblastoma and that temozolomide may chemosensitize the stem cell population by downregulating Wnt3a signaling. PMID:23897632

  18. Identification of an N-terminal glycogen synthase kinase 3 phosphorylation site which regulates the functional localisation of polycystin-2 in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Streets, Andrew J; Moon, David J; Kane, Michelle E; Obara, Tomoko; Ong, Albert CM

    2008-01-01

    PKD2 is mutated in 15% of patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Polycystin-2 (PC2), the PKD2 protein, is a nonselective Ca2+-permeable cation channel which may function at the cell surface and ER. Nevertheless, the factors that regulate the dynamic translocation of PC2 between the ER and other compartments are not well understood. Constitutive phosphorylation of PC2 at a single C-terminal site (Ser812) has been previously reported. Since we were unable to abolish phospholabelling of PC2 in HEK293 cells by site-directed mutagenesis of Ser812 or all 5 predicted phosphorylation sites in the C-terminus, we hypothesised that PC2 could also be phosphorylated at the N-terminus. In this paper, we report the identification of a new phosphorylation site for PC2 within its N-terminal domain (Ser76) and demonstrate that this residue is phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3). The consensus recognition sequence for GSK-3 (Ser76/Ser80) is evolutionarily conserved down to lower vertebrates. In the presence of specific GSK-3 inhibitors, the lateral plasma membrane pool of endogenous PC2 redistributes into an intracellular compartment in MDCK cells without a change in primary cilia localization. Finally, co-injection of wild-type but not a S76A/S80A mutant PKD2 capped mRNA could rescue the cystic phenotype induced by an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide to pkd2 in zebrafish pronephric kidney. We conclude that surface localization of PC2 is regulated by phosphorylation at a unique GSK-3 site in its N-terminal domain in vivo and in vitro. This site is functionally significant for the maintenance of normal glomerular and tubular morphology. PMID:16551655

  19. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Is Involved in Ligand-Dependent Activation of Transcription and Cellular Localization of the Glucocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Patiño, Camila; Palmeri, Claudia M.; Pérez-Perarnau, Alba; Cosialls, Ana M.; Moncunill-Massaguer, Cristina; González-Gironès, Diana M.; Pons-Hernández, Lluís; López, José M.; Ventura, Francesc; Gil, Joan; Iglesias-Serret, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in different cell types and therefore are widely used to treat a variety of diseases including autoimmune disorders and cancer. This effect is mediated by the GC receptor (GR), a ligand-activated transcription factor that translocates into the nucleus where it modulates transcription of target genes in a promoter-specific manner. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) regulates GR response by genomic and nongenomic mechanisms, although the specific role of each isoform is not well defined. We used GSK3 pharmacological inhibitors and isoform-specific small interfering RNA to evaluate the role of GSK3 in the genomic regulation induced by GC. GSK3 inhibition resulted in the reduction of GC-induced mRNA expression of GC-induced genes such as BIM, HIAP1, and GILZ. Knockdown of GSK3β but not GSK3α reduced endogenous GILZ induction in response to dexamethasone and GR-dependent reporter gene activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that GSK3 inhibition impaired the dexamethasone-mediated binding of GR and RNA polymerase II to endogenous GILZ promoter. These results indicate that GSK3β is important for GR transactivation activity and that GSK3β inhibition suppresses GC-stimulated gene expression. Furthermore, we show that genomic regulation by the GR is independent of known GSK3β phosphorylation sites. We propose that GC-dependent transcriptional activation requires functional GSK3β signaling and that altered GSK3β activity influences cell response to GC. PMID:22771494

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of [11C]PyrATP-1, a novel radiotracer for PET imaging of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β)

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Erin L.; Shao, Xia; Sherman, Phillip; Quesada, Carole; Fawaz, Maria V.; Desmond, Timothy J.; Scott, Peter J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The dysfunction of glycogen synthase kinase-3β(GSK-3β) has been implicated in a number of diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease. The ability to non-invasively quantify GSK-3βactivity in vivo is therefore of critical importance, and this work is focused upon development of inhibitors of GSK-3βradiolabeled with carbon-11 to examine quantification of the enzyme using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Methods [11C]PyrATP-1 was prepared from the corresponding desmethyl-piperazine precursor in an automated synthesis module. In vivo rodent and primate imaging studies were conducted on a Concorde MicroPET P4 scanner to evaluate imaging properties, and in vitro autoradiography studies with rat brain samples were carried out to examine specific binding. Results 2035 ± 518 MBq (55 ± 14 mCi) of [11C]PyrATP-1 were obtained (1–2% noncorrected radiochemical yield at end-of-synthesis based upon [11C]CO2) with high chemical (>95%) and radiochemical (>99%) purities, and good specific activities (143 ± 52 GBq/µmol (3874 ± 1424 Ci/mmol)), n = 5. In vivo microPET imaging studies revealed poor brain uptake in rodents and non-human primates. Pretreatment of rodents with cyclosporin A resulted in moderately increased brain uptake suggesting Pgp transporter involvement. Autoradiography demonstrated high levels of specific binding in areas of the rodent brain known to be rich in GSK-3β. Conclusion [11C]PyrATP-1 is readily synthesized using standard carbon-11 radiochemistry. However, the poor brain uptake in rodents and non-human primates indicates that the radiotracer is not suitable for the purposes of quantifying GSK-3βin neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:24768148

  1. Inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3 and transforming growth factor-β signaling to promote epithelial transition of human adipose mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Setiawan, Melina; Tan, Xiao-Wei; Goh, Tze-Wei; Hin-Fai Yam, Gary; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2017-09-02

    This study was aimed to investigate the epithelial differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) by inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) and transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling. STEMPRO human ADSCs at passage 2 were treated with CHIR99021 (GSK3 inhibitor), E-616452 (TGFβ1 receptor kinase inhibitor), A-83-01 (TGFβ type 1 receptor inhibitor), valproic acid (histone deacetylase inhibitor), tranylcypromine (monoamine oxidase inhibitor) and all-trans retinoic acid for 72 h. The mesenchymal-epithelial transition was shown by down-regulation of mesenchymal genes (Slug, Zinc Finger E-box Binding Homeobox 1 ZEB1, integrin α5 ITGA5 and vimentin VIM) and up-regulation of epithelial genes (E-cadherin, Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule EpCAM, Zonula Occludens-1 ZO-1, occludin, deltaN p63 δNp63, Transcription Factor 4 TCF4 and Twist Family bHLH Transcription Factor TWIST), compared to untreated ADSCs. Cell morphology and stress fiber pattern were examined and the treated cells became less migratory in scratch wound closure assay. The formation of cell junction complexes was observed under transmission electron microscopy. Global gene expression using GeneChip(®) Human Genome U133 Array (Affymetrix) showed that the treatment up-regulated 540 genes (containing genes for cell cycle, cytoskeleton reorganization, chemotaxis, epithelium development and regulation of cell migration) and down-regulated 483 genes. Human ADSCs were transited to epithelial lineage by inhibiting GSK3 and TGFβ signaling. It can be an adult stem cell source for epithelial cell-based therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-activated glycogen synthase kinase 3β aggravates liver inflammation and hepatotoxicity in mice with acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Ren, Feng; Zhou, Li; Zhang, Xiangying; Wen, Tao; Shi, Hongbo; Xie, Bangxiang; Li, Zhuo; Chen, Dexi; Wang, Zheling; Duan, Zhongping

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) has been increasingly recognized as an important mechanism in various liver diseases. However, its intrinsic physiological role in acute liver failure (ALF) remains largely undetermined. This study aimed to examine how ER stress orchestrates glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and inflammation to affect ALF. In a murine ALF model induced by D-galactosamine (D-GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) is to be administered to relieve ER stress. The lethality rate, liver damage, cytokine expression, and the activity of GSK3β were evaluated. How to regulate LPS-induced inflammation and TNF-α-induced hepatocyte apoptosis by ER stress was investigated in vitro. In vivo, ER stress was triggered in the liver with the progression of mice ALF model. ER stress was essential for the development of ALF because ER stress inhibition by 4-PBA ameliorated the liver damage through decreasing liver inflammation and hepatocyte apoptosis. 4-PBA also decreased GSK3β activity in the livers of ALF mice. In vitro, ER stress induced by tunicamycin synergistically increased LPS-triggered pro-inflammatory cytokine induction and promoted the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in bone marrow-derived macrophages; moreover, tunicamycin also cooperated with TNF-α to increase hepatocyte apoptosis. ER stress promoted LPS-triggered inflammation depending on GSK3β activation because inhibition of GSK3β by SB216763, the specific inhibitor of GSK3β, resulted in downregulation of pro-inflammatory genes. ER stress contributes to liver inflammation and hepatotoxicity in ALF, particularly by regulating GSK3β, and is therefore a potential therapeutic target for ALF.

  3. An essential role for the integrin-linked kinase-glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta pathway during dendrite initiation and growth.

    PubMed

    Naska, Sibel; Park, Katya J; Hannigan, Gregory E; Dedhar, Shoukat; Miller, Freda D; Kaplan, David R

    2006-12-20

    Multiple cues, including growth factors and circuit activity, signal to regulate the initiation and growth of mammalian dendrites. In this study, we have asked how these environmental cues regulate dendrite formation, and in particular, whether dendrite initiation and growth requires integrin-linked kinase (ILK) or its downstream effector, glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta). In cultured sympathetic neurons, NGF and neuronal depolarization activated ILK and promoted dendrite initiation and growth, and inhibition of ILK (either pharmacologically, with a dominant-negative form of ILK, or by genetic knockdown) reduced depolarization-induced dendrite formation. In sympathetic neurons, ILK phosphorylated and inhibited GSK-3beta, and inhibition of GSK-3beta (either pharmacologically, with dominant-negative GSK-3beta, or by genetic knockdown) caused robust dendrite initiation. GSK-3beta inhibition also caused dendrite initiation in cultured cortical neurons and growth of hippocampal neurons in slice cultures. GSK-3beta functioned downstream of ILK to regulate dendrite formation, because inhibition of GSK-3beta promoted dendrite initiation even when ILK was simultaneously inhibited. Moreover, GSK-3beta promoted dendrite formation in sympathetic neurons by regulating the activity of a key dendrite formation effector, the MAP (microtubule-associated protein) kinase kinase (MEK)-extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway. Specifically, inhibition of GSK-3beta led to increased ERK phosphorylation, and inhibition of MEK completely blocked the effects of GSK-3beta inhibition on dendrite initiation and growth. Thus, the ILK-GSK-3beta pathway plays a key role in regulating dendrite formation in developing mammalian neurons.

  4. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Is a Negative Regulator of Growth Factor-induced Activation of the c-Jun N-terminal Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuying; Yu, Shuangxing; Hasegawa, Yutaka; LaPushin, Ruth; Xu, Hong-Ji; Woodgett, James R.; Mills, Gordon B.; Fang, Xianjun

    2016-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/stress activated protein kinase is preferentially activated by stress stimuli. Growth factors, particularly ligands for G protein-coupled receptors, usually induce only modest JNK activation, although they may trigger marked activation of the related extracellular signal-regulated kinase. In the present study, we demonstrated that homozygous disruption of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) dramatically sensitized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to JNK activation induced by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate, two prototype ligands for G protein-coupled receptors. To a lesser degree, a lack of GSK-3β also potentiated JNK activation in response to epidermal growth factor. In contrast, the absence of GSK-3β decreased UV light-induced JNK activation. The increased JNK activation induced by LPA in GSK-3β null MEFs was insufficient to trigger apoptotic cell death or growth inhibition. Instead, the increased JNK activation observed in GSK-3β−/− MEFs was associated with an increased proliferative response to LPA, which was reduced by the inhibition of JNK. Ectopic expression of GSK-3β in GSK-3β-negative MEFs restrained LPA-triggered JNK phosphorylation and induced a concomitant decrease in the mitogenic response to LPA compatible with GSK-3β through the inhibition of JNK activation, thus limiting LPA-induced cell proliferation. Mutation analysis indicated that GSK-3β kinase activity was required for GSK-3β to optimally inhibit LPA-stimulated JNK activation. Thus GSK-3β serves as a physiological switch to specifically repress JNK activation in response to LPA, sphingosine-1-phosphate, or the epidermal growth factor. These results reveal a novel role for GSK-3β in signal transduction and cellular responses to growth factors. PMID:15466414

  5. Kallikrein/kinin protects against myocardial apoptosis after ischemia/reperfusion via Akt-glycogen synthase kinase-3 and Akt-Bad.14-3-3 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie

    2005-03-04

    Our previous study has shown that human tissue kallikrein protected against ischemia/reperfusion-induced myocardial injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective role of local kallikrein gene delivery in ischemia/reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and its signaling mechanisms in promoting cardiomyocyte survival. Adenovirus carrying the human tissue kallikrein gene was delivered locally into the heart using a catheter-based technique. Expression and localization of recombinant human kallikrein in rat myocardium after gene transfer were determined immunohistochemically. Kallikrein gene delivery markedly reduced reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis identified by both in situ nick end-labeling and DNA fragmentation. Delivery of the kallikrein gene increased phosphorylation of Src, Akt, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta, and Bad(Ser-136) but reduced caspase-3 activation in rat myocardium after reperfusion. The protective effect of kallikrein on apoptosis and its signaling mediators was blocked by icatibant and dominant-negative Akt, indicating a kinin B2 receptor-Akt-mediated event. Similarly, kinin or transduction of kallikrein in cultured cardiomyocytes promoted cell viability and attenuated apoptosis induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation. The effect of kallikrein on cardiomyocyte survival was blocked by dominant-negative Akt and a constitutively active mutant of GSK-3beta, but it was facilitated by constitutively active Akt, catalytically inactive GSK-3beta, lithium, and caspase-3 inhibitor. Moreover, kallikrein promoted Bad.14-3-3 complex formation and inhibited Akt-GSK-3beta-dependent activation of caspase-3, whereas caspase-3 administration caused reduction of the Bad.14-3-3 complex, indicating an interaction between Akt-GSK-caspase-3 and Akt-Bad.14-3-3 signaling pathways. In conclusion, kallikrein/kinin protects against cardiomyocyte apoptosis in vivo and in vitro via Akt-Bad.14-3-3 and Akt-GSK-3beta-caspase-3 signaling pathways.

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β in the ventral tegmental area mediates diurnal variations in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Xia; Wei, Yi-Ming; Shi, Hai-Shui; Luo, Yi-Xiao; Ding, Zeng-Bo; Xue, Yan-Xue; Lu, Lin; Yu, Chang-Xi

    2014-11-01

    Cocaine sensitization and reward are reported to be under the influence of diurnal rhythm. However, no previous studies have reported brain areas that play a role as modulators and underlie the mechanism of diurnal variations in cocaine reward. We examined (1) the diurnal rhythm of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and reward-related brain areas in naive rats; (2) the effect of day and night on the acquisition of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP); (3) the influence of cocaine-induced CPP on GSK-3β activity in the SCN and reward-related brain areas; and (4) the effect of the GSK-3β inhibitor SB216763 microinjected bilaterally into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) on cocaine-induced CPP. A significant diurnal rhythm of GSK-3β activity was found in the SCN and reward-related brain areas, with diurnal variations in cocaine-induced CPP. GSK-3β activity in the SCN and reward-related brain areas exhibited marked diurnal variations in rats treated with saline. GSK-3β activity in rats treated with cocaine exhibited distinct diurnal variations only in the prefrontal cortex and VTA. Cocaine decreased the expression of phosphorylated GSK-3β (i.e. increased GSK-3β activity) only in the VTA in rats trained and tested at ZT4 and ZT16. SB216763 microinjected into the VTA bilaterally eliminated the diurnal variations in cocaine-induced CPP, but did not affect the acquisition of cocaine-induced CPP. These findings suggest that the VTA may be a critical area involved in the diurnal variations in cocaine-induced CPP, and GSK-3β may be a regulator of diurnal variations in cocaine-induced CPP. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. Disruption of circadian rhythmicity and suprachiasmatic action potential frequency in a mouse model with constitutive activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3.

    PubMed

    Paul, J R; Johnson, R L; Jope, R S; Gamble, K L

    2012-12-13

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a serine/threonine kinase that has been implicated in psychiatric diseases, neurodevelopment, and circadian regulation. Both GSK3 isoforms, α and β, exhibit a 24-h variation of inhibitory phosphorylation within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the primary circadian pacemaker. We examined the hypothesis that rhythmic GSK3 activity is critical for robust circadian rhythmicity using GSK3α(21A/21A)/β(9A/9A) knock-in mice with serine-alanine substitutions at the inhibitory phosphorylation sites, making both forms constitutively active. We monitored wheel-running locomotor activity of GSK3 knock-in mice and used loose-patch electrophysiology to examine the effect of chronic GSK3 activity on circadian behavior and SCN neuronal activity. Double transgenic GSK3α/β knock-in mice exhibit disrupted behavioral rhythmicity, including significantly decreased rhythmic amplitude, lengthened active period, and increased activity bouts per day. This behavioral disruption was dependent on chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms and was not seen in single transgenic GSK3α or GSK3β knock-in mice. Underlying the behavioral changes, SCN neurons from double transgenic GSK3α/β knock-in mice exhibited significantly higher spike rates during the subjective night compared to those from wild-type controls, with no differences detected during the subjective day. These results suggest that constitutive activation of GSK3 results in the loss of the typical day/night variation of SCN neuronal activity. Together, these results implicate GSK3 activity as a critical regulator of circadian behavior and neurophysiological rhythms. Because GSK3 has been implicated in numerous pathologies, understanding how GSK3 modulates circadian rhythms and neurophysiological activity may lead to novel therapeutics for pathological disorders and circadian rhythm dysfunction. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. DISRUPTION OF CIRCADIAN RHYTHMICITY AND SUPRACHIASMATIC ACTION POTENTIAL FREQUENCY IN A MOUSE MODEL WITH CONSTITUTIVE ACTIVATION OF GLYCOGEN SYNTHASE KINASE-3

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Jodi R.; Johnson, Russell L.; Jope, Richard S.; Gamble, Karen L.

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a serine/threonine kinase that has been implicated in psychiatric diseases, neurodevelopment, and circadian regulation. Both GSK3 isoforms, α and β, exhibit a 24-hour variation of inhibitory phosphorylation within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the primary circadian pacemaker. We examined the hypothesis that rhythmic GSK3 activity is critical for robust circadian rhythmicity using GSK3α21A/21A/β9A/9A knock-in mice with serine-alanine substitutions at the inhibitory phosphorylation sites, making both forms constitutively active. We monitored wheel-running locomotor activity of GSK3 knock-in mice and used loose-patch electrophysiology to examine the effect of chronic GSK3 activity on circadian behavior and SCN neuronal activity. Double transgenic GSK3α/β knock-in mice exhibit disrupted behavioral rhythmicity, including significantly decreased rhythmic amplitude, lengthened active period, and increased activity bouts per day. This behavioral disruption was dependent on chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms and was not seen in single transgenic GSK3α or GSK3β knock-in mice. Underlying the behavioral changes, SCN neurons from double transgenic GSK3α/β knock-in mice exhibited significantly higher spike rates during the subjective night compared to those from WT controls, with no differences detected during the subjective day. These results suggest that constitutive activation of GSK3 results in loss of the typical day/night variation of SCN neuronal activity. Together, these results implicate GSK3 activity as a critical regulator of circadian behavior and neurophysiological rhythms. Because GSK3 has been implicated in numerous pathologies, understanding how GSK3 modulates circadian rhythms and neurophysiological activity may lead to novel therapeutics for pathological disorders and circadian rhythm dysfunction. PMID:22986169

  9. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 activation is important for anthrax edema toxin-induced dendritic cell maturation and anthrax toxin receptor 2 expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Larabee, Jason L; Maldonado-Arocho, Francisco J; Pacheco, Sergio; France, Bryan; DeGiusti, Kevin; Shakir, Salika M; Bradley, Kenneth A; Ballard, Jimmy D

    2011-08-01

    Anthrax edema toxin (ET) is one of two binary toxins produced by Bacillus anthracis that contributes to the virulence of this pathogen. ET is an adenylate cyclase that generates high levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP), causing alterations in multiple host cell signaling pathways. We previously demonstrated that ET increases cell surface expression of the anthrax toxin receptors (ANTXR) in monocyte-derived cells and promotes dendritic cell (DC) migration toward the lymph node-homing chemokine MIP-3β. In this work, we sought to determine if glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is important for ET-induced modulation of macrophage and DC function. We demonstrate that inhibition of GSK-3 dampens ET-induced maturation and migration processes of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). Additional studies reveal that the ET-induced expression of ANTXR in macrophages was decreased when GSK-3 activity was disrupted with chemical inhibitors or with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting GSK-3. Further examination of the ET induction of ANTXR revealed that a dominant negative form of CREB could block the ET induction of ANTXR, suggesting that CREB or a related family member was involved in the upregulation of ANTXR. Because CREB and GSK-3 activity appeared to be important for ET-induced ANTXR expression, the impact of GSK-3 on ET-induced CREB activity was examined in RAW 264.7 cells possessing a CRE-luciferase reporter. As with ANTXR expression, the ET induction of the CRE reporter was decreased by reducing GSK-3 activity. These studies not only provide insight into host pathways targeted by ET but also shed light on interactions between GSK-3 and CREB pathways in host immune cells.

  10. Regulation of Ribosomal S6 Protein Kinase-p90rsk, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3, and β-Catenin in Early Xenopus Development

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Monica A.; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit; Krebs, Edwin G.; Moon, Randall T.

    1999-01-01

    β-Catenin is a multifunctional protein that binds cadherins at the plasma membrane, HMG box transcription factors in the nucleus, and several cytoplasmic proteins that are involved in regulating its stability. In developing embryos and in some human cancers, the accumulation of β-catenin in the cytoplasm and subsequently the nuclei of cells may be regulated by the Wnt-1 signaling cascade and by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3). This has increased interest in regulators of both GSK-3 and β-catenin. Searching for kinase activities able to phosphorylate the conserved, inhibitory-regulatory GSK-3 residue serine 9, we found p90rsk to be a potential upstream regulator of GSK-3. Overexpression of p90rsk in Xenopus embryos leads to increased steady-state levels of total β-catenin but not of the free soluble protein. Instead, p90rsk overexpression increases the levels of β-catenin in a cell fraction containing membrane-associated cadherins. Consistent with the lack of elevation of free β-catenin levels, ectopic p90rsk was unable to rescue dorsal cell fate in embryos ventralized by UV irradiation. We show that p90rsk is a downstream target of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling during early Xenopus development, since ectopic FGF signaling activates both endogenous and overexpressed p90rsk. Moreover, overexpression of a dominant negative FGF receptor, which blocks endogenous FGF signaling, leads to decreased p90rsk kinase activity. Finally, we report that FGF inhibits endogenous GSK-3 activity in Xenopus embryos. We hypothesize that FGF and p90rsk play heretofore unsuspected roles in modulating GSK-3 and β-catenin. PMID:9891076

  11. Structure determination of glycogen synthase kinase-3 from Leishmania major and comparative inhibitor structure-activity relationships with Trypanosoma brucei GSK-3

    SciTech Connect

    Ojo, Kayode K; Arakaki, Tracy L; Napuli, Alberto J; Inampudi, Krishna K; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Zhang, Li; Hol, Wim G.J.; Verlind, Christophe L.M.J.; Merritt, Ethan A; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2012-04-24

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a drug target under intense investigation in pharmaceutical companies and constitutes an attractive piggyback target for eukaryotic pathogens. Two different GSKs are found in trypanosomatids, one about 150 residues shorter than the other. GSK-3 short (GeneDB: Tb927.10.13780) has previously been validated genetically as a drug target in Trypanosoma brucei by RNAi induced growth retardation; and chemically by correlation between enzyme and in vitro growth inhibition. Here, we report investigation of the equivalent GSK-3 short enzymes of L. major (LmjF18.0270) and L. infantum (LinJ18_V3.0270, identical in amino acid sequences to LdonGSK-3 short) and a crystal structure of LmajGSK-3 short at 2 Å resolution. The inhibitor structure-activity relationships (SARs) of L. major and L. infantum are virtually identical, suggesting that inhibitors could be useful for both cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Leishmania spp. GSK-3 short has different inhibitor SARs than TbruGSK-3 short, which can be explained mostly by two variant residues in the ATP-binding pocket. Indeed, mutating these residues in the ATP-binding site of LmajGSK-3 short to the TbruGSK-3 short equivalents results in a mutant LmajGSK-3 short enzyme with SAR more similar to that of TbruGSK-3 short. The differences between human GSK-3β (HsGSK-3β) and LmajGSK-3 short SAR suggest that compounds which selectively inhibit LmajGSK-3 short may be found.

  12. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 by SB 216763 affects acquisition at lower doses than expression of amphetamine-conditioned place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Wickens, Rebekah H; Quartarone, Susan E; Beninger, Richard J

    2016-12-14

    Dopamine (DA) drives incentive learning, whereby neutral stimuli acquire the ability to elicit responses. DA influences the signaling molecule glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). Inhibition of GSK3 attenuates the development of behavioral sensitization to stimulant drugs and conditioned place preference (CPP), a measure of incentive learning. We examined the role of GSK3 in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of rats in CPP produced by amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg, i.p. or 20.0 μg/0.5 μl/side intra-NAc) by administering the inhibitor SB 216763 (1.0, 2.0, and 2.5 mg/kg, i.p. or 0.03, 0.30, 3.00, and 5.00 μg/0.5 μl/side intra-NAc) during acquisition or expression. We hypothesized a dose-dependent effect of SB 216763 and that acquisition would be affected by smaller doses than expression. For the systemic groups, 1.0 mg/kg of SB 216763 did not block CPP; 2.0 mg/kg administered in acquisition but not expression blocked CPP; and 2.5 mg/kg administered in either phase blocked CPP. For the central groups, 0.03 μg/0.5 μl/side of SB 216763 prevented acquisition but not expression, whereas larger doses administered in either phase blocked CPP. Thus, systemic or NAc inhibition of GSK3 by SB 216763 during acquisition or expression blocks amphetamine-produced CPP and acquisition is sensitive to lower doses than expression.

  13. Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Ameliorates D-GalN/LPS-Induced Liver Injury by Reducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Triggered Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyan; Wen, Tao; Piao, Zhengfu; Zhou, Li; Zheng, Sujun; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Yu; Han, Yuanping; Duan, Zhongping; Ma, Yingji

    2012-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase 3β(GSK3β) is a ubiquitous serine-threonine protein kinase that participates in numerous cellular processes and disease pathophysiology. We aimed to determine therapeutic potential of GSK3β inhibition and its mechanism in a well-characterized model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced model of acute liver failure (ALF). Methodology In a murine ALF model induced by D-GalN(700 mg/kg)/LPS(10 µg/kg), we analyzed GSK3β mechanisms using a specific chemical inhibitor, SB216763, and detected the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). Mice were administered SB216763 at 2 h before or after D-GalN/LPS injection, respectively, and then sacrificed 6 h after D-GalN/LPS treatment to evaluate its prophylactic and therapeutic function. The lethality rate, liver damage, ERS, cytokine expression, MAP kinase, hepatocyte apoptosis and expression of TLR 4 were evaluated, respectively. Whether the inhibition of GSK3β activation protected hepatocyte from ERS-induced apoptosis was investigated in vitro. Principal Findings GSK3β became quickly activated (dephosphorylated) upon D-GalN/LPS exposure. Administration of SB216763 not only ameliorated liver injury, as evidenced by reduced transaminase levels, and well-preserved liver architecture, but also decreased lethality. Moreover, GSK3β inhibition resulted in down-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins C/EBP–homologous protein(CHOP) and caspase-12, which are related to ERS. To further demonstrate the role of ERS, we found that GSK3β inhibition protected hepatocyte from ERS-induced cell death. GSK3β inhibition down-regulated the MAPK pathways, reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines and decreased expression of TLR4. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate the key function of GSK3β signaling in the pathophysiology of ALF, especially in regulating the ERS, and provide a rationale for targeting GSK3β as a potential therapeutic strategy to ameliorate ALF. PMID:23028846

  14. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 and stimulation of T-cell factor signaling following activation of EP2 and EP4 prostanoid receptors by prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Hiromichi; West, Kimberly A; Regan, John W

    2002-01-25

    Recently we have shown that the FP(B) prostanoid receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor that couples to Galpha(q), activates T-cell factor (Tcf)/lymphoid enhancer factor (Lef)-mediated transcriptional activation (Fujino, H., and Regan, J. W. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 12489-12492). We now report that the EP(2) and EP(4) prostanoid receptors, which couple to Galpha(s), also activate Tcf/Lef signaling. By using a Tcf/Lef-responsive luciferase reporter gene, transcriptional activity was stimulated approximately 10-fold over basal by 1 h of treatment with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in HEK cells that were stably transfected with the human EP(2) and EP(4) receptors. This stimulation of reporter gene activity was accompanied by a PGE(2)-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of both glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) and Akt kinase. H-89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), completely blocked the agonist-dependent phosphorylation of GSK-3 in both EP(2)- and EP(4)-expressing cells. However, H-89 pretreatment only blocked PGE(2)-stimulated Lef/Tcf reporter gene activity by 20% in EP(4)-expressing cells compared with 65% inhibition in EP(2)-expressing cells. On the other hand wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, had the opposite effect and inhibited PGE(2)-stimulated reporter gene activity to a much greater extent in EP(4)-expressing cells as compared with EP(2)-expressing cells. These findings indicate that the activation of Tcf/Lef signaling by EP(2) receptors occurs primarily through a PKA-dependent pathway, whereas EP(4) receptors activate Tcf/Lef signaling mainly through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent pathway. This is the first indication of a fundamental difference in the signaling potential of EP(2) and EP(4) prostanoid receptors.

  15. Identification and in vitro evaluation of new leads as selective and competitive glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitors through ligand and structure based drug design.

    PubMed

    Darshit, B S; Balaji, B; Rani, P; Ramanathan, M

    2014-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3β elicits multi-functional effects on intracellular signaling pathways, thereby making the kinase a therapeutic target in multiple pathologies. Hence, it is important to selectively inhibit GSK-3β over structurally and biologically similar targets, such as CDK5. The current study was designed to identify and evaluate novel ATP-competitive GSK-3β inhibitors. The study was designed to identify new leads by ligand based drug design, structure based drug design and in vitro evaluation. The best validated pharmacophore model (AADRRR) identified using LBDD was derived from a dataset of 135 molecules. There were 357 primary hits within the SPECS database using this pharmacophore model. A SBDD approach to the GSK-3β and CDK5 proteins was applied to all primary hits, and 5 selective inhibitors were identified for GSK-3β. GSK-3β and CDK5 in vitro kinase inhibition assays were performed with these molecules to confirm their selectivity for GSK-3β. The molecules showed IC50 values ranging from 0.825μM to 1.116μM and were 23- to 57-fold selective for GSK-3β. Of all the molecules, molecule 3 had the lowest IC50 value of 0.825μM. Our research identified molecules possessing benzothiophene, isoquinoline, thiazolidinedione imidazo-isoquinoline and quinazolinone scaffolds. Potency of these molecules may be due to H-bond interaction with backbone residues of Val135, Asp133 and side chain interaction with Tyr134. Selectivity over CDK5 may be due to side chain interactions with Asp200, backbone of Val61, ionic interaction with Lys60 and π-cationic interaction with Arg141. These selective molecules were also exhibited small atom hydrophobicity and H-bond interaction with water molecule.

  16. Activation of the Wnt pathway through use of AR79, a glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitor, promotes prostate cancer growth in soft tissue and bone

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Dai, Jinlu; Zhang, Honglai; Sottnik, Joe L.; Keller, Jill M.; Escott, Katherine J.; Sanganee, Hitesh J.; Yao, Zhi; McCauley, Laurie K.; Keller, Evan T.

    2013-01-01

    Due to its bone anabolic activity, methods to increase Wnt activity, such as inhibitors of dickkopf-1 and sclerostin, are being clinically explored. Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3β) inhibits Wnt signaling through inducing β-catenin degradation. Therefore, AR79, an inhibitor of GSK3β, is being evaluated as a bone anabolic agent. However, Wnt activation has potential to promote tumor growth. The goal of this study was to determine if AR79 impacted progression of prostate cancer (PCa). PCa tumors were established in subcutaneous and bone sites of mice followed by AR79 administration. Tumor growth, β-catenin activation, proliferation (Ki67 expression) and apoptosis (caspase 3 activity) were measured. Additionally, PCa and osteoblast cell lines were treated with AR79 and β-catenin status, proliferation (with β-catenin knocked down in some cases) and proportion of the ALDH+CD133+ stem-like cells was determined. AR79 promoted PCa growth, decreased phospho-β-catenin expression and increased total and nuclear β-catenin expression in tumors and increased tumor-induced bone remodeling. Additionally, it decreased caspase 3 and increased Ki67 expression. In addition, AR79 increased bone formation in normal mouse tibiae. AR79 inhibited β-catenin phosphorylation, increased nuclear β-catenin accumulation in PCa and osteoblast cell lines and increased proliferation of PCa cells in vitro through β-catenin. Furthermore, AR79 increased the ALDH+CD133+ cancer stem cell-like proportion of the PCa cell lines. We conclude that AR79, while being bone anabolic, promotes PCa cell growth through Wnt pathway activation. PMID:24088787

  17. Constitutive activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β correlates with better prognosis and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aberrant regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) has been implicated in several human cancers; however, it has not been reported in the gastric cancer tissues to date. The present study was performed to determine the expression status of active form of GSK-3β phosphorylated at Tyr216 (pGSK-3β) and its relationship with other tumor-associated proteins in human gastric cancers. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed on tissue array slides containing 281 human gastric carcinoma specimens. In addition, gastric cancer cells were cultured and treated with a GSK-3β inhibitor lithium chloride (LiCl) for immunoblot analysis. Results We found that pGSK-3β was expressed in 129 (46%) of 281 cases examined, and was higher in the early-stages of pathologic tumor-node-metastasis (P < 0.001). The expression of pGSK-3β inversely correlated with lymphatic invasion (P < 0.001) and lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001) and correlated with a longer patient survival (P < 0.001). In addition, pGSK-3β expression positively correlated with that of p16, p21, p27, p53, APC, PTEN, MGMT, SMAD4, or KAI1 (P < 0.05), but not with that of cyclin D1. This was confirmed by immunoblot analysis using SNU-668 gastric cancer cells treated with LiCl. Conclusions GSK-3β activation was frequently observed in early-stage gastric carcinoma and was significantly correlated with better prognosis. Thus, these findings suggest that GSK-3β activation is a useful prognostic marker for the early-stage gastric cancer. PMID:20704706

  18. Melatonin attenuated adipogenesis through reduction of the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta by regulating the glycogen synthase 3 beta in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Chul

    2016-06-01

    Adipogenic differentiation is characterized by an increase in two major transcription factors: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) and the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα). These two signals are influenced by C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ and cross-regulate each other's expression during the initial stages of adipogenesis. Melatonin has been known to act as not only a direct scavenger of free radicals but also an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). Here, we report that melatonin inhibits the adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) which is due to the regulations of C/EBPβ in the early stage of adipogenic differentiation. Melatonin reduced the lipid accumulation, adiponectin, and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) during the adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Since C/EBPβ has been associated with the activation of PPARγ and the consensus site of ERK/GSK-3β, PPARγ and β-catenin were detected by immunofluorescence staining after pretreatment of melatonin. Melatonin blocked the activation of PPARγ which induced the degradation of β-catenin. Melatonin also decreased the levels of cyclic adenosine-3,5-monophosphate (cAMP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The cAMP triggered the activity of C/EBPβ which is a critical inducer of PPARγ and C/EBPα activation in the early stage of adipogenic differentiation, and this is further affected by ROS production. The adipogenic marker proteins such as PPARγ, C/EBPα, C/EBPβ, and pERK were also decreased by melatonin. In summary, melatonin inhibited the cAMP synthesis through ROS reduction and the phosphorylation of the ERK/GSK-3β site which is known to be responsible for C/EBPβ activation for adipogenic differentiation in hMSCs.

  19. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitor AR-A014418 suppresses pancreatic cancer cell growth via inhibition of GSK-3-mediated Notch1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Kunnimalaiyaan, Selvi; Gamblin, T Clark; Kunnimalaiyaan, Muthusamy

    2015-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) can act as either a tumour promoter or suppressor by its inactivation depending on the cell type. There are conflicting reports on the roles of GSK-3 isoforms and their interaction with Notch1 in pancreatic cancer. It was hypothesized that GSK-3α stabilized Notch1 in pancreatic cancer cells thereby promoting cellular proliferation. Methods The pancreatic cancer cell lines MiaPaCa2, PANC-1 and BxPC-3, were treated with 0–20 μM of AR-A014418 (AR), a known GSK-3 inhibitor. Cell viability was determined by the MTT assay and Live-Cell Imaging. The levels of Notch pathway members (Notch1, HES-1, survivin and cyclinD1), phosphorylated GSK-3 isoforms, and apoptotic markers were determined by Western blot. Immunoprecipitation was performed to identify the binding of GSK-3 specific isoform to Notch1. Results AR-A014418 treatment had a significant dose-dependent growth reduction (P < 0.001) in pancreatic cancer cells compared with the control and the cytotoxic effect is as a result of apoptosis. Importantly, a reduction in GSK-3 phosphorylation lead to a reduction in Notch pathway members. Overexpression of active Notch1 in AR-A014418-treated cells resulted in the negation of growth suppression. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that GSK-3α binds to Notch1. Conclusions This study demonstrates for the first time that the growth suppressive effect of AR-A014418 on pancreatic cancer cells is mainly mediated by a reduction in phosphorylation of GSK-3α with concomitant Notch1 reduction. GSK-3α appears to stabilize Notch1 by binding and may represent a target for therapeutic development. Furthermore, downregulation of GSK-3 and Notch1 may be a viable strategy for possible chemosensitization of pancreatic cancer cells to standard therapeutics. PMID:26147011

  20. Interactions between glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, protein kinase B, and protein phosphatase 2A in tau phosphorylation in mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin-Wen; Winblad, Bengt; Guan, Zhizhong; Pei, Jin-Jing

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we investigated how tau phosphorylation is regulated by protein kinase glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3 beta), protein kinase B (PKB), and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells. Results showed that GSK3 beta overexpression significantly increased PKB phosphorylation at the S473 site but not the T308 site. Neither GSK3 beta nor PKB overexpression could reduce the PP2AC phosphorylation at the Y307 site. In contrast, either PKB or GSK3 beta knockdown could increase PP2A phosphorylation at the Y307 site. PP2AC knockdown increased GSK3 beta phosphorylation at the S9 site but not at the Y216 site, and PKB phosphorylation at the T308 site but not at the S473 site. Tau phosphorylation at the S396 site was increased by GSK3 beta or PKB overexpression. Tau phosphorylation at the S214 site was only induced by PKB overexpression in the study. While GSK3 beta knockdown decreased tau phosphorylation at the S396 site, PKB knockdown increased tau phosphorylation at both the S396 and S214 sites. PP2AC knockdown decreased tau phosphorylation at the S396 and S214 sites. These findings suggest that tau phosphorylation at the S396 and S214 sites is differentially regulated by GSK3 beta, PKB, and PP2A in N2a cells. The final phosphorylation state of tau is possibly caused by the synergic action of the three enzymes.

  1. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta alters anxiety-, depression-, and addiction-related behaviors and neuronal activity in the nucleus accumbens shell.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Elizabeth J; Nenov, Miroslav N; Zhang, Yafang; Scala, Federico; Page, Sean A; McCue, David L; Li, Dingge; Hommel, Jonathan D; Laezza, Fernanda; Green, Thomas A

    2017-05-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression and addiction are often comorbid brain pathologies thought to share common mechanistic biology. As part of the cortico-limbic circuit, the nucleus accumbens shell (NAcSh) plays a fundamental role in integrating information in the circuit, such that modulation of NAcSh circuitry alters anxiety, depression, and addiction-related behaviors. Intracellular kinase cascades in the NAcSh have proven important mediators of behavior. To investigate glycogen-synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) beta signaling in the NAcSh in vivo we knocked down GSK3beta expression with a novel adeno-associated viral vector (AAV2) and assessed changes in anxiety- and depression-like behavior and cocaine self-administration in GSK3beta knockdown rats. GSK3beta knockdown reduced anxiety-like behavior while increasing depression-like behavior and cocaine self-administration. Correlative electrophysiological recordings in acute brain slices were used to assess the effect of AAV-shGSK3beta on spontaneous firing and intrinsic excitability of tonically active interneurons (TANs), cells required for input and output signal integration in the NAcSh and for processing reward-related behaviors. Loose-patch recordings showed that TANs transduced by AAV-shGSK3beta exhibited reduction in tonic firing and increased spike half width. When assessed by whole-cell patch clamp recordings these changes were mirrored by reduction in action potential firing and accompanied by decreased hyperpolarization-induced depolarizing sag potentials, increased action potential current threshold, and decreased maximum rise time. These results suggest that silencing of GSK3beta in the NAcSh increases depression- and addiction-related behavior, possibly by decreasing intrinsic excitability of TANs. However, this study does not rule out contributions from other neuronal sub-types. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Convergence of 3',5'-cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate/protein kinase A and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta/beta-catenin signaling in corpus luteum progesterone synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Lynn; McDonald, Claudia A; Jiang, Chao; Maroni, Dulce; Zeleznik, Anthony J; Wyatt, Todd A; Hou, Xiaoying; Davis, John S

    2009-11-01

    Progesterone secretion by the steroidogenic cells of the corpus luteum (CL) is essential for reproduction. Progesterone synthesis is under the control of LH, but the exact mechanism of this regulation is unknown. It is established that LH stimulates the LH receptor/choriogonadotropin receptor, a G-protein coupled receptor, to increase cAMP and activate cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that cAMP/PKA-dependent regulation of the Wnt pathway components glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta and beta-catenin contributes to LH-dependent steroidogenesis in luteal cells. We observed that LH via a cAMP/PKA-dependent mechanism stimulated the phosphorylation of GSK3beta at N-terminal Ser9 causing its inactivation and resulted in the accumulation of beta-catenin. Overexpression of N-terminal truncated beta-catenin (Delta90 beta-catenin), which lacks the phosphorylation sites responsible for its destruction, significantly augmented LH-stimulated progesterone secretion. In contrast, overexpression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3beta (GSK-S9A) reduced beta-catenin levels and inhibited LH-stimulated steroidogenesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the association of beta-catenin with the proximal promoter of the StAR gene, a gene that expresses the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, which is a cholesterol transport protein that controls a rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. Collectively these data suggest that cAMP/PKA regulation of GSK3beta/beta-catenin signaling may contribute to the acute increase in progesterone production in response to LH.

  3. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase and phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase3 β mediate ursolic acid induced apoptosis in HepG2 liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyun-Soo; Kwon, Hee Young; Sohn, Eun Jung; Lee, Jang-Hoon; Woo, Hong-Jung; Yun, Miyong; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Chul

    2013-11-01

    Despite the antitumour effect of ursolic acid observed in several cancers, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Thus, in the present study, the roles of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) were examined in ursolic acid induced apoptosis in HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Ursolic acid significantly exerted cytotoxicity, increased the sub-G1 population and the number of ethidium homodimer and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase(TdT) mediated dUTP nick end labeling positive cells in HepG2 cells. Also, ursolic acid enhanced the cleavages of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) and caspase3, attenuated the expression of astrocyte elevated gene (AEG1) and survivin in HepG2 cells. Interestingly, ursolic acid increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and coenzyme A carboxylase and also enhanced phosphorylation of GSK3β at inactive form serine 9, whereas ursolic acid attenuated the phosphorylation of AKT and mTOR in HepG2 cells. Conversely, AMPK inhibitor compound C or GSK3β inhibitor SB216763 blocked the cleavages of PARP and caspase 3 induced by ursolic acid in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, proteosomal inhibitor MG132 suppressed AMPK activation, GSK3β phosphorylation, cleaved PARP and deceased AEG-1 induced by ursolic acid in HepG2 cells. Overall, our findings suggest that ursolic acid induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells via AMPK activation and GSK3β phosphorylation as a potent chemopreventive agent. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Coupling of mammalian target of rapamycin with phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway regulates protein phosphatase 2A- and glycogen synthase kinase-3 -dependent phosphorylation of Tau.

    PubMed

    Meske, Volker; Albert, Frank; Ohm, Thomas Georg

    2008-01-04

    Tau is an important microtubule-stabilizing protein in neurons. In its hyperphosphorylated form, Tau protein loses its ability to bind to microtubules and then accumulates and is part of pathological lesions characterizing tauopathies, e.g. Alzheimer disease. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta), antagonized by protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), regulates Tau phosphorylation at many sites. Diabetes mellitus is linked to an increased risk of developing Alzheimer disease. This could be partially caused by dysregulated GSK-3beta. In a long term experiment (-16 h) using primary murine neuron cultures, we interfered in the insulin/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) (LY294002 treatment and insulin boost) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) (AICAR and rapamycin treatment) signaling pathways and examined consequent changes in the activities of PP2A, GSK-3beta, and Tau phosphorylation. We found that the coupling of PI3K with mTor signaling, in conjunction with a regulatory interaction between PP2A and GSK-3beta, changed activities of both enzymes always in the same direction. These balanced responses seem to ensure the steady Tau phosphorylation at GSK/PP2A-dependent sites observed over a long period of time (>/=6 h). This may help in preventing severe changes in Tau phosphorylation under conditions when neurons undergo transient fluctuations either in insulin or nutrient supply. On the other hand, the investigation of Tau protein at Ser-262 showed that interference in the insulin/PI3K and mTor signaling potentially influenced the Tau phosphorylation status at sites where only one of two enzymes (in this case PP2A) is involved in the regulation.

  5. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta heterozygote knockout mice as a model of findings in postmortem schizophrenia brain or as a model of behaviors mimicking lithium action: negative results.

    PubMed

    Bersudsky, Yuly; Shaldubina, Alona; Kozlovsky, Nitzan; Woodgett, James R; Agam, Galila; Belmaker, R H

    2008-05-01

    In mice glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta heterozygote knockout status was reported to cause reduced immobility in the Porsolt forced swim test and reduced amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, behaviors that mimic the effects of lithium. GSK-3beta protein and mRNA level and activity have been reported to be reduced in the postmortem brain of schizophrenia patients and this could suggest the involvement of GSK-3beta in the etiology of schizophrenia. However, apomorphine-induced stereotyping was reported to be unchanged in GSK-3beta heterozygote (HZ) knockout (KO) mice. As such behaviors are not always robust, study in another laboratory seemed indicated. Motor activity and coordination were assessed in the rotarod test. Behavior was studied in the following tests: pilocarpine-induced seizures model for lithium action, Porsolt forced swim test, tail suspension test, elevated plus-maze, large open field, startle response and prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle response, amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, and apomorphine-induced stereotypic climbing. We could not confirm the report that GSK-3beta HZ KO mice exhibit reduced immobility in the Porsolt forced swim or reduced amphetamine-induced hyperactivity in a manner mimicking the behavioral effects of lithium. We did not find increased apomorphine-induced stereotypic climbing or disruption of prepulse inhibition, suggesting that human postmortem findings regarding GSK-3beta in schizophrenia are not mediated by changes in dopamine receptors and are not the cause of prepulse inhibition deficits in schizophrenia. These data do not support the role of GSK-3beta in schizophrenia or in the mechanism of therapeutic action of lithium. Although differences in the genetic background of the GSK-3beta HZ KOs used in the present study compared with that of the previous study could be responsible, such results could suggest that the previously reported effects of GSK-3beta knockout on behavior are not robust.

  6. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibition in the medial prefrontal cortex mediates paradoxical amphetamine action in a mouse model of ADHD.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yi-Chun; Gassen, Nils C; Zellner, Andreas; Rein, Theo; Landgraf, Rainer; Wotjak, Carsten T; Anderzhanova, Elmira

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants show therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is generally assumed that they ameliorate ADHD symptoms via interfering with monoaminergic signaling. We combined behavioral pharmacology, neurochemistry and molecular analyses to identify mechanisms underlying the paradoxical calming effect of amphetamine in low trait anxiety behavior (LAB) mice, a novel multigenetic animal model of ADHD. Amphetamine (1 mg/kg) and methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) elicited similar dopamine and norepinephrine release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and in the striatum of LAB mice. In contrast, amphetamine decreased, while methylphenidate increased locomotor activity. This argues against changes in dopamine and/or norepinephrine release as mediators of amphetamine paradoxical effects. Instead, the calming activity of amphetamine corresponded to the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity, specifically in the mPFC. Accordingly, not only systemic administration of the GSK3β inhibitor TDZD-8 (20 mg/kg), but also local microinjections of TDZD-8 and amphetamine into the mPFC, but not into the striatum, decreased locomotor activity in LAB mice. Amphetamine effects seem to depend on NMDA receptor signaling, since pre- or co-treatment with MK-801 (0.3 mg/kg) abolished the effects of amphetamine (1 mg/kg) on the locomotion and on the phosphorylation of GSK3β at the level of the mPFC. Taken together, the paradoxical calming effect of amphetamine in hyperactive LAB mice concurs with a decreased GSK3β activity in the mPFC. This effect appears to be independent of dopamine or norepinephrine release, but contingent on NMDA receptor signaling.

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibition in the medial prefrontal cortex mediates paradoxical amphetamine action in a mouse model of ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yi-Chun; Gassen, Nils C.; Zellner, Andreas; Rein, Theo; Landgraf, Rainer; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Anderzhanova, Elmira

    2015-01-01

    Psychostimulants show therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is generally assumed that they ameliorate ADHD symptoms via interfering with monoaminergic signaling. We combined behavioral pharmacology, neurochemistry and molecular analyses to identify mechanisms underlying the paradoxical calming effect of amphetamine in low trait anxiety behavior (LAB) mice, a novel multigenetic animal model of ADHD. Amphetamine (1 mg/kg) and methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) elicited similar dopamine and norepinephrine release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and in the striatum of LAB mice. In contrast, amphetamine decreased, while methylphenidate increased locomotor activity. This argues against changes in dopamine and/or norepinephrine release as mediators of amphetamine paradoxical effects. Instead, the calming activity of amphetamine corresponded to the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity, specifically in the mPFC. Accordingly, not only systemic administration of the GSK3β inhibitor TDZD-8 (20 mg/kg), but also local microinjections of TDZD-8 and amphetamine into the mPFC, but not into the striatum, decreased locomotor activity in LAB mice. Amphetamine effects seem to depend on NMDA receptor signaling, since pre- or co-treatment with MK-801 (0.3 mg/kg) abolished the effects of amphetamine (1 mg/kg) on the locomotion and on the phosphorylation of GSK3β at the level of the mPFC. Taken together, the paradoxical calming effect of amphetamine in hyperactive LAB mice concurs with a decreased GSK3β activity in the mPFC. This effect appears to be independent of dopamine or norepinephrine release, but contingent on NMDA receptor signaling. PMID:25852508

  8. Respiratory Muscle Training Improves Diaphragm Citrate Synthase Activity and Hemodynamic Function in Rats with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Jaenisch, Rodrigo Boemo; Bertagnolli, Mariane; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Arena, Ross; Lago, Pedro Dal

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced respiratory muscle strength in patients with heart failure positively alters the clinical trajectory of heart failure. In an experimental model, respiratory muscle training in rats with heart failure has been shown to improve cardiopulmonary function through mechanisms yet to be entirely elucidated. The present report aimed to evaluate the respiratory muscle training effects in diaphragm citrate synthase activity and hemodynamic function in rats with heart failure. Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: sedentary sham (Sed-Sham, n=8), trained sham (RMT-Sham, n=8), sedentary heart failure (Sed-HF, n=7) and trained heart failure (RMT-HF, n=7). The animals were submitted to a RMT protocol performed 30 minutes a day, 5 days/week, for 6 weeks. In rats with heart failure, respiratory muscle training decreased pulmonary congestion and right ventricular hypertrophy. Deleterious alterations in left ventricular pressures, as well as left ventricular contractility and relaxation, were assuaged by respiratory muscle training in heart failure rats. Citrate synthase activity, which was significantly reduced in heart failure rats, was preserved by respiratory muscle training. Additionally, a negative correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular end diastolic pressure and positive correlation was found between citrate synthase and left ventricular systolic pressure. Respiratory muscle training produces beneficial adaptations in the diaphragmatic musculature, which is linked to improvements in left ventricular hemodynamics and blood pressure in heart failure rats. The RMT-induced improvements in cardiac architecture and the oxidative capacity of the diaphragm may improve the clinical trajectory of patients with heart failure.

  9. Correction of glycogen storage disease type III with rapamycin in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Yi, Haiqing; Brooks, Elizabeth D; Thurberg, Beth L; Fyfe, John C; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2014-06-01

    Recently, we reported that progression of liver fibrosis and skeletal myopathy caused by extensive accumulation of cytoplasmic glycogen at advanced age is the major feature of a canine model of glycogen storage disease (GSD) IIIa. Here, we aim to investigate whether rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, is an effective therapy for GSD III. Our data show that rapamycin significantly reduced glycogen content in primary muscle cells from human patients with GSD IIIa by suppressing the expression of glycogen synthase and glucose transporter 1. To test the treatment efficacy in vivo, rapamycin was daily administered to GSD IIIa dogs starting from age 2 (early-treatment group) or 8 months (late-treatment group), and liver and skeletal muscle biopsies were performed at age 12 and 16 months. In both treatment groups, muscle glycogen accumulation was not affected at age 12 months but significantly inhibited at 16 months. Liver glycogen content was reduced in the early-treatment group but not in the late-treatment group at age 12 months. Both treatments effectively reduced liver fibrosis at age 16 months, consistent with markedly inhibited transition of hepatic stellate cells into myofibroblasts, the central event in the process of liver fibrosis. Our results suggest a potential useful therapy for GSD III. Rapamycin inhibited glycogen accumulation in GSD IIIa patient muscle cells. Rapamycin reduced muscle glycogen content in GSD IIIa dogs at advanced age. Rapamycin effectively prevented progression of liver fibrosis in GSD IIIa dogs. Our results suggest rapamycin as potential useful therapy for patients with GSD III.

  10. Effect of diabetes on glycogen metabolism in rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Hernández-Berrones, Jethro; Luna-Ulloa, Luis Bernardo; Coffe, Víctor; Salceda, Rocío

    2008-07-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in retina. The regulatory mechanisms that maintain glucose homeostasis in retina could include hormonal action. Retinopathy is one of the chemical manifestations of long-standing diabetes mellitus. In order to better understand the effect of hyperglycemia in retina, we studied glycogen content as well as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase activities in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retina and compared them with other tissues. Glycogen levels in normal rat retina are low (46 +/- 4.0 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein). However, high specific activity of glycogen synthase was found in retina, indicating a substantial capacity for glycogen synthesis. In diabetic rats, glycogen synthase activity increased between 50% and 100% in retina, brain cortex and liver of diabetic rats, but only retina exhibited an increase in glycogen content. Although, total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase levels were similar in normal and diabetic retina, activation of glycogen synthase by glucose-6-P was remarkable increased. Glycogen phosphorylase activity decreased 50% in the liver of diabetic animals; it was not modified in the other tissues examined. We conclude that the increase in glycogen levels in diabetic retina was due to alterations in glycogen synthase regulation.

  11. Increased subsarcolemmal lipids in type 2 diabetes: effect of training on localization of lipids, mitochondria, and glycogen in sedentary human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Joachim; Mogensen, Martin; Vind, Birgitte F; Sahlin, Kent; Højlund, Kurt; Schrøder, Henrik D; Ortenblad, Niels

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of aerobic training and type 2 diabetes on intramyocellular localization of lipids, mitochondria, and glycogen. Obese type 2 diabetic patients (n = 12) and matched obese controls (n = 12) participated in aerobic cycling training for 10 wk. Endurance-trained athletes (n = 15) were included for comparison. Insulin action was determined by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Intramyocellular contents of lipids, mitochondria, and glycogen at different subcellular compartments were assessed by transmission electron microscopy in biopsies obtained from vastus lateralis muscle. Type 2 diabetic patients were more insulin resistant than obese controls and had threefold higher volume of subsarcolemmal (SS) lipids compared with obese controls and endurance-trained subjects. No difference was found in intermyofibrillar lipids. Importantly, following aerobic training, this excess SS lipid volume was lowered by approximately 50%, approaching the levels observed in the nondiabetic subjects. A strong inverse association between insulin sensitivity and SS lipid volume was found (r(2)=0.62, P = 0.002). The volume density and localization of mitochondria and glycogen were the same in type 2 diabetic patients and control subjects, and showed in parallel with improved insulin sensitivity a similar increase in response to training, however, with a more pronounced increase in SS mitochondria and SS glycogen than in other localizations. In conclusion, this study, estimating intramyocellular localization of lipids, mitochondria, and glycogen, indicates that type 2 diabetic patients may be exposed to increased levels of SS lipids. Thus consideration of cell compartmentation may advance the understanding of the role of lipids in muscle function and type 2 diabetes.

  12. Nitric oxide synthase inhibitors do not alter functional hyperemia in canine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Barclay, J K; Woodley, N E

    1994-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that endothelium-derived products contribute to functional hyperemia in skeletal muscle, we infused nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, either 200 microM N omega-nitro-L-arginine (NNA) (N = 4) or 1 mM N gamma-monomethyl-L-arginine (NMMA) (N = 4), before and during 6 min of 4 Hz stimulation of canine gastrocnemius in situ. We infused saline (N = 4) as a control. NNA significantly decreased steady-level resting flow by 3.8 +/- 0.4 mL.kg-1.s-1. The increase in flow from rest to 5 min of stimulation was not changed by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. We also stimulated muscles for 60 min either with saline infusion (N = 4) or with the infusion of saline during the first 15 min and NNA for the remaining 45 min (n = 4). There was no difference in the flow during contractions. To clarify the effect of these inhibitors on canine vessels, we challenged rings of canine femoral artery with and without endothelium with acetylcholine and bradykinin (both 1 microM) before and after the addition of NNA and NMMA (both 10 microM). The nitric oxide synthase inhibitors decreased the relaxation accompanying acetylcholine. Both inhibitors caused only endothelium-intact rings to contract. Thus, the presence of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor identified an endothelium-dependent contribution to the regulation of blood flow to skeletal muscle at rest but had no effect on functional hyperemia.

  13. Insights into Brain Glycogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Cécile; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Duval, Romain; Xu, Ximing; Cocaign, Angélique; Léger, Thibaut; Woffendin, Gary; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Etchebest, Catherine; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Brain glycogen metabolism plays a critical role in major brain functions such as learning or memory consolidation. However, alteration of glycogen metabolism and glycogen accumulation in the brain contributes to neurodegeneration as observed in Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a key enzyme in glycogen metabolism, catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen mobilization. Moreover, the allosteric regulation of the three GP isozymes (muscle, liver, and brain) by metabolites and phosphorylation, in response to hormonal signaling, fine-tunes glycogenolysis to fulfill energetic and metabolic requirements. Whereas the structures of muscle and liver GPs have been known for decades, the structure of brain GP (bGP) has remained elusive despite its critical role in brain glycogen metabolism. Here, we report the crystal structure of human bGP in complex with PEG 400 (2.5 Å) and in complex with its allosteric activator AMP (3.4 Å). These structures demonstrate that bGP has a closer structural relationship with muscle GP, which is also activated by AMP, contrary to liver GP, which is not. Importantly, despite the structural similarities between human bGP and the two other mammalian isozymes, the bGP structures reveal molecular features unique to the brain isozyme that provide a deeper understanding of the differences in the activation properties of these allosteric enzymes by the allosteric effector AMP. Overall, our study further supports that the distinct structural and regulatory properties of GP isozymes contribute to the different functions of muscle, liver, and brain glycogen. PMID:27402852

  14. Starch Binding Domain-containing Protein 1/Genethonin 1 Is a Novel Participant in Glycogen Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Sixin; Heller, Brigitte; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.; Zhai, Lanmin; Irimia, Jose M.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Wells, Clark D.; Skurat, Alexander V.; Roach, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Stbd1 is a protein of previously unknown function that is most prevalent in liver and muscle, the major sites for storage of the energy reserve glycogen. The protein is predicted to contain a hydrophobic N terminus and a C-terminal CBM20 glycan binding domain. Here, we show that Stbd1 binds to glycogen in vitro and that endogenous Stbd1 locates to perinuclear compartments in cultured mouse FL83B or Rat1 cells. When overexpressed in COSM9 cells, Stbd1 concentrated at enlarged perinuclear structures, co-localized with glycogen, the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP1 and the autophagy protein GABARAPL1. Mutant Stbd1 lacking the N-terminal hydrophobic segment had a diffuse distribution throughout the cell. Point mutations in the CBM20 domain did not change the perinuclear localization of Stbd1, but glycogen was no longer concentrated in this compartment. Stable overexpression of glycogen synthase in Rat1WT4 cells resulted in accumulation of glycogen as massive perinuclear deposits, where a large fraction of the detectable Stbd1 co-localized. Starvation of Rat1WT4 cells for glucose resulted in dissipation of the massive glycogen stores into numerous and much smaller glycogen deposits that retained Stbd1. In vitro, in cells, and in animal models, Stbd1 consistently tracked with glycogen. We conclude that Stbd1 is involved in glycogen metabolism by binding to glycogen and anchoring it to membranes, thereby affecting its cellular localization and its intracellular trafficking to lysosomes. PMID:20810658

  15. Thermoregulation during Cold Water Immersion is Unimpaired by Low Muscle Glycogen Levels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    DARRELL NEUFER , 3 H STEPHEN R. MUZA, ELDON W. ASKEW, AND KENT B. PANDOLF US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, Massacausetts...01760-5007 YOUNG, ANDREW J., MICHAEL N. SAWKA, P. DARRELL energy substrates. Although the principal substrate has NEUFER , STEPHEN R. MUZA, ELDON W...T. ROCHE, M. compared with moderate-intensity exercise. Vo 2 during S. ROSE, E. W. ASKEW, A. J. YOUNG, AND P. D. NEUFER . Manip- ulation of Muscle

  16. A Splice Mutation in the PHKG1 Gene Causes High Glycogen Content and Low Meat Quality in Pig Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lisheng; Ren, Jun; Liu, Xianxian; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Zhiyan; Ma, Huanban; Xie, Xianhua; Xing, Yuyun; Guo, Yuanmei; Huang, Lusheng

    2014-01-01

    Glycolytic potential (GP) in skeletal muscle is economically important in the pig industry because of its effect on pork processing yield. We have previously mapped a major quantitative trait lo