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Sample records for muscle interstitial atp

  1. Muscle interstitial ATP and norepinephrine concentrations in the human leg during exercise and ATP infusion.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; González-Alonso, José; Nielsen, Jens-Jung; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2009-12-01

    ATP has been proposed to play multiple roles in local skeletal muscle blood flow regulation by inducing vasodilation and modulating sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here we evaluated the effects of arterial ATP infusion and exercise on leg muscle interstitial ATP and norepinephrine (NE) concentrations to gain insight into the interstitial and intravascular mechanisms by which ATP causes muscle vasodilation and sympatholysis. Leg hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotide and NE concentrations were measured during 1) femoral arterial ATP infusion (0.42 +/- 0.04 and 2.26 +/- 0.52 micromol/min; mean +/- SE) and 2) one-leg knee-extensor exercise (18 +/- 0 and 37 +/- 2 W) in 10 healthy men. Arterial ATP infusion and exercise increased leg blood flow (LBF) in the experimental leg from approximately 0.3 l/min at baseline to 4.2 +/- 0.3 and 4.6 +/- 0.5 l/min, respectively, whereas it was reduced or unchanged in the control leg. During arterial ATP infusion, muscle interstitial ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine concentrations remained unchanged in both legs, but muscle interstitial NE increased from approximately 5.9 nmol/l at baseline to 8.3 +/- 1.2 and 8.7 +/- 0.7 nmol/l in the experimental and control leg, respectively (P < 0.05), in parallel to a reduction in arterial pressure (P < 0.05). During exercise, however, interstitial ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine concentrations increased in the contracting muscle (P < 0.05), but not in inactive muscle, whereas interstitial NE concentrations increased similarly in both active and inactive muscles. These results suggest that the vasodilatory and sympatholytic effects of intraluminal ATP are mainly mediated via endothelial purinergic receptors. Intraluminal ATP and muscle contractions appear to modulate sympathetic nerve activity by inhibiting the effect of NE rather than blunting its local concentration. PMID:19797688

  2. Effect of extraluminal ATP application on vascular tone and blood flow in skeletal muscle: implications for exercise hyperemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khazraji, Baraa K.; Mortensen, Stefan P.; Jackson, Dwayne N.; Ellis, Christopher G.; Hellsten, Ylva

    2013-01-01

    During skeletal muscle contractions, the concentration of ATP increases in muscle interstitial fluid as measured by microdialysis probes. This increase is associated with the magnitude of blood flow, suggesting that interstitial ATP may be important for contraction-induced vasodilation. However, interstitial ATP has solely been described to induce vasoconstriction in skeletal muscle. To examine whether interstitial ATP induces vasodilation in skeletal muscle and to what extent this vasoactive effect is mediated by formation of nitric oxide (NO) and prostanoids, three different experimental models were studied. The rat gluteus maximus skeletal muscle model was used to study changes in local skeletal muscle hemodynamics. Superfused ATP at concentrations found during muscle contractions (1–10 μM) increased blood flow by up to 400%. In this model, the underlying mechanism was also examined by inhibition of NO and prostanoid formation. Inhibition of these systems abolished the vasodilator effect of ATP. Cell-culture experiments verified ATP-induced formation of NO and prostacyclin in rat skeletal muscle microvascular endothelial cells, and ATP-induced formation of NO in rat skeletal muscle cells. To confirm these findings in humans, ATP was infused into skeletal muscle interstitium of healthy subjects via microdialysis probes and found to increase muscle interstitial concentrations of NO and prostacyclin by ∼60% and ∼40%, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that a physiologically relevant elevation in interstitial ATP concentrations increases muscle blood flow, indicating that the contraction-induced increase in skeletal muscle interstitial [ATP] is important for exercise hyperemia. The vasodilator effect of ATP application is mediated by NO and prostanoid formation. PMID:23761642

  3. Interstitial Cells: Regulators of Smooth Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα+ cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα+ cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues. PMID:24987007

  4. Compartmentalized ATP synthesis in skeletal muscle triads.

    PubMed

    Han, J W; Thieleczek, R; Varsányi, M; Heilmeyer, L M

    1992-01-21

    Isolated skeletal muscle triads contain a compartmentalized glycolytic reaction sequence catalyzed by aldolase, triosephosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate kinase. These enzymes express activity in the structure-associated state leading to synthesis of ATP in the triadic junction upon supply of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate or fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. ATP formation occurs transiently and appears to be kinetically compartmentalized, i.e., the synthesized ATP is not in equilibrium with the bulk ATP. The apparent rate constants of the aldolase and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase/phosphoglycerate kinase reaction are significantly increased when fructose 1,6-bisphosphate instead of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate is employed as substrate. The observations suggest that fructose 1,6-bisphosphate is especially effectively channelled into the junctional gap. The amplitude of the ATP transient is decreasing with increasing free [Ca2+] in the range of 1 nM to 30 microM. In the presence of fluoride, the ATP transient is significantly enhanced and its declining phase is substantially retarded. This observation suggests utilization of endogenously synthesized ATP in part by structure associated protein kinases and phosphatases which is confirmed by the detection of phosphorylated triadic proteins after gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Endogenous protein kinases phosphorylate proteins of apparent Mr 450,000, 180,000, 160,000, 145,000, 135,000, 90,000, 54,000, 51,000, and 20,000, respectively. Some of these phosphorylated polypeptides are in the Mr range of known phosphoproteins involved in excitation-contraction coupling of skeletal muscle, which might give a first hint at the functional importance of the sequential glycolytic reactions compartmentalized in triads. PMID:1731894

  5. Involvement of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in the acidosis-induced efflux of ATP from rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jie; Le, Gengyun; Ballard, Heather J

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effect of acidosis on the efflux of ATP from skeletal muscle. Infusion of lactic acid to the perfused hindlimb muscles of anaesthetised rats produced dose-dependent decreases in pH and increases in the interstitial ATP of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle: 10 mm lactic acid reduced the venous pH from 7.22 ± 0.04 to 6.97 ± 0.02 and increased interstitial ATP from 38 ± 8 to 67 ± 11 nm. The increase in interstitial ATP was well-correlated with the decrease in pH (r2 = 0.93; P < 0.05). Blockade of cellular uptake of lactic acid using α-cyano-hydroxycinnamic acid abolished the lactic acid-induced ATP release, whilst infusion of sodium lactate failed to depress pH or increase interstitial ATP, suggesting that intracellular pH depression, rather than lactate, stimulated the ATP efflux. Incubation of cultured skeletal myoblasts with 10 mm lactic acid significantly increased the accumulation of ATP in the bathing medium from 0.46 ± 0.06 to 0.76 ± 0.08 μm, confirming the skeletal muscle cells as the source of the released ATP. Acidosis-induced ATP efflux from the perfused muscle was abolished by CFTRinh-172, a specific inhibitor of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), or glibenclamide, an inhibitor of both KATP channels and CFTR, but it was not affected by atractyloside, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial ATP transporter. Silencing of the CFTR gene using an siRNA abolished the acidosis-induced increase in ATP release from cultured myoblasts. CFTR expression on skeletal muscle cells was confirmed using immunostaining in the intact muscle and Western blotting in the cultured cells. These data suggest that depression of the intracellular pH of skeletal muscle cells stimulates ATP efflux, and that CFTR plays an important role in the release mechanism. PMID:20819945

  6. ATP overflow in skeletal muscle 1A arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Kluess, Heidi A; Stone, Audrey J; Evanson, Kirk W

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the sources of ATP in the 1A arteriole, and to investigate age-related changes in ATP overflow. Arterioles (1A) from the red portion of the gastrocnemius muscle were isolated, cannulated and pressurized in a microvessel chamber with field stimulation electrodes. ATP overflow was determined using probes specific for ATP and null probes that were constructed similar to the ATP probes, but did not contain the enzyme coating. ATP concentrations were determined using a normal curve (0.78 to 25 μmol l−1 ATP). ATP overflow occurred in two phases. Phase one began in the first 20 s following stimulation and phase two started 35 s after field stimulation. Tetrodotoxin, a potent neurotoxin that blocks action potential generation in nerves, abolished both phases of ATP overflow. α1-Receptor blockade resulted in a small decrease in ATP overflow in phase two, but endothelial removal resulted in an increase in ATP overflow. ATP overflow was lowest in 6-month-old rats and highest in 12- and 2-month-old rats (P < 0.05). ATP overflow measured via biosensors was of neural origin with a small contribution from the vascular smooth muscle. The endothelium seems to play an important role in attenuating ATP overflow in 1A arterioles. PMID:20566660

  7. cAMP/Protein Kinase A Activates Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator for ATP Release from Rat Skeletal Muscle during Low pH or Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weisong; Ballard, Heather J.

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is involved in ATP release from skeletal muscle at low pH. These experiments investigate the signal transduction mechanism linking pH depression to CFTR activation and ATP release, and evaluate whether CFTR is involved in ATP release from contracting muscle. Lactic acid treatment elevated interstitial ATP of buffer-perfused muscle and extracellular ATP of L6 myocytes: this ATP release was abolished by the non-specific CFTR inhibitor, glibenclamide, or the specific CFTR inhibitor, CFTRinh-172, suggesting that CFTR was involved, and by inhibition of lactic acid entry to cells, indicating that intracellular pH depression was required. Muscle contractions significantly elevated interstitial ATP, but CFTRinh-172 abolished the increase. The cAMP/PKA pathway was involved in the signal transduction pathway for CFTR-regulated ATP release from muscle: forskolin increased CFTR phosphorylation and stimulated ATP release from muscle or myocytes; lactic acid increased intracellular cAMP, pCREB and PKA activity, whereas IBMX enhanced ATP release from myocytes. Inhibition of PKA with KT5720 abolished lactic-acid- or contraction-induced ATP release from muscle. Inhibition of either the Na+/H+-exchanger (NHE) with amiloride or the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger (NCX) with SN6 or KB-R7943 abolished lactic-acid- or contraction-induced release of ATP from muscle, suggesting that these exchange proteins may be involved in the activation of CFTR. Our data suggest that CFTR-regulated release contributes to ATP release from contracting muscle in vivo, and that cAMP and PKA are involved in the activation of CFTR during muscle contractions or acidosis; NHE and NCX may be involved in the signal transduction pathway. PMID:23226244

  8. Modest hyperglycemia prevents interstitial dispersion of insulin in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kolka, Cathryn M.; Castro, Ana Valeria B.; Kirkman, Erlinda L.; Bergman, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin injected directly into skeletal muscle diffuses rapidly through the interstitial space to cause glucose uptake, but this is blocked in insulin resistance. As glucotoxicity is associated with endothelial dysfunction, the observed hyperglycemia in diet-induced obese dogs may inhibit insulin access to muscle cells, and exacerbate insulin resistance. Here we asked whether interstitial insulin diffusion is reduced in modest hyperglycemia, similar to that induced by a high fat diet. METHODS During normoglycemic (100mg/dl) and moderately hyperglycemic (120mg/dl) clamps in anesthetized canines, sequential doses of insulin were injected into the vastus medialis of one hindlimb; the contra-lateral limb served as a control. Plasma samples were collected and analyzed for insulin content. Lymph vessels of the hind leg were also catheterized, and lymph samples were analyzed as an indicator of interstitial insulin concentration. RESULTS Insulin injection increased lymph insulin in normoglycemic animals, but not in hyperglycemic animals. Muscle glucose uptake was elevated in response to hyperglycemia, however the insulin-mediated glucose uptake in normoglycemic controls was not observed in hyperglycemia. Modest hyperglycemia prevented intra-muscularly injected insulin from diffusing through the interstitial space reduced insulin-mediated glucose uptake. CONCLUSION Hyperglycemia prevents the appearance of injected insulin in the interstitial space, thus reducing insulin action on skeletal muscle cells. PMID:25468139

  9. Hypophosphatemia promotes lower rates of muscle ATP synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pesta, Dominik H.; Tsirigotis, Dimitrios N.; Befroy, Douglas E.; Caballero, Daniel; Jurczak, Michael J.; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Cline, Gary W.; Dufour, Sylvie; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Carpenter, Thomas O.; Insogna, Karl; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Bergwitz, Clemens; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia can lead to muscle weakness and respiratory and heart failure, but the mechanism is unknown. To address this question, we noninvasively assessed rates of muscle ATP synthesis in hypophosphatemic mice by using in vivo saturation transfer [31P]-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. By using this approach, we found that basal and insulin-stimulated rates of muscle ATP synthetic flux (VATP) and plasma inorganic phosphate (Pi) were reduced by 50% in mice with diet-induced hypophosphatemia as well as in sodium-dependent Pi transporter solute carrier family 34, member 1 (NaPi2a)-knockout (NaPi2a−/−) mice compared with their wild-type littermate controls. Rates of VATP normalized in both hypophosphatemic groups after restoring plasma Pi concentrations. Furthermore, VATP was directly related to cellular and mitochondrial Pi uptake in L6 and RC13 rodent myocytes and isolated muscle mitochondria. Similar findings were observed in a patient with chronic hypophosphatemia as a result of a mutation in SLC34A3 who had a 50% reduction in both serum Pi content and muscle VATP. After oral Pi repletion and normalization of serum Pi levels, muscle VATP completely normalized in the patient. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that decreased muscle ATP synthesis, in part, may be caused by low blood Pi concentrations, which may explain some aspects of muscle weakness observed in patients with hypophosphatemia.—Pesta, D. H., Tsirigotis, D. N., Befroy, D. E., Caballero, D., Jurczak, M. J., Rahimi, Y., Cline, G. W., Dufour, S., Birkenfeld, A. L., Rothman, D. L., Carpenter, T. O., Insogna, K., Petersen, K. F., Bergwitz, C., Shulman, G. I. Hypophosphatemia promotes lower rates of muscle ATP synthesis. PMID:27338702

  10. Mechanical effects of muscle contraction increase intravascular ATP draining quiescent and active skeletal muscle in humans

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, Anne R.; Kirby, Brett S.; Richards, Jennifer C.

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) evokes vasodilation and is implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise. Mechanical stresses to erythrocytes and endothelial cells stimulate ATP release in vitro. How mechanical effects of muscle contractions contribute to increased plasma ATP during exercise is largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that simulated mechanical effects of muscle contractions increase [ATP]venous and ATP effluent in vivo, independent of changes in tissue metabolic demand, and further increase plasma ATP when superimposed with mild-intensity exercise. In young healthy adults, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) (Doppler ultrasound) and plasma [ATP]v (luciferin-luciferase assay), then calculated forearm ATP effluent (FBF×[ATP]v) during rhythmic forearm compressions (RFC) via a blood pressure cuff at three graded pressures (50, 100, and 200 mmHg; Protocol 1; n = 10) and during RFC at 100 mmHg, 5% maximal voluntary contraction rhythmic handgrip exercise (RHG), and combined RFC + RHG (Protocol 2; n = 10). [ATP]v increased from rest with each cuff pressure (range 144–161 vs. 64 ± 13 nmol/l), and ATP effluent was graded with pressure. In Protocol 2, [ATP]v increased in each condition compared with rest (RFC: 123 ± 33; RHG: 51 ± 9; RFC + RHG: 96 ± 23 vs. Mean Rest: 42 ± 4 nmol/l; P < 0.05), and ATP effluent was greatest with RFC + RHG (RFC: 5.3 ± 1.4; RHG: 5.3 ± 1.1; RFC + RHG: 11.6 ± 2.7 vs. Mean Rest: 1.2 ± 0.1 nmol/min; P < 0.05). We conclude that the mechanical effects of muscle contraction can 1) independently elevate intravascular ATP draining quiescent skeletal muscle without changes in local metabolism and 2) further augment intravascular ATP during mild exercise associated with increases in metabolism and local deoxygenation; therefore, it is likely one stimulus for increasing intravascular ATP during exercise in humans. PMID:23429876

  11. Skeletal muscle ATP kinetics are impaired in frail mice.

    PubMed

    Akki, Ashwin; Yang, Huanle; Gupta, Ashish; Chacko, Vadappuram P; Yano, Toshiyuki; Leppo, Michelle K; Steenbergen, Charles; Walston, Jeremy; Weiss, Robert G

    2014-02-01

    The interleukin-10 knockout mouse (IL10(tm/tm)) has been proposed as a model for human frailty, a geriatric syndrome characterized by skeletal muscle (SM) weakness, because it develops an age-related decline in SM strength compared to control (C57BL/6J) mice. Compromised energy metabolism and energy deprivation appear to play a central role in muscle weakness in metabolic myopathies and muscular dystrophies. Nonetheless, it is not known whether SM energy metabolism is altered in frailty. A combination of in vivo (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and biochemical assays was used to measure high-energy phosphate concentrations, the rate of ATP synthesis via creatine kinase (CK), the primary energy reserve reaction in SM, as well as the unidirectional rates of ATP synthesis from inorganic phosphate (Pi) in hind limb SM of 92-week-old control (n = 7) and IL10(tm/tm) (n = 6) mice. SM Phosphocreatine (20.2 ± 2.3 vs. 16.8 ± 2.3 μmol/g, control vs. IL10(tm/tm), p < 0.05), ATP flux via CK (5.0 ± 0.9 vs. 3.1 ± 1.1 μmol/g/s, p < 0.01), ATP synthesis from inorganic phosphate (Pi → ATP) (0.58 ± 0.3 vs. 0.26 ± 0.2 μmol/g/s, p < 0.05) and the free energy released from ATP hydrolysis (∆G ∼ATP) were significantly lower and [Pi] (2.8 ± 1.0 vs. 5.3 ± 2.0 μmol/g, control vs. IL10(tm/tm), p < 0.05) markedly higher in IL10(tm/tm) than in control mice. These observations demonstrate that, despite normal in vitro metabolic enzyme activities, in vivo SM ATP kinetics, high-energy phosphate levels and energy release from ATP hydrolysis are reduced and inorganic phosphate is elevated in a murine model of frailty. These observations do not prove, but are consistent with the premise, that energetic abnormalities may contribute metabolically to SM weakness in this geriatric syndrome.

  12. Is postural tremor size controlled by interstitial potassium concentration in muscle?

    PubMed Central

    Lakie, M; Hayes, N; Combes, N; Langford, N

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether factors associated with postural tremor operate by altering muscle interstitial K+. Methods: An experimental approach was used to investigate the effects of procedures designed to increase or decrease interstitial K+. Postural physiological tremor was measured by conventional means. Brief periods of ischaemic muscle activity were used to increase muscle interstitial K+. Infusion of the ß2 agonist terbutaline was used to decrease plasma (and interstitial) K+. Blood samples were taken for the determination of plasma K+. Results: Ischaemia rapidly reduced tremor size, but only when the muscle was active. The ß2 agonist produced a slow and progressive rise in tremor size that was almost exactly mirrored by a slow and progressive decrease in plasma K+. Conclusions: Ischaemic reduction of postural tremor has been attributed to effects on muscle spindles or an unexplained effect on muscle. This study showed that ischaemia did not reduce tremor size unless there was accompanying muscular activity. An accumulation of K+ in the interstitium of the ischaemic active muscle may blunt the response of the muscle and reduce its fusion frequency, so that the force output becomes less pulsatile and tremor size decreases. When a ß2 agonist is infused, the rise in tremor mirrors the resultant decrease in plasma K+. Decreased plasma K+ reduces interstitial K+ concentration and may produce greater muscular force fluctuation (more tremor). Many other factors that affect postural tremor size may exert their effect by altering plasma K+ concentration, thereby changing the concentration of K+ in the interstitial fluid. PMID:15201362

  13. Hereditary rimmed vacuole myopathy showing interstitial amyloid deposition in muscle tissue.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yukiko; Sakai, Kenji; Ishida, Chiho; Asaka, Tomoya; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Nozaki, Ichiro; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Kametani, Fuyuki; Yazaki, Masahide; Okino, Soichi; Yamada, Masahito

    2009-09-01

    We describe a consanguineous family that had progressive myopathy with rimmed vacuole (RV) formation and amyloid deposition. Patient 1 is a 71-year-old woman with muscle atrophy in the lumbar girdle and lower extremities. Patient 2 is a 40-year-old man (the son of Patient 1) with fatty changes in the biceps femoris muscles. Muscle biopsies revealed myopathic and neurogenic degeneration with RV, necrotic fibers, and interstitial amyloid deposition. Amyloid deposition was detected only in the muscle tissue.

  14. Original Research: Combined model of bladder detrusor smooth muscle and interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Josef; Byrtus, Miroslav; Stengl, Milan

    2016-10-01

    Although patients with lower urinary tract symptoms constitute a large and still growing population, understanding of bladder detrusor muscle physiology remains limited. Understanding the interactions between the detrusor smooth muscle cells and other bladder cell types (e.g. interstitial cells, IC) that may significantly contribute to coordinating and modulating detrusor contractions represents a considerable challenge. Computer modeling could help to elucidate some properties that are difficult to address experimentally; therefore, we developed in silico models of detrusor smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells, coupled through gap junctions. The models include all of the major ion conductances and transporters described in smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells in the literature. The model of normal detrusor muscle (smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells coupled through gap junctions) completely reproduced the experimental results obtained with detrusor strips in the presence of several pharmacological interventions (ryanodine, caffeine, nimodipine), whereas the model of smooth muscle cell alone (without interstitial cells) failed to reproduce the experimental results. Next, a model of overactive bladder, a highly prevalent clinical condition in both men and women with increasing incidence at older ages, was produced by modifying several processes as reported previously: a reduction of Ca(2+)-release through ryanodine receptors and a reduction of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-conductance with augmented gap junctional coupling. This model was also able to reproduce the pharmacological modulation of overactive bladder. In conclusion, a model of bladder detrusor muscle was developed that reproduced experimental results obtained in both normal and overactive bladder preparations. The results indicate that the non-smooth muscle cells of the detrusor (interstitial cells) contribute significantly to the contractile behavior of bladder detrusor muscle and should not be

  15. ATP decreases mechanical sensitivity of muscle thin-fiber afferents in rats.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Teru; Kubo, Asako; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue

    2015-08-01

    ATP is an energy rich substance contained in cells in the order of mM. It is released when cells are damaged and when muscle is compressed or contracted. Subcutaneous injection of ATP induces pain-related behavior and hyperalgesia to mechanical and heat stimulation in rats. However, the effects of ATP in muscle have not been fully studied. In the present study we examined the effects of ATP on muscle C-fiber afferent activities using single fiber recordings, and on nociceptive behavior. Muscle C-fiber activities were recorded in vitro using extensor digitorum longus muscle-common peroneal nerve preparations excised from rats deeply anesthetized with pentobarbital. ATP (100 μM and 1 mM, but not 1 μM) superfused for 5 min before the mechanical stimulation suppressed the mechanical responses of muscle thin fibers irrespective of whether they excited the fiber. This suppressive effect was reversed by P2X receptor antagonists PPADS (100 μM) and suramin (300 μM). We also found that subcutaneous injection of ATP (10 mM) induced nociceptive behavior, whereas intramuscular injection had no effect. These findings showed that effects of ATP on muscle afferents differ from those on cutaneous afferents.

  16. Glucocorticoids activate the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic system in skeletal muscle during fasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, S. S.; Goldberg, A. L.; Goldberger, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are essential for the increase in protein breakdown in skeletal muscle normally seen during fasting. To determine which proteolytic pathway(s) are activated upon fasting, leg muscles from fed and fasted normal rats were incubated under conditions that block or activate different proteolytic systems. After food deprivation (1 day), the nonlysosomal ATP-dependent process increased by 250%, as shown in experiments involving depletion of muscle ATP. Also, the maximal capacity of the lysosomal process increased 60-100%, but no changes occurred in the Ca(2+)-dependent or the residual energy-independent proteolytic processes. In muscles from fasted normal and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats, the protein breakdown sensitive to inhibitors of the lysosomal or Ca(2+)-dependent pathways did not differ. However, the ATP-dependent process was 30% slower in muscles from fasted ADX rats. Administering dexamethasone to these animals or incubating their muscles with dexamethasone reversed this defect. During fasting, when the ATP-dependent process rises, muscles show a two- to threefold increase in levels of ubiquitin (Ub) mRNA. However, muscles of ADX animals failed to show this response. Injecting dexamethasone into the fasted ADX animals increased muscle Ub mRNA within 6 h. Thus glucocorticoids activate the ATP-Ub-dependent proteolytic pathway in fasting apparently by enhancing the expression of components of this system such as Ub.

  17. Sources of Intravascular ATP During Exercise in Humans: Critical Role for Skeletal Muscle Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Brett S.; Crecelius, Anne R.; Richards, Jennifer C.; Dinenno, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise hyperemia is regulated by several factors and one factor known to increase with exercise that evokes powerful vasomotor action is extracellular ATP. The origination of ATP detectable in plasma from exercising muscle of humans is, however, a matter of debate and ATP has been suggested to arise from sympathetic nerves, blood sources (e.g. erythrocytes), endothelial cells, and skeletal myocytes, among others. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that acute augmentation of sympathetic nervous system activity (SNA) results in elevated plasma ATP draining skeletal muscle, and that SNA superimposition during exercise further increases ATP vs exercise alone. We show that increased SNA via −40mmHg lower body negative pressure (LBNP) at rest does not increase plasma ATP (51±8 vs 58±7 nmol/L with LBNP), nor does it increase [ATP] above levels observed during rhythmic handgrip exercise (79±11 exercise alone vs 71±8 nmol/L with LBNP). Secondly, we tested the hypothesis that active perfusion of skeletal muscle is essential to observe increased plasma ATP during exercise. We identify that complete obstruction of blood flow to contracting muscle abolishes exercise-mediated increases in plasma ATP (90±19 to 49±12 nmol/L), and further, that cessation of blood flow prior to exercise completely inhibits the typical rise in ATP (3 vs 61%; obstructed vs intact perfusion). The lack of ATP change during occlusion occurred in the face of continued muscle work and elevated SNA, indicating the rise of intravascular ATP is not resultant from these extravascular sources. Our collective observations indicate that the elevation in extracellular ATP observed in blood during exercise is unlikely to originate from sympathetic nerves or the contacting muscle itself, but rather is dependent on intact skeletal muscle perfusion. We conclude that an intravascular source for ATP is essential and points toward an important role for blood sources (e.g. red blood cells) in augmenting and

  18. Effect of Intramuscular Protons, Lactate, and ATP on Muscle Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Nicholas S; Whitley, Phillip E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic muscle pain is a significant health problem leading to disability[1]. Muscle fatigue can exacerbate muscle pain. Metabolites, including ATP, lactate, and protons, are released during fatiguing exercise and produce pain in humans. These substances directly activate purinergic (P2X) and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) on muscle nociceptors, and when combined, produce a greater increase in neuron firing than when given alone. Whether the enhanced effect of combining protons, lactate, and ATP is the sum of individual effects (additive) or more than the sum of individual effects (synergistic) is unknown. Using a rat model of muscle nociceptive behavior, we tested each of these compounds individually over a range of physiologic and supra-physiologic concentrations. Further, we combined all three compounds in a series of dilutions and tested their effect on muscle nociceptive behavior. We also tested a non-hydrolyzable form of ATP (α,β-meATP) alone and in combination with lactate and acidic pH. Surprisingly, we found no dose-dependent effect on muscle nociceptive behavior for protons, lactate, or ATP when given alone. We similarly found no effect after application of each two-metabolite combination. Only pH 4 saline and α,β-meATP produced hyperalgesia when given alone. When all 3 substances were combined, however, ATP (2.4μm), lactate (10mM), and acidic pH (pH 6.0) produced an enhanced effect greater than the sum of the effects of the individual components, i.e. synergism. α,β me ATP (3nmol), on the other hand, showed no enhanced effects when combined with lactate (10mM) or acidic pH (pH 6.0), i.e. additive. These data suggest that combining fatigue metabolites in muscle produces a synergistic effect on muscle nociception.

  19. K(ATP) channels process nucleotide signals in muscle thermogenic response.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Santiago; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Alekseev, Alexey E

    2010-12-01

    Uniquely gated by intracellular adenine nucleotides, sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels have been typically assigned to protective cellular responses under severe energy insults. More recently, K(ATP) channels have been instituted in the continuous control of muscle energy expenditure under non-stressed, physiological states. These advances raised the question of how K(ATP) channels can process trends in cellular energetics within a milieu where each metabolic system is set to buffer nucleotide pools. Unveiling the mechanistic basis of the K(ATP) channel-driven thermogenic response in muscles thus invites the concepts of intracellular compartmentalization of energy and proteins, along with nucleotide signaling over diffusion barriers. Furthermore, it requires gaining insight into the properties of reversibility of intrinsic ATPase activity associated with K(ATP) channel complexes. Notwithstanding the operational paradigm, the homeostatic role of sarcolemmal K(ATP) channels can be now broadened to a wider range of environmental cues affecting metabolic well-being. In this way, under conditions of energy deficit such as ischemic insult or adrenergic stress, the operation of K(ATP) channel complexes would result in protective energy saving, safeguarding muscle performance and integrity. Under energy surplus, downregulation of K(ATP) channel function may find potential implications in conditions of energy imbalance linked to obesity, cold intolerance and associated metabolic disorders.

  20. Photoaffinity labelling of smooth-muscle myosin by methylanthraniloyl-8-azido-ATP.

    PubMed

    Maruta, S; Ikebe, M

    1993-06-01

    Methylanthraniloyl-8-azido-ATP (Mant-8-N3-ATP), which binds to the 20 kDa C-terminal tryptic fragment of skeletal-muscle myosin subfragment-1 [Maruta, Miyanishi and Matsuda (1989) Eur. J. Biochem. 184, 213-221], was synthesized and used as a probe of the conformational change of smooth-muscle myosin. Mant-8-N3-ATP, like ATP, induced the formation of the 10 S conformation at low ionic strength. In the presence of vanadate, smooth-muscle myosin formed a stable complex with Mant-8-N3-ADP, and this complex showed the 10 S-->6 S transition of myosin. ATP-binding sites for 6 S (extended state) and 10 S (folded state) myosin were studied by photolabelling of myosin with Mant-8-N3-ADP. For both 6 S and 10 S myosin, Mant-8-N3-ATP was incorporated into the 29 kDa N-terminal tryptic fragment of myosin heavy chain. This is unlike the labelling of skeletal-muscle myosin, in which the 20 kDa C-terminal fragment is labelled. The labelling of 29 kDa fragment was diminished significantly by addition of ATP. These results suggest that the conformation of the ATP-binding site of smooth-muscle myosin is different from that of skeletal-muscle myosin. To examine further the possible differences in the labelling site between 6 S and 10 S myosin, the affinity-labelled 29 kDa fragment was subjected to complete proteolysis by lysylendo-peptidase. The fluorescent-labelled-peptide map suggested that the Mant-8-N3-ADP-binding sites for 6 S and 10 S myosin were identical.

  1. 31P magnetization transfer measurements of Pi→ATP flux in exercising human muscle.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, Alison; Savage, David B; Williams, Guy B; Porter, David; Carpenter, T Adrian; Brindle, Kevin M; Kemp, Graham J

    2016-03-15

    Fundamental criticisms have been made over the use of (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) magnetization transfer estimates of inorganic phosphate (Pi)→ATP flux (VPi-ATP) in human resting skeletal muscle for assessing mitochondrial function. Although the discrepancy in the magnitude of VPi-ATP is now acknowledged, little is known about its metabolic determinants. Here we use a novel protocol to measure VPi-ATP in human exercising muscle for the first time. Steady-state VPi-ATP was measured at rest and over a range of exercise intensities and compared with suprabasal oxidative ATP synthesis rates estimated from the initial rates of postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis (VATP). We define a surplus Pi→ATP flux as the difference between VPi-ATP and VATP. The coupled reactions catalyzed by the glycolytic enzymes GAPDH and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) have been shown to catalyze measurable exchange between ATP and Pi in some systems and have been suggested to be responsible for this surplus flux. Surplus VPi-ATP did not change between rest and exercise, even though the concentrations of Pi and ADP, which are substrates for GAPDH and PGK, respectively, increased as expected. However, involvement of these enzymes is suggested by correlations between absolute and surplus Pi→ATP flux, both at rest and during exercise, and the intensity of the phosphomonoester peak in the (31)P NMR spectrum. This peak includes contributions from sugar phosphates in the glycolytic pathway, and changes in its intensity may indicate changes in downstream glycolytic intermediates, including 3-phosphoglycerate, which has been shown to influence the exchange between ATP and Pi catalyzed by GAPDH and PGK. PMID:26744504

  2. 31P magnetization transfer measurements of Pi→ATP flux in exercising human muscle.

    PubMed

    Sleigh, Alison; Savage, David B; Williams, Guy B; Porter, David; Carpenter, T Adrian; Brindle, Kevin M; Kemp, Graham J

    2016-03-15

    Fundamental criticisms have been made over the use of (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) magnetization transfer estimates of inorganic phosphate (Pi)→ATP flux (VPi-ATP) in human resting skeletal muscle for assessing mitochondrial function. Although the discrepancy in the magnitude of VPi-ATP is now acknowledged, little is known about its metabolic determinants. Here we use a novel protocol to measure VPi-ATP in human exercising muscle for the first time. Steady-state VPi-ATP was measured at rest and over a range of exercise intensities and compared with suprabasal oxidative ATP synthesis rates estimated from the initial rates of postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis (VATP). We define a surplus Pi→ATP flux as the difference between VPi-ATP and VATP. The coupled reactions catalyzed by the glycolytic enzymes GAPDH and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) have been shown to catalyze measurable exchange between ATP and Pi in some systems and have been suggested to be responsible for this surplus flux. Surplus VPi-ATP did not change between rest and exercise, even though the concentrations of Pi and ADP, which are substrates for GAPDH and PGK, respectively, increased as expected. However, involvement of these enzymes is suggested by correlations between absolute and surplus Pi→ATP flux, both at rest and during exercise, and the intensity of the phosphomonoester peak in the (31)P NMR spectrum. This peak includes contributions from sugar phosphates in the glycolytic pathway, and changes in its intensity may indicate changes in downstream glycolytic intermediates, including 3-phosphoglycerate, which has been shown to influence the exchange between ATP and Pi catalyzed by GAPDH and PGK.

  3. ATP induces sustained facilitation of craniofacial nociception through P2X receptors on neck muscle nociceptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Makowska, A; Panfil, C; Ellrich, J

    2006-06-01

    Noxious input from neck muscles probably plays a key role in tension-type headache pathophysiology. ATP selectively excites group III and IV muscle afferents in vitro. Accordingly, ATP infusion into trapezius muscle induces strong pain and local tenderness in healthy man. The present study addresses the impact of ATP on neck muscle nociception in anaesthetized mice. Craniofacial nociceptive processing was tested by the jaw-opening reflex via noxious electrical tongue stimulation. Within 2 h after injection of 100 nmol/l or 1 micromol/l ATP into semispinal neck muscles, reflex integrals significantly increased by 114% or 328%, respectively. Preceding intramuscular administration of the P2X receptor antagonist PPADS (3-100 nmol/l) suppressed the ATP effect. Subsequent application of PPADS (100 nmol/l) caused a total recovery of facilitated reflex to baseline values. ATP induces sustained facilitation of craniofacial nociception by prolonged excitation of P2X receptors in neck muscles. PMID:16686909

  4. Reserve capacity for ATP consumption during isometric contraction in human skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Han, Y S; Proctor, D N; Geiger, P C; Sieck, G C

    2001-02-01

    Maximum velocity of the actomyosin ATPase reaction (V(max) ATPase) and ATP consumption rate during maximum isometric activation (ATP(iso)) were determined in human vastus lateralis (VL) muscle fibers expressing different myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms. We hypothesized that the reserve capacity for ATP consumption [1 -- (ratio of ATP(iso) to V(max) ATPase)] varies across VL muscle fibers expressing different MHC isoforms. Biopsies were obtained from 12 subjects (10 men and 2 women; age 21--66 yr). A quantitative histochemical procedure was used to measure V(max) ATPase. In permeabilized fibers, ATP(iso) was measured using an NADH-linked fluorometric procedure. The reserve capacity for ATP consumption was lower for fibers coexpressing MHC(2X) and MHC(2A) compared with fibers singularly expressing MHC(2A) and MHC(slow) (39 vs. 52 and 56%, respectively). Tension cost (ratio of ATP(iso) to generated force) also varied with fiber type, being highest in fibers coexpressing MHC(2X) and MHC(2A). We conclude that fiber-type differences in the reserve capacity for ATP consumption and tension cost reflect functional differences such as susceptibility to fatigue.

  5. Muscle MRS detects elevated PDE/ATP ratios prior to fatty infiltration in Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wokke, B H; Hooijmans, M T; van den Bergen, J C; Webb, A G; Verschuuren, J J; Kan, H E

    2014-11-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Muscles show structural changes (fatty infiltration, fibrosis) and metabolic changes, both of which can be assessed using MRI and MRS. It is unknown at what stage of the disease process metabolic changes arise and how this might vary for different metabolites. In this study we assessed metabolic changes in skeletal muscles of Becker patients, both with and without fatty infiltration, quantified via Dixon MRI and (31) P MRS. MRI and (31) P MRS scans were obtained from 25 Becker patients and 14 healthy controls using a 7 T MR scanner. Five lower-leg muscles were individually assessed for fat and muscle metabolite levels. In the peroneus, soleus and anterior tibialis muscles with non-increased fat levels, PDE/ATP ratios were higher (P < 0.02) compared with controls, whereas in all muscles with increased fat levels PDE/ATP ratios were higher compared with healthy controls (P ≤ 0.05). The Pi /ATP ratio in the peroneus muscles was higher in muscles with increased fat fractions (P = 0.005), and the PCr/ATP ratio was lower in the anterior tibialis muscles with increased fat fractions (P = 0.005). There were no other significant changes in metabolites, but an increase in tissue pH was found in all muscles of the total group of BMD patients in comparison with healthy controls (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that (31) P MRS can be used to detect early changes in individual muscles of BMD patients, which are present before the onset of fatty infiltration.

  6. Local release of ATP into the arterial inflow and venous drainage of human skeletal muscle: insight from ATP determination with the intravascular microdialysis technique.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Thaning, Pia; Nyberg, Michael; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2011-04-01

    Intraluminal ATP could play an important role in the local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow, but the stimuli that cause ATP release and the levels of plasma ATP in vessels supplying and draining human skeletal muscle remain unclear. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which ATP is released into plasma, we measured plasma [ATP] with the intravascular microdialysis technique at rest and during dynamic exercise (normoxia and hypoxia), passive exercise, thigh compressions and arterial ATP, tyramine and ACh infusion in a total of 16 healthy young men. Femoral arterial and venous [ATP] values were 109 ± 34 and 147 ± 45 nmol l(−1) at rest and increased to 363 ± 83 and 560 ± 111 nmol l(−1), respectively, during exercise (P < 0.05), whereas these values did not increase when exercise was performed with the other leg. Hypoxia increased venous plasma [ATP] at rest compared to normoxia (P < 0.05), but not during exercise. Arterial ATP infusion (≤1.8 μmol min(−1) increased arterial plasma [ATP] from 74 ± 17 to 486 ± 82 nmol l(−1) (P < 0.05), whereas it remained unchanged in the femoral vein at ∼150 nmol l(−1). Both arterial and venous plasma [ATP] decreased during acetylcholine infusion (P < 0.05). Rhythmic thigh compressions increased arterial and venous plasma [ATP] compared to baseline conditions, whereas these values did not change during passive exercise or tyramine infusion. These results demonstrate that ATP is released locally into arterial and venous plasma during exercise and during hypoxia at rest. Compression of the vascular system could contribute to the increase during exercise whereas there appears to be little ATP release in response to increased blood flow, vascular stretch or sympathetic ATP release. Furthermore, the half-life of arterially infused ATP is <1 s. PMID:21300753

  7. Local release of ATP into the arterial inflow and venous drainage of human skeletal muscle: insight from ATP determination with the intravascular microdialysis technique

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Thaning, Pia; Nyberg, Michael; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Intraluminal ATP could play an important role in the local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow, but the stimuli that cause ATP release and the levels of plasma ATP in vessels supplying and draining human skeletal muscle remain unclear. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which ATP is released into plasma, we measured plasma [ATP] with the intravascular microdialysis technique at rest and during dynamic exercise (normoxia and hypoxia), passive exercise, thigh compressions and arterial ATP, tyramine and ACh infusion in a total of 16 healthy young men. Femoral arterial and venous [ATP] values were 109 ± 34 and 147 ± 45 nmol l−1 at rest and increased to 363 ± 83 and 560 ± 111 nmol l−1, respectively, during exercise (P < 0.05), whereas these values did not increase when exercise was performed with the other leg. Hypoxia increased venous plasma [ATP] at rest compared to normoxia (P < 0.05), but not during exercise. Arterial ATP infusion (≤1.8 μmol min−1) increased arterial plasma [ATP] from 74 ± 17 to 486 ± 82 nmol l−1 (P < 0.05), whereas it remained unchanged in the femoral vein at ∼150 nmol l−1. Both arterial and venous plasma [ATP] decreased during acetylcholine infusion (P < 0.05). Rhythmic thigh compressions increased arterial and venous plasma [ATP] compared to baseline conditions, whereas these values did not change during passive exercise or tyramine infusion. These results demonstrate that ATP is released locally into arterial and venous plasma during exercise and during hypoxia at rest. Compression of the vascular system could contribute to the increase during exercise whereas there appears to be little ATP release in response to increased blood flow, vascular stretch or sympathetic ATP release. Furthermore, the half-life of arterially infused ATP is <1 s. PMID:21300753

  8. Estimation of skeletal muscle interstitial adenosine during forearm dynamic exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, F.; Heusinkveld, J.; Ballog, R.; Davis, S.; Biaggioni, I.

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that adenosine is a metabolic signal that triggers activation of muscle afferents involved in the exercise pressor reflex. Furthermore, exogenous adenosine induces sympathetic activation that mimics the exercise pressor reflex, and blockade of adenosine receptors inhibits sympathetic activation induced by exercise. Thus, we hypothesize that adenosine is released locally by the muscle during exercise. We used microdialysis probes, placed in the flexor digitorium superficialis muscle, to estimate muscle interstitial adenosine levels in humans. We estimated resting in vivo muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations (0.292+/-0.058 micromol/L, n=4) by perfusing increasing concentrations of adenosine to determine the gradient produced in the dialysate. Muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations increased from 0.23+/-0.04 to 0.82+/-0.14 micromol/L (n=14, P<0.001) during intermittent dynamic exercise at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. Lactate increased from 0.8+/-0.1 to 2.3+/-0.3 mmol/L (P<0.001). Lower intensity (15% maximal voluntary contraction) intermittent dynamic exercise increased adenosine concentrations from 0.104+/-0.02 to 0.42+/-0.16 micromol/L (n=7). The addition of ischemia to this low level of exercise produced a greater increase in adenosine (from 0.095+/-0.02 to 0.48+/-0.2 micromol/L) compared with nonischemic exercise (0. 095+/-0.02 to 0.25+/-0.12 micromol/L). These results indicate that microdialysis is useful in estimating adenosine concentrations and in reflecting changes in muscle interstitial adenosine during dynamic exercise in humans.

  9. Exercise sensitizes skeletal muscle to extracellular ATP for IL-6 expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Verdejo, R; Casas, M; Galgani, J E; Jaimovich, E; Buvinic, S

    2014-04-01

    Active skeletal muscle synthesizes and releases interleukin-6 (IL-6), which plays important roles in the organism's adaptation to exercise. Autocrine/paracrine ATP signaling has been shown to modulate IL-6 expression. The aim of this study was to determine whether a period of physical activity modifies the ATP-induced IL-6 expression. BalbC mice were either subject to 5 weeks voluntary wheel running (VA) or kept sedentary (SED). Flexor digitorum brevis muscles were dissected, stimulated with different ATP concentrations (0-100 μM) and IL-6 mRNA levels were measured using qPCR. ATP evoked a concentration-dependent rise in IL-6 mRNA in both SED and VA mice. VA mice however, had significantly higher ATP sensitivity (pD2 pharmacological values: VA=5.58±0.02 vs. SED=4.95±0.04, p<0.05). Interestingly, in VA mice we observed a positive correlation between the level of physical activity and the IL-6 mRNA increase following fiber stimulation with 10 μM ATP. In addition, there were lower P2Y2- and higher P2Y14-receptor mRNA levels in skeletal muscles of VA compared to SED mice, showing plasticity of nucleotide receptors with exercise. These results suggest that exercise increases skeletal muscle ATP sensitivity, a response dependent on the level of physical activity performed. This could have an important role in the mechanisms controlling skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise and training.

  10. Exercise sensitizes skeletal muscle to extracellular ATP for IL-6 expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Verdejo, R; Casas, M; Galgani, J E; Jaimovich, E; Buvinic, S

    2014-04-01

    Active skeletal muscle synthesizes and releases interleukin-6 (IL-6), which plays important roles in the organism's adaptation to exercise. Autocrine/paracrine ATP signaling has been shown to modulate IL-6 expression. The aim of this study was to determine whether a period of physical activity modifies the ATP-induced IL-6 expression. BalbC mice were either subject to 5 weeks voluntary wheel running (VA) or kept sedentary (SED). Flexor digitorum brevis muscles were dissected, stimulated with different ATP concentrations (0-100 μM) and IL-6 mRNA levels were measured using qPCR. ATP evoked a concentration-dependent rise in IL-6 mRNA in both SED and VA mice. VA mice however, had significantly higher ATP sensitivity (pD2 pharmacological values: VA=5.58±0.02 vs. SED=4.95±0.04, p<0.05). Interestingly, in VA mice we observed a positive correlation between the level of physical activity and the IL-6 mRNA increase following fiber stimulation with 10 μM ATP. In addition, there were lower P2Y2- and higher P2Y14-receptor mRNA levels in skeletal muscles of VA compared to SED mice, showing plasticity of nucleotide receptors with exercise. These results suggest that exercise increases skeletal muscle ATP sensitivity, a response dependent on the level of physical activity performed. This could have an important role in the mechanisms controlling skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise and training. PMID:24022572

  11. Smaller muscle ATP reduction in women than in men by repeated bouts of sprint exercise.

    PubMed

    Esbjörnsson-Liljedahl, Mona; Bodin, Kristina; Jansson, Eva

    2002-09-01

    It was hypothesized that the reduction of high-energy phosphates in muscle after repeated sprints is smaller in women than in men. Fifteen healthy and physically active women and men with an average age of 25 yr (range of 19-42 yr) performed three 30-s cycle sprints (Wingate test) with 20 min of rest between sprints. Repeated blood and muscle samples were obtained. Freeze-dried pooled muscle fibers of types I and II were analyzed for high-energy phosphates and their breakdown products and for glycogen. Accumulation of plasma ATP breakdown products, plasma catecholamines, and blood lactate, as well as glycogen reduction in type I fibers, was all lower in women than in men during sprint exercise. Repeated sprints induced smaller reduction of ATP and smaller accumulation of IMP and inosine in women than in men in type II muscle fibers, with no gender differences in changes of ATP and its breakdown products during the bouts of exercise themselves. This indicates that the smaller ATP reduction in women than in men during repeated sprints was created during recovery periods between the sprint exercises and that women possess a faster recovery of ATP via reamination of IMP during these recovery periods.

  12. Circulating ATP-induced vasodilatation overrides sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Rosenmeier, Jaya B; Hansen, Jim; González-Alonso, José

    2004-07-01

    Despite increases in muscle sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity, skeletal muscle blood flow and O2 delivery increase during exercise in humans in proportion to the local metabolic demand, a phenomenon coupled to local reductions in the oxygenation state of haemoglobin and concomitant increases in circulating ATP. We tested the hypothesis that circulating ATP contributes to local blood flow and O2 delivery regulation by both inducing vasodilatation and blunting the augmented sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity. In eight healthy subjects, we first measured leg blood flow (LBF) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) during three hyperaemic conditions: (1) intrafemoral artery adenosine infusion (vasodilator control), (2) intrafemoral artery ATP infusion (vasodilator), and (3) mild knee-extensor exercise (approximately 20 W), and then compared the responses with the combined infusion of the vasoconstrictor drug tyramine, which evokes endogenous release of noradrenaline from sympathetic nerve endings. In all three hyperaemic conditions, LBF equally increased from approximately 0.5 +/- 0.1 l min(-1) at rest to approximately 3.6 +/- 0.3 l min(-1), with no change in MAP. Tyramine caused significant leg vasoconstriction during adenosine infusion (53 +/- 5 and 56 +/- 5% lower LBF and leg vascular conductance, respectively, P < 0.05), which was completely abolished by both ATP infusion and exercise. In six additional subjects resting in the sitting position, intrafemoral artery infusion of ATP increased LBF and leg vascular conductance 27 +/- 3-fold, despite concomitant increases in venous noradrenaline and muscle sympathetic nerve activity of 2.5 +/- 0.2- and 2.4 +/- 0.1-fold, respectively. Maximal ATP-induced vasodilatation at rest accounted for 78% of the peak LBF during maximal bicycling exercise. Our findings in humans demonstrate that circulating ATP is capable of regulating local skeletal muscle blood flow and O2 delivery by causing substantial vasodilatation and negating

  13. High-Intensity Interval Training Alters ATP Pathway Flux During Maximal Muscle Contractions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Ryan G.; Maynard, Logan; Kent, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Aim High-intensity interval training (HIT) results in potent metabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle, however little is known about the influence of these adaptations on energetics in vivo. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to examine the effects of HIT on ATP synthesis from net PCr breakdown (ATPCK), oxidative phosphorylation (ATPOX) and non-oxidative glycolysis (ATPGLY) in vivo in vastus lateralis during a 24-s maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Methods Eight young men performed 6 sessions of repeated, 30-s “all-out” sprints on a cycle ergometer; measures of muscle energetics were obtained at baseline, and after the first and sixth sessions. Results Training increased peak oxygen consumption (35.8±1.4 to 39.3±1.6 ml·min−1·kg−1, p=0.01) and exercise capacity (217.0±11.0 to 230.5±11.7 W, p=0.04) on the ergometer, with no effects on total ATP production or force-time integral during the MVC. While ATP production by each pathway was unchanged after the first session, 6 sessions increased the relative contribution of ATPOX (from 31±2 to 39±2% of total ATP turnover, p<0.001), and lowered the relative contribution from both ATPCK (49±2 to 44±1%, p=0.004) and ATPGLY (20±2 to 17±1%, p=0.03). Conclusion These alterations to muscle ATP production in vivo indicate that brief, maximal contractions are performed with increased support of oxidative ATP synthesis, and relatively less contribution from anaerobic ATP production following training. These results extend previous reports of molecular and cellular adaptations to HIT and show that 6 training sessions are sufficient to alter in vivo muscle energetics, which likely contributes to increased exercise capacity after short-term HIT. PMID:24612773

  14. Intracellular ATP measured with luciferin/luciferase in isolated single mouse skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Allen, David G; Lännergren, Jan; Westerblad, Håkan

    2002-03-01

    The firefly luciferin/luciferase reaction was utilized to monitor intracellular ATP concentration ([ATP](i)). Single fibres of mouse skeletal muscle were dissected and injected with luciferase. Luciferin was added to the perfusate and light emission from the fibres was monitored as an indication of [ATP](i). Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation with cyanide and anaerobic glycolysis with iodoacetate caused light emission to fall to zero within 10 min and the fibres developed a rigor contraction. Inhibition of creatine kinase with 2,4-dinitro-1-fluorobenzene produced a small transient fall in light emission in association with each tetanus. Muscle fibres were fatigued by repeated tetani and 5/12 fibres showed a fall in light emission in the late phase of fatigue. If fibres were allowed to recover from fatigue in the absence of glucose and then restimulated in the absence of glucose they fatigued much more rapidly. However, such fibres showed no obvious change in light emission. We conclude that the luciferin/luciferase system can be used to monitor [ATP](i) in functioning single skeletal muscle cells. A depletion of global [ATP](i) is not observed in all fatiguing fibres and cannot be the sole cause of the final phase of fatigue.

  15. Sensing muscle ischemia: coincident detection of acid and ATP via interplay of two ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Birdsong, William T.; Fierro, Leonardo; Williams, Frank G.; Spelta, Valeria; Naves, Ligia A.; Knowles, Michelle; Marsh-Haffner, Josephine; Adelman, John P.; Almers, Wolfhard; Elde, Robert P.; McCleskey, Edwin W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Ischemic pain – examples include the chest pain of a heart attack and the leg pain of a 30 second sprint – occurs when muscle gets too little oxygen for its metabolic need. Lactic acid cannot act alone to trigger ischemic pain because the pH change is so small. Here we show that another compound released from ischemic muscle, ATP (adenosine tri-phosphate), works together with acid by increasing the pH sensitivity of ASIC3 (acid sensing ion channel #3), the molecule used by sensory neurons to detect lactic acidosis. Our data argue that ATP acts by binding to P2X receptors that form a molecular complex with ASICs; the receptor on sensory neurons appears to be P2X5, an electrically quiet ion channel. Coincident detection of acid and ATP should confer sensory selectivity for ischemia over other conditions of acidosis. PMID:21092862

  16. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  17. ATP Released by Electrical Stimuli Elicits Calcium Transients and Gene Expression in Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, with an EC50 value of 7.8 ± 3.1 μm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 μm suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y2 receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 μm ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca2+ homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  18. ATP released by electrical stimuli elicits calcium transients and gene expression in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-12-11

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration, with an EC(50) value of 7.8 +/- 3.1 microm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 mum suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y(2) receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 mum ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca(2+) homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  19. The adjuvant MF59 induces ATP release from muscle that potentiates response to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Vono, Maria; Taccone, Marianna; Caccin, Paola; Gallotta, Marilena; Donvito, Giovanna; Falzoni, Simonetta; Palmieri, Emiliano; Pallaoro, Michele; Rappuoli, Rino; Di Virgilio, Francesco; De Gregorio, Ennio; Montecucco, Cesare; Seubert, Anja

    2013-12-24

    Vaccines are the most effective agents to control infections. In addition to the pathogen antigens, vaccines contain adjuvants that are used to enhance protective immune responses. However, the molecular mechanism of action of most adjuvants is ill-known, and a better understanding of adjuvanticity is needed to develop improved adjuvants based on molecular targets that further enhance vaccine efficacy. This is particularly important for tuberculosis, malaria, AIDS, and other diseases for which protective vaccines do not exist. Release of endogenous danger signals has been linked to adjuvanticity; however, the role of extracellular ATP during vaccination has never been explored. Here, we tested whether ATP release is involved in the immune boosting effect of four common adjuvants: aluminum hydroxide, calcium phosphate, incomplete Freund's adjuvant, and the oil-in-water emulsion MF59. We found that intramuscular injection is always associated with a weak transient release of ATP, which was greatly enhanced by the presence of MF59 but not by all other adjuvants tested. Local injection of apyrase, an ATP-hydrolyzing enzyme, inhibited cell recruitment in the muscle induced by MF59 but not by alum or incomplete Freund's adjuvant. In addition, apyrase strongly inhibited influenza-specific T-cell responses and hemagglutination inhibition titers in response to an MF59-adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccine. These data demonstrate that a transient ATP release is required for innate and adaptive immune responses induced by MF59 and link extracellular ATP with an enhanced response to vaccination. PMID:24324152

  20. The Signaling Mechanism of Contraction Induced by ATP and UTP in Feline Esophageal Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Tae Hoon; Jung, Hyunwoo; Cho, Eun Jeong; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2015-01-01

    P2 receptors are membrane-bound receptors for extracellular nucleotides such as ATP and UTP. P2 receptors have been classified as ligand-gated ion channels or P2X receptors and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors. Recently, purinergic signaling has begun to attract attention as a potential therapeutic target for a variety of diseases especially associated with gastroenterology. This study determined the ATP and UTP-induced receptor signaling mechanism in feline esophageal contraction. Contraction of dispersed feline esophageal smooth muscle cells was measured by scanning micrometry. Phosphorylation of MLC20 was determined by western blot analysis. ATP and UTP elicited maximum esophageal contraction at 30 s and 10 μM concentration. Contraction of dispersed cells treated with 10 μM ATP was inhibited by nifedipine. However, contraction induced by 0.1 μM ATP, 0.1 μM UTP and 10 μM UTP was decreased by U73122, chelerythrine, ML-9, PTX and GDPβS. Contraction induced by 0.1 μM ATP and UTP was inhibited by Gαi3 or Gαq antibodies and by PLCβ1 or PLCβ3 antibodies. Phosphorylated MLC20 was increased by ATP and UTP treatment. In conclusion, esophageal contraction induced by ATP and UTP was preferentially mediated by P2Y receptors coupled to Gαi3 and G q proteins, which activate PLCβ1 and PLCβ3. Subsequently, increased intracellular Ca2+ and activated PKC triggered stimulation of MLC kinase and inhibition of MLC phosphatase. Finally, increased pMLC20 generated esophageal contraction. PMID:26013385

  1. Impaired skeletal muscle blood flow control with advancing age in humans: attenuated ATP release and local vasodilation during erythrocyte deoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Brett S.; Crecelius, Anne R.; Voyles, Wyatt F.; Dinenno, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Skeletal muscle blood flow is coupled with the oxygenation state of hemoglobin in young adults, whereby the erythrocyte functions as an oxygen sensor and releases ATP during deoxygenation to evoke vasodilation. Whether this function is impaired in humans of advanced age is unknown. Objective To test the hypothesis that older adults demonstrate impaired muscle blood flow and lower intravascular ATP during conditions of erythrocyte deoxygenation. Methods and Results We show impaired forearm blood flow (FBF) responses during two conditions of erythrocyte deoxygenation (systemic hypoxia and graded handgrip exercise) with age, and this is due to reduced local vasodilation. In young adults, both hypoxia and exercise significantly increased venous [ATP] and ATP effluent (FBF × [ATP]) draining skeletal muscle. In contrast, hypoxia and exercise did not increase [ATP]v in older adults, and both [ATP]v and ATP effluent were substantially reduced compared with young despite similar levels of deoxygenation. Next, we demonstrate that this cannot be explained by augmented extracellular ATP hydrolysis in whole blood with age. Finally, we found that deoxygenation-mediated ATP release from isolated erythrocytes is essentially non-existent in older adults. Conclusions Skeletal muscle blood flow during conditions of erythrocyte deoxygenation is markedly reduced in aging humans, and reductions in plasma ATP and erythrocyte-mediated ATP release may be a novel mechanism underlying impaired vasodilation and oxygen delivery during hypoxemia with advancing age. Because aging is associated with elevated risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease and exercise intolerance, interventions targeting erythrocyte-mediated ATP release may offer therapeutic potential. PMID:22647875

  2. What Do Magnetic Resonance–Based Measurements of Pi→ATP Flux Tell Us About Skeletal Muscle Metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Graham J.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) methods offer a potentially valuable window into cellular metabolism. Measurement of flux between inorganic phosphate (Pi) and ATP using 31P MRS magnetization transfer has been used in resting muscle to assess what is claimed to be mitochondrial ATP synthesis and has been particularly popular in the study of insulin effects and insulin resistance. However, the measured Pi→ATP flux in resting skeletal muscle is far higher than the true rate of oxidative ATP synthesis, being dominated by a glycolytically mediated Pi↔ATP exchange reaction that is unrelated to mitochondrial function. Furthermore, even if measured accurately, the ATP production rate in resting muscle has no simple relationship to mitochondrial capacity as measured either ex vivo or in vivo. We summarize the published measurements of Pi→ATP flux, concentrating on work relevant to diabetes and insulin, relate it to current understanding of the physiology of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and glycolytic Pi↔ATP exchange, and discuss some possible implications of recently reported correlations between Pi→ATP flux and other physiological measures. PMID:22826313

  3. ATP release and contraction mediated by different P2-receptor subtypes in guinea-pig ileal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Katsuichi; Katsuragi, Takeshi; Fujiki, Sono; Sato, Chiemi; Furukawa, Tatsuo

    1997-01-01

    The present study was addressed to clarify the subtypes of P2-purinoceptor involved in ATP release and contraction evoked by α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-mATP) and other P2-agonists in guinea-pig ileum.α,β-mATP 100 μM produced a transient and steep contraction followed by ATP release from tissue segments. These maximum responses appeared with different time-courses and their ED50 values were 5 and 25 μM, respectively. The maximum release of ATP by α,β-mATP was markedly reduced by 250 μM suramin, 30 μM pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,5′-disulphonic acid (PPADS) and 30 μM reactive blue 2 (RB-2), P2-receptor antagonists. However, the contractile response was inhibited by suramin, tetrodotoxin and atropine, but not by PPADS and RB-2.Although the contraction caused by α,β-mATP was strongly diminished by Ca2+-removal and nifedipine, and also by tetrodotoxin and atropine at 0.3 μM, the release of ATP was virtually unaffected by these procedures.UTP, β,γ-methylene ATP (β,γ-mATP) and ADP at 100 μM elicited a moderate release of ATP. The release caused by UTP was virtually unaffected by RB-2. However, these P2-agonists failed to elicit a contraction of the segment.The potency order of all the agonists tested for the release of ATP was α,β-mATP>UTP>β,γ-mATP>ADP.In superfusion experiments with cultured smooth muscle cells from the ileum, α,β-mATP (100 μM) enhanced the release of ATP 5 fold above the basal value. This evoked release was inhibited by RB-2.These findings suggest that ATP release and contraction induced by P2-agonists such as α,β-mATP in the guinea-pig ileum result mainly from stimulation of different P2-purinoceptors, P2Y-like purinoceptors on the smooth muscles and, probably, P2X-purinoceptors on cholinergic nerve terminals, respectively. However, the ATP release may also be mediated, in part, by P2U-receptors, because UTP caused RB-2-insensitive ATP release. PMID:9283712

  4. PPARdelta agonism inhibits skeletal muscle PDC activity, mitochondrial ATP production and force generation during prolonged contraction.

    PubMed

    Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Baker, David J; Constantin, Despina; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2009-01-15

    We have recently shown that PPARdelta agonism, used clinically to treat insulin resistance, increases fat oxidation and up-regulates mitochondrial PDK4 mRNA and protein expression in resting skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that PDK4 up-regulation, which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC)-dependent carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation, would negatively affect muscle function during sustained contraction where the demand on CHO is markedly increased. Three groups of eight male Wistar rats each received either vehicle or a PPARdelta agonist (GW610742X) at two doses (5 and 100 mg (kg body mass (bm))(-1) orally for 6 days. On the seventh day, the gastrocnemius-soleus-plantaris muscle group was isolated and snap frozen, or underwent 30 min of electrically evoked submaximal intensity isometric contraction using a perfused hindlimb model. During contraction, the rate of muscle PDC activation was significantly lower at 100 mg (kg bm)(-1) compared with control (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the rates of muscle PCr hydrolysis and lactate accumulation were significantly increased at 100 mg (kg bm)(-1) compared with control, reflecting lower mitochondrial ATP generation. Muscle tension development during contraction was significantly lower at 100 mg (kg bm)(-1) compared with control (25%; P < 0.05). The present data demonstrate that PPARdelta agonism inhibits muscle CHO oxidation at the level of PDC during prolonged contraction, and is paralleled by the activation of anaerobic metabolism, which collectively impair contractile function.

  5. Effect of insulin on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial ATP production, protein synthesis, and mRNA transcripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Craig S.; Short, Kevin R.; Bigelow, Maureen L.; Schimke, Jill M.; Sreekumaran Nair, K.

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondria are the primary site of skeletal muscle fuel metabolism and ATP production. Although insulin is a major regulator of fuel metabolism, its effect on mitochondrial ATP production is not known. Here we report increases in vastus lateralis muscle mitochondrial ATP production capacity (32-42%) in healthy humans (P < 0.01) i.v. infused with insulin (1.5 milliunits/kg of fat-free mass per min) while clamping glucose, amino acids, glucagon, and growth hormone. Increased ATP production occurred in association with increased mRNA levels from both mitochondrial (NADH dehydrogenase subunit IV) and nuclear [cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunit IV] genes (164-180%) encoding mitochondrial proteins (P < 0.05). In addition, muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis, and COX and citrate synthase enzyme activities were increased by insulin (P < 0.05). Further studies demonstrated no effect of low to high insulin levels on muscle mitochondrial ATP production for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, whereas matched nondiabetic controls increased 16-26% (P < 0.02) when four different substrate combinations were used. In conclusion, insulin stimulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle along with synthesis of gene transcripts and mitochondrial protein in human subjects. Skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients has a reduced capacity to increase ATP production with high insulin levels. cytochrome c oxidase | NADH dehydrogenase subunit IV | amino acids | citrate synthase

  6. Regulation of blood flow distribution in skeletal muscle: role of erythrocyte-released ATP

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, Mary L; Sprague, Randy S

    2012-01-01

    The maintenance of adequate tissue O2 levels in skeletal muscle is vital for normal physiology and requires a well regulated and appropriately distributed convective O2 supply. Inherent in this fundamental physiological process is the requirement for a mechanism which both senses tissue O2 need and locally adjusts flow to appropriately meet that need. Over the past several years we and others have suggested that, in skeletal muscle, O2 carrying erythrocytes participate in the regulation of total blood flow and its distribution by releasing ATP. Importantly, the release of this vasoactive molecule must be both rapid and well controlled if it is to serve an important physiological role. Here we provide insights into three distinct regulated signalling pathways within the erythrocyte that are activated by exposure to reduced O2 tension or in response to binding of agonists to the prostacyclin or β-adrenergic receptors. Although much has been learned about the role of the erythrocyte in perfusion of skeletal muscle, much remains to be understood. However, what is clear is that the long established passive carrier of O2 also contributes to the regulation of the distribution of microvascular perfusion in skeletal muscle by virtue of its capacity to release ATP. PMID:22586223

  7. Tyrphostin inhibition of ATP-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell proliferation and fos-protein expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Erlinge, D.; Heilig, M.; Edvinsson, L.

    1996-01-01

    1. We and others have shown that extracellular ATP (adenosine triphosphate), released from sympathetic nerves and platelets, stimulates growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). To study the importance of tyrosine kinases for ATP-mediated proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells we used tyrphostins, a recently developed group of highly specific inhibitors of tyrosine kinases. 2. ATP induced a powerful concentration-dependent increase in DNA synthesis measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation in rat aorta SMC (RASMC) and an increase in total cell number after 72 h of incubation as measured by an enzymatic cell proliferation assay. Tyrphostin 25 (10(-5) M) had no effect per se on basal DNA synthesis but reduced ATP-stimulated DNA synthesis and increase in cell number in a dose-dependent manner. Higher concentrations of ATP could not reverse the inhibitory effect of tyrphostin 25. The potency of several (six) other tyrphostins was also examined and found to be slightly greater than tyrphostin 25 with equal efficacy. 3. When RASMC were incubated with 10(-5) M ATP for 2 h, nearly all of the cells (87 +/- 5%) were intensely stained with an antibody to the Fos protein while in the controls only 1 +/- 2% of the cells were weakly stained. Tyrphostin 25 greatly reduced the Fos-protein staining (14 +/- 2%). 4. ATP induced a concentration-dependent increase in 45Ca(2+)-influx and formation of inositol phosphates (IPtotal) in RASMC. These effects were not inhibited by tyrphostin 25. 5. Tyrphostin 25 did not alter ATP-induced contraction in ring segments of rat aorta. 6. In conclusion, tyrphostin 25 inhibited ATP-induced DNA synthesis, cell proliferation and Fos-protein expression, but not ATP-induced 45Ca(2+)-influx, inositolphosphate-production or vasoconstriction. This indicates that the mitogenic effect of ATP on vascular smooth muscle cells is dependent on tyrosine kinases in contrast to the contractile effect of ATP in blood vessels. Images Figure 2 PMID:8799578

  8. Contribution of interstitial diffusion in drug absorption from perfused rabbit muscle: effect of hyaluronidase on absorption.

    PubMed

    Nara, E; Saikawa, A; Masegi, M; Hashida, M; Sezaki, H

    1992-03-01

    [3H]Water and [14C]inulin were injected into perfused rabbit muscle with or without hyaluronidase (300 units/ml) and their absorption into venous effluent from muscle was determined. Hyaluronidase accelerated the absorption of both compounds but the enhancement of [14C]inulin was much larger than that for [3H]water. The pharmacokinetic analysis of venous appearance curves based on a physiological diffusion model elucidated that interstitial diffusion of [14C]inulin was remarkably increased by hyaluronidase treatment, suggesting the existence of steric hindrance for it by the polysaccharide network under normal conditions. Enhancement of [3H]water diffusion was also detected although enhancement ratio was about one-half of that of [14C]inulin. Mean time necessary for each process was calculated using the statistical moment concepts. The results suggested predominant contribution of the interstitial diffusion process and secondary and little contribution of local perfusion flow and permeation process across the capillary wall, respectively, in total absorption of [14C]inulin. Effect of hyaluronidase on transcapillary movement of [14C]inulin was studied using an in vitro diffusion experiment with cultured endothelial cell monolayer and no enhancing effect was shown on [14C]inulin transport across the cell monolayer. The contribution of the local perfusion flow, on the other hand, was shown to be almost equivalent to that of the diffusion process in the total absorption of [3H]water.

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum is a key organella in bradykinin-triggered ATP release from cultured smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yumei; Migita, Keisuke; Sato, Chiemi; Usune, Sadaharu; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Katsuragi, Takeshi

    2007-09-01

    ATP has broad functions as an autocrine/paracrine molecule. The mode of ATP release and its intracellular source, however, are little understood. Here we show that bradykinin via B(2)-receptor stimulation induces the extracellular release of ATP via the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P(3)]-signaling pathway in cultured taenia coli smooth muscle cells. It was found that bradykinin also increased the production of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) and 2-APB-inhibitable [Ca(2+)](i). The evoked release of ATP was suppressed by the Ca(2+)-channel blockers, nifedipine, and verapamil. Moreover, the extracellular release of ATP was elicited by photoliberation of Ins(1,4,5)P(3). Bradykinin caused a quick and transient accumulation of intracellular ATP from cells treated with 1% perchloric acid solution (PCA), but not with the cell lysis buffer. Peak accumulation was prevented by 2-APB and thapsigargin, but not by nifedipine or verapamil, inhibitors of extracellular release of ATP. These findings suggest that bradykinin elicits the extracellular release of ATP that is mediated by the Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-induced Ca(2+) signaling and, finally, leads to a Ca(2+)-dependent export of ATP from the cells. Furthermore, the bradykinin-induced transient accumulation of ATP in the cells treated with PCA may imply a possible release of ATP from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  10. UV-B exposure reduces locomotor performance by impairing muscle function but not mitochondrial ATP production.

    PubMed

    Ghanizadeh Kazerouni, Ensiyeh; Franklin, Craig E; Seebacher, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B) can reduce swimming performance by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. High concentrations of ROS can damage mitochondria, resulting in reduced ATP production. ROS can also damage muscle proteins, thereby leading to impaired muscle contractile function. We have shown previously that UV-B exposure reduces locomotor performance in mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) without affecting metabolic scope. Our aim was therefore to test whether UV-B influences swimming performance of mosquitofish by ROS-induced damage to muscle proteins without affecting mitochondrial function. In a fully factorial design, we exposed mosquitofish to UV-B and no-UV-B controls in combination with exposure to N-acetylcysteine (NAC) plus no-NAC controls. We used NAC, a precursor of glutathione, as an antioxidant to test whether any effects of UV-B on swimming performance were at least partly due to UV-B-induced ROS. UV-B significantly reduced critical sustained swimming performance and tail beat frequencies, and it increased ROS-induced damage (protein carbonyl concentrations and lipid peroxidation) in muscle. However, UV-B did not affect the activity of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA), an enzyme associated with muscle calcium cycling and muscle relaxation. UV-B did not affect ADP phosphorylation (state 3) rates of mitochondrial respiration, and it did not alter the amount of ATP produced per atom of oxygen consumed (P:O ratio). However, UV-B reduced the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio. Under UV-B exposure, fish treated with NAC showed greater swimming performance and tail beat frequencies, higher glutathione concentrations, and lower protein carbonyl concentrations and lipid peroxidation than untreated fish. Tail beat amplitude was not affected by any treatment. Our results showed, firstly, that the effects of UV-B on locomotor performance were mediated by ROS and, secondly, that reduced swimming performance was not caused by

  11. Effects of microgravity on interstitial muscle receptors affecting heart rate and blood pressure during static exercise.

    PubMed

    Essfeld, D; Baum, K; Hoffmann, U; Stegemann, J

    1993-09-01

    Afferent nerve fibers from receptors situated in the interstitium of skeletal muscles can induce cardiovascular reflexes. It has been shown that these interstitial muscle receptors are also sensitive to the local state of hydration: increased heart rates and blood pressure values were seen during dynamic and static exercise after local dehydration on earth. Since weightlessness leads to a persisting fluid loss in the lower part of the body, we hypothesized that leg exercise in space would augment heart rate and blood pressure responses to a similar extent as during local, interstitial dehydration on earth. Initial measurements during weightlessness were obtained in one subject after 6 days of space flight. Heart rate and blood pressure responses to light static foot plantar flexion (18% of maximal voluntary contraction) were recorded in two sessions. To eliminate the influence of muscle perfusion, exercise was performed during a period of arterial occlusion obtained by means of pneumatic cuffs at mid-thigh level. Identical protocols were used in the pre- and postflight controls, which were performed both in the sitting posture and in a -90 degrees tilted sitting posture assumed 30-40 min before arterial occlusion. During weightlessness the exercise responses of heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressure closely followed the tracings obtained with the tilted sitting posture on ground. The response amplitudes in these states of reduced lower limb volumes (about 20/min and 20 mmHg, respectively) exceeded the responses in the supine position by a factor of at least 2.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Yeast actin filaments display ATP-dependent sliding movement over surfaces coated with rabbit muscle myosin.

    PubMed Central

    Kron, S J; Drubin, D G; Botstein, D; Spudich, J A

    1992-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to study the function of components of the actin cytoskeleton in vivo, mainly because it is easy to derive and characterize mutations affecting these proteins. In contrast, biochemical studies have generally used proteins derived from higher eukaryotes. We have devised a simple procedure to prepare, in high yield, homogeneous native actin from wild-type and act1 mutant yeast. Using intensified video fluorescence microscopy, we found that actin filaments polymerized from these preparations exhibit ATP-dependent sliding movement over surfaces coated with rabbit skeletal muscle myosin. The rates of sliding movement of the wild-type and mutant yeast actins were each about half that of rabbit skeletal muscle actin under similar conditions. We conclude that over the large evolutionary distance between yeast and mammals there has been significant conservation of actin function, specifically the ability to be moved by interaction with myosin. Images PMID:1533933

  13. SLOW MYOSIN ATP TURNOVER IN THE SUPER-RELAXED STATE IN TARANTULA MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Nariman; Cooke, Roger

    2011-01-01

    We measured the nucleotide turnover rate of myosin in tarantula leg-muscle fibers by observing single turnovers of the fluorescent nucleotide analog, mantATP, as monitored by the decrease in fluorescence when mantATP is replaced by ATP in a chase experiment. We find a multi-exponential process, with approximately two-thirds of the myosin showing a very slow nucleotide turnover time constant, ~30 minutes. This slow-turnover state is termed the super-relaxed state (SRX). If fibers are incubated in mantADP and chased with ADP, the SRX is not seen, indicating that trinucleotide-relaxed myosins are responsible for the SRX. Phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain eliminates the fraction of myosin with the very long lifetime. The data imply that the very long-lived SRX in tarantula fibers is a highly novel adaptation for energy conservation in an animal that spends extremely long periods of time in a quiescent state employing a lie-in-wait hunting strategy. The presence of the SRX measured here correlates well with the binding of myosin heads to the core of the thick filament in a structure known as the “interacting-heads motif” observed previously by electron microscopy. Both the structural array and the long-lived SRX require relaxed filaments or relaxed fibers, both are lost upon myosin phosphorylation, and both appear to be more stable in tarantula than in vertebrate skeletal or vertebrate cardiac preparations. PMID:21763701

  14. Influence of erythrocyte oxygenation and intravascular ATP on resting and exercising skeletal muscle blood flow in humans with mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Tina D; Vissing, John; González-Alonso, José

    2012-05-01

    Oxygen (O₂) extraction is impaired in exercising skeletal muscle of humans with mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but the muscle hemodynamic response to exercise has never been directly investigated. This study sought to examine the extent to which human skeletal muscle perfusion can increase without reductions in blood oxygenation and to determine whether erythrocyte O₂ off-loading and related ATP vascular mechanisms are impaired in humans with mutations of mtDNA. Leg vascular hemodynamic, oxygenation and ATP were investigated in ten patients with mtDNA mutations and ten matched healthy control subjects: 1) at rest during normoxia, hypoxia, hyperoxia and intra-femoral artery ATP infusion, and 2) during passive and dynamic one-legged knee-extensor exercises. At rest, blood flow (LBF), femoral arterial and venous blood oxygenation and plasma ATP were similar in the two groups. During dynamic exercise, LBF and vascular conductance increased 9-10 fold in the patients despite erythrocyte oxygenation and leg O₂ extraction remained unchanged (p<0.01). In the patients, workload-adjusted LBF was 28% to 62% higher during submaximal- and maximal exercises and was associated with augmented plasma ATP. The appropriate hemodynamic adjustments during severe hypoxia and ATP infusion suggest that erythrocyte O₂ off-loading and related ATP vascular mechanisms are intact in patients with mtDNA mutations. Furthermore, greater increase in plasma ATP and LBF at a given metabolic demand in the patients, in concert with unchanged oxyhemoglobin, suggest that erythrocyte O₂ off-loading is not obligatory for the exercise-induced increase in blood flow and intravascular ATP concentration. PMID:22155147

  15. Palmitate-induced changes in energy demand cause reallocation of ATP supply in rat and human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nisr, Raid B; Affourtit, Charles

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with obesity-related muscle insulin resistance, but the causality of this association is controversial. The notion that mitochondrial oxidative capacity may be insufficient to deal appropriately with excessive nutrient loads is for example disputed. Effective mitochondrial capacity is indirectly, but largely determined by ATP-consuming processes because skeletal muscle energy metabolism is mostly controlled by ATP demand. Probing the bioenergetics of rat and human myoblasts in real time we show here that the saturated fatty acid palmitate lowers the rate and coupling efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation under conditions it causes insulin resistance. Stearate affects the bioenergetic parameters similarly, whereas oleate and linoleate tend to decrease the rate but not the efficiency of ATP synthesis. Importantly, we reveal that palmitate influences how oxidative ATP supply is used to fuel ATP-consuming processes. Direct measurement of newly made protein demonstrates that palmitate lowers the rate of de novo protein synthesis by more than 30%. The anticipated decrease of energy demand linked to protein synthesis is confirmed by attenuated cycloheximide-sensitivity of mitochondrial respiratory activity used to make ATP. This indirect measure of ATP turnover indicates that palmitate lowers ATP supply reserved for protein synthesis by at least 40%. This decrease is also provoked by stearate, oleate and linoleate, albeit to a lesser extent. Moreover, palmitate lowers ATP supply for sodium pump activity by 60-70% and, in human cells, decreases ATP supply for DNA/RNA synthesis by almost three-quarters. These novel fatty acid effects on energy expenditure inform the 'mitochondrial insufficiency' debate. PMID:27154056

  16. Palmitate-induced changes in energy demand cause reallocation of ATP supply in rat and human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nisr, Raid B; Affourtit, Charles

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with obesity-related muscle insulin resistance, but the causality of this association is controversial. The notion that mitochondrial oxidative capacity may be insufficient to deal appropriately with excessive nutrient loads is for example disputed. Effective mitochondrial capacity is indirectly, but largely determined by ATP-consuming processes because skeletal muscle energy metabolism is mostly controlled by ATP demand. Probing the bioenergetics of rat and human myoblasts in real time we show here that the saturated fatty acid palmitate lowers the rate and coupling efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation under conditions it causes insulin resistance. Stearate affects the bioenergetic parameters similarly, whereas oleate and linoleate tend to decrease the rate but not the efficiency of ATP synthesis. Importantly, we reveal that palmitate influences how oxidative ATP supply is used to fuel ATP-consuming processes. Direct measurement of newly made protein demonstrates that palmitate lowers the rate of de novo protein synthesis by more than 30%. The anticipated decrease of energy demand linked to protein synthesis is confirmed by attenuated cycloheximide-sensitivity of mitochondrial respiratory activity used to make ATP. This indirect measure of ATP turnover indicates that palmitate lowers ATP supply reserved for protein synthesis by at least 40%. This decrease is also provoked by stearate, oleate and linoleate, albeit to a lesser extent. Moreover, palmitate lowers ATP supply for sodium pump activity by 60-70% and, in human cells, decreases ATP supply for DNA/RNA synthesis by almost three-quarters. These novel fatty acid effects on energy expenditure inform the 'mitochondrial insufficiency' debate.

  17. A simple approach to evaluate the kinetic rate constant for ATP synthesis in resting human skeletal muscle at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jimin; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-09-01

    Inversion transfer (IT) is a well-established technique with multiple attractive features for analysis of kinetics. However, its application in measurement of ATP synthesis rate in vivo has lagged behind the more common saturation transfer (ST) techniques. One well-recognized issue with IT is the complexity of data analysis in comparison with much simpler analysis by ST. This complexity arises, in part, because the γ-ATP spin is involved in multiple chemical reactions and magnetization exchanges, whereas Pi is involved in a single reaction, Pi → γ-ATP. By considering the reactions involving γ-ATP only as a lumped constant, the rate constant for the reaction of physiological interest, kPi→γATP , can be determined. Here, we present a new IT data analysis method to evaluate kPi→γATP using data collected from resting human skeletal muscle at 7 T. The method is based on the basic Bloch-McConnell equation, which relates kPi→γATP to m˙Pi, the rate of Pi magnetization change. The kPi→γATP value is accessed from m˙Pi data by more familiar linear correlation approaches. For a group of human subjects (n = 15), the kPi→γATP value derived for resting calf muscle was 0.066 ± 0.017 s(-1) , in agreement with literature-reported values. In this study we also explored possible time-saving strategies to speed up data acquisition for kPi→γATP evaluation using simulations. The analysis indicates that it is feasible to carry out a (31) P IT experiment in about 10 min or less at 7 T with reasonable outcome in kPi→γATP variance for measurement of ATP synthesis in resting human skeletal muscle. We believe that this new IT data analysis approach will facilitate the wide acceptance of IT to evaluate ATP synthesis rate in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Permeation of both cations and anions through a single class of ATP- activated ion channels in developing chick skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Micromolar concentrations of extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) elicit a rapid excitatory response in developing chick skeletal muscle. Excitation is the result of a simultaneous increase in membrane permeability to sodium, potassium, and chloride ions. In the present study we quantify the selectivity of the ATP response, and provide evidence that a single class of ATP-activated ion channels conducts both cations and anions. Experiments were performed on myoballs using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We estimated permeability ratios by measuring the shift in reversal potential when one ion was substituted for another. We found that monovalent cations, divalent cations, and monovalent anions all permeate the membrane during the ATP response, and that there was only moderate selectivity between many of these ions. Calcium was the most permeant ion tested. To determine if ATP activates a single class of channels that conducts both cations and anions, or if ATP activates separate classes of cation and anion channels, we analyzed the fluctuations about the mean current induced by ATP. Ionic conditions were arranged so that the reversal potential for cations was +50 mV and the reversal potential for anions was -50 mV. Under these conditions, if ATP activates a single class of channels, ATP should not evoke an increase in noise at the reversal potential of the ATP current. However, if ATP activates separate classes of cation and anion channels, ATP should evoke a significant increase in noise at the reversal potential of the ATP current. At both +40 and -50 mV ATP elicited a clear increase in noise, but at the reversal potential of the ATP current (-5 mV), no increase in noise above background was seen. These results indicate that there is only a single class of excitatory ATP-activated channels, which do not select by charge. Based on analysis of the noise spectrum, the conductance of individual channels is estimated to be 0.2-0.4 pS. PMID:1692581

  19. Activation of ATP/UTP-selective receptors increases blood flow and blunts sympathetic vasoconstriction in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rosenmeier, Jaya B; Yegutkin, Gennady G; González-Alonso, José

    2008-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstriction is blunted in the vascular beds of contracting skeletal muscle in humans, presumably due to the action of vasoactive metabolites (functional sympatholysis). Recently, we demonstrated that infusion of ATP into the arterial circulation of the resting human leg increases blood flow and concomitantly blunts α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in a similar manner to that during moderate exercise. Here we tested the hypothesis that ATP, rather than its dephosphorylated metabolites, induces vasodilatation and sympatholysis in resting skeletal muscle via activation of ATP/UTP-selective receptors. To this aim, we first measured leg blood flow (LBF), mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output (Q̇), leg arterial–venous (a–v) O2 difference, plasma ATP and soluble nucleotidase activities during intrafemoral artery infusion of adenosine, AMP, ADP, ATP or UTP in nine healthy males. Comparison of the doses of nucleotides and adenosine required for a similar increase in LBF from ∼0.5 l min−1 at baseline to ∼3.5 l min−1 (without altering MAP but increasing Q̇ significantly) revealed the following rank order of vasoactive potency: ATP (100) = UTP (100) >> adenosine (5.8) > ADP (2.7) > AMP (1.7). The infusions did not cause any shifts in plasma ATP level or soluble serum nucleotidase activities. Combined infusion of the vasodilatory compounds and the sympathetic vasoconstrictor drug tyramine increased plasma noradrenaline in all hyperaemic conditions, but only caused leg and systemic vasoconstriction and augmented O2 extraction during adenosine, AMP and ADP infusion (LBF from 3.2 ± 0.3 to 1.8 ± 0.2 l min−1; 3.7 ± 0.4 to 1.7 ± 0.2 l min−1 and 3.3 ± 0.4 to 2.4 ± 0.3 l min−1, respectively, P < 0.05). These findings in humans suggest that the vasodilatory and sympatholytic effects of exogenous ATP in the skeletal muscle vasculature are largely mediated via ATP itself rather than its dephosphorylated metabolites, most likely via binding

  20. Stronger control of ATP/ADP by proton leak in pancreatic β-cells than skeletal muscle mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Affourtit, Charles; Brand, Martin D.

    2005-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cells respond to rising blood glucose concentrations by increasing their oxidative metabolism, which leads to an increased ATP/ADP ratio, closure of KATP channels, depolarization of the plasma membrane potential, influx of calcium and the eventual secretion of insulin. Such a signalling mechanism implies that the ATP/ADP ratio is flexible in beta cells (β-cells), which is in contrast with other cell types (e.g. muscle and liver) that maintain a stable ATP/ADP poise while respiring at widely varying rates. To determine whether this difference in flexibility is accounted for by mitochondrial peculiarities, we performed a top-down metabolic control analysis to quantitatively assess how ATP/ADP is controlled in mitochondria isolated from rat skeletal muscle and cultured beta cells. We show that the ATP/ADP ratio is more strongly controlled (approx. 7.5-fold) by proton leak in beta cells than in muscle. The comparatively high importance of proton leak in beta cell mitochondria (relative to phosphorylation) is evidenced furthermore by its relatively high level of control over membrane potential and overall respiratory activity. Modular-kinetic analysis of oxidative phosphorylation reveals that these control differences can be fully explained by a higher relative leak activity in beta cell mitochondria, which results in a comparatively high contribution of proton leak to the overall respiratory activity in this system. PMID:16137248

  1. ATP as a mediator of erythrocyte-dependent regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery in humans

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    In healthy human beings, blood flow to dynamically contracting skeletal muscle is regulated primarily to match oxygen (O2) delivery closely with utilisation. This occurs across a wide range of exercise intensities, as well as when exercise is combined with conditions that modify blood O2 content. The red blood cells (RBCs), the primary O2 carriers in the blood, contribute to the regulation of the local processes matching O2 supply and demand. This is made possible by the ability of RBCs to release the vasoactive substance adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in response to reductions in erythrocyte and plasma O2, as well as to other adjuvant metabolic and mechanical stimuli. The regulatory role of RBCs in human beings is supported by the observations that, i) exercising skeletal muscle blood flow responds primarily to changes in the amount of O2 bound to the erythrocyte haemoglobin molecules, rather than the amount of O2 in plasma, and ii) exercising muscle blood flow can almost double (from 260 to 460 ml min−1 100 g−1) with alterations in blood O2 content, such that O2 delivery and are kept constant. Besides falling blood O2 content, RBCs release ATP when exposed to increased temperature, reduced pH, hypercapnia, elevated shear stress and augmented mechanical deformation, i.e. conditions that exist in the microcirculation of active skeletal muscle. ATP is an attractive mediator signal for skeletal muscle blood flow regulation, not only because it can act as a potent vasodilator, but also because of its sympatholytic properties in the human limb circulations. These properties are essential to counteract the vasoconstrictor effects of concurrent increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and circulating vasoconstrictor substances during exercise. Comparison of the relative vasoactive potencies and sympatholytic properties of ATP, other nucleotides, and adenosine in human limbs, suggests that intravascular ATP exerts its vasodilator and sympatholytic effects directly

  2. Porcine skeletal muscle differentially expressed gene ATP5B: molecular characterization, expression patterns, and association analysis with meat quality traits.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haixia; Xu, Yongjie; Liang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yanbo; Jin, Fangfang; Liu, Dengying; Ma, Yun; Yuan, Hongyu; Song, Xinqiang; Zeng, Wenxian

    2013-04-01

    The 2-DE/MS-based proteomics approach was used to investigate the differences of porcine skeletal muscle, and ATP5B was identified as one differential expression protein. In the present study, ATP5B gene was further cloned by RT-PCR, the sequence was analyzed using the bioinformatics method, and the mRNA expression was detected by qRT-PCR. Sequence analysis showed that the porcine ATP5B gene contains an ORF encoding 528-amino-acid residues with 49 and 166 nucleotides in the 5' and 3' UTRs, respectively. The mRNA of ATP5B was widely expressed in all 14 tissues tested, but especially highly expressed in parorchis and fat. The expression pattern of ATP5B was similar in Large White and Meishan breeds, showing that the expression was upregulated by 3 days after birth and downregulated during postnatal development of skeletal muscle. Comparing the two breeds, the mRNA abundance of ATP5B in Large White was more highly expressed than in Meishan at all developmental stages (P < 0.05). Moreover, a synonymous mutation, G75A in exon 8, was identified and association analysis with the traits of meat quality showed that it was significantly associated with the RLF, FMP, IFR, IMF, and IMW (P < 0.05). These results suggested that ATP5B probably plays a key role in porcine skeletal muscle development and may provide further insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for breed-specific differences in meat quality.

  3. Structural characterization of weakly attached cross-bridges in the A*M*ATP state in permeabilized rabbit psoas muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, S; Gu, J; Melvin, G; Yu, L C

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that in a skeletal muscle under relaxing conditions, cross-bridges exist in a mixture of four weak binding states in equilibrium (A*M*ATP, A*M*ADP*P(i), M*ATP, and M*ADP*P(i)). It has been shown that these four weak binding states are in the pathway to force generation. In the past their structural, biochemical, and mechanical properties have been characterized as a group. However, it was shown that the myosin heads in the M*ATP state exhibited a disordered distribution along the thick filament, while in the M*ADP*P(i) state they were well ordered. It follows that the structures of the weakly attached states of A*M*ATP and A*M*ADP*P(i) could well be different. Individual structures of the two attached states could not be assigned because protocol for isolating the two states has not been available until recently. In the present study, muscle fibers are reacted with N-phenylmaleimide such that ATP hydrolysis is inhibited, i.e., the cross-bridge population under relaxing conditions is distributed only between the two states of M*ATP and A*M*ATP. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction was applied to determine the structural characteristics of the attached A*M*ATP state. Because the detached state of M*ATP is disordered and does not contribute to layer line intensities, changes as a result of increasing attachment in the A*M*ATP state are attributable to that state alone. The equilibrium toward the attached state was achieved by lowering the ionic strength. The results show that upon attachment, both the myosin and the first actin associated layer lines increased intensities, while the sixth actin layer line was not significantly affected. However, the intensities remain weak despite substantial attachment. The results, together with modeling (see J. Gu, S. Xu and L. C. Yu, 2002, Biophys. J. 82:2123-2133), suggest that there is a wide range of orientation of the attached A*M*ATP cross-bridges while the myosin heads maintain some degree of helical

  4. Interstitial diffuse radiance spectroscopy of gold nanocages and nanorods in bulk muscle tissues.

    PubMed

    Grabtchak, Serge; Montgomery, Logan G; Pang, Bo; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Chao; Li, Zhiyuan; Xia, Younan; Whelan, William M

    2015-01-01

    Radiance spectroscopy was applied to the interstitial detection of localized inclusions containing Au nanocages or nanorods with various concentrations embedded in porcine muscle phantoms. The radiance was quantified using a perturbation approach, which enabled the separation of contributions from the porcine phantom and the localized inclusion, with the inclusion serving as a perturbation probe of photon distributions in the turbid medium. Positioning the inclusion at various places in the phantom allowed for tracking of photons that originated from a light source, passed through the inclusion's location, and reached a detector. The inclusions with high extinction coefficients were able to absorb nearly all photons in the range of 650-900 nm, leading to a spectrally flat radiance signal. This signal could be converted to the relative density of photons incident on the inclusion. Finally, the experimentally measured quantities were expressed via the relative perturbation and arranged into the classical Beer-Lambert law that allowed one to extract the extinction coefficients of various types of Au nanoparticles in both the transmission and back reflection geometries. It was shown that the spatial variation of perturbation could be described as 1/r dependence, where r is the distance between the inclusion and the detector. Due to a larger absorption cross section, Au nanocages produced greater perturbations than Au nanorods of equal particle concentration, indicating a better suitability of Au nanocages as contrast agents for optical measurements in turbid media. Individual measurements from different inclusions were combined into detectability maps. PMID:25709450

  5. The Relay/Converter Interface Influences Hydrolysis of ATP by Skeletal Muscle Myosin II.

    PubMed

    Bloemink, Marieke J; Melkani, Girish C; Bernstein, Sanford I; Geeves, Michael A

    2016-01-22

    The interface between relay and converter domain of muscle myosin is critical for optimal myosin performance. Using Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle S1, we performed a kinetic analysis of the effect of mutations in the converter and relay domain. Introduction of a mutation (R759E) in the converter domain inhibits the steady-state ATPase of myosin S1, whereas an additional mutation in the relay domain (N509K) is able to restore the ATPase toward wild-type values. The R759E S1 construct showed little effect on most steps of the actomyosin ATPase cycle. The exception was a 25-30% reduction in the rate constant of the hydrolysis step, the step coupled to the cross-bridge recovery stroke that involves a change in conformation at the relay/converter domain interface. Significantly, the double mutant restored the hydrolysis step to values similar to the wild-type myosin. Modeling the relay/converter interface suggests a possible interaction between converter residue 759 and relay residue 509 in the actin-detached conformation, which is lost in R759E but is restored in N509K/R759E. This detailed kinetic analysis of Drosophila myosin carrying the R759E mutation shows that the interface between the relay loop and converter domain is important for fine-tuning myosin kinetics, in particular ATP binding and hydrolysis.

  6. Protease-activated receptors modulate excitability of murine colonic smooth muscles by differential effects on interstitial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Tae Sik; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lu, Hongli; Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by proteolytic cleavage at their amino termini by serine proteases. PAR activation contributes to the inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and alters GI motility, but little is known about the specific cells within the tunica muscularis that express PARs and the mechanisms leading to contractile responses. Using real time PCR, we found PARs to be expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α positive (PDGFRα+) cells. The latter cell-type showed dominant expression of F2r (encodes PAR1) and F2rl1 (encodes PAR2). Contractile and intracellular electrical activities were measured to characterize the integrated responses to PAR activation in whole muscles. Cells were isolated and ICC and PDGFRα+ cells were identified by constitutive expression of fluorescent reporters. Thrombin (PAR1 agonist) and trypsin (PAR2 agonist) caused biphasic responses in colonic muscles: transient hyperpolarization and relaxation followed by repolarization and excitation. The inhibitory phase was blocked by apamin, revealing a distinct excitatory component. Patch clamp studies showed that the inhibitory response was mediated by activation of small conductance calcium-activated K+ channels in PDGFRα+ cells, and the excitatory response was mediated by activation of a Cl− conductance in ICC. SMCs contributed little to PAR responses in colonic muscles. In summary, PARs regulate the excitability of colonic muscles; different conductances are activated in each cell type of the SMC–ICC–PDGFRα+ cell (SIP) syncytium. Motor responses to PAR agonists are integrated responses of the SIP syncytium. Key points Activation of protease-activated receptors (PAR) regulates gastrointestinal (GI) motility but little is known about the cells and mechanisms in GI muscles responsible for PAR responses. Using mouse cells, we

  7. Activation of the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in skeletal muscle of cachectic rats bearing a hepatoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracos, V. E.; DeVivo, C.; Hoyle, D. H.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Rats implanted with Yoshida ascites hepatoma (YAH) show a rapid and selective loss of muscle protein due mainly to a marked increase (63-95%) in the rate of protein degradation (compared with rates in muscles of pair-fed controls). To define which proteolytic pathways contribute to this increase, epitrochlearis muscles from YAH-bearing and control rats were incubated under conditions that modify different proteolytic systems. Overall proteolysis in either group of rats was not affected by removal of Ca2+ or by blocking the Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic system. Inhibition of lysosomal function with methylamine reduced proteolysis (-12%) in muscles from YAH-bearing rats, but not in muscles of pair-fed rats. When ATP production was also inhibited, the remaining accelerated proteolysis in muscles of tumor-bearing rats fell to control levels. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins and a 27-kDa proteasome subunit in Western blot analysis. Levels of mRNA encoding components of proteolytic systems were quantitated using Northern hybridization analysis. Although their total RNA content decreased 20-38%, pale muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin mRNA (590-880%) and mRNA for multiple subunits of the proteasome (100-215%). Liver, kidney, heart, and brain showed no weight loss and no change in these mRNA species. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats also showed small increases (30-40%) in mRNA for cathepsins B and D, but not for calpain I or heat shock protein 70. Our findings suggest that accelerated muscle proteolysis and muscle wasting in tumor-bearing rats result primarily from activation of the ATP-dependent pathway involving ubiquitin and the proteasome.

  8. Changes in interstitial noradrenaline, trapezius muscle activity and oxygen saturation during low-load work and recovery.

    PubMed

    Flodgren, Gerd M; Crenshaw, A G; Gref, M; Fahlström, M

    2009-09-01

    Both physical as well as mental demands result in an increased activity in the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) with changes in blood-pressure and heart-rate. Through local release of catecholamines, e.g. noradrenaline (NAd) SNS exerts various actions at the muscle level. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of low-load repetitive work alone and in combination with mental demands on local muscle interstitial noradrenaline concentration [NAd](i), muscle activity and oxygenation, assessed with microdialysis, surface electromyography, and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Healthy females (n = 15) were exposed to (1) 30 min repetitive work (RW) and (2) 30 min repetitive work with superimposed mental load (RWML) on two different occasions. Muscle [NAd](i) and muscle activity increased significantly in response to RW, but did not increase further during RWML. For RW, [NAd](i) was found to be inversely correlated to muscle activity. Oxygenation decreased significantly during work, independently of occasion. Our findings indicate that low-load work causes significantly increased trapezius muscle [NAd](i) in healthy females, and short periods of superimposed mental load do not add to this increase and further, that both muscle activity and oxygenation were unaffected by the superimposed mental load.

  9. Two weeks of muscle immobilization impairs functional sympatholysis but increases exercise hyperemia and the vasodilatory responsiveness to infused ATP.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, S P; Mørkeberg, J; Thaning, P; Hellsten, Y; Saltin, B

    2012-05-15

    During exercise, contracting muscles can override sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity (functional sympatholysis). ATP and adenosine have been proposed to play a role in skeletal muscle blood flow regulation. However, little is known about the role of muscle training status on functional sympatholysis and ATP- and adenosine-induced vasodilation. Eight male subjects (22 ± 2 yr, Vo(2max): 49 ± 2 ml O(2)·min(-1)·kg(-1)) were studied before and after 5 wk of one-legged knee-extensor training (3-4 times/wk) and 2 wk of immobilization of the other leg. Leg hemodynamics were measured at rest, during exercise (24 ± 4 watts), and during arterial ATP (0.94 ± 0.03 μmol/min) and adenosine (5.61 ± 0.03 μmol/min) infusion with and without coinfusion of tyramine (11.11 μmol/min). During exercise, leg blood flow (LBF) was lower in the trained leg (2.5 ± 0.1 l/min) compared with the control leg (2.6 ± 0.2 l/min; P < 0.05), and it was higher in the immobilized leg (2.9 ± 0.2 l/min; P < 0.05). Tyramine infusion lowers LBF similarly at rest, but, when tyramine was infused during exercise, LBF was blunted in the immobilized leg (2.5 ± 0.2 l/min; P < 0.05), whereas it was unchanged in the control and trained leg. Mean arterial pressure was lower during exercise with the trained leg compared with the immobilized leg (P < 0.05), and leg vascular conductance was similar. During ATP infusion, the LBF response was higher after immobilization (3.9 ± 0.3 and 4.5 ± 0.6 l/min in the control and immobilized leg, respectively; P < 0.05), whereas it did not change after training. When tyramine was coinfused with ATP, LBF was reduced in the immobilized leg (P < 0.05) but remained similar in the control and trained leg. Training increased skeletal muscle P2Y2 receptor content (P < 0.05), whereas it did not change with immobilization. These results suggest that muscle inactivity impairs functional sympatholysis and that the magnitude of hyperemia and blood pressure response to exercise

  10. A quasi-elastic light scattering study of smooth muscle myosin in the presence of ATP.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, X; Blank, P S; Carlson, F D

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the hydrodynamic properties of turkey gizzard smooth muscle myosin in solution using quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS). The effects of ionic strength (0.05-0.5 M KCl) and light chain phosphorylation on the conformational transition of myosin were examined in the presence of ATP at 20 degrees C. Cumulant analysis and light scattering models were used to describe the myosin system in solution. A nonlinear least squares fitting procedure was used to determine the model that best fits the data. The conformational transition of the myosin monomer from a folded form to an extended form was clearly demonstrated in a salt concentration range of 0.15-0.3 M KCl. Light chain phosphorylation regulates the transition and promotes unfolding of the myosin. These results agree with the findings obtained using sedimentation velocity and electron microscopy (Onishi and Wakabayashi, 1982; Trybus et al., 1982; Trybus and Lowey, 1984). In addition, we present evidence for polymeric myosin coexisting with the two monomeric myosin species over a salt concentration range from 0.05 to 0.5 M KCl. The size of the polymeric myosin varied with salt concentration. This observation supports the hypothesis that, in solution, a dynamic equilibrium exists between the two conformations of myosin monomer and filaments. PMID:1420864

  11. Modeling the effects of hypoxia on ATP turnover in exercising muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, P. G.; Hogan, M. C.; Bebout, D. E.; Wagner, P. D.; Hochachka, P. W.

    1992-01-01

    Most models of metabolic control concentrate on the regulation of ATP production and largely ignore the regulation of ATP demand. We describe a model, based on the results of Hogan et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 73: 728-736, 1992), that incorporates the effects of ATP demand. The model is developed from the premise that a unique set of intracellular conditions can be measured at each level of ATP turnover and that this relationship is best described by energetic state. Current concepts suggest that cells are capable of maintaining oxygen consumption in the face of declines in the concentration of oxygen through compensatory changes in cellular metabolites. We show that these compensatory changes can cause significant declines in ATP demand and result in a decline in oxygen consumption and ATP turnover. Furthermore we find that hypoxia does not directly affect the rate of anaerobic ATP synthesis and associated lactate production. Rather, lactate production appears to be related to energetic state, whatever the PO2. The model is used to describe the interaction between ATP demand and ATP supply in determining final ATP turnover.

  12. Electrical stimulation induces IL-6 in skeletal muscle through extracellular ATP by activating Ca(2+) signals and an IL-6 autocrine loop.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Mario; Fernández-Verdejo, Rodrigo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Buvinic, Sonja

    2014-04-15

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important myokine that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle cells upon exercise. We assessed IL-6 expression in response to electrical stimulation (ES) or extracellular ATP as a known mediator of the excitation-transcription mechanism in skeletal muscle. We examined whether the canonical signaling cascade downstream of IL-6 (IL-6/JAK2/STAT3) also responds to muscle cell excitation, concluding that IL-6 influences its own expression through a positive loop. Either ES or exogenous ATP (100 μM) increased both IL-6 expression and p-STAT3 levels in rat myotubes, a process inhibited by 100 μM suramin and 2 U/ml apyrase. ATP also evoked IL-6 expression in both isolated skeletal fibers and extracts derived from whole FDB muscles. ATP increased IL-6 release up to 10-fold. STAT3 activation evoked by ATP was abolished by the JAK2 inhibitor HBC. Blockade of secreted IL-6 with a neutralizing antibody or preincubation with the STAT3 inhibitor VIII reduced STAT3 activation evoked by extracellular ATP by 70%. Inhibitor VIII also reduced by 70% IL-6 expression evoked by ATP, suggesting a positive IL-6 loop. In addition, ATP increased up to 60% the protein levels of SOCS3, a negative regulator of the IL-6 signaling pathway. On the other hand, intracellular calcium chelation or blockade of IP3-dependent calcium signals abolished STAT3 phosphorylation evoked by either extracellular ATP or ES. These results suggest that expression of IL-6 in stimulated skeletal muscle cells is mediated by extracellular ATP and nucleotide receptors, involving IP3-dependent calcium signals as an early step that triggers a positive IL-6 autocrine loop.

  13. Electrical stimulation induces IL-6 in skeletal muscle through extracellular ATP by activating Ca2+ signals and an IL-6 autocrine loop

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Mario; Fernández-Verdejo, Rodrigo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important myokine that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle cells upon exercise. We assessed IL-6 expression in response to electrical stimulation (ES) or extracellular ATP as a known mediator of the excitation-transcription mechanism in skeletal muscle. We examined whether the canonical signaling cascade downstream of IL-6 (IL-6/JAK2/STAT3) also responds to muscle cell excitation, concluding that IL-6 influences its own expression through a positive loop. Either ES or exogenous ATP (100 μM) increased both IL-6 expression and p-STAT3 levels in rat myotubes, a process inhibited by 100 μM suramin and 2 U/ml apyrase. ATP also evoked IL-6 expression in both isolated skeletal fibers and extracts derived from whole FDB muscles. ATP increased IL-6 release up to 10-fold. STAT3 activation evoked by ATP was abolished by the JAK2 inhibitor HBC. Blockade of secreted IL-6 with a neutralizing antibody or preincubation with the STAT3 inhibitor VIII reduced STAT3 activation evoked by extracellular ATP by 70%. Inhibitor VIII also reduced by 70% IL-6 expression evoked by ATP, suggesting a positive IL-6 loop. In addition, ATP increased up to 60% the protein levels of SOCS3, a negative regulator of the IL-6 signaling pathway. On the other hand, intracellular calcium chelation or blockade of IP3-dependent calcium signals abolished STAT3 phosphorylation evoked by either extracellular ATP or ES. These results suggest that expression of IL-6 in stimulated skeletal muscle cells is mediated by extracellular ATP and nucleotide receptors, involving IP3-dependent calcium signals as an early step that triggers a positive IL-6 autocrine loop. PMID:24518675

  14. Electrical stimulation induces IL-6 in skeletal muscle through extracellular ATP by activating Ca(2+) signals and an IL-6 autocrine loop.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Mario; Fernández-Verdejo, Rodrigo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Buvinic, Sonja

    2014-04-15

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important myokine that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle cells upon exercise. We assessed IL-6 expression in response to electrical stimulation (ES) or extracellular ATP as a known mediator of the excitation-transcription mechanism in skeletal muscle. We examined whether the canonical signaling cascade downstream of IL-6 (IL-6/JAK2/STAT3) also responds to muscle cell excitation, concluding that IL-6 influences its own expression through a positive loop. Either ES or exogenous ATP (100 μM) increased both IL-6 expression and p-STAT3 levels in rat myotubes, a process inhibited by 100 μM suramin and 2 U/ml apyrase. ATP also evoked IL-6 expression in both isolated skeletal fibers and extracts derived from whole FDB muscles. ATP increased IL-6 release up to 10-fold. STAT3 activation evoked by ATP was abolished by the JAK2 inhibitor HBC. Blockade of secreted IL-6 with a neutralizing antibody or preincubation with the STAT3 inhibitor VIII reduced STAT3 activation evoked by extracellular ATP by 70%. Inhibitor VIII also reduced by 70% IL-6 expression evoked by ATP, suggesting a positive IL-6 loop. In addition, ATP increased up to 60% the protein levels of SOCS3, a negative regulator of the IL-6 signaling pathway. On the other hand, intracellular calcium chelation or blockade of IP3-dependent calcium signals abolished STAT3 phosphorylation evoked by either extracellular ATP or ES. These results suggest that expression of IL-6 in stimulated skeletal muscle cells is mediated by extracellular ATP and nucleotide receptors, involving IP3-dependent calcium signals as an early step that triggers a positive IL-6 autocrine loop. PMID:24518675

  15. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  16. Electrical stimuli are anti-apoptotic in skeletal muscle via extracellular ATP. Alteration of this signal in Mdx mice is a likely cause of dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies.

  17. Electrical Stimuli Are Anti-Apoptotic in Skeletal Muscle via Extracellular ATP. Alteration of This Signal in Mdx Mice Is a Likely Cause of Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies. PMID:24282497

  18. Electrical stimuli are anti-apoptotic in skeletal muscle via extracellular ATP. Alteration of this signal in Mdx mice is a likely cause of dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies. PMID:24282497

  19. Phosphorylation of β-catenin by PKA promotes ATP-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Taurin, Sebastien; Sandbo, Nathan; Yau, Douglas M.; Sethakorn, Nan; Dulin, Nickolai O.

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular ATP stimulates proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through activation of G protein-coupled P2Y purinergic receptors. We have previously shown that ATP stimulates a transient activation of protein kinase A (PKA), which, together with the established mitogenic signaling of purinergic receptors, promotes proliferation of VSMC (Hogarth DK, Sandbo N, Taurin S, Kolenko V, Miano JM, Dulin NO. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 287: C449–C456, 2004). We also have shown that PKA can phosphorylate β-catenin at two novel sites (Ser552 and Ser675) in vitro and in overexpression cell models (Taurin S, Sandbo N, Qin Y, Browning D, Dulin NO. J Biol Chem 281: 9971–9976, 2006). β-Catenin promotes cell proliferation by activation of a family of T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors, which drive the transcription of genes implicated in cell cycle progression including cyclin D1. In the present study, using the phosphospecific antibodies against phospho-Ser552 or phospho-Ser675 sites of β-catenin, we show that ATP can stimulate PKA-dependent phosphorylation of endogenous β-catenin at both of these sites without affecting its expression levels in VSMC. This translates to a PKA-dependent stimulation of TCF transcriptional activity through an increased association of phosphorylated (by PKA) β-catenin with TCF-4. Using the PKA inhibitor PKI or dominant negative TCF-4 mutant, we show that ATP-induced cyclin D1 promoter activation, cyclin D1 protein expression, and proliferation of VSMC are all dependent on PKA and TCF activities. In conclusion, we show a novel mode of regulation of endogenous β-catenin through its phosphorylation by PKA, and we demonstrate the importance of this mechanism for ATP-induced proliferation of VSMC. PMID:18353896

  20. Prolonged Exposure of Primary Human Muscle Cells to Plasma Fatty Acids Associated with Obese Phenotype Induces Persistent Suppression of Muscle Mitochondrial ATP Synthase β Subunit.

    PubMed

    Tran, Lee; Hanavan, Paul D; Campbell, Latoya E; De Filippis, Elena; Lake, Douglas F; Coletta, Dawn K; Roust, Lori R; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Carroll, Chad C; Katsanos, Christos S

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies show reduced abundance of the β-subunit of mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase (β-F1-ATPase) in skeletal muscle of obese individuals. The β-F1-ATPase forms the catalytic core of the ATP synthase, and it is critical for ATP production in muscle. The mechanism(s) impairing β-F1-ATPase metabolism in obesity, however, are not completely understood. First, we studied total muscle protein synthesis and the translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in obese (BMI, 36±1 kg/m2) and lean (BMI, 22±1 kg/m2) subjects. Both total protein synthesis (0.044±0.006 vs 0.066±0.006%·h-1) and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase (0.0031±0.0007 vs 0.0073±0.0004) were lower in muscle from the obese subjects when compared to the lean controls (P<0.05). We then evaluated these same responses in a primary cell culture model, and tested the specific hypothesis that circulating non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in obesity play a role in the responses observed in humans. The findings on total protein synthesis and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in primary myotubes cultured from a lean subject, and after exposure to NEFA extracted from serum of an obese subject, were similar to those obtained in humans. Among candidate microRNAs (i.e., non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression), we identified miR-127-5p in preventing the production of β-F1-ATPase. Muscle expression of miR-127-5p negatively correlated with β-F1-ATPase protein translation efficiency in humans (r = - 0.6744; P<0.01), and could be modeled in vitro by prolonged exposure of primary myotubes derived from the lean subject to NEFA extracted from the obese subject. On the other hand, locked nucleic acid inhibitor synthesized to target miR-127-5p significantly increased β-F1-ATPase translation efficiency in myotubes (0.6±0.1 vs 1.3±0.3, in control vs exposure to 50 nM inhibitor; P<0.05). Our experiments implicate circulating NEFA in obesity in suppressing muscle protein metabolism, and establish

  1. Prolonged Exposure of Primary Human Muscle Cells to Plasma Fatty Acids Associated with Obese Phenotype Induces Persistent Suppression of Muscle Mitochondrial ATP Synthase β Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Lee; Hanavan, Paul D.; Campbell, Latoya E.; De Filippis, Elena; Lake, Douglas F.; Coletta, Dawn K.; Roust, Lori R.; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Carroll, Chad C.; Katsanos, Christos S.

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies show reduced abundance of the β-subunit of mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase (β-F1-ATPase) in skeletal muscle of obese individuals. The β-F1-ATPase forms the catalytic core of the ATP synthase, and it is critical for ATP production in muscle. The mechanism(s) impairing β-F1-ATPase metabolism in obesity, however, are not completely understood. First, we studied total muscle protein synthesis and the translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in obese (BMI, 36±1 kg/m2) and lean (BMI, 22±1 kg/m2) subjects. Both total protein synthesis (0.044±0.006 vs 0.066±0.006%·h-1) and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase (0.0031±0.0007 vs 0.0073±0.0004) were lower in muscle from the obese subjects when compared to the lean controls (P<0.05). We then evaluated these same responses in a primary cell culture model, and tested the specific hypothesis that circulating non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in obesity play a role in the responses observed in humans. The findings on total protein synthesis and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in primary myotubes cultured from a lean subject, and after exposure to NEFA extracted from serum of an obese subject, were similar to those obtained in humans. Among candidate microRNAs (i.e., non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression), we identified miR-127-5p in preventing the production of β-F1-ATPase. Muscle expression of miR-127-5p negatively correlated with β-F1-ATPase protein translation efficiency in humans (r = – 0.6744; P<0.01), and could be modeled in vitro by prolonged exposure of primary myotubes derived from the lean subject to NEFA extracted from the obese subject. On the other hand, locked nucleic acid inhibitor synthesized to target miR-127-5p significantly increased β-F1-ATPase translation efficiency in myotubes (0.6±0.1 vs 1.3±0.3, in control vs exposure to 50 nM inhibitor; P<0.05). Our experiments implicate circulating NEFA in obesity in suppressing muscle protein metabolism, and establish

  2. Contribution of intravascular versus interstitial purines and nitric oxide in the regulation of exercise hyperaemia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hellsten, Y; Nyberg, M; Mortensen, S P

    2012-01-01

    The regulation of blood flow to skeletal muscle involves a complex interaction between several locally formed vasodilators that are produced both in the skeletal muscle interstitium and intravascularly. The gas nitric oxide (NO) and the purines ATP and adenosine, are potent vasodilators that are formed by multiple cell types and released into the skeletal muscle interstitium and in plasma in response to muscle contraction. Cellular sources of ATP and NO in plasma are erythrocytes and endothelial cells, whereas interstitial sources are skeletal muscle cells and endothelial cells. Adenosine originates primarily from extracellular degradation of ATP. During exercise the concentrations of ATP and adenosine increase markedly in the interstitium with smaller increases occurring in plasma, and thus the interstitial concentration during exercise is severalfold higher than in plasma. The concentration of NO metabolites (NOx) in interstitium and plasma does not change during exercise and is similar in the two compartments. Adenosine and NO have been shown to contribute to exercise hyperaemia whereas the role of ATP remains unclear due to lack of specific purinergic receptor blockers. The relative role of intravascular versus interstitial vasodilators is not known but evidence suggests that both compartments are important. In cardiovascular disease, a reduced capacity to form adenosine in the muscle interstitium may be a contributing factor in increased peripheral vascular resistance. PMID:22733661

  3. The penetration of inulin, sucrose, mannitol and tritiated water from the interstitial space in muscle into the vascular system

    PubMed Central

    Crone, Christian; Garlick, David

    1970-01-01

    1. An isolated gastrocnemius muscle from cat was perfused with a modified Ringer fluid containing the extracellular tracers mannitol, sucrose and inulin and in some cases tritiated water (HTO). When equilibration of the tracers between the perfusate and the tissue was obtained, perfusion with tracer-free fluid was started. 2. The fractional rate of escape, Φ (t), of the tracers was followed. For all tracers it declined steadily with time. The rate of decline was faster for the smaller extracellular molecules when any combination of two extracellular tracers was studied. 3. Arrest of flow for 1-2 min lead to an increase in Φ (t) for the extracellular tracers when flow was resumed. There was little or no effect upon Φ (t) for HTO. 4. Doubling the rate of flow had no effect upon Φ (t) for the extracellular tracers, while that of HTO increased. 5. We conclude that the cause of the decline in Φ (t) for the extracellular tracers is concentration gradients in the interstitial space. The findings raise problems in methods for studying capillary permeability by means of the fractional rate of escape of tracers from the interstitial space into the vascular system. PMID:5503509

  4. Skeletal muscle ATP synthesis and cellular H(+) handling measured by localized (31)P-MRS during exercise and recovery.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Georg B; Schmid, Albrecht I; Goluch, Sigrun; Schewzow, Kiril; Laistler, Elmar; Niess, Fabian; Unger, Ewald; Wolzt, Michael; Mirzahosseini, Arash; Kemp, Graham J; Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is widely used for non-invasive investigation of muscle metabolism dynamics. This study aims to extend knowledge on parameters derived from these measurements in detail and comprehensiveness: proton (H(+)) efflux, buffer capacity and the contributions of glycolytic (L) and oxidative (Q) rates to ATP synthesis were calculated from the evolutions of phosphocreatine (PCr) and pH. Data are reported for two muscles in the human calf, for each subject and over a wide range of exercise intensities. 22 subjects performed plantar flexions in a 7T MR-scanner, leading to PCr changes ranging from barely noticeable to almost complete depletion, depending on exercise protocol and muscle studied by localized MRS. Cytosolic buffer capacity was quantified for the first time non-invasively and individually, as was proton efflux evolution in early recovery. Acidification started once PCr depletion reached 60-75%. Initial and end-exercise L correlated with end-exercise levels of PCr and approximately linear with pH. Q calculated directly from PCr and pH derivatives was plausible, requiring fewer assumptions than the commonly used ADP-model. In conclusion, the evolution of parameters describing cellular energy metabolism was measured over a wide range of exercise intensities, revealing a relatively complete picture of muscle metabolism. PMID:27562396

  5. Skeletal muscle ATP synthesis and cellular H+ handling measured by localized 31P-MRS during exercise and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Georg B.; Schmid, Albrecht I.; Goluch, Sigrun; Schewzow, Kiril; Laistler, Elmar; Niess, Fabian; Unger, Ewald; Wolzt, Michael; Mirzahosseini, Arash; Kemp, Graham J.; Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is widely used for non-invasive investigation of muscle metabolism dynamics. This study aims to extend knowledge on parameters derived from these measurements in detail and comprehensiveness: proton (H+) efflux, buffer capacity and the contributions of glycolytic (L) and oxidative (Q) rates to ATP synthesis were calculated from the evolutions of phosphocreatine (PCr) and pH. Data are reported for two muscles in the human calf, for each subject and over a wide range of exercise intensities. 22 subjects performed plantar flexions in a 7T MR-scanner, leading to PCr changes ranging from barely noticeable to almost complete depletion, depending on exercise protocol and muscle studied by localized MRS. Cytosolic buffer capacity was quantified for the first time non-invasively and individually, as was proton efflux evolution in early recovery. Acidification started once PCr depletion reached 60–75%. Initial and end-exercise L correlated with end-exercise levels of PCr and approximately linear with pH. Q calculated directly from PCr and pH derivatives was plausible, requiring fewer assumptions than the commonly used ADP-model. In conclusion, the evolution of parameters describing cellular energy metabolism was measured over a wide range of exercise intensities, revealing a relatively complete picture of muscle metabolism. PMID:27562396

  6. Light-emitting diode therapy in exercise-trained mice increases muscle performance, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; de Sousa, Marcelo Victor Pires; Kaippert, Beatriz; Huang, Ying-Ying; Koiso, Tomoharu; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) applied over the leg, gluteus and lower-back muscles of mice using a LED cluster (630 nm and 850 nm, 80 mW/cm2, 7.2 J/cm2) increased muscle performance (repetitive climbing of a ladder carrying a water-filled tube attached to the tail), ATP and mitochondrial metabolism; oxidative stress and proliferative myocyte markers in mice subjected to acute and progressive strength training. Six bi-daily training sessions LEDT-After and LEDT-Before-After regimens more than doubled muscle performance and increased ATP more than tenfold. The effectiveness of LEDT on improving muscle performance and recovery suggest applicability for high performance sports and in training programs. Positioning of the mice and light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) applied on mouse legs, gluteus and lower-back muscles without contact. PMID:25378263

  7. Light-emitting diode therapy in exercise-trained mice increases muscle performance, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Pires de Sousa, Marcelo Victor; Kaippert, Beatriz; Huang, Ying-Ying; Koiso, Tomoharu; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) applied over the leg, gluteus and lower-back muscles of mice using a LED cluster (630 nm and 850 nm, 80 mW/cm(2) , 7.2 J/cm(2) ) increased muscle performance (repetitive climbing of a ladder carrying a water-filled tube attached to the tail), ATP and mitochondrial metabolism; oxidative stress and proliferative myocyte markers in mice subjected to acute and progressive strength training. Six bi-daily training sessions LEDT-After and LEDT-Before-After regimens more than doubled muscle performance and increased ATP more than tenfold. The effectiveness of LEDT on improving muscle performance and recovery suggest applicability for high performance sports and in training programs. Positioning of the mice and light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) applied on mouse legs, gluteus and lower-back muscles without contact.

  8. Interstitial and arterial–venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise: effect of ischaemia and relation to muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    Green, Simon; Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, Dorthe; Bülow, Jens; Kjær, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Changes in the concentration of interstitial K+ surrounding skeletal muscle fibres ([K+]I) probably play some role in the regulation of cardiovascular adjustments to muscular activity, as well as in the aetiology of muscle pain and fatigue during high-intensity exercise. However, there is very little information on the response of [K+]I to exercise in human skeletal muscle. Five young healthy subjects performed plantar flexion exercise for four 5 min periods at increasing power outputs (∼1–6 W) with 10 min intervening recovery periods, as well as for two 5 min periods with ischaemia at ∼1 and ∼3 W. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the gastrocnemius medialis muscle of the right leg to measure [K+]I, and K+ release from the plantar flexors during and after incremental exercise was calculated from plasma flow and arterial–venous differences for K+. Calf muscle pain was assessed using a visual analogue scale. On average, [K+]I was 4.4 mmol l−1 at rest and increased during minutes 3–5 of incremental exercise by ∼1–7 mmol l−1 as a positive function of power output. K+ release also increased as a function of exercise intensity, although there was a progressive increase by ∼1–6 mmol l−1 in the [K+] gradient between the interstitium and arterial–venous plasma. [K+]I was lower during ischaemic exercise than control exercise. In contrast to this effect of ischaemia on [K+]I, muscle pain was relatively higher during ischaemic exercise, which demonstrates that factors other than changes in [K+]I are responsible for ischaemic muscle pain. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that during 5 min of dynamic exercise, [K+]I increases during the later period of exercise as a positive function of exercise intensity, ischaemia reduces [K+]I during rest and exercise, and the increase in [K+]I is not responsible for muscle pain during ischaemic exercise. PMID:11118511

  9. Haemodynamic responses to exercise, ATP infusion and thigh compression in humans: insight into the role of muscle mechanisms on cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Jeppesen, Tina D; Ali, Leena; Barker, Horace; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Secher, Niels H; Dawson, Ellen A; Dufour, Stéphane P

    2008-01-01

    The muscle pump and muscle vasodilatory mechanims are thought to play important roles in increasing and maintaining muscle perfusion and cardiac output during exercise, but their actual contributions remain uncertain. To evaluate the role of the skeletal muscle pump and vasodilatation on cardiovascular function during exercise, we determined leg and systemic haemodynamic responses in healthy men during (1) incremental one-legged knee-extensor exercise, (2) step-wise femoral artery ATP infusion at rest, (3) passive exercise (n = 10), (4) femoral vein or artery ATP infusion (n = 6), and (5) cyclic thigh compressions at rest and during passive and voluntary exercise (n = 7). Incremental exercise resulted in progressive increases in leg blood flow (ΔLBF 7.4 ± 0.7 l min−1), cardiac output ( 8.7 ± 0.7 l min−1), mean arterial pressure (ΔMAP 51 ± 5 mmHg), and leg and systemic oxygen delivery and . Arterial ATP infusion resulted in similar increases in , LBF, and systemic and leg oxygen delivery, but central venous pressure and muscle metabolism remained unchanged and MAP was reduced. In contrast, femoral vein ATP infusion did not alter LBF, or MAP. Passive exercise also increased blood flow (ΔLBF 0.7 ± 0.1 l min−1), yet the increase in muscle and systemic perfusion, unrelated to elevations in aerobic metabolism, accounted only for ∼5% of peak exercise hyperaemia. Likewise, thigh compressions alone or in combination with passive exercise increased blood flow (ΔLBF 0.5–0.7 l min−1) without altering , MAP or . These findings suggest that the skeletal muscle pump is not obligatory for sustaining venous return, central venous pressure, stroke volume and or maintaining muscle blood flow during one-legged exercise in humans. Further, its contribution to muscle and systemic peak exercise hyperaemia appears to be minimal in comparison to the effects of muscle vasodilatation. PMID:18339690

  10. Identification of C-Kit-Positive Interstitial Cells in the Dog Lower Urinary Tract and Relationship with Smooth Muscle and Nerves. Hypotheses for a Likely Pacemaker Role.

    PubMed Central

    Arrighi, Silvana; Bosi, Giampaolo; Groppetti, Debora; Cremonesi, Fausto

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to give an evidence of the likely presence of interstitial cells in the canine lower urinary tract and to study their possible interactions with the musculature and the intramural innervation. Cryosections of normal canine bladder and urethra were immunofluorescently labelled with c-kit, a transmembrane, tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor, known to be expressed on the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) of the gut. The relationship with antiactin positive smooth muscle cells and PGP9.5-positive intramural innervation was also investigated by confocal microscopy. Anti-c-kit labelling demonstrated a network of elongated and branched c-kit positive cells, which were located in interstitial spaces, oriented in parallel to the smooth muscle bundles that form the bladder muscular layer, irrespective of dog sex. Cells with a similar localization were also PAS- and NADPH-diaphorase-positive. A contact between c-kit immunofluorescent cells and intramural innervation was demonstrated, too. The roles of interstitial cells might include regulation of smooth muscle activity of the bladder detrusor, integrating neuronal signals during urine storage and voiding. PMID:20706651

  11. A 3-day EGCG-supplementation reduces interstitial lactate concentration in skeletal muscle of overweight subjects

    PubMed Central

    Most, Jasper; van Can, Judith G P; van Dijk, Jan-Willem; Goossens, Gijs H.; Jocken, Johan; Hospers, Jeannette J.; Bendik, Igor; Blaak, Ellen E.

    2015-01-01

    Green tea, particularly epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), may affect body weight and composition, possibly by enhancing fat oxidation. The aim of this double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study was to investigate whether 3-day supplementation with EGCG (282mg/day) stimulates fat oxidation and lipolysis in 24 overweight subjects (age = 30 ± 2yrs, BMI = 27.7 ± 0.3 kg/m2). Energy expenditure, substrate metabolism and circulating metabolites were determined during fasting and postprandial conditions. After 6 h, a fat biopsy was collected to examine gene expression. In 12 subjects, skeletal muscle glycerol, glucose and lactate concentrations were determined using microdialysis. EGCG-supplementation did not alter energy expenditure and substrate oxidation compared to placebo. Although EGCG reduced postprandial circulating glycerol concentrations (P = 0.015), no difference in skeletal muscle lipolysis was observed. Fasting (P = 0.001) and postprandial (P = 0.003) skeletal muscle lactate concentrations were reduced after EGCG-supplementation compared to placebo, despite similar tissue blood flow. Adipose tissue leptin (P = 0.05) and FAT/CD36 expression (P = 0.08) were increased after EGCG compared to placebo. In conclusion, 3-day EGCG-supplementation decreased postprandial plasma glycerol concentrations, but had no significant effects on skeletal muscle lipolysis and whole-body fat oxidation in overweight individuals. Furthermore, EGCG decreased skeletal muscle lactate concentrations, which suggest a shift towards a more oxidative muscle phenotype. PMID:26647963

  12. [Effects of cell-binding protein A of Staphylococcus aureus on the level of intracellular calcium ions and actomyosin ATP-ase activity in the smooth muscles].

    PubMed

    Melenevs'ka, N V; Miroshnychenko, M S; Filippov, I B; Artemenko, O Iu; Shuba, M F

    2006-01-01

    Immune-active substance of Staphylococcus aureus, cell-bound protein A (CBPA), enhances the acetylcholine- or hyperpotassium (K+) Krebs solution-evoked excitation in Taenia coli smooth muscles. CBPA increases caffeine- and carbachole-evoked Ca2+ signals in smooth muscle cells suspension, loaded with indo-1, and also caffeine- and acetylcholine-evoked contraction in smooth muscles slices. Against a background of CBPA-suppressed action of sodium nitroprusside, ATP evokes the membrane depolarization. CBPA in small concentrations potentiates ATPase (Mg2+,Ca2+-; Mg2+- and Mg2+- in the presence of EGTA) activity of actomyosin in the smooth muscles.

  13. Interstitial nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    Tubulointerstitial nephritis; Nephritis - interstitial; Acute interstitial (allergic) nephritis ... Interstitial nephritis may be temporary ( acute ), or it may be long-lasting ( chronic ) and get worse over ...

  14. Acute inhibition of ATP-sensitive K+ channels impairs skeletal muscle vascular control in rats during treadmill exercise

    PubMed Central

    Copp, Steven W.; Ferguson, Scott K.; Sims, Gabrielle E.; Poole, David C.; Musch, Timothy I.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel is part of a class of inward rectifier K+ channels that can link local O2 availability to vasomotor tone across exercise-induced metabolic transients. The present investigation tested the hypothesis that if KATP channels are crucial to exercise hyperemia, then inhibition via glibenclamide (GLI) would lower hindlimb skeletal muscle blood flow (BF) and vascular conductance during treadmill exercise. In 27 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, mean arterial pressure, blood lactate concentration, and hindlimb muscle BF (radiolabeled microspheres) were determined at rest (n = 6) and during exercise (n = 6–8, 20, 40, and 60 m/min, 5% incline, i.e., ∼60–100% maximal O2 uptake) under control and GLI conditions (5 mg/kg intra-arterial). At rest and during exercise, mean arterial pressure was higher (rest: 17 ± 3%, 20 m/min: 5 ± 1%, 40 m/min: 5 ± 2%, and 60 m/min: 5 ± 1%, P < 0.05) with GLI. Hindlimb muscle BF (20 m/min: 16 ± 7%, 40 m/min: 30 ± 9%, and 60 m/min: 20 ± 8%) and vascular conductance (20 m/min: 20 ± 7%, 40 m/min: 33 ± 8%, and 60 m/min: 24 ± 8%) were lower with GLI during exercise at 20, 40, and 60 m/min, respectively (P < 0.05 for all) but not at rest. Within locomotory muscles, there was a greater fractional reduction present in muscles comprised predominantly of type I and type IIa fibers at all exercise speeds (P < 0.05). Additionally, blood lactate concentration was 106 ± 29% and 44 ± 15% higher during exercise with GLI at 20 and 40 m/min, respectively (P < 0.05). That KATP channel inhibition reduces hindlimb muscle BF during exercise in rats supports the obligatory contribution of KATP channels in large muscle mass exercise-induced hyperemia. PMID:25820394

  15. Acute inhibition of ATP-sensitive K+ channels impairs skeletal muscle vascular control in rats during treadmill exercise.

    PubMed

    Holdsworth, Clark T; Copp, Steven W; Ferguson, Scott K; Sims, Gabrielle E; Poole, David C; Musch, Timothy I

    2015-06-01

    The ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel is part of a class of inward rectifier K(+) channels that can link local O2 availability to vasomotor tone across exercise-induced metabolic transients. The present investigation tested the hypothesis that if KATP channels are crucial to exercise hyperemia, then inhibition via glibenclamide (GLI) would lower hindlimb skeletal muscle blood flow (BF) and vascular conductance during treadmill exercise. In 27 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats, mean arterial pressure, blood lactate concentration, and hindlimb muscle BF (radiolabeled microspheres) were determined at rest (n = 6) and during exercise (n = 6-8, 20, 40, and 60 m/min, 5% incline, i.e., ~60-100% maximal O2 uptake) under control and GLI conditions (5 mg/kg intra-arterial). At rest and during exercise, mean arterial pressure was higher (rest: 17 ± 3%, 20 m/min: 5 ± 1%, 40 m/min: 5 ± 2%, and 60 m/min: 5 ± 1%, P < 0.05) with GLI. Hindlimb muscle BF (20 m/min: 16 ± 7%, 40 m/min: 30 ± 9%, and 60 m/min: 20 ± 8%) and vascular conductance (20 m/min: 20 ± 7%, 40 m/min: 33 ± 8%, and 60 m/min: 24 ± 8%) were lower with GLI during exercise at 20, 40, and 60 m/min, respectively (P < 0.05 for all) but not at rest. Within locomotory muscles, there was a greater fractional reduction present in muscles comprised predominantly of type I and type IIa fibers at all exercise speeds (P < 0.05). Additionally, blood lactate concentration was 106 ± 29% and 44 ± 15% higher during exercise with GLI at 20 and 40 m/min, respectively (P < 0.05). That KATP channel inhibition reduces hindlimb muscle BF during exercise in rats supports the obligatory contribution of KATP channels in large muscle mass exercise-induced hyperemia. PMID:25820394

  16. Graded sympatholytic effect of exogenous ATP on postjunctional alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction in the human forearm: implications for vascular control in contracting muscle.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Brett S; Voyles, Wyatt F; Carlson, Rick E; Dinenno, Frank A

    2008-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can inhibit vasoconstrictor responses to endogenous noradrenaline release via tyramine in the skeletal muscle circulation, similar to what is observed in contracting muscle. Whether this involves direct modulation of postjunctional alpha-adrenoceptor responsiveness, or is selective for alpha(1)- or alpha(2)-receptors remains unclear. Therefore, in Protocol 1, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous ATP can blunt direct postjunctional alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction in humans. We measured forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) and calculated the vascular conductance (FVC) responses to local intra-arterial infusions of phenylephrine (alpha(1)-agonist) and dexmedetomidine (alpha(2)-agonist) during moderate rhythmic handgrip exercise (15% maximum voluntary contraction), during a control non-exercise vasodilator condition (adenosine), and during ATP infusion in eight young adults. Forearm hyperaemia was matched across all conditions. Forearm vasoconstrictor responses to direct alpha(1)-receptor stimulation were blunted during exercise versus adenosine (DeltaFVC = -11 +/- 3% versus -39 +/- 5%; P< 0.05), and were abolished during ATP infusion (-3 +/- 2%). Similarly, vasoconstrictor responses to alpha(2)-receptor stimulation were blunted during exercise versus adenosine (-13 +/- 4% versus -40 +/- 8%; P< 0.05), and were abolished during ATP infusion (-4 +/- 4%). In Prototol 2 (n = 10), we tested the hypothesis that graded increases in ATP would reduce alpha(1)-mediated vasoconstriction in a dose-dependent manner compared with vasodilatation evoked via adenosine. Forearm vasoconstrictor responses during low dose adenosine (-38 +/- 3%) and ATP (-33 +/- 2%) were not significantly different from rest (-40 +/- 3%; P> 0.05). In contrast, vasoconstrictor responses during moderate (-22 +/- 6%) and high dose ATP (-8 +/- 5%) were significantly blunted compared with rest, whereas the responses during adenosine became

  17. Graded sympatholytic effect of exogenous ATP on postjunctional α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in the human forearm: implications for vascular control in contracting muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Brett S; Voyles, Wyatt F; Carlson, Rick E; Dinenno, Frank A

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that adenosine triphosphate (ATP) can inhibit vasoconstrictor responses to endogenous noradrenaline release via tyramine in the skeletal muscle circulation, similar to what is observed in contracting muscle. Whether this involves direct modulation of postjunctional α-adrenoceptor responsiveness, or is selective for α1- or α2-receptors remains unclear. Therefore, in Protocol 1, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous ATP can blunt direct postjunctional α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in humans. We measured forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) and calculated the vascular conductance (FVC) responses to local intra-arterial infusions of phenylephrine (α1-agonist) and dexmedetomidine (α2-agonist) during moderate rhythmic handgrip exercise (15% maximum voluntary contraction), during a control non-exercise vasodilator condition (adenosine), and during ATP infusion in eight young adults. Forearm hyperaemia was matched across all conditions. Forearm vasoconstrictor responses to direct α1-receptor stimulation were blunted during exercise versus adenosine (ΔFVC =−11 ± 3%versus−39 ± 5%; P< 0.05), and were abolished during ATP infusion (−3 ± 2%). Similarly, vasoconstrictor responses to α2-receptor stimulation were blunted during exercise versus adenosine (−13 ± 4%versus−40 ± 8%; P< 0.05), and were abolished during ATP infusion (−4 ± 4%). In Prototol 2 (n= 10), we tested the hypothesis that graded increases in ATP would reduce α1-mediated vasoconstriction in a dose-dependent manner compared with vasodilatation evoked via adenosine. Forearm vasoconstrictor responses during low dose adenosine (−38 ± 3%) and ATP (−33 ± 2%) were not significantly different from rest (−40 ± 3%; P < 0.05). In contrast, vasoconstrictor responses during moderate (−22 ± 6%) and high dose ATP (−8 ± 5%) were significantly blunted compared with rest, whereas the responses during adenosine became progressively greater (moderate =−48

  18. Skeletal muscle ATP turnover by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during moderate and heavy bilateral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Daniel T; Bimson, William E; Hampson, Sophie A; Bowen, T Scott; Murgatroyd, Scott R; Marwood, Simon; Kemp, Graham J; Rossiter, Harry B

    2014-01-01

    During constant-power high-intensity exercise, the expected increase in oxygen uptake () is supplemented by a  slow component (), reflecting reduced work efficiency, predominantly within the locomotor muscles. The intracellular source of inefficiency is postulated to be an increase in the ATP cost of power production (an increase in P/W). To test this hypothesis, we measured intramuscular ATP turnover with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and whole-body during moderate (MOD) and heavy (HVY) bilateral knee-extension exercise in healthy participants (n = 14). Unlocalized 31P spectra were collected from the quadriceps throughout using a dual-tuned (1H and 31P) surface coil with a simple pulse-and-acquire sequence. Total ATP turnover rate (ATPtot) was estimated at exercise cessation from direct measurements of the dynamics of phosphocreatine (PCr) and proton handling. Between 3 and 8 min during MOD, there was no discernable (mean ± SD, 0.06 ± 0.12 l min−1) or change in [PCr] (30 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 7 mm) or ATPtot (24 ± 14 vs. 17 ± 14 mm min−1; each P = n.s.). During HVY, the was 0.37 ± 0.16 l min−1 (22 ± 8%), [PCr] decreased (19 ± 7 vs. 18 ± 7 mm, or 12 ± 15%; P < 0.05) and ATPtot increased (38 ± 16 vs. 44 ± 14 mm min−1, or 26 ± 30%; P < 0.05) between 3 and 8 min. However, the increase in ATPtot (ΔATPtot) was not correlated with the during HVY (r2 = 0.06; P = n.s.). This lack of relationship between ΔATPtot and , together with a steepening of the [PCr]– relationship in HVY, suggests that reduced work efficiency during heavy exercise arises from both contractile (P/W) and mitochondrial sources (the O2 cost of ATP resynthesis; P/O). PMID:25281731

  19. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC.

  20. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A.; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC. PMID:26053483

  1. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC. PMID:26053483

  2. Porcine skeletal muscle-derived multipotent PW1pos/Pax7neg interstitial cells: isolation, characterization, and long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Fiona C; Henning, Beverley J; Marazzi, Giovanna; Sassoon, David; Ellison, Georgina M; Nadal-Ginard, Bernardo

    2014-06-01

    Developing effective strategies for the regeneration of solid tissue requires an understanding of the biology underlying the tissue's endogenous repair mechanisms. PW1/Peg3(pos)/Pax7(neg) skeletal muscle-derived interstitial progenitor cells (PICs) were first identified recently in the interstitium of murine skeletal muscle and shown to contribute to muscle fiber regeneration in vivo. PICs, therefore, represent a novel candidate resident progenitor cell for muscle regeneration. To explore the potential of these cells for clinical translation, we must ascertain the presence of PICs in larger mammalian species and identify criteria to successfully isolate and expand this population. In this study, we report the isolation, characterization, and maintenance of multipotent PICs from juvenile porcine skeletal muscle. We show that porcine PICs can be reproducibly isolated from skeletal muscle, express stem/progenitor cell markers, and have a stable phenotype and karyotype through multiple passages. Furthermore, porcine PICs are clonogenic and multipotent, giving rise to skeletal myoblast/myotubes, smooth muscle, and endothelial cells. In addition, PICs can be induced to differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells. These results demonstrate, in an animal model with size and physiology extrapolatable to the human, that porcine skeletal muscle-derived PW1(pos)/Pax7(neg) PICs are a source of stem/progenitor cells. These findings open new avenues for a variety of solid tissue engineering and regeneration using a single multipotent stem cell type isolated from an easily accessible source, such as skeletal muscle. PMID:24744394

  3. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Palmieri, R H; Frischat, A; Fischer, A H; Wu, L H; Maland, L; Manship, M

    1984-05-22

    The total amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been determined, and the single polypeptide chain of 194 amino acid residues starts with N-acetylmethionine and ends with leucyllysine at its carboxyl terminus, in agreement with the earlier data on its amino acid composition [Mahowald, T. A., Noltmann, E. A., & Kuby, S. A. (1962) J. Biol. Chem. 237, 1138-1145] and its carboxyl-terminus sequence [Olson, O. E., & Kuby, S. A. (1964) J. Biol. Chem. 239, 460-467]. Elucidation of the primary structure was based on tryptic and chymotryptic cleavages of the performic acid oxidized protein, cyanogen bromide cleavages of the 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein at its five methionine sites (followed by maleylation of peptide fragments), and tryptic cleavages at its 12 arginine sites of the maleylated 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein. Calf muscle myokinase, whose sequence has also been established, differs primarily from the rabbit muscle myokinase's sequence in the following: His-30 is replaced by Gln-30; Lys-56 is replaced by Met-56; Ala-84 and Asp 85 are replaced by Val-84 and Asn-85. A comparison of the four muscle-type adenylate kinases, whose covalent structures have now been determined, viz., rabbit, calf, porcine, and human [for the latter two sequences see Heil, A., Müller, G., Noda, L., Pinder, T., Schirmer, H., Schirmer, I., & Von Zabern, I. (1974) Eur. J. Biochem. 43, 131-144, and Von Zabern, I., Wittmann-Liebold, B., Untucht-Grau, R., Schirmer, R. H., & Pai, E. F. (1976) Eur. J. Biochem. 68, 281-290], demonstrates an extraordinary degree of homology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. The endothermic ATP hydrolysis and crossbridge attachment steps drive the increase of force with temperature in isometric and shortening muscle

    PubMed Central

    Offer, Gerald; Ranatunga, K W

    2015-01-01

    The isometric tetanic tension of skeletal muscle increases with temperature because attached crossbridge states bearing a relatively low force convert to those bearing a higher force. It was previously proposed that the tension-generating step(s) in the crossbridge cycle was highly endothermic and was therefore itself directly targeted by changes in temperature. However, this did not explain why a rapid rise in temperature (a temperature jump) caused a much slower rate of rise of tension than a rapid length step. This led to suggestions that the step targeted by a temperature rise is not the tension-generating step but is an extra step in the attached pathway of the crossbridge cycle, perhaps located on a parallel pathway. This enigma has been a major obstacle to a full understanding of the operation of the crossbridge cycle. We have now used a previously developed mechano-kinetic model of the crossbridge cycle in frog muscle to simulate the temperature dependence of isometric tension and shortening velocity. We allowed all five steps in the cycle to be temperature-sensitive. Models with different starting combinations of enthalpy changes and activation enthalpies for the five steps were refined by downhill simplex runs and scored by their ability to fit experimental data on the temperature dependence of isometric tension and the relationship between force and shortening velocity in frog muscle. We conclude that the first tension-generating step may be weakly endothermic and that the rise of tension with temperature is largely driven by the preceding two strongly endothermic steps of ATP hydrolysis and attachment of M.ADP.Pi to actin. The refined model gave a reasonable fit to the available experimental data and after a temperature jump the overall rate of tension rise was much slower than after a length step as observed experimentally. The findings aid our understanding of the crossbridge cycle by showing that it may not be necessary to include an additional

  5. ATP as a cotransmitter in the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Charles

    2015-09-01

    The role of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a major intracellular energy source is well-established. In addition, ATP and related nucleotides have widespread extracellular actions via the ionotropic P2X (ligand-gated cation channels) and metabotropic P2Y (G protein-coupled) receptors. Numerous experimental techniques, including myography, electrophysiology and biochemical measurement of neurotransmitter release, have been used to show that ATP has several major roles as a neurotransmitter in peripheral nerves. When released from enteric nerves of the gastrointestinal tract it acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter, mediating descending muscle relaxation during peristalsis. ATP is also an excitatory cotransmitter in autonomic nerves; 1) It is costored with noradrenaline in synaptic vesicles in postganglionic sympathetic nerves innervating smooth muscle preparations, such as the vas deferens and most arteries. When coreleased with noradrenaline, ATP acts at postjunctional P2X1 receptors to evoke depolarisation, Ca(2+) influx, Ca(2+) sensitisation and contraction. 2) ATP is also coreleased with acetylcholine from postganglionic parasympathetic nerves innervating the urinary bladder and again acts at postjunctional P2X1 receptors, and possibly also a P2X1+4 heteromer, to elicit smooth muscle contraction. In both cases the neurotransmitter actions of ATP are terminated by dephosphorylation by extracellular, membrane-bound enzymes and soluble nucleotidases released from postganglionic nerves. There are indications of an increased contribution of ATP to control of blood pressure in hypertension, but further research is needed to clarify this possibility. More promising is the upregulation of P2X receptors in dysfunctional bladder, including interstitial cystitis, idiopathic detrusor instability and overactive bladder syndrome. Consequently, these roles of ATP are of great therapeutic interest and are increasingly being targeted by pharmaceutical companies.

  6. Haemodynamic responses to exercise, ATP infusion and thigh compression in humans: insight into the role of muscle mechanisms on cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Jeppesen, Tina D; Ali, Leena; Barker, Horace; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Secher, Niels H; Dawson, Ellen A; Dufour, Stéphane P

    2008-05-01

    The muscle pump and muscle vasodilatory mechanism are thought to play important roles in increasing and maintaining muscle perfusion and cardiac output ((.)Q) during exercise, but their actual contributions remain uncertain. To evaluate the role of the skeletal muscle pump and vasodilatation on cardiovascular function during exercise, we determined leg and systemic haemodynamic responses in healthy men during (1) incremental one-legged knee-extensor exercise, (2) step-wise femoral artery ATP infusion at rest, (3) passive exercise (n=10), (4)femoral vein or artery ATP infusion (n=6), and (5) cyclic thigh compressions at rest and during passive and voluntary exercise (n=7). Incremental exercise resulted in progressive increases in leg blood flow (DeltaLBF 7.4 +/- 0.7 l min(-1)), cardiac output (Delta (.)Q 8.7 +/- 0.7 l min(-1)), mean arterial pressure (DeltaMAP 51 +/- 5 mmHg), and leg and systemic oxygen delivery and (.)VO2 . Arterial ATP infusion resulted in similar increases in (.)Q , LBF, and systemic and leg oxygen delivery, but central venous pressure and muscle metabolism remained unchanged and MAP was reduced. In contrast,femoral vein ATP infusion did not alter LBF, (.)Q or MAP. Passive exercise also increased blood flow (DeltaLBF 0.7 +/- 0.1 l min(-1)), yet the increase in muscle and systemic perfusion, unrelated to elevations in aerobic metabolism, accounted only for approximately 5% of peak exercise hyperaemia.Likewise, thigh compressions alone or in combination with passive exercise increased blood flow (DeltaLBF 0.5-0.7 l min(-1)) without altering (.)Q, MAP or (.)VO2. These findings suggest that the skeletal muscle pump is not obligatory for sustaining venous return, central venous pressure,stroke volume and (.)Q or maintaining muscle blood flow during one-legged exercise in humans.Further, its contribution to muscle and systemic peak exercise hyperaemia appears to be minimal in comparison to the effects of muscle vasodilatation. PMID:18339690

  7. Force and number of myosin motors during muscle shortening and the coupling with the release of the ATP hydrolysis products

    PubMed Central

    Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Dolfi, Mario; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The chemo-mechanical cycle of the myosin II–actin reaction in situ has been investigated in Ca2+-activated skinned fibres from rabbit psoas, by determining the number and strain (s) of myosin motors interacting during steady shortening at different velocities (V) and the effect of raising inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration. It was found that in control conditions (no added Pi), shortening at V ≤ 350 nm s–1 per half-sarcomere, corresponding to force (T) greater than half the isometric force (T0), decreases the number of myosin motors in proportion to the reduction of T, so that s remains practically constant and similar to the T0 value independent of V. At higher V the number of motors decreases less than in proportion to T, so that s progressively decreases. Raising Pi concentration by 10 mm, which reduces T0 and the number of motors by 40–50%, does not influence the dependence on V of number and strain. A model simulation of the myosin–actin reaction in which the structural transitions responsible for the myosin working stroke and the release of the hydrolysis products are orthogonal explains the results assuming that Pi and then ADP are released with rates that increase as the motor progresses through the working stroke. The rate of ADP release from the conformation at the end of the working stroke is also strain-sensitive, further increasing by one order of magnitude within a few nanometres of negative strain. These results provide the molecular explanation of the relation between the rate of energy liberation and the load during muscle contraction. Key points Muscle contraction is due to cyclical ATP-driven working strokes in the myosin motors while attached to the actin filament. Each working stroke is accompanied by the release of the hydrolysis products, orthophosphate and ADP. The rate of myosin–actin interactions increases with the increase in shortening velocity. We used fast half-sarcomere mechanics on skinned muscle fibres to

  8. Activation of ATP-dependent K+ channels by hypoxia in smooth muscle cells isolated from the pig coronary artery.

    PubMed Central

    Dart, C; Standen, N B

    1995-01-01

    1. The perforated patch technique with amphotericin B was used to record whole-cell currents activated by hypoxia in smooth muscle cells, isolated enzymatically from pig coronary arteries. 2. Superfusion with hypoxic solution (O2 partial pressure, 25-40 mmHg) activated an inward current at -60 mV in 143 mM extracellular K+. The reversal potential of the current induced by hypoxia shifted with extracellular [K+] as expected for a K+ current, while its current-voltage relation was consistent with the channels showing little voltage dependence. 3. The hypoxia-induced current was inhibited by glibenclamide (10 microM), but was unaffected by charybdotoxin (50 nM). 4. In whole-cell recordings at -60 mV in 143 mM K+ solution, openings of single channels passing a current close to -2 pA could sometimes be detected in normoxic solution. Openings became more frequent during the onset of the response to hypoxia, when several levels could be detected. Channels with a similar conductance were activated by hypoxia in cell-attached patches. 5. Our results suggest that hypoxia activates ATP-dependent K+ channels. We discuss possible mechanisms by which this activation may occur. PMID:7539841

  9. Structural responses to the photolytic release of ATP in frog muscle fibres, observed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Tsaturyan, A K; Bershitsky, S Y; Burns, R; He, Z H; Ferenczi, M A

    1999-11-01

    1. Structural changes following the photolytic release of ATP were observed in single, permeabilised fibres of frog skeletal muscle at 5-6 C, using time-resolved, low-angle X-ray diffraction. The structural order in the fibres and their isometric function were preserved by cross-linking 10-20 % of the myosin cross-bridges to the thin filaments. 2. The time courses of the change in force, stiffness and in intensity of the main equatorial reflections (1,0) and (1,1), of the third myosin layer line (M3) at a reciprocal spacing of (14.5 nm)-1 on the meridian and of the first myosin-actin layer line (LL1) were measured with 1 ms time resolution. 3. In the absence of Ca2+, photolytic release of ATP in muscle fibres initially in the rigor state caused the force and stiffness to decrease monotonically towards their values in relaxed muscle fibres. 4. In the presence of Ca2+, photolytic release of ATP resulted in an initial rapid decrease in force, followed by a slower increase to the isometric plateau. Muscle fibre stiffness decreased rapidly to approximately 65 % of its value in rigor. 5. In the absence of Ca2+, changes on the equator, in LL1 and in M3 occurred with a time scale comparable to that of the changes in tension and stiffness. 6. In the presence of Ca2+, the changes on the equator and LL1 occurred simultaneously with the early phase of tension decrease. The changes in the intensity of M3 (IM3) occurred on the time scale of the subsequent increase in force. The time courses of the changes in tension and IM3 were similar following the photolytic release of 0. 33 or 1.1 mM ATP. However the gradual return towards the rigor state began earlier when only 0.33 mM ATP was released. 7. In the presence of Ca2+, the time course of changes in IM3 closely mimicked that of force development following photolytic release of ATP. This is consistent with models that propose that force development results from a change in the average orientation of cross-bridges, although other

  10. The ultrastructure of the muscle coat of human gastro-oesophageal junction, with special reference to “interstitial cells of Cajal”†

    PubMed Central

    Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria-Simonetta; Cortesini, Camillo; Romagnoli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The muscle coat of the human lower oesophageal sphincter and stomach was studied 5 cm above and 4 cm below the gastro-oesophageal junction. Four subjects were operated on for motility disorders of the esophagus, two for a hypertensive lower oesophageal sphincter and two for an epiphrenic diverticulum; six subjects were operated on for oesophageal or gastric carcinomas. Specimens were fixed in phosphate-buffered OsO4, embedded in Epon, contrasted with uranyl acetate and lead citrate and observed under a Siemens Elmiskop Ia electron microscope. Both the oesophageal and gastric muscle cells, which showed features typical of this cell type, were innervated by multiple varicosities that were rich in synaptic vesicles; these varicosities were generally rarely encountered at distances less than 1000 Å from muscle cells. Only a very few, close neuromuscular junctions were detected. Special cells, which correspond to the “interstitial cells of Cajal” as reported by other authors, were discerned at the periphery of muscle cell bundles. These cells were characterized by an elongated cell body with many thin branches and an oval, sometimes indented nucleus. Some pinocytotic vesicles were located at the cell periphery. These cells were surrounded by a discontinuous basal lamina and were seen in close contact with each other and with muscle cells; the close contact areas were often very wide. The cytoplasm contained variable amounts of mitochondria, a well-developed smooth endoplasmic reticulum and a Golgi complex. As a characteristic feature, bundles of thin filaments were located at the cell periphery and were attached to electron-dense areas of the cell membrane. Morphologically, these filaments resembled myofilaments; they were present in variable amounts and were sometimes very numerous. The observation that the cytoplasmic organelles and filaments varied in number, is probably related to the different functional properties of these cells. Interstitial cells were

  11. Direct deamination of AMP, ADP, ATP and NADH by non-specific adenylate deaminase in the foot muscle of the snail Helix pomatia.

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, A J

    1983-01-01

    Homogeneous adenylate deaminase from snail foot muscle deaminated 5'-AMP, 5'-ADP, 5'-ATP and NADH with similar velocity and affinity to all substrates. At millimolar concentration NAD+ was also deaminated to a comparable extent, but NADP+, NADPH and FAD were not substrates for the snail enzyme. The amount of deaminase activity per g of fresh tissue is 5-10 times greater than in the muscle of any other species studied. The activity of the snail deaminase is regulated by pH, KCl and buffer concentrations, and Pi; however, regulation seems to be very poor in comparison with that of muscle deaminases from other species, specific to 5'-AMP. Snail enzyme appears as the first animal deaminase so far described that has such characteristics. It offers also some opportunities as an analytical tool as a consequence of its very high affinity toward adenylates. PMID:6626180

  12. Mechanical study of rat soleus muscle using caged ATP and X-ray diffraction: high ADP affinity of slow cross-bridges.

    PubMed Central

    Horiuti, K; Yagi, N; Takemori, S

    1997-01-01

    1. The cross-bridges in slow- and fast-twitch fibres (taken, respectively, from soleus and psoas muscles of rats) were examined in mechanical experiments using caged ATP and X-ray diffraction, to compare their binding of ATP and ADP. 2. Caged ATP was photolysed in rigor fibres. When ADP was removed from pre-photolysis fibres, the initial relaxation (+/- Ca2+) in soleus was as fast as that in psoas fibres, whereas the subsequent contraction (+Ca2+) was slower in soleus than in psoas. The ATPase rate during the steady-state contraction was also slower in soleus fibres. 3. When ADP was added to pre-photolysis fibres (+/- Ca2+), tension developed even in the initial phase, the overall tension development being biphasic. Both initial and late components of the Ca(2+)-free contraction were enhanced when ADP was added before photolysis, although pre-photolysis ADP was not a prerequisite for the late component. The effect of ADP was greater in soleus than in psoas fibres. Static experiments on rigor fibres revealed a higher ADP affinity in soleus fibres. 4. The intensity of the actin layer-line from ADP rigor soleus fibres decreased rapidly on photorelease of ATP. We conclude that, despite the tight ADP binding of the soleus cross-bridge, its isometric reaction is not rate limited by the 'off' rate of ADP. PMID:9263922

  13. An NF-κB--EphrinA5-Dependent Communication between NG2(+) Interstitial Cells and Myoblasts Promotes Muscle Growth in Neonates.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jin-Mo; Wang, David J; Peterson, Jennifer M; Shintaku, Jonathan; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Coppola, Vincenzo; Frakes, Ashley E; Kaspar, Brian K; Cornelison, Dawn D; Guttridge, Denis C

    2016-01-25

    Skeletal muscle growth immediately following birth is critical for proper body posture and locomotion. However, compared with embryogenesis and adulthood, the processes regulating the maturation of neonatal muscles is considerably less clear. Studies in the 1960s predicted that neonatal muscle growth results from nuclear accretion of myoblasts preferentially at the tips of myofibers. Remarkably, little information has been added since then to resolve how myoblasts migrate to the ends of fibers. Here, we provide insight into this process by revealing a unique NF-κB-dependent communication between NG2(+) interstitial cells and myoblasts. NF-κB in NG2(+) cells promotes myoblast migration to the tips of myofibers through cell-cell contact. This occurs through expression of ephrinA5 from NG2(+) cells, which we further deduce is an NF-κB target gene. Together, these results suggest that NF-κB plays an important role in the development of newborn muscles to ensure proper myoblast migration for fiber growth.

  14. Erythrocyte-dependent regulation of human skeletal muscle blood flow: role of varied oxyhemoglobin and exercise on nitrite, S-nitrosohemoglobin, and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rakesh P.; Brandon, Angela; Teng, Xinjun; Pearson, James; Barker, Horace; Ali, Leena; Yuen, Ada H. Y.; Smolenski, Ryszard T.; González-Alonso, José

    2010-01-01

    The erythrocyte is proposed to play a key role in the control of local tissue perfusion via three O2-dependent signaling mechanisms: 1) reduction of circulating nitrite to vasoactive NO, 2) S-nitrosohemoglobin (SNO-Hb)-dependent vasodilatation, and 3) release of the vasodilator and sympatholytic ATP; however, their relative roles in vivo remain unclear. Here we evaluated each mechanism to gain insight into their roles in the regulation of human skeletal muscle blood flow during hypoxia and hyperoxia at rest and during exercise. Arterial and femoral venous hemoglobin O2 saturation (O2Hb), plasma and erythrocyte NO and ATP metabolites, and leg and systemic hemodynamics were measured in 10 healthy males exposed to graded hypoxia, normoxia, and graded hyperoxia both at rest and during submaximal one-legged knee-extensor exercise. At rest, leg blood flow and NO and ATP metabolites in plasma and erythrocytes remained unchanged despite large alterations in O2Hb. During exercise, however, leg and systemic perfusion and vascular conductance increased in direct proportion to decreases in arterial and venous O2Hb (r2 = 0.86–0.98; P = 0.01), decreases in venous plasma nitrite (r2 = 0.93; P < 0.01), increases in venous erythrocyte nitroso species (r2 = 0.74; P < 0.05), and to a lesser extent increases in erythrocyte SNO (r2 = 0.59; P = 0.07). No relationship was observed with plasma ATP (r2 = 0.01; P = 0.99) or its degradation compounds. These in vivo data indicate that, during low-intensity exercise and hypoxic stress, but not hypoxic stress alone, plasma nitrite consumption and formation of erythrocyte nitroso species are associated with limb vasodilatation and increased blood flow in the human skeletal muscle vasculature. PMID:20852046

  15. ATP Sensitive Potassium Channels in the Skeletal Muscle Function: Involvement of the KCNJ11(Kir6.2) Gene in the Determination of Mechanical Warner Bratzer Shear Force

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Domenico; Selvaggi, Maria; Passantino, Giuseppe; De Palo, Pasquale; Dario, Cataldo; Centoducati, Pasquale; Tateo, Alessandra; Curci, Angela; Maqoud, Fatima; Mele, Antonietta; Camerino, Giulia M.; Liantonio, Antonella; Imbrici, Paola; Zizzo, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-sensitive K+-channels (KATP) are distributed in the tissues coupling metabolism with K+ ions efflux. KATP subunits are encoded by KCNJ8 (Kir6.1), KCNJ11 (Kir6.2), ABCC8 (SUR1), and ABCC9 (SUR2) genes, alternative RNA splicing give rise to SUR variants that confer distinct physiological properties on the channel. An high expression/activity of the sarco-KATP channel is observed in various rat fast-twitch muscles, characterized by elevated muscle strength, while a low expression/activity is observed in the slow-twitch muscles characterized by reduced strength and frailty. Down-regulation of the KATP subunits of fast-twitch fibers is found in conditions characterized by weakness and frailty. KCNJ11 gene knockout mice have reduced glycogen, lean phenotype, lower body fat, and weakness. KATP channel is also a sensor of muscle atrophy. The KCNJ11 gene is located on BTA15, close to a QTL for meat tenderness, it has also a role in glycogen storage, a key mechanism of the postmortem transformation of muscle into meat. The role of KCNJ11 gene in muscle function may underlie an effect of KCNJ11 genotypes on meat tenderness, as recently reported. The fiber phenotype and genotype are important in livestock production science. Quantitative traits including meat production and quality are influenced both by environment and genes. Molecular markers can play an important role in the genetic improvement of animals through breeding strategies. Many factors influence the muscle Warner-Bratzler shear force including breed, age, feeding, the biochemical, and functional parameters. The role of KCNJ11gene and related genes on muscle tenderness will be discussed in the present review. PMID:27242541

  16. Morphometry of interstitial fibrosis.

    PubMed

    De Heer, E; Sijpkens, Y W; Verkade, M; den Dulk, M; Langers, A; Schutrups, J; Bruijn, J A; van Es, L A

    2000-01-01

    thereafter, in order to establish whether uraemia-induced interstitial fibrosis remains reversible at all times. In rat models, we have found that both protein overload-induced and serum sickness-induced interstitial fibrosis are accompanied by the development of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis. Only in the ureter obstruction model did selective interstitial fibrosis develop, and remained reversible at all times studied. For the reliable assessment of interstitial fibrosis we have found that the best correlating parameters of interstitial fibrosis with renal function were: (i) the ratio of protein accumulation of TGF-beta-1 and its antagonist decorin; (ii) interstitial expression of smooth muscle alpha-actin; and (iii) accumulation of interstitial collagens (as determined by immunoperoxidase and by Sirius red staining). PMID:11143998

  17. Studies on the roles of ATP, adenosine and nitric oxide in mediating muscle vasodilatation induced in the rat by acute systemic hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Skinner, M R; Marshall, J M

    1996-09-01

    1. In Saffan-anaesthetized rats, we have further investigated the mechanisms underlying the vasodilatation induced by adenosine in skeletal muscle by acute systemic hypoxia (breathing 8% O2 for 5 min). 2. In eleven rats the nitric oxide (NO) synthesis inhibitor nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10 mg kg-1, i.v.) reduced the increase in femoral vascular conductance (FVC) induced by hypoxia by approximately 50%. L-NAME had similar effects on the increase in FVC induced by intra-arterial (I.A.) infusion of adenosine (at 1.2 mg kg-1 min-1 for 5 min via the tail artery) and by ATP (I.A., 1 mg kg-1 min-1 for 5 min). Subsequent administration of the adenosine receptor antagonist 8-sulphophenyl theophylline (8-SPT, 20 mg kg-1, i.v.) virtually abolished the adenosine- and ATP-induced increase in FVC. 3. In a further nine rats, 8-SPT reduced the increase in FVC induced by hypoxia by approximately 50%. This remaining increase in FVC was substantially reduced by L-NAME. 4. In an additional nine rats, alpha,beta-methyleneADP (160 micrograms kg-1, i.v.) which inhibits the 5'-ectonucleotidase that degrades AMP to adenosine, reduced the peripheral vasodilatation (fall in arterial blood pressure, ABP) induced by ATP infusion, but had no effect on the increase in FVC or decrease in ABP evoked by systemic hypoxia. 5. These results provide the first evidence that the muscle vasodilatation induced by adenosine during systemic hypoxia is mainly dependent on NO synthesis. They also suggest that adenosine is released as such rather than being formed extracellularly from AMP. Given evidence that extraluminal adenosine acts in an NO-independent fashion we propose that hypoxia releases adenosine from the endothelium. Our results also indicate that hypoxia induces muscle vasodilatation that is adenosine independent but NO dependent: they allow the possibility that this is partly mediated by ATP released from the endothelium. PMID:8887765

  18. Essential role of the interstitial cells of Cajal in nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of longitudinal muscle of the mouse ileum.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Tadayoshi; Fujinami, Kaori; Fujita, Akikazu; Okishio, Yutaka; Takewaki, Tadashi; Hata, Fumiaki

    2004-05-01

    The role of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced neurogenic responses in ileum was studied by using the ICC-deficient mutant (SLC-W/W(V)) mouse and its wild type. In the immunohistochemical study with anti-c-Kit antibody, ICC was observed in the myenteric plexus (MY) and deep muscular plexus (DMP) region in the wild type. In the mutant, ICC-MY were lost, only ICC-DMP were present. EFS induced a rapid contraction of the ileal segments from the wild type mouse in the direction of longitudinal muscle. In the mutant mouse, onset of contraction was delayed and its rate was slowed. EFS induced nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) relaxation in the presence of atropine and guanethidine in the wild type. A nitric oxide synthase inhibitor inhibited the relaxation and L-arginine reversed it. In the mutant, EFS did not induce NANC relaxation. There was no difference between the responsiveness of the segments from wild type and mutant mice to exogenously added acetylcholine or Nor-1. Taking into account the selective loss of ICC-MY in the mutant mice, it seems likely that ICC-MY have an essential role in inducing nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of longitudinal muscle of the mouse ileum and that ICC-MY partly participate in EFS-induced contraction.

  19. Divergent effects of low-O(2) tension and iloprost on ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with type 2 diabetes: implications for O(2) supply to skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Randy S; Goldman, Daniel; Bowles, Elizabeth A; Achilleus, David; Stephenson, Alan H; Ellis, Christopher G; Ellsworth, Mary L

    2010-08-01

    Erythrocytes release both O(2) and a vasodilator, ATP, when exposed to reduced O(2) tension. We investigated the hypothesis that ATP release is impaired in erythrocytes of humans with type 2 diabetes (DM2) and that this defect compromises the ability of these cells to stimulate dilation of resistance vessels. We also determined whether a general vasodilator, the prostacyclin analog iloprost (ILO), stimulates ATP release from healthy human (HH) and DM2 erythrocytes. Finally, we used a computational model to compare the effect on tissue O(2) levels of increases in blood flow directed to areas of increased O(2) demand (erythrocyte ATP release) with nondirected increases in flow (ILO). HH erythrocytes, but not DM2 cells, released increased amounts of ATP when exposed to reduced O(2) tension (Po(2) < 30 mmHg). In addition, isolated hamster skeletal muscle arterioles dilated in response to similar decreases in extraluminal O(2) when perfused with HH erythrocytes, but not when perfused with DM2 erythrocytes. In contrast, both HH and DM2 erythrocytes released ATP in response to ILO. In the case of DM2 erythrocytes, amounts of ATP released correlated inversely with glycemic control. Modeling revealed that a functional regulatory system that directs blood flow to areas of need (low O(2)-induced ATP release) provides appropriate levels of tissue oxygenation and that this level of the matching of O(2) delivery with demand in skeletal muscle cannot be achieved with a general vasodilator. These results suggest that the inability of erythrocytes to release ATP in response to exposure to low-O(2) tension could contribute to the peripheral vascular disease of DM2. PMID:20511412

  20. ATP Consumption by SR Ca2+ Pumps Accounts for 50% of Resting Metabolic Rate in Mouse Fast and Slow Twitch Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Sarah Michelle; Bombardier, Eric; Smith, Ian Curtis; Vigna, Chris; Tupling, Allan Russell

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to directly quantify the relative contribution of Ca2+ cycling to resting metabolic rate in mouse fast (extensor digitorum longus, EDL) and slow (soleus, SOL) twitch skeletal muscle. Resting oxygen consumption of isolated muscles (VO2, μL/g wet weight/s) measured polarographically at 30°C was ~25% higher in SOL (0.61 ± .03) than EDL (0.46 ± .03). In order to quantify the specific contribution of Ca2+ cycling to resting metabolic rate, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a highly specific inhibitor of sarco(endo)plasmic Ca2+ ATPases (SERCAs), was added to the bath at different concentrations (1, 5, 10 and 15 μM). There was a concentration-dependent effect of CPA on oxygen consumption with increasing CPA concentrations up to 10 μM resulting in progressively greater reductions in muscle VO2. There were no differences between 10 and 15 μM CPA indicating that 10 μM CPA induces maximal inhibition of SERCAs in isolated muscle preparations. The relative (%) reduction in muscle VO2 in response to CPA was nearly identical in EDL (1 μM, 10.6 ± 3.0; 5 μM, 33.2 ± 3.4; 10 μM, 49.2 ± 2.9; 15 μM, 50.9 ± 2.1) and SOL (1 μM, 11.2 ± 1.5; 5 μM, 37.7 ± 2.4; 10 μM, 50.0 ± 1.3; 15 μM, 49.9 ± 1.6). The results indicate that ATP consumption by SERCAs is responsible for ~50% of resting metabolic rate in both mouse fast- and slow-twitch muscles at 30°C. Thus, SERCA pumps in skeletal muscle could represent an important control point for energy balance regulation and a potential target for metabolic alterations to oppose obesity. PMID:20018953

  1. Muscle protein waste in tumor-bearing rats is effectively antagonized by a beta 2-adrenergic agonist (clenbuterol). Role of the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Costelli, P; García-Martínez, C; Llovera, M; Carbó, N; López-Soriano, F J; Agell, N; Tessitore, L; Baccino, F M; Argilés, J M

    1995-01-01

    Tissue protein hypercatabolism (TPH) is a most important feature in cancer cachexia, particularly with regard to the skeletal muscle. The rat ascites hepatoma Yoshida AH-130 is a very suitable model system for studying the mechanisms involved in the processes that lead to tissue depletion, since it induces in the host a rapid and progressive muscle waste mainly due to TPH (Tessitore, L., G. Bonelli, and F. M. Baccino. 1987. Biochem. J. 241:153-159). Detectable plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha associated with marked perturbations in the hormonal homeostasis have been shown to concur in forcing metabolism into a catabolic setting (Tessitore, L., P. Costelli, and F. M. Baccino. 1993. Br. J. Cancer. 67:15-23). The present study was directed to investigate if beta 2-adrenergic agonists, which are known to favor skeletal muscle hypertrophy, could effectively antagonize the enhanced muscle protein breakdown in this cancer cachexia model. One such agent, i.e., clenbuterol, indeed largely prevented skeletal muscle waste in AH-130-bearing rats by restoring protein degradative rates close to control values. This normalization of protein breakdown rates was achieved through a decrease of the hyperactivation of the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway, as previously demonstrated in our laboratory (Llovera, M., C. García-Martínez, N. Agell, M. Marzábal, F. J. López-Soriano, and J. M. Argilés. 1994. FEBS (Fed. Eur. Biochem. Soc.) Lett. 338:311-318). By contrast, the drug did not exert any measurable effect on various parenchymal organs, nor did it modify the plasma level of corticosterone and insulin, which were increased and decreased, respectively, in the tumor hosts. The present data give new insights into the mechanisms by which clenbuterol exerts its preventive effect on muscle protein waste and seem to warrant the implementation of experimental protocols involving the use of clenbuterol or alike drugs in the treatment of pathological states involving

  2. Interstitial keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cornea. This condition is often caused by infections. Syphilis is the most common cause of interstitial keratitis, ... Tuberculosis In the United States, most cases of syphilis are recognized and treated before this eye condition ...

  3. Extracellular ATP

    PubMed Central

    Chivasa, Stephen; Tomé, Daniel FA; Murphy, Alex M; Hamilton, John M; Lindsey, Keith; Carr, John P

    2009-01-01

    Living organisms acquire or synthesize high energy molecules, which they frugally conserve and use to meet their cellular metabolic demands. Therefore, it is surprising that ATP, the most accessible and commonly utilized chemical energy carrier, is actively secreted to the extracellular matrix of cells. It is now becoming clear that in plants this extracellular ATP (eATP) is not wasted, but harnessed at the cell surface to signal across the plasma membrane of the secreting cell and neighboring cells to cxontrol gene expression and influence plant development. Identification of the gene/protein networks regulated by eATP-mediated signaling should provide insight into the physiological roles of eATP in plants. By disrupting eATP-mediated signaling, we have identified pathogen defense genes as part of the eATP-regulated gene circuitry, leading us to the discovery that eATP is a negative regulator of pathogen defense in plants.1 Previously, we reported that eATP is a key signal molecule that modulates programmed cell death in plants.2 A complex picture is now emerging, in which eATP-mediated signaling cross-talks with signaling mediated by the major plant defense hormone, salicylic acid, in the regulation of pathogen defense and cell death. PMID:20009563

  4. ATP-sensitive K+ channels in smooth muscle cells of guinea-pig mesenteric lymphatics: role in nitric oxide and β-adrenoceptor agonist-induced hyperpolarizations

    PubMed Central

    von der Weid, Pierre-Yves

    1998-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrode recordings were performed to investigate the membrane K+ conductances involved in smooth muscle hyperpolarization of lymphatic vessels in the guinea-pig mesentery. Nitric oxide (NO), released either by the endothelium after acetylcholine (ACh; 10 μM) stimulation or by sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 50–100 μM), hyperpolarized lymphatic smooth muscle. These responses were inhibited with the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 μM). ACh and SNP-induced hyperpolarizations were inhibited (by about 90%) upon application of the ATP-sensitive K+(KATP) channel blocker, glibenclamide (10 μM), or with 4-aminopyridine (2.5 mM), but were not affected by the Ca2+-activated K+ channels blocker, penitrem A (100 nM). Hyperpolarization caused by the K+ channel opener, cromakalim (0.1–10 μM), isoprenaline (0.1 μM) or forskolin (0.5 μM) were all significantly blocked by glibenclamide. Hyperpolarization evoked by ACh and SNP were inhibited with N-[2-(p-bromociannamylamino)-ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide-dichloride (H89, 10 μM), suggesting the involvement of cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase (PKA). These results suggest that KATP channels play a central role in lymphatic smooth muscle hyperpolarization evoked by a NO-induced increase in cyclic GMP synthesis, as well as by β-adrenoceptor-mediated production of cyclic AMP. Interestingly, both pathways lead to KATP channels opening through the activation of PKA. PMID:9776338

  5. cDNA sequence of a human skeletal muscle ADP/ATP translocator: lack of a leader peptide, divergence from a fibroblast translocator cDNA, and coevolution with mitochondrial DNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Neckelmann, N.; Li, K.; Wade, R.P.; Shuster, R.; Wallace, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    The authors have characterized a 1400-nucleotide cDNA for the human skeletal muscle ADP/ATP translocator. The deduced amino acid sequence is 94% homologous to the beef heart ADP/ATP translocator protein and contains only a single additional amino-terminal methionine. This implies that the human translocator lacks an amino-terminal targeting peptide, a conclusion substantiated by measuring the molecular weight of the protein synthesized in vitro. A 1400-nucleotide transcript encoding the skeletal muscle translocator was detected on blots of total RNA from human heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, and HeLa cells by hybridization with oligonucleotide probes homologous to the coding region and 3' noncoding region of the cDNA. However, the level of this mRNA varied substantially among tissues. Comparison of our skeletal muscle translocator sequence with that of a recently published human fibroblast translocator cognate revealed that the two proteins are 88% identical and diverged about 275 million years ago. Hence, tissues vary both in the level of expression of individual translocator genes and in differential expression of cognate translocator genes. Comparison of the base substitution rates of the ADP/ATP translocator and the oxidative phosphorylation genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA revealed that the mitochondrial DNA genes fix 10 times more synonymous substitutions and 12 times more replacement substitutions; yet, these nuclear and cytoplasmic respiration genes experience comparable evolutionary constraints. This suggest that the mitochondrial DNA genes are highly prone to deleterious mutations.

  6. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. XVIII. Synthesis and preparation of peptides and peptide fragments of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase (adenylate kinase) and their nucleotide-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Hamada, M; Johnson, M S; Russell, G A; Manship, M; Palmieri, R H; Fleming, G; Bredt, D S; Mildvan, A S

    1989-08-01

    Two peptide fragments, derived from the head and tail of rabbit muscle myokinase, were found to possess remarkable and specific ligand-binding properties (Hamada et al., 1979). By initiating systematic syntheses and measurements of equilibrium substrate-binding properties of these two sets of peptides, or portions thereof, which encompass the binding sites for (a) the magnesium complexes of the nucleotide substrates (MgATP2- and MgADP-) and (b) the uncomplexed nucleotide substrates (ADP3- and AMP2-) of rabbit muscle myokinase, some of the requirements for binding of the substrates to ATP-AMP transphosphorylase are being deduced and chemically outlined. One requirement for tight nucleotide binding appears to be a minimum peptide length of 15-25 residues. In addition, Lys-172 and/or Lys-194 may be involved in the binding of epsilon AMP. The syntheses are described as a set of peptides corresponding to residues 31-45, 20-45, 5-45, and 1-45, and a set of peptides corresponding to residues 178-192, 178-194, and 172-194 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase. The ligand-binding properties of the first set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands: epsilon MgATP/epsilon ATP and epsilon MgADP/epsilon ADP are quantitatively presented in terms of their intrinsic dissociation constants (K'd) and values of N (maximal number of moles bound per mole of peptide); and compared with the peptide fragment MT-I (1-44) obtained from rabbit muscle myokinase (Kuby et al., 1984) and with the native enzyme (Hamada et al., 1979). In addition, the values of N and K'd are given for the second set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands epsilon AMP and epsilon ADP as well as for the peptide fragments MT-XII(172-194) and CB-VI(126-194) (Kuby et al., 1984) and, in turn, compared with the native enzyme. A few miscellaneous dissociation constants which had been derived kinetically are also given for comparison (e.g., the Ki for epsilon AMP and the value of KMg epsilon ATP obtained for

  7. Interstitial space and collagen alterations of the developing rat diaphragm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, L. E.; Martinez, D. A.; Vailas, A. C.; Sieck, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of growth on the relative interstitial space [%total cross-sectional area (CSA)] and collagen content of the rat diaphragm muscle was examined at postnatal ages of 0, 7, 14, and 21 days as well as in adult males. The proportion of interstitial space relative to total muscle CSA was determined by computerized image analysis of lectin-stained cross sections of diaphragm muscle. To assess collagen content and extent of collagen maturation (i.e., cross-linking), high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis was used to measure hydroxyproline concentration and the nonreducible collagen cross-link hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP), respectively. At birth, interstitial space accounted for approximately 47% of total diaphragm muscle CSA. During postnatal growth, the relative contribution of interstitial space decreased such that by adulthood the interstitial space accounted for approximately 18% of total muscle CSA. The change in relative interstitial space occurred without a concomitant change in hydroxyproline concentration. However, the concentration of HP markedly increased with age such that the adult diaphragm contained approximately 17 times more HP than at birth. These results indicate that during development the relative CSA occupied by interstitial space decreases as muscle fiber size increases. However, the reduction in relative interstitial space is not associated with a change in collagen concentration. Thus collagen density in the interstitial space may increase with age. It is possible that the observed changes in relative interstitial space and collagen influence the passive length-force properties of the diaphragm.

  8. Interstitial nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, A J; Winearls, C G; Dunnill, M S

    1981-01-01

    The clinical and pathological findings are reviewed in ten cases where renal biopsy showed abnormalities predominantly within the interstitium. In six the nephritis was considered to be drug-induced; in two the aetiology was slightly obscure but the most likely diagnosis was considered to be sarcoidosis. Of the remaining two cases one was chronic pyelonephritis and the other polyarteritis nodosa. The diagnosis and pathogenesis of the renal lesions are discussed and attention is drawn to the importance of distinguishing primary interstitial changes from those found in association with glomerular disease. Images PMID:7251904

  9. Interstitial cystitis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - interstitial cystitis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on interstitial cystitis : Interstitial Cystitis Association -- www.ichelp.org National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www.kidney.niddk. ...

  10. Interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Erickson, D R; Davies, M F

    1998-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a multifactorial syndrome with symptoms of pelvic or perineal pain, urinary frequency and urgency. The etiologies are unknown, but several theories have been proposed. Diagnosis is often delayed because most of the conventional evaluation is normal. Pelvic examination is normal except for bladder tenderness. Urodynamics are normal except for increased bladder sensitivity and low capacity. Urinalysis, urine culture and office cystoscopy are also normal. The diagnostic test is cystoscopy under anesthesia with bladder distension. Small submucosal hemorrhages (glomerulations) or ulcers appear after distension. Many empiric treatments have been proposed for IC. None is universally effective, and so treatments are tried sequentially until good symptom relief is achieved. Bladder distension gives excellent (but transient) relief in some patients, especially those with severe bladder inflammation (who also tend to be older). A variety of oral, intravesical and adjunctive treatments are also described.

  11. The Significance of Interstitial Cells in Neurogastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Peter J; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle layers of the gastrointestinal tract consist of a heterogeneous population of cells that include enteric neurons, several classes of interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin, a variety of immune cells and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Over the last number of years the complexity of the interactions between these cell types has begun to emerge. For example, interstitial cells, consisting of both interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha-positive (PDGFRα+) cells generate pacemaker activity throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and also transduce enteric motor nerve signals and mechanosensitivity to adjacent SMCs. ICC and PDGFRα+ cells are electrically coupled to SMCs possibly via gap junctions forming a multicellular functional syncytium termed the SIP syncytium. Cells that make up the SIP syncytium are highly specialized containing unique receptors, ion channels and intracellular signaling pathways that regulate the excitability of GI muscles. The unique role of these cells in coordinating GI motility is evident by the altered motility patterns in animal models where interstitial cell networks are disrupted. Although considerable advances have been made in recent years on our understanding of the roles of these cells within the SIP syncytium, the full physiological functions of these cells and the consequences of their disruption in GI muscles have not been clearly defined. This review gives a synopsis of the history of interstitial cell discovery and highlights recent advances in structural, molecular expression and functional roles of these cells in the GI tract. PMID:24948131

  12. The significance of interstitial cells in neurogastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Blair, Peter J; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M

    2014-07-31

    Smooth muscle layers of the gastrointestinal tract consist of a heterogeneous population of cells that include enteric neurons, several classes of interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin, a variety of immune cells and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Over the last number of years the complexity of the interactions between these cell types has begun to emerge. For example, interstitial cells, consisting of both interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha-positive (PDGFRα(+)) cells generate pacemaker activity throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and also transduce enteric motor nerve signals and mechanosensitivity to adjacent SMCs. ICC and PDGFRα(+) cells are electrically coupled to SMCs possibly via gap junctions forming a multicellular functional syncytium termed the SIP syncytium. Cells that make up the SIP syncytium are highly specialized containing unique receptors, ion channels and intracellular signaling pathways that regulate the excitability of GI muscles. The unique role of these cells in coordinating GI motility is evident by the altered motility patterns in animal models where interstitial cell networks are disrupted. Although considerable advances have been made in recent years on our understanding of the roles of these cells within the SIP syncytium, the full physiological functions of these cells and the consequences of their disruption in GI muscles have not been clearly defined. This review gives a synopsis of the history of interstitial cell discovery and highlights recent advances in structural, molecular expression and functional roles of these cells in the GI tract.

  13. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Human isoenzymes of adenylate kinase: isolation and physicochemical comparison of the crystalline human ATP-AMP transphosphorylases from muscle and liver.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Fleming, G; Frischat, A; Cress, M C; Hamada, M

    1983-02-10

    Procedures are described for the isolation, in crystalline form, of the adenylate kinases from autopsy samples of human muscle and from human liver. Weight average molecular weights were determined by sedimentation equilibrium to be 22,000 (+/- 700) and 25,450 (+/- 160) for the human muscle and liver isoenzymes, respectively. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, their molecular weights were estimated to be 21,700 and 26,500 for the muscle and liver enzymes, respectively. Both isoenzymes are accordingly monomeric proteins in their native state. Amino acid analyses are reported here for the normal human liver, calf liver, and rabbit liver adenylate kinases and compared with the normal human muscle, calf muscle, and rabbit muscle myokinases. The liver types as a group and the muscle types as a group show a great deal of homology, but some distinct differences are evident between the liver and muscle enzyme groups, especially in the number of residues of His, Pro, half-cystine, and the presence of tryptophan in the liver enzymes. The normal human liver adenylate kinase, as isolated in this report, has proved to be similar in its properties, if not identical, to the adenylate kinase isolated directly from human liver mitochondria (Hamada, M., Sumida, M., Okuda, H., Watanabe, T., Nojima, M., and Kuby, S. A. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 13120-13128). Therefore, the liver-type adenylate kinase may be considered a mitochondrial type.

  14. Tension Recovery following Ramp-Shaped Release in High-Ca and Low-Ca Rigor Muscle Fibers: Evidence for the Dynamic State of AMADP Myosin Heads in the Absence of ATP.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Haruo; Yamaguchi, Maki; Ohno, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During muscle contraction, myosin heads (M) bound to actin (A) perform power stroke associated with reaction, AMADPPi → AM + ADP + Pi. In this scheme, A • M is believed to be a high-affinity complex after removal of ATP. Biochemical studies on extracted protein samples show that, in the AM complex, actin-binding sites are located at both sides of junctional peptide between 50K and 20K segments of myosin heavy chain. Recently, we found that a monoclonal antibody (IgG) to the junctional peptide had no effect on both in vitro actin-myosin sliding and skinned muscle fiber contraction, though it covers the actin-binding sites on myosin. It follows from this that, during muscle contraction, myosin heads do not pass through the static rigor AM configuration, determined biochemically and electron microscopically using extracted protein samples. To study the nature of AM and AMADP myosin heads, actually existing in muscle, we examined mechanical responses to ramp-shaped releases (0.5% of Lo, complete in 5ms) in single skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in high-Ca (pCa, 4) and low-Ca (pCa, >9) rigor states. The fibers exhibited initial elastic tension drop and subsequent small but definite tension recovery to a steady level. The tension recovery was present over many minutes in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it tended to decrease quickly in low-Ca rigor fibers. EDTA (10mM, with MgCl2 removed) had no appreciable effect on the tension recovery in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it completely eliminated the tension recovery in low-Ca rigor fibers. These results suggest that the AMADP myosin heads in rigor muscle have long lifetimes and dynamic properties, which show up as the tension recovery following applied release. Possible AM linkage structure in muscle is discussed in connection with the X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting muscle, which is intermediate between resting and rigor muscles. PMID:27583360

  15. Tension Recovery following Ramp-Shaped Release in High-Ca and Low-Ca Rigor Muscle Fibers: Evidence for the Dynamic State of AMADP Myosin Heads in the Absence of ATP.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Haruo; Yamaguchi, Maki; Ohno, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During muscle contraction, myosin heads (M) bound to actin (A) perform power stroke associated with reaction, AMADPPi → AM + ADP + Pi. In this scheme, A • M is believed to be a high-affinity complex after removal of ATP. Biochemical studies on extracted protein samples show that, in the AM complex, actin-binding sites are located at both sides of junctional peptide between 50K and 20K segments of myosin heavy chain. Recently, we found that a monoclonal antibody (IgG) to the junctional peptide had no effect on both in vitro actin-myosin sliding and skinned muscle fiber contraction, though it covers the actin-binding sites on myosin. It follows from this that, during muscle contraction, myosin heads do not pass through the static rigor AM configuration, determined biochemically and electron microscopically using extracted protein samples. To study the nature of AM and AMADP myosin heads, actually existing in muscle, we examined mechanical responses to ramp-shaped releases (0.5% of Lo, complete in 5ms) in single skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in high-Ca (pCa, 4) and low-Ca (pCa, >9) rigor states. The fibers exhibited initial elastic tension drop and subsequent small but definite tension recovery to a steady level. The tension recovery was present over many minutes in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it tended to decrease quickly in low-Ca rigor fibers. EDTA (10mM, with MgCl2 removed) had no appreciable effect on the tension recovery in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it completely eliminated the tension recovery in low-Ca rigor fibers. These results suggest that the AMADP myosin heads in rigor muscle have long lifetimes and dynamic properties, which show up as the tension recovery following applied release. Possible AM linkage structure in muscle is discussed in connection with the X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting muscle, which is intermediate between resting and rigor muscles.

  16. Tension Recovery following Ramp-Shaped Release in High-Ca and Low-Ca Rigor Muscle Fibers: Evidence for the Dynamic State of AMADP Myosin Heads in the Absence of ATP

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Haruo; Yamaguchi, Maki; Ohno, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During muscle contraction, myosin heads (M) bound to actin (A) perform power stroke associated with reaction, AMADPPi → AM + ADP + Pi. In this scheme, A • M is believed to be a high-affinity complex after removal of ATP. Biochemical studies on extracted protein samples show that, in the AM complex, actin-binding sites are located at both sides of junctional peptide between 50K and 20K segments of myosin heavy chain. Recently, we found that a monoclonal antibody (IgG) to the junctional peptide had no effect on both in vitro actin-myosin sliding and skinned muscle fiber contraction, though it covers the actin-binding sites on myosin. It follows from this that, during muscle contraction, myosin heads do not pass through the static rigor AM configuration, determined biochemically and electron microscopically using extracted protein samples. To study the nature of AM and AMADP myosin heads, actually existing in muscle, we examined mechanical responses to ramp-shaped releases (0.5% of Lo, complete in 5ms) in single skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in high-Ca (pCa, 4) and low-Ca (pCa, >9) rigor states. The fibers exhibited initial elastic tension drop and subsequent small but definite tension recovery to a steady level. The tension recovery was present over many minutes in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it tended to decrease quickly in low-Ca rigor fibers. EDTA (10mM, with MgCl2 removed) had no appreciable effect on the tension recovery in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it completely eliminated the tension recovery in low-Ca rigor fibers. These results suggest that the AMADP myosin heads in rigor muscle have long lifetimes and dynamic properties, which show up as the tension recovery following applied release. Possible AM linkage structure in muscle is discussed in connection with the X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting muscle, which is intermediate between resting and rigor muscles. PMID:27583360

  17. Berberine induces pacemaker potential inhibition via cGMP-dependent ATP-sensitive K+ channels by stimulating mu/delta opioid receptors in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal from mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyungwoo; Jung, Myeong Ho; Kwon, Young Kyu; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-10-01

    Berberine is traditionally used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders. The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract, which are responsible for the production of gut movements. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of berberine on pacemaker potentials (PPs) in cultured ICC clusters from the mouse small intestine, and sought to identify the receptors involved and the underlying mechanisms of action. All experiments were performed on cultured ICCs, and a whole‑cell patch‑clamp configuration was used to record PPs from ICC clusters (current clamp mode). Under current clamp mode, berberine was shown to decrease the amplitude and frequency of PPs. However, these effects were suppressed by treatment with glibenclamide, a specific ATP‑sensitive K+ channel blocker. Nor‑binaltorphimine dihydrochloride (a kappa opioid receptor antagonist) did not suppress berberine‑induced PP inhibition, whereas ICI 174,864 (a delta opioid receptor antagonist) and CTOP (a mu opioid receptor antagonist) did suppress the inhibitory effects of berberine. Pretreatment with SQ‑22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) or with KT‑5720 (a protein kinase A inhibitor) did not suppress the effects of berberine; however, pretreatment with 1H‑[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3‑a] quinoxalin‑1‑one (a guanylate cyclase inhibitor) or KT‑5823 [a protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor] did. In addition, berberine stimulated cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production in ICCs. These observations indicate that berberine may inhibit the pacemaker activity of ICC clusters via ATP‑sensitive K+ channels and the cGMP‑PKG‑dependent pathway by stimulating mu and delta opioid receptors. Therefore, berberine may provide a basis for the development of novel agents for the treatment of GI motility dysfunction. PMID:27601272

  18. Increased mRNA levels for components of the lysosomal, Ca2+-activated, and ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathways in skeletal muscle from head trauma patients.

    PubMed Central

    Mansoor, O; Beaufrere, B; Boirie, Y; Ralliere, C; Taillandier, D; Aurousseau, E; Schoeffler, P; Arnal, M; Attaix, D

    1996-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for enhanced muscle protein breakdown in hospitalized patients, which frequently results in lean body wasting, are unknown. To determine whether the lysosomal, Ca2+-activated, and ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathways are activated, we measured mRNA levels for components of these processes in muscle biopsies from severe head trauma patients. These patients exhibited negative nitrogen balance and increased rates of whole-body protein breakdown (assessed by [13C]leucine infusion) and of myofibrillar protein breakdown (assessed by 3-methylhistidine urinary excretion). Increased muscle mRNA levels for cathepsin D, m-calpain, and critical components of the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway (i.e., ubiquitin, the 14-kDa ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, and proteasome subunits) paralleled these metabolic adaptations. The data clearly support a role for multiple proteolytic processes in increased muscle proteolysis. The ubiquitin proteolytic pathway could be activated by altered glucocorticoid production and/or increased circulating levels of interleukin 1beta and interleukin 6 observed in head trauma patients and account for the breakdown of myofibrillar proteins, as was recently reported in animal studies. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8610106

  19. [Interstitial pulmonary diseases].

    PubMed

    Brasch, F

    2006-03-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is a rare disease, posing a diagnostic challenge to pneumologists, pediatricians, radiologists and pathologists. Only by the combined efforts of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the American Thoracic Society (ATS) has has been possible to standardize the formerly different European and Northern American nomenclature of interstitial lung diseases (alveolitis versus interstitial pneumonia) in adults and to clearly and unambiguously define the diagnostic criteria. The ATS/ERS classification of 2002 comprises seven entities: usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), lymphocyte interstitial pneumonia (LIP), and acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP). Using the ATS/ERS classification of interstitial pulmonary diseases in premature infants, infants and children is problematic, since UIP, RB-ILD and AIP do not occur at this age. Although infants with severe respiratory insufficiency may sometimes show morphological features similar to DIP or NSIP, this entity should rather be classified as chronic pneumonitis of infancy (CPI) because of differences in etiology, pathogenesis and prognostic outcome.

  20. ATP regulation in bioproduction.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-12-10

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is consumed as a biological energy source by many intracellular reactions. Thus, the intracellular ATP supply is required to maintain cellular homeostasis. The dependence on the intracellular ATP supply is a critical factor in bioproduction by cell factories. Recent studies have shown that changing the ATP supply is critical for improving product yields. In this review, we summarize the recent challenges faced by researchers engaged in the development of engineered cell factories, including the maintenance of a large ATP supply and the production of cell factories. The strategies used to enhance ATP supply are categorized as follows: addition of energy substrates, controlling pH, metabolic engineering of ATP-generating or ATP-consuming pathways, and controlling reactions of the respiratory chain. An enhanced ATP supply generated using these strategies improves target production through increases in resource uptake, cell growth, biosynthesis, export of products, and tolerance to toxic compounds.

  1. Sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive K(+) channels control energy expenditure determining body weight.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, Alexey E; Reyes, Santiago; Yamada, Satsuki; Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M; Sattiraju, Srinivasan; Zhu, Zhiyong; Sierra, Ana; Gerbin, Marina; Coetzee, William A; Goldhamer, David J; Terzic, Andre; Zingman, Leonid V

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic processes that regulate muscle energy use are major determinants of bodily energy balance. Here, we find that sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels, which couple membrane excitability with cellular metabolic pathways, set muscle energy expenditure under physiological stimuli. Disruption of K(ATP) channel function provoked, under conditions of unaltered locomotor activity and blood substrate availability, an extra energy cost of cardiac and skeletal muscle performance. Inefficient fuel metabolism in K(ATP) channel-deficient striated muscles reduced glycogen and fat body depots, promoting a lean phenotype. The propensity to lesser body weight imposed by K(ATP) channel deficit persisted under a high-fat diet, yet obesity restriction was achieved at the cost of compromised physical endurance. Thus, sarcolemmal K(ATP) channels govern muscle energy economy, and their downregulation in a tissue-specific manner could present an antiobesity strategy by rendering muscle increasingly thermogenic at rest and less fuel efficient during exercise.

  2. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to ... air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among ...

  3. Acute interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bouros, D; Nicholson, A C; Polychronopoulos, V; du Bois, R M

    2000-02-01

    The term "acute interstitial pneumonia" (AIP) describes an idiopathic clinicopathological condition, characterized clinically by an interstitial lung disease causing rapid onset of respiratory failure, which is distinguishable from the other more chronic forms of interstitial pneumonia. It is synonymous with Hamman-Rich syndrome, occurring in patients without pre-existing lung disease. The histopathological findings are those of diffuse alveolar damage. AIP radiologically and physiologically resembles acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is considered to represent the small subset of patients with idiopathic ARDS. It is frequently confused with other clinical entities characterized by rapidly progressive interstitial pneumonia, especially secondary acute interstitial pneumonia, acute exacerbations and accelerated forms of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis . Furthermore, many authors use the above terms, both erroneously and interchangeably. It has a grave prognosis with >70% mortality in 3 months, despite mechanical ventilation. This review aims to clarify the relative clinical and pathological issues and terminology.

  4. Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease - discharge; Alveolitis - discharge; Idiopathic pulmonary pneumonitis - discharge; IPP - discharge; Chronic interstitial lung - discharge; Chronic respiratory interstitial lung - ...

  5. Nerve fibre proliferation in interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Rode, J; Chapple, C R; Milroy, E J; Turner-Warwick, R T

    1990-01-01

    The aetiology of pain in interstitial cystitis is not understood, although it has been reported to be due to release of mediators from mast cell granules. Cystolysis and intravesical instillation of dimethyl sulphoxide have been shown to relieve pain in this condition. We have studied the nerve population within the bladder wall using immunohistochemical stains for protein gene product 9.5. A group of 18 cases of chronic interstitial cystitis and 12 controls; neuropathic bladder (n = 1), chronic bacterial cystitis (n = 3), systemic lupus erythematosus cystitis (n = 2) and normals (n = 6), were investigated. There were significantly more nerve fibres within the sub-urothelial and detrusor muscle layers in chronic interstitial cystitis than there were in normals. Patients with chronic cystitis of other aetiology did not have a significant increase in nerve fibre density within the bladder wall suggesting a specific association between nerve fibre proliferation and interstitial cystitis. Cystolysis is shown to deplete selectively the submucosal nerve plexuses without altering the nerve density within detrusor muscle. This finding explains the desensitisation of the bladder without impairment of detrusor function after this procedure.

  6. Calcium channel antagonists in the treatment of interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Fleischmann, J

    1994-02-01

    The calcium channel antagonist nifedipine has shown efficacy in the treatment of interstitial cystitis and the urethral syndrome. The optimal daily dose of nifedipine can be determined with the use of a nifedipine titration test. To complete the repair of damaged bladder and/or urethral mucosa, nifedipine therapy should be used for a minimum of 3 months. Patients who do not respond well to nifedipine are those with the pelvic floor muscle spasm syndrome variant of interstitial cystitis.

  7. Imaging Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Megha; Dane, Eric; Conley, Jason; Tantama, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a universal mediator of metabolism and signaling across unicellular and multicellular species. There is a fundamental interdependence between the dynamics of ATP and the physiology that occurs inside and outside the cell. Characterizing and understanding ATP dynamics provide valuable mechanistic insight into processes that range from neurotransmission to the chemotaxis of immune cells. Therefore, we require the methodology to interrogate both temporal and spatial components of ATP dynamics from the subcellular to the organismal levels in live specimens. Over the last several decades, a number of molecular probes that are specific to ATP have been developed. These probes have been combined with imaging approaches, particularly optical microscopy, to enable qualitative and quantitative detection of this critical molecule. In this review, we survey current examples of technologies available for visualizing ATP in living cells, and identify areas where new tools and approaches are needed to expand our capabilities. PMID:27638696

  8. Imaging Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP).

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Megha; Dane, Eric; Conley, Jason; Tantama, Mathew

    2016-08-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a universal mediator of metabolism and signaling across unicellular and multicellular species. There is a fundamental interdependence between the dynamics of ATP and the physiology that occurs inside and outside the cell. Characterizing and understanding ATP dynamics provide valuable mechanistic insight into processes that range from neurotransmission to the chemotaxis of immune cells. Therefore, we require the methodology to interrogate both temporal and spatial components of ATP dynamics from the subcellular to the organismal levels in live specimens. Over the last several decades, a number of molecular probes that are specific to ATP have been developed. These probes have been combined with imaging approaches, particularly optical microscopy, to enable qualitative and quantitative detection of this critical molecule. In this review, we survey current examples of technologies available for visualizing ATP in living cells, and identify areas where new tools and approaches are needed to expand our capabilities.

  9. Karyomegalic Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Isnard, Pierre; Rabant, Marion; Labaye, Jacques; Antignac, Corinne; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Zaidan, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis is a rare cause of hereditary chronic interstitial nephritis, described for the first time over 40 years ago. A 36-year-old woman, of Turkish origin, presented with chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure. She had a history of recurrent upper respiratory tract infections but no familial history of nephropathy. Physical examination was unremarkable. Laboratory tests showed serum creatinine at 2.3 mg/dL with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 26 mL/min/1.73m2, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and alkaline phosphatase at 3 and 1.5 times the upper normal limit. Urinalysis showed 0.8 g/day of nonselective proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, and aseptic leukocyturia. Immunological tests and tests for human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B and C viruses were negative. Complement level and serum proteins electrophoresis were normal. Analysis of the renal biopsy showed severe interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. Numerous tubular cells had nuclear enlargement with irregular outlines, hyperchromatic aspect, and prominent nucleoli. These findings were highly suggestive of karyomegalic interstitial nephritis, which was further confirmed by exome sequencing of FAN1 gene showing an identified homozygous frameshift mutation due to a one-base-pair deletion in exon 12 (c.2616delA). The present case illustrates a rare but severe cause of hereditary interstitial nephritis, sometimes accompanied by subtle extrarenal manifestations. Identification of mutations in FAN1 gene underscores recent insights linking inadequate DNA repair and susceptibility to chronic kidney disease. PMID:27196444

  10. [Interstitial lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Carughi, Stefano; De Cata, Angelo; Giuliani, Antonio; Masciale, Nunzia; La Viola, Marco; Puzzolante, Felice; Balzanelli, Mario

    2003-05-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are an heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases characterized by an anatomical distortion of peripheral airways and interstitium, determined by a first stage of alveolitis and a following stage of fibrosis. Natural history of several ILD is characterized by slow and progressive destruction of alveolar-capillary functional units, often with respiratory failure and death. For their smoldering evolution and not specificity of symptoms (exertional dyspnea and cough) ILD may remain not diagnosed and not treated for a long time.

  11. Interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cottin, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    This article reviews the most important articles published in interstitial lung disease, as reviewed during the Clinical Year in Review session at the 2012 annual European Respiratory Society Congress in Vienna, Austria. Since the recent international guidelines for the management of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), important new evidence is available. The anti-fibrotic drug pirfenidone has been recently approved in Europe. Other pharmacological agents, especially nintedanib, are still being tested. The so-called triple combination therapy, anticoagulation therapy and endothelin receptor antagonists, especially ambrisentan, are either harmful or ineffective in IPF and are not recommended as treatment. Although the clinical course of IPF is highly variable, novel tools have been developed for individual prediction of prognosis. Acute exacerbations of IPF are associated with increased mortality and may occur with higher frequency in IPF patients with associated pulmonary hypertension. Interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue disease has been definitely established to have a better long-term survival than IPF. A subset of patients present with symptoms and/or biological autoimmune features, but do not fulfil diagnostic criteria for a given autoimmune disease; this condition is associated with a higher prevalence of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia pattern, female sex and younger age, although survival relevance is unclear.

  12. Interstitial duplication 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.F.; DuPont, B.R.; Moore, C.M.

    1995-07-17

    We report on a 9-month-old girl with an interstitial duplication of 19p, developmental delay, and multiple anomalies including bifrontal prominence, obtuse frontonasal angle, short columella, additional midline philtral pillar, midline ridge on the tongue, vertical midline ridge at the mental symphysis, and a complex congenital heart defect including severe branch pulmonary artery stenosis, secundum atrial septal defect (ASD), and several ventricular septal defects (VSDs). Use of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome 19- specific probes showed a direct duplication of bands 19p13.13 and 19p13.2. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Feedlot Acute Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Woolums, Amelia R

    2015-11-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) of feedlot cattle is a sporadically occurring respiratory condition that is often fatal. Affected cattle have a sudden onset of labored breathing. There is no confirmed effective treatment of feedlot AIP; however, administration of antibiotics effective against common bacterial respiratory pathogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, especially aspirin, has been recommended. Protective strategies are not well defined, but efforts to limit dust exposure and heat stress; to ensure consistent formulation, mixing, and delivery of feed; and to identify and treat infectious respiratory disease in a timely manner may decrease rates of feedlot AIP.

  14. Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Farver, Carol; Highland, Kristin B

    2016-09-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is a rare lung disease on the spectrum of benign pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders. LIP is frequently associated with connective tissue diseases or infections. Idiopathic LIP is rare; every attempt must be made to diagnose underlying conditions when LIP is diagnosed. Computed tomography of the chest in patients with LIP may reveal ground-glass opacities, centrilobular and subpleural nodules, and randomly distributed thin-walled cysts. Demonstrating polyclonality with immunohistochemistry is the key to differentiating LIP from lymphoma. The 5-year mortality remains between 33% and 50% and is likely to vary based on the underlying disease process. PMID:27514593

  15. Interstitial cells of Cajal mediate mechanosensitive responses in the stomach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.

    2005-10-01

    Changes in motor activity are a basic response to filling of smooth muscle organs. Responses to gastric filling, for example, are thought to be regulated by neural reflexes. Here, we demonstrate a previously uncharacterized aspect of stretch-dependent responses in visceral smooth muscles that is mediated by mechanosensitive interstitial cells of Cajal. Length ramps were applied to the murine antral muscles while recording intracellular electrical activity and isometric force. Stretching muscles by an average of 27 ± 1% of resting length resulted in 5 mN of force. Increasing length caused membrane depolarization and increased slow-wave frequency. The responses were dependent on the rate of stretch. Stretch-dependent responses were not inhibited by neuronal antagonists or nifedipine. Increases in slow-wave frequency, but not membrane depolarization, were inhibited by reducing external Ca2+ (100 μM) and by Ni2+ (250 μM). Responses to stretch were inhibited by indomethacin (1 μM) and were absent in cyclooxygenase II-deficient mice, suggesting that cyclooxygenase II-derived eicosanoids may mediate these responses. Dual microelectrode impalements of muscle cells within the corpus and antrum showed that stretch-induced changes in slow-wave frequency uncoupled proximal-to-distal propagation of slow waves. This uncoupling could interfere with gastric peristalsis and impede gastric emptying. Stretch of antral muscles of W/WV mice, which lack intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal, did not affect membrane depolarization or slow-wave frequency. These data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized nonneural stretch reflex in gastric muscles and provide physiological evidence demonstrating a mechanosensitive role for interstitial cells of Cajal in smooth muscle tissues. gastric compliance | pacemaker | stretch | slow waves | propagation

  16. Subclinical Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Tracy J.; Hunninghake, Gary M.

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of high-resolution computed tomography in clinical and research settings has increased the detection of interstitial lung abnormalities (ILA) in asymptomatic and undiagnosed individuals. We reported that in smokers, ILA were present in about 1 of every 12 high-resolution computed tomographic scans; however, the long-term significance of these subclinical changes remains unclear. Studies in families affected with pulmonary fibrosis, smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and patients with inflammatory lung disease have shown that asymptomatic and undiagnosed individuals with ILA have reductions in lung volume, functional limitations, increased pulmonary symptoms, histopathologic changes, and molecular profiles similar to those observed in patients with clinically significant interstitial lung disease (ILD). These findings suggest that, in select at-risk populations, ILA may represent early stages of pulmonary fibrosis or subclinical ILD. The growing interest surrounding this topic is motivated by our poor understanding of the inciting events and natural history of ILD, coupled with a lack of effective therapies. In this perspective, we outline past and current research focused on validating radiologic, physiological, and molecular methods to detect subclinical ILD. We discuss the limitations of the available cross-sectional studies and the need for future longitudinal studies to determine the prognostic and therapeutic implications of subclinical ILD in populations at risk of developing clinically significant ILD. PMID:22366047

  17. Curtains for ATP?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The administration's efforts to keep various technology-transfer programs afloat in the budget process appear to be stalled. House Science Committee chair Robert Walker (R-Pa.) advised in early April that the Republican agenda for the pending budget process entails zeroing out the Commerce Department's Advanced Technology Program (ATP), which was funded at 431 million in fiscal year 1995. The ATP would lose about 90 million from its FY 95 budget. Although Walker says that the Republican leadership has no intention to dictate to the subcommittees how cuts should be made, they will be held to the "fairly severe caps" established by the House Budget Committee. In other words, Walker says, if ATP stays, something else will have to go in its place. In addition, a bill to rescind about 223 million from the FY 1995 budget of the Technology Reinvestment Project and another 77 million from TRP's FY 1994 budget, which has not been spent, is heading for the president's signature. Yet Walker says while he supports the merits of technology transfer, "the question is do you have to create government programs to get the technology out?"

  18. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  19. Regulation of pacemaker currents in interstitial cells of Cajal from murine small intestine by cyclic nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sang Don; Kim, Tae Wan; Jun, Jae Yeol; Glasgow, Nichola J; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2000-01-01

    Electrical rhythmicity (slow waves) in gastrointestinal muscles (GI) is generated by interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Cultured ICC from the murine small intestine were studied with the patch-clamp technique to characterize regulation of pacemaker currents by cyclic nucleotides. Cyclic nucleotide agonists were also tested on intact strips of murine small intestine.Nitric oxide donors slowed the frequency of pacemaker currents in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects depended on cGMP formation and were reduced by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). The effects of nitric oxide donors were mimicked by membrane-permeable analogues of cGMP. The specific cGMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor zaprinast reduced the frequency of spontaneous pacemaker currents.The cGMP-dependent effects on pacemaker currents were not affected by okadaic acid or KT-5823, an inhibitor of protein kinase G.Forskolin, but not dideoxy forskolin, reduced the frequency of spontaneous pacemaker activity and activated a sustained outward current. The latter was likely to be due to ATP-dependent K+ channels because it was blocked by glibenclamide.The effects of forskolin were not mimicked by membrane-permeable cAMP analogues. A membrane-permeable inhibitor of protein kinase A, myristoylated PKA inhibitor, and the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536, had no effect on responses to forskolin.Responses of intact muscles to cGMP and cAMP agonists were similar to the responses of pacemaker cells. Changes in resting membrane potential and slow wave amplitude, however, were noted in intact jejunal muscles that were not observed in ICC. Differences in responses may have been due to the effects of cyclic nucleotide agonists on smooth muscle cells that would sum with responses of ICC in intact jejunal muscle strips.A cGMP-dependent mechanism regulates slow wave frequency, but this occurs through direct action of cGMP not via protein phosphorylation. Regulation of pacemaker currents by c

  20. Characteristics of mast cells in normal bladder, bacterial cystitis and interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Rode, J

    1991-11-01

    An analysis was made of the numbers and characteristics of mast cells in lateral bladder wall biopsies from 22 patients with interstitial cystitis, 6 with bacterial cystitis and 8 normal controls, using toluidine blue stains and computerised video image analysis techniques. A significantly greater number of mast cells were found within the detrusor muscle in interstitial cystitis than in bacterial cystitis or normal controls. Within the urothelium and submucosa, mast cell numbers were significantly greater than in normal controls in both interstitial and bacterial cystitis. In interstitial cystitis mast cells were significantly larger within the detrusor than in the urothelium/submucosa and they appeared to degranulate predominantly within the superficial layers. Differential staining techniques, using long and short toluidine blue stains, failed to reveal statistically significant evidence of mast cell heterogeneity within the bladder wall in interstitial cystitis.

  1. ATP stimulates pannexin 1 internalization to endosomal compartments.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Andrew K J; Kim, Michelle S; Wicki-Stordeur, Leigh E; Swayne, Leigh Anne

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquitous pannexin 1 (Panx1) ion- and metabolite-permeable channel mediates the release of ATP, a potent signalling molecule. In the present study, we provide striking evidence that ATP, in turn, stimulates internalization of Panx1 to intracellular membranes. These findings hold important implications for understanding the regulation of Panx1 when extracellular ATP is elevated. In the nervous system, this includes phenomena such as synaptic plasticity, pain, precursor cell development and stroke; outside of the nervous system, this includes things like skeletal and smooth muscle activity and inflammation. Within 15 min, ATP led to significant Panx1-EGFP internalization. In a series of experiments, we determined that hydrolysable ATP is the most potent stimulator of Panx1 internalization. We identified two possible mechanisms for Panx1 internalization, including activation of ionotropic purinergic (P2X) receptors and involvement of a putative ATP-sensitive residue in the first extracellular loop of Panx1 (Trp(74)). Internalization was cholesterol-dependent, but clathrin, caveolin and dynamin independent. Detailed analysis of Panx1 at specific endosome sub-compartments confirmed that Panx1 is expressed in endosome membranes of the classical degradation pathway under basal conditions and that elevation of ATP levels diverts a sub-population to recycling endosomes. This is the first report detailing endosome localization of Panx1 under basal conditions and the potential for ATP regulation of its surface expression. Given the ubiquitous expression profile of Panx1 and the importance of ATP signalling, these findings are of critical importance for understanding the role of Panx1 in health and disease. PMID:26195825

  2. ATP stimulates pannexin 1 internalization to endosomal compartments.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Andrew K J; Kim, Michelle S; Wicki-Stordeur, Leigh E; Swayne, Leigh Anne

    2015-09-15

    The ubiquitous pannexin 1 (Panx1) ion- and metabolite-permeable channel mediates the release of ATP, a potent signalling molecule. In the present study, we provide striking evidence that ATP, in turn, stimulates internalization of Panx1 to intracellular membranes. These findings hold important implications for understanding the regulation of Panx1 when extracellular ATP is elevated. In the nervous system, this includes phenomena such as synaptic plasticity, pain, precursor cell development and stroke; outside of the nervous system, this includes things like skeletal and smooth muscle activity and inflammation. Within 15 min, ATP led to significant Panx1-EGFP internalization. In a series of experiments, we determined that hydrolysable ATP is the most potent stimulator of Panx1 internalization. We identified two possible mechanisms for Panx1 internalization, including activation of ionotropic purinergic (P2X) receptors and involvement of a putative ATP-sensitive residue in the first extracellular loop of Panx1 (Trp(74)). Internalization was cholesterol-dependent, but clathrin, caveolin and dynamin independent. Detailed analysis of Panx1 at specific endosome sub-compartments confirmed that Panx1 is expressed in endosome membranes of the classical degradation pathway under basal conditions and that elevation of ATP levels diverts a sub-population to recycling endosomes. This is the first report detailing endosome localization of Panx1 under basal conditions and the potential for ATP regulation of its surface expression. Given the ubiquitous expression profile of Panx1 and the importance of ATP signalling, these findings are of critical importance for understanding the role of Panx1 in health and disease.

  3. Interstitial Lung Disease in Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Saketkoo, Lesley Ann; Ascherman, Dana P.; Cottin, Vincent; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Danoff, Sonye K.; Oddis, Chester V.

    2011-01-01

    The lung is one of the most common extra-muscular targets in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a prevalent and often devastating manifestation of IIM. IIM-associated ILD (IIM-ILD) contributes to nearly 80% of the mortality in IIM with a reported prevalence of 65% of newly diagnosed IIM cases. Although ILD frequently accompanies clinical and laboratory findings of myositis, overt signs of muscle disease may be absent in the setting of significant lung disease. Understanding the varied scope of presentation of these diseases is essential to providing optimal patient care. This review will provide an in depth examination of ILD in IIM both from a rheumatologic and pulmonary perspective and will discuss the scope of disease, presenting features, genetic associations, pathogenesis, diagnosis, radiographic and histopathologic findings, along with biomarker assessment and a rationale for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21941374

  4. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  5. ATP release through pannexon channels.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signal for diverse physiological functions, including spread of calcium waves between astrocytes, control of vascular oxygen supply and control of ciliary beat in the airways. ATP can be released from cells by various mechanisms. This review focuses on channel-mediated ATP release and its main enabler, Pannexin1 (Panx1). Six subunits of Panx1 form a plasma membrane channel termed 'pannexon'. Depending on the mode of stimulation, the pannexon has large conductance (500 pS) and unselective permeability to molecules less than 1.5 kD or is a small (50 pS), chloride-selective channel. Most physiological and pathological stimuli induce the large channel conformation, whereas the small conformation so far has only been observed with exclusive voltage activation of the channel. The interaction between pannexons and ATP is intimate. The pannexon is not only the conduit for ATP, permitting ATP efflux from cells down its concentration gradient, but the pannexon is also modulated by ATP. The channel can be activated by ATP through both ionotropic P2X as well as metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors. In the absence of a control mechanism, this positive feedback loop would lead to cell death owing to the linkage of purinergic receptors with apoptotic processes. A control mechanism preventing excessive activation of the purinergic receptors is provided by ATP binding (with low affinity) to the Panx1 protein and gating the channel shut. PMID:26009770

  6. Ava[L-Pro9,N-MeLeu10] substance P(7-11) (GR 73632) and Sar9, Met(O2)11 increase distention-induced peristalsis through activation of neurokinin-1 receptors on smooth muscle and interstitial cells of cajal.

    PubMed

    Nieuwmeyer, Florentine; Ye, Jing; Huizinga, Jan D

    2006-04-01

    Substance P is generally considered an excitatory neurotransmitter related to gut motor activity, although an inhibitory influence of neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor activation on peristalsis has also been reported. With an optimized in vitro method to assess distention-induced peristalsis, our aim was to clarify the effect of NK1 receptor activation on peristaltic activity and to reveal the mechanisms by which NK1 activation alters peristalsis. Distention of the small intestine of the mouse and guinea pig induced periodic occurrence of rhythmic waves of propagating rings of circular muscle contraction, associated with slow waves and superimposed action potentials, that propelled intestinal contents aborally. Activation of NK1 receptors by Ava[l-Pro(9),N-MeLeu10] substance P(7-11) (GR 73632) and Sar(9), Met(O(2))(11) on smooth muscle cells resulted in prolongation of the activity periods and increased action potential generation occurring superimposed on the intestinal slow wave activity. Activation of NK1 receptors on interstitial cells of Cajal resulted in an increase in slow wave frequency. Slow wave amplitude increased, likely by increased cell-to-cell coupling. The NK1 antagonist (S)-1-(2-[3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-(3-isopropoxyphenylacetyl)piperidin-3-yl]ethyl)-4-phenyl-1-azoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octane chloride (SR 140333) induced a decrease in the slow wave frequency and duration of the activity periods evoked by distention, which makes it likely that NK1 receptor activation plays a role in the normal physiological distention-induced generation of peristaltic motor patterns. In summary, NK1 receptors play a role in normal development of peristalsis and NK1 receptor activation markedly increases propulsive peristaltic contractile activity.

  7. Interstitial Functionalization in elemental Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, Edwin

    Societies in the 21st century will face many challenges. Materials science and materials design will be essential to address and master some if not all of these challenges. Semiconductors are among the most important technological material classes. Properties such as electrical transport are strongly affected by defects and a central goal continues to be the reduction of defect densities as much as possible in these compounds. Here we present results of interstitial Fe doping in elemental Si using first-principles DFT calculations. The preliminary results show that Fe will only occupy octahedral interstitial sites. The analysis of the electronic structure shows that the compounds are ferromagnetic and that a bandgap opens as interstitial Fe concentrations decrease, with a possible intermittent semi-metallic phase. The formation energy for interstitial Fe is unfavorable, as expected, by ~1.5 eV but becomes favorable as the chemical potential of Fe increases. Therefore, we expect that biasing the system with an external electrical field will lead to the formation of these materials. Thus, our results show that interstitial defects can be beneficial for the design of functionalities that differ significantly from those of the host material.

  8. Receptor tyrosine and MAP kinase are involved in effects of H(2)O(2) on interstitial cells of Cajal in murine intestine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seok; Yeum, Cheol Ho; Kim, Young Dae; Park, Chan Guk; Kim, Man Yoo; Park, Jong-Seong; Jeong, Han-Seong; Kim, Byung Joo; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is involved in intestinal motility through changes of smooth muscle activity. However, there is no report as to the modulatory effects of H(2)O(2) on interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). We investigated the H(2)O(2) effects and signal transductions to determine whether the intestinal motility can be modulated through ICC. We performed whole-cell patch clamp in cultured ICC from murine intestine and molecular analyses. H(2)O(2) hyperpolarized the membrane and inhibited pacemaker currents. These effects were inhibited by glibenclamide, an inhibitor of ATP-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) channels. The free-radical scavenger catalase inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced effects. MAFP and AACOCF3 (a cytosolic phospholipase A2 inhibitors) or SC-560 and NS-398 (a selective COX-1 and 2 inhibitor) or AH6809 (an EP2 receptor antagonist) inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced effects. PD98059 (a mitogen activated/ERK-activating protein kinase inhibitor) inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced effects, though SB-203580 (a p38 MAPK inhibitor) or a JNK inhibitor did not affect. H(2)O(2)-induced effects could not be inhibited by LY-294002 (an inhibitor of PI3-kinases), calphostin C (a protein kinase C inhibitor) or SQ-22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor). Adenoviral infection analysis revealed H2O2 stimulated tyrosine kinase activity and AG 1478 (an antagonist of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase) inhibited the H(2)O(2)-induced effects. These results suggest H(2)O(2) can modulate ICC pacemaker activity and this occur by the activation of K(ATP) channels through PGE(2) production via receptor tyrosine kinase-dependent MAP kinase activation.

  9. Structure of ATP-Bound Human ATP:Cobalamin Adenosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert,H.; Hill, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding human ATP:cobalamin adenosyltransferase (hATR) can result in the metabolic disorder known as methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). This enzyme catalyzes the final step in the conversion of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B{sub 12}) to the essential human cofactor adenosylcobalamin. Here we present the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of ATP bound to hATR refined to an R{sub free} value of 25.2%. The enzyme forms a tightly associated trimer, where the monomer comprises a five-helix bundle and the active sites lie on the subunit interfaces. Only two of the three active sites within the trimer contain the bound ATP substrate, thereby providing examples of apo- and substrate-bound-active sites within the same crystal structure. Comparison of the empty and occupied sites indicates that twenty residues at the enzyme's N-terminus become ordered upon binding of ATP to form a novel ATP-binding site and an extended cleft that likely binds cobalamin. The structure explains the role of 20 invariant residues; six are involved in ATP binding, including Arg190, which hydrogen bonds to ATP atoms on both sides of the scissile bond. Ten of the hydrogen bonds are required for structural stability, and four are in positions to interact with cobalamin. The structure also reveals how the point mutations that cause MMA are deficient in these functions.

  10. Extracellular ATP mediates Ca2+ signaling in cultured myenteric neurons via a PLC-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kimball, B C; Yule, D I; Mulholland, M W

    1996-04-01

    In the myenteric plexus, ATP is released as a neurotransmitter by "purinergic" nerves, relaxing visceral smooth muscle. We report a signal transduction mechanism for ATP in cultured myenteric neurons involving receptor-mediated release of intracellular Ca2+ stores. Primary cultures of myenteric neurons from guinea pigs taenia coli were loaded with the Ca2+ indicator fura 2-acetoxymethyl ester (AM) and examined using digital imaging microscopy. Superfusion of single neurons with ATP (0.01-1,000 microM) resulted in concentration-dependent increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) that were independent of extracellular Ca2+. Decrements in peak [Ca2+]i were seen with repetitive ATP exposure. Responsiveness of myenteric neurons to purinergic agonists (100 microM) was consistent with action at a neuronal P 2y purinoceptor: 2-chloro-ATP = ATP = 2-methyl-thio-ATP (MeSATP) > ADP > alpha, beta-MeATP = beta,gamma-MeATP > AMP > adenosine. ATP-evoked Ca2+ transients were inhibited dose dependently by suramin, a nonspecific P2 antagonist, and reactive blue 2, a specific P 2y antagonist. ATP and cyclopiazonic acid (30 microM) appear to release an identical intracellular Ca2+ store. Preincubation with the aminosteroid U-73122 (10 microM) inhibited ATP-evoked Ca2+ transients by 71 +/- 7%, whereas phorbol ester pretreatment (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, 100 nM, 5 min) caused a 76 +/- 4% inhibition. Peak [Ca2+]i evoked by ATP was not affected by preincubation with pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml, 24 h) or nifedipine (10 microM). These data suggest a signal transduction mechanism for ATP in cultured myenteric neurons involving purinoceptor-mediated activation of phospholipase C (PLC), with release of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores.

  11. Reactive oxygen species contribute to the presynaptic action of extracellular ATP at the frog neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Giniatullin, AR; Grishin, SN; Sharifullina, ER; Petrov, AM; Zefirov, AL; Giniatullin, RA

    2005-01-01

    During normal cell metabolism the production of intracellular ATP is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which appear to be important signalling molecules. Both ATP and ROS can be released extracellularly by skeletal muscle during intense activity. Using voltage clamp recording combined with imaging and biochemical assay of ROS, we tested the hypothesis that at the neuromuscular junction extracellular ATP generates ROS to inhibit transmitter release from motor nerve endings. We found that ATP produced the presynaptic inhibitory action on multiquantal end-plate currents. The inhibitory action of ATP (but not that of adenosine) was significantly reduced by several antioxidants or extracellular catalase, which breaks down H2O2. Consistent with these data, the depressant effect of ATP was dramatically potentiated by the pro-oxidant Fe2+. Exogenous H2O2 reproduced the depressant effects of ATP and showed similar sensitivity to anti- and pro-oxidants. While NO also inhibited synaptic transmission, inhibitors of the NO-producing cascade did not prevent the depressant action of ATP. The ferrous oxidation in xylenol orange assay showed the increase of ROS production by ATP and 2-MeSADP but not by adenosine. Suramin, a non-selective antagonist of P2 receptors, and pertussis toxin prevented the action of ATP on ROS production. Likewise, imaging with the ROS-sensitive dye carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein revealed increased production of ROS in the muscle treated with ATP or ADP while UTP or adenosine had no effect. Thus, generation of ROS contributed to the ATP-mediated negative feedback mechanism controlling quantal secretion of ACh from the motor nerve endings. PMID:15774519

  12. Drug Induced Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwaiblmair, Martin; Behr, Werner; Haeckel, Thomas; Märkl, Bruno; Foerg, Wolfgang; Berghaus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of therapeutic drugs, the list of drugs that is responsible for severe pulmonary disease also grows. Many drugs have been associated with pulmonary complications of various types, including interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, and pleural effusions. Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD) can be caused by chemotherapeutic agents, antibiotics, antiarrhythmic drugs, and immunosuppressive agents. There are no distinct physiologic, radiographic or pathologic patterns of DILD, and the diagnosis is usually made when a patient with interstitial lung disease (ILD) is exposed to a medication known to result in lung disease. Other causes of ILD must be excluded. Treatment is avoidance of further exposure and systemic corticosteroids in patients with progressive or disabling disease. PMID:22896776

  13. Pathology of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hashisako, Mikiko; Fukuoka, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The updated classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) in 2013 by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society included several important revisions to the categories described in the 2002 classification. In the updated classification, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) was moved from major to rare IIPs, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) was newly included in the rare IIPs, acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and interstitial pneumonias with a bronchiolocentric distribution are recognized as rare histologic patterns, and unclassifiable IIP (UCIP) was classified as an IIP. However, recent reports indicate the areas of concern that may require further evaluation. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of the updated IIPs and their rare histologic patterns and also point out some of the issues to be considered in this context. PMID:26949346

  14. Interstitial brines in playa sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Van Denburgh, A.S.; Truesdell, A.H.; Rettig, S.L.

    1969-01-01

    Study of several closed drainages in the Great Basin has shown that the interstitial solutions of shallow, fine-grained playa deposits store a large quantity of dissolved solids and are often more concentrated than associated lakes and ponds, except in peripheral zones of stream or ground-water inflow. These interstitial fluids, when compared with local runoff, impoundments, or spring waters, commonly have a distinctive ionic composition which sometimes cannot be explained by either simple mixing of surface and subsurface inflow or by evaporative concentration. At Abert Lake, Oregon, the interstitial solute concentrations increased with depth to values as much as five times greater than the lake, except where springs indicate significant ground-water input. Where Na+, Cl, and CO2 species constitute more than 90% of the solutes, Na+ Cl- ratios in the lake water are lower than in interstitial solutions of bottom cores and higher than in playa fluids. At the same time, Na+ K+ ratios are highest in the fluids of lake bottom muds and lowest in playa interstitials. In deeper playa profiles, interstitial Na+ Cl- tended to decrease with depth (5 ft. maximum). In the Abert Lake area, as in other parts of the western Great Basin, Na+ Cl- ratios are indicative of total CO2 in solution and the effects of organic decay in surficial sediments. These ratios, coupled with data on silica and bulk density, show that higher PCO2 accompanying decay promotes silicate dissolution and hydrogen ion exchange, stripping alkalis from sediment which had preferentially adsorbed K+ when entering the lake. On subsequent loss of pore fluid in the playa regime, silica initially released to solution in the lake environment is readsorbed on dissolution products. ?? 1969.

  15. Amyloidotic muscle pseudohypertrophy: case report.

    PubMed

    Scola, R H; Werneck, L C; Ramos, C S; Pasquini, R; Graf, H; Arruda, W O

    2001-09-01

    The authors report one case of amyloidosis associated with muscular pseudohypertrophy in a 46-year-old woman, who developed weakness, macroglossia and muscle hypertrophy associated with primary systemic amyloidosis. Electromyography showed a myopathic pattern and bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. The muscle biopsy presented with a type I and II fiber hypertrophy and infiltration of amyloid material in the interstitious space and artery walls. She underwent bone marrow transplantation with stabilization and subjective improvement of the clinical picture.

  16. Equine testicular interstitial cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Gelberg, H B; McEntee, K

    1987-05-01

    Interstitial cell tumors from nine stallions were described. In all but one horse the tumors were found in undescended testes. Five animals had bilateral tumors. Two animals showed increased aggression. Tumors contained two cell types. The first type were large distinctly bordered eosinophilic cells interpreted to be hyperplastic and hypertrophic interstitial cells. They blended with pleomorphic often spindloid neoplastic cells which had fibrillar, vacuolated cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. This latter cell population was arranged in nodules or broad sheets as endocrine-like packets or interweaving fascicles. Biologic behavior of the neoplasms could not be ascertained from histologic examination. PMID:2885961

  17. Interstitial lung disease in scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Sara R; Castelino, Flavia V

    2015-05-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a heterogeneous disease of unknown etiology with limited effective therapies. It is characterized by autoimmunity, vasculopathy, and fibrosis and is clinically manifested by multiorgan involvement. Interstitial lung disease is a common complication of systemic sclerosis and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of interstitial lung disease hinges on careful clinical evaluation and pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography. Effective therapeutic options are still limited. Several experimental therapies are currently in early-phase clinical trials and show promise.

  18. Interstitial nephritis. A brief review.

    PubMed Central

    Heptinstall, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a common condition, which in spite of a relatively constant pathologic picture has different etiologic agents and pathogenetic mechanisms. Failure to appreciate this, particularly in the chronic group, has led to considerable confusion and has been largely responsible for the overdiagnosis of chronic pyelonephritis. Although we are still largely ignorant of the causes of interstitial nephritis, it is now possible to define many of them. While experimental studies have not made spectacular contributions to our understanding, an attempt is now being made to develop appropriate models, and we hope these will enable us to still further clarify our understanding of other entities. PMID:776003

  19. Release of noradrenaline and ATP by electrical stimulation and nicotine in guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed

    von Kügelgen, I; Starke, K

    1991-10-01

    Effects of electrical stimulation and nicotine on ATP and tritium outflow and smooth muscle tension were studied in the guinea-pig isolated vas deferens preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline. ATP was measured using the luciferase technique. Electrical stimulation caused biphasic contractions and an acceleration of ATP and tritium outflow. The contraction amplitude and the overflow of ATP increased markedly, whereas the overflow of tritium increased only slightly with the frequency of stimulation (1-10 Hz; constant number of 60 pulses). The contraction amplitude did not increase with an increase in pulse number (20-540 pulses; constant frequency of 5 Hz), whereas the overflow of ATP increased slightly, and that of tritium markedly. Nicotine caused monophasic, transient contractions and, again, an acceleration of ATP and tritium outflow. Contractions, ATP and tritium overflow increased with the concentration of nicotine (56-320 mumol/l) in an approximately parallel manner. The influence of some drugs on responses to electrical stimulation (60 pulses, 5 Hz) and nicotine (180 mumol/l) was investigated. Tetrodotoxin blocked all effects of electrical stimulation but did not change those of nicotine. The reverse was true for hexamethonium. Neither electrical stimulation nor nicotine caused contraction or an increase in ATP outflow after pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. The main effects of prazosin 0.3 mumol/l were to reduce electrically evoked contractions (above all second phase) as well as nicotine-evoked contractions and the nicotine-evoked overflow of ATP (the latter by about 81%). Prazosin also tended to diminish the electrically evoked overflow of ATP. alpha,beta-Methylene-ATP 10 mumol/l elicited a transient contraction and ATP overflow on its own. The main change in the subsequent state of desensitization was a decrease of the first phase of electrically evoked contractions. The main effects of prazosin combined with desensitization by alpha,beta-methylene-ATP

  20. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated? Childhood interstitial lung disease (chILD) is ... prevent acid reflux, which can lead to aspiration. Lung Transplant A lung transplant may be an option ...

  1. Types of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease The broad term "childhood interstitial lung disease" ( ... affect are shown in the illustration below. Normal Lungs and Lung Structures Figure A shows the location ...

  2. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Laria, A; Lurati, A; Scarpellini, M

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs) are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US) findings in the follow-up of a NSIP's case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26240772

  3. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  4. Energy transduction in ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elston, Timothy; Wang, Hongyun; Oster, George

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondria, bacteria and chloroplasts use the free energy stored in transmembrane ion gradients to manufacture ATP by the action of ATP synthase. This enzyme consists of two principal domains. The asymmetric membrane-spanning Fo portion contains the proton channel, and the soluble F1 portion contains three catalytic sites which cooperate in the synthetic reactions. The flow of protons through Fo is thought to generate a torque which is transmitted to F1 by an asymmetric shaft, the coiled-coil γ-subunit. This acts as a rotating `cam' within F1, sequentially releasing ATPs from the three active sites. The free-energy difference across the inner membrane of mitochondria and bacteria is sufficient to produce three ATPs per twelve protons passing through the motor. It has been suggested that this protonmotive force biases the rotor's diffusion so that Fo constitutes a rotary motor turning the γ shaft. Here we show that biased diffusion, augmented by electrostatic forces, does indeed generate sufficient torque to account for ATP production. Moreover, the motor's reversibility - supplying torque from ATP hydrolysis in F1 converts the motor into an efficient proton pump - can also be explained by our model.

  5. Mechanisms of ATP release and signalling in the blood vessel wall

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Alexander W.; Billaud, Marie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) has classically been considered the cell's primary energy currency. Importantly, a novel role for ATP as an extracellular autocrine and/or paracrine signalling molecule has evolved over the past century and extensive work has been conducted to characterize the ATP-sensitive purinergic receptors expressed on almost all cell types in the body. Extracellular ATP elicits potent effects on vascular cells to regulate blood vessel tone but can also be involved in vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. While the effects of purinergic signalling in the vasculature have been well documented, the mechanism(s) mediating the regulated release of ATP from cells in the blood vessel wall and circulation are now a key target of investigation. The aim of this review is to examine the current proposed mechanisms of ATP release from vascular cells, with a special emphasis on the transporters and channels involved in ATP release from vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, circulating red blood cells, and perivascular sympathetic nerves, including vesicular exocytosis, plasma membrane F1/F0-ATP synthase, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, connexin hemichannels, and pannexin channels. PMID:22678409

  6. Ulcerative colitis: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in myenteric plexus.

    PubMed

    Rumessen, J J; Vanderwinden, J-M; Horn, T

    2010-10-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are key regulatory cells in the gut. In the colon of patients with severe ulcerative colitis (UC), myenteric ICC had myoid ultrastructural features and were in close contact with nerve terminals. In all patients as opposed to controls, some ICC profiles showed degenerative changes, such as lipid droplets and irregular vacuoles. Nerve terminals often appeared swollen and empty. Glial cells, muscle cells, and fibroblast-like cells (FLC) showed no alterations. FLC enclosed macrophages (MLC), which were in close contact with naked axon terminals. The organization and cytological changes may be of pathophysiological significance in patients with UC. PMID:20568987

  7. ATP synthase subunit-β down-regulation aggravates diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Siao-Syun; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of ATP synthase subunit-β (ATP5b) in diabetic nephropathy. Histopathological changes, fibrosis, and protein expressions of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), and ATP5b were obviously observed in the kidneys of db/db diabetic mice as compared with the control db/m+ mice. The increased ATP5b expression was majorly observed in diabetic renal tubules and was notably observed to locate in cytoplasm of tubule cells, but no significant increase of ATP5b in diabetic glomeruli. AGEs significantly increased protein expression of ATP5b and fibrotic factors and decreased ATP content in cultured renal tubular cells via an AGEs-receptor for AGEs (RAGE) axis pathway. Oxidative stress was also induced in diabetic kidneys and AGEs-treated renal tubular cells. The increase of ATP5b and CTGF protein expression in AGEs-treated renal tubular cells was reversed by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. ATP5b-siRNA transfection augmented the increased protein expression of α-SMA and CTGF and CTGF promoter activity in AGEs-treated renal tubular cells. The in vivo ATP5b-siRNA delivery significantly enhanced renal fibrosis and serum creatinine in db/db mice with ATP5b down-regulation. These findings suggest that increased ATP5b plays an important adaptive or protective role in decreasing the rate of AGEs-induced renal fibrosis during diabetic condition. PMID:26449648

  8. Does ATP cross the cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudry, I. H.

    1982-01-01

    Although there is an abundance of evidence which indicates that ATP is released as well as taken up by cells, the concept that ATP cannot cross the cell membrane has tended to prevail. This article reviews the evidence for the release as well as uptake of ATP by cells. The evidence presented by various investigators clearly indicates that ATP can cross the cell membrane and suggests that the release and uptake of ATP are physiological processes. PMID:7051582

  9. Calcium-Binding Properties of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum As Influenced by ATP, Caffeine, Quinine, and Local Anesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Arselio P.

    1968-01-01

    Calcium retained at binding sites of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from rabbit skeletal muscle requires 10-5 - 10-4 M ATP to exchange with 45Ca added to the medium. The ATP requirement for Ca exchangeability was observed with respect to the "intrinsic" Ca of the reticulum membranes and the fraction of Ca that is "actively" bound in the presence of ATP. Furthermore, a concentration of free Ca in the medium higher than 10-8 M is required for ATP to promote Ca exchangeability. This exchangeability is not influenced by caffeine, quinine, procaine, and tetracaine, and Ca that is either nonexchangeable (in the absence of ATP) or exchangeable (in the presence of ATP) is released by 1–5 mM quinine or tetracaine, but neither caffeine (6 mM) nor procaine (2–5 mM) has this effect. Quinine or tetracaine also releases Ca and Mg bound passively to the reticulum membranes. A possible role of ATP in maintaining the integrity of cellular membranes is discussed, and the effects of caffeine, quinine, and of local anesthetics on the binding of Ca by the isolated reticulum are related to the effects of these agents on 45Ca fluxes and on the twitch output observed in whole muscles. PMID:5682486

  10. The role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in cellular function and protection in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Andrew; Aziz, Qadeer; Thomas, Alison

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP)) are widely distributed and present in a number of tissues including muscle, pancreatic beta cells and the brain. Their activity is regulated by adenine nucleotides, characteristically being activated by falling ATP and rising ADP levels. Thus, they link cellular metabolism with membrane excitability. Recent studies using genetically modified mice and genomic studies in patients have implicated K(ATP) channels in a number of physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we focus on their role in cellular function and protection particularly in the cardiovascular system.

  11. Ultrasound interstitial thermal therapy (USITT) in the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nau, William H.; Diederich, Chris J.; Deardorff, Dana L.

    1999-05-01

    This research represents an experimental investigation of the use of interstitial catheter-cooled ultrasound applicators in various treatment strategies for the management of localized prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The anticipated clinical approaches under consideration were: (1) Ultrasound Interstitial Thermal therapy (USITT) alone for treatment of the whole gland, (2) high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with USITT to treat local recurrences or extracapsular extensions of the disease, and (3) sequence HDR brachytherapy and hyperthermia. Directional multielement catheter-cooled ultrasound applicators were fabricated using cylindrical piezoceramic transducers which can be inserted into 13 or 14 gage catheters. The applicators were characterized through measurements of acoustic power output, and beam profile distributions in degassed water. Thermal lesion formation studies were performed in an in vitro setup using fresh beef muscle. Various implant strategies were evaluated for the ability to control the temperature distribution within a pre-determined volume of tissue. Lesions extending more than 15 mm from the applicator surface were generated within 5 minutes of heating. Preliminary results from this study demonstrate the versatility of catheter-cooled interstitial ultrasound applicators, and their potential to provide controlled thermal therapy in the prostate.

  12. [Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Marten, Katharina

    2007-03-01

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  13. Does the mast cell have an intrinsic role in the pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis?

    PubMed

    Frenz, A M; Christmas, T J; Pearce, F L

    1994-06-01

    In order to examine the role of mast cells in the inflammatory bladder disease interstitial cystitis, mast cells isolated from the human bladder of normal and diseased tissue were challenged with a range of secretagogues. Calcium ionophore A23187 and anti-IgE caused histamine release from all bladder mast cells in a dose-related manner. Mast cells from the diseased tissue were far more responsive than those from the normal tissue. Mast cells from the muscle of normal bladder were responsive towards substance P and compound 48/80. However, mast cells from interstitial cystitis bladder did not release significant amounts of histamine with these two secretagogues.

  14. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Sjoerd A M E G; Christiaans, Maarten H L; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A; Stifft, Frank; Damoiseaux, Jan G M C; van Paassen, Pieter

    2016-08-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis has been observed in <1% of native renal biopsies. Here, we describe two patients with granulomatous interstitial nephritis in relation to Crohn's disease. Circulating helper and cytotoxic T cells were highly activated, and both cell types predominated in the interstitial infiltrate, indicating a cellular autoimmune response. After immunosuppressive treatment, renal function either improved or stabilized in both patients. In conclusion, granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a genuine extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease, the treatment of which should include immunosuppressive agents. PMID:27478596

  15. Decline of Phosphotransfer and Substrate Supply Metabolic Circuits Hinders ATP Cycling in Aging Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Nemutlu, Emirhan; Gupta, Anu; Zhang, Song; Viqar, Maria; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson; Terzic, Andre; Jahangir, Arshad; Dzeja, Petras

    2015-01-01

    Integration of mitochondria with cytosolic ATP-consuming/ATP-sensing and substrate supply processes is critical for muscle bioenergetics and electrical activity. Whether age-dependent muscle weakness and increased electrical instability depends on perturbations in cellular energetic circuits is unknown. To define energetic remodeling of aged atrial myocardium we tracked dynamics of ATP synthesis-utilization, substrate supply, and phosphotransfer circuits through adenylate kinase (AK), creatine kinase (CK), and glycolytic/glycogenolytic pathways using 18O stable isotope-based phosphometabolomic technology. Samples of intact atrial myocardium from adult and aged rats were subjected to 18O-labeling procedure at resting basal state, and analyzed using the 18O-assisted HPLC-GC/MS technique. Characteristics for aging atria were lower inorganic phosphate Pi[18O], γ-ATP[18O], β-ADP[18O], and creatine phosphate CrP[18O] 18O-labeling rates indicating diminished ATP utilization-synthesis and AK and CK phosphotransfer fluxes. Shift in dynamics of glycolytic phosphotransfer was reflected in the diminished G6P[18O] turnover with relatively constant glycogenolytic flux or G1P[18O] 18O-labeling. Labeling of G3P[18O], an indicator of G3P-shuttle activity and substrate supply to mitochondria, was depressed in aged myocardium. Aged atrial myocardium displayed reduced incorporation of 18O into second (18O2), third (18O3), and fourth (18O4) positions of Pi[18O] and a lower Pi[18O]/γ-ATP[18 O]-labeling ratio, indicating delayed energetic communication and ATP cycling between mitochondria and cellular ATPases. Adrenergic stress alleviated diminished CK flux, AK catalyzed β-ATP turnover and energetic communication in aging atria. Thus, 18O-assisted phosphometabolomics uncovered simultaneous phosphotransfer through AK, CK, and glycolytic pathways and G3P substrate shuttle deficits hindering energetic communication and ATP cycling, which may underlie energetic vulnerability of aging

  16. Decline of Phosphotransfer and Substrate Supply Metabolic Circuits Hinders ATP Cycling in Aging Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Nemutlu, Emirhan; Gupta, Anu; Zhang, Song; Viqar, Maria; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson; Terzic, Andre; Jahangir, Arshad; Dzeja, Petras

    2015-01-01

    Integration of mitochondria with cytosolic ATP-consuming/ATP-sensing and substrate supply processes is critical for muscle bioenergetics and electrical activity. Whether age-dependent muscle weakness and increased electrical instability depends on perturbations in cellular energetic circuits is unknown. To define energetic remodeling of aged atrial myocardium we tracked dynamics of ATP synthesis-utilization, substrate supply, and phosphotransfer circuits through adenylate kinase (AK), creatine kinase (CK), and glycolytic/glycogenolytic pathways using 18O stable isotope-based phosphometabolomic technology. Samples of intact atrial myocardium from adult and aged rats were subjected to 18O-labeling procedure at resting basal state, and analyzed using the 18O-assisted HPLC-GC/MS technique. Characteristics for aging atria were lower inorganic phosphate Pi[18O], γ-ATP[18O], β-ADP[18O], and creatine phosphate CrP[18O] 18O-labeling rates indicating diminished ATP utilization-synthesis and AK and CK phosphotransfer fluxes. Shift in dynamics of glycolytic phosphotransfer was reflected in the diminished G6P[18O] turnover with relatively constant glycogenolytic flux or G1P[18O] 18O-labeling. Labeling of G3P[18O], an indicator of G3P-shuttle activity and substrate supply to mitochondria, was depressed in aged myocardium. Aged atrial myocardium displayed reduced incorporation of 18O into second (18O2), third (18O3), and fourth (18O4) positions of Pi[18O] and a lower Pi[18O]/γ-ATP[18 O]-labeling ratio, indicating delayed energetic communication and ATP cycling between mitochondria and cellular ATPases. Adrenergic stress alleviated diminished CK flux, AK catalyzed β-ATP turnover and energetic communication in aging atria. Thus, 18O-assisted phosphometabolomics uncovered simultaneous phosphotransfer through AK, CK, and glycolytic pathways and G3P substrate shuttle deficits hindering energetic communication and ATP cycling, which may underlie energetic vulnerability of aging

  17. Identification of ATP-Binding Regions in the RyR1 Ca2+ Release Channel

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Olga B.; Baker, Mariah R.; Tran, Tina P.; Le, Tri; Serysheva, Irina I.

    2012-01-01

    ATP is an important modulator of gating in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), also known as a Ca2+ release channel in skeletal muscle cells. The activating effect of ATP on this channel is achieved by directly binding to one or more sites on the RyR1 protein. However, the number and location of these sites have yet to be determined. To identify the ATP-binding regions within RyR1 we used 2N3ATP-2′,3′-Biotin-LC-Hydrazone (BioATP-HDZ), a photo-reactive ATP analog to covalently label the channel. We found that BioATP-HDZ binds RyR1 specifically with an IC50 = 0.6±0.2 mM, comparable with the reported EC50 for activation of RyR1 with ATP. Controlled proteolysis of labeled RyR1 followed by sequence analysis revealed three fragments with apparent molecular masses of 95, 45 and 70 kDa that were crosslinked by BioATP-HDZ and identified as RyR1 sequences. Our analysis identified four glycine-rich consensus motifs that can potentially constitute ATP-binding sites and are located within the N-terminal 95-kDa fragment. These putative nucleotide-binding sequences include amino acids 699–704, 701–706, 1081–1084 and 1195–1200, which are conserved among the three RyR isoforms. Located next to the N-terminal disease hotspot region in RyR1, these sequences may communicate the effects of ATP-binding to channel function by tuning conformational motions within the neighboring cytoplasmic regulatory domains. Two other labeled fragments lack ATP-binding consensus motifs and may form non-canonical ATP-binding sites. Based on domain topology in the 3D structure of RyR1 it is also conceivable that the identified ATP-binding regions, despite their wide separation in the primary sequence, may actually constitute the same non-contiguous ATP-binding pocket within the channel tetramer. PMID:23144945

  18. Redox regulation of ATP sulfurylase in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Prioretti, Laura; Lebrun, Régine; Gontero, Brigitte; Giordano, Mario

    2016-09-30

    ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) catalyzes the first step of sulfur assimilation in photosynthetic organisms. An ATPS type A is mostly present in freshwater cyanobacteria, with four conserved cysteine residues. Oceanic cyanobacteria and most eukaryotic algae instead, possess an ATPS-B containing seven to ten cysteines; five of them are conserved, but only one in the same position as ATPS-A. We investigated the role of cysteines on the regulation of the different algal enzymes. We found that the activity of ATPS-B from four different microorganisms was enhanced when reduced and decreased when oxidized. The LC-MS/MS analysis of the ATPS-B from the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana showed that the residue Cys-247 was presumably involved in the redox regulation. The absence of this residue in the ATPS-A of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. instead, was consistent with its lack of regulation. Some other conserved cysteine residues in the ATPS from T. pseduonana and not in Synechocystis sp.were accessible to redox agents and possibly play a role in the enzyme regulation. Furthermore, the fact that oceanic cyanobacteria have ATPS-B structurally and functionally closer to that from most of eukaryotic algae than to the ATPS-A from other cyanobacteria suggests that life in the sea or freshwater may have driven the evolution of ATPS. PMID:27613093

  19. Redox regulation of ATP sulfurylase in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Prioretti, Laura; Lebrun, Régine; Gontero, Brigitte; Giordano, Mario

    2016-09-30

    ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) catalyzes the first step of sulfur assimilation in photosynthetic organisms. An ATPS type A is mostly present in freshwater cyanobacteria, with four conserved cysteine residues. Oceanic cyanobacteria and most eukaryotic algae instead, possess an ATPS-B containing seven to ten cysteines; five of them are conserved, but only one in the same position as ATPS-A. We investigated the role of cysteines on the regulation of the different algal enzymes. We found that the activity of ATPS-B from four different microorganisms was enhanced when reduced and decreased when oxidized. The LC-MS/MS analysis of the ATPS-B from the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana showed that the residue Cys-247 was presumably involved in the redox regulation. The absence of this residue in the ATPS-A of the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. instead, was consistent with its lack of regulation. Some other conserved cysteine residues in the ATPS from T. pseduonana and not in Synechocystis sp.were accessible to redox agents and possibly play a role in the enzyme regulation. Furthermore, the fact that oceanic cyanobacteria have ATPS-B structurally and functionally closer to that from most of eukaryotic algae than to the ATPS-A from other cyanobacteria suggests that life in the sea or freshwater may have driven the evolution of ATPS.

  20. Nano-nutrition of chicken embryos. The effect of silver nanoparticles and ATP on expression of chosen genes involved in myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sawosz, Filip; Pineda, Lane; Hotowy, Anna; Jaworski, Sławomir; Prasek, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the quantity and quality of nutrients stored in the egg might not be optimal for the fast rate of chicken embryo development in modern broilers, and embryos could be supplemented with nutrients by in ovo injection. Recent experiments showed that in ovo feeding reduces post-hatch mortality and skeletal disorders and increases muscle growth and breast meat yield. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a "ready for use" energetic molecule, while nanoparticles of silver (Nano-Ag) may penetrate tissues as well as cells and localise inside cells. In this investigation, we hypothesised that silver nanoparticles could be used as a protective carrier for ATP as well as an active agent. ATP and/or an ATP complex with Nano-Ag would be delivered to the muscle cells as a gene expression regulator and promoter of growth and development of embryo breast muscle. A collection of 160 broiler eggs was randomly divided into a Control group without injection and injected groups with hydrocolloids of Nano-Ag, ATP or a complex of Nano-Ag and ATP (Nano-Ag/ATP). The embryos were evaluated on day 20 of incubation. The results indicate that the application of ATP to chicken embryos increases expression of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Na(+)/K(+) transporting ATPase (ATP1A1), which may indicate that an extra energy source can enhance molecular mechanisms of muscle cell proliferation. Nano-Ag also up-regulated expression of FGF2, VEGF, ATP1A1 and, also up-regulated expression of myogenic differentiation 1(MyoD1), affecting cell differentiation. The results indicate that ATP and Nano-Ag may accelerate growth and maturation of muscle cells. PMID:23952606

  1. [Interstitial lung diseases. The pattern is important].

    PubMed

    Fink, L

    2014-11-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) comprise a number of rare entities with an estimated incidence of 10-25 per 100,000 inhabitants but the incidence greatly increases beyond the age of 65 years. The prognosis depends on the underlying cause. The fibrotic disorders show a set of radiological and histopathological patterns that are distinct but not entirely specific. In the absence of a clear clinical picture and consistent high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) findings, patients are advised to undergo surgical lung biopsies from two or three lung lobes (or transbronchial biopsies) to determine the histopathological pattern. The ILDs are differentiated into disorders of known causes (e.g. collagen vascular disease, drug-related), idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP), granulomatous ILDs (e.g. sarcoidosis) and other forms of ILD (e.g. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis). The IIPs encompass idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), non-specific interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease, cryptogen organizing pneumonia, lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia and acute interstitial pneumonia. Additionally, a category of unclassified interstitial pneumonia exists. The pathologist has to recognize and address the histopathological pattern. In a multidisciplinary discussion the disorder is allocated to a clinicopathological entity and the histopathological pattern plays a major role in the classification of the entity. Recognition of the underlying pattern and the respective histopathological differential diagnoses is important as the therapy varies depending on the cause and ranges from elimination of the stimulus (if possible) to antifibrotic drug therapy up to preparation for lung transplantation.

  2. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  3. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  4. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  5. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the removal of a small piece of muscle tissue for examination. ... dystrophy Myopathic changes (destruction of the muscle) Necrosis (tissue death) of muscle Necrotizing vasculitis Traumatic muscle damage Polymyositis Additional conditions ...

  6. [Oral therapy of interstitial cystitis].

    PubMed

    Sievert, K D; Edenfeld, K D; Oberpenning, F; Piechota, H J

    2000-11-01

    Up to now there is no specific treatment targeting the ultimate cause of interstitial cystitis (IC), since its pathogenesis and etiology are still unknown. Most studies focussing on oral medication have not been randomized, double-blinded or placebo-controlled. Numerous case reports and intent-to-treat trials are lacking a systematic approach and do not meet evidence-based medicine criteria. Consequently there is as yet no standard oral therapy available for the treatment of IC. However, only a few oral substances have shown a potential to improve symptoms such as frequency and pain. The best results were obtained from monotherapeutic use of pentosanpolysulfate, amitriptylin and hydroxycin. The true benefit of these substances alone should be compared to analgesics and anticholinergics in the course of controlled clinical trials.

  7. Cough in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Garner, Justin; George, Peter M; Renzoni, Elisabetta

    2015-12-01

    Cough in the context of interstitial lung disease (ILD) has not been the focus of many studies. However, chronic cough has a major impact on quality of life in a significant proportion of patients with ILD. For the purpose of this review, we have chosen to highlight some of the more frequently encountered diffuse lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and systemic sclerosis associated ILD. Many of the underlying mechanisms remain speculative and further research is now required to elucidate the complex pathways involved in the pathogenesis of chronic cough in ILD. This will hopefully pave the way for the identification of new therapeutic agents to alleviate this distressing and often intractable symptom.

  8. Interstitial cystitis--an update.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A C; Christmas, T J

    1996-12-01

    Interstitial cystitis is a rare chronic debilitating condition predominantly affecting middle-aged women. The diagnosis, made from the combination of symptoms, cystoscopic findings and bladder biopsies, is often delayed because GPs are often unaware of the condition. The precise aetiology remains obscure and it is clear that there is much research that needs to be undertaken to shed any light on the various current aetiological theories. There is a wide assortment of therapies already available and many more currently under trial. Until there is further progress in the pathogenesis of IC, it seems unlikely that non-operative treatment will consist of anything but palliation. The only potential cures currently available are cystectomy and urinary diversion or surgical replacement of the bladder by enterocystoplasty.

  9. ATP-mediated release of arachidonic acid metabolites from venular endothelium causes arteriolar dilation.

    PubMed

    Hammer, L W; Ligon, A L; Hester, R L

    2001-06-01

    This study was designed to test the hypothesis that venular administration of ATP resulted in endothelium-dependent dilation of adjacent arterioles through a mechanism involving cyclooxygenase products. Forty-three male golden hamsters were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (60 mg/kg ip), and the cremaster muscle was prepared for in vivo microscopy. ATP (100 microM) injected into venules dilated adjacent arterioles from a mean diameter of 51 +/- 4 to 76 +/- 6 microm (P < 0.05, n = 6). To remove the source of endothelial-derived relaxing factors, the venules were then perfused with air bubbles to disrupt the endothelium. Resting arteriolar diameter was not altered after disruption of the venular endothelium (51 +/- 5 microm), and the responses to venular ATP infusions were significantly attenuated (59 +/- 4 microm, P < 0.05). To determine whether the relaxing factor was a cyclooxygenase product, ATP infusion studies were repeated in the absence and presence of indomethacin (28 microM). Under control conditions, ATP (100 microM) infusion into the venule caused an increase in mean arteriolar diameter from 55 +/- 4 to 78 +/- 3 microm (P < 0.05, n = 6). In the presence of indomethacin, mean resting arteriolar tone was not significantly altered (49 +/- 4 microm), and the response to ATP was significantly attenuated (54 +/- 4 microm, P < 0.05, n = 6). These studies show that increases in venular ATP concentrations stimulate the release of cyclooxygenase products, possibly from the venular endothelium, to vasodilate the adjacent arteriole. PMID:11356617

  10. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  11. [Histopathological classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias].

    PubMed

    Povýsil, Ctibor

    2010-01-01

    The classification scheme of interstitial lung diseases has undergone numerous revisions. The criteria for distinguishing seven distinct subtypes of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are now well defined by consensus in the recently published ATS/ERS classification of these lung diseases. In our present review the histological patterns of the different types are described and the differential diagnosis of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias is discussed. Surgical lung biopsy remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of interstitial pneumonias, and sampling from at least 2 sites is recommended. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical biopsy is the preferred method for obtaining lung tissue as this procedure offers a similar yield as an open thoracotomy The most common histological subtype of chronic interstitial lung disease is the usual interstitial pneumonia [UIP] which makes up 47-71% of cases. The key histologic features include patchy subpleural and paraseptal distribution of remodeling lung architecture with dense fibrosis, frequent honeycombing, and large fibroblastic foci. Temporal and spatial heterogeneity are the hallmarks. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia [NSIP] occurs primarily in middle-aged women who have never smoked, with more than 5-years survival rate in 80% of patients. The major feature of NSIP is a uniform interstitial thickening of alveolar septa by a fibrosing or cellular process. The cardinal histological feature in respiratory bronchiolitis and desquamative pneumonia is an excess of intraalveolar histiocytes. In both patterns, there is variable interstitial fibrosis and chronic inflammation, and a strong association with a history of smoking. Organizing pneumonia (idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans-organizing pneumonia [BOOP]) is not strictly an interstitial process, because the alveoli and bronchioles are filled by intraluminal polyps of fibroblastic tissue and the expansion of the interstitium is mild. Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia

  12. Comparative single-molecule and ensemble myosin enzymology: sulfoindocyanine ATP and ADP derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Oiwa, K; Eccleston, J F; Anson, M; Kikumoto, M; Davis, C T; Reid, G P; Ferenczi, M A; Corrie, J E; Yamada, A; Nakayama, H; Trentham, D R

    2000-01-01

    Single-molecule and macroscopic reactions of fluorescent nucleotides with myosin have been compared. The single-molecule studies serve as paradigms for enzyme-catalyzed reactions and ligand-receptor interactions analyzed as individual stochastic processes. Fluorescent nucleotides, called Cy3-EDA-ATP and Cy5-EDA-ATP, were derived by coupling the dyes Cy3.29.OH and Cy5.29.OH (compounds XI and XIV, respectively, in, Bioconjug. Chem. 4:105-111)) with 2'(3')-O-[N-(2-aminoethyl)carbamoyl]ATP (EDA-ATP). The ATP(ADP) analogs were separated into their respective 2'- and 3'-O-isomers, the interconversion rate of which was 30[OH(-)] s(-1) (0.016 h(-1) at pH 7.1) at 22 degrees C. Macroscopic studies showed that 2'(3')-O-substituted nucleotides had properties similar to those of ATP and ADP in their interactions with myosin, actomyosin, and muscle fibers, although the ATP analogs did not relax muscle as well as ATP did. Significant differences in the fluorescence intensity of Cy3-nucleotide 2'- and 3'-O-isomers in free solution and when they interacted with myosin were evident. Single-molecule studies using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed that reciprocal mean lifetimes of the nucleotide analogs interacting with myosin filaments were one- to severalfold greater than predicted from macroscopic data. Kinetic and equilibrium data of nucleotide-(acto)myosin interactions derived from single-molecule microscopy now have a biochemical and physiological framework. This is important for single-molecule mechanical studies of motor proteins. PMID:10827983

  13. Intradermal administration of ATP does not mitigate tyramine-stimulated vasoconstriction in human skin

    PubMed Central

    Wingo, Jonathan E.; Brothers, R. Matthew; Coso, Juan Del

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous vasodilation associated with whole-body heat stress occurs via withdrawal of adrenergic vasoconstriction and engagement of cholinergic “active” vasodilation, the latter of which attenuates cutaneous vasoconstrictor responsiveness. However, the precise neurotransmitter(s) responsible for this sympatholytic-like effect remain unknown. In skeletal muscle, ATP inhibits adrenergically mediated vasoconstriction. ATP also may be responsible for attenuating cutaneous vasoconstriction since it is coreleased from cholinergic neurons. The effect of ATP on cutaneous vasoconstrictor responsiveness, however, has not been investigated. Accordingly, this study tested the hypothesis that ATP inhibits adrenergically mediated cutaneous vasoconstriction. To accomplish this objective, four microdialysis probes were inserted in dorsal forearm skin of 11 healthy individuals (mean ± SD; 35 ± 11 years). Local temperature at each site was clamped at 34°C throughout the protocol. Skin blood flow was indexed by laser-Doppler flowmetry and was used to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; laser-Doppler-derived flux/mean arterial pressure), which was normalized to peak CVC achieved with sodium nitroprusside infusion combined with local skin heating to ∼42°C. Two membranes were perfused with 30 mM ATP, while the other two membranes were flow matched via administration of 2.8 mM adenosine to serve as control sites. After achieving stable baselines, 1×10−4 M tyramine was administered at all sites, while ATP and adenosine continued to be infused at their respective sites. ATP and adenosine infusion increased CVC from baseline by 35 ± 26% CVCpeak units and by 36 ± 15% CVCpeak units, respectively (P = 0.75). Tyramine decreased CVC similarly (by about one-third) at all sites (P < 0.001 for main effect and P = 0.32 for interaction). These findings indicate that unlike in skeletal muscle, ATP does not attenuate tyramine-stimulated vasoconstriction in human skin. PMID

  14. Src inhibition blocks renal interstitial fibroblast activation and ameliorates renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yanli; Ma, Li; Zhou, Xiaoxu; Ponnusamy, Murugavel; Tang, Jinhua; Zhuang, Michelle A.; Tolbert, Evelyn; Bayliss, Georgia; Bai, Jianwen; Zhuang, Shougang

    2015-01-01

    Increased Src activity has been associated with the pathogenesis of renal tumors and some glomerular diseases, but its role in renal interstitial fibrosis remains elusive. To evaluate this, cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts (NRK-49F) were treated with PP1, a selective inhibitor of Src. This resulted in decreased expression of α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and collagen I in response to serum, angiotension II, or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Silencing Src with siRNA also inhibited expression of those proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of Src activity blocked renal fibroblast proliferation. In a murine model of renal interstitial fibrosis induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction, the active form of Src (phopsho-Src Tyr416) was upregulated in both renal interstitial fibroblasts and renal tubular cells of the fibrotic kidney. Its inactivation reduced renal fibroblast activation and attenuated extracellular matrix protein deposition. Src inhibition also suppressed activation of TGF-β1 signaling, activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and STAT3, and reduced the number of renal epithelial cells arrested at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle after ureteral obstruction. Thus, Src is an important mediator of renal interstitial fibroblast activation and renal fibrosis, and suggest that Src is a potential therapeutic target for treatment of chronic renal fibrosis. PMID:26444028

  15. Synaptic activity and connective tissue remodeling in denervated frog muscle

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Denervation of skeletal muscle results in dramatic remodeling of the cellular and molecular composition of the muscle connective tissue. This remodeling is concentrated in muscle near neuromuscular junctions and involves the accumulation of interstitial cells and several extracellular matrix molecules. Given the role of extracellular matrix in neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, we predict that this remodeling of the junctional connective tissue directly influences the regeneration of the neuromuscular junction. As one step toward understanding the role of this denervation-induced remodeling in synapse formation, we have begun to look for the signals that are involved in initiating the junctional accumulations of interstitial cells and matrix molecules. Here, the role of muscle inactivity as a signal was examined. The distributions of interstitial cells, fibronectin, and tenascin were determined in muscles inactivated by presynaptic blockade of muscle activity with tetrodotoxin. We found that blockade of muscle activity for up to 4 wk produced neither the junctional accumulation of interstitial cells nor the junctional concentrations of tenascin and fibronectin normally present in denervated frog muscle. In contrast, the muscle inactivity induced the extrajunctional appearance of two synapse-specific molecules, the acetylcholine receptor and a muscle fiber antigen, mAb 3B6. These results demonstrate that the remodeling of the junctional connective tissue in response to nerve injury is a unique response of muscle to denervation in that it is initiated by a mechanism that is independent of muscle activity. Thus connective tissue remodeling in denervated skeletal muscle may be induced by signals released from or associated with the nerve other than the evoked release of neurotransmitter. PMID:7525607

  16. [Interstitial lung disease in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Froidevaux-Janin, Sylvie; Dudler, Jean; Nicod, Laurent P; Lazor, Romain

    2011-11-23

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is found in up to 30% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is clinically manifest in 5 to 10%, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The most frequent histopathological forms are usual interstitial pneumonia and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Another recently described presentation is combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. Similarly to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, acute exacerbation of ILD may occur in RA and is associated with severe prognosis. Smoking is a known risk factor of RA and may also play a role in the pathogenesis of RA-associated ILD, in combination with genetic and immunologic mechanisms. Several treatments of RA may also lead to drug-induced ILD.

  17. The role of K+ conductances in regulating membrane excitability in human gastric corpus smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Ko, Eun-ju; Ahn, Ki Duck; Kim, Sung

    2015-01-01

    Changes in resting membrane potential (RMP) regulate membrane excitability. K+ conductance(s) are one of the main factors in regulating RMP. The functional role of K+ conductances has not been studied the in human gastric corpus smooth muscles (HGCS). To examine the role of K+ channels in regulation of RMP in HGCS we employed microelectrode recordings, patch-clamp, and molecular approaches. Tetraethylammonium and charybdotoxin did not affect the RMP, suggesting that BK channels are not involved in regulating RMP. Apamin, a selective small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel (SK) blocker, did not show a significant effect on the membrane excitability. 4-Aminopyridine, a Kv channel blocker, caused depolarization and increased the duration of slow wave potentials. 4-Aminopyridine also inhibited a delayed rectifying K+ current in isolated smooth muscle cells. End-product RT-PCR gel detected Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 in human gastric corpus muscles. Glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP) blocker, did not induce depolarization, but nicorandil, a KATP opener, hyperpolarized HGCS, suggesting that KATP are expressed but not basally activated. Kir6.2 transcript, a pore-forming subunit of KATP was expressed in HGCS. A low concentration of Ba2+, a Kir blocker, induced strong depolarization. Interestingly, Ba2+-sensitive currents were minimally expressed in isolated smooth muscle cells under whole-cell patch configuration. KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) transcript was expressed in HGCS. Unique K+ conductances regulate the RMP in HGCS. Delayed and inwardly rectifying K+ channels are the main candidates in regulating membrane excitability in HGCS. With the development of cell dispersion techniques of interstitial cells, the cell-specific functional significance will require further analysis. PMID:25591864

  18. Severe pulmonary hypertension in idiopathic nonspecific interstitial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Hallowell, Robert W.; Reed, Robert M.; Fraig, Mostafa; Horton, Maureen R.; Girgis, Reda E.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of interstitial lung disease (ILD), particularly in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and ILD associated with connective tissue disease, where the underlying pathology is often a nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) pattern. The degree of PH in ILD is typically mild to moderate and radiographic changes of ILD are usually prominent. We describe four patients with idiopathic NSIP and severe PH (mPAP > 40 mmHg). The average mean pulmonary artery pressure was 51±7 mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance was 13±4 Wood's units. Pulmonary function was characterized by mild restriction (total lung capacity 63–94% predicted) and profound reductions in DLCO (19–53% predicted). Computed tomographic imaging revealed minimal to moderate interstitial thickening without honeycombing. In two of the cases, an initial clinical diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension was made. Both were treated with intravenous epoprostenol, which was associated with worsening of hypoxemia. All four patients died or underwent lung transplant within 4 years of PH diagnonsis. Lung pathology in all four demonstrated fibrotic NSIP with medial thickening of the small and medium pulmonary arteries, and proliferative intimal lesions that stained negative for endothelial markers (CD31 and CD34) and positive for smooth muscle actin. There were no plexiform lesions. Severe pulmonary hypertension can therefore occur in idiopathic NSIP, even in the absence of advanced radiographic changes. Clinicians should suspect underlying ILD as the basis for PH when DLCO is severely reduced or gas exchange deteriorates with pulmonary vasodilator therapy. PMID:22558525

  19. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-03-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or 'bathing solution' ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature.

  20. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or ‘bathing solution’ ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r2 = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r2 = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature. PMID:22227202

  1. Effects of exogenous neurotrophin-3 on myocyte apoptosis and Ca2+-ATP enzyme levels following nerve injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yu-Zhen; Yang, Lin; Lu, Tan; Zhao, Hong-Xing; Ma, Chao; Zhao, Yi-Lei

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine the influence of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) plasmids on neuronal apoptosis and Ca2+-ATP enzyme levels in injured muscles. We also investigated the mechanism underlying the role of NT-3 in delaying muscle atrophy following a peripheral nerve injury. Sixty adult Wistar rats were used to generate the peripheral nerve injury models. The rats were randomly assigned to the saline and NT-3 groups. Related indicators, such as caspase-3 protein expression, skeletal muscle cell apoptosis, and Ca2+-ATP enzyme expression were quantified. The expression levels of caspase-3 and the histone-muscle cell apoptosis rate in the NT-3 group decreased at different post-operative times following peripheral nerve injury, whereas NT-3 expression and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATP enzyme levels increased. Statistically significant differences were observed in the NT-3 group as compared to the saline group (P < 0.05). NT-3 mitigated muscle atrophy following peripheral nerve damage by inhibiting caspase-3 gene expression and increasing Ca2+-ATP enzymatic activity, ultimately reducing muscle apoptosis. PMID:26770627

  2. Unexpected role of the copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced vascular smooth

    SciTech Connect

    Ashino, T.; Varadarajan, S.; Urao, N.; Oshikawa, J.; Chen, G. -F.; Wang, H.; Huo, Y.; Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; McKinney, R. D.; Maryon, E. B.; Kaplan, J. H.; Ushio-Fukai, M.; Fukai, T.

    2010-09-09

    Copper, an essential nutrient, has been implicated in vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis with unknown mechanism. Bioavailability of intracellular copper is regulated not only by the copper importer CTR1 (copper transporter 1) but also by the copper exporter ATP7A (Menkes ATPase), whose function is achieved through copper-dependent translocation from trans-Golgi network (TGN). Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) promotes vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key component of neointimal formation. To determine the role of copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Depletion of ATP7A inhibited VSMC migration in response to PDGF or wound scratch in a CTR1/copper-dependent manner. PDGF stimulation promoted ATP7A translocation from the TGN to lipid rafts, which localized at the leading edge, where it colocalized with PDGF receptor and Rac1, in migrating VSMCs. Mechanistically, ATP7A small interfering RNA or CTR small interfering RNA prevented PDGF-induced Rac1 translocation to the leading edge, thereby inhibiting lamellipodia formation. In addition, ATP7A depletion prevented a PDGF-induced decrease in copper level and secretory copper enzyme precursor prolysyl oxidase (Pro-LOX) in lipid raft fraction, as well as PDGF-induced increase in LOX activity. In vivo, ATP7A expression was markedly increased and copper accumulation was observed by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy at neointimal VSMCs in wire injury model. These findings suggest that ATP7A plays an important role in copper-dependent PDGF-stimulated VSMC migration via recruiting Rac1 to lipid rafts at the leading edge, as well as regulating LOX activity. This may contribute to neointimal formation after vascular injury. Our findings provide insight into ATP7A as a novel therapeutic target for vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis.

  3. Fractionalization of interstitials in curved colloidal crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, William T. M.; Bowick, Mark J.; Chaikin, Paul M.

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the effect of curvature and topological frustration in crystals yields insights into the fragility of the ordered state. For instance, a one-dimensional crystal of identical charged particles can accommodate an extra particle (interstitial) if all the particle positions are readjusted, yet in a planar hexagonal crystal interstitials remain trapped between lattice sites and diffuse by hopping. Using optical tweezers operated independently of three-dimensional imaging, we inserted interstitials in a lattice of similar colloidal particles sitting on flat or curved oil/glycerol interfaces, and imaged the ensuing dynamics. We find that, unlike in flat space, the curved crystals self-heal through a collective particle rearrangement that redistributes the increased density associated with the interstitial. This process can be interpreted in terms of the out-of-equilibrium interaction of topological defects with each other and with the underlying curvature. Our observations suggest the existence of particle fractionalization on curved surface crystals.

  4. Thermodynamic processes of si-interstitial clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Birner, S.; Richie, D. A.; Voter, A. F.

    2001-01-01

    Structural and dynamical properties of silicon interstitial defects are extracted from extensive atomistic simulations using ab initio total energy calculations. With increasing number of interstitials, the stable defect shape evolves from compact to chain-like to rod-like. The rodlike {l_brace}311{r_brace} defect, formed from (011) interstitial chains, is stabilized as it grows, elongating in the chain direction. We utilize new accelerated dynamics algorithms based on the parallel-replica method and reliable empirical potentials to efficiently explore large configurational space involving many degrees of freedom. We evaluate the empirical potentials that have been widely used for bulk silicon in light of the energetic and structural properties of interstitial defects.

  5. Mathematical model of renal interstitial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Wenrui; Rovin, Brad H.; Friedman, Avner

    2014-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is an autoimmune disease that occurs when autoantibodies complex with self-antigen and form immune complexes that accumulate in the glomeruli. These immune complexes initiate an inflammatory response resulting in glomerular injury. LN often concomitantly affects the tubulointerstitial compartment of the kidney, leading first to interstitial inflammation and subsequently to interstitial fibrosis and atrophy of the renal tubules if not appropriately treated. Presently the only way to assess interstitial inflammation and fibrosis is through kidney biopsy, which is invasive and cannot be repeated frequently. Hence, monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy is suboptimal. In this paper we describe a mathematical model of the progress from tubulointerstitial inflammation to fibrosis. We demonstrate how the model can be used to monitor treatments for interstitial fibrosis in LN with drugs currently being developed or used for nonrenal fibrosis. PMID:25225370

  6. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  7. Interstitial fibrosis and growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, J A; Brody, A R

    2000-01-01

    Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring of the lung caused by a variety of inhaled agents including mineral particles, organic dusts, and oxidant gases. The disease afflicts millions of individuals worldwide, and there are no effective therapeutic approaches. A major reason for this lack of useful treatments is that few of the molecular mechanisms of disease have been defined sufficiently to design appropriate targets for therapy. Our laboratory has focused on the molecular mechanisms through which three selected peptide growth factors could play a role in the development of IPF. Hundreds of growth factors and cytokines could be involved in the complex disease process. We are studying platelet-derived growth factor because it is the most potent mesenchymal cell mitogen yet described, transforming growth factor beta because it is a powerful inducer of extracellular matrix (scar tissue) components by mesenchymal cells, and tumor necrosis factor alpha because it is a pleiotropic cytokine that we and others have shown is essential for the development of IPF in animal models. This review describes some of the evidence from studies in humans, in animal models, and in vitro, that supports the growth factor hypothesis. The use of modern molecular and transgenic technologies could elucidate those targets that will allow effective therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931794

  8. ATP is not involved in α1-adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Angus, James A; Wright, Christine E

    2015-12-15

    Recent publications suggest that α1-adrenoceptor stimulation by exogenous agonists such as phenylephrine in resistance arteries cause contraction through the release of ATP from within the vascular smooth muscle cells. This ATP exits the cell through pannexin-1 channels to act back "autocrine-like" on P2 receptors on the smooth muscle that cause the contraction. In this work we directly test this hypothesis by using a selective P2X1 purinoceptor antagonist NF449 (1-10µM) against phenylephrine and ATP concentration-response curves in small mesenteric arteries of the rat and thoracodorsal arteries of the mouse. We show that NF449 is a simple competitive antagonist of ATP with a pKB of 6.43 and 6.41 in rat and mouse arteries, respectively, but did not antagonise phenylephrine concentration-response curves. This work cautions against the growing overstated role of the reputed pannexin-1/ATP release axis following α1-adrenoceptor activation in small resistance arteries.

  9. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  10. On the ATP binding site of the ε subunit from bacterial F-type ATP synthases.

    PubMed

    Krah, Alexander; Takada, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    F-type ATP synthases are reversible machinery that not only synthesize adenosine triphosphate (ATP) using an electrochemical gradient across the membrane, but also can hydrolyze ATP to pump ions under certain conditions. To prevent wasteful ATP hydrolysis, subunit ε in bacterial ATP synthases changes its conformation from the non-inhibitory down- to the inhibitory up-state at a low cellular ATP concentration. Recently, a crystal structure of the ε subunit in complex with ATP was solved in a non-biologically relevant dimeric form. Here, to derive the functional ATP binding site motif, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations. Our results suggest that the ATP binding site markedly differs from the experimental resolved one; we observe a reorientation of several residues, which bind to ATP in the crystal structure. In addition we find that an Mg(2+) ion is coordinated by ATP, replacing interactions of the second chain in the crystal structure. Thus we demonstrate more generally the influence of crystallization effects on ligand binding sites and their respective binding modes. Furthermore, we propose a role for two highly conserved residues to control the ATP binding/unbinding event, which have not been considered before. Additionally our results provide the basis for the rational development of new biosensors based on subunit ε, as shown previously for novel sensors measuring the ATP concentration in cells.

  11. An Autopsy Case of Anti-melanoma Differentiation-associated Gene-5 Antibody-positive Clinical Amyopathic Dermatomyositis Complicated by Rapidly Progressive Interstitial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Naomi; Kaieda, Shinjiro; Tomozoe, Kumi; Tajiri, Morihiro; Wakasugi, Daisuke; Okamoto, Masaki; Tominaga, Masaki; Ida, Hiroaki; Hoshino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    A 62-year-old man presented with heliotrope rash, Gottron's sign, and mild muscle weakness. Both of his lung fields showed interstitial changes that worsened rapidly. He was diagnosed with clinical amyopathic dermatomyositis with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. The patient died of respiratory failure, despite the administration of immunosuppressive therapy. Autopsy revealed diffuse alveolar damage. An antibody analysis, which was performed postmortem, detected the presence of anti-melanoma differentiation-associated gene (MDA)-5 antibodies. Clinicians should note the clinical, radiologic, and serologic findings to predict anti-MDA-5 antibody-associated rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. PMID:27301523

  12. Complementary and Alternative Therapies as Treatment Approaches for Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Kristene E

    2002-01-01

    The management of interstitial cystitis (IC) is predominantly the reduction of the symptoms of frequency, urgency, and pain. Multimodal treatment approaches for IC are helpful in customizing therapy for individual patients. Complementary and alternative therapies are a quintessential addition to the therapeutic armamentarium and frequently include dietary modification, nutraceuticals, bladder training, neuromodulation, stress reduction, and sex therapy. Dietary modification involves elimination of bladder irritants, fluid regulation, and a bowel regimen. Nutraceuticals studied for the treatment of IC include calcium glycerophosphate, L-arginine, mucopolysaccharides, bioflavinoids, and Chinese herbs. Bladder training is effective after pain reduction. The neuromodulation of high-tone pelvic-floor muscle dysfunction is achieved with physical therapy and acupuncture. Stress reduction and sex therapy are best administered by a qualified stress manager and sex therapist. Multimodal, nonconventional management may add efficacy to the treatment of IC. PMID:16986031

  13. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-07-22

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum-classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO4(2-) state, but in the H2PγO4(-) state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3(-)) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes.

  14. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum–classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO42− state, but in the H2PγO4− state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3−) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes. PMID:25006262

  15. Acute exacerbations of fibrotic interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L; Tazelaar, Henry D

    2011-03-01

    An acute exacerbation is the development of acute lung injury, usually resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome, in a patient with a pre-existing fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. By definition, acute exacerbations are not caused by infection, heart failure, aspiration or drug reaction. Most patients with acute exacerbations have underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, either idiopathic or in association with a connective tissue disease, but the same process has been reported in patients with fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia, fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and asbestosis. Occasionally an acute exacerbation is the initial manifestation of underlying interstitial lung disease. On biopsy, acute exacerbations appear as diffuse alveolar damage or bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) superimposed upon the fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. Biopsies may be extremely confusing, because the acute injury pattern can completely obscure the underlying disease; a useful clue is that diffuse alveolar damage and organizing pneumonia should not be associated with old dense fibrosis and peripheral honeycomb change. Consultation with radiology can also be extremely helpful, because the fibrosing disease may be evident on old or concurrent computed tomography scans. The aetiology of acute exacerbations is unknown, and the prognosis is poor; however, some patients survive with high-dose steroid therapy.

  16. Interstitial zinc clusters in zinc oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluba, M. A.; Nickel, N. H.; Karpensky, N.

    2013-12-01

    Doped zinc oxide (ZnO) exhibits anomalous Raman modes in the range of 270 to 870 cm-1. Commonly, the resonance at 275 cm-1 is attributed to the local vibration of Zn atoms in the vicinity of extrinsic dopants. We revisit this assignment by investigating the influence of isotopically purified zinc oxide thin films on the frequency of the vibrational mode around 275 cm-1. For this purpose, undoped and nitrogen-doped ZnO thin-films with Zn isotope compositions of natural Zn, 64Zn, 68Zn, and a 1:1 mixture of 64Zn and 68Zn were grown by pulsed laser deposition. The isotopic shift and the line shape of the Raman resonance around 275 cm-1 are analyzed in terms of three different microscopic models, which involve the vibration of (i) interstitial zinc atoms bound to extrinsic defects, (ii) interstitial diatomic Zn molecules, and (iii) interstitial zinc clusters. The energy diagram of interstitial Zn-Zn bonds in a ZnO matrix is derived from density functional theory calculations. The interstitial Zn-Zn bond is stabilized by transferring electrons from the antibonding orbital into the ZnO conduction band. This mechanism facilitates the formation of interstitial Zn clusters and fosters the common n-type doping asymmetry of ZnO.

  17. A review of interstitial pneumonia in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kerr, L A; Linnabary, R D

    1989-06-01

    Interstitial pneumonias comprise a significant proportion of cattle respiratory diseases. Known by different names, such as acute bovine pulmonary emphysema and edema (ABPE), fog fever, atypical interstitial pneumonia (AIP) and cow asthma, the condition seems to occur predominantly in late summer or fall. However, depending on the etiology, cases have occurred throughout the year. Interstitial pneumonia often begins with acute respiratory distress in animals that were clinically normal 12 hr earlier. Animals are observed breathing very rapid and shallow with their mouths open. If disturbed, death may occur rapidly from hypoxia. Causes of interstitial pneumonia are quite varied ranging from parasitic, viral and bacterial to toxic. Toxic agents constitute the most economically important cause of this condition in cattle. The primary toxin is the amino acid L-tryptophan in lush pasture grasses, a compound which is converted to 3-methylindole by rumen microorganisms. Other leading toxic causes of interstitial pneumonia are perilla mint and moldy sweet potatoes. Although treatments are mainly symptomatic and ineffective, preventive measures will reduce the occurrence of interstitial pneumonia. Prevention consists of denying animals exposure to know pneumotoxic agents, eliminating certain rumen microflora that break down the toxic compounds to reactive metabolites, and supplying ample good forage so that cattle will not as likely consume toxic plants.

  18. ATP-induced vasodilation and purinergic receptors in the human leg: roles of nitric oxide, prostaglandins, and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; González-Alonso, José; Bune, Laurids T; Saltin, Bengt; Pilegaard, Henriette; Hellsten, Ylva

    2009-04-01

    Plasma ATP is thought to contribute to the local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow. Intravascular ATP infusion can induce profound limb muscle vasodilatation, but the purinergic receptors and downstream signals involved in this response remain unclear. This study investigated: 1) the role of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandins, and adenosine as mediators of ATP-induced limb vasodilation and 2) the expression and distribution of purinergic P(2) receptors in human skeletal muscle. Systemic and leg hemodynamics were measured before and during 5-7 min of femoral intra-arterial infusion of ATP [0.45-2.45 micromol/min] in 19 healthy male subjects with and without coinfusion of N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA; NO formation inhibitor; 12.3 +/- 0.3 (SE) mg/min), indomethacin (INDO; prostaglandin formation blocker; 613 +/- 12 microg/min), and/or theophylline (adenosine receptor blocker; 400 +/- 26 mg). During control conditions, ATP infusion increased leg blood flow (LBF) from baseline conditions by 1.82 +/- 0.14 l/min. When ATP was coinfused with either l-NMMA, INDO, or l-NMMA + INDO combined, the increase in LBF was reduced by 14 +/- 6, 15 +/- 9, and 39 +/- 8%, respectively (all P < 0.05), and was associated with a parallel lowering in leg vascular conductance and cardiac output and a compensatory increase in leg O(2) extraction. Infusion of theophylline did not alter the ATP-induced leg hyperemia or systemic variables. Real-time PCR analysis of the mRNA content from the vastus lateralis muscle of eight subjects showed the highest expression of P(2Y2) receptors of the 10 investigated P(2) receptor subtypes. Immunohistochemistry showed that P(2Y2) receptors were located in the endothelium of microvessels and smooth muscle cells, whereas P(2X1) receptors were located in the endothelium and the sacrolemma. Collectively, these results indicate that NO and prostaglandins, but not adenosine, play a role in ATP-induced vasodilation in human skeletal muscle. The expression

  19. Nuclear genetic defects of mitochondrial ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Hejzlarová, K; Mráček, T; Vrbacký, M; Kaplanová, V; Karbanová, V; Nůsková, H; Pecina, P; Houštěk, J

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of ATP synthase, the key enzyme of mitochondrial energy provision belong to the most severe metabolic diseases presenting as early-onset mitochondrial encephalo-cardiomyopathies. Up to now, mutations in four nuclear genes were associated with isolated deficiency of ATP synthase. Two of them, ATP5A1 and ATP5E encode enzyme's structural subunits alpha and epsilon, respectively, while the other two ATPAF2 and TMEM70 encode specific ancillary factors that facilitate the biogenesis of ATP synthase. All these defects share a similar biochemical phenotype with pronounced decrease in the content of fully assembled and functional ATP synthase complex. However, substantial differences can be found in their frequency, molecular mechanism of pathogenesis, clinical manifestation as well as the course of the disease progression. While for TMEM70 the number of reported patients as well as spectrum of the mutations is steadily increasing, mutations in ATP5A1, ATP5E and ATPAF2 genes are very rare. Apparently, TMEM70 gene is highly prone to mutagenesis and this type of a rare mitochondrial disease has a rather frequent incidence. Here we present overview of individual reported cases of nuclear mutations in ATP synthase and discuss, how their analysis can improve our understanding of the enzyme biogenesis.

  20. Action of ATP on ventricular automaticity.

    PubMed

    Stark, G; Domanowits, H; Sterz, F; Stark, U; Bachernegg, M; Kickenweiz, E; Decrinis, M; Laggner, A N; Tritthart, H A

    1994-11-01

    ATP is an effective treatment of supraventricular tachycardia when the atrioventricular (AV) node is part of the reentrant circuit. However, the lower a pace-maker in the pacemaker hierarchy, the more sensitive it is to adenosine. Therefore, we investigated the effects of ATP on ventricular automaticity in in vivo and in vitro conditions. Wide and narrow QRS complex tachycardia in 46 patients was treated with 6, 12, and 18 mg ATP as sequential intravenous (i.v.) bolus. ATP terminated tachycardias in 67%. Bolus infusion ATP caused < or = 6.4-s asystole that was self-limited. Perfusion of isolated spontaneously beating guinea pig heart with 100 microM ATP completely suppressed ventricular automaticity. After ATP-infusion was discontinued, the first ventricular beat was evident after 3.1 +/- 0.9 s and sinus node activity recovered with a time constant of 3.0 +/- 1.1 s. Because sinus node and ventricular automaticity recovered within seconds after ATP infusion was discontinued in vitro, recovery in vivo is also likely to be determined by the short half-life (+1/2) of ATP. PMID:7532751

  1. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  2. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  3. Profiling Protein Kinases and Other ATP Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis Using Acyl-ATP Probes*

    PubMed Central

    Villamor, Joji Grace; Kaschani, Farnusch; Colby, Tom; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Zhao, David; Kaiser, Markus; Patricelli, Matthew P.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Many protein activities are driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Here, we explore the ATP binding proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using acyl-ATP (AcATP)1 probes. These probes target ATP binding sites and covalently label lysine residues in the ATP binding pocket. Gel-based profiling using biotinylated AcATP showed that labeling is dependent on pH and divalent ions and can be competed by nucleotides. The vast majority of these AcATP-labeled proteins are known ATP binding proteins. Our search for labeled peptides upon in-gel digest led to the discovery that the biotin moiety of the labeled peptides is oxidized. The in-gel analysis displayed kinase domains of two receptor-like kinases (RLKs) at a lower than expected molecular weight, indicating that these RLKs lost the extracellular domain, possibly as a result of receptor shedding. Analysis of modified peptides using a gel-free platform identified 242 different labeling sites for AcATP in the Arabidopsis proteome. Examination of each individual labeling site revealed a preference of labeling in ATP binding pockets for a broad diversity of ATP binding proteins. Of these, 24 labeled peptides were from a diverse range of protein kinases, including RLKs, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and calcium-dependent kinases. A significant portion of the labeling sites could not be assigned to known nucleotide binding sites. However, the fact that labeling could be competed with ATP indicates that these labeling sites might represent previously uncharacterized nucleotide binding sites. A plot of spectral counts against expression levels illustrates the high specificity of AcATP probes for protein kinases and known ATP binding proteins. This work introduces profiling of ATP binding activities of a large diversity of proteins in plant proteomes. The data have been deposited in ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD000188. PMID:23722185

  4. Citrulline malate supplementation increases muscle efficiency in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Giannesini, Benoît; Le Fur, Yann; Cozzone, Patrick J; Verleye, Marc; Le Guern, Marie-Emmanuelle; Bendahan, David

    2011-09-30

    Citrulline malate (CM; CAS 54940-97-5, Stimol®) is known to limit the deleterious effect of asthenic state on muscle function, but its effect under healthy condition remains poorly documented. The aim of this longitudinal double-blind study was to investigate the effect of oral ingestion of CM on muscle mechanical performance and bioenergetics in normal rat. Gastrocnemius muscle function was investigated strictly non-invasively using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques. A standardized rest-stimulation- (5.7 min of repeated isometric contractions electrically induced by transcutaneous stimulation at a frequency of 3.3 Hz) recovery-protocol was performed twice, i.e., before (t(0)-24 h) and after (t(0)+48 h) CM (3 g/kg/day) or vehicle treatment. CM supplementation did not affect PCr/ATP ratio, [PCr], [Pi], [ATP] and intracellular pH at rest. During the stimulation period, it lead to a 23% enhancement of specific force production that was associated to significant decrease in both PCr (28%) and oxidative (32%) costs of contraction, but had no effect on the time-courses of phosphorylated compounds and intracellular pH. Furthermore, both the rate of PCr resynthesis during the post-stimulation period (VPCr(rec)) and the oxidative ATP synthesis capacity (Q(max)) remained unaffected by CM treatment. These data demonstrate that CM supplementation under healthy condition has an ergogenic effect associated to an improvement of muscular contraction efficiency. PMID:21664351

  5. Urine markers of interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Erickson, D R

    2001-06-01

    This article describes the current state of the art with regard to urine markers of interstitial cystitis (IC), and describes the areas that need continuing research. Articles referenced in MEDLINE that describe urine alterations in IC were reviewed. Additional articles were identified by cross-referencing. The different marker alterations were tabulated. The relevant articles were discussed, considering different purposes for urine markers including: (1) diagnosing IC; (2) confirming a specific pathophysiology for IC; and (3) predicting or following response to a specific treatment. Currently, 2 markers (glycoprotein-51 and antiproliferative factor [APF]) clearly separate IC and control subjects, with minimal overlap. Markers that correlate with specific bladder biopsy features include 1,4-methylimidazole acetic acid and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), which correlate with mast cell density, and interleukin (IL)-6, which correlates with mononuclear inflammation. Markers that changed after treatment were as follows: (1) nitric oxide synthase and cyclic guanosine monophosphate increased with oral L-arginine; (2) ECP decreased with subcutaneous heparin; (3) prostaglandin E(2) and kallikrein decreased after bladder distention; (4) neutrophil chemotactic activity decreased after dimethyl sulfoxide; (5) IL-2 inhibitor decreased after oral nifedipine; (6) IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 decreased after bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine; and (7) APF and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor changed to or toward normal levels after bladder distention or sacral nerve stimulation. A larger number of urine alterations have been reported, and a few are being pursued further by correlating with bladder biopsy findings or treatment responses. Further research is needed.

  6. ATP-triggered anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Disanto, Rocco; Tai, Wanyi; Gu, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli-triggered drug delivery systems have been increasingly used to promote physiological specificity and on-demand therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here we utilize adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a trigger for the controlled release of anticancer drugs. We demonstrate that polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with an ATP-binding aptamer-incorporated DNA motif can selectively release the intercalating doxorubicin via a conformational switch when in an ATP-rich environment. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ATP-responsive nanovehicles is 0.24 μM in MDA-MB-231 cells, a 3.6-fold increase in the cytotoxicity compared with that of non-ATP-responsive nanovehicles. Equipped with an outer shell crosslinked by hyaluronic acid, a specific tumour-targeting ligand, the ATP-responsive nanocarriers present an improvement in the chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumour growth using xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumour-bearing mice. This ATP-triggered drug release system provides a more sophisticated drug delivery system, which can differentiate ATP levels to facilitate the selective release of drugs.

  7. Paclitaxel attenuates renal interstitial fibroblast activation and interstitial fibrosis by inhibiting STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Xu, Xuan; Yang, Ruhao; Chen, Jingwen; Wang, Shixuan; Yang, Junqin; Xiang, Xudong; He, Zhibiao; Zhao, Yu; Dong, Zheng; Zhang, Dongshan

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that paclitaxel might inhibit renal fibrosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that low-dose paclitaxel may block the STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) signaling to attenuate fibrosis in a mouse model with unilateral ureteral obstruction. Both NRK-49F cells and mice with unilateral ureteral obstruction were treated with paclitaxel. The results showed that paclitaxel treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent decrease in tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT3, and inhibited the expression of fibronectin, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and collagen I in cultured NRK-49F cells. S3I-201, an STAT3 inhibitor, also suppressed the expression of fibronectin, α-SMA, and collagen I in cultured NRK-49F cells. Mechanistically, paclitaxel treatment blocked the STAT3 activity by disrupting the association of STAT3 with tubulin and inhibiting STAT3 nucleus translocation. Furthermore, paclitaxel also ameliorated renal fibrosis by down-regulating the expression of fibronectin, α-SMA, and collagen I, and suppressed the infiltration of macrophages and production of TNF-α, IL-1β, TGF-β, and ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1) by inhibition of STAT3 activity in obstructive nephropathy. These results suggest that paclitaxel may block the STAT3 activity by disrupting the association of STAT3 with tubulin and inhibiting STAT3 nucleus translocation, consequently leading to the suppression of renal interstitial fibroblast activation and the development of renal fibrosis, and inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production. PMID:25931810

  8. Thermodynamics of proton transport coupled ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Turina, Paola; Petersen, Jan; Gräber, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio of the H(+)-ATP synthase from chloroplasts was measured in proteoliposomes after energization of the membrane by an acid base transition (Turina et al. 2003 [13], 418-422). The method is discussed, and all published data obtained with this system are combined and analyzed as a single dataset. This meta-analysis led to the following results. 1) At equilibrium, the transmembrane ΔpH is energetically equivalent to the transmembrane electric potential difference. 2) The standard free energy for ATP synthesis (reference reaction) is ΔG°(ref)=33.8±1.3kJ/mol. 3) The thermodynamic H(+)/ATP ratio, as obtained from the shift of the ATP synthesis equilibrium induced by changing the transmembrane ΔpH (varying either pH(in) or pH(out)) is 4.0±0.1. The structural H(+)/ATP ratio, calculated from the ratio of proton binding sites on the c-subunit-ring in F(0) to the catalytic nucleotide binding sites on the β-subunits in F(1), is c/β=14/3=4.7. We infer that the energy of 0.7 protons per ATP that flow through the enzyme, but do not contribute to shifting the ATP/(ADP·Pi) ratio, is used for additional processes within the enzyme, such as activation, and/or energy dissipation, due e.g. to internal uncoupling. The ratio between the thermodynamic and the structural H(+)/ATP values is 0.85, and we conclude that this value represents the efficiency of the chemiosmotic energy conversion within the chloroplast H(+)-ATP synthase.

  9. [Modern Views on Children's Interstitial Lung Disease].

    PubMed

    Boĭtsova, E V; Beliashova, M A; Ovsiannikov, D Iu

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILD, diffuse lung diseases) are a heterogeneous group of diseases in which a pathological process primarily involved alveoli and perialveolar interstitium, resulting in impaired gas exchange, restrictive changes of lung ventilation function and diffuse interstitial changes detectable by X-ray. Children's interstitial lung diseases is an topical problem ofpediatricpulmonoogy. The article presents current information about classification, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment and prognosis of these rare diseases. The article describes the differences in the structure, pathogenesis, detection of various histological changes in children's ILD compared with adult patients with ILD. Authors cite an instance of registers pediatric patients with ILD. The clinical semiotics of ILD, the possible results of objective research, the frequency of symptoms, the features of medical history, the changes detected on chest X-rays, CT semiotics described in detail. Particular attention was paid to interstitial lung diseases, occurring mainly in newborns and children during the first two years of life, such as congenital deficiencies of surfactant proteins, neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy, pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis. The diagnostic program for children's ILD, therapy options are presented in this article.

  10. [Methods and clinical results of interstitial thermoradiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Seegenschmiedt, M H; Sauer, R

    1989-05-01

    Besides percutaneous hyperthermia techniques, some new interstitial procedures have been developed and included into the arsenal of radiotherapists. As compared to percutaneous techniques, considerable benefits are offered by interstitial methods: a more homogeneous distribution of therapeutical temperatures, a better sparing of normal tissue, the possibility to treat deep tumors, and better therapy control and evaluation by extensive "thermal mapping" within the target volume. This study presents the technical principles and the clinical possibilities of the interstitial hyperthermia methods developed hitherto: resistive radiofrequency hyperthermia, radiative microwave hyperthermia, inductive ferromagnetic seed hyperthermia, and conductive hot-water perfusion hyperthermia. Until now, interstitial thermo-radiotherapy was only performed during some phase I/II studies. It was applied for palliative reasons in persisting and recurrent tumors accessible for implantation and situated in superficial to semi-deep locations with no or insufficient response to differently combined treatment modalities (surgery, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy). The preliminary clinical results obtained in almost 300 patients are quite promising: complete remission rates up to 70% have been achieved. Interstitial hyperthermia represents an effective and safe therapy modality, especially when combined with radiotherapy in palliative tumor therapy. At present, several prospective randomized multicentric studies are conducted to investigate its value as adjuvant therapy modality.

  11. [Modern Views on Children's Interstitial Lung Disease].

    PubMed

    Boĭtsova, E V; Beliashova, M A; Ovsiannikov, D Iu

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILD, diffuse lung diseases) are a heterogeneous group of diseases in which a pathological process primarily involved alveoli and perialveolar interstitium, resulting in impaired gas exchange, restrictive changes of lung ventilation function and diffuse interstitial changes detectable by X-ray. Children's interstitial lung diseases is an topical problem ofpediatricpulmonoogy. The article presents current information about classification, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment and prognosis of these rare diseases. The article describes the differences in the structure, pathogenesis, detection of various histological changes in children's ILD compared with adult patients with ILD. Authors cite an instance of registers pediatric patients with ILD. The clinical semiotics of ILD, the possible results of objective research, the frequency of symptoms, the features of medical history, the changes detected on chest X-rays, CT semiotics described in detail. Particular attention was paid to interstitial lung diseases, occurring mainly in newborns and children during the first two years of life, such as congenital deficiencies of surfactant proteins, neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy, pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis. The diagnostic program for children's ILD, therapy options are presented in this article. PMID:26234096

  12. Cloning of the cDNA for the human ATP synthase OSCP subunit (ATP5O) by exon trapping and mapping to chromosome 21q22.1-q22.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haiming; Morris, M.A.; Rossier, C.

    1995-08-10

    Exon trapping was used to clone portions of potential genes from human chromosome 21. One trapped sequence showed striking homology with the bovine and rat ATP synthase OSCP (oligomycin sensitivity conferring protein) subunit. We subsequently cloned the full-length human ATP synthase OSCP cDNA (GDB/HGMW approved name ATP50) from infant brain and muscle libraries and determined its nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence (EMBL/GenBank Accession No. X83218). The encoded polypeptide contains 213 amino acids, with more than 80% identity to bovine and murine ATPase OSCP subunits and over 35% identity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and sweet potato sequences. The human ATP5O gene is located at 21q22.1-q22.2, just proximal to D21S17, in YACs 860G11 and 838C7 of the Chumakov et al. YAC contig. The gene is expressed in all human tissues examined, most strongly in muscle and heart. This ATP5O subunit is a key structural component of the stalk of the mitochondrial respiratory chain F{sub 1}F{sub 0}-ATP synthase and as such may contribute in a gene dosage-dependent manner to the phenotype of Down syndrome (trisomy 21). 39 refs., 5 figs.

  13. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis secondary to soy.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Senait W; Hirsch, Ann; Jaworsky, Christine

    2004-08-01

    A healthy 58-year-old woman developed an asymptomatic papular eruption of the neck, cheek, abdomen, arms, and flexures. There was an 8-year history of the lesions, which had erupted when the patient started a strict vegetarian diet. Lesions lasted 3 to 5 days, cleared without scarring, and were associated with burning and increased tearing of the eyes. The biopsy specimen showed an interstitial granulomatous dermatitis without vascular injury, collagen alteration, or mononuclear atypia. The eruption cleared when the patient omitted soy products from her diet. It subsequently recurred with intake of even minimal amounts of soy. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis is a histologic pattern of inflammation that generates a broad differential diagnosis. No previous reports of interstitial granulomatous dermatitis related to soy products are available in the literature.

  14. [Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis: A new French case].

    PubMed

    Verine, Jérôme; Reade, Richard; Janin, Anne; Droz, Dominique

    2010-06-01

    Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN) is a rare and slowly progressive chronic interstitial nephritis (CIN) (28 cases reported), described for the first time by Mihatsch et al. in 1979. Here, we report on a 50-year-old woman who presented with asymptomatic renal failure and mild proteinuria without hematuria. Renal biopsy showed large tubulo-interstitial fibrosis and massively enlarged tubular epithelial cell nuclei, without viral inclusion. KIN is a rare CIN defined by a karyomegaly of tubular epithelial cell nuclei. Its pathogenesis remains obscure. Nevertheless, an exogenous factor is suspected, ochratoxin A particularly. The familial clustering of patients and the frequency of HLA-A9 and HLA-B35 haplotypes suggest the presence of a possible genetic susceptibility to this disorder.

  15. Di-interstitial defect in silicon revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Londos, C. A.; Antonaras, G.; Chroneos, A.

    2013-11-21

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the defect spectrum of Cz-Si samples following fast neutron irradiation. We mainly focus on the band at 533 cm{sup −1}, which disappears from the spectra at ∼170 °C, exhibiting similar thermal stability with the Si-P6 electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum previously correlated with the di-interstitial defect. The suggested structural model of this defect comprises of two self-interstitial atoms located symmetrically around a lattice site Si atom. The band anneals out following a first-order kinetics with an activation energy of 0.88 ± 0.3 eV. This value does not deviate considerably from previously quoted experimental and theoretical values for the di-interstitial defect. The present results indicate that the 533 cm{sup −1} IR band originates from the same structure as that of the Si-P6 EPR spectrum.

  16. An overview of interstitial brachytherapy and hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, B.B.; Harney, J.

    1989-11-01

    Interstitial thermoradiotherapy, an experimental cancer treatment that combines interstitial radiation implants (brachytherapy) and interstitial hyperthermia, is in the early stages of investigation. In accordance with the procedure used in a current national trial protocol, a 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered after catheters are placed into the tumor area while the patient is under general anesthesia. This is immediately followed by loading of radioactive Iridium-192 seeds into the catheters for a defined period of time. Once the prescribed radiation dose is delivered, the radioactive sources are removed and a second, 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered. Clinical trials with hyperthermia in combination with radiation have increased in recent years. Nurses caring for these patients need to become more knowledgeable about this investigational therapy. This paper provides an overview of the biologic rationale for this therapy, as well as a description of the delivery method and clinical application. Specific related nursing interventions are defined in a nursing protocol.23 references.

  17. Wear evaluation of high interstitial stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Tylczak, J.H.

    2008-07-01

    A new series of high nitrogen-carbon manganese stainless steel alloys are studied for their wear resistance. High nitrogen and carbon concentrations were obtained by melting elemental iron-chromium-manganese (several with minor alloy additions of nickel, silicon, and molybdenum) in a nitrogen atmosphere and adding elemental graphite. The improvement in material properties (hardness and strength) with increasing nitrogen and carbon interstitial concentration was consistent with previously reported improvements in similar material properties alloyed with nitrogen only. Wear tests included: scratch, pin-on-disk, sand-rubber-wheel, impeller, and jet erosion. Additions of interstitial nitrogen and carbon as well as interstitial nitrogen and carbide precipitates were found to greatly improve material properties. In general, with increasing nitrogen and carbon concentrations, strength, hardness, and wear resistance increased.

  18. Identification of ATP-binding regions in the RyR1 Ca²⁺ release channel.

    PubMed

    Popova, Olga B; Baker, Mariah R; Tran, Tina P; Le, Tri; Serysheva, Irina I

    2012-01-01

    ATP is an important modulator of gating in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), also known as a Ca²⁺ release channel in skeletal muscle cells. The activating effect of ATP on this channel is achieved by directly binding to one or more sites on the RyR1 protein. However, the number and location of these sites have yet to be determined. To identify the ATP-binding regions within RyR1 we used 2N₃ATP-2',3'-Biotin-LC-Hydrazone (BioATP-HDZ), a photo-reactive ATP analog to covalently label the channel. We found that BioATP-HDZ binds RyR1 specifically with an IC₅₀ = 0.6±0.2 mM, comparable with the reported EC50 for activation of RyR1 with ATP. Controlled proteolysis of labeled RyR1 followed by sequence analysis revealed three fragments with apparent molecular masses of 95, 45 and 70 kDa that were crosslinked by BioATP-HDZ and identified as RyR1 sequences. Our analysis identified four glycine-rich consensus motifs that can potentially constitute ATP-binding sites and are located within the N-terminal 95-kDa fragment. These putative nucleotide-binding sequences include amino acids 699-704, 701-706, 1081-1084 and 1195-1200, which are conserved among the three RyR isoforms. Located next to the N-terminal disease hotspot region in RyR1, these sequences may communicate the effects of ATP-binding to channel function by tuning conformational motions within the neighboring cytoplasmic regulatory domains. Two other labeled fragments lack ATP-binding consensus motifs and may form non-canonical ATP-binding sites. Based on domain topology in the 3D structure of RyR1 it is also conceivable that the identified ATP-binding regions, despite their wide separation in the primary sequence, may actually constitute the same non-contiguous ATP-binding pocket within the channel tetramer.

  19. Mutations in the Atp1p and Atp3p subunits of yeast ATP synthase differentially affect respiration and fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Francis, Brian R; White, Karen H; Thorsness, Peter E

    2007-04-01

    ATP1-111, a suppressor of the slow-growth phenotype of yme1Delta lacking mitochondrial DNA is due to the substitution of phenylalanine for valine at position 111 of the alpha-subunit of mitochondrial ATP synthase (Atp1p in yeast). The suppressing activity of ATP1-111 requires intact beta (Atp2p) and gamma (Atp3p) subunits of mitochondrial ATP synthase, but not the stator stalk subunits b (Atp4p) and OSCP (Atp5p). ATP1-111 and other similarly suppressing mutations in ATP1 and ATP3 increase the growth rate of wild-type strains lacking mitochondrial DNA. These suppressing mutations decrease the growth rate of yeast containing an intact mitochondrial chromosome on media requiring oxidative phosphorylation, but not when grown on fermentable media. Measurement of chronological aging of yeast in culture reveals that ATP1 and ATP3 suppressor alleles in strains that contain mitochondrial DNA are longer lived than the isogenic wild-type strain. In contrast, the chronological life span of yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA and containing these mutations is shorter than that of the isogenic wild-type strain. Spore viability of strains bearing ATP1-111 is reduced compared to wild type, although ATP1-111 enhances the survival of spores that lacked mitochondrial DNA.

  20. The role of K⁺ conductances in regulating membrane excitability in human gastric corpus smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Ko, Eun-Ju; Ahn, Ki Duck; Kim, Sung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-04-01

    Changes in resting membrane potential (RMP) regulate membrane excitability. K(+) conductance(s) are one of the main factors in regulating RMP. The functional role of K(+) conductances has not been studied the in human gastric corpus smooth muscles (HGCS). To examine the role of K(+) channels in regulation of RMP in HGCS we employed microelectrode recordings, patch-clamp, and molecular approaches. Tetraethylammonium and charybdotoxin did not affect the RMP, suggesting that BK channels are not involved in regulating RMP. Apamin, a selective small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (SK) blocker, did not show a significant effect on the membrane excitability. 4-Aminopyridine, a Kv channel blocker, caused depolarization and increased the duration of slow wave potentials. 4-Aminopyridine also inhibited a delayed rectifying K(+) current in isolated smooth muscle cells. End-product RT-PCR gel detected Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 in human gastric corpus muscles. Glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (KATP) blocker, did not induce depolarization, but nicorandil, a KATP opener, hyperpolarized HGCS, suggesting that KATP are expressed but not basally activated. Kir6.2 transcript, a pore-forming subunit of KATP was expressed in HGCS. A low concentration of Ba(2+), a Kir blocker, induced strong depolarization. Interestingly, Ba(2+)-sensitive currents were minimally expressed in isolated smooth muscle cells under whole-cell patch configuration. KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) transcript was expressed in HGCS. Unique K(+) conductances regulate the RMP in HGCS. Delayed and inwardly rectifying K(+) channels are the main candidates in regulating membrane excitability in HGCS. With the development of cell dispersion techniques of interstitial cells, the cell-specific functional significance will require further analysis.

  1. Interstitial Pneumonitis from Treatment with Gemcitabine

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Brolin B.; Brockman, Megan M.; Byrd, Debbie C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The use of gemcitabine may lead to numerous adverse effects ranging from mild to very severe, such as interstitial pneumonitis. The diagnosis of this complication is based on multiple laboratory findings, radiographic evidence, and high clinical suspicion. Presented is a case report of a patient who met these criteria and had onset consistent with drug-induced interstitial pneumonitis. Case Presentation: A 76-year-old White female was treated with gemcitabine for pancreatic cancer. Two months after the initiation of therapy, she was admitted to the hospital for worsening dyspnea and cough. High clinical suspicion, bilateral interstitial opacities on chest x-ray, worsening pulmonary status, and onset 2 months after initiation of therapy led to the diagnosis of gemcitabine-induced interstitial pneumonitis. Steroid therapy with prednisone was initiated, and the patient’s clinical symptoms and radiographic findings improved. Discussion: Gemcitabine-induced interstitial pneumonitis is well described in the literature. It is a rare but serious complication associated with gemcitabine therapy in which patients present with worsening dyspnea. Most patients only require supportive care and discontinuation of the drug for treatment, but in severe cases supplemental oxygen and steroid therapy must be used before resolution of symptoms. It is important to obtain an accurate medication history to evaluate for other potentially pulmonary toxic medications. Radiographic findings such as bilateral infiltrates should be completely resolved after therapy. Conclusion: Radiographic findings, clinical symptoms, and clinical suspicion can lead to early recognition of interstitial pneumonitis from gemcitabine. Physician awareness of this adverse effect and early recognition are keys to providing prompt treatment in resolving symptoms and decreasing mortality. PMID:25477616

  2. Usual interstitial pneumonia in rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, E J; Elicker, B M; Maldonado, F; Webb, W R; Ryu, J H; Van Uden, J H; Lee, J S; King, T E; Collard, H R

    2010-06-01

    Interstitial lung disease is a common manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis; however, little is known about factors that influence its prognosis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not the usual interstitial pneumonia pattern found on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is of prognostic significance in rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD). Patients with RA-ILD were identified retrospectively (n = 82). The relationship of a definite usual interstitial pneumonia pattern on HRCT to survival was determined and compared to that in a cohort of patients with radiologically diagnosed idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (n = 51). A definite usual interstitial pneumonia pattern was seen in 20 (24%) out of 82 patients with RA-ILD. These patients showed worse survival than those without this pattern (median survival 3.2 versus 6.6 yrs), and a similar survival to those with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. On multivariate analysis, a definite usual interstitial pneumonia pattern on HRCT was associated with worse survival (hazard ratio of 2.3). Analysis of specific HRCT features demonstrated that traction bronchiectasis and honeycomb fibrosis were associated with worse survival (hazard ratio of 2.6 and 2.1, respectively). Female sex (hazard ratio of 0.30) and a higher baseline diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (hazard ratio of 0.96) were associated with better survival. A definite usual interstitial pneumonia pattern on HRCT has important prognostic implications in RA-ILD.

  3. [Interstitial cystitis. A challenge for the clinician].

    PubMed

    Young, Pablo; Finn, Bárbara C; González, Martín; Comercio, Laura P; Quezel, Mariano; Bruetman, Julio E

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis is characterized by over 6 months of chronic pain, pressure and discomfort felt in the lower pelvis or bladder. It is often relieved with voiding, along with daytime frequency and nocturia in the absence of an urinary tract infection. The disorder can be divided clinically into two groups -ulcerative and non-ulcerative- based on cystoscopic findings and response to treatment. Management follows an approach of applying the least invasive therapy that affords sufficient relief of symptoms. We report a case of a patient with interstitial cystitis. The diagnosis was performed by symptoms and lesion in the cystoscopy and excellent response to amitriptyline.

  4. [Interstitial cystitis. A challenge for the clinician].

    PubMed

    Young, Pablo; Finn, Bárbara C; González, Martín; Comercio, Laura P; Quezel, Mariano; Bruetman, Julio E

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis is characterized by over 6 months of chronic pain, pressure and discomfort felt in the lower pelvis or bladder. It is often relieved with voiding, along with daytime frequency and nocturia in the absence of an urinary tract infection. The disorder can be divided clinically into two groups -ulcerative and non-ulcerative- based on cystoscopic findings and response to treatment. Management follows an approach of applying the least invasive therapy that affords sufficient relief of symptoms. We report a case of a patient with interstitial cystitis. The diagnosis was performed by symptoms and lesion in the cystoscopy and excellent response to amitriptyline. PMID:20679058

  5. Interstitial irradiation of brain tumors: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, M.; Gutin, P.H.

    1981-12-01

    As an adjuvant to surgery, radiation therapy has consistently proven to be the most successful form of treatment for primary and secondary malignant brain tumors and possibly for inoperable benign tumors. Because the risk of radiation necrosis of normal brain limits the amount of radiation that can be given by external beam therapy at conventional dose rates, interstitial radiation of brain tumors is a logical alternative treatment approach. We discuss the radiobiological advantages of low dose rate irradiation and intratumoral placement of sources that make interstitial irradiation an attractive treatment for brain tumors and review the history of clinical brachytherapy for intracranial neoplasia.

  6. Metal-Dependent Regulation of ATP7A and ATP7B in Fibroblast Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Malgorzata; Moos, Torben; Ogórek, Mateusz; Jensen, Thomas G.; Møller, Lisbeth B.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of one of the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B leads to the rare X-linked disorder Menkes Disease (MD) or the rare autosomal disorder Wilson disease (WD), respectively. In order to investigate whether the ATP7A and the ATP7B genes may be transcriptionally regulated, we measured the expression level of the two genes at various concentrations of iron, copper, and insulin. Treating fibroblasts from controls or from individuals with MD or WD for 3 and 10 days with iron chelators revealed that iron deficiency led to increased transcript levels of both ATP7A and ATP7B. Copper deficiency obtained by treatment with the copper chelator led to a downregulation of ATP7A in the control fibroblasts, but surprisingly not in the WD fibroblasts. In contrast, the addition of copper led to an increased expression of ATP7A, but a decreased expression of ATP7B. Thus, whereas similar regulation patterns for the two genes were observed in response to iron deficiency, different responses were observed after changes in the access to copper. Mosaic fibroblast cultures from female carriers of MD treated with copper or copper chelator for 6–8 weeks led to clonal selection. Cells that express the normal ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at high copper concentrations, whereas more surprisingly, cells that express the mutant ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at low copper concentrations. Thus, although the transcription of ATP7A is regulated by copper, clonal growth selection in mosaic cell cultures is affected by the level of copper. Female carriers of MD are rarely affected probably due to a skewed inactivation of the X-chromosome bearing the ATP7A mutation. PMID:27587995

  7. Metal-Dependent Regulation of ATP7A and ATP7B in Fibroblast Cultures.

    PubMed

    Lenartowicz, Malgorzata; Moos, Torben; Ogórek, Mateusz; Jensen, Thomas G; Møller, Lisbeth B

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of one of the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B leads to the rare X-linked disorder Menkes Disease (MD) or the rare autosomal disorder Wilson disease (WD), respectively. In order to investigate whether the ATP7A and the ATP7B genes may be transcriptionally regulated, we measured the expression level of the two genes at various concentrations of iron, copper, and insulin. Treating fibroblasts from controls or from individuals with MD or WD for 3 and 10 days with iron chelators revealed that iron deficiency led to increased transcript levels of both ATP7A and ATP7B. Copper deficiency obtained by treatment with the copper chelator led to a downregulation of ATP7A in the control fibroblasts, but surprisingly not in the WD fibroblasts. In contrast, the addition of copper led to an increased expression of ATP7A, but a decreased expression of ATP7B. Thus, whereas similar regulation patterns for the two genes were observed in response to iron deficiency, different responses were observed after changes in the access to copper. Mosaic fibroblast cultures from female carriers of MD treated with copper or copper chelator for 6-8 weeks led to clonal selection. Cells that express the normal ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at high copper concentrations, whereas more surprisingly, cells that express the mutant ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at low copper concentrations. Thus, although the transcription of ATP7A is regulated by copper, clonal growth selection in mosaic cell cultures is affected by the level of copper. Female carriers of MD are rarely affected probably due to a skewed inactivation of the X-chromosome bearing the ATP7A mutation. PMID:27587995

  8. Computer-assisted interstitial laser coagulation for BPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Gideon; Barrett, Adrian R. W.; Ng, Wan S.; Lim, Liam G.; Cheng, Wai S.

    2001-06-01

    Interstitial laser thermotherapy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that utilizes laser to coagulate and treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. This study explores the use of a computer-assisted interstitial laser coagulation system to aid surgeons in performing this procedure.

  9. [Systemic karyomegaly with chronic interstitial nephritis. Discussion of the disease picture based on an autopsy case].

    PubMed

    Moch, H; Spöndlin, M; Schmassmann, A; Mihatsch, M J

    1994-02-01

    Systemic karyomegaly associated with interstitial nephritis was first described in 1978 by Mihatsch. Seven cases have been reported to date. We give an account of an autopsy case of systemic karyomegaly in a 30-year-old Italian man. Bizarre enlargement of nuclei was found in renal tubular epithelial cells, Schwann cells and in smooth muscle cells of vessels and bowel and, less obviously, in endothelial and adventitial cells of vessels, in alveolar epithelial cells and in astrocytes of the brain. These findings were associated with chronic interstitial nephritis, nonspecific hepatopathy, adenocarcinoma of the rectum and multiple sclerosis. The clinical course was marked by chronic renal failure, chronic haemodialysis and renal transplantation. The patient died 8 years after diagnosis in septic-toxic shock. The aetiology and pathogenesis of the disease are discussed.

  10. The Rotary Mechanism of the ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Robert K.; Scanlon, Joanne A. Baylis; Al-Shawi, Marwan K.

    2008-01-01

    The FOF1 ATP synthase is a large complex of at least 22 subunits, more than half of which are in the membranous FO sector. This nearly ubiquitous transporter is responsible for the majority of ATP synthesis in oxidative and photo-phosphorylation, and its overall structure and mechanism have remained conserved throughout evolution. Most examples utilize the proton motive force to drive ATP synthesis except for a few bacteria, which use a sodium motive force. A remarkable feature of the complex is the rotary movement of an assembly of subunits that plays essential roles in both transport and catalytic mechanisms. This review addresses the role of rotation in catalysis of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and the transport of protons or sodium. PMID:18515057

  11. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  12. Binding of ATP to the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Moudgil, V K; Toft, D O

    1975-01-01

    The possible interaction of progesterone--receptor complexes with nucleotides was tested by affinity chromatography. The cytosol progesterone receptor from hen oviduct was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation before use. When progesterone was bound to the receptor, the resulting complex could be selectively adsorbed onto columns of ATP-Sepharose. This interaction was reversible and of an ionic nature since it could be disrupted by high-salt conditions. A competitive binding assay was used to test the specificity of receptor binding to several other nucleotides, including ADP, AMP, and cAMP. A clear specificity for binding ATP was evident from these studies. When ATP was added to receptor preparations, the nucleotide did not affect the sedimentation properties or hormone binding characteristics of the receptor. Although the function of ATP remains unknown, these studies indicate a role of this nucleotide in some aspect of hormone receptor activity. PMID:165493

  13. Customized ATP towpreg. [Automated Tow Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandusky, Donald A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Baucom, Robert M.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1992-01-01

    Automated tow placement (ATP) utilizes robotic technology to lay down adjacent polymer-matrix-impregnated carbon fiber tows on a tool surface. Consolidation and cure during ATP requires that void elimination and polymer matrix adhesion be accomplished in the short period of heating and pressure rolling that follows towpreg ribbon placement from the robot head to the tool. This study examined the key towpreg ribbon properties and dimensions which play a significant role in ATP. Analysis of the heat transfer process window indicates that adequate heating can be achieved at lay down rates as high as 1 m/sec. While heat transfer did not appear to be the limiting factor, resin flow and fiber movement into tow lap gaps could be. Accordingly, consideration was given to towpreg ribbon having uniform yet non-rectangular cross sections. Dimensional integrity of the towpreg ribbon combined with customized ribbon architecture offer great promise for processing advances in ATP of high performance composites.

  14. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia. PMID:27123874

  15. Edemagenic gain and interstitial fluid volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Quick, C M; Stewart, R H; Drake, R E; Cox, C S; Laine, G A

    2008-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, interstitial fluid volume is tightly regulated by balancing microvascular filtration and lymphatic return to the central venous circulation. Even though microvascular filtration and lymphatic return are governed by conservation of mass, their interaction can result in exceedingly complex behavior. Without making simplifying assumptions, investigators must solve the fluid balance equations numerically, which limits the generality of the results. We thus made critical simplifying assumptions to develop a simple solution to the standard fluid balance equations that is expressed as an algebraic formula. Using a classical approach to describe systems with negative feedback, we formulated our solution as a "gain" relating the change in interstitial fluid volume to a change in effective microvascular driving pressure. The resulting "edemagenic gain" is a function of microvascular filtration coefficient (K(f)), effective lymphatic resistance (R(L)), and interstitial compliance (C). This formulation suggests two types of gain: "multivariate" dependent on C, R(L), and K(f), and "compliance-dominated" approximately equal to C. The latter forms a basis of a novel method to estimate C without measuring interstitial fluid pressure. Data from ovine experiments illustrate how edemagenic gain is altered with pulmonary edema induced by venous hypertension, histamine, and endotoxin. Reformulation of the classical equations governing fluid balance in terms of edemagenic gain thus yields new insight into the factors affecting an organ's susceptibility to edema.

  16. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia.

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Joshua J; Brown, Kevin K

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting 1% of the US population. Patients can have extra-articular manifestations of their disease and the lungs are commonly involved. RA can affect any compartment of the respiratory system and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the lung is abnormal in over half of these patients. Interstitial lung disease is a dreaded complication of RA. It is more prevalent in smokers, males, and those with high antibody titers. The pathogenesis is unknown but data suggest an environmental insult in the setting of a genetic predisposition. Smoking may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease through citrullination of protein in the lung leading to the development of autoimmunity. Patients usually present in middle age with cough and dyspnea. Pulmonary function testing most commonly shows reduced diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide and HRCT reveals a combination of reticulation and ground glass abnormalities. The most common pattern on HRCT and histopathology is usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia seen less frequently. There are no large-scale well-controlled treatment trials. In severe or progressive cases, treatment usually consists of corticosteroids with or without a cytotoxic agent for 6 months or longer. RA interstitial lung disease is progressive; over half of patients show radiographic progression within 2 years. Patients with a UIP pattern on biopsy have a survival similar to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  18. Edemagenic gain and interstitial fluid volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Quick, C M; Stewart, R H; Drake, R E; Cox, C S; Laine, G A

    2008-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, interstitial fluid volume is tightly regulated by balancing microvascular filtration and lymphatic return to the central venous circulation. Even though microvascular filtration and lymphatic return are governed by conservation of mass, their interaction can result in exceedingly complex behavior. Without making simplifying assumptions, investigators must solve the fluid balance equations numerically, which limits the generality of the results. We thus made critical simplifying assumptions to develop a simple solution to the standard fluid balance equations that is expressed as an algebraic formula. Using a classical approach to describe systems with negative feedback, we formulated our solution as a "gain" relating the change in interstitial fluid volume to a change in effective microvascular driving pressure. The resulting "edemagenic gain" is a function of microvascular filtration coefficient (K(f)), effective lymphatic resistance (R(L)), and interstitial compliance (C). This formulation suggests two types of gain: "multivariate" dependent on C, R(L), and K(f), and "compliance-dominated" approximately equal to C. The latter forms a basis of a novel method to estimate C without measuring interstitial fluid pressure. Data from ovine experiments illustrate how edemagenic gain is altered with pulmonary edema induced by venous hypertension, histamine, and endotoxin. Reformulation of the classical equations governing fluid balance in terms of edemagenic gain thus yields new insight into the factors affecting an organ's susceptibility to edema. PMID:18056984

  19. Reversible Fluindione-Induced Chronic Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Crepin, Thomas; Bamoulid, Jamal; Courivaud, Cécile; Dahmani, Omar; Felix, Sophie; Ducloux, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Fluindione is well known to induce acute drug-induced interstitial nephritis (IN). Most cases occurred soon after the onset of treatment. We report a unique case of severe subacute fluindione-induced IN diagnosed 2 years after the treatment was begun. Renal function dramatically improved after fluindione withdrawal and steroid therapy. PMID:27127666

  20. Primitive ATP-activated P2X receptors: discovery, function and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Samuel J.

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine 5-triphosphate (ATP) is omnipresent in biology. It is therefore no surprise that organisms have evolved multifaceted roles for ATP, exploiting its abundance and restriction of passive diffusion across biological membranes. A striking role is the emergence of ATP as a bona fide transmitter molecule, whereby the movement of ATP across membranes serves as a chemical message through a direct ligand-receptor interaction. P2X receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast responses to the transmitter ATP in mammalian cells including central and sensory neurons, vascular smooth muscle, endothelium, and leukocytes. Molecular cloning of P2X receptors and our understanding of structure-function relationships has provided sequence information with which to query an exponentially expanding wealth of genome sequence information including protist, early animal and human pathogen genomes. P2X receptors have now been cloned and characterized from a number of simple organisms. Such work has led to surprising new cellular roles for the P2X receptors family and an unusual phylogeny, with organisms such as Drosophila and C. elegans notably lacking P2X receptors despite retaining ionotropic receptors for other common transmitters that are present in mammals. This review will summarize current work on the evolutionary biology of P2X receptors and ATP as a signaling molecule, discuss what can be drawn from such studies when considering the action of ATP in higher animals and plants, and outline how simple organisms may be exploited experimentally to inform P2X receptor function in a wider context. PMID:24367292

  1. LOCATION OF MYOFIBER DAMAGE IN SKELETAL MUSCLE AFTER LENGTHENING CONTRACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    LOVERING, RICHARD M.; MCMILLAN, ALAN B.; GULLAPALLI, RAO P.

    2012-01-01

    High-force lengthening contractions are associated with muscle damage and pain, and the muscle–tendon junction is commonly cited as the primary area where myofiber damage occurs. We induced injury in the rat tibialis anterior muscle and acquired magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images postinjury. We also assayed membrane damage and quantified the number of centrally nucleated myofibers throughout the injured muscles. Results suggest that myofiber injury occurs primarily in the middle portion of the muscle, with interstitial edema in the middle and distal portions. PMID:19760787

  2. Non-ATP competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, L; Roberti, M; Bottegoni, G

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases represent an attractive target in oncology drug discovery. Most of kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive and are called type I inhibitors. The ATP-binding pocket is highly conserved among members of the kinase family and it is difficult to find selective agents. Moreover, the ATP-competitive inhibitors must compete with high intracellular ATP levels leading to a discrepancy between IC50s measured by biochemical versus cellular assays. The non-ATP competitive inhibitors, called type II and type III inhibitors, offer the possibility to overcome these problems. These inhibitors act by inducing a conformational shift in the target enzyme such that the kinase is no longer able to function. In the DFG-out form, the phenylalanine side chain moves to a new position. This movement creates a hydrophobic pocket available for occupation by the inhibitor. Some common features are present in these inhibitors. They contain a heterocyclic system that forms one or two hydrogen bonds with the kinase hinge residue. They also contain a hydrophobic moiety that occupies the pocket formed by the shift of phenylalanine from the DFG motif. Moreover, all the inhibitors bear a hydrogen bond donor-acceptor pair, usually urea or amide, that links the hinge-binding portion to the hydrophobic moiety and interacts with the allosteric site. Examples of non ATP-competitive inhibitors are available for various kinases. In this review small molecules capable of inducing the DFG-out conformation are reported, especially focusing on structural feature, SAR and biological properties.

  3. Tau binds ATP and induces its aggregation.

    PubMed

    Farid, Mina; Corbo, Christopher P; Alonso, Alejandra Del C

    2014-02-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein mainly found in neurons. The protein is associated with process of microtubule assembly, which plays an important role in intracellular transport and cell structure of the neuron. Tauopathies are a group of neurodegenerative diseases specifically associated with tau abnormalities. While a well-defined mechanism remains unknown, most facts point to tau as a prominent culprit in neurodegeneration. In most cases of Tauopathies, aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau have been found. Two proposals are present when discussing tau toxicity, one being the aggregation of tau proteins and the other points toward a conformational change within the protein. Previous work we carried out showed tau hyperphosphorylation promotes tau to behave abnormally resulting in microtubule assembly disruption as well as a breakdown in tau self-assembly. We found that tau's N-terminal region has a putative site for ATP/GTP binding. In this paper we demonstrate that tau is able to bind ATP and not GTP, that this binding induces tau self-assembly into filaments. At 1 mM ATP the filaments are 4-7 nm in width, whereas at 10 mM ATP the filaments appeared to establish lateral interaction, bundling and twisting, forming filaments that resembled the Paired Helical Filaments (PHF) isolated from Alzheimer disease brain. ATP-induced self-assembly is not energy dependent because the nonhydrolysable analogue of the ATP induces the same assembly. PMID:24258797

  4. Hyaluronan in Tubular and Interstitial Nephrocalcinosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkoelen, Carl F.

    2007-04-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is the major glycosaminoglycan (GAG) component of the renal medullary interstitium. HA is extremely large (up to 104 kDa) and composed of thousands repeating disaccharides of glucuronic acid (GlcUA) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). HA is synthesized by hyaluronan synthases (HASs) and degraded by hyaluronidases (Hyals). The production of HA by renomedullary interstitial cells is mediated by local osmolality. When excess water needs to be excreted, increased interstitial HA seems to antagonize water reabsorption, while the opposite occurs during water conservation. Hence, papillary interstitial HA is low and Hyal high during anti-diuresis, whereas during diuresis HA is high and Hyal low. The polyanion HA plays a role in the reabsorption of hypotonic fluid by immobilizing cations (Na+) via the carboxylate (COO-) groups of GlcUA. The binding of Ca2+ to anionic HA is probably also responsible for the fact that the papilla does not become a stone despite the extremely high interstitial phosphate and oxalate. HA is also an excellent crystal binding molecule. The expression of HA at the luminal surface of renal tubular cells leads to tubular nephrocalcinosis (tubular NC). Calcium staining methods (Von Kossa, Yasue) demonstrated that crystallization inhibitors cannot avoid the occasional precipitation of calcium phosphate in the papillary interstitium (interstitial NC). These crystals are probably immediately immobilized by the gel-like HA matrix. After ulcerating through the pelvic wall the calcified matrix becomes a Randall's plaque. The attachment of calcium oxalate crystals from the primary urine to plaque may ultimately lead to the development of clinical stones in the renal calyces (nephrolithiasis).

  5. Smoking-related idiopathic interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Kevin R; Fell, Charlene; Aubry, Marie-Christine; Brown, Kevin; Colby, Thomas; Costabel, Ulrich; Franks, Teri J; Gross, Barry H; Hansell, David M; Kazerooni, Ella; Kim, Dong Soon; King, Talmadge E; Kitachi, Masanori; Lynch, David; Myers, Jeff; Nagai, Sonoko; Nicholson, Andrew G; Poletti, Venerino; Raghu, Ganesh; Selman, Moises; Toews, Galen; Travis, William; Wells, Athol U; Vassallo, Robert; Martinez, Fernando J

    2014-09-01

    Cigarette smoking is a key factor in the development of numerous pulmonary diseases. An international group of clinicians, radiologists and pathologists evaluated patients with previously identified idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) to determine unique features of cigarette smoking. Phase 1 (derivation group) identified smoking-related features in patients with a history of smoking (n=41). Phase 2 (validation group) determined if these features correctly predicted the smoking status of IIP patients (n=100) to participants blinded to smoking history. Finally, the investigators sought to determine if a new smoking-related interstitial lung disease phenotype could be defined. Phase 1 suggested that preserved forced vital capacity with disproportionately reduced diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide, and various radiographic and histopathological findings were smoking-related features. In phase 2, the kappa coefficient among clinicians was 0.16 (95% CI 0.11-0.21), among the pathologists 0.36 (95% CI 0.32-0.40) and among the radiologists 0.43 (95% CI 0.35-0.52) for smoking-related features. Eight of the 100 cases were felt to represent a potential smoking-related interstitial lung disease. Smoking-related features of interstitial lung disease were identified in a minority of smokers and were not specific for smoking. This study is limited by its retrospective design, the potential for recall bias in smoking history and lack of information on second-hand smoke exposure. Further research is needed to understand the relationship between smoking and interstitial lung disease. PMID:25063244

  6. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  7. Genetic Analysis of Sporadic and Familial Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Although much progress has been made in understanding the biology and clinical course of interstitial pneumonia, the etiology of this disease remains elusive. Epidemiologic studies have consistently identified cigarette smoke as an important exposure; however, most smokers do not develop interstitial pneumonia and many individuals with interstitial pneumonia do not smoke cigarettes. Moreover, interstitial pneumonias have been reported to cluster in families. Thus, a more thorough understanding of the genetic etiology of interstitial pneumonia may prove critically important in defining the biology and clinical course of this complex human disease. PMID:18403331

  8. ATP Synthesis in the Extremely Halophilic Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The proton-translocating ATPases are multimeric enzymes that carry out a multitude of essential functions. Their origin and evolution represent a seminal event in the early evolution of life. Amino acid sequences of the two largest subunits from archaeal ATPases (A-ATPases), vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases), and FOF1-ATP syntheses (FATPases) suggest these ATPases evolved from an ancestral vacuolar-like ATP syntheses. A necessary consequence of this notion is that the A-ATPases are ATP syntheses. With the possible exception of the A-ATPase from Halobacterium salinarium. no A-ATPase has been demonstrated to synthesize ATP. The evidence for this case is dubious since ATP synthesis occurs only when conditions are distinctively unphysiological. We demonstrated that ATP synthesis in H.saccharovorum is inconsistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. In order to determine if this phenomenon was unique to H. saccharovorum, ATP synthesis was examined in various extremely halophilic bacteria with the goal of ascertaining if it resembled what occurred in a. saccharovorum, or was consistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. A-, V-, and F-type ATPases respond singularly to certain inhibitors. Therefore, the effect of these inhibitors on ATP synthesis in several extreme halophiles was determined. Inhibitors that either blocked or collapsed proton-gradients inhibited the steady state synthesis of ATP thus verifying that synthesis took place at the expense of a proton gradient. Azide, an inhibitor of F-ATPases inhibited ATP synthesis. Since the arginine-dependent synthesis of ATP, which occurs by way of substrate-level phosphorylation, was unaffected by azide, it was unlikely that azide acted as an "uncoupler." N -ethylmaleimide and nitrate, which inhibit V- and A-ATPases, either did not inhibit ATP synthesis or resulted in higher steady-state levels of ATP. These results suggest there are two types of proton-motive ATPases in the extreme halophiles (and presumably in other

  9. Artificial muscle: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Marcus C

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical devices are sought to support insufficient or paralysed striated muscles including the failing heart. Nickel-titanium alloys (nitinol) present the following two properties: (i) super-elasticity, and (ii) the potential to assume different crystal structures depending on temperature and/or stress. Starting from the martensite state nitinol is able to resume the austenite form (state of low potential energy and high entropy) even against an external resistance. This one-way shape change is deployed in self-expanding vascular stents. Heating induces the force generating transformation from martensite to the austenite state while cooling induces relaxation back to the martensite state. This two-way shape change oscillating between the two states may be used in cyclically contracting support devices of silicon-coated nitinol wires. Such a contractile device sutured to the right atrium has been tested in vitro in a bench model and in vivo in sheep. The contraction properties of natural muscles, specifically of the myocardium, and the tight correlation with ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria is briefly outlined. Force development by the nitinol device cannot be smoothly regulated as in natural muscle. Its mechanical impact is forced onto the natural muscle regardless of the actual condition with regard to metabolism and Ca2+-homeostasis. The development of artificial muscle on the basis of nitinol wires is still in its infancy. The nitinol artificial muscle will have to prove its viability in the various clinical settings. PMID:22183715

  10. Artificial muscle: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Marcus C

    2011-12-19

    Mechanical devices are sought to support insufficient or paralysed striated muscles including the failing heart. Nickel-titanium alloys (nitinol) present the following two properties: (i) super-elasticity, and (ii) the potential to assume different crystal structures depending on temperature and/or stress. Starting from the martensite state nitinol is able to resume the austenite form (state of low potential energy and high entropy) even against an external resistance. This one-way shape change is deployed in self-expanding vascular stents. Heating induces the force generating transformation from martensite to the austenite state while cooling induces relaxation back to the martensite state. This two-way shape change oscillating between the two states may be used in cyclically contracting support devices of silicon-coated nitinol wires. Such a contractile device sutured to the right atrium has been tested in vitro in a bench model and in vivo in sheep. The contraction properties of natural muscles, specifically of the myocardium, and the tight correlation with ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria is briefly outlined. Force development by the nitinol device cannot be smoothly regulated as in natural muscle. Its mechanical impact is forced onto the natural muscle regardless of the actual condition with regard to metabolism and Ca2+-homeostasis. The development of artificial muscle on the basis of nitinol wires is still in its infancy. The nitinol artificial muscle will have to prove its viability in the various clinical settings.

  11. Facts and controversies in the classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Poletti, V; Kitaichi, M

    2000-10-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are defined from the pathological point of view as non granulomatous intralobular inflammatory and fibrotic processes involving the alveolar walls. More than thirty years ago Liebow and Carrington pioneered the notion that morphological characteristics could be used with benefit in separating the different entities found in this group, which present with typical, but not pathognomonic clinical features. In the mid-1980s some entities, including giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP) and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP), were removed from this group and considered as peculiar forms. In the early 90s the concept of cellular or nonspecific interstitial pneumonia was reconsidered, leading to an in depth revision of various types of interstitial pneumonia of unknown etiology. The histological pattern observed in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is now referred to as usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Other entities that have been revised during the last ten years are desquamative interstitial pneumonia/alveolar macrophage pneumonia (DIP/AMP), respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP) and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). This paper provides a detailed description of pulmonary disorders which have been included in the new classification systems of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. In the second part of the paper we will discuss several doubts and controversies that this new classification schemes leave unresolved.

  12. Dynamic imaging of free cytosolic ATP concentration during fuel sensing by rat hypothalamic neurones: evidence for ATP-independent control of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Ainscow, Edward K; Mirshamsi, Shirin; Tang, Teresa; Ashford, Michael L J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-10-15

    Glucose-responsive (GR) neurons from hypothalamic nuclei are implicated in the regulation of feeding and satiety. To determine the role of intracellular ATP in the closure of ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels in these cells and associated glia, the cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP](c)) was monitored in vivo using adenoviral-driven expression of recombinant targeted luciferases and bioluminescence imaging. Arguing against a role for ATP in the closure of K(ATP) channels in GR neurons, glucose (3 or 15 mM) caused no detectable increase in [ATP](c), monitored with cytosolic luciferase, and only a small decrease in the concentration of ATP immediately beneath the plasma membrane, monitored with a SNAP25-luciferase fusion protein. In contrast to hypothalamic neurons, hypothalamic glia responded to glucose (3 and 15 mM) with a significant increase in [ATP](c). Both neurons and glia from the cerebellum, a glucose-unresponsive region of the brain, responded robustly to 3 or 15 mM glucose with increases in [ATP](c). Further implicating an ATP-independent mechanism of K(ATP) channel closure in hypothalamic neurons, removal of extracellular glucose (10 mM) suppressed the electrical activity of GR neurons in the presence of a fixed, high concentration (3 mM) of intracellular ATP. Neurons from both brain regions responded to 5 mM lactate (but not pyruvate) with an oligomycin-sensitive increase in [ATP](c). High levels of the plasma membrane lactate-monocarboxylate transporter, MCT1, were found in both cell types, and exogenous lactate efficiently closed K(ATP) channels in GR neurons. These data suggest that (1) ATP-independent intracellular signalling mechanisms lead to the stimulation of hypothalamic neurons by glucose, and (2) these effects may be potentiated in vivo by the release of lactate from neighbouring glial cells.

  13. Caldesmon inhibits the rotation of smooth actin subdomain-1 and alters its mobility during the ATP hydrolysis cycle.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, Natalia; Avrova, Stanislava V; Borovikov, Yurii S

    2009-12-01

    Smooth muscle thin filaments have been reconstituted in muscle ghost fibers by incorporation of smooth muscle actin, tropomyosin and caldesmon. For the first time, rotation of subdomain-1 and changes of its mobility in IAEDANS-labeled actin during the ATP hydrolysis cycle simulated using nucleotides and non-hydrolysable ATP analogs have been demonstrated directly. Binding of caldesmon altered the mobility and inhibited the rotation of actin subdomain-1 during the transition from AM * *.ADP.Pi to AM state, resulting in inhibition of both strong and weak-binding intermediate states. These new results imply that regulation of actomyosin interaction by caldesmon during the ATPase cycle is fulfilled via the inhibition of actin subdomain-1 rotation toward the periphery of the thin filament, which decreases the area of the specific binding between actin and myosin molecules and is likely to underlie at least in part the mechanism of caldesmon-induced contractility suppression.

  14. Mechanisms of exertional fatigue in muscle glycogenoses.

    PubMed

    Vissing, John; Haller, Ronald G

    2012-12-01

    Exertional fatigue early in exercise is a clinical hallmark of muscle glycogenoses, which is often coupled with painful muscle contractures and episodes of myoglobinuria. A fundamental biochemical problem in these conditions is the impaired generation of ATP to fuel muscle contractions, which relates directly to the metabolic defect, but also to substrate-limited energy deficiency, as exemplified by the "second wind" phenomenon in McArdle disease. A number of secondary events may also play a role in inducing premature fatigue in glycogenoses, including (1) absent or blunted muscle acidosis, which may be important for maintaining muscle membrane excitability by decreasing chloride permeability, (2) loss of the osmotic effect related to lactate accumulation, which may account for absence of the normal increase in water content of exercised muscle, and thus promote higher than normal concentrations of extracellular potassium in exercising muscle and (3) exaggerated accumulation of ADP during exercise that may inhibit sodium-potassium and calcium-ATPases. Disorders of muscle glycogenolysis and glycolysis reveal the crucial role of these metabolic processes for supplying both anaerobic and aerobic energy for muscle contraction; and the pathological fatigue that occurs when glycogenolysis and/or glycolysis is blocked imply an important role for theses metabolic pathways in normal muscle fatigue. PMID:23182633

  15. Blockade of Extracellular ATP Effect by Oxidized ATP Effectively Mitigated Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis (EAU)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ronglan; Liang, Dongchun; Sun, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Various pathological conditions are accompanied by ATP release from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. Extracellular ATP (eATP) functions as a signaling molecule by activating purinergic P2 purine receptors. The key P2 receptor involved in inflammation was identified as P2X7R. Recent studies have shown that P2X7R signaling is required to trigger the Th1/Th17 immune response, and oxidized ATP (oxATP) effectively blocks P2X7R activation. In this study we investigated the effect of oxATP on mouse experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Our results demonstrated that induced EAU in B6 mice was almost completely abolished by the administration of small doses of oxATP, and the Th17 response, but not the Th1 response, was significantly weakened in the treated mice. Mechanistic studies showed that the therapeutic effects involve the functional change of a number of immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and regulatory T cells. OxATP not only directly inhibits the T cell response; it also suppresses T cell activation by altering the function of DCs and Foxp3+ T cell. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of P2X7R activation effectively exempts excessive autoimmune inflammation, which may indicate a possible therapeutic use in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27196432

  16. Treatment of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome as a neuropathic pain condition

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Lakshmi; Pattanik, Manorama; Titarmore, Vaishali

    2014-01-01

    A lady of 52 years with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis (PBS/IC) presented with chronic pelvic pain, irritative voiding with sphincter dominance on urodynamics. 3 yrs of oral analgesics, antispasmodics and intravesical therapy was ineffective. We surmised her pain, and irritative voiding to be secondary to constant straining against a dysfunctional pelvic floor. We treated PBS/IC as a neuropathic phenomenon with a combination of neuromodulator medications and continuous caudal epidural analgesia to reduce the pain induced peripheral and central sensitisation. Botulinum toxin type A injection into pelvic floor muscles appeared to address their dysfuction. Clinical and urodynamics response was encouraging. PMID:25097327

  17. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-07-12

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission.

  18. Magnetic field affects enzymatic ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A

    2008-10-01

    The rate of ATP synthesis by creatine kinase extracted from V. xanthia venom was shown to depend on the magnetic field. The yield of ATP produced by enzymes with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions in catalytic sites increases by 7-8% at 55 mT and then decreases at 80 mT. For enzyme with 25Mg2+ ion in a catalytic site, the ATP yield increases by 50% and 70% in the fields 55 and 80 mT, respectively. In the Earth field the rate of ATP synthesis by enzyme, in which Mg2+ ion has magnetic nucleus 25Mg, is 2.5 times higher than that by enzymes, in which Mg2+ ion has nonmagnetic, spinless nuclei 24Mg or 26Mg. Both magnetic field effect and magnetic isotope effect demonstrate that the ATP synthesis is an ion-radical process, affected by Zeeman interaction and hyperfine coupling in the intermediate ion-radical pair. PMID:18774801

  19. Interstitial pregnancy management and subsequent pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Sagiv, Ron; Debby, Abraham; Keidar, Ran; Kerner, Ram; Golan, Abraham

    2013-11-01

    We report on management and subsequent fertility outcome of interstitial pregnancy in a retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-3) at a university affiliated teaching hospital. Of 706 women with extrauterine pregnancy, 14 consecutive women with interstitial pregnancy were treated by methotrexate, laparotomy or laparoscopy between 1997 and 2007. The first four women, with significant hemoperitoneum, were treated by laparotomy. Of the next 10 women, four were selected for medical treatment with methotrexate. Only one case was treated successfully. The other six women had laparoscopic treatment. Of nine laparoscopies, one was converted to laparotomy due to excessive blood loss during the procedure. Of nine women desiring a child, three were infertile, whereas six conceived with an intrauterine pregnancy. A change from diagnosis later in pregnancy and laparotomy to more conservative treatment, mainly by laparoscopy, suggests a possibly better subsequent pregnancy rate.

  20. Interstitial laser thermotherapy in neurosurgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Menovsky, T; Beek, J F; van Gemert, M J; Roux, F X; Bown, S G

    1996-01-01

    One of the most recent laser treatment modalities in neurosurgery is interstitial laser thermotherapy (ILTT). In this review, experimental and clinical studies concerning intracranial ILTT are discussed. Two methods for intra-operative control of the laser induced lesions are described; i.e., computer-controlled power delivery, using a thermocouple that is positioned interstitially at the periphery of the tumour to maintain the desired temperature at that point, and MRI, to visualise the extent of the thermal lesions induced by ILTT. The results show that ILTT using a Nd: YAG laser is easy and relatively effective in the treatment of small deep-seated brain tumours with minimal risk and complications. This review is concluded with suggestions for further improvement of this treatment modality.

  1. Noninvasive NIR monitoring of interstitial ethanol concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridder, Trent D.; Ver Steeg, Benjamin J.; Vanslyke, Stephen J.; Way, Jeff F.

    2009-02-01

    A practical limitation encountered in alcohol research is the relatively small number of body compartments (e.g. blood, liver, tissue) that can be directly interrogated. In this work, an NIR spectroscopic device was investigated that provided a direct measurement of alcohol concentration in skin tissue (interstitial fluid). This work is intended to characterize the relationship of forearm interstitial fluid alcohol concentration relative to capillary blood using a first order kinetic model. Concurrent blood and tissue alcohol concentrations were collected on 101 test subjects while consuming alcohol. Estimates of the first order kinetic rate constant were calculated for each of the subjects. It is hoped that this characterization will lead to further improvements in optical based alcohol monitors for impairment detection.

  2. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  3. Interstitial devices for treating deep seated tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril; Cathignol, Dominique; Prat, Frédéric; Melodelima, David; Salomir, Rares; Theillère, Yves; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2006-05-01

    Techniques using intracavitary or interstitial applicators have been proposed because extracorporeal HIFU techniques are not always suitable for deep-seated tumors. Bones or gaseous pockets may indeed be located in the intervening tissue. The objective is to bring the ultrasound source as close as possible to the target through natural routes in order to minimize the effects of attenuation and phase aberration along the ultrasound pathway. Under these circumstances, it becomes possible to use higher frequency, thus increasing the ultrasonic absorption coefficient and resulting in more efficient heating of the treatment region. In contrast to extra-corporeal applicators, the design of interstitial probes imposes additional constraints relative to size and ergonomy. The goal of this paper is to present the range of miniature interstitial applicators we developed at INSERM for various applications. The sources are rotating plane water-cooled transducers that operate at a frequency between 3 and 10 MHz depending on the desired therapeutic depth. The choice of a plane transducer rather than divergent sources permits to extend the therapeutic depth and to enhance the angular selectivity of the treatment Rotating single element flat transducer can also be replaced by cylindrical arrays for rotating electronically a reconstructed plane wave. When extended zone of coagulation are required, original therapeutic modalities combining cavitation and thermal effects are used. These methods consist in favoring in depth heating by increasing the acoustic attenuation away from the transducer with the presence of bubbles. When associated to modern imaging modalities, these minimally invasive therapeutic devices offer very promising options for cancer treatment. For examples, two versions of an image-guided esophageal applicator are designed: one uses a retractable ultrasound mini probe for the positioning of the applicator, while the other is MRI compatible and offers on line

  4. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome.

    PubMed

    Panzera, Alis Kolter

    2007-02-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic, painful bladder syndrome primarily found in women. Although the direct cause(s) of IC are unknown, several theories exist. Common symptoms include urinary urgency, frequency, and pain. Treatment options include behavioral therapies, use of pharmacologic agents, and surgery. Patients benefit from prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatments. Important clinical features of IC in women including the pathology, common symptoms, and recommended evaluation and management strategies are reviewed.

  5. Interstitial loop transformations in FeCr

    SciTech Connect

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Osetsky, Yuri N.; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-03-27

    Here, we improve the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) algorithm by integrating the Activation Relaxation Technique nouveau (ARTn), a powerful open-ended saddle-point search method, into the algorithm. We use it to investigate the reaction of 37-interstitial 1/2[1 1 1] and 1/2[View the MathML source] loops in FeCr at 10 at.% Cr. They transform into 1/2[1 1 1], 1/2[View the MathML source], [1 0 0] and [0 1 0] 74-interstitial clusters with an overall barrier of 0.85 eV. We find that Cr decoration locally inhibits the rotation of crowdions, which dictates the final loop orientation. Moreover, the final loop orientation depends on the details of the Cr decoration. Generally, a region of a given orientation is favored if Cr near its interface with a region of another orientation is able to inhibit reorientation at this interface more than the Cr present at the other interfaces. Also, we find that substitutional Cr atoms can diffuse from energetically unfavorable to energetically favorable sites within the interlocked 37-interstitial loops conformation with barriers of less than 0.35 eV.

  6. Interstitial loop transformations in FeCr

    DOE PAGES

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Osetsky, Yuri N.; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-03-27

    Here, we improve the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) algorithm by integrating the Activation Relaxation Technique nouveau (ARTn), a powerful open-ended saddle-point search method, into the algorithm. We use it to investigate the reaction of 37-interstitial 1/2[1 1 1] and 1/2[View the MathML source] loops in FeCr at 10 at.% Cr. They transform into 1/2[1 1 1], 1/2[View the MathML source], [1 0 0] and [0 1 0] 74-interstitial clusters with an overall barrier of 0.85 eV. We find that Cr decoration locally inhibits the rotation of crowdions, which dictates the final loop orientation. Moreover, the final loop orientationmore » depends on the details of the Cr decoration. Generally, a region of a given orientation is favored if Cr near its interface with a region of another orientation is able to inhibit reorientation at this interface more than the Cr present at the other interfaces. Also, we find that substitutional Cr atoms can diffuse from energetically unfavorable to energetically favorable sites within the interlocked 37-interstitial loops conformation with barriers of less than 0.35 eV.« less

  7. Breast conservation treatment with perioperative interstitial irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, L.; Mansfield, C.M.; Jewell, W.R.; Reddy, E.K.; Thomas, J.H.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1987-10-01

    Limited resection of the breast combined with radiation has proved to be as effective as more radical surgery in treating early breast cancer. At the University of Kansas Medical Center, the radiotherapy consists of an interstitial implant at the time of lumpectomy to deliver an interstitial boost dose to the tumor bed with iridium-192 immediately following the surgical procedure. An axillary node dissection is also performed at the time of lumpectomy. A dose of 2000 cGy is delivered to the tumor bed between 40 and 60 h. Two to three weeks later, 4500-5000 cGy is delivered to the entire breast with external beam radiation over 5-5.5 weeks. One hundred breasts in 98 patients were so treated between June 1982 and February 1986, with 2 carcinomas in situ, 40 stage I, 51 stage II, and 7 stage III cancers, consisting of 2 TIS, 54 T1, 39 T2, and 5 T3 lesions. Locoregional control with a median follow-up of 31 months was 98%. One recurrence was in a different quadrant, and the other revealed predominantly the in situ component. Immediate implant did not compromise wound healing or cosmesis. The cosmetic result was graded as good to excellent in 88% of the breasts. Our preliminary results appear to suggest a better local control with immediate interstitial irradiation.

  8. INTERSTITIAL IMMUNE COMPLEX THYROIDITIS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Clagett, James A.; Wilson, Curtis B.; Weigle, William O.

    1974-01-01

    Mice immunized with soluble heterologous thyroglobulins developed autoantibody that cross-reacted with autologous thyroglobulin. There was a direct correlation between the temporal appearance and quantity of serum autoantibody and the presumed in situ formation of immune complexes in the interstitium of the thyroid glands. Immediately after the formation of interstitial immune complexes containing antibody of the IgG complement-fixing type, the thyroids were invaded by a transient but intense neutrophil infiltrate which within 1 wk was replaced by chronic mononuclear elements. By the combination of fluorescence microscopy and autoradiography, thyroglobulin was demonstrated to be one, if not the sole, antigen in the interstitial immune complexes. The interstitial immune complexes were granular to lumpy in appearance and formed at the basal area of the follicular cells in intimate association with the follicular basement membrane. Electron microscopy revealed electron dense deposits, presumably immune complexes, between the follicular basement membrane and the plasma membrane. The presumed in situ formation of immune complexes in this model is similar to that which occurs in the Arthus reaction and is a different mechanism of immune complex injury than that caused by tissue deposition of circulating immune complexes as occurs in serum sickness. PMID:4279269

  9. Pathway of processive ATP hydrolysis by kinesin

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Susan P.; Webb, Martin R.; Brune, Martin; Johnson, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    Direct measurement of the kinetics of kinesin dissociation from microtubules, the release of phosphate and ADP from kinesin, and rebinding of kinesin to the microtubule have defined the mechanism for the kinesin ATPase cycle. The processivity of ATP hydrolysis is ten molecules per site at low salt concentration but is reduced to one ATP per site at higher salt concentration. Kinesin dissociates from the microtubule after ATP hydrolysis. This step is rate-limiting. The subsequent rebinding of kinesin · ADP to the microtubule is fast, so kinesin spends only a small fraction of its duty cycle in the dissociated state. These results provide an explanation for the motility differences between skeletal myosin and kinesin. PMID:7854446

  10. Synergistic effects of C-peptide and insulin on low O2-induced ATP release from human erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Alan H.; Ellsworth, Mary L.; Sprague, Randy S.

    2013-01-01

    Erythrocytes participate in the matching of oxygen (O2) delivery with local need in skeletal muscle via the release of O2 and the vasodilator, ATP. It was reported that a concentration of insulin found in humans with insulin resistance inhibits low O2-induced ATP release. However, in vivo, insulin is coreleased with connecting peptide (C-peptide) at equimolar concentrations, but because of the shorter insulin half-life, the peptides circulate at ratios of C-peptide to insulin ranging from 1:1 to 6:1. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that C-peptide and insulin work synergistically to maintain low O2-induced ATP release from human erythrocytes. Using a thin-film tonometer to alter O2 tension, we determined that either C-peptide or insulin alone inhibits low O2-induced ATP release in a concentration-dependent manner; however, coadministration of the peptides at a 1:1 ratio does not (n = 5; P < 0.05). Because this ratio of C-peptide to insulin is not present in vivo for extended periods, we also investigated the effect of additional physiological ratios on ATP release. In the presence of insulin concentrations that would be found in fasting humans (0.05 nM), C-peptide to insulin ratios of 4:1 and 6:1 did not adversely affect low O2-induced ATP release. However, at a concentration of insulin found in the peripheral circulation of humans under postprandial conditions (0.5 nM), a ratio of C-peptide to insulin of 6:1 inhibited low O2-induced ATP release (n = 5). These findings demonstrate a heretofore unrecognized synergism between C-peptide and insulin that could have physiological importance in the regulation of perfusion distribution in skeletal muscle. PMID:24089376

  11. BRET-linked ATP assay with luciferase.

    PubMed

    Borghei, Golnaz; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2014-09-01

    Taking advantage of BRET, a mutant firefly luciferase with higher pH- and thermo-stability than the wild-type could be coupled with the red-emitting fluorescent protein of mCherry in both a fused and unfused format. The BRET pair allows >40% of the light emitted to be red shifted over 600 nm to the mCherry acceptor wavelength. Taking the expected quantum yield for mCherry (0.22), a good fit to predicted light transfer is shown, with no other losses. Two measurements are considered for ATP determination: (a) a ratiometric technique for ATP measurement using both donor and acceptor emission intensities, making the calibration slope independent of protein concentration in a broad range. This measurement was limited by the BRET efficiency and the low quantum yield of the mCherry acceptor, but this detection limit might be improved with other fluorescent proteins with higher quantum yield. The fused BRET pair also resulted in a small increase in the BRET ratio. (b) An ATP dependent shift in the wavelength maximum using just the acceptor mCherry emission was also proposed for ATP determination. This did not require a high BRET efficiency and only uses emission above 600 nm to obtain the acceptor emission maximum, but not its intensity; it is independent of protein concentration across a broad range. This offers a novel and robust method for determination of ATP between 10(-11) to 10(-5) M with an easy baseline calibration with ATP concentration >10(-4) M.

  12. Mitochondrial involvement in skeletal muscle insulin resistance: A case of imbalanced bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Affourtit, Charles

    2016-10-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance in obesity associates with mitochondrial dysfunction, but the causality of this association is controversial. This review evaluates mitochondrial models of nutrient-induced muscle insulin resistance. It transpires that all models predict that insulin resistance arises as a result of imbalanced cellular bioenergetics. The nature and precise origin of the proposed insulin-numbing molecules differ between models but all species only accumulate when metabolic fuel supply outweighs energy demand. This observation suggests that mitochondrial deficiency in muscle insulin resistance is not merely owing to intrinsic functional defects, but could instead be an adaptation to nutrient-induced changes in energy expenditure. Such adaptive effects are likely because muscle ATP supply is fully driven by energy demand. This market-economic control of myocellular bioenergetics offers a mechanism by which insulin-signalling deficiency can cause apparent mitochondrial dysfunction, as insulin resistance lowers skeletal muscle anabolism and thus dampens ATP demand and, consequently, oxidative ATP synthesis. PMID:27473535

  13. Experimental depletion of different renal interstitial cell populations

    SciTech Connect

    Bohman, S.O.; Sundelin, B.; Forsum, U.; Tribukait, B.

    1988-04-01

    To define different populations of renal interstitial cells and investigate some aspects of their function, we studied the kidneys of normal rats and rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus (DI, Brattleboro) after experimental manipulations expected to alter the number of interstitial cells. DI rats showed an almost complete loss of interstitial cells in their renal papillae after treatment with a high dose of vasopressin. In spite of the lack of interstitial cells, the animals concentrated their urine to the same extent as vasopressin-treated normal rats, indicating that the renomedullary interstitial cells do not have an important function in concentrating the urine. The interstitial cells returned nearly to normal within 1 week off vasopressin treatment, suggesting a rapid turnover rate of these cells. To further distinguish different populations of interstitial cells, we studied the distribution of class II MHC antigen expression in the kidneys of normal and bone-marrow depleted Wistar rats. Normal rats had abundant class II antigen-positive interstitial cells in the renal cortex and outer medulla, but not in the inner medulla (papilla). Six days after 1000 rad whole body irradiation, the stainable cells were almost completely lost, but electron microscopic morphometry showed a virtually unchanged volume density of interstitial cells in the cortex and outer medulla, as well as the inner medulla. Thus, irradiation abolished the expression of the class II antigen but caused no significant depletion of interstitial cells.

  14. Regulation of mitochondrial ATP synthase in cardiac pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Long, Qinqiang; Yang, Kevin; Yang, Qinglin

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is paramount to energy homeostasis, metabolism, signaling, and apoptosis in cells. Mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase), a molecular motor, is the ultimate ATP generator and a key determinant of mitochondrial function. ATP synthase catalyzes the final coupling step of oxidative phosphorylation to supply energy in the form of ATP. Alterations at this step will crucially impact mitochondrial respiration and hence cardiac performance. It is well established that cardiac contractility is strongly dependent on the mitochondria, and that myocardial ATP depletion is a key feature of heart failure. ATP synthase dysfunction can cause and exacerbate human diseases, such as cardiomyopathy and heart failure. While ATP synthase has been extensively studied, essential questions related to how the regulation of ATP synthase determines energy metabolism in the heart linger and therapies targeting this important mechanism remain scarce. This review will visit the main findings, identify unsolved issues and provide insights into potential future perspectives related to the regulation of ATP synthase and cardiac pathophysiology.

  15. Dynein ATPase pathway: ATP analogs and regulation by phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcote, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Three biochemical aspects of 22S dynein from Tetrahymena cilia have been investigated: its ATP binding polypeptides and the manner in which they bind ATP, its AMPPNP-induced dissociation from microtubules, and its phosphorylation. We have attempted to identify the polypeptides of dynein that bind ATP, i.e., the active site polypeptides, with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-N{sub 3}ATP. The 8-N{sub 3}ATP has been shown to bind to dyneins active sites and in a manner similar to that of ATP. Upon irradiation, (2-{sup 3}H)8-N{sub 3}ATP covalently labels the three heavy chains, i.e., heads, which is detected by autoradiography of SDS PAG's. Thus, the three heads are considered to be the three active sites of dynein. AMPPNP is a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog which we have assayed for the ability to induce dynein dissociation from microtubules.

  16. Three-dimensional cell culture model for measuring the effects of interstitial fluid flow on tumor cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Tchafa, Alimatou M; Shah, Arpit D; Wang, Shafei; Duong, Melissa T; Shieh, Adrian C

    2012-07-25

    The growth and progression of most solid tumors depend on the initial transformation of the cancer cells and their response to stroma-associated signaling in the tumor microenvironment (1). Previously, research on the tumor microenvironment has focused primarily on tumor-stromal interactions (1-2). However, the tumor microenvironment also includes a variety of biophysical forces, whose effects remain poorly understood. These forces are biomechanical consequences of tumor growth that lead to changes in gene expression, cell division, differentiation and invasion(3). Matrix density (4), stiffness (5-6), and structure (6-7), interstitial fluid pressure (8), and interstitial fluid flow (8) are all altered during cancer progression. Interstitial fluid flow in particular is higher in tumors compared to normal tissues (8-10). The estimated interstitial fluid flow velocities were measured and found to be in the range of 0.1-3 μm s(-1), depending on tumor size and differentiation (9, 11). This is due to elevated interstitial fluid pressure caused by tumor-induced angiogenesis and increased vascular permeability (12). Interstitial fluid flow has been shown to increase invasion of cancer cells (13-14), vascular fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells (15). This invasion may be due to autologous chemotactic gradients created around cells in 3-D (16) or increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression (15), chemokine secretion and cell adhesion molecule expression (17). However, the mechanism by which cells sense fluid flow is not well understood. In addition to altering tumor cell behavior, interstitial fluid flow modulates the activity of other cells in the tumor microenvironment. It is associated with (a) driving differentiation of fibroblasts into tumor-promoting myofibroblasts (18), (b) transporting of antigens and other soluble factors to lymph nodes (19), and (c) modulating lymphatic endothelial cell morphogenesis (20). The technique presented here imposes interstitial

  17. The structural basis of ATP as an allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoyong; Huang, Wenkang; Wang, Qi; Shen, Qiancheng; Li, Shuai; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is generally regarded as a substrate for energy currency and protein modification. Recent findings uncovered the allosteric function of ATP in cellular signal transduction but little is understood about this critical behavior of ATP. Through extensive analysis of ATP in solution and proteins, we found that the free ATP can exist in the compact and extended conformations in solution, and the two different conformational characteristics may be responsible for ATP to exert distinct biological functions: ATP molecules adopt both compact and extended conformations in the allosteric binding sites but conserve extended conformations in the substrate binding sites. Nudged elastic band simulations unveiled the distinct dynamic processes of ATP binding to the corresponding allosteric and substrate binding sites of uridine monophosphate kinase, and suggested that in solution ATP preferentially binds to the substrate binding sites of proteins. When the ATP molecules occupy the allosteric binding sites, the allosteric trigger from ATP to fuel allosteric communication between allosteric and functional sites is stemmed mainly from the triphosphate part of ATP, with a small number from the adenine part of ATP. Taken together, our results provide overall understanding of ATP allosteric functions responsible for regulation in biological systems. PMID:25211773

  18. The Structural Basis of ATP as an Allosteric Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Shen, Qiancheng; Li, Shuai; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) is generally regarded as a substrate for energy currency and protein modification. Recent findings uncovered the allosteric function of ATP in cellular signal transduction but little is understood about this critical behavior of ATP. Through extensive analysis of ATP in solution and proteins, we found that the free ATP can exist in the compact and extended conformations in solution, and the two different conformational characteristics may be responsible for ATP to exert distinct biological functions: ATP molecules adopt both compact and extended conformations in the allosteric binding sites but conserve extended conformations in the substrate binding sites. Nudged elastic band simulations unveiled the distinct dynamic processes of ATP binding to the corresponding allosteric and substrate binding sites of uridine monophosphate kinase, and suggested that in solution ATP preferentially binds to the substrate binding sites of proteins. When the ATP molecules occupy the allosteric binding sites, the allosteric trigger from ATP to fuel allosteric communication between allosteric and functional sites is stemmed mainly from the triphosphate part of ATP, with a small number from the adenine part of ATP. Taken together, our results provide overall understanding of ATP allosteric functions responsible for regulation in biological systems. PMID:25211773

  19. Mechanisms that match ATP supply to demand in cardiac pacemaker cells during high ATP demand.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Yael; Spurgeon, Harold A; Ziman, Bruce D; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Lakatta, Edward G

    2013-06-01

    The spontaneous action potential (AP) firing rate of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) involves high-throughput signaling via Ca(2+)-calmodulin activated adenylyl cyclases (AC), cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent phosphorylation of SR Ca(2+) cycling and surface membrane ion channel proteins. When the throughput of this signaling increases, e.g., in response to β-adrenergic receptor activation, the resultant increase in spontaneous AP firing rate increases the demand for ATP. We hypothesized that an increase of ATP production to match the increased ATP demand is achieved via a direct effect of increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)m) and an indirect effect via enhanced Ca(2+)-cAMP/PKA-CaMKII signaling to mitochondria. To increase ATP demand, single isolated rabbit SANCs were superfused by physiological saline at 35 ± 0.5°C with isoproterenol, or by phosphodiesterase or protein phosphatase inhibition. We measured cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) and flavoprotein fluorescence in single SANC, and we measured cAMP, ATP, and O₂ consumption in SANC suspensions. Although the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate was accompanied by an increase in O₂ consumption, the ATP level and flavoprotein fluorescence remained constant, indicating that ATP production had increased. Both Ca(2+)m and cAMP increased concurrently with the increase in AP firing rate. When Ca(2+)m was reduced by Ru360, the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate in response to isoproterenol was reduced by 25%. Thus, both an increase in Ca(2+)m and an increase in Ca(2+) activated cAMP-PKA-CaMKII signaling regulate the increase in ATP supply to meet ATP demand above the basal level.

  20. The Importance of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shboul, Othman A.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility function and its regulation is a complex process involving collaboration and communication of multiple cell types such as enteric neurons, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), and smooth muscle cells. Recent advances in GI research made a better understanding of ICC function and their role in the GI tract, and studies based on different types of techniques have shown that ICC, as an integral part of the GI neuromuscular apparatus, transduce inputs from enteric motor neurons, generate intrinsic electrical rhythmicity in phasic smooth muscles, and have a mechanical sensation ability. Absence or improper function of these cells has been linked to some GI tract disorders. This paper provides a general overview of ICC; their discovery, subtypes, function, locations in the GI tract, and some disorders associated with their loss or disease, and highlights some controversial issues with regard to the importance of ICC in the GI tract. PMID:23319032

  1. Morphology of the interstitial cells of Cajal of the human ileum from foetal to neonatal life

    PubMed Central

    Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria-Simonetta; Vannucchi, Maria-Giuliana; Alaggio, Rita; Strojna, Aleksandra; Midrio, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The so-called interstitial cells of Cajal myenteric plexus (ICC-MP), interstitial cells of Cajal intramuscular (ICC-IM) and interstitial cells of Cajal deep muscular plexus (ICC-DMP) are the three types of ICC endowed within the intestinal muscle coat where they play different roles in gut motility. Studies on ICC ontogenesis showed ICC-MP in the human ileum by 7–9 weeks while information on ICC-IM and ICC-DMP in foetuses and new-borns are not exhaustive. Functional recordings in the fasting state of prematurely born babies aged 28–37 weeks showed immature ileal motility. To gain more information on the time of appearance of the three ICC types in the human ileum and on the steps of the acquisition of mature features, we studied by c-kit immuno-histochemistry foetuses aged 17–27 weeks and newborns aged 36–41 weeks. In parallel, the maturative steps of enteric plexuses and muscle layers were immunohistochemically examined by using anti-neuron specific enolase (NSE), anti-S-100 and anti-α smooth muscle actin (αSMA) antibodies. The appearance and differentiation of all the ICC types were seen to occur in concomitance with those of the related nerve plexuses and muscle layers. ICC-MP appeared first, ICC-IM and ICC-DMP later and their differentiation was incomplete at birth. In conclusion, the ICC-MP, the intestinal pacemaker cells, in spite of absence of food intake, are already present during the foetal life and the ICC-IM appear by pre-term life, thus ensuring neurotransmission. The ICC-DMP and their related nerve plexus and smooth muscle cells, i.e. the intestinal stretch receptor, begin to differentiate at birth. These findings might help in predicting neonatal ileal motor behaviour and in interpreting the role of ICC abnormalities in the pathophysiology of intestinal motile disorders of neonates and young children. PMID:17635640

  2. Respiratory failure due to infliximab induced interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kakavas, Sotiris; Balis, Evangelos; Lazarou, Vasiliki; Kouvela, Marousa; Tatsis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Although poorly understood, interstitial lung disease has been reported as a possible complication of tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitors. We report a case of interstitial lung disease in a 64-year-old man with psoriasis 3 weeks after the initiation of infliximab treatment. The patient had received two fortnightly infusions of infliximab following a short course of methotrexate. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral ground glass and interstitial infiltrates, while the results of microbiology and immunologic workup were negative. Likewise, bronchoalveolar lavage detected neither typical nor atypical pathogens. Infliximab-induced interstitial lung injury was suspected and corticosteroid therapy was administered which resulted in rapid clinical and radiological improvement. This is one of the few reported cases of interstitial lung disease due to infliximab in the psoriasis population. The patient had no pre-existing lung pathology, while his previous exposure to methotrexate was minimal and was not temporally associated with the induction of interstitial lung disease.

  3. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-07-14

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  4. Electric field driven torque in ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Miller, John H; Rajapakshe, Kimal I; Infante, Hans L; Claycomb, James R

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  5. Electric Field Driven Torque in ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John H.; Rajapakshe, Kimal I.; Infante, Hans L.; Claycomb, James R.

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  6. Intensification of ciliary motility by extracellular ATP.

    PubMed

    Ovadyahu, D; Eshel, D; Priel, Z

    1988-01-01

    Ciliary metachronism and motility were examined optically in tissue cultures from frog palate epithelium as a function of extracellular ATP concentration in the range of 10(-7)-10(-3) M. The main findings were: a) upon addition of ATP the metachronal wavelength increased by a factor of up to 2. b) the velocity of the metachronal wave increased by a factor of up to 5. c) the frequency of ciliary beating increased by a factor of up to 2-3, the increase being temperature insensitive in the range of 15 degrees C-25 degrees C. d) the area under the 1-second FFT spectrum decreased by a factor of up to 2.5. e) the energy of the metachronal wave is increased by a factor of up to 9.5. f) all the spectrum parameters are subject to influence by ATP, as also by ADP and AMP. However, there are pronounced differences in the various responses to them. Based on these findings, physical aspects of the rate increase of particle transport caused by addition of extracellular ATP are explained. A plausible overall chemical mechanism causing pronounced changes in ciliary motility is discussed.

  7. A reusable prepositioned ATP reaction chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Luminescence biometer detects presence of life by means of light-emitting chemical reaction of luciferin and luciferase with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that occurs in all living cells. Amount of light in reaction chamber is measured to determine presence and extent of life.

  8. Electric field driven torque in ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Miller, John H; Rajapakshe, Kimal I; Infante, Hans L; Claycomb, James R

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring.

  9. Calcium and ATP control multiple vital functions

    PubMed Central

    Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    Life on Planet Earth, as we know it, revolves around adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a universal energy storing molecule. The metabolism of ATP requires a low cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, and hence tethers these two molecules together. The exceedingly low cytosolic Ca2+ concentration (which in all life forms is kept around 50–100 nM) forms the basis for a universal intracellular signalling system in which Ca2+ acts as a second messenger. Maintenance of transmembrane Ca2+ gradients, in turn, requires ATP-dependent Ca2+ transport, thus further emphasizing the inseparable links between these two substances. Ca2+ signalling controls the most fundamental processes in the living organism, from heartbeat and neurotransmission to cell energetics and secretion. The versatility and plasticity of Ca2+ signalling relies on cell specific Ca2+ signalling toolkits, remodelling of which underlies adaptive cellular responses. Alterations of these Ca2+ signalling toolkits lead to aberrant Ca2+ signalling which is fundamental for the pathophysiology of numerous diseases from acute pancreatitis to neurodegeneration. This paper introduces a theme issue on this topic, which arose from a Royal Society Theo Murphy scientific meeting held in March 2016. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Evolution brings Ca2+ and ATP together to control life and death’. PMID:27377728

  10. Torque generation mechanism of ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John; Maric, Sladjana; Scoppa, M.; Cheung, M.

    2010-03-01

    ATP synthase is a rotary motor that produces adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the chemical currency of life. Our proposed electric field driven torque (EFT) model of FoF1-ATP synthase describes how torque, which scales with the number of c-ring proton binding sites, is generated by the proton motive force (pmf) across the mitochondrial inner membrane. When Fo is coupled to F1, the model predicts a critical pmf to drive ATP production. In order to fully understand how the electric field resulting from the pmf drives the c-ring to rotate, it is important to examine the charge distributions in the protonated c-ring and a-subunit containing the proton channels. Our calculations use a self-consistent field approach based on a refinement of reported structural data. The results reveal changes in pKa for key residues on the a-subunit and c-ring, as well as titration curves and protonation state energy diagrams. Health implications will be briefly discussed.

  11. MicroRNAs Regulate Cellular ATP Levels by Targeting Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism Genes during C2C12 Myoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Siengdee, Puntita; Trakooljul, Nares; Murani, Eduard; Schwerin, Manfred; Wimmers, Klaus; Ponsuksili, Siriluck

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, we identified an miRNA regulatory network involved in energy metabolism in porcine muscle. To better understand the involvement of miRNAs in cellular ATP production and energy metabolism, here we used C2C12 myoblasts, in which ATP levels increase during differentiation, to identify miRNAs modulating these processes. ATP level, miRNA and mRNA microarray expression profiles during C2C12 differentiation into myotubes were assessed. The results suggest 14 miRNAs (miR-423-3p, miR-17, miR-130b, miR-301a/b, miR-345, miR-15a, miR-16a, miR-128, miR-615, miR-1968, miR-1a/b, and miR-194) as cellular ATP regulators targeting genes involved in mitochondrial energy metabolism (Cox4i2, Cox6a2, Ndufb7, Ndufs4, Ndufs5, and Ndufv1) during C2C12 differentiation. Among these, miR-423-3p showed a high inverse correlation with increasing ATP levels. Besides having implications in promoting cell growth and cell cycle progression, its function in cellular ATP regulation is yet unknown. Therefore, miR-423-3p was selected and validated for the function together with its potential target, Cox6a2. Overexpression of miR-423-3p in C2C12 myogenic differentiation lead to decreased cellular ATP level and decreased expression of Cox6a2 compared to the negative control. These results suggest miR-423-3p as a novel regulator of ATP/energy metabolism by targeting Cox6a2.

  12. ATP and microfilaments in cellular oxidant injury.

    PubMed Central

    Hinshaw, D. B.; Armstrong, B. C.; Burger, J. M.; Beals, T. F.; Hyslop, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidant injury produces dramatic changes in cytoskeletal organization and cell shape. ATP synthetic pathways are major targets of oxidant injury resulting in rapid depletion of cellular ATP following oxidant exposure. The relation of ATP depletion to the changes in microfilament organization seen following H2O2 exposure were examined in the P388D1 cell line. Three hours of glucose depletion alone resulted in a decline in cellular ATP levels to less than 10% of controls, which was comparable to ATP levels in cells 30 to 60 minutes after exposure to 5 mM H2O2 in the presence of glucose. Adherent cells stained with rhodamine phalloidin, a probe specific for polymerized (F) actin, revealed a progressive shortening of microfilaments into globular aggregates within cells depleted of glucose over 3 hours, a pattern similar to earlier observations of H2O2-injured cells after 1 hour. The changes in cellular ATP associated with glucose depletion or H2O2 exposure were then correlated with G actin content measured by the DNAse 1 inhibition assay. No real differences in G actin content as a percentage of total actin were seen in P388D1 cells following 3 hours of glucose depletion or 30 to 60 minutes after exposure to 5 mM H2O2. But 2 to 3 hours after exposure to H2O2 there was a progressive decrease in G actin as a percentage of total actin within the cells. Transmission electron microscopy of cells depleted of glucose for 3 h or 1 hour after exposure to H2O2 revealed the presence of side-to-side aggregates or bundles of microfilaments within the cells. These observations suggest that declining levels of ATP either from metabolic inhibition or H2O2 injury are correlated with the fragmentation and shortening of microfilaments into aggregates. No net change in monomeric or polymeric actin was necessary for this to occur. However, at later time points after H2O2 exposure some actin assembly did occur. Images p[484]-a p481-a p482-a Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3414780

  13. [Surgical therapy of interstitial pulmonary emphysema in a premature infant].

    PubMed

    Storm, W

    1986-07-01

    Pulmonary interstitial emphysema is a frequent complication in the use of respirators in newborn infants suffering from respiratory insufficiency. If it is diffuse and bilateral, treatment often is without success; occasionally, interstitial emphysema may be localized in a lobe, in which case it may persist and lead to therapeutic difficulties. We report a successful surgical approach to a unilateral pulmonary interstitial emphysema in a premature infant.

  14. Increased Interstitial Concentrations of Glutamate and Pyruvate in Vastus Lateralis of Women with Fibromyalgia Syndrome Are Normalized after an Exercise Intervention – A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gerdle, Björn; Ernberg, Malin; Mannerkorpi, Kaisa; Larsson, Britt; Kosek, Eva; Christidis, Nikolaos; Ghafouri, Bijar

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is associated with central alterations, but controversies exist regarding the presence and role of peripheral factors. Microdialysis (MD) can be used in vivo to study muscle alterations in FMS. Furthermore for chronic pain conditions such as FMS, the mechanisms for the positive effects of exercise are unclear. This study investigates the interstitial concentrations of algesics and metabolites in the vastus lateralis muscle of 29 women with FMS and 28 healthy women before and after an exercise intervention. Methods All the participants went through a clinical examination and completed a questionnaire. In addition, their pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in their upper and lower extremities were determined. For both groups, MD was conducted in the vastus lateralis muscle before and after a 15-week exercise intervention of mainly resistance training of the lower limbs. Muscle blood flow and interstitial muscle concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, glucose, and glycerol were determined. Results FMS was associated with significantly increased interstitial concentrations of glutamate, pyruvate, and lactate. After the exercise intervention, the FMS group exhibited significant decreases in pain intensity and in mean interstitial concentrations of glutamate, pyruvate, and glucose. The decrease in pain intensity in FMS correlated significantly with the decreases in pyruvate and glucose. In addition, the FMS group increased their strength and endurance. Conclusion This study supports the suggestion that peripheral metabolic and algesic muscle alterations are present in FMS patients and that these alterations contribute to pain. After an exercise intervention, alterations normalized, pain intensity decreased (but not abolished), and strength and endurance improved, all findings that suggest the effects of exercise are partially peripheral. PMID:27695113

  15. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial energetic efficiency and aging.

    PubMed

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Mazzoli, Arianna; Giacco, Antonia; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with a progressive loss of maximal cell functionality, and mitochondria are considered a key factor in aging process, since they determine the ATP availability in the cells. Mitochondrial performance during aging in skeletal muscle is reported to be either decreased or unchanged. This heterogeneity of results could partly be due to the method used to assess mitochondrial performance. In addition, in skeletal muscle the mitochondrial population is heterogeneous, composed of subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar mitochondria. Therefore, the purpose of the present review is to summarize the results obtained on the functionality of the above mitochondrial populations during aging, taking into account that the mitochondrial performance depends on organelle number, organelle activity, and energetic efficiency of the mitochondrial machinery in synthesizing ATP from the oxidation of fuels. PMID:25970752

  16. Macrophage polarization in interstitial lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mierzejewski, Michał; Osińska, Iwona; Domagała-Kulawik, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The role of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf) examination in differential diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases (ILD) was established. Currently, functional polarization into M1 (pro-inflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory) subpopulations is emphasized. The aim of our study was to compare the proportion of M1 and M2 in BALf of patients with different ILD. BALf samples were collected from 75 ILD patients: sarcoidosis (SA, 36), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP, 10), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP, 8), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, 6) and other ILD (15). Phenotyping was performed by immunocytochemistry with anti-CD40 and CD163 antibodies (for M1 and M2, respectively). For both, CD40 and CD163, three populations of cells have been specified: small cells with strong (+++), large cells with weak (+) and cells with no (–) reaction. Due to lack of statistically significant differences between patients with HP, NSIP and IPF, they were classified into a common group and compared to the group of patients with sarcoidosis. The median proportion of macrophage population was as follows: for CD40: 61%, 35%, 2% in patients with SA and 49%, 47%, 3% in patients with other ILD and for CD163: 55%, 35%, 5% in SA and 53%, 43%, 1% in ILD patients, respectively. We found a significantly higher proportion of M1 in SA when compared with other ILD. Our study showed no evidence of defined polarization of alveolar macrophages in different types of interstitial lung diseases. However, we emphasized the role of CD40 positive cells in sarcoidosis and the role of CD163 positive cells in fibrotic diffuse lung diseases. PMID:27536201

  17. Idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Belloli, Elizabeth A; Beckford, Rosemarie; Hadley, Ryan; Flaherty, Kevin R

    2016-02-01

    Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is an interstitial lung disease that may be idiopathic or secondary to connective tissue disease, toxins or numerous other causes. Idiopathic NSIP is a rare diagnosis and requires exclusion of these other possible causes. Patients typically present in mid-adulthood with dyspnoea, cough and often constitutional symptoms including fever and fatigue. The disease has a female predominance, and more than 50% of patients have never smoked. Physical exam features mild hypoxaemia and inspiratory rales. Pulmonary function tests demonstrate restriction and a low diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include predominantly lower lobe subpleural reticular changes, traction bronchiectasis and ground-glass opacities; honeycombing is rarely seen. An evaluation of the underlying pathology is necessary for a firm diagnosis. Histologically, alveolar and interstitial mononuclear cell inflammation and fibrosis are seen in a temporally uniform pattern with preserved underlying alveolar architecture. NSIP must be differentiated from other parenchymal lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. A thorough exposure history and assessment for underlying connective tissue diseases are highly important, as positive findings in these categories would likely denote a case of secondary NSIP. A multi-disciplinary discussion that includes pulmonologist(s), radiologist(s) and pathologist(s) assists in reaching a consensus diagnosis and improves diagnostic accuracy. Treatment of idiopathic NSIP, although not well proven, is generally instituted in the form of immunosuppression. Prognosis is favourable compared with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, although the diagnosis still carries an attributable mortality. Herein we will summarize the clinical characteristics and management of idiopathic NSIP. PMID:26564810

  18. Diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema treated by lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Matta, Reva; Matta, Judy; Hage, Pierre; Nassif, Yolla; Mansour, Nabil; Diab, Nabil

    2011-10-01

    Persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema is a rare condition that occurs in preterm infants on mechanical ventilation, characterized by abnormal accumulation of air in the pulmonary interstitium, due to disruption of the basement membrane. Diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema is observed when small cysts are noted in all lobes of the lung. The management of infants suffering from diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema varies according to severity and stability of the patient, being either conservative treatment or aggressive surgical treatment by pneumonectomy. We report a case of an unstable patient with diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema successfully treated by lobectomy as a form of conservative surgical approach.

  19. Desquamative alveolar disease (desquamative interstitial pneumonia): case report 1

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Edgardo; Rodriguez, Jaime; Lisboa, Carmen; Ferretti, Ricardo

    1969-01-01

    Desquamative interstitial pneumonia is a disease characterized by massive alveolar cell proliferation and desquamation with sparse interstitial involvement. The reported case shows an unusually widespread radiographic reticulo-nodular image and abundant alveolar cells in the sputum. Functional studies reveal the expected diffusion defect with practically normal mechanical properties of the lung, in contrast with interstitial fibrosing lung diseases. On the basis of the pathological findings, especially the behaviour of alveolar cells, the individuality of this disease is discussed. We think that it is different from other diseases classed as varieties of a single disease or as different entities under the names of primary interstitial fibrosis or chronic fibrosing alveolitis. Images PMID:5822250

  20. Role of ATP and related purines in inhibitory neurotransmission to the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Medardo; Knight, Gillian E; Wildman, Scott SP; Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    . Conclusions and implications: ATP is involved in the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic, non-nitrergic inhibitory neurotransmission in the pig bladder neck, producing relaxation largely through muscle A2A receptors after breakdown to adenosine, and P2Y1 receptors after breakdown to ADP. Antagonists of these receptors may be useful for urinary incontinence treatment produced by intrinsic sphincteric deficiency. PMID:19563528

  1. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  2. Interstitial microwave antennas for thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, J C; Wang, Y J

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a new microwave antenna design with improved heating at the tip for interstitial hyperthermia and thermocoagulation. Temperature distribution patterns surrounding a conventional insulated antenna and the new sleeved coaxial slot radiator are measured in a saline phantom under transient and steady-state conditions. The new design provides an improved steady-state temperature distribution over the active region of the radiator. In contrast to the cold zone at the tip of a conventional insulated antenna the new sleeved coaxial slot antenna provides maximal (sixfold greater) power deposition at its tip. PMID:3559297

  3. Karyomegalic interstitial nephropathy following ifosfamide therapy.

    PubMed

    Jayasurya, R; Srinivas, B H; Ponraj, M; Haridasan, S; Parameswaran, S; Priyamvada, P S

    2016-01-01

    Ifosfamide (IFO), an alkylating agent used for the management of solid organ tumors, can cause reversible Fanconi's syndrome and acute kidney injury. Karyomegalic interstitial nephropathy (KIN) is a rare form of chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, initially described as a familial nephropathy in adults. So far, four cases of KIN have been reported in pediatric and adolescent population following treatment with IFO. We report a 22-year-old man who developed renal dysfunction following IFO therapy for relapsed Hodgkin's lymphoma. Renal biopsy revealed chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis with atypical tubular epithelial cells showing nuclear enlargement and hyperchromasia, consistent with a diagnosis of KIN. The renal function improved following a short course of corticosteroids.

  4. Karyomegalic interstitial nephropathy following ifosfamide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Jayasurya, R.; Srinivas, B. H.; Ponraj, M.; Haridasan, S.; Parameswaran, S.; Priyamvada, P. S.

    2016-01-01

    Ifosfamide (IFO), an alkylating agent used for the management of solid organ tumors, can cause reversible Fanconi's syndrome and acute kidney injury. Karyomegalic interstitial nephropathy (KIN) is a rare form of chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis, initially described as a familial nephropathy in adults. So far, four cases of KIN have been reported in pediatric and adolescent population following treatment with IFO. We report a 22-year-old man who developed renal dysfunction following IFO therapy for relapsed Hodgkin's lymphoma. Renal biopsy revealed chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis with atypical tubular epithelial cells showing nuclear enlargement and hyperchromasia, consistent with a diagnosis of KIN. The renal function improved following a short course of corticosteroids. PMID:27512305

  5. Azacitidine-associated acute interstitial pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Junya; Shimura, Yuji; Mizutani, Shinsuke; Nagoshi, Hisao; Kiyota, Miki; Chinen, Yoshiaki; Maegawa, Saori; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Horiike, Shigeo; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Azacitidine is the first-line therapeutic option for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). This report describes a case of MDS in a patient who developed fatal acute interstitial pneumonitis (AIP) after the first seven-day course of intravenous azacitidine (75 mg/m(2)/day) treatment. A review of previous and present studies of azacitidine-associated AIP suggests that azacitidine may cause life-threatening AIP during or after the first seven-day course of treatment, with pyrexia commonly preceding AIP. Although the non-hematologic adverse events associated with azacitidine are generally relatively mild, further accumulation of evidence may help to make an earlier diagnosis of azacitidine-associated AIP.

  6. Interstitial gas effect on vibrated granular columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastenes, Javier C.; Géminard, Jean-Christophe; Melo, Francisco

    2014-06-01

    Vibrated granular materials have been intensively used to investigate particle segregation, convection, and heaping. We report on the behavior of a column of heavy grains bouncing on an oscillating solid surface. Measurements indicate that, for weak effects of the interstitial gas, the temporal variations of the pressure at the base of the column are satisfactorily described by considering that the column, despite the observed dilation, behaves like a porous solid. In addition, direct observation of the column dynamics shows that the grains of the upper and lower surfaces are in free fall in the gravitational field and that the dilation is due to a small delay between their takeoff times.

  7. Diseases and disorders of muscle.

    PubMed

    Pearson, A M; Young, R B

    1993-01-01

    Muscle may suffer from a number of diseases or disorders, some being fatal to humans and animals. Their management or treatment depends on correct diagnosis. Although no single method may be used to identify all diseases, recognition depends on the following diagnostic procedures: (1) history and clinical examination, (2) blood biochemistry, (3) electromyography, (4) muscle biopsy, (5) nuclear magnetic resonance, (6) measurement of muscle cross-sectional area, (7) tests of muscle function, (8) provocation tests, and (9) studies on protein turnover. One or all of these procedures may prove helpful in diagnosis, but even then identification of the disorder may not be possible. Nevertheless, each of these procedures can provide useful information. Among the most common diseases in muscle are the muscular dystrophies, in which the newly identified muscle protein dystrophin is either absent or present at less than normal amounts in both Duchenne and Becker's muscular dystrophy. Although the identification of dystrophin represents a major breakthrough, treatment has not progressed to the experimental stage. Other major diseases of muscle include the inflammatory myopathies and neuropathies. Atrophy and hypertrophy of muscle and the relationship of aging, exercise, and fatigue all add to our understanding of the behavior of normal and abnormal muscle. Some other interesting related diseases and disorders of muscle include myasthenia gravis, muscular dysgenesis, and myclonus. Disorders of energy metabolism include those caused by abnormal glycolysis (Von Gierke's, Pompe's, Cori-Forbes, Andersen's, McArdle's, Hers', and Tauri's diseases) and by the acquired diseases of glycolysis (disorders of mitochondrial oxidation). Still other diseases associated with abnormal energy metabolism include lipid-related disorders (carnitine and carnitine palmitoyl-transferase deficiencies) and myotonic syndromes (myotonia congenita, paramyotonia congenita, hypokalemic and hyperkalemic

  8. Interstitial hydraulic conductivity and interstitial fluid pressure for avascular or poorly vascularized tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, L J; Schlesinger, M

    2015-09-01

    A correct description of the hydraulic conductivity is essential for determining the actual tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) distribution. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the hydraulic conductivities both in a tumor and normal tissue are constant, and that a tumor has a much larger interstitial hydraulic conductivity than normal tissue. The abrupt transition of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface leads to non-physical results (the hydraulic conductivity and the slope of the TIFP are not continuous at tumor surface). For the sake of simplicity and the need to represent reality, we focus our analysis on avascular or poorly vascularized tumors, which have a necrosis that is mostly in the center and vascularization that is mostly on the periphery. We suggest that there is an intermediary region between the tumor surface and normal tissue. Through this region, the interstitium (including the structure and composition of solid components and interstitial fluid) transitions from tumor to normal tissue. This process also causes the hydraulic conductivity to do the same. We introduce a continuous variation of the hydraulic conductivity, and show that the interstitial hydraulic conductivity in the intermediary region should be monotonically increasing up to the value of hydraulic conductivity in the normal tissue in order for the model to correspond to the actual TIFP distribution. The value of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface should be the lowest in value.

  9. Mitochondrial ATP synthasome: Expression and structural interaction of its components.

    PubMed

    Nůsková, Hana; Mráček, Tomáš; Mikulová, Tereza; Vrbacký, Marek; Kovářová, Nikola; Kovalčíková, Jana; Pecina, Petr; Houštěk, Josef

    2015-08-28

    Mitochondrial ATP synthase, ADP/ATP translocase (ANT), and inorganic phosphate carrier (PiC) are supposed to form a supercomplex called ATP synthasome. Our protein and transcript analysis of rat tissues indicates that the expression of ANT and PiC is transcriptionally controlled in accordance with the biogenesis of ATP synthase. In contrast, the content of ANT and PiC is increased in ATP synthase deficient patients' fibroblasts, likely due to a post-transcriptional adaptive mechanism. A structural analysis of rat heart mitochondria by immunoprecipitation, blue native/SDS electrophoresis, immunodetection and MS analysis revealed the presence of ATP synthasome. However, the majority of PiC and especially ANT did not associate with ATP synthase, suggesting that most of PiC, ANT and ATP synthase exist as separate entities.

  10. A label-free electrochemiluminescent sensor for ATP detection based on ATP-dependent ligation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingting; Lin, Chunshui; Yao, Qiuhong; Chen, Xi

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we describe a new label-free, sensitive and highly selective strategy for the electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection of ATP at the picomolar level via ATP-induced ligation. The molecular-beacon like DNA probes (P12 complex) are self-assembled on a gold electrode. The presence of ATP leads to the ligation of P12 complex which blocks the digestion by Exonuclease III (Exo III). The protected P12 complex causes the intercalation of numerous ECL indicators (Ru(phen)3(2+)) into the duplex DNA grooves, resulting in significantly amplified ECL signal output. Since the ligating site of T4 DNA ligase and the nicking site of Exo III are the same, it involves no long time of incubation for conformation change. The proposed strategy combines the amplification power of enzyme and the inherent high sensitivity of the ECL technique and enables picomolar detection of ATP. The developed strategy also shows high selectivity against ATP analogs, which makes our new label-free and highly sensitive ligation-based method a useful addition to the amplified ATP detection arena. PMID:27154705

  11. A label-free electrochemiluminescent sensor for ATP detection based on ATP-dependent ligation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tingting; Lin, Chunshui; Yao, Qiuhong; Chen, Xi

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we describe a new label-free, sensitive and highly selective strategy for the electrochemiluminescent (ECL) detection of ATP at the picomolar level via ATP-induced ligation. The molecular-beacon like DNA probes (P12 complex) are self-assembled on a gold electrode. The presence of ATP leads to the ligation of P12 complex which blocks the digestion by Exonuclease III (Exo III). The protected P12 complex causes the intercalation of numerous ECL indicators (Ru(phen)3(2+)) into the duplex DNA grooves, resulting in significantly amplified ECL signal output. Since the ligating site of T4 DNA ligase and the nicking site of Exo III are the same, it involves no long time of incubation for conformation change. The proposed strategy combines the amplification power of enzyme and the inherent high sensitivity of the ECL technique and enables picomolar detection of ATP. The developed strategy also shows high selectivity against ATP analogs, which makes our new label-free and highly sensitive ligation-based method a useful addition to the amplified ATP detection arena.

  12. An atpE-specific promoter within the coding region of the atpB gene in tobacco chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, S; Wakasugi, T; Deno, H; Sugiura, M

    1994-09-01

    The atpB and atpE genes encode beta and epsilon subunits, respectively, of chloroplast ATP synthase and are co-transcribed in the plant species so far studied. In tobacco, an atpB gene-specific probe hybridizes to 2.7- and 2.3-kb transcripts. In addition to these, a probe from the atpE coding region hybridizes also to a 1.0-kb transcript. The 5' end of the atpE-specific transcript has been mapped 430/431 nt upstream of the atpE translation initiation site, within the coding region of the atpB gene. In-vitro capping revealed that this transcript results from a primary transcriptional event and is also characterized by -10 and -35 canonical sequences in the 5' region. It has been found to share a common 3' end with the bi-cistronic transcripts that has been mapped within the coding region of the divergently transcribed trnM gene, approximately 236 nt downstream from the atpE termination codon. Interestingly, this transcript accumulates only in leaves and not in proplastid-containing cultured (BY-2) cells, indicating that, unless it is preferentially degraded in BY-2 cells, its expression might be transcriptionally controlled.

  13. Interstitial Fe in MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølholt, T. E.; Mantovan, R.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Svane, A.; Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Fanciulli, M.; Gislason, H. P.; Johnston, K.; Langouche, G.; Ólafsson, S.; Sielemann, R.; Weyer, G.

    2014-01-01

    Isolated 57Fe atoms were studied in MgO single-crystals by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy following implantation of 57Mn decaying to 57Fe. Four Mössbauer spectral components were found corresponding to different Fe lattice positions and/or charge states. Two components represent Fe atoms substituting Mg as Fe2+ and Fe3+, respectively; a third component is due to Fe in a strongly implantation-induced disturbed region. The fourth component, which is the focus of this paper, can be assigned to Fe at an interstitial site. Comparison of its measured isomer shift with ab initio calculations suggests that the interstitial Fe is located on, or close to, the face of the rock-salt MgO structure. To harmonize such an assignment with the measured near-zero quadrupole interaction a local motion process (cage motion) of the Fe has to be stipulated. The relation of such a local motion as a starting point for long range diffusion is discussed.

  14. Interstitial therapy of perineal and gynecological malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, A.; Herstein, P.; Portnuff, J.

    1983-03-01

    Thirty-five patients, 38 to 88 years of age, were treated with 125-Iodine or 192-Iridium interstitial implants at Stanford University Medical Center between July 1974, and December, 1978. There were 25 primary epithelial malignancies, eight extensions from intrapelvic organs and two metastatic tumors (hypernephroma and Hodgkin's disease). The involved sites were: urethra (6 patients); vulva (9 patients); vagina (8 patients); anus (7 patients); cervix (5 patients). Implantation was usually performed to treat evident or microscopic disease in conjunction with external beam pelvic treatment with or without local excision. Computerized implant preplanning was used.125-Iodine seeds were inserted either directly or within absorbable suture Polyglactin 910; 192-Iridium in nylon carriers was placed by suture or transperineal template. Two patients were lost to follow-up leaving 33 patients, 27 of whom are alive and free of local disease from 37 to 76 months. The overall local control rate was 88%, or 29/33 patients. All four local recurrences appeared before 24 months. Minor complications included: 10 patients with transient mucositis, four with superficial ulcers, and one patient with infection at the implanted site. Two major complications occurred: a necrotic rectal ulcer requiring a colostomy and a contracted, painful bladder necessitating a urinary diversion. It is concluded that in selected cases interstitial irradiation provides good local control of perineal and gynecological malignancies with low morbidity in this elderly and quite often fragile group of patients.

  15. Interstitial lung disease in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wells, Athol U

    2014-10-01

    Based on international collaborative data, interstitial lung disease is now the most frequent cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc), having supplanted renal crisis in that regard. Despite detailed explorations of candidate mediators, no primary pathway in the pathogenesis of interstitial lung disease associated with SSc (SSc-ILD) has been definitively identified and, therefore, treatment with current agents is only partially successful. However, as immunomodulatory agents do, on average, retard progression of lung disease, early identification of SSc-ILD, using thoracic high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), is highly desirable. The decision whether to introduce therapy immediately is often difficult as the balance of risk and benefit favours a strategy of careful observation when lung disease is very limited, especially in long-standing SSc. The threshold for initiating treatment is substantially reduced when lung disease is severe, systemic disease is short in duration or ongoing progression is evident, based on pulmonary function tests and symptoms. This review summarises epidemiology, pathogenesis, difficult clinical problems and management issues in SSc-ILD.

  16. Interstitial Fe in MgO

    SciTech Connect

    Mølholt, T. E. Gislason, H. P.; Ólafsson, S.; Mantovan, R.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Svane, A.; Weyer, G.; Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D.; Bharuth-Ram, K.; Fanciulli, M.; Johnston, K.; Sielemann, R.

    2014-01-14

    Isolated {sup 57}Fe atoms were studied in MgO single-crystals by emission Mössbauer spectroscopy following implantation of {sup 57}Mn decaying to {sup 57}Fe. Four Mössbauer spectral components were found corresponding to different Fe lattice positions and/or charge states. Two components represent Fe atoms substituting Mg as Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}, respectively; a third component is due to Fe in a strongly implantation-induced disturbed region. The fourth component, which is the focus of this paper, can be assigned to Fe at an interstitial site. Comparison of its measured isomer shift with ab initio calculations suggests that the interstitial Fe is located on, or close to, the face of the rock-salt MgO structure. To harmonize such an assignment with the measured near-zero quadrupole interaction a local motion process (cage motion) of the Fe has to be stipulated. The relation of such a local motion as a starting point for long range diffusion is discussed.

  17. Acute interstitial pneumonia: report of a series.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi, A; Cancellieri, A; Chilosi, M; Trisolini, R; Boaron, M; Crimi, N; Poletti, V

    2003-01-01

    Four cases of acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) are described with special emphasis on clinical background, lung imaging and bronchoalveolar lavage findings. A retrospective chart review of four patients with histologically-proven AIP, diagnosed between 1998 and 2000, was carried out. Clinical data, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) findings, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and histological features were analysed. Three patients died and only one is in follow-up. HRCT showed areas of ground glass attenuation and alveolar consolidation in all patients. Histology, documented by open lung biopsy or autopsy specimens, was consistent with the organising form of diffuse alveolar damage pattern. BAL findings were characteristic, with a huge neutrophilia associated with scattered atypical type II pneumocytes collected in clusters with extracellular amorphous material (fragments of hyaline membranes) observed in two out of three cases. In this paper, four cases of acute interstitial pneumonia are reported in detail. The poor prognosis associated with this entity has been confirmed and the possible diagnostic role of the bronchoalveolar lavage is emphasised.

  18. Eosinophilic alveolitis in immunologic interstitial lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, D; Pesci, A; Bertorelli, G

    1990-01-01

    To analyze the role of eosinophils in alveolitis due to immunological interstitial lung disorders, 568 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from 537 patients affected by 13 types of interstitial lung disease involving immunologic mechanisms were considered. An arbitrary cut-off of 4% of eosinophils in BAL was assumed. In five (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), amiodarone-induced pneumonitis (AIP), chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP), Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS)) out of the thirteen groups we took into consideration, the level of eosinophils was greater than 4%. In CEP and CSS in particular, the arbitrary cut-off of 4% was greatly exceeded (28.9% +/- 27.4, p less than 0.01 and 33.6% +/- 14.5, p less than 0.01, respectively). In the same two groups the increase of eosinophils in BAL was isolated with a direct correlation to the number of eosinophils in blood. By contrast, the increase of eosinophils in BAL of IPF, AIP and ABPA was of lesser extent (4.7% +/- 5.7 p less than 0.01, 5.0% +/- 3.0 p less than 0.01 and 6.1% +/- 10.4 p less than 0.01, respectively) and was accompanied by an increase of neutrophils in IPF, of lymphocytes in AIP and both in ABPA. These patterns are generally defined as "mixed alveolitis." On the basis of these data we conclude that the term "eosinophilic alveolitis" should be reserved for CEP and CSS.

  19. Fire performance of interstitial space construction system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, J. R.

    1985-05-01

    Two unique walk-on deck construction systems were exposed to the standard NFPA 251 time-temperature fire exposure in order to evaluate their fire performance. A large scale steel structure was used in the test program to simulate construction systems found in the field. The structure consisted of two large functional floors separate by an interstitial space in which a walk-on deck system was constructed from light-weight concrete, and the second was built with poured gypsum. Three complete two hour fire tests were conducted along with one shorter test. Critical areas evaluated were the top functional floor, unprotected steel work in the interstitial space, response of the walk-on deck systems, and protection for a heavy steel column located in the center of each test bay. Test data were compared with the fire endurance test requirements of NFPA 251. Computer predictions were also made using the FIRES-08 model to determine its ability to accurately predict the construction systems performance.

  20. Acute allergic interstitial pneumonitis induced by hydrochlorothiazide.

    PubMed Central

    Biron, P; Dessureault, J; Napke, E

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the clinical features of 4 unpublished cases and 26 published cases of acute allergic interstitial pneumonitis induced by hydrochlorothiazide (HCT). DATA SOURCES: The unpublished cases were found in the database of the Drug Adverse Reaction Program, Health Protection Branch, Department of National Health and Welfare, and the database of the Programme conjoint de pharmacovigilance, in Quebec. The published cases were retrieved from MEDLINE and EMBASE. STUDY SELECTION: Reported cases were selected if they were sufficiently documented. All published cases were selected because a differential diagnosis had been made in each one. DATA SYNTHESIS: The onset was acute and dramatic; the average time to onset of symptoms was 44 minutes. Sex was a predominant risk factor, since 27 (90%) of the 30 patients were women. The average age was 56 years; thus, most of the women were postmenopausal. Over two-thirds of the patients had one to three positive prechallenges or rechallenges, 3 of the 52 documented adverse events occurred after a voluntary rechallenge, some were life-threatening and necessitated mechanical ventilation, and 1 was fatal. Treatment was supportive; avoidance of HCT was the only prevention. CONCLUSION: Acute allergic interstitial pneumonitis due to HCT is extremely rare and potentially fatal. Such a reaction can be diagnosed only if the clinician suspects it when presented with a case of unexplained acute pulmonary edema. PMID:2049694

  1. Tissue temperature monitoring during interstitial photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Jenny; Johansson, Ann; Svanberg, Katarina; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2005-04-01

    During δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) based Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy (IPDT) a high light fluence rate is present close to the source fibers. This might induce an unintentional tissue temperature increase of importance for the treatment outcome. In a previous study, we have observed, that the absorption in the tissue increases during the treatment. A system to measure the local tissue temperature at the source fibers during IPDT on tissue phantoms is presented. The temperature was measured by acquiring the fluorescence from small Cr3+-doped crystals attached to the tip of the illumination fiber used in an IPDT-system. The fluorescence of the Alexandrite crystal used is temperature dependent. A ratio of the intensity of the fluorescence was formed between two different wavelength bands in the red region. The system was calibrated by immersing the fibers in an Intralipid solution placed in a temperature controlled oven. Measurements were then performed by placing the fibers interstitially in a pork chop as a tissue phantom. Measurements were also performed superficially on skin on a volunteer. A treatment was conducted for 10 minutes, and the fluorescence was measured each minute during the illumination. The fluorescence yielded the temperature at the fiber tip through the calibration curve. The measurements indicate a temperature increase of a few degrees during the simulated treatment.

  2. Multigenerational interstitial growth of biological tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ricken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study formulates a theory for multigenerational interstitial growth of biological tissues whereby each generation has a distinct reference configuration determined at the time of its deposition. In this model, the solid matrix of a growing tissue consists of a multiplicity of intermingled porous permeable bodies, each of which represents a generation, all of which are constrained to move together in the current configuration. Each generation’s reference configuration has a one-to-one mapping with the master reference configuration, which is typically that of the first generation. This mapping is postulated based on a constitutive assumption with regard to that generations’ state of stress at the time of its deposition. For example, the newly deposited generation may be assumed to be in a stress-free state, even though the underlying tissue is in a loaded configuration. The mass content of each generation may vary over time as a result of growth or degradation, thereby altering the material properties of the tissue. A finite element implementation of this framework is used to provide several illustrative examples, including interstitial growth by cell division followed by matrix turnover. PMID:20238138

  3. Dynamic imaging of free cytosolic ATP concentration during fuel sensing by rat hypothalamic neurones: evidence for ATP-independent control of ATP-sensitive K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Ainscow, Edward K; Mirshamsi, Shirin; Tang, Teresa; Ashford, Michael L J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-01-01

    Glucose-responsive (GR) neurons from hypothalamic nuclei are implicated in the regulation of feeding and satiety. To determine the role of intracellular ATP in the closure of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels in these cells and associated glia, the cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP]c) was monitored in vivo using adenoviral-driven expression of recombinant targeted luciferases and bioluminescence imaging. Arguing against a role for ATP in the closure of KATP channels in GR neurons, glucose (3 or 15 mm) caused no detectable increase in [ATP]c, monitored with cytosolic luciferase, and only a small decrease in the concentration of ATP immediately beneath the plasma membrane, monitored with a SNAP25–luciferase fusion protein. In contrast to hypothalamic neurons, hypothalamic glia responded to glucose (3 and 15 mm) with a significant increase in [ATP]c. Both neurons and glia from the cerebellum, a glucose-unresponsive region of the brain, responded robustly to 3 or 15 mm glucose with increases in [ATP]c. Further implicating an ATP-independent mechanism of KATP channel closure in hypothalamic neurons, removal of extracellular glucose (10 mm) suppressed the electrical activity of GR neurons in the presence of a fixed, high concentration (3 mm) of intracellular ATP. Neurons from both brain regions responded to 5 mm lactate (but not pyruvate) with an oligomycin-sensitive increase in [ATP]c. High levels of the plasma membrane lactate-monocarboxylate transporter, MCT1, were found in both cell types, and exogenous lactate efficiently closed KATP channels in GR neurons. These data suggest that (1) ATP-independent intracellular signalling mechanisms lead to the stimulation of hypothalamic neurons by glucose, and (2) these effects may be potentiated in vivo by the release of lactate from neighbouring glial cells. PMID:12381816

  4. Yeast mitochondria import ATP through the calcium-dependent ATP-Mg/Pi carrier Sal1p, and are ATP consumers during aerobic growth in glucose.

    PubMed

    Traba, Javier; Froschauer, Elisabeth Maria; Wiesenberger, Gerlinde; Satrústegui, Jorgina; Del Arco, Araceli

    2008-08-01

    Sal1p, a novel Ca2+-dependent ATP-Mg/Pi carrier, is essential in yeast lacking all adenine nucleotide translocases. By targeting luciferase to the mitochondrial matrix to monitor mitochondrial ATP levels, we show in isolated mitochondria that both ATP-Mg and free ADP are taken up by Sal1p with a K(m) of 0.20 +/- 0.03 mM and 0.28 +/- 0.06 mM respectively. Nucleotide transport along Sal1p is strictly Ca2+ dependent. Ca2+ increases the V(max) with a S(0.5) of 15 muM, and no changes in the K(m) for ATP-Mg. Glucose sensing in yeast generates Ca2+ transients involving Ca2+ influx from the external medium. We find that carbon-deprived cells respond to glucose with an immediate increase in mitochondrial ATP levels which is not observed in the presence of EGTA or in Sal1p-deficient cells. Moreover, we now report that during normal aerobic growth on glucose, yeast mitochondria import ATP from the cytosol and hydrolyse it through H+-ATP synthase. We identify two pathways for ATP uptake in mitochondria, the ADP/ATP carriers and Sal1p. Thus, during exponential growth on glucose, mitochondria are ATP consumers, as those from cells growing in anaerobic conditions or deprived of mitochondrial DNA which depend on cytosolic ATP and mitochondrial ATPase working in reverse to generate a mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, the results show that growth on glucose requires ATP hydrolysis in mitochondria and recruits Sal1p as a Ca2+-dependent mechanism to import ATP-Mg from the cytosol. Whether this mechanism is used under similar settings in higher eukaryotes is an open question.

  5. Genomic Analysis of ATP Efflux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Peters, Theodore W; Miller, Aaron W; Tourette, Cendrine; Agren, Hannah; Hubbard, Alan; Hughes, Robert E

    2015-11-19

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plays an important role as a primary molecule for the transfer of chemical energy to drive biological processes. ATP also functions as an extracellular signaling molecule in a diverse array of eukaryotic taxa in a conserved process known as purinergic signaling. Given the important roles of extracellular ATP in cell signaling, we sought to comprehensively elucidate the pathways and mechanisms governing ATP efflux from eukaryotic cells. Here, we present results of a genomic analysis of ATP efflux from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by measuring extracellular ATP levels in cultures of 4609 deletion mutants. This screen revealed key cellular processes that regulate extracellular ATP levels, including mitochondrial translation and vesicle sorting in the late endosome, indicating that ATP production and transport through vesicles are required for efflux. We also observed evidence for altered ATP efflux in strains deleted for genes involved in amino acid signaling, and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the retrograde signaling pathway potentiates amino acid signaling to promote mitochondrial respiration. This study advances our understanding of the mechanism of ATP secretion in eukaryotes and implicates TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and nutrient signaling pathways in the regulation of ATP efflux. These results will facilitate analysis of ATP efflux mechanisms in higher eukaryotes.

  6. Physiological levels of ATP Negatively Regulate Proteasome Function

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hongbiao; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Li, Shujue; Liu, Ningning; Lian, Wen; McDowell, Emily; Zhou, Ping; Zhao, Canguo; Guo, Haiping; Zhang, Change; Yang, Changshan; Wen, Guangmei; Dong, Xiaoxian; Lu, Li; Ma, Ningfang; Dong, Weihua; Dou, Q. Ping; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is ATP-dependent and the optimal ATP concentration to activate proteasome function in vitro is ~100 μM. Intracellular ATP levels are generally in the low millimolar range but ATP at a level within this range was shown to inhibit proteasome peptidase activities in vitro. Here we report new evidence that supports a hypothesis that intracellular ATP at the physiological levels bidirectionally regulates 26S proteasome proteolytic function in the cell. First, we confirmed that ATP exerted bidirectional regulation on the 26S proteasome in vitro, with the optimal ATP concentration (between 50–100 μM) stimulating proteasome chymotrypsin-like activities. Second, we found that manipulating intracellular ATP levels also led to bidirectional changes in the levels of proteasome-specific protein substrates in cultured cells. Finally, measures to increase intracellular ATP enhanced, while decreasing intracellular ATP attenuated, the ability of proteasome inhibition to induce cell death. These data strongly suggest that endogenous ATP within the physiological concentration range can exert a negative impact on proteasome activities, allowing the cell to rapidly up-regulate proteasome activity upon ATP reduction under stress conditions. PMID:20805844

  7. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Wang, C; Fujita, T; Malmstrom, H S; Nedergaard, M; Ren, Y F; Dirksen, R T

    2015-09-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation-induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. PMID:26130258

  8. External Dentin Stimulation Induces ATP Release in Human Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C.; Fujita, T.; Malmstrom, H.S.; Nedergaard, M.; Ren, Y.F.; Dirksen, R.T.

    2015-01-01

    ATP is involved in neurosensory processing, including nociceptive transduction. Thus, ATP signaling may participate in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. In this study, we investigated whether pannexins, which can form mechanosensitive ATP-permeable channels, are present in human dental pulp. We also assessed the existence and functional activity of ecto-ATPase for extracellular ATP degradation. We further tested if ATP is released from dental pulp upon dentin mechanical or thermal stimulation that induces dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain and if pannexin or pannexin/gap junction channel blockers reduce stimulation-dependent ATP release. Using immunofluorescence staining, we demonstrated immunoreactivity of pannexin 1 and 2 in odontoblasts and their processes extending into the dentin tubules. Using enzymatic histochemistry staining, we also demonstrated functional ecto-ATPase activity within the odontoblast layer, subodontoblast layer, dental pulp nerve bundles, and blood vessels. Using an ATP bioluminescence assay, we found that mechanical or cold stimulation to the exposed dentin induced ATP release in an in vitro human tooth perfusion model. We further demonstrated that blocking pannexin/gap junction channels with probenecid or carbenoxolone significantly reduced external dentin stimulation–induced ATP release. Our results provide evidence for the existence of functional machinery required for ATP release and degradation in human dental pulp and that pannexin channels are involved in external dentin stimulation–induced ATP release. These findings support a plausible role for ATP signaling in dentin hypersensitivity and dental pain. PMID:26130258

  9. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in skeletal muscle health and disease.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jingsong; Dhakal, Kamal; Yi, Jianxun

    2016-08-01

    Muscle uses Ca(2+) as a messenger to control contraction and relies on ATP to maintain the intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Mitochondria are the major sub-cellular organelle of ATP production. With a negative inner membrane potential, mitochondria take up Ca(2+) from their surroundings, a process called mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Under physiological conditions, Ca(2+) uptake into mitochondria promotes ATP production. Excessive uptake causes mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload, which activates downstream adverse responses leading to cell dysfunction. Moreover, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake could shape spatio-temporal patterns of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Malfunction of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is implicated in muscle degeneration. Unlike non-excitable cells, mitochondria in muscle cells experience dramatic changes of intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Besides the sudden elevation of Ca(2+) level induced by action potentials, Ca(2+) transients in muscle cells can be as short as a few milliseconds during a single twitch or as long as minutes during tetanic contraction, which raises the question whether mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is fast and big enough to shape intracellular Ca(2+) signaling during excitation-contraction coupling and creates technical challenges for quantification of the dynamic changes of Ca(2+) inside mitochondria. This review focuses on characterization of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in skeletal muscle and its role in muscle physiology and diseases. PMID:27430885

  10. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype.

  11. Cav1.1 controls frequency-dependent events regulating adult skeletal muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Jorquera, Gonzalo; Altamirano, Francisco; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Almarza, Gonzalo; Buvinic, Sonja; Jacquemond, Vincent; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-03-01

    An important pending question in neuromuscular biology is how skeletal muscle cells decipher the stimulation pattern coming from motoneurons to define their phenotype as slow or fast twitch muscle fibers. We have previously shown that voltage-gated L-type calcium channel (Cav1.1) acts as a voltage sensor for activation of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P₃]-dependent Ca(2+) signals that regulates gene expression. ATP released by muscle cells after electrical stimulation through pannexin-1 channels plays a key role in this process. We show now that stimulation frequency determines both ATP release and Ins(1,4,5)P₃ production in adult skeletal muscle and that Cav1.1 and pannexin-1 colocalize in the transverse tubules. Both ATP release and increased Ins(1,4,5)P₃ was seen in flexor digitorum brevis fibers stimulated with 270 pulses at 20 Hz, but not at 90 Hz. 20 Hz stimulation induced transcriptional changes related to fast-to-slow muscle fiber phenotype transition that required ATP release. Addition of 30 µM ATP to fibers induced the same transcriptional changes observed after 20 Hz stimulation. Myotubes lacking the Cav1.1-α1 subunit released almost no ATP after electrical stimulation, showing that Cav1.1 has a central role in this process. In adult muscle fibers, ATP release and the transcriptional changes produced by 20 Hz stimulation were blocked by both the Cav1.1 antagonist nifedipine (25 µM) and by the Cav1.1 agonist (-)S-BayK 8644 (10 µM). We propose a new role for Cav1.1, independent of its calcium channel activity, in the activation of signaling pathways allowing muscle fibers to decipher the frequency of electrical stimulation and to activate specific transcriptional programs that define their phenotype. PMID:23321639

  12. Space shuttle (ATP configuration) abort staging investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampy, J. M.; Blackwell, K. L.; Allen, E. C., Jr.; Fossler, I.

    1973-01-01

    A wind tunnel test conducted in a 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel to determine the force and moment characteristics of the ATP Orbiter and modified ATP External Tank/SRB combination during abort staging conditions is discussed. Six component aerodynamic force and moment data were recorded for the orbiter and ET/SRB combination. Pitch polars were obtained for an angle of attack range from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees and orbiter incidence angles (orbiter relative to the ET/SRB combination) of 0 and 2 degrees. A limited amount of yaw data were obtained at 0 degree angle of attack and beta range from minus 10 to plus 10 degrees. In addition, orbiter pitch control effectiveness was determined at several grid points. These force and moment data were obtained for Mach numbers of 0.9, 1.2 and 2.0.

  13. Regional vascular responses to ATP and ATP analogues in the rabbit kidney in vivo: roles for adenosine receptors and prostanoids

    PubMed Central

    Eppel, G A; Ventura, S; Evans, R G

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Our knowledge of the effects of P2-receptor activation on renal vascular tone comes mostly from in vitro models. We aimed to characterise the pharmacology of ATP in the renal circulation in vivo. Experimental approach: In pentobarbitone anaesthetized rabbits, we examined total renal and medullary vascular responses to ATP (0.2 and 0.8 mg kg-1), β,γ-methylene ATP (β,γ-mATP, 7 and 170 μg kg-1), α,β-mATP (0.2 and 2 μg kg-1) and adenosine (2 and 6 μg kg-1) using transit-time ultrasound and laser Doppler flowmetry, respectively. We also determined whether adenosine receptors, NO or prostanoids contribute to the actions of the purinoceptor agonists. Key results: Renal arterial boluses of ATP, β,γ-mATP, and adenosine produced biphasic changes; ischaemia followed by hyperaemia, in total renal and medullary blood flow. α,β-mATP induced only ischaemia. The adenosine receptor antagonist 8-(p-sulphophenyl)theophylline reduced the responses to adenosine and the hyperaemic responses to ATP and β,γ-mATP only. NO synthase inhibition (Nω-nitro-L-arginine) did not significantly alter responses to the P2 receptor agonists. Subsequent cyclooxygenase inhibition (ibuprofen) reduced the ATP- and β,γ-mATP-induced increases in renal blood flow. All other responses remained unchanged. Conclusions and implications: In the rabbit kidney in vivo, α,β-mATP sensitive receptors mediate vasoconstriction. β,γ-mATP and ATP induce vasodilation at least partly through adenosine receptors. ATP induced renal vasodilatation is independent of NO and partly dependent on prostanoids in the bulk of the kidney, but not in the vasculature controlling medullary blood flow. PMID:16981003

  14. Regulation of mitochondrial translation of the ATP8/ATP6 mRNA by Smt1p

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Malgorzata; Su, Chen Hsien; Xu, Jonathan Tong; Azpiroz, Ricardo; Singh, Angela Mohan; Tzagoloff, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the mitochondrially encoded ATP6 and ATP8 genes is translationally regulated by F1 ATPase. We report a translational repressor (Smt1p) of the ATP6/8 mRNA that, when mutated, restores translation of the encoded Atp6p and Atp8p subunits of the ATP synthase. Heterozygous smt1 mutants fail to rescue the translation defect, indicating that the mutations are recessive. Smt1p is an intrinsic inner membrane protein, which, based on its sedimentation, has a native size twice that of the monomer. Affinity purification of tagged Smt1p followed by reverse transcription of the associated RNA and PCR amplification of the resultant cDNA with gene-specific primers demonstrated the presence in mitochondria of Smt1p-ATP8/ATP6 and Smt1p-COB mRNA complexes. These results indicate that Smt1p is likely to be involved in translational regulation of both mRNAs. Applying Occam’s principle, we favor a mechanistic model in which translation of the ATP8/ATP6 bicistronic mRNA is coupled to the availability of F1 for subsequent assembly of the Atp6p and Atp8p products into the ATP synthase. The mechanism of this regulatory pathway is proposed to entail a displacement of the repressor from the translationally mute Smt1-ATP8/ATP6 complex by F1, thereby permitting the Atp22p activator to interact with and promote translation of the mRNA. PMID:26823015

  15. H+/ATP ratio during ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria: modification of the chemiosmotic theory.

    PubMed

    Brand, M D; Lehninger, A L

    1977-05-01

    The stoichiometry of H+ ejection by mitochondria during hydrolysis of a small pulse of ATP (the H+/ATP ratio) has been reexamined in the light of our recent observation that the stoichiometry of H+ ejection during mitochondrial electron transport (the H+/site ratio) was previously underestimated. We show that earlier estimates of the H+/ATP ratio in intact mitochondria were based upon an invalid correction for scaler H+ production and describe a modified method for determination of this ratio which utilizes mersalyl or N-ethylmaleimide to prevent complicating transmembrane movements of phosphate and H+. This method gives a value for the H+/ATP ratio of 2.0 without the need for questionable corrections, compared with a value of 3.0 for the H+/site ratio also obtained by pulse methods. A modified version of the chemiosmotic theory is presented, in which 3 H+ are ejected per pair of electrons traversing each energy-conserving site of the respiratory chain. Of these, 2 H+ return to the matrix through the ATPase to form ATP from ADP and phosphate, and 1 H+ returns through the combined action of the phosphate and adenine nucleotide exchange carriers of the inner membrane to allow the energy-requiring influx of Pi and ADP3- and efflux of ATP4-. Thus, up to one-third of the energy input into synthesis of extramitochondrial ATP may be required for transport work. Since other methods suggest that the H+/site significantly exceeds 3.0, an alternative possibility is that 4 h+ are ejected per site, followed by return of 3 H+ through the ATPase and 1 H+ through the operation of the proton-coupled membrane transport systems.

  16. Cold Work Embrittlement of Interstitial-Free Steels

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    Interstitial-free (IF) steels are defined by their low amounts of solute interstitial elements, such as carbon and nitrogen. During secondary forming, strain can be localized at the grain boundaries of these steels, resulting in secondary cold work embrittlement (CWE).

  17. Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis: A rare association.

    PubMed

    Radha, S; Tameem, A; Rao, B S

    2014-03-01

    Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN) is a rare form of, progressive chronic interstitial nephritis. We present a case of KIN in a child, who was also found to have nephrotic syndrome because of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis on renal biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of KIN associated with glomerulopathy.

  18. Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis: A rare association

    PubMed Central

    Radha, S.; Tameem, A.; Rao, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN) is a rare form of, progressive chronic interstitial nephritis. We present a case of KIN in a child, who was also found to have nephrotic syndrome because of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis on renal biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first case of KIN associated with glomerulopathy. PMID:24701046

  19. Adenylate kinase 1 gene deletion disrupts muscle energetic economy despite metabolic rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Edwin; Dzeja, Petras P.; Oerlemans, Frank; Simonetti, Arjan W.; Heerschap, Arend; Haan, Arnold de; Rush, Paula S.; Terjung, Ronald R.; Wieringa, Bé; Terzic, Andre

    2000-01-01

    Efficient cellular energy homeostasis is a critical determinant of muscle performance, providing evolutionary advantages responsible for species survival. Phosphotransfer reactions, which couple ATP production and utilization, are thought to play a central role in this process. Here, we provide evidence that genetic disruption of AK1-catalyzed β-phosphoryl transfer in mice decreases the potential of myofibers to sustain nucleotide ratios despite up-regulation of high-energy phosphoryl flux through glycolytic, guanylate and creatine kinase phosphotransfer pathways. A maintained contractile performance of AK1-deficient muscles was associated with higher ATP turnover rate and larger amounts of ATP consumed per contraction. Metabolic stress further aggravated the energetic cost in AK1–/– muscles. Thus, AK1-catalyzed phosphotransfer is essential in the maintenance of cellular energetic economy, enabling skeletal muscle to perform at the lowest metabolic cost. PMID:11101510

  20. ATP synthase: a tentative structural model.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, S; Junge, W

    1997-09-15

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase produces ATP from ADP and inorganic phosphate at the expense of proton- or sodium-motive force across the respective coupling membrane in Archaea, Bacteria and Eucarya. Cation flow through the intrinsic membrane portion of this enzyme (Fo, subunits ab2c9-12) and substrate turnover in the headpiece (F1, subunits alpha3beta3 gammadeltaepsilon) are mechanically coupled by the rotation of subunit gamma in the center of the catalytic hexagon of subunits (alphabeta)3 in F1. ATP synthase is the smallest rotatory engine in nature. With respect to the headpiece alone, it probably operates with three steps. Partial structures of six out of its at least eight different subunits have been published and a 3-dimensional structure is available for the assembly (alphabeta)3gamma. In this article, we review the available structural data and build a tentative topological model of the holoenzyme. The rotor portion is proposed to consist of a wheel of at least nine copies of subunits c, epsilon and a portion of gamma as a spoke, and another portion of gamma as a crankshaft. The stator is made up from a, the transmembrane portion of b2, delta and the catalytic hexagon of (alphabeta)3. As an educated guess, the model may be of heuristic value for ongoing studies on this fascinating electrochemical-to-mechanical-to-chemical transducer. PMID:9323021

  1. Sympathetic co-transmission: the coordinated action of ATP and noradrenaline and their modulation by neuropeptide Y in human vascular neuroeffector junctions.

    PubMed

    Pablo Huidobro-Toro, J; Verónica Donoso, M

    2004-10-01

    The historical role of noradrenaline as the predominant sympathetic neurotransmitter in vascular neuroeffector junctions has matured to include ATP and the modulator action of neuropeptide Y (NPY). Numerous studies with isolated blood vessels rings demonstrate the presence of key enzymes responsible for the synthesis of ATP, noradrenaline and NPY, their co-storage, and their electrically evoked release from sympathetic perivascular nerve terminals. Functional assays coincide to demonstrate the integral role of these neurochemicals in sympathetic reflexes. In addition, the detection of the diverse receptor populations for ATP, noradrenaline and NPY in blood vessels, either in the smooth muscle, endothelial cells or nerve endings, further contribute to the notion that sympathetic vascular reflexes encompass the orchestrated action of the noradrenaline and ATP, and their modulation by NPY. The future clinical opportunities of sympathetic co-transmission in the control of human cardiovascular diseases will be highlighted.

  2. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a possible indicator of extraterrestrial biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ubiquity of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in terrestrial organisms provides the basis for proposing the assay of this vital metabolic intermediate for detecting extraterrestrial biological activity. If an organic carbon chemistry is present on the planets, the occurrence of ATP is possible either from biosynthetic or purely chemical reactions. However, ATP's relative complexity minimizes the probability of abiogenic synthesis. A sensitive technique for the quantitative detection of ATP was developed using the firefly bioluminescent reaction. The procedure was used successfully for the determination of the ATP content of soil and bacteria. This technique is also being investigated from the standpoint of its application in clinical medicine.

  3. Effect of continuous ATP injection on human hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Komukai, Kimiaki; Hashimoto, Koichi; Shibata, Takahiro; Iwano, Keiji; Muto, Makoto; Mogi, Junichi; Imai, Kamon; Horie, Toshinobu; Mochizuki, Seibu

    2002-10-01

    Continuous ATP injection is used clinically for Tl imaging or coronary flow measurement and because the effect on human hemodynamics is unknown, the present study investigated it in 14 patients undergoing heart catheter examination. Continuous ATP injection induced chest symptoms in 13 of the patients and second-degree atrioventricular block in one, but these complications disappeared immediately after the end of ATP infusion. Continuous ATP injection decreased aortic pressure, but increased pulmonary artery pressure, right atrial pressure and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. ATP increased heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output, the latter the result of an increase in preload, a decrease in afterload, and the increase in heart rate. PMID:12381087

  4. Low-level laser (light) therapy increases mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP synthesis in C2C12 myotubes with a peak response at 3-6 h.

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Kaippert, Beatriz; Avci, Pinar; Huang, Ying-Ying; de Sousa, Marcelo V P; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy has been used before exercise to increase muscle performance in both experimental animals and in humans. However, uncertainty exists concerning the optimum time to apply the light before exercise. The mechanism of action is thought to be stimulation of mitochondrial respiration in muscles, and to increase adenosine triphosphate (ATP) needed to perform exercise. The goal of this study was to investigate the time course of the increases in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP in myotubes formed from C2C12 mouse muscle cells and exposed to light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT). LEDT employed a cluster of LEDs with 20 red (630 ± 10 nm, 25 mW) and 20 near-infrared (850 ± 10 nm, 50 mW) delivering 28 mW cm(2) for 90 s (2.5 J cm(2)) with analysis at 5 min, 3 h, 6 h and 24 h post-LEDT. LEDT-6 h had the highest MMP, followed by LEDT-3 h, LEDT-24 h, LEDT-5 min and Control with significant differences. The same order (6 h > 3 h > 24 h > 5 min > Control) was found for ATP with significant differences. A good correlation was found (r = 0.89) between MMP and ATP. These data suggest an optimum time window of 3-6 h for LEDT stimulate muscle cells.

  5. Effects of graded LBNP on MSNA and interstitial norepinephrine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Mazhar H.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.; MacLean, David A.

    2002-01-01

    Exposure to lower body negative pressure (LBNP) leads to an increased activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and an increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). In this study, we examined the relationship between MSNA and interstitial norepinephrine (NE(i)) concentrations during LBNP. Twelve healthy volunteers were studied (26 +/- 6 yr). Simultaneous MSNA and microdialysis data were collected in six of these subjects. Measurements of MSNA (microneurography) and NE(i) (microdialysis, vastus lateralis) were performed at rest and then during an incremental LBNP paradigm (-10, -30, and -50 mmHg). MSNA rose as a function of LBNP (P < 0.001, n = 12). The plasma norepinephrine (NE(p)) concentration was 0.9 +/- 0.1 nmol/l at rest (n = 12). NE(i) measured in six subjects rose from 5.2 +/- 0.8 nmol/l at rest to 17.0 +/- 1.7 nmol/l at -50 mmHg (P < 0.001). Of note, the rise in NE(p) with LBNP was considerably less compared with the changes in NE(i) (Delta21 +/- 6% vs. Delta197 +/- 52%, n = 6, P < 0.015). MSNA and NE(i) showed a significant linear relationship (r = 0.721, P < 0.004). Activation of the SNS increased MSNA and NE(i) levels. The magnitude of the NE(i) increase was far greater than that seen for NE(p) suggesting that NE movement into the circulation decreases with baroreceptor unloading.

  6. Balance point characterization of interstitial fluid volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Laine, G A; Stewart, R H; Quick, C M

    2009-07-01

    The individual processes involved in interstitial fluid volume and protein regulation (microvascular filtration, lymphatic return, and interstitial storage) are relatively simple, yet their interaction is exceedingly complex. There is a notable lack of a first-order, algebraic formula that relates interstitial fluid pressure and protein to critical parameters commonly used to characterize the movement of interstitial fluid and protein. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to develop a simple, transparent, and general algebraic approach that predicts interstitial fluid pressure (P(i)) and protein concentrations (C(i)) that takes into consideration all three processes. Eight standard equations characterizing fluid and protein flux were solved simultaneously to yield algebraic equations for P(i) and C(i) as functions of parameters characterizing microvascular, interstitial, and lymphatic function. Equilibrium values of P(i) and C(i) arise as balance points from the graphical intersection of transmicrovascular and lymph flows (analogous to Guyton's classical cardiac output-venous return curves). This approach goes beyond describing interstitial fluid balance in terms of conservation of mass by introducing the concept of inflow and outflow resistances. Algebraic solutions demonstrate that P(i) and C(i) result from a ratio of the microvascular filtration coefficient (1/inflow resistance) and effective lymphatic resistance (outflow resistance), and P(i) is unaffected by interstitial compliance. These simple algebraic solutions predict P(i) and C(i) that are consistent with reported measurements. The present work therefore presents a simple, transparent, and general balance point characterization of interstitial fluid balance resulting from the interaction of microvascular, interstitial, and lymphatic function. PMID:19420292

  7. Balance point characterization of interstitial fluid volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Laine, G A; Stewart, R H; Quick, C M

    2009-07-01

    The individual processes involved in interstitial fluid volume and protein regulation (microvascular filtration, lymphatic return, and interstitial storage) are relatively simple, yet their interaction is exceedingly complex. There is a notable lack of a first-order, algebraic formula that relates interstitial fluid pressure and protein to critical parameters commonly used to characterize the movement of interstitial fluid and protein. Therefore, the purpose of the present study is to develop a simple, transparent, and general algebraic approach that predicts interstitial fluid pressure (P(i)) and protein concentrations (C(i)) that takes into consideration all three processes. Eight standard equations characterizing fluid and protein flux were solved simultaneously to yield algebraic equations for P(i) and C(i) as functions of parameters characterizing microvascular, interstitial, and lymphatic function. Equilibrium values of P(i) and C(i) arise as balance points from the graphical intersection of transmicrovascular and lymph flows (analogous to Guyton's classical cardiac output-venous return curves). This approach goes beyond describing interstitial fluid balance in terms of conservation of mass by introducing the concept of inflow and outflow resistances. Algebraic solutions demonstrate that P(i) and C(i) result from a ratio of the microvascular filtration coefficient (1/inflow resistance) and effective lymphatic resistance (outflow resistance), and P(i) is unaffected by interstitial compliance. These simple algebraic solutions predict P(i) and C(i) that are consistent with reported measurements. The present work therefore presents a simple, transparent, and general balance point characterization of interstitial fluid balance resulting from the interaction of microvascular, interstitial, and lymphatic function.

  8. QiShenYiQi Attenuates Renal Interstitial Fibrosis by Blocking the Activation of β-Catenin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanmei; Hu, Zheng; Li, Mei; Zhu, Fengxin; Zhang, Hao; Nie, Jing; Ai, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming a worldwide problem. However, current treatment options are limited. In the current study we showed that QiShenYiQi (QSYQ), a water-ethanol extract from several Chinese medicines, is a potent inhibitor of renal interstitial fibrosis. QSYQ inhibited transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-responsive α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen I, and fibronectin up-regulation in obstructive nephropathy and cultured cells. Administration of QSYQ also inhibited the established renal interstitial fibrosis in obstructive nephropathy. Interestingly, QSYQ selectively inhibited TGF-β1-induced β-catenin up-regulation and downstream gene transcription. Taken together, our study suggests that QSYQ selectively inhibits TGF-β1-induced β-catenin up-regulation and might have significant therapeutic potential for the treatment of renal fibrosis. PMID:27636716

  9. Ultrastructure of the genital organs in interstitial polychaetes. III. Penes and ejaculatory ducts in Hesionides arenaria (Hesionidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westheide, W.

    1982-12-01

    The ejaculatory ducts of the two paired copulatory organs in the interstitial polychaete Hesionides arenaria are ciliated tubes, which open into simple, partly groove-like, non-stiffened penis papillae. The larger part of the ducts within the dorsal body wall is surrounded by circular muscle cells. Voluminous gland cell bodies lie between the pharynx-gut system and the body wall in the anterior part of the body; they extend anteriorly like long, thin necks, of which severl are always united in prominent strands. Their distal ends are expanded and penetrate the ducts. Six different types of glands can be distinguished according to the ultrastructure of their secretory granules. They produce the sheath of the double spermatophore or probably contain lytic enzymes that provide for the penetration of sperm into the body of the female. Differences in ultrastructure of the male organs in the interstitial genera Hesionides and Microphthalmus do not support the recent erection of the subfamily “Microphthalminae”.

  10. QiShenYiQi Attenuates Renal Interstitial Fibrosis by Blocking the Activation of β-Catenin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei; Zhu, Fengxin; Zhang, Hao; Nie, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming a worldwide problem. However, current treatment options are limited. In the current study we showed that QiShenYiQi (QSYQ), a water-ethanol extract from several Chinese medicines, is a potent inhibitor of renal interstitial fibrosis. QSYQ inhibited transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-responsive α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), collagen I, and fibronectin up-regulation in obstructive nephropathy and cultured cells. Administration of QSYQ also inhibited the established renal interstitial fibrosis in obstructive nephropathy. Interestingly, QSYQ selectively inhibited TGF-β1-induced β-catenin up-regulation and downstream gene transcription. Taken together, our study suggests that QSYQ selectively inhibits TGF-β1-induced β-catenin up-regulation and might have significant therapeutic potential for the treatment of renal fibrosis. PMID:27636716

  11. ATP synthases from archaea: the beauty of a molecular motor.

    PubMed

    Grüber, Gerhard; Manimekalai, Malathy Sony Subramanian; Mayer, Florian; Müller, Volker

    2014-06-01

    Archaea live under different environmental conditions, such as high salinity, extreme pHs and cold or hot temperatures. How energy is conserved under such harsh environmental conditions is a major question in cellular bioenergetics of archaea. The key enzymes in energy conservation are the archaeal A1AO ATP synthases, a class of ATP synthases distinct from the F1FO ATP synthase ATP synthase found in bacteria, mitochondria and chloroplasts and the V1VO ATPases of eukaryotes. A1AO ATP synthases have distinct structural features such as a collar-like structure, an extended central stalk, and two peripheral stalks possibly stabilizing the A1AO ATP synthase during rotation in ATP synthesis/hydrolysis at high temperatures as well as to provide the storage of transient elastic energy during ion-pumping and ATP synthesis/-hydrolysis. High resolution structures of individual subunits and subcomplexes have been obtained in recent years that shed new light on the function and mechanism of this unique class of ATP synthases. An outstanding feature of archaeal A1AO ATP synthases is their diversity in size of rotor subunits and the coupling ion used for ATP synthesis with H(+), Na(+) or even H(+) and Na(+) using enzymes. The evolution of the H(+) binding site to a Na(+) binding site and its implications for the energy metabolism and physiology of the cell are discussed.

  12. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors augment UT-15C-stimulated ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Elizabeth A; Moody, Gina N; Yeragunta, Yashaswini; Stephenson, Alan H; Ellsworth, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    Both prostacyclin analogs and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are effective treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In addition to direct effects on vascular smooth muscle, prostacyclin analogs increase cAMP levels and ATP release from healthy human erythrocytes. We hypothesized that UT-15C, an orally available form of the prostacyclin analog, treprostinil, would stimulate ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with PAH and that this release would be augmented by PDE5 inhibitors. Erythrocytes were isolated and the effect of UT-15C on cAMP levels and ATP release were measured in the presence and absence of the PDE5 inhibitors, zaprinast or tadalafil. In addition, the ability of a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor to prevent the effects of tadalafil was determined. Erythrocytes of healthy humans and humans with PAH respond to UT-15C with increases in cAMP levels and ATP release. In both groups, UT-15C-induced ATP release was potentiated by zaprinast and tadalafil. The effect of tadalafil was prevented by pre-treatment with an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase in healthy human erythrocytes. Importantly, UT-15C-induced ATP release was greater in PAH erythrocytes than in healthy human erythrocytes in both the presence and the absence of PDE5 inhibitors. The finding that prostacyclin analogs and PDE5 inhibitors work synergistically to enhance release of the potent vasodilator ATP from PAH erythrocytes provides a new rationale for the co-administration of these drugs in this disease. Moreover, these results suggest that the erythrocyte is a novel target for future drug development for the treatment of PAH. PMID:25125498

  13. In vivo myosin step-size from zebrafish skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ajtai, Katalin; Sun, Xiaojing; Takubo, Naoko; Wang, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    Muscle myosins transduce ATP free energy into actin displacement to power contraction. In vivo, myosin side chains are modified post-translationally under native conditions, potentially impacting function. Single myosin detection provides the ‘bottom-up’ myosin characterization probing basic mechanisms without ambiguities inherent to ensemble observation. Macroscopic muscle physiological experimentation provides the definitive ‘top-down’ phenotype characterizations that are the concerns in translational medicine. In vivo single myosin detection in muscle from zebrafish embryo models for human muscle fulfils ambitions for both bottom-up and top-down experimentation. A photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged myosin light chain expressed in transgenic zebrafish skeletal muscle specifically modifies the myosin lever-arm. Strychnine induces the simultaneous contraction of the bilateral tail muscles in a live embryo, causing them to be isometric while active. Highly inclined thin illumination excites the GFP tag of single lever-arms and its super-resolution orientation is measured from an active isometric muscle over a time sequence covering many transduction cycles. Consecutive frame lever-arm angular displacement converts to step-size by its product with the estimated lever-arm length. About 17% of the active myosin steps that fall between 2 and 7 nm are implicated as powerstrokes because they are beyond displacements detected from either relaxed or ATP-depleted (rigor) muscle. PMID:27249818

  14. In vivo myosin step-size from zebrafish skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Thomas P; Ajtai, Katalin; Sun, Xiaojing; Takubo, Naoko; Wang, Yihua

    2016-05-01

    Muscle myosins transduce ATP free energy into actin displacement to power contraction. In vivo, myosin side chains are modified post-translationally under native conditions, potentially impacting function. Single myosin detection provides the 'bottom-up' myosin characterization probing basic mechanisms without ambiguities inherent to ensemble observation. Macroscopic muscle physiological experimentation provides the definitive 'top-down' phenotype characterizations that are the concerns in translational medicine. In vivo single myosin detection in muscle from zebrafish embryo models for human muscle fulfils ambitions for both bottom-up and top-down experimentation. A photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged myosin light chain expressed in transgenic zebrafish skeletal muscle specifically modifies the myosin lever-arm. Strychnine induces the simultaneous contraction of the bilateral tail muscles in a live embryo, causing them to be isometric while active. Highly inclined thin illumination excites the GFP tag of single lever-arms and its super-resolution orientation is measured from an active isometric muscle over a time sequence covering many transduction cycles. Consecutive frame lever-arm angular displacement converts to step-size by its product with the estimated lever-arm length. About 17% of the active myosin steps that fall between 2 and 7 nm are implicated as powerstrokes because they are beyond displacements detected from either relaxed or ATP-depleted (rigor) muscle. PMID:27249818

  15. Modulation of postjunctional α-adrenergic vasoconstriction during exercise and exogenous ATP infusions in ageing humans

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Brett S; Crecelius, Anne R; Voyles, Wyatt F; Dinenno, Frank A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The ability to modulate sympathetic α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle is impaired with age. In young adults, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been shown to blunt sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness similar to exercise. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that modulation of postjunctional α-adrenergic vasoconstriction to exogenous ATP is impaired in ageing humans. We measured forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) and calculated vascular conductance (FVC) to intra-arterial infusions of phenylephrine (α1-agonist) and dexmedetomidine (α2-agonist) during rhythmic handgrip exercise (15% MVC), a control non-exercise vasodilator condition (adenosine), and ATP infusion in seven older (64 ± 3 years) and seven young (22 ± 1 years) healthy adults. Forearm hyperaemia was matched across all vasodilatating conditions. During adenosine, forearm vasoconstrictor responses to direct α1-stimulation were lower in older compared with young adults (ΔFVC =−25 ± 3%vs.−41 ± 5%; P < 0.05), whereas the responses to α2-stimulation were not different (−35 ± 6%vs.−44 ± 8%; NS). During exercise, α1-mediated vasoconstriction was significantly blunted compared with adenosine in both young (−9 ± 2%vs.−41 ± 5%) and older adults (−15 ± 2%vs.−25 ± 3%); however, the magnitude of sympatholysis was reduced in older adults (32 ± 13 vs. 74 ± 8%; P < 0.05). Similarly, α2-mediated vasoconstriction during exercise was significantly blunted in both young (−15 ± 4%vs.−44 ± 8%) and older adults (−26 ± 3%vs.−35 ± 6%), however the magnitude of sympatholysis was reduced in older adults (19 ± 8%vs. 60 ± 10%; P < 0.05). During ATP, both α1- and α2-mediated vasoconstriction was nearly abolished in young and older adults (ΔFVC ∼−5%), and the magnitude of sympatholysis was similar in both age groups (∼85–90%). Our findings indicate that the ability to modulate postjunctional α-adrenergic vasoconstriction during

  16. Modulation of postjunctional α-adrenergic vasoconstriction during exercise and exogenous ATP infusions in ageing humans.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Brett S; Crecelius, Anne R; Voyles, Wyatt F; Dinenno, Frank A

    2011-05-15

    The ability to modulate sympathetic α-adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle is impaired with age. In young adults, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) has been shown to blunt sympathetic vasoconstrictor responsiveness similar to exercise. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that modulation of postjunctional α-adrenergic vasoconstriction to exogenous ATP is impaired in ageing humans.We measured forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) and calculated vascular conductance (FVC) to intra-arterial infusions of phenylephrine (α₁-agonist) and dexmedetomidine (α₂-agonist) during rhythmic handgrip exercise (15% MVC), a control non-exercise vasodilator condition (adenosine), and ATP infusion in seven older (64 ± 3 years) and seven young (22 ± 1 years) healthy adults. Forearm hyperaemia was matched across all vasodilatating conditions. During adenosine, forearm vasoconstrictor responses to direct α₁-stimulation were lower in older compared with young adults (ΔFVC=-25 ± 3% vs. -41 ± 5%; P <0.05), whereas the responses to α₂-stimulation were not different (-35±6% vs. -44 ± 8%; NS). During exercise, α₁-mediated vasoconstriction was significantly blunted compared with adenosine in both young (-9 ± 2% vs. -41 ± 5%) and older adults (-15 ± 2% vs. -25 ± 3%); however, the magnitude of sympatholysis was reduced in older adults (32 ± 13 vs. 74 ± 8%; P <0.05). Similarly, α₂-mediated vasoconstriction during exercise was significantly blunted in both young (-15 ± 4% vs. -44 ± 8%) and older adults (-26 ± 3% vs. -35 ± 6%), however the magnitude of sympatholysis was reduced in older adults (19 ± 8% vs. 60 ± 10%; P <0.05). During ATP, both α₁- and α₂-mediated vasoconstriction was nearly abolished in young and older adults (ΔFVC ∼ -5%), and the magnitude of sympatholysis was similar in both age groups (∼85-90%). Our findings indicate that the ability to modulate postjunctional α-adrenergic vasoconstriction during exercise is impaired

  17. When Too Much ATP Is Bad for Protein Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Mauricio H; Sevostyanova, Anastasia; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2015-08-14

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is the energy currency of living cells. Even though ATP powers virtually all energy-dependent activities, most cellular ATP is utilized in protein synthesis via tRNA aminoacylation and guanosine triphosphate regeneration. Magnesium (Mg(2+)), the most common divalent cation in living cells, plays crucial roles in protein synthesis by maintaining the structure of ribosomes, participating in the biochemistry of translation initiation and functioning as a counterion for ATP. A non-physiological increase in ATP levels hinders growth in cells experiencing Mg(2+) limitation because ATP is the most abundant nucleotide triphosphate in the cell, and Mg(2+) is also required for the stabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane and as a cofactor for essential enzymes. We propose that organisms cope with Mg(2+) limitation by decreasing ATP levels and ribosome production, thereby reallocating Mg(2+) to indispensable cellular processes.

  18. Interstitial pH, K(+), lactate, and phosphate determined with MSNA during exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLean, D. A.; Imadojemu, V. A.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to use the microdialysis technique to simultaneously measure the interstitial concentrations of several putative stimulators of the exercise pressor reflex during 5 min of intermittent static quadriceps exercise in humans (n = 7). Exercise resulted in approximately a threefold (P < 0.05) increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and 13 +/- 3 beats/min (P < 0.05) and 20 +/- 2 mmHg (P < 0.05) increases in heart rate and blood pressure, respectively. During recovery, all reflex responses quickly returned to baseline. Interstitial lactate levels were increased (P < 0.05) from rest (1.1 +/- 0.1 mM) to exercise (1. 6 +/- 0.2 mM) and were further increased (P < 0.05) during recovery (2.0 +/- 0.2 mM). Dialysate phosphate concentrations were 0.55 +/- 0. 04, 0.71 +/- 0.05, and 0.48 +/- 0.03 mM during rest, exercise, and recovery, respectively, and were significantly elevated during exercise. At the onset of exercise, dialysate K(+) levels rose rapidly above resting values (4.2 +/- 0.1 meq/l) and continued to increase during the exercise bout. After 5 min of contractions, dialysate K(+) levels had peaked with an increase (P < 0.05) of 0.6 +/- 0.1 meq/l and subsequently decreased during recovery, not being different from rest after 3 min. In contrast, H(+) concentrations rapidly decreased (P < 0.05) from resting levels (69.4 +/- 3.7 nM) during quadriceps exercise and continued to decrease with a mean decline (P < 0.05) of 16.7 +/- 3.8 nM being achieved after 5 min. During recovery, H(+) concentrations rapidly increased and were not significantly different from baseline after 1 min. This study represents the first time that skeletal muscle interstitial pH, K(+), lactate, and phosphate have been measured in conjunction with MSNA, heart rate, and blood pressure during intermittent static quadriceps exercise in humans. These data suggest that interstitial K(+) and phosphate, but not lactate and H(+), may contribute to the stimulation

  19. Unclassifiable interstitial lung disease: A review.

    PubMed

    Skolnik, Kate; Ryerson, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Accurate classification of interstitial lung disease (ILD) requires a multidisciplinary approach that incorporates input from an experienced respirologist, chest radiologist and lung pathologist. Despite a thorough multidisciplinary evaluation, up to 15% of ILD patients have unclassifiable ILD and cannot be given a specific diagnosis. The objectives of this review are to discuss the definition and features of unclassifiable ILD, identify the barriers to ILD classification and outline an approach to management of unclassifiable ILD. Several recent studies have described the characteristics of these patients; however, there are inconsistencies in the definition and terminology of unclassifiable ILD due to limited research in this population. Additional studies are required to determine the appropriate evaluation and management of patients with unclassifiable ILD.

  20. [Tubulo-interstitial renal complications of myeloma].

    PubMed

    Le Goas, F; Mougenot, B; Mignon, F; Ronco, P

    1993-02-01

    Tubulo-interstitial lesions are the main causes of renal failure in patients with myeloma, and they sometimes reveal this tumour. They are mainly found in large tumoral mass myelomas and are characterized by tubular lesions and specific casts of unexplained physiopathology. Symptomatic and aetiological treatments must be instituted at an early stage to obtain the recovery, at least partial, of renal function, as observed in more than 50% of the cases. The persistence of renal failure carries a sombre prognosis, which emphasizes the importance of a preventive treatment that is too often omitted. Functional tubular disorders are frequent but seldom result in Fanconi's syndrome. A better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the nephrotoxicity of monoclonal immunoglobulins should permit to reduce the incidence of tubular lesions in myelomas.

  1. Unclassifiable interstitial lung disease: A review.

    PubMed

    Skolnik, Kate; Ryerson, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Accurate classification of interstitial lung disease (ILD) requires a multidisciplinary approach that incorporates input from an experienced respirologist, chest radiologist and lung pathologist. Despite a thorough multidisciplinary evaluation, up to 15% of ILD patients have unclassifiable ILD and cannot be given a specific diagnosis. The objectives of this review are to discuss the definition and features of unclassifiable ILD, identify the barriers to ILD classification and outline an approach to management of unclassifiable ILD. Several recent studies have described the characteristics of these patients; however, there are inconsistencies in the definition and terminology of unclassifiable ILD due to limited research in this population. Additional studies are required to determine the appropriate evaluation and management of patients with unclassifiable ILD. PMID:26059704

  2. Bortezomib-induced acute interstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Leung, Nelson; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Cornell, Lynn D; Sethi, Sanjeev; Angioi, Andrea; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2015-07-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is one of the important causes of acute kidney injury (AKI) resulting from inflammatory tubulointerstitial injury induced by medications, infections and systemic diseases. Bortezomib has been increasingly used especially in renal related indications such as multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance. Severe allergic reactions from bortezomib treatment including AIN have not been described in the literature. We report a 47-year-old white man who developed biopsy-proven allergic AIN after treatment with bortezomib for his C3 glomerulonephritis. The patient's kidney function improved after treatment with glucocorticoid therapy and discontinuation of bortezomib, but worsened with recurrent AKI episode after re-initiation of bortezomib. His renal function improved after glucocorticoid therapy and discontinuation of bortezomib. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a biopsy-proven AIN from bortezomib.

  3. Two-dimensional acoustic attenuation mapping of high-temperature interstitial ultrasound lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyréus, Per Daniel; Diederich, Chris

    2004-02-01

    Acoustic attenuation change in biological tissues with temperature and time is a critical parameter for interstitial ultrasound thermal therapy treatment planning and applicator design. Earlier studies have not fully explored the effects on attenuation of temperatures (75-95 °C) and times (5-15 min) common in interstitial ultrasound treatments. A scanning transmission ultrasound attenuation measurement system was devised and used to measure attenuation changes due to these types of thermal exposures. To validate the approach and to loosely define expected values, attenuation changes in degassed ex vivo bovine liver, bovine brain and chicken muscle were measured after 10 min exposures in a water bath to temperatures up to 90 °C. Maximum attenuation increases of approximately seven, four and two times the values at 37 °C were measured for the three tissue models at 5 MHz. By using the system to scan over lesions produced using interstitial ultrasound applicators, 2D contour maps of attenuation were produced. Attenuation profiles measured through the centrelines of lesions showed that attenuation was highest close to the applicator and decreased with radial distance, as expected with decreasing thermal exposure. Attenuation values measured in profiles through lesions were also shown to decrease with reduced power to the applicator. Attenuation increases in 2D maps of interstitial ultrasound lesions in ex vivo chicken breast, bovine liver and bovine brain were correlated with visible tissue coagulation. While regions of visible coagulation corresponded well to contours of attenuation increase in liver and chicken, no lesion was visible under the same experimental conditions in brain, due primarily to the heterogeneity of the tissue. Acoustic and biothermal simulations were employed to show that attenuation models taking into account these attenuation changes at higher temperatures and longer times were better able to fit experimental data than previous models. These

  4. Myofibril ATPase activity of cardiac and skeletal muscle of exhaustively exercised rats.

    PubMed

    Belcastro, A N; Turcotte, R; Rossiter, M; Secord, D; Maybank, P E

    1984-01-01

    The activation characteristics of Mg-ATP and Ca2+ on cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibril ATPase activity were studied in rats following a run to exhaustion. In addition, the effect of varying ionic strength was determined on skeletal muscle from exhausted animals. The exhausted group (E) ran at a speed of 25 m min-1 with an 8% incline. Myofibril ATPase activities for control (C) and E were determined with 1, 3 and 5 mM Mg-ATP and 1 and 10 microM Ca2+ at pH 7.0 and 30 degrees C. For control skeletal muscle, at 1 and 10 microM Ca2+, there was an increase in ATPase activity from 1 to 5 mM Mg-ATP (P less than 0.05). For E animals the myofibril ATPase activities at 10 microM Ca2+ and all Mg-ATP concentrations were similar to C (P greater than 0.05). At 1.0 microM Ca2+ and all Mg-ATP concentrations were similar to C (P greater than 0.05). At 1.0 microM Ca2+ the activities at 3 and 5 mM Mg-ATP were greater for the E animals (P less than 0.05). Increasing KCl concentrations resulted in greater inhibition for E animals. With cardiac muscle, the myofibril ATPase activities at 1.0 microM free Ca2+ were lower for E at all Mg-ATP levels (P less than 0.05). In contrast, at 10 microM Ca2+, the E group exhibited an elevated myofibril ATPase activity. The results indicate that Mg-ATP and Ca2+ activation of cardiac and skeletal muscle myofibril ATPase is altered with exhaustive exercise. PMID:6230276

  5. The multiple faces of leukocyte interstitial migration

    PubMed Central

    Lämmermann, Tim; Germain, Ronald N.

    2014-01-01

    Spatiotemporal control of leukocyte dynamics within tissues is critical for successful innate and adaptive immune responses. Homeostatic trafficking and coordinated infiltration into and within sites of inflammation and infection rely on signaling in response to extracellular cues that in turn controls a variety of intracellular protein networks regulating leukocyte motility, migration, chemotaxis, positioning, and cell–cell interaction. In contrast to mesenchymal cells, leukocytes migrate in an amoeboid fashion by rapid cycles of actin polymerization and actomyosin contraction, and their migration in tissues is generally referred to as low adhesive and nonproteolytic. The interplay of actin network expansion, contraction, and adhesion shapes the exact mode of amoeboid migration, and in this review, we explore how leukocyte subsets potentially harness the same basic biomechanical mechanisms in a cell-type-specific manner. Most of our detailed understanding of these processes derives from in vitro migration studies in three-dimensional gels and confined spaces that mimic geometrical aspects of physiological tissues. We summarize these in vitro results and then critically compare them to data from intravital imaging of leukocyte interstitial migration in mouse tissues. We outline the technical challenges of obtaining conclusive mechanistic results from intravital studies, discuss leukocyte migration strategies in vivo, and present examples of mode switching during physiological interstitial migration. These findings are also placed in the context of leukocyte migration defects in primary immunodeficiencies. This overview of both in vitro and in vivo studies highlights recent progress in understanding the molecular and biophysical mechanisms that shape robust leukocyte migration responses in physiologically complex and heterogeneous environments. PMID:24573488

  6. Release of ATP induced by hypertonic solutions in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Aleu, Jordi; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Navarro, Piedad; de Lara, Ivanna Pérez; Bahima, Laia; Marsal, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-01-01

    ATP mediates intercellular communication. Mechanical stress and changes in cell volume induce ATP release from various cell types, both secretory and non-secretory. In the present study, we stressed Xenopus oocytes with a hypertonic solution enriched in mannitol (300 mm). We measured simultaneously ATP release and ionic currents from a single oocyte. A decrease in cell volume, the activation of an inward current and ATP release were coincident. We found two components of ATP release: the first was associated with granule or vesicle exocytosis, because it was inhibited by tetanus neurotoxin, and the second was related to the inward current. A single exponential described the correlation between ATP release and the hypertonic-activated current. Gadolinium ions, which block mechanically activated ionic channels, inhibited the ATP release and the inward current but did not affect the decrease in volume. Oocytes expressing CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator) released ATP under hypertonic shock, but ATP release was significantly inhibited in the first component: that related to granule exocytosis. Since the ATP measured is the balance between ATP release and ATP degradation by ecto-enzymes, we measured the nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) activity of the oocyte surface during osmotic stress, as the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of ATP, which was inhibited by more than 50 % in hypertonic conditions. The best-characterized membrane protein showing NTPDase activity is CD39. Oocytes injected with an antisense oligonucleotide complementary to CD39 mRNA released less ATP and showed a lower amplitude in the inward current than those oocytes injected with water. PMID:12562935

  7. The origin of biexponential T2 relaxation in muscle water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, W. C.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    Two theories have been proposed to explain the multiexponential transverse relaxation of muscle water protons: "anatomical" and "chemical" compartmentation. In an attempt to obtain evidence to support one or the other of these two theories, interstitial and intracellular macromolecular preparations were studied and compared with rat muscle tissue by proton NMR transverse relaxation (T2) measurements. All macromolecule preparations displayed monoexponential T2 decay. Membrane alteration with DMSO/glycerin did not eliminate the biexponential T2 decay of muscle tissue. Maceration converted biexponential T2 decay of muscle tissue to single exponential decay. It is concluded that the observed two component exponential T2 decay of muscle represents anatomical compartmentation of tissue water, probably intracellular versus extracellular.

  8. Muscle sarcomere lesions and thrombosis after spaceflight and suspension unloading

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.A.; Ellis, S.; Giometti, C.S.; Hoh, J.F.Y.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E.I.; Oganov, V.S.; Slocum, G.R.; Bain, J.L.W.; Sedlak, F.R. )

    1992-08-01

    Extended exposure of humans to spaceflight produces a progressive loss of skeletal muscle strength. This process must be understood to design effective countermeasures. The present investigation examined hindlimb muscles from flight rats killed as close to landing as possible. Spaceflight and tail suspension-hindlimb unloading (unloaded) produced significant decreases in fiber cross-sectional areas of the adductor longus (AL), a slow-twitch antigravity muscle. However, the mean wet weight of the flight AL muscles was near normal, whereas that of the suspension unloaded AL muscles was significantly reduced. Interstitial edema within the flight AL, but not in the unloaded AL, appeared to account for this apparent disagreement.In both conditions, the slow-twitch oxidative fibers atrophied more than the fast-twitch oxidative-glycolytic fibers. Microcirculation was also compromised by spaceflight, such that there was increased formation of thrombi in the postcapillary venules and capillaries.

  9. Interstitial Photoacoustic Sensor for the Measurement of Tissue Temperature during Interstitial Laser Phototherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhifang; Chen, Haiyu; Zhou, Feifan; Li, Hui; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-01-01

    Photothermal therapy is an effective means to induce tumor cell death, since tumor tissue is more sensitive to temperature increases than normal tissue. Biological responses depend on tissue temperature; target tissue temperature needs to be precisely measured and controlled to achieve desired thermal effects. In this work, a unique photoacoustic (PA) sensor is proposed for temperature measurement during interstitial laser phototherapy. A continuous-wave laser light and a pulsed laser light, for photothermal irradiation and photoacoustic temperature measurement, respectively, were delivered to the target tissue through a fiber coupler. During laser irradiation, the PA amplitude was measured. The Grüneisen parameter and the bioheat equation were used to determine the temperature in strategic positions in the target tissue. Our results demonstrate that the interstitial PA amplitude is a linear function of temperature in the range of 22 to 55 °C, as confirmed by thermocouple measurement. Furthermore, by choosing appropriate laser parameters, the maximum temperature surrounding the active diffuse fiber tip in tissue can be controlled in the range of 41 to 55 °C. Thus, this sensor could potentially be used for fast, accurate, and convenient three-dimensional temperature measurement, and for real-time feedback and control of interstitial laser phototherapy in cancer treatment. PMID:25756865

  10. Interstitial photoacoustic sensor for the measurement of tissue temperature during interstitial laser phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhifang; Chen, Haiyu; Zhou, Feifan; Li, Hui; Chen, Wei R

    2015-03-06

    Photothermal therapy is an effective means to induce tumor cell death, since tumor tissue is more sensitive to temperature increases than normal tissue. Biological responses depend on tissue temperature; target tissue temperature needs to be precisely measured and controlled to achieve desired thermal effects. In this work, a unique photoacoustic (PA) sensor is proposed for temperature measurement during interstitial laser phototherapy. A continuous-wave laser light and a pulsed laser light, for photothermal irradiation and photoacoustic temperature measurement, respectively, were delivered to the target tissue through a fiber coupler. During laser irradiation, the PA amplitude was measured. The Grüneisen parameter and the bioheat equation were used to determine the temperature in strategic positions in the target tissue. Our results demonstrate that the interstitial PA amplitude is a linear function of temperature in the range of 22 to 55 °C, as confirmed by thermocouple measurement. Furthermore, by choosing appropriate laser parameters, the maximum temperature surrounding the active diffuse fiber tip in tissue can be controlled in the range of 41 to 55 °C. Thus, this sensor could potentially be used for fast, accurate, and convenient three-dimensional temperature measurement, and for real-time feedback and control of interstitial laser phototherapy in cancer treatment.

  11. Reduced boron diffusion under interstitial injection in fluorine implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kham, M. N.; Matko, I.; Chenevier, B.; Ashburn, P.

    2007-12-01

    Point defect injection studies are performed to investigate how fluorine implantation influences the diffusion of boron marker layers in both the vacancy-rich and interstitial-rich regions of the fluorine damage profile. A 185 keV, 2.3x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} F{sup +} implant is made into silicon samples containing multiple boron marker layers and rapid thermal annealing is performed at 1000 deg. C for times of 15-120 s. The boron and fluorine profiles are characterized by secondary ion mass spectroscopy and the defect structures by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fluorine implanted samples surprisingly show less boron diffusion under interstitial injection than those under inert anneal. This effect is particularly noticeable for boron marker layers located in the interstitial-rich region of the fluorine damage profile and for short anneal times (15 s). TEM images show a band of dislocation loops around the range of the fluorine implant and the density of dislocation loops is lower under interstitial injection than under inert anneal. It is proposed that interstitial injection accelerates the evolution of interstitial defects into dislocation loops, thereby giving transient enhanced boron diffusion over a shorter period of time. The effect of the fluorine implant on boron diffusion is found to be the opposite for boron marker layers in the interstitial-rich and vacancy-rich regions of the fluorine damage profile. For marker layers in the interstitial-rich region of the fluorine damage profile, the boron diffusion coefficient decreases with anneal time, as is typically seen for transient enhanced diffusion. The boron diffusion under interstitial injection is enhanced by the fluorine implant at short anneal times but suppressed at longer anneal times. It is proposed that this behavior is due to trapping of interstitials at the dislocation loops introduced by the fluorine implant. For boron marker layers in the vacancy-rich region of the fluorine damage profile

  12. From ATP to PTP and back. A dual function for the mitochondrial ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Paolo; Di Lisa, Fabio; Fogolari, Federico; Lippe, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play a fundamental role in heart physiology, but are also key effectors of dysfunction and death. This dual role assumes a new meaning following recent advances on the nature and regulation of the permeability transition pore, an inner membrane channel whose opening requires matrix Ca2+ and is modulated by many effectors including reactive oxygen species, matrix cyclophilin D, Pi and matrix pH. The recent demonstration that the F-ATP synthase can reversibly undergo a Ca2+-dependent transition to form a channel that mediates the permeability transition opens new perspectives to the field. These findings demand a reassessment of the modifications of F-ATP synthase that take place in the heart under pathological conditions and of their potential role in determining the transition of F-ATP synthase from and energy-conserving into an energy-dissipating device. PMID:25999424

  13. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Månsson, Alf

    2015-01-01

    Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs. PMID:25961006

  14. A selective phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor rescues low Po2-induced ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with type 2 diabetes: implication for vascular control

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Elizabeth A.; Achilleus, David; Stephenson, Alan H.; Ellis, Christopher G.; Ellsworth, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    Erythrocytes, via release of ATP in areas of low oxygen (O2) tension, are components of a regulatory system for the distribution of perfusion in skeletal muscle ensuring optimal O2 delivery to meet tissue needs. In type 2 diabetes (DM2), there are defects in O2 supply to muscle as well as a failure of erythrocytes to release ATP. The goal of this study was to ascertain if a phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) inhibitor, cilostazol, would rescue low O2-induced ATP release from DM2 erythrocytes and, thereby, enable these cells to dilate isolated erythrocyte-perfused skeletal muscle arterioles exposed to decreased extraluminal O2. Erythrocytes were obtained from healthy humans (HH; n = 12) and humans with DM2 (n = 17). We determined that 1) PDE3B is similarly expressed in both groups, 2) mastoparan 7 (Gi activation) stimulates increases in cAMP in HH but not in DM2 erythrocytes, and 3) pretreatment of DM2 erythrocytes with cilostazol resulted in mastoparan 7-induced increases in cAMP not different from those in HH cells. Most importantly, cilostazol restored the ability of DM2 erythrocytes to release ATP in response to low O2. In contrast with perfusion with HH erythrocytes, isolated hamster retractor muscle arterioles perfused with DM2 erythrocytes constricted in response to low extraluminal PO2. However, in the presence of cilostazol (100 μM), DM2 erythrocytes induced vessel dilation not different from that seen with HH erythrocytes. Thus rescue of low O2-induced ATP release from DM2 erythrocytes by cilostazol restored the ability of erythrocytes to participate in the regulation of perfusion distribution in skeletal muscle. PMID:21963837

  15. Clusterin and COMMD1 Independently Regulate Degradation of the Mammalian Copper ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B*

    PubMed Central

    Materia, Stephanie; Cater, Michael A.; Klomp, Leo W. J.; Mercer, Julian F. B.; La Fontaine, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    ATP7A and ATP7B are copper-transporting P1B-type ATPases (Cu-ATPases) that are critical for regulating intracellular copper homeostasis. Mutations in the genes encoding ATP7A and ATP7B lead to copper deficiency and copper toxicity disorders, Menkes and Wilson diseases, respectively. Clusterin and COMMD1 were previously identified as interacting partners of these Cu-ATPases. In this study, we confirmed that clusterin and COMMD1 interact to down-regulate both ATP7A and ATP7B. Overexpression and knockdown of clusterin/COMMD1 decreased and increased, respectively, endogenous levels of ATP7A and ATP7B, consistent with a role in facilitating Cu-ATPase degradation. We demonstrate that whereas the clusterin/ATP7B interaction was enhanced by oxidative stress or mutation of ATP7B, the COMMD1/ATP7B interaction did not change under oxidative stress conditions, and only increased with ATP7B mutations that led to its misfolding. Clusterin and COMMD1 facilitated the degradation of ATP7B containing the same Wilson disease-causing C-terminal mutations via different degradation pathways, clusterin via the lysosomal pathway and COMMD1 via the proteasomal pathway. Furthermore, endogenous ATP7B existed in a complex with clusterin and COMMD1, but these interactions were neither competitive nor cooperative and occurred independently of each other. Together these data indicate that clusterin and COMMD1 represent alternative and independent systems regulating Cu-ATPase quality control, and consequently contributing to the maintenance of copper homeostasis. PMID:22130675

  16. Abnormal urothelial HLA-DR expression in interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Christmas, T J; Bottazzo, G F

    1992-03-01

    Interstitial cystitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the urinary bladder that predominantly afflicts middle-age women. The end stage of the disease is ulceration of the urothelium, the so-called Hunner's ulcer. The aetiology of interstitial cystitis remains obscure. We have studied bladder biopsies from 22 cases of interstitial cystitis and control groups consisting of six cases of bacterial cystitis and eight healthy women. Indirect immunofluorescence was performed on the biopsies using murine MoAbs to human HLA class I molecules, and class II molecules, HLA-DP, HLA-DQ and HLA-DR. In interstitial cystitis, bacterial cystitis and normal controls most cells expressed HLA class I products. In six cases of interstitial cystitis and one case of bacterial cystitis there was evidence of HLA class I hyperexpression. In normal bladder and bacterial cystitis HLA class II expression was restricted to submucosal dendritic cells, Langerhans cells macrophages, vascular endothelial cells and activated lymphocytes. All but two cases of interstitial cystitis showed surface expression of HLA-DR (but not HLA-DP or DQ). In all cases of interstitial cystitis there was an increase in the numbers of macrophages, activated lymphocytes and vascular endothelial cells expressing HLA class II molecules within the submucosa. These findings provide further evidence for the importance of inappropriate HLA molecule expression in a disease suspected of having an autoimmune pathogenesis and where cellular autoimmune mechanisms play a decisive role in the destruction of the target cells--the bladder urothelium.

  17. Bioanalytical Applications of Real-Time ATP Imaging Via Bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Jason Alan Gruenhagen

    2003-12-12

    The research discussed within involves the development of novel applications of real-time imaging of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). ATP was detected via bioluminescence and the firefly luciferase-catalyzed reaction of ATP and luciferin. The use of a microscope and an imaging detector allowed for spatially resolved quantitation of ATP release. Employing this method, applications in both biological and chemical systems were developed. First, the mechanism by which the compound 48/80 induces release of ATP from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated. Numerous enzyme activators and inhibitors were utilized to probe the second messenger systems involved in release. Compound 48/80 activated a G{sub q}-type protein to initiate ATP release from HUVECs. Ca{sup 2+} imaging along with ATP imaging revealed that activation of phospholipase C and induction of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling were necessary for release of ATP. Furthermore, activation of protein kinase C inhibited the activity of phospholipase C and thus decreased the magnitude of ATP release. This novel release mechanism was compared to the existing theories of extracellular release of ATP. Bioluminescence imaging was also employed to examine the role of ATP in the field of neuroscience. The central nervous system (CNS) was dissected from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the neurons of the Lymnaea were not damaged by any of the components of the imaging solution. ATP was continuously released by the ganglia of the CNS for over eight hours and varied from ganglion to ganglion and within individual ganglia. Addition of the neurotransmitters K{sup +} and serotonin increased release of ATP in certain regions of the Lymnaea CNS. Finally, the ATP imaging technique was investigated for the study of drug release systems. MCM-41-type mesoporous nanospheres were loaded with ATP and end-capped with mercaptoethanol functionalized Cd

  18. The role of mitochondrially derived ATP in synaptic vesicle recycling.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Divya; Shields, Lauren Y; Mendelsohn, Bryce A; Haddad, Dominik; Lin, Wei; Gerencser, Akos A; Kim, Hwajin; Brand, Martin D; Edwards, Robert H; Nakamura, Ken

    2015-09-11

    Synaptic mitochondria are thought to be critical in supporting neuronal energy requirements at the synapse, and bioenergetic failure at the synapse may impair neural transmission and contribute to neurodegeneration. However, little is known about the energy requirements of synaptic vesicle release or whether these energy requirements go unmet in disease, primarily due to a lack of appropriate tools and sensitive assays. To determine the dependence of synaptic vesicle cycling on mitochondrially derived ATP levels, we developed two complementary assays sensitive to mitochondrially derived ATP in individual, living hippocampal boutons. The first is a functional assay for mitochondrially derived ATP that uses the extent of synaptic vesicle cycling as a surrogate for ATP level. The second uses ATP FRET sensors to directly measure ATP at the synapse. Using these assays, we show that endocytosis has high ATP requirements and that vesicle reacidification and exocytosis require comparatively little energy. We then show that to meet these energy needs, mitochondrially derived ATP is rapidly dispersed in axons, thereby maintaining near normal levels of ATP even in boutons lacking mitochondria. As a result, the capacity for synaptic vesicle cycling is similar in boutons without mitochondria as in those with mitochondria. Finally, we show that loss of a key respiratory subunit implicated in Leigh disease markedly decreases mitochondrially derived ATP levels in axons, thus inhibiting synaptic vesicle cycling. This proves that mitochondria-based energy failure can occur and be detected in individual neurons that have a genetic mitochondrial defect.

  19. Gallium interstitial contributions to diffusion in gallium arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, Joseph T.; Morgan, Caroline G.

    2011-09-01

    A new diffusion path is identified for gallium interstitials, which involves lower barriers than the barriers for previously identified diffusion paths [K. Levasseur-Smith and N. Mousseau, J. Appl. Phys. 103, 113502 (2008), P. A. Schultz and O. A. von Lilienfeld, Modelling and Simulation in Materials Science and Engineering 17, 084007 (2009)] for the charge states which dominate diffusion over most of the available range of Fermi energies. This path passes through the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration, and has a particularly low diffusion barrier of 0.35 eV for diffusion in the neutral charge state. As a part of this work, the character of the charge states for the gallium interstitials which are most important for diffusion is investigated, and it is shown that the last electron bound to the neutral interstitial occupies a shallow hydrogenic bound state composed of conduction band states for the hexagonal interstitial and both tetrahedral interstitials. How to properly account for the contributions of such interstitials is discussed for density-functional calculations with a k-point mesh not including the conduction band edge point. Diffusion barriers for gallium interstitials are calculated in all the charge states which can be important for a Fermi level anywhere in the gap, q = 0, +1, +2, and +3, for diffusion via the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration and via the hexagonal interstitial configuration. The lowest activation enthalpies over most of the available range of Fermi energies are found to correspond to diffusion in the neutral or singly positive state via the ⟨110⟩ gallium-gallium split interstitial configuration. It is shown that several different charge states and diffusion paths contribute significantly for Fermi levels within 0.2 eV above the valence band edge, which may help to explain some of the difficulties [H. Bracht and S. Brotzmann, Phys. Rev. B 71, 115216 (2005)] which have been

  20. Interstitial lung disease in infancy: A general approach.

    PubMed

    Hines, Erica J; Walsh, Mark; Armes, Jane E; Douglas, Tonia; Chawla, Jasneek

    2016-04-01

    Childhood Interstitial lung disease (chILD) is an umbrella term used to define a broad range of rare, diffuse pulmonary disorders with altered interstitial structure that leads to abnormal gas exchange. Presentation of chILD in infancy can be difficult to differentiate from other common causes of diffuse lung disease. This article aimed at paediatricians provides an overview of interstitial lung disease presenting in infancy and includes key clinical features, a suggested approach to investigation and a summary of management. An overview of three clinical cases has been included to demonstrate the diagnostic approach, characteristic investigation findings and varied clinical outcomes.

  1. The effects of cutting or of stretching skeletal muscle in vitro on the rates of protein synthesis and degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seider, M. J.; Kapp, R.; Chen, C.-P.; Booth, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Skeletal muscle preparations using cut muscle fibers have often been used in studies of protein metabolism. The present paper reports an investigation of the effect of muscle cutting or stretching in vitro on the rates of protein synthesis and/or degradation. Protein synthesis and content, and ATP and phosphocreatine levels were monitored in soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles from the rat with various extents of muscle fiber cuts and following stretching to about 120% the resting length. Rates of protein synthesis are found to be significantly lower and protein degradation higher in the cut muscles than in uncut controls, while ATP and phosphocreatine concentrations decreased. Stretched intact muscles, on the other hand, are observed to have higher concentrations of high-energy phosphates than unstretched muscles, while rates of protein degradation were not affected. Results thus demonstrate that the cutting of skeletal muscle fibers alters many aspects of muscle metabolism, and that moderate decreases in ATP concentration do not alter rates of protein concentration in intact muscles in vitro.

  2. Interstitial collagen turnover during airway remodeling in acute and chronic experimental asthma

    PubMed Central

    González-Avila, Georgina; Bazan-Perkins, Blanca; Sandoval, Cuauhtémoc; Sommer, Bettina; Vadillo-Gonzalez, Sebastian; Ramos, Carlos; Aquino-Galvez, Arnoldo

    2016-01-01

    Asthma airway remodeling is characterized by the thickening of the basement membrane (BM) due to an increase in extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, which contributes to the irreversibility of airflow obstruction. Interstitial collagens are the primary ECM components to be increased during the fibrotic process. The aim of the present study was to examine the interstitial collagen turnover during the course of acute and chronic asthma, and 1 month after the last exposure to the allergen. Guinea pigs sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) and exposed to 3 further OVA challenges (acute model) or 12 OVA challenges (chronic model) were used as asthma experimental models. A group of animals from either model was sacrificed 1 h or 1 month after the last OVA challenge. Collagen distribution, collagen content, interstitial collagenase activity and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-13 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 protein expression levels were measured in the lung tissue samples from both experimental models. The results revealed that collagen deposit in bronchiole BM, adventitial and airway smooth muscle layers was increased in both experimental models as well as lung tissue collagen concentration. These structural changes persisted 1 month after the last OVA challenge. In the acute model, a decrease in collagenase activity and in MMP-1 concentration was observed. Collagenase activity returned to basal levels, and an increase in MMP-1 and MMP-13 expression levels along with a decrease in TIMP-1 expression levels were observed in animals sacrificed 1 month after the last OVA challenge. In the chronic model, there were no changes in collagenase activity or in MMP-13 concentration, although MMP-1 expression levels increased. One month later, an increase in collagenase activity was observed, although MMP-1 and TIMP-1 levels were not altered. The results of the present study suggest that even when the allergen challenges were discontinued, and collagenase

  3. Antisynthetase syndrome: An under-recognized cause of interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Maturu, Venkata Nagarjuna; Lakshman, Arjun; Bal, Amanjit; Dhir, Varun; Sharma, Aman; Garg, Mandeep; Saikia, Biman; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antisynthetase syndrome (AS) is an uncommon and under-recognised connective tissue disease characterized by the presence of antibodies to anti-aminoacyl t-RNA synthetase along with features of interstitial lung disease (ILD), myositis and arthritis. The aim of the current study is to describe our experience with management of AS. Materials and Methods: This was a 2-year (2013-2014) retrospective analysis of patients diagnosed with anti-Jo-1-related AS. The presence of anti-Jo-1 antibody was tested by the immunoblot assay. All patients underwent high-resolution computed tomography of the chest, transthoracic echocardiography and evaluation for inflammatory myositis. Transbronchial lung biopsies and muscle biopsies were obtained when clinically indicated. Results: Nine patients (mean age: 43.8 years) were diagnosed with anti-Jo-1-related AS. The median duration of symptoms before diagnosis of AS was 6 months. All patients were negative for antinuclear antibodies by indirect immunofluorescence. The prevalence of ILD, myositis and arthritis at presentation was 100%, 77.8% and 55.6%, respectively. The most common ILD pattern was non-specific interstitial pneumonia (n = 6) followed by organizing pneumonia (n = 2) and usual interstitial pneumonia (n = 1). ILD was the sole manifestation in two patients and was subclinical in two patients. Six patients had pleuropericardial effusions, three patients had pulmonary artery hypertension and two patients had venous thromboembolism. Eight of the nine patients improved after treatment with steroids and other immunosuppressants. Conclusion: Antisynthetase syndrome is an important and a treatable cause of ILD. Strong clinical suspicion is needed to achieve an early diagnosis. PMID:26933302

  4. Interstitial collagen turnover during airway remodeling in acute and chronic experimental asthma

    PubMed Central

    González-Avila, Georgina; Bazan-Perkins, Blanca; Sandoval, Cuauhtémoc; Sommer, Bettina; Vadillo-Gonzalez, Sebastian; Ramos, Carlos; Aquino-Galvez, Arnoldo

    2016-01-01

    Asthma airway remodeling is characterized by the thickening of the basement membrane (BM) due to an increase in extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, which contributes to the irreversibility of airflow obstruction. Interstitial collagens are the primary ECM components to be increased during the fibrotic process. The aim of the present study was to examine the interstitial collagen turnover during the course of acute and chronic asthma, and 1 month after the last exposure to the allergen. Guinea pigs sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) and exposed to 3 further OVA challenges (acute model) or 12 OVA challenges (chronic model) were used as asthma experimental models. A group of animals from either model was sacrificed 1 h or 1 month after the last OVA challenge. Collagen distribution, collagen content, interstitial collagenase activity and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-13 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 protein expression levels were measured in the lung tissue samples from both experimental models. The results revealed that collagen deposit in bronchiole BM, adventitial and airway smooth muscle layers was increased in both experimental models as well as lung tissue collagen concentration. These structural changes persisted 1 month after the last OVA challenge. In the acute model, a decrease in collagenase activity and in MMP-1 concentration was observed. Collagenase activity returned to basal levels, and an increase in MMP-1 and MMP-13 expression levels along with a decrease in TIMP-1 expression levels were observed in animals sacrificed 1 month after the last OVA challenge. In the chronic model, there were no changes in collagenase activity or in MMP-13 concentration, although MMP-1 expression levels increased. One month later, an increase in collagenase activity was observed, although MMP-1 and TIMP-1 levels were not altered. The results of the present study suggest that even when the allergen challenges were discontinued, and collagenase

  5. Fluorescent ATP analog mant-ATP reports dynein activity in the isolated Chlamydomonas axoneme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilova, Maria; Howard, Jonathon

    Eukaryotic flagella are long rod-like extensions of cells, which play a fundamental role in single cell movement, as well as in fluid transport. Flagella contain a highly evolutionary conserved mechanical structure called the axoneme. The motion of the flagellum is generated by dynein motor proteins located all along the length of the axoneme. How the force production of motors is controlled spatially and temporally is still an open question. Therefore, monitoring dynein activity in the axonemal structure is expected to provide novel insights in regulation of the beat. We use high sensitivity fluorescence microscopy to monitor the binding and hydrolysis kinetics of the fluorescently labeled ATP analogue mant-ATP (2'(3')-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) adenosine 5'-triphosphate), which is known to support dynein activity. By studying the kinetics of mant-ATP fluorescence, we identified distinct mant-ATP binding sites in the axoneme. The application of this method to axonemes with reduced amounts of dynein, showed evidence that one of the sites is associated with binding to dynein. In the future, we would like to use this method to find the spatial distribution of dynein activity in the axoneme.

  6. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Quentin E. Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Enger, Shirin A.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq{sup 153}Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D{sub 98%}), I-RSBT reduced urethral D{sub 0.1cc} below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq {sup 153}Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed{sup 153}Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29

  7. Quantitative ATP synthesis in human liver measured by localized 31P spectroscopy using the magnetization transfer experiment.

    PubMed

    Schmid, A I; Chmelík, M; Szendroedi, J; Krssák, M; Brehm, A; Moser, E; Roden, M

    2008-06-01

    The liver plays a central role in intermediate metabolism. Accumulation of liver fat (steatosis) predisposes to various liver diseases. Steatosis and abnormal muscle energy metabolism are found in insulin-resistant and type-2 diabetic states. To examine hepatic energy metabolism, we measured hepatocellular lipid content, using proton MRS, and rates of hepatic ATP synthesis in vivo, using the 31P magnetization transfer experiment. A suitable localization scheme was developed and applied to the measurements of longitudinal relaxation times (T1) in six healthy volunteers and the ATP-synthesis experiment in nine healthy volunteers. Liver 31P spectra were modelled and quantified successfully using a time domain fit and the AMARES (advanced method for accurate, robust and efficient spectral fitting of MRS data with use of prior knowledge) algorithm describing the essential components of the dataset. The measured T1 relaxation times are comparable to values reported previously at lower field strengths. All nine subjects in whom saturation transfer was measured had low hepatocellular lipid content (1.5 +/- 0.2% MR signal; mean +/- SEM). The exchange rate constant (k) obtained was 0.30 +/- 0.02 s(-1), and the rate of ATP synthesis was 29.5 +/- 1.8 mM/min. The measured rate of ATP synthesis is about three times higher than in human skeletal muscle and human visual cortex, but only about half of that measured in perfused rat liver. In conclusion, 31P MRS at 3 T provides sufficient sensitivity to detect magnetization transfer effects and can therefore be used to assess ATP synthesis in human liver.

  8. Single molecule thermodynamics of ATP synthesis by F1-ATPase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2015-01-01

    FoF1-ATP synthase is a factory for synthesizing ATP in virtually all cells. Its core machinery is the subcomplex F1-motor (F1-ATPase) and performs the reversible mechanochemical coupling. The isolated F1-motor hydrolyzes ATP, which is accompanied by unidirectional rotation of its central γ -shaft. When a strong opposing torque is imposed, the γ -shaft rotates in the opposite direction and drives the F1-motor to synthesize ATP. This mechanical-to-chemical free-energy transduction is the final and central step of the multistep cellular ATP-synthetic pathway. Here, we determined the amount of mechanical work exploited by the F1-motor to synthesize an ATP molecule during forced rotations using a methodology combining a nonequilibrium theory and single molecule measurements of responses to external torque. We found that the internal dissipation of the motor is negligible even during rotations far from a quasistatic process.

  9. Snapshots of the maltose transporter during ATP hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oldham, Michael L.; Chen, Jue

    2011-12-05

    ATP-binding cassette transporters are powered by ATP, but the mechanism by which these transporters hydrolyze ATP is unclear. In this study, four crystal structures of the full-length wild-type maltose transporter, stabilized by adenosine 5{prime}-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate or ADP in conjunction with phosphate analogs BeF{sub 3}{sup -}, VO{sub 4}{sup 3-}, or AlF{sub 4}{sup -}, were determined to 2.2- to 2.4-{angstrom} resolution. These structures led to the assignment of two enzymatic states during ATP hydrolysis and demonstrate specific functional roles of highly conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domain, suggesting that ATP-binding cassette transporters catalyze ATP hydrolysis via a general base mechanism.

  10. Extracellular ATP protects endothelial cells against DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Aho, Joonas; Helenius, Mikko; Vattulainen-Collanus, Sanna; Alastalo, Tero-Pekka; Koskenvuo, Juha

    2016-09-01

    Cell damage can lead to rapid release of ATP to extracellular space resulting in dramatic change in local ATP concentration. Evolutionary, this has been considered as a danger signal leading to adaptive responses in adjacent cells. Our aim was to demonstrate that elevated extracellular ATP or inhibition of ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (ENTPD1/CD39) activity could be used to increase tolerance against DNA-damaging conditions. Human endothelial cells, with increased extracellular ATP concentration in cell proximity, were more resistant to irradiation or chemically induced DNA damage evaluated with the DNA damage markers γH2AX and phosphorylated p53. In our rat models of DNA damage, inhibiting CD39-driven ATP hydrolysis with POM-1 protected the heart and lung tissues against chemically induced DNA damage. Interestingly, the phenomenon could not be replicated in cancer cells. Our results show that transient increase in extracellular ATP can promote resistance to DNA damage.

  11. Crossbridges in insect flight muscles of the blowfly (Sarcophaga bullata).

    PubMed

    Heuser, J E

    1987-08-01

    Crossbridges in quick-frozen deep-etched blowfly flight muscles (from Sarcophaga bullata) were compared with those observed in the traditional waterbug preparation (Lethocerus) and found to be indistinguishable. Hence, blowfly was chosen as a fresher more accessible tissue for determining the effect of various fixatives and nucleotides on crossbridge structure. In rigor control, crossbridges were most regular in muscles that were stabilized before freezing by prefixation in glutaraldehyde followed by 'hardening' with neutralized tannic acid, so all nucleotide treatments were terminated by such fixation. MgATP (5 mM) converted the rigor pattern of crossbridges into a random array of disconnected thick filament projections. Lower levels of ATP (0.1 mM) caused a variable but generally lesser degree of crossbridge disconnection, as did 5 mM ADP (probably because it slowly converted to ATP inside the muscle fibres). Vanadate (1-2 mM) potentiated muscle relaxation in the latter two nucleotide treatments (i.e. produced a greater degree of crossbridge disconnection). Thus, differences in overall crossbridge abundance were readily apparent in chemically fixed muscles. Structural details within individual crossbridges were less well preserved, however. Chemical prefixation tended to collapse the muscle lattice, add a surface film to the filaments and thus obscure crossbridge details. Rigorous control of fixative pH largely prevented these problems and permitted recognition of the fact that in Sarcophaga flight muscle, as in Lethocerus muscle in rigor, the S1 'heads' of crossbridges attach to the thin filaments in the expected 'arrowhead' configuration.

  12. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  13. Heterogeneous clinical spectrum of interstitial lung disease in patients with anti-EJ anti-synthetase syndrome: a case series.

    PubMed

    Giannini, Margherita; Notarnicola, Antonella; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Lopalco, Giuseppe; Iannone, Florenzo

    2016-09-01

    Auto-antibodies against aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetases (anti-ARS Abs) represent the hallmark of the anti-synthetase syndrome that is defined as the clinical association of fever, Raynaud's phenomenon, myositis, interstitial lung disease (ILD), arthritis and mechanic's hands. Recently, differences in clinical features depending on specific anti-ARS Abs have been reported. We describe three cases of anti-EJ (anti-glycyl) antibody-positive patients presenting with ILD as a common feature, but with heterogeneous histopathological and radiographic patterns and with different responses to treatment. Relapsing-remittent fever, refractory muscle involvement and seronegative arthritis were also striking clinical manifestations.

  14. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) channels, and corresponding transcripts were expressed in duct cells. Direct stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling and ethanol application had negligible effects on ATP release. The released ATP was sequentially dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting adenylate kinase (AK1) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) enzymes (NME1, 2), which contribute to metabolism and regeneration of extracellular ATP and other nucleotides (ADP, uridine diphosphate (UDP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP)). In conclusion, we illustrate a complex regulation of extracellular purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide

  15. ATP7B detoxifies silver in ciliated airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ibricevic, Aida; Brody, Steven L.; Youngs, Wiley J.; Cannon, Carolyn L.

    2010-03-15

    Silver is a centuries-old antibiotic agent currently used to treat infected burns. The sensitivity of a wide range of drug-resistant microorganisms to silver killing suggests that it may be useful for treating refractory lung infections. Toward this goal, we previously developed a methylated caffeine silver acetate compound, SCC1, that exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against clinical strains of bacteria in vitro and when nebulized to lungs in mouse infection models. Preclinical testing of high concentrations of SCC1 in primary culture mouse tracheal epithelial cells (mTEC) showed selective ciliated cell death. Ciliated cell death was induced by both silver- and copper-containing compounds but not by the methylated caffeine portion of SCC1. We hypothesized that copper transporting P-type ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, play a role in silver detoxification in the airway. In mTEC, ATP7A was expressed in non-ciliated cells, whereas ATP7B was expressed only in ciliated cells. The exposure of mTEC to SCC1 induced the trafficking of ATP7B, but not ATP7A, suggesting the presence of a cell-specific silver uptake and detoxification mechanisms. Indeed, the expression of the copper uptake protein CTR1 was also restricted to ciliated cells. A role of ATP7B in silver detoxification was further substantiated when treatment of SCC1 significantly increased cell death in ATP7B shRNA-treated HepG2 cells. In addition, mTEC from ATP7B{sup -/-} mice showed enhanced loss of ciliated cells compared to wild type. These studies are the first to demonstrate a cell type-specific expression of the Ag{sup +}/Cu{sup +} transporters ATP7A, ATP7B, and CTR1 in airway epithelial cells and a role for ATP7B in detoxification of these metals in the lung.

  16. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regulates pancreatic duct function via P2Y and P2X receptors. It is well known that ATP is released from upstream pancreatic acinar cells. The ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts, which secrete bicarbonate-rich fluid, has not yet been examined. First, our aim was to reveal whether pancreatic duct cells release ATP locally and whether they enzymatically modify extracellular nucleotides/sides. Second, we wished to explore which physiological and pathophysiological factors may be important in these processes. Using a human pancreatic duct cell line, Capan-1, and online luminescence measurement, we detected fast ATP release in response to pH changes, bile acid, mechanical stress and hypo-osmotic stress. ATP release following hypo-osmotic stress was sensitive to drugs affecting exocytosis, pannexin-1, connexins, maxi-anion channels and transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) channels, and corresponding transcripts were expressed in duct cells. Direct stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) and cAMP signalling and ethanol application had negligible effects on ATP release. The released ATP was sequentially dephosphorylated through ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase2) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 reactions, with respective generation of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine and their maintenance in the extracellular medium at basal levels. In addition, Capan-1 cells express counteracting adenylate kinase (AK1) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) enzymes (NME1, 2), which contribute to metabolism and regeneration of extracellular ATP and other nucleotides (ADP, uridine diphosphate (UDP) and uridine triphosphate (UTP)). In conclusion, we illustrate a complex regulation of extracellular purine homeostasis in a pancreatic duct cell model involving: ATP release by several mechanisms and subsequent nucleotide breakdown and ATP regeneration via counteracting nucleotide

  17. Parenchymal stress affects interstitial and pleural pressures in in situ lung.

    PubMed

    Miserocchi, G; Negrini, D; Gonano, C

    1991-11-01

    After resecting the intercostal muscles and thinning the endothoracic fascia, we micropunctured the lung tissue through the intact pleural space at functional residual capacity (FRC) and at volumes above FRC to evaluate the effect of increasing parenchymal stresses on pulmonary interstitial pressure (Pip). Pip was measured at a depth of approximately 230 microns from the pleural surface, at 50% lung height, in 12 anesthetized paralyzed rabbits oxygenated via a tracheal tube with 50% humidified O2. Pip was -10 +/- 1.5 cmH2O at FRC. At alveolar pressure of 5 and 10 cmH2O, lung volume increased by 8.5 and 19 ml and Pip decreased to -12.4 +/- 1.6 and -12.3 +/- 5 cmH2O, respectively. For the same lung volumes held by decreasing pleural surface pressure to about -5 and -8.5 cmH2O, Pip decreased to -17.4 +/- 1.6 and -23.8 +/- 5 cmH2O, respectively. Because Pip is more negative than pleural pressure, the data suggest that in intact pulmonary interstitium the pressure of the liquid phase is primarily set by the mechanisms controlling interstitial fluid turnover.

  18. Cinnamaldehyde impairs high glucose-induced hypertrophy in renal interstitial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Louis Kuoping; Chang, W.-T.; Shih, Y.-W.; Huang, J.-S.

    2010-04-15

    Cinnamaldehyde is a major and a bioactive compound isolated from the leaves of Cinnamomum osmophloeum kaneh. To explore whether cinnamaldehyde was linked to altered high glucose (HG)-mediated renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in diabetic nephropathy (DN), the molecular mechanisms of cinnamaldehyde responsible for inhibition of HG-induced hypertrophy in renal interstitial fibroblasts were examined. We found that cinnamaldehyde caused inhibition of HG-induced cellular mitogenesis rather than cell death by either necrosis or apoptosis. There were no changes in caspase 3 activity, cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein expression, and mitochondrial cytochrome c release in HG or cinnamaldehyde treatments in these cells. HG-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (but not the Janus kinase 2/signal transducers and activators of transcription) activation was markedly blocked by cinnamaldehyde. The ability of cinnamaldehyde to inhibit HG-induced hypertrophy was verified by the observation that it significantly decreased cell size, cellular hypertrophy index, and protein levels of collagen IV, fibronectin, and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA). The results obtained in this study suggest that cinnamaldehyde treatment of renal interstitial fibroblasts that have been stimulated by HG reduces their ability to proliferate and hypertrophy through mechanisms that may be dependent on inactivation of the ERK/JNK/p38 MAPK pathway.

  19. Interstitial lung disease associated with Equine Infectious Anemia Virus infection in horses.

    PubMed

    Bolfa, Pompei; Nolf, Marie; Cadoré, Jean-Luc; Catoi, Cornel; Archer, Fabienne; Dolmazon, Christine; Mornex, Jean-François; Leroux, Caroline

    2013-12-01

    EIA (Equine Infectious Anemia) is a blood-borne disease primarily transmitted by haematophagous insects or needle punctures. Other routes of transmission have been poorly explored. We evaluated the potential of EIAV (Equine Infectious Anemia Virus) to induce pulmonary lesions in naturally infected equids. Lungs from 77 EIAV seropositive horses have been collected in Romania and France. Three types of lesions have been scored on paraffin-embedded lungs: lymphocyte infiltration, bronchiolar inflammation, and thickness of the alveolar septa. Expression of the p26 EIAV capsid (CA) protein has been evaluated by immunostaining. Compared to EIAV-negative horses, 52% of the EIAV-positive horses displayed a mild inflammation around the bronchioles, 22% had a moderate inflammation with inflammatory cells inside the wall and epithelial bronchiolar hyperplasia and 6.5% had a moderate to severe inflammation, with destruction of the bronchiolar epithelium and accumulation of smooth muscle cells within the pulmonary parenchyma. Changes in the thickness of the alveolar septa were also present. Expression of EIAV capsid has been evidenced in macrophages, endothelial as well as in alveolar and bronchiolar epithelial cells, as determined by their morphology and localization. To summarize, we found lesions of interstitial lung disease similar to that observed during other lentiviral infections such as FIV in cats, SRLV in sheep and goats or HIV in children. The presence of EIAV capsid in lung epithelial cells suggests that EIAV might be responsible for the broncho-interstitial damages observed.

  20. αvβ6 integrin may be a potential prognostic biomarker in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Saini, Gauri; Porte, Joanne; Weinreb, Paul H; Violette, Shelia M; Wallace, William A; McKeever, Tricia M; Jenkins, Gisli

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and fibrotic nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis are progressive interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) with limited treatment options and poor survival. However, the rate of disease progression is variable, implying there may be different endotypes of disease. We hypothesised that immunophenotyping biopsies from ILD patients might reveal distinct endotypes of progressive fibrotic disease, which may facilitate stratification when undertaking clinical trials of novel therapies for IPF.43 paraffin-embedded, formalin-fixed lung tissue sections were immunostained for five molecules implicated in the pathogenesis of the fibrosis: α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), αvβ6 integrin, pro-surfactant protein C (SP-C), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and tenascin-C (TenC). Levels of immunostaining and numbers of fibroblastic foci were quantified using operator-dependent and -independent methods. The relationship of all these markers to overall survival was analysed.Staining revealed high levels of αSMA, αvβ6 integrin, pro-SP-C, HGF and TenC, and fibroblastic foci. Immunostaining varied across samples for all molecules but only the extent of αvβ6 integrin immunostaining was associated with increased mortality. There was no association with the other markers measured.Our data suggest high levels of αvβ6 integrin may identify a specific endotype of progressive fibrotic lung disease.

  1. Losartan attenuates renal interstitial fibrosis and tubular cell apoptosis in a rat model of obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Li, Detian; Zhang, Beiru

    2014-08-01

    Ureteral obstruction leads to renal injury and progresses to irreversible renal fibrosis, with tubular cell atrophy and apoptosis. There is conflicting evidence concerning whether losartan (an angiotensin II type I receptor antagonist) mitigates renal interstitial fibrosis and renal tubular epithelial cell apoptosis following unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in animal models. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of losartan on renal tubular cell apoptosis and renal fibrosis in a rat model of UUO. The rats were subjected to UUO by ureteral ligation and were treated with dimethyl sulfoxide (control) or losartan. The controls underwent sham surgery. The renal tissues were collected 3, 5, 7 and 14 days after surgery for measurement of various indicators of renal fibrosis. UUO increased the expression levels of α‑smooth muscle actin and collagen I, and the extent of renal tubular fibrosis and apoptosis in a time‑dependent manner. Losartan treatment partially attenuated these responses. Progression of renal interstitial fibrosis was accompanied by phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and altered the expression levels of two apoptosis‑related proteins (Bax and Bcl2). Losartan treatment also partially attenuated these responses. The results indicated that losartan attenuated renal fibrosis and renal tubular cell apoptosis in a rat model of UUO. This effect appeared to be mediated by partial blockage of STAT3 phosphorylation.

  2. CT in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bergin, C.J.; Mueller, N.L.

    1985-09-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of interstitial lung disease was assessed in 23 patients with known interstitial disease. These included seven patients with fibrosing alveolitis, six with silicosis, two with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, three with lymphangitic spread of tumor, two with sarcoidosis, one with rheumatoid lung disease, and two with neurofibromatosis. The CT appearance of the interstitial changes in the different disease entities was assessed. Nodules were a prominent CT feature in silicosis, sarcoidosis, and lymphangitic spread of malignancy. Distribution of nodules and associated interlobular septal thickening provided further distinguishing features in these diseases. Reticular densities were the predominant CT change in fibrosing alveolitis, rheumatoid lung disease, and extrinsic allergic alveolitis. CT can be useful in the investigation of selected instances of interstitial pulmonary disease.

  3. Interstitial deletion of distal 13q associated with Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, M A; Fitchett, M; Dennis, N R

    1989-01-01

    Three cases of interstitial deletion of chromosome 13 involving the common segment 13q22.1----q32.1 are reported. In addition to the recognised clinical features of this deletion, two had Hirschsprung's disease. Images PMID:2918536

  4. View of first level from north showing interstitial structural columns ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of first level from north showing interstitial structural columns for the Shuttle assemble configuration. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V Dynamic Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. Phenotypic characterization of rare interstitial deletion of chromosome 4

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Samira; Helmy, Nivine A.; Mahmoud, Wael M.; El-Ruby, Mona O.

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 4 is rare. Patients with interstitial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 4 differ from those with terminal deletions. Phenotypes may be variable, depending upon the specific length and location of the deleted portion. Here, we report on a boy exhibiting most of the congenital malformations encountered in terminal 4q syndrome. The conventional karyotyping and Fluorescence in-situ hybridization revealed a de novo interstitial del (4)(q31q32). The current report is a further document highlighting that deletion of segment q31 could be contributing to the expression of most of the phenotype of 4q deletion syndrome. Using array comparative genome hybridization methodology is recommended for investigating further cases with similar segmental interstitial deletions to support and delineate findings and to define genes implicated in the pathogenesis of the disorder.

  6. Complexes of self-interstitials with oxygen atoms in Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Khirunenko, L. I.; Pomozov, Yu. V.; Sosnin, M. G.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Riemann, H.

    2014-02-21

    Interactions of germanium self-interstitials with interstitial oxygen atoms in Ge subjected to irradiation at ∼80 K and subsequently to annealing have been studied. To distinguish the processes involving vacancies and self-interstitials the doping with tin was used. It was shown that absorption lines with maximum at 602, 674, 713 and 803 cm{sup −1} are self-interstitials-related. Two lines at 602 and 674, which develop upon annealing in the temperature range 180–240 K, belong to IO complexes, while the bands at 713 and 803 cm{sup −1}, which emerge after annealing at T>220 K, are associated with I{sub 2}O. It is argued that the annealing of IO occurs by two mechanisms: by dissociation and by diffusion.

  7. Granular Material Flows with Interstitial Fluid Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Melany L.; Brennen, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    The research focused on experimental measurements of the rheological properties of liquid-solid and granular flows. In these flows, the viscous effects of the interstitial fluid, the inertia of the fluid and particles, and the collisional interactions of the particles may all contribute to the flow mechanics. These multiphase flows include industrial problems such as coal slurry pipelines, hydraulic fracturing processes, fluidized beds, mining and milling operation, abrasive water jet machining, and polishing and surface erosion technologies. In addition, there are a wide range of geophysical flows such as debris flows, landslides and sediment transport. In extraterrestrial applications, the study of transport of particulate materials is fundamental to the mining and processing of lunar and Martian soils and the transport of atmospheric dust (National Research Council 2000). The recent images from Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft dramatically depict the complex sand and dust flows on Mars, including dune formation and dust avalanches on the slip-face of dune surfaces. These Aeolian features involve a complex interaction of the prevailing winds and deposition or erosion of the sediment layer; these features make a good test bed for the verification of global circulation models of the Martian atmosphere.

  8. Pulmonary interstitial compliance and microvascular filtration coefficient.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, H S

    1980-08-01

    Static and dynamic properties governing the fluid movement into the pulmonary interstitium were examined in isolated canine lobes. The system was driven by altering intravascular presure (Piv) when the lobe was isogravimetric (change in weight (W) = 0) and allowing the lobe to become isogravimetric again. By making use of an analogy to charging a capacitor across a resistor, calculation of the filtration coefficient for transvascular fluid movement (KF) and determination of the pressure-volume relationship of the pulmonary interstitial space (Pis-Vis), with a minimum of untested assumptions, was possible. KF was found to be the same for fluid moving out of or into the intravascular space, and when the relationship between Piv and alveolar pressure (PAlv) was constant, KF was independent of transpulmonary pressure (PL). When PAlv exceeded Piv, changes in Piv did not influence KF, suggesting no significant change in either surface area available for fluid transudation or vascular permeability. The Pis-Vis curve for increasing values of Vis and Pis is best described by an exponential relationhip and is independent of PL. However, the Pis-Vis curve with decreasing values of Vis and Pis is dependent on PL.

  9. Interstitial laser photocoagulation of breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickard, David C. O.; Bown, Stephen G.; Briggs, Gavin M.; Hall-Craggs, Margret A.

    2001-10-01

    Interstitial Laser Photocoagulation (ILP) is a method of destroying lesions in the center of solid organs without the need for open surgery. Under image guidance, up to four needles are inserted percutaneously into the tumor through which thin optic fibers are passed into the target lesion. Low power laser light from a semiconductor laser is delivered to gently coagulate the tissue. This dead tissue is subsequently resorbed by the body's normal healing processes. Follow up is achieved with ultrasound imaging. One study is described for assessing ILP for benign fibroadenomas. Fibroadenomas were treated to assess how laser treated breast tissue healed in the long term and we have shown that the necrosed tissue is resorbed without complications over a period of months. Nevertheless, by following treated fibroadenomas (up to 35mm diameter) with ultrasound measurement at 3, 6 and 12 months, in 14 patients, only one lesion was still detectable 12 months after ILP. In appropriate cases, ILP could be an attractive option, as it leaves no scars and should not change the shape or size of the breast. If the present studies are successful, the plan is for a multi-center trial of minimally invasive, thermal ablation of breast cancers.

  10. Interstitial lung disease in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ascherman, Dana P

    2010-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common systemic autoimmune disease in the United States, affecting 1% to 2% of the adult population. Although joints and synovium are the primary targets in this disorder, extra-articular manifestations involving the lungs can lead to significant morbidity and excess mortality. Among the various pulmonary complications that occur in RA, interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the most damaging, with effects ranging from subclinical inflammation/scarring to end-stage pulmonary fibrosis. New insights during the past several years have underscored the epidemiologic impact of clinically/functionally significant RA-associated ILD (RA-ILD) and have begun to identify factors contributing to the pathogenesis of this potentially devastating complication of RA. Despite these advancements, the complexity of RA-ILD and the lack of reliable predictors for disease progression highlight the need for improved biomarker development. Establishing such detailed molecular signatures will ultimately guide the application and timing of therapeutic agents that include immunomodulators as well as newly studied antifibrotic agents.

  11. [Acute interstitial pneumonia: diagnostic approach and management].

    PubMed

    Feuillet, S; Tazi, A

    2011-06-01

    Acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) encompasses a spectrum of pulmonary disorders characterized by involvement of the lung interstitium and distal airways (bronchioles and alveoli). The onset of respiratory symptoms is acute, most often within two weeks. Most AIP take place de novo, but sometimes represent an acute exacerbation of chronic lung disease. The clinical presentation of AIP comprises rapidly progressive dyspnoea, associated sometimes with cough, fever, myalgia and asthenia. Chest radiography shows diffuse pulmonary opacities. The associated hypoxemia may be severe enough to cause acute respiratory failure. Underlying aetiologies are numerous and variable, particularly in relation to the underlying immune status of the host. Various histopathological entities may be responsible for AIP although diffuse alveolar damage is the predominant pattern. The diagnostic approach to a patient presenting with AIP is to try to determine the most likely underlying histopathological pattern and to search for a precise aetiology. It relies mainly on a meticulous clinical evaluation and accurate biological investigation, essentially guided by the results of bronchoalveolar lavage performed in an area identified by abnormalities on high resolution computed tomography of the lungs. Initial therapeutic management includes symptomatic measures, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment adapted to the clinical context, frequently combined with systemic corticosteroid therapy.

  12. Interstitial adenosine concentration is increased by dipyridamole

    SciTech Connect

    Gorman, M.W.; Wangler, R.D.; DeWitt, D.F.; Wang, C.Y.; Bassingthwaighte, J.B.; Sparks, H.V.

    1986-03-01

    The authors used the multiple indicator dilution technique to observe the capillary transport of adenosine (ADO) in isolated guinea pig hearts. Radiolabelled albumin, sucrose and ADO were injected on the arterial side and measured in venous samples collected during the following 20 seconds. Transport parameters calculated from these data include permeability-surface area products (PS) for transendothelial diffusion, endothelial cell (EC) uptake at the lumenal and ablumenal membranes, and EC metabolism. With simultaneous measurements of arterial and venous ADO concentrations and flow, the authors calculated the steady-state interstitial fluid (ISF) ADO concentration. Under control conditions the venous ADO concentration was 7.1 +/- 2.8 nM. The calculated ISF concentration depends on whether they assume the venous ADO comes from the ISF, or directly from ECs. These ISF concentrations are 25 +/- 12 nM and 9.8 +/- 4.0 nM, respectively. During dipyridamole infusion (10 uM) the EC transport parameters became nearly zero. Venous and ISF ADO concentrations increased to 33 +/- 8.9 nM and 169 +/- 42 nM, respectively. The authors conclude that the ISF ADO concentration is 1.5-4 fold higher than the venous concentration at rest, and the ISF concentration increases greatly with dipyridamole.

  13. Renaissance of laser interstitial thermal ablation.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon; Barnett, Gene H

    2015-03-01

    Laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive technique for treating intracranial tumors, originally introduced in 1983. Its use in neurosurgical procedures was historically limited by early technical difficulties related to the monitoring and control of the extent of thermal damage. The development of magnetic resonance thermography and its application to LITT have allowed for real-time thermal imaging and feedback control during laser energy delivery, allowing for precise and accurate provision of tissue hyperthermia. Improvements in laser probe design, surgical stereotactic targeting hardware, and computer monitoring software have accelerated acceptance and clinical utilization of LITT as a neurosurgical treatment alternative. Current commercially available LITT systems have been used for the treatment of neurosurgical soft-tissue lesions, including difficult to access brain tumors, malignant gliomas, and radiosurgery-resistant metastases, as well as for the ablation of such lesions as epileptogenic foci and radiation necrosis. In this review, the authors aim to critically analyze the literature to describe the advent of LITT as a neurosurgical, laser excision tool, including its development, use, indications, and efficacy as it relates to neurosurgical applications. PMID:25727222

  14. Standardising Responsibility? The Significance of Interstitial Spaces.

    PubMed

    Wickson, Fern; Forsberg, Ellen-Marie

    2015-10-01

    Modern society is characterised by rapid technological development that is often socially controversial and plagued by extensive scientific uncertainty concerning its socio-ecological impacts. Within this context, the concept of 'responsible research and innovation' (RRI) is currently rising to prominence in international discourse concerning science and technology governance. As this emerging concept of RRI begins to be enacted through instruments, approaches, and initiatives, it is valuable to explore what it is coming to mean for and in practice. In this paper we draw attention to a realm that is often backgrounded in the current discussions of RRI but which has a highly significant impact on scientific research, innovation and policy-namely, the interstitial space of international standardization. Drawing on the case of nanoscale sciences and technologies to make our argument, we present examples of how international standards are already entangled in the development of RRI and yet, how the process of international standardization itself largely fails to embody the norms proposed as characterizing RRI. We suggest that although current models for RRI provide a promising attempt to make research and innovation more responsive to societal needs, ethical values and environmental challenges, such approaches will need to encompass and address a greater diversity of innovation system agents and spaces if they are to prove successful in their aims. PMID:25344842

  15. Interstitial laser photocoagulation of uterine leimyoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Alastair D.; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; Patel, Bipin L.; Broadbent, Jeff J.; Thurrell, Wendy; Bown, Stephen G.

    1996-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are common benign tumors which may cause heavy or painful periods, may present as a pelvic mass and are associated with infertility. Local excision of symptomatic lesions can be difficult and hazardous, and the alternative is hysterectomy. We are investigating interstitial laser photocoagulation (ILP) as a less invasive alternative. Initial experiments were undertaken on 40 fibroids after surgical removal. One or two bare tipped, precharred fibers from a 25 W semiconductor laser (805 nm) were inserted into the center of the fibroid and treatment delivered with 2 - 10 W for 100 - 1000 sec. Specimens were subsequently sectioned perpendicular to the fiber track. Fibroids are very pale and apart from occasional charred tracts there was little evidence of thermal coagulation macroscopically or after haematoxylon and eosin staining. However, using a diaphorase stain technique we were able to demonstrate ellipsoid zones of devitalized tissue up to 20 mm across (15 mm for single fibers). These results suggest that ILP is producing gentle, uniform coagulation which could lead to resorption of treated areas. With appropriate numbers of treatment sites, this could permit minimally invasive management of clinically significant lesions. Clinical studies have commenced treating fibroids with ILP at the time of surgical excision by myomectomy or hysterectomy.

  16. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Caminati, Antonella; Cassandro, Roberto; Harari, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a common complication of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), particularly in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and ILD associated with connective tissue disease. However, other lung diseases, such as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema syndrome, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and lymphangioleiomyomatosis, may also include PH in their clinical manifestations. In all of these diseases, PH is associated with reduced exercise capacity and poor prognosis. The degree of PH in ILDs is typically mild-to-moderate. However, some of these patients may develop a disproportionate increase in PH that cannot be justified solely by hypoxia and parenchymal injury: this condition has been termed "out-of-proportion" PH. The pathogenesis of PH in these diseases is various, incompletely understood and may be multifactorial. The clinical suspicion (i.e. increased dyspnoea, low diffusion capacity) and echocardiographic assessment are the first steps towards proper diagnosis of PH; however, right heart catheterisation remains the current gold standard for diagnosis of PH. At present, no specific therapies have been approved for the treatment of PH in patients with ILDs. PMID:23997057

  17. Optical dosimetry for interstitial photodynamic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Arnfield, M.R.; Tulip, J.; Chetner, M.; McPhee, M.S. )

    1989-07-01

    An approach to photodynamic treatment of tumors is the interstitial implantation of fiber optic light sources. Dosimetry is critical in identifying regions of low light intensity in the tumor which may prevent tumor cure. We describe a numerical technique for calculating light distributions within tumors, from multiple fiber optic sources. The method was tested using four translucent plastic needles, which were placed in a 0.94 X 0.94 cm grid pattern within excised Dunning R3327-AT rat prostate tumors. A cylindrical diffusing fiber tip, illuminated by 630 nm dye laser light was placed within one needle and a miniature light detector was placed within another. The average penetration depth in the tumor region between the two needles was calculated from the optical power measured by the detector, using a modified diffusion theory. Repeating the procedure for each pair of needles revealed significant variations in penetration depth within individual tumors. Average values of penetration depth, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient, and mean scattering cosine were 0.282 cm, 0.469 cm-1, 250 cm-1 and 0.964, respectively. Calculated light distributions from four cylindrical sources in tumors gave reasonable agreement with direct light measurements using fiber optic probes.

  18. Nilotinib-induced interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Go, Se-Il; Lee, Won Sup; Lee, Gyeong-Won; Kang, Jung Hun; Kang, Myung Hee; Lee, Jeong-Hee; Kim, Hoon-Gu

    2013-09-01

    Nilotinib is a second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor active in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) resistant to imatinib, and has been recently approved for newly diagnosed patients. We present a case of nilotinib-induced interstitial lung disease (ILD). A 67-year-old female patient was initially treated with imatinib for chronic-phase Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) CML. Imatinib was replaced by nilotinib because of hematological toxicity. The patient had received nilotinib for about 3 years without significant adverse effects. She visited the clinic due to chronic cough; chest X-ray revealed consolidations in both lung fields. Nilotinib-induced ILD was diagnosed based on intensive workup, including lung biopsy. She responded dramatically to corticosteroid therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of nilotinib-induced ILD in a patient with Ph(+) CML. We emphasize that if unexplained lung abnormalities progress in patients receiving nilotinib, physicians should consider this potentially fatal complication in their differential diagnoses.

  19. Modified arteriolar responses to ATP after impairment of endothelium by light-dye techniques in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, A.; Rodenburg, J.M.; Wolin, M.S.; Messina, E.J.; Kaley, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether endothelial cells are involved in the dilation of third-order arterioles (14 to 22 microns) in response to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in cremaster muscle of pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Two light/dye (L/D) techniques were employed to achieve selective, local endothelial impairment. One of these techniques utilizes a mercury lamp and sodium fluorescein, the other a Helium-Neon laser and Evans blue dye. L/D treatment (illumination with the appropriate wavelengths of light in the presence of an intravascular dye) of a 20-to 100-microns segment of an arteriole resulted in a complete loss of arteriolar dilation in response to topical administration of acetylcholine (10(-6) M) and arachidonic acid (AA, 10(-5) M). These agents were applied in 100-microl aliquots without interrupting the continuous suffusion with Ringer-gelatin solution and caused a {approximately} 70% increase in vascular diameter before the L/D intervention. Selectivity of the impairment was assessed by arteriolar responses to the nonendothelium-dependent dilator agents adenosine (10(-5) M) and sodium nitroprusside (2 {times} 10(-7) M), which elicited the same degree of dilation before and after L/D treatment. Under control conditions ATP (10(-6), 10(-5), and 10(-4) M) elicited dose-dependent increases in arteriolar diameter (from 38 to 74%). After impairment of arteriolar endothelium, dilation in response to all doses of ATP was significantly reduced. Theophylline (30 microM) significantly inhibited arteriolar dilation in response to adenosine (10(-6), 10(-5), and 10(-4) M) but did not affect the responses to various doses of ATP. Moreover, impairment of endothelium enhanced constrictor responses of arterioles to norepinephrine (0.6 {times} 10(-8) M).

  20. Diversity and regulation of ATP sulfurylase in photosynthetic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Prioretti, Laura; Gontero, Brigitte; Hell, Ruediger; Giordano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) catalyzes the first committed step in the sulfate assimilation pathway, the activation of sulfate prior to its reduction. ATPS has been studied in only a few model organisms and even in these cases to a much smaller extent than the sulfate reduction and cysteine synthesis enzymes. This is possibly because the latter were considered of greater regulatory importance for sulfate assimilation. Recent evidences (reported in this paper) challenge this view and suggest that ATPS may have a crucial regulatory role in sulfate assimilation, at least in algae. In the ensuing text, we summarize the current knowledge on ATPS, with special attention to the processes that control its activity and gene(s) expression in algae. Special attention is given to algae ATPS proteins. The focus on algae is the consequence of the fact that a comprehensive investigation of ATPS revealed that the algal enzymes, especially those that are most likely involved in the pathway of sulfate reduction to cysteine, possess features that are not present in other organisms. Remarkably, algal ATPS proteins show a great diversity of isoforms and a high content of cysteine residues, whose positions are often conserved. According to the occurrence of cysteine residues, the ATPS of eukaryotic algae is closer to that of marine cyanobacteria of the genera Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus and is more distant from that of freshwater cyanobacteria. These characteristics might have evolved in parallel with the radiation of algae in the oceans and the increase of sulfate concentration in seawater. PMID:25414712

  1. A hierarchy of ATP-consuming processes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Buttgereit, F; Brand, M D

    1995-01-01

    The rates of different ATP-consuming reactions were measured in concanavalin A-stimulated thymocytes, a model system in which more than 80% of the ATP consumption can be accounted for. There was a clear hierarchy of the responses of different energy-consuming reactions to changes in energy supply: pathways of macromolecule biosynthesis (protein synthesis and RNA/DNA synthesis) were most sensitive to energy supply, followed by sodium cycling and then calcium cycling across the plasma membrane. Mitochondrial proton leak was the least sensitive to energy supply. Control analysis was used to quantify the relative control over ATP production exerted by the individual groups of ATP-consuming reactions. Control was widely shared; no block of reactions had more than one-third of the control. A fuller control analysis showed that there appeared to be a hierarchy of control over the flux through ATP: protein synthesis > RNA/DNA synthesis and substrate oxidation > Na+ cycling and Ca2+ cycling > other ATP consumers and mitochondrial proton leak. Control analysis also indicated that there was significant control over the rates of individual ATP consumers by energy supply. Each ATP consumer had strong control over its own rate but very little control over the rates of the other ATP consumers. Images Figure 3 PMID:7492307

  2. Understanding structure, function, and mutations in the mitochondrial ATP synthase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Pagadala, Vijayakanth; Mueller, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial ATP synthase is a multimeric enzyme complex with an overall molecular weight of about 600,000 Da. The ATP synthase is a molecular motor composed of two separable parts: F1 and Fo. The F1 portion contains the catalytic sites for ATP synthesis and protrudes into the mitochondrial matrix. Fo forms a proton turbine that is embedded in the inner membrane and connected to the rotor of F1. The flux of protons flowing down a potential gradient powers the rotation of the rotor driving the synthesis of ATP. Thus, the flow of protons though Fo is coupled to the synthesis of ATP. This review will discuss the structure/function relationship in the ATP synthase as determined by biochemical, crystallographic, and genetic studies. An emphasis will be placed on linking the structure/function relationship with understanding how disease causing mutations or putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the subunits of the ATP synthase, will affect the function of the enzyme and the health of the individual. The review will start by summarizing the current understanding of the subunit composition of the enzyme and the role of the subunits followed by a discussion on known mutations and their effect on the activity of the ATP synthase. The review will conclude with a summary of mutations in genes encoding subunits of the ATP synthase that are known to be responsible for human disease, and a brief discussion on SNPs. PMID:25938092

  3. Application of luciferase assay for ATP to antimicrobial drug susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The susceptibility of bacteria, particularly those derived from body fluids, to antimicrobial agents is determined in terms of an ATP index measured by culturing a bacterium in a growth medium. The amount of ATP is assayed in a sample of the cultured bacterium by measuring the amount of luminescent light emitted when the bacterial ATP is reacted with a luciferase-luciferin mixture. The sample of the cultured bacterium is subjected to an antibiotic agent. The amount of bacterial adenosine triphosphate is assayed after treatment with the antibiotic by measuring the luminescent light resulting from the reaction. The ATP index is determined from the values obtained from the assay procedures.

  4. Imaging changes in the cytosolic ATP-to-ADP ratio.

    PubMed

    Tantama, Mathew; Yellen, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a central metabolite that plays fundamental roles as an energy transfer molecule, a phosphate donor, and a signaling molecule inside the cells. The phosphoryl group transfer potential of ATP provides a thermodynamic driving force for many metabolic reactions, and phosphorylation of both small metabolites and large proteins can serve as a regulatory modification. In the process of phosphoryl transfer from ATP, the diphosphate ADP is produced, and as a result, the ATP-to-ADP ratio is an important physiological control parameter. The ATP-to-ADP ratio is directly proportional to cellular energy charge and phosphorylation potential. Furthermore, several ATP-dependent enzymes and signaling proteins are regulated by ADP, and their activation profiles are a function of the ATP-to-ADP ratio. Finally, regeneration of ATP from ADP can serve as an important readout of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. We, therefore, developed a genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor tuned to sense ATP-to-ADP ratios in the physiological range of healthy mammalian cells. Here, we present a protocol for using this biosensor to visualize energy status using live-cell fluorescence microscopy.

  5. Connective tissue disease-associated interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic interstitial pneumonia: similarity and difference.

    PubMed

    Bryson, Thomas; Sundaram, Baskaran; Khanna, Dinesh; Kazerooni, Ella A

    2014-02-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are increasingly recognized in patients with systemic diseases. Patients with early ILD changes may be asymptomatic. Features of ILD overlap among systemic diseases and with idiopathic variety. High-resolution computed tomography plays a central role in diagnosing ILDs. Imaging features are often nonspecific. Therapy- and complication-related lung changes would pose difficulty in diagnosing and classifying an ILD. Biology and prognosis of secondary ILDs may differ between different disease-related ILDs and idiopathic variety. Combination of clinical features, serological tests, pulmonary and extrapulmonary imaging findings, and pathology findings may help to diagnose ILDs. PMID:24480141

  6. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis: rare cutaneous manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis*

    PubMed Central

    Veronez, Isis Suga; Dantas, Fernando Luiz; Valente, Neusa Yuriko; Kakizaki, Priscila; Yasuda, Thaís Helena; Cunha, Thaís do Amaral

    2015-01-01

    Besides being an uncommon clinicopathological entity, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis, also described as interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis (IGDA), has shown a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, such as linear and erythematous lesions, papules, plaques and nodules. Histological features include dense dermal histiocytic infiltrate, usually in a palisade configuration, and scattered neutrophils and eosinophils. We describe a middle aged woman with rheumatoid arthritis of difficult management and cutaneous lesions compatible with IGDA. PMID:26131871

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Assayag, Deborah; Lee, Joyce S; King, Talmadge E

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  8. Exercise in muscle glycogen storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Preisler, Nicolai; Haller, Ronald G; Vissing, John

    2015-05-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inborn errors of glycogen or glucose metabolism. In the GSDs that affect muscle, the consequence of a block in skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown or glucose use, is an impairment of muscular performance and exercise intolerance, owing to 1) an increase in glycogen storage that disrupts contractile function and/or 2) a reduced substrate turnover below the block, which inhibits skeletal muscle ATP production. Immobility is associated with metabolic alterations in muscle leading to an increased dependence on glycogen use and a reduced capacity for fatty acid oxidation. Such changes may be detrimental for persons with GSD from a metabolic perspective. However, exercise may alter skeletal muscle substrate metabolism in ways that are beneficial for patients with GSD, such as improving exercise tolerance and increasing fatty acid oxidation. In addition, a regular exercise program has the potential to improve general health and fitness and improve quality of life, if executed properly. In this review, we describe skeletal muscle substrate use during exercise in GSDs, and how blocks in metabolic pathways affect exercise tolerance in GSDs. We review the studies that have examined the effect of regular exercise training in different types of GSD. Finally, we consider how oral substrate supplementation can improve exercise tolerance and we discuss the precautions that apply to persons with GSD that engage in exercise.

  9. Impairment of ATP hydrolysis decreases adenosine A1 receptor tonus favoring cholinergic nerve hyperactivity in the obstructed human urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Silva-Ramos, M; Silva, I; Faria, M; Magalhães-Cardoso, M T; Correia, J; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2015-12-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether reduced adenosine formation linked to deficits in extracellular ATP hydrolysis by NTPDases contributes to detrusor neuromodulatory changes associated with bladder outlet obstruction in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The kinetics of ATP catabolism and adenosine formation as well as the role of P1 receptor agonists on muscle tension and nerve-evoked [(3)H]ACh release were evaluated in mucosal-denuded detrusor strips from BPH patients (n = 31) and control organ donors (n = 23). The neurogenic release of ATP and [(3)H]ACh was higher (P < 0.05) in detrusor strips from BPH patients. The extracellular hydrolysis of ATP and, subsequent, adenosine formation was slower (t (1/2) 73 vs. 36 min, P < 0.05) in BPH detrusor strips. The A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of evoked [(3)H]ACh release by adenosine (100 μM), NECA (1 μM), and R-PIA (0.3 μM) was enhanced in BPH bladders. Relaxation of detrusor contractions induced by acetylcholine required 30-fold higher concentrations of adenosine. Despite VAChT-positive cholinergic nerves exhibiting higher A(1) immunoreactivity in BPH bladders, the endogenous adenosine tonus revealed by adenosine deaminase is missing. Restoration of A1 inhibition was achieved by favoring (1) ATP hydrolysis with apyrase (2 U mL(-1)) or (2) extracellular adenosine accumulation with dipyridamole or EHNA, as these drugs inhibit adenosine uptake and deamination, respectively. In conclusion, reduced ATP hydrolysis leads to deficient adenosine formation and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of cholinergic nerve activity in the obstructed human bladder. Thus, we propose that pharmacological manipulation of endogenous adenosine levels and/or A(1) receptor activation might be useful to control bladder overactivity in BPH patients.

  10. Interstitial and substitutional Zr in SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, John; van Ginhoven, Renee; Jiang, Weilin

    2011-03-01

    We investigate Zr in SrTi O3 (STO) as an electronic dopant and as a model for nuclear waste forms in which radioactive Sr decays to Y and then to stable Zr through beta emission. Density functional theory (DFT) within the supercell model is used to predict the thermodynamic stability and electronic states of interstitial and Sr- or Ti-substituted Zr atoms in the STO lattice. Native point defects such as vacancies and antisites are also considered. When Zr replaces Sr, its most stable configuration is to simply occupy the Sr site (instead of, for example, replacing a Ti and displacing the Ti to the Sr site.) For Zr added to the lattice, its most stable configuration is to replace a Ti, making a Zr Ti impurity plus a Ti interstitial (as opposed to the Zr just remaining as an interstitial atom.) Zr Sr is predicted to be a double electron donor, Zr Ti is electrically inactive and interstitial Zr and Ti are predicted to be quadruple donors, with all donor levels in the conduction band. Zr Sr and the tetravalent interstitials are all predicted to increase the crystal volume, and the interstitials also are predicted to lead to a tetragonal distortion of the lattice. Experiments with injection of Zr atoms into STO qualitatively confirm these predictions of crystal structural changes. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Form Campaign.

  11. Interstitial fluid flow of alveolar primary septa after pneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Haber, Shimon; Weisbord, Michal; Mishima, Michiaki; Mentzer, Steve J; Tsuda, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Neoalveolation is known to occur in the remaining lung after pneumonectomy. While compensatory lung growth is a complex process, stretching of the lung tissue appears to be crucial for tissue remodeling. Even a minute shear stress exerted on fibroblasts in the interstitial space is known to trigger cell differentiation into myofibroblast that are essential to building new tissues. We hypothesize that the non-uniform motion of the primary septa due to their heterogeneous mechanical properties under tidal breathing induces a spatially unique interstitial flow and shear stress distribution in the interstitial space. This may in turn trigger pulmonary fibroblast differentiation and neoalveolation. In this study, we developed a theoretical basis for how cyclic motion of the primary septal walls with heterogeneous mechanical properties affects the interstitial flow and shear stress distribution. The velocity field of the interstitial flow was expressed by a Fourier (complex) series and its leading term was considered to induce the basic structure of stress distribution as long as the dominant length scale of heterogeneity is the size of collapsed alveoli. We conclude that the alteration of mechanical properties of the primary septa caused by pneumonectomy can develop a new interstitial flow field, which alters the shear stress distribution. This may trigger the differentiation of resident fibroblasts, which may in turn induce spatially unique neoalveolation in the remaining lung. Our example illustrates that the initial forming of new alveoli about half the size of the original ones.

  12. The Contribution of B Cells to Renal Interstitial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Florian; Lindenmeyer, Maja T.; Cohen, Clemens D.; Brandt, Ulrike; Draganovici, Dan; Fischereder, Michael; Kretzler, Matthias; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Sitter, Thomas; Mosberger, Isabella; Kerjaschki, Dontscho; Regele, Heinz; Schlöndorff, Detlef; Segerer, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Local B-cell infiltrates play a role in tissue fibrosis, neolymphangiogenesis, and renal allograft survival. We sought to characterize the B-cell infiltrates, factors involved in B-cell recruitment, and lymphangiogenesis in renal interstitial injury (ie, acute and chronic interstitial nephritis and chronic IgA nephropathy). CD20-positive B cells formed a prominent part of the interstitial infiltrating cells. Together with CD3-positive T cells, the CD20-positive B cells formed larger nodular structures. CD10-positive pre-B cells were rare, and the majority were mature CD27-positive B cells. Proliferating B cells were detected within nodular infiltrates. The level of mRNA expression of the chemokine CXCL13 was increased and correlated with CD20 mRNA in the tubulointerstitial space. CXCL13 protein was predominantly found at sites of nodular infiltrates, in association with CXCR5-positive B cells. Furthermore, sites of chronic interstitial inflammation were associated with a high number of lymphatic vessels. B-cell infiltrates form a prominent part of the interstitial infiltrates both in primary interstitial lesions and in IgA nephropathy. CXCR5-positive B cells might be recruited via the chemokine CXCL13 and seem to contribute to the formation of intrarenal lymphoid follicle-like structures. These might represent an intrarenal immune system. PMID:17255314

  13. Interstitial fluid flow of alveolar primary septa after pneumonectomy.