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Sample records for muscle homogenate fluid

  1. On shearing fluids with homogeneous densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, D. C.; Srivastava, V. C.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study shearing spherically symmetric homogeneous density fluids in comoving coordinates. It is found that the expansion of the four-velocity of a perfect fluid is homogeneous, whereas its shear is generated by an arbitrary function of time M( t), related to the mass function of the distribution. This function is found to bear a functional relationship with density. The field equations are reduced to two coupled first order ordinary differential equations for the metric coefficients g_{11} and g_{22}. We have explored a class of solutions assuming that M is a linear function of the density. This class embodies, as a subcase, the complete class of shear-free solutions. We have discussed the off quoted work of Kustaanheimo (Comment Phys Math XIII:12, 1, 1947) and have noted that it deals with shear-free fluids having anisotropic pressure. It is shown that the anisotropy of the fluid is characterized by an arbitrary function of time. We have discussed some issues of historical priorities and credentials related to shear-free solutions. Recent controversial claims by Mitra (Astrophys Space Sci 333:351, 2011 and Gravit Cosmol 18:17, 2012) have also been addressed. We found that the singularity and the shearing motion of the fluid are closely related. Hence, there is a need for fresh look to the solutions obtained earlier in comoving coordinates.

  2. Isotropic homogeneous universe with viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, N.O.; Dias, R.S.; Banerjee, A.

    1985-04-01

    Exact solutions are obtained for the isotropic homogeneous cosmological model with viscous fluid. The fluid has only bulk viscosity and the viscosity coefficient is taken to be a power function of the mass density. The equation of state assumed obeys a linear relation between mass density and pressure. The models satisfying Hawking's energy conditions are discussed. Murphy's model is only a special case of this general set of solutions and it is shown that Murphy's conclusion that the introduciton of bulk viscosity can avoid the occurrence of space-time singularity at finite past is not, in general, valid.

  3. Fluid mechanics of muscle vibrations.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, D T; Cole, N M

    1988-01-01

    The pressure field produced by an isometrically contracting frog gastrocnemius muscle is described by the fluid mechanics equations for a vibrating sphere. The equations predict a pressure amplitude that is proportional to the lateral acceleration of the muscle, inversely proportional to the square of the distance from the muscle, and cosinusoidally related to the major axis of lateral movement. The predictions are confirmed by experiments that measure the pressure amplitude distribution and by photographs of muscle movement during contraction. The lateral movement of muscle has the appearance of an oscillating system response to a step function input--the oscillation may be at the resonant frequency of the muscle and therefore may provide a means to measure muscle stiffness without actually touching the muscle. PMID:3260803

  4. Homogeneous and hypersurface-homogeneous shear-free perfect fluids ingeneral relativity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, C. B.

    1988-08-01

    Shear-free, general-relativistic perfect fluids are investigated in the case where they are either homogeneous or hypersurface-homogeneous (and, in particular, spatially homogeneous). It is assumed that the energy density μ and the presurep of the fluid are related by a barotropic equation of statep = p(μ), where μ +p ≠ 0. Under such circumstances, it follows that either the fluid's volume expansion rate θ or the fluid's vorticity (i.e., rotation) ω must vanish. In the homogeneous case, this leads to only two possibilities: either ω = θ = 0 (the Einstein static solution), or ω ≠ 0,θ = 0 (the Gödel solution). In the hypersurface-homogeneous case, the situation is more complicated: either ω = 0, θ≠ 0 (as exemplified,inter alia, by the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models), or ω ≠ 0, θ = 0 (which pertains, for example, in general stationary cylindrically symmetric fluids with rigid rotation, or ω = θ = 0 (as occurs for static spherically symmetric solutions). Each possibility is further subdivided in an invariant way, and related to the studies of other authors, thereby unifying and extending these earlier works.

  5. Statistical mechanics of homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems.

    PubMed

    Krakoviack, Vincent

    2010-12-01

    The homogeneous partly pinned fluid systems are simple models of a fluid confined in a disordered porous matrix obtained by arresting randomly chosen particles in a one-component bulk fluid or one of the two components of a binary mixture. In this paper, their configurational properties are investigated. It is shown that a peculiar complementarity exists between the mobile and immobile phases, which originates from the fact that the solid is prepared in presence of and in equilibrium with the adsorbed fluid. Simple identities follow, which connect different types of configurational averages, either relative to the fluid-matrix system or to the bulk fluid from which it is prepared. Crucial simplifications result for the computation of important structural quantities, both in computer simulations and in theoretical approaches. Finally, possible applications of the model in the field of dynamics in confinement or in strongly asymmetric mixtures are suggested.

  6. Influence of extraction technique on the anti-oxidative potential of hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) extracts in bovine muscle homogenates.

    PubMed

    Shortle, E; O'Grady, M N; Gilroy, D; Furey, A; Quinn, N; Kerry, J P

    2014-12-01

    Six extracts were prepared from hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) leaves and flowers (HLF) and berries (HB) using solid-liquid [traditional (T) (HLFT, HBT), sonicated (S) (HLFS, HBS)] and supercritical fluid (C) extraction (HLFC, HBC) techniques. The antioxidant activities of HLF and HB extracts were characterised using in vitro antioxidant assays (TPC, DPPH, FRAP) and in 25% bovine muscle (longissimus lumborum) homogenates (lipid oxidation (TBARS), oxymyoglobin (% of total myoglobin)) after 24h storage at 4°C. Hawthorn extracts exhibited varying degrees of antioxidant potency. In vitro and muscle homogenate (TBARS) antioxidant activity followed the order: HLFS>HLFT and HBT>HBS. In supercritical fluid extracts, HLFC>HBC (in vitro antioxidant activity) and HLFC≈HBC (TBARS). All extracts (except HBS) reduced oxymyoglobin oxidation. The HLFS extract had the highest antioxidant activity in all test systems. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) exhibited potential as a technique for the manufacture of functional ingredients (antioxidants) from hawthorn for use in muscle foods.

  7. Homogenization of two fluid flow in porous media

    PubMed Central

    Daly, K. R.; Roose, T.

    2015-01-01

    The macroscopic behaviour of air and water in porous media is often approximated using Richards' equation for the fluid saturation and pressure. This equation is parametrized by the hydraulic conductivity and water release curve. In this paper, we use homogenization to derive a general model for saturation and pressure in porous media based on an underlying periodic porous structure. Under an appropriate set of assumptions, i.e. constant gas pressure, this model is shown to reduce to the simpler form of Richards' equation. The starting point for this derivation is the Cahn–Hilliard phase field equation coupled with Stokes equations for fluid flow. This approach allows us, for the first time, to rigorously derive the water release curve and hydraulic conductivities through a series of cell problems. The method captures the hysteresis in the water release curve and ties the macroscopic properties of the porous media with the underlying geometrical and material properties. PMID:27547073

  8. A Class of Homogeneous Scalar Tensor Cosmologies with a Radiation Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazadjiev, Stoytcho S.

    We present a new class of exact homogeneous cosmological solutions with a radiation fluid for all scalar tensor theories. The solutions belong to Bianchi type VIh cosmologies. Explicit examples of nonsingular homogeneous scalar tensor cosmologies are also given.

  9. Acetylcholinesterase activity in intact and homogenized skeletal muscle of the frog.

    PubMed Central

    Miledi, R; Molenaar, P C; Polak, R L

    1984-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of acetylcholine (ACh) was determined in intact frog sartorius muscles or their homogenates. The Vmax was 29 nmol min-1 in intact muscles and 46 nmol min-1 per muscle in homogenates, and the Km was 6 and 0.2 mM, respectively. The muscle was divided into small segments, which were homogenized; the junctional cholinesterase (ChE) accounted for 60% of total enzyme activity. At low substrate concentrations the rate of hydrolysis was up to 30 times higher in homogenates than in intact muscles. This difference was greatly reduced at very high substrate concentrations. It appears that most of the ChE in intact muscle is 'occluded' to external ACh, mainly because the ChE at the edges of the synaptic cleft prevents the ACh from reaching the enzyme situated further inwards, which consequently does not contribute to its hydrolysis; homogenization makes all synaptic ChE accessible to added ACh. Incubation of sartorius muscles with collagenase caused an 80% decrease in ChE activity (determined in homogenates) of end-plate-containing parts which became similar to that in end-plate-free parts on which collagenase had little effect. Histochemistry showed that the tendon-muscle junction contained folds which were stained intensively for ChE. Diethyldimethylpyrophosphonate , neostigmine, eserine, and di-isopropyl fluorophosphonate inhibited ChE activity in this order of potency. The I50 values (i.e. the concentrations of the drugs which caused a 50% inhibition) were about 5 times higher in intact than in homogenized tissue. Neostigmine, 0.15 and 0.4 microM, increased the time constant of miniature end-plate currents 1.3- and 1.8-fold, and slowed down ChE activity of muscle homogenates by 1.4 and 2.1 times, respectively, without significantly affecting ACh hydrolysis by intact muscles. This indicates that synaptic ChE is not present in large excess. It is concluded that ChE activity measured in homogenates presents a better picture of in situ ChE activity than

  10. A comparative study of Casson fluid with homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Ijaz; Waqas, Muhammad; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-03-09

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stagnation point flow of Casson fluid towards a stretching sheet is addressed. Homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions together with homogeneous heat effect subject to a resistive force of electromagnetic origin is discussed. It is assumed that the homogeneous process in the ambient fluid is governed by first order kinetics and the heterogeneous process on the wall surface is given by isothermal cubic autocatalator kinetics. Ordinary differential systems have been considered. Solutions of the problems are presented via a numerical technique namely built in shooting method. Graphical behaviors of velocity, temperature and concentration are analyzed comprehensively. Velocity is noticed a decreasing function of Hartman number.

  11. Impact of Cattaneo-Christov Heat Flux in Jeffrey Fluid Flow with Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qayyum, Sumaira; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional stretched flow of Jeffrey fluid in view of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux is addressed. Effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions are also considered. Suitable transformations are used to form ordinary differential equations. Convergent series solutions are computed. Impact of significant parameters on the velocity, temperature, concentration and skin friction coefficient is addressed. Analysis of thermal relaxation is made. The obtained results show that ratio of relaxation to retardation times and Deborah number have inverse relation for velocity profile. Temperature distribution has decreasing behavior for Prandtl number and thermal relaxation time. Also concentration decreases for larger values of strength of homogeneous reaction parameter while it increases for strength of heterogeneous reaction parameter. PMID:26859675

  12. Homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions in nonlinear radiative flow of Jeffrey fluid between two stretchable rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Qayyum, Sumaira; Imtiaz, Maria; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    This article addresses MHD Jeffrey fluid flow between two stretchable rotating disks. Momentum equation with magnetic field is presented. Energy equation is constructed in presence of heat source/sink and nonlinear radiation. Thermal stratification and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions are accounted. The related systems have been solved for convergent solutions. Velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are analyzed. The velocities (radial, axial, tangential) are increasing functions of Deborah number. Decline in axial velocity is noticed at lower disk for larger ratio of relaxation to retardation times constant. Thermal field is enhanced for temperature ratio parameter. Concentration has opposite behavior for larger homogeneous parameter and Schmidt number. Surface drag force decays for larger ratio of relaxation to retardation times at both disks. Heat transfer rate enhances for temperature ratio parameter.

  13. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media: Homogeneous versus heterogeneous pore network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-05-01

    Injection of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) into geological formations is a promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Predicting the amount of CO2 that can be captured and its long-term storage stability in subsurface requires a fundamental understanding of multiphase displacement phenomena at the pore scale. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the immiscible displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting one in two microfluidic flow cells, one with a homogeneous pore network and the other with a randomly heterogeneous pore network. We have identified three different displacement patterns, namely, stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering, all of which are strongly dependent upon the capillary number (Ca), viscosity ratio (M), and the media heterogeneity. The non-wetting fluid saturation (Snw) is found to increase nearly linearly with logCa for each constant M. Increasing M (viscosity ratio of non-wetting fluid to wetting fluid) or decreasing the media heterogeneity can enhance the stability of the displacement process, resulting in an increase in Snw. In either pore networks, the specific interfacial length is linearly proportional to Snw during drainage with equal proportionality constant for all cases excluding those revealing considerable viscous fingering. Our numerical results confirm the previous experimental finding that the steady state specific interfacial length exhibits a linear dependence on Snw for either favorable (M ≥ 1) or unfavorable (M < 1) displacement, and the slope is slightly higher for the unfavorable displacement.

  14. Suppression of turbulent energy cascade due to phase separation in homogenous binary mixture fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Youhei; Okamoto, Sachiya

    2015-11-01

    When a multi-component fluid mixture becomes themophysically unstable state by quenching from well-melting condition, phase separation due to spinodal decomposition occurs, and a self-organized structure is formed. During phase separation, free energy is consumed for the structure formation. In our previous report, the phase separation in homogenous turbulence was numerically simulated and the coarsening process of phase separation was discussed. In this study, we extended our numerical model to a high Schmidt number fluid corresponding to actual polymer solution. The governing equations were continuity, Navier-Stokes, and Chan-Hiliard equations as same as our previous report. The flow filed was an isotropic homogenous turbulence, and the dimensionless parameters in the Chan-Hilliard equation were estimated based on the thermophysical condition of binary mixture. From the numerical results, it was found that turbulent energy cascade was drastically suppressed in the inertial subrange by phase separation for the high Schmidt number flow. By using the identification of turbulent and phase separation structure, we discussed the relation between total energy balance and the structures formation processes. This study is financially supported by the Grand-in-Aid for Young Scientists (B) (No. T26820045) from the Ministry of Education, Cul-ture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

  15. Contribution of Antisymmetric and Symmetric Waves to the Reflection of Sound in a Fluid by a Thick, Homogeneous Plate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-23

    SOUND IN A FLUID BY A THICK, HOMOGENEOUS PLATE INTRODUCTION In a recent report Rudgers [11 describes the acoustical behavior of thick, fluid-loaded...symmetric waves to the plate-fluid interactions studied by Rudgers (1]. In the present report, the role of antisymmetric and symmetric waves is analyzed...defined by Rudgers (4]. The structural response function of the two types of waves in combination is related to the response functions of the two types

  16. Homogenization-dependent responses of acid-soluble and acid-insoluble glycogen to exercise and refeeding in human muscles.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Phillip D; Singh, Anish; Fournier, Paul A

    2009-12-01

    Muscle glycogen exists as acid-insoluble (AIG) and acid-soluble (ASG) forms, with AIG levels reported in most recent studies in humans to be the most responsive to exercise and refeeding. Because the muscle samples in these studies were not homogenized to extract glycogen, such homogenization-free protocols might have resulted in a suboptimal yield of ASG. Our goal, therefore, was to determine whether similar findings can be achieved using homogenized muscle samples by comparing the effect of exercise and refeeding on ASG and AIG levels. Eight male participants cycled for 60 minutes at 70% Vo(2peak) before ingesting 10.9 +/- 0.6 g carbohydrate per kilogram body mass over 24 hours. Muscle biopsies were taken before exercise and after 0, 2, and 24 hours of recovery. Using a homogenization-dependent protocol to extract glycogen, 77% to 91% of it was extracted as ASG, compared with 11% to 24% with a homogenization-free protocol. In response to exercise, muscle glycogen levels fell from 366 +/- 24 to 184 +/- 46 mmol/kg dry weight and returned to 232 +/- 32 and 503 +/- 59 mmol/kg dry weight after 2 and 24 hours, respectively. Acid-soluble glycogen but not AIG accounted for all the changes in total glycogen during exercise and refeeding when extracted using a homogenization-dependent protocol, but AIG was the most responsive fraction when extracted using a homogenization-free protocol. In conclusion, the patterns of response of ASG and AIG levels to changes in glycogen concentrations in human muscles are highly dependent on the protocol used to acid-extract glycogen, with the physiologic significance of the many previous studies on AIG and ASG being in need of revision.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of immiscible fluid displacement in porous media: Homogeneous versus heterogeneous pore network

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haihu; Zhang, Yonghao; Valocchi, Albert J.

    2015-05-15

    Injection of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into geological formations is a promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere. Predicting the amount of CO{sub 2} that can be captured and its long-term storage stability in subsurface requires a fundamental understanding of multiphase displacement phenomena at the pore scale. In this paper, the lattice Boltzmann method is employed to simulate the immiscible displacement of a wetting fluid by a non-wetting one in two microfluidic flow cells, one with a homogeneous pore network and the other with a randomly heterogeneous pore network. We have identified three different displacement patterns, namely, stable displacement, capillary fingering, and viscous fingering, all of which are strongly dependent upon the capillary number (Ca), viscosity ratio (M), and the media heterogeneity. The non-wetting fluid saturation (S{sub nw}) is found to increase nearly linearly with logCa for each constant M. Increasing M (viscosity ratio of non-wetting fluid to wetting fluid) or decreasing the media heterogeneity can enhance the stability of the displacement process, resulting in an increase in S{sub nw}. In either pore networks, the specific interfacial length is linearly proportional to S{sub nw} during drainage with equal proportionality constant for all cases excluding those revealing considerable viscous fingering. Our numerical results confirm the previous experimental finding that the steady state specific interfacial length exhibits a linear dependence on S{sub nw} for either favorable (M ≥ 1) or unfavorable (M < 1) displacement, and the slope is slightly higher for the unfavorable displacement.

  18. Adapting SAFT-γ perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. I. Homogeneous fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2013-12-21

    In this work, we aim to develop a version of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT)-γ equation of state (EOS) that is compatible with united-atom force fields, rather than experimental data. We rely on the accuracy of the force fields to provide the relation to experimental data. Although, our objective is a transferable theory of interfacial properties for soft and fused heteronuclear chains, we first clarify the details of the SAFT-γ approach in terms of site-based simulations for homogeneous fluids. We show that a direct comparison of Helmholtz free energy to molecular simulation, in the framework of a third order Weeks-Chandler-Andersen perturbation theory, leads to an EOS that takes force field parameters as input and reproduces simulation results for Vapor-Liquid Equilibria (VLE) calculations. For example, saturated liquid density and vapor pressure of n-alkanes ranging from methane to dodecane deviate from those of the Transferable Potential for Phase Equilibria (TraPPE) force field by about 0.8% and 4%, respectively. Similar agreement between simulation and theory is obtained for critical properties and second virial coefficient. The EOS also reproduces simulation data of mixtures with about 5% deviation in bubble point pressure. Extension to inhomogeneous systems and united-atom site types beyond those used in description of n-alkanes will be addressed in succeeding papers.

  19. Adapting SAFT-γ perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. I. Homogeneous fluids.

    PubMed

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F; Elliott, J Richard

    2013-12-21

    In this work, we aim to develop a version of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT)-γ equation of state (EOS) that is compatible with united-atom force fields, rather than experimental data. We rely on the accuracy of the force fields to provide the relation to experimental data. Although, our objective is a transferable theory of interfacial properties for soft and fused heteronuclear chains, we first clarify the details of the SAFT-γ approach in terms of site-based simulations for homogeneous fluids. We show that a direct comparison of Helmholtz free energy to molecular simulation, in the framework of a third order Weeks-Chandler-Andersen perturbation theory, leads to an EOS that takes force field parameters as input and reproduces simulation results for Vapor-Liquid Equilibria (VLE) calculations. For example, saturated liquid density and vapor pressure of n-alkanes ranging from methane to dodecane deviate from those of the Transferable Potential for Phase Equilibria (TraPPE) force field by about 0.8% and 4%, respectively. Similar agreement between simulation and theory is obtained for critical properties and second virial coefficient. The EOS also reproduces simulation data of mixtures with about 5% deviation in bubble point pressure. Extension to inhomogeneous systems and united-atom site types beyond those used in description of n-alkanes will be addressed in succeeding papers.

  20. Stochastic modeling of fluid-particle flows in homogeneous cluster-induced turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Alessio; Chibbaro, Sergio; Fox, Rodney; Salvetti, Maria Vittoria

    2016-11-01

    Inertial particles in turbulent flows are characterized by preferential concentration and segregation and, at sufficient mass loading, dense clusters may spontaneously generate due to momentum coupling between the phases. These clusters in turn can generate and sustain turbulence in the fluid phase, which we refer to as cluster-induced turbulence (CIT). In the present work, we tackle the problem of homogeneous gravity driven CIT in the framework of a stochastic model, based on a Lagrangian formalism which includes naturally the Eulerian one. A rigorous formalism has been put forward focusing in particular on the terms responsible of the two-way coupling in the carrier phase, which is the key mechanism in this type of flow. Moreover, the decomposition of the particle-phase velocity into the spatially correlated and uncorrelated components has been used allowing to identify the contributions to the correlated fluctuating energy and to the granular temperature. Tests have been performed taking into account also the effects of collisions between particles. Results are compared against DNS, and they show a good accuracy in predicting first and second order moments of particle velocity and fluid velocity seen by particles.

  1. Metabolic stability of new anticonvulsants in body fluids and organ homogenates.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Dorota; Goldnik, Anna; Pluciński, Franciszek; Mazurek, Aleksander P; Jakubiak, Anna; Lis, Ewa; Tazbir, Piotr; Koziorowska, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    The stability as a function of time of compounds with established anticonvulsant activity: picolinic acid benzylamide (Pic-BZA), picolinic acid 2-fluorobenzylamide (Pic-2-F-BZA), picolinic acid 3-fluorobenzylamide (Pic-3-F-BZA), picolinic acid 4-fluorobenzylamide (Pic-4-F-BZA) and picolinic acid 2-methylbenzylamide (Pic-2-Me-BZA) in body fluids and homogenates of body organs were determined after incubation. It was found that they decompose relatively rapidly in liver and kidney and are stable against enzymes present in body fluids and some organs. These results are consistent with the bond strength expressed as total energy of amide bonds (calculated by quantum chemical methods) in the studied anticonvulsants. The calculated values of the amide bond energy are: 199.4 kcal/mol, 200.2 kcal/mol, 207.5 kcal/mol, 208.4 kcal/mol and 198.2 kcal/mol, respectively. The strength of the amide bonds in the studied anticonvulsants correctly reflects their stability in liver or kidney.

  2. Retention of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus infectivity in fish tissue homogenates and fluids stored at three temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, J.; Mulcahy, D.

    1983-01-01

    Pools of brain, kidney, spleen, liver and gut tissues from several rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri Richardson, and whole sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), fry were homogenized with a known amount of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Virus was also added to ovarian fluids and sera pooled from several rainbow trout. The plaque assay was used to determine the retention of IHNV infectivity after different storage periods at 20°C, 4°C and -20°C. The work was used to evaluate homogenization as a remote field treatment of IHNV samples before shipment to the laboratory. Maintenance of viral infectivity varied widely among different homogenates and fluids. For short-term storage, 4°C was generally the most efficient temperature for preserving infectious virus in ovarian fluids, sera and homogenates of eggs, spleen, whole fry and brain, while infectivity was most efficiently preserved in kidney and liver homogenates by storage at -20°C. Infectious virus was not detected in any sample stored for one year at -20°C. Variations in retention of viral infectivity make homogenization of samples in the field followed by transfer to the laboratory unacceptable.

  3. Retention of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus infectivity in fish tissue homogenates and fluids stored at three temperatures.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, J.; Mulcahy, D.

    1983-01-01

    Pools of brain, kidney, spleen, liver and gut tissues from several rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri Richardson, and whole sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka (Walbaum), fry were homogenized with a known amount of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Virus was also added to ovarian fluids and sera pooled from several rainbow trout. The plaque assay was used to determine the retention of IHNV infectivity after different storage periods at 20°C, 4°C and —20°C. The work was used to evaluate homogenization as a remote field treatment of IHNV samples before shipment to the laboratory. Maintenance of viral infectivity varied widely among different homogenates and fluids. For short-term storage, 4°C was generally the most efficient temperature for preserving infectious virus in ovarian fluids, Sera and homogenates of eggs, spleen, whole fry and brain, while infectivity was most efficiently preserved in kidney and liver homogenates by storage at −20°C. Infectious virus was not detected in any sample stored for one year at −20°C. Variations in retention of viral infectivity make homogenization of samples in the field followed by transfer to the laboratory unacceptable.

  4. Assessment of magnetic fluid stability in non-homogeneous magnetic field of a single-tooth magnetic fluid sealer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefyev, I. M.; Demidenko, O. V.; Saikin, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    A special experimental stand has been developed and made to test magnetic fluid. It represents a single-tooth magnetic fluid sealer. The type of dependence of the pressure differential on magnetic fluid sealer operation time is used as a criterion to determine magnetic fluid stability and magnetic fluid sealer service life under such conditions. The siloxane-based magnetic fluid was used as the test sample. The colloidal stability as well as stability of the synthesized magnetic fluid in magnetic fields in static mode were determined. It has been found that the obtained magnetic fluid is stable in static mode and, consequently, can be used to conduct necessary tests on stand. Short-term and life tests on stand have shown that MF remains stable and efficient for at least 360 days of continuous utilization.

  5. A homogenization approach for characterization of the fluid-solid coupling parameters in Biot's equations for acoustic poroelastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, K.; van Dommelen, J. A. W.; Göransson, P.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a homogenization method is proposed to obtain the parameters of Biot's poroelastic theory from a multiscale perspective. It is assumed that the behavior of a macroscopic material point can be captured through the response of a microscopic Representative Volume Element (RVE) consisting of both a solid skeleton and a gaseous fluid. The macroscopic governing equations are assumed to be Biot's poroelastic equations and the RVE is governed by the conservation of linear momentum and the adopted linear constitutive laws under the isothermal condition. With boundary conditions relying on the macroscopic solid displacement and fluid pressure, the homogenized solid stress and fluid displacement are obtained based on energy consistency. This homogenization framework offers an approach to obtain Biot's parameters directly through the response of the RVE in the regime of Darcy's flow where the pressure gradient is dominating. A numerical experiment is performed in the form of a sound absorption test on a porous material with an idealized partially open microstructure that is described by Biot's equations where the parameters are obtained through the proposed homogenization approach. The result is evaluated by comparison with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS), showing a superior performance of this approach compared to an alternative semi-phenomenological model for estimating Biot's parameters of the studied porous material.

  6. Inhomogeneous cartilage properties enhance superficial interstitial fluid support and frictional properties, but do not provide a homogeneous state of stress.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Park, Seonghun; Eckstein, Felix; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2003-10-01

    It has been well established that articular cartilage is compositionally and mechanically inhomogenous through its depth. To what extent this structural inhomogeneity is a prerequisite for appropriate cartilage function and integrity is not well understood. The first hypothesis to be tested in this study was that the depth-dependent inhomogeneity of the cartilage acts to maximize the interstitial fluid load support at the articular surface, to provide efficient frictional and wear properties. The second hypothesis was that the inhomogeneity produces a more homogeneous state of elastic stress in the matrix than would be achieved with uniform properties. We have, for the first time, simultaneously determined depth-dependent tensile and compressive properties of human patellofemoral cartilage from unconfined compression stress relaxation tests. The results show that the tensile modulus increases significantly from 4.1 +/- 1.9 MPa in the deep zone to 8.3 +/- 3.7 MPa at the superficial zone, while the compressive modulus decreases from 0.73 +/- 0.26 MPa to 0.28 +/- 0.16 MPa. The experimental measurements were then implemented with the finite-element method to compute the response of an inhomogeneous and homogeneous cartilage layer to loading. The finite-element models demonstrate that structural inhomogeneity acts to increase the interstitial fluid load support at the articular surface. However, the state of stress, strain, or strain energy density in the solid matrix remained inhomogeneous through the depth of the articular layer, whether or not inhomogeneous material properties were employed. We suggest that increased fluid load support at the articular surface enhances the frictional and wear properties of articular cartilage, but that the tissue is not functionally adapted to produce homogeneous stress, strain, or strain energy density distributions. Interstitial fluid pressurization, but not a homogeneous elastic stress distribution, appears thus to be a

  7. MHD Convective Flow of Jeffrey Fluid Due to a Curved Stretching Surface with Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Maria; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks at the flow of Jeffrey fluid due to a curved stretching sheet. Effect of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions is considered. An electrically conducting fluid in the presence of applied magnetic field is considered. Convective boundary conditions model the heat transfer analysis. Transformation method reduces the governing nonlinear partial differential equations into the ordinary differential equations. Convergence of the obtained series solutions is explicitly discussed. Characteristics of sundry parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are analyzed by plotting graphs. Computations for pressure, skin friction coefficient and surface heat transfer rate are presented and examined. It is noted that fluid velocity and temperature through curvature parameter are enhanced. Increasing values of Biot number correspond to the enhancement in temperature and Nusselt number.

  8. MHD Convective Flow of Jeffrey Fluid Due to a Curved Stretching Surface with Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, Maria; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This paper looks at the flow of Jeffrey fluid due to a curved stretching sheet. Effect of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions is considered. An electrically conducting fluid in the presence of applied magnetic field is considered. Convective boundary conditions model the heat transfer analysis. Transformation method reduces the governing nonlinear partial differential equations into the ordinary differential equations. Convergence of the obtained series solutions is explicitly discussed. Characteristics of sundry parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are analyzed by plotting graphs. Computations for pressure, skin friction coefficient and surface heat transfer rate are presented and examined. It is noted that fluid velocity and temperature through curvature parameter are enhanced. Increasing values of Biot number correspond to the enhancement in temperature and Nusselt number. PMID:27583457

  9. Chronic periodic fluid redistribution effect on muscle calcium in healthy subjects during prolonged hypokinesia.

    PubMed

    Zorbas, Yan G; Deogenov, Victor A; Merkov, Pavel L; Federenko, Yuri F

    2012-05-01

    Studies have shown that chronic periodic fluid shifting upwards is not sensed as excessive fluid volume and excretion mechanisms are not activated. To determine if chronic periodic fluid and volume shifting upwards can affect muscle calcium (Ca(2+)) during hypokinesia (HK) we measured muscle Ca(2+) content, plasma Ca(2+) concentration, and Ca(2+) losses in urine and feces. Studies were conducted on 40 healthy male volunteers. They were divided into four equal groups: active control subjects (ACS), hypokinetic subjects (HKS), periodic fluid redistribution control subjects (PFRCS), and periodic fluid redistribution hypokinetic subjects (PFRHS). Plasma Ca(2+) level decreased (p < 0.05) in Ca(2+) repleted muscle, muscle Ca(2+) level increased (p < 0.05), and Ca(2+) losses in urine and feces decreased (p < 0.05) in the PFRHS group compared with the HKS group. Plasma Ca(2+) level increased (p < 0.05) in Ca(2+) deficient muscle, muscle Ca(2+) level decreased (p < 0.05), and Ca(2+) losses in urine and feces increased (p < 0.05) in the HKS group compared with their pre-experimental levels and the values in their respective control groups (ACS and PFRCS). This study shows that the muscle Ca(2+) content increases and Ca(2+) excretion decreases, suggesting the clinical potential of chronic periodic fluid and volume redistribution in treatment of muscle Ca(2+) deficiency.

  10. The motor cortical representation of a muscle is not homogeneous in brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jo Armour; Albishi, Alaa; Babikian, Sarine; Asavasopon, Skulpan; Fisher, Beth E; Kutch, Jason J

    2017-06-19

    Functional connectivity patterns of the motor cortical representational area of single muscles have not been extensively mapped in humans, particularly for the axial musculature. Functional connectivity may provide a neural substrate for adaptation of muscle activity in axial muscles that have both voluntary and postural functions. The purpose of this study was to combine brain stimulation and neuroimaging to both map the cortical representation of the external oblique (EO) in primary motor cortex (M1) and supplementary motor area (SMA), and to establish the resting-state functional connectivity associated with this representation. Motor-evoked potentials were elicited from the EO muscle in stimulation locations encompassing M1 and SMA. The coordinates of locations with the largest motor-evoked potentials were confirmed with task-based fMRI imaging during EO activation. The M1 and SMA components of the EO representation demonstrated significantly different resting-state functional connectivity with other brain regions: the SMA representation of the EO muscle was significantly more connected to the putamen and cerebellum, and the M1 representation of the EO muscle was significantly more connected to somatosensory cortex and the superior parietal lobule. This study confirms the representation of a human axial muscle in M1 and SMA, and demonstrates for the first time that different parts of the cortical representation of a human axial muscle have resting-state functional connectivity with distinct brain regions. Future studies can use the brain regions of interest we have identified here to test the association between resting-state functional connectivity and control of the axial muscles.

  11. Vibrations of a circular cylinder submerged in a fluid with a non-homogeneous upper boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturova, I. V.

    2014-05-01

    Results of solving a linear problem on steady vibrations of a horizontal cylinder submerged in a fluid, whose upper boundary is partially closed by a solid lid, whereas the rest of the surface is free, are presented. Multipole and eigenfunction expansion methods are used. Reciprocity relations are derived. Added-mass and damping coefficients and the wave amplitudes on the free surface of the fluid are calculated.

  12. Turbulent Fluid Motion 5: Fourier Analysis, the Spectral Form of the Continuum Equations, and Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Background material on Fourier analysis and on the spectral form of the continuum equations, both averaged and unaveraged, are given. The equations are applied to a number of cases of homogeneous turbulence with and without mean gradients. Spectral transfer of turbulent activity between scales of motion is studied in some detail. The effects of mean shear, heat transfer, normal strain, and buoyancy are included in the analyses.

  13. Assessing the function of mitochondria in cytosolic context in human skeletal muscle: adopting high-resolution respirometry to homogenate of needle biopsy tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Ziak, Jakub; Krajcova, Adela; Jiroutkova, Katerina; Nemcova, Vlasta; Dzupa, Valer; Duska, Frantisek

    2015-03-01

    Using skeletal muscle homogenates for respirometry has many advantages, but the main challenge is avoiding the damage to outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and complex I. By optimising the amount of muscle and careful titration of substrates and inhibitors we developed a new protocol and compared it to isolated mitochondria. We found acceptable damage to OMM (~10-15% increment of oxygen flux after addition of cytochrome c) and to complex I (~70% of electron flux). Homogenate retained ~90% of phosphorylation capacity of isolated mitochondria. The use of fresh homogenate was crucial as mitochondrial function declined rapidly after 2-3h of cold storage.

  14. Unbound drug concentration in brain homogenate and cerebral spinal fluid at steady state as a surrogate for unbound concentration in brain interstitial fluid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingrong; Van Natta, Kristine; Yeo, Helen; Vilenski, Olga; Weller, Paul E; Worboys, Philip D; Monshouwer, Mario

    2009-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the accuracy of using unbound brain concentration determined by a brain homogenate method (C(ub)), cerebral spinal fluid concentration (C(CSF)), and unbound plasma concentration (C(up)) as a surrogate for brain interstitial fluid concentration determined by brain microdialysis (C(m)). Nine compounds-carbamazepine, citalopram, ganciclovir, metoclopramide, N-desmethylclozapine, quinidine, risperidone, 9-hydroxyrisperidone, and thiopental-were selected, and each was administered as an intravenous bolus (up to 5 mg/kg) followed by a constant intravenous infusion (1-9 mg/kg/h) for 6 h in rats. For eight of the nine compounds, the C(ub)s were within 3-fold of their C(m); thiopental had a C(m) 4-fold of its C(ub). The C(CSF)s of eight of the nine compounds were within 3-fold of their corresponding C(m); 9-hydroxyrisperidone showed a C(CSF) 5-fold of its C(m). The C(up)s of five of the nine compounds were within 3-fold of their C(m); four compounds (ganciclovir, metoclopramide, quinidine, and 9-hydroxyrisperidone) had C(up)s 6- to 14-fold of their C(m). In conclusion, the C(ub) and C(CSF) were within 3-fold of the C(m) for the majority of the compounds tested. The C(up)s were within 3-fold of C(m) for lipophilic non-P-glycoprotein (-P-gp) substrates and greater than 3-fold of C(m) for hydrophilic or P-gp substrates. The present study indicates that the brain homogenate and cerebral spinal fluid methods may be used as surrogate methods to predict brain interstitial fluid concentrations within 3-fold of error in drug discovery and development settings.

  15. Deformable, rigid, and inviscid elliptical inclusions in a homogeneous incompressible anisotropic viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Raymond C.

    2009-04-01

    The solution for stress, rate of deformation, and vorticity in an incompressible anisotropic viscous cylindrical inclusion with elliptical cross-section embedded in an incompressible, homogeneous anisotropic viscous medium subjected to a far-field homogeneous rate of deformation is presented. The rate of rotation of a single rigid elliptical inclusion is independent of the ratio of the principal viscosity in "foliation-parallel" shortening or extension to that in foliation-parallel shear, m = ηn/ ηs, and is hence given by the well-known result for the isotropic medium. An analytical expression shows that a thin, very weak elliptical inclusion rotates as though it were a material line in a homogeneous medium [Kocher, T., Mancktelow, N.S., 2005. Dynamic reverse modeling of flanking structures: a source of quantitative kinematic information. Journal of Structural Geology 27, 1346-1354; Kocher, T., Mancktelow, N.S., 2006. Flanking structure development in anisotropic viscous rock. Journal of Structural Geology 28, 1139-1145]. The sense of slip and slip rate across such an inclusion depends on m. The behavior of an isotropic inclusion with viscosity η∗in a medium deforming in simple shear parallel to its foliation plane, depends on m and R = η∗/ ηn; R is the quantity of the same name in Bilby and Kolbuszewski [Bilby, B.A., Kolbuszewski, M.L., 1977. The finite deformation of an inhomogeneity in two-dimensional slow viscous incompressible flow. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series A - Mathematical and Physical Sciences 355, 335-353] when the host is isotropic, m = 1. R and m determine ranges of qualitatively different behavior in a finite shearing deformation. For mR = η∗/ ηs < 2, all inclusions, irrespective of initial aspect ratio and orientation, are stretched to indefinitely large values and their long axis approaches the shear plane. For mR > 2, depending on initial aspect ratio, a/ b, and orientation to the shear plane, ϕ, the inclusions

  16. Power-law decay of the velocity autocorrelation function of a granular fluid in the homogeneous cooling state.

    PubMed

    Brey, J Javier; Ruiz-Montero, M J

    2015-01-01

    The hydrodynamic part of the velocity autocorrelation function of a granular fluid in the homogeneous cooling state has been calculated by using mode-coupling theory for a finite system with periodic boundary conditions. The existence of the shearing instability, leading to a divergent behavior of the velocity flow fluctuations, is taken into account. A time region in which the velocity autocorrelation function exhibits a power-law decay, when time is measured by the number of collisions per particle, has been been identified. Also the explicit form of the exponential asymptotic long time decay has been obtained. The theoretical prediction for the power-law decay is compared with molecular dynamics simulation results, and a good agreement is found, after taking into account finite size corrections. The effects of approaching the shearing instability are also explored.

  17. MHD Stagnation Point Flow of Williamson Fluid over a Stretching Cylinder with Variable Thermal Conductivity and Homogeneous/Heterogeneous Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal, M.; Sagheer, M.; Hussain, S.; Mehmood, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The present study reveals the effect of homogeneous/hetereogeneous reaction on stagnation point flow of Williamson fluid in the presence of magnetohydrodynamics and heat generation/absorption coefficient over a stretching cylinder. Further the effects of variable thermal conductivity and thermal stratification are also considered. The governing partial differential equations are converted to ordinary differential equations with the help of similarity transformation. The system of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations is then solved by shooting technique. MATLAB shooting code is validated by comparison with the previously published work in limiting case. Results are further strengthened when the present results are compared with MATLAB built-in function bvp4c. Effects of prominent parameters are deliberated graphically for the velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. Skin-friction coefficient and Nusselt number for the different parameters are investigated with the help of tables.

  18. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  19. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  20. On the stability of discrete tripole, quadrupole, Thomson' vortex triangle and square in a two-layer/homogeneous rotating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurakin, Leonid G.; Ostrovskaya, Irina V.; Sokolovskiy, Mikhail A.

    2016-05-01

    A two-layer quasigeostrophic model is considered in the f-plane approximation. The stability of a discrete axisymmetric vortex structure is analyzed for the case when the structure consists of a central vortex of arbitrary intensity Γ and two/three identical peripheral vortices. The identical vortices, each having a unit intensity, are uniformly distributed over a circle of radius R in a single layer. The central vortex lies either in the same or in another layer. The problem has three parameters ( R, Γ, α), where α is the difference between layer thicknesses. A limiting case of a homogeneous fluid is also considered. A limiting case of a homogeneous fluid is also considered. The theory of stability of steady-state motions of dynamic systems with a continuous symmetry group G is applied. The two definitions of stability used in the study are Routh stability and G-stability. The Routh stability is the stability of a one-parameter orbit of a steady-state rotation of a vortex multipole, and the G-stability is the stability of a three-parameter invariant set O G , formed by the orbits of a continuous family of steady-state rotations of a multipole. The problem of Routh stability is reduced to the problem of stability of a family of equilibria of a Hamiltonian system. The quadratic part of the Hamiltonian and the eigenvalues of the linearization matrix are studied analytically. The cases of zero total intensity of a tripole and a quadrupole are studied separately. Also, the Routh stability of a Thomson vortex triangle and square was proved at all possible values of problem parameters. The results of theoretical analysis are sustained by numerical calculations of vortex trajectories.

  1. Muscle fluid shift does not alter EMG global variables during sustained isometric actions.

    PubMed

    von Walden, Ferdinand; Pozzo, Marco; Elman, Ted; Tesch, Per A

    2008-10-01

    Body fluid redistribution occurs in astronauts traveling in space, potentially altering interstitial water content and hence impedance. This in turn may impact the features of electromyographic (EMG) signals measured to compare in-flight muscle function with pre- and post-flight conditions. Thus, the current study aimed at investigating the influence of similar fluid shifts on EMG spectral variables during muscle contractile activity. Ten men performed sustained isometric actions (120 s) at 20% and 60% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) following 1-h rest in the vertical or supine position. From single differential EMG signals, recorded from the soleus (SOL), the medial (MG) and lateral (LG) gastrocnemius muscles, initial value and rate of change over time (slope) of mean power frequency (MNF) and average rectified value (ARV) were assessed. MNF initial value showed dependence on muscle (P<0.01), but was unaffected by body tilt. MNF rate of change increased (P<0.001) with increased force and differed across muscles (P<0.05), but was not influenced (P=0.85) by altered body position. Thus, fluid shift resulting from vertical to supine tilt had no impact on myoelectrical manifestations of muscle fatigue. Furthermore, since such alteration of body fluid distribution resembles that occurring in microgravity, our findings suggest this may not be a methodological limitation, when comparing EMG fatigue indices on Earth versus in space.

  2. Fluid shifts and muscle function in humans during acute simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Tipton, C. M.; Gollnick, P. D.; Mubarak, S. J.; Tucker, B. J.; Akeson, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The acute effects of simulated weightlessness on transcapillary fluid balance, tissue fluid shifts, muscle function, and triceps surface reflex time were studied in eight supine human subjects who were placed in a 5 degrees head-down tilt position for 8 hr. Results show a cephalic fluid shift from the legs as indicated by facial edema, nasal congestion, increased urine flow, decreased creatinine excretion, reduced calf girth, and decreased lower leg volume. The interstitial fluid pressure in the tibialis anterior muscle and subcutaneous tissue of the lower leg was found to fall significantly, while other transcapillary pressures (capillary and interstitial fluid colloid osmotic pressures) were relatively unchanged. The total water content of the soleus muscle was unchanged during the head-down tilt. After head-down tilt, isometric strength and isokinetic strength of the plantar flexors were unchanged, while the triceps surae reflex time associated with plantar flexion movement slowed slightly. These results demonstrate a dehydration effect of head-down tilt on muscle and subcutaneous tissue of the lower leg that may affect muscle function.

  3. Fluid shifts and muscle function in humans during acute simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Tipton, C. M.; Gollnick, P. D.; Mubarak, S. J.; Tucker, B. J.; Akeson, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    The acute effects of simulated weightlessness on transcapillary fluid balance, tissue fluid shifts, muscle function, and triceps surface reflex time were studied in eight supine human subjects who were placed in a 5 degrees head-down tilt position for 8 hr. Results show a cephalic fluid shift from the legs as indicated by facial edema, nasal congestion, increased urine flow, decreased creatinine excretion, reduced calf girth, and decreased lower leg volume. The interstitial fluid pressure in the tibialis anterior muscle and subcutaneous tissue of the lower leg was found to fall significantly, while other transcapillary pressures (capillary and interstitial fluid colloid osmotic pressures) were relatively unchanged. The total water content of the soleus muscle was unchanged during the head-down tilt. After head-down tilt, isometric strength and isokinetic strength of the plantar flexors were unchanged, while the triceps surae reflex time associated with plantar flexion movement slowed slightly. These results demonstrate a dehydration effect of head-down tilt on muscle and subcutaneous tissue of the lower leg that may affect muscle function.

  4. Dynamic Structure Factor and Transport Coefficients of a Homogeneously Driven Granular Fluid in Steady State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmayr-Lee, Katharina; Zippelius, Annette; Aspelmeier, Timo

    2011-03-01

    We study the dynamic structure factor of a granular fluid of hard spheres, driven into a stationary nonequilibrium state by balancing the energy loss due to inelastic collisions with the energy input due to driving. The driving is chosen to conserve momentum, so that fluctuating hydrodynamics predicts the existence of sound modes. We present results of computer simulations which are based on an event driven algorithm. The dynamic structure factor F (q , ω) is determined for volume fractions 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 and coefficients of normal restitution 0.8 and 0.9. We observe sound waves, and compare our results for F (q , ω) with the predictions of generalized fluctuating hydrodynamics which takes into account that temperature fluctuations decay either diffusively or with a finite relaxation rate, depending on wave number and inelasticity. We determine the speed of sound and the transport coefficients and compare them to the results of kinetic theory. K.V.L. thanks the Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Goettingen, for financial support and hospitality.

  5. Characterization and evaluation in vivo of baicalin-nanocrystals prepared by an ultrasonic-homogenization-fluid bed drying method.

    PubMed

    Shi-Ying, Jin; Jin, Han; Shi-Xiao, Jin; Qing-Yuan, Lv; Jin-Xia, Bai; Chen, Hong-Ge; Rui-Sheng, Li; Wei, Wu; Hai-Long, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    To improve the absorption and bioavailability of baicalin using a nanocrystal (or nanosuspension) drug delivery system. A tandem, ultrasonic-homogenization-fluid bed drying technology was applied to prepare baicalin-nanocrystal dried powders, and the physicochemical properties of baicalin-nanocrystals were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, physical stability, and solubility experiments. Furthermore, in situ intestine single-pass perfusion experiments and pharmacokinetics in rats were performed to make a comparison between the microcrystals of baicalin and pure baicalin in their absorption properties and bioavailability in vivo. The mean particle size of baicalin-nanocrystals was 236 nm, with a polydispersity index of 0.173, and a zeta potential value of -34.8 mV, which provided a guarantee for the stability of the reconstituted nanosuspension. X-Ray diffraction results indicated that the crystallinity of baicalin was decreased through the ultrasonic-homogenization process. Physical stability experiments showed that the prepared baicalin-nanocrystals were sufficiently stable. It was shown that the solubility of baicalin in the form of nanocrystals, at 495 μg·mL(-1), was much higher than the baicalin-microcrystals and the physical mixture (135 and 86.4 μg·mL(-1), respectively). In situ intestine perfusion experiments demonstrated a clear advantage in the dissolution and absorption characteristics for baicalin-nanocrystals compared to the other formulations. In addition, after oral administration to rats, the particle size decrease from the micron to nanometer range exhibited much higher in vivo bioavailability (with the AUC(0-t) value of 206.96 ± 21.23 and 127.95 ± 14.41 mg·L(-1)·h(-1), respectively). The nanocrystal drug delivery system using an ultrasonic-homogenization-fluid bed drying process is able to improve the absorption and in vivo bioavailability of baicalin, compared with pure

  6. Photonic Crystal Enhancement of a Homogeneous Fluorescent Assay using Submicron Fluid Channels Fabricated by E-jet Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yafang; Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G.; Cunningham, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the enhancement of a liquid-based homogenous fluorescence assay using the resonant electric fields from a photonic crystal (PC) surface. Because evanescent fields are confined to the liquid volume nearest to the photonic crystal, we developed a simple approach for integrating a PC fabricated on a silicon substrate within a fluid channel with submicron height, using electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing of a light-curable epoxy adhesive to define the fluid channel pattern. The PC is excited by a custom-designed compact instrument that illuminates the PC with collimated light that precisely matches the resonant coupling condition when the PC is covered with aqueous media. Using a molecular beacon nucleic acid fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) probe for a specific miRNA sequence, we demonstrate an 8x enhancement of the fluorescence emission signal, compared to performing the same assay without exciting resonance in the PC detecting a miRNA sequence at a concentration of 62nM from a liquid volume of only ~20 nl. The approach may be utilized for any liquid-based fluorescence assay for applications in point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, or pathogen detection. PMID:24376013

  7. Photonic crystal enhancement of a homogeneous fluorescent assay using submicron fluid channels fabricated by E-jet patterning.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yafang; Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate the enhancement of a liquid-based homogenous fluorescence assay using the resonant electric fields from a photonic crystal (PC) surface. Because evanescent fields are confined to the liquid volume nearest to the photonic crystal, we developed a simple approach for integrating a PC fabricated on a silicon substrate within a fluid channel with submicron height, using electrohydrodynamic jet (e-jet) printing of a light-curable epoxy adhesive to define the fluid channel pattern. The PC is excited by a custom-designed compact instrument that illuminates the PC with collimated light that precisely matches the resonant coupling condition when the PC is covered with aqueous media. Using a molecular beacon nucleic acid fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) probe for a specific miRNA sequence, we demonstrate an 8× enhancement of the fluorescence emission signal, compared to performing the same assay without exciting resonance in the PC detecting a miRNA sequence at a concentration of 62 nM from a liquid volume of only ∼20 nL. The approach may be utilized for any liquid-based fluorescence assay for applications in point-of-care diagnostics, environmental monitoring, or pathogen detection.

  8. Double porosity in fluid-saturated elastic media: deriving effective parameters by hierarchical homogenization of static problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohan, Eduard; Naili, Salah; Lemaire, Thibault

    2016-09-01

    We propose a model of complex poroelastic media with periodic or locally periodic structures observed at microscopic and mesoscopic scales. Using a two-level homogenization procedure, we derive a model coherent with the Biot continuum, describing effective properties of such a hierarchically structured poroelastic medium. The effective material coefficients can be computed using characteristic responses of the micro- and mesostructures which are solutions of local problems imposed in representative volume elements describing the poroelastic medium at the two levels of heterogeneity. In the paper, we discus various combinations of the interface between the micro- and mesoscopic porosities, influence of the fluid compressibility, or solid incompressibility. Gradient of porosity is accounted for when dealing with locally periodic structures. Derived formulae for computing the poroelastic material coefficients characterize not only the steady-state responses with static fluid, but are relevant also for quasistatic problems. The model is applicable in geology, or in tissue biomechanics, in particular for modeling canalicular-lacunar porosity of bone which can be characterized at several levels.

  9. An integrated muscle mechanic-fluid dynamic model of lamprey swimming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chia-Yu; Tytell, Eric; Fauci, Lisa

    2009-11-01

    In an effort towards a detailed understanding of the generation and control of vertebrate locomotion, including the role of the CPG and its interactions with reflexive feedback, muscle mechanics, and external fluid dynamics, we study a simple vertebrate, the lamprey. Lamprey body undulations are a result of a wave of neural activation that passes from head to tail, causing a wave of muscle activation. These active forces are mediated by passive structural forces. We present recent results from a model that fully couples a viscous, incompressible fluid with nonlinear muscle mechanics. We measure the dependence of the phase lag between activation wave and mechanical wave as a function of model parameters, such as body stiffness and muscle strength. Simulation results are compared to experiments utilizing both real and synthetic lamprey.

  10. Homogeneous nucleation in vapor-liquid phase transition of Lennard-Jones fluids: a density functional theory approach.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Satinath; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2011-01-14

    Density functional theory (DFT) with square gradient approximation for the free energy functional and a model density profile are used to obtain an analytical expression for the size-dependent free energy of formation of a liquid drop from the vapor through the process of homogeneous nucleation, without invoking the approximations used in classical nucleation theory (CNT). The density of the liquid drop in this work is not the same as the bulk liquid density but it corresponds to minimum free energy of formation of the liquid drop. The theory is applied to study the nucleation phenomena from supersaturated vapor of Lennard-Jones fluid. The barrier height predicted by this theory is significantly lower than the same in CNT which is rather high. The density at the center of the small liquid drop as obtained through optimization is less than the bulk density which is in agreement with other earlier works. Also proposed is a sharp interface limit of the proposed DFT of nucleation, which is as simple as CNT but with a modified barrier height and this modified classical nucleation theory, as we call it, is shown to lead to improved results.

  11. Development of an equivalent homogenous fluid model for pseudo-two-phase (air plus water) flow through fractured rock

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.; Indraratna, B.

    2005-07-01

    Fracture flow of two-phase mixtures is particularly applicable to the coal mining and coal bed methane projects in Australia. A one-dimensional steady-state pseudo-two-phase flow model is proposed for fractured rock. The model considers free flow of a compressible mixture of air and water in an inclined planar fracture and is based upon the conservation of momentum and the 'cubic' law. The flow model is coupled to changes in the stress environment through the fracture normal stiffness, which is related to changes in fracture aperture. The model represents the individual air and water phases as a single equivalent homogenous fluid. Laboratory testing was performed using the two-phase high-pressure triaxial apparatus on 54 mm diameter (approximately 2: 1 height: diameter) borehole cores intersected by induced near-axial fractures. The samples were of Triassic arenaceous fine-medium grained sandstone (known as the Eckersley Formation) that is found locally in the Southern Coalfield of New South Wales. The sample fracture roughness was assessed using a technique based upon Fourier series analysis to objectively attribute a joint roughness coefficient. The proposed two-phase flow model was verified using the recorded laboratory data obtained over a range of triaxial confining pressures (i.e., fracture normal stresses).

  12. A Mathematical Model and MATLAB Code for Muscle-Fluid-Structure Simulations.

    PubMed

    Battista, Nicholas A; Baird, Austin J; Miller, Laura A

    2015-11-01

    This article provides models and code for numerically simulating muscle-fluid-structure interactions (FSIs). This work was presented as part of the symposium on Leading Students and Faculty to Quantitative Biology through Active Learning at the society-wide meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in 2015. Muscle mechanics and simple mathematical models to describe the forces generated by muscular contractions are introduced in most biomechanics and physiology courses. Often, however, the models are derived for simplifying cases such as isometric or isotonic contractions. In this article, we present a simple model of the force generated through active contraction of muscles. The muscles' forces are then used to drive the motion of flexible structures immersed in a viscous fluid. An example of an elastic band immersed in a fluid is first presented to illustrate a fully-coupled FSI in the absence of any external driving forces. In the second example, we present a valveless tube with model muscles that drive the contraction of the tube. We provide a brief overview of the numerical method used to generate these results. We also include as Supplementary Material a MATLAB code to generate these results. The code was written for flexibility so as to be easily modified to many other biological applications for educational purposes.

  13. Fluid transfer from skeletal muscle to blood during hemorrhage. Importance of beta adrenergic vascular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lundvall, J; Hillman, J

    1978-04-01

    Vascular reactions in the cat lower leg in response to short-term (10 min) hemorrhagic hypotension (approximately 80 mmHg) were studied before and after regional blockade of the beta-adrenoceptors. In the muscle region with intact beta-adrenoceptors, hemorrhage raised vascular resistance by about 80% and caused a dilatation of the precapillary sphincters, the latter effect evidenced in terms of a 35% increase of the capillary filtration coefficient. Concomitantly, an absorption of extravascular fluid to the blood stream occurred, a process tending to compensate for the reduction of intravascular fluid volume. After regional beta-blockade there was quite a marked augmentation of the hemorrhage induced increase of vascular resistance whereas the inhibition of precapillary sphincter tone and the transcapillary fluid absorption were almost abolished. These observations indicate that bleeding is associated with a significant beta-adrenergic dilator influence in both the resistance vessels and precapillary sphincters of skeletal muscle and that the beta-dilator mechanism may be essential for the important, compensatory fluid gain from the extravascular to the intravascular space during hemorrhage. The observed beta-adrenergic mediation of the net transcapillary fluid absorption could be ascribed to resetting of the pre-/postcapillary resistance ratio, leading to decreased capillary hydrostatic pressure, and to the dilator influence in the precapillary sphincters, leading to an increased number of the patent capillaries available for the transcapillary fluid exchange.

  14. Vibration control of an artificial muscle manipulator with a magnetorheological fluid brake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomori, H.; Midorikawa, Y.; Nakamura, T.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, proposed applications of robots require them to contact human safely. Therefore, we focus on pneumatic rubber artificial muscle. This actuator is flexible, light, and has high-power density. However, because the artificial muscle is flexible, it vibrates when there is a high load. Therefore, we paid attention to the magnetorheological (MR) fluid. We propose a control method of the MR brake considering energy of the manipulator system. By this control method, MR brake dissipates energy leading to vibration of the manipulator. In this paper, we calculated the energy and controlled the MR brake. And, we deliberated the proposal method by simulation using the dynamic model of the manipulator, and experiment.

  15. Left ventricular muscle and fluid mechanics in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Nucifora, Gaetano; Delgado, Victoria; Bertini, Matteo; Marsan, Nina Ajmone; Van de Veire, Nico R; Ng, Arnold C T; Siebelink, Hans-Marc J; Schalij, Martin J; Holman, Eduard R; Sengupta, Partho P; Bax, Jeroen J

    2010-11-15

    Left ventricular (LV) diastolic filling is characterized by the formation of intraventricular rotational bodies of fluid (termed "vortex rings") that optimize the efficiency of LV ejection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the morphology and dynamics of LV diastolic vortex ring formation early after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), in relation to LV diastolic function and infarct size. A total of 94 patients with a first ST-segment elevation AMI (59 ± 11 years; 78% men) were included. All patients underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention. After 48 hours, the following examinations were performed: 2-dimensional echocardiography with speckle-tracking analysis to assess the LV systolic and diastolic function, the vortex formation time (VFT, a dimensionless index for characterizing vortex formation), and the LV untwisting rate; contrast echocardiography to assess LV vortex morphology; and myocardial contrast echocardiography to identify the infarct size. Patients with a large infarct size (≥ 3 LV segments) had a significantly lower VFT (p <0.001) and vortex sphericity index (p <0.001). On univariate analysis, several variables were significantly related to the VFT, including anterior AMI, LV end-systolic volume, LV ejection fraction, grade of diastolic dysfunction, LV untwisting rate, and infarct size. On multivariate analysis, the LV untwisting rate (β = -0.43, p <0.001) and infarct size (β = -0.33, p = 0.005) were independently associated with VFT. In conclusion, early in AMI, both the LV infarct size and the mechanical sequence of diastolic restoration play key roles in modulating the morphology and dynamics of early diastolic vortex ring formation.

  16. Effects of adding fluids to solid foods on muscle activity and number of chewing cycles.

    PubMed

    van der Bilt, Andries; Engelen, Lina; Abbink, Jan; Pereira, Luciano J

    2007-06-01

    The production of a sufficient amount of saliva is indispensable for good chewing. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that adding fluid to a food will facilitate the chewing process, especially for dry foods. The effect might be larger for subjects with relatively low salivary flow rates. Furthermore, adding fluids that contain mucins or alpha-amylase may have a larger facilitating effect on mastication than the addition of water alone. Twenty subjects chewed on melba toast, breakfast cake, carrot, peanut, and Gouda cheese. In addition, they chewed on these foods after different volumes of water, artificial saliva containing mucins, or a solution of alpha-amylase had been added. Muscle activity and number of chewing strokes until swallowing were measured. The salivary flow rates of the subjects were also determined. Adding fluid to the food significantly reduced the number of chewing cycles and total muscular work (i.e. the integrated surface electromyograpy of masseter and temporalis muscles measured bilaterally, summed for all chewing cycles) until swallowing for all foods, except carrot. The largest effects were observed for melba and cake, which are dry products requiring sufficient saliva to form a coherent bolus safe for swallowing. More facilitation of the chewing process was observed after adding fluid to breakfast cake for subjects with relatively low salivary flow rates. The type of fluid had no significant effect on the chewing process.

  17. A fully resolved fluid-structure-muscle-activation model for esophageal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Wenjun; Bhalla, Amneet P. S.; Griffith, Boyce E.; Johnson, Mark; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2013-11-01

    Esophageal transport is a mechanical and physiological process that transfers the ingested food bolus from the pharynx to the stomach through a multi-layered esophageal tube. The process involves interactions between the bolus, esophageal wall composed of mucosal, circular muscle (CM) and longitudinal muscle (LM) layers, and neurally coordinated muscle activation including CM contraction and LM shortening. In this work, we present a 3D fully-resolved model of esophageal transport based on the immersed boundary method. The model describes the bolus as a Newtonian fluid, the esophageal wall as a multi-layered elastic tube represented by springs and beams, and the muscle activation as a traveling wave of sequential actuation/relaxation of muscle fibers, represented by springs with dynamic rest lengths. Results on intraluminal pressure profile and bolus shape will be shown, which are qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. Effects of activating CM contraction only, LM shortening only or both, for the bolus transport, are studied. A comparison among them can help to identify the role of each type of muscle activation. The support of grant R01 DK56033 and R01 DK079902 from NIH is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Immunocapture-based fluorometric assay for the measurement of neprilysin-specific enzyme activity in brain tissue homogenates and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Miners, James Scott; Verbeek, Marcel M; Rikkert, Marcel Olde; Kehoe, Patrick Gavin; Love, Seth

    2008-01-30

    Neprilysin, a zinc-metalloendopeptidase, has important roles in the physiology and pathology of many diseases such as hypertension, cancer and Alzheimer's disease. We have developed an immunocapture assay to measure the specific enzyme activity of neprilysin in brain tissue homogenates and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The assay uses a neprilysin-specific antibody, previously used in a commercially available ELISA kit, to isolate and immobilise NEP from brain homogenates and CSF, prior to the addition of a fluorogenic peptide substrate (Mca-RPPGFSAFK(Dnp)). This fluorogenic substrate is ordinarily cleaved by multiple enzymes. We have shown that without the immunocapture phase, even under reaction conditions reported to be specific for neprilysin - i.e. in the presence of thiorphan, at pH above 7 - the fluorogenic peptide substrate does not allow neprilysin activity in brain homogenates and CSF to be discriminated from that of other closely related enzymes. The specificity of the immunocapture enzyme activity assay was confirmed by >80% inhibition of substrate cleavage in brain homogenates and CSF in the presence of thiorphan. The assay allows high-throughput analysis and, critically, also ensures a high level of enzyme specificity even when assaying crude tissue homogenates or CSF.

  19. Effect of denervation and reinnervation on oxidation of 6-(C-14) glucose by rat skeletal muscle homogenates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, D. C.; Max, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of denervation and reinnervation of the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle on the oxidation of 6-(C-14) glucose to (C-14)O2 is investigated. Results show that the rate of (C-14)O2 production decreased dramatically following denervation and the decrease became significant 20 days after nerve section. The changes which occurred prior to day 20 apparently reflected the decline of muscle mass. The decreased (C-14)O2 production was found to be due to reduced capacity of the enzymatic system, while there was no change in the apparent affinity for glucose. Results of mixing experiments showed that the loss of oxidative capacity following denervation is not caused by the production of soluble inhibitors by degenerating muscle. Measurements of the (C-14)O2 revealed that oxidative metabolism recovered during reinnervation. The specific activity in reinnervated muscles displayed an 'overshoot' of approximately 50 percent, which returned to control levels by day 60. The time-course of the denervation-mediated change indicates that altered oxidative capacity is secondary to events that initiate dennervation changes in muscle, although diminished oxidative capacity may be of considerable metabolic significance in denervated muscle.

  20. Effect of denervation and reinnervation on oxidation of 6-(C-14) glucose by rat skeletal muscle homogenates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, D. C.; Max, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of denervation and reinnervation of the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle on the oxidation of 6-(C-14) glucose to (C-14)O2 is investigated. Results show that the rate of (C-14)O2 production decreased dramatically following denervation and the decrease became significant 20 days after nerve section. The changes which occurred prior to day 20 apparently reflected the decline of muscle mass. The decreased (C-14)O2 production was found to be due to reduced capacity of the enzymatic system, while there was no change in the apparent affinity for glucose. Results of mixing experiments showed that the loss of oxidative capacity following denervation is not caused by the production of soluble inhibitors by degenerating muscle. Measurements of the (C-14)O2 revealed that oxidative metabolism recovered during reinnervation. The specific activity in reinnervated muscles displayed an 'overshoot' of approximately 50 percent, which returned to control levels by day 60. The time-course of the denervation-mediated change indicates that altered oxidative capacity is secondary to events that initiate dennervation changes in muscle, although diminished oxidative capacity may be of considerable metabolic significance in denervated muscle.

  1. Parametric performance of circumferentially grooved heat pipes with homogeneous and graded-porosity slab wicks at cryogenic temperatures. [methane and ethane working fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groll, M.; Pittman, R. B.; Eninger, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed, potentially high-performance nonarterial wick was extensively tested. This slab wick has an axially varying porosity which can be tailored to match the local stress imposed on the wick. The purpose of the tests was to establish the usefulness of the graded-porosity slab wick at cryogenic temperatures between 110 and 260 K, with methane and ethane as working fluids. For comparison, a homogeneous (i.e., uniform porosity) slab wick was also tested. The tests included: maximum heat pipe performance as a function of fluid inventory, maximum performance as a function of operating temperature, maximum performance as a function of evaporator elevation, and influence of slab wick orientation on performance. The experimental data were compared with theoretical predictions obtained with the GRADE computer program.

  2. The use of a non-Newtonian fluid to visualize the mixing of a pseudo-homogeneous slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Pullum, L.; Welsh, M.C.; Hamilton, N.; Baillie, K.; Kam, P.

    1994-12-31

    The efficient mixing of suspensions is important t many mineral processing extraction operations. A flow visualization study was undertaken by CSIRO using a pseudo-plastic yield stress fluid in a one-ninth scale model mixing vessel with impellers. The non-Newtonian viscosity characteristics of the model fluid matched those of a slurry encountered in the alumina industry. Flow visualization showed that the fluid foil blades on the impellers were stalled and generated radial flows rather than axial flows, leading to massive scaling in the mixing vessel. Repositioning the impellers brought the blades out of stall and oiled to near ideal mixing. Subsequent installation of the modified agitator configuration in the full size vessel confirmed the scale model results.

  3. Intracellular Calcium Changes in Rat Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells in Response to Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ritu; Yellowley, Clare E.; Civelek, Mete; Ainslie, Kristy; Hodgson, Louis; Tarbell, John M.; Donahue, Henry J.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSM) are normally exposed to transmural fluid flow shear stresses, and after vascular injury, blood flow shear stresses are imposed upon them. Since Ca2+ is a ubiquitous intracellular signaling molecule, we examined the effects of fluid flow on intracellular Ca2+ concentration in rat aortic smooth muscle cells to assess VSM responsiveness to shear stress. Cells loaded with fura 2 were exposed to steady flow shear stress levels of 0.5–10.0 dyn/cm2 in a parallel-plate flow chamber. The percentage of cells displaying a rise in cytosolic Ca2+ ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) increased in response to increasing flow, but there was no effect of flow on the ([Ca2+]i) amplitude of responding cells. Addition of Gd3+ (10 μM) or thapsigargin (50 nM) significantly reduced the percentage of cells responding and the response amplitude, suggesting that influx of Ca2+ through ion channels and release from intracellular stores contribute to the rise in ([Ca2+]i) in response to flow. The addition of nifedipine (1 or 10 μM) or ryanodine (10 μM) also significantly reduced the response amplitude, further defining the role of ion channels and intracellular stores in the Ca2+ response. PMID:12051621

  4. Adaptive force regulation of muscle strengthening rehabilitation device with magnetorheological fluids.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shufang; Lu, Ke-Qian; Sun, Jian Qiao; Rudolph, Katherine

    2006-03-01

    In rehabilitation from neuromuscular trauma or injury, strengthening exercises are often prescribed by physical therapists to recover as much function as possible. Strengthening equipment used in clinical settings range from low-cost devices, such as sandbag weights or elastic bands to large and expensive isotonic and isokinetic devices. The low-cost devices are incapable of measuring strength gains and apply resistance based on the lowest level of torque that is produced by a muscle group. Resistance that varies with joint angle can be achieved with isokinetic devices in which angular velocity is held constant and variable torque is generated when the patient attempts to move faster than the device but are ineffective if a patient cannot generate torque rapidly. In this paper, we report the development of a versatile rehabilitation device that can be used to strengthen different muscle groups based on the torque generating capability of the muscle that changes with joint angle. The device is low cost, is smaller than other commercially available machines, and can be programmed to apply resistance that is unique to a particular patient and that will optimize strengthening. The core of the device, a damper with smart magnetorheological fluids, provides passive exercise force. A digital adaptive control is capable of regulating exercise force precisely following the muscle strengthening profile prescribed by a physical therapist. The device could be programmed with artificial intelligence to dynamically adjust the target force profile to optimize rehabilitation effects. The device provides both isometric and isokinetic strength training and can be developed into a small, low-cost device that may be capable of providing optimal strengthening in the home.

  5. Bell palsy and herpes simplex virus: identification of viral DNA in endoneurial fluid and muscle.

    PubMed

    Murakami, S; Mizobuchi, M; Nakashiro, Y; Doi, T; Hato, N; Yanagihara, N

    1996-01-01

    To determine whether herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) causes Bell palsy. Prospective study. University inpatient service. 14 patients with Bell palsy, 9 patients with the Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, and 12 other controls. Viral genomes of HSV-1, varicella-zoster virus, and Epstein-Barr virus were analyzed in clinical samples of facial nerve endoneurial fluid and posterior auricular muscle using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by hybridization with Southern blot analysis. Herpes simplex virus type 1 genomes were detected in 11 of 14 patients (79%) with Bell palsy but not in patients with the Ramsay-Hunt syndrome or in other controls. The nucleotide sequences of the PCR fragments were identical to those of the HSV-1 genome. Herpes simplex virus type 1 is the major etiologic agent in Bell palsy.

  6. Effect of non-homogeneous surface viscosity on the Marangoni migration of a droplet in viscous fluid.

    PubMed

    Manor, O; Lavrenteva, O; Nir, A

    2008-05-01

    Marangoni migration of a single droplet in an unbounded viscous fluid under the additional effect of variable surface viscosity is studied. The surface tension and the surface viscosity depend on concentration of dissolved species. Cases of the motion induced by the presence of a point source and by a given constant concentration gradient are considered. The dependence of the migration velocity on the governing parameters is computed under quasi-stationary approximation. The effect of weak advective transport is studied making use of singular perturbations in the Peclet number, Pe. It is shown that, when the source is time dependent a Basset-type history term appears in the expansion of the concentration and, as a result, the leading order correction to the flow and to the migration velocity is of O(Pe(1/2)). If the source of active substance driving the flow is steady, the effect of convective transport on the migration is weaker.

  7. Influence of high-pressure homogenization, ultrasonication, and supercritical fluid on free astaxanthin extraction from β-glucanase-treated Phaffia rhodozyma cells.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mojeer; Azhar, Mohd; Nangia, Hina; Bhatt, Prakash Chandra; Panda, Bibhu Prasad

    2016-01-01

    In this study astaxanthin production by Phaffia rhodozyma was enhanced by chemical mutation using ethyl methane sulfonate. The mutant produces a higher amount of astaxanthin than the wild yeast strain. In comparison to supercritical fluid technique, high-pressure homogenization is better for extracting astaxanthin from yeast cells. Ultrasonication of dimethyl sulfoxide, hexane, and acetone-treated cells yielded less astaxanthin than β-glucanase enzyme-treated cells. The combination of ultrasonication with β-glucanase enzyme is found to be the most efficient method of extraction among all the tested physical and chemical extraction methods. It gives a maximum yield of 435.71 ± 6.55 µg free astaxanthin per gram of yeast cell mass.

  8. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  9. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  10. The interstitial fluid content in working muscle modifies the cardiovascular response to exercise.

    PubMed

    Schütze, H; Hildebrandt, W; Stegemann, J

    1991-01-01

    The volume of interstitial fluid in the limbs varies considerably, due to hydrostatic effects. As signals from working muscle, responsible for much of the cardiovascular drive, are assumed to be transmitted in this compartment, blood pressure and heart rate could be affected by local or systemic variations in interstitial hydration. Using a special calf ergometer, eight male subjects performed rhythmic aerobic plantar flexions in a supine position with dependent calves for periods of 7 min. During exercise heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen uptake (VO2) and blood lactate concentrations were measured in two different tests, one before and after interstitial calf dehydration through limb elevation for 25 min, compared to the other, a control with unaltered fluid volume in a maintained working position. Impedance plethysmography showed calf volume to be stabilized in the control position. Leg elevation by passive hip flexion to 90 degrees resulted in a fast (vascular) volume decrease lasting less than 2 min, followed by a slow linear fluid loss from the interstitial compartment. Then, when returned to the control position, adjustment of vascular volume was completed within 2 min and exercise could be performed with dehydration remaining in the interstitium only. Cardiovascular response was identical at the start of both tests. However, exercising with dehydrated calves elicited a significantly larger increase in heart rate compared to the control, whereas VO2 was identical. The blood pressure response was shown to be only slightly enhanced. Structural interstitial features varying with hydration, most likely chemical or mechanical ones, may have been responsible for this amplification of signals.

  11. Nitric oxide production by cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells: stimulation by fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Tilton, R. G.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1998-01-01

    This study demonstrated that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) to fluid flow resulted in nitric oxide (NO) production, monitored by nitrite and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production. A rapid burst in nitrite production rate was followed by a more gradual increase throughout the period of flow exposure. Neither the initial burst nor the prolonged nitrite production was dependent on the level of shear stress in the range of 1.1-25 dyn/cm2. Repeated exposure to shear stress after a 30-min static period restimulated nitrite production similar to the initial burst. Ca(2+)-calmodulin antagonists blocked the initial burst in nitrite release. An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocked nitrite production, indicating that changes in nitrite reflect NO production. Treatment with dexamethasone or cycloheximide had no effect on nitrite production. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms showed no immunoreactivity on Western blots, whereas monoclonal antibodies directed against the neuronal NOS gave specific products. These findings suggest that human aortic SMC express a constitutive neuronal NOS isoform, the enzymatic activity of which is modulated by flow.

  12. Nitric oxide production by cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells: stimulation by fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Tilton, R. G.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1998-01-01

    This study demonstrated that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) to fluid flow resulted in nitric oxide (NO) production, monitored by nitrite and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production. A rapid burst in nitrite production rate was followed by a more gradual increase throughout the period of flow exposure. Neither the initial burst nor the prolonged nitrite production was dependent on the level of shear stress in the range of 1.1-25 dyn/cm2. Repeated exposure to shear stress after a 30-min static period restimulated nitrite production similar to the initial burst. Ca(2+)-calmodulin antagonists blocked the initial burst in nitrite release. An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocked nitrite production, indicating that changes in nitrite reflect NO production. Treatment with dexamethasone or cycloheximide had no effect on nitrite production. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms showed no immunoreactivity on Western blots, whereas monoclonal antibodies directed against the neuronal NOS gave specific products. These findings suggest that human aortic SMC express a constitutive neuronal NOS isoform, the enzymatic activity of which is modulated by flow.

  13. Antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote: inhibition of muscle contraction and enterotoxin-induced fluid secretion in rabbit small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Shibata, T

    2001-01-01

    Wood creosote has long been used as an antidiarrheal agent, but its mechanism of action is not well understood. To elucidate the mechanism of its antidiarrheal activity, we have addressed questions whether it inhibits fluid secretion induced by Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in rabbit jejunum in vivo, and whether it inhibits muscle contraction of isolated rabbit ileum ex vivo. Wood creosote (10-100 mg/l) instilled in a ligated loop of jejunum inhibited STa-induced fluid secretion (p < 0.05). It also inhibited the spontaneous phasic, acetylcholine-induced tonic and Ba2+-induced tonic contractions of longitudinal and circular muscles of ileum dose-dependently with IC(50) values of 130-530 mg/l. These data provide further evidence that the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote is attributable to its antisecretory and antimotility effects.

  14. Androgen Action via Testicular Arteriole Smooth Muscle Cells Is Important for Leydig Cell Function, Vasomotion and Testicular Fluid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Michelle; Sharpe, Richard M.; Moffat, Lindsey; Atanassova, Nina; Saunders, Philippa T. K.; Kilter, Sigrid; Bergh, Anders; Smith, Lee B.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of blood flow through the testicular microvasculature by vasomotion is thought to be important for normal testis function as it regulates interstitial fluid (IF) dynamics which is an important intra-testicular transport medium. Androgens control vasomotion, but how they exert these effects remains unclear. One possibility is by signalling via androgen receptors (AR) expressed in testicular arteriole smooth muscle cells. To investigate this and determine the overall importance of this mechanism in testis function, we generated a blood vessel smooth muscle cell-specific AR knockout mouse (SMARKO). Gross reproductive development was normal in SMARKO mice but testis weight was reduced in adulthood compared to control littermates; this reduction was not due to any changes in germ cell volume or to deficits in testosterone, LH or FSH concentrations and did not cause infertility. However, seminiferous tubule lumen volume was reduced in adult SMARKO males while interstitial volume was increased, perhaps indicating altered fluid dynamics; this was associated with compensated Leydig cell failure. Vasomotion was impaired in adult SMARKO males, though overall testis blood flow was normal and there was an increase in the overall blood vessel volume per testis in adult SMARKOs. In conclusion, these results indicate that ablating arteriole smooth muscle AR does not grossly alter spermatogenesis or affect male fertility but does subtly impair Leydig cell function and testicular fluid exchange, possibly by locally regulating microvascular blood flow within the testis. PMID:21049031

  15. Homogeneity Pursuit

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Tracy; Fan, Jianqing; Wu, Yichao

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the homogeneity of coefficients in high-dimensional regression, which extends the sparsity concept and is more general and suitable for many applications. Homogeneity arises when regression coefficients corresponding to neighboring geographical regions or a similar cluster of covariates are expected to be approximately the same. Sparsity corresponds to a special case of homogeneity with a large cluster of known atom zero. In this article, we propose a new method called clustering algorithm in regression via data-driven segmentation (CARDS) to explore homogeneity. New mathematics are provided on the gain that can be achieved by exploring homogeneity. Statistical properties of two versions of CARDS are analyzed. In particular, the asymptotic normality of our proposed CARDS estimator is established, which reveals better estimation accuracy for homogeneous parameters than that without homogeneity exploration. When our methods are combined with sparsity exploration, further efficiency can be achieved beyond the exploration of sparsity alone. This provides additional insights into the power of exploring low-dimensional structures in high-dimensional regression: homogeneity and sparsity. Our results also shed lights on the properties of the fussed Lasso. The newly developed method is further illustrated by simulation studies and applications to real data. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. PMID:26085701

  16. Fluid and electrolyte supplementation after prolonged moderate-intensity exercise enhances muscle glycogen resynthesis in Standardbred horses.

    PubMed

    Waller, Amanda P; Heigenhauser, George J F; Geor, Raymond J; Spriet, Lawrence L; Lindinger, Michael I

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized that postexercise rehydration using a hypotonic electrolyte solution will increase the rate of recovery of whole body hydration, and that this is associated with increased muscle glycogen and electrolyte recovery in horses. Gluteus medius biopsies and jugular venous blood were sampled from six exercise-conditioned Standardbreds on two separate occasions, at rest and for 24 h following a competitive exercise test (CET) designed to simulate the speed and endurance test of a 3-day event. After the CETs, horses were given water ad libitum, and either a hypotonic commercial electrolyte solution (electrolyte) via nasogastric tube, followed by a typical hay/grain meal, or a hay/grain meal alone (control). The CET resulted in decreased total body water and muscle glycogen concentration of 8.4 +/- 0.3 liters and 22.6%, respectively, in the control treatment, and 8.2 +/- 0.4 liters and 21.9% in the electrolyte treatment. Electrolyte resulted in an enhanced rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis and faster restoration of hydration (as evidenced by faster recovery of plasma protein concentration, maintenance of plasma osmolality, and greater muscle intracellular fluid volume) during the recovery period compared with control. There were no differences in muscle Na, K, Cl, or Mg contents between the two treatments. It is concluded that oral administration of a hypotonic electrolyte solution after prolonged moderate-intensity exercise enhanced the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis during the recovery period compared with control. It is speculated that postexercise dehydration may be one key contributor to the slow muscle glycogen replenishment in horses.

  17. The effects of prolonged spaceflight on the regional distribution of fluid, muscle and fat: Biostereometric results from Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittle, M. W.; Herron, R. L.; Cuzzi, J. R.; Keys, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    Biostereometric analysis of body form was performed several times preflight and postflight on the astronauts of all three skylab flights. The analysis was made by deriving the three-dimensional coordinates of numerous points on the body surface from stereoscopic pairs of photographs of the subject, using a stereoplotter. The volume of segments of the body, and of the body as a whole, was calculated by integration of cross sectional areas derived from the coordinate data. All nine astronauts demonstrated regional changes in volume distribution which could be related to changes in total body water, muscle mass, and fat deposits. The change in water resulted from a redistribution of fluid in response to zero gravity. Changes in muscle mass resulted from an alternation in patterns of musclar activity in the absence of gravity, and changes in fat resulted from discrepancies between the individual's caloric needs and his food consumption.

  18. Elastic recoil can either amplify or attenuate muscle-tendon power, depending on inertial vs. fluid dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Richards, Christopher T; Sawicki, Gregory S

    2012-11-21

    Frog jumps exceed muscle power limits. To achieve this, a muscle may store elastic energy in tendon before it is released rapidly, producing 'power amplification' as tendon recoil assists the muscle to accelerate the load. Do the musculoskeletal modifications conferring power amplification help or hinder frog swimming? We used a Hill-type mathematical model of a muscle-tendon (MT) with contractile element (CE) and series elastic element (SEE) properties of frogs. We varied limb masses from 0.3 to 30 g, foot-fin areas from 0.005 to 50 cm(2) and effective mechanical advantage (EMA=in-lever/out-lever) from 0.025 to 0.1. 'Optimal' conditions produced power amplification of ~19% greater than the CE limit. Yet, other conditions caused ~80% reduction of MT power (power attenuation) due to SEE recoil absorbing power from (rather than adding to) the CE. The tendency for elastic recoil to cause power amplification vs. attenuation was load dependent: low fluid drag loads, high limb mass and EMA=0.1 caused power amplification whereas high drag, low mass and low EMA (=0.025) caused attenuation. Power amplification emerged when: (1) CE shortening velocity is 1/3V(max), (2) elastic energy storage is neither too high nor too low, and (3). peak inertial-drag force ratio ≥ ~1.5. Excessive elastic energy storage delayed the timing of recoil, causing power attenuation. Thus our model predicts that for fluid loads, the benefit from a compliant tendon is modest, and when the system is 'poorly tuned' (i.e., inappropriate EMA), MT power attenuation can be severe. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Regional Homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lili; Zuo, Xi-Nian

    2015-01-01

    Much effort has been made to understand the organizational principles of human brain function using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods, among which resting-state fMRI (rfMRI) is an increasingly recognized technique for measuring the intrinsic dynamics of the human brain. Functional connectivity (FC) with rfMRI is the most widely used method to describe remote or long-distance relationships in studies of cerebral cortex parcellation, interindividual variability, and brain disorders. In contrast, local or short-distance functional interactions, especially at a scale of millimeters, have rarely been investigated or systematically reviewed like remote FC, although some local FC algorithms have been developed and applied to the discovery of brain-based changes under neuropsychiatric conditions. To fill this gap between remote and local FC studies, this review will (1) briefly survey the history of studies on organizational principles of human brain function; (2) propose local functional homogeneity as a network centrality to characterize multimodal local features of the brain connectome; (3) render a neurobiological perspective on local functional homogeneity by linking its temporal, spatial, and individual variability to information processing, anatomical morphology, and brain development; and (4) discuss its role in performing connectome-wide association studies and identify relevant challenges, and recommend its use in future brain connectomics studies. PMID:26170004

  20. Evaluation of dynamic changes in interstitial fluid proteome following microdialysis probe insertion trauma in trapezius muscle of healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Turkina, Maria V.; Ghafouri, Nazdar; Gerdle, Björn; Ghafouri, Bijar

    2017-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) has been shown to be a promising technique for sampling of biomarkers. Implantation of MD probe causes an acute tissue trauma and provokes innate response cascades. In order to normalize tissue a two hours equilibration period for analysis of small molecules has been reported previously. However, how the proteome profile changes due to this acute trauma has yet to be fully understood. To characterize the early proteome events induced by this trauma we compared proteome in muscle dialysate collected during the equilibration period with two hours later in “post-trauma”. Samples were collected from healthy females using a 100 kDa MW cut off membrane and analyzed by high sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Proteins involved in stress response, immune system processes, inflammatory responses and nociception from extracellular and intracellular fluid spaces were identified. Sixteen proteins were found to be differentially abundant in samples collected during first two hours in comparison to “post-trauma”. Our data suggests that microdialysis in combination with mass spectrometry may provide potentially new insights into the interstitial proteome of trapezius muscle, yet should be further adjusted for biomarker discovery and diagnostics. Moreover, MD proteome alterations in response to catheter injury may reflect individual innate reactivity. PMID:28266628

  1. [Stability of beta-lactamase inhibitors and beta-lactam antibiotics in parenteral formulations as well as in body fluids and tissue homogenates. Comparison of sulbactam, clavulanic acid, ampicillin and amoxicillin].

    PubMed

    Wildfeuer, A; Räder, K

    1991-01-01

    Stability of beta-Lactamase Inhibitors and beta-Lactam Antibiotics in Parenteral Formulations as Well as in Body Fluids and Tissue Homogenates/Comparative studies with sulbactam, clavulanic acid, ampicillin and amoxicillin. The beta-lactamase inhibitors and the beta-lactam antibiotics are markedly different in chemical stability. The comparative examination of 4 different infusion solutions at 4 degrees C, 25 degrees C and 37 degrees C gives the following sequence of decreasing stability: sulbactam (CAS 68373-14-8), ampicillin (CAS 69-53-4), amoxicillin (CAS 61336-70-7) and clavulanic acid (CAS 58001-44-8). It is particularly striking that the two beta-lactamase inhibitors, sulbactam and clavulanic acid, behave very differently. Sulbactam is also much more stable than clavulanic acid to incubation at 37 degrees C in body fluids or in tissue homogenates. The differences in the stability of the individual drugs should be born in mind during clinical use of combination formulations such as sulbactam/ampicillin (Unacid) and clavulanic acid/amoxicillin.

  2. Intracellular pH changes in human aortic smooth muscle cells in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; McIntire, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell (SMC) layers of human arteries may be exposed to blood flow after endothelium denudation, for example, following balloon angioplasty treatment. These SMCs are also constantly subjected to pressure driven transmural fluid flow. Flow-induced shear stress can alter SMC growth and metabolism. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in these flow effects on SMCs are still poorly understood. In this work, the hypothesis that shear stress alters the intracellular pH (pHi) of SMC is examined. When exposed to venous and arterial levels of shear stress, human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMC) undergo alkalinization. The alkalinization plateau persisted even after 20 min of cell exposure to flow. Addition of amiloride (10 micromoles) or its 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) analog (EIPA, 10 micromoles), both Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, attenuated intracellular alkalinization, suggesting the involvement of the Na+/H+ exchanger in this response. The same concentrations of these inhibitors did not show an effect on pHi of hASMCs in static culture. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothio-cyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS, 1 mM), a Cl-/HCO3- exchange inhibitor, affected the pHi of hASMCs both in static and flow conditions. Our results suggest that flow may perturb the Na+/H+ exchanger leading to an alkalinization of hASMCs, a different response from the flow-induced acidification seen with endothelial cells at the same levels of shear stress. Understanding the flow-induced signal transduction pathways in the vascular cells is of great importance in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. In the case of SMCs, the involvement of pHi changes in nitric oxide production and proliferation regulation highlights further the significance of such studies.

  3. Intracellular pH changes in human aortic smooth muscle cells in response to fluid shear stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stamatas, G. N.; Patrick, C. W. Jr; McIntire, L. V.

    1997-01-01

    The smooth muscle cell (SMC) layers of human arteries may be exposed to blood flow after endothelium denudation, for example, following balloon angioplasty treatment. These SMCs are also constantly subjected to pressure driven transmural fluid flow. Flow-induced shear stress can alter SMC growth and metabolism. Signal transduction mechanisms involved in these flow effects on SMCs are still poorly understood. In this work, the hypothesis that shear stress alters the intracellular pH (pHi) of SMC is examined. When exposed to venous and arterial levels of shear stress, human aortic smooth muscle cells (hASMC) undergo alkalinization. The alkalinization plateau persisted even after 20 min of cell exposure to flow. Addition of amiloride (10 micromoles) or its 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) analog (EIPA, 10 micromoles), both Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitors, attenuated intracellular alkalinization, suggesting the involvement of the Na+/H+ exchanger in this response. The same concentrations of these inhibitors did not show an effect on pHi of hASMCs in static culture. 4-Acetamido-4'-isothio-cyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS, 1 mM), a Cl-/HCO3- exchange inhibitor, affected the pHi of hASMCs both in static and flow conditions. Our results suggest that flow may perturb the Na+/H+ exchanger leading to an alkalinization of hASMCs, a different response from the flow-induced acidification seen with endothelial cells at the same levels of shear stress. Understanding the flow-induced signal transduction pathways in the vascular cells is of great importance in the tissue engineering of vascular grafts. In the case of SMCs, the involvement of pHi changes in nitric oxide production and proliferation regulation highlights further the significance of such studies.

  4. Influence of successive badminton matches on muscle strength, power, and body-fluid balance in elite players.

    PubMed

    Abian-Vicen, Javier; Castanedo, Adrián; Abian, Pablo; Gonzalez-Millan, Cristina; Salinero, Juan José; Del Coso, Juan

    2014-07-01

    The aim was to analyze the influence of competitive round on muscle strength, body-fluid balance, and renal function in elite badminton players during a real competition. Body mass, jump height during a countermovement jump, handgrip force, and urine samples were obtained from 13 elite badminton players (6 men and 7 women) before and after the 2nd-round and quarterfinal matches of the national Spanish badminton championship. Sweat rate was determined by using prematch-to-postmatch body-mass change and by weighing individually labeled fluid bottles. Sweat rates were 1.04 ± 0.62 and 0.98 ± 0.43 L/h, while rehydration rate was 0.69 ± 0.26 and 0.91 ± 0.52 L/h for the 2nd round and quarterfinals, respectively. Thus, dehydration was 0.47% ± 1.03% after the 2nd round and 0.23% ± 0.43% after the quarterfinals. There were no differences in prematch-to-postmatch jump height, but jump height was reduced from 37.51 ± 8.83 cm after the 2nd-round game to 34.82 ± 7.37 cm after the quarterfinals (P < .05). No significant differences were found in handgrip force when comparing prepost matches or rounds, although there were significant differences between dominant and nondominant hands (P < .05). The succession of rounds caused the appearance of proteinuria, hematuria, glycosuria, and higher nitrite and ketone concentrations in urine. Rehydration patterns during a real badminton competition were effective to prevent dehydration. A badminton match did not affect jump height or handgrip force, but jump height was progressively reduced by the competitive round. Badminton players' renal responses reflected diminished renal flux due to the high-intensity nature of this racket sport.

  5. Amniotic fluid and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells can be converted to smooth muscle cells in the cryo-injured rat bladder and prevent compensatory hypertrophy of surviving smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    De Coppi, Paolo; Callegari, Andrea; Chiavegato, Angela; Gasparotto, Lisa; Piccoli, Martina; Taiani, Jenny; Pozzobon, Michela; Boldrin, Luisa; Okabe, Masaru; Cozzi, Emanuele; Atala, Anthony; Gamba, Piergiorgio; Sartore, Saverio

    2007-01-01

    Wound healing of the cryo-injured bladder can bring about organ remodeling because of incomplete reconstitution of depleted smooth muscle cells. Stem cell transplantation could be beneficial to improve smooth muscle cell regeneration and/or modulate the remodeling process. The repair of bladder injury using adult-type stem cells would be useful for adult urological patients but unsuited for neonatal patients, in whom major benefits are likely to derive from fetal-type stem cells. The smooth muscle cell differentiation potential of fetal-type vs adult-type stem cells was evaluated by injecting green fluorescent protein labeled mesenchymal stem cells from rat amniotic fluid or bone marrow, respectively, in cryo-injured rat bladder walls. At 30 days after transplantation only a few fetal-type or adult-type mesenchymal stem cells gave rise to enteric or vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas most mesenchymal stem cells appeared incapable of specific differentiation. In vitro co-culture experiments of smooth muscle cells with fetal-type or adult-type mesenchymal stem cells selectively labeled with distinct fluorochromes showed the presence of hybrid cells, suggesting that some mesenchymal stem cells can undergo cell fusion. Surprisingly the major effect of rat bone marrow or amniotic fluid mesenchymal stem cell transplantation seemed to be preventing cryo-injury induced hypertrophy of surviving smooth muscle cells. In this model stem cell transplantation has a limited effect on smooth muscle cell regeneration. Instead it can regulate post-injury bladder remodeling, possibly via a paracrine mechanism.

  6. Laser speckle contrast imaging for assessing microcirculatory changes in multiple splanchnic organs and the gracilis muscle during hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chun-Yu; Yeh, Yu-Chang; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Chao, Anne; Sun, Wei-Zen; Cheng, Ya-Jung

    2015-09-01

    Hemorrhagic shock induces both macrocirculatory and microcirculatory impairment. Persistent microcirculatory dysfunction is associated with the dysfunction of multiple organs, especially in the splanchnic organs. However, few studies have simultaneously investigated microcirculation in multiple organs. In the present study, we used laser speckle contrast imaging to simultaneously investigate microcirculatory changes secondary to hemorrhagic shock and after fluid resuscitation among multiple splanchnic organs and the gracilis muscle. 72 male Wistar rats were subjected to sham operation, hemorrhagic shock (total blood loss of 30mL/kg) and saline resuscitation. Macrocirculatory parameters, including the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate, and microcirculatory parameters, including microcirculatory blood flow intensity and tissue oxygen saturation in the liver, kidney, intestine (mucosa, serosal muscular layer, and Peyer's patch), and gracilis muscle were compared in a period of 3h. Hemorrhagic shock induced a significant reduction of microcirculatory blood flow intensity in the kidney and intestine (especially the mucosa). Tissue oxygen saturation reduction secondary to hemorrhagic shock was comparable among the various splanchnic organs but lower than the gracilis muscle. Fluid resuscitation restored the MAP but not the microcirculatory blood flow in the intestine and the tissue oxygen saturation in each splanchnic organ. Hemorrhagic shock induced the largest reduction in microcirculatory blood flow intensity in the intestinal mucosa. By comparison, the reduction of tissue oxygen saturation was not significantly different among the various splanchnic organs. Although fluid resuscitation restored the MAP, the intestinal microcirculation remained damaged. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Papillary Muscle Forces Using a Comprehensive Mitral Valve Model with 3D Chordal Structure.

    PubMed

    Toma, Milan; Jensen, Morten Ø; Einstein, Daniel R; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Cochran, Richard P; Kunzelman, Karyn S

    2016-04-01

    Numerical models of native heart valves are being used to study valve biomechanics to aid design and development of repair procedures and replacement devices. These models have evolved from simple two-dimensional approximations to complex three-dimensional, fully coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) systems. Such simulations are useful for predicting the mechanical and hemodynamic loading on implanted valve devices. A current challenge for improving the accuracy of these predictions is choosing and implementing modeling boundary conditions. In order to address this challenge, we are utilizing an advanced in vitro system to validate FSI conditions for the mitral valve system. Explanted ovine mitral valves were mounted in an in vitro setup, and structural data for the mitral valve was acquired with [Formula: see text]CT. Experimental data from the in vitro ovine mitral valve system were used to validate the computational model. As the valve closes, the hemodynamic data, high speed leaflet dynamics, and force vectors from the in vitro system were compared to the results of the FSI simulation computational model. The total force of 2.6 N per papillary muscle is matched by the computational model. In vitro and in vivo force measurements enable validating and adjusting material parameters to improve the accuracy of computational models. The simulations can then be used to answer questions that are otherwise not possible to investigate experimentally. This work is important to maximize the validity of computational models of not just the mitral valve, but any biomechanical aspect using computational simulation in designing medical devices.

  8. Homogeneous quantum electrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1992-01-01

    The electromagnetic field equations and Dirac equations for oppositely charged wave functions are numerically time-integrated using a spatial Fourier method. The numerical approach used, a spectral transform technique, is based on a continuum representation of physical space. The coupled classical field equations contain a dimensionless parameter which sets the strength of the nonlinear interaction (as the parameter increases, interaction volume decreases). For a parameter value of unity, highly nonlinear behavior in the time-evolution of an individual wave function, analogous to ideal fluid turbulence, is observed. In the truncated Fourier representation which is numerically implemented here, the quantum turbulence is homogeneous but anisotropic and manifests itself in the nonlinear evolution of equilibrium modal spatial spectra for the probability density of each particle and also for the electromagnetic energy density. The results show that nonlinearly interacting fermionic wave functions quickly approach a multi-mode, dynamic equilibrium state, and that this state can be determined by numerical means.

  9. Amniotic fluid stem cells restore the muscle cell niche in a HSA-Cre, Smn(F7/F7) mouse model.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Martina; Franzin, Chiara; Bertin, Enrica; Urbani, Luca; Blaauw, Bert; Repele, Andrea; Taschin, Elisa; Cenedese, Angelo; Zanon, Giovanni Franco; André-Schmutz, Isabelle; Rosato, Antonio; Melki, Judith; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Pozzobon, Michela; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    Mutations in the survival of motor neuron gene (SMN1) are responsible for spinal muscular atrophy, a fatal neuromuscular disorder. Mice carrying a homozygous deletion of Smn exon 7 directed to skeletal muscle (HSA-Cre, Smn(F7/F7) mice) present clinical features of human muscular dystrophies for which new therapeutic approaches are highly warranted. Herein we demonstrate that tail vein transplantation of mouse amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells enhances the muscle strength and improves the survival rate of the affected animals. Second, after cardiotoxin injury of the Tibialis Anterior, only AFS-transplanted mice efficiently regenerate. Most importantly, secondary transplants of satellite cells (SCs) derived from treated mice show that AFS cells integrate into the muscle stem cell compartment and have long-term muscle regeneration capacity indistinguishable from that of wild-type-derived SC. This is the first study demonstrating the functional and stable integration of AFS cells into the skeletal muscle, highlighting their value as cell source for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. Copyright © 2012 AlphaMed Press.

  10. Investigation and clinical applications of muscle strength change in cerebrospinal fluid tap test in cases of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Tsuyoshi; Iida, Jun-Ichi; Kawahara, Makoto; Uchiyama, Yoshitomo

    2016-12-15

    The cerebrospinal fluid tap test (CSFTT) is widely used to diagnose idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and predict the therapeutic effectiveness of shunting. However, the ability to walk cannot be quantified for patients who are unable to walk. Therefore, we examined whether the iNPH diagnostic aid is possible using dynamometry, even for patients who are unable to walk. In this study, 45 patients underwent grip strength assessment, quadriceps strength assessment, 10-m walk test, and 3-m Timed Up and Go test before and after CSFTT. Our investigation of physical functions indicated that the CSFTT-positive group demonstrated significant improvements in grip and bilateral quadriceps muscle strength. The results of the receiver operating characteristic analysis indicated that leg muscle strength measurement reliability was high and that the area under the curve was 0.754-0.811. Our investigation of the clinically effective cutoff point for the rate of change indicated that it was 13.6% for right quadriceps muscle strength and 15.3% for left quadriceps muscle strength. Comparing CSFTT results in cases of iNPH with the observed rate of change in muscle strength can aid in the diagnosis of iNPH.

  11. Dynamic detection of non-protein-bound strychnine and brucine in rabbit muscle and synovial fluid after topical application of total Strychnos alkaloid patches.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huaibo; Yan, Miao; Li, Huande; Xun, Tianrong; Deng, Yang; Zhao, Yeye; Deng, Long

    2014-04-01

    Semen Strychni, a known toxic drug in Chinese pharmacopoeia, is notable for its therapeutic effects on local muscle and joint pain. However, oral administration can be risky. Topically administered drugs accumulate in the topical muscles and knee joints without any major increase in plasma levels; only non-protein-bound drugs in the biological fluids of target tissues are effective for therapeutic effects. A sensitive and rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) method coupled with a microdialysis technique was developed to determine the non-protein-bound strychnine (Str) and brucine (Bru) in rabbit muscle and synovial fluid microdialysate. The UPLC separation was carried out using a 1.7μm BEH C18 column (50 mm × 2.1 mm) with a mobile phase consisting of methanol: water (29.5:70.5, v/v) with 0.1% formic acid and 20 mM ammonium acetate in water. The method was validated at concentrations ranging from 0.58 ng/ml to 467.20 ng/ml for Str and from 0.42 ng/ml to 422.40 ng/ml for Bru. Intra-day and inter-day accuracy ranged from 99.1% to 103.2% for Str and from 95.8% to 108.8% for Bru with intra-day and inter-day precision within 9.7%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determine non-protein-bound Str and Bru, and the analysates concentration remained stable in rabbit muscle and synovial fluid after topical application of total Strychnos alkaloid patches, which indicated that total Strychnos alkaloid patches could substitute for the traditional oral administration of Semen Strychni. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Protein and Molecular Characterization of a Clinically Compliant Amniotic Fluid Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicle Fraction Capable of Accelerating Muscle Regeneration Through Enhancement of Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mellows, Ben; Mitchell, Robert; Antonioli, Manuela; Kretz, Oliver; Chambers, David; Zeuner, Marie-Theres; Denecke, Bernd; Musante, Luca; Ramachandra, Durrgah L; Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence; Holthofer, Harry; Joch, Barbara; Ray, Steve; Widera, Darius; David, Anna L; Huber, Tobias B; Dengjel, Joern; De Coppi, Paolo; Patel, Ketan

    2017-09-15

    The secretome of human amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSCs) has great potential as a therapeutic agent in regenerative medicine. However, it must be produced in a clinically compliant manner before it can be used in humans. In this study, we developed a means of producing a biologically active secretome from AFSCs that is free of all exogenous molecules. We demonstrate that the full secretome is capable of promoting stem cell proliferation, migration, and protection of cells against senescence. Furthermore, it has significant anti-inflammatory properties. Most importantly, we show that it promotes tissue regeneration in a model of muscle damage. We then demonstrate that the secretome contains extracellular vesicles (EVs) that harbor much, but not all, of the biological activity of the whole secretome. Proteomic characterization of the EV and free secretome fraction shows the presence of numerous molecules specific to each fraction that could be key regulators of tissue regeneration. Intriguingly, we show that the EVs only contain miRNA and not mRNA. This suggests that tissue regeneration in the host is mediated by the action of EVs modifying existing, rather than imposing new, signaling pathways. The EVs harbor significant anti-inflammatory activity as well as promote angiogenesis, the latter may be the mechanistic explanation for their ability to promote muscle regeneration after cardiotoxin injury.

  13. Sellar repair with autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts for treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery

    PubMed Central

    El Shazly, Ayman A.; El Wardany, Mohammed A.; Abo El Ezz, Tamer A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Many reconstructive techniques have been proposed to prevent postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery. However, no total agreement has been reached to the best technique. Aim: Assessment of the efficacy of sellar repair with autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts for treatment of intraoperative and delayed postoperative CSF leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery without the use of postoperative external lumbar CSF drain. Study Design: This is a retrospective case series study, level IV evidence. Materials and Methods : Twenty three patients were involved in this study. Seventeen patients had intraoperative CSF leakage and were treated immediately by our technique. Six patients had postoperative CSF rhinorrhea and had delayed treatment with our technique after failure of conservative measures and external lumbar CSF drainage for more than three days. The technique involved intradural placement of autologous muscle graft supplemented with extradural composite septal cartilage graft, composed of a piece of the posterior cartilaginous septum with its covering mucoperichondrium on one side only to fit into the sellar defect as a double layer button. Results: CSF leak was of grade 1 in 6 patients (26.1%), grade 2 in 10 patients (43.5%) and grade 3 in 7 patients (30.4%). None of the patients in our study had postoperative CSF leak after the use of our technique during the follow up period (mean 24 ± 10.47 standard deviation months). None of the patients developed treatment-related complications. All the patients had well developed mucosal covering of the sellar defect after two months. Conclusion: Our technique of sellar repair by using autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts is effective in treatment of intraoperative and delayed postoperative CSF leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery without the use of postoperative external lumbar CSF drain even in

  14. Performance of commercial ELISA and agglutination test kits for the detection of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in serum and muscle fluid of swine infected with 100, 300, 500 or 1000 oocysts.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Lorry B; Parker, Sarah E; Gajadhar, Alvin A

    2012-12-21

    Serum and tissue fluid samples from experimentally infected swine were tested for antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii using both an indirect ELISA and a modified agglutination test (MAT) available commercially in kit form. Ten 8-9 week-old swine were fed meatballs containing 100, 300, 500 or 1000 T. gondii oocysts and three control animals were fed meatballs with no oocysts. Post-inoculation blood samples were collected weekly until euthanasia at 35-63 days post inoculation (DPI). Tissue fluid was obtained from diaphragm, heart and sternomastoideus muscles post-mortem. By 16 DPI, nine of 10 inoculated pigs were detected serologically using ELISA at a pre-test serum dilution of 1:50 and all ten pigs were detected by the MAT at a serum dilution of 1:25. The last pig became positive on ELISA by 21 DPI and the 10 pigs maintained their serological status for the duration of the experiment. Heart muscle was the best overall source of tissue fluid for ELISA and all six pigs inoculated with either 500 or 1000 oocysts were positive using either diaphragm or heart tissue fluid samples. However, 10 of 18 fluid samples from pigs receiving ≤ 300 oocysts were not detected using ELISA, including 5 of 6 from sternomastoideus muscle. The MAT used at a 1:10 pre-test dilution of tissue fluid correctly identified all 10 inoculated pigs regardless of the source muscle. Based on these data, we conclude that either assay would be useful for herd evaluation or surveillance testing using sera, and the MAT would be a good candidate assay for testing tissue fluid for the same purposes.

  15. Numerical simulation of perfect fluid flows around complex 3D configurations by a multidomain solver using the MUSCL approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillen, Ph.; Borrel, M.; Dormieux, M.

    1990-10-01

    A numerical scheme of the MUSCL type used for the numerical simulation of gas flow of different types around complex configurations is described. Approximate Riemann solvers of the Van Leer, Roc, and Osher types, developed for perfect gas flows are used. These solvers have been extended to non-reactive mixtures of two species and real gas flows by Abgrall, Montagne and Vinokur. The architecture of the code, dictated by constraints in geometrical considerations, computational aspects, the specific nature of the flow, and ergonomy, is described.

  16. Is the Universe homogeneous?

    PubMed

    Maartens, Roy

    2011-12-28

    The standard model of cosmology is based on the existence of homogeneous surfaces as the background arena for structure formation. Homogeneity underpins both general relativistic and modified gravity models and is central to the way in which we interpret observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the galaxy distribution. However, homogeneity cannot be directly observed in the galaxy distribution or CMB, even with perfect observations, since we observe on the past light cone and not on spatial surfaces. We can directly observe and test for isotropy, but to link this to homogeneity we need to assume the Copernican principle (CP). First, we discuss the link between isotropic observations on the past light cone and isotropic space-time geometry: what observations do we need to be isotropic in order to deduce space-time isotropy? Second, we discuss what we can say with the Copernican assumption. The most powerful result is based on the CMB: the vanishing of the dipole, quadrupole and octupole of the CMB is sufficient to impose homogeneity. Real observations lead to near-isotropy on large scales--does this lead to near-homogeneity? There are important partial results, and we discuss why this remains a difficult open question. Thus, we are currently unable to prove homogeneity of the Universe on large scales, even with the CP. However, we can use observations of the cosmic microwave background, galaxies and clusters to test homogeneity itself.

  17. Reduced capillary hydraulic conductivity in skeletal muscle and skin in Type I diabetes: a possible cause for reduced transcapillary fluid absorption during hypovolaemia.

    PubMed

    Olsen, H; Länne, T

    2000-09-01

    Patients with Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus have a reduced transcapillary fluid absorption from skeletal muscle and skin and thus defective plasma volume regulation during hypovolaemia. Our aim was to find whether a defective capillary filtration coefficient or impaired transcapillary driving force are aetiologic factors for this reduction. We investigated 11 diabetic patients (diabetes duration 6.9 +/- 1.1 years, age 26 +/- 1 years), without complications and 12 control subjects (26 +/- 1 years). Their capillary filtration coefficient was measured in the upper arm using a volumetric technique at rest and during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). We calculated the driving force for transcapillary fluid transfer. The increase in heart rate and the decrease in systolic blood pressure during lower body negative pressure were similar in diabetic and control subjects. The resting capillary filtration coefficient was decreased in the diabetic subjects, 0.033 +/- 0.003 vs 0.051 +/- 0.007 ml x 100 ml(-1) x min(-1) x mmHg(-1) (p < 0.05). During lower body negative pressure, the capillary filtration coefficient increased 35 % in both groups compared with resting capillary filtration coefficient and was still decreased in diabetes; 0.046 +/- 0.004 compared with 0.069 +/- 0.006 ml x 100ml(-1) x min(-1) x mmHg(-1) (p < 0.01). The established driving force during lower body negative pressure was 1.37 +/- 0.11 vs 1.30 +/- 0.15 mmHg (NS) in diabetic and control subjects, respectively. Our study indicates that a reduced capillary filtration coefficient rather than defective regulation of transcapillary driving force, is the reason for the reduced transcapillary fluid absorption during hypovolaemic circulatory stress found in Type I diabetic patients.

  18. Broken Ergodicity in Ideal, Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John; Fu, Terry; Nguyen, Phu; Shum, Victor

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the statistical mechanics of numerical models of ideal homogeneous, incompressible turbulence and their relevance for dissipative fluids and magnetofluids. These numerical models are based on Fourier series and the relevant statistical theory predicts that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. However, numerical simulations clearly show that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We explain this phenomena in terms of broken ergodicity', which is defined to occur when dynamical behavior does not match ensemble predictions on very long time-scales. We review the theoretical basis of broken ergodicity, apply it to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence, and show new results from simulations using GPU (graphical processing unit) computers.

  19. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratianni, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.

    2011-08-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative). The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide) trend was added. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii) the error in linear trend estimates and (iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data

  20. Homogeneous vortex model for liquid slosh in spinning spherical tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, M.; Wagner, P.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of forced fluid sloshing in a partially filled spinning spherical tank is solved numerically using the finite element method. The governing equations include Coriolis acceleration, empirical fluid damping and spatially homogeneous vorticity first introduced by Pfeiffer. An exponential instability similar to flutter is detected in the present simulation for fill ratios below 50 percent. This instability appears in the model as a result of the homogeneous vortex assumption since the free slosh equations are neutrally stable in the Liapunov sense.

  1. Numerical experiments in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The direct simulation methods developed by Orszag and Patternson (1972) for isotropic turbulence were extended to homogeneous turbulence in an incompressible fluid subjected to uniform deformation or rotation. The results of simulations for irrotational strain (plane and axisymmetric), shear, rotation, and relaxation toward isotropy following axisymmetric strain are compared with linear theory and experimental data. Emphasis is placed on the shear flow because of its importance and because of the availability of accurate and detailed experimental data. The computed results are used to assess the accuracy of two popular models used in the closure of the Reynolds-stress equations. Data from a variety of the computed fields and the details of the numerical methods used in the simulation are also presented.

  2. Optimizing homogenization by chaotic unmixing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijs, Joost; Bartolo, Denis

    2016-11-01

    A number of industrial processes rely on the homogeneous dispersion of non-brownian particles in a viscous fluid. An ideal mixing would yield a so-called hyperuniform particle distribution. Such configurations are characterized by density fluctuations that grow slower than the standard √{ N}-fluctuations. Even though such distributions have been found in several natural structures, e.g. retina receptors in birds, they have remained out of experimental reach until very recently. Over the last 5 years independent experiments and numerical simulations have shown that periodically driven suspensions can self-assemble hyperuniformally. Simple as the recipe may be, it has one important disadvantage. The emergence of hyperuniform states co-occurs with a critical phase transition from reversible to non reversible particle dynamics. As a consequence the homogenization dynamics occurs over a time that diverges with the system size (critical slowing down). Here, we discuss how this process can be sped up by exploiting the stirring properties of chaotic advection. Among the questions that we answer are: What are the physical mechanisms in a chaotic flow that are relevant for hyperuniformity? How can we tune the flow parameters such to obtain optimal hyperuniformity in the fastest way? JW acknowledges funding by NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) through a Rubicon Grant.

  3. New exact perfect fluid solutions of Einstein's equations. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uggla, Claes; Rosquist, Kjell

    1990-12-01

    A family of new spatially homogeneous Bianchi type VIh perfect fluid solutions of the Einstein equations is presented. The fluid flow is orthogonal to the spatially homogeneous hypersurfaces, and the pressure is proportional to the energy density.

  4. Homogeneity and Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tignanelli, H. L.; Vazquez, R. A.; Mostaccio, C.; Gordillo, S.; Plastino, A.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Presentamos una metodologia de analisis de la homogeneidad a partir de la Teoria de la Informaci6n, aplicable a muestras de datos observacionales. ABSTRACT:Standard concepts that underlie Information Theory are employed in order design a methodology that enables one to analyze the homogeneity of a given data sample. Key : DATA ANALYSIS

  5. CUDA Simulation of Homogeneous, Incompressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lee; Shebalin, John V.; Shum, Victor; Fu, Terry

    2011-01-01

    We discuss very fast Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) simulations of ideal homogeneous incompressible turbulence based on Fourier models. These models have associated statistical theories that predict that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic fields (if present) are zero-mean random variables. Prior numerical simulations have shown that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation. We review the theoretical basis of this "broken ergodicity" as applied to 2-D and 3-D fluid and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence. Our new simulations examine the phenomenon of broken ergodicity through very long time and large grid size runs performed on a state-of-the-art CUDA platform. Results comparing various CUDA hardware configurations and grid sizes are discussed. NS and MHD results are compared.

  6. Fluid and Electrolyte Balance

    MedlinePlus

    ... right balance of electrolytes helps your body's blood chemistry, muscle action and other processes. Sodium, calcium, potassium, chlorine, phosphate and magnesium are all electrolytes. You get them from the foods you eat and the fluids you drink. Levels ...

  7. Homogeneous Atomic Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Yan, Zhenjie; Patel, Parth B.; Hadzibabic, Zoran; Yefsah, Tarik; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the creation of homogeneous Fermi gases of ultracold atoms in a uniform potential. In the momentum distribution of a spin-polarized gas, we observe the emergence of the Fermi surface and the saturated occupation of one particle per momentum state: the striking consequence of Pauli blocking in momentum space for a degenerate gas. Cooling a spin-balanced Fermi gas at unitarity, we create homogeneous superfluids and observe spatially uniform pair condensates. For thermodynamic measurements, we introduce a hybrid potential that is harmonic in one dimension and uniform in the other two. The spatially resolved compressibility reveals the superfluid transition in a spin-balanced Fermi gas, saturation in a fully polarized Fermi gas, and strong attraction in the polaronic regime of a partially polarized Fermi gas.

  8. Oligoclonal immunoglobulins and smooth muscle antibodies in arthritic joints.

    PubMed

    Mellbye, O J; Fyrand, O; Brath, H K; Olsen, E

    1980-04-01

    In twelve synovial fluid/serum pairs from patients with various types of seronegative polyarthritis, homogeneous gamma-bands by agarose gel electrophoresis were found in seven of the synovial fluids and in only one of the sera. In six of the fluids with gamma-bands, smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) were also present, usually in a titre identical to that in serum. In fluids with no gamma-bands, no SMA were detected. In forty synovial fluid/serum pairs from paitients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis, no gamma-bands were detected in the synovial fluids, and SMA were present in only three pairs. Absorption and inhibition experiments did not give evidence that the SMA activity in seronegative polyarthritis was confined to the gamma-bands in the synovial fluids. The SMA activity in the fluids seemed to be directed against both actin and 'non-actin' muscular antigens. The association between locally produced oligoclonal immunoglobulins and possible locally produced SMA with differnet electrophoretic mobility suggests that in some of thes patients there is a local synovial production of oligoclonal antibodies with different specificities. Thus, even if the results may indicate a local virus infection in some arthritic joints, they may also be dur to an unspecific local stimulation of B cells or to a specific antigen stimulation combined with an unspecific co-activation of other antibody-producing cells.

  9. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  10. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  11. Homogeneous, bioluminescent proteasome assays.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Martha A; Moravec, Richard A; Riss, Terry L; Bulleit, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Protein degradation is mediated predominantly through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The importance of the proteasome in regulating degradation of proteins involved in cell-cycle control, apoptosis, and angiogenesis led to the recognition of the proteasome as a therapeutic target for cancer. The proteasome is also essential for degrading misfolded and aberrant proteins, and impaired proteasome function has been implicated in neurodegerative and cardiovascular diseases. Robust, sensitive assays are essential for monitoring proteasome activity and for developing inhibitors of the proteasome. Peptide-conjugated fluorophores are widely used as substrates for monitoring proteasome activity, but fluorogenic substrates can exhibit significant background and can be problematic for screening because of cellular autofluorescence or interference from fluorescent library compounds. Furthermore, fluorescent proteasome assays require column-purified 20S or 26S proteasome (typically obtained from erythrocytes), or proteasome extracts from whole cells, as their samples. To provide assays more amenable to high-throughput screening, we developed a homogeneous, bioluminescent method that combines peptide-conjugated aminoluciferin substrates and a stabilized luciferase. Using substrates for the chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and caspase-like proteasome activities in combination with a selective membrane permeabilization step, we developed single-step, cell-based assays to measure each of the proteasome catalytic activities. The homogeneous method eliminates the need to prepare individual cell extracts as samples and has adequate sensitivity for 96- and 384-well plates. The simple "add and read" format enables sensitive and rapid proteasome assays ideal for inhibitor screening.

  12. Differential homogeneous immunosensor device

    DOEpatents

    Malmros, Mark K.; Gulbinski, III, Julian

    1990-04-10

    There is provided a novel method of testing for the presence of an analyte in a fluid suspected of containing the same. In this method, in the presence of the analyte, a substance capable of modifying certain characteristics of the substrate is bound to the substrate and the change in these qualities is measured. While the method may be modified for carrying out quantitative differential analyses, it eliminates the need for washing analyte from the substrate which is characteristic of prior art methods.

  13. Equilibrium states of homogeneous sheared compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, M.; Lili, T.

    2011-06-01

    Equilibrium states of homogeneous compressible turbulence subjected to rapid shear is studied using rapid distortion theory (RDT). The purpose of this study is to determine the numerical solutions of unsteady linearized equations governing double correlations spectra evolution. In this work, RDT code developed by authors solves these equations for compressible homogeneous shear flows. Numerical integration of these equations is carried out using a second-order simple and accurate scheme. The two Mach numbers relevant to homogeneous shear flow are the turbulent Mach number Mt, given by the root mean square turbulent velocity fluctuations divided by the speed of sound, and the gradient Mach number Mg which is the mean shear rate times the transverse integral scale of the turbulence divided by the speed of sound. Validation of this code is performed by comparing RDT results with direct numerical simulation (DNS) of [A. Simone, G.N. Coleman, and C. Cambon, Fluid Mech. 330, 307 (1997)] and [S. Sarkar, J. Fluid Mech. 282, 163 (1995)] for various values of initial gradient Mach number Mg0. It was found that RDT is valid for small values of the non-dimensional times St (St < 3.5). It is important to note that RDT is also valid for large values of St (St > 10) in particular for large values of Mg0. This essential feature justifies the resort to RDT in order to determine equilibrium states in the compressible regime.

  14. Sources of Peer Group Homogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jere M.

    1977-01-01

    Investigates how adolescent friendship groups become homogeneous. Analysis of 49 student friendship groups indicates that homophilic selection is most important for group homogeneity, conformity pressures are somewhat important, and disproportionate group leaving contributes nothing to homogeneity. The conclusion is that the magnitude of peer…

  15. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; Busey, H.M.

    1959-02-17

    Nuclear reactors of the homogeneous liquid fuel type are discussed. The reactor is comprised of an elongated closed vessel, vertically oriented, having a critical region at the bottom, a lower chimney structure extending from the critical region vertically upwardly and surrounded by heat exchanger coils, to a baffle region above which is located an upper chimney structure containing a catalyst functioning to recombine radiolyticallydissociated moderator gages. In operation the liquid fuel circulates solely by convection from the critical region upwardly through the lower chimney and then downwardly through the heat exchanger to return to the critical region. The gases formed by radiolytic- dissociation of the moderator are carried upwardly with the circulating liquid fuel and past the baffle into the region of the upper chimney where they are recombined by the catalyst and condensed, thence returning through the heat exchanger to the critical region.

  16. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal Homogeneous Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2002-01-01

    Plasmas, such as those found in the space environment or in plasma confinement devices, are often modeled as electrically conducting fluids. When fluids and plasmas are energetically stirred, regions of highly nonlinear, chaotic behavior known as turbulence arise. Understanding the fundamental nature of turbulence is a long-standing theoretical challenge. The present work describes a statistical theory concerning a certain class of nonlinear, finite dimensional, dynamical models of turbulence. These models arise when the partial differential equations describing incompressible, ideal (i.e., nondissipative) homogeneous fluid and magnetofluid (i.e., plasma) turbulence are Fourier transformed into a very large set of ordinary differential equations. These equations define a divergenceless flow in a high-dimensional phase space, which allows for the existence of a Liouville theorem, guaranteeing a distribution function based on constants of the motion (integral invariants). The novelty of these particular dynamical systems is that there are integral invariants other than the energy, and that some of these invariants behave like pseudoscalars under two of the discrete symmetry transformations of physics, parity, and charge conjugation. In this work the 'rugged invariants' of ideal homogeneous turbulence are shown to be the only significant scalar and pseudoscalar invariants. The discovery that pseudoscalar invariants cause symmetries of the original equations to be dynamically broken and induce a nonergodic structure on the associated phase space is the primary result presented here. Applicability of this result to dissipative turbulence is also discussed.

  17. Optical characterization of muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Luís; Lage, Armindo; Pais Clemente, Manuel; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2011-10-01

    Optical characterization and internal structure of biological tissues is highly important for biomedical optics. In particular for optical clearing processes, such information is of vital importance to understand the mechanisms involved through the variation of the refractive indices of tissue components. The skeletal muscle presents a fibrous structure with an internal arrangement of muscle fiber cords surrounded by interstitial fluid that is responsible for strong light scattering. To determine the refractive index of muscle components we have used a simple method of measuring tissue mass and refractive index during dehydration. After performing measurements for natural and ten dehydration states of the muscle samples, we have determined the dependence between the refractive index of the muscle and its water content. Also, we have joined our measurements with some values reported in literature to perform some calculations that have permitted to determine the refractive index of the dried muscle fibers and their corresponding volume percentage inside the natural muscle.

  18. Optical characterization of muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Luís; Lage, Armindo; Pais Clemente, Manuel; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2012-03-01

    Optical characterization and internal structure of biological tissues is highly important for biomedical optics. In particular for optical clearing processes, such information is of vital importance to understand the mechanisms involved through the variation of the refractive indices of tissue components. The skeletal muscle presents a fibrous structure with an internal arrangement of muscle fiber cords surrounded by interstitial fluid that is responsible for strong light scattering. To determine the refractive index of muscle components we have used a simple method of measuring tissue mass and refractive index during dehydration. After performing measurements for natural and ten dehydration states of the muscle samples, we have determined the dependence between the refractive index of the muscle and its water content. Also, we have joined our measurements with some values reported in literature to perform some calculations that have permitted to determine the refractive index of the dried muscle fibers and their corresponding volume percentage inside the natural muscle.

  19. Differential homogeneous immunosensor device

    DOEpatents

    Malmros, M.K.; Gulbinski, J. III.

    1990-04-10

    There is provided a novel method of testing for the presence of an analyte in a fluid suspected of containing the same. In this method, in the presence of the analyte, a substance capable of modifying certain characteristics of the substrate is bound to the substrate and the change in these qualities is measured. While the method may be modified for carrying out quantitative differential analyses, it eliminates the need for washing the analyte from the substrate which is characteristic of prior art methods. 12 figs.

  20. Coherent Eigenmodes in Homogeneous MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2010-01-01

    The statistical mechanics of Fourier models of ideal, homogeneous, incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is discussed, along with their relevance for dissipative magnetofluids. Although statistical theory predicts that Fourier coefficients of fluid velocity and magnetic field are zero-mean random variables, numerical simulations clearly show that certain coefficients have a non-zero mean value that can be very large compared to the associated standard deviation, i.e., we have coherent structure. We use eigenanalysis of the modal covariance matrices in the probability density function to explain this phenomena in terms of `broken ergodicity', which is defined to occur when dynamical behavior does not match ensemble predictions on very long time-scales. We provide examples from 2-D and 3-D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of homogeneous turbulence, and show new results from long-time simulations of MHD turbulence with and without a mean magnetic field

  1. Homogeneous nucleation kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, D. H.; Appleby, M. R.; Leedom, G. L.; Babu, S. V.; Naumann, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Homogeneous nucleation kinetics are rederived in a manner fundamentally similar to the approach of classical nucleation theory with the following modifications and improvements. First, the cluster is a parent phase cluster and does not require energization to the parent state. Second, the thermodynamic potential used to describe phase stability is a continuous function along the pathway of phase decomposition. Third, the kinetics of clustering corresponds directly to the diffusional flux of monomers through the cluster distribution and are formally similar to classical theory with the resulting kinetic equation modified by two terms in the preexponential factor. These terms correct for the influence of a supersaturation dependent clustering within the parent phase and for the influence of an asymmetrical cluster concentration as a function of cluster size at the critical cluster size. Fourth, the supersaturation dependence of the nucleation rate is of the same form as that given by classical nucleation theory. This supersaturation dependence must however be interpreted in terms of a size dependent surface tension. Finally, there are two scaling laws which describe supersaturation to either constant nucleation rate or to the thermodynamically determined physical spinodal.

  2. A comparison of maximal bioenergetic enzyme activities obtained with commonly used homogenization techniques.

    PubMed

    Grace, M; Fletcher, L; Powers, S K; Hughes, M; Coombes, J

    1996-12-01

    Homogenization of tissue for analysis of bioenergetic enzyme activities is a common practice in studies examining metabolic properties of skeletal muscle adaptation to disease, aging, inactivity or exercise. While numerous homogenization techniques are in use today, limited information exists concerning the efficacy of specific homogenization protocols. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of four commonly used approaches to homogenizing skeletal muscle for analysis of bioenergetic enzyme activity. The maximal enzyme activity (Vmax) of citrate synthase (CS) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured from homogenous muscle samples (N = 48 per homogenization technique) and used as indicators to determine which protocol had the highest efficacy. The homogenization techniques were: (1) glass-on-glass pestle; (2) a combination of a mechanical blender and a teflon pestle (Potter-Elvehjem); (3) a combination of the mechanical blender and a biological detergent; and (4) the combined use of a mechanical blender and a sonicator. The glass-on-glass pestle homogenization protocol produced significantly higher (P < 0.05) enzyme activities compared to all other protocols for both enzymes. Of the four protocols examined, the data demonstrate that the glass-on-glass pestle homogenization protocol is the technique of choice for studying bioenergetic enzyme activity in skeletal muscle.

  3. Universum Inference and Corpus Homogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Carl; Lynch, Gerard; Janssen, Jerom

    Universum Inference is re-interpreted for assessment of corpus homogeneity in computational stylometry. Recent stylometric research quantifies strength of characterization within dramatic works by assessing the homogeneity of corpora associated with dramatic personas. A methodological advance is suggested to mitigate the potential for the assessment of homogeneity to be achieved by chance. Baseline comparison analysis is constructed for contributions to debates by nonfictional participants: the corpus analyzed consists of transcripts of US Presidential and Vice-Presidential debates from the 2000 election cycle. The corpus is also analyzed in translation to Italian, Spanish and Portuguese. Adding randomized categories makes assessments of homogeneity more conservative.

  4. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in polymers.

    PubMed

    Schick, Christoph; Androsch, R; Schmelzer, Juern W P

    2017-07-14

    The pathway of crystal nucleation significantly influences the structure and properties of semi-crystalline polymers. Crystal nucleation is normally heterogeneous at low supercooling, and homogeneous at high supercooling, of the polymer melt. Homogeneous nucleation in bulk polymers has been, so far, hardly accessible experimentally, and was even doubted to occur at all. This topical review summarizes experimental findings on homogeneous crystal nucleation in polymers. Recently developed fast scanning calorimetry, with cooling and heating rates up to 106 K s-1, allows for detailed investigations of nucleation near and even below the glass transition temperature, including analysis of nuclei stability. As for other materials, the maximum homogeneous nucleation rate for polymers is located close to the glass transition temperature. In the experiments discussed here, it is shown that polymer nucleation is homogeneous at such temperatures. Homogeneous nucleation in polymers is discussed in the framework of classical nucleation theory. The majority of our observations are consistent with the theory. The discrepancies may guide further research, particularly experiments to progress theoretical development. Progress in the understanding of homogeneous nucleation is much needed, since most of the modelling approaches dealing with polymer crystallization exclusively consider homogeneous nucleation. This is also the basis for advancing theoretical approaches to the much more complex phenomena governing heterogeneous nucleation. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  5. Heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation compared: rapid nucleation on microscopic impurities.

    PubMed

    Sear, Richard P

    2006-03-16

    We use computer simulation to calculate the rates of both homogeneous nucleation and heterogeneous nucleation on microscopic impurities. We do so in perhaps the simplest model of fluids and magnets: the two-dimensional Ising model. We expect our results to be qualitatively applicable to many simple and complex fluids. We find that heterogeneous nucleation on an impurity that is not only microscopic but also as small as possible, that is, a single fixed spin, is more than four orders of magnitude faster than homogeneous nucleation. The rate of heterogeneous nucleation then increases by a factor of approximately five for each additional fixed spin in the impurity. These results suggest that impurities as small as single molecules can result in homogeneous nucleation being irrelevant due to heterogeneous nucleation on these microscopic impurities being much faster.

  6. Fluid dynamics of heart development.

    PubMed

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Miller, Laura A

    2011-09-01

    The morphology, muscle mechanics, fluid dynamics, conduction properties, and molecular biology of the developing embryonic heart have received much attention in recent years due to the importance of both fluid and elastic forces in shaping the heart as well as the striking relationship between the heart's evolution and development. Although few studies have directly addressed the connection between fluid dynamics and heart development, a number of studies suggest that fluids may play a key role in morphogenic signaling. For example, fluid shear stress may trigger biochemical cascades within the endothelial cells of the developing heart that regulate chamber and valve morphogenesis. Myocardial activity generates forces on the intracardiac blood, creating pressure gradients across the cardiac wall. These pressures may also serve as epigenetic signals. In this article, the fluid dynamics of the early stages of heart development is reviewed. The relevant work in cardiac morphology, muscle mechanics, regulatory networks, and electrophysiology is also reviewed in the context of intracardial fluid dynamics.

  7. Peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation: influence of tissue non-homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Krasteva, Vessela T Z; Papazov, Sava P; Daskalov, Ivan K

    2003-12-23

    Peripheral nerves are situated in a highly non-homogeneous environment, including muscles, bones, blood vessels, etc. Time-varying magnetic field stimulation of the median and ulnar nerves in the carpal region is studied, with special consideration of the influence of non-homogeneities. A detailed three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of the anatomy of the wrist region was built to assess the induced currents distribution by external magnetic stimulation. The electromagnetic field distribution in the non-homogeneous domain was defined as an internal Dirichlet problem using the finite element method. The boundary conditions were obtained by analysis of the vector potential field excited by external current-driven coils. The results include evaluation and graphical representation of the induced current field distribution at various stimulation coil positions. Comparative study for the real non-homogeneous structure with anisotropic conductivities of the tissues and a mock homogeneous media is also presented. The possibility of achieving selective stimulation of either of the two nerves is assessed. The model developed could be useful in theoretical prediction of the current distribution in the nerves during diagnostic stimulation and therapeutic procedures involving electromagnetic excitation. The errors in applying homogeneous domain modeling rather than real non-homogeneous biological structures are demonstrated. The practical implications of the applied approach are valid for any arbitrary weakly conductive medium.

  8. Dual regeneration of muscle and nerve by intravenous administration of human amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells regulated by stromal cell-derived factor-1α in a sciatic nerve injury model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dar-Yu; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Su, Hong-Lin; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Chen, Ying-Ju; Chen, Chun-Jung; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Yiin, Jia-Jean; Sheehan, Jason; Pan, Hung-Chuan

    2012-06-01

    Human amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AFMSCs) have been shown to promote peripheral nerve regeneration. The expression of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) in the injured nerve exerts a trophic effect by recruiting progenitor cells that promote nerve regeneration. In this study, the authors investigated the feasibility of intravenous administration of AFMSCs according to SDF-1α expression time profiles to facilitate neural regeneration in a sciatic nerve crush injury model. Peripheral nerve injury was induced in 63 Sprague-Dawley rats by crushing the left sciatic nerve using a vessel clamp. The animals were randomized into 1 of 3 groups: Group I, crush injury as the control; Group II, crush injury and intravenous administration of AFMSCs (5 × 10(6) cells for 3 days) immediately after injury (early administration); and Group III, crush injury and intravenous administration of AFMSCs (5 × 10(6) cells for 3 days) 7 days after injury (late administration). Evaluation of neurobehavior, electrophysiological study, and assessment of regeneration markers were conducted every week after injury. The expression of SDF-1α and neurotrophic factors and the distribution of AFMSCs in various time profiles were also assessed. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α increased the migration and wound healing of AFMSCs in vitro, and the migration ability was dose dependent. Crush injury induced the expression of SDF-1α at a peak of 10-14 days either in nerve or muscle, and this increased expression paralleled the expression of its receptor, chemokine receptor type-4 (CXCR-4). Most AFMSCs were distributed to the lung during early or late administration. Significant deposition of AFMSCs in nerve and muscle only occurred in the late administration group. Significantly enhanced neurobehavior, electrophysiological function, nerve myelination, and expression of neurotrophic factors and acetylcholine receptor were demonstrated in the late administration group. Amniotic

  9. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  10. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  11. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  12. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart because it controls the heartbeat. Skeletal Muscle Now, let's talk about the kind of muscle ... soccer ball into the goal. These are your skeletal muscles — sometimes called striated (say: STRY-ay-tud) muscle ...

  13. High-intensity resistance training in multiple sclerosis - An exploratory study of effects on immune markers in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, and on mood, fatigue, health-related quality of life, muscle strength, walking and cognition.

    PubMed

    Kierkegaard, Marie; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Olsson, Tomas; Johansson, Sverker; Ygberg, Sofia; Opava, Christina; Holmqvist, Lotta Widén; Piehl, Fredrik

    2016-03-15

    High-intensity resistance training is unexplored in people with multiple sclerosis. To evaluate effects of high-intensity resistance training on immune markers and on measures of mood, fatigue, health-related quality of life, muscle strength, walking and cognition. Further, to describe participants' opinion and perceived changes of the training. Twenty patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis performed high-intensity resistance training at an intensity of 80% of one-repetition maximum, twice a week for 12 weeks. Blood and optional cerebrospinal fluid samples, and data on secondary outcome measures were collected before and after intervention. A study-specific questionnaire was used for capturing participants' opinion. Seventeen participants completed the study. Plasma cytokine levels of tumor necrosis factor were significantly decreased post-intervention (p=0.001). Exploratory cytokine analyses in cerebrospinal fluid (n=8) did not reveal major changes. Significant and clinically important improvements were found in fatigue (p=0.001) and health-related quality of life (p=0.004). Measures of mood (p=0.002), muscle strength (p ≤ 0.001), walking speed (p=0.013) and cognition (p=0.04) were also improved. A majority of participants evaluated the training as very good and perceived changes to the better. High-intensity resistance training in persons with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis with low disability had positive effects on peripheral pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, led to clinically relevant improvements in measures of fatigue and health-related quality of life, and was well tolerated. These results provide a basis for a larger randomized trial. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Locally homogeneous pp-waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Globke, Wolfgang; Leistner, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    We show that every n-dimensional locally homogeneous pp-wave is a plane wave, provided it is indecomposable and its curvature operator, when acting on 2-forms, has rank greater than one. As a consequence we obtain that indecomposable, Ricci-flat locally homogeneous pp-waves are plane waves. This generalises a classical result by Jordan, Ehlers and Kundt in dimension 4. Several examples show that our assumptions on indecomposability and the rank of the curvature are essential.

  15. Operator estimates in homogenization theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhikov, V. V.; Pastukhova, S. E.

    2016-06-01

    This paper gives a systematic treatment of two methods for obtaining operator estimates: the shift method and the spectral method. Though substantially different in mathematical technique and physical motivation, these methods produce basically the same results. Besides the classical formulation of the homogenization problem, other formulations of the problem are also considered: homogenization in perforated domains, the case of an unbounded diffusion matrix, non-self-adjoint evolution equations, and higher-order elliptic operators. Bibliography: 62 titles.

  16. Homogeneous coordinates in motion correction.

    PubMed

    Zahneisen, Benjamin; Ernst, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Prospective motion correction for MRI and other imaging modalities are commonly based on the assumption of affine motion, i.e., rotations, shearing, scaling and translations. In addition it often involves transformations between different reference frames, especially for applications with an external tracking device. The goal of this work is to develop a computational framework for motion correction based on homogeneous transforms. The homogeneous representation of affine transformations uses 4 × 4 transformation matrices applied to four-dimensional augmented vectors. It is demonstrated how homogenous transforms can be used to describe the motion of slice objects during an MRI scan. Furthermore, we extend the concept of homogeneous transforms to gradient and k-space vectors, and show that the fourth dimension of an augmented k-space vector encodes the complex phase of the corresponding signal sample due to translations. The validity of describing motion tracking in real space and k-space using homogeneous transformations only is demonstrated on phantom experiments. Homogeneous transformations allows for a conceptually simple, consistent and computationally efficient theoretical framework for motion correction applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A validated method for simultaneous determination of codeine, codeine-6-glucuronide, norcodeine, morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide in post-mortem blood, vitreous fluid, muscle, fat and brain tissue by LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Frost, Joachim; Løkken, Trine N; Brede, Wenche R; Hegstad, Solfrid; Nordrum, Ivar S; Slørdal, Lars

    2015-04-01

    The toxicodynamics and, to a lesser degree, toxicokinetics of the widely used opiate codeine remain a matter of controversy. To address this issue, analytical methods capable of providing reliable quantification of codeine metabolites alongside codeine concentrations are required. This article presents a validated method for simultaneous determination of codeine, codeine metabolites codeine-6-glucuronide (C6G), norcodeine and morphine, and morphine metabolites morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) in post-mortem whole blood, vitreous fluid, muscle, fat and brain tissue by high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Samples were prepared by solid-phase extraction. The validated ranges were 1.5-300 ng/mL for codeine, norcodeine and morphine, and 23-4,600 ng/mL for C6G, M3G and M6G, with exceptions for norcodeine in muscle (3-300 ng/mL), morphine in muscle, fat and brain (3-300 ng/mL) and M6G in fat (46-4,600 ng/mL). Within-run and between-run accuracy (88.1-114.1%) and precision (CV 0.6-12.7%), matrix effects (CV 0.3-13.5%) and recovery (57.8-94.1%) were validated at two concentration levels; 3 and 150 ng/mL for codeine, norcodeine and morphine, and 46 and 2,300 ng/mL for C6G, M3G and M6G. Freeze-thaw and long-term stability (6 months at -80°C) was assessed, showing no significant changes in analyte concentrations (-12 to +8%). The method was applied in two authentic forensic autopsy cases implicating codeine in both therapeutic and presumably lethal concentration levels. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Effect of heat and homogenization on in vitro digestion of milk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Central to commercial fluid milk processing is the use of high temperature, short time (HTST) pasteurization to ensure the safety and quality of milk, and homogenization to prevent creaming of fat-containing milk. UHT processed homogenized milk is also available commercially and is typically used to...

  19. Analysis of stability of a homogeneous state of anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, V. Yu. Chernova, T. G. Stepanov, S. E.

    2015-04-15

    Small-amplitude waves in collisionless magnetized plasma are considered in the framework of one-fluid anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics with allowance for the anisotropy of the pressure and thermal flux. Stability of a homogeneous plasma state is analyzed using an eighth-order dispersion relation. Restrictions on the parameters of the homogeneous state at which the dispersion relation has no complex roots at any value of the angle between the wave vector and the unperturbed magnetic field are obtained. The applied method also makes it possible to determine the types of unstable waves.

  20. Population dynamics in non-homogeneous environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alards, Kim M. J.; Tesser, Francesca; Toschi, Federico

    2014-11-01

    For organisms living in aquatic ecosystems the presence of fluid transport can have a strong influence on the dynamics of populations and on evolution of species. In particular, displacements due to self-propulsion, summed up with turbulent dispersion at larger scales, strongly influence the local densities and thus population and genetic dynamics. Real marine environments are furthermore characterized by a high degree of non-homogeneities. In the case of population fronts propagating in ``fast'' turbulence, with respect to the population duplication time, the flow effect can be studied by replacing the microscopic diffusivity with an effective turbulent diffusivity. In the opposite case of ``slow'' turbulence the advection by the flow has to be considered locally. Here we employ numerical simulations to study the influence of non-homogeneities in the diffusion coefficient of reacting individuals of different species expanding in a 2 dimensional space. Moreover, to explore the influence of advection, we consider a population expanding in the presence of simple velocity fields like cellular flows. The output is analyzed in terms of front roughness, front shape, propagation speed and, concerning the genetics, by means of heterozygosity and local and global extinction probabilities.

  1. Dynamics of compact homogeneous universes

    SciTech Connect

    Tanimoto, M.; Koike, T.; Hosoya, A.

    1997-01-01

    A complete description of dynamics of compact locally homogeneous universes is given, which, in particular, includes explicit calculations of Teichm{umlt u}ller deformations and careful counting of dynamical degrees of freedom. We regard each of the universes as a simply connected four-dimensional space{endash}time with identifications by the action of a discrete subgroup of the isometry group. We then reduce the identifications defined by the space{endash}time isometries to ones in a homogeneous section, and find a condition that such spatial identifications must satisfy. This is essential for explicit construction of compact homogeneous universes. Some examples are demonstrated for Bianchi II, VI{sub 0}, VII{sub 0}, and I universal covers. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  3. Fluid inclusions in stony meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, J. L.; Ashwal, L. D.; Bergman, S. C.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Henry, D. J.; Lee-Berman, R.; Roedder, E.; Belkin, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The fluid inclusions presently described for five stony meteorites brings to seven the number of such meteorites confirmed. Homogenization temperatures are reproducible in each inclusion, and range from 25 C to over 225 C, with some vapor plus liquid inclusions remaining at 225 C, the highest temperature in these microthermometric experiments. Upon cooling, the fluid in some inclusions appears to freeze, as indicated by deformation and immobilization of the vapor bubble at low temperatures. Melting temperatures are by contrast difficult to observe and are not reproducible. Microthermometric data for the fluid in diogenite ALPHA 77256 and inclusions in four chondrites suggest that the fluid is aqueous, with a high solute content.

  4. Harmonic analysis of homogeneous networks.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, W J; Rothman, J A; Chang, E H; Aultman, W; Ripton, G

    1995-01-01

    We introduce a generalization of mutually inhibitory networks called homogeneous networks. Such networks have symmetric connection strength matrices that are circulant (one-dimensional case) or block circulant with circulant blocks (two-dimensional case). Fourier harmonics provide universal eigenvectors, and we apply them to several homogeneous examples: k-wta, k-cluster, on/center off/surround, and the assignment problem. We also analyze one nonhomogeneous case: the subset-sum problem. We present the results of 10000 trials on a 50-node k-cluster problem and 100 trials on a 25-node subset-sum problem.

  5. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  6. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  7. Homogeneous-heterogeneous reaction effects in peristalsis through curved geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hayat, Tasawar; Tanveer, Anum Alsaadi, Fuad; Alotaibi, Naif D.

    2015-06-15

    This paper looks at the influence of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions on the peristaltic transport of non-Newtonian fluid in a curved channel with wall properties. Constitutive relations for thermodynamic third grade material are utilized in the problem development. An electrically conducting fluid in the presence of radial applied magnetic field is considered. The governing flow equations are developed in the presence of viscous heating. Mathematical computations are simplified employing long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations. The solutions for velocity, temperature, concentration and heat transfer coefficient are obtained and examined. The features of sundry parameters are analyzed by plotting graphs.

  8. On the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrbek, L.; Stalp, Steven R.

    2000-08-01

    Decaying homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is investigated using a phenomenological model based on the three-dimensional turbulent energy spectra. We generalize the approach first used by Comte-Bellot and Corrsin [J. Fluid Mech. 25, 657 (1966)] and revised by Saffman [J. Fluid Mech. 27, 581 (1967); Phys. Fluids 10, 1349 (1967)]. At small wave numbers we assume the spectral energy is proportional to the wave number to an arbitrary power. The specific case of power 2, which follows from the Saffman invariant, is discussed in detail and is later shown to best describe experimental data. For the spectral energy density in the inertial range we apply both the Kolmogorov -5/3 law, E(k)=Cɛ2/3k-5/3, and the refined Kolmogorov law by taking into account intermittency. We show that intermittency affects the energy decay mainly by shifting the position of the virtual origin rather than altering the power law of the energy decay. Additionally, the spectrum is naturally truncated due to the size of the wind tunnel test section, as eddies larger than the physical size of the system cannot exist. We discuss effects associated with the energy-containing length scale saturating at the size of the test section and predict a change in the power law decay of both energy and vorticity. To incorporate viscous corrections to the model, we truncate the spectrum at an effective Kolmogorov wave number kη=γ(ɛ/v3)1/4, where γ is a dimensionless parameter of order unity. We show that as the turbulence decays, viscous corrections gradually become more important and a simple power law can no longer describe the decay. We discuss the final period of decay within the framework of our model, and show that care must be taken to distinguish between the final period of decay and the change of the character of decay due to the saturation of the energy containing length scale. The model is applied to a number of experiments on decaying turbulence. These include the downstream decay of turbulence in

  9. Microfluidic converging/diverging channels optimised for homogeneous extensional deformation.

    PubMed

    Zografos, K; Pimenta, F; Alves, M A; Oliveira, M S N

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we optimise microfluidic converging/diverging geometries in order to produce constant strain-rates along the centreline of the flow, for performing studies under homogeneous extension. The design is examined for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows where the effects of aspect ratio and dimensionless contraction length are investigated. Initially, pressure driven flows of Newtonian fluids under creeping flow conditions are considered, which is a reasonable approximation in microfluidics, and the limits of the applicability of the design in terms of Reynolds numbers are investigated. The optimised geometry is then used for studying the flow of viscoelastic fluids and the practical limitations in terms of Weissenberg number are reported. Furthermore, the optimisation strategy is also applied for electro-osmotic driven flows, where the development of a plug-like velocity profile allows for a wider region of homogeneous extensional deformation in the flow field.

  10. Microfluidic converging/diverging channels optimised for homogeneous extensional deformation

    PubMed Central

    Zografos, K.; Oliveira, M. S. N.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we optimise microfluidic converging/diverging geometries in order to produce constant strain-rates along the centreline of the flow, for performing studies under homogeneous extension. The design is examined for both two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows where the effects of aspect ratio and dimensionless contraction length are investigated. Initially, pressure driven flows of Newtonian fluids under creeping flow conditions are considered, which is a reasonable approximation in microfluidics, and the limits of the applicability of the design in terms of Reynolds numbers are investigated. The optimised geometry is then used for studying the flow of viscoelastic fluids and the practical limitations in terms of Weissenberg number are reported. Furthermore, the optimisation strategy is also applied for electro-osmotic driven flows, where the development of a plug-like velocity profile allows for a wider region of homogeneous extensional deformation in the flow field. PMID:27478523

  11. Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions in Peristaltic Flow with Convective Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Tanveer, Anum; Yasmin, Humaira; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions in peristaltic transport of Carreau fluid in a channel with wall properties. Mathematical modelling and analysis have been carried out in the presence of Hall current. The channel walls satisfy the more realistic convective conditions. The governing partial differential equations along with long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations are solved. The results of temperature and heat transfer coefficient are analyzed for various parameters of interest. PMID:25460608

  12. Salinity of oceanic hydrothermal fluids: a fluid inclusion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehlig, Pierre

    1991-03-01

    An extensive microthermometric study of quartz, epidote, plagioclase, anhydrite and sphalerite-hosted fluid inclusions from ophiolitic [Semail (Oman) and Trinity (California) ophiolites] and oceanic (East Pacific Rise hydrothermal vents, Gorringe Bank, ODP Leg 111 Hole 504B) crust has been carried out in order to constrain a model accounting for wide salinity variations measured in the oceanic hydrothermal fluids. Recorded salinities in fluid inclusions vary between 0.3 and 52 wt% NaCl eq. However, more than 60% of the mean (± standard deviation) salinities of the samples are within the range 3.2 ± 0.3wt% NaCl eq (= microthermometric error) and the mean salinity of all fluid inclusions (without the brines) is 4.0 wt% NaCl eq with a standard deviation of 1.6 wt% NaCl eq. Whereas most samples display slightly higher salinities than seawater, several samples exhibit very high salinities (more than two times that of seawater). These high salinities are restricted to the plagiogranites (Semail and Trinity ophiolites) which mark the top of the fossil magma chamber, in the transition zone between the plutonic sequence and the sheeted dyke complex. The fluid inclusion population studied in the plagiogranites is characterized by the occurrence of four major fluid inclusion families: (1) low- to medium-salinity Liquid/Vapor fluid inclusions which homogenize into the liquid phase; (2) low-salinity Liquid/Vapor fluid inclusions with pseudocritical homogenization; (3) low- to medium-salinity Liquid/Vapor fluid inclusions which homogenize into the vapor phase; and (4) high-salinity Liquid/Vapor/Halite fluid inclusions which homogenize into the liquid phase by halite dissolution and exhibit salinities as high as 52 wt% NaCl eq. These fluid inclusion families are interpreted as resulting from phase separation occurring in hydrothermal or magmatic fluids within the transition zone between the hydrothermal system and the magma chamber at temperatures higher than 500°C. Very low

  13. Homogeneous Pt-bimetallic Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chao; Chi, Miaofang; More, Karren Leslie; Markovic, Nenad; Stamenkovic, Vojislav

    2011-01-01

    Alloying has shown enormous potential for tailoring the atomic and electronic structures, and improving the performance of catalytic materials. Systematic studies of alloy catalysts are, however, often compromised by inhomogeneous distribution of alloying components. Here we introduce a general approach for the synthesis of monodispersed and highly homogeneous Pt-bimetallic alloy nanocatalysts. Pt{sub 3}M (where M = Fe, Ni, or Co) nanoparticles were prepared by an organic solvothermal method and then supported on high surface area carbon. These catalysts attained a homogeneous distribution of elements, as demonstrated by atomic-scale elemental analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy. They also exhibited high catalytic activities for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), with improvement factors of 2-3 versus conventional Pt/carbon catalysts. The measured ORR catalytic activities for Pt{sub 3}M nanocatalysts validated the volcano curve established on extended surfaces, with Pt{sub 3}Co being the most active alloy.

  14. Highly efficient, functional engraftment of skeletal muscle stem cells in dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Cerletti, Massimiliano; Jurga, Sara; Witczak, Carol A; Hirshman, Michael F; Shadrach, Jennifer L; Goodyear, Laurie J; Wagers, Amy J

    2008-07-11

    Satellite cells reside beneath the basal lamina of skeletal muscle fibers and include cells that act as precursors for muscle growth and repair. Although they share a common anatomical localization and typically are considered a homogeneous population, satellite cells actually exhibit substantial heterogeneity. We used cell-surface marker expression to purify from the satellite cell pool a distinct population of skeletal muscle precursors (SMPs) that function as muscle stem cells. When engrafted into muscle of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, purified SMPs contributed to up to 94% of myofibers, restoring dystrophin expression and significantly improving muscle histology and contractile function. Transplanted SMPs also entered the satellite cell compartment, renewing the endogenous stem cell pool and participating in subsequent rounds of injury repair. Together, these studies indicate the presence in adult skeletal muscle of prospectively isolatable muscle-forming stem cells and directly demonstrate the efficacy of myogenic stem cell transplant for treating muscle degenerative disease.

  15. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    SciTech Connect

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  16. Convective mixing in homogeneous porous media flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Jia-Hau; Chen, Peilong; Tsai, Peichun Amy

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the flow processes in the technology of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in saline formations, we modeled a homogeneous porous media flow in a Hele-Shaw cell to investigate density-driven convection due to dissolution. We used an analogy of the fluid system to mimic the diffusion and subsequent convection when CO2 dissolves in brine, which generates a heavier solution. By varying the permeability, we examined the onset of convection, the falling dynamics, the wavelengths of fingers, and the rate of dissolution, for the Rayleigh number Ra (a dimensionless forcing term which is the ratio of buoyancy to diffusivity) in the range of 2.0 ×104≤Ra≤8.26 ×105 . Our results reveal that the effect of permeability influences significantly the initial convective speed, as well as the later coarsening dynamics of the heavier fingering plumes. However, the total dissolved mass, characterized by a nondimensional Nusselt number Nu, has an insignificant dependence on Ra. This implies that the total dissolution rate of CO2 is nearly constant in high Ra geological porous structures.

  17. 7 CFR 58.623 - Homogenizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE....623 Homogenizer. Homogenizer shall comply with 3-A Sanitary Standards....

  18. Gray's paradox: A fluid mechanical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Rahul; Hao, Max; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Patel, Namrata; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly eighty years ago, Gray reported that the drag power experienced by a dolphin was larger than the estimated muscle power – this is termed as Gray's paradox. We provide a fluid mechanical perspective of this paradox. The viewpoint that swimmers necessarily spend muscle energy to overcome drag in the direction of swimming needs revision. For example, in undulatory swimming most of the muscle energy is directly expended to generate lateral undulations of the body, and the drag power is balanced not by the muscle power but by the thrust power. Depending on drag model utilized, the drag power may be greater than muscle power without being paradoxical. PMID:25082341

  19. Invariant distributions on compact homogeneous spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatsevich, V V

    2013-12-31

    In this paper, we study distributions on compact homogeneous spaces, including invariant distributions and also distributions admitting a sub-Riemannian structure. We first consider distributions of dimension 1 and 2 on compact homogeneous spaces. After this, we study the cases of compact homogeneous spaces of dimension 2, 3, and 4 in detail. Invariant distributions on simply connected compact homogeneous spaces are also treated. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  20. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    DOEpatents

    Rasmussen, P.; Bernhardt, A.

    1993-06-29

    The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

  1. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    DOEpatents

    Rasmussen, Paul; Bernhardt, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    The geometrical restrictions on a laser beam homogenizer are relaxed by ug a coherence delay line to separate a coherent input beam into several components each having a path length difference equal to a multiple of the coherence length with respect to the other components. The components recombine incoherently at the output of the homogenizer, and the resultant beam has a more uniform spatial intensity suitable for microlithography and laser pantogography. Also disclosed is a variable aperture homogenizer, and a liquid filled homogenizer.

  2. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... that affect the muscles (such as trichinosis or toxoplasmosis ) Inherited muscle disorders such as muscular dystrophy or ... nodosa Polymyalgia rheumatica Polymyositis - adult Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis Toxoplasmosis Trichinosis Review Date 7/21/2016 Updated by: ...

  3. Orthogonality Measurement for Homogenous Projects-Bases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivan, Ion; Sandu, Andrei; Popa, Marius

    2009-01-01

    The homogenous projects-base concept is defined. Next, the necessary steps to create a homogenous projects-base are presented. A metric system is built, which then will be used for analyzing projects. The indicators which are meaningful for analyzing a homogenous projects-base are selected. The given hypothesis is experimentally verified. The…

  4. Homogeneous catalytic hydrogenolysis of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilakos, N.P.; Barreiros, M.T.

    1984-01-01

    Aqueous hydrogenation of cellulose in the presence of various homogeneous acidic catalysts was studied in a batch autoclave system at 250-350 degrees, residence times of 1-4 h, catalyst concentrations of less than 10% weight, and H pressures of less than 735 psi. The use of heterogeneous cocatalysts was also investigated. Under these conditions, less than 93% of the initial cellulose feed was converted, yielding mainly water-soluble components and gases rich in CO and CO2. C conversions to water-solubles and gases of less than 57% (on the basis of cellulose) were obtained, constituting in some cases improvements of more than 100% over the noncatalytic experiments. The conversion mechanism involved competing hydrolysis, pyrolysis, and hydrogenation reactions, the relative importance of which was strongly dependent on temperature. FeCl3 was the best overall catalyst, while molybdates displayed high selectivity toward hydrogenation.

  5. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  6. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  7. Redistribution Mechanisms and Quantification of Homogeneity in Friction Stir Welding and Processing of an Aluminum Silicon Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    slurries , which are high-viscosity fluids containing particulates such as platelets in a blood flow , etc., all definitively show that shearing...211 APPENDIX G: FLOW CHART OF HOMOGENEITY INDEX PROCEDURE ........215 APPENDIX H: MATLAB CODES...narrow deformation zone and “ flow -line” type chip microstructure. Note the improved homogeneity of the chip as compared to the bulk. After [48

  8. Fluid Physics

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-12

    These are video microscope images of magnetorheological (MR) fluids, illuminated with a green light. Those on Earth, left, show the MR fluid forming columns or spikes structures. On the right, the fluids in microgravity aboard the International Space Station (ISS), formed broader columns.

  9. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  10. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  11. Bovine muscle 20S proteasome. III: Quantification in tissue crude extracts using ELISA and radial immunodiffusion techniques and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Aubry, L; Sentandreu, M A; Levieux, D; Ouali, A; Dutaud, D

    2006-10-01

    The 20S proteasome is a large complex (700kDa) that exhibits endo- and exo-peptidase activities with wide specificity. In postmortem muscles, several sets of evidence suggest a possible significant contribution of proteasome to meat tenderisation. Hence, an accurate and rapid quantification procedure is needed to attest that new function during the ageing of meat. In the present work, we developed an ELISA test enabling the quantification of nM concentrations of the 20S proteasome. We further tested the radial immunodiffusion (RID) technique described as a more simple method that can quantitatively determine the concentration of an antigen in a complex mixture. The ELISA test allowed us to quantify the 20S protesome in tissue homogenates and fluids with a recovery of 100%, a coefficient of variation lower than 5% and a detection limit of 9ng/ml. Quantification of the 20S proteasome in various bovine tissue by ELISA showed the highest concentration in liver followed by spleen and kidney, with muscles exhibiting the lowest concentrations. In addition, measurement of the proteasome concentration in eight different bovine muscles with various metabolic profiles led to the conclusion that the relationship between muscle metabolic properties and proteasome concentration is rather complex. Nevertheless, heart muscle exhibited the highest proteasome content (331μg/g wet tissue) whereas the lowest values were found for M. Tensor Fascia Latae (213μg/g wet tissue), a fast twitch white muscle, M. Supraspinatus (209μg/g wet tissue), a slow twitch red muscle and M. Pectoralis profondus (203μg/g wet tissue), an intermediate muscle. As compared to other endogenous peptidases, muscle tissue contains relatively high amounts of proteasome. Hence this complex can be quantified using the RID, which allows quantification of protein in the μg range. Plotting the concentration values determined with both methods for all bovine tissues tested gave a straight line with a correlation

  12. Electrorheological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Adolf, D.; Anderson, R.; Garino, T.; Halsey, T.C.; Hance, B.; Martin, J.E.; Odinek, J.

    1996-10-01

    An Electrorheological fluid is normally a low-viscosity colloidal suspension, but when an electric field is applied, the fluid undergoes a reversible transition to a solid, being able to support considerable stress without yield. Commercial possibilities for such fluids are enormous, including clutches, brakes, valves,shock absorbers, and stepper motors. However, performance of current fluids is inadequate for many proposed applications. Our goal was to engineer improved fluids by investigating the key technical issues underlying the solid-phase yield stress and the liquid to solid switching time. Our studies focused on field-induced interactions between colloidal particles that lead to solidification, the relation between fluid structure and performance (viscosity, yield stress), and the time evolution of structure in the fluid as the field is switched on or off.

  13. Vibrations in a Fluid-Loaded Poroelastic Hollow Cylinder Surrounded by a Fluid in Plane-Strain Form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, B.; Nath, C. N.; Shah, S. A.; Reddy, P. M.

    2013-03-01

    Plane-strain vibrations in a fluid-loaded poroelastic hollow cylinder surrounded by a fluid are investigated employing Biot's theory of wave propagation in poroelastic media. The poroelastic hollow cylinder is homogeneous and isotropic, while the inner and outer fluids are homogeneous, isotropic and inviscid. The frequency equation of the fluid-loaded poroelastic cylinder surrounded by a fluid is obtained along with several particular cases, namely, fluid-loaded poroelastic cylinder, fluid-loaded bore, poroelastic cylinder surrounded by a fluid and poroelastic solid cylinder submerged in a fluid. The frequency equations are obtained for axially symmetric, flexural and anti-symmetric vibrations each for a pervious and an impervious surface. Nondimensional frequency for propagating modes is computed as a function of the ratio of thickness to the inner radius of the core. The results are presented graphically for two types of poroelastic cylinders and then discussed.

  14. Reciprocity theory of homogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbormbai, Adolf A.

    1990-03-01

    The reciprocity formalism is applied to the homogeneous gaseous reactions in which the structure of the participating molecules changes upon collision with one another, resulting in a change in the composition of the gas. The approach is applied to various classes of dissociation, recombination, rearrangement, ionizing, and photochemical reactions. It is shown that for the principle of reciprocity to be satisfied it is necessary that all chemical reactions exist in complementary pairs which consist of the forward and backward reactions. The backward reaction may be described by either the reverse or inverse process. The forward and backward processes must satisfy the same reciprocity equation. Because the number of dynamical variables is usually unbalanced on both sides of a chemical equation, it is necessary that this balance be established by including as many of the dynamical variables as needed before the reciprocity equation can be formulated. Statistical transformation models of the reactions are formulated. The models are classified under the titles free exchange, restricted exchange and simplified restricted exchange. The special equations for the forward and backward processes are obtained. The models are consistent with the H theorem and Le Chatelier's principle. The models are also formulated in the context of the direct simulation Monte Carlo method.

  15. Homogeneous modes of cosmological instantons

    SciTech Connect

    Gratton, Steven; Turok, Neil

    2001-06-15

    We discuss the O(4) invariant perturbation modes of cosmological instantons. These modes are spatially homogeneous in Lorentzian spacetime and thus not relevant to density perturbations. But their properties are important in establishing the meaning of the Euclidean path integral. If negative modes are present, the Euclidean path integral is not well defined, but may nevertheless be useful in an approximate description of the decay of an unstable state. When gravitational dynamics is included, counting negative modes requires a careful treatment of the conformal factor problem. We demonstrate that for an appropriate choice of coordinate on phase space, the second order Euclidean action is bounded below for normalized perturbations and has a finite number of negative modes. We prove that there is a negative mode for many gravitational instantons of the Hawking-Moss or Coleman{endash}De Luccia type, and discuss the associated spectral flow. We also investigate Hawking-Turok constrained instantons, which occur in a generic inflationary model. Implementing the regularization and constraint proposed by Kirklin, Turok and Wiseman, we find that those instantons leading to substantial inflation do not possess negative modes. Using an alternate regularization and constraint motivated by reduction from five dimensions, we find a negative mode is present. These investigations shed new light on the suitability of Euclidean quantum gravity as a potential description of our universe.

  16. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Liver Homogenates

    PubMed Central

    Demirkan, Gokhan; Salomon, Arthur R.; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Regulation of protein function via reversible phosphorylation is an essential component of cell signaling. Our ability to understand complex phosphorylation networks in the physiological context of a whole organism or tissue remains limited. This is largely due to the technical challenge of isolating serine/threonine phosphorylated peptides from a tissue sample. In the present study, we developed a phosphoproteomic strategy to purify and identify phosphopeptides from a tissue sample by employing protein gel filtration, protein SAX (strong anion exchange) and SCX (strong cation exchange) chromatography, peptide SCX chromatography and TiO2 affinity purification. By applying this strategy to the mass spectrometry-based analysis of rat liver homogenates, we were able to identify with high confidence and quantify over four thousand unique phosphopeptides. Finally, the reproducibility of our methodology was demonstrated by its application to analysis of the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways in liver samples obtained from rats in which hepatic mTOR was activated by refeeding following a period of fasting. PMID:22903715

  17. Dynamic Green's function for homogeneous and isotropic porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahay, Pratap N.

    2001-12-01

    The source terms that are meaningful in dynamic poroelasticity are those exciting the centre-of-mass field and the internal field. These fields are the sum of the mass weighted motion and the difference motion of the solid and fluid constituents, respectively. The corresponding homogeneous and isotropic Green's function valid for a uniform whole-space is obtained using Kupradze's method after the vector differential equations for these two fields are combined and expressed as a 6×6 matrix differential operator. The solution is quite amenable to numerical calculations and the results for a saturated Berea sandstone show that the fast P and S waves correspond to those usually detected by geophones at large distances from the source. The slow P wave, which is associated with fluid flow, is rapidly attenuated with distance from the source while the slow S wave, which is part of the solution, dies off rapidly in the near-neighbourhood of the source.

  18. AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS REACTORTECHNICAL PANEL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, D.J.; Bajorek, S.; Bakel, A.; Flanagan, G.; Mubayi, V.; Skarda, R.; Staudenmeier, J.; Taiwo, T.; Tonoike, K.; Tripp, C.; Wei, T.; Yarsky, P.

    2010-12-03

    Considerable interest has been expressed for developing a stable U.S. production capacity for medical isotopes and particularly for molybdenum- 99 (99Mo). This is motivated by recent re-ductions in production and supply worldwide. Consistent with U.S. nonproliferation objectives, any new production capability should not use highly enriched uranium fuel or targets. Conse-quently, Aqueous Homogeneous Reactors (AHRs) are under consideration for potential 99Mo production using low-enriched uranium. Although the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has guidance to facilitate the licensing process for non-power reactors, that guidance is focused on reactors with fixed, solid fuel and hence, not applicable to an AHR. A panel was convened to study the technical issues associated with normal operation and potential transients and accidents of an AHR that might be designed for isotope production. The panel has produced the requisite AHR licensing guidance for three chapters that exist now for non-power reactor licensing: Reac-tor Description, Reactor Coolant Systems, and Accident Analysis. The guidance is in two parts for each chapter: 1) standard format and content a licensee would use and 2) the standard review plan the NRC staff would use. This guidance takes into account the unique features of an AHR such as the fuel being in solution; the fission product barriers being the vessel and attached systems; the production and release of radiolytic and fission product gases and their impact on operations and their control by a gas management system; and the movement of fuel into and out of the reactor vessel.

  19. Don't homogenize, synchronize.

    PubMed

    Sawhney, M

    2001-01-01

    To be more responsive to customers, companies often break down organizational walls between their units--setting up all manner of cross-business and cross-functional task forces and working groups and promoting a "one-company" culture. But such attempts can backfire terribly by distracting business and functional units and by contaminating their strategies and processes. Fortunately, there's a better way, says the author. Rather than tear down organizational walls, a company can make them permeable to information. It can synchronize all its data on products, filtering the information through linked databases and applications and delivering it in a coordinated, meaningful form to customers. As a result, the organization can present a single, unified face to the customer--one that can change as market conditions warrant--without imposing homogeneity on its people. Such synchronization can lead not just to stronger customer relationships and more sales but also to greater operational efficiency. It allows a company, for example, to avoid the high costs of maintaining many different information systems with redundant data. The decoupling of product control from customer control in a synchronized company reflects a fundamental fact about business: While companies have to focus on creating great products, customers think in terms of the activities they perform and the benefits they seek. For companies, products are ends, but for customers, products are means. The disconnect between how customers think and how companies organize themselves is what leads to inefficiencies and missed opportunities, and that's exactly the problem that synchronization solves. Synchronized companies can get closer to customers, sustain product innovation, and improve operational efficiency--goals that have traditionally been very difficult to achieve simultaneously.

  20. Homogeneous catalysts in hypersonic combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Harradine, D.M.; Lyman, J.L.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Pack, R.T.; Schott, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Density and residence time both become unfavorably small for efficient combustion of hydrogen fuel in ramjet propulsion in air at high altitude and hypersonic speed. Raising the density and increasing the transit time of the air through the engine necessitates stronger contraction of the air flow area. This enhances the kinetic and thermodynamic tendency of H/sub 2/O to form completely, accompanied only by N/sub 2/ and any excess H/sub 2/(or O/sub 2/). The by-products to be avoided are the energetically expensive fragment species H and/or O atoms and OH radicals, and residual (2H/sub 2/ plus O/sub 2/). However, excessive area contraction raises air temperature and consequent combustion-product temperature by adiabatic compression. This counteracts and ultimately overwhelms the thermodynamic benefit by which higher density favors the triatomic product, H/sub 2/O, over its monatomic and diatomic alternatives. For static pressures in the neighborhood of 1 atm, static temperature must be kept or brought below ca. 2400 K for acceptable stability of H/sub 2/O. Another measure, whose requisite chemistry we address here, is to extract propulsive work from the combustion products early in the expansion. The objective is to lower the static temperature of the combustion stream enough for H/sub 2/O to become adequately stable before the exhaust flow is massively expanded and its composition ''frozen.'' We proceed to address this mechanism and its kinetics, and then examine prospects for enhancing its rate by homogeneous catalysts. 9 refs.

  1. STEAM STIRRED HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Busey, H.M.

    1958-06-01

    A homogeneous nuclear reactor utilizing a selfcirculating liquid fuel is described. The reactor vessel is in the form of a vertically disposed tubular member having the lower end closed by the tube walls and the upper end closed by a removal fianged assembly. A spherical reaction shell is located in the lower end of the vessel and spaced from the inside walls. The reaction shell is perforated on its lower surface and is provided with a bundle of small-diameter tubes extending vertically upward from its top central portion. The reactor vessel is surrounded in the region of the reaction shell by a neutron reflector. The liquid fuel, which may be a solution of enriched uranyl sulfate in ordinary or heavy water, is mainiained at a level within the reactor vessel of approximately the top of the tubes. The heat of the reaction which is created in the critical region within the spherical reaction shell forms steam bubbles which more upwardly through the tubes. The upward movement of these bubbles results in the forcing of the liquid fuel out of the top of these tubes, from where the fuel passes downwardly in the space between the tubes and the vessel wall where it is cooled by heat exchangers. The fuel then re-enters the critical region in the reaction shell through the perforations in the bottom. The upper portion of the reactor vessel is provided with baffles to prevent the liquid fuel from splashing into this region which is also provided with a recombiner apparatus for recombining the radiolytically dissociated moderator vapor and a control means.

  2. Homogeneity and thermodynamic identities in geometrothermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quevedo, Hernando; Quevedo, María N.; Sánchez, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    We propose a classification of thermodynamic systems in terms of the homogeneity properties of their fundamental equations. Ordinary systems correspond to homogeneous functions and non-ordinary systems are given by generalized homogeneous functions. This affects the explicit form of the Gibbs-Duhem relation and Euler's identity. We show that these generalized relations can be implemented in the formalism of black hole geometrothermodynamics in order to completely fix the arbitrariness present in Legendre invariant metrics.

  3. The Homogenization and Optimization of Thermoelectric Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-17

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0090 The Homogenization and Optimization of Thermoelectric Composites Jiangyu Li UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Final Report 04/17/2015...SUBTITLE The Homogenization and Optimization of Thermoelectric Composites 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0325 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...behavior of thermoelectric composites using rigorous homogenization technique in this project. In the last three years, our accomplishment includes: (1

  4. Inhibitors of microsomal oxidations in insect homogenates

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, J.; Sissons, C. H.; Smith, J. N.

    1967-01-01

    1. Homogenates of insect tissues were assayed for enzymes capable of oxidizing p-nitrotoluene to p-nitrobenzoic acid. 2. Locust fat-body homogenate 10000g supernatant was an effective enzyme and required no added cofactors. 3. Homogenates of other insects or locust organs and 10000g sediment from locust fat-body were not active and inhibited microsomal oxidations carried out by locust fat-body or rabbit liver enzyme. 4. Inhibitory power was high in homogenates of whole flies and of fly heads or thoraces. 5. Inhibition appeared to involve both irreversible inactivation of enzyme and the removal of essential cofactors. PMID:4382105

  5. Intravenous Fluid Use in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Givan, Gordon V.; Diehl, Jason J.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Time allowing, euhydration can be achieved in the vast majority of individuals by drinking and eating normal beverages and meals. Important to the competitive athlete is prevention and treatment of dehydration and exercise-associated muscle cramps, as they are linked to a decline in athletic performance. Intravenous (IV) prehydration and rehydration has been proposed as an ergogenic aid to achieve euhydration more effectively and efficiently. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed database was searched in November 2011 for all English-language articles related to IV utilization in sport using the keywords intravenous, fluid requirements, rehydration, hydration, athlete, sport, exercise, volume expansion, and performance. Results: Limited evidence exists for prehydration with IV fluids. Although anecdotal evidence does exist, at this time there are no high-level studies confirming that IV prehydration prevents dehydration or the onset of exercise-associated muscle cramps. Currently, there are no published studies describing IV fluid use during the course of an event, at intermission, or after the event as an ergogenic aid. Conclusion: The use of IV fluid may be beneficial for a subset of fluid-sensitive athletes; this should be reserved for high-level athletes with strong histories of symptoms in well-monitored settings. Volume expanders may also be beneficial for some athletes. IV fluids and plasma binders are not allowed in World Anti-Doping Agency–governed competitions. Routine IV therapy cannot be recommended as best practice for the majority of athletes. PMID:23016105

  6. Benchmarking homogenization algorithms for monthly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M. J.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratiannil, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.; Willett, K.

    2013-09-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies. The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous values at various averaging scales, ii) the error in linear trend estimates and iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data. Moreover, state-of-the-art relative homogenization algorithms developed to work with an inhomogeneous reference are shown to perform best. The study showed that currently automatic algorithms can perform as well as manual ones.

  7. Generating and controlling homogeneous air turbulence using random jet arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Douglas; Petersen, Alec; Amili, Omid; Coletti, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    The use of random jet arrays, already employed in water tank facilities to generate zero-mean-flow homogeneous turbulence, is extended to air as a working fluid. A novel facility is introduced that uses two facing arrays of individually controlled jets (256 in total) to force steady homogeneous turbulence with negligible mean flow, shear, and strain. Quasi-synthetic jet pumps are created by expanding pressurized air through small straight nozzles and are actuated by fast-response low-voltage solenoid valves. Velocity fields, two-point correlations, energy spectra, and second-order structure functions are obtained from 2D PIV and are used to characterize the turbulence from the integral-to-the Kolmogorov scales. Several metrics are defined to quantify how well zero-mean-flow homogeneous turbulence is approximated for a wide range of forcing and geometric parameters. With increasing jet firing time duration, both the velocity fluctuations and the integral length scales are augmented and therefore the Reynolds number is increased. We reach a Taylor-microscale Reynolds number of 470, a large-scale Reynolds number of 74,000, and an integral-to-Kolmogorov length scale ratio of 680. The volume of the present homogeneous turbulence, the largest reported to date in a zero-mean-flow facility, is much larger than the integral length scale, allowing for the natural development of the energy cascade. The turbulence is found to be anisotropic irrespective of the distance between the jet arrays. Fine grids placed in front of the jets are effective at modulating the turbulence, reducing both velocity fluctuations and integral scales. Varying the jet-to-jet spacing within each array has no effect on the integral length scale, suggesting that this is dictated by the length scale of the jets.

  8. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  9. Wellbore fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsey, D.L.; Corley, W.T.

    1983-12-27

    A clay-based or clay-free aqueous thixotropic wellbore fluid having improved fluid loss control, desirable flow characteristics and low shale sensitivity for use in drilling a well comprising water or a brine base including an effective amount of an additive comprising a crosslinked potato starch, a heteropolysaccharide derived from a carbohydrate by bacteria of the genus Xanthomonas, and hydroxyethylcellulose or carboxymethylcellulose, is disclosed. This drilling fluid has been found to be nondamaging to the formations through which the well is drilled.

  10. Fluid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Firouzjahi, H.; Namjoo, M.H.; Sasaki, M. E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-09-01

    In this work we present an inflationary mechanism based on fluid dynamics. Starting with the action for a single barotropic perfect fluid, we outline the procedure to calculate the power spectrum and the bispectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is shown that a perfect barotropic fluid naturally gives rise to a non-attractor inflationary universe in which the curvature perturbation is not frozen on super-horizon scales. We show that a scale-invariant power spectrum can be obtained with the local non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} = 5/2.

  11. Inhomogeneous generalizations of Bianchi type VIh models with perfect fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S. R.; Prasad, A.

    1991-07-01

    Inhomogeneous universes admitting an Abelian G2 of isometry and filled with perfect fluid have been derived. These contain as special cases exact homogeneous universes of Bianchi type VIh. Many of these universes asymptotically tend to homogeneous Bianchi VIh universes. The models have been discussed for their physical and kinematical behaviors.

  12. A Rapid Fluorescence Assay for Danofloxacin in Beef Muscle. Effect of Muscle Type on Limit of Quantitation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A simple, rapid fluorescence screening assay was applied to the analysis of beef muscle for danofloxacin at the U.S. tolerance level of 200 ng/g. Muscle samples were homogenized in acetic acid/acetonitrile, the resultant mixture centrifuged, and fluorescence of the supernatants was then measured. ...

  13. Workover fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Shell, F. J.

    1985-12-17

    The high temperature water loss property of alkaline well completion and well workover fluids is improved by the addition of an effective amount of a naphthalene sulfonate formaldehyde condensate in the form of its monovalent or bivalent metal salts.

  14. Benchmarking homogenization algorithms for monthly data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, V. K. C.; Mestre, O.; Aguilar, E.; Auer, I.; Guijarro, J. A.; Domonkos, P.; Vertacnik, G.; Szentimrey, T.; Stepanek, P.; Zahradnicek, P.; Viarre, J.; Müller-Westermeier, G.; Lakatos, M.; Williams, C. N.; Menne, M. J.; Lindau, R.; Rasol, D.; Rustemeier, E.; Kolokythas, K.; Marinova, T.; Andresen, L.; Acquaotta, F.; Fratianni, S.; Cheval, S.; Klancar, M.; Brunetti, M.; Gruber, C.; Prohom Duran, M.; Likso, T.; Esteban, P.; Brandsma, T.

    2012-01-01

    The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) Action ES0601: advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME) has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative). The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random independent break-type inhomogeneities with normally distributed breakpoint sizes were added to the simulated datasets. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide) trend was added. Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study. After the deadline at which details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed, 22 additional solutions were submitted. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i) the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii) the error in linear trend estimates and (iii) traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve precipitation data

  15. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; hide

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  16. Electrorheological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, T.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    An electrorheological fluid is a substance whose form changes in the presence of electric fields. Depending on the strength of the field to which it is subjected, an electrorheological fluid can run freely like water, ooze like honey or solidify like gelatin. Indeed, the substance can switch from ne state to another within a few milliseconds. Electrorheological fluids are easy to make; they consist of microscopic particles suspended in an insulating liquid. Yet they are not ready for most commercial applications. They tend to suffer from a number of problems, including structural weakness as solids, abrasiveness as liquids and chemical breakdown, especially at high temperatures. Automotive engineers could imagine, for instance, constructing an electrorheological clutch. It was also hoped that electrorheological fluids would lead to valveless hydraulic systems, in which solidifying fluid would shut off flow through a thin section of pipe. Electrorheological fluids also offer the possibility of a shock absorber that provides response times of milliseconds and does not require mechanical adjustments. 3 refs.

  17. Clustering of vertically constrained passive particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pietro, Massimo; van Hinsberg, Michel A. T.; Biferale, Luca; Clercx, Herman J. H.; Perlekar, Prasad; Toschi, Federico

    2015-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of small particles vertically confined, by means of a linear restoring force, to move within a horizontal fluid slab in a three-dimensional (3D) homogeneous isotropic turbulent velocity field. The model that we introduce and study is possibly the simplest description for the dynamics of small aquatic organisms that, due to swimming, active regulation of their buoyancy, or any other mechanism, maintain themselves in a shallow horizontal layer below the free surface of oceans or lakes. By varying the strength of the restoring force, we are able to control the thickness of the fluid slab in which the particles can move. This allows us to analyze the statistical features of the system over a wide range of conditions going from a fully 3D incompressible flow (corresponding to the case of no confinement) to the extremely confined case corresponding to a two-dimensional slice. The background 3D turbulent velocity field is evolved by means of fully resolved direct numerical simulations. Whenever some level of vertical confinement is present, the particle trajectories deviate from that of fluid tracers and the particles experience an effectively compressible velocity field. Here, we have quantified the compressibility, the preferential concentration of the particles, and the correlation dimension by changing the strength of the restoring force. The main result is that there exists a particular value of the force constant, corresponding to a mean slab depth approximately equal to a few times the Kolmogorov length scale η , that maximizes the clustering of the particles.

  18. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... potassium or calcium Fibromyalgia Infections, including the flu, Lyme disease , malaria , muscle abscess , polio , Rocky Mountain spotted ... enzymes (creatine kinase) and possibly a test for Lyme disease or a connective tissue disorder Physical therapy ...

  19. Getting Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscular as a superhero or your favorite professional athlete? Well, the big muscles you're thinking about ... Superheroes, of course, aren't real, and professional athletes are grownups, whose bodies are different from kids' ...

  20. Chaotic Advection, Transport and Mixing in Homogeneous Porous Media (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, D.; Trefry, M.; Metcalfe, G.

    2013-12-01

    All porous media, whether heterogeneous or homogeneous, including granular and packed media, fractured and open networks, are typified by the inherent topographical complexity of the pore-space. Such geometric complexities render exact modelling of fluid flow and transport an intractable problem, hence averaging methods are required for upscaling to the Darcy scale. Although successful transport theories have been developed via averaging techniques, it is also possible to eliminate important flow phenomena during the upscaling process. In general, the detailed flow structure and Lagrangian dynamics of fluid flows can have significant impacts upon a range of fluid-borne processes. In the context of turbulent flow, it is well known that such structure can fundamentally alter processes such as transport, mixing, chemical reactions and biological activity across a wide range of length scales. More recently, it has been established that similar impacts also occur for laminar flows which exhibit chaotic Lagrangian dynamics, commonly known as chaotic advection. In the context of porous media flows, an important question is whether steady Stokes flow at the pore scale can admit chaotic advection, and what are the impacts upon fluid transport, mixing, chemical reaction and biological activity? Conversely, due to limitations of the flow topology, steady Darcy flow cannot admit chaotic advection, and so the impacts of chaotic advection are neglected during the upscaling process. For transport and mixing, chaotic advection imparts strongly anomalous transport for passive tracer particles, whereas diffusive particles exhibit significantly accelerated dispersion even in the limit of vanishing diffusivity. Chemically or biologically active chaotic flows have been shown to generate singularly-enhanced reaction kinetics in autocatalytic, bistable and combustion reactions, and fundamentally alter the stability of a wide variety of reactive processes. An important question is whether

  1. Fluid Management System (FMS) fluid systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fluid management system (FMS) fluid systems overview are presented. Topics addressed include: fluid management system description including system requirements (integrated nitrogen system, integrated water system, and integrated waste gas system) and physical description; and fluid management system evolution.

  2. Muscle MRI Findings in Childhood/Adult Onset Pompe Disease Correlate with Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bonaparte, Sebastián; Segovia, Sonia; Llauger, Jaume; Belmonte, Izaskun; Pedrosa, Irene; Alejaldre, Aída; Mayos, Mercè; Suárez-Cuartín, Guillermo; Gallardo, Eduard; Illa, Isabel; Díaz-Manera, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Enzyme replacement therapy has shown to be effective for childhood/adult onset Pompe disease (AOPD). The discovery of biomarkers useful for monitoring disease progression is one of the priority research topics in Pompe disease. Muscle MRI could be one possible test but the correlation between muscle MRI and muscle strength and function has been only partially addressed so far. Methods We studied 34 AOPD patients using functional scales (Manual Research Council scale, hand held myometry, 6 minutes walking test, timed to up and go test, time to climb up and down 4 steps, time to walk 10 meters and Motor Function Measure 20 Scale), respiratory tests (Forced Vital Capacity seated and lying, Maximun Inspiratory Pressure and Maximum Expiratory Pressure), daily live activities scales (Activlim) and quality of life scales (Short Form-36 and Individualized Neuromuscular Quality of Life questionnaire). We performed a whole body muscle MRI using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging centered on thighs and lower trunk region. Results T1w whole body muscle MRI showed a homogeneous pattern of muscle involvement that could also be found in pre-symptomatic individuals. We found a strong correlation between muscle strength, muscle functional scales and the degree of muscle fatty replacement in muscle MRI analyzed using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging studies. Moreover, muscle MRI detected mild degree of fatty replacement in paraspinal muscles in pre-symptomatic patients. Conclusion Based on our findings, we consider that muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic patients under treatment. Take home message Muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful to follow-up patients in daily clinic. PMID:27711114

  3. Homogeneous and Non-Homogeneous Boundary Value Problems for First Order Linear Hyperbolic Systems Arising in Fluid Mechanics. Part II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    multiplying both sides of the last equation (scalarly in Xt) by u one gets ( dtu (itt), u (it))t+ ((L+B)u ( 1 )(t), u ()(t))t " (f() (t),u (t)) t. On the other...lIX), u 0 e X and u e L1 CI;y) n AC(IX) such that u -w on I x R!-, dtu (i) + (L+B)u f ()(A) () ( 1 ) 1 MA U (0) -O U ( u0 in X, f + f in L (IPX) and u...boundary conditionsg see also the introduction of Part I of this work [ 1 ]. AMS(MOS) Subject Classifications: 35F15, 35L50, 76N10. Key Words: partial

  4. Magnifying absolute instruments for optically homogeneous regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tyc, Tomas

    2011-09-15

    We propose a class of magnifying absolute optical instruments with a positive isotropic refractive index. They create magnified stigmatic images, either virtual or real, of optically homogeneous three-dimensional spatial regions within geometrical optics.

  5. ANALYSIS OF FISH HOMOGENATES FOR PERFLUORINATED COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) which include PFOS and PFOA are widely distributed in wildlife. Whole fish homogenates were analyzed for PFCs from the upper Mississippi, the Missouri and the Ohio rivers. Methods development, validation data, and preliminary study results will b...

  6. Producing tritium in a homogenous reactor

    DOEpatents

    Cawley, William E.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for the joint production and separation of tritium. Tritium is produced in an aqueous homogenous reactor and heat from the nuclear reaction is used to distill tritium from the lower isotopes of hydrogen.

  7. Model Misspecification: Finite Mixture or Homogeneous?

    PubMed Central

    Tarpey, Thaddeus; Yun, Dong; Petkova, Eva

    2007-01-01

    A common problem in statistical modelling is to distinguish between finite mixture distribution and a homogeneous non-mixture distribution. Finite mixture models are widely used in practice and often mixtures of normal densities are indistinguishable from homogenous non-normal densities. This paper illustrates what happens when the EM algorithm for normal mixtures is applied to a distribution that is a homogeneous non-mixture distribution. In particular, a population-based EM algorithm for finite mixtures is introduced and applied directly to density functions instead of sample data. The population-based EM algorithm is used to find finite mixture approximations to common homogeneous distributions. An example regarding the nature of a placebo response in drug treated depressed subjects is used to illustrate ideas. PMID:18974843

  8. Homogeneous cosmological models in Yang's gravitation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, A. J.; Pavelle, R.

    1979-01-01

    We present a dynamic, spatially homogeneous solution of Yang's pure space gravitational field equations which is non-Einsteinian. The predictions of this cosmological model seem to be at variance with observations.

  9. Homogeneous cosmological models in Yang's gravitation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennelly, A. J.; Pavelle, R.

    1979-01-01

    We present a dynamic, spatially homogeneous solution of Yang's pure space gravitational field equations which is non-Einsteinian. The predictions of this cosmological model seem to be at variance with observations.

  10. Relative permeability of homogenous-wet and mixed-wet porous media as determined by pore-scale lattice Boltzmann modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, C. J.; Karpyn, Z. T.; Ayala, O.

    2014-05-01

    We present a pore-scale study of two-phase relative permeability in homogenous-wet porous media, and porous media altered to a mixed-wet state. A Shan-Chen type multicomponent lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is employed to determine pore-scale fluid distributions and relative permeability. Mixed-wet states are created by altering the wettability of solid surfaces in contact with the nonwetting phase at the end of steady state simulation of initially homogenous-wet porous media. To ensure accurate representation of fluid-solid interfacial areas, we compare LB simulation results to experimental measurements of interfacial fluid-fluid and fluid-solid areas determined by X-ray computed microtomography imaging of water and oil distributions in bead packs. The LB simulations are found to match experimental trends observed for fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfacial area-saturation relationships. The relative permeability of both fluids in the homogenous-wet porous media was found to decrease with a decreasing contact angle. The relative permeability of both fluids in the altered, mixed-wet porous media was found to decrease for all mixed-wet states in comparison to the initial homogenous-wet states. The nonwetting phase relative permeability decreased significantly, while the wetting phase experienced only a minor decrease. The significance of the decrease was found to be dependent on the distribution of the unaltered solid surfaces, with less dependence on the severity of alteration.

  11. Craniospinal Irradiation With Spinal IMRT to Improve Target Homogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Panandiker, Atmaram Pai; Ning, Holly; Likhacheva, Anna; Ullman, Karen; Arora, Barbara; Ondos, John C.; Karimpour, Shervin; Packer, Roger; Miller, Robert; Citrin, Deborah . E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To report a new technique for the spinal component of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in the supine position, to describe a verification procedure for this method, and to compare this technique with conventional plans. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were treated between 1998 and 2006 with CSI using a novel technique. Sixteen children were treated with a conventional field arrangement. All patients were followed for outcomes and toxicity. CSI was delivered using a posteroanterior (PA) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) spinal field matched to conventional, opposed lateral cranial fields. Treatment plans were generated for each patient using the IMRT technique and a standard PA field technique. The resulting dosimetry was compared to determine target homogeneity, maximum dose to normal tissues, and total monitor units delivered. Results: Evaluation of the spinal IMRT technique compared with a standard PA technique reveals a 7% reduction in the target volume receiving {>=}110% of the prescribed dose and an 8% increase in the target volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescribed dose. Although target homogeneity was improved, the maximum dose delivered in the paraspinal muscles was increased by approximately 8.5% with spinal IMRT compared to the PA technique. Follow-up evaluations revealed no unexpected toxicity associated with the IMRT technique. Conclusions: A new technique of spine IMRT is presented in combination with a quality assurance method. This method improves target dose uniformity compared to the conventional CSI technique. Longer follow-up will be required to determine any benefit with regard to toxicity and disease control.

  12. Striped anyonic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokela, Niko; Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2017-08-01

    The choice of statistics for a quantum particle is almost always a discrete one: either bosonic or fermionic. Anyons are the exceptional case for which the statistics can take a range of intermediate values. Holography provides an opportunity to address the question of how the behavior of interacting anyons depends on the choice of statistics. In this paper, we analyze the spectrum of a strongly coupled, gapless fluid of anyons described holographically by the D3-D7' model with alternative boundary conditions. We investigate how these alternative boundary conditions impact the instability of the gapless homogeneous phase toward the formation of spatial order. In addition, we also show that for a particular, limiting choice of the alternative boundary conditions, this holographic system can be interpreted as describing strongly coupled (2 +1 )-dimensional QED. In this case, the instability leads to a spontaneous, spatially modulated magnetic field.

  13. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  14. Application of high pressure homogenization on gums: a review.

    PubMed

    Belmiro, Ricardo Henrique; Tribst, Alline Artigiani Lima; Cristianini, Marcelo

    2017-09-25

    High pressure homogenization (HPH) is an emerging process in which a fluid product is pumped by pressure intensifiers forcing it to flows through a narrow gap, usually measured in the order of micrometers. Gums are polysaccharides from vegetal, animal or microbial origin, widely employed in food and chemical industries as thickeners, stabilizers, gelling agents and emulsifiers. Choosing a specific gum will depend on its application and purpose, as each form of gum has particular values for viscosity, intrinsic viscosity, stability, emulsifying and gelling properties, being these parameters determined by its structure. HPH is able to alter positively those properties by inducing changes in the original polymer, allowing for new applications and improvements on technical properties of gums. This review highlights the most important advances on this process applied to change polysaccharides from distinct sources and molecular structures, as well as the next challenges to be dealt with in this area. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. A spiral vortex model of homogeneous isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Keith; Ooi, Andrew; Chong, Min

    2002-11-01

    The Lundgren-Townsend model of turbulent fine scales has been successful in predicting some of the properties of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Lundgren obtained these results by averaging over an ensemble of nearly axisymmetric, unsteady, stretched spiral vortices. These vortical structures are represented in the model by a large-time asymptotic solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Extending on the work of Pullin & Saffman [Phys. Fluids 8, 3072 (1996)], we calculate the energy spectrum and longitudinal velocity structure functions for a specific realisation of the Lundgren-Townsend model. Here the members of our ensemble are time-evolving spiral vortex structures resulting from the merging of stretched Burgers vortex tubes. The merging is computed numerically following the method of Buntine & Pullin [JFM 205, 263 (1989)]. We present results for a range of vortex Reynolds numbers.

  16. Structure of ferrofluid nanofilms in homogeneous magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Jordanovic, Jelena; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2009-02-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations results for model ferrofluid films subject to an external, homogeneous magnetic field directed parallel or perpendicular to the film surfaces. The interactions between the magnetic nanoparticles are modeled via the Stockmayer potential. In a previous study [J. Jordanovic and S. H. L. Klapp, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 038302 (2008)] we have shown that an external field can control the number and internal structure of the layers characterizing the fluid films, in qualitative agreement with experiments. Here we explore the dependence of the layering effects on thermodynamic conditions, and we analyze the results from an energetic (microscopic and macroscopic) perspective. As a special case we investigate a monolayer to bilayer transition induced via a perpendicular field.

  17. Structure of ferrofluid nanofilms in homogeneous magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanovic, Jelena; Klapp, Sabine H. L.

    2009-02-01

    We report molecular dynamics simulations results for model ferrofluid films subject to an external, homogeneous magnetic field directed parallel or perpendicular to the film surfaces. The interactions between the magnetic nanoparticles are modeled via the Stockmayer potential. In a previous study [J. Jordanovic and S. H. L. Klapp, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 038302 (2008)] we have shown that an external field can control the number and internal structure of the layers characterizing the fluid films, in qualitative agreement with experiments. Here we explore the dependence of the layering effects on thermodynamic conditions, and we analyze the results from an energetic (microscopic and macroscopic) perspective. As a special case we investigate a monolayer to bilayer transition induced via a perpendicular field.

  18. Down-regulation of common NFκB-iNOS pathway by chronic Thalidomide treatment improves Hepatopulmonary Syndrome and Muscle Wasting in rats with Biliary Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tzu-Hao; Lee, Pei-Chang; Lee, Kuei-Chuan; Hsieh, Yun-Cheng; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Yang, Ying-Ying; Huang, Shiang-Fen; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Hou, Ming-Chih; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide can modulate the TNFα-NFκB and iNOS pathway, which involve in the pathogenesis of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) and muscle wasting in cirrhosis. In bile duct ligated-cirrhotic rats, the increased circulating CD16+ (inflammatory) monocytes and its intracellular TNFα, NFκB, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1) and iNOS levels were associated with increased circulating MCP-1/soluable intercellular cell adehesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), pulmonary TNFα/NOx, up-regulated M1 polarization, exacerbated angiogenesis and hypoxemia (increased AaPO2) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and pulmonary homogenates. Meanwhile, a significant correlation was noted between circulating CD16+ monocyte/M1 (%) macrophages in BAL; M1 (%) macrophages in BAL/pulmonary iNOS mRNA expression; pulmonary iNOS mRNA expression/relative pulmonary MVD; pulmonary NOx level/AaPO2; circulating CD16+ monocyte/M1 (%) macrophages in muscle homogenates; 3-nitrotyrosine (representative of peroxynitrite) concentration/M1 (%) macrophages in muscle homogenates. The in vitro data demonstrated an iNOS-dependent inhibition of thalidomide on the TNFα-stimulated angiogenesis and myogenesis in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) and C2C12 myoblasts. Significantly, the co-culture of CD16+ monocyte from different rats with HPAECs, or co-culture of supernatant of above mixed cultures with HPAECs or C2C12 myoblasts stimulated angiogenesis, migration and myogenesis. Our findings demonstrate that TNFα inhibitor thalidomide markedly diminishes the severity of experimental HPS and muscle wasting by down-regulation of common peripheral and local NFκB-iNOS pathway. PMID:28009008

  19. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R. W.; Ebert, D. J.; Garcia, K. M.; Johnston, S. L.; Laurie, S. S.; Lee, S. M. C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. NASA's Human Research Program is focused on addressing health risks associated with long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but now more than 50 percent of ISS astronauts have experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural findings such as optic disc edema, globe flattening and choroidal folds. These structural and functional changes are referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. Development of VIIP symptoms may be related to elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) secondary to spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight and to determine if a relation exists with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as any VIIP-related effects of those shifts, are predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight status and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations, specifically posture changes and lower body negative pressure. Methods. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, and calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound); (3) vascular dimensions by ultrasound (jugular veins, cerebral and carotid arteries, vertebral arteries and veins, portal vein); (4) vascular dynamics by MRI (head/neck blood flow, cerebrospinal fluid

  20. Homogeneous anisotropic solutions of topologically massive gravity with a cosmological constant and their homogeneous deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutsopoulos, George

    2013-06-01

    We solve the equations of topologically massive gravity (TMG) with a potentially non-vanishing cosmological constant for homogeneous metrics without isotropy. We only reproduce known solutions. We also discuss their homogeneous deformations, possibly with isotropy. We show that de Sitter space and hyperbolic space cannot be infinitesimally homogeneously deformed in TMG. We clarify some of their Segre-Petrov types and discuss the warped de Sitter spacetime.

  1. Early fluid resuscitation in patients with rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Better, Ori S; Abassi, Zaid A

    2011-05-17

    Extensive rhabdomyolysis is often lethal unless treated immediately. Early mortality arises from hypovolemic shock, hyperkalemia, acidosis and myoglobinuric acute kidney injury (AKI). Many individuals with rhabdomyolysis could be saved, and myoglobinuric AKI prevented, by early vigorous fluid resuscitation with ≥12 l daily intravenous infusion of alkaline solution started at the scene of injury. This regimen stabilizes the circulation and mobilizes edema fluids sequestered in the injured muscles into the circulation, corrects hyperkalemia and acidosis, and protects against the nephrotoxic effects of myoglobinemia and hyperuricosuria. This regime results in a large positive fluid balance, which is well tolerated in young, carefully monitored individuals. In patients with rhabdomyolysis caused by muscle crush syndrome, mortality has been reduced from nearly 100% to <20% over the past 70 years through utilization of this intervention. This Perspectives discusses the lifesaving and limb-saving potential of early vigorous fluid resuscitation in patients with extensive traumatic and nontraumatic rhabdomyolysis.

  2. Analysis of homogeneous/non-homogeneous nanofluid models accounting for nanofluid-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, R.

    2016-07-01

    This article reports an unbiased analysis for the water based rod shaped alumina nanoparticles by considering both the homogeneous and non-homogeneous nanofluid models over the coupled nanofluid-surface interface. The mechanics of the surface are found for both the homogeneous and non-homogeneous models, which were ignored in previous studies. The viscosity and thermal conductivity data are implemented from the international nanofluid property benchmark exercise. All the simulations are being done by using the experimentally verified results. By considering the homogeneous and non-homogeneous models, the precise movement of the alumina nanoparticles over the surface has been observed by solving the corresponding system of differential equations. For the non-homogeneous model, a uniform temperature and nanofluid volume fraction are assumed at the surface, and the flux of the alumina nanoparticle is taken as zero. The assumption of zero nanoparticle flux at the surface makes the non-homogeneous model physically more realistic. The differences of all profiles for both the homogeneous and nonhomogeneous models are insignificant, and this is due to small deviations in the values of the Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters.

  3. Homogenization in compiling ICRF combined catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, F. J.; Martínez, M. J.; López, J. A.

    2013-10-01

    Context. The International Astronomical Union (IAU) recommendations regarding the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) realizations require the construction of radio sources catalogs obtained using very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) methods. The improvement of these catalogs is a necessary procedure for the further densification of the ICRF over the celestial sphere. Aims: The different positions obtained from several catalogs using common sources to the ICRF make it necessary to critically revise the different methods employed in improving the ICRF from several radio sources catalogs. In this sense, a revision of the analytical and the statistical methods is necessary in line with their advantages and disadvantages. We have a double goal: first, we propose an adequate treatment of the residual of several catalogs to obtain a homogeneous catalog; second, we attempt to discern whether a combined catalog is homogeneous. Methods: We define homogeneity as applied to our problem in a dual sense: the first deals with the spatial distribution of the data over the celestial sphere. The second has a statistical meaning, as we consider that homogeneity exists when the residual between a given catalog and the ICRF behaves as a unimodal pure Gaussian. We use a nonparametrical method, which enables us to homogeneously extend the statistical properties of the residual over the entire sphere. This intermediate adjustment allows for subsequent computation of the coefficients for any parametrical adjustment model that has a higher accuracy and greater stability, and it prevents problems related with direct adjustments using the models. On the other hand, the homogeneity of the residuals in a catalog is tested using different weights. Our procedure also serves to propose the most suitable weights to maintain homogeneity in the final results. We perform a test using the ICRF-Ext2, JPL, and USNO quasar catalogs. Results: We show that a combination of catalogs can only

  4. Critical Casimir forces between homogeneous and chemically striped surfaces.

    PubMed

    Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Tröndle, Matthias; Dietrich, S

    2013-11-01

    Recent experiments have measured the critical Casimir force acting on a colloid immersed in a binary liquid mixture near its continuous demixing phase transition and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. Motivated by these experiments, we study the critical behavior of a system, which belongs to the Ising universality class, for the film geometry with one planar wall chemically striped, such that there is a laterally alternating adsorption preference for the two species of the binary liquid mixture, which is implemented by surface fields. For the opposite wall we employ alternatively a homogeneous adsorption preference or homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions, which within a lattice model are realized by open boundary conditions. By means of mean-field theory, Monte Carlo simulations, and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the critical Casimir force acting on the two parallel walls and its corresponding universal scaling function. We show that in the limit of stripe widths small compared with the film thickness, on the striped surface the system effectively realizes Dirichlet boundary conditions, which generically do not hold for actual fluids. Moreover, the critical Casimir force is found to be attractive or repulsive, depending on the width of the stripes of the chemically patterned surface and on the boundary condition applied to the opposing surface.

  5. Direction of unsaturated flow in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Ning; Kaya, Basak Sener; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of soil moisture in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope is a transient, variably saturated physical process controlled by rainfall characteristics, hillslope geometry, and the hydrological properties of the hillslope materials. The major driving mechanisms for moisture movement are gravity and gradients in matric potential. The latter is solely controlled by gradients of moisture content. In a homogeneous and isotropic saturated hillslope, absent a gradient in moisture content and under the driving force of gravity with a constant pressure boundary at the slope surface, flow is always in the lateral downslope direction, under either transient or steady state conditions. However, under variably saturated conditions, both gravity and moisture content gradients drive fluid motion, leading to complex flow patterns. In general, the flow field near the ground surface is variably saturated and transient, and the direction of flow could be laterally downslope, laterally upslope, or vertically downward. Previous work has suggested that prevailing rainfall conditions are sufficient to completely control these flow regimes. This work, however, shows that under time-varying rainfall conditions, vertical, downslope, and upslope lateral flow can concurrently occur at different depths and locations within the hillslope. More importantly, we show that the state of wetting or drying in a hillslope defines the temporal and spatial regimes of flow and when and where laterally downslope and/or laterally upslope flow occurs.

  6. Direction of unsaturated flow in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Kaya, B.S.; Godt, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of soil moisture in a homogeneous and isotropic hillslope is a transient, variably saturated physical process controlled by rainfall characteristics, hillslope geometry, and the hydrological properties of the hillslope materials. The major driving mechanisms for moisture movement are gravity and gradients in matric potential. The latter is solely controlled by gradients of moisture content. In a homogeneous and isotropic saturated hillslope, absent a gradient in moisture content and under the driving force of gravity with a constant pressure boundary at the slope surface, flow is always in the lateral downslope direction, under either transient or steady state conditions. However, under variably saturated conditions, both gravity and moisture content gradients drive fluid motion, leading to complex flow patterns. In general, the flow field near the ground surface is variably saturated and transient, and the direction of flow could be laterally downslope, laterally upslope, or vertically downward. Previous work has suggested that prevailing rainfall conditions are sufficient to completely control these flow regimes. This work, however, shows that under time-varying rainfall conditions, vertical, downslope, and upslope lateral flow can concurrently occur at different depths and locations within the hillslope. More importantly, we show that the state of wetting or drying in a hillslope defines the temporal and spatial regimes of flow and when and where laterally downslope and/or laterally upslope flow occurs. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. A new framework for simulating forced homogeneous buoyant turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Phares L.; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2015-06-01

    This work proposes a new simulation methodology to study variable density turbulent buoyant flows. The mathematical framework, referred to as homogeneous buoyant turbulence, relies on a triply periodic domain and incorporates numerical forcing methods commonly used in simulation studies of homogeneous, isotropic flows. In order to separate the effects due to buoyancy from those due to large-scale gradients, the linear scalar forcing technique is used to maintain the scalar variance at a constant value. Two sources of kinetic energy production are considered in the momentum equation, namely shear via an isotropic forcing term and buoyancy via the gravity term. The simulation framework is designed such that the four dimensionless parameters of importance in buoyant mixing, namely the Reynolds, Richardson, Atwood, and Schmidt numbers, can be independently varied and controlled. The framework is used to interrogate fully non-buoyant, fully buoyant, and partially buoyant turbulent flows. The results show that the statistics of the scalar fields (mixture fraction and density) are not influenced by the energy production mechanism (shear vs. buoyancy). On the other hand, the velocity field exhibits anisotropy, namely a larger variance in the direction of gravity which is associated with a statistical dependence of the velocity component on the local fluid density.

  8. Method of Mapping Anomalies in Homogenous Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E. (Inventor); Taylor, Bryant D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An electrical conductor and antenna are positioned in a fixed relationship to one another. Relative lateral movement is generated between the electrical conductor and a homogenous material while maintaining the electrical conductor at a fixed distance from the homogenous material. The antenna supplies a time-varying magnetic field that causes the electrical conductor to resonate and generate harmonic electric and magnetic field responses. Disruptions in at least one of the electric and magnetic field responses during this lateral movement are indicative of a lateral location of a subsurface anomaly. Next, relative out-of-plane movement is generated between the electrical conductor and the homogenous material in the vicinity of the anomaly's lateral location. Disruptions in at least one of the electric and magnetic field responses during this out-of-plane movement are indicative of a depth location of the subsurface anomaly. A recording of the disruptions provides a mapping of the anomaly.

  9. Rapid biotic homogenization of marine fish assemblages.

    PubMed

    Magurran, Anne E; Dornelas, Maria; Moyes, Faye; Gotelli, Nicholas J; McGill, Brian

    2015-09-24

    The role human activities play in reshaping biodiversity is increasingly apparent in terrestrial ecosystems. However, the responses of entire marine assemblages are not well-understood, in part, because few monitoring programs incorporate both spatial and temporal replication. Here, we analyse an exceptionally comprehensive 29-year time series of North Atlantic groundfish assemblages monitored over 5° latitude to the west of Scotland. These fish assemblages show no systematic change in species richness through time, but steady change in species composition, leading to an increase in spatial homogenization: the species identity of colder northern localities increasingly resembles that of warmer southern localities. This biotic homogenization mirrors the spatial pattern of unevenly rising ocean temperatures over the same time period suggesting that climate change is primarily responsible for the spatial homogenization we observe. In this and other ecosystems, apparent constancy in species richness may mask major changes in species composition driven by anthropogenic change.

  10. Computational Homogenization of Defect Driving Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricker, Sarah; Mergheim, Julia; Steinmann, Paul

    Due to the fact that many engineering materials and also biological tissues possess an underlying (heterogeneous) micro-structure it is not sufficient to simulate these materials by pre-assumed overall constitutive assumptions. Therefore, we apply a homogenization scheme, which determines the macroscopic material behavior based on analysis of the underlying micro-structure. In the work at hand focus is put on the extension of the classical computational homogenization scheme towards the homogenization of material forces. Therefore, volume forces have to incorporated which may emerge due to inhomogeneities in the material. With assistance of this material formulation and the equivalence of the J-integral and the material force at a crack tip, studies on the influence of the micro-structure onto the macroscopic crack-propagation are carried out.

  11. Applications of High and Ultra High Pressure Homogenization for Food Safety

    PubMed Central

    Patrignani, Francesca; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the shelf-life and safety of foods have been achieved by thermal processing. Low temperature long time and high temperature short time treatments are the most commonly used hurdles for the pasteurization of fluid foods and raw materials. However, the thermal treatments can reduce the product quality and freshness. Consequently, some non-thermal pasteurization process have been proposed during the last decades, including high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric field, ultrasound (US), and high pressure homogenization (HPH). This last technique has been demonstrated to have a great potential to provide “fresh-like” products with prolonged shelf-life. Moreover, the recent developments in high-pressure-homogenization technology and the design of new homogenization valves able to withstand pressures up to 350–400 MPa have opened new opportunities to homogenization processing in the food industries and, consequently, permitted the development of new products differentiated from traditional ones by sensory and structural characteristics or functional properties. For this, this review deals with the principal mechanisms of action of HPH against microorganisms of food concern in relation to the adopted homogenizer and process parameters. In addition, the effects of homogenization on foodborne pathogenic species inactivation in relation to the food matrix and food chemico-physical and process variables will be reviewed. Also the combined use of this alternative technology with other non-thermal technologies will be considered. PMID:27536270

  12. On gain in homogenized composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Tom G.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2016-09-01

    Three theoretical studies were undertaken, each based on the Bruggeman homogenization formalism and each involving homogenized composite materials (HCMs) comprising active component materials. It was found that: (i) HCMs can exhibit higher degrees of amplification than are exhibited by the HCM's component materials; (ii) anisotropic HCMs can simultaneously exhibit plane-wave amplification for certain propagation directions and plane-wave attenuation for other propagation directions; and (iii) for isotropic chiral HCMs, left-circularly polarized fields may be amplified while right-circularly polarized fields may be simultaneously attenuated (or vice versa) in any propagation direction.

  13. Unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids.

    PubMed

    Adib, Artur B; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    We use a statistical-mechanical identity closely related to the familiar virial theorem, to derive unbiased estimators for spatial distribution functions of classical fluids. In particular, we obtain estimators for both the fluid density rho(r) in the vicinity of a fixed solute and the pair correlation g(r) of a homogeneous classical fluid. We illustrate the utility of our estimators with numerical examples, which reveal advantages over traditional histogram-based methods of computing such distributions.

  14. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  15. Immunohistochemical localization of alpha(1a)-adrenoreceptors in muscle spindles of rabbit masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Bombardi, C; Grandis, A; Chiocchetti, R; Bortolami, R; Johansson, H; Lucchi, M L

    2006-04-01

    The expression of alpha(1a)-adrenoreceptors (alpha(1a)-ARs) within the muscle spindles of rabbit masseter muscle was investigated. The alpha(1a)-ARs were detected by immunohistochemical fluorescent method and examined along the entire length of 109 cross serially sectioned spindles. The sympathetic fibers were visualized by the immunofluorescent labeling of the noradrenaline synthesizing enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH). In order to recognize the intrafusal muscle fiber types, antibodies for different myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHCI) were used. TH and DBH immunolabeled nerve fibers have been observed within the capsule lamellar layers, in the periaxial fluid space and close to intrafusal muscle fibers. The alpha(1a)-ARs were detected on the smooth muscle cells of the blood vessels coursing in the muscle and in the capsule lamellar layers or within the periaxial fluid space of the spindles. Moreover, at the polar regions of a high percentage (88.1%) of muscle spindles a strong alpha(1a)-ARs immunoreactivity was present on the intrafusal muscle fibers. In double immunostained sections for alpha(1a)-ARs and MyHCI it was evidenced that both bag, and nuclear chain fibers express alpha(1a)-ARs. The receptors that we have detected by immunofluorescence may support a direct control by adrenergic fibers on muscle spindle.

  16. Muscle "Building."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of constructivism in teaching human anatomy. Provides directions for constructing arm-hand and leg-foot models that include extensor and flexor muscles and that are easily and cheaply constructed. Lists resources that provide ideas for using such models depending upon the curriculum implemented in a school or the course that is…

  17. Steady laminar flow of fractal fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balankin, Alexander S.; Mena, Baltasar; Susarrey, Orlando; Samayoa, Didier

    2017-02-01

    We study laminar flow of a fractal fluid in a cylindrical tube. A flow of the fractal fluid is mapped into a homogeneous flow in a fractional dimensional space with metric induced by the fractal topology. The equations of motion for an incompressible Stokes flow of the Newtonian fractal fluid are derived. It is found that the radial distribution for the velocity in a steady Poiseuille flow of a fractal fluid is governed by the fractal metric of the flow, whereas the pressure distribution along the flow direction depends on the fractal topology of flow, as well as on the fractal metric. The radial distribution of the fractal fluid velocity in a steady Couette flow between two concentric cylinders is also derived.

  18. Hyperelastic bodies under homogeneous Cauchy stress induced by non-homogeneous finite deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihai, L. Angela; Neff, Patrizio

    2017-03-01

    We discuss whether homogeneous Cauchy stress implies homogeneous strain in isotropic nonlinear elasticity. While for linear elasticity the positive answer is clear, we exhibit, through detailed calculations, an example with inhomogeneous continuous deformation but constant Cauchy stress. The example is derived from a non rank-one convex elastic energy.

  19. Muscle conditioning and muscle injuries.

    PubMed

    Stone, M H

    1990-08-01

    Empirical and objective data suggest that muscle and connective tissue can undergo adaptations to physical training resulting in greater tissue mass and increased maximum tensile strength. These adaptations are especially apparent as a result of load bearing and resistive training. Furthermore, information is presented suggesting that pre-conditioning and in-season muscle conditioning, especially strength training, reduce injuries among athletes. Additionally, a theoretical model of training, "periodization", is offered as a method of increasing performance to maximum or optimal values while reducing overtraining and injury potential. Periodization of training can reduce overtraining potential and injury potential while optimizing performance by variation of volume, intensity, and exercise selection during a training program.

  20. Reynolds and Atwood Numbers Effects on Homogeneous Rayleigh Taylor Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslangil, Denis; Livescu, Daniel; Banerjee, Arindam

    2015-11-01

    The effects of Reynolds and Atwood numbers on turbulent mixing of a heterogeneous mixture of two incompressible, miscible fluids with different densities are investigated by using high-resolution Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). The flow occurs in a triply periodic 3D domain, with the two fluids initially segregated in random patches, and turbulence is generated in response to buoyancy. In turn, stirring produced by turbulence breaks down the scalar structures, accelerating the molecular mixing. Statistically homogeneous variable-density (VD) mixing, with density variations due to compositional changes, is a basic mixing problem and aims to mimic the core of the mixing layer of acceleration driven Rayleigh Taylor Instability (RTI). We present results covering a large range of kinematic viscosity values for density contrasts including small (A =0.04), moderate (A =0.5), and high (A =0.75 and 0.9) Atwood numbers. Particular interest will be given to the structure of the turbulence and mixing process, including the alignment between various turbulence and scalar quantities, as well as providing fidelity data for verification and validation of mix models. Arindam Banerjee acknowledges support from NSF CAREER award # 1453056.

  1. Forensic interlaboratory evaluation of the ForFLUID kit for vaginal fluids identification.

    PubMed

    Giampaoli, Saverio; Alessandrini, Federica; Berti, Andrea; Ripani, Luigi; Choi, Ajin; Crab, Roselien; De Vittori, Elisabetta; Egyed, Balazs; Haas, Cordula; Lee, Hwan Young; Korabecná, Marie; Noel, Fabrice; Podini, Daniele; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Valentini, Alessio; Romano Spica, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Identification of vaginal fluids is an important step in the process of sexual assaults confirmation. Advances in both microbiology and molecular biology defined technical approaches allowing the discrimination of body fluids. These protocols are based on the identification of specific bacterial communities by microfloraDNA (mfDNA) amplification. A multiplex real time-PCR assay (ForFLUID kit) has been developed for identifying biological fluids and for discrimination among vaginal, oral and fecal samples. In order to test its efficacy and reliability of the assay in the identification of vaginal fluids, an interlaboratory evaluation has been performed on homogeneous vaginal swabs. All the involved laboratories were able to correctly recognize all the vaginal swabs, and no false positives were identified when the assay was applied on non-vaginal samples. The assay represents an useful molecular tool that can be easily adopted by forensic geneticists involved in vaginal fluid identification.

  2. Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pnueli, David; Gutfinger, Chaim

    1997-01-01

    This text is intended for the study of fluid mechanics at an intermediate level. The presentation starts with basic concepts, in order to form a sound conceptual structure that can support engineering applications and encourage further learning. The presentation is exact, incorporating both the mathematics involved and the physics needed to understand the various phenomena in fluid mechanics. Where a didactical choice must be made between the two, the physics prevails. Throughout the book the authors have tried to reach a balance between exact presentation, intuitive grasp of new ideas, and creative applications of concepts. This approach is reflected in the examples presented in the text and in the exercises given at the end of each chapter. Subjects treated are hydrostatics, viscous flow, similitude and order of magnitude, creeping flow, potential flow, boundary layer flow, turbulent flow, compressible flow, and non-Newtonian flows. This book is ideal for advanced undergraduate students in mechanical, chemical, aerospace, and civil engineering. Solutions manual available.

  3. Fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  4. Modification of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence by solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Wontae

    2005-12-01

    Particle-laden flows are prevalent in natural and industrial environments. Dilute loadings of small, heavy particles have been observed to attenuate the turbulence levels of the carrier-phase flow, up to 80% in some cases. We attempt to increase the physical understanding of this complex phenomenon by studying the interaction of solid particles with the most fundamental type of turbulence, which is homogeneous and isotropic with no mean flow. A flow facility was developed that could create air turbulence in a nearly-spherical chamber by means of synthetic jet actuators mounted on the corners. Loudspeakers were used as the actuators. Stationary turbulence and natural decaying turbulence were investigated using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry for the base flow qualification. Results indicated that the turbulence was fairly homogeneous throughout the measurement domain and very isotropic, with small mean flow. The particle-laden flow experiments were conducted in two different environments, the lab and in micro-gravity, to examine the effects of particle wakes and flow structure distortion caused by settling particles. The laboratory experiments showed that glass particles with diameters on the order of the turbulence Kolmogorov length scale attenuated the fluid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and dissipation rate with increasing particle mass loadings. The main source of fluid TKE production in the chamber was the speakers, but the loss of potential energy of the settling particles also resulted in a significant amount of production of extra TKE. The sink of TKE in the chamber was due to the ordinary fluid viscous dissipation and extra dissipation caused by particles. This extra dissipation could be divided into "unresolved" dissipation caused by local velocity disturbances in the vicinity of the small particles and dissipation caused by large-scale flow distortions from particle wakes and particle clusters. The micro-gravity experiments in NASA's KC-135

  5. Large Eddy Simulation of Homogeneous Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, Kyle D.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Cambon, Claude; Chasnov, Jeffrey R.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Study of turbulent flows in rotating reference frames has proven to be one of the more challenging areas of turbulence research. The large number of theoretical, experimental, and computational studies performed over the years have demonstrated that the effect of solid-body rotation on turbulent flows is subtle and remains exceedingly difficult to predict. Because of the complexities associated with non-homogeneous turbulence, it is worthwhile to examine the effect of steady system rotation on the evolution of an initially isotropic turbulent flow. The assumption of statistical homogeneity considerably simplifies analysis and computation; calculation of homogeneous turbulence is further motivated since it possesses the essential physics found in more complex rotating flows. The principal objectives of the present study have therefore been to increase our fundamental understanding of turbulent flows in rotating reference frames through an examination of the asymptotic state of homogeneous rotating turbulence; particularly as to the existence of an asymptotic state which is self similar. Knowledge of an asymptotic similarity state permits prediction of the ultimate statistical evolution of the flow without requiring detailed knowledge of the complex, and not well understood, non-linear transfer processes. Aside from examination of possible similarity states in rotating turbulence, of further interest in this study has been an examination of the degree to which solid-body rotation induces a two-dimensional state in an initially isotropic flow.

  6. Spatial Homogeneity and Redshift--Distance Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, J. F.; Segal, I. E.

    1982-06-01

    Spatial homogeneity in the radial direction of low-redshift galaxies is subjected to Kafka-Schmidt V/Vm tests using well-documented samples. Homogeneity is consistent with the assumption of the Lundmark (quadratic redshift-distance) law, but large deviations from homogeneity are implied by the assumption of the Hubble (linear redshift-distance) law. These deviations are similar to what would be expected on the basis of the Lundmark law. Luminosity functions are obtained for each law by a nonparametric statistically optimal method that removes the observational cutoff bias in complete samples. Although the Hubble law correlation of absolute magnitude with redshift is reduced considerably by elimination of the bias, computer simulations show that its bias-free value is nevertheless at a satistically quite significant level, indicating the self-inconsistency of the law. The corresponding Lundmark law correlations are quite satisfactory satistically. The regression of redshift on magnitude also involves radial spatial homogeneity and, according to R. Soneira, has slope determining the redshift-magnitude exponent independently of the luminosity function. We have, however, rigorously proved the material dependence of the regression on this function and here exemplify our treatment by using the bias-free functions indicated, with results consistent with the foregoing argument.

  7. Homogeneous Catalysis by Transition Metal Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawby, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Examines four processes involving homogeneous catalysis which highlight the contrast between the simplicity of the overall reaction and the complexity of the catalytic cycle. Describes how catalysts provide circuitous routes in which all energy barriers are relatively low rather than lowering the activation energy for a single step reaction.…

  8. Homogeneous Immunoassays: Historical Perspective and Future Promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, Edwin F.

    1999-06-01

    The founding and growth of Syva Company is examined in the context of its leadership role in the development of homogeneous immunoassays. The simple mix and read protocols of these methods offer advantages in routine analytical and clinical applications. Early homogeneous methods were based on insensitive detection of immunoprecipitation during antigen/antibody binding. The advent of reporter groups in biology provided a means of quantitating immunochemical binding by labeling antibody or antigen and physically separating label incorporated into immune complexes from free label. Although high sensitivity was achieved, quantitative separations were experimentally demanding. Only when it became apparent that reporter groups could provide information, not only about the location of a molecule but also about its microscopic environment, was it possible to design practical non-separation methods. The evolution of early homogenous immunoassays was driven largely by the development of improved detection strategies. The first commercial spin immunoassays, developed by Syva for drug abuse testing during the Vietnam war, were followed by increasingly powerful methods such as immunochemical modulation of enzyme activity, fluorescence, and photo-induced chemiluminescence. Homogeneous methods that quantify analytes at femtomolar concentrations within a few minutes now offer important new opportunities in clinical diagnostics, nucleic acid detection and drug discovery.

  9. RELIABLE COMPUTATION OF HOMOGENEOUS AZEOTROPES. (R824731)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    It is important to determine the existence and composition of homogeneous azeotropes in the analysis of phase behavior and in the synthesis and design of separation systems, from both theoretical and practical standpoints. A new method for reliably locating an...

  10. HSTEP - Homogeneous Studies of Transiting Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, John

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a summary of the HSTEP project: an effort to calculate the physical properties of the known transiting extrasolar planets using a homogeneous approach. I discuss the motivation for the project, list the 83 planets which have already been studied, run through some important aspects of the methodology, and finish with a synopsis of the results.

  11. Homogeneous Catalysis by Transition Metal Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawby, Roger

    1988-01-01

    Examines four processes involving homogeneous catalysis which highlight the contrast between the simplicity of the overall reaction and the complexity of the catalytic cycle. Describes how catalysts provide circuitous routes in which all energy barriers are relatively low rather than lowering the activation energy for a single step reaction.…

  12. Revisiting Shock Initiation Modeling of Homogeneous Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2013-04-01

    Shock initiation of homogeneous explosives has been a subject of research since the 1960s, with neat and sensitized nitromethane as the main materials for experiments. A shock initiation model of homogeneous explosives was established in the early 1960s. It involves a thermal explosion event at the shock entrance boundary, which develops into a superdetonation that overtakes the initial shock. In recent years, Sheffield and his group, using accurate experimental tools, were able to observe details of buildup of the superdetonation. There are many papers on modeling shock initiation of heterogeneous explosives, but there are only a few papers on modeling shock initiation of homogeneous explosives. In this article, bulk reaction reactive flow equations are used to model homogeneous shock initiation in an attempt to reproduce experimental data of Sheffield and his group. It was possible to reproduce the main features of the shock initiation process, including thermal explosion, superdetonation, input shock overtake, overdriven detonation after overtake, and the beginning of decay toward Chapman-Jouget (CJ) detonation. The time to overtake (TTO) as function of input pressure was also calculated and compared to the experimental TTO.

  13. Reduced-order modelling numerical homogenization.

    PubMed

    Abdulle, A; Bai, Y

    2014-08-06

    A general framework to combine numerical homogenization and reduced-order modelling techniques for partial differential equations (PDEs) with multiple scales is described. Numerical homogenization methods are usually efficient to approximate the effective solution of PDEs with multiple scales. However, classical numerical homogenization techniques require the numerical solution of a large number of so-called microproblems to approximate the effective data at selected grid points of the computational domain. Such computations become particularly expensive for high-dimensional, time-dependent or nonlinear problems. In this paper, we explain how numerical homogenization method can benefit from reduced-order modelling techniques that allow one to identify offline and online computational procedures. The effective data are only computed accurately at a carefully selected number of grid points (offline stage) appropriately 'interpolated' in the online stage resulting in an online cost comparable to that of a single-scale solver. The methodology is presented for a class of PDEs with multiple scales, including elliptic, parabolic, wave and nonlinear problems. Numerical examples, including wave propagation in inhomogeneous media and solute transport in unsaturated porous media, illustrate the proposed method.

  14. RELIABLE COMPUTATION OF HOMOGENEOUS AZEOTROPES. (R824731)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    It is important to determine the existence and composition of homogeneous azeotropes in the analysis of phase behavior and in the synthesis and design of separation systems, from both theoretical and practical standpoints. A new method for reliably locating an...

  15. General Theorems about Homogeneous Ellipsoidal Inclusions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korringa, J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Mathematical theorems about the properties of ellipsoids are developed. Included are Poisson's theorem concerning the magnetization of a homogeneous body of ellipsoidal shape, the polarization of a dielectric, the transport of heat or electricity through an ellipsoid, and other problems. (BB)

  16. Coherence delay augmented laser beam homogenizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, P.; Bernhardt, A.

    1991-12-31

    It is an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus that can reduce the apparent coherence length of a laser beam so the beam can be used with an inexpensive homogenizer to produce an output beam with a uniform spatial intensity across its entire cross section. It is a further object of the invention to provide an improved homogenizer with a variable aperture size that is simple and easily made. It is still an additional object of the invention to provide an improved liquid filled homogenizer utilizing total internal reflection for improved efficiency. These, and other objects of the invention are realized by using a ``coherence delay line,`` according to the present invention, in series between a laser and a homogenizer. The coherence delay line is an optical ``line`` that comprises two mirrors, one partially reflecting, and one totally reflecting, arranged so that light incident from the laser first strikes the partially reflecting mirror. A portion of the beam passes through, and a portion is reflected back to the totally reflecting mirror.

  17. Darcy-Forchheimer flow with Cattaneo-Christov heat flux and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Haider, Farwa; Muhammad, Taseer; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Here Darcy-Forchheimer flow of viscoelastic fluids has been analyzed in the presence of Cattaneo-Christov heat flux and homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions. Results for two viscoelastic fluids are obtained and compared. A linear stretching surface has been used to generate the flow. Flow in porous media is characterized by considering the Darcy-Forchheimer model. Modified version of Fourier's law through Cattaneo-Christov heat flux is employed. Equal diffusion coefficients are employed for both reactants and auto catalyst. Optimal homotopy scheme is employed for solutions development of nonlinear problems. Solutions expressions of velocity, temperature and concentration fields are provided. Skin friction coefficient and heat transfer rate are computed and analyzed. Here the temperature and thermal boundary layer thickness are lower for Cattaneo-Christov heat flux model in comparison to classical Fourier's law of heat conduction. Moreover, the homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions parameters have opposite behaviors for concentration field.

  18. Homogenization of a mathematical model for cavitation in thin film flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsandzana, Afonso Fernando

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a contribution to mathematical modeling of thin film flow between two surfaces which are in relative motion. In particular such flows are important in lubrication theory. For many shapes of the surfaces and boundary conditions the pressure in the fluid will be so low that the continuous fluid film ruptures and air bubbles are formed. This phenomenon is known as cavitation and have a huge impact on the hydrodynamic performance. We derive a mathematical model of thin film flow between two close surfaces which takes into account cavitation, surface roughness and pressure dependent density. Moreover, we use two-scale convergence to homogenize the model. In addition, we compute the coefficients of the homogenized equation for a simple class of functions that describe the film thickness.

  19. Homogeneity of Latvian temperature and precipitation series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizuma, L.; Briede, A.

    2010-09-01

    During previous years and decades the homogenization of Latvian monthly temperature and precipitation data series was based on the direct homogenization methods which relayed on metadata and studies of the effects of specific changes in time of observation as well as methods of observation. However, the method is not effective for temperature and precipitation data series shifts detection caused by measurement's place relocation or environmental changes. The both climatological temperature and precipitation records are significantly affected by a number of non-climatological factors (station moves, changes in instrumentation; introduction of different observing practices like a different observing time or introduction of wetting corrections for precipitation, changes in the local urban environment). If these non-homogeneities are not accounted for properly, that makes the data unrepresentative to be used for analyses of climate state, variations and changes. Monthly and daily Latvian station series (1950-2008) of surface air temperature and precipitation are statistically tested with respect to homogeneity. Two homogeneity tests are applied to evaluate monthly series. The multiple analyses of series for homogenization MASHv3.02 has been applied to 23 Latvian mean, maximum and minimum daily and monthly data series and daily and monthly precipitation series. The standard normal homogeneity tests (SNHT) has been applied to monthly mean temperature and precipitation series. During the tested period the station network is dense enough for efficient homogeneity testing. It has been found that all the time series contain the homogeneity breaks at least during one of the month. For some stations the multiple breaks were found. For mean temperature time series the 80 % of the breaks are generally less than ±0.20C. The largest detected homogeneity breaks in the mean monthly temperatures are up to ±1.00C, in mean monthly maximum temperature are up to ±1.30C and for mean

  20. Muscle Mass Predicts Outcomes Following Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    DiMartini, Andrea; Cruz, Ruy J.; Dew, Mary Amanda; Myaskovsky, Larissa; Goodpaster, Bret; Fox, Kristen; Kim, Kevin H.; Fontes, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims For patients with end-stage liver disease commonly used indices of nutritional status (i.e. body weight and BMI) are often inflated due to fluid overload (i.e. ascites, peripheral edema) resulting in an underdiagnosis of malnutrition. As muscle is the largest protein reservoir in the body, an estimate of muscle mass may be a more reliable and valid estimate of nutritional status. Methods Therefore, we used pre-transplant computerized tomography data of 338 liver transplant (LTX) candidates to identify muscle and fat mass based on a specific abdominal transverse section commonly used in body composition analyses and investigated the contribution of this measure to specific post-LTX outcomes. Results We found the majority, 68%, of our patients could be defined as cachetic. For men muscle mass predicted many important post-transplant outcomes including intensive care unit (ICU) and total length of stay and days of intubation. Muscle mass was a significant predictor of survival and also predicted disposition to home vs another facility. For women muscle mass predicted lengths of ICU and total stay and days of intubation but the effect was modest. Muscle mass did not predict survival or disposition for women. Conclusions As pre-transplant muscle mass was associated with many important post-operative outcomes we discuss these findings in the context of possible pre-transplant interventions to either improve or sustain muscle mass before surgery. PMID:23960026

  1. Muscle mass predicts outcomes following liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    DiMartini, Andrea; Cruz, Ruy J; Dew, Mary Amanda; Myaskovsky, Larissa; Goodpaster, Bret; Fox, Kristen; Kim, Kevin H; Fontes, Paulo

    2013-11-01

    For patients with end-stage liver disease, commonly used indices of nutritional status (ie, body weight and body mass index) are often inflated because of fluid overload (ie, ascites and peripheral edema), and this results in an underdiagnosis of malnutrition. Because muscle is the largest protein reservoir in the body, an estimate of the muscle mass may be a more reliable and valid estimate of nutritional status. Therefore, we used pretransplant computed tomography data for 338 liver transplantation (LT) candidates to identify muscle and fat mass on the basis of a specific abdominal transverse section commonly used in body composition analyses, and we investigated the contribution of this measure to specific post-LT outcomes. We found that the majority of our patients (68%) could be defined as cachectic. For men, muscle mass predicted many important posttransplant outcomes, including intensive care unit (ICU) stay, total length of stay (LOS), and days of intubation. Muscle mass was a significant predictor of survival and also predicted disposition to home versus another facility. For women, muscle mass predicted ICU stay, total LOS, and days of intubation, but the effect was modest. Muscle mass did not predict survival or disposition for women. In conclusion, because pretransplant muscle mass is associated with many important postoperative outcomes, we discuss these findings in the context of possible pretransplant interventions for either improving or sustaining muscle mass before surgery. © 2013 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  2. To homogenize, or not to homogenize, that is the question: Quartz-hosted melt inclusion analysis avenues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, C. N.; Roberge, J.; Todorov, T. I.; Hofstra, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Melt inclusions hosted in quartz can provide the only direct information about the pressure, temperature, and melt composition of pre-eruptive rhyolitic magmas, many of which are the precursors to mineralizing aqueous fluids [1]. With ideal, rapidly-quenched pumice samples, analysis of glassy quartz-hosted melt inclusions is relatively straightforward. These data can be directly interpreted to represent snapshots of metal and volatile concentrations during magma crystallization and degassing. However, most ore deposit-related igneous samples are non-ideal; being older, potentially hydrothermally altered, and often crystallized due to slow cooling in subvolcanic regions (e.g., porphyry-type deposits). In this case, analysis of crystalline melt inclusions in quartz is not straightforward and resulting data must be meticulously examined before interpretation. Many melt inclusions may have experienced post-entrapment modifications [1] such as diffusion of elements (e.g., H, Li, Na, Ag, Cu) [2], which may lead to changes in measured oxygen fugacity. Slowly cooled inclusions may crystallize, producing a heterogeneous "micro-rock" that cannot be analyzed by spectroscopic methods or electron microprobe. While crystallized inclusions can be homogenized in a high-temperature furnace, many new problems may arise such as inclusion decrepitation [3], diffusion of elements [2], and incorporation of too little or too much Si from the inclusion rim or host crystal. However, if unwanted homogenization effects are minimized by choosing ideal experimental conditions, then these homogenized inclusions can be analyzed by traditional FTIR and electron microprobe methods. The electron microprobe data from homogenized inclusions can be used as accurate internal standards for laser ablation-ICP-MS data reduction. Alternatively, crystalline inclusions can be directly analyzed for major and trace elements by laser ablation-ICP-MS [4], which considerably reduces sample preparation time, but

  3. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  4. Development of Human Muscle Protein Measurement with MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chen; Evans, Harlan; Leblanc, Adrian D.

    1997-01-01

    It is known that micro-gravity has a strong influence on the human musculoskeletal system. A number of studies have shown that significant changes in skeletal muscles occur in both space flight and bedrest simulation. In our 5 week bedrest study, the cross-sectional area of soleus-gastrocnemius decreased about 12% while the cross-sectional area of anterior calf muscles decreased about 4%. Using volume measurements, these losses increased after 17 weeks to approximately 30% and 21% respectively. Significant muscle atrophy was also found on the SL-J crew members after only 8 days in space. It is important that these effects are fully understood so that countermeasures can be developed. The same knowledge might also be useful in preventing muscle atrophy related to other medical problems. A major problem with anatomical measurements of muscle during bed rest and microgravity is the influence of fluid shifts and water balance on the measurement of muscle volume, especially when the exposure duration is short and the atrophy is relatively small. Fluid shifts were documented in Skylab by visual observations of blood vessel distention, rapid changes in limb volume, center of mass measurements and subjective descriptions such as puffy faces and head fullness. It has been reported that the muscle water content of biopsied soleus muscles decreased following 8 hours of head down tilt bed rest. Three aspects of fluid shifts that can affect volume measurements are: first, the shift of fluid that occurs whenever there is a change from upright to a recumbent position and vice versa; second, the potential for fluid accumulation in the lower limbs resulting from muscle damage caused by overextending atrophied muscle or swelling caused by deconditioned precapillary sphincter muscles during reambulation; third, the net change of hydration level during and after bed rest or spaceflight. Because of these transitory fluid shifts, muscle protein is expected to represent muscle capacity

  5. Fluid and Electrolyte Nutrition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Smith, Scott M.; Leach, Carolyn S.; Rice, Barbara L.

    1999-01-01

    Studies of fluid and electrolyte homeostasis have been completed since the early human space flight programs, with comprehensive research completed on the Spacelab Life Sciences missions SLS-1 and SLS-2 flights, and more recently on the Mir 18 mission. This work documented the known shifts in fluids, the decrease in total blood volume, and indications of reduced thirst. Data from these flights was used to evaluate the nutritional needs for water, sodium, and potassium. Interpretations of the data are confounded by the inadequate energy intakes routinely observed during space flight. This in turn results in reduced fluid intake, as food provides approximately 70% water intake. Subsequently, body weight, lean body mass, total body water, and total body potassium may decrease. Given these issues, there is evidence to support a minimum required water intake of 2 L per day. Data from previous Shuttle flights indicated that water intake is 2285 +/- 715 ml/day (mean +/- SD, n=26). There are no indications that sodium intake or homeostasis is compromised during space flight. The normal or low aldosterone and urinary sodium levels suggest adequate sodium intake (4047 +/- 902 mg/day, n=26). Because excessive sodium intake is associated with hypercalciuria, the recommended maximum amount of sodium intake during flight is 3500 mg/day (i.e., similar to the Recommended Dietary Allowance, RDA). Potassium metabolism appears to be more complex. Data indicate loss of body potassium related to muscle atrophy and low dietary intake (2407 +/- 548 mg/day, n=26). Although possibly related to measurement error, the elevations in blood potassium suggest alterations in potassium homeostasis. The space RDA for minimum potassium intake is 3500 mg/day. With the documented inadequate intakes, efforts are being made to increase dietary consumption of potassium.

  6. Craniospinal Irradiation with Spinal IMRT to Improve Target Homogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Panandiker, Atmaram Pai; Ning, Holly; Likhacheva, Anna; Ullman, Karen; Arora, Barbara; Ondos, John; Karimpour, Shervin; Packer, Roger; Miller, Robert; Citrin, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To report a new technique for the spinal component of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in the supine position, to describe a verification procedure for this method, and to compare this technique to conventional plans. Methods and Materials Twelve patients were treated between 1998 and 2006 with CSI using a novel technique. Sixteen children were treated with a conventional field arrangement. All patients were followed for outcomes and toxicity. CSI was delivered using a posterior-to-anterior (PA) intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) spinal field matched to conventional, opposed lateral cranial fields. Treatment plans were generated for each patient using the IMRT technique and a standard PA field technique. The resulting dosimetry was compared to determine target homogeneity, maximum dose to normal tissues, and total monitor units delivered. Results Evaluation of the spinal IMRT technique compared to a standard PA technique reveals a 7% reduction in the target volume receiving ≥110% of the prescribed dose and an 8 % increase in the target volume receiving ≥ 95% of the prescribed dose. While target homogeneity was improved, the maximum dose delivered in the paraspinal muscles was increased by approximately 8.5 % with spinal IMRT compared to the PA technique. Follow-up evaluations revealed no unexpected toxicity associated with the IMRT technique. Conclusions A new technique of spine IMRT is presented in combination with a quality assurance method. This method improves target dose uniformity compared to the conventional CSI technique. Longer follow-up will be required to determine any benefit with regard to toxicity and disease control. PMID:17467921

  7. Drilling fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.A.; Patel, B.B.

    1987-11-03

    A drilling fluid additive mixture is described consisting essentially of a sulfoalkylated tannin in admixture with a non-sulfoalkylated alkali-solubilized lignite wherein the weight ratio of the sulfoalkylated tannin to the non-sulfoalkylated lignite is in the range from about 2:1 to about 1:1. The sulfoalkylated tannin has been sulfoalkylated with at least one -(C(R-)/sub 2/-SO/sub 3/M side chain, wherein each R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and alkyl radicals containing from 1 to about 5 carbon atoms, and M is selected from the group consisting of ammonium and the alkali metals.

  8. Paleotemperatures preserved in fluid inclusions in halite

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.M.; Spencer, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    A variety of paleoclimate proxy records allow determination of relative warming or cooling. However, if we are to understand climate change, quantification of past temperature fluctuations is essential. Our research indicates that fluid inclusions in halite can yield homogenization temperatures that record surface brine temperatures at the time of halite precipitation. To avoid problems with stretching, leaking, and initial trapping of air, samples with primary, single-phase (liquid) fluid inclusions are chilled in a freezer to nucleate vapor bubbles. We tested the reliability of this method of obtaining fluid-inclusion homogenization temperatures using modern salts precipitated at Badwater Basin, Death Valley, California. Homogenization temperatures correlate well with measured brine temperatures. The same method is applied to fluid inclusions in Pleistocene halite from a core taken at the same location in Death Valley. Results are at several scales, recording diurnal temperature variations, seasonal temperature fluctuations, and longer-term warming and cooling events that correlate with major changes in the sedimentary environment related to climate. This technique is uniquely instrumental for paleoclimate studies because it offers actual, not just proxy, paleotemperature data. 27 refs., 17 figs.

  9. Homogeneous freezing nucleation of stratospheric solution droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The classical theory of homogeneous nucleation was used to calculate the freezing rate of sulfuric acid solution aerosols under stratospheric conditions. The freezing of stratospheric aerosols would be important for the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres. In addition, the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions on stratospheric aerosols may be very sensitive to their state. The calculations indicate that homogeneous freezing nucleation of pure water ice in the stratospheric solution droplets would occur at temperatures below about 192 K. However, the physical properties of H2SO4 solution at such low temperatures are not well known, and it is possible that sulfuric acid aerosols will freeze out at temperatures ranging from about 180 to 195 K. It is also shown that the temperature at which the aerosols freeze is nearly independent of their size.

  10. Homogeneous crystal nucleation in binary metallic melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. V.; Spaepen, F.

    1983-01-01

    A method for calculating the homogeneous crystal nucleation frequency in binary metallic melts is developed. The free energy of crystallization is derived from regular solution models for the liquid and solid and is used, together with model-based estimates of the interfacial tension, to calculate the nucleation frequency from the classical theory. The method can account for the composition dependence of the maximum undercooling observed in a number of experiments on small droplet dispersions. It can also be used to calculate the driving force for crystal growth and to obtain more precise estimates of the homogeneous crystal nucleation frequency in glass-forming alloys. This method, although approximate, is simple to apply, and requires only knowledge of the phase diagram and a few readily available thermodynamic quantities as input data.

  11. Detonation in shocked homogeneous high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.; Souers, P.C.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied shock-induced changes in homogeneous high explosives including nitromethane, tetranitromethane, and single crystals of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) by using fast time-resolved emission and Raman spectroscopy at a two-stage light-gas gun. The results reveal three distinct steps during which the homogeneous explosives chemically evolve to final detonation products. These are (1) the initiation of shock compressed high explosives after an induction period, (2) thermal explosion of shock-compressed and/or reacting materials, and (3) a decay to a steady-state representing a transition to the detonation of uncompressed high explosives. Based on a gray-body approximation, we have obtained the CJ temperatures: 3800 K for nitromethane, 2950 K for tetranitromethane, and 4100 K for PETN. We compare the data with various thermochemical equilibrium calculations. In this paper we will also show a preliminary result of single-shot time-resolved Raman spectroscopy applied to shock-compressed nitromethane.

  12. Beyond relationships between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David A.; Katz, Alexander; Arslan, Ilke; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-08-13

    Scientists who regard catalysis as a coherent field have been striving for decades to articulate the fundamental unifying principles. But because these principles seem to be broader than chemistry, chemical engineering, and materials science combined, catalytic scientists commonly interact within the sub-domains of homogeneous, heterogeneous, and bio-catalysis, and increasingly within even narrower domains such as organocatalysis, phase-transfer catalysis, acid-base catalysis, zeolite catalysis, etc. Attempts to unify catalysis have motivated researchers to find relationships between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis and to mimic enzymes. These themes have inspired vibrant international meetings and workshops, and we have benefited from the idea exchanges and have some thoughts about a path forward.

  13. Program Logics for Homogeneous Meta-programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Martin; Tratt, Laurence

    A meta-program is a program that generates or manipulates another program; in homogeneous meta-programming, a program may generate new parts of, or manipulate, itself. Meta-programming has been used extensively since macros were introduced to Lisp, yet we have little idea how formally to reason about meta-programs. This paper provides the first program logics for homogeneous meta-programming - using a variant of MiniML_e^{square} by Davies and Pfenning as underlying meta-programming language. We show the applicability of our approach by reasoning about example meta-programs from the literature. We also demonstrate that our logics are relatively complete in the sense of Cook, enable the inductive derivation of characteristic formulae, and exactly capture the observational properties induced by the operational semantics.

  14. Kinematical uniqueness of homogeneous isotropic LQC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan; Hanusch, Maximilian

    2017-01-01

    In a paper by Ashtekar and Campiglia, invariance under volume preserving residual diffeomorphisms has been used to single out the standard representation of the reduced holonomy-flux algebra in homogeneous loop quantum cosmology (LQC). In this paper, we use invariance under all residual diffeomorphisms to single out the standard kinematical Hilbert space of homogeneous isotropic LQC for both the standard configuration space {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} , as well as for the Fleischhack one {R}\\sqcup {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} . We first determine the scale invariant Radon measures on these spaces, and then show that the Haar measure on {{{R}}\\text{Bohr}} is the only such measure for which the momentum operator is hermitian w.r.t. the corresponding inner product. In particular, the measure is forced to be identically zero on {R} in the Fleischhack case, so that for both approaches, the standard kinematical LQC-Hilbert space is singled out.

  15. Homogeneous freezing nucleation of stratospheric solution droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Eric J.; Toon, Owen B.; Hamill, Patrick

    1991-10-01

    The classical theory of homogeneous nucleation was used to calculate the freezing rate of sulfuric acid solution aerosols under stratospheric conditions. The freezing of stratospheric aerosols would be important for the nucleation of nitric acid trihydrate particles in the Arctic and Antarctic stratospheres. In addition, the rate of heterogeneous chemical reactions on stratospheric aerosols may be very sensitive to their state. The calculations indicate that homogeneous freezing nucleation of pure water ice in the stratospheric solution droplets would occur at temperatures below about 192 K. However, the physical properties of H2SO4 solution at such low temperatures are not well known, and it is possible that sulfuric acid aerosols will freeze out at temperatures ranging from about 180 to 195 K. It is also shown that the temperature at which the aerosols freeze is nearly independent of their size.

  16. Genetic homogeneity of Fascioloides magna in Austria.

    PubMed

    Husch, Christian; Sattmann, Helmut; Hörweg, Christoph; Ursprung, Josef; Walochnik, Julia

    2017-08-30

    The large American liver fluke, Fascioloides magna, is an economically relevant parasite of both domestic and wild ungulates. F. magna was repeatedly introduced into Europe, for the first time already in the 19th century. In Austria, a stable population of F. magna has established in the Danube floodplain forests southeast of Vienna. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of F. magna in Austria. A total of 26 individuals from various regions within the known area of distribution were investigated for their cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) and nicotinamide dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) gene haplotypes. Interestingly, all 26 individuals revealed one and the same haplotype, namely concatenated haplotype Ha5. This indicates a homogenous population of F. magna in Austria and may argue for a single introduction. Alternatively, genetic homogeneity might also be explained by a bottleneck effect and/or genetic drift. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Homogeneous Superpixels from Markov Random Walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perbet, Frank; Stenger, Björn; Maki, Atsuto

    This paper presents a novel algorithm to generate homogeneous superpixels from Markov random walks. We exploit Markov clustering (MCL) as the methodology, a generic graph clustering method based on stochastic flow circulation. In particular, we introduce a graph pruning strategy called compact pruning in order to capture intrinsic local image structure. The resulting superpixels are homogeneous, i.e. uniform in size and compact in shape. The original MCL algorithm does not scale well to a graph of an image due to the square computation of the Markov matrix which is necessary for circulating the flow. The proposed pruning scheme has the advantages of faster computation, smaller memory footprint, and straightforward parallel implementation. Through comparisons with other recent techniques, we show that the proposed algorithm achieves state-of-the-art performance.

  18. Homogeneous isolation of nanocellulose from sugarcane bagasse by high pressure homogenization.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihua; Wei, Xiaoyi; Wang, Qinghuang; Chen, Jiacui; Chang, Gang; Kong, Lingxue; Su, Junbo; Liu, Yuhuan

    2012-11-06

    Nanocellulose from sugarcane bagasse was isolated by high pressure homogenization in a homogeneous media. Pretreatment with an ionic liquid (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]Cl)) was initially involved to dissolve the bagasse cellulose. Subsequently, the homogeneous solution was passed through a high pressure homogenizer without any clogging. The nanocellulose was obtained at 80 MPa for 30 cycles with recovery of 90% under the optimum refining condition. Nanocellulose had been characterized by Fourier transformed infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological measurements and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that nanocellulose was 10-20 nm in diameter, and presented lower thermal stability and crystallinity than the original cellulose. The developed nanocellulose would be a very versatile renewable material.

  19. Metastable states in homogeneous Ising models

    SciTech Connect

    Achilles, M.; Bendisch, J.; von Trotha, H.

    1987-04-01

    Metastable states of homogeneous 2D and 3D Ising models are studied under free boundary conditions. The states are defined in terms of weak and strict local minima of the total interaction energy. The morphology of these minima is characterized locally and globally on square and cubic grids. Furthermore, in the 2D case, transition from any spin configuration that is not a strict minimum to a strict minimum is possible via non-energy-increasing single flips.

  20. Castings, Steel, Homogenization of Steel Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1942-12-05

    diffraction pattern of quenched and tempered steel castings. 2. Calculations based upon known diffusion rates show: A. Practical homogenizing heat ...will be largely eliminated by either the usual heating for nuenching or a homo- genizing treatment. C. Interdendritic segregation of sulfur will...26 Appendix A - History of the Heat Treatment and Composition of Centrifugal Gun Castings at W-tertown Ar- sen-.l. ..... ..................... 2

  1. Recent advances in homogeneous nickel catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Sarah Z.; Standley, Eric A.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2014-05-01

    Tremendous advances have been made in nickel catalysis over the past decade. Several key properties of nickel, such as facile oxidative addition and ready access to multiple oxidation states, have allowed the development of a broad range of innovative reactions. In recent years, these properties have been increasingly understood and used to perform transformations long considered exceptionally challenging. Here we discuss some of the most recent and significant developments in homogeneous nickel catalysis, with an emphasis on both synthetic outcome and mechanism.

  2. A Homogeneous Billet Layer Casting Fabrication Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, FengLi; Wang, JunGe; Ge, HongHao; Li, Jun; Hu, Qiaodan; Nadendla, Hari-Babu; Xia, MingXu; Li, JianGuo

    2017-10-01

    A novel additive casting approach, termed as layer casting (LC), was proposed to fabricate ingots with homogeneous composition and grain structure distribution. Ingots of Al-4.5 wt pct Cu were fabricated using conventional and novel methods to verify the feasibility of this novel approach. The results show that the novel processing not only alleviates macrosegregation but also reduces the shrinkage cavity and improves the tensile properties of the as-cast condition.

  3. Homogeneous Biosensing Based on Magnetic Particle Labels

    PubMed Central

    Schrittwieser, Stefan; Pelaz, Beatriz; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Lentijo-Mozo, Sergio; Soulantica, Katerina; Dieckhoff, Jan; Ludwig, Frank; Guenther, Annegret; Tschöpe, Andreas; Schotter, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    The growing availability of biomarker panels for molecular diagnostics is leading to an increasing need for fast and sensitive biosensing technologies that are applicable to point-of-care testing. In that regard, homogeneous measurement principles are especially relevant as they usually do not require extensive sample preparation procedures, thus reducing the total analysis time and maximizing ease-of-use. In this review, we focus on homogeneous biosensors for the in vitro detection of biomarkers. Within this broad range of biosensors, we concentrate on methods that apply magnetic particle labels. The advantage of such methods lies in the added possibility to manipulate the particle labels by applied magnetic fields, which can be exploited, for example, to decrease incubation times or to enhance the signal-to-noise-ratio of the measurement signal by applying frequency-selective detection. In our review, we discriminate the corresponding methods based on the nature of the acquired measurement signal, which can either be based on magnetic or optical detection. The underlying measurement principles of the different techniques are discussed, and biosensing examples for all techniques are reported, thereby demonstrating the broad applicability of homogeneous in vitro biosensing based on magnetic particle label actuation. PMID:27275824

  4. Homogeneous cooling state of frictionless rod particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Largo, S. M.; Alonso-Marroquin, F.; Weinhart, T.; Luding, S.; Hidalgo, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we report some theoretical results on granular gases consisting of frictionless 3D rods with low energy dissipation. We performed simulations on the temporal evolution of soft spherocylinders, using a molecular dynamics algorithm implemented on GPU architecture. A homogeneous cooling state for rods, where the time dependence of the system's intensive variables occurs only through a global granular temperature, has been identified. We have found a homogeneous cooling process, which is in excellent agreement with Haff's law, when using an adequate rescaling time τ(ξ), the value of which depends on the particle elongation ξ and the restitution coefficient. It was further found that scaled particle velocity distributions remain approximately Gaussian regardless of the particle shape. Similarly to a system of ellipsoids, energy equipartition between rotational and translational degrees of freedom was better satisfied as one gets closer to the elastic limit. Taking advantage of scaling properties, we have numerically determined the general functionality of the magnitude Dc(ξ), which describes the efficiency of the energy interchange between rotational and translational degrees of freedom, as well as its dependence on particle shape. We have detected a range of particle elongations (1.5 < ξ < 4.0), where the average energy transfer between the rotational and translational degrees of freedom results greater for spherocylinders than for homogeneous ellipsoids with the same aspect ratio.

  5. TESTING HOMOGENEITY WITH GALAXY STAR FORMATION HISTORIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyle, Ben; Jimenez, Raul; Tojeiro, Rita; Maartens, Roy; Heavens, Alan; Clarkson, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Observationally confirming spatial homogeneity on sufficiently large cosmological scales is of importance to test one of the underpinning assumptions of cosmology, and is also imperative for correctly interpreting dark energy. A challenging aspect of this is that homogeneity must be probed inside our past light cone, while observations take place on the light cone. The star formation history (SFH) in the galaxy fossil record provides a novel way to do this. We calculate the SFH of stacked luminous red galaxy (LRG) spectra obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We divide the LRG sample into 12 equal-area contiguous sky patches and 10 redshift slices (0.2 < z < 0.5), which correspond to 120 blocks of volume {approx}0.04 Gpc{sup 3}. Using the SFH in a time period that samples the history of the universe between look-back times 11.5 and 13.4 Gyr as a proxy for homogeneity, we calculate the posterior distribution for the excess large-scale variance due to inhomogeneity, and find that the most likely solution is no extra variance at all. At 95% credibility, there is no evidence of deviations larger than 5.8%.

  6. Tits Satake projections of homogeneous special geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fré, Pietro; Gargiulo, Floriana; Rosseel, Jan; Rulik, Ksenya; Trigiante, Mario; Van Proeyen, Antoine

    2007-01-01

    We organize the homogeneous special geometries, describing as well the couplings of D = 6, 5, 4 and 3 supergravities with eight supercharges, in a small number of universality classes. This relates manifolds on which similar types of dynamical solutions can exist. The mathematical ingredient is the Tits Satake projection of real simple Lie algebras, which we extend to all solvable Lie algebras occurring in these homogeneous special geometries. Apart from some exotic cases all the other, 'very special', homogeneous manifolds can be grouped into seven universality classes. The organization of these classes, which capture the essential features of their basic dynamics, commutes with the r- and c-map. Different members are distinguished by different choices of the paint group, a notion discovered in the context of cosmic billiard dynamics of non-maximally supersymmetric supergravities. We comment on the usefulness of this organization in universality class both in relation with cosmic billiard dynamics and with configurations of branes and orbifolds defining special geometry backgrounds.

  7. Superfluid transition of homogeneous and trapped two-dimensional Bose gases.

    PubMed

    Holzmann, Markus; Baym, Gordon; Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Laloë, Franck

    2007-01-30

    Current experiments on atomic gases in highly anisotropic traps present the opportunity to study in detail the low temperature phases of two-dimensional inhomogeneous systems. Although, in an ideal gas, the trapping potential favors Bose-Einstein condensation at finite temperature, interactions tend to destabilize the condensate, leading to a superfluid Kosterlitz-Thouless-Berezinskii phase with a finite superfluid mass density but no long-range order, as in homogeneous fluids. The transition in homogeneous systems is conveniently described in terms of dissociation of topological defects (vortex-antivortex pairs). However, trapped two-dimensional gases are more directly approached by generalizing the microscopic theory of the homogeneous gas. In this paper, we first derive, via a diagrammatic expansion, the scaling structure near the phase transition in a homogeneous system, and then study the effects of a trapping potential in the local density approximation. We find that a weakly interacting trapped gas undergoes a Kosterlitz-Thouless-Berezinskii transition from the normal state at a temperature slightly below the Bose-Einstein transition temperature of the ideal gas. The characteristic finite superfluid mass density of a homogeneous system just below the transition becomes strongly suppressed in a trapped gas.

  8. GLUT-3 expression in human skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Peng, B. H.; Popov, V. L.; Hudnall, S. D.; Campbell, G. A.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle biopsy homogenates contain GLUT-3 mRNA and protein. Before these studies, it was unclear where GLUT-3 was located in muscle tissue. In situ hybridization using a midmolecule probe demonstrated GLUT-3 within all muscle fibers. Fluorescent-tagged antibody reacting with affinity-purified antibody directed at the carboxy-terminus demonstrated GLUT-3 protein in all fibers. Slow-twitch muscle fibers, identified by NADH-tetrazolium reductase staining, possessed more GLUT-3 protein than fast-twitch fibers. Electron microscopy using affinity-purified primary antibody and gold particle-tagged second antibody showed that the majority of GLUT-3 was in association with triads and transverse tubules inside the fiber. Strong GLUT-3 signals were seen in association with the few nerves that traversed muscle sections. Electron microscopic evaluation of human peripheral nerve demonstrated GLUT-3 within the axon, with many of the particles related to mitochondria. GLUT-3 protein was found in myelin but not in Schwann cells. GLUT-1 protein was not present in nerve cells, axons, myelin, or Schwann cells but was seen at the surface of the peripheral nerve in the perineurium. These studies demonstrated that GLUT-3 mRNA and protein are expressed throughout normal human skeletal muscle, but the protein is predominantly found in the triads of slow-twitch muscle fibers.

  9. GLUT-3 expression in human skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Peng, B. H.; Popov, V. L.; Hudnall, S. D.; Campbell, G. A.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle biopsy homogenates contain GLUT-3 mRNA and protein. Before these studies, it was unclear where GLUT-3 was located in muscle tissue. In situ hybridization using a midmolecule probe demonstrated GLUT-3 within all muscle fibers. Fluorescent-tagged antibody reacting with affinity-purified antibody directed at the carboxy-terminus demonstrated GLUT-3 protein in all fibers. Slow-twitch muscle fibers, identified by NADH-tetrazolium reductase staining, possessed more GLUT-3 protein than fast-twitch fibers. Electron microscopy using affinity-purified primary antibody and gold particle-tagged second antibody showed that the majority of GLUT-3 was in association with triads and transverse tubules inside the fiber. Strong GLUT-3 signals were seen in association with the few nerves that traversed muscle sections. Electron microscopic evaluation of human peripheral nerve demonstrated GLUT-3 within the axon, with many of the particles related to mitochondria. GLUT-3 protein was found in myelin but not in Schwann cells. GLUT-1 protein was not present in nerve cells, axons, myelin, or Schwann cells but was seen at the surface of the peripheral nerve in the perineurium. These studies demonstrated that GLUT-3 mRNA and protein are expressed throughout normal human skeletal muscle, but the protein is predominantly found in the triads of slow-twitch muscle fibers.

  10. A compact setup to study homogeneous nucleation and condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Mattias; Alxneit, Ivo; Rütten, Frederik; Wuillemin, Daniel; Tschudi, Hans Rudolf

    2007-03-01

    An experiment is presented to study homogeneous nucleation and the subsequent droplet growth at high temperatures and high pressures in a compact setup that does not use moving parts. Nucleation and condensation are induced in an adiabatic, stationary expansion of the vapor and an inert carrier gas through a Laval nozzle. The adiabatic expansion is driven against atmospheric pressure by pressurized inert gas its mass flow carefully controlled. This allows us to avoid large pumps or vacuum storage tanks. Because we eventually want to study the homogeneous nucleation and condensation of zinc, the use of carefully chosen materials is required that can withstand pressures of up to 106 Pa resulting from mass flow rates of up to 600 lN min-1 and temperatures up to 1200 K in the presence of highly corrosive zinc vapor. To observe the formation of droplets a laser beam propagates along the axis of the nozzle and the light scattered by the droplets is detected perpendicularly to the nozzle axis. An ICCD camera allows to record the scattered light through fused silica windows in the diverging part of the nozzle spatially resolved and to detect nucleation and condensation coherently in a single exposure. For the data analysis, a model is needed to describe the isentropic core part of the flow along the nozzle axis. The model must incorporate the laws of fluid dynamics, the nucleation and condensation process, and has to predict the size distribution of the particles created (PSD) at every position along the nozzle axis. Assuming Rayleigh scattering, the intensity of the scattered light can then be calculated from the second moment of the PSD.

  11. A compact setup to study homogeneous nucleation and condensation.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Mattias; Alxneit, Ivo; Rütten, Frederik; Wuillemin, Daniel; Tschudi, Hans Rudolf

    2007-03-01

    An experiment is presented to study homogeneous nucleation and the subsequent droplet growth at high temperatures and high pressures in a compact setup that does not use moving parts. Nucleation and condensation are induced in an adiabatic, stationary expansion of the vapor and an inert carrier gas through a Laval nozzle. The adiabatic expansion is driven against atmospheric pressure by pressurized inert gas its mass flow carefully controlled. This allows us to avoid large pumps or vacuum storage tanks. Because we eventually want to study the homogeneous nucleation and condensation of zinc, the use of carefully chosen materials is required that can withstand pressures of up to 10(6) Pa resulting from mass flow rates of up to 600 l(N) min(-1) and temperatures up to 1200 K in the presence of highly corrosive zinc vapor. To observe the formation of droplets a laser beam propagates along the axis of the nozzle and the light scattered by the droplets is detected perpendicularly to the nozzle axis. An ICCD camera allows to record the scattered light through fused silica windows in the diverging part of the nozzle spatially resolved and to detect nucleation and condensation coherently in a single exposure. For the data analysis, a model is needed to describe the isentropic core part of the flow along the nozzle axis. The model must incorporate the laws of fluid dynamics, the nucleation and condensation process, and has to predict the size distribution of the particles created (PSD) at every position along the nozzle axis. Assuming Rayleigh scattering, the intensity of the scattered light can then be calculated from the second moment of the PSD.

  12. Gyroelastic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Kerbel, G.D.

    1981-01-20

    A study is made of a scale model in three dimensions of a guiding center plasma within the purview of gyroelastic (also known as finite gyroradius-near theta pinch) magnetohydrodynamics. The (nonlinear) system sustains a particular symmetry called isorrhopy which permits the decoupling of fluid modes from drift modes. Isorrhopic equilibria are analyzed within the framework of geometrical optics resulting in (local) dispersion relations and ray constants. A general scheme is developed to evolve an arbitrary linear perturbation of a screwpinch equilibrium as an invertible integral transform (over the complete set of generalized eigenfunctions defined naturally by the equilibrium). Details of the structure of the function space and the associated spectra are elucidated. Features of the (global) dispersion relation owing to the presence of gyroelastic stabilization are revealed. An energy principle is developed to study the stability of the tubular screwpinch.

  13. Immobilization/remobilization and the regulation of muscle mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almon, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between animal body weight and the wet and dry weights of the soleus and EDL muscles was derived. Procedures were examined for tissue homogenization, fractionation, protein determination and DNA determination. A sequence of procedures and buffers were developed to carry out all analyses on one small muscle. This would yield a considerable increase in analytical strength associated with paired statistics. The proposed casting procedure which was to be used for immobilization was reexamined.

  14. Anthropometric changes and fluid shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Rummel, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    In an effort to obtain the most comprehensive and coherent picture of changes under weightlessness, a set of measurements on Skylab 2 was initiated and at every opportunity, additional studies were added. All pertinent information from ancillary sources were gleaned and collated. On Skylab 2, the initial anthropometric studies were scheduled in conjunction with muscle study. A single set of facial photographs was made in-flight. Additional measurements were made on Skylab 3, with photographs and truncal and limb girth measurements in-flight. Prior to Skylab 4, it was felt there was considerable evidence for large and rapid fluid shifts, so a series of in-flight volume and center of mass measurements and infrared photographs were scheduled to be conducted in the Skylab 4 mission. A number of changes were properly documented for the first time, most important of which were the fluid shifts. The following description of Skylab anthropometrics address work done on Skylab 4 primarily.

  15. Renal function alterations during skeletal muscle disuse in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Bryan J.

    1992-01-01

    This project was to examine the alterations in renal functions during skeletal muscle disuse in simulated microgravity. Although this area could cover a wide range of investigative efforts, the limited funding resulted in the selection of two projects. These projects would result in data contributing to an area of research deemed high priority by NASA and would address issues of the alterations in renal response to vasoactive stimuli during conditions of skeletal muscle disuse as well as investigate the contribution of skeletal muscle disuse, conditions normally found in long term human exposure to microgravity, to the balance of fluid and macromolecules within the vasculature versus the interstitium. These two projects selected are as follows: investigate the role of angiotensin 2 on renal function during periods of simulated microgravity and skeletal muscle disuse to determine if the renal response is altered to changes in circulating concentrations of angiotensin 2 compared to appropriate controls; and determine if the shift of fluid balance from vasculature to the interstitium, the two components of extracellular fluid volume, that occur during prolonged exposure to microgravity and skeletal muscle disuse is a result, in part, to alterations in the fluid and macromolecular balance in the peripheral capillary beds, of which the skeletal muscle contains the majority of recruitment capillaries. A recruitment capillary bed would be most sensitive to alterations in Starling forces and fluid and macromolecular permeability.

  16. Lane formation in a driven attractive fluid.

    PubMed

    Wächtler, C W; Kogler, F; Klapp, S H L

    2016-11-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium lane formation in a generic model of a fluid with attractive interactions, that is, a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid composed of two particle species driven in opposite directions. Performing Brownian dynamics simulations for a wide range of parameters, supplemented by a stability analysis based on dynamical density functional theory, we identify generic features of lane formation in the presence of attraction, including structural properties. In fact, we find a variety of states (as compared to purely repulsive systems), as well as a close relation between laning and long-wavelength instabilities of the homogeneous phase such as demixing and condensation.

  17. Lane formation in a driven attractive fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wächtler, C. W.; Kogler, F.; Klapp, S. H. L.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate nonequilibrium lane formation in a generic model of a fluid with attractive interactions, that is, a two-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid composed of two particle species driven in opposite directions. Performing Brownian dynamics simulations for a wide range of parameters, supplemented by a stability analysis based on dynamical density functional theory, we identify generic features of lane formation in the presence of attraction, including structural properties. In fact, we find a variety of states (as compared to purely repulsive systems), as well as a close relation between laning and long-wavelength instabilities of the homogeneous phase such as demixing and condensation.

  18. Numerical simulations of non-homogeneous viscoelastic turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housiadas, Kostas; Beris, Antony

    2004-11-01

    The effect of the polymer mixing in turbulent channel flow is studied through numerical simulations, using a spectral technique. In particular, we simulate injection of polymeric material through a slit very close to the wall and parallel to it in pre-established Newtonian turbulent flow. The governing equations consist of the mass conservation, the modified Navier-Stokes equation (in order to take into account the polymer extra-stress), the evolution equation for the conformation tensor and an advection-diffusion equation for the polymer concentration. The injection process is simulated by dividing the computational domain in three different regions: (a) the entrance region where the polymer is introduced (b) the developing region where the polymer is allowed to convect freely interacting/modifying the turbulent flow and (c) the recovering region where we use a reacting sink to force the removal of the polymer from the solvent in order to re-establish the inlet conditions. A fully spectral method is used in order to solve the set of governing equations similar to that developed for homogenous viscoelastic turbulent DNS (Housiadas & Beris, Phys. Fluids, 15, (2003)). Although a significantly improved numerical algorithm has been successfully used before (Housiadas & Beris, to appear in J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. (2004)) a further improved version of that algorithm is presented in this work. The new algorithm has enabled us to extend the simulations for much wider range of viscoelasticity parameter values as well as for many viscoelastic models like the FENE-P, Giesekus, Oldroyd-B and the modified Giesekus/FENE-P model. Results for illustrative sets of parameter values are going to be presented.

  19. Anisotropic spectral modeling for unstably stratified homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briard, Antoine; Iyer, Manasa; Gomez, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a spectral model is derived to investigate numerically unstably stratified homogeneous turbulence (USHT) at large Reynolds numbers. The modeling relies on an earlier work for passive scalar dynamics [Briard et al., J. Fluid Mech. 799, 159 (2016), 10.1017/jfm.2016.362] and can handle both shear and mean scalar gradients. The extension of this model to the case of active scalar dynamics is the main theoretical contribution of this paper. This spectral modeling is then applied at large Reynolds numbers to analyze the scaling of the kinetic energy, scalar variance, and scalar flux spectra and to study as well the temporal evolution of the mixing parameter, the Froude number, and some anisotropy indicators in USHT. A theoretical prediction for the exponential growth rate of the kinetic energy, associated with our model equations, is derived and assessed numerically. Throughout the validation part, results are compared with an analogous approach, restricted to axisymmetric turbulence, which is more accurate in term of anisotropy description, but also much more costly in terms of computational resources [Burlot et al., J. Fluid Mech. 765, 17 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2014.726]. It is notably shown that our model can qualitatively recover all the features of the USHT dynamics, with good quantitative agreement on some specific aspects. In addition, some remarks are proposed to point out the similarities and differences between the physics of USHT, shear flows, and passive scalar dynamics with a mean gradient, the two latter configurations having been addressed previously with the same closure. Moreover, it is shown that the anisotropic part of the pressure spectrum in USHT scales in k-11 /3 in the inertial range, similarly to the one in shear flows. Finally, at large Schmidt numbers, a different spectral range is found for the scalar flux: It first scales in k-3 around the Kolmogorov scale and then further in k-1 in the viscous-convective range.

  20. Intramuscular pressures for monitoring different tasks and muscle conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sejersted, O. M.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Intramuscular fluid pressure (IMP) can easily be measured in man and animals. It follows the law of Laplace which means that it is determined by the tension of the muscle fibers, the recording depth and by fiber geometry (fiber curvature or pennation angle). Thick, bulging muscles create high IMPs (up to 1000 mmHg) and force transmission to tendons becomes inefficient. High resting or postexercise IMPs are indicative of a compartment syndrome due to muscle swelling within a low-compliance osseofascial boundary. IMP increases linearly with force (torque) independent of the mode or speed of contraction (isometric, eccentric, concentric). IMP is also a much better predictor of muscle force than the EMG signal. During prolonged low-force isometric contractions, cyclic variations in IMP are seen. Since IMP influences muscle blood flow through the muscle pump, autoregulating vascular elements, and compression of the intramuscular vasculature, alterations in IMP have important implications for muscle function.

  1. Intramuscular pressures for monitoring different tasks and muscle conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sejersted, O. M.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Intramuscular fluid pressure (IMP) can easily be measured in man and animals. It follows the law of Laplace which means that it is determined by the tension of the muscle fibers, the recording depth and by fiber geometry (fiber curvature or pennation angle). Thick, bulging muscles create high IMPs (up to 1000 mmHg) and force transmission to tendons becomes inefficient. High resting or postexercise IMPs are indicative of a compartment syndrome due to muscle swelling within a low-compliance osseofascial boundary. IMP increases linearly with force (torque) independent of the mode or speed of contraction (isometric, eccentric, concentric). IMP is also a much better predictor of muscle force than the EMG signal. During prolonged low-force isometric contractions, cyclic variations in IMP are seen. Since IMP influences muscle blood flow through the muscle pump, autoregulating vascular elements, and compression of the intramuscular vasculature, alterations in IMP have important implications for muscle function.

  2. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  3. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  4. Homogeneous Characterization of Transiting Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Faedi, Francesca; Hebb, Leslie; Pollacco, Don; Stassun, Keivan; Ghezzi, Luan; Cargile, Phillip; Barros, Susana; Smalley, Barry; Mack, Claude

    2012-02-01

    We aim to obtain a homogeneous set of high resolution, high signal- to-noise (S/N) spectra for a large and diverse sample of stars with transiting planets, using the Kitt Peak 4-m echelle spectrograph for bright Northern targets (7.7homogeneous analysis of this high-quality dataset, we will be able to investigate any systematic uncertainties on the derived stellar properties, and consequently, on the planetary properties derived from the iterative combination of our spectral analysis with the best available radial velocity data and transit photometry. % to derive a homogeneous set of properties for the transiting systems. The resulting consistent set of physical properties will allow us to further explore known correlations, e.g., core-size of the planet and stellar metallicity, and to newly identify subtle relationships providing insight into our understanding of planetary formation, structure, and evolution. Our pilot study analyzing our WASP-13 HIRES spectrum (R 48 000, S/N>150) in combination with high precision light curves shows an improvement in the precision of the stellar parameters of 60% in Teff, 75% in FeH, 82% in mstar, and 73% in rstar, which translates into a 64% improvement in the precision of rpl, and more than 2% on mpl, relative to the discovery paper's values.

  5. Sulfur isotope homogeneity of lunar mare basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wing, Boswell A.; Farquhar, James

    2015-12-01

    We present a new set of high precision measurements of relative 33S/32S, 34S/32S, and 36S/32S values in lunar mare basalts. The measurements are referenced to the Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT) scale, on which the international reference material, IAEA-S-1, is characterized by δ33S = -0.061‰, δ34S ≡ -0.3‰ and δ36S = -1.27‰. The present dataset confirms that lunar mare basalts are characterized by a remarkable degree of sulfur isotopic homogeneity, with most new and published SF6-based sulfur isotope measurements consistent with a single mass-dependent mean isotopic composition of δ34S = 0.58 ± 0.05‰, Δ33S = 0.008 ± 0.006‰, and Δ36S = 0.2 ± 0.2‰, relative to V-CDT, where the uncertainties are quoted as 99% confidence intervals on the mean. This homogeneity allows identification of a single sample (12022, 281) with an apparent 33S enrichment, possibly reflecting cosmic-ray-induced spallation reactions. It also reveals that some mare basalts have slightly lower δ34S values than the population mean, which is consistent with sulfur loss from a reduced basaltic melt prior to eruption at the lunar surface. Both the sulfur isotope homogeneity of the lunar mare basalts and the predicted sensitivity of sulfur isotopes to vaporization-driven fractionation suggest that less than ≈1-10% of lunar sulfur was lost after a potential moon-forming impact event.

  6. The Chemical Homogeneity of Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovy, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Determining the level of chemical homogeneity in open clusters is of fundamental importance in the study of the evolution of star-forming clouds and that of the Galactic disk. Yet limiting the initial abundance spread in clusters has been hampered by difficulties in obtaining consistent spectroscopic abundances for different stellar types. Without reference to any specific model of stellar photospheres, a model for a homogeneous cluster is that it forms a one-dimensional sequence, with any differences between members due to variations in stellar mass and observational uncertainties. I present a novel method for investigating the abundance spread in open clusters that tests this one-dimensional hypothesis at the level of observed stellar spectra, rather than constraining homogeneity using derived abundances as is traditionally done. Using high-resolution APOGEE spectra for 49 giants in M67, NGC 6819, and NGC 2420 I demonstrate that these spectra form one-dimensional sequences for each cluster. With detailed forward modeling of the spectra and Approximate Bayesian Computation, I derive strong limits on the initial abundance spread of 15 elements: <0.01 (0.02) {dex} for C and Fe, ≲0.015 (0.03) {dex} for N, O, Mg, Si, and Ni, ≲0.02 (0.03) {dex} for Al, Ca, and Mn, and ≲0.03 (0.05) {dex} for Na, S, K, Ti, and V (at 68% and 95% confidence, respectively). The strong limits on C and O imply that no pollution by massive core-collapse supernovae occurred during star formation in open clusters, which, thus, need to form within ≲6 {Myr}. Further development of this and related techniques will bring the power of differential abundances to stars other than solar twins in large spectroscopic surveys and will help unravel the history of star formation and chemical enrichment in the Milky Way through chemical tagging.

  7. Viscous dark fluid universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hipolito-Ricaldi, W. S.; Velten, H. E. S.; Zimdahl, W.

    2010-09-15

    We investigate the cosmological perturbation dynamics for a universe consisting of pressureless baryonic matter and a viscous fluid, the latter representing a unified model of the dark sector. In the homogeneous and isotropic background the total energy density of this mixture behaves as a generalized Chaplygin gas. The perturbations of this energy density are intrinsically nonadiabatic and source relative entropy perturbations. The resulting baryonic matter power spectrum is shown to be compatible with the 2dFGRS and SDSS (DR7) data. A joint statistical analysis, using also Hubble-function and supernovae Ia data, shows that, different from other studies, there exists a maximum in the probability distribution for a negative present value q{sub 0{approx_equal}}-0.53 of the deceleration parameter. Moreover, while previous descriptions on the basis of generalized Chaplygin-gas models were incompatible with the matter power-spectrum data since they required a much too large amount of pressureless matter, the unified model presented here favors a matter content that is of the order of the baryonic matter abundance suggested by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  8. Compressible homogeneous shear: Simulation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, S.; Erlebacher, G.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Compressibility effects were studied on turbulence by direct numerical simulation of homogeneous shear flow. A primary observation is that the growth of the turbulent kinetic energy decreases with increasing turbulent Mach number. The sinks provided by compressible dissipation and the pressure dilatation, along with reduced Reynolds shear stress, are shown to contribute to the reduced growth of kinetic energy. Models are proposed for these dilatational terms and verified by direct comparison with the simulations. The differences between the incompressible and compressible fields are brought out by the examination of spectra, statistical moments, and structure of the rate of strain tensor.

  9. Homogenization and Numerical Methods for Hyperbolic Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Guo

    1990-01-01

    This dissertation studies three aspects of analysis and numerical methods for partial differential equations with oscillatory solutions. 1. Homogenization theory for certain linear hyperbolic equations is developed. We derive the homogenized convection equations for linear convection problems with rapidly varying velocity in space and time. We find that the oscillatory solutions are very sensitive to the arithmetic properties of certain parameters, such as the corresponding rotation number and the ratio between the components of the mean velocity field in linear convection. We also show that the oscillatory velocity field in two dimensional incompressible flow behaves like shear flows. 2. The homogenization of scalar nonlinear conservation laws in several space variables with oscillatory initial data is also discussed. We prove that the initial oscillations will be eliminated for any positive time when the equations are non-degenerate. This is also true for degenerate equations if there is enough mixing among the initial oscillations in the degenerate direction. Otherwise, the initial oscillation, for which the homogenized equation is obtained, will survive and be propagated. The large-time behavior of conservation laws with several space variables is studied. We show that, under a new nondegenerate condition (the second derivatives of the flux functions are linearly independent in any interval), a piecewise smooth periodic solution with converge strongly to the mean value of initial data. This generalizes Glimm and Lax's result for the one dimensional problem (3). 3. Numerical simulations of the oscillatory solutions are also carried out. We give some error estimate for varepsilon-h resonance ( varepsilon: oscillation wave length, h: numerical step) and prove essential convergence (24) of order alpha < 1 for some numerical schemes. These include upwind schemes and particle methods for linear hyperbolic equations with oscillatory coefficients. A stochastic analysis

  10. Heterogeneity versus homogeneity of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fumitaka; Martinez, Nicholas E; Omura, Seiichi; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    The 10th International Congress of Neuroimmunology, including the 10th European School of Neuroimmunology Course, was held by the International Society of Neuroimmunology in Sitges (Barcelona, Spain) on 26–30 October 2010. The conference covered a wide spectrum of issues and challenges in both basic science and clinical aspects of neuroimmunology. Data and ideas were shared through a variety of programs, including review talks and poster sessions. One of the topics of the congress was whether multiple sclerosis is a homogenous or heterogenous disease, clinically and pathologically, throughout its course. PMID:21426254

  11. Multifractal spectra in homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deane, A. E.; Keefe, L. R.

    1988-01-01

    Employing numerical simulations of 3-D homogeneous shear flow, the associated multifractal spectra of the energy dissipation, scalar dissipation and vorticity fields were calculated. The results for (128) cubed simulations of this flow, and those obtained in recent experiments that analyzed 1- and 2-D intersections of atmospheric and laboratory flows, are in some agreement. A two-scale Cantor set model of the energy cascade process which describes the experimental results from 1-D intersections quite well, describes the 3-D results only marginally.

  12. Homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry.

    PubMed

    Fischer, W; Koch, E

    2002-11-01

    All homogeneous sphere packings with triclinic symmetry have been derived by studying the characteristic Wyckoff positions P -1 1a and P -1 2i of the two triclinic lattice complexes. These sphere packings belong to 30 different types. Only one type exists that has exclusively triclinic sphere packings and no higher-symmetry ones. The inherent symmetry of part of the sphere packings is triclinic for 18 types. Sphere packings of all but six of the 30 types may be realized as stackings of parallel planar nets.

  13. Thermophysical Properties of Fluids and Fluid Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sengers, Jan V.; Anisimov, Mikhail A.

    2004-05-03

    The major goal of the project was to study the effect of critical fluctuations on the thermophysical properties and phase behavior of fluids and fluid mixtures. Long-range fluctuations appear because of the presence of critical phase transitions. A global theory of critical fluctuations was developed and applied to represent thermodynamic properties and transport properties of molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. In the second phase of the project, the theory was extended to deal with critical fluctuations in complex fluids such as polymer solutions and electrolyte solutions. The theoretical predictions have been confirmed by computer simulations and by light-scattering experiments. Fluctuations in fluids in nonequilibrium states have also been investigated.

  14. Permian paleoclimate data from fluid inclusions in halite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benison, K.C.; Goldstein, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    This study has yielded surface water paleotemperatures from primary fluid inclusions in mid Permian Nippewalla Group halite from western Kansas. A 'cooling nucleation' method is used to generate vapor bubbles in originally all-liquid primary inclusions. Then, surface water paleotemperatures are obtained by measuring temperatures of homogenization to liquid. Homogenization temperatures ranged from 21??C to 50??C and are consistent along individual fluid inclusion assemblages, indicating that the fluid inclusions have not been altered by thermal reequilibration. Homogenization temperatures show a range of up to 26??C from base to top of individual cloudy chevron growth bands. Petrographic and fluid inclusion evidence indicate that no significant pressure correction is needed for the homogenization temperature data. We interpret these homogenization temperatures to represent shallow surface water paleotemperatures. The range in temperatures from base to top of single chevron bands may reflect daily temperatures variations. These Permian surface water temperatures fall within the same range as some modern evaporative surface waters, suggesting that this Permian environment may have been relatively similar to its modern counterparts. Shallow surface water temperatures in evaporative settings correspond closely to local air temperatures. Therefore, the Permian surface water temperatures determined in this study may be considered proxies for local Permian air temperatures.

  15. Transduction of skeletal muscles with common reporter genes can promote muscle fiber degeneration and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Winbanks, Catherine E; Beyer, Claudia; Qian, Hongwei; Gregorevic, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV vectors) are promising tools for delivering transgenes to skeletal muscle, in order to study the mechanisms that control the muscle phenotype, and to ameliorate diseases that perturb muscle homeostasis. Many studies have employed rAAV vectors carrying reporter genes encoding for β-galactosidase (β-gal), human placental alkaline phosphatase (hPLAP), and green fluorescent protein (GFP) as experimental controls when studying the effects of manipulating other genes. However, it is not clear to what extent these reporter genes can influence signaling and gene expression signatures in skeletal muscle, which may confound the interpretation of results obtained in experimentally manipulated muscles. Herein, we report a strong pro-inflammatory effect of expressing reporter genes in skeletal muscle. Specifically, we show that the administration of rAAV6:hPLAP vectors to the hind limb muscles of mice is associated with dose- and time-dependent macrophage recruitment, and skeletal muscle damage. Dose-dependent expression of hPLAP also led to marked activity of established pro-inflammatory IL-6/Stat3, TNFα, IKKβ and JNK signaling in lysates obtained from homogenized muscles. These effects were independent of promoter type, as expression cassettes featuring hPLAP under the control of constitutive CMV and muscle-specific CK6 promoters both drove cellular responses when matched for vector dose. Importantly, the administration of rAAV6:GFP vectors did not induce muscle damage or inflammation except at the highest doses we examined, and administration of a transgene-null vector (rAAV6:MCS) did not cause damage or inflammation at any of the doses tested, demonstrating that GFP-expressing, or transgene-null vectors may be more suitable as experimental controls. The studies highlight the importance of considering the potential effects of reporter genes when designing experiments that examine gene manipulation in vivo.

  16. Magnetized drive fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensweig, R.E.; Zahn, M.

    1986-04-01

    A process is described for recovering a first fluid from a porous subterranean formation which comprises injecting a displacement fluid in an effective amount to displace the first fluid, injecting a ferrofluid, applying a magnetic field containing a gradient of field intensity within the formation, driving the displacement fluid through the formation with the ferrofluid and recovering first fluid.

  17. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  18. Fluid Fantasy

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-24

    Saturn's clouds are full of raw beauty, but they also represent a playground for a branch of physics called fluid dynamics, which seeks to understand the motion of gases and liquids. Saturn's lack of a solid planetary surface (as on Earth, Mars or Venus) means that its atmosphere is free to flow around the planet essentially without obstruction. This is one factor that generates Saturn's pattern of alternating belts and zones -- one of the main features of its dynamic atmosphere. Winds in the belts blow at speeds different from those in the adjacent zones, leading to the formation of vortices along the boundaries between the two. And vigorous convection occasionally leads to storms and waves. Saturn's innermost rings are just visible at the bottom and in the upper left corner. This view is centered on clouds at 25 degrees north latitude on Saturn. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on July 20, 2016 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 728 nanometers. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 752,000 miles (1.21 million kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 6 degrees. Image scale is 45 miles (72 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20503

  19. Stimulus homogeneity enhances implicit learning: evidence from contextual cueing.

    PubMed

    Feldmann-Wüstefeld, Tobias; Schubö, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Visual search for a target object is faster if the target is embedded in a repeatedly presented invariant configuration of distractors ('contextual cueing'). It has also been shown that the homogeneity of a context affects the efficiency of visual search: targets receive prioritized processing when presented in a homogeneous context compared to a heterogeneous context, presumably due to grouping processes at early stages of visual processing. The present study investigated in three Experiments whether context homogeneity also affects contextual cueing. In Experiment 1, context homogeneity varied on three levels of the task-relevant dimension (orientation) and contextual cueing was most pronounced for context configurations with high orientation homogeneity. When context homogeneity varied on three levels of the task-irrelevant dimension (color) and orientation homogeneity was fixed, no modulation of contextual cueing was observed: high orientation homogeneity led to large contextual cueing effects (Experiment 2) and low orientation homogeneity led to low contextual cueing effects (Experiment 3), irrespective of color homogeneity. Enhanced contextual cueing for homogeneous context configurations suggest that grouping processes do not only affect visual search but also implicit learning. We conclude that memory representation of context configurations are more easily acquired when context configurations can be processed as larger, grouped perceptual units. However, this form of implicit perceptual learning is only improved by stimulus homogeneity when stimulus homogeneity facilitates grouping processes on a dimension that is currently relevant in the task. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of chymostatin and other proteinase inhibitors on protein breakdown and proteolytic activities in muscle

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Peter; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    1980-01-01

    To learn more about the enzymes involved in protein catabolism in skeletal and cardiac muscle and to identify selective inhibitors of this process, we studied the effects of proteinase inhibitors on protein turnover in isolated muscles and on proteolytic activities in muscle homogenates. Chymostatin (20μm) decreased protein breakdown by 20–40% in leg muscles from normal rodents and also in denervated and dystrophic muscles. These results are similar to our previous findings with leupeptin. The related inhibitors pepstatin, bestatin, and elastatinal did not decrease protein breakdown; antipain slowed this process in rat hind-limb muscles but not in diaphragm. Chymostatin did not decrease protein synthesis and thus probably retards proteolysis by a specific effect on cell proteinase(s). In homogenates of rat muscle, chymostatin, in common with leupeptin and antipain, inhibits the lysosomal proteinase cathepsin B, and the soluble Ca2+-activated proteinase. In addition, chymostatin, but not leupeptin, inhibits the chymotrypsin-like proteinase apparent in muscle homogenates. In muscles depleted of most of this activity by treatment with the mast-cell-degranulating agent 48/80, chymostatin still decreased protein breakdown. Therefore inhibition of this alkaline activity probably does not account for the decrease in protein breakdown. These results are consistent with a lysosomal site of action for chymostatin. Because of its lack of toxicity, chymostatin may be useful in maintaining tissues in vitro and perhaps in decreasing muscle atrophy in vivo. PMID:7406880

  1. HYPERLEDA. II. The homogenized HI data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturel, G.; Theureau, G.; Bottinelli, L.; Gouguenheim, L.; Coudreau-Durand, N.; Hallet, N.; Petit, C.

    2003-12-01

    After a compilation of HI data from 611 references and new observations made in Nançay, we produce a catalog of homogenized HI data for 16781 galaxies. The homogenization is made using the EPIDEMIC method from which all data are progressively converted into the adopted standard. The result is a catalog giving: 1) the logarithm of twice the maximum rotation velocity, log 2V_Msin i, converted to the system of Mathewson et al. (\\cite{Mathewson1996}). This quantity is given without correction for inclination; 2) the HI magnitude, m21, (area of the 21-cm line width expressed in magnitude) converted to the flux system of Theureau et al. (\\cite{Theureau1998}); 3) the HI velocity, V_HI, expressed with the optical definition (i.e., using wavelengths instead frequencies). The typical uncertainties are: 0.04 for log 2V_Msin i, 0.25 mag for m21 and 9 km s-1 for V_HI. Full Tables \\ref{epidemicw}, \\ref{epidemicw2}, \\ref{epidemicf}, \\ref{epidemicf2} and Fig. \\ref{profiles} are available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org. Full Tables \\ref{references}, \\ref{cataf}, \\ref{newdata} and \\ref{notes} are available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/412/57

  2. Homogenized radiosonde data for climate reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimberger, Leopold; Blaschek, Michael

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that radiosonde data need bias correction before they can be used for climate reanalyses. Variational approaches have so far not achieved satisfactory results for this type of data. Therefore most reanalyses rely on bias corrections calculated offline using (semi)automatic homogeneity adjustment methods. One approach is to analyse time subdaily time series of differences between background forecasts of a previous reanalysis cycle (bg) and observation records (obs) for break detection. For break adjustment, one can either use again the bg-obs time series or one can use composites of neighboring radiosondes. Adjustments from both methods (called RAOBCORE/RICH) have been used in most contemporary reanalyses assimilating these data. Improvements to these methods to deal with annual variations of the radiosonde observation biases are described as well as improvements due to the use of better quality background departure time series. The adjustments are expected to reduce differences with independent satellite data as well as the rejection rate of radiosonde temperature observations and are used also in the first COPERNICUS climate reanalysis ERA5. Efforts on radiosonde humidity homogenization are presented as well.

  3. Emergence of Leadership within a Homogeneous Group

    PubMed Central

    Eskridge, Brent E.; Valle, Elizabeth; Schlupp, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Large scale coordination without dominant, consistent leadership is frequent in nature. How individuals emerge from within the group as leaders, however transitory this position may be, has become an increasingly common question asked. This question is further complicated by the fact that in many of these aggregations, differences between individuals are minor and the group is largely considered to be homogeneous. In the simulations presented here, we investigate the emergence of leadership in the extreme situation in which all individuals are initially identical. Using a mathematical model developed using observations of natural systems, we show that the addition of a simple concept of leadership tendencies which is inspired by observations of natural systems and is affected by experience can produce distinct leaders and followers using a nonlinear feedback loop. Most importantly, our results show that small differences in experience can promote the rapid emergence of stable roles for leaders and followers. Our findings have implications for our understanding of adaptive behaviors in initially homogeneous groups, the role experience can play in shaping leadership tendencies, and the use of self-assessment in adapting behavior and, ultimately, self-role-assignment. PMID:26226381

  4. Topology of actions and homogeneous spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, Konstantin L

    2013-04-30

    Topologization of a group of homeomorphisms and its action provide additional possibilities for studying the topological space, the group of homeomorphisms, and their interconnections. The subject of the paper is the use of the property of d-openness of an action (introduced by Ancel under the name of weak micro-transitivity) in the study of spaces with various forms of homogeneity. It is proved that a d-open action of a Cech-complete group is open. A characterization of Polish SLH spaces using d-openness is given, and it is established that any separable metrizable SLH space has an SLH completion that is a Polish space. Furthermore, the completion is realized in coordination with the completion of the acting group with respect to the two-sided uniformity. A sufficient condition is given for extension of a d-open action to the completion of the space with respect to the maximal equiuniformity with preservation of d-openness. A result of van Mill is generalized, namely, it is proved that any homogeneous CDH metrizable compactum is the only G-compactification of the space of rational numbers for the action of some Polish group. Bibliography: 39 titles.

  5. Primary Healthcare Solo Practices: Homogeneous or Heterogeneous?

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Boivin, Antoine; Prud'homme, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Solo practices have generally been viewed as forming a homogeneous group. However, they may differ on many characteristics. The objective of this paper is to identify different forms of solo practice and to determine the extent to which they are associated with patient experience of care. Methods. Two surveys were carried out in two regions of Quebec in 2010: a telephone survey of 9180 respondents from the general population and a postal survey of 606 primary healthcare (PHC) practices. Data from the two surveys were linked through the respondent's usual source of care. A taxonomy of solo practices was constructed (n = 213), using cluster analysis techniques. Bivariate and multilevel analyses were used to determine the relationship of the taxonomy with patient experience of care. Results. Four models were derived from the taxonomy. Practices in the “resourceful networked” model contrast with those of the “resourceless isolated” model to the extent that the experience of care reported by their patients is more favorable. Conclusion. Solo practice is not a homogeneous group. The four models identified have different organizational features and their patients' experience of care also differs. Some models seem to offer a better organizational potential in the context of current reforms. PMID:24523964

  6. Planar factors of proper homogeneous Lorentz transformations

    SciTech Connect

    Fahnline, D.E.

    1985-02-01

    This article discusses two constructions factoring proper homogeneous Lorentz transformations H into the product of two planar transformations. A planar transformation is a proper homogeneous Lorentz transformation changing vectors in a two-flat through the origin, called the transformation two-flat, into new vectors in the same two-flat and which leaves unchanged vectors in the orthogonal two-flat, called the pointwise invariant two-flat. The first construction provides two planar factors such that a given timelike vector lies in the transformation two-flat of one and in the pointwise invariant two-flat of the other; it leads to several basic conditions on the trace of H and to necessary and sufficient conditions for H to be planar. The second construction yields explicit formulas for the orthogonal factors of H when they exist and are unique, where two planar transformations are orthogonal if the transformation two-flat of one is the pointwise invariant two-flat of the other.

  7. Modified Homogeneous Data Set of Coronal Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorotovič, I.; Minarovjech, M.; Lorenc, M.; Rybanský, M.

    2014-07-01

    The Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences has published the intensities, recalibrated with respect to a common intensity scale, of the 530.3 nm (Fe xiv) green coronal line observed at ground-based stations up to the year 2008. The name of this publication is Homogeneous Data Set (HDS). We have developed a method that allows one to successfully substitute the ground-based observations by satellite observations and, thus, continue with the publication of the HDS. For this purpose, the observations of the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) satellite, were exploited. Among other data the EIT instrument provides almost daily 28.4 nm (Fe xv) emission-line snapshots of the corona. The Fe xiv and Fe xv data (4051 observation days) taken in the period 1996 - 2008 have been compared and good agreement was found. The method to obtain the individual data for the HDS follows from the correlation analysis described in this article. The resulting data, now under the name of Modified Homogeneous Data Set (MHDS), are identical up to 1996 to those in the HDS. The MHDS can be used further for studies of the coronal solar activity and its cycle. These data are available at http://www.suh.sk.

  8. Primary healthcare solo practices: homogeneous or heterogeneous?

    PubMed

    Pineault, Raynald; Borgès Da Silva, Roxane; Provost, Sylvie; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Boivin, Antoine; Couture, Audrey; Prud'homme, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Solo practices have generally been viewed as forming a homogeneous group. However, they may differ on many characteristics. The objective of this paper is to identify different forms of solo practice and to determine the extent to which they are associated with patient experience of care. Methods. Two surveys were carried out in two regions of Quebec in 2010: a telephone survey of 9180 respondents from the general population and a postal survey of 606 primary healthcare (PHC) practices. Data from the two surveys were linked through the respondent's usual source of care. A taxonomy of solo practices was constructed (n = 213), using cluster analysis techniques. Bivariate and multilevel analyses were used to determine the relationship of the taxonomy with patient experience of care. Results. Four models were derived from the taxonomy. Practices in the "resourceful networked" model contrast with those of the "resourceless isolated" model to the extent that the experience of care reported by their patients is more favorable. Conclusion. Solo practice is not a homogeneous group. The four models identified have different organizational features and their patients' experience of care also differs. Some models seem to offer a better organizational potential in the context of current reforms.

  9. GOLGI FRACTIONS PREPARED FROM RAT LIVER HOMOGENATES

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenreich, J. H.; Bergeron, J. J. M.; Siekevitz, P.; Palade, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    In devising a new procedure for the isolation of Golgi fractions from rat liver homogenates, we have taken advantage of the overloading with very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles that occurs in the Golgi elements of hepatocytes ∼90 min after ethanol is administered (0.6 g/100 g body weight) by stomach tube to the animals. The VLDLs act as morphological markers as well as density modifiers of these elements. The starting preparation is a total microsomal fraction prepared from liver homogenized (1:5) in 0.25 M sucrose. This fraction is resuspended in 1.15 M sucrose and loaded at the bottom of a discontinuous sucrose density gradient. Centrifugation at ∼13 x 106 g·min yields by flotation three Golgi fractions of density >1.041 and <1.173. The light and intermediate fractions consist essentially of VLDL-loaded Golgi vacuoles and cisternae. Nearly empty, often collapsed, Golgi cisternae are the main component of the heavy fraction. A procedure which subjects the Golgi fractions to hypotonic shock and shearing in a French press at pH 8.5 allows the extraction of the content of the Golgi elements and the subsequent isolation of their membranes by differential centrifugation. PMID:4356571

  10. Si isotope homogeneity of the solar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, Emily A.; Savage, Paul S.; Moynier, Frédéric; Jackson, Matthew G.; Barrat, Jean-Alix E-mail: savage@levee.wustl.edu E-mail: moynier@ipgp.fr E-mail: Jean-Alix.Barrat@univ-brest.fr

    2013-12-20

    The presence or absence of variations in the mass-independent abundances of Si isotopes in bulk meteorites provides important clues concerning the evolution of the early solar system. No Si isotopic anomalies have been found within the level of analytical precision of 15 ppm in {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si across a wide range of inner solar system materials, including terrestrial basalts, chondrites, and achondrites. A possible exception is the angrites, which may exhibit small excesses of {sup 29}Si. However, the general absence of anomalies suggests that primitive meteorites and differentiated planetesimals formed in a reservoir that was isotopically homogenous with respect to Si. Furthermore, the lack of resolvable anomalies in the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion measured here suggests that any nucleosynthetic anomalies in Si isotopes were erased through mixing in the solar nebula prior to the formation of refractory solids. The homogeneity exhibited by Si isotopes may have implications for the distribution of Mg isotopes in the solar nebula. Based on supernova nucleosynthetic yield calculations, the expected magnitude of heavy-isotope overabundance is larger for Si than for Mg, suggesting that any potential Mg heterogeneity, if present, exists below the 15 ppm level.

  11. Microstructure and homogeneity of dental porcelain frits.

    PubMed

    Ban, S; Matsuo, K; Mizutani, N; Iwase, H; Kani, T; Hasegawa, J

    1998-12-01

    The microstructure and homogeneity of three commercial dentin and incisal unfired porcelain frits (one conventional and two ultra-low fusing types, fused-to metal were analyzed by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microspectroscopy, and wavelength- and energy dispersive X-ray microspectroscopy. The average contents of tetragonal and cubic leucite for the conventional and one of the ultra-low fusing type frits were 20.1-22.6 wt% and 0-2.6 wt%, respectively, whereas those of another of the ultra-low fusing type frits were about 11.5-11.6 wt% and 2.9-4.6 wt%, respectively. The conventional type frits seemed to be admixtures of three kinds of glass frits. One of the ultra-low fusing type frits seemed to be an admixture of four kinds of glass frits. Another ultra-low fusing frits seemed to be only one kind of glass frit dispersed with small size, less than 1 micron, leucite crystals. There were no remarkable differences in microstructure and homogeneity between dentin and incisal porcelain frits in each brand.

  12. Tests of marginal homogeneity and special cases.

    PubMed

    Dunnigan, Keith

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of two-way contingency tables is common in clinical studies. In addition to summary counts and percentages, statistical tests or summary measures are often desired. If the data can be viewed as two categorical measurements on the same experimental unit (matched pair data) then a test of marginal homogeneity may be appropriate. The most common clinical example is the so called 'shift table' whereby a quantity is tested for change between two time points. The two principal marginal homogeneity tests are the Stuart Maxwell and Bhapkar tests. At present, SAS software does not compute either test directly (for tables with more than two categories) and a programmatic solution is required. Two examples of programmatic SAS code are found in the current literature. Although accurate in most instances, they fail to produce output for certain tables ('special cases'). After summarizing the mathematics behind the two tests, a SAS macro is presented, which produces correct output for all tables. Finally, several examples are coded and presented with resultant output. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Homogenization in micro-magneto-mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, A.; Keip, M.-A.; Miehe, C.

    2016-07-01

    Ferromagnetic materials are characterized by a heterogeneous micro-structure that can be altered by external magnetic and mechanical stimuli. The understanding and the description of the micro-structure evolution is of particular importance for the design and the analysis of smart materials with magneto-mechanical coupling. The macroscopic response of the material results from complex magneto-mechanical interactions occurring on smaller length scales, which are driven by magnetization reorientation and associated magnetic domain wall motions. The aim of this work is to directly base the description of the macroscopic magneto-mechanical material behavior on the micro-magnetic domain evolution. This will be realized by the incorporation of a ferromagnetic phase-field formulation into a macroscopic Boltzmann continuum by the use of computational homogenization. The transition conditions between the two scales are obtained via rigorous exploitation of rate-type and incremental variational principles, which incorporate an extended version of the classical Hill-Mandel macro-homogeneity condition covering the phase field on the micro-scale. An efficient two-scale computational scenario is developed based on an operator splitting scheme that includes a predictor for the magnetization on the micro-scale. Two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations demonstrate the performance of the method. They investigate micro-magnetic domain evolution driven by macroscopic fields as well as the associated overall hysteretic response of ferromagnetic solids.

  14. Numerical Experiments on Homogeneous Strained Turbulence Subjected to Coriolis Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, K.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Homogeneous turbulent flows with various combinations of strain-rate, rotation rate and coriolis force capture some important aspects of more complex flows with streamline curvature and rotation. Presently, a situation is considered in which as a box of turbulence rotates, strain axes rotate with it. This is to be contrasted with the elliptic streamline flow in which the strain axes are fixed in an inertial frame. The elliptic flow is known to exhibit (inviscid) growth of turbulent energy and one might expect even more rapid growth with the strain-axes following the box. Instead, it is found that the sign of the Reynolds shear stress is reversed leading to a negative production term for turbulent energy. Partial understanding of the phenomenon is obtained from a consideration of the rotation of inertial waves relative to the strain axes as well as the "pressure-less" RDT argument put forward by Cambon etal. [J. Fluid Mech, 278, 175]. Some comparisons with the predictions of second-order closure models will be presented.

  15. Distribution of shear stress over smooth muscle cells in deformable arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Dabagh, Mahsa; Jalali, Payman; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Sarkomaa, Pertti

    2008-07-01

    A biphasic, anisotropic model of the deformable aortic wall in combination with computational fluid dynamics is used to investigate the variation of shear stress over smooth muscle cells (SMCs) with transmural pressure. The media layer is modeled as a porous medium consisting of SMCs and a homogeneous porous medium of interstitial fluid and elastin, collagen and proteoglycans fibers. Interstitial fluid enters the media through fenestral pores, which are distributed over the internal elastic lamina (IEL). The IEL is considered as an impermeable barrier to fluid flow except at fenestral pores. The thickness and the radius of aortic wall vary with transmural pressure ranging from 10 to 180 mm Hg. It is assumed that SMCs are cylinders with a circular cross section at 0 mm Hg. As the transmural pressure increases, SMCs elongate with simultaneous change of cross sectional shape into ellipse according to the strain field in the media. Results demonstrate that the variation of shear stress within the media layer is significantly dependent on the configuration and cross sectional shape of SMCs. In the staggered array of SMCs, the shear stress over the first SMC nearest to the IEL is about 2.2 times lower than that of the square array. The shear stress even over the second nearest SMC to the IEL is considerably higher (about 15%) in the staggered array. In addition to configuration and cross sectional shape of SMCs, the variation of structural properties of the media layer with pressure and the sensitivity of the local shear stress to the minimum distance between SMCs and the IEL (reducing with transmural pressure) between SMCs and the IEL are studied. At 180 mm Hg, the ratio of the local shear stress of the nearest SMC to that of the second nearest SMC is 4.8 in the square array, whereas it reduces to about 1.8 in the staggered array. The importance of the fluid shear stress is associated with its role in the biomolecular state of smooth muscle cells bearing the shear

  16. Review of numerical models of cavitating flows with the use of the homogeneous approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedźwiedzka, Agnieszka; Schnerr, Günter H.; Sobieski, Wojciech

    2016-06-01

    The focus of research works on cavitation has changed since the 1960s; the behaviour of a single bubble is no more the area of interest for most scientists. Its place was taken by the cavitating flow considered as a whole. Many numerical models of cavitating flows came into being within the space of the last fifty years. They can be divided into two groups: multi-fluid and homogeneous (i.e., single-fluid) models. The group of homogenous models contains two subgroups: models based on transport equation and pressure based models. Several works tried to order particular approaches and presented short reviews of selected studies. However, these classifications are too rough to be treated as sufficiently accurate. The aim of this paper is to present the development paths of numerical investigations of cavitating flows with the use of homogeneous approach in order of publication year and with relatively detailed description. Each of the presented model is accompanied by examples of the application area. This review focuses not only on the list of the most significant existing models to predict sheet and cloud cavitation, but also on presenting their advantages and disadvantages. Moreover, it shows the reasons which inspired present authors to look for new ways of more accurate numerical predictions and dimensions of cavitation. The article includes also the division of source terms of presented models based on the transport equation with the use of standardized symbols.

  17. Arachidonate metabolism in bovine gallbladder muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Hidaka, T.; Ueta, T.; Ogura, R.

    1983-04-01

    Incubation of (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid (AA) with homogenates of bovine gallbladder muscle generated a large amount of radioactive material having the chromatographic mobility of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (stable product of PGI2) and smaller amounts of products that comigrated with PGF2 alpha PGE2. Formation of these products was inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The major radioactive product identified by thin-layer chromatographic mobility and by gas chromatography - mass spectrometric analysis was found to be 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. The quantitative metabolic pattern of (1-/sup 14/C)PGH2 was virtually identical to that of (1-/sup 14/C)AA. Incubation of arachidonic acid with slices of bovine gallbladder muscle released labile anti-aggregatory material in the medium, which was inhibited by aspirin or 15-hydroperoxy-AA. These results indicate that bovine gallbladder muscle has a considerable enzymatic capacity to produce PGI2 from arachidonic acid.

  18. Muscle shape consistency and muscle volume prediction of thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, F; Bohm, S; Schroll, A; Boeth, H; Duda, G; Arampatzis, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated the applicability of a muscle volume prediction method using only the muscle length (L(M)), the maximum anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA(max)), and a muscle-specific shape factor (p) on the quadriceps vastii. L(M), ACSA(max), muscle volume, and p were obtained from magnetic resonance images of the vastus intermedius (VI), lateralis (VL), and medialis (VM) of female (n = 20) and male (n = 17) volleyball athletes. The average p was used to predict muscle volumes (V(p)) using the equation V(p)  = p × ACSA(max)  × L(M). Although there were significant differences in the muscle dimensions between male and female athletes, p was similar and on average 0.582, 0.658, 0.543 for the VI, VL, and VM, respectively. The position of ACSA(max) showed low variability and was at 57%, 60%, and 81% of the thigh length for VI, VL, and VM. Further, there were no significant differences between measured and predicted muscle volumes with root mean square differences of 5-8%. These results suggest that the muscle shape of the quadriceps vastii is independent of muscle dimensions or sex and that the prediction method could be sensitive enough to detect changes in muscle volume related to degeneration, atrophy, or hypertrophy.

  19. Pleural fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - pleural fluid ... is used to get a sample of pleural fluid. The sample is sent to a laboratory and ... the chest wall into the pleural space. As fluid drains into a collection bottle, you may cough ...

  20. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  1. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  2. Fluid sampling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studenick, D. K. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An inlet leak is described for sampling gases, more specifically, for selectively sampling multiple fluids. This fluid sampling device includes a support frame. A plurality of fluid inlet devices extend through the support frame and each of the fluid inlet devices include a longitudinal aperture. An opening device that is responsive to a control signal selectively opens the aperture to allow fluid passage. A closing device that is responsive to another control signal selectively closes the aperture for terminating further fluid flow.

  3. Lipid peroxidation by "free" iron ions and myoglobin as affected by dietary antioxidants in simulated gastric fluids.

    PubMed

    Lapidot, Tair; Granit, Rina; Kanner, Joseph

    2005-05-04

    Grilled red turkey muscle (Doner Kabab) is a real "fast food" containing approximately 200 microM hydroperoxides, homogenized in simulated gastric fluid and oxidized more rapidly at pH 3.0 than at pH 5.0, after 180 min, producing 1200 and 600 microM hydroperoxides, respectively. The effects of "free" iron ions and metmyoglobin, two potential catalyzers of lipid peroxidation in muscle foods, were evaluated for linoleic acid peroxidation at pH 3.0 of simulated gastric fluid. The prooxidant effects of free iron ions on linoleic acid peroxidation in simulated gastric fluid was evaluated in the presence of ascorbic acid. At low concentrations of ascorbic acid, the effects were prooxidative, which was reversed at high concentrations. In the presence of metmyoglobin, ascorbic acid with or without free iron enhanced the antioxidative effect. Lipid peroxidation by an iron-ascorbic acid system was inhibited totally by 250-500 microM catechin at pH 3.0. The catechin antioxidant effect was determined also in the iron-ascorbic acid system containing metmyoglobin. In this system, catechin totally inhibited lipid peroxidation at a concentration 20-fold lower than without metmyoglobin. The ability of catechin to inhibit lipid peroxidation was also determined at a low pH with beta-carotene as a sensitive target molecule for oxidation. The results show that a significant protection was achieved only with almost 100-fold higher antioxidant concentration. Polyphenols from different groups were determined for the antioxidant activity at pH 3.0. The results show a high antioxidant activity of polyphenols with orthodihydroxylated groups at the B ring, unsaturation, and the presence of a 4-oxo group in the heterocyclic ring, as demonstrated by quercetin.

  4. Bounds for nonlinear composites via iterated homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponte Castañeda, P.

    2012-09-01

    Improved estimates of the Hashin-Shtrikman-Willis type are generated for the class of nonlinear composites consisting of two well-ordered, isotropic phases distributed randomly with prescribed two-point correlations, as determined by the H-measure of the microstructure. For this purpose, a novel strategy for generating bounds has been developed utilizing iterated homogenization. The general idea is to make use of bounds that may be available for composite materials in the limit when the concentration of one of the phases (say phase 1) is small. It then follows from the theory of iterated homogenization that it is possible, under certain conditions, to obtain bounds for more general values of the concentration, by gradually adding small amounts of phase 1 in incremental fashion, and sequentially using the available dilute-concentration estimate, up to the final (finite) value of the concentration (of phase 1). Such an approach can also be useful when available bounds are expected to be tighter for certain ranges of the phase volume fractions. This is the case, for example, for the "linear comparison" bounds for porous viscoplastic materials, which are known to be comparatively tighter for large values of the porosity. In this case, the new bounds obtained by the above-mentioned "iterated" procedure can be shown to be much improved relative to the earlier "linear comparison" bounds, especially at low values of the porosity and high triaxialities. Consistent with the way in which they have been derived, the new estimates are, strictly, bounds only for the class of multi-scale, nonlinear composites consisting of two well-ordered, isotropic phases that are distributed with prescribed H-measure at each stage in the incremental process. However, given the facts that the H-measure of the sequential microstructures is conserved (so that the final microstructures can be shown to have the same H-measure), and that H-measures are insensitive to length scales, it is conjectured

  5. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1991-02-12

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  6. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  7. Soliton production with nonlinear homogeneous lines

    DOE PAGES

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.; Coleman, Phillip D.; Moorman, Matthew W.; ...

    2015-11-24

    Low- and high-voltage Soliton waves were produced and used to demonstrate collision and compression using diode-based nonlinear transmission lines. Experiments demonstrate soliton addition and compression using homogeneous nonlinear lines. We built the nonlinear lines using commercially available diodes. These diodes are chosen after their capacitance versus voltage dependence is used in a model and the line design characteristics are calculated and simulated. Nonlinear ceramic capacitors are then used to demonstrate high-voltage pulse amplification and compression. The line is designed such that a simple capacitor discharge, input signal, develops soliton trains in as few as 12 stages. We also demonstrated outputmore » voltages in excess of 40 kV using Y5V-based commercial capacitors. The results show some key features that determine efficient production of trains of solitons in the kilovolt range.« less

  8. Analysis of homogeneous turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, A. D.; Hill, J. C.; Mahalingam, S.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Full turbulence simulations at low Reynolds numbers were made for the single-step, irreversible, bimolecular reaction between non-premixed reactants in isochoric, decaying homogeneous turbulence. Various initial conditions for the scalar field were used in the simulations to control the initial scalar dissipation length scale, and simulations were also made for temperature-dependent reaction rates and for non-stoichiometric and unequal diffusivity conditions. Joint probability density functions (pdf's), conditional pdf's, and various statistical quantities appearing in the moment equations were computed. Preliminary analysis of the results indicates that compressive strain-rate correlates better than other dynamical quantities with local reaction rate, and the locations of peak reaction rates seem to be insensitive to the scalar field initial conditions.

  9. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy; Kurien, Susan

    2016-11-01

    A new spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence is proposed. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Numerical simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.

  10. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy T.; Kurien, Susan

    2017-06-01

    Here, a proposal for a spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Here, numericalmore » simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.« less

  11. Soliton production with nonlinear homogeneous lines

    SciTech Connect

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.; Coleman, Phillip D.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Petney, Sharon Joy Victor; Dudley, Evan C.; Youngman, Kevin; Penner, Tim Dwight; Fang, Lu; Myers, Katherine M.

    2015-11-24

    Low- and high-voltage Soliton waves were produced and used to demonstrate collision and compression using diode-based nonlinear transmission lines. Experiments demonstrate soliton addition and compression using homogeneous nonlinear lines. We built the nonlinear lines using commercially available diodes. These diodes are chosen after their capacitance versus voltage dependence is used in a model and the line design characteristics are calculated and simulated. Nonlinear ceramic capacitors are then used to demonstrate high-voltage pulse amplification and compression. The line is designed such that a simple capacitor discharge, input signal, develops soliton trains in as few as 12 stages. We also demonstrated output voltages in excess of 40 kV using Y5V-based commercial capacitors. The results show some key features that determine efficient production of trains of solitons in the kilovolt range.

  12. ELECTROPHORETIC HOMOGENEITY OF PREGNANT MARE SERUM GONADOTROPHIN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Choh Hao; Evans, Herbert M.; Wonder, Donald H.

    1940-01-01

    A highly purified and potent gonadotrophin in pregnant mare serum has been prepared. The preparation has been shown to be electrophoretically homogeneous in the Tiselius apparatus. The mobilities of the substance have been determined over a wide range of hydrogen ion concentrations. The isoelectric point lies at pH 2.60–2.65 and the value of See PDF for Equation is 4.0 x 10–5. Some chemical constituents have been studied. From the tryptophane and tyrosine content the molecular weight of the hormone is estimated to be 30,000. The hormone has been subjected to acetylation by ketene in aqueous solution at room temperature and the result suggests again the essentiality of free amino groups for the biological activity of the hormone. In this respect it is to be contrasted with human chorionic gonadotrophin. PMID:19873189

  13. Homogeneously dispersed, multimetal oxygen-evolving catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xueli; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Bajdich, Michal; Garcia-Melchor, Max; Han, Lili; Xu, Jixian; Liu, Min; Zheng, Lirong; F. Pelayo Garcia de Arquer; Dinh, Cao Thang; Fan, Fengjia; Yuan, Mingjian; Yassitepe, Emre; Chen, Ning; Regier, Tom; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Yuhang; De Luna, Phil; Janmohamed, Alyf; Xin, Huolin L.; Yang, Huagui; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-03-24

    Earth-abundant first-row (3d) transition-metal-based catalysts have been developed for the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER); however, they operate at overpotentials significantly above thermodynamic requirements. Density functional theory suggested that non-3d high-valency metals such as tungsten can modulate 3d metal oxides, providing near-optimal adsorption energies for OER intermediates. We developed a room-temperature synthesis to produce gelled oxy-hydroxide materials with an atomically homogeneous metal distribution. These gelled FeCoW oxy-hydroxide exhibits the lowest overpotential (191 mV) reported at 10 mA per square centimeter in alkaline electrolyte. Here, the catalyst shows no evidence of degradation following more than 500 hours of operation. X-ray absorption and computational studies reveal a synergistic interplay between W, Fe and Co in producing a favorable local coordination environment and electronic structure that enhance the energetics for OER.

  14. Nanodosimetric track structure in homogeneous extended beams.

    PubMed

    Conte, V; Moro, D; Colautti, P; Grosswendt, B

    2015-09-01

    Physical aspects of particle track structure are important in determining the induction of clustered damage in relevant subcellular structures like the DNA and higher-order genomic structures. The direct measurement of track-structure properties of ionising radiation is feasible today by counting the number of ionisations produced inside a small gas volume. In particular, the so-called track-nanodosimeter, installed at the TANDEM-ALPI accelerator complex of LNL, measures ionisation cluster-size distributions in a simulated subcellular structure of dimensions 20 nm, corresponding approximately to the diameter of the chromatin fibre. The target volume is irradiated by pencil beams of primary particles passing at specified impact parameter. To directly relate these measured track-structure data to radiobiological measurements performed in broad homogeneous particle beams, these data can be integrated over the impact parameter. This procedure was successfully applied to 240 MeV carbon ions and compared with Monte Carlo simulations for extended fields.

  15. An inhomogeneous model universe behaving homogeneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravi, Sh.; Kourkchi, E.; Mansouri, R.; Akrami, Y.

    2008-05-01

    We present a new model universe based on the junction of FRW to flat Lemaitre Tolman Bondi (LTB) solutions of Einstein equations along our past light cone, bringing structures within the FRW models. The model is assumed globally to be homogeneous, i.e. the cosmological principle is valid. Local inhomogeneities within the past light cone are modeled as a flat LTB, whereas those outside the light cone are assumed to be smoothed out and represented by a FRW model. The model is singularity free, always FRW far from the observer along the past light cone, gives way to a different luminosity distance relation as for the CDM/FRW models, a negative deceleration parameter near the observer, and correct linear and non-linear density contrast. As a whole, the model behaves like a FRW model on the past light cone with a special behavior of the scale factor, Hubble and deceleration parameter, mimicking dark energy.

  16. A homogeneous survey of red supergiants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Amparo; Dorda, Ricardo; González-Fernández, Carlos; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2015-08-01

    We have carried out a comprehensive homogeneous spectroscopic and photometric study of a sample of a few hundred red supergiants in the Milky Way, the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Small Magellanic Cloud. Our results show that global trends can be derived for many spectroscopic features independently of metallicity. The intensity of atomic Ti lines is directly correlated to spectral type, suggesting a real temperature change in the photospheric temperature. We find that the shape of the spectral energy distribution stops being directly related to surface temperature around mid-K spectral types, and becomes strongly correlated to mass loss. The distribution of spectral types is markedly different for the subset of red supergiants above a given luminosity cut, giving very strong hints of a separate evolutionary phase.

  17. Instability of Homogeneous State in Magnetic Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkkonen, J.; Kuivalainen, P.; Stubb, T.

    1982-06-01

    The instability of the homogeneous state in a ferromagnetic semiconductor is studied. The electronic part of the free energy is determined using Thomas-Fermi statistical model and the magnetic part is calculated by the molecular field approximation including the RKKY-interaction. The inhomogeneity consists of a small magnetically polarized region with a high electron density surrounded by a less polarized positively charged depletion layer. The inhomogeneous state is found to be stable in a relatively broad temperature range around the Curie temperature at low and intermediate doping densities. The stability range shrinks in an applied magnetic field. At fields exceeding about 3 T or at doping densities larger than 1021 cm-3 the inhomogeneous state is no more stable.

  18. Catalytic Parallel Kinetic Resolution under Homogeneous Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Duffey, Trisha A.; MacKay, James A.; Vedejs, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    Two complementary chiral catalysts, the phosphine 8d and the DMAP-derived ent-23b, are used simultaneously to selectively activate one of a mixture of two different achiral anhydrides as acyl donors under homogeneous conditions. The resulting activated intermediates 25 and 26 react with the racemic benzylic alcohol 5 to form enantioenriched esters (R)-24 and (S)-17 by fully catalytic parallel kinetic resolution (PKR). The aroyl ester (R)-24 is obtained with near-ideal enantioselectivity for the PKR process, but (S)-17 is contaminated by ca. 8% of the minor enantiomer (R)-17 resulting from a second pathway via formation of mixed anhydride 24 and its activation by 8d. PMID:20557113

  19. Leith diffusion model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, Robert; Clark, Timothy T.; Kurien, Susan

    2016-07-19

    Here, a proposal for a spectral closure model for homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. The systematic development begins by closing the third-order correlation describing nonlinear interactions by an anisotropic generalization of the Leith diffusion model for isotropic turbulence. The correlation tensor is then decomposed into a tensorially isotropic part, or directional anisotropy, and a trace-free remainder, or polarization anisotropy. The directional and polarization components are then decomposed using irreducible representations of the SO(3) symmetry group. Under the ansatz that the decomposition is truncated at quadratic order, evolution equations are derived for the directional and polarization pieces of the correlation tensor. Here, numerical simulation of the model equations for a freely decaying anisotropic flow illustrate the non-trivial effects of spectral dependencies on the different return-to-isotropy rates of the directional and polarization contributions.

  20. Homogeneously dispersed, multimetal oxygen-evolving catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xueli; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Comin, Riccardo; Bajdich, Michal; Garcia-Melchor, Max; Han, Lili; Xu, Jixian; Liu, Min; Zheng, Lirong; F. Pelayo Garcia de Arquer; Dinh, Cao Thang; Fan, Fengjia; Yuan, Mingjian; Yassitepe, Emre; Chen, Ning; Regier, Tom; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Yuhang; De Luna, Phil; Janmohamed, Alyf; Xin, Huolin L.; Yang, Huagui; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Sargent, Edward H.

    2016-03-24

    Earth-abundant first-row (3d) transition-metal-based catalysts have been developed for the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER); however, they operate at overpotentials significantly above thermodynamic requirements. Density functional theory suggested that non-3d high-valency metals such as tungsten can modulate 3d metal oxides, providing near-optimal adsorption energies for OER intermediates. We developed a room-temperature synthesis to produce gelled oxy-hydroxide materials with an atomically homogeneous metal distribution. These gelled FeCoW oxy-hydroxide exhibits the lowest overpotential (191 mV) reported at 10 mA per square centimeter in alkaline electrolyte. Here, the catalyst shows no evidence of degradation following more than 500 hours of operation. X-ray absorption and computational studies reveal a synergistic interplay between W, Fe and Co in producing a favorable local coordination environment and electronic structure that enhance the energetics for OER.

  1. Homogenization analysis of complementary waveguide metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landy, Nathan; Hunt, John; Smith, David R.

    2013-11-01

    We analyze the properties of complementary metamaterials as effective inclusions patterned into the conducting walls of metal waveguide structures. We show that guided wave metamaterials can be homogenized using the same retrieval techniques used for volumetric metamaterials, leading to a description in which a given complementary element is conceptually replaced by a block of material within the waveguide whose effective permittivity and permeability result in equivalent scattering characteristics. The use of effective constitutive parameters for waveguide materials provides an alternative point-of-view for the design of waveguide and microstrip based components, including planar lenses and filters, as well as devices with derived from a bulk material response. In addition to imparting effective constitutive properties to the waveguide, complementary metamaterials also couple energy from waveguide modes into radiation. Thus, complementary waveguide metamaterials can be used to modify and optimize a variety of antenna structures.

  2. Iodothyronine Metabolism in Rat Liver Homogenates

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Michael M.; Utiger, Robert D.

    1978-01-01

    To investigate mechanisms of extrathyroidal thyroid hormone metabolism, conversion of thyroxine (T4) to 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) and degradation of 3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine (rT3) were studied in rat liver homogenates. Both reactions were enzymatic. For conversion of T4 to T3, the Km of T4 was 7.7 μM, and the Vmax was 0.13 pmol T3/min per mg protein. For rT3 degradation, the Km of rT3 was 7.5 nM, and the Vmax was 0.36 pmol rT3/min per mg protein. Production of rT3 or degradation of T4 or T3 was not detected under the conditions employed. rT3 was a potent competitive inhibitor of T4 to T3 conversion with a Ki of 4.5 nM; 3,3′-diiodothyronine was a less potent inhibitor of this reaction. T4 was a competitive inhibitor of rT3 degradation with a Ki of 10.2 μM. Agents which inhibited both reactions included propylthiouracil, which appeared to be an allosteric inhibitor, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and iopanoic acid. Sodium diatrizoate had a weak inhibitory effect. No inhibition was found with α-methylparatyrosine, Fe+2, Fe+3, reduced glutathione, β-hydroxybutyrate, or oleic acid. Fasting resulted in inhibition of T4 to T3 conversion and of rT3 degradation by rat liver homogenates which was reversible after refeeding. Serum T4, T3, and thyrotropin concentrations fell during fasting, with no decrease in serum protein binding as assessed by a T3-charcoal uptake. There was no consistent change in serum rT3 concentrations. Dexamethasone had no effect in vitro. In vivo dexamethasone administration resulted in elevated serum rT3 concentrations after 1 day, and after 5 days, in inhibition of T4 to T3 conversion and rT3 degradation without altering serum T4, T3, or thyrotropin concentrations. Endotoxin treatment had no effect of iodothyronine metabolism in liver homogenates. In kidney homogenates the reaction rates and response to propylthiouracil in vitro were similar to those in liver. No significant T4 to T3 conversion or rT3 production or degradation could be detected

  3. The homogeneity conjecture for supergravity backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa-O'Farrill, José Miguel

    2009-06-01

    These notes record three lectures given at the workshop "Higher symmetries in Physics", held at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in November 2008. In them we explain how to construct a Lie (super)algebra associated to a spin manifold, perhaps with extra geometric data, and a notion of privileged spinors. The typical examples are supersymmetric supergravity backgrounds; although there are more classical instances of this construction. We focus on two results: the geometric constructions of compact real forms of the simple Lie algebras of type B4, F4 and E8 from S7, S8 and S15, respectively; and the construction of the Killing superalgebra of eleven-dimensional supergravity backgrounds. As an application of this latter construction we show that supersymmetric supergravity backgrounds with enough supersymmetry are necessarily locally homogeneous.

  4. Thermodynamics and flow-frames for dissipative relativistic fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ván, P.; Biró, T. S.

    2014-01-14

    A general thermodynamic treatment of dissipative relativistic fluids is introduced, where the temperature four vector is not parallel to the velocity field of the fluid. Generic stability and kinetic equilibrium points out a particular thermodynamics, where the temperature vector is parallel to the enthalpy flow vector and the choice of the flow fixes the constitutive functions for viscous stress and heat. The linear stability of the homogeneous equilibrium is proved in a mixed particle-energy flow-frame.

  5. Homogeneous cosmologies as group field theory condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, Steffen; Oriti, Daniele; Sindoni, Lorenzo

    2014-06-01

    We give a general procedure, in the group field theory (GFT) formalism for quantum gravity, for constructing states that describe macroscopic, spatially homogeneous universes. These states are close to coherent (condensate) states used in the description of Bose-Einstein condensates. The condition on such states to be (approximate) solutions to the quantum equations of motion of GFT is used to extract an effective dynamics for homogeneous cosmologies directly from the underlying quantum theory. The resulting description in general gives nonlinear and nonlocal equations for the `condensate wavefunction' which are analogous to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in Bose-Einstein condensates. We show the general form of the effective equations for current quantum gravity models, as well as some concrete examples. We identify conditions under which the dynamics becomes linear, admitting an interpretation as a quantum-cosmological Wheeler-DeWitt equation, and give its semiclassical (WKB) approximation in the case of a kinetic term that includes a Laplace-Beltrami operator. For isotropic states, this approximation reproduces the classical Friedmann equation in vacuum with positive spatial curvature. We show how the formalism can be consistently extended from Riemannian signature to Lorentzian signature models, and discuss the addition of matter fields, obtaining the correct coupling of a massless scalar in the Friedmann equation from the most natural extension of the GFT action. We also outline the procedure for extending our condensate states to include cosmological perturbations. Our results form the basis of a general programme for extracting effective cosmological dynamics directly from a microscopic non-perturbative theory of quantum gravity.

  6. Homogenization of global radiosonde humidity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschek, Michael; Haimberger, Leopold

    2016-04-01

    The global radiosonde network is an important source of upper-air measurements and is strongly connected to reanalysis efforts of the 20th century. However, measurements are strongly affected by changes in the observing system and require a homogenization before they can be considered useful in climate studies. In particular humidity measurements are known to show spurious trends and biases induced by many sources, e.g. reporting practices or freezing of the sensor. We propose to detect and correct these biases in an automated way, as has been done with temperature and winds. We detect breakpoints in dew point depression (DPD) time series by employing a standard normal homogeneity test (SNHT) on DPD-departures from ERA-Interim. In a next step, we calculate quantile departures between the latter and the earlier part near the breakpoints of the time series, going back in time. These departures adjust the earlier distribution of DPD to the latter distribution, called quantile matching, thus removing for example a non climatic shift. We employ this approach to the existing radiosonde network. In a first step to verify our approach we compare our results with ERA-Interim data and brightness temperatures of humidity-sensitive channels of microwave measuring radiometers (SSMIS) onboard DMSP F16. The results show that some of the biases can be detected and corrected in an automated way, however large biases that impact the distribution of DPD values originating from known reporting practices (e.g. 30 DPD on US stations) remain. These biases can be removed but not corrected. The comparison of brightness temperatures from satellite and radiosondes proofs to be difficult as large differences result from for example representative errors.

  7. Homogeneous ice nucleation from supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianshu; Donadio, Davide; Russo, Giovanna; Galli, Giulia

    2011-11-28

    Homogeneous ice nucleation from supercooled water was studied in the temperature range of 220-240 K through combining the forward flux sampling method (Allen et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2006, 124, 024102) with molecular dynamics simulations (FFS/MD), based on a recently developed coarse-grained water model (mW) (Molinero et al., J. Phys. Chem. B, 2009, 113, 4008). The calculated ice nucleation rates display a strong temperature dependence, ranging from 2.148 ± 0.635 × 10(25) m(-3) s(-1) at 220 K to 1.672 ± 0.970 × 10(-7) m(-3) s(-1) at 240 K. These rates can be fitted according to the classical nucleation theory, yielding an estimate of the effective ice-water interface energy γ(ls) of 31.01 ± 0.21 mJ m(-2) for the mW water model. Compared to experiments, our calculation underestimates the homogeneous ice nucleation rate by a few orders of magnitude. Possible reasons for the discrepancy are discussed. The nucleating ice embryo contains both cubic ice Ic and hexagonal ice Ih, with the fraction of each structure being roughly 50% when the critical size is reached. In particular, a novel defect structure containing nearly five-fold twin boundaries is identified in the ice clusters formed during nucleation. The way such defect structure is formed is found to be different from mechanisms proposed for the formation of the same defect in metallic nanoparticles and thin film. The quasi five-fold twin boundary structure found here is expected to occur in the crystallization of a wide range of materials with the diamond cubic structure, including ice.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow by a Stretching Cylinder with Newtonian Heating and Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, T; Hussain, Zakir; Alsaedi, A; Farooq, M

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions and Newtonian heating in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of Powell-Eyring fluid by a stretching cylinder. The nonlinear partial differential equations of momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to the nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Convergent solutions of momentum, energy and reaction equations are developed by using homotopy analysis method (HAM). This method is very efficient for development of series solutions of highly nonlinear differential equations. It does not depend on any small or large parameter like the other methods i. e., perturbation method, δ-perturbation expansion method etc. We get more accurate result as we increase the order of approximations. Effects of different parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are sketched and discussed. Comparison of present study with the previous published work is also made in the limiting sense. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are also computed and analyzed. It is noticed that the flow accelerates for large values of Powell-Eyring fluid parameter. Further temperature profile decreases and concentration profile increases when Powell-Eyring fluid parameter enhances. Concentration distribution is decreasing function of homogeneous reaction parameter while opposite influence of heterogeneous reaction parameter appears.

  9. Magnetohydrodynamic Flow by a Stretching Cylinder with Newtonian Heating and Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, T.; Hussain, Zakir; Alsaedi, A.; Farooq, M.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions and Newtonian heating in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of Powell-Eyring fluid by a stretching cylinder. The nonlinear partial differential equations of momentum, energy and concentration are reduced to the nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Convergent solutions of momentum, energy and reaction equations are developed by using homotopy analysis method (HAM). This method is very efficient for development of series solutions of highly nonlinear differential equations. It does not depend on any small or large parameter like the other methods i. e., perturbation method, δ—perturbation expansion method etc. We get more accurate result as we increase the order of approximations. Effects of different parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration distributions are sketched and discussed. Comparison of present study with the previous published work is also made in the limiting sense. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are also computed and analyzed. It is noticed that the flow accelerates for large values of Powell-Eyring fluid parameter. Further temperature profile decreases and concentration profile increases when Powell-Eyring fluid parameter enhances. Concentration distribution is decreasing function of homogeneous reaction parameter while opposite influence of heterogeneous reaction parameter appears. PMID:27280883

  10. Distributions of nerve and muscle fibre types in locust jumping muscle.

    PubMed

    Hoyle, G

    1978-04-01

    Muscle fibres of the locust extensor tibiae (jumping muscle) were examined by interference microscopy and by electron microscopy. The electrical responses of single fibres and the mechanical responses of bundles or selected regions to the nerve fibres were examined. Four axons innervate the muscle: fast (FETi), slow (SETi), common inhibitor (CI) and dorsal unpaired median (DUMETi). Their distributions were examined by combined electrophysiological tracing and EM sectioning. The mean diameter of muscle fibres in different regions varies from 40 to 140 micrometer and is related to the local leg thickness rather than muscle fibre type. The fine structure of a fibre is related to its innervation. Fibres innervated by FETi but not SETi are of fast type ultrastructurally. Fibres innervated by SETi but not by FETi are of slow type ultrastructurally. Fibres innervated by both axons are generally intermediate between the extremes though more nearly of fast type than slow. Distal slow muscle fibres have much slower relaxation rates than do proximal ones. The most proximal bundles are of mixed muscle fibre type. There is an abrupt transition from a mixed population to homogeneous fast type, in the muscle units immediately distal to the most proximal bundles. This transition is associated with the presence of DUMETi terminals on some of the fibres distal to the transition point. There are no SETi endings on these same fibres. Fibres innervated by both SETi and FETi are scattered throughout the leg, but are commonest in the dorsal bundles. The percentage of these increases progressively passing distally. The most distal muscle fibres are innervated by SETi but not by FETi. It is concluded that different regions of the muscle will play different roles functionally since they are differentially sensitive to the pattern of SETi discharge.

  11. Forkhead box O1 and muscle RING finger 1 protein expression in atrophic and hypertrophic denervated mouse skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors and E3 ubiquitin ligases such as Muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) are believed to participate in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass. The function of FoxO transcription factors is regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation. In the present study FoxO1 protein expression, phosphorylation and acetylation as well as MuRF1 protein expression, were examined in atrophic and hypertrophic denervated skeletal muscle. Methods Protein expression, phosphorylation and acetylation were studied semi-quantitatively using Western blots. Muscles studied were 6-days denervated mouse hind-limb muscles (anterior tibial as well as pooled gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, all atrophic), 6-days denervated mouse hemidiaphragm muscles (hypertrophic) and innervated control muscles. Total muscle homogenates were used as well as separated nuclear and cytosolic fractions of innervated and 6-days denervated anterior tibial and hemidiaphragm muscles. Results Expression of FoxO1 and MuRF1 proteins increased 0.3-3.7-fold in all 6-days denervated muscles studied, atrophic as well as hypertrophic. Phosphorylation of FoxO1 at S256 increased about 0.8-1-fold after denervation in pooled gastrocnemius and soleus muscles and in hemidiaphragm but not in unfractionated anterior tibial muscle. A small (0.2-fold) but statistically significant increase in FoxO1 phosphorylation was, however, observed in cytosolic fractions of denervated anterior tibial muscle. A statistically significant increase in FoxO1 acetylation (0.8-fold) was observed only in denervated anterior tibial muscle. Increases in total FoxO1 and in phosphorylated FoxO1 were only seen in cytosolic fractions of denervated atrophic anterior tibial muscle whereas in denervated hypertrophic hemidiaphragm both total FoxO1 and phosphorylated FoxO1 increased in cytosolic as well as in nuclear fractions. MuRF1 protein expression increased in cytosolic as well

  12. Muscle Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ryabykh, Sergey; Ochirova, Polina; Kenis, Vladimir; Hofstätter, Jochen G.; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf; Kircher, Susanne Gerit

    2017-01-01

    Marked ligamentous hyperlaxity and muscle weakness/wasting associated with awkward gait are the main deficits confused with the diagnosis of myopathy. Seven children (6 boys and 1 girl with an average age of 8 years) were referred to our department because of diverse forms of skeletal abnormalities. No definitive diagnosis was made, and all underwent a series of sophisticated investigations in other institutes in favor of myopathy. We applied our methodology through the clinical and radiographic phenotypes followed by targeted genotypic confirmation. Three children (2 boys and 1 girl) were compatible with the diagnosis of progressive pseudorheumatoid chondrodysplasia. The genetic mutation was correlated with the WISP 3 gene actively expressed by articular chondrocytes and located on chromosome 6. Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnosis in 2 boys. Karyotyping confirmed 47,XXY (aneuploidy of Klinefelter syndrome). And 2 boys were finally diagnosed with Morquio syndrome (MPS type IV A) as both showed missense mutations in the N-acetylgalactosamine-sulfate sulfatase gene. Misdiagnosis can lead to the initiation of a long list of sophisticated investigations. PMID:28210640

  13. Experimental evidence of homogeneous superfluid turbulence in large-pore porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Maddocks, J.R.; Van Sciver, S.W. )

    1994-09-01

    Experimental results are presented for counterflow and isothermal coflow through large-pore porous materials, with porosities greater than 90% and permeabilities of order 10[sup [minus]11] m[sup 2]. Counterflow velocities ranging from 0.06 to 0.14 m/s were obtained. Because of the large-pore geometry, and the velocity range investigated, the superfluid is fully turbulent. The counterflow data are well described by the two-fluid model using the Schwarz model of homogeneous mutual friction, with a larger, empirically-modified, mutual friction coefficient. The same mutual friction model is applied to the coflow results, assuming that dissipation due to superfluid vortex interaction with the wall of the porous media is negligible. In this case, the normal-fluid and superfluid velocities are coupled through the mutual friction, and relative velocities in the range 0.00 to 0.10 m/s, the authors calculate relative velocities up to 0.07 m/s, and normal-fluid velocities in excess of 0.04 m/s. An interesting feature of the coflow pressure drop, as a function of the normal-fluid velocity, is that it is larger than the counterflow pressure drop by the ratio of the total density to the normal-fluid density.

  14. Reconditioning aging muscles.

    PubMed

    Kraus, H

    1978-06-01

    Weakness or stiffness of key posture muscles can cause much of the disability seen in elderly patients. Too much tension and too little exercise greatly increase the natural loss of muscular fitness with age. A systematic program of exercise, stressing relaxation and stretching of tight muscles and strenghthening of weak muscles, can improve physical fitness. The program must be tailored to the patient, starting with relaxation and gentle limbering exercises and proceeding ultimately to vigorous muscle-stretching exercises. Muscle aches and pain from tension and muscle imbalance are to be expected. Relaxation relieves tension pain, and strengthening weak muscles and stretching tight muscles will correct muscle imbalance. To prevent acute muscle spasm, the patient should avoid excessive exertion and increase exercise intensity gradually.

  15. Origins of Willis coupling and acoustic bianisotropy in acoustic metamaterials through source-driven homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieck, Caleb F.; Alù, Andrea; Haberman, Michael R.

    2017-09-01

    Willis fluids, or more generally Willis materials, are homogenized composites that exhibit coupling between momentum and strain. This coupling is intrinsic to inhomogeneous media and can play a significant role in the overall response in acoustic metamaterials. In this paper, we draw connections between bianisotropy in electromagnetism and Willis coupling in elastodynamics to provide a qualitative understanding. Building upon these analogies, we introduce a homogenization technique for acoustic metamaterials based on a source-driven, multiple scattering approach that highlights the physical origins of Willis coupling. Moreover, through numerical examples, we compare several macroscopic material descriptions of acoustic metamaterials with non-negligible Willis coupling. The descriptions neglecting Willis coupling may not satisfy restrictions stemming from reciprocity, passivity, and causality, which suggests that including Willis coupling in macroscopic descriptions is necessary to realize physically meaningful macroscopic parameters.

  16. Optimization of Fluid Front Dynamics in Porous Media Using Rate Control: I. Equal Mobility Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaryanto, Bagus; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    1999-10-18

    In applications involving this injection of a fluid in a porous medium to displace another fluid, a main objective is the maximization of the displacement efficiency. For a fixed arrangement of injection and production points (sources and sinks), such optimization is possible by controlling the injection rate policy. Despite its practical relevance, however, this aspect has received scant attention in the literature. In this paper, a fundamental approach based on optimal control theory, for the case when the fluids are miscible, of equal viscosity and in the absence of dispersion and gravity effects. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media are considered. From a fluid dynamics viewpoint, this is a problem in the deformation of material lines in porous media, as a function of time-varying injection rates.

  17. Effects of sample homogenization on solid phase sediment toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, B.S.; Hunt, J.W.; Newman, J.W.; Tjeerdema, R.S.; Fairey, W.R.; Stephenson, M.D.; Puckett, H.M.; Taberski, K.M.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment toxicity is typically assessed using homogenized surficial sediment samples. It has been recognized that homogenization alters sediment integrity and may result in changes in chemical bioavailability through oxidation-reduction or other chemical processes. In this study, intact (unhomogenized) sediment cores were taken from a Van Veen grab sampler and tested concurrently with sediment homogenate from the same sample in order to investigate the effect of homogenization on toxicity. Two different solid-phase toxicity test protocols were used for these comparisons. Results of amphipod exposures to samples from San Francisco Bay indicated minimal difference between intact and homogenized samples. Mean amphipod survival in intact cores relative to homogenates was similar at two contaminated sites. Mean survival was 34 and 33% in intact and homogenized samples, respectively, at Castro Cove. Mean survival was 41% and 57%, respectively, in intact and homogenized samples from Islais Creek. Studies using the sea urchin development protocol, modified for testing at the sediment/water interface, indicated considerably more toxicity in intact samples relative to homogenized samples from San Diego Bay. Measures of metal flux into the overlying water demonstrated greater flux of metals from the intact samples. Zinc flux was five times greater, and copper flux was twice as great in some intact samples relative to homogenates. Future experiments will compare flux of metals and organic compounds in intact and homogenized sediments to further evaluate the efficacy of using intact cores for solid phase toxicity assessment.

  18. The intramuscular nerve supply of the human lateral cricoarytenoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Sanders, I; Mu, L; Wu, B L; Biller, H F

    1993-09-01

    The lateral cricoarytenoid (LCA) muscle is one of the adductors of the vocal cords; however, some investigators believe that the lateral edge of the muscle may be involved in abduction. The possibility of functionally distinct compartments within the LCA was investigated by observing the pattern of the intramuscular nerve supply. This technique has previously clearly demonstrated neural compartments in the posterior cricoarytenoid, thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles. Five adult human larynges were processed by the Sihler's stain which clears all soft tissue while counterstaining the nerves. The results of our study showed that the innervation pattern of the human LCA muscle is composed of a homogenous nerve plexus localized to the middle region of the muscle. This pattern correlates with the location of motor endplates described by prior investigators. The consistent neural pattern suggests that the LCA is composed of a single neuromuscular compartment.

  19. Muscle tone abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Habel, M

    1997-01-01

    Rehabilitation nurses frequently encounter clients with neurological disorders that adversely affect muscle tone. By understanding the physiological etiology of abnormal muscle tone, individual practitioners can design nursing interventions for various care settings that appropriately protect clients from injury and that can help clients and caregivers learn effective techniques for managing muscle tone problems. This article explains muscle tone abnormalities in detail and offers insight into how rehabilitation nurses can play a key role in managing clients' alterations in muscle tone.

  20. Modulating contact angle hysteresis to direct fluid droplets along a homogenous surface.

    PubMed

    Luo, Mingxiang; Gupta, Rohini; Frechette, Joelle

    2012-02-01

    The shape and motion of drops on surfaces is governed by the balance between the driving and the pinning forces. Here we demonstrate control over the motion of droplets on an inclined surface by exerting control over the contact angle hysteresis. The external modulation of contact angle hysteresis is achieved through a voltage-induced local molecular reorganization within the surface film at the solid-liquid interface. We show that tuning contact angle hysteresis alone is sufficient to direct and deform drops when subjected to a constant external driving force, here gravity, in the absence of a pre-defined surface energy gradient or pattern. We also show that the observed stretching and contraction of the drops mimic the motion of an inchworm. Such reversible manipulation of the pinning forces could be an attractive means to direct drops, especially with the dominance of surface forces at micro-/nanoscale.

  1. Evolution of a confined turbulent jet in a long cylindrical cavity: Homogeneous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voropayev, S. I.; Sanchez, X.; Nath, C.; Webb, S.; Fernando, H. J. S.

    2011-11-01

    The flow induced in a long cylinder by an axially discharging round turbulent jet was investigated experimentally with applications to crude oil storage in the U.S. strategic petroleum reserves (SPR). It was found that the flow does not reach a true steady state, but vacillates periodically. Digital video recordings and particle image velocimetry were used to map the flow structures and velocity/vorticity fields, from which the frequency of jet switching, jet stopping distance, mean flow, turbulence characteristics, and the influence of end-wall boundary conditions were inferred. The results were parameterized using the characteristic length D and velocity J1/2/D scales based on the jet kinematic momentum flux J and cylinder width D. The scaling laws so developed could be used to extrapolate laboratory observations to SPR flows.

  2. Electro-osmotic flow in bicomponent fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazarenko, Andrei; Sega, Marcello

    The electroosmotic flow (EOF) is a widely used technique that uses the action of external electric fields on solvated ions to move fluids around in microfluidics devices. For homogeneous fluids, the characteristics of the flow can be well approximated by simple analytical models, but in multicomponent systems such as oil-in-water droplets one has to rely to numerical simulations. The purpose of this study is to investigate physical properties of the EOF in a bicomponent fluid by solving the coupled equations of motions of explicit ions in interaction with a continuous model of the flow. To do so we couple the hydrodynamics equations as solved by a Shan-Chen Lattice-Boltzmann method to the molecular dynamics of the ions. The presence of explicit ions allows us to go beyond the simple Poisson-Boltzmann approximations, and investigate a variety of EOF regimes. ETN-COLLDENSE (H2020-MCSA-ITN-2014, Grant No. 642774).

  3. Effects of added fluids on the perception of solid food.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciano Jose; de Wijk, René A; Gavião, Maria Beatriz D; van der Bilt, Andries

    2006-07-30

    The production of sufficient saliva is indispensable for good chewing. Recent research has demonstrated that salivary flow rate has little influence on the swallowing threshold. We examined the hypothesis that adding fluid to a food will influence the chewing process. Twenty healthy subjects chewed on melba toast, breakfast cake, carrot, peanut and Gouda cheese. In addition they chewed on these foods after we added different volumes of tap water or a solution of alpha-amylase. We measured jaw muscle activity and the number of cycles until swallowing. Furthermore, we obtained visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for texture and sound attributes for all foods and fluid conditions. The additional fluids significantly lowered muscle activity and swallowing threshold for melba, cake and peanut. The effect of alpha-amylase in the solutions was rather limited. Doubling the volume of tap water had a larger effect. Several texture and sound attributes of melba, cake and peanut were also significantly affected by the additional fluids. For melba, cake, and peanut we observed significant correlations between the physiology parameters and several attributes for the various fluid conditions. This indicates that the added fluid affects both the physiology (muscle activity and number of cycles) and the sensory perception of a number of texture and sound attributes. Adding fluid facilitates the chewing of dry foods (melba, cake), but does not influence the chewing of fatty (cheese) and wet products (carrot).

  4. Fluid mechanics in fluids at rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Howard

    2012-07-01

    Using readily available experimental thermophoretic particle-velocity data it is shown, contrary to current teachings, that for the case of compressible flows independent dye- and particle-tracer velocity measurements of the local fluid velocity at a point in a flowing fluid do not generally result in the same fluid velocity measure. Rather, tracer-velocity equality holds only for incompressible flows. For compressible fluids, each type of tracer is shown to monitor a fundamentally different fluid velocity, with (i) a dye (or any other such molecular-tagging scheme) measuring the fluid's mass velocity v appearing in the continuity equation and (ii) a small, physicochemically and thermally inert, macroscopic (i.e., non-Brownian), solid particle measuring the fluid's volume velocity vv. The term “compressibility” as used here includes not only pressure effects on density, but also temperature effects thereon. (For example, owing to a liquid's generally nonzero isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, nonisothermal liquid flows are to be regarded as compressible despite the general perception of liquids as being incompressible.) Recognition of the fact that two independent fluid velocities, mass- and volume-based, are formally required to model continuum fluid behavior impacts on the foundations of contemporary (monovelocity) fluid mechanics. Included therein are the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, which are now seen to apply only to incompressible fluids (a fact well-known, empirically, to experimental gas kineticists). The findings of a difference in tracer velocities heralds the introduction into fluid mechanics of a general bipartite theory of fluid mechanics, bivelocity hydrodynamics [Brenner, Int. J. Eng. Sci.10.1016/j.ijengsci.2012.01.006 54, 67 (2012)], differing from conventional hydrodynamics in situations entailing compressible flows and reducing to conventional hydrodynamics when the flow is incompressible, while being applicable to both liquids and

  5. Fluid mechanics in fluids at rest.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Howard

    2012-07-01

    Using readily available experimental thermophoretic particle-velocity data it is shown, contrary to current teachings, that for the case of compressible flows independent dye- and particle-tracer velocity measurements of the local fluid velocity at a point in a flowing fluid do not generally result in the same fluid velocity measure. Rather, tracer-velocity equality holds only for incompressible flows. For compressible fluids, each type of tracer is shown to monitor a fundamentally different fluid velocity, with (i) a dye (or any other such molecular-tagging scheme) measuring the fluid's mass velocity v appearing in the continuity equation and (ii) a small, physicochemically and thermally inert, macroscopic (i.e., non-Brownian), solid particle measuring the fluid's volume velocity v(v). The term "compressibility" as used here includes not only pressure effects on density, but also temperature effects thereon. (For example, owing to a liquid's generally nonzero isobaric coefficient of thermal expansion, nonisothermal liquid flows are to be regarded as compressible despite the general perception of liquids as being incompressible.) Recognition of the fact that two independent fluid velocities, mass- and volume-based, are formally required to model continuum fluid behavior impacts on the foundations of contemporary (monovelocity) fluid mechanics. Included therein are the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations, which are now seen to apply only to incompressible fluids (a fact well-known, empirically, to experimental gas kineticists). The findings of a difference in tracer velocities heralds the introduction into fluid mechanics of a general bipartite theory of fluid mechanics, bivelocity hydrodynamics [Brenner, Int. J. Eng. Sci. 54, 67 (2012)], differing from conventional hydrodynamics in situations entailing compressible flows and reducing to conventional hydrodynamics when the flow is incompressible, while being applicable to both liquids and gases.

  6. Principles of Fluid Management.

    PubMed

    Rewa, Oleksa; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2015-10-01

    Fluid therapy is the most common intervention received by acutely ill hospitalized patients; however, important questions on its optimal use remain. Its prescription should be patient and context specific, with clear indications and contradictions, and have the type, dose, and rate specified. Any fluid therapy, if provided inappropriately, can contribute unnecessary harm to patients. The quantitative toxicity of fluid therapy contributes to worse outcomes; this should prompt greater bedside attention to fluid prescription, fluid balance, development of avoidable complications attributable to fluid overload, and for the timely deresuscitation of patients whose clinical status and physiology allow active fluid mobilization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibited muscle amino acid uptake in sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Hasselgren, P O; James, J H; Fischer, J E

    1986-01-01

    Amino acid uptake in vivo was determined in soleus (SOL) muscle, diaphragm, heart, and liver following intravenous injection of [3H]-alpha-amino-isobutyric acid ([3H]-AIB) in rats made septic by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and in sham-operated controls. Muscle amino acid transport was also measured in vitro by determining uptake of [3H]-AIB in incubated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and SOL muscles. Results were expressed as distribution ratio between [3H]-AIB in intracellular and extracellular fluid. AIB uptake in vivo was reduced by 90% in SOL and cardiac muscle and by 45% in diaphragm 16 hours after CLP. In contrast, AIB uptake by liver was almost four times higher in septic than in control animals. AIB uptake in vitro was reduced by 18% in EDL 8 hours after CLP but was not significantly altered in SOL at the same time point. Sixteen hours after CLP, AIB uptake was significantly reduced in both muscles, i.e., by 17% in EDL and by 65% in SOL. When muscles from untreated rats were incubated in the presence of plasma from septic animals (16 hours CLP) or from animals injected with endotoxin (2 mg/kg body weight), AIB uptake was reduced. Addition of endotoxin in vitro (2-200 micrograms/ml) to incubated muscles did not affect AIB uptake. The results suggest that sepsis leads to marked impairment of amino acid transport system A in muscle and that this impairment is mediated by a circulating factor that is not endotoxin. Reduced uptake of amino acids by skeletal muscle during sepsis may divert amino acids to the liver for increased gluconeogenesis and protein synthesis. PMID:3963895

  8. Numerical homogenization on approach for stokesian suspensions.

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, B. M.; Berlyand, L. V.; Karpeev, D. A.

    2012-01-20

    In this technical report we investigate efficient methods for numerical simulation of active suspensions. The prototypical system is a suspension of swimming bacteria in a Newtonian fluid. Rheological and other macroscopic properties of such suspensions can differ dramatically from the same properties of the suspending fluid alone or of suspensions of similar but inactive particles. Elongated bacteria, such as E. coli or B. subtilis, swim along their principal axis, propelling themselves with the help of flagella, attached at the anterior of the organism and pushing it forward in the manner of a propeller. They interact hydrodynamically with the surrounding fluid and, because of their asymmetrical shape, have the propensity to align with the local flow. This, along with the dipolar nature of bacteria (the two forces a bacterium exerts on a fluid - one due to self-propulsion and the other opposing drag - have equal magnitude and point in opposite directions), causes nearby bacteria to tend to align, resulting in a intermittent local ordering on the mesoscopic scale, which is between the microscopic scale of an individual bacterium and the macroscopic scale of the suspension (e.g., its container). The local ordering is sometimes called a collective mode or collective swimming. Thanks to self-propulsion, collective modes inject momentum into the fluid in a coherent way. This enhances the local strain rate without changing the macroscopic stress applied at the boundary of the container. The macroscopic effective viscosity of the suspension is defined roughly as the ratio of the applied stress to the bulk strain rate. If local alignment and therefore local strain-rate enhancement, are significant, the effective viscosity can be appreciably lower than that of the corresponding passive suspension or even of the surrounding fluid alone. Indeed, a sevenfold decrease in the effective viscosity was observed in experiments with B. subtilis. More generally, local collective

  9. Homogeneous superconducting phase in TiN film: A complex impedance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, P.; Schellevis, H.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The low frequency complex impedance of a high resistivity 92 μ Ω cm and 100 nm thick TiN superconducting film has been measured via the transmission of several high sensitivity GHz microresonators, down to TC/50. The temperature dependence of the kinetic inductance follows closely BCS local electrodynamics, with one well defined superconducting gap. This evidences the recovery of a homogeneous superconducting phase in TiN far from the disorder and composition driven transitions. Additionally, we observe a linearity between resonator quality factor and frequency temperature changes, which can be described by a two fluid model.

  10. Effects of non-homogeneous flow on ADCP data processing in a hydroturbine forebay

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, S. F.; Richmond, M. C.; Romero-Gomez, P.; Serkowski, J. A.

    2016-01-02

    Accurate modeling of the velocity field in the forebay of a hydroelectric power station is important for both power generation and fish passage, and is able to be increasingly well represented by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) are investigated herein as a method of validating the numerical flow solutions, particularly in observed and calculated regions of non-homogeneous flow velocity. By using a numerical model of an ADCP operating in a velocity field calculated using CFD, the errors due to the spatial variation of the flow velocity are quantified. Furthermore, the numerical model of the ADCP is referred to herein as a Virtual ADCP (VADCP).

  11. Fetal development of deep back muscles in the human thoracic region with a focus on transversospinalis muscles and the medial branch of the spinal nerve posterior ramus

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Tatsuo; Koizumi, Masahiro; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Wang, Bao Jian; Murakami, Gen; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2011-01-01

    Fetal development of human deep back muscles has not yet been fully described, possibly because of the difficulty in identifying muscle bundle directions in horizontal sections. Here, we prepared near-frontal sections along the thoracic back skin (eight fetuses) as well as horizontal sections (six fetuses) from 14 mid-term fetuses at 9–15 weeks of gestation. In the deep side of the trapezius and rhomboideus muscles, the CD34-positive thoracolumbar fascia was evident even at 9 weeks. Desmin-reactivity was strong and homogeneous in the superficial muscle fibers in contrast to the spotty expression in the deep fibers. Thus, in back muscles, formation of the myotendinous junction may start from the superficial muscles and advance to the deep muscles. The fact that developing intramuscular tendons were desmin-negative suggested little possibility of a secondary change from the muscle fibers to tendons. We found no prospective spinalis muscle or its tendinous connections with other muscles. Instead, abundant CD68-positive macrophages along the spinous process at 15 weeks suggested a change in muscle attachment, an event that may result in a later formation of the spinalis muscle. S100-positive intramuscular nerves exhibited downward courses from the multifidus longus muscle in the original segment to the rotatores brevis muscles in the inferiorly adjacent level. The medial cutaneous nerve had already reached the thoracolumbar fascia at 9 weeks, but by 15 weeks the nerve could not penetrate the trapezius muscle. Finally, we propose a folded myotomal model of the primitive transversospinalis muscle that seems to explain a fact that the roofing tile-like configuration of nerve twigs in the semispinalis muscle is reversed in the multifidus and rotatores muscles. PMID:21954879

  12. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, Bradley G.; Downing, Jr., John P.; Neal, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitment for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container.

  13. Fluid transport container

    DOEpatents

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  14. Nitric oxide and Na,K-ATPase activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Juel, C

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that nitric oxide (NO) stimulates the Na,K-ATPase in cardiac myocytes. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate whether NO increases Na,K-ATPase activity in skeletal muscle and, if that is the case, to identify the underlying mechanism. The study used isolated rat muscle, muscle homogenates and purified membranes as model systems. Na,K-ATPase activity was quantified from phosphate release due to ATP hydrolysis. Exposure to the NO donor spermine NONOate (10 μm) increased the maximal Na,K-ATPase activity by 27% in isolated glycolytic muscles, but had no effect in oxidative muscles. Spermine NONOate increased the maximal Na,K-ATPase activity by 58% (P < 0.05) in homogenates from glycolytic muscle, but had no effect in oxidative muscle. The stimulatory effect of NONOate was not related to one specific Na,K-ATPase α-isoform. Incubation with cGMP (1 mm) increased the maximal Na,K-ATPase activity in homogenates from glycolytic muscle by 16% (P < 0.05), but had no effect on homogenates from oxidative muscle. cGMP had no effect on phospholemman phosphorylation at serine 68. Spermine NONOate had no effect in muscle membranes in which the ATPase activity was depressed by oxidized glutathione. NO and cGMP stimulate the Na,K-ATPase in glycolytic skeletal muscle. Direct S-nitrosylation and interference with S-glutathionylation seem to be excluded. In addition, phosphorylation of phospholemman at serine 68 is not involved. Most likely, the NO/cGMP/protein kinase G signalling pathway is involved. © 2015 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Numerical Computation of Homogeneous Slope Stability

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuangshuang; Li, Kemin; Ding, Xiaohua; Liu, Tong

    2015-01-01

    To simplify the computational process of homogeneous slope stability, improve computational accuracy, and find multiple potential slip surfaces of a complex geometric slope, this study utilized the limit equilibrium method to derive expression equations of overall and partial factors of safety. This study transformed the solution of the minimum factor of safety (FOS) to solving of a constrained nonlinear programming problem and applied an exhaustive method (EM) and particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO) to this problem. In simple slope examples, the computational results using an EM and PSO were close to those obtained using other methods. Compared to the EM, the PSO had a small computation error and a significantly shorter computation time. As a result, the PSO could precisely calculate the slope FOS with high efficiency. The example of the multistage slope analysis indicated that this slope had two potential slip surfaces. The factors of safety were 1.1182 and 1.1560, respectively. The differences between these and the minimum FOS (1.0759) were small, but the positions of the slip surfaces were completely different than the critical slip surface (CSS). PMID:25784927

  16. Magnetic field homogeneity for neutron EDM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Melissa

    2016-09-01

    The neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) is an observable which, if non-zero, would violate time-reversal symmetry, and thereby charge-parity symmetry of nature. New sources of CP violation beyond those found in the standard model of particle physics are already tightly constrained by nEDM measurements. Our future nEDM experiment seeks to improve the precision on the nEDM by a factor of 30, using a new ultracold neutron (UCN) source that is being constructed at TRIUMF. Systematic errors in the nEDM experiment are driven by magnetic field inhomogeneity and instability. The goal field inhomogeneity averaged over the experimental measurement cell (order of 1 m) is 1 nT/m, at a total magnetic field of 1 microTesla. This equates to roughly 10-3 homogeneity. A particularly challenging aspect of the design problem is that nearby magnetic materials will also affect the magnetic inhomogeneity, and this must be taken into account in completing the design. This poster will present the design methodology and status of the main coil for the experiment where we use FEA software (COMSOL) to simulate and analyze the magnetic field. Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.

  17. Homogeneously dispersed, multimetal oxygen-evolving catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xueli; Voznyy, Oleksandr; ...

    2016-03-24

    Earth-abundant first-row (3d) transition-metal-based catalysts have been developed for the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER); however, they operate at overpotentials significantly above thermodynamic requirements. Density functional theory suggested that non-3d high-valency metals such as tungsten can modulate 3d metal oxides, providing near-optimal adsorption energies for OER intermediates. We developed a room-temperature synthesis to produce gelled oxy-hydroxide materials with an atomically homogeneous metal distribution. These gelled FeCoW oxy-hydroxide exhibits the lowest overpotential (191 mV) reported at 10 mA per square centimeter in alkaline electrolyte. Here, the catalyst shows no evidence of degradation following more than 500 hours of operation. X-ray absorption and computationalmore » studies reveal a synergistic interplay between W, Fe and Co in producing a favorable local coordination environment and electronic structure that enhance the energetics for OER.« less

  18. Simulation and modeling of homogeneous, compressed turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.T.; Ferziger, J.H.; Chapman, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression was simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were performed on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second-order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one-dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point closure, two-equation models. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  19. Simulation and modeling of homogeneous, compressed turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. T.; Ferziger, J. H.; Chapman, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    Low Reynolds number homogeneous turbulence undergoing low Mach number isotropic and one-dimensional compression was simulated by numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations. The numerical simulations were performed on a CYBER 205 computer using a 64 x 64 x 64 mesh. A spectral method was used for spatial differencing and the second-order Runge-Kutta method for time advancement. A variety of statistical information was extracted from the computed flow fields. These include three-dimensional energy and dissipation spectra, two-point velocity correlations, one-dimensional energy spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, integral length scales, Taylor microscales, and Kolmogorov length scale. Results from the simulated flow fields were used to test one-point closure, two-equation models. A new one-point-closure, three-equation turbulence model which accounts for the effect of compression is proposed. The new model accurately calculates four types of flows (isotropic decay, isotropic compression, one-dimensional compression, and axisymmetric expansion flows) for a wide range of strain rates.

  20. Homogenizing atomic dynamics by fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shaoqiang; Ying, Yuping

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we propose two ways to construct fractional differential equations (FDE) for approximating atomic chain dynamics. Taking harmonic chain as an example, we add a power function of fractional order to Taylor expansion of the dispersion relation, and determine the parameters by matching two selected wave numbers. This approximate function leads to an FDE after considering both directions for wave propagation. As an alternative, we consider the symbol of the force term, and approximate it by a similar function. It also induces an FDE. Both approaches produce excellent agreement with the harmonic chain dynamics. The accuracy may be improved by optimizing the selected wave numbers, or starting with higher order Taylor expansions. When resolved in the lattice constant, the resulting FDE's faithfully reproduce the lattice dynamics. When resolved in a coarse grid instead, they systematically generate homogenized algorithms. Numerical tests are performed to verify the proposed approaches. Moreover, FDE's are also constructed for diatomic chain and anharmonic lattice, to illustrate the generality of the proposed approaches.

  1. Dynamic contact angle cycling homogenizes heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Belibel, R; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-12-01

    In order to reduce restenosis, the necessity to develop the appropriate coating material of metallic stent is a challenge for biomedicine and scientific research over the past decade. Therefore, biodegradable copolymers of poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) were prepared in order to develop a new coating exhibiting different custom groups in its side chain and being able to carry a drug. This material will be in direct contact with cells and blood. It consists of carboxylic acid and hexylic groups used for hydrophilic and hydrophobic character, respectively. The study of this material wettability and dynamic surface properties is of importance due to the influence of the chemistry and the potential motility of these chemical groups on cell adhesion and polymer kinetic hydrolysis. Cassie theory was used for the theoretical correction of contact angles of these chemical heterogeneous surfaces coatings. Dynamic Surface Analysis was used as practical homogenizer of chemical heterogeneous surfaces by cycling during many cycles in water. In this work, we confirmed that, unlike receding contact angle, advancing contact angle is influenced by the difference of only 10% of acidic groups (%A) in side-chain of polymers. It linearly decreases with increasing acidity percentage. Hysteresis (H) is also a sensitive parameter which is discussed in this paper. Finally, we conclude that cycling provides real information, thus avoiding theoretical Cassie correction. H(10)is the most sensible parameter to %A.

  2. Ultrasensitive magnetic biosensor for homogeneous immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Chemla, Y. R.; Grossman, H. L.; Poon, Y.; McDermott, R.; Stevens, R.; Alper, M. D.; Clarke, J.

    2000-01-01

    A technique is described for specific, sensitive, quantitative, and rapid detection of biological targets by using superparamagnetic nanoparticles and a “microscope” based on a high-transition temperature dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). In this technique, a mylar film to which the targets have been bound is placed on the microscope. The film, at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, is typically 40 μm from the SQUID, which is at 77 K in a vacuum. A suspension of magnetic nanoparticles carrying antibodies directed against the target is added to the mixture in the well, and 1-s pulses of magnetic field are applied parallel to the SQUID. In the presence of this aligning field the nanoparticles develop a net magnetization, which relaxes when the field is turned off. Unbound nanoparticles relax rapidly by Brownian rotation and contribute no measurable signal. Nanoparticles that are bound to the target on the film are immobilized and undergo Néel relaxation, producing a slowly decaying magnetic flux, which is detected by the SQUID. The ability to distinguish between bound and unbound labels allows one to run homogeneous assays, which do not require separation and removal of unbound magnetic particles. The technique has been demonstrated with a model system of liposomes carrying the FLAG epitope. The SQUID microscope requires no more than (5 ± 2) × 104 magnetic nanoparticles to register a reproducible signal. PMID:11121032

  3. Ultrasensitive magnetic biosensor for homogeneous immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Chemla, Y R; Grossman, H L; Poon, Y; McDermott, R; Stevens, R; Alper, M D; Clarke, J

    2000-12-19

    A technique is described for specific, sensitive, quantitative, and rapid detection of biological targets by using superparamagnetic nanoparticles and a "microscope" based on a high-transition temperature dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). In this technique, a mylar film to which the targets have been bound is placed on the microscope. The film, at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, is typically 40 micrometer from the SQUID, which is at 77 K in a vacuum. A suspension of magnetic nanoparticles carrying antibodies directed against the target is added to the mixture in the well, and 1-s pulses of magnetic field are applied parallel to the SQUID. In the presence of this aligning field the nanoparticles develop a net magnetization, which relaxes when the field is turned off. Unbound nanoparticles relax rapidly by Brownian rotation and contribute no measurable signal. Nanoparticles that are bound to the target on the film are immobilized and undergo Néel relaxation, producing a slowly decaying magnetic flux, which is detected by the SQUID. The ability to distinguish between bound and unbound labels allows one to run homogeneous assays, which do not require separation and removal of unbound magnetic particles. The technique has been demonstrated with a model system of liposomes carrying the FLAG epitope. The SQUID microscope requires no more than (5 +/- 2) x 10(4) magnetic nanoparticles to register a reproducible signal.

  4. Davydov's solitons in a homogeneous nucleotide chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhno, Victor D.

    Charge transfer in homogeneous nucleotide chains is modeled on the basis of Holstein Hamiltonian. The path length of Davydov solitons in these chains is being studied. It is shown that in a dispersionless case, when the soliton velocity V is small, the path length grows exponentially as V decreases. In this case, the state of a moving soliton is quasisteady. In the presence of dispersion determined by the dependenceΩ2 =Ω 02 + V 02κ2, the path length in the region 0 < V < V0 is equal to infinity. In this case, the phonon environment follows the charge motion. In the region V > V0, the soliton motion is accompanied by emission of phonons which leads to a finite path length of a soliton. The latter tends to infinity as V → V0 + 0 and V → ∞. The presence of dissipation leads to a finite soliton path length. An equilibrium velocity of soliton in an external electric field is calculated. It is shown that there is a maximum intensity of an electric field at which a steady motion of a soliton is possible. The soliton mobility is calculated for the stable or ohmic brunch.

  5. Converter film technology for homogeneous white light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Rafael C.; Bauer, Jörg; Oppermann, Hermann

    2007-09-01

    An important issue for white ultra high power LEDs is the generation of a homogeneous light with high efficiency and a good color rendering index. Different from hot light sources LEDs do not emit the whole range of visible wavelengths. Only a certain wavelength with a limited full width at half maximum is emitted. Therefore a combination of wavelengths must be used to satisfy the human eye for white light. The CIE chromaticity diagram (Fig. 1) shows, that several combinations of wavelengths let the brain realize white light. Already the combination of two wavelengths (e.g. cyan and red or blue and yellow) let us think, that the source is white, if this wavelengths hit our receptors. This is completely different, if the light is illuminating an object. The reflection spectra of this object, which is crucial for our color feeling about this object, can not be stimulated in the whole range. For example a red stop sign, which is absorbing all wavelength excepting red, will absorb the blue and yellow light from our "white" light source and due to the missing red, the sign seems to be dark grey or black.

  6. Homogeneously dispersed, multimetal oxygen-evolving catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Bo; Zheng, Xueli; Voznyy, Oleksandr; ...

    2016-03-24

    Earth-abundant first-row (3d) transition-metal-based catalysts have been developed for the oxygen-evolution reaction (OER); however, they operate at overpotentials significantly above thermodynamic requirements. Density functional theory suggested that non-3d high-valency metals such as tungsten can modulate 3d metal oxides, providing near-optimal adsorption energies for OER intermediates. We developed a room-temperature synthesis to produce gelled oxy-hydroxide materials with an atomically homogeneous metal distribution. These gelled FeCoW oxy-hydroxide exhibits the lowest overpotential (191 mV) reported at 10 mA per square centimeter in alkaline electrolyte. Here, the catalyst shows no evidence of degradation following more than 500 hours of operation. X-ray absorption and computationalmore » studies reveal a synergistic interplay between W, Fe and Co in producing a favorable local coordination environment and electronic structure that enhance the energetics for OER.« less

  7. Fluid Drainage from Porous Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhong; Soh, Beatrice; Huppert, Herbert; Stone, Howard; Stone Group Team

    2012-11-01

    We report theoretical and experimental studies to describe buoyancy-driven fluid drainage from a porous medium. We first study homogeneous porous systems. To investigate the influence of heterogeneities, we consider the case where the permeability varies transverse to the flow direction, exemplified by a V-shaped Hele-Shaw cell. Finally, we analyze a model where both the permeability and the porosity vary transverse to the flow direction. In each case, a self-similar solution for the shape of the gravity current is found and a power-law behavior in time is derived for the mass remaining in the system. Laboratory experiments are conducted in homogeneous and V-shaped Hele-Shaw cells, and the measured profile shapes and the mass remaining in the cells agree well with our model predictions. Our study provides new insights into drainage processes such as may occur in a variety of natural and industrial activities including the geological storage of carbon dioxide. This work is supported by a grant from Carbon Mitigation Initiative at Princeton University.

  8. Anisotropic Developments for Homogeneous Shear Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Rubinstein, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The general decomposition of the spectral correlation tensor R(sub ij)(k) by Cambon et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 202, 295; J. Fluid Mech., 337, 303) into directional and polarization components is applied to the representation of R(sub ij)(k) by spherically averaged quantities. The decomposition splits the deviatoric part H(sub ij)(k) of the spherical average of R(sub ij)(k) into directional and polarization components H(sub ij)(sup e)(k) and H(sub ij)(sup z)(k). A self-consistent representation of the spectral tensor in the limit of weak anisotropy is constructed in terms of these spherically averaged quantities. The directional polarization components must be treated independently: models that attempt the same representation of the spectral tensor using the spherical average H(sub ij)(k) alone prove to be inconsistent with Navier-Stokes dynamics. In particular, a spectral tensor consistent with a prescribed Reynolds stress is not unique. The degree of anisotropy permitted by this theory is restricted by realizability requirements. Since these requirements will be less severe in a more accurate theory, a preliminary account is given of how to generalize the formalism of spherical averages to higher expansion of the spectral tensor. Directionality is described by a conventional expansion in spherical harmonics, but polarization requires an expansion in tensorial spherical harmonics generated by irreducible representations of the spatial rotation group SO(exp 3). These expansions are considered in more detail in the special case of axial symmetry.

  9. Mixing high-viscosity fluids via acoustically driven bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orbay, Sinem; Ozcelik, Adem; Lata, James; Kaynak, Murat; Wu, Mengxi; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    We present an acoustofluidic micromixer which can perform rapid and homogeneous mixing of highly viscous fluids in the presence of an acoustic field. In this device, two high-viscosity polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions were co-injected into a three-inlet PDMS microchannel with the center inlet containing a constant stream of nitrogen flow which forms bubbles in the device. When these bubbles were excited by an acoustic field generated via a piezoelectric transducer, the two solutions mixed homogenously due to the combination of acoustic streaming, droplet ejection, and bubble eruption effects. The mixing efficiency of this acoustofluidic device was evaluated using PEG-700 solutions which are ~106 times more viscous than deionized (DI) water. Our results indicate homogenous mixing of the PEG-700 solutions with a ~0.93 mixing index. The acoustofluidic micromixer is compact, inexpensive, easy to operate, and has the capacity to mix highly viscous fluids within 50 ms.

  10. Numerical Investigation of the Preferential Concentration Instability of Particle Laden Homogeneous Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasbaoui, Mohamed; Koch, Donald; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    In a previous study (Kasbaoui et al., J. Fluid Mech. 2015), particle laden homogeneous shear was shown to be subject to an algebraic instability. Initially randomly distributed particles are entrained by wave-like perturbations in the fluid velocity and segregate in a similar wave-like pattern while they sediment under gravity. The preferential concentration mechanism, which is the tendency of particles to exit vortical regions and gather in straining regions, causes the two waves to amplify each other resulting in an algebraic instability. By means of simulations, we compare the perturbations growth to the one yielded by the theory in the limit of small Stokes number particles. The simulations are conducted with an Eulerian model of the particles as well as a Lagrangian model. The two are compared. A secondary Rayleigh-Taylor instability caused by the periodic stacking of heavy layers of concentrated particles on top of depleted lighter layers is analyzed.

  11. ISOLATION OF SKELETAL MUSCLE NUCLEI

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Jean C.; Edelman, P. Michael; Knigge, Karl M.; Schwartz, Irving L.

    1965-01-01

    A method employing aqueous media for isolation of nuclei from rat skeletal muscle is described. The technique involves (a) mincing and then homogenizing in a 0.32 M sucrose-salt solution with a Potter-Elvehjem type homogenizer using a Delrin (an acetal resin) pestle and a carefully controlled, relatively large pestle-to-glass clearance, (b) filtering through fiberglass and stainless steel screens of predetermined mesh size to remove myofibrils and connective tissue, and (c) centrifuging in a 2.15 M sucrose-salt solution containing 0.7 mM ATP. Electron and phase-contrast microscopic observations show that the nuclei are intact, unencumbered by cytoplasmic tags, and possess well preserved distinct nucleoli, nucleoplasm, and nuclear membranes. Cytoplasmic contamination is minimal and mainly mitochondrial. Chemical assays of the nuclear fraction show that the DNA/protein and RNA/DNA ratios are comparable to those obtained in other tissues. These ratios, as well as the low specific activity obtained for cytochrome c oxidase and the virtual absence of myofibrillar ATPase, indicate a high degree of purity with minimal mitochondrial and myofibrillar contamination. The steps comprising the technique and the reasons for their selection are discussed. PMID:4287141

  12. Dynamic contraction behaviour of pneumatic artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doumit, Marc D.; Pardoel, Scott

    2017-07-01

    The development of a dynamic model for the Pneumatic Artificial Muscle (PAM) is an imperative undertaking for understanding and analyzing the behaviour of the PAM as a function of time. This paper proposes a Newtonian based dynamic PAM model that includes the modeling of the muscle geometry, force, inertia, fluid dynamic, static and dynamic friction, heat transfer and valve flow while ignoring the effect of bladder elasticity. This modeling contribution allows the designer to predict, analyze and optimize PAM performance prior to its development. Thus advancing successful implementations of PAM based powered exoskeletons and medical systems. To date, most muscle dynamic properties are determined experimentally, furthermore, no analytical models that can accurately predict the muscle's dynamic behaviour are found in the literature. Most developed analytical models adequately predict the muscle force in static cases but neglect the behaviour of the system in the transient response. This could be attributed to the highly challenging task of deriving such a dynamic model given the number of system elements that need to be identified and the system's highly non-linear properties. The proposed dynamic model in this paper is successfully simulated through MATLAB programing and validated the pressure, contraction distance and muscle temperature with experimental testing that is conducted with in-house built prototype PAM's.

  13. Active mixing of complex fluids at the microscale

    SciTech Connect

    Ober, Thomas J.; Foresti, Daniele; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2015-09-22

    Mixing of complex fluids at low Reynolds number is fundamental for a broad range of applications, including materials assembly, microfluidics, and biomedical devices. Of these materials, yield stress fluids (and gels) pose the most significant challenges, especially when they must be mixed in low volumes over short timescales. New scaling relationships between mixer dimensions and operating conditions are derived and experimentally verified to create a framework for designing active microfluidic mixers that can efficiently homogenize a wide range of complex fluids. As a result, active mixing printheads are then designed and implemented for multimaterial 3D printing of viscoelastic inks with programmable control of local composition.

  14. Active mixing of complex fluids at the microscale

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Thomas J.; Foresti, Daniele; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Mixing of complex fluids at low Reynolds number is fundamental for a broad range of applications, including materials assembly, microfluidics, and biomedical devices. Of these materials, yield stress fluids (and gels) pose the most significant challenges, especially when they must be mixed in low volumes over short timescales. New scaling relationships between mixer dimensions and operating conditions are derived and experimentally verified to create a framework for designing active microfluidic mixers that can efficiently homogenize a wide range of complex fluids. Active mixing printheads are then designed and implemented for multimaterial 3D printing of viscoelastic inks with programmable control of local composition. PMID:26396254

  15. Active mixing of complex fluids at the microscale

    DOE PAGES

    Ober, Thomas J.; Foresti, Daniele; Lewis, Jennifer A.

    2015-09-22

    Mixing of complex fluids at low Reynolds number is fundamental for a broad range of applications, including materials assembly, microfluidics, and biomedical devices. Of these materials, yield stress fluids (and gels) pose the most significant challenges, especially when they must be mixed in low volumes over short timescales. New scaling relationships between mixer dimensions and operating conditions are derived and experimentally verified to create a framework for designing active microfluidic mixers that can efficiently homogenize a wide range of complex fluids. As a result, active mixing printheads are then designed and implemented for multimaterial 3D printing of viscoelastic inks withmore » programmable control of local composition.« less

  16. Fluid-solid transition in unsteady shearing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovi, Dalila; Berzi, Diego; di Prisco, Claudio

    2017-06-01

    This paper focuses on the mechanical behaviour of granular systems under shearing, unsteady conditions. The results of numerical simulations of time evolving, homogeneous, shear flows of an assembly of frictional spheres, under constant volume conditions are illustrated. Simulations have been performed considering three volume fractions corresponding to fluid, solid and near-to-critical conditions at steady state. The three systems follow very different evolutionary paths, in terms of pressure, coordination number and stress ratio. Fluid-like and solid-like systems exhibit large and small fluctuations, respectively, in those quantities. A critical value of the coordination number seems to govern the transition from fluid to solid.

  17. Regarding the influence of heating and the Soret effect on a magnetic fluid seal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakov, M. S.; Nikiforov, I. V.

    2017-06-01

    The influence of a temperature gradient and the Soret effect on the distribution of particles in a magnetic fluid seal (MFS) is studied. The heating of the MFS is found to be an effective method of homogenizing the magnetic fluid in the seal; in addition, the influence of the Soret effect on this process is found to be essential.

  18. Stochastic homogenization of rate-independent systems and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heida, Martin

    2017-05-01

    We study the stochastic and periodic homogenization 1-homogeneous convex functionals. We prove some convergence results with respect to stochastic two-scale convergence, which are related to classical Γ -convergence results. The main result is a general \\liminf -estimate for a sequence of 1-homogeneous functionals and a two-scale stability result for sequences of convex sets. We apply our results to the homogenization of rate-independent systems with 1-homogeneous dissipation potentials and quadratic energies. In these applications, both the energy and the dissipation potential have an underlying stochastic microscopic structure. We study the particular homogenization problems of Prandtl-Reuss plasticity, Tresca friction on a macroscopic surface and Tresca friction on microscopic fissures.

  19. Effective properties of a fly ash geopolymer: Synergistic application of X-ray synchrotron tomography, nanoindentation, and homogenization models

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sumanta; Yang, Pu; Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Mertens, James C. E.; Xiao, Xianghui; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2015-09-02

    Microstructural and micromechanical investigation of a fly ash-based geopolymer using: (i) synchrotron x-ray tomography (XRT) to determine the volume fraction and tortuosity of pores that are influential in fluid transport, (ii) mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) to capture the volume fraction of smaller pores, (iii) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with multi-label thresholding to identify and characterize the solid phases in the microstructure, and (iv) nanoindentation to determine the component phase elastic properties using statistical deconvolution, is reported in this paper. The phase volume fractions and elastic properties are used in multi-step mean field homogenization (Mori- Tanaka and double inclusion) models to determine the homogenized macroscale elastic modulus of the composite. The homogenized elastic moduli are in good agreement with the flexural elastic modulus determined on macroscale paste beams. As a result, the combined use of microstructural and micromechanical characterization tools at multiple scales provides valuable information towards the material design of fly ash geopolymers.

  20. Modern fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, S.-I.

    The properties of fluids are examined, taking into account fluids and modern fluid mechanics, the properties of liquids and gases, the properties of a plasma, the kinetic theory of fluids, the Boltzmann-Maxwellian laws of distribution, atomic and molecular structures, specific heats, enthalpy, ionization, radiation, viscosity, rheology, heat transfer, and the mixture of fluids. Statics of fluids are considered along with the fundamentals of fluid dynamics, giving attention to flow regimes, the conservation of mass, the equation of continuity, diffusion equations, the stream function, equations of motion, Kelvin's theorem, equations of motion from the Lagrangian point of view, boundary conditions, and initial conditions. Other topics discussed are related to dimensional analysis and dynamics similarity, aerothermochemistry, magnetofluid dynamics and plasma dynamics, radiation gasdynamics, rarefied gasdynamics, non-Newtonian fluids, two-phase flows, the multifluid theory of a plasma, and relativistic fluid mechanics

  1. Postoperative fluid management

    PubMed Central

    Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Dinc, Tolga; Sozen, Isa; Bostanoglu, Akin; Cete, Mukerrem; Coskun, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative care units are run by an anesthesiologist or a surgeon, or a team formed of both. Management of postoperative fluid therapy should be done considering both patients’ status and intraoperative events. Types of the fluids, amount of the fluid given and timing of the administration are the main topics that determine the fluid management strategy. The main goal of fluid resuscitation is to provide adequate tissue perfusion without harming the patient. The endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction and fluid shift to extracellular compartment should be considered wisely. Fluid management must be done based on patient’s body fluid status. Patients who are responsive to fluids can benefit from fluid resuscitation, whereas patients who are not fluid responsive are more likely to suffer complications of over-hydration. Therefore, common use of central venous pressure measurement, which is proved to be inefficient to predict fluid responsiveness, should be avoided. Goal directed strategy is the most rational approach to assess the patient and maintain optimum fluid balance. However, accessible and applicable monitoring tools for determining patient’s actual fluid need should be further studied and universalized. The debate around colloids and crystalloids should also be considered with goal directed therapies. Advantages and disadvantages of each solution must be evaluated with the patient’s specific condition. PMID:26261771

  2. Homogeneity of passively ventilated waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Jensen, L.; Cromar, R.D.; Hayes, J.C.

    1997-07-01

    Gases and vapors in the high-level radioactive waste underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site are being characterized to help resolve waste storage safety issues and estimate air emissions. Characterization is accomplished by collecting and analyzing air samples from the headspaces of the tanks. Samples are generally collected from a single central location within the headspace, and it is assumed that they are representative of the entire headspace. The validity of this assumption appears to be very good for most tanks, because thermally induced convection currents within the headspaces mix constituents continuously. In the coolest waste tanks, however, thermally induced convection may be suppressed for several months of each year because of the seasonal soil temperature cycle. To determine whether composition does vary significantly with location in a cool tank, the headspaces of three waste tanks have been sampled at different horizontal and vertical locations during that part of the year when thermally induced convection is minimized. This report describes the bases for tank selection and the sampling and analytical methods used, then analyzes and discusses the results. Headspace composition data from two risers at three elevations in Tanks 241-B-103, TY-103, and U-112 have been analyzed by standard analysis of variance (ANOVA) methods, which indicate that these tank headspaces are essentially homogeneous. No stratification of denser vapors (e.g., carbon tetrachloride, dodecane) or lighter gases (e.g., ammonia, hydrogen) was detected in any of the three tanks. A qualitative examination of all tentatively identified organic vapors in SUMMA{trademark} and TST samples supported this conclusion.

  3. Cluster Mechanism of Homogeneous Crystallization (Computer Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belashchenko, D. K.

    2008-12-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) study of homogeneous crystallization of liquid rubidium is conducted with an inter-particle pair potential. The equilibrium crystallization temperature of the models was 313 K. Models consisted of 500, 998, and 1968 particles in a basic cube. The main investigation method was as follows: to detect (along the MD run) the atoms with Voronoi polyhedrons (VP) of 0608 type (“0608-atoms,” as in a bcc crystal) and to detect the bound groups of 0608-atoms (“0608-clusters”) that could play the role of the seeds in crystallization. Full crystallization was observed only at temperatures lower than 185 K with the creation of a predominant bcc crystal. The crystallization mechanism of Rb models differs drastically from the mechanism adopted in classical nucleation theory. It consists of the growth of the total number of 0608-atoms on cooling and the formation of 0608-clusters, analogous to the case of coagulation of solute for a supersaturated two-component solution. At the first stage of the process the clusters have a very loose structure (something like medusa or octopus with many tentacles) and include inside atoms with other Voronoi polyhedron types. The dimensions of clusters quickly increase and approach those of the basic cube. 0608-atoms play the leading role in the crystallization process and activate the transition of the atoms involved in the 0608-coordination. The fast growth of the maximum cluster begins after it attains a critical size (about 150 0608-atoms). The fluctuations of cluster sizes are very important in the creation of a 0608-cluster of critical (threshold) size. These fluctuations are especially large in the interval from 180 K to 185 K.

  4. Homogeneous and heterogenized iridium water oxidation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchioni, Alceo

    2014-10-01

    The development of an efficient catalyst for the oxidative splitting of water into molecular oxygen, protons and electrons is of key importance for producing solar fuels through artificial photosynthesis. We are facing the problem by means of a rational approach aimed at understanding how catalytic performance may be optimized by the knowledge of the reaction mechanism of water oxidation and the fate of the catalytic site under the inevitably harsh oxidative conditions. For the purposes of our study we selected iridium water oxidation catalysts, exhibiting remarkable performance (TOF > 5 s-1 and TON > 20000). In particular, we recently focused our attention on [Cp*Ir(N,O)X] (N,O = 2-pyridincarboxylate; X = Cl or NO3) and [IrCl(Hedta)]Na water oxidation catalysts. The former exhibited a remarkable TOF whereas the latter showed a very high TON. Furthermore, [IrCl(Hedta)]Na was heterogenized onto TiO2 taking advantage of the presence of a dandling -COOH functionality. The heterogenized catalyst maintained approximately the same catalytic activity of the homogeneous analogous with the advantage that could be reused many times. Mechanistic studies were performed in order to shed some light on the rate-determining step and the transformation of catalysts when exposed to "oxidative stress". It was found that the last oxidative step, preceding oxygen liberation, is the rate-determining step when a small excess of sacrificial oxidant is used. In addition, several intermediates of the oxidative transformation of the catalyst were intercepted and characterized by NMR, X-Ray diffractometry and ESI-MS.

  5. Line segments in homogeneous scalar turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauding, Michael; Goebbert, Jens Henrik; Hasse, Christian; Peters, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    The local structure of a turbulent scalar field in homogeneous isotropic turbulence is analyzed by direct numerical simulations (DNS) with different Taylor micro-scale based Reynolds numbers between 119 and 529. A novel signal decomposition approach is introduced where the signal of the scalar along a straight line is partitioned into segments based on the local extremal points of the scalar field. These segments are then parameterized by the distance ℓ between adjacent extremal points and the scalar difference Δϕ at the extrema. Both variables are statistical quantities and a joint distribution function of these quantities contains most information to statistically describe the scalar field. It is highlighted that the marginal distribution function of the length becomes independent of Reynolds number when normalized by the mean length ℓm. From a statistical approach, it is further shown that the mean length scales with the Kolmogorov length, which is also confirmed by DNS. For turbulent mixing, the scalar gradient plays a paramount role. Turbulent scalar fields are characterized by cliff-ramp-like structures manifesting the occurrence of localized large scalar gradients. To study turbulent mixing, a segment-based gradient is defined as Δϕ/ℓ. Joint statistics of the length and the segment-based gradient provide novel understanding of cliff-ramp-like structures. Ramp-like structures are unveiled by the asymmetry of the joint distribution function of the segment-based gradient and the length. Cliff-like structures are further analyzed by conditional statistics and it is shown from DNS that the width of cliffs scales with the Kolmogorov length scale.

  6. Climate Data Homogenization Using Edge Detection Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammann, A. C.; Rennermalm, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    The problem of climate data homogenization has predominantly been addressed by testing the likelihood of one or more breaks inserted into a given time series and modeling the mean to be stationary in between the breaks. We recast the same problem in a slightly different form: that of detecting step-like changes in noisy data, and observe that this problem has spawned a large number of approaches to its solution as the "edge detection" problem in image processing. With respect to climate data, we ask the question: How can we optimally separate step-like from smoothly-varying low-frequency signals? We study the hypothesis that the edge-detection approach makes better use of all information contained in the time series than the "traditional" approach (e.g. Caussinus and Mestre, 2004), which we base on several observations. 1) The traditional formulation of the problem reduces the available information from the outset to that contained in the test statistic. 2) The criterion of local steepness of the low-frequency variability, while at least hypothetically useful, is ignored. 3) The practice of using monthly data corresponds, mathematically, to applying a moving average filter (to reduce noise) and subsequent subsampling of the result; this subsampling reduces the amount of available information beyond what is necessary for noise reduction. Most importantly, the tradeoff between noise reduction (better with filters with wide support in the time domain) and localization of detected changes (better with filters with narrow support) is expressed in the well-known uncertainty principle and can be addressed optimally within a time-frequency framework. Unsurprisingly, a large number of edge-detection algorithms have been proposed that make use of wavelet decompositions and similar techniques. We are developing this framework in part to be applied to a particular set of climate data from Greenland; we will present results from this application as well as from tests with

  7. A study of the homogenization of soils

    SciTech Connect

    Giovine, L.R.S.; Miller, F.L. Jr.

    1993-06-01

    In accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) regulations, areas of land that have been contaminated must be returned to an environmental condition that permits less restrictive forms of use. In anticipation of being listed as an EPA Superfund Site, the United States Department of Energy`s (US DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS) is evaluating existing the technologies, and supporting the development of new technologies, for the removal of plutonium contaminants from soils. During the 1950s, DOE conducted a series of tests on the NTS wherein attempts were made to detonate nuclear weapons by igniting charges of high explosives packed around the weapons` warheads. While the warheads never achieved criticality, each test disseminated particulate plutonium over several square miles, principally in Area 11 of the NTS.DOE`s Nevada Operations Office has committed to a Plutonium In Soils Integrated Demonstration Project (PuID) to evaluate existing and developmental technologies for the safe removal of plutonium contamination from soils. It is DOE`s intention to provide approximately one ton of Area 11 soil, traced with a non-radioactive plutonium surrogate, to each of several companies with expertise in the removal of soil contaminants. These companies have expressed an interest in contracting with DOE for remediation of NTS soils. DOE wishes to evaluate each company`s process in an unbiased and statistically justifiable manner. For this reason, DOE must provide to each company a large sample of soil for prototype testing. The soil must be homogenized such that the representativeness of each split is well documented and defensible. The process of uniformly mixing large volumes of soil has not been addressed, to our knowledge, in the hydrogeologic, soil science or mining literature. Several mixing devices are currently being evaluated by DOE for use in the PuID. This report describes the results of some initial experimentation with a small cement mixer.

  8. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  9. Human Muscle Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The stimulus of gravity affects RNA production, which helps maintain the strength of human muscles on Earth (top), as seen in this section of muscle fiber taken from an astronaut before spaceflight. Astronauts in orbit and patients on Earth fighting muscle-wasting diseases need countermeasures to prevent muscle atrophy, indicated here with white lipid droplets (bottom) in the muscle sample taken from the same astronaut after spaceflight. Kerneth Baldwin of the University of California, Irvine, is conducting research on how reducing the stimulus of gravity affects production of the RNA that the body uses as a blueprint for making muscle proteins. Muscle proteins are what give muscles their strength, so when the RNA blueprints aren't available for producing new proteins to replace old ones -- a situation that occurs in microgravity -- the muscles atrophy. When the skeletal muscle system is exposed to microgravity during spaceflight, the muscles undergo a reduced mass that translates to a reduction in strength. When this happens, muscle endurance decreases and the muscles are more prone to injury, so individuals could have problems in performing extravehicular activity [space walks] or emergency egress because their bodies are functionally compromised.

  10. Homogenization of alloys in the system Al-Mg-Sc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drits, M. E.; Toropova, L. S.; Bykov, Yu. G.

    1983-07-01

    A reduction in homogenizing anneal temperature and a reduction in soaking time leads to an increase in yield point for alloys of the system Al-Mg-Sc. The optimum homogenizing schedule for alloys of this system is heating to 400°C and soaking for up to 10 h. This homogenizing schedule provides an alloy structure of fine coherent ScAl3-phase precipitates and dissolution of excess β-phase precipitates.

  11. Muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  12. A non-asymptotic homogenization theory for periodic electromagnetic structures

    PubMed Central

    Tsukerman, Igor; Markel, Vadim A.

    2014-01-01

    Homogenization of electromagnetic periodic composites is treated as a two-scale problem and solved by approximating the fields on both scales with eigenmodes that satisfy Maxwell's equations and boundary conditions as accurately as possible. Built into this homogenization methodology is an error indicator whose value characterizes the accuracy of homogenization. The proposed theory allows one to define not only bulk, but also position-dependent material parameters (e.g. in proximity to a physical boundary) and to quantify the trade-off between the accuracy of homogenization and its range of applicability to various illumination conditions. PMID:25104912

  13. Mechanized syringe homogenization of human and animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Kurien, Biji T; Porter, Andrew C; Patel, Nisha C; Kurono, Sadamu; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Scofield, R Hal

    2004-06-01

    Tissue homogenization is a prerequisite to any fractionation schedule. A plethora of hands-on methods are available to homogenize tissues. Here we report a mechanized method for homogenizing animal and human tissues rapidly and easily. The Bio-Mixer 1200 (manufactured by Innovative Products, Inc., Oklahoma City, OK) utilizes the back-and-forth movement of two motor-driven disposable syringes, connected to each other through a three-way stopcock, to homogenize animal or human tissue. Using this method, we were able to homogenize human or mouse tissues (brain, liver, heart, and salivary glands) in 5 min. From sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric enzyme assay for prolidase, we have found that the homogenates obtained were as good or even better than that obtained used a manual glass-on-Teflon (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) homogenization protocol (all-glass tube and Teflon pestle). Use of the Bio-Mixer 1200 to homogenize animal or human tissue precludes the need to stay in the cold room as is the case with the other hands-on homogenization methods available, in addition to freeing up time for other experiments.

  14. [Muscle crush injury and crush syndrome].

    PubMed

    Reingardienė, Dagmara; Jodžiūnienė, Liucija; Lažauskas, Robertas

    2010-01-01

    Crush injury is defined as compression of extremities or other parts of the body that causes muscle breakdown (traumatic rhabdomyolysis). Systemic consequences of crush injuries are as follows: rhabdomyolysis, electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities, hypovolemia, and acute renal failure. Crush injuries are important injuries in disaster situations: earthquakes, hurricanes, mining and road traffic accidents, war, collapse of buildings, etc. In this review article, there are discussed about epidemiology of crush syndrome, risk factors, pathophysiology (mechanisms of muscle cell injury, release of substances from injured muscles, other consequences of reperfusion), clinical features, differential diagnosis, investigations, complications (acute renal failure, hypovolemic shock, hyperkalemia, infection, compartment syndrome), approach to treatment (adequate rehydration, a forced mannitol-alkaline diuresis, intravenous fluids, management of hyperkalemia, wound care, hyperbaric oxygen, etc.), prognosis, the mortality rate and prevention (timely support may reduce morbidity and mortality).

  15. Healthy Muscles Matter

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep my muscles more healthy? Definitions What can go wrong? Injuries Almost everyone has had sore muscles ... If you have been inactive, “start low and go slow” by gradually increasing how often and how ...

  16. Eye muscle repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100062.htm Eye muscle repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... the eyeball to the eye socket. The external muscles of the eye are found behind the conjunctiva. ...

  17. Respiratory muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Katharine L; Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

    2005-07-28

    Plasticity of respiratory muscles must be considered in the context of their unique physiological demands. The continuous rhythmic activation of respiratory muscles makes them among the most active in the body. Respiratory muscles, especially the diaphragm, are non-weight-bearing, and thus, in contrast to limb muscles, are not exposed to gravitational effects. Perturbations in normal activation and load known to induce plasticity in limb muscles may not cause similar adaptations in respiratory muscles. In this review, we explore the structural and functional properties of the diaphragm muscle and their response to alterations in load and activity. Overall, relatively modest changes in diaphragm structural and functional properties occur in response to perturbations in load or activity. However, disruptions in the normal influence of phrenic innervation by frank denervation, tetrodotoxin nerve block and spinal hemisection, induce profound changes in the diaphragm, indicating the substantial trophic influence of phrenic motoneurons on diaphragm muscle.

  18. Experimental stretching of fluid inclusions in calcite—Implications for diagenetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prezbindowski, Dennis R.; Larese, Richard E.

    1987-04-01

    Homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions trapped in calcite crystals may change with increased heating beyond the homogenization temperature. Fluid inclusions trapped in calcite during basin subsidence will tend to yield homogenization temperatures approaching maximum burial temperatures. Diagenetic studies that depend on these data will be biased. Coarse crystalline calcite containing saline fluid inclusions was used to examine the influence of increased temperatures and pressures on measured homogenization temperatures. Stepped heating experiments were conducted at 1 atm, over a temperature range of 90 to 245 °C, along with hydrothermal experiments at confining pressures of 173 and 691 bar and temperatures of 160, 250, and 350 °C. In all cases, significant increases in the homogenization temperatures of the inclusion population were recorded. Presumably, stresses generated during heating of the fluid inclusions exceeded the combined strength of the calcite crystal and the external pore pressure and thus caused fluid-inclusion stretching. Size is a secondary factor that controls fluid-inclusion reequilibration.

  19. Metamaterials: supra-classical dynamic homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caleap, Mihai; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2015-12-01

    Metamaterials are artificial composite structures designed for controlling waves or fields, and exhibit interaction phenomena that are unexpected on the basis of their chemical constituents. These phenomena are encoded in effective material parameters that can be electronic, magnetic, acoustic, or elastic, and must adequately represent the wave interaction behavior in the composite within desired frequency ranges. In some cases—for example, the low frequency regime—there exist various efficient ways by which effective material parameters for wave propagation in metamaterials may be found. However, the general problem of predicting frequency-dependent dynamic effective constants has remained unsolved. Here, we obtain novel mathematical expressions for the effective parameters of two-dimensional metamaterial systems valid at higher frequencies and wavelengths than previously possible. By way of an example, random configurations of cylindrical scatterers are considered, in various physical contexts: sound waves in a compressible fluid, anti-plane elastic waves, and electromagnetic waves. Our results point towards a paradigm shift in our understanding of these effective properties, and metamaterial designs with functionalities beyond the low-frequency regime are now open for innovation. Dedicated with gratitude to the memory of Prof Yves C Angel.

  20. Fluid sampling pump

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.V.; Nimberger, M.; Ward, R.L.

    1991-12-24

    This patent describes a fluid sampling pump for withdrawing pressurized sample fluid from a flow line and for pumping a preselected quantity of sample fluid with each pump driving stroke from the pump to a sample vessel, the sampling pump including a pump body defining a pump bore therein having a central axis, a piston slideably moveable within the pump bore and having a fluid inlet end and an opposing operator end, a fluid sample inlet port open to sample fluid in the flow line, a fluid sample outlet port for transmitting fluid from the pump bore to the sample vessel, and a line pressure port in fluid pressure sample fluid in the flow line, an inlet valve for selectively controlling sample fluid flow from the flow line through the fluid sample inlet port, an operator unit for periodically reciprocating the piston within the pump bore, and a controller for regulating the stroke of the piston within the pump bore, and thereby the quantity of fluid pumped with each pump driving stroke. It comprises a balanced check valve seat; a balanced check valve seal; a compression member; and a central plunger.

  1. Transplantation of Devitalized Muscle Scaffolds is Insufficient for Appreciable De Novo Muscle Fiber Regeneration After Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-10

    the remaining muscle mass (50–100 mg). RNA was extracted using Trizol LS reagent (Invitrogen), and purified using RNeasy mini kit (Qiagen). The yield...was extracted as described previously (Corona et al. 2013c). The protein isolated from these tissues (n=5/ group) was probed for Collagen 1 (Abcam...Scientific). Proteins were resolved by SDS -PAGE using total protein from cell lysates (10 μg) and tissue homogenates (20 μg, Col1; 40 μg Pax7) on 4–20

  2. Propagation of the light generated by quasi-homogeneous sources through quasi-homogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Chen, Yan-Ru; Zhao, Qi; Zhou, Mu-Chun; Xu, Shi-Xue

    2010-01-01

    The spectral density of the quasi-homogeneous (QH) light has been known when it scatters on QH media or propagates in free space. The case that QH sources are surrounded by QH media is proposed in this paper. Under the paraxial approximation, the spectral density of the QH light propagating through QH media is derived. A modified scaling law for the propagation of the QH light through QH media is also obtained. This law also holds true in the far field beyond the paraxial approximation.

  3. Vertically homogeneous stationary tornado-type vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkevich, P. B.; Rutkevych, P. P.

    2010-05-01

    Tornado is regarded as one of the most dangerous atmosphere phenomena. The tornado phenomenon has been intensively studied so far, however, there is still no established and accepted theory of how tornadoes form, an uncertainty still exists concerning extreme winds and pressure drops in tornadoes. It is commonly accepted that it is possible to describe tornado from the set of nonlinear hydrodynamical equations, however, it is still unclear which non-linear processes are responsible for its formation. Nonlinear terms in the system are associated with either centrifugal force, or entropy transport, or transport of humidity. It appears that the amount and spatial distribution of precipitation with the convection are important indicators of the weather phenomena associated with a particular storm. The low-precipitation supercells that produce relatively little precipitation and yet show clear visual signs of rotation. Low-precipitation supercells occur most often near the surface dryline and, owing to the sparse precipitation and relatively dry environments with little cloudiness. Low-precipitation storms are frequently non-tornadic and many are non-severe despite exhibiting persistent rotation. On the other hand, the so-called high-precipitation storms are characterized by substantial precipitation within their mesocyclonic circulations. When high-precipitation storms have a recognizable hook radar echo, reflectivity in the hook is comparable to those in the precipitation core. High-precipitation supercells are probably the most common form of supercell and produce severe weather of all types including tornadoes. Therefore, in this work we consider a hydrodynamic system with only one nonlinear term associated with atmosphere humidity, which yields energy to the system. The tornado vortex is usually to a good approximation cylindrical so we use cylindrical geometry and homogeneity in vertical direction. In this case the problem reduces to a system of ordinary

  4. Muscle Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth; Feeback, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Presentations from the assembled group of investigators involved in specific research projeects related to skeletal muscle in space flight can categorized in thematic subtopics: regulation of contractile protein phenotypes, muscle growth and atrophy, muscle structure: injury, recovery,and regeneration, metabolism and fatigue, and motor control and loading factors.

  5. Muscle Session Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth; Feeback, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Presentations from the assembled group of investigators involved in specific research projeects related to skeletal muscle in space flight can categorized in thematic subtopics: regulation of contractile protein phenotypes, muscle growth and atrophy, muscle structure: injury, recovery,and regeneration, metabolism and fatigue, and motor control and loading factors.

  6. Near-critical point phenomena in fluids (19-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beysens, D.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the effects of gravity is essential if the behavior of fluids is to be predicted in spacecraft and orbital stations, and, more generally, to give a better understanding of the hydrodynamics in these systems. An understanding is sought of the behavior of fluids in space. What should emerge from the International Microgravity Lab (IML-1) mission is a better understanding of the kinetics of growth in off-critical conditions, in both liquid mixtures and pure fluids. This complex phenomenon is the object of intensive study in physics and materials sciences area. It is also expected that the IML-1 flight will procure key results to provide a better understanding of how a pure fluid can be homogenized without gravity induced convections, and to what extent the 'Piston Effect' is effective in thermalizing the compressible fluids.

  7. Diffusion in Homogeneous and in Inhomogeneous Media: A New Unified Approach.

    PubMed

    Mercier Franco, Luís Fernando; Castier, Marcelo; Economou, Ioannis G

    2016-11-08

    We propose a new method to calculate the diffusion coefficient within molecular dynamics simulations for either homogeneous or inhomogeneous fluids. We formulate such method by solving analytically the Smoluchowski equation for a linear potential of mean force within a thin layer with absorbing boundary conditions. The bulk, or homogeneous, fluid diffusion emerges as a particular case in this approach. We apply this method to bulk liquid water at atmospheric pressure and different temperatures using the SPC/E water force field. We show that our method gives results as accurate as the traditional Einstein-Smoluchowski method, avoiding the fitting procedure required in the traditional method. We also apply this method for molten sodium chloride showing its applicability for multicomponent systems. The water vapor-liquid interface is studied as an example of an inhomogeneous system. We calculate all the components of the diffusion tensor at the interface. We observe the same anisotropy between the perpendicular and the parallel components at the interface as it has been noted in the literature. We also calculate the perpendicular self-diffusion coefficient of methane near the calcite surface showing that this coefficient is much lower than the parallel diffusion coefficients. We believe that this new unified approach is a very promising technique for both bulk and confined media.

  8. Prevention of metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Rats were subjected to tail-cast suspension hypokinesia for 6 days with one leg immobilized in dorsal flexion by casting. Control animals were also tail-casted. The soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles of uncasted hypokinetic legs were smaller than control muscles. Dorsal flexion prevented atrophy of these muscles and caused the soleus to hypertrophy. The anterior muscles were unaffected by hypokinesia. The smaller size of the soleus of the uncasted leg relative to the dorsal flexed and weight bearing limbs correlated with slower protein synthesis and faster proteolysis. The capacity of this muscle to synthesize glutamine (gln), which carries nitrogenous waste from muscle was also measured. Although tissue homogenates showed higher activities of gln synthetase, the rate of de novo synthesis was not altered in intact muscle but the tissue ratio of gln/glutamate was decreased. Glutamate and ATP were not limiting for gln synthesis, but availability of ammonia may be a limiting factor for this process in hypokinesia.

  9. Prevention of metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Rats were subjected to tail-cast suspension hypokinesia for 6 days with one leg immobilized in dorsal flexion by casting. Control animals were also tail-casted. The soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles of uncasted hypokinetic legs were smaller than control muscles. Dorsal flexion prevented atrophy of these muscles and caused the soleus to hypertrophy. The anterior muscles were unaffected by hypokinesia. The smaller size of the soleus of the uncasted leg relative to the dorsal flexed and weight bearing limbs correlated with slower protein synthesis and faster proteolysis. The capacity of this muscle to synthesize glutamine (gln), which carries nitrogenous waste from muscle was also measured. Although tissue homogenates showed higher activities of gln synthetase, the rate of de novo synthesis was not altered in intact muscle but the tissue ratio of gln/glutamate was decreased. Glutamate and ATP were not limiting for gln synthesis, but availability of ammonia may be a limiting factor for this process in hypokinesia.

  10. Substitute fluid examinations for liquid manure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Kevin; Riedel, Marco; Eichert, Helmut

    For the farming industry it is essential to use liquid manure as natural fertilizer. Through new agricultural regulation 2015 in Germany the industry must develop new liquid manure spreader systems because the ammonia and methane emission are limited. In a research project the University of Applied Sciences Zwickau and some other industry partners will develop such a new innovative liquid manure spreader. The new liquid manure spreader should use pulsating air to distribute the liquid manure exactly. The pulsating air, which flows through the pipelines, should be analysed at a test station. For examinations at this test station it is important to find another substitute fluid because liquid manure smells strong, is not transparent and is also not homogeneous enough for scientific investigations. Furthermore it is important to ensure that the substitute fluid is, like liquid manure, a non-Newtonian fluid. The substitute fluid must be a shear-thinning substance - this means the viscosity decrease at higher shear rate. Many different samples like soap-water-farragoes, jelly-water-farragoes, agar-water-farragoes, soap-ethanol-farragoes and more are, for the project, examined in regard of their physical properties to find the best substitute fluid. The samples are examined at the rotational viscometer for viscosity at various shear rates and then compared with the viscosity values of liquid manure.

  11. Substitute fluid examinations for liquid manure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Kevin; Riedel, Marco; Eichert, Helmut

    2016-11-01

    For the farming industry it is essential to use liquid manure as natural fertilizer. Through new agricultural regulation 2015 in Germany the industry must develop new liquid manure spreader systems because the ammonia and methane emission are limited. In a research project the University of Applied Sciences Zwickau and some other industry partners will develop such a new innovative liquid manure spreader. The new liquid manure spreader should use pulsating air to distribute the liquid manure exactly. The pulsating air, which flows through the pipelines, should be analysed at a test station. For examinations at this test station it is important to find another substitute fluid because liquid manure smells strong, is not transparent and is also not homogeneous enough for scientific investigations. Furthermore it is important to ensure that the substitute fluid is, like liquid manure, a non-Newtonian fluid. The substitute fluid must be a shear-thinning substance - this means the viscosity decrease at higher shear rate. Many different samples like soap-water-farragoes, jelly-water-farragoes, agar-water-farragoes, soap-ethanol-farragoes and more are, for the project, examined in regard of their physical properties to find the best substitute fluid. The samples are examined at the rotational viscometer for viscosity at various shear rates and then compared with the viscosity values of liquid manure.

  12. Morphogenetic implications of peristaltic fluid-tissue dynamics in the embryonic lung.

    PubMed

    Bokka, Kishore K; Jesudason, Edwin C; Warburton, David; Lubkin, Sharon R

    2015-10-07

    Peristalsis begins in the lung as soon as the smooth muscle forms, and persists until birth. Since the prenatal lung is liquid-filled, smooth muscle action can deform tissues and transport fluid far from the immediately adjacent tissues. Stretching of embryonic tissues and sensation of internal fluid flows have been shown to have potent morphogenetic effects. We hypothesize that these effects are at work in lung morphogenesis. To place that hypothesis in a quantitative framework, we analyze a model of the fluid-structure interactions between embryonic tissues and lumen fluid resulting from peristaltic waves that partially occlude the airway. We find that if the airway is closed, deformations are synchronized; by contrast, if the trachea is open, maximal occlusion precedes maximal pressure. We perform a parametric analysis of how occlusion, stretch, and flow depend on tissue stiffnesses, smooth muscle force, tissue shape and size, and fluid viscosity. We find that most of these relationships are governed by simple ratios.

  13. The Suppression of the Late After-Potential in Rubidium-Containing Frog Muscle Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Hellam, D. C.; Goldstein, D. A.; Peachey, L. D.; Freygang, W. H.

    1965-01-01

    The late after-potential that follows trains of impulses in frog muscle fibers is virtually absent when most of the intracellular potassium is replaced by rubidium and the muscle is immersed in rubidium-containing Ringer's fluid. Its amplitude is also reduced in freshly dissected, potassium-containing muscle fibers that are immersed directly in Rb-Ringer's fluid. These findings are discussed in terms of the model for muscle membrane of Adrian and Freygang (1962 a, b) and in relation to the report of Adrian (1964) that Rb-containing muscle fibers do not exhibit the variations in potassium permeability as a function of membrane potential that are found in fibers with normal intracellular potassium concentration immersed in Ringer's fluid. PMID:5855505

  14. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-01-01

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  15. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOEpatents

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-07-06

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  16. Electric fluid pump

    DOEpatents

    Van Dam, Jeremy Daniel; Turnquist, Norman Arnold; Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Shen, Xiaochun

    2015-09-29

    An electric machine is presented. The electric machine includes a hollow rotor; and a stator disposed within the hollow rotor, the stator defining a flow channel. The hollow rotor includes a first end portion defining a fluid inlet, a second end portion defining a fluid outlet; the fluid inlet, the fluid outlet, and the flow channel of the stator being configured to allow passage of a fluid from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet via the flow channel; and wherein the hollow rotor is characterized by a largest cross-sectional area of hollow rotor, and wherein the flow channel is characterized by a smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel, wherein the smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel is at least about 25% of the largest cross-sectional area of the hollow rotor. An electric fluid pump and a power generation system are also presented.

  17. Pericardial fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003720.htm Pericardial fluid culture To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pericardial fluid culture is a test performed on a sample of ...

  18. Pleural fluid smear

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  19. Peritoneal fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... at fluid that has built up in the space in the abdomen around the internal organs. This area is called the peritoneal space. ... sample of fluid is removed from the peritoneal space using a needle and syringe. Your health care ...

  20. Pericardial fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... staining a sample of fluid taken from the pericardium. This is the sac surrounding the heart to ... sample of fluid will be taken from the pericardium. This is done through a procedure called pericardiocentesis . ...

  1. Amniotic fluid (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid surrounds the growing fetus in the womb and protects the fetus from injury and temperature changes. It ... fetal movement and permits musculoskeletal development. The amniotic fluid can be withdrawn in a procedure called amniocentsis ...

  2. Fluid sampling tool

    DOEpatents

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  3. A homogenized constrained mixture (and mechanical analog) model for growth and remodeling of soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Cyron, C J; Aydin, R C; Humphrey, J D

    2016-12-01

    Most mathematical models of the growth and remodeling of load-bearing soft tissues are based on one of two major approaches: a kinematic theory that specifies an evolution equation for the stress-free configuration of the tissue as a whole or a constrained mixture theory that specifies rates of mass production and removal of individual constituents within stressed configurations. The former is popular because of its conceptual simplicity, but relies largely on heuristic definitions of growth; the latter is based on biologically motivated micromechanical models, but suffers from higher computational costs due to the need to track all past configurations. In this paper, we present a temporally homogenized constrained mixture model that combines advantages of both classical approaches, namely a biologically motivated micromechanical foundation, a simple computational implementation, and low computational cost. As illustrative examples, we show that this approach describes well both cell-mediated remodeling of tissue equivalents in vitro and the growth and remodeling of aneurysms in vivo. We also show that this homogenized constrained mixture model suggests an intimate relationship between models of growth and remodeling and viscoelasticity. That is, important aspects of tissue adaptation can be understood in terms of a simple mechanical analog model, a Maxwell fluid (i.e., spring and dashpot in series) in parallel with a "motor element" that represents cell-mediated mechanoregulation of extracellular matrix. This analogy allows a simple implementation of homogenized constrained mixture models within commercially available simulation codes by exploiting available models of viscoelasticity.

  4. [Intrarenal smooth muscle: histology of a complex urodymamic machine].

    PubMed

    Arias, L F; Ortiz-Arango, N

    2013-03-01

    To know better the microscopic arrangement of the bundles of smooth muscle in the human renal parenchyma, their distribution and anatomical relationships, trying to make a reconstruction of this muscular system. Five adult human kidneys and one fetal kidney were processed "in toto" with cross sections every 300μm. In the histological sections we identify the smooth muscle fibers trying to determine its insertion, course and anatomical relationship with other structures of the kidney tissue. There are bundles of smooth muscle fibers of variable thickness parallel to the edges of the medullary pyramids, bundles that surrounding the medulla in a spiral course, and bundles that accompany arcuate vessels, the latter being the most abundant and easy to identify. These groups of muscle fibers do not have a precise or constant insertion site, their periodicity is not homogeneous and they are not a direct extension of the muscle of the renal pelvis, although some bundles are in contact with it. There are also unusual and inconstant small muscle fibers no associated to vessels in the interstitium of the cortex and, exceptionally, in the medulla. There is a complex microscopic system of smooth muscle fibers that partially surround the renal medulla and are related to renal pelvic muscles without a direct continuity with them. Although this small muscular system is under-recognized, could be very important in urodynamics. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Fluid force transducer

    DOEpatents

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  6. EDQNM closure: A homogeneous simulation to support it. A quasi-homogeneous simulation to disprove it

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertoglio, J. P.; Squires, K.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    It is known that two-point closures are useful tools for understanding and predicting turbulence. Among the various closures, the Eddy Damped Quasi-Normal Markovian (EDQNM) approach is one of the simplest and, at the same time, most useful. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) can provide information that can be used to test the validity of two-point theories. It is the purpose of the present work to use DNS to validate, or improve upon, EDQNM. A case was selected for which EDQNM is known to give satisfactory results: homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Quantities were then evaluated which may be used to test the assumptions of two-point closure approximations: spectral Lagrangian time scales. The goal was to make a careful and refined study to validate the EDQNM theory. A reference case was built for which EDQNM is likely to give poor results. An attempt to generate a quasi-homogeneous turbulent field containing organized structures, was built by artifically injecting them in the initial conditions. The results of direct simulations using such initial conditions are expected to provide a challenge for EDQNM since this kind of field is simple enough to allow comparisons with two-point theories, but at the same time contains coherent structures which cannot be expected to be accurately accounted for by closures based on expansions about Gaussianity.

  7. Pi overlapping ring systems contained in a homogeneous assay: a novel homogeneous assay for antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, David A.

    1993-05-01

    A novel immunoassay, Pi overlapping ring systems contained in a homogeneous assay (PORSCHA), is described. This assay relies upon the change in fluorescent spectral properties that pyrene and its derivatives show with varying concentration. Because antibodies and other biomolecules can bind two molecules simultaneously, they can change the local concentration of the molecules that they bind. This concentration change may be detected spectrally as a change in the fluorescence emission wavelength of an appropriately labeled biomolecule. Several tests of PORSCHA have been performed which demonstrate this principle. For example: with streptavidin as the binding biomolecule and a biotin labeled pyrene derivative, the production of the excimer emitting at 470 nm is observed. Without the streptavidin present, only the monomer emitting at 378 and 390 nm is observed. The ratio of monomer to excimer provides the concentration of unlabeled biotin in the sample. Approximately 1 ng/mL of biotin may be detected with this system using a 50 (mu) l sample (2 X 10-16 moles biotin). The principles behind PORSCHA, the results with the streptavidin/biotin system are discussed and extensions of the PORSCHA concept to antibodies as the binding partner and DNA in homogeneous assays are suggested.

  8. Feeding premature infants banked human milk homogenized by ultrasonic treatment.

    PubMed

    Rayol, M R; Martinez, F E; Jorge, S M; Gonçalves, A L; Desai, I D

    1993-12-01

    Premature neonates fed ultrasonically homogenized human milk had better weight gain and triceps skin-fold thickness than did a control group given untreated human milk (p < 0.01) and also had lower fat loss during tube feeding (p < 0.01). Ultrasonic homogenization of human milk appears to minimize loss of fat and thus allows better growth of premature infants.

  9. Sensitivity of liquid clouds to homogenous freezing parameterizations

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Ross J; Murray, Benjamin J; Dobbie, Steven J; Koop, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Water droplets in some clouds can supercool to temperatures where homogeneous ice nucleation becomes the dominant freezing mechanism. In many cloud resolving and mesoscale models, it is assumed that homogeneous ice nucleation in water droplets only occurs below some threshold temperature typically set at −40°C. However, laboratory measurements show that there is a finite rate of nucleation at warmer temperatures. In this study we use a parcel model with detailed microphysics to show that cloud properties can be sensitive to homogeneous ice nucleation as warm as −30°C. Thus, homogeneous ice nucleation may be more important for cloud development, precipitation rates, and key cloud radiative parameters than is often assumed. Furthermore, we show that cloud development is particularly sensitive to the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate. In order to better constrain the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation laboratory measurements are needed at both high (>−35°C) and low (<−38°C) temperatures. Key Points Homogeneous freezing may be significant as warm as −30°C Homogeneous freezing should not be represented by a threshold approximation There is a need for an improved parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation PMID:26074652

  10. Fluid Movement and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepian, Michael L.; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation,…

  11. Fluid Movement and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slepian, Michael L.; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive scientists describe creativity as fluid thought. Drawing from findings on gesture and embodied cognition, we hypothesized that the physical experience of fluidity, relative to nonfluidity, would lead to more fluid, creative thought. Across 3 experiments, fluid arm movement led to enhanced creativity in 3 domains: creative generation,…

  12. Oxidative Metabolism in Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, M.; Binzoni, T.; Quaresima, V.

    1997-06-01

    Oxidative metabolism is the dominant source of energy for skeletal muscle. Near-infrared spectroscopy allows the non-invasive measurement of local oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption. Although several muscle studies have been made using various near-infrared optical techniques, it is still difficult to interpret the local muscle metabolism properly. The main findings of near-infrared spectroscopy muscle studies in human physiology and clinical medicine are summarized. The advantages and problems of near-infrared spectroscopy measurements, in resting and exercising skeletal muscles studies, are discussed through some representative examples.

  13. Surface activity of Janus particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces: Theoretical and experimental aspects.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel; Rodriguez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, Miguel Angel; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2016-07-01

    Since de Gennes coined in 1992 the term Janus particle (JP), there has been a continued effort to develop this field. The purpose of this review is to present the most relevant theoretical and experimental results obtained so far on the surface activity of amphiphilic JPs at fluid interfaces. The surface activity of JPs at fluid-fluid interfaces can be experimentally determined using two different methods: the classical Langmuir balance or the pendant drop tensiometry. The second method requires much less amount of sample than the first one, but it has also some experimental limitations. In all cases collected here the JPs exhibited a higher surface or interfacial activity than the corresponding homogeneous particles. This reveals the significant advantage of JPs for the stabilization of emulsions and foams.

  14. Nonlinear Boltzmann equation for the homogeneous isotropic case: Some improvements to deterministic methods and applications to relaxation towards local equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asinari, P.

    2011-03-01

    Boltzmann equation is one the most powerful paradigms for explaining transport phenomena in fluids. Since early fifties, it received a lot of attention due to aerodynamic requirements for high altitude vehicles, vacuum technology requirements and nowadays, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMs). Because of the intrinsic mathematical complexity of the problem, Boltzmann himself started his work by considering first the case when the distribution function does not depend on space (homogeneous case), but only on time and the magnitude of the molecular velocity (isotropic collisional integral). The interest with regards to the homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation goes beyond simple dilute gases. In the so-called econophysics, a Boltzmann type model is sometimes introduced for studying the distribution of wealth in a simple market. Another recent application of the homogeneous isotropic Boltzmann equation is given by opinion formation modeling in quantitative sociology, also called socio-dynamics or sociophysics. The present work [1] aims to improve the deterministic method for solving homogenous isotropic Boltzmann equation proposed by Aristov [2] by two ideas: (a) the homogeneous isotropic problem is reformulated first in terms of particle kinetic energy (this allows one to ensure exact particle number and energy conservation during microscopic collisions) and (b) a DVM-like correction (where DVM stands for Discrete Velocity Model) is adopted for improving the relaxation rates (this allows one to satisfy exactly the conservation laws at macroscopic level, which is particularly important for describing the late dynamics in the relaxation towards the equilibrium).

  15. Simulation of homogeneous condensation of small polyatomic systems in high pressure supersonic nozzle flows using Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook model.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Levin, Deborah A

    2011-03-28

    In the present work, we have simulated the homogeneous condensation of carbon dioxide and ethanol using the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook based approach. In an earlier work of Gallagher-Rogers et al. [J. Thermophys. Heat Transfer 22, 695 (2008)], it was found that it was not possible to simulate condensation experiments of Wegener et al. [Phys. Fluids 15, 1869 (1972)] using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Therefore, in this work, we have used the statistical Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook approach, which was found to be numerically more efficient than direct simulation Monte Carlo method in our previous studies [Kumar et al., AIAA J. 48, 1531 (2010)], to model homogeneous condensation of two small polyatomic systems, carbon dioxide and ethanol. A new weighting scheme is developed in the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook framework to reduce the computational load associated with the study of homogeneous condensation flows. The solutions obtained by the use of the new scheme are compared with those obtained by the baseline Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook condensation model (without the species weighting scheme) for the condensing flow of carbon dioxide in the stagnation pressure range of 1-5 bars. Use of the new weighting scheme in the present work makes the simulation of homogeneous condensation of ethanol possible. We obtain good agreement between our simulated predictions for homogeneous condensation of ethanol and experiments in terms of the point of condensation onset and the distribution of mass fraction of ethanol condensed along the nozzle centerline.

  16. Fibrations and globalizations of compact homogeneous CR-manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilligan, B.; Huckleberry, Alan T.

    2009-06-01

    Fibration methods which were previously used for complex homogeneous spaces and CR-homogeneous spaces of special types [1]-[4] are developed in a general framework. These include the \\mathfrak{g}-anticanonical fibration in the CR-setting, which reduces certain considerations to the compact projective algebraic case, where a Borel-Remmert type splitting theorem is proved. This leads to a reduction to spaces homogeneous under actions of compact Lie groups. General globalization theorems are proved which enable one to regard a homogeneous CR-manifold as an orbit of a real Lie group in a complex homogeneous space of a complex Lie group. In the special case of CR-codimension at most two, precise classification results are proved and are applied to show that in most cases there exists such a globalization.

  17. Sensitivity of liquid clouds to homogenous freezing parameterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, Ross J.; Murray, Benjamin J.; Dobbie, Steven J.; Koop, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Water droplets in some clouds can supercool to temperatures where homogeneous ice nucleation becomes the dominant freezing mechanism. In many cloud resolving and mesoscale models, it is assumed that homogeneous ice nucleation in water droplets only occurs below some threshold temperature typically set at -40°C. However, laboratory measurements show that there is a finite rate of nucleation at warmer temperatures. In this study we use a parcel model with detailed microphysics to show that cloud properties can be sensitive to homogeneous ice nucleation as warm as -30°C. Thus, homogeneous ice nucleation may be more important for cloud development, precipitation rates, and key cloud radiative parameters than is often assumed. Furthermore, we show that cloud development is particularly sensitive to the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate. In order to better constrain the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation laboratory measurements are needed at both high (>-35°C) and low (<-38°C) temperatures.

  18. Sensitivity of liquid clouds to homogenous freezing parameterizations.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Ross J; Murray, Benjamin J; Dobbie, Steven J; Koop, Thomas

    2015-03-16

    Water droplets in some clouds can supercool to temperatures where homogeneous ice nucleation becomes the dominant freezing mechanism. In many cloud resolving and mesoscale models, it is assumed that homogeneous ice nucleation in water droplets only occurs below some threshold temperature typically set at -40°C. However, laboratory measurements show that there is a finite rate of nucleation at warmer temperatures. In this study we use a parcel model with detailed microphysics to show that cloud properties can be sensitive to homogeneous ice nucleation as warm as -30°C. Thus, homogeneous ice nucleation may be more important for cloud development, precipitation rates, and key cloud radiative parameters than is often assumed. Furthermore, we show that cloud development is particularly sensitive to the temperature dependence of the nucleation rate. In order to better constrain the parameterization of homogeneous ice nucleation laboratory measurements are needed at both high (>-35°C) and low (<-38°C) temperatures.

  19. Turbulent Diffusion in Non-Homogeneous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, M.; Redondo, J. M.; Mahjoub, O. B.; Sekula, E.

    2012-04-01

    Many experimental studies have been devoted to the understanding of non-homogeneous turbulent dynamics. Activity in this area intensified when the basic Kolmogorov self-similar theory was extended to two-dimensional or quasi 2D turbulent flows such as those appearing in the environment, that seem to control mixing [1,2]. The statistical description and the dynamics of these geophysical flows depend strongly on the distribution of long lived organized (coherent) structures. These flows show a complex topology, but may be subdivided in terms of strongly elliptical domains (high vorticity regions), strong hyperbolic domains (deformation cells with high energy condensations) and the background turbulent field of moderate elliptic and hyperbolic characteristics. It is of fundamental importance to investigate the different influence of these topological diverse regions. Relevant geometrical information of different areas is also given by the maximum fractal dimension, which is related to the energy spectrum of the flow. Using all the available information it is possible to investigate the spatial variability of the horizontal eddy diffusivity K(x,y). This information would be very important when trying to model numerically the behaviour in time of the oil spills [3,4] There is a strong dependence of horizontal eddy diffusivities with the Wave Reynolds number as well as with the wind stress measured as the friction velocity from wind profiles measured at the coastline. Natural sea surface oily slicks of diverse origin (plankton, algae or natural emissions and seeps of oil) form complicated structures in the sea surface due to the effects of both multiscale turbulence and Langmuir circulation. It is then possible to use the topological and scaling analysis to discriminate the different physical sea surface processes. We can relate higher orden moments of the Lagrangian velocity to effective diffusivity in spite of the need to calibrate the different regions determining the

  20. Atrophy of rat skeletal muscles in simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, D. D.; Ginoza, H. S.; Morey, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    A hypokinetic rat model was used for elucidation of the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting which occurs in weightlessness. Rats were suspended from a back-harness with the head tilted downward and the hind limbs totally unloaded. A progressive decrease in the size of the soleus muscle from suspended rats was observed as a function of time. The rate of protein degradation of the homogenates from the soleus muscles of suspended and control animals was not significantly different. The rate of cell-free protein synthesis was severely repressed in the atrophied muscle. An initial rise in the levels of plasma glucose and corticosterone was observed on the second day of suspension, but they subsequently returned to normal values.

  1. Atrophy of rat skeletal muscles in simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feller, D. D.; Ginoza, H. S.; Morey, E. R.

    1982-01-01

    A hypokinetic rat model was used for elucidation of the mechanism of skeletal muscle wasting which occurs in weightlessness. Rats were suspended from a back-harness with the head tilted downward and the hind limbs totally unloaded. A progressive decrease in the size of the soleus muscle from suspended rats was observed as a function of time. The rate of protein degradation of the homogenates from the soleus muscles of suspended and control animals was not significantly different. The rate of cell-free protein synthesis was severely repressed in the atrophied muscle. An initial rise in the levels of plasma glucose and corticosterone was observed on the second day of suspension, but they subsequently returned to normal values.

  2. Improved mechanism for capturing muscle power for circulatory support.

    PubMed

    Trumble, Dennis R; Melvin, David B; Byrne, Mark T; Magovern, James A

    2005-09-01

    Although it is now understood that trained skeletal muscle can generate enough steady-state power to provide significant circulatory support, there are currently no means by which to tap this endogenous energy source to aid the failing heart. To that end, an implantable muscle energy converter (MEC) has been constructed and its function has been improved to optimize durability, anatomic fit, and mechanical efficiency. Bench tests show that MEC transmission losses average less than 10% of total work input and that about 85% of this muscle power is successfully transferred to the working fluid of the pump. Results from canine implant trials confirm excellent biocompatibility and demonstrate that contractile work of the latissimus dorsi muscle-measured to 290 mJ/stroke in one dog-can be transmitted within the body at levels consistent with cardiac assist requirements. These findings suggest that muscle-powered cardiac assist devices are feasible and that efforts to further develop this technology are warranted.

  3. Density Stratification in Rotating Spherical Fluid Shells: Application to the Earth's Fluid Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamruzzaman, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's outer core is a rotating ellipsoidal shell of compressible, stratified and self-gravitating fluid. The Galerkin method is applied to study the effects of density stratification on the frequencies of the inertial modes for a compressible shell proportional to the realistic Earth's fluid core. The inertial modes of the core are the free oscillations with periods longer than half of a day and have the Coriolis force as their restoring force. Historically an incompressible and homogeneous fluid sphere is considered to study these modes and analytical solutions are known for the frequencies and the displacement eigenfunctions of this model. The three potential description (3PD) is used to a compressible and stratified fluid core model with different stratification parameters β, related to the local Brunt-Väisälä frequency. As a first approximation, however, we ignore the ellipticity of the core's figure. The 3PD scheme describes the exact linearized dynamics of rotating, self-gravitating, stratified, compressible and inviscid fluids. We show that, depending on the size of β, some modal frequencies and eigenfunctions are practically unaffected by stratification, some are changed and some modes may disappear. We also first derive the web of characteristics, which gives more information about the eigenfunctions of these modes, as functions of frequency and stratification for compressible and inviscid fluids.

  4. Stable isotope study of fluid inclusions in fluorite from Idaho: implications for continental climates during the Eocene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, R.R.; Rye, R.O.

    1993-01-01

    Isotopic studies of fluid inclusions from meteoric water-dominated epithermal ore deposits offer a unique opportunity to study paleoclimates because the fluids can provide direct samples of ancient waters. Fluorite-hosted fluid inclusions from the Eocene (51-50 Ma) epithermal deposits of the Bayhorse mining district, have low salinities and low to moderate homogenization temperatures indicating meteoric origins for the fluids. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope data on inclusion fluids are almost identical to those of modern meteoric waters in the area. The equivalence of the isotope composition of the Eocene inclusion fluids and modern meteoric waters indicates that the Eocene climatic conditions were similar to those today. -from Authors

  5. Goal directed fluid therapy.

    PubMed

    Marik, Paul E; Desai, Himanshu

    2012-01-01

    The cornerstone of treating patients with shock remains as it has for decades, intravenous fluids. Surprisingly, dosing intravenous fluid during resuscitation of shock remains largely empirical. Recent data suggests that early aggressive resuscitation of critically ill patients may limit and/or reverse tissue hypoxia, progression to organ failure and improve outcome. However, overzealous fluid resuscitation has been associated with increased complications, increased length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay and increased mortality. This review focuses on methods to assess fluid responsiveness and the application of these methods for goal directed fluid therapy in critically ill and peri-operative patients.

  6. Inflammatory Muscle Disease: A New Landscape.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Alain; Lannes, Béatrice; Goetz, Joëlle; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Lipsker, Dan; Arnaud, Laurent; Martin, Thierry; Gottenberg, Jacques Eric; Geny, Bernard; Sibilia, Jean

    2017-03-22

    Greater accuracy in clinical descriptions combined with advances in muscle histology and immunology have established that inflammatory muscle diseases (IMDs) resemble inflammatory joint diseases in that they constitute a highly heterogeneous group of conditions. The topographic distribution, severity, and tempo of onset vary widely, and the histological findings distinguish at least five different profiles, which may reflect different pathophysiological processes. Most IMDs are connective tissue diseases that can affect multiple organs, among which the most common targets are the skin, joints, and lungs. The extramuscular manifestations may antedate the muscular involvement and should therefore suggest a diagnosis of IMD even in the absence of obvious muscle disease. About 20 different autoantibodies have been identified in patients with IMD. Some are mutually exclusive and associated with specific combinations of clinical manifestations. Following the model of antisynthetase syndrome, about 10 syndromes associated with autoantibodies specific of IMD have been identified. Thus, polymyositis is now emerging as a rare entity that is often mistaken for more recently described patterns of IMD. No consensus exists to date about the classification of IMDs. Nevertheless, the clinical manifestations, autoantibody profile, and muscle histology can be used to distinguish patient subgroups with fairly homogeneous patterns of complications, treatment responses, and outcomes. These subgroups are also characterized by specific genetic and environmental factors. The advances made in the nosology of IMDs have benefited the diagnosis, personalization of treatment strategies, and understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms. They can be expected to assist in the development of specific treatments.

  7. Thermoelectric Generation Using Counter-Flows of Ideal Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangning; Lu, Baiyi; Zhu, Miaoyong; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2017-08-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) performance of a three-dimensional (3-D) TE module is examined by exposing it between a pair of counter-flows of ideal fluids. The ideal fluids are thermal sources of TE module flow in the opposite direction at the same flow rate and generate temperature differences on the hot and cold surfaces due to their different temperatures at the channel inlet. TE performance caused by different inlet temperatures of thermal fluids are numerically analyzed by using the finite-volume method on 3-D meshed physical models and then compared with those using a constant boundary temperature. The results show that voltage and current of the TE module increase gradually from a beginning moment to a steady flow and reach a stable value. The stable values increase with inlet temperature of the hot fluid when the inlet temperature of cold fluid is fixed. However, the time to get to the stable values is almost consistent for all the temperature differences. Moreover, the trend of TE performance using a fluid flow boundary is similar to that of using a constant boundary temperature. Furthermore, 3-D contours of fluid pressure, temperature, enthalpy, electromotive force, current density and heat flux are exhibited in order to clarify the influence of counter-flows of ideal fluids on TE generation. The current density and heat flux homogeneously distribute on an entire TE module, thus indicating that the counter-flows of thermal fluids have high potential to bring about fine performance for TE modules.

  8. A simple mixture to enhance muscle transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Luís; Lage, Armindo; Clemente, Manuel Pais; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2008-06-01

    Skeletal muscle is a fibrous tissue composed by muscle fibers and interstitial fluid. Due to this constitution, the muscle presents a non uniform refractive index profile that origins strong light scattering. One way to improve tissue transmittance is to reduce this refractive index mismatch by immersing the muscle in an optical clearing agent. As a consequence of such immersion tissue also suffers dehydration. The study of the optical clearing effect created by a simple mixture composed by ethanol, glycerol and distilled water has proven its effectiveness according to the variations observed in the parameters under study. The effect was characterized in terms of its magnitude, time duration and histological variations. The applied treatment has created a small reduction of the global sample refractive index that is justified by the long time rehydration caused by water in the immersing solution. From the reduction in sample pH we could also identify the dehydration process created in the sample. The immersion treatment has originated fiber bundle contraction and a spread distribution of the muscle fiber bundles inside. New studies with the mixture used, or with other combinations of its constituents might be interesting to perform with the objective to develop new clinical procedures.

  9. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  10. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Matthew E; Pavlath, Grace K

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  11. Fluid cooled electrical assembly

    DOEpatents

    Rinehart, Lawrence E.; Romero, Guillermo L.

    2007-02-06

    A heat producing, fluid cooled assembly that includes a housing made of liquid-impermeable material, which defines a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet and an opening. Also included is an electrical package having a set of semiconductor electrical devices supported on a substrate and the second major surface is a heat sink adapted to express heat generated from the electrical apparatus and wherein the second major surface defines a rim that is fit to the opening. Further, the housing is constructed so that as fluid travels from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet it is constrained to flow past the opening thereby placing the fluid in contact with the heat sink.

  12. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  13. Perioperative Fluid Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Bleier, Joshua I.S.; Aarons, Cary B.

    2013-01-01

    Perioperative fluid management of the colorectal surgical patient has evolved significantly over the last five decades. Older notions espousing aggressive hydration have been shown to be associated with increased complications. Newer data regarding fluid restriction has shown an association with improved outcomes. Management of perioperative fluid administration can be considered in three primary phases: In the preoperative phase, data suggests that avoidance of preoperative bowel preparation and avoidance of undue preoperative dehydration can improve outcomes. Although the type of intraoperative fluid given does not have a significant effect on outcome, data do suggest that a restrictive fluid regimen results in improved outcomes. Finally, in the postoperative phase of fluid management, a fluid-restrictive regimen, coupled with early enteral feeding also seems to result in improved outcomes. PMID:24436675

  14. Intravenous fluids: balancing solutions.

    PubMed

    Hoorn, Ewout J

    2017-08-01

    The topic of intravenous (IV) fluids may be regarded as "reverse nephrology", because nephrologists usually treat to remove fluids rather than to infuse them. However, because nephrology is deeply rooted in fluid, electrolyte, and acid-base balance, IV fluids belong in the realm of our specialty. The field of IV fluid therapy is in motion due to the increasing use of balanced crystalloids, partly fueled by the advent of new solutions. This review aims to capture these recent developments by critically evaluating the current evidence base. It will review both indications and complications of IV fluid therapy, including the characteristics of the currently available solutions. It will also cover the use of IV fluids in specific settings such as kidney transplantation and pediatrics. Finally, this review will address the pathogenesis of saline-induced hyperchloremic acidosis, its potential effect on outcomes, and the question if this should lead to a definitive switch to balanced solutions.

  15. Limitations to fluid replacement during exercise.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J; Leiper, J B

    1999-04-01

    Fluid replacement during exercise is essential for endurance exercise performance and reducing the risk of heat illness. Fluids supply water, which ameliorates dehydration, and also substrate for the working muscles. Absorption of water and nutrients occurs in the upper part of the small intestine, and replacement may be limited by the rate at which fluid is emptied from the stomach or absorbed in the intestine. Gastric emptying of liquids is influenced primarily by the volume of fluid in the stomach and by its energy density. Increasing the volume will speed emptying, but increasing the nutrient content will slow emptying. Osmolality, temperature, and pH of drinks, as well as exercise intensity, are of minor importance. Intestinal water absorption is a passive process: water follows osmotic gradients but will also follow the active absorption of nutrients, especially glucose, which is actively co-transported with sodium. Water transport is maximised by the presence in the intestine of hypotonic solutions of glucose and sodium. Hypertonic solutions promote net water secretion into the intestinal lumen, resulting in a temporary net loss of water from the body. The amount of fluid ingested by athletes is normally much less than can be tolerated, therefore issues such as palatability and practising drinking during training are important.

  16. Pattern and process of biotic homogenization in the New Pangaea.

    PubMed

    Baiser, Benjamin; Olden, Julian D; Record, Sydne; Lockwood, Julie L; McKinney, Michael L

    2012-12-07

    Human activities have reorganized the earth's biota resulting in spatially disparate locales becoming more or less similar in species composition over time through the processes of biotic homogenization and biotic differentiation, respectively. Despite mounting evidence suggesting that this process may be widespread in both aquatic and terrestrial systems, past studies have predominantly focused on single taxonomic groups at a single spatial scale. Furthermore, change in pairwise similarity is itself dependent on two distinct processes, spatial turnover in species composition and changes in gradients of species richness. Most past research has failed to disentangle the effect of these two mechanisms on homogenization patterns. Here, we use recent statistical advances and collate a global database of homogenization studies (20 studies, 50 datasets) to provide the first global investigation of the homogenization process across major faunal and floral groups and elucidate the relative role of changes in species richness and turnover. We found evidence of homogenization (change in similarity ranging from -0.02 to 0.09) across nearly all taxonomic groups, spatial extent and grain sizes. Partitioning of change in pairwise similarity shows that overall change in community similarity is driven by changes in species richness. Our results show that biotic homogenization is truly a global phenomenon and put into question many of the ecological mechanisms invoked in previous studies to explain patterns of homogenization.

  17. At tank Low Activity Feed Homogeneity Analysis Verification

    SciTech Connect

    DOUGLAS, J.G.

    2000-09-28

    This report evaluates the merit of selecting sodium, aluminum, and cesium-137 as analytes to indicate homogeneity of soluble species in low-activity waste (LAW) feed and recommends possible analytes and physical properties that could serve as rapid screening indicators for LAW feed homogeneity. The three analytes are adequate as screening indicators of soluble species homogeneity for tank waste when a mixing pump is used to thoroughly mix the waste in the waste feed staging tank and when all dissolved species are present at concentrations well below their solubility limits. If either of these conditions is violated, then the three indicators may not be sufficiently chemically representative of other waste constituents to reliably indicate homogeneity in the feed supernatant. Additional homogeneity indicators that should be considered are anions such as fluoride, sulfate, and phosphate, total organic carbon/total inorganic carbon, and total alpha to estimate the transuranic species. Physical property measurements such as gamma profiling, conductivity, specific gravity, and total suspended solids are recommended as possible at-tank methods for indicating homogeneity. Indicators of LAW feed homogeneity are needed to reduce the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (ORP) Program's contractual risk by assuring that the waste feed is within the contractual composition and can be supplied to the waste treatment plant within the schedule requirements.

  18. Proficiency testing in immunopathology: establishing the homogeneity of test material.

    PubMed

    Esterman, Adrian; Javanovich, Sue; McEvoy, Robert; Roberts-Thomson, Peter

    2005-04-01

    To develop a technique for homogeneity testing of serum aliquot samples suitable for use in the Quality Assurance Program in Clinical Immunology (QAP Pty Ltd). Albumin was selected as the surrogate protein marker for the product to be tested and the coefficient of dispersion (COD) calculated as the measure of homogeneity. To detect changes in the average level of homogeneity, cumulative sum control (cusum) charts were used. The COD(%) for each triplicate reading of albumin obtained from 34 specimens was normally distributed with a mean of 0.49% and a standard deviation of 0.25%. In industrial quality control schemes the action line is generally set at the upper 99% confidence limits, hence any triplicate sample would be considered to have acceptable homogeneity if the COD was < or = 1.08%. Cusum charts were created to monitor albumin homogeneity over time. The use of albumin measurement as the surrogate appears statistically suitable for homogeneity testing in QAP programs for immunodiagnostic testing. CUSUM charts are particularly useful to monitor such homogeneity testing.

  19. Muscle injuries: optimising recovery.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Tero A H; Järvinen, Teppo L N; Kääriäinen, Minna; Aärimaa, Ville; Vaittinen, Samuli; Kalimo, Hannu; Järvinen, Markku

    2007-04-01

    Muscle injuries are one of the most common traumas occurring in sports. Despite their clinical importance, there are only a few clinical studies on the treatment of muscle injuries. Lack of clinical studies is most probably attributable to the fact that there is not only a high heterogeneity in the severity of injuries, but also the injuries take place in different muscles, making it very demanding to carry out clinical trials. Accordingly, the current treatment principles of muscle injuries have either been derived from experimental studies or been tested empirically only. Clinically, first aid for muscle injuries follows the RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation) principle. The objective of RICE is to stop the injury-induced bleeding into the muscle tissue and thereby minimise the extent of the injury. Clinical examination should be carried out immediately after the injury and 5-7 days after the initial trauma, at which point the severity of the injury can be assessed more reliably. At that time, a more detailed characterisation of the injury can be made using imaging diagnostic modalities (ultrasound or MRI) if desired. The treatment of injured skeletal muscle should be carried out by immediate immobilisation of the injured muscle (clinically, relative immobility/avoidance of muscle contractions). However, the duration of immobilisation should be limited to a period sufficient to produce a scar of sufficient strength to bear the forces induced by remobilisation without re-rupture and the return to activity (mobilisation) should then be started gradually within the limits of pain. Early return to activity is needed to optimise the regeneration of healing muscle and recovery of the flexibility and strength of the injured skeletal muscle to pre-injury levels. The rehabilitation programme should be built around progressive agility and trunk stabilisation exercises, as these exercises seem to yield better outcome for injured skeletal muscle than programmes based

  20. Mastication and swallowing: influence of fluid addition to foods.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciano José; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte; Engelen, Lina; Van der Bilt, Andries

    2007-02-01

    The production of sufficient saliva is indispensable for good chewing. Recent research has demonstrated that salivary flow rate has little influence on the swallowing threshold. The hypothesis examined in the present study was that adding fluids to foods will influence chewing physiology. Twenty subjects chewed on melba toast, cake, carrot, peanut and Gouda cheese. They also chewed on these foods after addition of different volumes of water or alpha-amylase solution. Jaw muscle activity, number of chewing cycles until swallowing and chewing cycle duration were measured. Repeated measures analysis of variance was applied to test the null hypothesis that there would be no statistically significant difference among the results obtained for the various food types and fluids. Subsequently, contrasts were determined to study the levels of intra-subjects factors (food type and fluid volume). Linear regression was used to determine the changes in muscle activity and cycle duration as a function of the chewing cycles. Fluid addition significantly decreased muscle activity and swallowing threshold for melba, cake and peanut (p<0.05). The effect of alpha-amylase in the solutions was similar to that of water (p>0.05). Doubling the volume of tap water had a greater effect. Fluid addition facilitated chewing of dry foods (melba, cake), but did not influence the chewing of fatty (cheese) and wet products (carrot). This study is relevant to improve patients' life quality and the management of chewing and feeding disorders caused by hyposalivation.