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Sample records for muscle interstitial atp

  1. Interstitial Cells: Regulators of Smooth Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα+ cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα+ cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues. PMID:24987007

  2. Interstitial cells: regulators of smooth muscle function.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M; Koh, Sang Don

    2014-07-01

    Smooth muscles are complex tissues containing a variety of cells in addition to muscle cells. Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin interact with and form electrical connectivity with smooth muscle cells in many organs, and these cells provide important regulatory functions. For example, in the gastrointestinal tract, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRα(+) cells have been described, in detail, and represent distinct classes of cells with unique ultrastructure, molecular phenotypes, and functions. Smooth muscle cells are electrically coupled to ICC and PDGFRα(+) cells, forming an integrated unit called the SIP syncytium. SIP cells express a variety of receptors and ion channels, and conductance changes in any type of SIP cell affect the excitability and responses of the syncytium. SIP cells are known to provide pacemaker activity, propagation pathways for slow waves, transduction of inputs from motor neurons, and mechanosensitivity. Loss of interstitial cells has been associated with motor disorders of the gut. Interstitial cells are also found in a variety of other smooth muscles; however, in most cases, the physiological and pathophysiological roles for these cells have not been clearly defined. This review describes structural, functional, and molecular features of interstitial cells and discusses their contributions in determining the behaviors of smooth muscle tissues.

  3. Regulation of Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle Function by Interstitial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Kito, Yoshihiko; Hwang, Sung Jin; Ward, Sean M

    2016-09-01

    Interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin form gap junctions with smooth muscle cells in visceral smooth muscles and provide important regulatory functions. In gastrointestinal (GI) muscles, there are two distinct classes of interstitial cells, c-Kit(+) interstitial cells of Cajal and PDGFRα(+) cells, that regulate motility patterns. Loss of these cells may contribute to symptoms in GI motility disorders.

  4. Involvement of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in the acidosis-induced efflux of ATP from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jie; Le, Gengyun; Ballard, Heather J

    2010-11-15

    The present study was performed to investigate the effect of acidosis on the efflux of ATP from skeletal muscle. Infusion of lactic acid to the perfused hindlimb muscles of anaesthetised rats produced dose-dependent decreases in pH and increases in the interstitial ATP of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle: 10 mM lactic acid reduced the venous pH from 7.22 ± 0.04 to 6.97 ± 0.02 and increased interstitial ATP from 38 ± 8 to 67 ± 11 nM. The increase in interstitial ATP was well-correlated with the decrease in pH (r(2) = 0.93; P < 0.05). Blockade of cellular uptake of lactic acid using α-cyano-hydroxycinnamic acid abolished the lactic acid-induced ATP release, whilst infusion of sodium lactate failed to depress pH or increase interstitial ATP, suggesting that intracellular pH depression, rather than lactate, stimulated the ATP efflux. Incubation of cultured skeletal myoblasts with 10 mM lactic acid significantly increased the accumulation of ATP in the bathing medium from 0.46 ± 0.06 to 0.76 ± 0.08 μM, confirming the skeletal muscle cells as the source of the released ATP. Acidosis-induced ATP efflux from the perfused muscle was abolished by CFTR(inh)-172, a specific inhibitor of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), or glibenclamide, an inhibitor of both K(ATP) channels and CFTR, but it was not affected by atractyloside, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial ATP transporter. Silencing of the CFTR gene using an siRNA abolished the acidosis-induced increase in ATP release from cultured myoblasts. CFTR expression on skeletal muscle cells was confirmed using immunostaining in the intact muscle and Western blotting in the cultured cells. These data suggest that depression of the intracellular pH of skeletal muscle cells stimulates ATP efflux, and that CFTR plays an important role in the release mechanism.

  5. Involvement of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in the acidosis-induced efflux of ATP from rat skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Jie; Le, Gengyun; Ballard, Heather J

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effect of acidosis on the efflux of ATP from skeletal muscle. Infusion of lactic acid to the perfused hindlimb muscles of anaesthetised rats produced dose-dependent decreases in pH and increases in the interstitial ATP of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle: 10 mm lactic acid reduced the venous pH from 7.22 ± 0.04 to 6.97 ± 0.02 and increased interstitial ATP from 38 ± 8 to 67 ± 11 nm. The increase in interstitial ATP was well-correlated with the decrease in pH (r2 = 0.93; P < 0.05). Blockade of cellular uptake of lactic acid using α-cyano-hydroxycinnamic acid abolished the lactic acid-induced ATP release, whilst infusion of sodium lactate failed to depress pH or increase interstitial ATP, suggesting that intracellular pH depression, rather than lactate, stimulated the ATP efflux. Incubation of cultured skeletal myoblasts with 10 mm lactic acid significantly increased the accumulation of ATP in the bathing medium from 0.46 ± 0.06 to 0.76 ± 0.08 μm, confirming the skeletal muscle cells as the source of the released ATP. Acidosis-induced ATP efflux from the perfused muscle was abolished by CFTRinh-172, a specific inhibitor of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), or glibenclamide, an inhibitor of both KATP channels and CFTR, but it was not affected by atractyloside, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial ATP transporter. Silencing of the CFTR gene using an siRNA abolished the acidosis-induced increase in ATP release from cultured myoblasts. CFTR expression on skeletal muscle cells was confirmed using immunostaining in the intact muscle and Western blotting in the cultured cells. These data suggest that depression of the intracellular pH of skeletal muscle cells stimulates ATP efflux, and that CFTR plays an important role in the release mechanism. PMID:20819945

  6. cAMP/protein kinase A activates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator for ATP release from rat skeletal muscle during low pH or contractions.

    PubMed

    Tu, Jie; Lu, Lin; Cai, Weisong; Ballard, Heather J

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is involved in ATP release from skeletal muscle at low pH. These experiments investigate the signal transduction mechanism linking pH depression to CFTR activation and ATP release, and evaluate whether CFTR is involved in ATP release from contracting muscle. Lactic acid treatment elevated interstitial ATP of buffer-perfused muscle and extracellular ATP of L6 myocytes: this ATP release was abolished by the non-specific CFTR inhibitor, glibenclamide, or the specific CFTR inhibitor, CFTR(inh)-172, suggesting that CFTR was involved, and by inhibition of lactic acid entry to cells, indicating that intracellular pH depression was required. Muscle contractions significantly elevated interstitial ATP, but CFTR(inh)-172 abolished the increase. The cAMP/PKA pathway was involved in the signal transduction pathway for CFTR-regulated ATP release from muscle: forskolin increased CFTR phosphorylation and stimulated ATP release from muscle or myocytes; lactic acid increased intracellular cAMP, pCREB and PKA activity, whereas IBMX enhanced ATP release from myocytes. Inhibition of PKA with KT5720 abolished lactic-acid- or contraction-induced ATP release from muscle. Inhibition of either the Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger (NHE) with amiloride or the Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchanger (NCX) with SN6 or KB-R7943 abolished lactic-acid- or contraction-induced release of ATP from muscle, suggesting that these exchange proteins may be involved in the activation of CFTR. Our data suggest that CFTR-regulated release contributes to ATP release from contracting muscle in vivo, and that cAMP and PKA are involved in the activation of CFTR during muscle contractions or acidosis; NHE and NCX may be involved in the signal transduction pathway.

  7. cAMP/Protein Kinase A Activates Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator for ATP Release from Rat Skeletal Muscle during Low pH or Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weisong; Ballard, Heather J.

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is involved in ATP release from skeletal muscle at low pH. These experiments investigate the signal transduction mechanism linking pH depression to CFTR activation and ATP release, and evaluate whether CFTR is involved in ATP release from contracting muscle. Lactic acid treatment elevated interstitial ATP of buffer-perfused muscle and extracellular ATP of L6 myocytes: this ATP release was abolished by the non-specific CFTR inhibitor, glibenclamide, or the specific CFTR inhibitor, CFTRinh-172, suggesting that CFTR was involved, and by inhibition of lactic acid entry to cells, indicating that intracellular pH depression was required. Muscle contractions significantly elevated interstitial ATP, but CFTRinh-172 abolished the increase. The cAMP/PKA pathway was involved in the signal transduction pathway for CFTR-regulated ATP release from muscle: forskolin increased CFTR phosphorylation and stimulated ATP release from muscle or myocytes; lactic acid increased intracellular cAMP, pCREB and PKA activity, whereas IBMX enhanced ATP release from myocytes. Inhibition of PKA with KT5720 abolished lactic-acid- or contraction-induced ATP release from muscle. Inhibition of either the Na+/H+-exchanger (NHE) with amiloride or the Na+/Ca2+-exchanger (NCX) with SN6 or KB-R7943 abolished lactic-acid- or contraction-induced release of ATP from muscle, suggesting that these exchange proteins may be involved in the activation of CFTR. Our data suggest that CFTR-regulated release contributes to ATP release from contracting muscle in vivo, and that cAMP and PKA are involved in the activation of CFTR during muscle contractions or acidosis; NHE and NCX may be involved in the signal transduction pathway. PMID:23226244

  8. Changes in dermal interstitial ATP levels during local heating of human skin

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Jayson R; Heal, Cory; Bridges, Jarom; Goldthorpe, Scott; Mack, Gary W

    2012-01-01

    Heating skin is believed to activate vanilloid type III and IV transient receptor potential ion channels (TRPV3, TRPV4, respectively), resulting in the release of ATP into the interstitial fluid. We examined the hypothesis that local skin heating would result in an accumulation of ATP in the interstitial fluid that would be related with a rise in skin blood flow (SkBF) and temperature sensation. Two microdialysis probes were inserted into the dermis on the dorsal aspect of the forearm in 15 young, healthy subjects. The probed skin was maintained at 31°C, 35°C, 39°C and 43°C for 8 min periods, during which SkBF was monitored as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC). Dialysate was collected and analysed for ATP ([ATP]d) using a luciferase-based assay, and ratings of perceived warmth were taken at each temperature. At a skin temperature of 31°C, [ATP]d averaged 18.93 ± 4.06 nm and CVC averaged 12.57 ± 1.59% peak. Heating skin to 35°C resulted in an increase in CVC (17.63 ± 1.27% peak; P < 0.05), but no change in [ATP]d. Heating skin to 39°C and 43°C resulted in a decreased [ATP]d (5.88 ± 1.68 nm and 8.75 ± 3.44 nm, respectively; P < 0.05), which was accompanied by significant elevations in CVC (38.90 ± 1.37% peak and 60.32 ± 1.95% peak, respectively; P < 0.05). Ratings of perceived warmth increased in proportion to the increase in skin temperature (r2 = 0.75, P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicate that an accumulation of interstitial ATP does not occur during local heating, and therefore does not have a role in temperature sensation or the dilator response in human skin. Nevertheless, the low threshold of dilatation (35°C) indicates a possible role for the TRPV3, TRPV4 channels or the sensitization of other ion channels in mediating the dilator response. PMID:23045344

  9. ATP economy of force maintenance in human tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Ratkevicius, Aivaras; Mizuno, Masao; Quistorff, Bjorn

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was investigate ATP economy of force maintenance in the human tibialis anterior muscle during 60 s of anaerobic voluntary contraction at 50% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). ATP turnover rate was evaluated using P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (P-MRS). The total volume of ankle dorsiflexor muscles was assessed by H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (H-MRI), and the fiber type composition of the tibialis anterior muscle was evaluated using histochemical analysis of muscle biopsies. The tibialis anterior muscle occupied 59.7 +/- 0.6% (mean +/- SEM) of the total ankle dorsiflexor muscle volume, which was 267 +/- 10 cm. Relative cross-sectional areas occupied by Type I, IIA, and IIB fibers in the tibialis anterior were 69.3 +/- 2.2, 27.4 +/- 2.76, and 3.2 +/- 1.0%, respectively. ATP economy of force maintenance did not change significantly during the 60-s contraction. It averaged at 4.81 +/- 0.42 N.s.micromol-1, and correlated with the relative cross-sectional area of the muscle occupied by Type I fiber (r = 0.73, P < 0.01). For the second half of the contraction, subjects dropping in force showed lower ATP economy compared with those maintaining the force (3.7 +/- 0.6 vs 5.3 +/- 0.6 N.s.micromol-1; P < 0.05). It is argued that the unchanged ATP economy of force maintenance during the voluntary contraction could be due to an increase in the ATP economy of contracting muscle fibers offsetting the effects of increased temperature and low ATP economy of Type II fibers. Mechanical interaction between motor units could also act to improve ATP economy of force maintenance.

  10. Hypophosphatemia promotes lower rates of muscle ATP synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pesta, Dominik H.; Tsirigotis, Dimitrios N.; Befroy, Douglas E.; Caballero, Daniel; Jurczak, Michael J.; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Cline, Gary W.; Dufour, Sylvie; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.; Rothman, Douglas L.; Carpenter, Thomas O.; Insogna, Karl; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Bergwitz, Clemens; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    Hypophosphatemia can lead to muscle weakness and respiratory and heart failure, but the mechanism is unknown. To address this question, we noninvasively assessed rates of muscle ATP synthesis in hypophosphatemic mice by using in vivo saturation transfer [31P]-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. By using this approach, we found that basal and insulin-stimulated rates of muscle ATP synthetic flux (VATP) and plasma inorganic phosphate (Pi) were reduced by 50% in mice with diet-induced hypophosphatemia as well as in sodium-dependent Pi transporter solute carrier family 34, member 1 (NaPi2a)-knockout (NaPi2a−/−) mice compared with their wild-type littermate controls. Rates of VATP normalized in both hypophosphatemic groups after restoring plasma Pi concentrations. Furthermore, VATP was directly related to cellular and mitochondrial Pi uptake in L6 and RC13 rodent myocytes and isolated muscle mitochondria. Similar findings were observed in a patient with chronic hypophosphatemia as a result of a mutation in SLC34A3 who had a 50% reduction in both serum Pi content and muscle VATP. After oral Pi repletion and normalization of serum Pi levels, muscle VATP completely normalized in the patient. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that decreased muscle ATP synthesis, in part, may be caused by low blood Pi concentrations, which may explain some aspects of muscle weakness observed in patients with hypophosphatemia.—Pesta, D. H., Tsirigotis, D. N., Befroy, D. E., Caballero, D., Jurczak, M. J., Rahimi, Y., Cline, G. W., Dufour, S., Birkenfeld, A. L., Rothman, D. L., Carpenter, T. O., Insogna, K., Petersen, K. F., Bergwitz, C., Shulman, G. I. Hypophosphatemia promotes lower rates of muscle ATP synthesis. PMID:27338702

  11. Mechanical effects of muscle contraction increase intravascular ATP draining quiescent and active skeletal muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Richards, Jennifer C; Dinenno, Frank A

    2013-04-01

    Intravascular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) evokes vasodilation and is implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise. Mechanical stresses to erythrocytes and endothelial cells stimulate ATP release in vitro. How mechanical effects of muscle contractions contribute to increased plasma ATP during exercise is largely unexplored. We tested the hypothesis that simulated mechanical effects of muscle contractions increase [ATP](venous) and ATP effluent in vivo, independent of changes in tissue metabolic demand, and further increase plasma ATP when superimposed with mild-intensity exercise. In young healthy adults, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF) (Doppler ultrasound) and plasma [ATP](v) (luciferin-luciferase assay), then calculated forearm ATP effluent (FBF×[ATP](v)) during rhythmic forearm compressions (RFC) via a blood pressure cuff at three graded pressures (50, 100, and 200 mmHg; Protocol 1; n = 10) and during RFC at 100 mmHg, 5% maximal voluntary contraction rhythmic handgrip exercise (RHG), and combined RFC + RHG (Protocol 2; n = 10). [ATP](v) increased from rest with each cuff pressure (range 144-161 vs. 64 ± 13 nmol/l), and ATP effluent was graded with pressure. In Protocol 2, [ATP](v) increased in each condition compared with rest (RFC: 123 ± 33; RHG: 51 ± 9; RFC + RHG: 96 ± 23 vs. Mean Rest: 42 ± 4 nmol/l; P < 0.05), and ATP effluent was greatest with RFC + RHG (RFC: 5.3 ± 1.4; RHG: 5.3 ± 1.1; RFC + RHG: 11.6 ± 2.7 vs. Mean Rest: 1.2 ± 0.1 nmol/min; P < 0.05). We conclude that the mechanical effects of muscle contraction can 1) independently elevate intravascular ATP draining quiescent skeletal muscle without changes in local metabolism and 2) further augment intravascular ATP during mild exercise associated with increases in metabolism and local deoxygenation; therefore, it is likely one stimulus for increasing intravascular ATP during exercise in humans.

  12. Muscle Interstitial Cells: A Brief Field Guide to Non-satellite Cell Populations in Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Francesco Saverio; Moyle, Louise A; Perdiguero, Eusebio

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration is mainly enabled by a population of adult stem cells known as satellite cells. Satellite cells have been shown to be indispensable for adult skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. In the last two decades, other stem/progenitor cell populations resident in the skeletal muscle interstitium have been identified as "collaborators" of satellite cells during regeneration. They also appear to have a key role in replacing skeletal muscle with adipose, fibrous, or bone tissue in pathological conditions. Here, we review the role and known functions of these different interstitial skeletal muscle cell types and discuss their role in skeletal muscle tissue homeostasis, regeneration, and disease, including their therapeutic potential for cell transplantation protocols.

  13. ATP-gated channels in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Benham, C D

    1990-01-01

    ATP acting through P2x-purinoceptors activates cation channels with some similarities to the activation of channels gated by acetylcholine and glutamate (channels that can also act as fast excitatory transmitters). These experiments clearly demonstrate an ATP-mediated Ca2+ influx through agonist-gated channels and a consequent elevation of [Ca2+]i in these single vascular smooth muscle cells. The combination of the ability to hold these cells under voltage-clamp and to measure [Ca2+]i simultaneously has allowed us to exclude other possible explanations for the rise in [Ca2+]i under these conditions. Thus, although the major cation entering through the channels is Na+, ATP receptor activation will also generate subtle, localized increases in [Ca2+]. These increases might directly activate contractile proteins or, if insufficient to do this, might upregulate other Ca2(+)-dependent enzymes modulating the contractile process and provide an enhanced source of Ca2+ for uptake into internal Ca2+ stores. Further understanding of the physiological role of this conductance pathway may require the development of specific receptor antagonists or channel blockers.

  14. ATP and heat production in human skeletal muscle during dynamic exercise: higher efficiency of anaerobic than aerobic ATP resynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Krustrup, Peter; Ferguson, Richard A; Kjær, Michael; Bangsbo, Jens

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to simultaneously examine skeletal muscle heat production and ATP turnover in humans during dynamic exercise with marked differences in aerobic metabolism. This was done to test the hypothesis that efficiency is higher in anaerobic than aerobic ATP resynthesis. Six healthy male subjects performed 90 s of low intensity knee-extensor exercise with (OCC) and without thigh occlusion (CON-LI) as well as 90 s of high intensity exercise (CON-HI) that continued from the CON-LI bout. Muscle heat production was determined by continuous measurements of muscle heat accumulation and heat release to the blood. Muscle ATP production was quantified by repeated measurements of thigh oxygen uptake as well as blood and muscle metabolite changes. All temperatures of the thigh were equalized to ≈37 °C prior to exercise by a water-perfused heating cuff. Oxygen uptake accounted for 80 ± 2 and 59 ± 4 %, respectively, of the total ATP resynthesis in CON-LI and CON-HI, whereas it was negligible in OCC. The rise in muscle temperature was lower (P < 0.05) in OCC than CON-LI (0.32 ± 0.04 vs. 0.37 ± 0.03 °C). The mean rate of heat production was also lower (P < 0.05) in OCC than CON-LI (36 ± 4 vs. 57 ± 4 J s−1). Mechanical efficiency was 52 ± 4 % after 15 s of OCC and remained constant, whereas it decreased (P < 0.05) from 56 ± 5 to 32 ± 3 % during CON-LI. During CON-HI, mechanical efficiency transiently increased (P < 0.05) to 47 ± 4 %, after which it decreased (P < 0.05) to 36 ± 3 % at the end of CON-HI. Assuming a fully coupled mitochondrial respiration, the ATP turnover per unit of work was calculated to be unaltered during OCC (≈20 mmol ATP kJ−1), whereas it increased (P < 0.05) from 21 ± 4 to 29 ± 3 mmol ATP kJ−1 during CON-LI and further (P < 0.05) to 37 ± 3 mmol ATP kJ−1 during CON-HI. The present data confirm the hypothesis that heat loss is lower in anaerobic ATP resynthesis than in oxidative phosphorylation and can in part

  15. Distance of myofilament sliding per ATP molecule in skeletal muscle fibers studied using laser flash photolysis of caged ATP.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Abe, O; Kobayashi, T; Sugi, H

    1993-01-01

    We studied the distance of myofilament sliding per hydrolysis of one ATP molecule by recording shortening of single glycerinated muscle fibers induced by laser flash photolysis of caged ATP, diffusion of photochemically released ATP out of the fiber being prevented by surrounding the fiber with silicone oil. With 75 microM ATP released (one half of the total myosin head concentration within the fiber), the fiber showed the minimum shortening (10 +/- 2 nm/half sarcomere, n = 10) taking place uniformly in each sarcomere in the fiber. Comparison of the initial flash-induced shortening velocity with the force-velocity relation of maximally Ca(2+)-activated fibers indicated that the above minimum fiber shortening took place under an internal load nearly equal to Po. These results may be taken to indicate that, under a nearly isometric condition, the distance of myofilament sliding per hydrolysis of one ATP molecule is of the order of 10 nm.

  16. Original Research: Combined model of bladder detrusor smooth muscle and interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Josef; Byrtus, Miroslav; Stengl, Milan

    2016-10-01

    Although patients with lower urinary tract symptoms constitute a large and still growing population, understanding of bladder detrusor muscle physiology remains limited. Understanding the interactions between the detrusor smooth muscle cells and other bladder cell types (e.g. interstitial cells, IC) that may significantly contribute to coordinating and modulating detrusor contractions represents a considerable challenge. Computer modeling could help to elucidate some properties that are difficult to address experimentally; therefore, we developed in silico models of detrusor smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells, coupled through gap junctions. The models include all of the major ion conductances and transporters described in smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells in the literature. The model of normal detrusor muscle (smooth muscle cell and interstitial cells coupled through gap junctions) completely reproduced the experimental results obtained with detrusor strips in the presence of several pharmacological interventions (ryanodine, caffeine, nimodipine), whereas the model of smooth muscle cell alone (without interstitial cells) failed to reproduce the experimental results. Next, a model of overactive bladder, a highly prevalent clinical condition in both men and women with increasing incidence at older ages, was produced by modifying several processes as reported previously: a reduction of Ca(2+)-release through ryanodine receptors and a reduction of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+)-conductance with augmented gap junctional coupling. This model was also able to reproduce the pharmacological modulation of overactive bladder. In conclusion, a model of bladder detrusor muscle was developed that reproduced experimental results obtained in both normal and overactive bladder preparations. The results indicate that the non-smooth muscle cells of the detrusor (interstitial cells) contribute significantly to the contractile behavior of bladder detrusor muscle and should not be

  17. Role of extracellular ATP and P2 receptor signaling in regulating renal cyst growth and interstitial inflammation in polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Rangan, Gopi

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic kidney diseases (PKD) are a group of inherited ciliopathies in which the formation and growth of multiple cysts derived from the distal nephron and collecting duct leads to the disruption of normal kidney architecture, chronic interstitial inflammation/fibrosis and hypertension. Kidney failure is the most life-threatening complication of PKD, and is the consequence of cyst expansion, renal interstitial disease and loss of normal kidney tissue. Over the last decade, accumulating evidence suggests that the autocrine and paracrine effects of ATP (through its receptor family P2X and P2Y), could be detrimental for the progression of PKD. (2009). In vitro, ATP-P2 signaling promotes cystic epithelial cell proliferation, chloride-driven fluid secretion and apoptosis. Furthermore, dysfunction of the polycystin signal transduction pathways promotes the secretagogue activity of extracellular ATP by activating a calcium-activated chloride channel via purinergic receptors. Finally, ATP is a danger signal and could potentially contribute to interstitial inflammation associated with PKD. These data suggest that ATP-P2 signaling worsens the progression of cyst enlargement and interstitial inflammation in PKD. PMID:23966953

  18. Effect of Intramuscular Protons, Lactate, and ATP on Muscle Hyperalgesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Nicholas S.; Whitley, Phillip E.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic muscle pain is a significant health problem leading to disability[1]. Muscle fatigue can exacerbate muscle pain. Metabolites, including ATP, lactate, and protons, are released during fatiguing exercise and produce pain in humans. These substances directly activate purinergic (P2X) and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) on muscle nociceptors, and when combined, produce a greater increase in neuron firing than when given alone. Whether the enhanced effect of combining protons, lactate, and ATP is the sum of individual effects (additive) or more than the sum of individual effects (synergistic) is unknown. Using a rat model of muscle nociceptive behavior, we tested each of these compounds individually over a range of physiologic and supra-physiologic concentrations. Further, we combined all three compounds in a series of dilutions and tested their effect on muscle nociceptive behavior. We also tested a non-hydrolyzable form of ATP (α,β-meATP) alone and in combination with lactate and acidic pH. Surprisingly, we found no dose-dependent effect on muscle nociceptive behavior for protons, lactate, or ATP when given alone. We similarly found no effect after application of each two-metabolite combination. Only pH 4 saline and α,β-meATP produced hyperalgesia when given alone. When all 3 substances were combined, however, ATP (2.4μm), lactate (10mM), and acidic pH (pH 6.0) produced an enhanced effect greater than the sum of the effects of the individual components, i.e. synergism. α,β me ATP (3nmol), on the other hand, showed no enhanced effects when combined with lactate (10mM) or acidic pH (pH 6.0), i.e. additive. These data suggest that combining fatigue metabolites in muscle produces a synergistic effect on muscle nociception. PMID:26378796

  19. Effect of Intramuscular Protons, Lactate, and ATP on Muscle Hyperalgesia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Nicholas S; Whitley, Phillip E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic muscle pain is a significant health problem leading to disability[1]. Muscle fatigue can exacerbate muscle pain. Metabolites, including ATP, lactate, and protons, are released during fatiguing exercise and produce pain in humans. These substances directly activate purinergic (P2X) and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) on muscle nociceptors, and when combined, produce a greater increase in neuron firing than when given alone. Whether the enhanced effect of combining protons, lactate, and ATP is the sum of individual effects (additive) or more than the sum of individual effects (synergistic) is unknown. Using a rat model of muscle nociceptive behavior, we tested each of these compounds individually over a range of physiologic and supra-physiologic concentrations. Further, we combined all three compounds in a series of dilutions and tested their effect on muscle nociceptive behavior. We also tested a non-hydrolyzable form of ATP (α,β-meATP) alone and in combination with lactate and acidic pH. Surprisingly, we found no dose-dependent effect on muscle nociceptive behavior for protons, lactate, or ATP when given alone. We similarly found no effect after application of each two-metabolite combination. Only pH 4 saline and α,β-meATP produced hyperalgesia when given alone. When all 3 substances were combined, however, ATP (2.4μm), lactate (10mM), and acidic pH (pH 6.0) produced an enhanced effect greater than the sum of the effects of the individual components, i.e. synergism. α,β me ATP (3nmol), on the other hand, showed no enhanced effects when combined with lactate (10mM) or acidic pH (pH 6.0), i.e. additive. These data suggest that combining fatigue metabolites in muscle produces a synergistic effect on muscle nociception.

  20. Glucocorticoids activate the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic system in skeletal muscle during fasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, S. S.; Goldberg, A. L.; Goldberger, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are essential for the increase in protein breakdown in skeletal muscle normally seen during fasting. To determine which proteolytic pathway(s) are activated upon fasting, leg muscles from fed and fasted normal rats were incubated under conditions that block or activate different proteolytic systems. After food deprivation (1 day), the nonlysosomal ATP-dependent process increased by 250%, as shown in experiments involving depletion of muscle ATP. Also, the maximal capacity of the lysosomal process increased 60-100%, but no changes occurred in the Ca(2+)-dependent or the residual energy-independent proteolytic processes. In muscles from fasted normal and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats, the protein breakdown sensitive to inhibitors of the lysosomal or Ca(2+)-dependent pathways did not differ. However, the ATP-dependent process was 30% slower in muscles from fasted ADX rats. Administering dexamethasone to these animals or incubating their muscles with dexamethasone reversed this defect. During fasting, when the ATP-dependent process rises, muscles show a two- to threefold increase in levels of ubiquitin (Ub) mRNA. However, muscles of ADX animals failed to show this response. Injecting dexamethasone into the fasted ADX animals increased muscle Ub mRNA within 6 h. Thus glucocorticoids activate the ATP-Ub-dependent proteolytic pathway in fasting apparently by enhancing the expression of components of this system such as Ub.

  1. Glucocorticoids activate the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic system in skeletal muscle during fasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, S. S.; Goldberg, A. L.; Goldberger, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are essential for the increase in protein breakdown in skeletal muscle normally seen during fasting. To determine which proteolytic pathway(s) are activated upon fasting, leg muscles from fed and fasted normal rats were incubated under conditions that block or activate different proteolytic systems. After food deprivation (1 day), the nonlysosomal ATP-dependent process increased by 250%, as shown in experiments involving depletion of muscle ATP. Also, the maximal capacity of the lysosomal process increased 60-100%, but no changes occurred in the Ca(2+)-dependent or the residual energy-independent proteolytic processes. In muscles from fasted normal and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats, the protein breakdown sensitive to inhibitors of the lysosomal or Ca(2+)-dependent pathways did not differ. However, the ATP-dependent process was 30% slower in muscles from fasted ADX rats. Administering dexamethasone to these animals or incubating their muscles with dexamethasone reversed this defect. During fasting, when the ATP-dependent process rises, muscles show a two- to threefold increase in levels of ubiquitin (Ub) mRNA. However, muscles of ADX animals failed to show this response. Injecting dexamethasone into the fasted ADX animals increased muscle Ub mRNA within 6 h. Thus glucocorticoids activate the ATP-Ub-dependent proteolytic pathway in fasting apparently by enhancing the expression of components of this system such as Ub.

  2. Phentolamine inhibits the pacemaker activity of mouse interstitial cells of Cajal by activating ATP-sensitive K+ channels.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seung Whan; Kim, Sang Hun; Kim, Jin Ho; Choi, Seok; Yeum, Cheol Ho; Wie, Hee Wook; Sun, Jae Myeong; So, Insuk; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify if phentolamine has proven effects on the pacemaker activities of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) from the mouse small intestine involving the ATPsensitive K(+) channels and adrenergic receptor. The actions of phentolamine on pacemaker activities were investigated using whole-cell patch-clamp technique and intracellular Ca(2+) analysis at 30 degrees C in cultured mouse intestinal ICC. ICC generated spontaneous pacemaker currents at a holding potential of -70 mV. Treatment with phentolamine reduced the frequency and amplitude of the pacemaker currents and increased the resting outward currents. Moreover, under current clamping (I = 0), phentolamine hyperpolarized the ICC membrane and decreased the amplitude of the pacemaker potentials. We also observed that phentolamine inhibited spontaneous [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations in ICC. The alpha-adrenergic drugs prazosin, yohimbine, methoxamine, and clonidine had no effect on ICC intestinal pacemaker activity and did not block phentolamine-induced effects. Phentolamine-induced effects on the pacemaker currents and the pacemaker potentials were significantly inhibited by ATP sensitive K(+) channel blocker glibenclamide, but not by TEA, apamin, or 4-aminopyridine. In addition, the NO synthase inhibitor, L-NAME and the guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ were incapable of blocking the phentolamine-induced effects. These results demonstrate that phentolamine regulates the pacemaker activity of ICC via ATP-sensitive K(+) channel activation. Phentolamine could act through an adrenergic receptor- and also through NO-independent mechanism that involves intracellular Ca(2+) signaling.

  3. Ion channels in gastrointestinal smooth muscle and interstitial cells of Cajal.

    PubMed

    Lyford, Gregory L; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2003-12-01

    A requirement for normal gastrointestinal motility is the tight regulation of ion channels expressed in interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscle. Interstitial cells of Cajal generate the slow wave and amplify neuronal signals; smooth muscle functions as the final effector organ. Recent advances in our understanding of the expression and mechano-regulation of these different subtypes of ion channels have allowed the development of hypotheses on how ion channels transduce a variety of inputs into electrical signals that directly or indirectly regulate gastrointestinal motor activity.

  4. In vivo ATP production during free-flow and ischaemic muscle contractions in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Ian R; Wigmore, Danielle M; Befroy, Douglas E; Kent-Braun, Jane A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how ATP synthesis and contractility in vivo are altered by ischaemia in working human skeletal muscle. The hypotheses were: (1) glycolytic flux would be higher during ischaemic (ISC) compared to free-flow (FF) muscle contractions, in compensation for reduced oxidative ATP synthesis, and (2) ischaemic muscle fatigue would be related to the accumulation of inhibitory metabolic by-products rather than to the phosphorylation potential ([ATP]/[ADP][Pi]) of the muscle. Twelve healthy adults (6 men, 6 women) performed six intermittent maximal isometric contractions of the ankle dorsiflexors (12 s contract, 12 s relax), once with intact blood flow and once with local ischaemia by thigh cuff inflation to 220 Torr. Intracellular phosphorous metabolites and pH were measured non-invasively with magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and rates of ATP synthesis through oxidative phosphorylation, anaerobic glycolysis, and the creatine kinase reaction were determined. The force–time integral declined more during ISC (66 ± 3% initial) than FF (75 ± 2% initial, P = 0.002), indicating greater fatigue in ISC. [ATP] was preserved in both protocols, indicating matching of ATP production and use under both conditions. Glycolytic flux (mm s−1) was similar during FF and ISC (P = 0.16). Total ATP synthesis rate was lower during ISC, despite adjustment for the greater muscle fatigue in this condition (P < 0.001). Fatigue was linearly associated with diprotonated inorganic phosphate (FF r = 0.94 ± 0.01, ISC r = 0.92 ± 0.02), but not phosphorylation potential. These data provide novel evidence that ATP supply and demand in vivo are balanced in human skeletal muscle during ischaemic work, not through higher glycolytic flux, but rather through increased metabolic economy and decreased rates of ATP consumption as fatigue ensues. PMID:16945975

  5. 31P magnetization transfer measurements of Pi→ATP flux in exercising human muscle

    PubMed Central

    Savage, David B.; Williams, Guy B.; Porter, David; Carpenter, T. Adrian; Brindle, Kevin M.; Kemp, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    Fundamental criticisms have been made over the use of 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) magnetization transfer estimates of inorganic phosphate (Pi)→ATP flux (VPi-ATP) in human resting skeletal muscle for assessing mitochondrial function. Although the discrepancy in the magnitude of VPi-ATP is now acknowledged, little is known about its metabolic determinants. Here we use a novel protocol to measure VPi-ATP in human exercising muscle for the first time. Steady-state VPi-ATP was measured at rest and over a range of exercise intensities and compared with suprabasal oxidative ATP synthesis rates estimated from the initial rates of postexercise phosphocreatine resynthesis (VATP). We define a surplus Pi→ATP flux as the difference between VPi-ATP and VATP. The coupled reactions catalyzed by the glycolytic enzymes GAPDH and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) have been shown to catalyze measurable exchange between ATP and Pi in some systems and have been suggested to be responsible for this surplus flux. Surplus VPi-ATP did not change between rest and exercise, even though the concentrations of Pi and ADP, which are substrates for GAPDH and PGK, respectively, increased as expected. However, involvement of these enzymes is suggested by correlations between absolute and surplus Pi→ATP flux, both at rest and during exercise, and the intensity of the phosphomonoester peak in the 31P NMR spectrum. This peak includes contributions from sugar phosphates in the glycolytic pathway, and changes in its intensity may indicate changes in downstream glycolytic intermediates, including 3-phosphoglycerate, which has been shown to influence the exchange between ATP and Pi catalyzed by GAPDH and PGK. PMID:26744504

  6. Estimation of skeletal muscle interstitial adenosine during forearm dynamic exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, F.; Heusinkveld, J.; Ballog, R.; Davis, S.; Biaggioni, I.

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that adenosine is a metabolic signal that triggers activation of muscle afferents involved in the exercise pressor reflex. Furthermore, exogenous adenosine induces sympathetic activation that mimics the exercise pressor reflex, and blockade of adenosine receptors inhibits sympathetic activation induced by exercise. Thus, we hypothesize that adenosine is released locally by the muscle during exercise. We used microdialysis probes, placed in the flexor digitorium superficialis muscle, to estimate muscle interstitial adenosine levels in humans. We estimated resting in vivo muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations (0.292+/-0.058 micromol/L, n=4) by perfusing increasing concentrations of adenosine to determine the gradient produced in the dialysate. Muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations increased from 0.23+/-0.04 to 0.82+/-0.14 micromol/L (n=14, P<0.001) during intermittent dynamic exercise at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. Lactate increased from 0.8+/-0.1 to 2.3+/-0.3 mmol/L (P<0.001). Lower intensity (15% maximal voluntary contraction) intermittent dynamic exercise increased adenosine concentrations from 0.104+/-0.02 to 0.42+/-0.16 micromol/L (n=7). The addition of ischemia to this low level of exercise produced a greater increase in adenosine (from 0.095+/-0.02 to 0.48+/-0.2 micromol/L) compared with nonischemic exercise (0. 095+/-0.02 to 0.25+/-0.12 micromol/L). These results indicate that microdialysis is useful in estimating adenosine concentrations and in reflecting changes in muscle interstitial adenosine during dynamic exercise in humans.

  7. Estimation of skeletal muscle interstitial adenosine during forearm dynamic exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, F.; Heusinkveld, J.; Ballog, R.; Davis, S.; Biaggioni, I.

    2000-01-01

    It has been proposed that adenosine is a metabolic signal that triggers activation of muscle afferents involved in the exercise pressor reflex. Furthermore, exogenous adenosine induces sympathetic activation that mimics the exercise pressor reflex, and blockade of adenosine receptors inhibits sympathetic activation induced by exercise. Thus, we hypothesize that adenosine is released locally by the muscle during exercise. We used microdialysis probes, placed in the flexor digitorium superficialis muscle, to estimate muscle interstitial adenosine levels in humans. We estimated resting in vivo muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations (0.292+/-0.058 micromol/L, n=4) by perfusing increasing concentrations of adenosine to determine the gradient produced in the dialysate. Muscle interstitial adenosine concentrations increased from 0.23+/-0.04 to 0.82+/-0.14 micromol/L (n=14, P<0.001) during intermittent dynamic exercise at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction. Lactate increased from 0.8+/-0.1 to 2.3+/-0.3 mmol/L (P<0.001). Lower intensity (15% maximal voluntary contraction) intermittent dynamic exercise increased adenosine concentrations from 0.104+/-0.02 to 0.42+/-0.16 micromol/L (n=7). The addition of ischemia to this low level of exercise produced a greater increase in adenosine (from 0.095+/-0.02 to 0.48+/-0.2 micromol/L) compared with nonischemic exercise (0. 095+/-0.02 to 0.25+/-0.12 micromol/L). These results indicate that microdialysis is useful in estimating adenosine concentrations and in reflecting changes in muscle interstitial adenosine during dynamic exercise in humans.

  8. Muscle MRS detects elevated PDE/ATP ratios prior to fatty infiltration in Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wokke, B H; Hooijmans, M T; van den Bergen, J C; Webb, A G; Verschuuren, J J; Kan, H E

    2014-11-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Muscles show structural changes (fatty infiltration, fibrosis) and metabolic changes, both of which can be assessed using MRI and MRS. It is unknown at what stage of the disease process metabolic changes arise and how this might vary for different metabolites. In this study we assessed metabolic changes in skeletal muscles of Becker patients, both with and without fatty infiltration, quantified via Dixon MRI and (31) P MRS. MRI and (31) P MRS scans were obtained from 25 Becker patients and 14 healthy controls using a 7 T MR scanner. Five lower-leg muscles were individually assessed for fat and muscle metabolite levels. In the peroneus, soleus and anterior tibialis muscles with non-increased fat levels, PDE/ATP ratios were higher (P < 0.02) compared with controls, whereas in all muscles with increased fat levels PDE/ATP ratios were higher compared with healthy controls (P ≤ 0.05). The Pi /ATP ratio in the peroneus muscles was higher in muscles with increased fat fractions (P = 0.005), and the PCr/ATP ratio was lower in the anterior tibialis muscles with increased fat fractions (P = 0.005). There were no other significant changes in metabolites, but an increase in tissue pH was found in all muscles of the total group of BMD patients in comparison with healthy controls (P < 0.05). These findings suggest that (31) P MRS can be used to detect early changes in individual muscles of BMD patients, which are present before the onset of fatty infiltration.

  9. Estimations of muscle interstitial insulin, glucose, and lactate in type 2 diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Sjöstrand, M; Holmäng, A; Strindberg, L; Lönnroth, P

    2000-11-01

    Previous measurement of insulin in human muscle has shown that interstitial muscle insulin and glucose concentrations are approximately 30-50% lower than in plasma during hyperinsulinemia in normal subjects. The aims of this study were to measure interstitial muscle insulin and glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes to evaluate whether transcapillary transport is part of the peripheral insulin resistance. Ten patients with type 2 diabetes and ten healthy controls matched for sex, age, and body mass index were investigated. Plasma and interstitial insulin, glucose, and lactate (measured by intramuscular in situ-calibrated microdialysis) in the medial quadriceps femoris muscle were analyzed during a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Blood flow in the contralateral calf was measured by vein plethysmography. At steady-state clamping, at 60-120 min, the interstitial insulin concentration was significantly lower than arterial insulin in both groups (409 +/- 86 vs. 1,071 +/- 99 pmol/l, P < 0.05, in controls and 584 +/- 165 vs. 1, 253 +/- 82 pmol/l, P < 0.05, in diabetic subjects, respectively). Interstitial insulin concentrations did not differ significantly between diabetic subjects and controls. Leg blood flow was significantly higher in controls (8.1 +/- 1.2 vs. 4.4 +/- 0.7 ml. 100 g(-1).min(-1) in diabetics, P < 0.05). Calculated glucose uptake was less in diabetic patients compared with controls (7.0 +/- 1.2 vs. 10.8 +/- 1.2 micromol. 100 g(-1).min(-1), P < 0.05, respectively). Arterial and interstitial lactate concentrations were both higher in the control group (1.7 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.2 +/- 0.1, P < 0. 01, and 1.8 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.2 +/- 0.2 mmol/l, P < 0.05, in controls and diabetics, respectively). We conclude that, during hyperinsulinemia, muscle interstitial insulin and glucose concentrations did not differ between patients with type 2 diabetes and healthy controls despite a significantly lower leg blood flow in diabetic subjects. It is suggested that decreased

  10. Mechanosensitive ion channels in interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kraichely, R E; Farrugia, G

    2007-04-01

    Normal gastrointestinal (GI) motility is required to mix digestive enzymes and food and to move content along the GI tract. Underlying the complex motor patterns of the gut are electrical events that reflect ion flux across cell membranes. Smooth muscle electrical activity is directly influenced by GI interstitial cells of Cajal, whose rhythmic oscillations in membrane potential in part determine the excitability of GI smooth muscle and its response to neuronal input. Coordinated activity of the ion channels responsible for the conductances that underlie ion flux in both smooth muscle and interstitial cells is a requisite for normal motility. These conductances are regulated by many factors, including mechanical stress. Recent studies have revealed mechanosensitivity at the level of the ion channels, and the mechanosensor within the channel has been identified in many cases. This has led to better comprehension of the role of mechanosensitive conductances in normal physiology and will undoubtedly lead to understanding of the consequences of disturbances in these conductances.

  11. Autocrine ATP release coupled to extracellular pyrophosphate accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Prosdocimo, Domenick A.; Douglas, Dezmond C.; Romani, Andrea M.; O'Neill, W. Charles; Dubyak, George R.

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) is a potent suppressor of physiological calcification in bone and pathological calcification in blood vessels. Ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterases (eNPPs) generate PPi via the hydrolysis of ATP released into extracellular compartments by poorly understood mechanisms. Here we report that cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from rat aorta generate extracellular PPi via an autocrine mechanism that involves ATP release tightly coupled to eNPP activity. The nucleotide analog β,γ-methylene ATP (MeATP or AMPPCP) was used to selectively suppress ATP metabolism by eNPPs but not the CD39-type ecto-ATPases. In the absence of MeATP, VSMC generated extracellular PPi to accumulate ≥600 nM within 2 h while steadily maintaining extracellular ATP at 1 nM. Conversely, the presence of MeATP completely suppressed PPi accumulation while increasing ATP accumulation. Probenecid, which inhibits PPi efflux dependent on ANK, a putative PPi transporter or transport regulator, reduced extracellular PPi accumulation by approximately twofold. This indicates that autocrine ATP release coupled to eNPP activity comprises ≥50% of the extracellular PPi-generating capacity of VSMC. The accumulation of extracellular PPi and ATP was markedly attenuated by reduced temperature but was insensitive to brefeldin A, which suppresses constitutive exocytosis of Golgi-derived secretory vesicles. The magnitude of extracellular PPi accumulation in VSMC cultures increased with time postplating, suggesting that ATP release coupled to PPi generation is upregulated as cultured VSMC undergo contact-inhibition of proliferation or deposit extracellular matrix. PMID:19193865

  12. [ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels in muscle cells: features and physiological role].

    PubMed

    Vadziuk, O B

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of plasma membranes belong to the inward rectifier potassium channels type. They are involved in coupling of electrical activity of muscle cell with its metabolic state. These channels are heterooctameric and consist of two types of subunits: four poreforming (Kir 6.x) and four regulatory (SUR, sulfonylurea receptor). The Kir subunits contain highly selective K+ filter and provide for high-velocity K+ currents. The SUR subunits contain binding sites for activators and blockers and have metabolic sensor, which enables channel activation under conditions of metabolic stress. ATP blocks K+ currents through the ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels in the most types of muscle cells. However, functional activity of these channels does not depend on absolute concentration of ATP but on the ATP/ADP ratio and presence of Mg2+. Physiologically active substances, such as phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate and fatty acid esters can regulate the activity of these structures in muscle cells. Activation of these channels under ischemic conditions underlies their cytoprotective action, which results in prevention of Ca2+ overload in cytosol. In contrast to ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of plasma membranes, the data regarding the structure and function of ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of mitochondrial membrane are contradictory. Pore-forming subunits of this channel have not been firmly identified yet. ATP-sensitive K+ transport through the mitochondrial membrane is easily tested by different methods, which are briefly reviewed in this paper. Interaction of mitoK(ATP) with physiological and pharmacological ligands is discussed as well.

  13. Exercise sensitizes skeletal muscle to extracellular ATP for IL-6 expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Verdejo, R; Casas, M; Galgani, J E; Jaimovich, E; Buvinic, S

    2014-04-01

    Active skeletal muscle synthesizes and releases interleukin-6 (IL-6), which plays important roles in the organism's adaptation to exercise. Autocrine/paracrine ATP signaling has been shown to modulate IL-6 expression. The aim of this study was to determine whether a period of physical activity modifies the ATP-induced IL-6 expression. BalbC mice were either subject to 5 weeks voluntary wheel running (VA) or kept sedentary (SED). Flexor digitorum brevis muscles were dissected, stimulated with different ATP concentrations (0-100 μM) and IL-6 mRNA levels were measured using qPCR. ATP evoked a concentration-dependent rise in IL-6 mRNA in both SED and VA mice. VA mice however, had significantly higher ATP sensitivity (pD2 pharmacological values: VA=5.58±0.02 vs. SED=4.95±0.04, p<0.05). Interestingly, in VA mice we observed a positive correlation between the level of physical activity and the IL-6 mRNA increase following fiber stimulation with 10 μM ATP. In addition, there were lower P2Y2- and higher P2Y14-receptor mRNA levels in skeletal muscles of VA compared to SED mice, showing plasticity of nucleotide receptors with exercise. These results suggest that exercise increases skeletal muscle ATP sensitivity, a response dependent on the level of physical activity performed. This could have an important role in the mechanisms controlling skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise and training. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Smaller muscle ATP reduction in women than in men by repeated bouts of sprint exercise.

    PubMed

    Esbjörnsson-Liljedahl, Mona; Bodin, Kristina; Jansson, Eva

    2002-09-01

    It was hypothesized that the reduction of high-energy phosphates in muscle after repeated sprints is smaller in women than in men. Fifteen healthy and physically active women and men with an average age of 25 yr (range of 19-42 yr) performed three 30-s cycle sprints (Wingate test) with 20 min of rest between sprints. Repeated blood and muscle samples were obtained. Freeze-dried pooled muscle fibers of types I and II were analyzed for high-energy phosphates and their breakdown products and for glycogen. Accumulation of plasma ATP breakdown products, plasma catecholamines, and blood lactate, as well as glycogen reduction in type I fibers, was all lower in women than in men during sprint exercise. Repeated sprints induced smaller reduction of ATP and smaller accumulation of IMP and inosine in women than in men in type II muscle fibers, with no gender differences in changes of ATP and its breakdown products during the bouts of exercise themselves. This indicates that the smaller ATP reduction in women than in men during repeated sprints was created during recovery periods between the sprint exercises and that women possess a faster recovery of ATP via reamination of IMP during these recovery periods.

  15. The ATP required for potentiation of skeletal muscle contraction is released via pannexin hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Manuel A; Cea, Luis A; Vega, José L; Boric, Mauricio P; Monyer, Hannah; Bennett, Michael V L; Frank, Marina; Willecke, Klaus; Sáez, Juan C

    2013-12-01

    During repetitive stimulation of skeletal muscle, extracellular ATP levels raise, activating purinergic receptors, increasing Ca2+ influx, and enhancing contractile force, a response called potentiation. We found that ATP appears to be released through pannexin1 hemichannels (Panx1 HCs). Immunocytochemical analyses and function were consistent with pannexin1 localization to T-tubules intercalated with dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors in slow (soleus) and fast (extensor digitorum longus, EDL) muscles. Isolated myofibers took up ethidium (Etd+) and released small molecules (as ATP) during electrical stimulation. Consistent with two glucose uptake pathways, induced uptake of 2-NBDG, a fluorescent glucose derivative, was decreased by inhibition of HCs or glucose transporter (GLUT4), and blocked by dual blockade. Adult skeletal muscles apparently do not express connexins, making it unlikely that connexin hemichannels contribute to the uptake and release of small molecules. ATP release, Etd+ uptake, and potentiation induced by repetitive electrical stimulation were blocked by HC blockers and did not occur in muscles of pannexin1 knockout mice. MRS2179, a P2Y1R blocker, prevented potentiation in EDL, but not soleus muscles, suggesting that in fast muscles ATP activates P2Y1 but not P2X receptors. Phosphorylation on Ser and Thr residues of pannexin1 was increased during potentiation, possibly mediating HC opening. Opening of Panx1 HCs during repetitive activation allows efflux of ATP, influx of glucose and possibly Ca2+ too, which are required for potentiation of contraction. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Current Pharmacology of Gap Junction Channels and Hemichannels'.

  16. Change in refractive index of muscle tissue during laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Chen, Meimei; Liu, Shupeng; Guo, Qiang; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Tingyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a long-period fiber-grating (LPG) based Michelson interferometric refractometry to monitor the change in refractive index of porcine muscle during laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). As the wavelength of RI interferometer alters with the change in refractive index around the probe, the LPG based refractometry is combined with LITT system to measure the change in refractive index of porcine muscle when irradiated by laser. The experimental results show the denaturation of tissue alters the refractive index significantly and the LPG sensor can be applied to monitor the tissue state during the LITT.

  17. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  18. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  19. Rabbit Erythrocytes Release ATP and Dilate Skeletal Muscle Arterioles in the Presence of Reduced Oxygen Tension

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Randy S.; Hanson, Madelyn S.; Achilleus, David; Bowles, Elizabeth A.; Stephenson, Alan H.; Sridharan, Meera; Adderley, Shaquria; Ellsworth, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, oxygen (O2) delivery to appropriately meet metabolic need requires mechanisms for detection of the magnitude of O2 demand and the regulation of O2 delivery. Erythrocytes, when exposed to decreases in O2 tension, release both O2 and the vasodilator, adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The aims of this study were to establish that erythrocytes release ATP in response to reduced O2 tension and determine if erythrocytes are necessary for dilation of isolated skeletal muscle arterioles exposed to reduced extra-luminal O2 tension. Rabbit erythrocytes exposed to reduced O2 tension in a tonometer (n = 5, PO2 = 27 ± 3, p<0.01) released ATP in response to reduced O2 tension. ATP release increased proportional to the decrease in O2 tension. The contribution of erythrocytes to the response of skeletal muscle arterioles to reduced extra-luminal O2 tension was determined using isolated hamster cheek pouch retractor muscle arterioles perfused with buffer (n = 11, mean diameter 52 ± 3 μm) in the absence and presence of rabbit erythrocytes. Without erythrocytes, arterioles did not dilate when exposed to reduced extra-luminal O2 tension (PO2 = 32 ± 4 mm Hg). In contrast, when rabbit erythrocytes were present in the perfusate (hematocrit 15%) the same decrease in O2 tension resulted in a 20 ± 4% dilation (p<0.01). These results provide support for the hypothesis that erythrocytes, via their ability to release O2 along with ATP in response to exposure to reduced O2 tension, can participate in the matching of O2 delivery with metabolic need in skeletal muscle. PMID:19307706

  20. Time course of the initial [Ca2+]i response to extracellular ATP in smooth muscle depends on [Ca2+]e and ATP concentration.

    PubMed Central

    Mahoney, M G; Slakey, L L; Benham, C D; Gross, D J

    1998-01-01

    In response to extracellular application of 50 microM ATP, all individual porcine aortic smooth muscle cells respond with rapid rises from basal [Ca2+]i to peak [Ca2+]i within 5 s. The time from stimulus to the peak of the [Ca2+]i response increases with decreasing concentration of ATP. At ATP concentrations of 0.5 microM and below, the time to the [Ca2+]i peak varies more significantly from cell to cell than at higher concentrations, and each cell shows complicated initiation and decay kinetics. For any individual cell, the lag phase before a response decreases with increasing concentration of ATP. An increase in lag time with decreasing ATP concentration is also observed in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, but the lag phase is more pronounced, especially at concentrations of ATP below 0.5 microM. Whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology shows that in porcine aortic smooth muscle cells, ATP stimulates an inward current carried mainly by Cl- ion efflux with a time course similar to the [Ca2+]i changes and no detectable current from an ATP-gated cation channel. A simple signal cascade initiation kinetics model, starting with nucleotide receptor activation leading to IP3-mediated Ca2+ release from IP3-sensitive internal stores, fits the data and suggests that the kinetics of the Ca2+ response are dominated by upstream signal cascade components. PMID:9746547

  1. ATP Released by Electrical Stimuli Elicits Calcium Transients and Gene Expression in Skeletal Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Buvinic, Sonja; Almarza, Gonzalo; Bustamante, Mario; Casas, Mariana; López, Javiera; Riquelme, Manuel; Sáez, Juan Carlos; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2009-01-01

    ATP released from cells is known to activate plasma membrane P2X (ionotropic) or P2Y (metabotropic) receptors. In skeletal muscle cells, depolarizing stimuli induce both a fast calcium signal associated with contraction and a slow signal that regulates gene expression. Here we show that nucleotides released to the extracellular medium by electrical stimulation are partly involved in the fast component and are largely responsible for the slow signals. In rat skeletal myotubes, a tetanic stimulus (45 Hz, 400 1-ms pulses) rapidly increased extracellular levels of ATP, ADP, and AMP after 15 s to 3 min. Exogenous ATP induced an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration, with an EC50 value of 7.8 ± 3.1 μm. Exogenous ADP, UTP, and UDP also promoted calcium transients. Both fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanic stimulation were inhibited by either 100 μm suramin or 2 units/ml apyrase. Apyrase also reduced fast and slow calcium signals evoked by tetanus (45 Hz, 400 0.3-ms pulses) in isolated mouse adult skeletal fibers. A likely candidate for the ATP release pathway is the pannexin-1 hemichannel; its blockers inhibited both calcium transients and ATP release. The dihydropyridine receptor co-precipitated with both the P2Y2 receptor and pannexin-1. As reported previously for electrical stimulation, 500 μm ATP significantly increased mRNA expression for both c-fos and interleukin 6. Our results suggest that nucleotides released during skeletal muscle activity through pannexin-1 hemichannels act through P2X and P2Y receptors to modulate both Ca2+ homeostasis and muscle physiology. PMID:19822518

  2. Augmentation of Muscle Blood Flow by Ultrasound Cavitation Is Mediated by ATP and Purinergic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Belcik, J Todd; Davidson, Brian P; Xie, Aris; Wu, Melinda D; Yadava, Mrinal; Qi, Yue; Liang, Sherry; Chon, Chae Ryung; Ammi, Azzdine Y; Field, Joshua; Harmann, Leanne; Chilian, William M; Linden, Joel; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2017-03-28

    Augmentation of tissue blood flow by therapeutic ultrasound is thought to rely on convective shear. Microbubble contrast agents that undergo ultrasound-mediated cavitation markedly amplify these effects. We hypothesized that purinergic signaling is responsible for shear-dependent increases in muscle perfusion during therapeutic cavitation. Unilateral exposure of the proximal hindlimb of mice (with or without ischemia produced by iliac ligation) to therapeutic ultrasound (1.3 MHz, mechanical index 1.3) was performed for 10 minutes after intravenous injection of 2×10(8) lipid microbubbles. Microvascular perfusion was evaluated by low-power contrast ultrasound perfusion imaging. In vivo muscle ATP release and in vitro ATP release from endothelial cells or erythrocytes were assessed by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Purinergic signaling pathways were assessed by studying interventions that (1) accelerated ATP degradation; (2) inhibited P2Y receptors, adenosine receptors, or KATP channels; or (3) inhibited downstream signaling pathways involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase or prostanoid production (indomethacin). Augmentation in muscle perfusion by ultrasound cavitation was assessed in a proof-of-concept clinical trial in 12 subjects with stable sickle cell disease. Therapeutic ultrasound cavitation increased muscle perfusion by 7-fold in normal mice, reversed tissue ischemia for up to 24 hours in the murine model of peripheral artery disease, and doubled muscle perfusion in patients with sickle cell disease. Augmentation in flow extended well beyond the region of ultrasound exposure. Ultrasound cavitation produced an ≈40-fold focal and sustained increase in ATP, the source of which included both endothelial cells and erythrocytes. Inhibitory studies indicated that ATP was a critical mediator of flow augmentation that acts primarily through either P2Y receptors or adenosine produced by ectonucleotidase activity. Combined indomethacin and inhibition of

  3. The interstitial fluid content in working muscle modifies the cardiovascular response to exercise.

    PubMed

    Schütze, H; Hildebrandt, W; Stegemann, J

    1991-01-01

    The volume of interstitial fluid in the limbs varies considerably, due to hydrostatic effects. As signals from working muscle, responsible for much of the cardiovascular drive, are assumed to be transmitted in this compartment, blood pressure and heart rate could be affected by local or systemic variations in interstitial hydration. Using a special calf ergometer, eight male subjects performed rhythmic aerobic plantar flexions in a supine position with dependent calves for periods of 7 min. During exercise heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen uptake (VO2) and blood lactate concentrations were measured in two different tests, one before and after interstitial calf dehydration through limb elevation for 25 min, compared to the other, a control with unaltered fluid volume in a maintained working position. Impedance plethysmography showed calf volume to be stabilized in the control position. Leg elevation by passive hip flexion to 90 degrees resulted in a fast (vascular) volume decrease lasting less than 2 min, followed by a slow linear fluid loss from the interstitial compartment. Then, when returned to the control position, adjustment of vascular volume was completed within 2 min and exercise could be performed with dehydration remaining in the interstitium only. Cardiovascular response was identical at the start of both tests. However, exercising with dehydrated calves elicited a significantly larger increase in heart rate compared to the control, whereas VO2 was identical. The blood pressure response was shown to be only slightly enhanced. Structural interstitial features varying with hydration, most likely chemical or mechanical ones, may have been responsible for this amplification of signals.

  4. Caffeine intake improves intense intermittent exercise performance and reduces muscle interstitial potassium accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Magni; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Bangsbo, Jens

    2011-11-01

    The effect of oral caffeine ingestion on intense intermittent exercise performance and muscle interstitial ion concentrations was examined. The study consists of two studies (S1 and S2). In S1, 12 subjects completed the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2) test with prior caffeine (6 mg/kg body wt; CAF) or placebo (PLA) intake. In S2, 6 subjects performed one low-intensity (20 W) and three intense (50 W) 3-min (separated by 5 min) one-legged knee-extension exercise bouts with (CAF) and without (CON) prior caffeine supplementation for determination of muscle interstitial K(+) and Na(+) with microdialysis. In S1 Yo-Yo IR2 performance was 16% better (P < 0.05) in CAF compared with PLA. In CAF, plasma K(+) at the end of the Yo-Yo IR2 test was 5.2 ± 0.1 mmol/l with no difference between the trials. Plasma free fatty acids (FFA) were higher (P < 0.05) in CAF than PLA at rest and remained higher (P < 0.05) during exercise. Peak blood glucose (8.0 ± 0.6 vs. 6.2 ± 0.4 mmol/l) and plasma NH(3) (137.2 ± 10.8 vs. 113.4 ± 13.3 μmol/l) were also higher (P < 0.05) in CAF compared with PLA. In S2 interstitial K(+) was 5.5 ± 0.3, 5.7 ± 0.3, 5.8 ± 0.5, and 5.5 ± 0.3 mmol/l at the end of the 20-W and three 50-W periods, respectively, in CAF, which were lower (P < 0.001) than in CON (7.0 ± 0.6, 7.5 ± 0.7, 7.5 ± 0.4, and 7.0 ± 0.6 mmol/l, respectively). No differences in interstitial Na(+) were observed between CAF and CON. In conclusion, caffeine intake enhances fatigue resistance and reduces muscle interstitial K(+) during intense intermittent exercise.

  5. What Do Magnetic Resonance–Based Measurements of Pi→ATP Flux Tell Us About Skeletal Muscle Metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Graham J.; Brindle, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) methods offer a potentially valuable window into cellular metabolism. Measurement of flux between inorganic phosphate (Pi) and ATP using 31P MRS magnetization transfer has been used in resting muscle to assess what is claimed to be mitochondrial ATP synthesis and has been particularly popular in the study of insulin effects and insulin resistance. However, the measured Pi→ATP flux in resting skeletal muscle is far higher than the true rate of oxidative ATP synthesis, being dominated by a glycolytically mediated Pi↔ATP exchange reaction that is unrelated to mitochondrial function. Furthermore, even if measured accurately, the ATP production rate in resting muscle has no simple relationship to mitochondrial capacity as measured either ex vivo or in vivo. We summarize the published measurements of Pi→ATP flux, concentrating on work relevant to diabetes and insulin, relate it to current understanding of the physiology of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and glycolytic Pi↔ATP exchange, and discuss some possible implications of recently reported correlations between Pi→ATP flux and other physiological measures. PMID:22826313

  6. Role of Erythrocyte-released ATP in the Regulation of Microvascular Oxygen Supply in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, Mary L.; Ellis, Christopher G.; Sprague, Randy S.

    2015-01-01

    In a 1914 book entitled The Respiratory Function of the Blood, Joseph Barcroft stated that “the cell takes what it needs and leaves the rest.” He postulated that there must be both a “call for oxygen” and a “mechanism by which the call elicits a response…” In the past century, intensive investigation has provided significant insights into the hemodynamic and biophysical mechanisms involved in supplying oxygen to skeletal muscle. However, the identification of the mechanism by which tissue oxygen needs are sensed and the affector responsible for altering the upstream vasculature to enable the need to be appropriately met has been a challenge. In 1995, Ellsworth et al proposed that the oxygen carrying erythrocyte, by virtue of its capacity to release the vasoactive mediator ATP in response to a decrease in oxygen saturation, could serve both roles. Several in vitro and in situ studies have established that exposure of erythrocytes to reduced oxygen tension induces the release of ATP which does result in a conducted arteriolar vasodilation with a sufficiently rapid time course to make the mechanism physiologically relevant. The components of the signaling pathway for the controlled release of ATP from erythrocytes in response to exposure to low oxygen tension have been determined. In addition, the implications of defective ATP release on human pathological conditions have been explored. This review provides a perspective on oxygen supply and the role that such a mechanism plays in meeting the oxygen needs of skeletal muscle. PMID:26336065

  7. Role of erythrocyte-released ATP in the regulation of microvascular oxygen supply in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, M L; Ellis, C G; Sprague, R S

    2016-03-01

    In a 1914 book entitled The Respiratory Function of the Blood, Joseph Barcroft stated that 'the cell takes what it needs and leaves the rest'. He postulated that there must be both a 'call for oxygen' and a 'mechanism by which the call elicits a response...' In the past century, intensive investigation has provided significant insights into the haemodynamic and biophysical mechanisms involved in supplying oxygen to skeletal muscle. However, the identification of the mechanism by which tissue oxygen needs are sensed and the affector responsible for altering the upstream vasculature to enable the need to be appropriately met has been a challenge. In 1995, Ellsworth et al. proposed that the oxygen-carrying erythrocyte, by virtue of its capacity to release the vasoactive mediator ATP in response to a decrease in oxygen saturation, could serve both roles. Several in vitro and in situ studies have established that exposure of erythrocytes to reduced oxygen tension induces the release of ATP which does result in a conducted arteriolar vasodilation with a sufficiently rapid time course to make the mechanism physiologically relevant. The components of the signalling pathway for the controlled release of ATP from erythrocytes in response to exposure to low oxygen tension have been determined. In addition, the implications of defective ATP release on human pathological conditions have been explored. This review provides a perspective on oxygen supply and the role that such a mechanism plays in meeting the oxygen needs of skeletal muscle.

  8. adPEO mutations in ANT1 impair ADP-ATP translocation in muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Hibiki; Tiranti, Valeria; Magrané, Jordi; Chinopoulos, Christos; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2011-08-01

    Mutations in the heart and muscle isoform of adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) are associated with autosomal-dominant progressive external opthalmoplegia (adPEO) clinically characterized by exercise intolerance, ptosis and muscle weakness. The pathogenic mechanisms underlying the mitochondrial myopathy caused by ANT1 mutations remain largely unknown. In yeast, expression of ANT1 carrying mutations corresponding to the human adPEO ones causes a wide range of mitochondrial abnormalities. However, functional studies of ANT1 mutations in mammalian cells are lacking, because they have been hindered by the fact that ANT1 expression leads to apoptotic cell death in commonly utilized replicating cell lines. Here, we successfully express functional ANT1 in differentiated mouse myotubes, which naturally contain high levels of ANT1, without causing cell death. We demonstrate, for the first time in these disease-relevant mammalian cells, that mutant human ANT1 causes dominant mitochondrial defects characterized by decreased ADP-ATP exchange function and abnormal translocator reversal potential. These abnormalities are not due to ANT1 loss of function, because knocking down Ant1 in myotubes causes functional changes different from ANT1 mutants. Under certain physiological conditions, mitochondria consume ATP to maintain membrane potential by reversing the ADP-ATP transport. The modified properties of mutant ANT1 can be responsible for disease pathogenesis in adPEO, because exchange reversal occurring at higher than normal membrane potential can cause excessive energy depletion and nucleotide imbalance in ANT1 mutant muscle cells.

  9. adPEO mutations in ANT1 impair ADP–ATP translocation in muscle mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kawamata, Hibiki; Tiranti, Valeria; Magrané, Jordi; Chinopoulos, Christos; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the heart and muscle isoform of adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) are associated with autosomal-dominant progressive external opthalmoplegia (adPEO) clinically characterized by exercise intolerance, ptosis and muscle weakness. The pathogenic mechanisms underlying the mitochondrial myopathy caused by ANT1 mutations remain largely unknown. In yeast, expression of ANT1 carrying mutations corresponding to the human adPEO ones causes a wide range of mitochondrial abnormalities. However, functional studies of ANT1 mutations in mammalian cells are lacking, because they have been hindered by the fact that ANT1 expression leads to apoptotic cell death in commonly utilized replicating cell lines. Here, we successfully express functional ANT1 in differentiated mouse myotubes, which naturally contain high levels of ANT1, without causing cell death. We demonstrate, for the first time in these disease-relevant mammalian cells, that mutant human ANT1 causes dominant mitochondrial defects characterized by decreased ADP–ATP exchange function and abnormal translocator reversal potential. These abnormalities are not due to ANT1 loss of function, because knocking down Ant1 in myotubes causes functional changes different from ANT1 mutants. Under certain physiological conditions, mitochondria consume ATP to maintain membrane potential by reversing the ADP–ATP transport. The modified properties of mutant ANT1 can be responsible for disease pathogenesis in adPEO, because exchange reversal occurring at higher than normal membrane potential can cause excessive energy depletion and nucleotide imbalance in ANT1 mutant muscle cells. PMID:21586654

  10. OXYGEN PRESSURES IN THE INTERSTITIAL SPACE OF SKELETAL MUSCLE AND TUMORS IN VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David F.; Lee, William M.F.; Makonnen, Sosina; Apreleva, Sophia; Vinogradov, Sergei A.

    2008-01-01

    A new Oxyphor (Oxyphor G3) has been used to selectively determine the oxygen pressure in interstitial (pericellular) spaces. Oxyphor G3 is a Pd-tetrabenzoporphyrin, encapsulated inside generation 2 poly-arylglycine (AG) dendrimer, and therefore is a true near infrared oxygen sensor, having a strong absorption band at 636nm and emission near 800nm. The periphery of the dendrimer is modified with oligoethylene glycol residues (Av. MW 350) to make the probe water soluble and biologically inert. Oxyphor G3 was injected along “tracks” in the tissue using a small needle (30gage or less) and remained in the pericellular space, allowing oxygen measurements for several hours with a single injection. The oxygen pressure distributions (histograms) were compared with those for Oxyphor G2 in the intravascular (blood plasma) space. In normal muscle, in the lower oxygen pressure region of the histograms (capillary bed) the oxygen pressure difference was small. At higher oxygen pressures in the histograms there were differences consistent with the presence of high flow vessels with oxygen pressures substantially above those of the surrounding interstitial space. In tumors, the oxygen pressures in the two spaces were similar but with large differences among tumors. In mice, anesthesia with ketamine plus xylazine markedly decreased oxygen pressures in the interstitial and intravascular spaces compared to awake or isoflurane anesthetized mice. PMID:18290314

  11. Disruption of ATP-sensitive potassium channel function in skeletal muscles promotes production and secretion of musclin

    SciTech Connect

    Sierra, Ana; Subbotina, Ekaterina; Zhu, Zhiyong; Gao, Zhan; Koganti, Siva Rama Krishna; Coetzee, William A.; Goldhamer, David J.; Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M.; Zingman, Leonid V.

    2016-02-26

    Sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels control skeletal muscle energy use through their ability to adjust membrane excitability and related cell functions in accordance with cellular metabolic status. Mice with disrupted skeletal muscle K{sub ATP} channels exhibit reduced adipocyte size and increased fatty acid release into the circulation. As yet, the molecular mechanisms underlying this link between skeletal muscle K{sub ATP} channel function and adipose mobilization have not been established. Here, we demonstrate that skeletal muscle-specific disruption of K{sub ATP} channel function in transgenic (TG) mice promotes production and secretion of musclin. Musclin is a myokine with high homology to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) that enhances ANP signaling by competing for elimination. Augmented musclin production in TG mice is driven by a molecular cascade resulting in enhanced acetylation and nuclear exclusion of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) – an inhibitor of transcription of the musclin encoding gene. Musclin production/secretion in TG is paired with increased mobilization of fatty acids and a clear trend toward increased circulating ANP, an activator of lipolysis. These data establish K{sub ATP} channel-dependent musclin production as a potential mechanistic link coupling “local” skeletal muscle energy consumption with mobilization of bodily resources from fat. Understanding such mechanisms is an important step toward designing interventions to manage metabolic disorders including those related to excess body fat and associated co-morbidities. - Highlights: • ATP-sensitive K{sup +} channels regulate musclin production by skeletal muscles. • Lipolytic ANP signaling is promoted by augmented skeletal muscle musclin production. • Skeletal muscle musclin transcription is promoted by a CaMKII/HDAC/FOXO1 pathway. • Musclin links adipose mobilization to energy use in K{sub ATP} channel deficient skeletal muscle.

  12. ATP release and contraction mediated by different P2-receptor subtypes in guinea-pig ileal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Katsuichi; Katsuragi, Takeshi; Fujiki, Sono; Sato, Chiemi; Furukawa, Tatsuo

    1997-01-01

    The present study was addressed to clarify the subtypes of P2-purinoceptor involved in ATP release and contraction evoked by α,β-methylene ATP (α,β-mATP) and other P2-agonists in guinea-pig ileum.α,β-mATP 100 μM produced a transient and steep contraction followed by ATP release from tissue segments. These maximum responses appeared with different time-courses and their ED50 values were 5 and 25 μM, respectively. The maximum release of ATP by α,β-mATP was markedly reduced by 250 μM suramin, 30 μM pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,5′-disulphonic acid (PPADS) and 30 μM reactive blue 2 (RB-2), P2-receptor antagonists. However, the contractile response was inhibited by suramin, tetrodotoxin and atropine, but not by PPADS and RB-2.Although the contraction caused by α,β-mATP was strongly diminished by Ca2+-removal and nifedipine, and also by tetrodotoxin and atropine at 0.3 μM, the release of ATP was virtually unaffected by these procedures.UTP, β,γ-methylene ATP (β,γ-mATP) and ADP at 100 μM elicited a moderate release of ATP. The release caused by UTP was virtually unaffected by RB-2. However, these P2-agonists failed to elicit a contraction of the segment.The potency order of all the agonists tested for the release of ATP was α,β-mATP>UTP>β,γ-mATP>ADP.In superfusion experiments with cultured smooth muscle cells from the ileum, α,β-mATP (100 μM) enhanced the release of ATP 5 fold above the basal value. This evoked release was inhibited by RB-2.These findings suggest that ATP release and contraction induced by P2-agonists such as α,β-mATP in the guinea-pig ileum result mainly from stimulation of different P2-purinoceptors, P2Y-like purinoceptors on the smooth muscles and, probably, P2X-purinoceptors on cholinergic nerve terminals, respectively. However, the ATP release may also be mediated, in part, by P2U-receptors, because UTP caused RB-2-insensitive ATP release. PMID:9283712

  13. Activating of ATP-dependent K+ channels comprised of K(ir) 6.2 and SUR 2B by PGE2 through EP2 receptor in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal from murine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seok; Yeum, Cheol Ho; Chang, In Youb; You, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Sung; Jeong, Han Seong; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2006-01-01

    The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are pacemaker cells in gastrointestinal tract and generate an electrical rhythm in gastrointestinal muscles. We investigated the possibility that PGE(2) might affect the electrical properties of cultured ICC by activating ATP-dependent K(+) channels and, the EP receptor subtypes and the subunits of ATP-dependent K(+) channels involved in these activities were identified. In addition, the regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) mobilization may be involved the action of PGE(2) on ICC. Treatments of ICC with PGE(2) inhibited electrical pacemaker activities in the same manner as pinacidil, an ATP-dependent K(+) channel opener and PGE(2) had only a dose-dependent effect. Using RT-PCR technique, we found that ATP-dependent K(+) channels exist in ICC and that these are composed of K(ir) 6.2 and SUR 2B subunits. To characterize the specific membrane EP receptor subtypes in ICC, EP receptor agonists and RT-PCR were used: Butaprost (an EP(2) receptor agonist) showed the actions on pacemaker currents in the same manner as PGE(2). However sulprostone (a mixed EP(1) and EP(3) agonist) had no effects. In addition, RT-PCR results indicated the presence of the EP(2) receptor in ICC. To investigate cAMP involvement in the effects of PGE(2) on ICCs, SQ-22536 (an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase) and cAMP assays were used. SQ-22536 did not affect the effect of PGE(2) on pacemaker currents, and PGE(2) did not stimulate cAMP production. Also, we found PGE(2) inhibited the spontaneous [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations in cultured ICC. These observations indicate that PGE(2) alters pacemaker currents by activating the ATP-dependent K(+) channels comprised of K(ir) 6.2-SUR 2B in ICC and this action of PGE(2) are through EP(2) receptor subtype and also the activation of ATP-dependent K(+) channels involves intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. ATP consumption and efficiency of human single muscle fibers with different myosin isoform composition.

    PubMed Central

    He, Z H; Bottinelli, R; Pellegrino, M A; Ferenczi, M A; Reggiani, C

    2000-01-01

    Chemomechanical transduction was studied in single fibers isolated from human skeletal muscle containing different myosin isoforms. Permeabilized fibers were activated by laser-pulse photolytic release of 1.5 mM ATP from p(3)-1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethylester of ATP. The ATP hydrolysis rate in the muscle fibers was determined with a fluorescently labeled phosphate-binding protein. The effects of varying load and shortening velocity during contraction were investigated. The myosin isoform composition was determined in each fiber by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. At 12 degrees C large variations (three- to fourfold) were found between slow and fast (2A and 2A-2B) fibers in their maximum shortening velocity, peak power output, velocity at which peak power is produced, isometric ATPase activity, and tension cost. Isometric tension was similar in all fiber groups. The ATP consumption rate increased during shortening in proportion to shortening velocity. At 12 degrees C the maximum efficiency was similar (0.21-0.27) for all fiber types and was reached at a higher speed of shortening for the faster fibers. In all fibers, peak efficiency increased to approximately 0.4 when the temperature was raised from 12 degrees C to 20 degrees C. The results were simulated with a kinetic scheme describing the ATPase cycle, in which the rate constant controlling ADP release is sensitive to the load on the muscle. The main difference between slow and fast fibers was reproduced by increasing the rate constant for the hydrolysis step, which was rate limiting at low loads. Simulation of the effect of increasing temperature required an increase in the force per cross-bridge and an acceleration of the rate constants in the reaction pathway. PMID:10920025

  15. Mice lacking hypertension candidate gene ATP2B1 in vascular smooth muscle cells show significant blood pressure elevation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Hirawa, Nobuhito; Tabara, Yasuharu; Muraoka, Hidenori; Fujita, Megumi; Miyazaki, Nobuko; Fujiwara, Akira; Ichikawa, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Yuichiro; Ichihara, Naoaki; Saka, Sanae; Wakui, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Shin-ichiro; Yatsu, Keisuke; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Yasuda, Gen; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kita, Yoshikuni; Takei, Kohtaro; Goshima, Yoshio; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Miki, Tetsuro; Umemura, Satoshi

    2012-04-01

    We reported previously that ATP2B1 was one of the genes for hypertension receptivity in a large-scale Japanese population, which has been replicated recently in Europeans and Koreans. ATP2B1 encodes the plasma membrane calcium ATPase isoform 1, which plays a critical role in intracellular calcium homeostasis. In addition, it is suggested that ATP2B1 plays a major role in vascular smooth muscle contraction. Because the ATP2B1 knockout (KO) mouse is embryo-lethal, we generated mice with vascular smooth muscle cell-specific KO of ATP2B1 using the Cre-loxP system to clarify the relationship between ATP2B1 and hypertension. The KO mice expressed significantly lower levels of ATP2B1 mRNA and protein in the aorta compared with control mice. KO mice showed significantly higher systolic blood pressure as measured by tail-cuff method and radiotelemetric method. Similar to ATP2B1, the expression of the Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger isoform 1 mRNA was decreased in vascular smooth muscle cells of KO mice. However, ATP2B4 expression was increased in KO mice. The cultured vascular smooth muscle cells of KO mice showed increased intracellular calcium concentration not only in basal condition but also in phenylephrine-stimulated condition. Furthermore, phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction was significantly increased in vascular rings of the femoral artery of KO mice. These results suggest that ATP2B1 plays important roles in the regulation of blood pressure through alteration of calcium handling and vasoconstriction in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  16. Effect of insulin on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial ATP production, protein synthesis, and mRNA transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Stump, Craig S.; Short, Kevin R.; Bigelow, Maureen L.; Schimke, Jill M.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondria are the primary site of skeletal muscle fuel metabolism and ATP production. Although insulin is a major regulator of fuel metabolism, its effect on mitochondrial ATP production is not known. Here we report increases in vastus lateralis muscle mitochondrial ATP production capacity (32–42%) in healthy humans (P < 0.01) i.v. infused with insulin (1.5 milliunits/kg of fat-free mass per min) while clamping glucose, amino acids, glucagon, and growth hormone. Increased ATP production occurred in association with increased mRNA levels from both mitochondrial (NADH dehydrogenase subunit IV) and nuclear [cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunit IV] genes (164–180%) encoding mitochondrial proteins (P < 0.05). In addition, muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis, and COX and citrate synthase enzyme activities were increased by insulin (P < 0.05). Further studies demonstrated no effect of low to high insulin levels on muscle mitochondrial ATP production for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, whereas matched nondiabetic controls increased 16–26% (P < 0.02) when four different substrate combinations were used. In conclusion, insulin stimulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle along with synthesis of gene transcripts and mitochondrial protein in human subjects. Skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients has a reduced capacity to increase ATP production with high insulin levels. PMID:12808136

  17. Effect of insulin on human skeletal muscle mitochondrial ATP production, protein synthesis, and mRNA transcripts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Craig S.; Short, Kevin R.; Bigelow, Maureen L.; Schimke, Jill M.; Sreekumaran Nair, K.

    2003-06-01

    Mitochondria are the primary site of skeletal muscle fuel metabolism and ATP production. Although insulin is a major regulator of fuel metabolism, its effect on mitochondrial ATP production is not known. Here we report increases in vastus lateralis muscle mitochondrial ATP production capacity (32-42%) in healthy humans (P < 0.01) i.v. infused with insulin (1.5 milliunits/kg of fat-free mass per min) while clamping glucose, amino acids, glucagon, and growth hormone. Increased ATP production occurred in association with increased mRNA levels from both mitochondrial (NADH dehydrogenase subunit IV) and nuclear [cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunit IV] genes (164-180%) encoding mitochondrial proteins (P < 0.05). In addition, muscle mitochondrial protein synthesis, and COX and citrate synthase enzyme activities were increased by insulin (P < 0.05). Further studies demonstrated no effect of low to high insulin levels on muscle mitochondrial ATP production for people with type 2 diabetes mellitus, whereas matched nondiabetic controls increased 16-26% (P < 0.02) when four different substrate combinations were used. In conclusion, insulin stimulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle along with synthesis of gene transcripts and mitochondrial protein in human subjects. Skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients has a reduced capacity to increase ATP production with high insulin levels. cytochrome c oxidase | NADH dehydrogenase subunit IV | amino acids | citrate synthase

  18. Regulation of blood flow distribution in skeletal muscle: role of erythrocyte-released ATP

    PubMed Central

    Ellsworth, Mary L; Sprague, Randy S

    2012-01-01

    The maintenance of adequate tissue O2 levels in skeletal muscle is vital for normal physiology and requires a well regulated and appropriately distributed convective O2 supply. Inherent in this fundamental physiological process is the requirement for a mechanism which both senses tissue O2 need and locally adjusts flow to appropriately meet that need. Over the past several years we and others have suggested that, in skeletal muscle, O2 carrying erythrocytes participate in the regulation of total blood flow and its distribution by releasing ATP. Importantly, the release of this vasoactive molecule must be both rapid and well controlled if it is to serve an important physiological role. Here we provide insights into three distinct regulated signalling pathways within the erythrocyte that are activated by exposure to reduced O2 tension or in response to binding of agonists to the prostacyclin or β-adrenergic receptors. Although much has been learned about the role of the erythrocyte in perfusion of skeletal muscle, much remains to be understood. However, what is clear is that the long established passive carrier of O2 also contributes to the regulation of the distribution of microvascular perfusion in skeletal muscle by virtue of its capacity to release ATP. PMID:22586223

  19. Regulation of blood flow distribution in skeletal muscle: role of erythrocyte-released ATP.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, Mary L; Sprague, Randy S

    2012-10-15

    The maintenance of adequate tissue O(2) levels in skeletal muscle is vital for normal physiology and requires a well regulated and appropriately distributed convective O(2) supply. Inherent in this fundamental physiological process is the requirement for a mechanism which both senses tissue O(2) need and locally adjusts flow to appropriately meet that need. Over the past several years we and others have suggested that, in skeletal muscle, O(2) carrying erythrocytes participate in the regulation of total blood flow and its distribution by releasing ATP. Importantly, the release of this vasoactive molecule must be both rapid and well controlled if it is to serve an important physiological role. Here we provide insights into three distinct regulated signalling pathways within the erythrocyte that are activated by exposure to reduced O(2) tension or in response to binding of agonists to the prostacyclin or β-adrenergic receptors. Although much has been learned about the role of the erythrocyte in perfusion of skeletal muscle, much remains to be understood. However, what is clear is that the long established passive carrier of O(2) also contributes to the regulation of the distribution of microvascular perfusion in skeletal muscle by virtue of its capacity to release ATP.

  20. Regulation of skeletal muscle ATP catabolism by AMPD1 genotype during sprint exercise in asymptomatic subjects.

    PubMed

    Norman, B; Sabina, R L; Jansson, E

    2001-07-01

    Deficiency of myoadenylate deaminase, the muscle isoform of AMP deaminase encoded by the AMPD1 gene, is a common myopathic condition associated with alterations in skeletal muscle energy metabolism. However, recent studies have demonstrated that most individuals harboring this genetic abnormality are asymptomatic. Therefore, 18 healthy subjects with different AMPD1 genotypes were studied during a 30-s Wingate test in order to evaluate the influence of this inherited defect in AMPD1 expression on skeletal muscle energy metabolism and exercise performance in the asymptomatic population. Exercise performances were similar across the AMPD1 genotypes, whereas significant differences in several descriptors of energy metabolism were observed. Normal homozygotes (NN) exhibited the highest levels of AMP deaminase activities, net ATP catabolism, and IMP accumulation, whereas intermediate values were observed in heterozygotes (MN). Conversely, mutant homozygotes (MM) had very low AMP deaminase activities and showed no significant net catabolism of ATP or IMP accumulation. Accordingly, MM also did not show any postexercise increase in plasma ammonia. Unexpectedly, MN consistently exhibited greater increases in plasma ammonia compared with NN despite the relatively lower accumulation of IMP in skeletal muscle. Moreover, time course profiles of postexercise plasma ammonia and blood lactate accumulation also differed across AMPD1 genotypes. Finally, analysis of adenosine in leftover biopsy material revealed a modest twofold increase in MN and a dramatic 25-fold increase in MM.

  1. PPARδ agonism inhibits skeletal muscle PDC activity, mitochondrial ATP production and force generation during prolonged contraction

    PubMed Central

    Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Baker, David J; Constantin, Despina; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that PPARδ agonism, used clinically to treat insulin resistance, increases fat oxidation and up-regulates mitochondrial PDK4 mRNA and protein expression in resting skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that PDK4 up-regulation, which inhibits pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC)-dependent carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation, would negatively affect muscle function during sustained contraction where the demand on CHO is markedly increased. Three groups of eight male Wistar rats each received either vehicle or a PPARδ agonist (GW610742X) at two doses (5 and 100 mg (kg body mass (bm))−1 orally for 6 days. On the seventh day, the gastrocnemius–soleus–plantaris muscle group was isolated and snap frozen, or underwent 30 min of electrically evoked submaximal intensity isometric contraction using a perfused hindlimb model. During contraction, the rate of muscle PDC activation was significantly lower at 100 mg (kg bm)−1 compared with control (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the rates of muscle PCr hydrolysis and lactate accumulation were significantly increased at 100 mg (kg bm)−1 compared with control, reflecting lower mitochondrial ATP generation. Muscle tension development during contraction was significantly lower at 100 mg (kg bm)−1 compared with control (25%; P < 0.05). The present data demonstrate that PPARδ agonism inhibits muscle CHO oxidation at the level of PDC during prolonged contraction, and is paralleled by the activation of anaerobic metabolism, which collectively impair contractile function. PMID:19001043

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum is a key organella in bradykinin-triggered ATP release from cultured smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yumei; Migita, Keisuke; Sato, Chiemi; Usune, Sadaharu; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Katsuragi, Takeshi

    2007-09-01

    ATP has broad functions as an autocrine/paracrine molecule. The mode of ATP release and its intracellular source, however, are little understood. Here we show that bradykinin via B(2)-receptor stimulation induces the extracellular release of ATP via the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P(3)]-signaling pathway in cultured taenia coli smooth muscle cells. It was found that bradykinin also increased the production of Ins(1,4,5)P(3) and 2-APB-inhibitable [Ca(2+)](i). The evoked release of ATP was suppressed by the Ca(2+)-channel blockers, nifedipine, and verapamil. Moreover, the extracellular release of ATP was elicited by photoliberation of Ins(1,4,5)P(3). Bradykinin caused a quick and transient accumulation of intracellular ATP from cells treated with 1% perchloric acid solution (PCA), but not with the cell lysis buffer. Peak accumulation was prevented by 2-APB and thapsigargin, but not by nifedipine or verapamil, inhibitors of extracellular release of ATP. These findings suggest that bradykinin elicits the extracellular release of ATP that is mediated by the Ins(1,4,5)P(3)-induced Ca(2+) signaling and, finally, leads to a Ca(2+)-dependent export of ATP from the cells. Furthermore, the bradykinin-induced transient accumulation of ATP in the cells treated with PCA may imply a possible release of ATP from the endoplasmic reticulum.

  3. Active relaxation of human gallbladder muscle is mediated by ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Bird, N C; Ahmed, R; Chess-Williams, R; Johnson, A G

    2002-01-01

    Active and significant relaxation of the human gallbladder must be one of the facets of its motility during both the filling and emptying cycle. Conflicting reports about the presence or significance of nitric oxide have been reported in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide and K(ATP) channels in human gallbladder muscle using isolated strips from human gallbladder. Full thickness strips were obtained from 56 human gallbladders and suspended under isometric tension in organ baths. The effect of nitric oxide donors and inhibitors on cholecystokinin octapeptide- and carbachol-induced contraction was examined. In separate experiments the effect of the K(ATP) channel activator, cromakalim, and the inhibitor, glibenclamide, were determined. Cromakalim induced a significant relaxation of agonist-induced contraction in human gallbladder in vitro, an effect which was abolished by the K(ATP) channel inhibitor glibenclamide. No evidence of significant nitric oxide involvement in relaxation was observed. This study has demonstrated the presence of K(ATP) channels in human gallbladder for the first time. These are capable of causing significant relaxation in the presence of hormonal and muscarinic agonists and may represent a major pathway for gallbladder relaxation. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. Dynamics of cross-bridge cycling, ATP hydrolysis, force generation, and deformation in cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Shivendra G; Bugenhagen, Scott M; Palmer, Bradley M; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    Despite extensive study over the past six decades the coupling of chemical reaction and mechanical processes in muscle dynamics is not well understood. We lack a theoretical description of how chemical processes (metabolite binding, ATP hydrolysis) influence and are influenced by mechanical processes (deformation and force generation). To address this need, a mathematical model of the muscle cross-bridge (XB) cycle based on Huxley's sliding filament theory is developed that explicitly accounts for the chemical transformation events and the influence of strain on state transitions. The model is identified based on elastic and viscous moduli data from mouse and rat myocardial strips over a range of perturbation frequencies, and MgATP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations. Simulations of the identified model reproduce the observed effects of MgATP and MgADP on the rate of force development. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the rate of force re-development measured in slack-restretch experiments is not directly proportional to the rate of XB cycling. For these experiments, the model predicts that the observed increase in the rate of force generation with increased Pi concentration is due to inhibition of cycle turnover by Pi. Finally, the model captures the observed phenomena of force yielding suggesting that it is a result of rapid detachment of stretched attached myosin heads.

  5. Dynamics of cross-bridge cycling, ATP hydrolysis, force generation, and deformation in cardiac muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Shivendra G.; Bugenhagen, Scott M.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Beard, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive study over the past six decades the coupling of chemical reaction and mechanical processes in muscle dynamics is not well understood. We lack a theoretical description of how chemical processes (metabolite binding, ATP hydrolysis) influence and are influenced by mechanical processes (deformation and force generation). To address this need, a mathematical model of the muscle cross-bridge (XB) cycle based on Huxley’s sliding filament theory is developed that explicitly accounts for the chemical transformation events and the influence of strain on state transitions. The model is identified based on elastic and viscous moduli data from mouse and rat myocardial strips over a range of perturbation frequencies, and MgATP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations. Simulations of the identified model reproduce the observed effects of MgATP and MgADP on the rate of force development. Furthermore, simulations reveal that the rate of force re-development measured in slack-restretch experiments is not directly proportional to the rate of XB cycling. For these experiments, the model predicts that the observed increase in the rate of force generation with increased Pi concentration is due to inhibition of cycle turnover by Pi. Finally, the model captures the observed phenomena of force yielding suggesting that it is a result of rapid detachment of stretched attached myosin heads. PMID:25681584

  6. Insulin modulation of ATP-sensitive K+ channel of rat skeletal muscle is impaired in the hypokalaemic state.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, D; Capriulo, R; Conte Camerino, D

    1999-01-01

    In the present work, we examined the effects of in vivo administration of insulin to rats made hypokalaemic by feeding a K+-free diet. The i.p. injection of insulin in the hypokalaemic rats provoked muscle paralysis within 3-5 h. Consistent with this observation, the skeletal muscle fibres of the paralysed rats were depolarized. In contrast, in the normokalaemic animals, insulin neither provoked paralysis nor produced significant fibre hyperpolarization. In the hypokalaemic rats, insulin almost completely abolished the sarcolemma adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive K+ currents without altering the sensitivity of the channels to ATP or glibenclamide. In contrast, in the normokalaemic rats, insulin enhanced ATP-sensitive K+ currents that became also resistant to ATP and glibenclamide. Our experiments indicate that the modulation of the sarcolemma ATP-sensitive K+ channels by insulin is impaired in the hypokalaemic state. This phenomenon appears to be related to the fibre depolarization and paralysis observed in the same animals.

  7. Differential scanning calorimetry study of glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibres in intermediate state of ATP hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Dergez, Timea; Lőrinczy, Dénes; Könczöl, Franciska; Farkas, Nelli; Belagyi, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Background Thermal denaturation experiments were extended to study the thermal behaviour of the main motor proteins (actin and myosin) in their native environment in striated muscle fibres. The interaction of actin with myosin in the highly organized muscle structure is affected by internal forces; therefore their altered conformation and interaction may differ from those obtained in solution. The energetics of long functioning intermediate states of ATP hydrolysis cycle was studied in muscle fibres by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results SETARAM Micro DSC-II was used to monitor the thermal denaturation of the fibre system in rigor and in the presence of nucleotide and nucleotide analogues. The AM.ADP.Pi state of the ATP hydrolysis cycle has a very short lifetime therefore, we mimicked the different intermediate states with AMP.PNP and/or inorganic phosphate analogues Vi and AlF4 or BeFx. Studying glycerol-extracted muscle fibres from the rabbit psoas muscle by DSC, three characteristic thermal transitions were detected in rigor. The thermal transitions can be assigned to myosin heads, myosin rods and actin with transition temperatures (Tm) of 52.9 ± 0.7°C, 57.9 ± 0.7°C, 63.7 ± 1.0°C. In different intermediate states of the ATP hydrolysis mimicked by nucleotide analogues a fourth thermal transition was also detected which is very likely connected with nucleotide binding domain of myosin and/or actin filaments. This transition temperature Tm4 depended on the mimicked intermediate states, and varied in the range of 66°C – 77°C. Conclusion According to DSC measurements, strongly and weakly binding states of myosin to actin were significantly different. In the presence of ADP only a moderate change of the DSC pattern was detected in comparison with rigor, whereas in ADP.Pi state trapped by Vi, AlF4 or BeFx a remarkable stabilization was detected on the myosin head and actin filament which is reflected in a 3.0 – 10.0°C shift in Tm to higher

  8. UV-B exposure reduces locomotor performance by impairing muscle function but not mitochondrial ATP production.

    PubMed

    Ghanizadeh Kazerouni, Ensiyeh; Franklin, Craig E; Seebacher, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UV-B) can reduce swimming performance by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. High concentrations of ROS can damage mitochondria, resulting in reduced ATP production. ROS can also damage muscle proteins, thereby leading to impaired muscle contractile function. We have shown previously that UV-B exposure reduces locomotor performance in mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) without affecting metabolic scope. Our aim was therefore to test whether UV-B influences swimming performance of mosquitofish by ROS-induced damage to muscle proteins without affecting mitochondrial function. In a fully factorial design, we exposed mosquitofish to UV-B and no-UV-B controls in combination with exposure to N-acetylcysteine (NAC) plus no-NAC controls. We used NAC, a precursor of glutathione, as an antioxidant to test whether any effects of UV-B on swimming performance were at least partly due to UV-B-induced ROS. UV-B significantly reduced critical sustained swimming performance and tail beat frequencies, and it increased ROS-induced damage (protein carbonyl concentrations and lipid peroxidation) in muscle. However, UV-B did not affect the activity of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA), an enzyme associated with muscle calcium cycling and muscle relaxation. UV-B did not affect ADP phosphorylation (state 3) rates of mitochondrial respiration, and it did not alter the amount of ATP produced per atom of oxygen consumed (P:O ratio). However, UV-B reduced the mitochondrial respiratory control ratio. Under UV-B exposure, fish treated with NAC showed greater swimming performance and tail beat frequencies, higher glutathione concentrations, and lower protein carbonyl concentrations and lipid peroxidation than untreated fish. Tail beat amplitude was not affected by any treatment. Our results showed, firstly, that the effects of UV-B on locomotor performance were mediated by ROS and, secondly, that reduced swimming performance was not caused by

  9. Flash and smash: rapid freezing of muscle fibers activated by photolysis of caged ATP.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Lenart, T D; Murray, J M; Franzini-Armstrong, C; Goldman, Y E

    1993-07-01

    A new approach was used to study transient structural states of cross-bridges during activation of muscle fibers. Rabbit skinned muscle fibers were rapidly and synchronously activated from the rigor state by photolysis of caged ATP in the presence of Ca2+. At several different times during the switch from rigor to fully active tension development, the fibers were rapidly frozen on a liquid helium-cooled metal block, freeze-substituted, and examined in an electron microscope. The limits of structural preservation and resolution with this technique were analyzed. We demonstrate that the resolution of our images is sufficient to draw the following conclusions about cross-bridge structure. Rigor cross-bridges point away from the Z-line and most of them are wider near the thin filaments than near the backbone of the thick filaments. In contrast, cross-bridges in actively contracting fibers stretch between the thick and thin filaments at a variable angle, and are uniformly thin. Diffraction patterns computed from contracting muscle show layer lines both at 38 and 43 nm indicating that active cross-bridges contribute mass to both the actin- and myosin-based helical periodicities. The images obtained from fibers frozen 20 ms after release of ATP show a mixture of rigor and active type cross-bridge configurations. There is little evidence of cross-bridges with the rigor shape by 50 ms, and the difference in configurations between 50 and 300 ms after photolysis is surprisingly subtle.

  10. Vagal intramuscular array afferents form complexes with interstitial cells of Cajal in gastrointestinal smooth muscle: Analogues of muscle spindle organs?

    PubMed Central

    Powley, Terry L.; Phillips, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Intramuscular arrays (IMAs), vagal mechanoreceptors that innervate gastrointestinal smooth muscle, have not been completely described structurally or functionally. To delineate more fully the architecture of IMAs and to consider the structure-function implications of the observations, the present experiment examined the organization of the IMA terminal arbors and the accessory tissue elements of those arbors. IMA terminal fields, labeled by injection of biotinylated dextran into the nodose ganglia, were examined in whole mounts of rat gastric smooth muscle double-labeled with immunohistochemistry for interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs; c-Kit) and/or inputs of different neuronal efferent transmitter (markers: TH, VChAT, and NOS) or afferent neuropeptidergic (CGRP) phenotypes. IMAs make extensive varicose and lamellar contacts with ICCs. In addition, axons of the multiple efferent and afferent phenotypes examined converge and articulate with IMA terminal arbors innervating ICCs. This architecture is consistent with the hypothesis that IMAs, or the multiply innervated IMA-ICC complexes they form, can function as stretch receptors. The tissue organization is also consonant with the proposal that those units can operate as functional analogues of muscle spindle organs. For electrophysiological assessments of IMA functions, experiments will need protocols that preserve both the complex architecture and the dynamic operations of IMA-ICC complexes. PMID:21530617

  11. Vagal intramuscular array afferents form complexes with interstitial cells of Cajal in gastrointestinal smooth muscle: analogues of muscle spindle organs?

    PubMed

    Powley, T L; Phillips, R J

    2011-07-14

    Intramuscular arrays (IMAs), vagal mechanoreceptors that innervate gastrointestinal smooth muscle, have not been completely described structurally or functionally. To delineate more fully the architecture of IMAs and to consider the structure-function implications of the observations, the present experiment examined the organization of the IMA terminal arbors and the accessory tissue elements of those arbors. IMA terminal fields, labeled by injection of biotinylated dextran into the nodose ganglia, were examined in whole mounts of rat gastric smooth muscle double-labeled with immunohistochemistry for interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs; c-Kit) and/or inputs of different neuronal efferent transmitter (markers: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)) or afferent neuropeptidergic (calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)) phenotypes. IMAs make extensive varicose and lamellar contacts with ICCs. In addition, axons of the multiple efferent and afferent phenotypes examined converge and articulate with IMA terminal arbors innervating ICCs. This architecture is consistent with the hypothesis that IMAs, or the multiply innervated IMA-ICC complexes they form, can function as stretch receptors. The tissue organization is also consonant with the proposal that those units can operate as functional analogues of muscle spindle organs. For electrophysiological assessments of IMA functions, experiments will need protocols that preserve both the complex architecture and the dynamic operations of IMA-ICC complexes.

  12. Increased susceptibility to ATP via alteration of P2X receptor function in dystrophic mdx mouse muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Davy; Zablocki, Krzysztof; Lien, Chun-Fu; Jiang, Taiwen; Arkle, Stephen; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Brown, James; Lochmuller, Hanns; Simon, Joseph; Barnard, Eric A; Górecki, Dariusz C

    2006-04-01

    Pathological cellular hallmarks of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) include, among others, abnormal calcium homeostasis. Changes in the expression of specific receptors for extracellular ATP in dystrophic muscle have been recently documented: here, we demonstrate that at the earliest, myoblast stage of developing dystrophic muscle a purinergic dystrophic phenotype arises. In myoblasts of a dystrophin-negative muscle cell line established from the mdx mouse model of DMD but not in normal myoblasts, exposure to extracellular ATP triggered a strong increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations. Influx of extracellular Ca2+ was stimulated by ATP and BzATP and inhibited by zinc, Coomassie Brilliant Blue-G, and KN-62, demonstrating activation of P2X7 receptors. Significant expression of P2X4 and P2X7 proteins was immunodetected in dystrophic myoblasts. Therefore, full-length dystrophin appears, surprisingly, to play an important role in myoblasts in controlling responses to ATP. Our results suggest that altered function of P2X receptors may be an important contributor to pathogenic Ca2+ entry in dystrophic mouse muscle and may have implications for the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophies. Treatments aiming at inhibition of specific ATP receptors could be of a potential therapeutic benefit.

  13. ATP-activated channels gate calcium entry in single smooth muscle cells dissociated from rabbit ear artery.

    PubMed

    Benham, C D

    1989-12-01

    1. A combination of the techniques of microspectrofluorimetry and whole-cell patch clamp was used to investigate changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration (Cai2+) in single arterial smooth muscle cells on external application of ATP. 2. ATP applied to cells held under voltage clamp at --60 mV evoked an inward current and an associated rise in Cai2+. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+. ATP-activated inward currents were observed but there was no rise in Cai2+. 3. Pre-treatment of cells with noradrenaline or caffeine did not prevent the rise in Cai2+ on subsequent application of ATP. 4. The ATP-activated rise in Cai2+ was voltage dependent as outward currents evoked by ATP at positive membrane potentials were not associated with a change in Cai2+. 5. At --60 mV, the rise in Cai2+ due to ATP application was dependent on the magnitude of the ATP current response, such that Cai2+ increased by about 0.5 nM/pC charge transferred through ATP-gated channels. 6. The results suggest that ATP-gated channels in these cells admit sufficient Ca2+ in a physiological Ca2+ gradient to significantly elevate Cai2+. About 10% of the ATP-gated current may be carried by Ca2+ ions. Thus the ATP-activated channels have a dual excitatory function: depolarization due to Na+ entry promotes action potential discharge and voltage-gated Ca2+ entry, and also direct entry of Ca2+ through the ATP-activated channels.

  14. ATP-activated channels gate calcium entry in single smooth muscle cells dissociated from rabbit ear artery.

    PubMed Central

    Benham, C D

    1989-01-01

    1. A combination of the techniques of microspectrofluorimetry and whole-cell patch clamp was used to investigate changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration (Cai2+) in single arterial smooth muscle cells on external application of ATP. 2. ATP applied to cells held under voltage clamp at --60 mV evoked an inward current and an associated rise in Cai2+. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+. ATP-activated inward currents were observed but there was no rise in Cai2+. 3. Pre-treatment of cells with noradrenaline or caffeine did not prevent the rise in Cai2+ on subsequent application of ATP. 4. The ATP-activated rise in Cai2+ was voltage dependent as outward currents evoked by ATP at positive membrane potentials were not associated with a change in Cai2+. 5. At --60 mV, the rise in Cai2+ due to ATP application was dependent on the magnitude of the ATP current response, such that Cai2+ increased by about 0.5 nM/pC charge transferred through ATP-gated channels. 6. The results suggest that ATP-gated channels in these cells admit sufficient Ca2+ in a physiological Ca2+ gradient to significantly elevate Cai2+. About 10% of the ATP-gated current may be carried by Ca2+ ions. Thus the ATP-activated channels have a dual excitatory function: depolarization due to Na+ entry promotes action potential discharge and voltage-gated Ca2+ entry, and also direct entry of Ca2+ through the ATP-activated channels. PMID:2559977

  15. SLOW MYOSIN ATP TURNOVER IN THE SUPER-RELAXED STATE IN TARANTULA MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Nariman; Cooke, Roger

    2011-01-01

    We measured the nucleotide turnover rate of myosin in tarantula leg-muscle fibers by observing single turnovers of the fluorescent nucleotide analog, mantATP, as monitored by the decrease in fluorescence when mantATP is replaced by ATP in a chase experiment. We find a multi-exponential process, with approximately two-thirds of the myosin showing a very slow nucleotide turnover time constant, ~30 minutes. This slow-turnover state is termed the super-relaxed state (SRX). If fibers are incubated in mantADP and chased with ADP, the SRX is not seen, indicating that trinucleotide-relaxed myosins are responsible for the SRX. Phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain eliminates the fraction of myosin with the very long lifetime. The data imply that the very long-lived SRX in tarantula fibers is a highly novel adaptation for energy conservation in an animal that spends extremely long periods of time in a quiescent state employing a lie-in-wait hunting strategy. The presence of the SRX measured here correlates well with the binding of myosin heads to the core of the thick filament in a structure known as the “interacting-heads motif” observed previously by electron microscopy. Both the structural array and the long-lived SRX require relaxed filaments or relaxed fibers, both are lost upon myosin phosphorylation, and both appear to be more stable in tarantula than in vertebrate skeletal or vertebrate cardiac preparations. PMID:21763701

  16. The effect of intracellular anions on ATP-dependent potassium channels of rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    McKillen, H C; Davies, N W; Stanfield, P R; Standen, N B

    1994-01-01

    1. We have used excised inside-out patches to study the effects of anions bathing the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane on ATP-dependent K+ channels of rat flexor digitorum brevis muscle. Channels were closed by ATP applied to the cytoplasmic face of the patch with a concentration for half-closure (Ki) of 14 microM, were highly selective for K+ and had unitary conductances of 62 pS in symmetrical 155 mM K+ and 27 pS in 5 mM [K+]o. 2. In 139 mM Cl- internal solution channel activity declined rapidly after excision of the patch. Inclusion of 40 mM potassium gluconate (substituted for KCl) in the solution both restored channel activity and greatly slowed its subsequent run-down. 3. The action of gluconate was concentration dependent. The effect did not involve a change in ATP binding, since the Ki for ATP was not significantly changed by gluconate, and was specific for the cytoplasmic face of the patch. 4. The anions pyruvate, lactate and acetate were all able to restore channel activity after run-down, though less well than gluconate, while sulphate and methylsulphate were without effect. 5. Analysis of single channel kinetics showed that gluconate did not affect mean open lifetime, but led to a decrease in the number and duration of long closings. 6. Anions are most likely to act by stabilizing the structure of the channel protein. Changes in the intracellular concentration of certain anions may play a role in regulating channel activity. PMID:7837093

  17. Taurine blocks ATP-sensitive potassium channels of rat skeletal muscle fibres interfering with the sulphonylurea receptor.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, D; Barbieri, M; Camerino, D C

    2000-06-01

    Taurine is a sulphonic aminoacid present in high amounts in various tissues including cardiac and skeletal muscles showing different properties such as antioxidative, antimyotonic and anti-schaemic effects. The cellular mechanism of action of taurine is under investigation and appears to involve the interaction of the sulphonic aminoacid with several ion channels. Using the patch-clamp technique we studied the effects of taurine in rat skeletal muscle fibres on ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (K(ATP)) immediately after excision and on channels that underwent rundown. The cytoplasmic application of 20 mM of taurine reduced the K(ATP) current; this effect was reverted by washout of the drug solution. In this experimental condition the IC(50) was 20.1 mM. After rundown, taurine inhibited the K(ATP) current with similar efficacy. Competition experiments showed that taurine shifted the dose-response inhibition curve of glybenclamide to the left on the log-dose axis without significantly affecting those of ATP or Ca(2+) ion. Single channel recording revealed that taurine affects the close state of the channel prolonging it and reducing the bursts duration. Our data indicate that taurine inhibits the muscular K(ATP) channel interfering with the glybenclamide site on the sulphonylurea receptor of the channel or on the site allosterically coupled to it. During ischaemia and hypoxia, the skeletal and heart muscles undergo several changes; for example, the activation of K(ATP) channels and loss of the intracellular taurine content. The depletion of taurine during ischaemia would contribute to the early activation of K(ATP) channels and salvage the intracellular ATP content.

  18. A simple approach to evaluate the kinetic rate constant for ATP synthesis in resting human skeletal muscle at 7 T.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jimin; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2016-09-01

    Inversion transfer (IT) is a well-established technique with multiple attractive features for analysis of kinetics. However, its application in measurement of ATP synthesis rate in vivo has lagged behind the more common saturation transfer (ST) techniques. One well-recognized issue with IT is the complexity of data analysis in comparison with much simpler analysis by ST. This complexity arises, in part, because the γ-ATP spin is involved in multiple chemical reactions and magnetization exchanges, whereas Pi is involved in a single reaction, Pi → γ-ATP. By considering the reactions involving γ-ATP only as a lumped constant, the rate constant for the reaction of physiological interest, kPi→γATP , can be determined. Here, we present a new IT data analysis method to evaluate kPi→γATP using data collected from resting human skeletal muscle at 7 T. The method is based on the basic Bloch-McConnell equation, which relates kPi→γATP to m˙Pi, the rate of Pi magnetization change. The kPi→γATP value is accessed from m˙Pi data by more familiar linear correlation approaches. For a group of human subjects (n = 15), the kPi→γATP value derived for resting calf muscle was 0.066 ± 0.017 s(-1) , in agreement with literature-reported values. In this study we also explored possible time-saving strategies to speed up data acquisition for kPi→γATP evaluation using simulations. The analysis indicates that it is feasible to carry out a (31) P IT experiment in about 10 min or less at 7 T with reasonable outcome in kPi→γATP variance for measurement of ATP synthesis in resting human skeletal muscle. We believe that this new IT data analysis approach will facilitate the wide acceptance of IT to evaluate ATP synthesis rate in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Real-time imaging of ATP release induced by mechanical stretch in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Norihiro; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells within the airway walls are continually exposed to mechanical stimuli, and exhibit various functions in response to these mechanical stresses. ATP acts as an extracellular mediator in the airway. Moreover, extracellular ATP is considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, it is not known whether ASM cells are cellular sources of ATP secretion in the airway. We therefore investigated whether mechanical stretch induces ATP release from ASM cells. Mechanical stretch was applied to primary human ASM cells cultured on a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Concentrations of ATP in cell culture supernatants measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence were significantly elevated by cyclic stretch (12 and 20% strain). We further visualized the stretch-induced ATP release from the cells in real time using a luminescence imaging system, while acquiring differential interference contrast cell images with infrared optics. Immediately after a single uniaxial stretch for 1 second, strong ATP signals were produced by a certain population of cells and spread to surrounding spaces. The cyclic stretch-induced ATP release was significantly reduced by inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular exocytosis, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester, monensin, N-ethylmaleimide, and bafilomycin. In contrast, the stretch-induced ATP release was not inhibited by a hemichannel blocker, carbenoxolone, or blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 by short interfering RNA transfection or ruthenium red. These findings reveal a novel property of ASM cells: mechanically induced ATP release may be a cellular source of ATP in the airway.

  20. Interstitial cells of Cajal: a new perspective on smooth muscle function

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M

    2006-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) were described more than 100 years ago by Ramon y Cajal. For many years these cells were identified only by non-specific histological stains and later, more reliably, by electron microscopy. Ultrastructural features and the anatomical locations of ICC suggested important physiological roles for these cells. A breakthrough occurred in our ability to study ICC when it was recognized that antibodies for Kit could be used to identify ICC, even in living tissues. Signalling via Kit, a receptor tyrosine kinase, is also necessary for ICC development and maintenance of phenotype. Thus, blocking Kit, by a variety of techniques, caused loss of ICC in experimental animals and demonstrated the critical physiological functions of these cells in gastrointestinal motility. Loss of ICC in human gastrointestinal diseases may contribute to the motor pathologies observed. Unrestrained Kit signalling leads to the transformation of ICC and the development of gastrointestinal stromal tumours. Now ICC-like cells have been identified in a variety of smooth muscle tissues, and the race is on to discover whether these cells have equivalent or even novel functions in organs outside the gastrointestinal tract. This perspectives article gives a short overview of the history of ICC research and directions for future investigation. PMID:16873406

  1. Evidences for an ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) in muscle and fat body mitochondria of insect.

    PubMed

    Slocinska, Malgorzata; Lubawy, Jan; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, we describe the existence of mitochondrial ATP-dependent K(+) channel (mitoKATP) in two different insect tissues, fat body and muscle of cockroach Gromphadorhina coquereliana. We found that pharmacological substances known to modulate potassium channel activity influenced mitochondrial resting respiration. In isolated mitochondria oxygen consumption increased by about 13% in the presence of potassium channel openers (KCOs) such as diazoxide and pinacidil. The opening of mitoKATP was reversed by glibenclamide (potassium channel blocker) and 1 mM ATP. Immunological studies with antibodies raised against the Kir6.1 and SUR1 subunits of the mammalian ATP-sensitive potassium channel, indicated the existence of mitoKATP in insect mitochondria. MitoKATP activation by KCOs resulted in a decrease in superoxide anion production, suggesting that protection against mitochondrial oxidative stress may be a physiological role of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel in insects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural characterization of weakly attached cross-bridges in the A*M*ATP state in permeabilized rabbit psoas muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, S; Gu, J; Melvin, G; Yu, L C

    2002-01-01

    It is well established that in a skeletal muscle under relaxing conditions, cross-bridges exist in a mixture of four weak binding states in equilibrium (A*M*ATP, A*M*ADP*P(i), M*ATP, and M*ADP*P(i)). It has been shown that these four weak binding states are in the pathway to force generation. In the past their structural, biochemical, and mechanical properties have been characterized as a group. However, it was shown that the myosin heads in the M*ATP state exhibited a disordered distribution along the thick filament, while in the M*ADP*P(i) state they were well ordered. It follows that the structures of the weakly attached states of A*M*ATP and A*M*ADP*P(i) could well be different. Individual structures of the two attached states could not be assigned because protocol for isolating the two states has not been available until recently. In the present study, muscle fibers are reacted with N-phenylmaleimide such that ATP hydrolysis is inhibited, i.e., the cross-bridge population under relaxing conditions is distributed only between the two states of M*ATP and A*M*ATP. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction was applied to determine the structural characteristics of the attached A*M*ATP state. Because the detached state of M*ATP is disordered and does not contribute to layer line intensities, changes as a result of increasing attachment in the A*M*ATP state are attributable to that state alone. The equilibrium toward the attached state was achieved by lowering the ionic strength. The results show that upon attachment, both the myosin and the first actin associated layer lines increased intensities, while the sixth actin layer line was not significantly affected. However, the intensities remain weak despite substantial attachment. The results, together with modeling (see J. Gu, S. Xu and L. C. Yu, 2002, Biophys. J. 82:2123-2133), suggest that there is a wide range of orientation of the attached A*M*ATP cross-bridges while the myosin heads maintain some degree of helical

  3. ATP as a mediator of erythrocyte-dependent regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery in humans

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    In healthy human beings, blood flow to dynamically contracting skeletal muscle is regulated primarily to match oxygen (O2) delivery closely with utilisation. This occurs across a wide range of exercise intensities, as well as when exercise is combined with conditions that modify blood O2 content. The red blood cells (RBCs), the primary O2 carriers in the blood, contribute to the regulation of the local processes matching O2 supply and demand. This is made possible by the ability of RBCs to release the vasoactive substance adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in response to reductions in erythrocyte and plasma O2, as well as to other adjuvant metabolic and mechanical stimuli. The regulatory role of RBCs in human beings is supported by the observations that, i) exercising skeletal muscle blood flow responds primarily to changes in the amount of O2 bound to the erythrocyte haemoglobin molecules, rather than the amount of O2 in plasma, and ii) exercising muscle blood flow can almost double (from 260 to 460 ml min−1 100 g−1) with alterations in blood O2 content, such that O2 delivery and are kept constant. Besides falling blood O2 content, RBCs release ATP when exposed to increased temperature, reduced pH, hypercapnia, elevated shear stress and augmented mechanical deformation, i.e. conditions that exist in the microcirculation of active skeletal muscle. ATP is an attractive mediator signal for skeletal muscle blood flow regulation, not only because it can act as a potent vasodilator, but also because of its sympatholytic properties in the human limb circulations. These properties are essential to counteract the vasoconstrictor effects of concurrent increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and circulating vasoconstrictor substances during exercise. Comparison of the relative vasoactive potencies and sympatholytic properties of ATP, other nucleotides, and adenosine in human limbs, suggests that intravascular ATP exerts its vasodilator and sympatholytic effects directly

  4. Protease-activated receptors modulate excitability of murine colonic smooth muscles by differential effects on interstitial cells

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Tae Sik; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lu, Hongli; Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by proteolytic cleavage at their amino termini by serine proteases. PAR activation contributes to the inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and alters GI motility, but little is known about the specific cells within the tunica muscularis that express PARs and the mechanisms leading to contractile responses. Using real time PCR, we found PARs to be expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α positive (PDGFRα+) cells. The latter cell-type showed dominant expression of F2r (encodes PAR1) and F2rl1 (encodes PAR2). Contractile and intracellular electrical activities were measured to characterize the integrated responses to PAR activation in whole muscles. Cells were isolated and ICC and PDGFRα+ cells were identified by constitutive expression of fluorescent reporters. Thrombin (PAR1 agonist) and trypsin (PAR2 agonist) caused biphasic responses in colonic muscles: transient hyperpolarization and relaxation followed by repolarization and excitation. The inhibitory phase was blocked by apamin, revealing a distinct excitatory component. Patch clamp studies showed that the inhibitory response was mediated by activation of small conductance calcium-activated K+ channels in PDGFRα+ cells, and the excitatory response was mediated by activation of a Cl− conductance in ICC. SMCs contributed little to PAR responses in colonic muscles. In summary, PARs regulate the excitability of colonic muscles; different conductances are activated in each cell type of the SMC–ICC–PDGFRα+ cell (SIP) syncytium. Motor responses to PAR agonists are integrated responses of the SIP syncytium. Key points Activation of protease-activated receptors (PAR) regulates gastrointestinal (GI) motility but little is known about the cells and mechanisms in GI muscles responsible for PAR responses. Using mouse cells, we

  5. The Relay/Converter Interface Influences Hydrolysis of ATP by Skeletal Muscle Myosin II.

    PubMed

    Bloemink, Marieke J; Melkani, Girish C; Bernstein, Sanford I; Geeves, Michael A

    2016-01-22

    The interface between relay and converter domain of muscle myosin is critical for optimal myosin performance. Using Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle S1, we performed a kinetic analysis of the effect of mutations in the converter and relay domain. Introduction of a mutation (R759E) in the converter domain inhibits the steady-state ATPase of myosin S1, whereas an additional mutation in the relay domain (N509K) is able to restore the ATPase toward wild-type values. The R759E S1 construct showed little effect on most steps of the actomyosin ATPase cycle. The exception was a 25-30% reduction in the rate constant of the hydrolysis step, the step coupled to the cross-bridge recovery stroke that involves a change in conformation at the relay/converter domain interface. Significantly, the double mutant restored the hydrolysis step to values similar to the wild-type myosin. Modeling the relay/converter interface suggests a possible interaction between converter residue 759 and relay residue 509 in the actin-detached conformation, which is lost in R759E but is restored in N509K/R759E. This detailed kinetic analysis of Drosophila myosin carrying the R759E mutation shows that the interface between the relay loop and converter domain is important for fine-tuning myosin kinetics, in particular ATP binding and hydrolysis.

  6. ATP-sensitive muscle afferents activate spinal trigeminal neurons with meningeal afferent input in rat - pathophysiological implications for tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Nöbel, Moritz; Feistel, Stephan; Ellrich, Jens; Messlinger, Karl

    2016-12-01

    Tension-type headache and other primary headaches may be triggered or aggravated by disorders of pericranial muscles, which is possibly due to convergent or collateral afferent input from meningeal and muscular receptive areas. In rodent models high extracellular concentrations of ATP caused muscle nociception and central sensitization of second order neurons. In a rat model of meningeal nociception we asked if spinal trigeminal activity induced by ATP can be modulated by local anaesthesia of distinct muscles. Ongoing activity was recorded from spinal trigeminal neurons with afferent input from the cranial dura mater, the temporal muscle and neck muscles. The stable ATP analogue α,β-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (α,β-meATP, 10 mM) was injected into the ipsilateral temporal muscle, 30 min later followed by injection of local anaesthetics (lidocaine, 2 %) into the ipsilateral neck muscles and/or the temporal muscle. Injection of α,β-meATP into the temporal muscle caused progressive increase in ongoing activity of most of the spinal trigeminal neurons within 30 min. Injection of lidocaine into the neck muscles and/or the temporal muscle reduced this activation to previous levels within 10 min. Distinct spinal trigeminal neurons processing meningeal nociceptive information are under the control of convergent afferent input from several pericranial muscles. Blockade of at least one of these inputs can normalize central trigeminal activity. This may explain why therapeutic manipulations of head muscles can be beneficial in primary headaches.

  7. Unexpected Role of the Copper Transporter ATP7A in PDGF-Induced Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ashino, Takashi; Sudhahar, Varadarajan; Urao, Norifumi; Oshikawa, Jin; Chen, Gin-Fu; Wang, Huan; Huo, Yuqing; Finney, Lydia; Vogt, Stefan; McKinney, Ronald D.; Maryon, Edward B.; Kaplan, Jack H.; Ushio-Fukai, Masuko; Fukai, Tohru

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Copper, an essential nutrient, has been implicated in vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis with unknown mechanism. Bioavailability of intracellular copper is regulated not only by the copper importer CTR1, but also by the copper exporter ATP7A (Menke ATPase) whose function is achieved through copper-dependent translocation from trans-Golgi network (TGN). Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) promotes vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key component of neointimal formation. Objective To determine the role of copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Methods and Results Depletion of ATP7A inhibited VSMC migration in response to PDGF or wound scratch in a CTR1/copper-dependent manner. PDGF stimulation promoted ATP7A translocation from the TGN to lipid rafts which localized at the leading edge, where it colocalized with PDGF receptor and Rac1, in migrating VSMCs. Mechanistically, ATP7A siRNA or CTR siRNA prevented PDGF-induced Rac1 translocation to the leading edge, thereby inhibiting lamellipodia formation. In addition, ATP7A depletion prevented a PDGF-induced decrease in copper level and secretory copper enzyme precursor pro-lysyl oxidase (Pro-LOX) in lipid raft fraction as well as PDGF-induced increase in LOX activity. In vivo, ATP7A expression was markedly increased and copper accumulation was observed by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy at neointimal VSMCs in wire injury model. Conclusions These findings suggest that ATP7A plays an important role in copper-dependent PDGF-stimulated VSMC migration via recruiting Rac1 to lipid rafts at the leading edge as well as regulating LOX activity. This may contribute to neointimal formation after vascular injury. Our findings provide insight into ATP7A as a novel therapeutic target for vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis. PMID:20671235

  8. Slow myosin ATP turnover in the super-relaxed state in tarantula muscle.

    PubMed

    Naber, Nariman; Cooke, Roger; Pate, Edward

    2011-09-02

    We measured the nucleotide turnover rate of myosin in tarantula leg muscle fibers by observing single turnovers of the fluorescent nucleotide analog 2'-/3'-O-(N'-methylanthraniloyl)adenosine-5'-O-triphosphate, as monitored by the decrease in fluorescence when 2'-/3'-O-(N'-methylanthraniloyl)adenosine-5'-O-triphosphate (mantATP) is replaced by ATP in a chase experiment. We find a multiexponential process with approximately two-thirds of the myosin showing a very slow nucleotide turnover time constant (∼30 min). This slow-turnover state is termed the super-relaxed state (SRX). If fibers are incubated in 2'-/3'-O-(N'-methylanthraniloyl)adenosine-5'-O-diphosphate and chased with ADP, the SRX is not seen, indicating that trinucleotide-relaxed myosins are responsible for the SRX. Phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain eliminates the fraction of myosin with a very long lifetime. The data imply that the very long-lived SRX in tarantula fibers is a highly novel adaptation for energy conservation in an animal that spends extremely long periods of time in a quiescent state employing a lie-in-wait hunting strategy. The presence of the SRX measured here correlates well with the binding of myosin heads to the core of the thick filament in a structure known as the "interacting-heads motif," observed previously by electron microscopy. Both the structural array and the long-lived SRX require relaxed filaments or relaxed fibers, both are lost upon myosin phosphorylation, and both appear to be more stable in tarantula than in vertebrate skeletal or vertebrate cardiac preparations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. P2X1 receptors localized in lipid rafts mediate ATP motor responses in the human vas deferens longitudinal muscles.

    PubMed

    Donoso, María Verónica; Norambuena, Andrés; Navarrete, Camilo; Poblete, Inés; Velasco, Alfredo; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2014-02-01

    To assess the role of the P2X1 receptors (P2X1R) in the longitudinal and circular layers of the human vas deferens, ex vivo-isolated strips or rings were prepared from tissue biopsies to record isometric contractions. To ascertain its membrane distribution, tissue extracts were analyzed by immunoblotting following sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. ATP, alpha,beta-methylene ATP, or electrical field stimulation elicited robust contractions of the longitudinal layer but not of the circular layer which demonstrated inconsistent responses. Alpha,beta-methylene ATP generated stronger and more robust contractions than ATP. In parallel, prostatic segments of the rat vas deferens were examined. The motor responses in both species were not sustained but decayed within the first minute, showing desensitization to additional applications. Cross-desensitization was established between alpha,beta-methylene ATP or ATP-evoked contractions and electrical field stimulation-induced contractions. Full recovery of the desensitized motor responses required more than 30 min and showed a similar pattern in human and rat tissues. Immunoblot analysis of the human vas deferens extracts revealed a P2X1R oligomer of approximately 200 kDa under nonreducing conditions, whereas dithiothreitol-treated extracts showed a single band of approximately 70 kDa. The P2X1R was identified in ultracentrifugation fractions containing 15%-29% sucrose; the receptor localized in the same fractions as flotillin-1, indicating that it regionalized into smooth muscle lipid rafts. In conclusion, ATP plays a key role in human vas deferens contractile responses of the longitudinal smooth muscle layer, an effect mediated through P2X1Rs.

  10. Lack of myostatin impairs mechanical performance and ATP cost of contraction in exercising mouse gastrocnemius muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Giannesini, Benoît; Vilmen, Christophe; Amthor, Helge; Bernard, Monique; Bendahan, David

    2013-07-01

    Although it is well established that the lack of myostatin (Mstn) promotes skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the corresponding changes regarding force generation have been studied mainly in vitro and remain conflicting. Furthermore, the metabolic underpinnings of these changes are very poorly documented. To clarify this issue, we have investigated strictly noninvasively in vivo the impact of the lack of Mstn on gastrocnemius muscle function and energetics in Mstn-targeted knockout (Mstn-/-) mice using ¹H-magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and ³¹P-MR spectroscopy during maximal repeated isometric contractions induced by transcutaneous electrostimulation. In Mstn-/- animals, although body weight, gastrocnemius muscle volume, and absolute force were larger (+38, +118, and +34%, respectively) compared with wild-type (Mstn+/+) mice, specific force (calculated from MR imaging measurements) was significantly lower (-36%), and resistance to fatigue was decreased. Besides, Mstn deficiency did not affect phosphorylated compound concentrations and intracellular pH at rest but caused a large increase in ATP cost of contraction (up to +206% compared with Mstn+/+) throughout the stimulation period. Further, Mstn deficiency limits the shift toward oxidative metabolism during muscle activity despite the fact that oxidative ATP synthesis capacity was not altered. Our data demonstrate in vivo that the absence of Mstn impairs both mechanical performance and energy cost of contraction in hypertrophic muscle. These findings must be kept in mind when considering Mstn as a potential therapeutic target for increasing muscle mass in patients suffering from muscle-wasting disorders.

  11. Activation of the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in skeletal muscle of cachectic rats bearing a hepatoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracos, V. E.; DeVivo, C.; Hoyle, D. H.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Rats implanted with Yoshida ascites hepatoma (YAH) show a rapid and selective loss of muscle protein due mainly to a marked increase (63-95%) in the rate of protein degradation (compared with rates in muscles of pair-fed controls). To define which proteolytic pathways contribute to this increase, epitrochlearis muscles from YAH-bearing and control rats were incubated under conditions that modify different proteolytic systems. Overall proteolysis in either group of rats was not affected by removal of Ca2+ or by blocking the Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic system. Inhibition of lysosomal function with methylamine reduced proteolysis (-12%) in muscles from YAH-bearing rats, but not in muscles of pair-fed rats. When ATP production was also inhibited, the remaining accelerated proteolysis in muscles of tumor-bearing rats fell to control levels. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins and a 27-kDa proteasome subunit in Western blot analysis. Levels of mRNA encoding components of proteolytic systems were quantitated using Northern hybridization analysis. Although their total RNA content decreased 20-38%, pale muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin mRNA (590-880%) and mRNA for multiple subunits of the proteasome (100-215%). Liver, kidney, heart, and brain showed no weight loss and no change in these mRNA species. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats also showed small increases (30-40%) in mRNA for cathepsins B and D, but not for calpain I or heat shock protein 70. Our findings suggest that accelerated muscle proteolysis and muscle wasting in tumor-bearing rats result primarily from activation of the ATP-dependent pathway involving ubiquitin and the proteasome.

  12. Activation of the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in skeletal muscle of cachectic rats bearing a hepatoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baracos, V. E.; DeVivo, C.; Hoyle, D. H.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Rats implanted with Yoshida ascites hepatoma (YAH) show a rapid and selective loss of muscle protein due mainly to a marked increase (63-95%) in the rate of protein degradation (compared with rates in muscles of pair-fed controls). To define which proteolytic pathways contribute to this increase, epitrochlearis muscles from YAH-bearing and control rats were incubated under conditions that modify different proteolytic systems. Overall proteolysis in either group of rats was not affected by removal of Ca2+ or by blocking the Ca(2+)-dependent proteolytic system. Inhibition of lysosomal function with methylamine reduced proteolysis (-12%) in muscles from YAH-bearing rats, but not in muscles of pair-fed rats. When ATP production was also inhibited, the remaining accelerated proteolysis in muscles of tumor-bearing rats fell to control levels. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin-conjugated proteins and a 27-kDa proteasome subunit in Western blot analysis. Levels of mRNA encoding components of proteolytic systems were quantitated using Northern hybridization analysis. Although their total RNA content decreased 20-38%, pale muscles of YAH-bearing rats showed increased levels of ubiquitin mRNA (590-880%) and mRNA for multiple subunits of the proteasome (100-215%). Liver, kidney, heart, and brain showed no weight loss and no change in these mRNA species. Muscles of YAH-bearing rats also showed small increases (30-40%) in mRNA for cathepsins B and D, but not for calpain I or heat shock protein 70. Our findings suggest that accelerated muscle proteolysis and muscle wasting in tumor-bearing rats result primarily from activation of the ATP-dependent pathway involving ubiquitin and the proteasome.

  13. Two weeks of muscle immobilization impairs functional sympatholysis but increases exercise hyperemia and the vasodilatory responsiveness to infused ATP.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, S P; Mørkeberg, J; Thaning, P; Hellsten, Y; Saltin, B

    2012-05-15

    During exercise, contracting muscles can override sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity (functional sympatholysis). ATP and adenosine have been proposed to play a role in skeletal muscle blood flow regulation. However, little is known about the role of muscle training status on functional sympatholysis and ATP- and adenosine-induced vasodilation. Eight male subjects (22 ± 2 yr, Vo(2max): 49 ± 2 ml O(2)·min(-1)·kg(-1)) were studied before and after 5 wk of one-legged knee-extensor training (3-4 times/wk) and 2 wk of immobilization of the other leg. Leg hemodynamics were measured at rest, during exercise (24 ± 4 watts), and during arterial ATP (0.94 ± 0.03 μmol/min) and adenosine (5.61 ± 0.03 μmol/min) infusion with and without coinfusion of tyramine (11.11 μmol/min). During exercise, leg blood flow (LBF) was lower in the trained leg (2.5 ± 0.1 l/min) compared with the control leg (2.6 ± 0.2 l/min; P < 0.05), and it was higher in the immobilized leg (2.9 ± 0.2 l/min; P < 0.05). Tyramine infusion lowers LBF similarly at rest, but, when tyramine was infused during exercise, LBF was blunted in the immobilized leg (2.5 ± 0.2 l/min; P < 0.05), whereas it was unchanged in the control and trained leg. Mean arterial pressure was lower during exercise with the trained leg compared with the immobilized leg (P < 0.05), and leg vascular conductance was similar. During ATP infusion, the LBF response was higher after immobilization (3.9 ± 0.3 and 4.5 ± 0.6 l/min in the control and immobilized leg, respectively; P < 0.05), whereas it did not change after training. When tyramine was coinfused with ATP, LBF was reduced in the immobilized leg (P < 0.05) but remained similar in the control and trained leg. Training increased skeletal muscle P2Y2 receptor content (P < 0.05), whereas it did not change with immobilization. These results suggest that muscle inactivity impairs functional sympatholysis and that the magnitude of hyperemia and blood pressure response to exercise

  14. ATP utilization for calcium uptake and force production in skinned muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed Central

    Stienen, G J; Zaremba, R; Elzinga, G

    1995-01-01

    1. A method has been developed to discriminate between the rate of ATP hydrolysis associated with calcium uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and force development of the contractile apparatus in mechanically or saponin-skinned skeletal muscle fibres. The rate of ATP hydrolysis was determined in fibres of different types from the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis by enzymatic coupling of ATP re-synthesis to the oxidation of NADH. 2. The ATPase activity was determined before and after exposure of the preparations for 30 min to a solution containing 0.5% Triton X-100, which effectively abolishes the SR ATPase activity. The fibres were activated in a solution containing 5 mM caffeine to ensure that calcium uptake into the SR was maximal. 3. At saturating Ca2+ concentrations the actomyosin (AM) and SR ATPase activities in fast-twitch fibres, at 4.3 degrees C, amounted to 1.52 +/- 0.07 and 0.58 +/- 0.10 mumol s-1 (g dry wt)-1, respectively (means +/- S.E.M.; n = 25). The SR ATPase activity was 25% of the total ATPase activity. At submaximal calcium concentrations the AM ATPase activity varied in proportion to the isometric force. 4. The calcium sensitivity of the SR ATPase was larger than that of the AM ATPase and its dependence on [Ca2+] was less steep. The AM ATPase activity was half-maximal at a pCa of 6.11 (pCa = -log [Ca2+]) whereas the SR ATPase activity was half-maximal at a pCa of 6.62. 5. In Triton X-100-treated fibres, at different 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM) concentrations, the AM ATPase activity and isometric force varied proportionally. The SR ATPase activity determined by extrapolation of the total ATPase activity in mechanically skinned or saponin-treated fibres to zero force, was independent of the BDM concentration in the range studied (0-20 mM). The values obtained for the SR ATPase activity in this way were similar to those obtained with Triton X-100 treatment. 6. The AM ATPase activity in slow-twitch fibres amounted to 0.74 +/- 0

  15. Modeling the effects of hypoxia on ATP turnover in exercising muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, P. G.; Hogan, M. C.; Bebout, D. E.; Wagner, P. D.; Hochachka, P. W.

    1992-01-01

    Most models of metabolic control concentrate on the regulation of ATP production and largely ignore the regulation of ATP demand. We describe a model, based on the results of Hogan et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 73: 728-736, 1992), that incorporates the effects of ATP demand. The model is developed from the premise that a unique set of intracellular conditions can be measured at each level of ATP turnover and that this relationship is best described by energetic state. Current concepts suggest that cells are capable of maintaining oxygen consumption in the face of declines in the concentration of oxygen through compensatory changes in cellular metabolites. We show that these compensatory changes can cause significant declines in ATP demand and result in a decline in oxygen consumption and ATP turnover. Furthermore we find that hypoxia does not directly affect the rate of anaerobic ATP synthesis and associated lactate production. Rather, lactate production appears to be related to energetic state, whatever the PO2. The model is used to describe the interaction between ATP demand and ATP supply in determining final ATP turnover.

  16. Modeling the effects of hypoxia on ATP turnover in exercising muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arthur, P. G.; Hogan, M. C.; Bebout, D. E.; Wagner, P. D.; Hochachka, P. W.

    1992-01-01

    Most models of metabolic control concentrate on the regulation of ATP production and largely ignore the regulation of ATP demand. We describe a model, based on the results of Hogan et al. (J. Appl. Physiol. 73: 728-736, 1992), that incorporates the effects of ATP demand. The model is developed from the premise that a unique set of intracellular conditions can be measured at each level of ATP turnover and that this relationship is best described by energetic state. Current concepts suggest that cells are capable of maintaining oxygen consumption in the face of declines in the concentration of oxygen through compensatory changes in cellular metabolites. We show that these compensatory changes can cause significant declines in ATP demand and result in a decline in oxygen consumption and ATP turnover. Furthermore we find that hypoxia does not directly affect the rate of anaerobic ATP synthesis and associated lactate production. Rather, lactate production appears to be related to energetic state, whatever the PO2. The model is used to describe the interaction between ATP demand and ATP supply in determining final ATP turnover.

  17. Coupled gating of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors is modulated by Ca2+, Mg2+, and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Maura; Diaz-Sylvester, Paula L.; Neumann, Jake T.; Escobar, Ariel L.; Fleischer, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Coupled gating (synchronous openings and closures) of groups of skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors (RyR1), which mimics RyR1-mediated Ca2+ release underlying Ca2+ sparks, was first described by Marx et al. (Marx SO, Ondrias K, Marks AR. Science 281: 818–821, 1998). The nature of the RyR1-RyR1 interactions for coupled gating still needs to be characterized. Consequently, we defined planar lipid bilayer conditions where ∼25% of multichannel reconstitutions contain mixtures of coupled and independently gating RyR1. In ∼10% of the cases, all RyRs (2–10 channels; most frequently 3–4) gated in coupled fashion, allowing for quantification. Our results indicated that coupling required cytosolic solutions containing ATP/Mg2+ and high (50 mM) luminal Ca2+ (Calum) or Sr2+ solutions. Bursts of coupled activity (events) started and ended abruptly, with all channels activating/deactivating within ∼300 μs. Coupled RyR1 were heterogeneous, where highly active RyR1 (“drivers”) seemed open during the entire coupled event (Po = 1), while other RyR1s (“followers”) displayed abundant flickering and smaller amplitude. Drivers mean open time increased with cytosolic Ca2+ (Cacyt) or caffeine, whereas followers flicker frequency was Cacyt independent and more sensitive to inhibition by cytosolic Mg2+. Coupled events were insensitive to varying lumen-to-cytosol Ca2+ fluxes from ∼1 to 8 pA, which does not corroborate coupling of neighboring RyR1 by local Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. However, coupling requires specific Calum sites, as it was lost when Calum was replaced by luminal Ba2+ or Mg2+. In summary, coupled events reveal complex interactions among heterogeneous RyR1, differentially modulated by cytosolic ATP/Mg2+, Cacyt, and Calum, which under cell-like ionic conditions may parallel synchronous RyR1 gating during Ca2+ sparks. PMID:22785120

  18. The ultrastructure of the muscle coat of human gastro-oesophageal junction, with special reference to "interstitial cells of Cajal".

    PubMed

    Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria-Simonetta; Cortesini, Camillo; Romagnoli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The muscle coat of the human lower oesophageal sphincter and stomach was studied 5 cm above and 4 cm below the gastro-oesophageal junction. Four subjects were operated on for motility disorders of the esophagus, two for a hypertensive lower oesophageal sphincter and two for an epiphrenic diverticulum; six subjects were operated on for oesophageal or gastric carcinomas. Specimens were fixed in phosphate-buffered OsO4, embedded in Epon, contrasted with uranyl acetate and lead citrate and observed under a Siemens Elmiskop Ia electron microscope. Both the oesophageal and gastric muscle cells, which showed features typical of this cell type, were innervated by multiple varicosities that were rich in synaptic vesicles; these varicosities were generally rarely encountered at distances less than 1000 Å from muscle cells. Only a very few, close neuromuscular junctions were detected. Special cells, which correspond to the "interstitial cells of Cajal" as reported by other authors, were discerned at the periphery of muscle cell bundles. These cells were characterized by an elongated cell body with many thin branches and an oval, sometimes indented nucleus. Some pinocytotic vesicles were located at the cell periphery. These cells were surrounded by a discontinuous basal lamina and were seen in close contact with each other and with muscle cells; the close contact areas were often very wide. The cytoplasm contained variable amounts of mitochondria, a well-developed smooth endoplasmic reticulum and a Golgi complex. As a characteristic feature, bundles of thin filaments were located at the cell periphery and were attached to electron-dense areas of the cell membrane. Morphologically, these filaments resembled myofilaments; they were present in variable amounts and were sometimes very numerous. The observation that the cytoplasmic organelles and filaments varied in number, is probably related to the different functional properties of these cells. Interstitial cells were richly

  19. Direct and indirect innervation of smooth muscle cells of rat stomach, with special reference to the interstitial cells of Cajal.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Retsu; Komuro, Terumasa

    2002-08-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal in the circular (ICC-CM) and longitudinal (ICC-LM) muscle layer of the rat gastric antrum and their innervation were studied ultrastructurally. Both ICC-CM and ICC-LM are characterized by many mitochondria, rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum, caveolae, and formation of gap junctions with each other and with muscle cells, though ICC-LM tend to show more variable cytoplasmic features depending on section profiles. Close contacts between nerve terminals and both ICC-CM and ICC-LM are observed. These possible synaptic structures are characterized by: (1) accumulation of synaptic vesicles in nerve varicosities, (2) a narrow gap (about 20 nm) between pre- and postjunctional membranes, (3) lack of a basal lamina between pre- and postjunctional membranes, and (4) the presence of an electron-dense lining on the inner aspect of prejunctional membranes. Almost the same characteristics are observed between the nerve terminals and the muscle cells of both circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the same specimens. Therefore, we conclude that the smooth muscle cells of both circular and longitudinal layers of the rat antrum are directly and indirectly innervated via ICC. Their functional significance is discussed.

  20. Insulin fails to enhance mTOR phosphorylation, mitochondrial protein synthesis, and ATP production in human skeletal muscle without amino acid replacement.

    PubMed

    Barazzoni, Rocco; Short, Kevin R; Asmann, Yan; Coenen-Schimke, Jill M; Robinson, Matthew M; Nair, K Sreekumaran

    2012-11-01

    Systemic insulin administration causes hypoaminoacidemia by inhibiting protein degradation, which may in turn inhibit muscle protein synthesis (PS). Insulin enhances muscle mitochondrial PS and ATP production when hypoaminoacidemia is prevented by exogenous amino acid (AA) replacement. We determined whether insulin would stimulate mitochondrial PS and ATP production in the absence of AA replacement. Using l-[1,2-¹³C]leucine as a tracer, we measured the fractional synthetic rate of mitochondrial as well as sarcoplasmic and mixed muscle proteins in 18 participants during sustained (7-h) insulin or saline infusion (n = 9 each). We also measured muscle ATP production, mitochondrial enzyme activities, mRNA levels of mitochondrial genes, and phosphorylation of signaling proteins regulating protein synthesis. The concentration of circulating essential AA decreased during insulin infusion. Mitochondrial, sarcoplasmic, and mixed muscle PS rates were also lower during insulin (2-7 h) than during saline infusions despite increased mRNA levels of selected mitochondrial genes. Under these conditions, insulin did not alter mitochondrial enzyme activities and ATP production. These effects were associated with enhanced phosphorylation of Akt but not of protein synthesis activators mTOR, p70(S6K), and 4EBP1. In conclusion, sustained physiological hyperinsulinemia without AA replacement did not stimulate PS of mixed muscle or protein subfractions and did not alter muscle mitochondrial ATP production in healthy humans. These results support that insulin and AA act in conjunction to stimulate muscle mitochondrial function and mitochondrial protein synthesis.

  1. Na+-K+ pumps in the transverse tubular system of skeletal muscle fibers preferentially use ATP from glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Dutka, T L; Lamb, G D

    2007-09-01

    The Na(+)-K(+) pumps in the transverse tubular (T) system of a muscle fiber play a vital role keeping K(+) concentration in the T-system sufficiently low during activity to prevent chronic depolarization and consequent loss of excitability. These Na(+)-K(+) pumps are located in the triad junction, the key transduction zone controlling excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, a region rich in glycolytic enzymes and likely having high localized ATP usage and limited substrate diffusion. This study examined whether Na(+)-K(+) pump function is dependent on ATP derived via the glycolytic pathway locally within the triad region. Single fibers from rat fast-twitch muscle were mechanically skinned, sealing off the T-system but retaining normal EC coupling. Intracellular composition was set by the bathing solution and action potentials (APs) triggered in the T-system, eliciting intracellular Ca(2+) release and twitch and tetanic force responses. Conditions were selected such that increased Na(+)-K(+) pump function could be detected from the consequent increase in T-system polarization and resultant faster rate of AP repriming. Na(+)-K(+) pump function was not adequately supported by maintaining cytoplasmic ATP concentration at its normal resting level ( approximately 8 mM), even with 10 or 40 mM creatine phosphate present. Addition of as little as 1 mM phospho(enol)pyruvate resulted in a marked increase in Na(+)-K(+) pump function, supported by endogenous pyruvate kinase bound within the triad. These results demonstrate that the triad junction is a highly restricted microenvironment, where glycolytic resynthesis of ATP is critical to meet the high demand of the Na(+)-K(+) pump and maintain muscle excitability.

  2. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  3. Electrical stimulation induces IL-6 in skeletal muscle through extracellular ATP by activating Ca(2+) signals and an IL-6 autocrine loop.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Mario; Fernández-Verdejo, Rodrigo; Jaimovich, Enrique; Buvinic, Sonja

    2014-04-15

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important myokine that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle cells upon exercise. We assessed IL-6 expression in response to electrical stimulation (ES) or extracellular ATP as a known mediator of the excitation-transcription mechanism in skeletal muscle. We examined whether the canonical signaling cascade downstream of IL-6 (IL-6/JAK2/STAT3) also responds to muscle cell excitation, concluding that IL-6 influences its own expression through a positive loop. Either ES or exogenous ATP (100 μM) increased both IL-6 expression and p-STAT3 levels in rat myotubes, a process inhibited by 100 μM suramin and 2 U/ml apyrase. ATP also evoked IL-6 expression in both isolated skeletal fibers and extracts derived from whole FDB muscles. ATP increased IL-6 release up to 10-fold. STAT3 activation evoked by ATP was abolished by the JAK2 inhibitor HBC. Blockade of secreted IL-6 with a neutralizing antibody or preincubation with the STAT3 inhibitor VIII reduced STAT3 activation evoked by extracellular ATP by 70%. Inhibitor VIII also reduced by 70% IL-6 expression evoked by ATP, suggesting a positive IL-6 loop. In addition, ATP increased up to 60% the protein levels of SOCS3, a negative regulator of the IL-6 signaling pathway. On the other hand, intracellular calcium chelation or blockade of IP3-dependent calcium signals abolished STAT3 phosphorylation evoked by either extracellular ATP or ES. These results suggest that expression of IL-6 in stimulated skeletal muscle cells is mediated by extracellular ATP and nucleotide receptors, involving IP3-dependent calcium signals as an early step that triggers a positive IL-6 autocrine loop.

  4. Electrical stimulation induces IL-6 in skeletal muscle through extracellular ATP by activating Ca2+ signals and an IL-6 autocrine loop

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Mario; Fernández-Verdejo, Rodrigo; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an important myokine that is highly expressed in skeletal muscle cells upon exercise. We assessed IL-6 expression in response to electrical stimulation (ES) or extracellular ATP as a known mediator of the excitation-transcription mechanism in skeletal muscle. We examined whether the canonical signaling cascade downstream of IL-6 (IL-6/JAK2/STAT3) also responds to muscle cell excitation, concluding that IL-6 influences its own expression through a positive loop. Either ES or exogenous ATP (100 μM) increased both IL-6 expression and p-STAT3 levels in rat myotubes, a process inhibited by 100 μM suramin and 2 U/ml apyrase. ATP also evoked IL-6 expression in both isolated skeletal fibers and extracts derived from whole FDB muscles. ATP increased IL-6 release up to 10-fold. STAT3 activation evoked by ATP was abolished by the JAK2 inhibitor HBC. Blockade of secreted IL-6 with a neutralizing antibody or preincubation with the STAT3 inhibitor VIII reduced STAT3 activation evoked by extracellular ATP by 70%. Inhibitor VIII also reduced by 70% IL-6 expression evoked by ATP, suggesting a positive IL-6 loop. In addition, ATP increased up to 60% the protein levels of SOCS3, a negative regulator of the IL-6 signaling pathway. On the other hand, intracellular calcium chelation or blockade of IP3-dependent calcium signals abolished STAT3 phosphorylation evoked by either extracellular ATP or ES. These results suggest that expression of IL-6 in stimulated skeletal muscle cells is mediated by extracellular ATP and nucleotide receptors, involving IP3-dependent calcium signals as an early step that triggers a positive IL-6 autocrine loop. PMID:24518675

  5. An ATP-gated cation channel with some P2Z-like characteristics in gastric smooth muscle cells of toad.

    PubMed

    Ugur, M; Drummond, R M; Zou, H; Sheng, P; Singer, J J; Walsh, J V

    1997-01-15

    1. Whole-cell and single-channel currents elicited by extracellular ATP were studied in freshly dissociated smooth muscle cells from the stomach of the toad Bufo marinus using standard patch clamp and microfluorimetric techniques. 2. This ATP-gated cation channel shares a number of pharmacological and functional properties with native rat myometrium receptors, certain native P2Z purinoceptors and the recently cloned P2X7 purinoceptor. But, unlike the last two, the ATP-gated channel does not mediate the formation of large non-specific pores. Thus, it may represent a novel member of the P2X or P2Z class. 3. Extracellular application of ATP (> or = 150 microM) elicited an inward whole-cell current at negative holding potentials that was inwardly rectifying and showed no sign of desensitization. Na+, Cs+ and, to a lesser degree, the organic cation choline served as charge carriers, but Cl- did not. Ratiometric fura-2 measurements indicated that the current is carried in part by Ca2+. The EC50 for ATP was 700 microM in solutions with a low divalent cation concentration. 4. ATP (> or = 100 microM) at the extracellular surface of cell-attached or excised patches elicited inwardly rectifying single-channel currents with a 22 pS conductance. Cl- did not serve as a charge carrier but both Na+ and Cs+ did, as did choline to a lesser extent. The mean open time of the channel was quite long, with a range in hundreds of milliseconds at a holding potential of -70 mV. 5. Mg2+ and Ca2+ decreased the magnitude of the ATP-induced whole-cell currents. Mg2+ decreased both the amplitude and the activity of ATP-activated single-channel currents. 6. ADP, UTP, P1, P5-di-adenosine pentaphosphate (AP5A), adenosine and alpha, beta-methylene ATP (alpha, beta-Me-ATP) did not induce significant whole-cell current. ATP-gamma-S and 2-methylthio ATP (2-Me-S-ATP) were significantly less effective than ATP in inducing whole-cell currents, whereas benzoylbenzoyl ATP (BzATP) was more effective. BzATP

  6. The integrin-adhesome is required to maintain muscle structure, mitochondrial ATP production, and movement forces in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Etheridge, Timothy; Rahman, Mizanur; Gaffney, Christopher J; Shaw, Debra; Shephard, Freya; Magudia, Jignesh; Solomon, Deepak E; Milne, Thomas; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Greenhaff, Paul L; Vanapalli, Siva A; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J

    2015-04-01

    The integrin-adhesome network, which contains >150 proteins, is mechano-transducing and located at discreet positions along the cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interface. A small subset of the integrin-adhesome is known to maintain normal muscle morphology. However, the importance of the entire adhesome for muscle structure and function is unknown. We used RNA interference to knock down 113 putative Caenorhabditis elegans homologs constituting most of the mammalian adhesome and 48 proteins known to localize to attachment sites in C. elegans muscle. In both cases, we found >90% of components were required for normal muscle mitochondrial structure and/or proteostasis vs. empty vector controls. Approximately half of these, mainly proteins that physically interact with each other, were also required for normal sarcomere and/or adhesome structure. Next we confirmed that the dystrophy observed in adhesome mutants associates with impaired maximal mitochondrial ATP production (P < 0.01), as well as reduced probability distribution of muscle movement forces compared with wild-type animals. Our results show that the integrin-adhesome network as a whole is required for maintaining both muscle structure and function and extend the current understanding of the full complexities of the functional adhesome in vivo. © The Author(s).

  7. Perturbed equilibria of myosin binding in airway smooth muscle: bond-length distributions, mechanics, and ATP metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Mijailovich, S M; Butler, J P; Fredberg, J J

    2000-01-01

    We carried out a detailed mathematical analysis of the effects of length fluctuations on the dynamically evolving cross-bridge distributions, simulating those that occur in airway smooth muscle during breathing. We used the latch regulation scheme of Hai and Murphy (Am. J. Physiol. Cell Physiol. 255:C86-C94, 1988) integrated with Huxley's sliding filament theory of muscle contraction. This analysis showed that imposed length fluctuations decrease the mean number of attached bridges, depress muscle force and stiffness, and increase force-length hysteresis. At frequencies >0.1 Hz, the bond-length distribution of slowly cycling latch bridges changed little over the stretch cycle and contributed almost elastically to muscle force, but the rapidly cycling cross-bridge distribution changed substantially and dominated the hysteresis. By contrast, at frequencies <0.033 Hz this behavior was reversed: the rapid cycling cross-bridge distribution changed little, effectively functioning as a constant force generator, while the latch bridge bond distribution changed substantially and dominated the stiffness and hysteresis. The analysis showed the dissociation of force/length hysteresis and cross-bridge cycling rates when strain amplitude exceeds 3%; that is, there is only a weak coupling between net external mechanical work and the ATP consumption required for cycling cross-bridges during the oscillatory steady state. Although these results are specific to airway smooth muscle, the approach generalizes to other smooth muscles subjected to cyclic length fluctuations. PMID:11053139

  8. Electrical stimuli are anti-apoptotic in skeletal muscle via extracellular ATP. Alteration of this signal in Mdx mice is a likely cause of dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies.

  9. Electrical Stimuli Are Anti-Apoptotic in Skeletal Muscle via Extracellular ATP. Alteration of This Signal in Mdx Mice Is a Likely Cause of Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies. PMID:24282497

  10. High-intensity interval training increases in vivo oxidative capacity with no effect on Pi→ATP rate in resting human muscle

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Ryan G.; Befroy, Douglas E.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial ATP production is vital for meeting cellular energy demand at rest and during periods of high ATP turnover. We hypothesized that high-intensity interval training (HIT) would increase ATP flux in resting muscle (VPi→ATP) in response to a single bout of exercise, whereas changes in the capacity for oxidative ATP production (Vmax) would require repeated bouts. Eight untrained men (27 ± 4 yr; peak oxygen uptake = 36 ± 4 ml·kg−1·min−1) performed six sessions of HIT (4–6 × 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min recovery). After standardized meals and a 10-h fast, VPi→ATP and Vmax of the vastus lateralis muscle were measured using phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 4 Tesla. Measurements were obtained at baseline, 15 h after the first training session, and 15 h after completion of the sixth session. VPi→ATP was determined from the unidirectional flux between Pi and ATP, using the saturation transfer technique. The rate of phosphocreatine recovery (kPCr) following a maximal contraction was used to calculate Vmax. While kPCr and Vmax were unchanged after a single session of HIT, completion of six training sessions resulted in a ∼14% increase in muscle oxidative capacity (P ≤ 0.004). In contrast, neither a single nor six training sessions altered VPi→ATP (P = 0.74). This novel analysis of resting and maximal high-energy phosphate kinetics in vivo in response to HIT provides evidence that distinct aspects of human skeletal muscle metabolism respond differently to this type of training. PMID:23255590

  11. ATP-sensitive potassium channels mediate contraction-induced attenuation of sympathetic vasoconstriction in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Thomas, G D; Hansen, J; Victor, R G

    1997-06-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstriction is sensitive to inhibition by metabolic events in contracting rat and human skeletal muscle, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are unknown. In rats, this inhibition involves mainly alpha2-adrenergic vasoconstriction, which relies heavily on Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. We therefore hypothesized that contraction-induced inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction is mediated by ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, a hyperpolarizing vasodilator mechanism that could be activated by some metabolic product(s) of skeletal muscle contraction. We tested this hypothesis in anesthetized rats by measuring femoral artery blood flow responses to lumbar sympathetic nerve stimulation or intraarterial hindlimb infusion of the specific alpha2-adrenergic agonist UK 14,304 during KATP channel activation with diazoxide in resting hindlimb and during KATP channel block with glibenclamide in contracting hindlimb. The major new findings are twofold. First, like muscle contraction, pharmacologic activation of KATP channels with diazoxide in resting hindlimb dose dependently attenuated the vasoconstrictor responses to either sympathetic nerve stimulation or intraarterial UK 14,304. Second, the large contraction-induced attenuation in sympathetic vasoconstriction elicited by nerve stimulation or UK 14,304 was partially reversed when the physiologic activation of KATP channels produced by muscle contraction was prevented with glibenclamide. We conclude that contraction-induced activation of KATP channels is a major mechanism underlying metabolic inhibition of sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising skeletal muscle.

  12. Protease-activated receptors modulate excitability of murine colonic smooth muscles by differential effects on interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Sung, Tae Sik; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Lu, Hongli; Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don

    2015-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by proteolytic cleavage at their amino termini by serine proteases. PAR activation contributes to the inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and alters GI motility, but little is known about the specific cells within the tunica muscularis that express PARs and the mechanisms leading to contractile responses. Using real time PCR, we found PARs to be expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α positive (PDGFRα(+)) cells. The latter cell-type showed dominant expression of F2r (encodes PAR1) and F2rl1 (encodes PAR2). Contractile and intracellular electrical activities were measured to characterize the integrated responses to PAR activation in whole muscles. Cells were isolated and ICC and PDGFRα(+) cells were identified by constitutive expression of fluorescent reporters. Thrombin (PAR1 agonist) and trypsin (PAR2 agonist) caused biphasic responses in colonic muscles: transient hyperpolarization and relaxation followed by repolarization and excitation. The inhibitory phase was blocked by apamin, revealing a distinct excitatory component. Patch clamp studies showed that the inhibitory response was mediated by activation of small conductance calcium-activated K(+) channels in PDGFRα(+) cells, and the excitatory response was mediated by activation of a Cl(-) conductance in ICC. SMCs contributed little to PAR responses in colonic muscles. In summary, PARs regulate the excitability of colonic muscles; different conductances are activated in each cell type of the SMC-ICC-PDGFRα(+) cell (SIP) syncytium. Motor responses to PAR agonists are integrated responses of the SIP syncytium.

  13. A birefringence study of changes in myosin orientation during relaxation of skinned muscle fibers induced by photolytic ATP release.

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, M; Ferenczi, M A; Irving, M

    1994-01-01

    The birefringence of isolated skinned fibers from rabbit psoas muscle was measured continuously during relaxation from rigor produced by photolysis of caged ATP at sarcomere length 2.8-2.9 microns, ionic strength 0.1 M, 15 degrees C. Birefringence, the difference in refractive index between light components polarized parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis, depends on the average degree of alignment of the myosin head domain with the fiber axis. After ATP release birefringence increased by 5.8 +/- 0.7% (mean +/- SE, n = 6) with two temporal components. A small fast component had an amplitude of 0.9 +/- 0.2% and rate constant of 63 s-1. By the completion of this component, the instantaneous stiffness had decreased to about half the rigor value, and the force response to a step stretch showed a rapid (approximately 1000 s-1) recovery phase. Subsequently a large slow birefringence component with rate constant 5.1 s-1 accompanied isometric force relaxation. Inorganic phosphate (10 mM) did not affect the fast birefringence component but accelerated the slow component and force relaxation. The fast birefringence component was probably caused by formation of myosin.ATP or myosin.ADP.Pi states that are weakly bound to actin. The average myosin head orientation at the end of this component is slightly more parallel to the fiber axis than in rigor. PMID:7811926

  14. Enhancement of Muscle T Regulatory Cells and Improvement of Muscular Dystrophic Process in mdx Mice by Blockade of Extracellular ATP/P2X Axis.

    PubMed

    Gazzerro, Elisabetta; Baldassari, Simona; Assereto, Stefania; Fruscione, Floriana; Pistorio, Angela; Panicucci, Chiara; Volpi, Stefano; Perruzza, Lisa; Fiorillo, Chiara; Minetti, Carlo; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Grassi, Fabio; Bruno, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Infiltration of immune cells and chronic inflammation substantially affect skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In the immune system, extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) released by dying cells is sensed as a danger associated molecular pattern through P2 purinergic receptors. Specifically, the P2X7 subtype has a prominent role in regulating immune system physiology and contributes to inflammasome activation also in muscle cells. Here, we show that in vivo blockade of the extracellular ATP/P2X purinergic signaling pathway by periodate-oxidized ATP delayed the progression of the dystrophic phenotype and dampened the local inflammatory response in mdx mice, a spontaneous mouse model of dystrophin deficiency. Reduced infiltration of leukocytes and macrophages and decreased expression of IL-6 were revealed in the muscles of periodate-oxidized ATP-treated mdx mice. Concomitantly, an increase in Foxp3(+) immunosuppressive regulatory T cells was observed and correlated with enhanced myofiber regeneration. Moreover, we detected reduced concentrations of profibrotic cytokines, including transforming growth factor-β and connective tissue growth factor, in muscles of periodate-oxidized ATP-treated mdx mice. The improvement of inflammatory features was associated with increased strength and reduced necrosis, thus suggesting that pharmacologic purinergic antagonism altering the adaptive immune component in the muscle infiltrates might represent a promising therapeutic approach in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  15. Prolonged Exposure of Primary Human Muscle Cells to Plasma Fatty Acids Associated with Obese Phenotype Induces Persistent Suppression of Muscle Mitochondrial ATP Synthase β Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Lee; Hanavan, Paul D.; Campbell, Latoya E.; De Filippis, Elena; Lake, Douglas F.; Coletta, Dawn K.; Roust, Lori R.; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Carroll, Chad C.; Katsanos, Christos S.

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies show reduced abundance of the β-subunit of mitochondrial H+-ATP synthase (β-F1-ATPase) in skeletal muscle of obese individuals. The β-F1-ATPase forms the catalytic core of the ATP synthase, and it is critical for ATP production in muscle. The mechanism(s) impairing β-F1-ATPase metabolism in obesity, however, are not completely understood. First, we studied total muscle protein synthesis and the translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in obese (BMI, 36±1 kg/m2) and lean (BMI, 22±1 kg/m2) subjects. Both total protein synthesis (0.044±0.006 vs 0.066±0.006%·h-1) and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase (0.0031±0.0007 vs 0.0073±0.0004) were lower in muscle from the obese subjects when compared to the lean controls (P<0.05). We then evaluated these same responses in a primary cell culture model, and tested the specific hypothesis that circulating non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in obesity play a role in the responses observed in humans. The findings on total protein synthesis and translation efficiency of β-F1-ATPase in primary myotubes cultured from a lean subject, and after exposure to NEFA extracted from serum of an obese subject, were similar to those obtained in humans. Among candidate microRNAs (i.e., non-coding RNAs regulating gene expression), we identified miR-127-5p in preventing the production of β-F1-ATPase. Muscle expression of miR-127-5p negatively correlated with β-F1-ATPase protein translation efficiency in humans (r = – 0.6744; P<0.01), and could be modeled in vitro by prolonged exposure of primary myotubes derived from the lean subject to NEFA extracted from the obese subject. On the other hand, locked nucleic acid inhibitor synthesized to target miR-127-5p significantly increased β-F1-ATPase translation efficiency in myotubes (0.6±0.1 vs 1.3±0.3, in control vs exposure to 50 nM inhibitor; P<0.05). Our experiments implicate circulating NEFA in obesity in suppressing muscle protein metabolism, and establish

  16. The acidosis of chronic renal failure activates muscle proteolysis in rats by augmenting transcription of genes encoding proteins of the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, J L; Wang, X; England, B K; Price, S R; Ding, X; Mitch, W E

    1996-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with negative nitrogen balance and loss of lean body mass. To identify specific proteolytic pathways activated by CRF, protein degradation was measured in incubated epitrochlearis muscles from CRF and sham-operated, pair-fed rats. CRF stimulated muscle proteolysis, and inhibition of lysosomal and calcium-activated proteases did not eliminate this increase. When ATP production was blocked, proteolysis in CRF muscles fell to the same level as that in control muscles. Increased proteolysis was also prevented by feeding CRF rats sodium bicarbonate, suggesting that activation depends on acidification. Evidence that the ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is stimulated by the acidemia of CRF includes the following findings: (a) An inhibitor of the proteasome eliminated the increase in muscle proteolysis; and (b) there was an increase in mRNAs encoding ubiquitin (324%) and proteasome subunits C3 (137%) and C9 (251%) in muscle. This response involved gene activation since transcription of mRNAs for ubiquitin and the C3 subunit were selectively increased in muscle of CRF rats. We conclude that CRF stimulates muscle proteolysis by activating the ATP-ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent pathway. The mechanism depends on acidification and increased expression of genes encoding components of the system. These responses could contribute to the loss of muscle mass associated with CRF. PMID:8617877

  17. A 3-day EGCG-supplementation reduces interstitial lactate concentration in skeletal muscle of overweight subjects.

    PubMed

    Most, Jasper; van Can, Judith G P; van Dijk, Jan-Willem; Goossens, Gijs H; Jocken, Johan; Hospers, Jeannette J; Bendik, Igor; Blaak, Ellen E

    2015-12-09

    Green tea, particularly epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), may affect body weight and composition, possibly by enhancing fat oxidation. The aim of this double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study was to investigate whether 3-day supplementation with EGCG (282 mg/day) stimulates fat oxidation and lipolysis in 24 overweight subjects (age = 30 ± 2 yrs, BMI = 27.7 ± 0.3 kg/m(2)). Energy expenditure, substrate metabolism and circulating metabolites were determined during fasting and postprandial conditions. After 6 h, a fat biopsy was collected to examine gene expression. In 12 subjects, skeletal muscle glycerol, glucose and lactate concentrations were determined using microdialysis. EGCG-supplementation did not alter energy expenditure and substrate oxidation compared to placebo. Although EGCG reduced postprandial circulating glycerol concentrations (P = 0.015), no difference in skeletal muscle lipolysis was observed. Fasting (P = 0.001) and postprandial (P = 0.003) skeletal muscle lactate concentrations were reduced after EGCG-supplementation compared to placebo, despite similar tissue blood flow. Adipose tissue leptin (P = 0.05) and FAT/CD36 expression (P = 0.08) were increased after EGCG compared to placebo. In conclusion, 3-day EGCG-supplementation decreased postprandial plasma glycerol concentrations, but had no significant effects on skeletal muscle lipolysis and whole-body fat oxidation in overweight individuals. Furthermore, EGCG decreased skeletal muscle lactate concentrations, which suggest a shift towards a more oxidative muscle phenotype.

  18. Skeletal muscle ATP synthesis and cellular H+ handling measured by localized 31P-MRS during exercise and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Georg B.; Schmid, Albrecht I.; Goluch, Sigrun; Schewzow, Kiril; Laistler, Elmar; Niess, Fabian; Unger, Ewald; Wolzt, Michael; Mirzahosseini, Arash; Kemp, Graham J.; Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is widely used for non-invasive investigation of muscle metabolism dynamics. This study aims to extend knowledge on parameters derived from these measurements in detail and comprehensiveness: proton (H+) efflux, buffer capacity and the contributions of glycolytic (L) and oxidative (Q) rates to ATP synthesis were calculated from the evolutions of phosphocreatine (PCr) and pH. Data are reported for two muscles in the human calf, for each subject and over a wide range of exercise intensities. 22 subjects performed plantar flexions in a 7T MR-scanner, leading to PCr changes ranging from barely noticeable to almost complete depletion, depending on exercise protocol and muscle studied by localized MRS. Cytosolic buffer capacity was quantified for the first time non-invasively and individually, as was proton efflux evolution in early recovery. Acidification started once PCr depletion reached 60–75%. Initial and end-exercise L correlated with end-exercise levels of PCr and approximately linear with pH. Q calculated directly from PCr and pH derivatives was plausible, requiring fewer assumptions than the commonly used ADP-model. In conclusion, the evolution of parameters describing cellular energy metabolism was measured over a wide range of exercise intensities, revealing a relatively complete picture of muscle metabolism. PMID:27562396

  19. Identification of C-kit-positive interstitial cells in the dog lower urinary tract and relationship with smooth muscle and nerves. Hypotheses for a likely pacemaker role.

    PubMed

    Arrighi, Silvana; Bosi, Giampaolo; Groppetti, Debora; Cremonesi, Fausto

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to give an evidence of the likely presence of interstitial cells in the canine lower urinary tract and to study their possible interactions with the musculature and the intramural innervation. Cryosections of normal canine bladder and urethra were immunofluorescently labelled with c-kit, a transmembrane, tyrosine kinase growth factor receptor, known to be expressed on the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) of the gut. The relationship with antiactin positive smooth muscle cells and PGP9.5-positive intramural innervation was also investigated by confocal microscopy. Anti-c-kit labelling demonstrated a network of elongated and branched c-kit positive cells, which were located in interstitial spaces, oriented in parallel to the smooth muscle bundles that form the bladder muscular layer, irrespective of dog sex. Cells with a similar localization were also PAS- and NADPH-diaphorase-positive. A contact between c-kit immunofluorescent cells and intramural innervation was demonstrated, too. The roles of interstitial cells might include regulation of smooth muscle activity of the bladder detrusor, integrating neuronal signals during urine storage and voiding.

  20. Light-emitting diode therapy in exercise-trained mice increases muscle performance, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Pires de Sousa, Marcelo Victor; Kaippert, Beatriz; Huang, Ying-Ying; Koiso, Tomoharu; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) applied over the leg, gluteus and lower-back muscles of mice using a LED cluster (630 nm and 850 nm, 80 mW/cm(2) , 7.2 J/cm(2) ) increased muscle performance (repetitive climbing of a ladder carrying a water-filled tube attached to the tail), ATP and mitochondrial metabolism; oxidative stress and proliferative myocyte markers in mice subjected to acute and progressive strength training. Six bi-daily training sessions LEDT-After and LEDT-Before-After regimens more than doubled muscle performance and increased ATP more than tenfold. The effectiveness of LEDT on improving muscle performance and recovery suggest applicability for high performance sports and in training programs. Positioning of the mice and light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) applied on mouse legs, gluteus and lower-back muscles without contact.

  1. Light-emitting diode therapy in exercise-trained mice increases muscle performance, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; de Sousa, Marcelo Victor Pires; Kaippert, Beatriz; Huang, Ying-Ying; Koiso, Tomoharu; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) applied over the leg, gluteus and lower-back muscles of mice using a LED cluster (630 nm and 850 nm, 80 mW/cm2, 7.2 J/cm2) increased muscle performance (repetitive climbing of a ladder carrying a water-filled tube attached to the tail), ATP and mitochondrial metabolism; oxidative stress and proliferative myocyte markers in mice subjected to acute and progressive strength training. Six bi-daily training sessions LEDT-After and LEDT-Before-After regimens more than doubled muscle performance and increased ATP more than tenfold. The effectiveness of LEDT on improving muscle performance and recovery suggest applicability for high performance sports and in training programs. Positioning of the mice and light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) applied on mouse legs, gluteus and lower-back muscles without contact. PMID:25378263

  2. Evaluation of dynamic changes in interstitial fluid proteome following microdialysis probe insertion trauma in trapezius muscle of healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Turkina, Maria V.; Ghafouri, Nazdar; Gerdle, Björn; Ghafouri, Bijar

    2017-01-01

    Microdialysis (MD) has been shown to be a promising technique for sampling of biomarkers. Implantation of MD probe causes an acute tissue trauma and provokes innate response cascades. In order to normalize tissue a two hours equilibration period for analysis of small molecules has been reported previously. However, how the proteome profile changes due to this acute trauma has yet to be fully understood. To characterize the early proteome events induced by this trauma we compared proteome in muscle dialysate collected during the equilibration period with two hours later in “post-trauma”. Samples were collected from healthy females using a 100 kDa MW cut off membrane and analyzed by high sensitive liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Proteins involved in stress response, immune system processes, inflammatory responses and nociception from extracellular and intracellular fluid spaces were identified. Sixteen proteins were found to be differentially abundant in samples collected during first two hours in comparison to “post-trauma”. Our data suggests that microdialysis in combination with mass spectrometry may provide potentially new insights into the interstitial proteome of trapezius muscle, yet should be further adjusted for biomarker discovery and diagnostics. Moreover, MD proteome alterations in response to catheter injury may reflect individual innate reactivity. PMID:28266628

  3. Haemodynamic responses to exercise, ATP infusion and thigh compression in humans: insight into the role of muscle mechanisms on cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Jeppesen, Tina D; Ali, Leena; Barker, Horace; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Secher, Niels H; Dawson, Ellen A; Dufour, Stéphane P

    2008-01-01

    The muscle pump and muscle vasodilatory mechanims are thought to play important roles in increasing and maintaining muscle perfusion and cardiac output during exercise, but their actual contributions remain uncertain. To evaluate the role of the skeletal muscle pump and vasodilatation on cardiovascular function during exercise, we determined leg and systemic haemodynamic responses in healthy men during (1) incremental one-legged knee-extensor exercise, (2) step-wise femoral artery ATP infusion at rest, (3) passive exercise (n = 10), (4) femoral vein or artery ATP infusion (n = 6), and (5) cyclic thigh compressions at rest and during passive and voluntary exercise (n = 7). Incremental exercise resulted in progressive increases in leg blood flow (ΔLBF 7.4 ± 0.7 l min−1), cardiac output ( 8.7 ± 0.7 l min−1), mean arterial pressure (ΔMAP 51 ± 5 mmHg), and leg and systemic oxygen delivery and . Arterial ATP infusion resulted in similar increases in , LBF, and systemic and leg oxygen delivery, but central venous pressure and muscle metabolism remained unchanged and MAP was reduced. In contrast, femoral vein ATP infusion did not alter LBF, or MAP. Passive exercise also increased blood flow (ΔLBF 0.7 ± 0.1 l min−1), yet the increase in muscle and systemic perfusion, unrelated to elevations in aerobic metabolism, accounted only for ∼5% of peak exercise hyperaemia. Likewise, thigh compressions alone or in combination with passive exercise increased blood flow (ΔLBF 0.5–0.7 l min−1) without altering , MAP or . These findings suggest that the skeletal muscle pump is not obligatory for sustaining venous return, central venous pressure, stroke volume and or maintaining muscle blood flow during one-legged exercise in humans. Further, its contribution to muscle and systemic peak exercise hyperaemia appears to be minimal in comparison to the effects of muscle vasodilatation. PMID:18339690

  4. A 3-day EGCG-supplementation reduces interstitial lactate concentration in skeletal muscle of overweight subjects

    PubMed Central

    Most, Jasper; van Can, Judith G P; van Dijk, Jan-Willem; Goossens, Gijs H.; Jocken, Johan; Hospers, Jeannette J.; Bendik, Igor; Blaak, Ellen E.

    2015-01-01

    Green tea, particularly epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), may affect body weight and composition, possibly by enhancing fat oxidation. The aim of this double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study was to investigate whether 3-day supplementation with EGCG (282mg/day) stimulates fat oxidation and lipolysis in 24 overweight subjects (age = 30 ± 2yrs, BMI = 27.7 ± 0.3 kg/m2). Energy expenditure, substrate metabolism and circulating metabolites were determined during fasting and postprandial conditions. After 6 h, a fat biopsy was collected to examine gene expression. In 12 subjects, skeletal muscle glycerol, glucose and lactate concentrations were determined using microdialysis. EGCG-supplementation did not alter energy expenditure and substrate oxidation compared to placebo. Although EGCG reduced postprandial circulating glycerol concentrations (P = 0.015), no difference in skeletal muscle lipolysis was observed. Fasting (P = 0.001) and postprandial (P = 0.003) skeletal muscle lactate concentrations were reduced after EGCG-supplementation compared to placebo, despite similar tissue blood flow. Adipose tissue leptin (P = 0.05) and FAT/CD36 expression (P = 0.08) were increased after EGCG compared to placebo. In conclusion, 3-day EGCG-supplementation decreased postprandial plasma glycerol concentrations, but had no significant effects on skeletal muscle lipolysis and whole-body fat oxidation in overweight individuals. Furthermore, EGCG decreased skeletal muscle lactate concentrations, which suggest a shift towards a more oxidative muscle phenotype. PMID:26647963

  5. Validation of Interstitial Fractional Volume Quantification by Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Porcine Skeletal Muscles.

    PubMed

    Hindel, Stefan; Söhner, Anika; Maa, Marc; Sauerwein, Wolfgang; Baba, Hideo Andreas; Kramer, Martin; Lüdemann, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the accuracy of fractional interstitial volume determination in low perfused and low vascularized tissue by using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The fractional interstitial volume (ve) was determined in the medial thigh muscle of 12 female pigs by using a 3-dimensional gradient echo sequence with k-space sharing and administering gadolinium-based contrast agent (gadoterate meglumine). Analysis was performed using 3 pharmacokinetic models: the simple Tofts model (TM), the extended TM (ETM), and the 2-compartment exchange model (2CXM). We investigated the effect of varying acquisition durations (ADs) on the model parameter estimates of the 3 models and compared the ve values with the results of histological examinations of muscle sections of the medial thigh muscle. Histological measurements yielded a median value (25%-75% quartile) of 4.8% (3.7%-6.2%) for ve. The interstitial fractional volume determined by DCE-MRI was comparable to the histological results but varied strongly with AD for the TM and ETM. For the TM and the ETM, the results were virtually the same. Choosing arterial hematocrit to Hcta = 0.4, the lowest median ve value determined by DCE-MRI was 5.2% (3.3%-6.1%) for the ETM at a 6-minute AD. The maximum ve value determined with the ETM at a 15-minute AD was 7.7% (4.5%-9.0%). The variation with AD of median ve values obtained with the 2CXM was much smaller: 6.2% (3.1%-9.2%) for the 6-minute AD and 6.3% (4.3%-9.8%) for the 15-minute AD. The best fit for the 2CXM was found at the 10-minute AD with ve values of 6.6% (3.7%-8.2%). No significant correlation between the histological and any DCE-MRI modeling results was found. Considering the expected accuracy of histological measurements, the medians of the MR modeling results were in good agreement with the histological prediction. A parameter determination uncertainty was identified with the use of the TMs. This is due to underfitting and

  6. The New Unified Theory of ATP Synthesis/Hydrolysis and Muscle Contraction, Its Manifold Fundamental Consequences and Mechanistic Implications and Its Applications in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Sunil

    2008-01-01

    Complete details of the thermodynamics and molecular mechanisms of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and muscle contraction are offered from the standpoint of the torsional mechanism of energy transduction and ATP synthesis and the rotation-uncoiling-tilt (RUT) energy storage mechanism of muscle contraction. The manifold fundamental consequences and mechanistic implications of the unified theory for oxidative phosphorylation and muscle contraction are explained. The consistency of current mechanisms of ATP synthesis and muscle contraction with experiment is assessed, and the novel insights of the unified theory are shown to take us beyond the binding change mechanism, the chemiosmotic theory and the lever arm model. It is shown from first principles how previous theories of ATP synthesis and muscle contraction violate both the first and second laws of thermodynamics, necessitating their revision. It is concluded that the new paradigm, ten years after making its first appearance, is now perfectly poised to replace the older theories. Finally, applications of the unified theory in cell life and cell death are outlined and prospects for future research are explored. While it is impossible to cover each and every specific aspect of the above, an attempt has been made here to address all the pertinent details and what is presented should be sufficient to convince the reader of the novelty, originality, breakthrough nature and power of the unified theory, its manifold fundamental consequences and mechanistic implications, and its applications in health and disease. PMID:19325832

  7. Decreased ATP synthesis and lower pH may lead to abnormal muscle contraction and skin sensitivity in human skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Kim, Jung Yun; Lee, Min Jung; Choi, Won Woo; Eun, Hee Chul; Chung, Jin Ho

    2014-12-01

    Sensitive skin represents hyperactive sensory symptoms showing exaggerated reactions in response to internal stimulants or external irritants. Although sensitive skin is a very common condition affecting an estimated 50% of the population, its pathophysiology remains largely elusive, particularly with regard to its metabolic aspects. The objective of our study was to investigate the pathogenesis of sensitive skin. We recruited healthy participants with 'sensitive' or 'non-sensitive' skin based on standardized questionnaires and 10% lactic acid stinging test, and obtained skin samples for microarray analysis and subsequent experiments. Microarray transcriptome profiling revealed that genes involved in muscle contraction, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, and ion transport and balance were significantly decreased in sensitive skin. These altered genes could account for the abnormal muscle contraction, decreased ATP amount in sensitive skin. In addition, pain-related transcripts such as TRPV1, ASIC3 and CGRP were significantly up-regulated in sensitive skin, compared with non-sensitive skin. Our findings suggest that sensitive skin is closely associated with the dysfunction of muscle contraction and metabolic homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Effects of cell-binding protein A of Staphylococcus aureus on the level of intracellular calcium ions and actomyosin ATP-ase activity in the smooth muscles].

    PubMed

    Melenevs'ka, N V; Miroshnychenko, M S; Filippov, I B; Artemenko, O Iu; Shuba, M F

    2006-01-01

    Immune-active substance of Staphylococcus aureus, cell-bound protein A (CBPA), enhances the acetylcholine- or hyperpotassium (K+) Krebs solution-evoked excitation in Taenia coli smooth muscles. CBPA increases caffeine- and carbachole-evoked Ca2+ signals in smooth muscle cells suspension, loaded with indo-1, and also caffeine- and acetylcholine-evoked contraction in smooth muscles slices. Against a background of CBPA-suppressed action of sodium nitroprusside, ATP evokes the membrane depolarization. CBPA in small concentrations potentiates ATPase (Mg2+,Ca2+-; Mg2+- and Mg2+- in the presence of EGTA) activity of actomyosin in the smooth muscles.

  9. [The influence of iron ions on ATP-hydrolases activity of cell membranes of rat colon smooth muscle and kidney].

    PubMed

    Kaplia, A A

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the specific features of the ATP-hydrolases structural resistance in the membrane under the action of the prooxidants: Fe2' and hydrogen peroxide, and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) the colonic smooth muscle (CSM) Na+, K(+)-ATPase activity was compared with activities of the corresponding Mg(2+)-ATP-hydrolase and ATPases from kidney medullar layer of rats. The inhibition study of the CSM Na+, K(+)-ATPase by divalent iron shows the decrease of the activity by 30% at 0.1 μM FeSO4 and in the range of 0.1-10 μM--to 45% of residual activity. When comparing with kidney enzyme (rep- resents exclusively α1-isozyme) the CSM Na+, K(+)-ATPase sensitivity to Fe2+ is reliably higher at its submicromolar concentration. CSM Mg2+-ATPase is much more resistant to iron ions effect, than kidney one. However for two tissues Mg2(+)-ATPase activity is always more resistant as compared with corresponding Na+, K(+)-ATPase activity. Against 1 mM EGTA Na+,K(+)-ATPase and Mg2(+)-ATPase activities of GMOK and kidneys are equally insensitive to effect of hydrogen peroxide in concentration up to 1 mM. But in the presence of 20 μM FeSO4 in the concentration range of 1 nM-1 mM of H2O2 the Na+, K(+)-ATPase is inhibited to greater extent, than Mg2+-ATPase activity. NEM sensitivity of the two ATP-hydrolase systems corresponds to prooxidant sensitivity that indicates the distinct importance of SH-groups for their functioning. It is concluded that Na+, K+-ATPase can serve as a marker of membrane sensitivity to oxidation, Mg(2+)-ATPase is resistant to oxidation and can be considered as criterion of the oxidation resistance when comparing membrane enzyme complexes, es- pecially in GMOK.

  10. Optical absorption and scattering properties of bulk porcine muscle phantoms from interstitial radiance measurements in 650-900 nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabtchak, Serge; Montgomery, Logan G.; Whelan, William M.

    2014-05-01

    We demonstrated the application of relative radiance-based continuous wave (cw) measurements for recovering absorption and scattering properties (the effective attenuation coefficient, the diffusion coefficient, the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient) of bulk porcine muscle phantoms in the 650-900 nm spectral range. Both the side-firing fiber (the detector) and the fiber with a spherical diffuser at the end (the source) were inserted interstitially at predetermined locations in the phantom. The porcine phantoms were prostate-shaped with ˜4 cm in diameter and ˜3 cm thickness and made from porcine loin or tenderloin muscles. The described method was previously validated using the diffusion approximation on simulated and experimental radiance data obtained for homogenous Intralipid-1% liquid phantom. The approach required performing measurements in two locations in the tissue with different distances to the source. Measurements were performed on 21 porcine phantoms. Spectral dependences of the effective attenuation and absorption coefficients for the loin phantom deviated from corresponding dependences for the tenderloin phantom for wavelengths <750 nm. The diffusion constant and the reduced scattering coefficient were very close for both phantom types. To quantify chromophore presence, the plot for the absorption coefficient was matched with a synthetic absorption spectrum constructed from deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin and water. The closest match for the porcine loin spectrum was obtained with the following concentrations: 15.5 µM (±30% s.d.) Hb, 21 µM (±30% s.d.) HbO2 and 0.3 (±30% s.d.) fractional volume of water. The tenderloin absorption spectrum was best described by 30 µM Hb (±30% s.d), 19 µM (±30% s.d.) HbO2 and 0.3 (±30% s.d.) fractional volume of water. The higher concentration of Hb in tenderloin was consistent with a dark-red appearance of the tenderloin phantom. The method can be applied to a number of biological

  11. Age-associated oxidative modifications of mitochondrial α-subunit of F1 ATP synthase from mouse skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Das, N; Jana, C K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the pattern of age-associated oxidative post-translational modifications in the skeletal muscles of a mammalian species and to address whether the modifications result in the loss of function of the oxidatively modified protein(s). Accordingly, proteins in the mitochondrial matrix of the hind limb of C57BL/6Nnia mice were examined for modifications by carbonylation--an established marker of oxidative post-translational modifications--by Western blotting using anti-2,4-dinitrophenyl antibodies and tritiated sodium borohydride methods. An age-associated increase in carbonylation of mitochondrial matrix proteins was observed, but not all proteins were equally susceptible. A 55 kDa protein, identified as the α-subunit of the F1 complex of ATP synthase (ATP phosphohydrolase [H(+)-transporting]), had approximately 17% and 27% higher levels of protein carbonyls in adult and old animals, respectively, in comparison to the young controls as estimated using tritiated sodium borohydride. In addition, an age-associated decline in its activity was observed, with approximately 9% and 28% decrease in the activity in the adult and old animals, respectively, in comparison to young controls. It may be concluded that such oxidative post-translational modifications and the resultant attenuation of the protein activity may contribute to the age-related energy loss and muscular degeneracy.

  12. Skeletal muscle ATP turnover by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during moderate and heavy bilateral knee extension

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Daniel T; Bimson, William E; Hampson, Sophie A; Bowen, T Scott; Murgatroyd, Scott R; Marwood, Simon; Kemp, Graham J; Rossiter, Harry B

    2014-01-01

    During constant-power high-intensity exercise, the expected increase in oxygen uptake () is supplemented by a  slow component (), reflecting reduced work efficiency, predominantly within the locomotor muscles. The intracellular source of inefficiency is postulated to be an increase in the ATP cost of power production (an increase in P/W). To test this hypothesis, we measured intramuscular ATP turnover with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and whole-body during moderate (MOD) and heavy (HVY) bilateral knee-extension exercise in healthy participants (n = 14). Unlocalized 31P spectra were collected from the quadriceps throughout using a dual-tuned (1H and 31P) surface coil with a simple pulse-and-acquire sequence. Total ATP turnover rate (ATPtot) was estimated at exercise cessation from direct measurements of the dynamics of phosphocreatine (PCr) and proton handling. Between 3 and 8 min during MOD, there was no discernable (mean ± SD, 0.06 ± 0.12 l min−1) or change in [PCr] (30 ± 8 vs. 32 ± 7 mm) or ATPtot (24 ± 14 vs. 17 ± 14 mm min−1; each P = n.s.). During HVY, the was 0.37 ± 0.16 l min−1 (22 ± 8%), [PCr] decreased (19 ± 7 vs. 18 ± 7 mm, or 12 ± 15%; P < 0.05) and ATPtot increased (38 ± 16 vs. 44 ± 14 mm min−1, or 26 ± 30%; P < 0.05) between 3 and 8 min. However, the increase in ATPtot (ΔATPtot) was not correlated with the during HVY (r2 = 0.06; P = n.s.). This lack of relationship between ΔATPtot and , together with a steepening of the [PCr]– relationship in HVY, suggests that reduced work efficiency during heavy exercise arises from both contractile (P/W) and mitochondrial sources (the O2 cost of ATP resynthesis; P/O). PMID:25281731

  13. Passive leg movement enhances interstitial VEGF protein, endothelial cell proliferation, and eNOS mRNA content in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hellsten, Ylva; Rufener, Nora; Nielsen, Jens J; Høier, Birgitte; Krustrup, Peter; Bangsbo, Jens

    2008-03-01

    The present study used passive limb movement as an experimental model to study the effect of increased blood flow and passive stretch, without enhanced metabolic demand, in young healthy male subjects. The model used was 90 min of passive movement of the leg leading to a 2.8-fold increase (P < 0.05) in blood flow without a significant enhancement in oxygen uptake. Muscle interstitial fluid was sampled with microdialysis technique and analyzed for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein and for the effect on endothelial cell proliferation. Biopsies obtained from the musculus vastus lateralis were analyzed for mRNA content of VEGF, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). The passive leg movement caused an increase (P < 0.05) in interstitial VEGF protein concentration above rest (73 +/- 21 vs. 344 +/- 83 pg/ml). Addition of muscle dialysate to cultured endothelial cells revealed that dialysate obtained during leg movement induced a 3.2-fold higher proliferation rate (P < 0.05) than dialysate obtained at rest. Passive movement also enhanced (P < 0.05) the eNOS mRNA level fourfold above resting levels. VEGF mRNA and MMP-2 mRNA levels were unaffected. The results show that a session of passive leg movement, elevating blood flow and causing passive stretch, augments the interstitial concentrations of VEGF, the proliferative effect of interstitial fluid, and eNOS mRNA content in muscle tissue. We propose that enhanced blood flow and passive stretch are positive physiological stimulators of factors associated with capillary growth in human muscle.

  14. Pulsed dose-rate perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities and skeletal muscles of the trunk.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Gianluca; Lazzari, Roberta; Pelosi, Giuseppe; De Pas, Tommaso; Mariani, Luigi; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Sances, Daniele; Tosti, Giulio; Baldini, Federica; Mosconi, Massimo; Tedeschi, Ines; Viale, Giuseppe; Marsiglia, Hugo; Chiappa, Antonio; Vavassori, Andrea; Orecchia, Roberto; Testori, Alessandro

    2005-11-01

    This study evaluated the role of pulsed dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy (BRT), delivered alone or as a boost to external beam radiotherapy, as adjuvant therapy for the local control of soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities and skeletal muscles of the trunk that have undergone surgical treatment. Between July 1998 and January 2002, 42 patients were treated with a combination of surgery and BRT alone (18 patients) or BRT/external beam radiotherapy (24 patients) for the treatment of primary (n = 32) and recurrent (n = 10) soft tissue sarcomas located in the proximal extremity (n = 17), distal extremity (n = 17), and trunk (n = 8). Tumor size was <5 cm in 20 cases and >5 cm in 22 cases, with histological grading of 1 (n = 7), 2 (n = 18), or 3 (n = 17). The median BRT dose delivered was 15 Gy, and the median external beam irradiation dose was 50 Gy. With a median follow-up of 34 months, the 36-month survival was 83.9% (SE, 6.1%), and the local control was 89%. PDR interstitial BRT for soft tissue sarcoma is an effective, well-tolerated adjuvant radiation treatment that offers several practical advantages, among which are low acute and late toxicity with maximum normal tissue and critical structure sparing and overall shorter radiotherapy and hospital stay.

  15. Substrate availability limits human skeletal muscle oxidative ATP regeneration at the onset of ischemic exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, J A; Gustafsson, T; Sundberg, C J; Jansson, E; Hultman, E; Kaijser, L; Chwalbinska-Moneta, J; Constantin-Teodosiu, D; Macdonald, I A; Greenhaff, P L

    1998-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that dichloroacetate can attenuate skeletal muscle fatigue by up to 35% in a canine model of peripheral ischemia (Timmons, J.A., S.M. Poucher, D. Constantin-Teodosiu, V. Worrall, I.A. Macdonald, and P.L. Greenhaff. 1996. J. Clin. Invest. 97:879-883). This was thought to be a consequence of dichloroacetate increasing acetyl group availability early during contraction. In this study we characterized the metabolic effects of dichloroacetate in a human model of peripheral muscle ischemia. On two separate occasions (control-saline or dichloroacetate infusion), nine subjects performed 8 min of single-leg knee extension exercise at an intensity aimed at achieving volitional exhaustion in approximately 8 min. During exercise each subject's lower limbs were exposed to 50 mmHg of positive pressure, which reduces blood flow by approximately 20%. Dichloroacetate increased resting muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activation status by threefold and elevated acetylcarnitine concentration by fivefold. After 3 min of exercise, phosphocreatine degradation and lactate accumulation were both reduced by approximately 50% after dichloroacetate pretreatment, when compared with control conditions. However, after 8 min of exercise no differences existed between treatments. Therefore, it would appear that dichloroacetate can delay the accumulation of metabolites which lead to the development of skeletal muscle fatigue during ischemia but does not alter the metabolic profile when a maximal effort is approached. PMID:9421469

  16. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC.

  17. ROS Production via P2Y1-PKC-NOX2 Is Triggered by Extracellular ATP after Electrical Stimulation of Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Vegas, Alexis; Campos, Cristian A.; Contreras-Ferrat, Ariel; Casas, Mariana; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Espinosa, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    During exercise, skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via NADPH oxidase (NOX2) while inducing cellular adaptations associated with contractile activity. The signals involved in this mechanism are still a matter of study. ATP is released from skeletal muscle during electrical stimulation and can autocrinely signal through purinergic receptors; we searched for an influence of this signal in ROS production. The aim of this work was to characterize ROS production induced by electrical stimulation and extracellular ATP. ROS production was measured using two alternative probes; chloromethyl-2,7- dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate or electroporation to express the hydrogen peroxide-sensitive protein Hyper. Electrical stimulation (ES) triggered a transient ROS increase in muscle fibers which was mimicked by extracellular ATP and was prevented by both carbenoxolone and suramin; antagonists of pannexin channel and purinergic receptors respectively. In addition, transient ROS increase was prevented by apyrase, an ecto-nucleotidase. MRS2365, a P2Y1 receptor agonist, induced a large signal while UTPyS (P2Y2 agonist) elicited a much smaller signal, similar to the one seen when using ATP plus MRS2179, an antagonist of P2Y1. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors also blocked ES-induced ROS production. Our results indicate that physiological levels of electrical stimulation induce ROS production in skeletal muscle cells through release of extracellular ATP and activation of P2Y1 receptors. Use of selective NOX2 and PKC inhibitors suggests that ROS production induced by ES or extracellular ATP is mediated by NOX2 activated by PKC. PMID:26053483

  18. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Palmieri, R H; Frischat, A; Fischer, A H; Wu, L H; Maland, L; Manship, M

    1984-05-22

    The total amino acid sequence of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase has been determined, and the single polypeptide chain of 194 amino acid residues starts with N-acetylmethionine and ends with leucyllysine at its carboxyl terminus, in agreement with the earlier data on its amino acid composition [Mahowald, T. A., Noltmann, E. A., & Kuby, S. A. (1962) J. Biol. Chem. 237, 1138-1145] and its carboxyl-terminus sequence [Olson, O. E., & Kuby, S. A. (1964) J. Biol. Chem. 239, 460-467]. Elucidation of the primary structure was based on tryptic and chymotryptic cleavages of the performic acid oxidized protein, cyanogen bromide cleavages of the 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein at its five methionine sites (followed by maleylation of peptide fragments), and tryptic cleavages at its 12 arginine sites of the maleylated 14C-labeled S-carboxymethylated protein. Calf muscle myokinase, whose sequence has also been established, differs primarily from the rabbit muscle myokinase's sequence in the following: His-30 is replaced by Gln-30; Lys-56 is replaced by Met-56; Ala-84 and Asp 85 are replaced by Val-84 and Asn-85. A comparison of the four muscle-type adenylate kinases, whose covalent structures have now been determined, viz., rabbit, calf, porcine, and human [for the latter two sequences see Heil, A., Müller, G., Noda, L., Pinder, T., Schirmer, H., Schirmer, I., & Von Zabern, I. (1974) Eur. J. Biochem. 43, 131-144, and Von Zabern, I., Wittmann-Liebold, B., Untucht-Grau, R., Schirmer, R. H., & Pai, E. F. (1976) Eur. J. Biochem. 68, 281-290], demonstrates an extraordinary degree of homology.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. The endothermic ATP hydrolysis and crossbridge attachment steps drive the increase of force with temperature in isometric and shortening muscle

    PubMed Central

    Offer, Gerald; Ranatunga, K W

    2015-01-01

    The isometric tetanic tension of skeletal muscle increases with temperature because attached crossbridge states bearing a relatively low force convert to those bearing a higher force. It was previously proposed that the tension-generating step(s) in the crossbridge cycle was highly endothermic and was therefore itself directly targeted by changes in temperature. However, this did not explain why a rapid rise in temperature (a temperature jump) caused a much slower rate of rise of tension than a rapid length step. This led to suggestions that the step targeted by a temperature rise is not the tension-generating step but is an extra step in the attached pathway of the crossbridge cycle, perhaps located on a parallel pathway. This enigma has been a major obstacle to a full understanding of the operation of the crossbridge cycle. We have now used a previously developed mechano-kinetic model of the crossbridge cycle in frog muscle to simulate the temperature dependence of isometric tension and shortening velocity. We allowed all five steps in the cycle to be temperature-sensitive. Models with different starting combinations of enthalpy changes and activation enthalpies for the five steps were refined by downhill simplex runs and scored by their ability to fit experimental data on the temperature dependence of isometric tension and the relationship between force and shortening velocity in frog muscle. We conclude that the first tension-generating step may be weakly endothermic and that the rise of tension with temperature is largely driven by the preceding two strongly endothermic steps of ATP hydrolysis and attachment of M.ADP.Pi to actin. The refined model gave a reasonable fit to the available experimental data and after a temperature jump the overall rate of tension rise was much slower than after a length step as observed experimentally. The findings aid our understanding of the crossbridge cycle by showing that it may not be necessary to include an additional

  20. The endothermic ATP hydrolysis and crossbridge attachment steps drive the increase of force with temperature in isometric and shortening muscle.

    PubMed

    Offer, Gerald; Ranatunga, K W

    2015-04-15

    The isometric tetanic tension of skeletal muscle increases with temperature because attached crossbridge states bearing a relatively low force convert to those bearing a higher force. It was previously proposed that the tension-generating step(s) in the crossbridge cycle was highly endothermic and was therefore itself directly targeted by changes in temperature. However, this did not explain why a rapid rise in temperature (a temperature jump) caused a much slower rate of rise of tension than a rapid length step. This led to suggestions that the step targeted by a temperature rise is not the tension-generating step but is an extra step in the attached pathway of the crossbridge cycle, perhaps located on a parallel pathway. This enigma has been a major obstacle to a full understanding of the operation of the crossbridge cycle. We have now used a previously developed mechano-kinetic model of the crossbridge cycle in frog muscle to simulate the temperature dependence of isometric tension and shortening velocity. We allowed all five steps in the cycle to be temperature-sensitive. Models with different starting combinations of enthalpy changes and activation enthalpies for the five steps were refined by downhill simplex runs and scored by their ability to fit experimental data on the temperature dependence of isometric tension and the relationship between force and shortening velocity in frog muscle. We conclude that the first tension-generating step may be weakly endothermic and that the rise of tension with temperature is largely driven by the preceding two strongly endothermic steps of ATP hydrolysis and attachment of M.ADP.Pi to actin. The refined model gave a reasonable fit to the available experimental data and after a temperature jump the overall rate of tension rise was much slower than after a length step as observed experimentally. The findings aid our understanding of the crossbridge cycle by showing that it may not be necessary to include an additional

  1. Metamizol acts as an ATP sensitive potassium channel opener to inhibit the contracting response induced by angiotensin II but not to norepinephrine in rat thoracic aorta smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Fermín; García-Saisó, Sebastián; Lemini, Cristina; Ramírez-Solares, Rafael; Vidrio, Horacio; Mendoza-Fernández, Víctor

    2005-08-01

    Clinically metamizol (MZ) has been related to alteration on haemodynamic parameters and modifications on blood pressure in humans when administered intravenously. These effects have been observed at MZ therapeutic doses. Experimentally, MZ is able to induce relaxation on several types of vascular smooth muscles and modulates the contraction induced by phenylephrine. However, the mechanism underlying the MZ effects on vascular reactivity is not clear. Potassium channels (K) present on vascular smooth muscle cells closely regulate the vascular reactivity and membrane potential. There are four described types of K in vascular tissue: K voltage sensitive (K(V)), K calcium sensitive (K(Ca)2+), K ATP sensitive (K(ATP) and K inward rectification (K(IR), voltage sensitive). The aim of this work was to investigate MZ effects on angiotensin II (AT II) and noradrenaline (NA) induced contraction and to evaluate the K participation on MZ modulating effect on vascular smooth muscle contraction, using isometric and patch clamp techniques. MZ induces relaxation in a concentration dependent manner. Furthermore, MZ strongly inhibits in a concentration dependent fashion the contraction induced by AT II. However, MZ inhibition on NA induced contraction was moderated compared with that observed on AT II. MZ effects on AT II induced contraction was blocked by glybenclamide (a specific K(ATP) blocker, 3 microM, *p < 0.01). In patch clamp experiments, MZ (3 mM) induces an increase on potassium current (K+) mediated by K(ATP) in similar way as diazoxide (a specific K(ATP) opener, 3 microM). Our results suggest that MZ induces relaxation and inhibits contraction induced by AT II acting as a K(ATP) opener.

  2. The function of mitochondrial F(O)F(1) ATP-synthase from the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei muscle during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Cruz, O; Calderon de la Barca, A M; Uribe-Carvajal, S; Muhlia-Almazan, A

    2012-08-01

    The effect of hypoxia and re-oxygenation on the mitochondrial complex F(O)F(1)-ATP synthase was investigated in the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. A 660 kDa protein complex isolated from mitochondria of the shrimp muscle was identified as the ATP synthase complex. After 10h at hypoxia (1.5-2.0 mg oxygen/L), the concentration of L-lactate in plasma increased significantly, but the ATP amount and the concentration of ATPβ protein remained unaffected. Nevertheless, an increase of 70% in the ATPase activity was detected, suggesting that the enzyme may be regulated at a post-translational level. Thus, during hypoxia shrimp are able to maintain ATP amounts probably by using some other energy sources as phosphoarginine when an acute lack of energy occurs. During re-oxygenation, the ATPase activity decreased significantly and the ATP production continued via the electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation. The results obtained showed that shrimp faces hypoxia partially by hydrolyzing the ATP through the reaction catalyzed by the mitochondrial ATPase which increases its activity.

  3. Effects of substituting uridine triphosphate for ATP on the crossbridge cycle of rabbit muscle

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Chun Y; White, Howard D; Ford, Lincoln E

    2001-01-01

    Substituting uridine triphosphate (UTP) for ATP as a substrate for rabbit skeletal myosin and actin at 4°C slowed the dissociation of myosin-S1 from actin by threefold, and hydrolysis of the nucleotide by sevenfold, without a decrease in the rates of phosphate or uridine diphosphate dissociation from actomyosin. The same substitution in skinned rabbit psoas fibres at 2–3°C reduced the maximum shortening velocity by 56% and increased the force asymptote of the force-velocity curve relative to force (α/Po) by 112% without altering the velocity asymptote, β. It also decreased isometric force by 35% and isometric stiffness by 20%, so that the stiffness/force ratio was increased by 23%. Tension transient experiments showed that the stiffness/force increase was associated with a 10% reduction in the amplitude of the rapid, partial (phase 2) recovery relative to the isometric force, and the addition of two new components, one that recovered at a step-size-independent rate of 100 s−1 and another that did not recover following the length change. The increased α/Po with constant β suggests an internal load, as expected of attached crossbridges detained in their movement. An increased stiffness/force ratio suggests a greater fraction of attached bridges in low-force states, as expected of bridges with unhydrolysed UTP detained in low-force states. Decreased phase 2 recovery suggests the detention of high-force bridges, as expected of slowed actomyosin dissociation by nucleotide. These results suggest that the separation of hydrolysed phosphates from nucleotides occurs early in the attached phase of the crossbridge cycle, near and possibly identical to a transition to a firmly attached, low-force state from an initial state where bridges with hydrolysed nucleotides are easily detached by shortening. PMID:11744764

  4. Effects of a supplement designed to increase ATP levels on muscle strength, power output, and endurance

    PubMed Central

    Herda, Trent J; Ryan, Eric D; Stout, Jeffrey R; Cramer, Joel T

    2008-01-01

    Background The present study examined the acute effects of a nutritional supplement intended to improve adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentrations on vertical jump height, isometric strength of the leg extensors, leg extension endurance, and forearm flexion endurance. Methods Twenty-four healthy men (mean age ± SD = 23 ± 4 yrs, stature = 181 ± 7 cm, and body mass = 82 ± 12 kg) volunteered to complete a familiarization trial plus 2 randomly-ordered experimental trials separated by a 7-day washout period. Participants received either 6 (body mass < 91 kg) or 8 (body mass ≥ 91 kg) tablets of the treatment (TR; 625 mg of adenylpyrophosphoric acid and calcium pyruvate, 350.8 mg of cordyceps sinensis extract and yohimbine hydrochloride) or placebo (PL; 980 mg of microcrystalline cellulose) 1 hour prior to the following tests: countermovement vertical jump (CVJ), forearm flexion repetitions to exhaustion, isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) of the leg extensors, and a 50-repetition maximal concentric isokinetic leg extension endurance test. Results There were no differences between the TR and PL trials for CVJ height (P > 0.05), isometric MVC peak torque (P > 0.05), maximal concentric isokinetic peak torque (P > 0.05), percent decline during the leg extension endurance tests (P > 0.05), or repetitions to exhaustion during the forearm flexion endurance tests (P > 0.05). Conclusion These findings indicated no improvements in the measured variables as a result of ingesting this nutritional supplement. Future studies should examine whether chronic supplementation or a loading period is necessary to observe any ergogenic effects of this supplement. PMID:18230170

  5. Force and number of myosin motors during muscle shortening and the coupling with the release of the ATP hydrolysis products.

    PubMed

    Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Dolfi, Mario; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Muscle contraction is due to cyclical ATP-driven working strokes in the myosin motors while attached to the actin filament. Each working stroke is accompanied by the release of the hydrolysis products, orthophosphate and ADP. The rate of myosin-actin interactions increases with the increase in shortening velocity. We used fast half-sarcomere mechanics on skinned muscle fibres to determine the relation between shortening velocity and the number and strain of myosin motors and the effect of orthophosphate concentration. A model simulation of the myosin-actin reaction explains the results assuming that orthophosphate and then ADP are released with rates that increase as the motor progresses through the working stroke. The ADP release rate further increases by one order of magnitude with the rise of negative strain in the final motor conformation. These results provide the molecular explanation of the relation between the rate of energy liberation and shortening velocity during muscle contraction. The chemo-mechanical cycle of the myosin II--actin reaction in situ has been investigated in Ca(2+)-activated skinned fibres from rabbit psoas, by determining the number and strain (s) of myosin motors interacting during steady shortening at different velocities (V) and the effect of raising inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration. It was found that in control conditions (no added Pi ), shortening at V ≤ 350 nm s(-1) per half-sarcomere, corresponding to force (T) greater than half the isometric force (T0 ), decreases the number of myosin motors in proportion to the reduction of T, so that s remains practically constant and similar to the T0 value independent of V. At higher V the number of motors decreases less than in proportion to T, so that s progressively decreases. Raising Pi concentration by 10 mM, which reduces T0 and the number of motors by 40-50%, does not influence the dependence on V of number and strain. A model simulation of the myosin-actin reaction in which

  6. Force and number of myosin motors during muscle shortening and the coupling with the release of the ATP hydrolysis products

    PubMed Central

    Caremani, Marco; Melli, Luca; Dolfi, Mario; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The chemo-mechanical cycle of the myosin II–actin reaction in situ has been investigated in Ca2+-activated skinned fibres from rabbit psoas, by determining the number and strain (s) of myosin motors interacting during steady shortening at different velocities (V) and the effect of raising inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentration. It was found that in control conditions (no added Pi), shortening at V ≤ 350 nm s–1 per half-sarcomere, corresponding to force (T) greater than half the isometric force (T0), decreases the number of myosin motors in proportion to the reduction of T, so that s remains practically constant and similar to the T0 value independent of V. At higher V the number of motors decreases less than in proportion to T, so that s progressively decreases. Raising Pi concentration by 10 mm, which reduces T0 and the number of motors by 40–50%, does not influence the dependence on V of number and strain. A model simulation of the myosin–actin reaction in which the structural transitions responsible for the myosin working stroke and the release of the hydrolysis products are orthogonal explains the results assuming that Pi and then ADP are released with rates that increase as the motor progresses through the working stroke. The rate of ADP release from the conformation at the end of the working stroke is also strain-sensitive, further increasing by one order of magnitude within a few nanometres of negative strain. These results provide the molecular explanation of the relation between the rate of energy liberation and the load during muscle contraction. Key points Muscle contraction is due to cyclical ATP-driven working strokes in the myosin motors while attached to the actin filament. Each working stroke is accompanied by the release of the hydrolysis products, orthophosphate and ADP. The rate of myosin–actin interactions increases with the increase in shortening velocity. We used fast half-sarcomere mechanics on skinned muscle fibres to

  7. Sex differences in the contribution of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in trigeminal ganglia under an acute muscle pain condition

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Katelyn; Saloman, Jami L.; Zhang, Youping; Ro, Jin Y.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether functional subunits of the ATP-dependent K+ channel (KATP) are expressed in trigeminal ganglia (TG), which contains sensory neurons that innervate oral and facial structures. We also investigated whether direct activation of the KATP effectively attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity in the context of an acute orofacial muscle pain condition. The KATP expression in TG and behavioral studies were conducted in age matched male and female Sprague Dawley rats. RT-PCR experiments showed that the mRNAs for the inwardly rectifying pore-forming subunits, Kir6.1 and Kir6.2, as well as the regulatory sulphonylurea subunits, SUR1 and SUR2, were reliably detected in TG. Subsequent western blot analysis confirmed that proteins for all 4 subunits are expressed in TG, and showed that Kir6.2 is expressed at a significantly higher level in male TG compared to that of female rats. This observation was confirmed by the immunohistochemical demonstration of higher percentages of Kir6 positive masseter afferents in female rats. Masseteric injection of capsaicin evokes a time dependent increase in masseter sensitivity to noxious mechanical stimulation. A specific KATP agonist, pinacidil, dose-dependently attenuated the capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in male rats. The dose of pinacidil (20µg) that completely blocked the capsaicin responses in male rats was ineffective in female rats regardless of their estrus phases. Only at the highest dose (300µg) we used, pinacidil was partially effective in female rats. Similarly, another KATP agonist, diazoxide which targets different KATP subunits also showed sex specific responses in attenuating capsaicin-induced masseter hypersensitivity. These data suggested that sex differences in functional KATP expression in TG may underlie sex specific responses to KATP agonists. The present study provided novel information on sex differences in KATP expression in TG and its contribution under an orofacial

  8. Activation of ATP-dependent K+ channels by hypoxia in smooth muscle cells isolated from the pig coronary artery.

    PubMed Central

    Dart, C; Standen, N B

    1995-01-01

    1. The perforated patch technique with amphotericin B was used to record whole-cell currents activated by hypoxia in smooth muscle cells, isolated enzymatically from pig coronary arteries. 2. Superfusion with hypoxic solution (O2 partial pressure, 25-40 mmHg) activated an inward current at -60 mV in 143 mM extracellular K+. The reversal potential of the current induced by hypoxia shifted with extracellular [K+] as expected for a K+ current, while its current-voltage relation was consistent with the channels showing little voltage dependence. 3. The hypoxia-induced current was inhibited by glibenclamide (10 microM), but was unaffected by charybdotoxin (50 nM). 4. In whole-cell recordings at -60 mV in 143 mM K+ solution, openings of single channels passing a current close to -2 pA could sometimes be detected in normoxic solution. Openings became more frequent during the onset of the response to hypoxia, when several levels could be detected. Channels with a similar conductance were activated by hypoxia in cell-attached patches. 5. Our results suggest that hypoxia activates ATP-dependent K+ channels. We discuss possible mechanisms by which this activation may occur. PMID:7539841

  9. ATP-sensitive K+ channels in pig urethral smooth muscle cells are heteromultimers of Kir6.1 and Kir6.2.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Noriyoshi; Zhu, Hai-Lei; Shibata, Atsushi; Aishima, Manami; Walsh, Emma J; Nagao, Masaya; Cole, William C

    2009-01-01

    The inwardly rectifying properties and molecular basis of ATP-sensitive K(+) channels (K(ATP) channels) have now been established for several cell types. However, these aspects of nonvascular smooth muscle K(ATP) channels still remain to be defined. In this study, we investigated the molecular basis of the pore of K(ATP) channels of pig urethral smooth muscle cells through a comparative study of the inwardly rectifying properties, conductance, and regulation by PKC of native and homo- and heteroconcatemeric recombinant Kir6.x channels coexpressed with sulfonylurea receptor subunit SUR2B in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells by the patch-clamp technique (conventional whole-cell and cell-attached modes). In conventional whole-cell clamp recordings, levcromakalim (> or = 1 microM) caused a concentration-dependent increase in current that demonstrated strong inward rectification at positive membrane potentials. In cell-attached mode, the unitary amplitude of levcromakalim-induced native and recombinant heteroconcatemeric Kir6.1-Kir6.2 K(ATP) channels also showed strong inward rectification at positive membrane potentials. Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, but not the inactive phorbol ester, 4alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, enhanced the activity of native and heteroconcatemeric K(ATP) channels at -50 mV. The conductance of the native channels at approximately 43 pS was consistent with that of heteroconcatemeric channels with a pore-forming subunit composition of (Kir6.1)(3)-(Kir6.2). RT-PCR analysis revealed the expression of Kir6.1 and Kir6.2 transcripts in pig urethral myocytes. Our findings provide the first evidence that the predominant K(ATP) channel expressed in pig urethral smooth muscle possesses a unique, heteromeric pore structure that differs from the homomeric Kir6.1 channels of vascular myocytes and is responsible for the differences in inward rectification, conductance, and PKC regulation exhibited by the channels in these smooth muscle cell types.

  10. Direct observation of a central bare zone in a native thick filament isolated from the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis using fluorescent ATP analogue.

    PubMed

    Oiwa, K; Yamaga, T; Yamada, A

    1998-04-01

    To investigate the existence of a central bare zone in native thick filaments isolated from the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis), the filaments were observed by fluorescence and dark-field microscopy after being incubated in the presence of Ca2+ with the fluorescent ATP analogue, Cy3-EDA-ATP. Filaments appeared under dark-field illumination as thin rods with tapered ends of length 5-30 microm. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that Cy3-EDA-ATP was bound to these filaments, except near their center. Although the boundary between this central non-fluorescent zone and fluorescent regions was not clearly defined, there was a trend for the width of the central non-fluorescent zone to increase with thick filament length (correlation coefficient = 0.45; n = 142). When Cy3-EDA-nucleotides bound to thick filaments were displaced by excess ATP, fluorescent images disappeared with a rate constant of 0. 024 s-1, close to the turnover rate of Cy3-EDA-ATP by myosin on the native thick filaments. These results indicate that each native thick filament isolated from the ABRM has a central bare zone, but its boundary was not sharply resolved.

  11. Nandrolone decanoate negatively reverses the beneficial effects of exercise on cardiac muscle via sarcolemmal, but not mitochondrial K(ATP) channel.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Gholamreza; Javan, Mohammad; Safari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Azadeh; Shokri, Saeed; Goudarzvand, Mahdi; Salimi, Mehdi; Hajizadeh, Sohrab

    2016-03-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels are supposed to have a substantial role in improvement of cardiac performance. This study was performed to evaluate whether nandrolone decanoate (ND) and (or) exercise training could affect the expression of cardiac K(ATP) channel subunits. Thirty-five male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, including sedentary control (SC), sedentary vehicle (SV), sedentary ND (SND), exercise control (EC), and exercise and ND (E+ND). Exercise training was performed on a treadmill 5 times per week. ND was injected (10 mg/kg/week, i.m.) to the rats in the SND and E+ND groups. Following cardiac isolation, the expression of both sarcolemmal and mitochondrial subunits of K(ATP) channel was measured using Western blot method. The expression of sarcolemmal, but not mitochondrial, subunits of K(ATP) channel (Kir6.2 and SUR2) of EC group was significantly higher compared with SC group while ND administration (SND group) did not show any change in their expression. In the E+ND group, ND administration led to decrease of the over-expression of sarcolemmal Kir6.2 and SUR2 which was previously induced by exercise. There was no significant association between the mitochondrial expression of either Kir6.2 or SUR2 proteins and administration of ND or exercise. Supra-physiological dosage of ND negatively reverses the effects of exercise on the cardiac muscle expression of sarcolemmal, but not mitochondrial, K(ATP) channel subunits.

  12. Skeletal muscle-derived interstitial progenitor cells (PICs) display stem cell properties, being clonogenic, self-renewing, and multi-potent in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cottle, Beverley J; Lewis, Fiona C; Shone, Victoria; Ellison-Hughes, Georgina M

    2017-07-04

    The development of cellular therapies to treat muscle wastage with disease or age is paramount. Resident muscle satellite cells are not currently regarded as a viable cell source due to their limited migration and growth capability ex vivo. This study investigated the potential of muscle-derived PW1(+)/Pax7(-) interstitial progenitor cells (PICs) as a source of tissue-specific stem/progenitor cells with stem cell properties and multipotency. Sca-1(+)/PW1(+) PICs were identified on tissue sections from hind limb muscle of 21-day-old mice, isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) technology and their phenotype and characteristics assessed over time in culture. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labelled PICs were used to determine multipotency in vivo in a tumour formation assay. Isolated PICs expressed markers of pluripotency (Oct3/4, Sox2, and Nanog), were clonogenic, and self-renewing with >60 population doublings, and a population doubling time of 15.8 ± 2.9 h. PICs demonstrated an ability to generate both striated and smooth muscle, whilst also displaying the potential to differentiate into cell types of the three germ layers both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, PICs did not form tumours in vivo. These findings open new avenues for a variety of solid tissue engineering and regeneration approaches, utilising a single multipotent stem cell type isolated from an easily accessible source such as skeletal muscle.

  13. H2S relaxes isolated human airway smooth muscle cells via the sarcolemmal K(ATP) channel.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Robert; DeSantiago, Breann; Lee, Danielle Y; Yang, Guangdong; Kim, Jae Yeon; Foster, D Brian; Chan-Li, Yee; Horton, Maureen R; Panettieri, Reynold A; Wang, Rui; An, Steven S

    2014-03-28

    Here we explored the impact of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on biophysical properties of the primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM)-the end effector of acute airway narrowing in asthma. Using magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC), we measured dynamic changes in the stiffness of isolated ASM, at the single-cell level, in response to varying doses of GYY4137 (1-10mM). GYY4137 slowly released appreciable levels of H2S in the range of 10-275 μM, and H2S released was long lived. In isolated human ASM cells, GYY4137 acutely decreased stiffness (i.e. an indicator of the single-cell relaxation) in a dose-dependent fashion, and stiffness decreases were sustained in culture for 24h. Human ASM cells showed protein expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE; a H2S synthesizing enzyme) and ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. The KATP channel opener pinacidil effectively relaxed isolated ASM cells. In addition, pinacidil-induced ASM relaxation was completely inhibited by the treatment of cells with the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide. Glibenclamide also markedly attenuated GYY4137-mediated relaxation of isolated human ASM cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that H2S causes the relaxation of human ASM and implicate as well the role for sarcolemmal KATP channels. Finally, given that ASM cells express intrinsic enzymatic machinery of generating H2S, we suggest thereby this class of gasotransmitter can be further exploited for potential therapy against obstructive lung disease.

  14. An NF-κB – EphrinA5 – Dependent Communication between NG2+ Interstitial Cells and Myoblasts Promotes Muscle Growth in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jin-Mo; Wang, David J.; Peterson, Jennifer M.; Shintaku, Jonathan; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Coppola, Vincenzo; Frakes, Ashley E.; Kaspar, Brian K.; Cornelison, Dawn D.; Guttridge, Denis C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Skeletal muscle growth immediately following birth is a critical for proper body posture and locomotion. However, compared to embryogenesis and adulthood, the processes regulating the maturation of neonatal muscles is considerably less clear. Studies in the 1960s predicted that neonatal muscle growth results from nuclear accretion of myoblasts preferentially at the tips of myofibers. Remarkably, little information has been added since then to resolve how myoblasts migrate to the ends of fibers. Here, we provide insight to this process by revealing a unique NF-κB-dependent communication between NG2+ interstitial cells and myoblasts. NF-κB in NG2+ cells promotes myoblast migration to the tips of myofibers through cell-cell contact. This occurs through expression of ephrinA5 from NG2+ cells, which we further deduce is an NF-κB target gene. Together, results suggest that NF-κB plays an important role in the development of newborn muscles to ensure proper myoblast migration for fiber growth. PMID:26777211

  15. Short-Term Exercise Training Does Not Stimulate Skeletal Muscle ATP Synthesis in Relatives of Humans With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kacerovsky-Bielesz, Gertrud; Chmelik, Marek; Ling, Charlotte; Pokan, Rochus; Szendroedi, Julia; Farukuoye, Michaela; Kacerovsky, Michaela; Schmid, Albrecht I.; Gruber, Stephan; Wolzt, Michael; Moser, Ewald; Pacini, Giovanni; Smekal, Gerhard; Groop, Leif; Roden, Michael

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested the hypothesis that short-term exercise training improves hereditary insulin resistance by stimulating ATP synthesis and investigated associations with gene polymorphisms. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 24 nonobese first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients and 12 control subjects at rest and 48 h after three bouts of exercise. In addition to measurements of oxygen uptake and insulin sensitivity (oral glucose tolerance test), ectopic lipids and mitochondrial ATP synthesis were assessed using1H and31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. They were genotyped for polymorphisms in genes regulating mitochondrial function, PPARGC1A (rs8192678) and NDUFB6 (rs540467). RESULTS Relatives had slightly lower (P = 0.012) insulin sensitivity than control subjects. In control subjects, ATP synthase flux rose by 18% (P = 0.0001), being 23% higher (P = 0.002) than that in relatives after exercise training. Relatives responding to exercise training with increased ATP synthesis (+19%, P = 0.009) showed improved insulin sensitivity (P = 0.009) compared with those whose insulin sensitivity did not improve. A polymorphism in the NDUFB6 gene from respiratory chain complex I related to ATP synthesis (P = 0.02) and insulin sensitivity response to exercise training (P = 0.05). ATP synthase flux correlated with O2uptake and insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSIONS The ability of short-term exercise to stimulate ATP production distinguished individuals with improved insulin sensitivity from those whose insulin sensitivity did not improve. In addition, the NDUFB6 gene polymorphism appeared to modulate this adaptation. This finding suggests that genes involved in mitochondrial function contribute to the response of ATP synthesis to exercise training. PMID:19265027

  16. A model of cross-bridge attachment to actin in the A*M*ATP state based on x-ray diffraction from permeabilized rabbit psoas muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jin; Xu, Sengen; Yu, Leepo C

    2002-01-01

    A model of cross-bridges binding to actin in the weak binding A*M*ATP state is presented. The modeling was based on the x-ray diffraction patterns from the relaxed skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers where ATP hydrolysis was inhibited by N-phenylmaleimide treatment (S. Xu, J. Gu, G. Melvin, L. C. Yu. 2002. Biophys. J. 82:2111-2122). Calculations included both the myosin filaments and the actin filaments of the muscle cells, and the binding to actin was assumed to be single headed. To achieve a good fit, considerable flexibility in the orientation of the myosin head and the position of the S1-S2 junction is necessary, such that the myosin head can bind to a nearby actin whereas the tail end was kept in the proximity of the helical track of the myosin filament. Hence, the best-fit model shows that the head binds to actin in a wide range of orientations, and the tail end deviates substantially from its lattice position in the radial direction (approximately 60 A). Surprisingly, the best fit model reveals that the detached head, whose location thus far has remained undetected, seems to be located close to the surface of the myosin filament. Another significant requirement of the best-fit model is that the binding site on actin is near the N terminus of the actin subunit, a position distinct from the putative rigor-binding site. The results support the idea that the essential role played by the weak binding states M*ATP <--> A*M*ATP for force generation lies in its flexibility, because the probability of attachment is greatly increased, compared with the weak binding M*ADP*P(i) <--> A*M*ADP*P(i) states. PMID:11916868

  17. [Interstitial microdialysis study of changes in metabolism and blood flow in skeletal muscles during cardiac surgery with normothermic and hypothermic extracorporeal circulation].

    PubMed

    Mand'ák, J; Zivný, P; Lonský, V; Palicka, V; Kakrdová, D; Marsíková, M; Kunes, P; Kubícek, J

    2003-09-01

    Hypoperfusion of peripheral tissues and splanchnic organs during cardiac surgery in extracorporeal circulation may lead to the origin of serious complications. The aim of the study was to monitor metabolism and blood pressure in interstital peripheral tissue, skeletal muscle, during the operation on the patient with extracorporeal circulation (ECC) in an early post-operation period by means of microdialysis. The interstitial microdialysis is a minimally invasive method for the biochemical monitoring of metabolic changes and blood pressure in extracellular space of tissue. The substances in interstitium pass across a semipermeable membrane of the inserted microdialysis probe and may be analyzed. Microdialysis in this study was performed by means of two microdialysis probes CMA (CMA Microdialysis AB, Sweden) inserted into the deltoid muscle of the surgically treated patient. The probes were perfused by the Ringer solution at the rate of 0.3 ml/hour. The dialysates were sampled in the following intervals: beginning of the operation, beginning of ECC, end of ECC, end of the operation, two hours during the post-operation period. Standard biochemical methods were to evaluate, in the dialysates, glucose, urea, glycerol and lactate. The blood flow in the interstitium was monitored by means of dynamic microdialysis of gentamycine as a marker. Microdialysis was performed in 40 patients with ischemic heart disease, operated on in the extracorporeal circulation. In 20 patients the ECC was performed in normothermia (NT), while in the other 20 patients it was made in hypothermia (HT). In both groups, NT versus HT, a similar dynamism of interstitial concentration of the observed substances in relation to the operation phase and in early post-operation period. Low initial concentrations were gradually increasing during the extracorporeal circulation and increased further after the end of extracorporeal circulation and also in the subsequent phase of the operation. The

  18. Are Interstitial Cells of Cajal Involved in Mechanical Stress-Induced Gene Expression and Impairment of Smooth Muscle Contractility in Bowel Obstruction?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chester C.; Lin, You-Min; Gao, Jerry; Winston, John H.; Cheng, Leo K.; Shi, Xuan-Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The network of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) is altered in obstructive bowel disorders (OBD). However, whether alteration in ICC network is a cause or consequence of OBD remains unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that mechanical dilation in obstruction disrupts the ICC network and that ICC do not mediate mechanotranscription of COX-2 and impairment of smooth muscle contractility in obstruction. Methods Medical-grade silicon bands were wrapped around the distal colon to induce partial obstruction in wild-type and ICC deficient (W/Wv) mice. Results In wild-type mice, colon obstruction led to time-dependent alterations of the ICC network in the proximal colon segment. Although unaffected on days 1 and 3, the ICC density decreased markedly and the network was disrupted on day 7 of obstruction. COX-2 expression increased, and circular muscle contractility decreased significantly in the segment proximal to obstruction. In W/Wv control mice, COX-2 mRNA level was 4.0 (±1.1)-fold higher (n=4) and circular muscle contractility was lower than in wild-type control mice. Obstruction further increased COX-2 mRNA level in W/Wv mice to 7.2 (±1.0)-fold vs. W/Wv controls [28.8 (±4.1)-fold vs. wild-type controls] on day 3. Obstruction further suppressed smooth muscle contractility in W/Wv mice. However, daily administration of COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 significantly improved muscle contractility in both W/Wv sham and obstruction mice. Conclusions Lumen dilation disrupts the ICC network. ICC deficiency has limited effect on stretch-induced expression of COX-2 and suppression of smooth muscle contractility in obstruction. Rather, stretch-induced COX-2 plays a critical role in motility dysfunction in partial colon obstruction. PMID:24098782

  19. Interstitial Nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Tags: acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, AIN, interstitial nephritis, kidney disorders, kidney failure, renal failure, renal infection Men, Seniors, Women December 2004 ...

  20. ATP Sensitive Potassium Channels in the Skeletal Muscle Function: Involvement of the KCNJ11(Kir6.2) Gene in the Determination of Mechanical Warner Bratzer Shear Force

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Domenico; Selvaggi, Maria; Passantino, Giuseppe; De Palo, Pasquale; Dario, Cataldo; Centoducati, Pasquale; Tateo, Alessandra; Curci, Angela; Maqoud, Fatima; Mele, Antonietta; Camerino, Giulia M.; Liantonio, Antonella; Imbrici, Paola; Zizzo, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-sensitive K+-channels (KATP) are distributed in the tissues coupling metabolism with K+ ions efflux. KATP subunits are encoded by KCNJ8 (Kir6.1), KCNJ11 (Kir6.2), ABCC8 (SUR1), and ABCC9 (SUR2) genes, alternative RNA splicing give rise to SUR variants that confer distinct physiological properties on the channel. An high expression/activity of the sarco-KATP channel is observed in various rat fast-twitch muscles, characterized by elevated muscle strength, while a low expression/activity is observed in the slow-twitch muscles characterized by reduced strength and frailty. Down-regulation of the KATP subunits of fast-twitch fibers is found in conditions characterized by weakness and frailty. KCNJ11 gene knockout mice have reduced glycogen, lean phenotype, lower body fat, and weakness. KATP channel is also a sensor of muscle atrophy. The KCNJ11 gene is located on BTA15, close to a QTL for meat tenderness, it has also a role in glycogen storage, a key mechanism of the postmortem transformation of muscle into meat. The role of KCNJ11 gene in muscle function may underlie an effect of KCNJ11 genotypes on meat tenderness, as recently reported. The fiber phenotype and genotype are important in livestock production science. Quantitative traits including meat production and quality are influenced both by environment and genes. Molecular markers can play an important role in the genetic improvement of animals through breeding strategies. Many factors influence the muscle Warner-Bratzler shear force including breed, age, feeding, the biochemical, and functional parameters. The role of KCNJ11gene and related genes on muscle tenderness will be discussed in the present review. PMID:27242541

  1. Remote postconditioning attenuates ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat skeletal muscle through mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Il; Wook Nha, Kyung; Suh, Jin Soo; Choo, Suk Kyu; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Jong Woong

    2013-11-01

    The authors investigated whether a remote postconditioning (remote post-con) procedure attenuated skeletal muscle ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We determined the optimal protocol of remote post-con and investigated its mechanism. Ischemia was induced for 3 hours in rat left hindlimb and three protocols of remote post-con were applied in right hindlimb just before the end of ischemia. The first (10-second group) involved two cycles of 10 seconds of occlusion followed by 10 seconds of reperfusion. The second (5-minute group) involved two cycles of 5 minutes of occlusion/reperfusion. The third (10-minute group) involved two cycles of 10 minutes of occlusion/reperfusion. In 5- and 10-minute groups, wet/dry ratio and muscle fiber edema were significantly lower than control group. Muscle contractility was preserved in 5- and 10-minute groups. An injection of 5-hydroxydecanoate (a specific blocker of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ [mKATP] channels) impaired this effect. This study demonstrates that remote post-con preserves muscle contractility and reduces tissue edema and necrosis, possibly through the activation of mKATP channels. We suggest that two cycles of 5 minutes of occlusion followed by 5 minutes of reperfusion are optimal protocols of remote post-con in skeletal muscle I/R injury. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. ATP Consumption by Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ Pumps Accounts for 40-50% of Resting Metabolic Rate in Mouse Fast and Slow Twitch Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ian Curtis; Bombardier, Eric; Vigna, Chris; Tupling, A. Russell

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to directly quantify the relative contribution of Ca2+ cycling to resting metabolic rate in mouse fast (extensor digitorum longus, EDL) and slow (soleus) twitch skeletal muscle. Resting oxygen consumption of isolated muscles (VO2, µL/g wet weight/s) measured polarographically at 30°C was ~20% higher (P<0.05) in soleus (0.326 ± 0.022) than in EDL (0.261 ± 0.020). In order to quantify the specific contribution of Ca2+ cycling to resting metabolic rate, the concentration of MgCl2 in the bath was increased to 10 mM to block Ca2+ release through the ryanodine receptor, thus eliminating a major source of Ca2+ leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and thereby indirectly inhibiting the activity of the sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCAs). The relative (%) reduction in muscle VO2 in response to 10 mM MgCl2 was similar between soleus (48.0±3.7) and EDL (42.4±3.2). Using a different approach, we attempted to directly inhibit SERCA ATPase activity in stretched EDL and soleus muscles (1.42x optimum length) using the specific SERCA inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid (CPA, up to 160 µM), but were unsuccessful in removing the energetic cost of Ca2+ cycling in resting isolated muscles. The results of the MgCl2 experiments indicate that ATP consumption by SERCAs is responsible for 40–50% of resting metabolic rate in both mouse fast- and slow-twitch muscles at 30°C, or 12–15% of whole body resting VO2. Thus, SERCA pumps in skeletal muscle could represent an important control point for energy balance regulation and a potential target for metabolic alterations to oppose obesity. PMID:23840903

  3. ATP consumption by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ pumps accounts for 40-50% of resting metabolic rate in mouse fast and slow twitch skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ian Curtis; Bombardier, Eric; Vigna, Chris; Tupling, A Russell

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to directly quantify the relative contribution of Ca²⁺ cycling to resting metabolic rate in mouse fast (extensor digitorum longus, EDL) and slow (soleus) twitch skeletal muscle. Resting oxygen consumption of isolated muscles (VO₂, µL/g wet weight/s) measured polarographically at 30°C was ~20% higher (P<0.05) in soleus (0.326 ± 0.022) than in EDL (0.261 ± 0.020). In order to quantify the specific contribution of Ca²⁺ cycling to resting metabolic rate, the concentration of MgCl₂ in the bath was increased to 10 mM to block Ca²⁺ release through the ryanodine receptor, thus eliminating a major source of Ca²⁺ leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and thereby indirectly inhibiting the activity of the sarco(endo) plasmic reticulum Ca²⁺-ATPases (SERCAs). The relative (%) reduction in muscle VO₂ in response to 10 mM MgCl₂ was similar between soleus (48.0±3.7) and EDL (42.4±3.2). Using a different approach, we attempted to directly inhibit SERCA ATPase activity in stretched EDL and soleus muscles (1.42x optimum length) using the specific SERCA inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid (CPA, up to 160 µM), but were unsuccessful in removing the energetic cost of Ca²⁺ cycling in resting isolated muscles. The results of the MgCl₂ experiments indicate that ATP consumption by SERCAs is responsible for 40-50% of resting metabolic rate in both mouse fast- and slow-twitch muscles at 30°C, or 12-15% of whole body resting VO₂. Thus, SERCA pumps in skeletal muscle could represent an important control point for energy balance regulation and a potential target for metabolic alterations to oppose obesity.

  4. Interstitial keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... However, interstitial keratitis accounts for 10% of avoidable blindness in the least developed countries worldwide. ... chap 4.17. World Health Organization. Causes of blindness and visual impairment. Prevention of blindness and visual ...

  5. Interstitial thermoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, C T; Strohbehn, J W

    1989-05-01

    The more recent engineering and clinical aspects of interstitial hyperthermia are reviewed. The advantages and difficulties of microwave, radiofrequency, and ferromagnetic seeds are evaluated and some future directions for improvements are outlined.

  6. Interstitial nephritis

    MedlinePlus

    Arend LJ. Tubulointerstitial diseases. In: Lager DJ, Abrahams NA, eds. Practical Renal Pathology . Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 7. Nangaku M. Chronic interstitial nephritis. In: Johnson RJ, Feehally J, Floege ...

  7. Alpha-2 adrenoceptors are present in rat aorta smooth muscle cells, and their action is mediated by ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Fauaz, G; Feres, T; Borges, A C; Paiva, T B

    2000-10-01

    The role of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors in the response of aorta smooth muscle rings to the alpha(2)-adrenoceptors agonists UK 14,304 and clonidine was studied. Stimulation by 1 - 10 nM UK 14,304 caused dose-dependent relaxant responses in BaCl(2)-contracted endothelium-denuded aorta rings, and hyperpolarization in rings with or without endothelium, which were inhibited by yohimbine and glibenclamide, but not affected by prazosin, propranolol, apamin or iberiotoxin. At higher concentrations (10 nM - 10 microM) UK 14,304 also induced a depolarizing effect which was potentiated by yohimbine and inhibited by prazosin. These results indicate that UK 14,304 acts on alpha(2)-adrenoceptors at lower concentrations and on both alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-adrenoceptors above 10 nM. In rings, with or without endothelium, noradrenaline had a depolarizing effect which was inhibited by prazosin. Adrenaline did not affect the membrane potential but in the presence of prazosin caused hyperpolarization, which was inhibited by yohimbine and glibenclamide. These results indicate that noradrenaline is more selective for alpha(1)-, whereas adrenaline has similar affinities for alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. In aortae with endothelium, L-NNA caused a small depolarization but did not affect the hyperpolarization induced by UK 14,304, indicating that NO is not involved in that response. Glibenclamide induced a small depolarization in aortae, with or without endothelium, indicating that ATP-sensitive K(+) channels may play a role in maintaining the smooth muscle's membrane potential. Our results indicate that, in rat aorta, alpha(2)-adrenoceptors are also present in the smooth muscle, and that these receptors act through small-conductance ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

  8. Effects of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) channel on protein kinase C pathway and airway smooth muscle cell proliferation in asthma.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xuan; Zhao, Jianping; Xie, Jungang

    2012-08-01

    The effects of ATP-sensitive mitochondrial K(+) channel (mitoK(ATP)) on mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), cell proliferation and protein kinase C alpha (PKCα) expression in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) were investigated. Thirty-six Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were immunized with saline (controls) or ovalbumin (OVA) with alum (asthma models). ASMCs were cultured from the lung of control and asthma rats. ASMCs were treated with diazoxide (the potent activator of mitoK(ATP)) or 5-hydroxydencanote (5-HD, the inhibitor of mitoK(ATP)). Rhodamine-123 (R-123) was used to detect Δψm. The expression of PKCα protein was examined by using Western blotting, while PKCα mRNA expression was detected by using real-time PCR. The proliferation of ASMCs was measured by MTT assay and cell cycle analysis. In diazoxide-treated normal ASMCs, the R-123 fluorescence intensity, protein and mRNA levels of PKCα, MTT A values and percentage of cells in S phase were markedly increased as compared with untreated controls. The ratio of G(0)/G(1) cells was decreased (P<0.05) in diazoxide-treated ASMCs from normal rats. However, there were no significant differences between the ASMCs from healthy rats treated with 5-HD and the normal control group. In untreated and diazoxide-treated ASMCs of asthmatic rats, the R-123 fluorescence intensity, protein and mRNA levels of PKCα, MTT A values and the percentage of cells in S phase were increased in comparison to the normal control group. Furthermore, in comparison to ASMCs from asthmatic rats, these values were considerably increased in asthmatic group treated with diazoxide (P<0.05). After exposure to 5-HD for 24 h, these values were decreased as compared with asthma control group (P<0.05). In ASMCs of asthma, the signal transduction pathway of PKCα may be involved in cell proliferation, which is induced by the opening of mitoK(ATP) and the depolarization of Δψm.

  9. Expression of anoctamin 1/TMEM16A by interstitial cells of Cajal is fundamental for slow wave activity in gastrointestinal muscles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung Jin; Blair, Peter J A; Britton, Fiona C; O'Driscoll, Kate E; Hennig, Grant; Bayguinov, Yulia R; Rock, Jason R; Harfe, Brian D; Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M

    2009-10-15

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) generate pacemaker activity (slow waves) in gastrointestinal (GI) smooth muscles, but the mechanism(s) of pacemaker activity are controversial. Several conductances, such as Ca(2+)-activated Cl() channels (CaCC) and non-selective cation channels (NSCC) have been suggested to be involved in slow wave depolarization. We investigated the expression and function of a new class of CaCC, anoctamin 1 (ANO1), encoded by Tmem16a, which was discovered to be highly expressed in ICC in a microarray screen. GI muscles express splice variants of the Tmem16a transcript in addition to other paralogues of the Tmem16a family. ANO1 protein is expressed abundantly and specifically in ICC in all regions of the murine, non-human primate (Macaca fascicularis) and human GI tracts. CaCC blocking drugs, niflumic acid and 4,4-diisothiocyano-2,2-stillbene-disulfonic acid (DIDS) reduced the frequency and blocked slow waves in murine, primate, human small intestine and stomach in a concentration-dependent manner. Unitary potentials, small stochastic membrane depolarizations thought to underlie slow waves, were insensitive to CaCC blockers. Slow waves failed to develop by birth in mice homozygous for a null allele of Tmem16a (Tmem16a(tm1Bdh)(/tm1Bdh)) and did not develop subsequent to birth in organ culture, as in wildtype and heterozygous muscles. Loss of function of ANO1 did not inhibit the development of ICC networks that appeared structurally normal as indicated by Kit antibodies. These data demonstrate the fundamental role of ANO1 in the generation of slow waves in GI ICC.

  10. Characterization of smooth muscle, enteric nerve, interstitial cells of Cajal, and fibroblast-like cells in the gastric musculature of patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Hwang, Il Seon; Park, Jae Hyung; Jang, Byung Ik; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Jeon, Sung Woo; Kim, Eun Soo; Park, Chang Sik; Kwon, Joong Goo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate histologic abnormalities in the gastric smooth muscle of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). METHODS Full-thickness gastric specimens were obtained from patients undergoing surgery for gastric cancer. H&E stain and Masson’s Trichrome stain were performed to assess the degree of fibrosis. Immunohistochemical staining using various antibodies was also performed [antibodies against protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor, c-Kit, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha, (PDGFRα)]. Immunofluorescent staining and evaluation with confocal microscopy were also conducted. RESULTS Twenty-six controls and 35 diabetic patients (21 short-duration patients and 14 long-duration patients) were included. There were no significant differences in basic demographics between the two groups except in mean body mass index (BMI) (higher in the DM group). Proportions of moderate-to-severe intercellular fibrosis in the muscle layer were significantly higher in the DM group than in the control group (P < 0.01). On immunohistochemical staining, c-Kit- and PDGFRα-positive immunoreactivity were significantly decreased in the DM group compared with the control group (P < 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in PGP9.5, nNOS, VIP, and neurokinin 1 expression. On immunofluorescent staining, cellularity of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) was observed to decrease with increasing duration of DM. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that increased intercellular fibrosis, loss of ICC, and loss of fibroblast-like cells are found in the smooth muscle of DM patients. These abnormalities may contribute to changes in gastric motor activity in patients with DM. PMID:28028361

  11. Potassium and ANO1/TMEM16A chloride channel profiles distinguish atypical and typical smooth muscle cells from interstitial cells in the mouse renal pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Javed; Tonta, Mary A; Mitsui, Retsu; Li, Qun; Kett, Michelle; Li, Jinhua; Parkington, Helena C; Hashitani, Hikaru; Lang, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Although atypical smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the proximal renal pelvis are thought to generate the pacemaker signals that drive pyeloureteric peristalsis, their location and electrical properties remain obscure. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Standard patch clamp, intracellular microelectrode and immunohistochemistry techniques were used. To unequivocally identify SMCs, transgenic mice with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) expressed in cells containing α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were sometimes used. KEY RESULTS Atypical SMCs were distinguished from typical SMCs by the absence of both a transient 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K+ current (IKA) and spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) upon the opening of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels. Many typical SMCs displayed a slowly activating, slowly decaying Cl- current blocked by niflumic acid (NFA). Immunostaining for KV4.3 and ANO1/ TMEM16A Cl- channel subunits co-localized with α-SMA immunoreactive product predominately in the distal renal pelvis. Atypical SMCs fired spontaneous inward currents that were either selective for Cl- and blocked by NFA, or cation-selective and blocked by La3+. α-SMA- interstitial cells (ICs) were distinguished by the presence of a Xe991-sensitive KV7 current, BK channel STOCs and Cl- selective, NFA-sensitive spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs). Intense ANO1/ TMEM16A and KV7.5 immunostaining was present in Kit-α-SMA- ICs in the suburothelial and adventitial regions of the renal pelvis. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We conclude that KV4.3+α-SMA+ SMCs are typical SMCs that facilitate muscle wall contraction, that ANO1/ TMEM16A and KV7.5 immunoreactivity may be selective markers of Kit- ICs and that atypical SMCs which discharge spontaneous inward currents are the pelviureteric pacemakers. PMID:22014103

  12. Optical absorption and scattering properties of bulk porcine muscle phantoms from interstitial radiance measurements in 650-900 nm range.

    PubMed

    Grabtchak, Serge; Montgomery, Logan G; Whelan, William M

    2014-05-21

    We demonstrated the application of relative radiance-based continuous wave (cw) measurements for recovering absorption and scattering properties (the effective attenuation coefficient, the diffusion coefficient, the absorption coefficient and the reduced scattering coefficient) of bulk porcine muscle phantoms in the 650-900 nm spectral range. Both the side-firing fiber (the detector) and the fiber with a spherical diffuser at the end (the source) were inserted interstitially at predetermined locations in the phantom. The porcine phantoms were prostate-shaped with ∼4 cm in diameter and ∼3 cm thickness and made from porcine loin or tenderloin muscles. The described method was previously validated using the diffusion approximation on simulated and experimental radiance data obtained for homogenous Intralipid-1% liquid phantom. The approach required performing measurements in two locations in the tissue with different distances to the source. Measurements were performed on 21 porcine phantoms. Spectral dependences of the effective attenuation and absorption coefficients for the loin phantom deviated from corresponding dependences for the tenderloin phantom for wavelengths <750 nm. The diffusion constant and the reduced scattering coefficient were very close for both phantom types. To quantify chromophore presence, the plot for the absorption coefficient was matched with a synthetic absorption spectrum constructed from deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin and water. The closest match for the porcine loin spectrum was obtained with the following concentrations: 15.5 µM (±30% s.d.) Hb, 21 µM (±30% s.d.) HbO2 and 0.3 (±30% s.d.) fractional volume of water. The tenderloin absorption spectrum was best described by 30 µM Hb (±30% s.d), 19 µM (±30% s.d.) HbO2 and 0.3 (±30% s.d.) fractional volume of water. The higher concentration of Hb in tenderloin was consistent with a dark-red appearance of the tenderloin phantom. The method can be applied to a number of

  13. Muscle protein waste in tumor-bearing rats is effectively antagonized by a beta 2-adrenergic agonist (clenbuterol). Role of the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Costelli, P; García-Martínez, C; Llovera, M; Carbó, N; López-Soriano, F J; Agell, N; Tessitore, L; Baccino, F M; Argilés, J M

    1995-01-01

    Tissue protein hypercatabolism (TPH) is a most important feature in cancer cachexia, particularly with regard to the skeletal muscle. The rat ascites hepatoma Yoshida AH-130 is a very suitable model system for studying the mechanisms involved in the processes that lead to tissue depletion, since it induces in the host a rapid and progressive muscle waste mainly due to TPH (Tessitore, L., G. Bonelli, and F. M. Baccino. 1987. Biochem. J. 241:153-159). Detectable plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha associated with marked perturbations in the hormonal homeostasis have been shown to concur in forcing metabolism into a catabolic setting (Tessitore, L., P. Costelli, and F. M. Baccino. 1993. Br. J. Cancer. 67:15-23). The present study was directed to investigate if beta 2-adrenergic agonists, which are known to favor skeletal muscle hypertrophy, could effectively antagonize the enhanced muscle protein breakdown in this cancer cachexia model. One such agent, i.e., clenbuterol, indeed largely prevented skeletal muscle waste in AH-130-bearing rats by restoring protein degradative rates close to control values. This normalization of protein breakdown rates was achieved through a decrease of the hyperactivation of the ATP-ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway, as previously demonstrated in our laboratory (Llovera, M., C. García-Martínez, N. Agell, M. Marzábal, F. J. López-Soriano, and J. M. Argilés. 1994. FEBS (Fed. Eur. Biochem. Soc.) Lett. 338:311-318). By contrast, the drug did not exert any measurable effect on various parenchymal organs, nor did it modify the plasma level of corticosterone and insulin, which were increased and decreased, respectively, in the tumor hosts. The present data give new insights into the mechanisms by which clenbuterol exerts its preventive effect on muscle protein waste and seem to warrant the implementation of experimental protocols involving the use of clenbuterol or alike drugs in the treatment of pathological states involving

  14. In vivo evidence of an age-related increase in ATP cost of contraction in the plantar flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Layec, Gwenael; Trinity, Joel D; Hart, Corey R; Kim, Seong-Eun; Groot, Henderik Jonathan; Le Fur, Yann; Sorensen, Jacob R; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S

    2014-04-01

    Impaired skeletal muscle efficiency potentially contributes to the age-related decline in exercise capacity and may explain the altered haemodynamic response to exercise in the elderly. Thus we examined whether (i) the ATP cost of contraction increases with age, and (ii) this results in altered convective O(2) delivery to maintain microvascular oxygenation in the calf muscle. To this aim, we used an integrative experimental approach combining (31)P-MRS (magnetic resonance spectroscopy), Doppler ultrasound imaging and NIRS (near-IR spectroscopy) during dynamic plantar flexion exercise at 40% of WR(max) (maximal power output) in 20 healthy young and 20 older subjects matched for physical activity. The ATP cost of contraction was significantly higher in the old (7.2±4.1 mM/min per W) compared with the young (2.4±1.9 mM/min per W; P<0.05) and this was only significantly correlated with the plantar flexion WR(max) value in the old subjects (r=-0.52; P<0.05). Even when differences in power output were taken into account, end-exercise blood flow (old, 259±168 ml/min per W and young, 134±40 ml/min per W; P<0.05) and convective O(2) delivery (old, 0.048±0.031 l/min per W and young, 0.026±0.008 l/min per W; P<0.05) were greater in the old in comparison with the young subjects. In contrast, the NIRS oxyhaemoglobin, deoxyhaemoglobin and microvascular oxygenation indices were not significantly different between the groups (P>0.05). Therefore the present study reveals that, although the peripheral haemodynamic responses to plantar flexion exercise appear to be appropriate, the elevated energy cost of contraction and associated reduction in the WR(max) value in this muscle group may play a role in limiting exercise capacity with age.

  15. Interstitial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Milligan, A J; Dobelbower, R R

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of hyperthermia as a treatment modality for cancer continues to gain popularity in the medical community. One of the disappointing findings has been the inability to deliver uniform thermal doses to tumor volumes. This inability to heat certain tumors is due to a variety of physical and physiologic phenomena. To increase the ability of heating tumors, local interstitial techniques have been developed that are proving to be safe and effective. These techniques employ implanted microwave or radiofrequency antennae for the delivery of local thermal doses. Recently, investigations into the placement of interstitially located ferromagnetic seeds for local hyperthermia have also been conducted. The seeds can be heated by delivery of a high-wattage RF magnetic field to the implanted volume by an external source after implantation. The tissue surrounding the ferromagnetic implant is heated by conduction of heat away from the implanted seeds. While these techniques have been effective, further development of the instrumentation for interstitial therapies is continuing. These developments will include the application of specific control circuitry for delivery of accurate thermal doses.

  16. An in vivo microdialysis characterization of the transient changes in the interstitial dialysate concentration of metabolites and cytokines in human skeletal muscle in response to insertion of a microdialysis probe.

    PubMed

    Carson, Brian P; McCormack, William G; Conway, Clare; Cooke, John; Saunders, Jean; O'Connor, William T; Jakeman, Philip M

    2015-02-01

    Skeletal muscle has recently been described as an endocrine organ, capable of releasing cytokines and regulators of metabolism. Microdialysis of the interstitial space of skeletal muscle enables analysis of the release of such cytokines. The purpose of this study was to determine the transient changes in concentration of metabolites and cytokines in human skeletal muscle in a 7h period following the insertion of a microdialysis probe. In total, sixteen microdialysis catheters were inserted into the vastus lateralis of male participants (age 26.2±1.35y, height 180.8±3.89cm, mass 83.9±3.86kg, BMI 25.7±0.87kgm(-2), body fat 26.1±3.0%). Serial samples were analyzed by micro-enzymatic and multiplexed immunoassay. Muscle interstitial glucose and lactate levels remained stable throughout, amino acid concentrations stabilized after 2.5h, however, insertion of a microdialysis catheter induced a 29-fold increase in peak IL-6 (p<0.001) and 35-fold increase in peak IL-8 concentrations (p<0.001) above basal levels 6h post insertion. In contrast to stable amino acid, glucose and lactate concentrations after 2h, commonly reported markers of tissue homeostasis in in vivo microdialysis, the multi-fold increase in IL-6 and IL-8 following insertion of a microdialysis catheter is indicative of a sustained disturbance of tissue homeostasis.

  17. ATP-sensitive K+ channels mediate alpha 2D-adrenergic receptor contraction of arteriolar smooth muscle and reversal of contraction by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, J; Faber, J E

    1995-01-01

    Evidence in rat skeletal muscle suggests that local metabolic control of blood flow is facilitated by the reliance on alpha 2D-adrenergic receptors (ARs) for constriction of arterioles, together with the strong sensitivity of this constriction to inhibition by hypoxia. The present study examined the role of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels in the selective interaction between alpha 2D-ARs and hypoxia. Arterioles from rat cremaster muscle that possess both alpha 1D (alpha 1A/D)- and alpha 2D-AR subtypes were microcannulated, pressurized, and isolated in a tissue bath for measurement of changes in lumen diameter. Three studies first examined whether stimulation of alpha 2D- and alpha 1D-ARs involves inhibition of the KATP channel. Concentration-dependent constriction by the KATP antagonists glibenclamide (GLB, 0.01 to 10 mumol/L) and disopyramide (0.001 to 1 mmol/L) were abolished during alpha 2D stimulation but unaffected during alpha 1D stimulation. Activation of the KATP channel by cromakalim inhibited alpha 2D constriction with greater potency than alpha 1D (EC50, 7.0 +/- 0.2 versus 6.3 +/- 0.1). Finally, GLB (0.5 mumol/L) abolished dose-dependent alpha 2D constriction, whereas alpha 1D was unaffected. These data suggest that alpha 2D but not alpha 1D stimulation is "coupled" with closure of the KATP channel, leading to depolarization and contraction of vascular smooth muscle. In a second series, hypoxic (PO2, 6 mm Hg) inhibition of intrinsic smooth muscle tone was completely reversed by 0.1 mumol/L GLB, concentration-dependent GLB constriction was enhanced during hypoxia, and hypoxia reversed GLB constriction. These data confirm reports by others that hypoxia potentiates the activation of KATP channels, leading to hyperpolarization and relaxation. Finally, GLB constriction, which was abolished by concomitant alpha 2D stimulation, was completely restored by simultaneous activation of KATP channels with hypoxia. These findings suggest that the sensitivity of alpha

  18. cDNA sequence of a human skeletal muscle ADP/ATP translocator: lack of a leader peptide, divergence from a fibroblast translocator cDNA, and coevolution with mitochondrial DNA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Neckelmann, N.; Li, K.; Wade, R.P.; Shuster, R.; Wallace, D.C.

    1987-11-01

    The authors have characterized a 1400-nucleotide cDNA for the human skeletal muscle ADP/ATP translocator. The deduced amino acid sequence is 94% homologous to the beef heart ADP/ATP translocator protein and contains only a single additional amino-terminal methionine. This implies that the human translocator lacks an amino-terminal targeting peptide, a conclusion substantiated by measuring the molecular weight of the protein synthesized in vitro. A 1400-nucleotide transcript encoding the skeletal muscle translocator was detected on blots of total RNA from human heart, kidney, skeletal muscle, and HeLa cells by hybridization with oligonucleotide probes homologous to the coding region and 3' noncoding region of the cDNA. However, the level of this mRNA varied substantially among tissues. Comparison of our skeletal muscle translocator sequence with that of a recently published human fibroblast translocator cognate revealed that the two proteins are 88% identical and diverged about 275 million years ago. Hence, tissues vary both in the level of expression of individual translocator genes and in differential expression of cognate translocator genes. Comparison of the base substitution rates of the ADP/ATP translocator and the oxidative phosphorylation genes encoded by mitochondrial DNA revealed that the mitochondrial DNA genes fix 10 times more synonymous substitutions and 12 times more replacement substitutions; yet, these nuclear and cytoplasmic respiration genes experience comparable evolutionary constraints. This suggest that the mitochondrial DNA genes are highly prone to deleterious mutations.

  19. Interstitial space and collagen alterations of the developing rat diaphragm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, L. E.; Martinez, D. A.; Vailas, A. C.; Sieck, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of growth on the relative interstitial space [%total cross-sectional area (CSA)] and collagen content of the rat diaphragm muscle was examined at postnatal ages of 0, 7, 14, and 21 days as well as in adult males. The proportion of interstitial space relative to total muscle CSA was determined by computerized image analysis of lectin-stained cross sections of diaphragm muscle. To assess collagen content and extent of collagen maturation (i.e., cross-linking), high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis was used to measure hydroxyproline concentration and the nonreducible collagen cross-link hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP), respectively. At birth, interstitial space accounted for approximately 47% of total diaphragm muscle CSA. During postnatal growth, the relative contribution of interstitial space decreased such that by adulthood the interstitial space accounted for approximately 18% of total muscle CSA. The change in relative interstitial space occurred without a concomitant change in hydroxyproline concentration. However, the concentration of HP markedly increased with age such that the adult diaphragm contained approximately 17 times more HP than at birth. These results indicate that during development the relative CSA occupied by interstitial space decreases as muscle fiber size increases. However, the reduction in relative interstitial space is not associated with a change in collagen concentration. Thus collagen density in the interstitial space may increase with age. It is possible that the observed changes in relative interstitial space and collagen influence the passive length-force properties of the diaphragm.

  20. Interstitial space and collagen alterations of the developing rat diaphragm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosselin, L. E.; Martinez, D. A.; Vailas, A. C.; Sieck, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of growth on the relative interstitial space [%total cross-sectional area (CSA)] and collagen content of the rat diaphragm muscle was examined at postnatal ages of 0, 7, 14, and 21 days as well as in adult males. The proportion of interstitial space relative to total muscle CSA was determined by computerized image analysis of lectin-stained cross sections of diaphragm muscle. To assess collagen content and extent of collagen maturation (i.e., cross-linking), high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis was used to measure hydroxyproline concentration and the nonreducible collagen cross-link hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP), respectively. At birth, interstitial space accounted for approximately 47% of total diaphragm muscle CSA. During postnatal growth, the relative contribution of interstitial space decreased such that by adulthood the interstitial space accounted for approximately 18% of total muscle CSA. The change in relative interstitial space occurred without a concomitant change in hydroxyproline concentration. However, the concentration of HP markedly increased with age such that the adult diaphragm contained approximately 17 times more HP than at birth. These results indicate that during development the relative CSA occupied by interstitial space decreases as muscle fiber size increases. However, the reduction in relative interstitial space is not associated with a change in collagen concentration. Thus collagen density in the interstitial space may increase with age. It is possible that the observed changes in relative interstitial space and collagen influence the passive length-force properties of the diaphragm.

  1. Interstitial Cystitis Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... may have IC. Get The Facts Interstitial Cystitis Association The Interstitial Cystitis Association (ICA) is the only ... events. Please leave this field empty Interstitial Cystitis Association 7918 Jones Branch Drive, Suite 300 McLean, VA ...

  2. Interstitial cystitis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - interstitial cystitis ... The following organizations are good resources for information on interstitial cystitis : Interstitial Cystitis Association -- www.ichelp.org National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www.kidney.niddk. ...

  3. Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD)/Pulmonary Fibrosis Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD)/Pulmonary Fibrosis Make an Appointment Refer ... ILD clinical trials and most effective therapies. Interstitial Lung Disease Care at National Jewish Health At National ...

  4. ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Junge, Wolfgang; Nelson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis is the principal converter of sunlight into chemical energy. Cyanobacteria and plants provide aerobic life with oxygen, food, fuel, fibers, and platform chemicals. Four multisubunit membrane proteins are involved: photosystem I (PSI), photosystem II (PSII), cytochrome b6f (cyt b6f), and ATP synthase (FOF1). ATP synthase is likewise a key enzyme of cell respiration. Over three billion years, the basic machinery of oxygenic photosynthesis and respiration has been perfected to minimize wasteful reactions. The proton-driven ATP synthase is embedded in a proton tight-coupling membrane. It is composed of two rotary motors/generators, FO and F1, which do not slip against each other. The proton-driven FO and the ATP-synthesizing F1 are coupled via elastic torque transmission. Elastic transmission decouples the two motors in kinetic detail but keeps them perfectly coupled in thermodynamic equilibrium and (time-averaged) under steady turnover. Elastic transmission enables operation with different gear ratios in different organisms.

  5. Interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Erickson, D R; Davies, M F

    1998-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a multifactorial syndrome with symptoms of pelvic or perineal pain, urinary frequency and urgency. The etiologies are unknown, but several theories have been proposed. Diagnosis is often delayed because most of the conventional evaluation is normal. Pelvic examination is normal except for bladder tenderness. Urodynamics are normal except for increased bladder sensitivity and low capacity. Urinalysis, urine culture and office cystoscopy are also normal. The diagnostic test is cystoscopy under anesthesia with bladder distension. Small submucosal hemorrhages (glomerulations) or ulcers appear after distension. Many empiric treatments have been proposed for IC. None is universally effective, and so treatments are tried sequentially until good symptom relief is achieved. Bladder distension gives excellent (but transient) relief in some patients, especially those with severe bladder inflammation (who also tend to be older). A variety of oral, intravesical and adjunctive treatments are also described.

  6. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. XVIII. Synthesis and preparation of peptides and peptide fragments of rabbit muscle ATP-AMP transphosphorylase (adenylate kinase) and their nucleotide-binding properties.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Hamada, M; Johnson, M S; Russell, G A; Manship, M; Palmieri, R H; Fleming, G; Bredt, D S; Mildvan, A S

    1989-08-01

    Two peptide fragments, derived from the head and tail of rabbit muscle myokinase, were found to possess remarkable and specific ligand-binding properties (Hamada et al., 1979). By initiating systematic syntheses and measurements of equilibrium substrate-binding properties of these two sets of peptides, or portions thereof, which encompass the binding sites for (a) the magnesium complexes of the nucleotide substrates (MgATP2- and MgADP-) and (b) the uncomplexed nucleotide substrates (ADP3- and AMP2-) of rabbit muscle myokinase, some of the requirements for binding of the substrates to ATP-AMP transphosphorylase are being deduced and chemically outlined. One requirement for tight nucleotide binding appears to be a minimum peptide length of 15-25 residues. In addition, Lys-172 and/or Lys-194 may be involved in the binding of epsilon AMP. The syntheses are described as a set of peptides corresponding to residues 31-45, 20-45, 5-45, and 1-45, and a set of peptides corresponding to residues 178-192, 178-194, and 172-194 of rabbit muscle adenylate kinase. The ligand-binding properties of the first set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands: epsilon MgATP/epsilon ATP and epsilon MgADP/epsilon ADP are quantitatively presented in terms of their intrinsic dissociation constants (K'd) and values of N (maximal number of moles bound per mole of peptide); and compared with the peptide fragment MT-I (1-44) obtained from rabbit muscle myokinase (Kuby et al., 1984) and with the native enzyme (Hamada et al., 1979). In addition, the values of N and K'd are given for the second set of synthetic peptides to the fluorescent ligands epsilon AMP and epsilon ADP as well as for the peptide fragments MT-XII(172-194) and CB-VI(126-194) (Kuby et al., 1984) and, in turn, compared with the native enzyme. A few miscellaneous dissociation constants which had been derived kinetically are also given for comparison (e.g., the Ki for epsilon AMP and the value of KMg epsilon ATP obtained for

  7. The effect of Mg2+ on cardiac muscle function: Is CaATP the substrate for priming myofibril cross-bridge formation and Ca2+ reuptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G A; Vandenberg, J I; Freestone, N S; Dixon, H B

    2001-01-01

    Kinetics are established for the activation of the myofibril from the relaxed state [Smith, Dixon, Kirschenlohr, Grace, Metcalfe and Vandenberg (2000) Biochem. J. 346, 393-402]. These require two troponin Ca2+-binding sites, one for each myosin head, to act as a single unit in initial cross-bridge formation. This defines the first, or activating, ATPase reaction, as distinct from the further activity of the enzyme that continues when a cross-bridge to actin is already established. The pairing of myosin heads to act as one unit suggests a possible alternating mechanism for muscle action. A large positive inotropic (contraction-intensifying) effect of loading the Mg2+ chelator citrate, via its acetoxymethyl ester, into the heart has confirmed the competitive inhibition of the Ca2+ activation by Mg2+, previously seen in vitro. In the absence of a recognized second Ca2+ binding site on the myofibril, with appropriate binding properties, the bound ATP is proposed as the second activating Ca2+-binding site. As ATP, free or bound to protein, can bind either Mg2+ or Ca2+, this leads to competitive inhibition by Mg2+. Published physico-chemical studies on skeletal muscle have shown that CaATP is potentially a more effective substrate than MgATP for cross-bridge formation. The above considerations allow calculation of the observed variation of fractional activation by Ca2+ as a function of [Mg2+] and in turn reveal simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics for the activation of the ATPase by sub-millimolar [Mg2+]. Furthermore the ability of bound ATP to bind either cation, and the much better promotion of cross-bridge formation by CaATP binding, give rise to the observed variation of the Hill coefficient for Ca2+ activation with altered [Mg2+]. The inclusion of CaADP within the initiating cross-bridge and replacement by MgADP during the second cycle is consistent with the observed fall in the rate of the myofibril ATPase that occurs after two phosphates are released. The similarity

  8. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Associates With the Response of Muscle ATP Synthesis to Long-Term Exercise Training in Relatives of Type 2 Diabetic Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kacerovsky-Bielesz, Gertrud; Kacerovsky, Michaela; Chmelik, Marek; Farukuoye, Michaela; Ling, Charlotte; Pokan, Rochus; Tschan, Harald; Szendroedi, Julia; Schmid, Albrecht Ingo; Gruber, Stephan; Herder, Christian; Wolzt, Michael; Moser, Ewald; Pacini, Giovanni; Smekal, Gerhard; Groop, Leif; Roden, Michael

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Myocellular ATP synthesis (fATP) associates with insulin sensitivity in first-degree relatives of subjects with type 2 diabetes. Short-term endurance training can modify their fATP and insulin sensitivity. This study examines the effects of moderate long-term exercise using endurance or resistance training in this cohort. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A randomized, parallel-group trial tested 16 glucose-tolerant nonobese relatives (8 subjects in the endurance training group and 8 subjects in the resistance training group) before and after 26 weeks of endurance or resistance training. Exercise performance was assessed from power output and oxygen uptake (Vo2) during incremental tests and from maximal torque of knee flexors (MaxTflex) and extensors (MaxText) using isokinetic dynamometry. fATP and ectopic lipids were measured with 1H/31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy. RESULTS Endurance training increased power output and Vo2 by 44 and 30%, respectively (both P < 0.001), whereas resistance training increased MaxText and MaxTflex by 23 and 40%, respectively (both P < 0.001). Across all groups, insulin sensitivity (382 ± 90 vs. 389 ± 40 mL ⋅ min−1 ⋅ m−2) and ectopic lipid contents were comparable after exercise training. However, 8 of 16 relatives had 26% greater fATP, increasing from 9.5 ± 2.3 to 11.9 ± 2.4 μmol ⋅ mL−1 ⋅ m−1 (P < 0.05). Six of eight responders were carriers of the G/G single nucleotide polymorphism rs540467 of the NDUFB6 gene (P = 0.019), which encodes a subunit of mitochondrial complex I. CONCLUSIONS Moderate exercise training for 6 months does not necessarily improve insulin sensitivity but may increase ATP synthase flux. Genetic predisposition can modify the individual response of the ATP synthase flux independently of insulin sensitivity. PMID:22190678

  9. The Significance of Interstitial Cells in Neurogastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Peter J; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Sanders, Kenton M; Ward, Sean M

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle layers of the gastrointestinal tract consist of a heterogeneous population of cells that include enteric neurons, several classes of interstitial cells of mesenchymal origin, a variety of immune cells and smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Over the last number of years the complexity of the interactions between these cell types has begun to emerge. For example, interstitial cells, consisting of both interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha-positive (PDGFRα+) cells generate pacemaker activity throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and also transduce enteric motor nerve signals and mechanosensitivity to adjacent SMCs. ICC and PDGFRα+ cells are electrically coupled to SMCs possibly via gap junctions forming a multicellular functional syncytium termed the SIP syncytium. Cells that make up the SIP syncytium are highly specialized containing unique receptors, ion channels and intracellular signaling pathways that regulate the excitability of GI muscles. The unique role of these cells in coordinating GI motility is evident by the altered motility patterns in animal models where interstitial cell networks are disrupted. Although considerable advances have been made in recent years on our understanding of the roles of these cells within the SIP syncytium, the full physiological functions of these cells and the consequences of their disruption in GI muscles have not been clearly defined. This review gives a synopsis of the history of interstitial cell discovery and highlights recent advances in structural, molecular expression and functional roles of these cells in the GI tract. PMID:24948131

  10. Berberine induces pacemaker potential inhibition via cGMP-dependent ATP-sensitive K+ channels by stimulating mu/delta opioid receptors in cultured interstitial cells of Cajal from mouse small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyungwoo; Jung, Myeong Ho; Kwon, Young Kyu; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-10-01

    Berberine is traditionally used to treat gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders. The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract, which are responsible for the production of gut movements. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of berberine on pacemaker potentials (PPs) in cultured ICC clusters from the mouse small intestine, and sought to identify the receptors involved and the underlying mechanisms of action. All experiments were performed on cultured ICCs, and a whole‑cell patch‑clamp configuration was used to record PPs from ICC clusters (current clamp mode). Under current clamp mode, berberine was shown to decrease the amplitude and frequency of PPs. However, these effects were suppressed by treatment with glibenclamide, a specific ATP‑sensitive K+ channel blocker. Nor‑binaltorphimine dihydrochloride (a kappa opioid receptor antagonist) did not suppress berberine‑induced PP inhibition, whereas ICI 174,864 (a delta opioid receptor antagonist) and CTOP (a mu opioid receptor antagonist) did suppress the inhibitory effects of berberine. Pretreatment with SQ‑22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) or with KT‑5720 (a protein kinase A inhibitor) did not suppress the effects of berberine; however, pretreatment with 1H‑[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3‑a] quinoxalin‑1‑one (a guanylate cyclase inhibitor) or KT‑5823 [a protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor] did. In addition, berberine stimulated cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production in ICCs. These observations indicate that berberine may inhibit the pacemaker activity of ICC clusters via ATP‑sensitive K+ channels and the cGMP‑PKG‑dependent pathway by stimulating mu and delta opioid receptors. Therefore, berberine may provide a basis for the development of novel agents for the treatment of GI motility dysfunction.

  11. Studies on adenosine triphosphate transphosphorylases. Human isoenzymes of adenylate kinase: isolation and physicochemical comparison of the crystalline human ATP-AMP transphosphorylases from muscle and liver.

    PubMed

    Kuby, S A; Fleming, G; Frischat, A; Cress, M C; Hamada, M

    1983-02-10

    Procedures are described for the isolation, in crystalline form, of the adenylate kinases from autopsy samples of human muscle and from human liver. Weight average molecular weights were determined by sedimentation equilibrium to be 22,000 (+/- 700) and 25,450 (+/- 160) for the human muscle and liver isoenzymes, respectively. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, their molecular weights were estimated to be 21,700 and 26,500 for the muscle and liver enzymes, respectively. Both isoenzymes are accordingly monomeric proteins in their native state. Amino acid analyses are reported here for the normal human liver, calf liver, and rabbit liver adenylate kinases and compared with the normal human muscle, calf muscle, and rabbit muscle myokinases. The liver types as a group and the muscle types as a group show a great deal of homology, but some distinct differences are evident between the liver and muscle enzyme groups, especially in the number of residues of His, Pro, half-cystine, and the presence of tryptophan in the liver enzymes. The normal human liver adenylate kinase, as isolated in this report, has proved to be similar in its properties, if not identical, to the adenylate kinase isolated directly from human liver mitochondria (Hamada, M., Sumida, M., Okuda, H., Watanabe, T., Nojima, M., and Kuby, S. A. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 13120-13128). Therefore, the liver-type adenylate kinase may be considered a mitochondrial type.

  12. Tension Recovery following Ramp-Shaped Release in High-Ca and Low-Ca Rigor Muscle Fibers: Evidence for the Dynamic State of AMADP Myosin Heads in the Absence of ATP

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Haruo; Yamaguchi, Maki; Ohno, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During muscle contraction, myosin heads (M) bound to actin (A) perform power stroke associated with reaction, AMADPPi → AM + ADP + Pi. In this scheme, A • M is believed to be a high-affinity complex after removal of ATP. Biochemical studies on extracted protein samples show that, in the AM complex, actin-binding sites are located at both sides of junctional peptide between 50K and 20K segments of myosin heavy chain. Recently, we found that a monoclonal antibody (IgG) to the junctional peptide had no effect on both in vitro actin-myosin sliding and skinned muscle fiber contraction, though it covers the actin-binding sites on myosin. It follows from this that, during muscle contraction, myosin heads do not pass through the static rigor AM configuration, determined biochemically and electron microscopically using extracted protein samples. To study the nature of AM and AMADP myosin heads, actually existing in muscle, we examined mechanical responses to ramp-shaped releases (0.5% of Lo, complete in 5ms) in single skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in high-Ca (pCa, 4) and low-Ca (pCa, >9) rigor states. The fibers exhibited initial elastic tension drop and subsequent small but definite tension recovery to a steady level. The tension recovery was present over many minutes in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it tended to decrease quickly in low-Ca rigor fibers. EDTA (10mM, with MgCl2 removed) had no appreciable effect on the tension recovery in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it completely eliminated the tension recovery in low-Ca rigor fibers. These results suggest that the AMADP myosin heads in rigor muscle have long lifetimes and dynamic properties, which show up as the tension recovery following applied release. Possible AM linkage structure in muscle is discussed in connection with the X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting muscle, which is intermediate between resting and rigor muscles. PMID:27583360

  13. Tension Recovery following Ramp-Shaped Release in High-Ca and Low-Ca Rigor Muscle Fibers: Evidence for the Dynamic State of AMADP Myosin Heads in the Absence of ATP.

    PubMed

    Sugi, Haruo; Yamaguchi, Maki; Ohno, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During muscle contraction, myosin heads (M) bound to actin (A) perform power stroke associated with reaction, AMADPPi → AM + ADP + Pi. In this scheme, A • M is believed to be a high-affinity complex after removal of ATP. Biochemical studies on extracted protein samples show that, in the AM complex, actin-binding sites are located at both sides of junctional peptide between 50K and 20K segments of myosin heavy chain. Recently, we found that a monoclonal antibody (IgG) to the junctional peptide had no effect on both in vitro actin-myosin sliding and skinned muscle fiber contraction, though it covers the actin-binding sites on myosin. It follows from this that, during muscle contraction, myosin heads do not pass through the static rigor AM configuration, determined biochemically and electron microscopically using extracted protein samples. To study the nature of AM and AMADP myosin heads, actually existing in muscle, we examined mechanical responses to ramp-shaped releases (0.5% of Lo, complete in 5ms) in single skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in high-Ca (pCa, 4) and low-Ca (pCa, >9) rigor states. The fibers exhibited initial elastic tension drop and subsequent small but definite tension recovery to a steady level. The tension recovery was present over many minutes in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it tended to decrease quickly in low-Ca rigor fibers. EDTA (10mM, with MgCl2 removed) had no appreciable effect on the tension recovery in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it completely eliminated the tension recovery in low-Ca rigor fibers. These results suggest that the AMADP myosin heads in rigor muscle have long lifetimes and dynamic properties, which show up as the tension recovery following applied release. Possible AM linkage structure in muscle is discussed in connection with the X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting muscle, which is intermediate between resting and rigor muscles.

  14. Update on interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Pamela A; Lascola, Kara M

    2015-04-01

    Interstitial pneumonias encompass a wide variety of acute and chronic respiratory diseases and include the specific diseases equine multinodular pulmonary fibrosis and acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress. These diseases have been diagnosed in all age groups of horses, and numerous agents have been identified as potential causes of interstitial pneumonia. Despite the varied causes, interstitial pneumonia is uniformly recognized by the severity of respiratory disease and often poor clinical outcome. This article reviews the causal agents that have been associated with the development of interstitial pneumonia in horses. Pathophysiology, clinical diagnosis, and treatment options are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to ... air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among ...

  16. Effect of Da-Cheng-Qi Decoction on the Repair of the Injured Enteric Nerve-Interstitial Cells of Cajal-Smooth Muscle Cells Network in Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mu-Cang; Xie, Ming-Zheng; Ma, Bin; Qi, Qing-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Wistar rats were randomly divided into control group, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) group, and Da-Cheng-Qi decoction (DCQD) group. The network of enteric nerves-interstitial cells of Cajal- (ICC-) smooth muscle cells (SMC) in small intestine was observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that the numbers of cholinergic/nitriergic nerves, and the deep muscular plexus of ICC (ICC-DMP) and connexin43 (Cx43) in small intestine with MODS were significantly decreased. The network integrity of enteric nerves-ICC-SMC was disrupted. The ultrastructures of ICC-DMP, enteric nerves, and SMC were severely damaged. After treatment with DCQD, the damages were repaired and the network integrity of enteric nerves ICC-SMC was significantly recovered. In conclusion, the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal motility dysfunction in MODS in part may be due to the damages to enteric nerves-ICC-SMC network and gap junctions. The therapeutic mechanism of DCQD in part may be that it could repair the damages and maintain the integrity of enteric nerves ICC-SMC network. PMID:25477993

  17. Effects of lubiprostone on pacemaker activity of interstitial cells of cajal from the mouse colon.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Han-Yi; Kim, Dong Hyun; Ki, Jung Suk; Ryu, Kwon Ho; Choi, Seok; Jun, Jae Yeoul

    2014-08-01

    Lubiprostone is a chloride (Cl(-)) channel activator derived from prostaglandin E1 and used for managing constipation. In addition, lubiprostone affects the activity of gastrointestinal smooth muscles. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are pacemaker cells that generate slow-wave activity in smooth muscles. We studied the effects of lubiprostone on the pacemaker potentials of colonic ICCs. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique to determine the pacemaker activity in cultured colonic ICCs obtained from mice. Lubiprostone hyperpolarized the membrane and inhibited the generation of pacemaker potentials. Prostanoid EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4 antagonists (SC-19220, PF-04418948, 6-methoxypyridine-2-boronc acid N-phenyldiethanolamine ester, and GW627368, respectively) did not block the response to lubiprostone. L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) and 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase) did not block the response to lubiprostone. In addition, tetraethylammonium (TEA, a voltage-dependent potassium [K(+)] channel blocker) and apamin (a calcium [Ca(2+)]-dependent K(+) channel blocker) did not block the response to lubiprostone. However, glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker) blocked the response to lubiprostone. Similar to lubiprostone, pinacidil (an opener of ATP-sensitive K(+) channel) hyperpolarized the membrane and inhibited the generation of pacemaker potentials, and these effects were inhibited by glibenclamide. These results suggest that lubiprostone can modulate the pacemaker potentials of colonic ICCs via activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) channel through a prostanoid EP receptor-independent mechanism.

  18. Electrophysiology of autonomic neuromuscular transmission involving ATP.

    PubMed

    Sneddon, P

    2000-07-03

    Electrophysiological investigations of autonomic neuromuscular transmission have provided great insights into the role of ATP as a neurotransmitter. Burnstock and Holman made the first recordings of excitatory junction potentials (e.j.p.s) produced by sympathetic nerves innervating the smooth muscle of the guinea-pig vas deferens. This led to the identification of ATP as the mediator of e.j.p.s in this tissue, where ATP acts as a cotransmitter with noradrenaline. The e.j.p.s are mediated solely by ATP acting on P2X(1) receptors leading to action potentials and a rapid phasic contraction, whilst noradrenaline mediates a slower, tonic contraction which is not dependent on membrane depolarisation. Subsequent electrophysiological studies of the autonomic innervation of smooth muscles of the urogenital, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems have revealed a similar pattern of response, where ATP mediates a fast electrical and mechanical response, whilst another transmitter such as noradrenaline, acetylcholine, nitric oxide or a peptide mediates a slower response. The modulation of junction potentials by a variety of pre-junctional receptors and the mechanism of inactivation of ATP as a neurotransmitter will also be described.

  19. Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, which are tissue-based classifications. Factors that may make you more susceptible to ... the right side of your heart Improve your sleep and sense of well-being You're most ...

  20. Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Critical Care & Sleep Medicine Interstitial Lung Disease Program Sarcoidosis Program Autoimmune Lung Center Rebecca C. Keith, MD, ... Syndromes Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis LAM Lupus Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Sarcoidosis Overview Scleroderma (SSC) Systemic Vasculitis Reasons to Visit ...

  1. Intracranial interstitial radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, D.; Rittenmeyer, H.; Hitchon, P.

    1986-06-01

    Primary malignant brain tumors are fatal, with 90% of patients having these tumors dying within two years following diagnosis. Cranial interstitial radiation therapy, a technique under investigation to control these tumors, involves implantation of radioactive iodine 125 seeds into the tumor bed by stereotaxic technique. The interstitial radiation technique, monitoring of radiation, and nursing care of patients are discussed. Case histories are presented, along with discussion of results attained using this therapy, and its future.

  2. ZD0947, a sulphonylurea receptor modulator, detects functional sulphonylurea receptor subunits in murine vascular smooth muscle ATP-sensitive K(+) channels.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tadashi; Takahara, Kohei; Uchida, Keiichiro; Teramoto, Noriyoshi

    2017-02-16

    In order to identify functional sulphonylurea receptor (SUR.x) subunits of native ATP-sensitive K(+) channels (KATP channels) in mouse portal vein, the effects of ZD0947, a SUR.x modulator, were investigated on spontaneous portal vein contractions, macroscopic membrane currents and unitary currents recorded (using patch-clamp techniques) in freshly dispersed mouse portal vein myocytes. Spontaneous contractions in mouse portal vein were reversibly reduced by ZD0947 in a concentration-dependent manner (Ki =293nM). The relaxation elicited by 3µM ZD0947 was antagonized by the additional application of glibenclamide (300nM), but not gliclazide (100-300nM). In the conventional whole-cell configuration, 100µM ZD0947 elicited inward glibenclamide-sensitive currents at a holding potential of -60mV that demonstrated selectivity for K(+)(i.e. KATP currents). The peak amplitude of the membrane current elicited by 30µM or 100µM ZD0947 was smaller than that elicited by 100µM pinacidil at -60mV. In the cell-attached mode, 100µM ZD0947 activated glibenclamide-sensitive K(+) channels with a conductance (35 pS) similar to that of recombinant Kir6.1/SUR2B channels that were expressed in HEK293 cells and activated by 100µM ZD0947. These results demonstrate that ZD0947 caused a significant vascular relaxation through the activation of KATP channels and that SUR2B may be the major functional subunit of SUR.x in mouse portal vein KATP channels, based on its pharmacological selectivity.

  3. Imaging Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP)

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Megha; Dane, Eric; Conley, Jason; Tantama, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a universal mediator of metabolism and signaling across unicellular and multicellular species. There is a fundamental interdependence between the dynamics of ATP and the physiology that occurs inside and outside the cell. Characterizing and understanding ATP dynamics provides valuable mechanistic insight into processes that range from neurotransmission to the chemotaxis of immune cells. Therefore, we require the methodology to interrogate both temporal and spatial components of ATP dynamics from the subcellular to organismal levels in live specimens. Over the last several decades, a number of molecular probes that are specific for ATP have been developed. These probes have been combined with imaging approaches, particularly optical microscopy, to enable qualitative and quantitative detection of this critical molecule. In this review, we survey current examples of technologies that are available to visualize ATP in living cells and identify areas where new tools and approaches are needed to expand our capabilities. PMID:27638696

  4. Interstitial laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Douglas E.; Cromeens, Douglas M.; Price, Roger E.

    1994-05-01

    Interstitial laser coagulation of the canine prostate using the Sharplan interstitial thermal therapy fiber (Model 25432) was performed in 9 adult dogs and the subsequent gross and histopathologic changes occurring in the prostate were studied at intervals ranging from 1 hour to 5 weeks. A large well-demarcated area of acute coagulative necrosis developed around each fiber tract which in turn was surrounded by a prominent narrow zone of marked tissue disruption and an outer zone of hemorrhage. Liquefaction developed within the coagulative areas within 24 hours and by 4 days, each prostatic lobe contained an irregular cavity which became lined by normal-appearing transitional epithelium and that by 5 weeks, communicated with the prostatic urethra. These changes, similar to those reported following transurethral visual laser ablation of the prostate, suggest that interstitial laser thermal therapy may provide an alternative means for treating selected patients suffering from prostatic enlargement.

  5. [Chronic interstitial pneumonitis].

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rui; Reis, Guilhermina; Ferreira, Cristina; Oliveira, Ma José; Oliveira, Dulce; Fernandes, Paula; Ferreira, Paula; Frutuoso, Simão; Carreira, Luísa; Alves, Valter; Paiva, António; Guedes, Margarida

    2004-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease includes a group of chronic diseases characterized by alterations in alveolar walls and loss of functional alveolar-capillary units. These are rare diseases in children, mostly with an unknown cause and associated with a high morbidity and mortality due to insufficient therapeutic effectiveness. The authors report a case of a previously healthy 3 years old child who presented with wheezing and severe respiratory insufficiency following a respiratory infection. The investigation performed led to the diagnosis of chronic interstitial pneumonitis. Several treatments have been tried (corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine, N-acetylcysteine) without any obvious improvement.

  6. Innovative gastric endoscopic muscle biopsy to identify all cell types, including myenteric neurons and interstitial cells of Cajal in patients with idiopathic gastroparesis: a feasibility study (with video).

    PubMed

    Rajan, Elizabeth; Gostout, Christopher J; Wong Kee Song, Louis M; Szarka, Lawrence A; Kashyap, Purna C; Smyrk, Thomas C; Bingener, Juliane; Deters, Jodie L; Knipschield, Mary A; Bernard, Cheryl E; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2016-09-01

    The pathophysiology of some GI neuromuscular diseases remains largely unknown. This is in part due to the inability to obtain ample deep gastric wall biopsies that include the intermuscular layer of the muscularis propria (MP) to evaluate the enteric nervous system, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), and related cells. We report on a novel technique for gastric endoscopic muscle biopsy (gEMB). Patients with idiopathic gastroparesis were prospectively enrolled in a feasibility study by using a novel "no hole" gEMB. Main outcome measures were technical success, adverse events, and histologic confirmation of the intermuscular layer, including myenteric neurons and ICC. The gEMB was a double resection clip-assist technique. A site was identified on the anterior wall of the gastric body as recommended by the International Working Group on histologic techniques. EMR was performed to unroof and expose the underlying MP. The exposed MP was then retracted into the cap of an over-the-scope clip. The clip was deployed, and the pseudopolyp of MP created was resected. This resulted in a no-hole gEMB. Three patients with idiopathic gastroparesis underwent gEMB. Patients had severe delayed gastric emptying with a mean (± standard deviation [SD]) of 49 ± 16.8% of retained gastric contents at 4 hours. They had no history of gastric or small-bowel surgery and did not use steroids or other immunosuppressive drugs. The gEMB procedure was successfully performed, with no procedural adverse events. Postprocedural abdominal pain was controlled with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and opioid analgesics. Mean length of resected MP was 10.3 ± 1.5 mm. Mean procedure time was 25.7 ± 6 minutes. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining of tissue samples confirmed the presence of both inner circular and outer longitudinal muscle, as well as the intermuscular layer. H&E staining showed reduced myenteric ganglia in 1 patient. In 2 patients, specialized immunohistochemistry was performed

  7. [Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis with interstitial myositis].

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Saori; Nozawa, Tomo; Kizawa, Toshitaka; Kikuchi, Masako; Miyamae, Takako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Inaba, Hiroshi; Sato, Tatsuharu; Hashimoto, Kunio; Aida, Noriko; Yokota, Shumpei

    2013-01-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an inflammatory, non-infectious disorder of skeletal system mainly seen in children. We report a case of CRMO presenting with fever and leg pain. The patient was an 11-year-old boy complaining of a fever, swelling and pain on his right foot, and pain on both legs. Although serum levels of CK and aldolase were not increased, MRI imaging suggested polymyositis. Muscle biopsy showed interstitial infiltration of inflammatory cells without any evidences of dermatomyositis or polymyositis. One month later, he complained of a swelling, pain and redness of his left clavicle as recurrently experienced during the recent 6 months, and MRI investigation indicated the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Bone biopsy was performed and showed chronic inflammatory changes with negative bacterial culture. Multiple bone lesions and muscle uptake of FDG in his legs were revealed by whole body FDG-PET/CT, and he was diagnosed as having CRMO with interstitial myositis. The combinatorial administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and bisphosphonate successfully improved his clinical symptoms and laboratory abnormalities. To our knowledge, there is no report of a patient of CRMO associated with interstitial myositis.

  8. Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    MedlinePlus

    ... News) U.S. Medical Groups Sound the Alarm on Climate Change Additional Content Medical News Overview of Idiopathic Interstitial ... HealthDay U.S. Medical Groups Sound the Alarm on Climate Change WEDNESDAY, March 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Climate change ...

  9. Karyomegalic Interstitial Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Isnard, Pierre; Rabant, Marion; Labaye, Jacques; Antignac, Corinne; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Zaidan, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Karyomegalic interstitial nephritis is a rare cause of hereditary chronic interstitial nephritis, described for the first time over 40 years ago. A 36-year-old woman, of Turkish origin, presented with chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure. She had a history of recurrent upper respiratory tract infections but no familial history of nephropathy. Physical examination was unremarkable. Laboratory tests showed serum creatinine at 2.3 mg/dL with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 26 mL/min/1.73m2, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and alkaline phosphatase at 3 and 1.5 times the upper normal limit. Urinalysis showed 0.8 g/day of nonselective proteinuria, microscopic hematuria, and aseptic leukocyturia. Immunological tests and tests for human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B and C viruses were negative. Complement level and serum proteins electrophoresis were normal. Analysis of the renal biopsy showed severe interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy. Numerous tubular cells had nuclear enlargement with irregular outlines, hyperchromatic aspect, and prominent nucleoli. These findings were highly suggestive of karyomegalic interstitial nephritis, which was further confirmed by exome sequencing of FAN1 gene showing an identified homozygous frameshift mutation due to a one-base-pair deletion in exon 12 (c.2616delA). The present case illustrates a rare but severe cause of hereditary interstitial nephritis, sometimes accompanied by subtle extrarenal manifestations. Identification of mutations in FAN1 gene underscores recent insights linking inadequate DNA repair and susceptibility to chronic kidney disease. PMID:27196444

  10. Customized ATP towpreg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandusky, Donald A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Baucom, Robert M.; Johnston, Norman J.

    Automated tow placement (ATP) utilizes robotic technology to lay down adjacent polymer-matrix-impregnated carbon fiber tows on a tool surface. Consolidation and cure during ATP requires that void elimination and polymer matrix adhesion be accomplished in the short period of heating and pressure rolling that follows towpreg ribbon placement from the robot head to the tool. This study examined the key towpreg ribbon properties and dimensions which play a significant role in ATP. Analysis of the heat transfer process window indicates that adequate heating can be achieved at lay down rates as high as 1 m/sec. While heat transfer did not appear to be the limiting factor, resin flow and fiber movement into tow lap gaps could be. Accordingly, consideration was given to towpreg ribbon having uniform yet non-rectangular cross sections. Dimensional integrity of the towpreg ribbon combined with customized ribbon architecture offer great promise for processing advances in ATP of high performance composites.

  11. Cloning, characterization and mapping of the human ATP5E gene, identification of pseudogene ATP5EP1, and definition of the ATP5E motif.

    PubMed

    Tu, Q; Yu, L; Zhang, P; Zhang, M; Zhang, H; Jiang, J; Chen, C; Zhao, S

    2000-04-01

    A cDNA encoding the epsilon subunit of human ATP synthase, ATP5E, was isolated from heart, skeletal muscle and spleen cDNA libraries respectively. Its genome structure was characterized as comprising three exons and two introns within a stretch of 5 kb, according to the genomic sequence AL109840. The gene was mapped to human chromosome 20q13.3 between marker D20S173 and 20qter using the radiation hybrid GB4 panel. Northern blot analysis showed that the ATP5E gene was expressed as a single 0.6 kb transcript in all 16 human tissues tested, with a high level present in heart and skeletal muscle. A new conserved motif composed of 24 residues, termed the ATP5E motif [W(R/K)X(5)YX(2)(Y/F)X(3)(C/A)X(4)RX(3)K], was defined on the basis of sequences of ATP synthase epsilon subunits from ten different organisms. In addition, a pseudogene ATP5EP1 was also identified on the basis of genomic sequence AC004066, localized on human chromosome 4q25. By analysing these results combined with the Southern blot patterns of human DNA hybridized with bovine ATP5E cDNA reported previously [Vinas, Powell, Runswick, Iacobazzi and Walker (1990) Biochem. J. 265, 321-326], we provide evidence of yet further homologous sequences (either gene or pseudogene) of ATP5E, in addition to ATP5E and ATP5EP1 in the human genome.

  12. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shivani; Carter-Monroe, Naima; Atta, Mohamed G.

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) is a rare entity detected in ∼0.5–0.9% of all renal biopsies. GIN has been linked to several antibiotics such as cephalosporins, vancomycin, nitrofurantoin and ciprofloxacin. It is also associated with NSAIDs and granulomatous disorders such as sarcoidosis, tuberculosis, fungal infections, and granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Renal biopsy is critical in establishing this diagnosis, and the extent of tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis may aid in determining prognosis. Retrospective data and clinical experience suggest that removal of the offending agent in conjunction with corticosteroid therapy often results in improvement in renal function. We describe a patient with a history of multiple spinal surgeries complicated by wound infection who presented with confusion and rash with subsequent development of acute kidney injury. Urinalysis demonstrated pyuria and eosinophiluria, and renal biopsy revealed acute interstitial nephritis with granulomas. These findings were attributed to doxycycline treatment of his wound infection. This review explores the clinical associations, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of this uncommon cause of acute kidney injury. PMID:26413275

  13. Changes in Interstitial Metabolic Parameters during Hemorrhagic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-09-01

    of an in vivo NKA inhibitor , or an uncoupling of NKA activity to potassium transport. Given the possible significance of hyperkalemia as an...changes are consistent with an effective loss of Na+-K+ ATPase (NKA) activity. Hyperkalemia may be a mechanism for vascular smooth muscle hyper...with intravascular values. Our hypothesis was that interstitial hyperkalemia in skeletal muscle may herald the onset of decompensation. 2.0

  14. Effects of high-intensity intermittent training on potassium kinetics and performance in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens Jung; Mohr, Magni; Klarskov, Christina; Kristensen, Michael; Krustrup, Peter; Juel, Carsten; Bangsbo, Jens

    2004-02-01

    A rise in extracellular potassium concentration in human skeletal muscle may play an important role in development of fatigue during intense exercise. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of intense intermittent training on muscle interstitial potassium kinetics and its relationship to the density of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase subunits and K(ATP) channels, as well as exercise performance, in human skeletal muscle. Six male subjects performed intense one-legged knee-extensor training for 7 weeks. On separate days the trained leg (TL) and the control leg (CL) performed a 30 min exercise period of 30 W and an incremental test to exhaustion. At frequent intervals during the exercise periods interstitial potassium ([K(+)](I)) was determined by microdialysis, femoral arterial and venous blood samples were drawn and thigh blood flow was measured. Time to fatigue for TL was 28% longer (P < 0.05) than for CL (10.6 +/- 0.7 (mean +/-s.e.m.) versus 8.2 +/- 0.7 min). The amounts of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase alpha(1) and alpha(2) subunits were, respectively, 29.0 +/- 8.4 and 15.1 +/- 2.7% higher (P < 0.05) in TL than in CL, while the amounts of beta(1) subunits and ATP-dependent K(+) (K(ATP)) channels were the same. In CL [K(+)](I) increased more rapidly and was higher (P < 0.05) throughout the 30 W exercise bout, as well at 60 and 70 W, compared to TL, whereas [K(+)](I) was similar at the point of fatigue (9.9 +/- 0.7 and 9.1 +/- 0.5 mmol l(-1), respectively). During the 30 W exercise bouts and at 70 W during the incremental exercise femoral venous potassium concentration ([K(+)](v)) was higher (P < 0.05) in CL than in TL, but identical at exhaustion (6.2 +/- 0.2 mmol l(-1)). Release of potassium to the blood was not different in the two legs. The present data demonstrated that intense intermittent training reduce accumulation of potassium in human skeletal muscle interstitium during exercise, probably through a larger re-uptake of potassium due to greater activity of the

  15. Interstitial duplication 19p

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, R.F.; DuPont, B.R.; Moore, C.M.

    1995-07-17

    We report on a 9-month-old girl with an interstitial duplication of 19p, developmental delay, and multiple anomalies including bifrontal prominence, obtuse frontonasal angle, short columella, additional midline philtral pillar, midline ridge on the tongue, vertical midline ridge at the mental symphysis, and a complex congenital heart defect including severe branch pulmonary artery stenosis, secundum atrial septal defect (ASD), and several ventricular septal defects (VSDs). Use of fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome 19- specific probes showed a direct duplication of bands 19p13.13 and 19p13.2. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Lymphocytic Interstitial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Farver, Carol; Highland, Kristin B

    2016-09-01

    Lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia (LIP) is a rare lung disease on the spectrum of benign pulmonary lymphoproliferative disorders. LIP is frequently associated with connective tissue diseases or infections. Idiopathic LIP is rare; every attempt must be made to diagnose underlying conditions when LIP is diagnosed. Computed tomography of the chest in patients with LIP may reveal ground-glass opacities, centrilobular and subpleural nodules, and randomly distributed thin-walled cysts. Demonstrating polyclonality with immunohistochemistry is the key to differentiating LIP from lymphoma. The 5-year mortality remains between 33% and 50% and is likely to vary based on the underlying disease process.

  17. A case of Amyopathic Dermatomyositis associated with Interstitial Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Ugan, Y; Sahin, M; Dogru, A; Bayram, D; Ceyhan, A M; Tunc, S E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory myopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases with unknown etiology characterized by inflammation of the skeletal muscles and proximal muscle weakness. Dermatomyositis (DM) is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy with characteristic cutaneous findings such as heliotrope rash, Gottron's sign, Gottron's papules, shawl sign and machinist hand. Amyopathic dermatomyositis (ADM) is a rare but well-recognized clinical subtype of DM, constituting aproximately 10-20% of patients with this disease. It generally manifests only pathognomonic skin findings without clinical and laboratory evidence of muscle involvement. In this report, we present a rare case of ADM associated with interstitial pulmonary disease.

  18. [Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias in 2016].

    PubMed

    Debray, M-P; Borie, R; Danel, C; Khalil, A; Majlath, M; Crestani, B

    2017-02-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias comprise 8 clinicopathological entities, most of them with a chronic course and various prognosis. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is the most frequent and most severe of these. Computed tomography has an important role for its diagnosis. It can identify the corresponding pathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia in about 50 percent of cases. It can suggest differential diagnosis in other cases, most frequently fibrosing nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Imaging features should be integrated to clinical and available pathologic data during multidisciplinary team meetings involving physicians with a good knowledge of interstitial diseases. Some cases may be unclassifiable, but these could later be reclassified as new data may occur or imaging features may change. Surgical lung biopsy is being less frequently performed and an emerging less invasive technique, lung cryobiopsy, is under evaluation. Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis is a distinct entity only recently described, with uncertain prevalence and prognosis that seems being quite often associated to another pattern of interstitial pneumonia.

  19. Interstitial cells of Cajal mediate mechanosensitive responses in the stomach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Sanders, Kenton M.; Ward, Sean M.

    2005-10-01

    Changes in motor activity are a basic response to filling of smooth muscle organs. Responses to gastric filling, for example, are thought to be regulated by neural reflexes. Here, we demonstrate a previously uncharacterized aspect of stretch-dependent responses in visceral smooth muscles that is mediated by mechanosensitive interstitial cells of Cajal. Length ramps were applied to the murine antral muscles while recording intracellular electrical activity and isometric force. Stretching muscles by an average of 27 ± 1% of resting length resulted in 5 mN of force. Increasing length caused membrane depolarization and increased slow-wave frequency. The responses were dependent on the rate of stretch. Stretch-dependent responses were not inhibited by neuronal antagonists or nifedipine. Increases in slow-wave frequency, but not membrane depolarization, were inhibited by reducing external Ca2+ (100 μM) and by Ni2+ (250 μM). Responses to stretch were inhibited by indomethacin (1 μM) and were absent in cyclooxygenase II-deficient mice, suggesting that cyclooxygenase II-derived eicosanoids may mediate these responses. Dual microelectrode impalements of muscle cells within the corpus and antrum showed that stretch-induced changes in slow-wave frequency uncoupled proximal-to-distal propagation of slow waves. This uncoupling could interfere with gastric peristalsis and impede gastric emptying. Stretch of antral muscles of W/WV mice, which lack intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal, did not affect membrane depolarization or slow-wave frequency. These data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized nonneural stretch reflex in gastric muscles and provide physiological evidence demonstrating a mechanosensitive role for interstitial cells of Cajal in smooth muscle tissues. gastric compliance | pacemaker | stretch | slow waves | propagation

  20. Renal Medullary Interstitial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Reena; Hao, Chuan-Ming; Breyer, Matthew D.

    2007-04-01

    Renal medullary interstitial cells (RMICs) are specialized fibroblast-like cells that reside in the renal medulla among the vasa recta, the thin limbs of Henle's loop, and medullary collecting ducts. These cells are characterized by abundant lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. The lipid droplets are composed of triglycerides, cholesterol esters and free long-chain fatty acids, including arachidonic acid. RMICs are also a major site of cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2) expression, and thus a major site of COX-2 derived prostanoid biosynthesis. RMICs are also a potential target of hormones such as angiotensin II and endothelin. The RMIC COX-2 expression and the abundance of lipid droplets change with salt and water intake. These properties of RMICs are consistent with an important role of these cells in modulating physiologic and pathologic processes of the kidney.

  1. Curtains for ATP?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The administration's efforts to keep various technology-transfer programs afloat in the budget process appear to be stalled. House Science Committee chair Robert Walker (R-Pa.) advised in early April that the Republican agenda for the pending budget process entails zeroing out the Commerce Department's Advanced Technology Program (ATP), which was funded at 431 million in fiscal year 1995. The ATP would lose about 90 million from its FY 95 budget. Although Walker says that the Republican leadership has no intention to dictate to the subcommittees how cuts should be made, they will be held to the "fairly severe caps" established by the House Budget Committee. In other words, Walker says, if ATP stays, something else will have to go in its place. In addition, a bill to rescind about 223 million from the FY 1995 budget of the Technology Reinvestment Project and another 77 million from TRP's FY 1994 budget, which has not been spent, is heading for the president's signature. Yet Walker says while he supports the merits of technology transfer, "the question is do you have to create government programs to get the technology out?"

  2. Histological, immunohistochemical and biological data in assessing interstitial fibrosis in patients with chronic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bob, Flaviu Raul; Gluhovschi, Gheorghe; Herman, Diana; Potencz, Elena; Gluhovschi, Cristina; Trandafirescu, Virginia; Schiller, Adalbert; Petrica, Ligia; Velciov, Silvia; Bozdog, Gheorghe; Vernic, Corina

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between histological, immunohistochemical (IHC) and biological data in the assessment of interstitial fibrosis in patients with glomerular diseases. A group of 41 patients with primary and secondary glomerulonephritis was studied. In order to quantify the histological changes and to assess the extent of active-inflammatory and chronic-sclerotic/fibrotic interstitial lesions, we adapted a scoring system, initially used for lupus nephritis, and ANCA-associated vasculitis. IHC labeling procedures with monoclonal antibodies anti-smooth muscle actin (SMA), anti-vimentin and anti-transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) were assessed using a semi-quantitative score, correlated with the histological and biological data. Our results showed that interstitial labeling of SMA correlated with scores for sclerotic/fibrotic lesions (chronicity index) and with active-inflammatory lesions (interstitial infiltrate, activity index). Interstitial vimentin correlated with the score for interstitial infiltrate. Both interstitial vimentin and TGFbeta immunopositivity correlated with sclerotic/fibrotic lesions (interstitial fibrosis, tubular atrophies, vascular hyalinosis/fibrosis, chronicity index), and negatively with glomerular filtration rate. An important correlation was found between the interstitial labeling of the two IHC markers of myofibroblasts (SMA and vimentin). We conclude that IHC studies related to clinico-biological and histological data can have an important role in the evaluation of the glomerular diseases, but the classical histological investigation assessed through quantification has still not lost its importance.

  3. Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung disease Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Patient Instructions Eating extra calories when sick - adults ... team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Interstitial Lung Diseases Sarcoidosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  4. [Interstitial Pneumonia and Emphysema].

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Kato, Yuko; Ishii, Sachiyo

    2015-09-01

    Interstitial pneumonia (IP) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are representative diseases of restrictive pulmonary dysfunction and obstructive pulmonary dysfunction, respectively. In the preoperative anesthesia clinic, anesthesiologists are frequently asked to assess the anesthesia management of patients with these diseases. In respiratory function tests, IP is detected as a decrease in % vital capacity (< 80%), and COPD as a decrease in % FEV1.0 (< 70%). Other key factors which affect the assessment are; 1) severity assessment that affects the safety of anesthesia management, 2) prognostic evaluation including the acute exacerbation in the postoperative period, and 3) patient-related factors (age, life degree of autonomy, other comorbidities, surgery-related factors, and anesthesia method). In the patients in the disease stage I or II, anesthesia management is relatively safe. On the other hand, the patients in the disease stage IV have no surgical indication except life-saving emergent situation. In another words, anesthesiologists are required to make the judgment for the anesthesia management of the patient in the disease stage III, based on the assessment of patient-related factors, surgery-related factors, and prognosis.

  5. Declining interstitial transsudation in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demarchin, P.; Lagneaux, D.; Lecomte, J.

    1980-01-01

    Results and methodology of experimentation dealing with declining interstitial transsudation are discussed. Concepts of the formation of interstitial fluids are in agreement with measurements of calf volume in normal young women, in horizontal recumbency or after horizontal immersion. The volume of the calf is reduced when the hydrostatic pressure of the blood column is diminished under the phlebostatic level and when the external pressure is increased by the hydrostatic pressure of a water bath.

  6. Intrarenal localization of the plasma membrane ATP channel pannexin1.

    PubMed

    Hanner, Fiona; Lam, Lisa; Nguyen, Mien T X; Yu, Alan; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2012-11-15

    In the renal tubules, ATP released from epithelial cells stimulates purinergic receptors, regulating salt and water reabsorption. However, the mechanisms by which ATP is released into the tubular lumen are multifaceted. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is a newly identified. ubiquitously expressed protein that forms connexin-like channels in the plasma membrane, which have been demonstrated to function as a mechanosensitive ATP conduit. Here, we report on the localization of Panx1 in the mouse kidney. Using immunofluorescence, strong Panx1 expression was observed in renal tubules, including proximal tubules, thin descending limbs, and collecting ducts, along their apical cell membranes. In the renal vasculature, Panx1 expression was localized to vascular smooth muscle cells in renal arteries, including the afferent and efferent arterioles. Additionally, we tested whether Panx1 channels expressed in renal epithelial cells facilitate luminal ATP release by measuring the ATP content of urine samples freshly collected from wild-type and Panx1(-/-) mice. Urinary ATP levels were reduced by 30% in Panx1(-/-) compared with wild-type mice. These results suggest that Panx1 channels in the kidney may regulate ATP release and via purinergic signaling may participate in the control of renal epithelial fluid and electrolyte transport and vascular functions.

  7. Intrarenal localization of the plasma membrane ATP channel pannexin1

    PubMed Central

    Hanner, Fiona; Lam, Lisa; Nguyen, Mien T. X.; Yu, Alan

    2012-01-01

    In the renal tubules, ATP released from epithelial cells stimulates purinergic receptors, regulating salt and water reabsorption. However, the mechanisms by which ATP is released into the tubular lumen are multifaceted. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is a newly identified. ubiquitously expressed protein that forms connexin-like channels in the plasma membrane, which have been demonstrated to function as a mechanosensitive ATP conduit. Here, we report on the localization of Panx1 in the mouse kidney. Using immunofluorescence, strong Panx1 expression was observed in renal tubules, including proximal tubules, thin descending limbs, and collecting ducts, along their apical cell membranes. In the renal vasculature, Panx1 expression was localized to vascular smooth muscle cells in renal arteries, including the afferent and efferent arterioles. Additionally, we tested whether Panx1 channels expressed in renal epithelial cells facilitate luminal ATP release by measuring the ATP content of urine samples freshly collected from wild-type and Panx1−/− mice. Urinary ATP levels were reduced by 30% in Panx1−/− compared with wild-type mice. These results suggest that Panx1 channels in the kidney may regulate ATP release and via purinergic signaling may participate in the control of renal epithelial fluid and electrolyte transport and vascular functions. PMID:22952282

  8. Pacemaker potentials generated by interstitial cells of Cajal in the murine intestine.

    PubMed

    Kito, Yoshihiko; Ward, Sean M; Sanders, Kenton M

    2005-03-01

    Pacemaker potentials were recorded in situ from myenteric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC-MY) in the murine small intestine. The nature of the two components of pacemaker potentials (upstroke and plateau) were investigated and compared with slow waves recorded from circular muscle cells. Pacemaker potentials and slow waves were not blocked by nifedipine (3 microM). In the presence of nifedipine, mibefradil, a voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel blocker, reduced the amplitude, frequency, and rate of rise of upstroke depolarization (dV/dt(max)) of pacemaker potentials and slow waves in a dose-dependent manner (1-30 microM). Mibefradil (30 microM) changed the pattern of pacemaker potentials from rapidly rising, high-frequency events to slowly depolarizing, low-frequency events with considerable membrane noise (unitary potentials) between pacemaker potentials. Caffeine (3 mM) abolished pacemaker potentials in the presence of mibefradil. Pinacidil (10 microM), an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel opener, hyperpolarized ICC-MY and increased the amplitude and dV/dt(max) without affecting frequency. Pinacidil hyperpolarized smooth muscle cells and attenuated the amplitude and dV/dt(max) of slow waves without affecting frequency. The effects of pinacidil were blocked by glibenclamide (10 microM). These data suggest that slow waves are electrotonic potentials driven by pacemaker potentials. The upstroke component of pacemaker potentials is due to activation of dihydropyridine-resistant Ca(2+) channels, and this depolarization entrains pacemaker activity to create the plateau potential. The plateau potential may be due to summation of unitary potentials generated by individual or small groups of pacemaker units in ICC-MY. Entrainment of unitary potentials appears to depend on Ca(2+) entry during upstroke depolarization.

  9. Differences in G-actin containing bound ATP or ADP: the Mg2+-induced conformational change requires ATP.

    PubMed

    Frieden, C; Patane, K

    1985-07-16

    The role of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) in the Mg2+-induced conformational change of rabbit skeletal muscle G-actin has been investigated by comparing actin containing bound ADP with actin containing bound ATP. As previously described [Frieden, C. (1982) J. Biol. Chem. 257, 2882-2886], N-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine-labeled G-actin containing ATP undergoes a time-dependent Mg2+-induced fluorescence change that reflects a conformational change in the actin. Addition of Mg2+ to labeled G-actin containing ADP gives no fluorescence change, suggesting that the conformational change does not occur. The fluorescence change can be restored on the addition of ATP. Examination of the time courses of these experiments suggests that ATP must replace ADP prior to the Mg2+-induced change. The Mg2+-induced polymerization of actin containing ADP is extraordinarily slow compared to that of actin containing ATP. The lack of the Mg2+-induced conformational change, which is an essential step in the Mg2+-induced polymerization, is probably the cause for the very slow polymerization of actin containing ADP. On the other hand, at 20 degrees C, at pH 8, and in 2 mM Mg2+, the elongation rate from the slow growing end of an actin filament, measured by using the protein brevin to block growth at the fast growing end, is only 4 times slower for actin containing ADP than for actin containing ATP.

  10. Optogenetic control of ATP release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Matthew A.; Joshi, Bipin; Gu, Ling; Feranchak, Andrew; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2013-03-01

    Controlled release of ATP can be used for understanding extracellular purinergic signaling. While coarse mechanical forces and hypotonic stimulation have been utilized in the past to initiate ATP release from cells, these methods are neither spatially accurate nor temporally precise. Further, these methods cannot be utilized in a highly effective cell-specific manner. To mitigate the uncertainties regarding cellular-specificity and spatio-temporal release of ATP, we herein demonstrate use of optogenetics for ATP release. ATP release in response to optogenetic stimulation was monitored by Luciferin-Luciferase assay (North American firefly, photinus pyralis) using luminometer as well as mesoscopic bioluminescence imaging. Our result demonstrates repetitive release of ATP subsequent to optogenetic stimulation. It is thus feasible that purinergic signaling can be directly detected via imaging if the stimulus can be confined to single cell or in a spatially-defined group of cells. This study opens up new avenue to interrogate the mechanisms of purinergic signaling.

  11. ATP release through pannexon channels

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) serves as a signal for diverse physiological functions, including spread of calcium waves between astrocytes, control of vascular oxygen supply and control of ciliary beat in the airways. ATP can be released from cells by various mechanisms. This review focuses on channel-mediated ATP release and its main enabler, Pannexin1 (Panx1). Six subunits of Panx1 form a plasma membrane channel termed ‘pannexon’. Depending on the mode of stimulation, the pannexon has large conductance (500 pS) and unselective permeability to molecules less than 1.5 kD or is a small (50 pS), chloride-selective channel. Most physiological and pathological stimuli induce the large channel conformation, whereas the small conformation so far has only been observed with exclusive voltage activation of the channel. The interaction between pannexons and ATP is intimate. The pannexon is not only the conduit for ATP, permitting ATP efflux from cells down its concentration gradient, but the pannexon is also modulated by ATP. The channel can be activated by ATP through both ionotropic P2X as well as metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors. In the absence of a control mechanism, this positive feedback loop would lead to cell death owing to the linkage of purinergic receptors with apoptotic processes. A control mechanism preventing excessive activation of the purinergic receptors is provided by ATP binding (with low affinity) to the Panx1 protein and gating the channel shut. PMID:26009770

  12. Interstitial Functionalization in elemental Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, Edwin

    Societies in the 21st century will face many challenges. Materials science and materials design will be essential to address and master some if not all of these challenges. Semiconductors are among the most important technological material classes. Properties such as electrical transport are strongly affected by defects and a central goal continues to be the reduction of defect densities as much as possible in these compounds. Here we present results of interstitial Fe doping in elemental Si using first-principles DFT calculations. The preliminary results show that Fe will only occupy octahedral interstitial sites. The analysis of the electronic structure shows that the compounds are ferromagnetic and that a bandgap opens as interstitial Fe concentrations decrease, with a possible intermittent semi-metallic phase. The formation energy for interstitial Fe is unfavorable, as expected, by ~1.5 eV but becomes favorable as the chemical potential of Fe increases. Therefore, we expect that biasing the system with an external electrical field will lead to the formation of these materials. Thus, our results show that interstitial defects can be beneficial for the design of functionalities that differ significantly from those of the host material.

  13. Optical characterization of muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Luís; Lage, Armindo; Pais Clemente, Manuel; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2011-10-01

    Optical characterization and internal structure of biological tissues is highly important for biomedical optics. In particular for optical clearing processes, such information is of vital importance to understand the mechanisms involved through the variation of the refractive indices of tissue components. The skeletal muscle presents a fibrous structure with an internal arrangement of muscle fiber cords surrounded by interstitial fluid that is responsible for strong light scattering. To determine the refractive index of muscle components we have used a simple method of measuring tissue mass and refractive index during dehydration. After performing measurements for natural and ten dehydration states of the muscle samples, we have determined the dependence between the refractive index of the muscle and its water content. Also, we have joined our measurements with some values reported in literature to perform some calculations that have permitted to determine the refractive index of the dried muscle fibers and their corresponding volume percentage inside the natural muscle.

  14. Optical characterization of muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Luís; Lage, Armindo; Pais Clemente, Manuel; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2012-03-01

    Optical characterization and internal structure of biological tissues is highly important for biomedical optics. In particular for optical clearing processes, such information is of vital importance to understand the mechanisms involved through the variation of the refractive indices of tissue components. The skeletal muscle presents a fibrous structure with an internal arrangement of muscle fiber cords surrounded by interstitial fluid that is responsible for strong light scattering. To determine the refractive index of muscle components we have used a simple method of measuring tissue mass and refractive index during dehydration. After performing measurements for natural and ten dehydration states of the muscle samples, we have determined the dependence between the refractive index of the muscle and its water content. Also, we have joined our measurements with some values reported in literature to perform some calculations that have permitted to determine the refractive index of the dried muscle fibers and their corresponding volume percentage inside the natural muscle.

  15. Drug Induced Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schwaiblmair, Martin; Behr, Werner; Haeckel, Thomas; Märkl, Bruno; Foerg, Wolfgang; Berghaus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    With an increasing number of therapeutic drugs, the list of drugs that is responsible for severe pulmonary disease also grows. Many drugs have been associated with pulmonary complications of various types, including interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, bronchospasm, pulmonary edema, and pleural effusions. Drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD) can be caused by chemotherapeutic agents, antibiotics, antiarrhythmic drugs, and immunosuppressive agents. There are no distinct physiologic, radiographic or pathologic patterns of DILD, and the diagnosis is usually made when a patient with interstitial lung disease (ILD) is exposed to a medication known to result in lung disease. Other causes of ILD must be excluded. Treatment is avoidance of further exposure and systemic corticosteroids in patients with progressive or disabling disease. PMID:22896776

  16. Pathology of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Hashisako, Mikiko; Fukuoka, Junya

    2015-01-01

    The updated classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) in 2013 by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society included several important revisions to the categories described in the 2002 classification. In the updated classification, lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) was moved from major to rare IIPs, pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) was newly included in the rare IIPs, acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and interstitial pneumonias with a bronchiolocentric distribution are recognized as rare histologic patterns, and unclassifiable IIP (UCIP) was classified as an IIP. However, recent reports indicate the areas of concern that may require further evaluation. Here, we describe the histopathologic features of the updated IIPs and their rare histologic patterns and also point out some of the issues to be considered in this context. PMID:26949346

  17. Interstitial brines in playa sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Van Denburgh, A.S.; Truesdell, A.H.; Rettig, S.L.

    1969-01-01

    Study of several closed drainages in the Great Basin has shown that the interstitial solutions of shallow, fine-grained playa deposits store a large quantity of dissolved solids and are often more concentrated than associated lakes and ponds, except in peripheral zones of stream or ground-water inflow. These interstitial fluids, when compared with local runoff, impoundments, or spring waters, commonly have a distinctive ionic composition which sometimes cannot be explained by either simple mixing of surface and subsurface inflow or by evaporative concentration. At Abert Lake, Oregon, the interstitial solute concentrations increased with depth to values as much as five times greater than the lake, except where springs indicate significant ground-water input. Where Na+, Cl, and CO2 species constitute more than 90% of the solutes, Na+ Cl- ratios in the lake water are lower than in interstitial solutions of bottom cores and higher than in playa fluids. At the same time, Na+ K+ ratios are highest in the fluids of lake bottom muds and lowest in playa interstitials. In deeper playa profiles, interstitial Na+ Cl- tended to decrease with depth (5 ft. maximum). In the Abert Lake area, as in other parts of the western Great Basin, Na+ Cl- ratios are indicative of total CO2 in solution and the effects of organic decay in surficial sediments. These ratios, coupled with data on silica and bulk density, show that higher PCO2 accompanying decay promotes silicate dissolution and hydrogen ion exchange, stripping alkalis from sediment which had preferentially adsorbed K+ when entering the lake. On subsequent loss of pore fluid in the playa regime, silica initially released to solution in the lake environment is readsorbed on dissolution products. ?? 1969.

  18. Interstitial nephritis. A brief review.

    PubMed Central

    Heptinstall, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a common condition, which in spite of a relatively constant pathologic picture has different etiologic agents and pathogenetic mechanisms. Failure to appreciate this, particularly in the chronic group, has led to considerable confusion and has been largely responsible for the overdiagnosis of chronic pyelonephritis. Although we are still largely ignorant of the causes of interstitial nephritis, it is now possible to define many of them. While experimental studies have not made spectacular contributions to our understanding, an attempt is now being made to develop appropriate models, and we hope these will enable us to still further clarify our understanding of other entities. PMID:776003

  19. Structure of ATP-Bound Human ATP:Cobalamin Adenosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert,H.; Hill, C.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding human ATP:cobalamin adenosyltransferase (hATR) can result in the metabolic disorder known as methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). This enzyme catalyzes the final step in the conversion of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B{sub 12}) to the essential human cofactor adenosylcobalamin. Here we present the 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of ATP bound to hATR refined to an R{sub free} value of 25.2%. The enzyme forms a tightly associated trimer, where the monomer comprises a five-helix bundle and the active sites lie on the subunit interfaces. Only two of the three active sites within the trimer contain the bound ATP substrate, thereby providing examples of apo- and substrate-bound-active sites within the same crystal structure. Comparison of the empty and occupied sites indicates that twenty residues at the enzyme's N-terminus become ordered upon binding of ATP to form a novel ATP-binding site and an extended cleft that likely binds cobalamin. The structure explains the role of 20 invariant residues; six are involved in ATP binding, including Arg190, which hydrogen bonds to ATP atoms on both sides of the scissile bond. Ten of the hydrogen bonds are required for structural stability, and four are in positions to interact with cobalamin. The structure also reveals how the point mutations that cause MMA are deficient in these functions.

  20. Toward a multiscale description of microvascular flow regulation: o(2)-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes and the distribution of ATP in capillary networks.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Daniel; Fraser, Graham M; Ellis, Christopher G; Sprague, Randy S; Ellsworth, Mary L; Stephenson, Alan H

    2012-01-01

    Integration of the numerous mechanisms that have been suggested to contribute to optimization of O(2) supply to meet O(2) need in skeletal muscle requires a systems biology approach which permits quantification of these physiological processes over a wide range of length scales. Here we describe two individual computational models based on in vivo and in vitro studies which, when incorporated into a single robust multiscale model, will provide information on the role of erythrocyte-released ATP in perfusion distribution in skeletal muscle under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Healthy human erythrocytes exposed to low O(2) tension release ATP via a well characterized signaling pathway requiring activation of the G-protein, Gi, and adenylyl cyclase leading to increases in cAMP. This cAMP then activates PKA and subsequently CFTR culminating in ATP release via pannexin 1. A critical control point in this pathway is the level of cAMP which is regulated by pathway-specific phosphodiesterases. Using time constants (~100 ms) that are consistent with measured erythrocyte ATP release, we have constructed a dynamic model of this pathway. The model predicts levels of ATP release consistent with measurements obtained over a wide range of hemoglobin O(2) saturations (sO(2)). The model further predicts how insulin, at concentrations found in pre-diabetes, enhances the activity of PDE3 and reduces intracellular cAMP levels leading to decreased low O(2)-induced ATP release from erythrocytes. The second model, which couples O(2) and ATP transport in capillary networks, shows how intravascular ATP and the resulting conducted vasodilation are affected by local sO(2), convection and ATP degradation. This model also predicts network-level effects of decreased ATP release resulting from elevated insulin levels. Taken together, these models lay the groundwork for investigating the systems biology of the regulation of microvascular perfusion distribution by

  1. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease Treated? Childhood interstitial lung disease (chILD) is ... prevent acid reflux, which can lead to aspiration. Lung Transplant A lung transplant may be an option ...

  2. Ultrasound in Rheumatologic Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report of Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Laria, A.; Lurati, A.; Scarpellini, M.

    2015-01-01

    According to the American Thoracic Society (ATS)/European Respiratory Society consensus classification, idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) include several clinic-radiologic-pathologic entities: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Ultrasound Lung Comets (ULCs) are an echographic chest-sonography hallmark of pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. We describe the ultrasound (US) findings in the follow-up of a NSIP's case in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:26240772

  3. Interstitial cells of Cajal in pancreas.

    PubMed

    Popescu, L M; Hinescu, M E; Ionescu, N; Ciontea, Sanda M; Cretoiu, D; Ardelean, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    We show here (presumably for the first time) a special type of cell in the human and rat exocrine pancreas. These cells have phenotypic characteristics of the enteric interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). To identify pancreatic interstitial cells of Cajal (pICC) we used routine light microscopy, non-conventional light microscopy (less than 1 mum semi-thin sections of Epon-embedded specimens cut by ultramicrotomy and stained with Toluidine blue), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and immunocytochemistry. The results showed that pICC can be recognized easily by light microscopy, particularly on semi-thin sections, as well as by TEM. Two-dimensional reconstructions from serial photos suggest a network-like spatial distribution of pICC. pICC represent 3.3+/-0.5% of all pancreatic cells, and seem to establish close spatial relationships with: capillaries (43%), acini (40%), stellate cells (14%), nerve fibres (3%). Most of pICC (88%) have 2 or 3 long processes (tens of mum) emerging from the cell body. TEM data show that pICC meet the criteria for positive diagnosis as ICC (e.g. numerous mitochondria, 8.7+/-0.8% of cytoplasm). Immunocytochemistry revealed that pICC are CD117/c-kit and CD34 positive. We found pICC positive (40-50%) for smooth muscle alpha-actin or S-100, and, occasionally, for CD68, NK1 neurokinin receptor and vimentin. The reactions for desmin and chromogranin A were negative in pICC. At present, only hypotheses and speculations can be formulated on the possible role of the pICC (e.g., juxtacrine and/or paracrine roles). In conclusion, the quite-established dogma: "ICC only in cavitary organs" is overpassed.

  4. Porcine mitral valve interstitial cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Lester, W; Rosenthal, A; Granton, B; Gotlieb, A I

    1988-11-01

    There are connective tissue cells present within the interstitium of the heart valves. This study was designed to isolate and characterize mitral valve interstitial cells from the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. Explants obtained from the distal part of the leaflet, having been scraped free of surface endocardial cells, were incubated in medium 199 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Cells grew out of the explant after 3 to 5 days and by 3 weeks these cells were harvested and passaged. Passages 1 to 22 were characterized in several explant sets. The cells showed a growth pattern reminiscent of fibroblasts. Growth was dependent on serum concentration. Cytoskeletal localization of actin and myosin showed prominent stress fibers. Ultrastructural studies showed many elongated cells with prominent stress fibers and some gap junctions and few adherens junctions. There were as well cells with fewer stress fibers containing prominent Golgi complex and dilated endoplasmic reticulum. In the multilayered superconfluent cultures, the former cells tended to be on the substratum of the dish or surface of the multilayered culture, whereas the latter was generally located within the layer of cells. Extracellular matrix was prominent in superconfluent cultures, often within the layers as well. Labeling of the cells with antibody HHF 35 (Tsukada T, Tippens D, Gordon D, Ross R, Gown AM: Am J Pathol 126:51, 1987), which recognizes smooth muscle cell actin, showed prominent staining of the elongated stress fiber-containing cells and much less in the secretory type cells. These studies show that interstitial mitral valve cells can be grown in culture and that either two different cell types or one cell type with two phenotypic expressions is present in culture.

  5. [Antisynthetase syndrome and interstitial lung involvement. Report of 6 cases].

    PubMed

    Santiago Villalobos, R; López-Campos Bodineau, J L; Rodríguez Becerra, E; Laserna Martínez, E; Luque Crespo, E; Borja Urbano, G

    2002-10-01

    The cases of 6 patients (4 men, 2 women) with antisynthetase syndrome are reported. The mean age was 60 years and the most frequent symptom was increasing dyspnea (4 patients). One of the remaining 2 patients had hemoptysis and the last was asymptomatic. Systemic symptoms included Raynaud's phenomenon (2 patients), arthritis in hands (3) and muscle impairment (4). Chest films showed linear interstitial infiltrates of varying severity in 5 patients; the patient without such infiltrates also suffered silicosis. Functional assessment showed restrictive impairment in 4 patients; of the remaining 2 patients, 1 had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and 1 had normal function. The antisynthetase antibody (ASAB) detected was anti-Jo-1 in 4 cases, anti-PL-12 in 1 case, and unidentified in 1 case. The course of disease was satisfactory for 5 patients. ASAB analysis is useful for studying idiopathic interstitial lung disease.

  6. Release of Adenosine and ATP During Ischemia and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Nicholas; Frenguelli, Bruno G

    2009-01-01

    Eighty years ago Drury & Szent-Györgyi described the actions of adenosine, AMP (adenylic acid) and ATP (pyrophosphoric or diphosphoric ester of adenylic acid) on the mammalian cardiovascular system, skeletal muscle, intestinal and urinary systems. Since then considerable insight has been gleaned on the means by which these compounds act, not least of which in the distinction between the two broad classes of their respective receptors, with their many subtypes, and the ensuing diversity in cellular consequences their activation invokes. These myriad actions are of course predicated on the release of the purines into the extracellular milieu, but, surprisingly, there is still considerable ambiguity as to how this occurs in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. In this review we summarise the release of ATP and adenosine during seizures and cerebral ischemia and discuss mechanisms by which the purines adenosine and ATP may be released from cells in the CNS under these conditions. PMID:20190959

  7. Postoperative interstitial hernia as a cause of obscure incisional wound site pain.

    PubMed

    Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Smietański, Maciej

    2012-03-01

    An interstitial hernia is one in which the hernia sac is located between the layers of the abdominal wall. The analysis of contemporary literature shows that interstitial hernias are most often seen in children as a type of inguinal hernia and often accompany undescended testis. The hernia sac is usually located between the external-oblique and internal-oblique muscles in a lateral-cephalic direction. The authors present 3 cases of interstitial hernia found during laparoscopic exploration of the front abdominal wall done due to incisional wound site pain. No previous diagnosis of hernia was considered in all the cases. Hernias were found as complications of appendectomy and wound healing after radiotherapy of uterine and cervical cancer. In conclusion, in obscure wound site pain, the presence of an interstitial postoperative hernia should be considered as a possible reason for the complaint. Laparoscopic examination of the anterior abdominal wall during adhesiolysis in patients with abdominal pain enables proper diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise: insight from heart rate pacing during exercise with a trained and a deconditioned muscle group.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads; Hellsten, Ylva; Secher, Niels H; Saltin, Bengt

    2013-05-01

    Endurance training lowers heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise, but the mechanisms and consequences remain unclear. To determine the role of skeletal muscle for the cardioventilatory response to exercise, 8 healthy young men were studied before and after 5 weeks of 1-legged knee-extensor training and 2 weeks of deconditioning of the other leg (leg cast). Hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotides were determined during exercise with the (1) deconditioned leg, (2) trained leg, and (3) trained leg with atrial pacing to the heart rate obtained with the deconditioned leg. Heart rate was ≈ 15 bpm lower during exercise with the trained leg (P<0.05), but stroke volume was higher (P<0.05) and cardiac output was similar. Arterial and central venous pressures, rate-pressure product, and ventilation were lower during exercise with the trained leg (P<0.05), whereas pulmonary capillary wedge pressure was similar. When heart rate was controlled by atrial pacing, stroke volume decreased (P<0.05), but cardiac output, peripheral blood flow, arterial pressures, and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure remained unchanged. Circulating [norepinephrine], [lactate] and [K(+)] were lower and interstitial [ATP] and pH were higher in the trained leg (P<0.05). The lower cardioventilatory response to exercise with the trained leg is partly coupled to a reduced signaling from skeletal muscle likely mediated by K(+), lactate, or pH, whereas the lower cardiac afterload increases stroke volume. These results demonstrate that skeletal muscle training reduces the cardioventilatory response to exercise without compromising O2 delivery, and it can therefore be used to reduce the load on the heart during physical activity.

  9. A Case of Sarcoidosis with Interstitial Lung Disease Mimicking Clinically Amyopathic Dermatomyositis and Rapidly Progressive Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nogi, Shinichi; Sasaki, Noriko; Chinen, Naofumi; Honda, Kiri; Saito, Eiko; Wakabayashi, Takayuki; Yamada, Chiho; Suzuki, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report a patient with sarcoidosis who developed edematous erythema and interstitial lung disease. At the initial visit, clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM) with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (RP-ILD) was suspected because he had progressive dyspnea but no muscle weakness. The presence of anti-CADM-140/MDA5 autoantibodies was immediately assessed to facilitate a precise diagnosis, with negative results. Thereafter, skin and transbronchial lung biopsies revealed noncaseating granuloma with Langhans giant cells in both specimens, leading to a diagnosis of sarcoidosis. In this case, clinical features of skin and lung were unable to distinguish DM (including CADM) from sarcoidosis, but the lack of anti-CADM-140/MDA5 antibody was useful for differentiating CADM with RP-ILD mimicking sarcoidosis from bona fide sarcoidosis. PMID:25431723

  10. Energy transduction in ATP synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elston, Timothy; Wang, Hongyun; Oster, George

    1998-01-01

    Mitochondria, bacteria and chloroplasts use the free energy stored in transmembrane ion gradients to manufacture ATP by the action of ATP synthase. This enzyme consists of two principal domains. The asymmetric membrane-spanning Fo portion contains the proton channel, and the soluble F1 portion contains three catalytic sites which cooperate in the synthetic reactions. The flow of protons through Fo is thought to generate a torque which is transmitted to F1 by an asymmetric shaft, the coiled-coil γ-subunit. This acts as a rotating `cam' within F1, sequentially releasing ATPs from the three active sites. The free-energy difference across the inner membrane of mitochondria and bacteria is sufficient to produce three ATPs per twelve protons passing through the motor. It has been suggested that this protonmotive force biases the rotor's diffusion so that Fo constitutes a rotary motor turning the γ shaft. Here we show that biased diffusion, augmented by electrostatic forces, does indeed generate sufficient torque to account for ATP production. Moreover, the motor's reversibility - supplying torque from ATP hydrolysis in F1 converts the motor into an efficient proton pump - can also be explained by our model.

  11. A peripheral governor regulates muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    MacIntosh, Brian R; Shahi, M Reza S

    2011-02-01

    Active skeletal muscles are capable of keeping the global [adenosine triphosphate (ATP)] reasonably constant during exercise, whether it is mild exercise, activating a few motor units, or all-out exercise using a substantial mass of muscle. This could only be accomplished if there were regulatory processes in place not only to replenish ATP as quickly as possible, but also to modulate the rate of ATP use when that rate threatens to exceed the rate of ATP replenishment, a situation that could lead to metabolic catastrophe. This paper proposes that there is a regulatory process or "peripheral governor" that can modulate activation of muscle to avoid metabolic catastrophe. A peripheral governor, working at the cellular level, should be able to reduce the cellular rate of ATP hydrolysis associated with muscle contraction by attenuating activation. This would necessarily cause something we call peripheral fatigue (i.e., reduced contractile response to a given stimulation). There is no doubt that peripheral fatigue occurs. It has been demonstrated in isolated muscles, in muscles in situ with no central nervous system input, and in intact human subjects performing voluntary exercise with small muscle groups or doing whole-body exercise. The regulation of muscle activation is achieved in at least 3 ways (decreasing membrane excitability, inhibiting Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors, and decreasing the availability of Ca2+ in the sarcoplasmic reticulum), making this a highly redundant control system. The peripheral governor attenuates cellular activation to reduce the metabolic demand, thereby preserving ATP and the integrity of the cell.

  12. Interstitial microwave hyperthermia treatment investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siauve, N.; Lormel, C.

    2012-11-01

    Microwave ablation also called interstitial hyperthermia is a medical procedure used in the treatment of many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. With this medical therapy, an electromagnetic source (antenna) is directly positioned in the target tissue and a sufficient power is injected to necrosis the tissue. The aim of this study is to propose a design procedure and develop the associated tools, for determining the optimal shape, dimensions, type and operating frequency of antenna according to the target volume. In this context, a 3D numerical predictive model of temperature elevation induced by the electric fields and two benches for thermal and electrical tissues properties characterization have been developed. To validate the procedure and the different tools, an experimental bench test which includes interstitial antenna, external microwave generator, phantom that represents the target tissue and measurement system of temperature and electric field has been elaborated.

  13. Phentermine induced acute interstitial nephritis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Emily Ximin; Wilson, Gregory John; Ranganathan, Dwarakanathan

    2017-03-09

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) has a number of medication-related aetiologies. Antibiotics, proton pump inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes; however, any medication has the potential to cause drug-induced AIN. We report the first case of phentermine-induced AIN. A Caucasian woman aged 43 years presented with a 5-week history of lethargy, left-sided lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. She had been taking phentermine for weight loss for 9 months and had recently ceased the medication. The patient underwent a renal biopsy that showed a predominantly lymphohistiocytic interstitial infiltrate with a moderate number of eosinophils consistent with AIN. Phentermine is increasingly used for weight loss in obese patients. This is the first case implicating phentermine as the causative agent for drug-induced AIN. While rare, phentermine-induced AIN is a possible adverse reaction of phentermine. Physicians and patients need to be aware of this risk.

  14. Interstitial lung disease in children.

    PubMed

    Cazzato, Salvatore; di Palmo, Emanuela; Ragazzo, Vincenzo; Ghione, Silvia

    2013-10-01

    Children's interstitial lung disease (ILD) includes a wide range of rare respiratory disorders associated with high morbidity and mortality. Genetic factors, systemic disease processes, nonspecific inflammatory or fibrotic patterns of repair seen in a number of clinical settings are involved in the ILD pathogenesis. Specific disorders more prevalent in young children include diffuse developmental disorders, alveolar growth abnormalities, genetic surfactant disorders, pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis and neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy. It may be difficult to recognize these entities and this can lead to delayed treatment. The diagnostic approach is based on a combination of history/physical examinations, imaging studies, pulmonary function testing, genetic testing, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and in most cases an open lung biopsy. Although some disease types overlap with those seen in adults, in this review emphasis is placed on entities unique to the pediatric population focusing on clinical characteristics, histologic definitions, radiologic-pathologic correlation and therapeutic strategies. © 2013.

  15. Smoking and interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Margaritopoulos, George A; Vasarmidi, Eirini; Jacob, Joseph; Wells, Athol U; Antoniou, Katerina M

    2015-09-01

    For many years has been well known that smoking could cause lung damage. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer have been the two most common smoking-related lung diseases. In the recent years, attention has also focused on the role of smoking in the development of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Indeed, there are three diseases, namely respiratory bronchiolitis-associated ILD, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, that are currently considered aetiologically linked to smoking and a few others which are more likely to develop in smokers. Here, we aim to focus on the most recent findings regarding the role of smoking in the pathogenesis and clinical behaviour of ILDs. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  16. Impaired ATP Kinetics in Failing in vivo Mouse Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashish; Chacko, Vadappuram P.; Schär, Michael; Akki, Ashwin; Weiss, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    Background The hypothesis that the failing heart may be energy starved is supported, in part, by observations of reduced rates of ATP synthesis through the creatine kinase (CK) reaction, the primary myocardial energy reservoir, in heart failure (HF) patients. Although murine models have been used to probe HF pathophysiology, it has not been possible to non-invasively measure the rate of ATP synthesis through CK in the in vivo mouse heart. The purpose of this work was to exploit non-invasive spatially-localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques to measure ATP flux through CK in in vivo mouse hearts and determine the extent of any reductions in murine HF. Methods and Results The Triple Repetition Time Saturation Transfer (TRiST) MRS method of measuring ATP kinetics was first validated in skeletal muscle, rendering similar results to conventional saturation transfer MRS. In normal mouse hearts the in vivo CK pseudo-first-order-rate constant, kf, was 0.32±0.03 s−1 (mean±SD) and the rate of ATP synthesis through CK was 3.16±0.47 µmol/g/s. Thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) reduced kf by 31% (0.23±0.03 s−1, p<0.0001) and ATP synthesis through CK by 51% (1.54±0.25 µmol/g/s, p<0.0001), analogous values to those in failing human hearts. Conclusions Despite the small size and high murine heart rate, the ATP synthesis rate through CK is similar in vivo in murine and human hearts and comparably reduced in HF. Because murine TAC shares fundamental energetic similarities with human HF, this model and new MRS approach promise a powerful means to non-invasively probe altered energetics in HF. PMID:20926788

  17. The Mechanochemistry of Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pool, Peter E.; Sonnenblick, Edmund H.

    1967-01-01

    The utilization of creatine phosphate (CP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was studied in the iodoacetate (IAA) and nitrogen (N2)-treated cat papillary muscle. Under these conditions the net production of ATP does not occur, and the net utilization of ATP is reflected in a fall in CP concentration. The rate of energy utilization of the IAA-N2-treated cat papillary muscle resting without tension was 0.68 µmole CP/g/min. This rate was increased to 1.07 µmole/g/min when muscles were passively stretched with 2 g of tension. In a series of isometrically contracting muscles CP utilization was found to be proportional to the number of activations and the summated contractile element work. These rates of CP utilization were 0.083 µmole/g/activation and 0.0059 µmole/g-cm of work. The calculated mechanochemical coupling efficiency was 33%. PMID:6034511

  18. Pulmonary gas conducting interstitial pathway

    PubMed Central

    Eklund, Gunnar; Jorulf, Håkan; Farkas, Árpád; Eden-Strindberg, Jerker; Gennser, Mikael; Jókay, Ágnes; Krebsz, Ádám

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the growing efforts oriented towards revealing different aspects of emphysema, the persistence of the emphysematous or emphysema-like changes (ELCs) is not explored yet in the open literature. In this study we demonstrate the persistence of an ELC for 22 years in a spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) patient which indicates a hitherto unknown gas supply to the ELC. For this purpose we used high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images processed into three-dimensional (3D) geometry. By the same token, not only a long persistence but also the volume increase of this ELC between 2002 and 2010 was demonstrated. The 3D geometry visualized an aerated interstitial structure between the sites of supposed gas leakage at the wall of the third generation airways and the ELC. This potential gas conducting interstitial pathway is not a continuation and has neither the form nor the structure of a bronchus. The finding suggests that in this patient the intrabronchial gas passes through the bronchial wall and via a gas conducting interstitial pathway reaches the ELC. Despite the availability of the presently employed techniques for at least 15 years, such case and phenomenon have not been described previously. The retrieval of the patient suggests that the findings could be relevant for a considerable proportion of the population. PMID:26500785

  19. Ulcerative colitis: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in myenteric plexus.

    PubMed

    Rumessen, J J; Vanderwinden, J-M; Horn, T

    2010-10-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are key regulatory cells in the gut. In the colon of patients with severe ulcerative colitis (UC), myenteric ICC had myoid ultrastructural features and were in close contact with nerve terminals. In all patients as opposed to controls, some ICC profiles showed degenerative changes, such as lipid droplets and irregular vacuoles. Nerve terminals often appeared swollen and empty. Glial cells, muscle cells, and fibroblast-like cells (FLC) showed no alterations. FLC enclosed macrophages (MLC), which were in close contact with naked axon terminals. The organization and cytological changes may be of pathophysiological significance in patients with UC.

  20. Models of muscle contraction and energetics

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Nicola; Gladden, L. Bruce; Carlier, Pierre G.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2013-01-01

    How does skeletal muscle manage to regulate the pathways of ATP synthesis during large-scale changes in work rate while maintaining metabolic homeostasis remains unknown. The classic model of metabolic regulation during muscle contraction states that accelerating ATP utilization leads to increasing concentrations of ADP and Pi, which serve as substrates for oxidative phosphorylation and thus accelerate ATP synthesis. An alternative model states that both the ATP demand and ATP supply pathways are simultaneously activated. Here, we review experimental and computational models of muscle contraction and energetics at various organizational levels and compare them with respect to their pros and cons in facilitating understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during exercise in the intact organism. PMID:24421861

  1. ATP released from cardiac fibroblasts via connexin hemichannels activates profibrotic P2Y2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lu, David; Soleymani, Sahar; Madakshire, Rohit; Insel, Paul A

    2012-06-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) play an essential role in remodeling of the cardiac extracellular matrix. Extracellular nucleotide signaling may provoke a profibrotic response in CFs. We tested the hypothesis that physical perturbations release ATP from CFs and that ATP participates in profibrotic signaling. ATP release was abolished by the channel inhibitor carbenoxolone and inhibited by knockdown of either connexin (Cx)43 or Cx45 (47 and 35%, respectively), implying that hypotonic stimulation induces ATP release via Cx43 and Cx45 hemichannels, although pannexin 1 may also play a role. ATP released by hypotonic stimulation rapidly (<10 min) increased phosphorylated ERK by 5-8 fold, an effect largely eliminated by P2Y(2) receptor knockdown or ATP hydrolysis with apyrase. ATP stimulation of P2Y(2) receptors increased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) production, and in an ERK-dependent manner, ATP increased collagen accumulation by 60% and mRNA expression of profibrotic markers: plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 by 4.5- and 4.0-fold, respectively. Apyrase treatment substantially reduced the basal profibrotic phenotype, decreasing collagen and α-SMA content and increasing matrix metalloproteinase expression. Thus, ATP release activates P2Y(2) receptors to mediate profibrotic responses in CFs, implying that nucleotide release under both basal and activated states is likely an important mechanism for fibroblast homeostasis.

  2. Mechanisms of ATP release and signalling in the blood vessel wall

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Alexander W.; Billaud, Marie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) has classically been considered the cell's primary energy currency. Importantly, a novel role for ATP as an extracellular autocrine and/or paracrine signalling molecule has evolved over the past century and extensive work has been conducted to characterize the ATP-sensitive purinergic receptors expressed on almost all cell types in the body. Extracellular ATP elicits potent effects on vascular cells to regulate blood vessel tone but can also be involved in vascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis. While the effects of purinergic signalling in the vasculature have been well documented, the mechanism(s) mediating the regulated release of ATP from cells in the blood vessel wall and circulation are now a key target of investigation. The aim of this review is to examine the current proposed mechanisms of ATP release from vascular cells, with a special emphasis on the transporters and channels involved in ATP release from vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, circulating red blood cells, and perivascular sympathetic nerves, including vesicular exocytosis, plasma membrane F1/F0-ATP synthase, ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, connexin hemichannels, and pannexin channels. PMID:22678409

  3. Ultrasound interstitial thermal therapy (USITT) in the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nau, William H.; Diederich, Chris J.; Deardorff, Dana L.

    1999-05-01

    This research represents an experimental investigation of the use of interstitial catheter-cooled ultrasound applicators in various treatment strategies for the management of localized prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The anticipated clinical approaches under consideration were: (1) Ultrasound Interstitial Thermal therapy (USITT) alone for treatment of the whole gland, (2) high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy with USITT to treat local recurrences or extracapsular extensions of the disease, and (3) sequence HDR brachytherapy and hyperthermia. Directional multielement catheter-cooled ultrasound applicators were fabricated using cylindrical piezoceramic transducers which can be inserted into 13 or 14 gage catheters. The applicators were characterized through measurements of acoustic power output, and beam profile distributions in degassed water. Thermal lesion formation studies were performed in an in vitro setup using fresh beef muscle. Various implant strategies were evaluated for the ability to control the temperature distribution within a pre-determined volume of tissue. Lesions extending more than 15 mm from the applicator surface were generated within 5 minutes of heating. Preliminary results from this study demonstrate the versatility of catheter-cooled interstitial ultrasound applicators, and their potential to provide controlled thermal therapy in the prostate.

  4. Extracellular ATP signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kiwamu; Gilroy, Simon; Jones, Alan M.; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) induces a number of cellular responses in plants and animals. Some of the molecular components for purinergic signaling in animal cells appear to be lacking in plant cells, although some cellular responses are similar in both systems [e.g. increased levels of cytosolic free calcium, nitric oxide (NO), and reactive oxygen species (ROS)]. The purpose of this review is to compare and contrast purinergic signaling mechanisms in animal and plant cells. This comparison will aid our overall understanding of plant physiology and also provide details of the general fundamentals of extracellular ATP signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:20817461

  5. Sensitivity of small myosin II ensembles from different isoforms to mechanical load and ATP concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Bartelheimer, Kathrin; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2016-11-01

    Based on a detailed crossbridge model for individual myosin II motors, we systematically study the influence of mechanical load and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on small myosin II ensembles made from different isoforms. For skeletal and smooth muscle myosin II, which are often used in actomyosin gels that reconstitute cell contractility, fast forward movement is restricted to a small region of phase space with low mechanical load and high ATP concentration, which is also characterized by frequent ensemble detachment. At high load, these ensembles are stalled or move backwards, but forward motion can be restored by decreasing ATP concentration. In contrast, small ensembles of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which are found in the cytoskeleton of nonmuscle cells, are hardly affected by ATP concentration due to the slow kinetics of the bound states. For all isoforms, the thermodynamic efficiency of ensemble movement increases with decreasing ATP concentration, but this effect is weaker for the nonmuscle myosin II isoforms.

  6. [Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Marten, Katharina

    2007-03-01

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  7. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis and Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Timmermans, Sjoerd A.M.E.G.; Christiaans, Maarten H.L.; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A.; Stifft, Frank; Damoiseaux, Jan G.M.C.; van Paassen, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis has been observed in <1% of native renal biopsies. Here, we describe two patients with granulomatous interstitial nephritis in relation to Crohn's disease. Circulating helper and cytotoxic T cells were highly activated, and both cell types predominated in the interstitial infiltrate, indicating a cellular autoimmune response. After immunosuppressive treatment, renal function either improved or stabilized in both patients. In conclusion, granulomatous interstitial nephritis is a genuine extraintestinal manifestation of Crohn's disease, the treatment of which should include immunosuppressive agents. PMID:27478596

  8. Contribution of interstitial solute strengthening in aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Isao; Ono, Satoshi; Hanaoka, Yudai; Uesugi, Tokuteru; Takigawa, Yorinobu; Higashi, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Enthalpies of solutions and misfit strains for the Al-X (X = H, B, C, N, and O) binary alloys were determined by first-principles calculations to estimate the strengthening of solid solutions caused by interstitial atoms. The results indicate that interstitial solute atoms produced large misfit strains. Electrodeposited Al containing 0.12-1.32 at.% C was used to assess the validity of solid-solution strengthening by interstitial solute atoms. The role that interstitial carbon plays in strengthening electrodeposited Al is discussed.

  9. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Caminati, A; Graziano, P; Sverzellati, N; Harari, S

    2010-12-01

    In pulmonary pathology, a wide spectrum of morphological changes is related to the consequences of smoking, and recognizing them on surgical specimens and on small transbronchial biopsies represents a challenge for the pathologist. Respiratory bronchiolitis, also referred to as smoker's bronchiolitis, is a common histologic feature found in the lung tissue of cigarette smokers. When identified as the sole histopathologic finding in the clinical setting of symptomatic interstitial lung disease, a diagnosis of respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease is made. Since smoking is recognized to cause a variety of histologic patterns encompassing respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary Langerhans cell hystiocytosis, smoking-related interstitial lung disease may be a useful concept to keep in mind for the pathologists. The relationship of smoking with each of these entities has been largely established on the basis of epidemiologic evidence. Although they have been retained as distinct and separate conditions in various classifications of interstitial lung diseases, these entities share a number of clinical, radiologic, and pathologic features suggesting that they represent a spectrum of patterns of interstitial lung disease occurring in predisposed individuals who smoke. Evaluation of histologic features, particularly in surgical lung biopsy samples, is important in making the distinction between these disorders. However, even after tissue biopsy, it may sometimes be difficult to clearly separate these entities. Recently, respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease with fibrosis has been described and postulated that this is a smoking-related condition distinct from fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia.

  10. Interstitial leukocyte migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Pui-ying; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Rapid leukocyte motility is essential for immunity and host defense. There has been progress in understanding the molecular signals that regulate leukocyte motility both in vitro and in vivo. However, a gap remains in understanding how complex signals are prioritized to result in directed migration, which is critical for both adaptive and innate immune function. Here we focus on interstitial migration and how external cues are translated into intracellular signaling pathways that regulate leukocyte polarity, directional sensing and motility in three-dimensional spaces. PMID:23797028

  11. Amyloidotic muscle pseudohypertrophy: case report.

    PubMed

    Scola, R H; Werneck, L C; Ramos, C S; Pasquini, R; Graf, H; Arruda, W O

    2001-09-01

    The authors report one case of amyloidosis associated with muscular pseudohypertrophy in a 46-year-old woman, who developed weakness, macroglossia and muscle hypertrophy associated with primary systemic amyloidosis. Electromyography showed a myopathic pattern and bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. The muscle biopsy presented with a type I and II fiber hypertrophy and infiltration of amyloid material in the interstitious space and artery walls. She underwent bone marrow transplantation with stabilization and subjective improvement of the clinical picture.

  12. Intracellular ATP can regulate afferent arteriolar tone via ATP-sensitive K+ channels in the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, J N; Schnermann, J; Brosius, F C; Briggs, J P; Furspan, P B

    1992-01-01

    Studies were performed to assess whether ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels on rabbit preglomerular vessels can influence afferent arteriolar (AA) tone. K+ channels with a slope conductance of 258 +/- 13 (n = 7) pS and pronounced voltage dependence were demonstrated in excised patches from vascular smooth muscle cells of microdissected preglomerular segments. Channel activity was markedly reduced by 1 mM ATP and in a dose-dependent fashion by glibenclamide (10(-9) M to 10(-6) M), a specific antagonist of KATP channels. 10(-5) M diazoxide, a K+ channel opener, activated these channels in the presence of ATP, and this effect was also blocked by glibenclamide. To determine the role of these KATP channels in the control of vascular tone, diazoxide was tested on isolated perfused AA. After preconstriction from a control diameter of 13.1 +/- 1.1 to 3.5 +/- 2.1 microns with phenylephrine (PE), addition of 10(-5) M diazoxide dilated vessels to 11.2 +/- 0.7 microns, which was not different from control. Further addition of 10(-5) M glibenclamide reconstricted the vessels to 5.8 +/- 1.5 microns (n = 5; P less than 0.03). In support of its specificity for KATP channels, glibenclamide did not reverse verapamil induced dilation in a separate series of experiments. To determine whether intracellular ATP levels can effect AA tone, studies were conducted to test the effect of the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose. After preconstriction from 13.4 +/- 3.2 to 7.7 +/- 1.3 microns with PE, bath glucose was replaced with 6 mM 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Within 10 min, the arteriole dilated to a mean value of 11.8 +/- 1.4 microns (n = 6; NS compared to control). Subsequent addition of 10(-5) M glibenclamide significantly reconstricted the vessels to a diameter of 8.6 +/- 0.5 micron (P less than 0.04). These data demonstrate that KATP channels are present on the preglomerular vasculature and that changes in intracellular ATP can directly influence afferent arteriolar tone via these channels

  13. TELOCYTES - a case of serendipity: the winding way from Interstitial Cells of Cajal (ICC), via Interstitial Cajal-Like Cells (ICLC) to TELOCYTES.

    PubMed

    Popescu, L M; Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria-Simonetta

    2010-04-01

    Ramon y Cajal discovered a particular cell type in the gut, which he named 'interstitial neurons' more that 100 years ago. In the early 1970s, electron microscopy/electron microscope (EM) studies showed that indeed a special interstitial cell type corresponding to the cells discovered by Cajal is localized in the gut muscle coat, but it became obvious that they were not neurons. Consequently, they were renamed 'interstitial cells of Cajal' (ICC) and considered to be pace-makers for gut motility. For the past 10 years many groups were interested in whether or not ICC are present outside the gastrointestinal tract, and indeed, peculiar interstitial cells were found in: upper and lower urinary tracts, blood vessels, pancreas, male and female reproductive tracts, mammary gland, placenta, and, recently, in the heart as well as in the gut. Such cells, now mostly known as interstitial Cajal-like cells (ICLC), were given different and confusing names. Moreover, ICLC are only apparently similar to canonical ICC. In fact, EM and cell cultures revealed very particular features of ICLC, which unequivocally distinguishes them from ICC and all other interstitial cells: the presence of 2-5 cell body prolongations that are very thin (less than 0.2 mum, under resolving power of light microscopy), extremely long (tens to hundreds of mum), with a moniliform aspect (many dilations along), as well as caveolae. Given the unique dimensions of these prolongations (very long and very thin) and to avoid further confusion with other interstitial cell types (e.g. fibroblast, fibrocyte, fibroblast-like cells, mesenchymal cells), we are proposing the term TELOCYTES for them, and TELOPODES for their prolongations, by using the Greek affix 'telos'.

  14. Cultured senescent myoblasts derived from human vastus lateralis exhibit normal mitochondrial ATP synthesis capacities with correlating concomitant ROS production while whole cell ATP production is decreased.

    PubMed

    Minet, Ariane D; Gaster, Michael

    2012-06-01

    The free radical theory of aging says that increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are associated with old age. In the present study we have investigated the effects of cellular senescence on muscle energetic by comparing mitochondrial content and function in cultured muscle satellite cells at early and late passage numbers. We show that cultured muscle satellite cells undergoing senescence express a reduced mitochondrial mass, decreased whole cell ATP level, normal to increased mitochondrial ATP production under ATP utilization, increased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased superoxide/mitochondrial mass and hydrogen peroxide/mitochondrial mass ratios. Moreover, the increased ROS production correlates with the corresponding mitochondrial ATP production. Thus, myotubes differentiated from human myoblasts undergoing senescence have a reduced mitochondrial content, but the existent mitochondria express normal to increased functional capabilities. The present data suggest that the origin of aging lies outside the mitochondria and that a malfunction in the cell might be preceding and initiating the increase of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and concomitant ROS production in the single mitochondrion in response to decreased mitochondrial mass and reduced extra-mitochondrial energy supply. This then can lead to the increased damage of DNA, lipids and proteins of the mitochondria as postulated by the free radical theory of aging.

  15. The role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in cellular function and protection in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Andrew; Aziz, Qadeer; Thomas, Alison

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP)) are widely distributed and present in a number of tissues including muscle, pancreatic beta cells and the brain. Their activity is regulated by adenine nucleotides, characteristically being activated by falling ATP and rising ADP levels. Thus, they link cellular metabolism with membrane excitability. Recent studies using genetically modified mice and genomic studies in patients have implicated K(ATP) channels in a number of physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we focus on their role in cellular function and protection particularly in the cardiovascular system. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Interstitial cells of Cajal integrate excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission with intestinal slow-wave activity.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sabine; Seidler, Barbara; Kettenberger, Anna; Sibaev, Andrei; Rohn, Michael; Feil, Robert; Allescher, Hans-Dieter; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Hofmann, Franz; Schemann, Michael; Rad, Roland; Storr, Martin A; Schmid, Roland M; Schneider, Günter; Saur, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The enteric nervous system contains excitatory and inhibitory neurons, which control contraction and relaxation of smooth muscle cells as well as gastrointestinal motor activity. Little is known about the exact cellular mechanisms of neuronal signal transduction to smooth muscle cells in the gut. Here we generate a c-Kit(CreERT2) knock-in allele to target a distinct population of pacemaker cells called interstitial cells of Cajal. By genetic loss-of-function studies, we show that interstitial cells of Cajal, which generate spontaneous electrical slow waves and thus rhythmic contractions of the smooth musculature, are essential for transmission of signals from enteric neurons to gastrointestinal smooth muscle cells. Interstitial cells of Cajal, therefore, integrate excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission with slow-wave activity to orchestrate peristaltic motor activity of the gut. Impairment of the function of interstitial cells of Cajal causes severe gastrointestinal motor disorders. The results of our study show at the genetic level that these disorders are not only due to loss of slow-wave activity but also due to disturbed neurotransmission.

  17. Insulin Inhibits Low Oxygen-Induced ATP Release from Human Erythrocytes: Implication for Vascular Control

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Madelyn S.; Ellsworth, Mary L.; Achilleus, David; Stephenson, Alan H.; Bowles, Elizabeth A.; Sridharan, Meera; Adderley, Shaquria; Sprague, Randy S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective ATP released from human erythrocytes in response to reduced oxygen tension (pO2) participates in the matching of oxygen (O2) supply with need in skeletal muscle by stimulating increases in blood flow to areas with increased O2 demand. Here we investigated the hypothesis that hyperinsulinemia inhibits ATP release from erythrocytes and impairs their ability to stimulate dilation of isolated arterioles exposed to decreased extra-luminal pO2. Methods Erythrocyte ATP release was stimulated pharmacologically (mastoparan 7) and physiologically (reduced pO2) in the absence or presence of insulin. We also examined the ability of isolated skeletal muscle arterioles perfused with buffer containing erythrocytes treated with insulin or its vehicle (saline) to dilate in response to decreased extra-luminal pO2. Results Insulin significantly attenuated mastoparan 7– and reduced pO2–induced ATP release. In vessels perfused with untreated erythrocytes, low extra-luminal pO2 resulted in an increase in vessel diameter. In contrast, when erythrocytes were treated with insulin, no vasodilation occurred. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that insulin inhibits ATP release from erythrocytes in response to reduced pO2 and impairs their ability to stimulate dilation of skeletal muscle arterioles. These results suggest that hyperinsulinemia could hinder the matching of O2 supply with need in skeletal muscle. PMID:19412833

  18. ATP6AP2 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    ATP6AP2 functions as a renin and prorenin cellular receptor. It may mediate renin-dependent cellular responses by activating ERK1 and ERK2. By increasing the catalytic efficiency of renin in AGT/angiotensinogen conversion to angiotensin I, it may also play a role in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). ATP6AP2 is expressed in brain, heart, placenta, liver, kidney and pancreas; it is barely detectable in lung and skeletal muscles. In the kidney cortex it is restricted to the mesangium of glomeruli. In the coronary and kidney artery it is expressed in the subendothelium, associated to smooth muscles where it colocalizes with REN. It is expressed in vascular structures and by syncytiotrophoblast cells in the mature fetal placenta. Defects in ATP6AP2 are a cause of mental retardation X-linked with epilepsy (MRXE). MRXE is a syndromic mental retardation. Patients manifest mild to moderate mental retardation associated with epilepsy, delays in motor milestones and speech acquisition in infancy.

  19. Types of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease The broad term "childhood interstitial lung disease" (chILD) ... therapeutic intervention Lung and bone marrow transplant-associated lung diseases Diffuse alveolar damage of unknown cause The various types ...

  20. MRP transporters as membrane machinery in the bradykinin-inducible export of ATP.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yumei; Migita, Keisuke; Sun, Jing; Katsuragi, Takeshi

    2010-04-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) plays the role of an autocrine/paracrine signal molecule in a variety of cells. So far, however, the membrane machinery in the export of intracellular ATP remains poorly understood. Activation of B2-receptor with bradykinin-induced massive release of ATP from cultured taenia coli smooth muscle cells. The evoked release of ATP was unaffected by gap junction hemichannel blockers, such as 18alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid and Gap 26. Furthermore, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) coupled Cl(-) channel blockers, CFTR(inh)172, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid, Gd3(+) and glibenclamide, failed to suppress the export of ATP by bradykinin. On the other, the evoked release of ATP was greatly reduced by multidrug resistance protein (MRP) transporter inhibitors, MK-571, indomethacin, and benzbromarone. From western blotting analysis, blots of MRP 1 protein only, but not MRP 2 and MRP 3 protein, appeared at 190 kD. However, the MRP 1 protein expression was not enhanced after loading with 1 muM bradykinin for 5 min. Likewise, niflumic acid and fulfenamic acid, Ca2(+)-activated Cl(-) channel blockers, largely abated the evoked release of ATP. The possibility that the MRP transporter system couples with Ca2(+)-activated Cl(-) channel activities is discussed here. These findings suggest that MRP transporters, probably MRP 1, unlike CFTR-Cl(-) channels and gap junction hemichannels, may contribute as membrane machinery to the export of ATP induced by G-protein-coupled receptor stimulation.

  1. Interstitial IgG antibody pharmacokinetics assessed by combined in vivo- and physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Eigenmann, Miro J; Karlsen, Tine V; Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Tenstad, Olav; Fronton, Ludivine; Otteneder, Michael B; Wiig, Helge

    2017-09-27

    For most therapeutic antibodies, the interstitium is the target space. Although experimental methods for measuring antibody pharmacokinetics (PK) in this space are not well established, making quantitative assessment difficult, the interstitial antibody concentration is assumed to be low. Here, we combined direct quantification of antibodies in the interstitial fluid with a physiologically-based PK (PBPK) modelling approach with the goal of better describing the PK of monoclonal antibodies in the interstitial space of different tissues. We isolated interstitial fluid by tissue centrifugation, and conducted an antibody biodistribution study in mice, measuring total tissue- and interstitial concentrations in selected tissues. Residual plasma, interstitial volumes and lymph flows, which are important PBPK model parameters, were assessed in vivo. We could thereby refine PBPK modelling of monoclonal antibodies, better interpret antibody biodistribution data and more accurately predict their PK in the different tissue spaces. Our results indicate that in tissues with discontinuous capillaries (liver and spleen), interstitial concentrations are reflected by plasma concentration. In tissues with continuous capillaries (e.g. skin and muscle), ∼50-60% of plasma concentration is found in the interstitial space. In brain and kidney, on the other hand, antibodies are restricted to the vascular space. Our data may significantly impact the interpretation of biodistribution data of monoclonal antibodies and might be important when relating measured concentrations to a therapeutic effect. Opposing the view that antibodies distribution to the interstitial space is limited, we show by direct measurements and model-based data interpretation that high antibody interstitial concentrations are reached in most tissues. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Cough in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Garner, Justin; George, Peter M; Renzoni, Elisabetta

    2015-12-01

    Cough in the context of interstitial lung disease (ILD) has not been the focus of many studies. However, chronic cough has a major impact on quality of life in a significant proportion of patients with ILD. For the purpose of this review, we have chosen to highlight some of the more frequently encountered diffuse lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, sarcoidosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and systemic sclerosis associated ILD. Many of the underlying mechanisms remain speculative and further research is now required to elucidate the complex pathways involved in the pathogenesis of chronic cough in ILD. This will hopefully pave the way for the identification of new therapeutic agents to alleviate this distressing and often intractable symptom. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Interstitial Lung Disease in Scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfeld, Sara R.; Castelino, Flavia V.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a heterogeneous disease of unknown etiology and with limited effective therapies. It is characterized by autoimmunity, vasculopathy and fibrosis and is clinically manifested by multi-organ involvement. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a common complication of the disease and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of ILD hinges upon careful clinical evaluation as well as pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT). A number of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic mediators are involved in the pathogenesis of SSc-ILD, with transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) playing a key role in the development of fibrosis. Despite recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of disease initiation and progression, effective therapeutic options are still limited. A number of experimental therapies are currently in early phase clinical trials and show promise. PMID:25836640

  4. Decline of Phosphotransfer and Substrate Supply Metabolic Circuits Hinders ATP Cycling in Aging Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Nemutlu, Emirhan; Gupta, Anu; Zhang, Song; Viqar, Maria; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson; Terzic, Andre; Jahangir, Arshad; Dzeja, Petras

    2015-01-01

    Integration of mitochondria with cytosolic ATP-consuming/ATP-sensing and substrate supply processes is critical for muscle bioenergetics and electrical activity. Whether age-dependent muscle weakness and increased electrical instability depends on perturbations in cellular energetic circuits is unknown. To define energetic remodeling of aged atrial myocardium we tracked dynamics of ATP synthesis-utilization, substrate supply, and phosphotransfer circuits through adenylate kinase (AK), creatine kinase (CK), and glycolytic/glycogenolytic pathways using 18O stable isotope-based phosphometabolomic technology. Samples of intact atrial myocardium from adult and aged rats were subjected to 18O-labeling procedure at resting basal state, and analyzed using the 18O-assisted HPLC-GC/MS technique. Characteristics for aging atria were lower inorganic phosphate Pi[18O], γ-ATP[18O], β-ADP[18O], and creatine phosphate CrP[18O] 18O-labeling rates indicating diminished ATP utilization-synthesis and AK and CK phosphotransfer fluxes. Shift in dynamics of glycolytic phosphotransfer was reflected in the diminished G6P[18O] turnover with relatively constant glycogenolytic flux or G1P[18O] 18O-labeling. Labeling of G3P[18O], an indicator of G3P-shuttle activity and substrate supply to mitochondria, was depressed in aged myocardium. Aged atrial myocardium displayed reduced incorporation of 18O into second (18O2), third (18O3), and fourth (18O4) positions of Pi[18O] and a lower Pi[18O]/γ-ATP[18 O]-labeling ratio, indicating delayed energetic communication and ATP cycling between mitochondria and cellular ATPases. Adrenergic stress alleviated diminished CK flux, AK catalyzed β-ATP turnover and energetic communication in aging atria. Thus, 18O-assisted phosphometabolomics uncovered simultaneous phosphotransfer through AK, CK, and glycolytic pathways and G3P substrate shuttle deficits hindering energetic communication and ATP cycling, which may underlie energetic vulnerability of aging

  5. Decline of Phosphotransfer and Substrate Supply Metabolic Circuits Hinders ATP Cycling in Aging Myocardium.

    PubMed

    Nemutlu, Emirhan; Gupta, Anu; Zhang, Song; Viqar, Maria; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson; Terzic, Andre; Jahangir, Arshad; Dzeja, Petras

    2015-01-01

    Integration of mitochondria with cytosolic ATP-consuming/ATP-sensing and substrate supply processes is critical for muscle bioenergetics and electrical activity. Whether age-dependent muscle weakness and increased electrical instability depends on perturbations in cellular energetic circuits is unknown. To define energetic remodeling of aged atrial myocardium we tracked dynamics of ATP synthesis-utilization, substrate supply, and phosphotransfer circuits through adenylate kinase (AK), creatine kinase (CK), and glycolytic/glycogenolytic pathways using 18O stable isotope-based phosphometabolomic technology. Samples of intact atrial myocardium from adult and aged rats were subjected to 18O-labeling procedure at resting basal state, and analyzed using the 18O-assisted HPLC-GC/MS technique. Characteristics for aging atria were lower inorganic phosphate Pi[18O], γ-ATP[18O], β-ADP[18O], and creatine phosphate CrP[18O] 18O-labeling rates indicating diminished ATP utilization-synthesis and AK and CK phosphotransfer fluxes. Shift in dynamics of glycolytic phosphotransfer was reflected in the diminished G6P[18O] turnover with relatively constant glycogenolytic flux or G1P[18O] 18O-labeling. Labeling of G3P[18O], an indicator of G3P-shuttle activity and substrate supply to mitochondria, was depressed in aged myocardium. Aged atrial myocardium displayed reduced incorporation of 18O into second (18O2), third (18O3), and fourth (18O4) positions of Pi[18O] and a lower Pi[18O]/γ-ATP[18 O]-labeling ratio, indicating delayed energetic communication and ATP cycling between mitochondria and cellular ATPases. Adrenergic stress alleviated diminished CK flux, AK catalyzed β-ATP turnover and energetic communication in aging atria. Thus, 18O-assisted phosphometabolomics uncovered simultaneous phosphotransfer through AK, CK, and glycolytic pathways and G3P substrate shuttle deficits hindering energetic communication and ATP cycling, which may underlie energetic vulnerability of aging

  6. Homeostasis of Extracellular ATP in Human Erythrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Montalbetti, Nicolas; Leal Denis, Maria F.; Pignataro, Omar P.; Kobatake, Eiry; Lazarowski, Eduardo R.; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J.

    2011-01-01

    We explored the intra- and extracellular processes governing the kinetics of extracellular ATP (ATPe) in human erythrocytes stimulated with agents that increase cAMP. Using the luciferin-luciferase reaction in off-line luminometry we found both direct adenylyl cyclase activation by forskolin and indirect activation through β-adrenergic stimulation with isoproterenol-enhanced [ATP]e in a concentration-dependent manner. A mixture (3V) containing a combination of these agents and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor papaverine activated ATP release, leading to a 3-fold increase in [ATP]e, and caused increases in cAMP concentration (3-fold for forskolin + papaverine, and 10-fold for 3V). The pannexin 1 inhibitor carbenoxolone and a pannexin 1 blocking peptide (10Panx1) decreased [ATP]e by 75–84%. The residual efflux of ATP resulted from unavoidable mechanical perturbations stimulating a novel, carbenoxolone-insensitive pathway. In real-time luminometry experiments using soluble luciferase, addition of 3V led to an acute increase in [ATP]e to a constant value of ∼1 pmol × (106 cells)−1. A similar treatment using a surface attached luciferase (proA-luc) triggered a rapid accumulation of surface ATP levels to a peak concentration of 2.4 pmol × (106 cells)−1, followed by a slower exponential decay (t½ = 3.7 min) to a constant value of 1.3 pmol × (106 cells)−1. Both for soluble luciferase and proA-luc, ATP efflux was fully blocked by carbenoxolone, pointing to a 3V-induced mechanism of ATP release mediated by pannexin 1. Ecto-ATPase activity was extremely low (∼28 fmol × (106 cells min)−1), but nevertheless physiologically relevant considering the high density of erythrocytes in human blood. PMID:21921036

  7. Teaching a changing paradigm in physiology: a historical perspective on gut interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Drumm, Bernard T; Baker, Salah A

    2017-03-01

    The study and teaching of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology necessitates an understanding of the cellular basis of contractile and electrical coupling behaviors in the muscle layers that comprise the gut wall. Our knowledge of the cellular origin of GI motility has drastically changed over the last 100 yr. While the pacing and coordination of GI contraction was once thought to be solely attributable to smooth muscle cells, it is now widely accepted that the motility patterns observed in the GI tract exist as a result of a multicellular system, consisting of not only smooth muscle cells but also enteric neurons and distinct populations of specialized interstitial cells that all work in concert to ensure proper GI functions. In this historical perspective, we focus on the emerging role of interstitial cells in GI motility and examine the key discoveries and experiments that led to a major shift in a paradigm of GI physiology regarding the role of interstitial cells in modulating GI contractile patterns. A review of these now classic experiments and papers will enable students and educators to fully appreciate the complex, multicellular nature of GI muscles as well as impart lessons on how shifting paradigms in physiology are fueled by new technologies that lead to new emerging discoveries.

  8. Chylothorax in dermatomyositis complicated with interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Isoda, Kentaro; Kiboshi, Takao; Shoda, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    Chylothorax is a disease in which chyle leaks and accumulates in the thoracic cavity. Interstitial pneumonia and pneumomediastinum are common thoracic manifestations of dermatomyositis, but chylothorax complicated with dermatomyositis is not reported. We report a case of dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia complicated by chylothorax. A 77-year-old woman was diagnosed as dermatomyositis with Gottron's papules, skin ulcers, anti-MDA5 antibody and rapid progressive interstitial pneumonia. Treatment with betamethasone, tacrolimus and intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide was initiated, and her skin symptoms and interstitial pneumonia improved once. However, right-sided chylothorax began to accumulate and gradually increase, and at the same time, her interstitial pneumonia began to exacerbate, and skin ulcers began to reappear on her fingers and auricles. Although her chylothorax improved by fasting and parenteral nutrition, she died due to further exacerbations of dermatomyositis and interstitial pneumonia in spite of steroid pulse therapy, increase in the betamethasone dosage, additional intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide and plasma pheresis. An autopsy showed no lesions such as malignant tumors in the thoracic cavity. This is the first report of chylothorax complicated by dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia.

  9. A novel mitochondrial ATP8 gene mutation in a patient with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jonckheere, An I; Hogeveen, Marije; Nijtmans, Leo; van den Brand, Mariel; Janssen, Antoon; Diepstra, Heleen; van den Brandt, Frans; van den Heuvel, Bert; Hol, Frans; Hofste, Tom; Kapusta, Livia; Dillmann, U; Shamdeen, M; Smeitink, J; Smeitink, J; Rodenburg, Richard

    2009-01-01

    To identify the biochemical and molecular genetic defect in a 16-year-old patient presenting with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and neuropathy suspected for a mitochondrial disorder. Measurement of the mitochondrial energy-generating system (MEGS) capacity in muscle and enzyme analysis in muscle and fibroblasts were performed. Relevant parts of the mitochondrial DNA were analysed by sequencing. A homoplasmic nonsense mutation m.8529G→A (p.Trp55X) was found in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene in the patient’s fibroblasts and muscle tissue. Reduced complex V activity was measured in the patient’s fibroblasts and muscle tissue, and was confirmed in cybrid clones containing patient-derived mitochondrial DNA We describe the first pathogenic mutation in the mitochondrial ATP8 gene, resulting in an improper assembly and reduced activity of the complex V holoenzyme. PMID:21686774

  10. EP2 receptors mediate airway relaxation to substance P, ATP, and PGE2.

    PubMed

    Fortner, C N; Breyer, R M; Paul, R J

    2001-08-01

    Substance P (SP) and ATP evoke transient, epithelium-dependent relaxation of constricted mouse tracheal smooth muscle. Relaxation to either SP or ATP is blocked by indomethacin, but the specific eicosanoid(s) involved have not been definitively identified. SP and ATP are reported to release PGE2 from airway epithelium in other species, suggesting PGE2 as a likely mediator in epithelium-dependent airway relaxation. Using mice homozygous for a gene-targeted deletion of the EP2 receptor [EP2(-/-)], one of the PGE2 receptors, we tested the hypothesis that PGE2 is the primary mediator of relaxation to SP or ATP. Relaxation in response to SP or ATP was significantly reduced in tracheas from EP2(-/-) mice. There were no differences between EP2(-/-) and wild-type tracheas in their physical dimensions, contraction to ACh, or relaxation to isoproterenol, thus ruling out any general alterations of smooth muscle function. There were also no differences between EP2(-/-) and wild-type tracheas in basal or stimulated PGE2 production. Exogenous PGE2 produced significantly less relaxation in EP2(-/-) tracheas compared with the wild type. Taken together, this experimental evidence supports the following two conclusions: EP2 receptors are of primary importance in airway relaxation to PGE2 and relaxation to SP or ATP is mediated through PGE2 acting on EP2 receptors.

  11. Cell accumulation in the junctional region of denervated muscle

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    If skeletal muscles are denervated, the number of mononucleated cells in the connective tissue between muscle fibers increases. Since interstitial cells might remodel extracellular matrix, and since extracellular matrix in nerve and muscle plays a direct role in reinnervation of the sites of the original neuromuscular junctions, we sought to determine whether interstitial cell accumulation differs between junctional and extrajunctional regions of denervated muscle. We found in muscles from frog and rat that the increase in interstitial cell number was severalfold (14-fold for frog, sevenfold for rat) greater in the vicinity of junctional sites than in extrajunctional regions. Characteristics of the response at the junctional sites of frog muscles are as follows. During chronic denervation, the accumulation of interstitial cells begins within 1 wk and it is maximal by 3 wk. Reinnervation 1-2 wk after nerve damage prevents the maximal accumulation. Processes of the cells form a multilayered veil around muscle fibers but make little, if any, contact with the muscle cell or its basal lamina sheath. The results of additional experiments indicate that the accumulated cells do not originate from terminal Schwann cells or from muscle satellite cells. Most likely the cells are derived from fibroblasts that normally occupy the space between muscle fibers and are known to make and degrade extracellular matrix components. PMID:3491825

  12. Cardiac specific ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP) overexpression results in embryonic lethality.

    PubMed

    Toib, Amir; Zhang, Hai Xia; Broekelmann, Thomas J; Hyrc, Krzysztof L; Guo, Qiusha; Chen, Feng; Remedi, Maria S; Nichols, Colin G

    2012-09-01

    Transgenic mice overexpressing SUR1 and gain of function Kir6.2[∆N30, K185Q] K(ATP) channel subunits, under cardiac α-myosin heavy chain (αMHC) promoter control, demonstrate arrhythmia susceptibility and premature death. Pregnant mice, crossed to carry double transgenic progeny, which harbor high levels of both overexpressed subunits, exhibit the most extreme phenotype and do not deliver any double transgenic pups. To explore the fetal lethality and embryonic phenotype that result from K(ATP) overexpression, wild type (WT) and K(ATP) overexpressing embryonic cardiomyocytes were isolated, cultured and voltage-clamped using whole cell and excised patch clamp techniques. Whole mount embryonic imaging, Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and α smooth muscle actin (αSMA) immunostaining were used to assess anatomy, histology and cardiac development in K(ATP) overexpressing and WT embryos. Double transgenic embryos developed in utero heart failure and 100% embryonic lethality by 11.5 days post conception (dpc). K(ATP) currents were detectable in both WT and K(ATP)-overexpressing embryonic cardiomyocytes, starting at early stages of cardiac development (9.5 dpc). In contrast to adult cardiomyocytes, WT and K(ATP)-overexpressing embryonic cardiomyocytes exhibit basal and spontaneous K(ATP) current, implying that these channels may be open and active under physiological conditions. At 9.5 dpc, live double transgenic embryos demonstrated normal looping pattern, although all cardiac structures were collapsed, probably representing failed, non-contractile chambers. In conclusion, K(ATP) channels are present and active in embryonic myocytes, and overexpression causes in utero heart failure and results in embryonic lethality. These results suggest that the K(ATP) channel may have an important physiological role during early cardiac development.

  13. ATP released from cardiac fibroblasts via connexin hemichannels activates profibrotic P2Y2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lu, David; Soleymani, Sahar; Madakshire, Rohit; Insel, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) play an essential role in remodeling of the cardiac extracellular matrix. Extracellular nucleotide signaling may provoke a profibrotic response in CFs. We tested the hypothesis that physical perturbations release ATP from CFs and that ATP participates in profibrotic signaling. ATP release was abolished by the channel inhibitor carbenoxolone and inhibited by knockdown of either connexin (Cx)43 or Cx45 (47 and 35%, respectively), implying that hypotonic stimulation induces ATP release via Cx43 and Cx45 hemichannels, although pannexin 1 may also play a role. ATP released by hypotonic stimulation rapidly (<10 min) increased phosphorylated ERK by 5-8 fold, an effect largely eliminated by P2Y2 receptor knockdown or ATP hydrolysis with apyrase. ATP stimulation of P2Y2 receptors increased α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) production, and in an ERK-dependent manner, ATP increased collagen accumulation by 60% and mRNA expression of profibrotic markers: plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 by 4.5- and 4.0-fold, respectively. Apyrase treatment substantially reduced the basal profibrotic phenotype, decreasing collagen and α-SMA content and increasing matrix metalloproteinase expression. Thus, ATP release activates P2Y2 receptors to mediate profibrotic responses in CFs, implying that nucleotide release under both basal and activated states is likely an important mechanism for fibroblast homeostasis.—Lu, D., Soleymani, S., Madakshire, R., Insel, P. A. ATP released from cardiac fibroblasts via connexin hemichannels activates profibrotic P2Y2 receptors. PMID:22415310

  14. Nano-nutrition of chicken embryos. The effect of silver nanoparticles and ATP on expression of chosen genes involved in myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sawosz, Filip; Pineda, Lane; Hotowy, Anna; Jaworski, Sławomir; Prasek, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Chwalibog, André

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that the quantity and quality of nutrients stored in the egg might not be optimal for the fast rate of chicken embryo development in modern broilers, and embryos could be supplemented with nutrients by in ovo injection. Recent experiments showed that in ovo feeding reduces post-hatch mortality and skeletal disorders and increases muscle growth and breast meat yield. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a "ready for use" energetic molecule, while nanoparticles of silver (Nano-Ag) may penetrate tissues as well as cells and localise inside cells. In this investigation, we hypothesised that silver nanoparticles could be used as a protective carrier for ATP as well as an active agent. ATP and/or an ATP complex with Nano-Ag would be delivered to the muscle cells as a gene expression regulator and promoter of growth and development of embryo breast muscle. A collection of 160 broiler eggs was randomly divided into a Control group without injection and injected groups with hydrocolloids of Nano-Ag, ATP or a complex of Nano-Ag and ATP (Nano-Ag/ATP). The embryos were evaluated on day 20 of incubation. The results indicate that the application of ATP to chicken embryos increases expression of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Na(+)/K(+) transporting ATPase (ATP1A1), which may indicate that an extra energy source can enhance molecular mechanisms of muscle cell proliferation. Nano-Ag also up-regulated expression of FGF2, VEGF, ATP1A1 and, also up-regulated expression of myogenic differentiation 1(MyoD1), affecting cell differentiation. The results indicate that ATP and Nano-Ag may accelerate growth and maturation of muscle cells.

  15. Combined treatment with interstitial hyperthermia and interstitial radiotherapy in an animal tumor model.

    PubMed

    Ruifrok, A C; Levendag, P C; Lakeman, R F; Deurloo, I K; Visser, A G

    1991-06-01

    An interstitial hyperthermia system operating at 27 MHz has been developed at the Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center. To test this system in combination with interstitial radiotherapy and to study the interactions of interstitial radiotherapy and interstitial hyperthermia, animal experiments were performed using rhabdomyosarcoma type R1 transplanted in the flanks of female Wag/Rij rats. Using the 27 MHz system, it appeared feasible to obtain hyperthermic temperatures. In this experiment a thermal dose of 44 degrees C for 30 minutes was delivered by controlling the temperature at the periphery of the tumor to 44 degrees C. The interstitial heating applicators were inserted in four standard afterloading catheters implanted with a fixed spacing of 7 mm; the same catheters were used for the radioactive sources for interstitial radiotherapy treatment following the interstitial hyperthermia sessions. Interstitial radiotherapy was given by means of four Ir192 wires with an average activity of 4.5.10(7) Bq/cm. Minimum tumor doses of 20 to 115 Gy with a mean dose rate of 47 cGy/hour were applied. Interstitial hyperthermia alone resulted in a growth delay (GD1) of 6 +/- 2 days without significant reduction of tumor volume. The 50% tumor cure dose after interstitial radiotherapy alone was 95 +/- 9 Gy. Combination of interstitial hyperthermia and interstitial radiotherapy resulted in reduction of the 50% tumor cure dose to 48 +/- 13 Gy. The dose-effect data for cure for these modalities are compared to existing data for external irradiation and external hyperthermia in the same tumor model. It was found that the addition of hyperthermia to different modes of irradiation, that is, either to single dose or protracted radiotherapy, results in a common level of radiosensitivity through impaired repair of sublethal damage. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the 27 MHz heating system in achieving hyperthermic temperatures; in the combined modality experiments a thermal

  16. Novel and recurrent ATP2A2 mutations in Japanese patients with Darier’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Kana; Takeichi, Takuya; Okuno, Yusuke; Takama, Hiromichi; Miura, Shunsuke; Kagami, Shinji; Hino, Haruko; Nakamura, Yuki; Fujio, Yumi; Konohana, Izumi; Otani, Ayako; Mukai, Hideki; Sugiura, Kazumitsu; Akiyama, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Darier’s disease (DD, keratosis follicularis: OMIM#124200) is an autosomal dominant skin disorder characterized by multiple dark brown keratotic plaques and warty papules covered by thick crusts. Most cases of DD are caused by mutations in ATP2A2, which is expressed in both the skin and the brain. ATP2A2 encodes the cardiac muscle SERCA2a protein and the ubiquitously expressed SERCA2b. SERCA2 plays an important role as a calcium pump. It is thought that a mutation in ATP2A2 causes dyskeratosis and abnormality of cell-cell adhesion. Here, we report five DD patients from five independent families who presented or were referred to the Nagoya University Hospital in the past five years. We detected five mutations in ATP2A2, including a previously unreported mutation. We observed no apparent genotype/phenotype correlation between types and sites of the ATP2A2 mutations and DD phenotypes in the present series of DD patients. Genetic diagnosis from ATP2A2 mutation search is useful for the definite diagnosis of DD, although it is difficult to predict the severity and prognosis of skin symptoms from the results of the ATP2A2 mutation analysis in DD patients. PMID:28008204

  17. Molecular mechanism of ATP binding and ion channel activation in P2X receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Motoyuki; Gouaux, Eric

    2012-10-24

    P2X receptors are trimeric ATP-activated ion channels permeable to Na{sup +}, K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}. The seven P2X receptor subtypes are implicated in physiological processes that include modulation of synaptic transmission, contraction of smooth muscle, secretion of chemical transmitters and regulation of immune responses. Despite the importance of P2X receptors in cellular physiology, the three-dimensional composition of the ATP-binding site, the structural mechanism of ATP-dependent ion channel gating and the architecture of the open ion channel pore are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the zebrafish P2X4 receptor in complex with ATP and a new structure of the apo receptor. The agonist-bound structure reveals a previously unseen ATP-binding motif and an open ion channel pore. ATP binding induces cleft closure of the nucleotide-binding pocket, flexing of the lower body {beta}-sheet and a radial expansion of the extracellular vestibule. The structural widening of the extracellular vestibule is directly coupled to the opening of the ion channel pore by way of an iris-like expansion of the transmembrane helices. The structural delineation of the ATP-binding site and the ion channel pore, together with the conformational changes associated with ion channel gating, will stimulate development of new pharmacological agents.

  18. MEAT SCIENCE AND MUSCLE BIOLOGY SYMPOSIUM

    PubMed Central

    Bi, P.; Kuang, S.

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell niche plays a critical role in regulating the behavior and function of adult stem cells that underlie tissue growth, maintenance, and regeneration. In the skeletal muscle, stem cells, called satellite cells, contribute to postnatal muscle growth and hypertrophy, and thus, meat production in agricultural animals. Satellite cells are located adjacent to mature muscle fibers underneath a sheath of basal lamina. Microenvironmental signals from extracellular matrix mediated by the basal lamina and from the host myofiber both impinge on satellite cells to regulate their activity. Furthermore, several types of muscle interstitial cells, including intramuscular preadipocytes and connective tissue fibroblasts, have recently been shown to interact with satellite cells and actively regulate the growth and regeneration of postnatal skeletal muscles. From this regard, interstitial adipogenic cells are not only important for marbling and meat quality, but also represent an additional cellular component of the satellite cell niche. At the molecular level, these interstitial cells may interact with satellite cells through cell surface ligands, such as delta-like 1 homolog (Dlk1) protein whose overexpression is thought to be responsible for muscle hypertrophy in callipyge sheep. In fact, extracellular Dlk1 protein has been shown to promote the myogenic differentiation of satellite cells. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms within the stem cell niche that regulate satellite cell differentiation and maintain muscle homeostasis may lead to promising approaches to optimizing muscle growth and composition, thus improving meat production and quality. PMID:22100594

  19. [Chemotherapy in Patients Complicated with Interstitial Pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Sata, Masafumi; Kato, Terufumi

    2016-08-01

    Interstitial pneumonia has high risk for chemotherapy-related exacerbation. Chemotherapy-related exacerbation is often fatal with respiratory failure. When we treat the cancer patient with interstitial pneumonia, it is necessary for us to regard of the efficacy of chemotherapy, and the frequency and mortality of chemotherapy-related exacerbation. All anti-cancer drugs has the possibilities of chemotherapy-related exacerbation. The incidence of chemotherapy-related exacerbation was higher in patients with target therapy agent or immune-checkpoint therapy agent, though there is not an interstitial pneumonia patient. In patients complicated with interstitial pneumonia, you should not use of these drugs, such as target therapy agent or immune-checkpoint therapy agent.

  20. Imaging of Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The aphorism that children are not little adults certainly applies for the imaging of interstitial lung disease. Acquiring motion-free images of fine pulmonary structures at desired lung volumes is much more difficult in children than in adults. Several forms of interstitial lung disease are unique to children, and some forms of interstitial lung disease encountered in adults rarely, if ever, occur in children. Meticulous attention to imaging technique and specialized knowledge are required to properly perform and interpret chest imaging studies obtained for the evaluation of childhood interstitial lung disease (chILD). This review will address technique recommendations for imaging chILD, the salient imaging findings in various forms of chILD, and the efficacy of imaging in the diagnosis and management of chILD. PMID:22332031

  1. Diffuse interstitial lung disease: overlaps and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Simon L F; Hansell, David M

    2010-08-01

    Histopathological analysis of lung biopsy material allows the diagnosis of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias; however, the strength of this diagnosis is sometimes subverted by interobserver variation and sampling. The American Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society recommendations of 2002 provide a framework for the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and proposed an integrated clinical, radiological and histopathological approach. These recommendations represent a break with tradition by replacing the 'gold standard' of histopathology with the combined 'silver standards' of clinical, imaging and histopathological information. One of the pitfalls of a rigid classification system for the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease is its failure to accommodate the phenomenon of overlapping disease patterns. This article reviews the various ways that interstitial lung disease may be classified and discusses their applicability. In addition the issue of overlap disease patterns is considered in the context of histopathological interobserver variation and sampling error and how a pigeonhole approach to disease classification may overlook these hybrid entities.

  2. Etiology, Pathogenesis, and Diagnosis of Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Grannum R

    2002-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a bladder syndrome of unknown etiology. The cause of IC is most likely multifactorial and includes genetic and environmental factors. Various pathophysiological changes in the bladder, pelvis, and peripheral and central nervous systems have been identified, and this has led to the emergence of biologically specific treatment modalities. Interstitial cystitis is being diagnosed with increasing frequency; however, current diagnostic criteria are non-uniform, and there is significant overlap between chronic pelvic pain syndromes in men and women, interstitial cystitis, recurrent “cystitis,” and the overactive bladder syndrome. The diagnosis of interstitial cystitis can be made clinically and by cystoscopy and hydrodistension. The sensitivity and specificity of urinary markers and the potassium sensitivity test have not been prospectively studied. PMID:16986036

  3. Interstitial lung diseases in children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) in infants and children comprises a large spectrum of rare respiratory disorders that are mostly chronic and associated with high morbidity and mortality. These disorders are characterized by inflammatory and fibrotic changes that affect alveolar walls. Typical features of ILD include dyspnea, diffuse infiltrates on chest radiographs, and abnormal pulmonary function tests with restrictive ventilatory defect and/or impaired gas exchange. Many pathological situations can impair gas exchange and, therefore, may contribute to progressive lung damage and ILD. Consequently, diagnosis approach needs to be structured with a clinical evaluation requiring a careful history paying attention to exposures and systemic diseases. Several classifications for ILD have been proposed but none is entirely satisfactory especially in children. The present article reviews current concepts of pathophysiological mechanisms, etiology and diagnostic approaches, as well as therapeutic strategies. The following diagnostic grouping is used to discuss the various causes of pediatric ILD: 1) exposure-related ILD; 2) systemic disease-associated ILD; 3) alveolar structure disorder-associated ILD; and 4) ILD specific to infancy. Therapeutic options include mainly anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and/or anti-fibrotic drugs. The outcome is highly variable with a mortality rate around 15%. An overall favorable response to corticosteroid therapy is observed in around 50% of cases, often associated with sequelae such as limited exercise tolerance or the need for long-term oxygen therapy. PMID:20727133

  4. Interstitial fibrosis and growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, J A; Brody, A R

    2000-01-01

    Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring of the lung caused by a variety of inhaled agents including mineral particles, organic dusts, and oxidant gases. The disease afflicts millions of individuals worldwide, and there are no effective therapeutic approaches. A major reason for this lack of useful treatments is that few of the molecular mechanisms of disease have been defined sufficiently to design appropriate targets for therapy. Our laboratory has focused on the molecular mechanisms through which three selected peptide growth factors could play a role in the development of IPF. Hundreds of growth factors and cytokines could be involved in the complex disease process. We are studying platelet-derived growth factor because it is the most potent mesenchymal cell mitogen yet described, transforming growth factor beta because it is a powerful inducer of extracellular matrix (scar tissue) components by mesenchymal cells, and tumor necrosis factor alpha because it is a pleiotropic cytokine that we and others have shown is essential for the development of IPF in animal models. This review describes some of the evidence from studies in humans, in animal models, and in vitro, that supports the growth factor hypothesis. The use of modern molecular and transgenic technologies could elucidate those targets that will allow effective therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931794

  5. Comparative single-molecule and ensemble myosin enzymology: sulfoindocyanine ATP and ADP derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Oiwa, K; Eccleston, J F; Anson, M; Kikumoto, M; Davis, C T; Reid, G P; Ferenczi, M A; Corrie, J E; Yamada, A; Nakayama, H; Trentham, D R

    2000-01-01

    Single-molecule and macroscopic reactions of fluorescent nucleotides with myosin have been compared. The single-molecule studies serve as paradigms for enzyme-catalyzed reactions and ligand-receptor interactions analyzed as individual stochastic processes. Fluorescent nucleotides, called Cy3-EDA-ATP and Cy5-EDA-ATP, were derived by coupling the dyes Cy3.29.OH and Cy5.29.OH (compounds XI and XIV, respectively, in, Bioconjug. Chem. 4:105-111)) with 2'(3')-O-[N-(2-aminoethyl)carbamoyl]ATP (EDA-ATP). The ATP(ADP) analogs were separated into their respective 2'- and 3'-O-isomers, the interconversion rate of which was 30[OH(-)] s(-1) (0.016 h(-1) at pH 7.1) at 22 degrees C. Macroscopic studies showed that 2'(3')-O-substituted nucleotides had properties similar to those of ATP and ADP in their interactions with myosin, actomyosin, and muscle fibers, although the ATP analogs did not relax muscle as well as ATP did. Significant differences in the fluorescence intensity of Cy3-nucleotide 2'- and 3'-O-isomers in free solution and when they interacted with myosin were evident. Single-molecule studies using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed that reciprocal mean lifetimes of the nucleotide analogs interacting with myosin filaments were one- to severalfold greater than predicted from macroscopic data. Kinetic and equilibrium data of nucleotide-(acto)myosin interactions derived from single-molecule microscopy now have a biochemical and physiological framework. This is important for single-molecule mechanical studies of motor proteins. PMID:10827983

  6. Treatment Approaches for Interstitial Cystitis: Multimodality Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis is an increasingly common disease characterized by urgency, frequency, and pelvic pain. Its etiology is poorly understood but is likely to be multifactorial. A proposed pathophysiology describing a cascade of events, including epithelial dysfunction, mast cell activation, and neurogenic inflammation, is presented. Using this model, multimodality therapy regimens have been developed that treat all components of this cascade. Multimodality therapy appears more effective than single agents in the treatment of interstitial cystitis. PMID:16986029

  7. Interstitial twin pregnancy: A unique case presentation.

    PubMed

    Garretto, Diana; Lee, Lan Na; Budorick, Nancy E; Figueroa, Reinaldo

    2015-09-01

    Early recognition and timely treatment of an interstitial pregnancy is imperative to avoid the high morbidity and mortality of this type of ectopic pregnancy. We report a case of twin interstitial pregnancy that was initially missed on initial sonogram and was subsequently recognized at our institution by transvaginal sonography. The patient underwent open laparoscopic surgery with cornual wedge resection but suffered infundibulopelvic ligament hemorrhage and subsequently required ipsilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. She did well and was discharged home a day later.

  8. Acute exacerbations of fibrotic interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L; Tazelaar, Henry D

    2011-03-01

    An acute exacerbation is the development of acute lung injury, usually resulting in acute respiratory distress syndrome, in a patient with a pre-existing fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. By definition, acute exacerbations are not caused by infection, heart failure, aspiration or drug reaction. Most patients with acute exacerbations have underlying usual interstitial pneumonia, either idiopathic or in association with a connective tissue disease, but the same process has been reported in patients with fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia, fibrotic hypersensitivity pneumonitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia and asbestosis. Occasionally an acute exacerbation is the initial manifestation of underlying interstitial lung disease. On biopsy, acute exacerbations appear as diffuse alveolar damage or bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) superimposed upon the fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. Biopsies may be extremely confusing, because the acute injury pattern can completely obscure the underlying disease; a useful clue is that diffuse alveolar damage and organizing pneumonia should not be associated with old dense fibrosis and peripheral honeycomb change. Consultation with radiology can also be extremely helpful, because the fibrosing disease may be evident on old or concurrent computed tomography scans. The aetiology of acute exacerbations is unknown, and the prognosis is poor; however, some patients survive with high-dose steroid therapy. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  9. Interstitial cystitis. Etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Nickel, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review current knowledge about the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of interstitial cystitis, with special emphasis on management of this condition by family physicians. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Articles were identified through MEDLINE and review of abstracts presented at Urology and Interstitial Cystitis meetings during the last decade. Recent reviews were further searched for additional studies and trials. Data were summarized from large epidemiologic studies. Etiologic theories were extracted from current concepts and reviews of scientific studies. Diagnostic criteria described in this review are based on clinical interpretation of National Institutes of Health (NIH) research guidelines, interpretation of data from the NIH Interstitial Cystitis Cohort Study, and recent evidence on use of the potassium sensitivity test. Treatment suggestions are based on six randomized placebo-controlled clinical treatment trials and best available clinical data. MAIN MESSAGE: Interstitial cystitis affects about 0.01% to 0.5% of women. Its etiology is unknown, but might involve microbiologic, immunologic, mucosal, neurogenic, and other yet undefined agents. The diagnosis of interstitial cystitis is a diagnosis of exclusion. It is impossible to provide a purely evidence-based treatment strategy, but review of available evidence suggests that conservative supportive therapy (including diet modification); oral treatment with pentosan polysulfate, amitriptyline, or hydroxyzine; and intravesical treatments with heparinlike medications, dimethyl sulfoxide, or BCG vaccine could benefit some patients. CONCLUSION: Family physicians should have an understanding of interstitial cystitis and be able to make a diagnosis and formulate an evidence-based treatment strategy for their patients. PMID:11153410

  10. Effect of intensified training on muscle ion kinetics, fatigue development, and repeated short-term performance in endurance-trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Christensen, Peter M; Thomassen, Martin; Nielsen, Lars R; Bangsbo, Jens

    2013-10-01

    The effects of intensified training in combination with a reduced training volume on muscle ion kinetics, transporters, and work capacity were examined. Eight well-trained cyclists replaced their regular training with speed-endurance training (12 × 30 s sprints) 2-3 times per week and aerobic high-intensity training (4-5 × 3-4 min at 90-100% of maximal heart rate) 1-2 times per week for 7 wk and reduced training volume by 70% (intervention period; IP). The duration of an intense exhaustive cycling bout (EX2; 368 ± 6 W), performed 2.5 min after a 2-min intense cycle bout (EX1), was longer (P < 0.05) after than before IP (4:16 ± 0:34 vs. 3:37 ± 0:28 min:s), and mean and peak power during a repeated sprint test improved (P < 0.05) by 4% and 3%, respectively. Femoral venous K(+) concentration in recovery from EX1 and EX2 was lowered (P < 0.05) after compared with before IP, whereas muscle interstitial K(+) concentration and net muscle K(+) release during exercise was unaltered. No changes in muscle lactate and H(+) release during and after EX1 and EX2 were observed, but the in vivo buffer capacity was higher (P < 0.05) after IP. Expression of the ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel (Kir6.2) decreased by IP, with no change in the strong inward rectifying K(+) channel (Kir2.1), muscle Na(+)-K(+) pump subunits, monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1 and MCT4), and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1). In conclusion, 7 wk of intensified training with a reduced training volume improved performance during repeated intense exercise, which was associated with a greater muscle reuptake of K(+) and muscle buffer capacity but not with the amount of muscle ion transporters.

  11. Rutin ameliorates kidney interstitial fibrosis in rats with obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Liu, Ding; Zhu, Qiu-Hua; Li, Min; Chen, Hua; Guo, Ying; Fan, Li-Pei; Yue, Liang-Sheng; Li, Liu-Yang; Zhao, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Rutin reportedly conveys many beneficial effects, including renoprotection; however, it has not yet been demonstrated to have a renoprotective effect against obstructive nephropathy. The present study is the first to show a protective effect of rutin against obstructive renal injury induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). A total of 24 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups of six rats each, including vehicle- or rutin-treated sham operated groups, and vehicle- or rutin-treated UUO groups. Rats received daily oral gavage of rutin (100mg/kg) for 2weeks. All rats were euthanized on postoperative day 14. Histological findings showed that rutin administration significantly reduced renal interstitial injury and suppressed interstitial collagen deposits in UUO rats. Moreover, rutin decreased macrophage infiltration, proinflammatory cytokine expression and phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65. Furthermore, rutin inhibited extracellular matrix accumulation by reducing expression of type I/III collagen and fibronectin. Rutin also prevented the epithelial-mesenchymal transition processes of renal tubular cells by decreasing α-smooth muscle actin expression and retaining E-cadherin expression. These effects of rutin were in parallel with the reductions in Smad3 activity and pivotal to the fibrogenic potential of TGF-β1. Taken together, the renoprotective effects of rutin in obstructive nephropathy were likely due to anti-inflammatory effects and inhibition of TGF-β1/Smad3 signaling.

  12. Interstitial Cajal-like cells in human gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Hinescu, Mihail E; Ardeleanu, Carmen; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Popescu, Laurentziu M

    2007-08-01

    We describe here an interstitial Cajal-like cell type (ICLC) in human gallbladder, resembling the archetypal enteric interstitial cells of Cajal. Gallbladder ICLC were demonstrated in fresh preparations (tissue cryosections) using methylene-blue, and fixed specimens in Epon semi-thin sections stained with toluidine blue or transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The positive diagnosis of gallbladder ICLC was further verified by immunohistochemistry: CD117/c-kit, CD34, and another 16 antigens: vimentin, desmin, nestin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, NK-1, S-100, PGP-9.5, tau protein, chromogranin A, NSE, GFAP, CD1a, CD62-P, CD68, estrogen and progesterone receptors. Double immunostaining was performed for CD117, CD34 and CD117 and nestin, respectively. In fresh specimens, the spatial density of gallbladder ICLC was 100-110 cells/mm(2). ICLC mainly appeared beneath the epithelium and in muscularis (about 7%, and approximately 5%, respectively). In toto, ICLC represent in gallbladder approximately 5.5% of subepithelial cells. TEM showed that diagnostic criteria were fulfilled by ICLC. Moreover, TEM indicated that the main ultrastructural distinctive feature for ICLC, the cell processes, develop into the characteristic shape at a relatively early stage of development. It remains to be established if, in humans, ICLC are involved in gallbladder (dis)functions (e.g. pace-making, secretion (auto-, juxta- and/or paracrine), intercellular signaling, or stone formation).

  13. Apoptotic Cell Death of Human Interstitial Cells of Cajal

    PubMed Central

    De Giorgio, Roberto; Faussone Pellegrini, Maria Simonetta; Garrity-Park, Megan M.; Miller, Steven M.; Schmalz, Philip F.; Young-Fadok, Tonia M.; Larson, David W.; Dozois, Eric J.; Camilleri, Michael; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Szurszewski, Joseph H.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2008-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are specialized mesenchyme-derived cells that regulate contractility and excitability of many smooth muscles with loss of ICC seen in a variety of gut motility disorders. Maintenance of ICC numbers is tightly regulated, with several factors known to regulate proliferation. In contrast, the fate of ICC is not established. The aim of this study was to investigate whether apoptosis plays a role in the regulation of ICC numbers in the normal colon. ICC were identified by immunolabeling for the c-Kit receptor tyrosine kinase and by electron microscopy. Apoptosis was detected in colon tissue by immunolabeling for activated caspase-3, terminal dUTP nucleotide end labeling, and ultrastructural changes in the cells. Apoptotic ICC were identified and counted in double labeled tissue sections. Apoptotic ICC were identified in all layers of the colonic muscle. In the muscularis propria 1.5 ± 0.2% of ICC were positive for activated caspase-3 and in the circular muscle layer 2.1 ± 0.9% of ICC were positive for TUNEL. Apoptotic ICC were identified by electron microscopy. Apoptotic cell death is ongoing in ICC. The level of apoptosis in ICC in healthy colon indicates that these cells must be continually regenerated to maintain intact networks. PMID:18798796

  14. Secretion of adenylate kinase 1 is required for extracellular ATP synthesis in C2C12 myotubes

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Bong-Woo; Kwon, Oh-Bong; Lee, Chang Seok; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular ATP (exATP) has been known to be a critical ligand regulating skeletal muscle differentiation and contractibility. ExATP synthesis was greatly increased with the high level of adenylate kinase 1 (AK1) and ATP synthase β during C2C12 myogenesis. The exATP synthesis was abolished by the knock-down of AK1 but not by that of ATP synthase β in C2C12 myotubes, suggesting that AK1 is required for exATP synthesis in myotubes. However, membrane-bound AK1β was not involved in exATP synthesis because its expression level was decreased during myogenesis in spite of its localization in the lipid rafts that contain various kinds of receptors and mediate cell signal transduction, cell migration, and differentiation. Interestingly, cytoplasmic AK1 was secreted from C2C12 myotubes but not from C2C12 myoblasts. Taken together all these data, we can conclude that AK1 secretion is required for the exATP generation in myotubes. PMID:18446060

  15. SIRT3 Deacetylates ATP Synthase F1 Complex Proteins in Response to Nutrient- and Exercise-Induced Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vassilopoulos, Athanassios; Pennington, J. Daniel; Andresson, Thorkell; Rees, David M.; Bosley, Allen D.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Ham, Amy; Flynn, Charles Robb; Hill, Salisha; Rose, Kristie Lindsey; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Walker, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase uses chemiosmotic energy across the inner mitochondrial membrane to convert adenosine diphosphate and orthophosphate into ATP, whereas genetic deletion of Sirt3 decreases mitochondrial ATP levels. Here, we investigate the mechanistic connection between SIRT3 and energy homeostasis. Results: By using both in vitro and in vivo experiments, we demonstrate that ATP synthase F1 proteins alpha, beta, gamma, and Oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein (OSCP) contain SIRT3-specific reversible acetyl-lysines that are evolutionarily conserved and bind to SIRT3. OSCP was further investigated and lysine 139 is a nutrient-sensitive SIRT3-dependent deacetylation target. Site directed mutants demonstrate that OSCPK139 directs, at least in part, mitochondrial ATP production and mice lacking Sirt3 exhibit decreased ATP muscle levels, increased ATP synthase protein acetylation, and an exercise-induced stress-deficient phenotype. Innovation: This work connects the aging and nutrient response, via SIRT3 direction of the mitochondrial acetylome, to the regulation of mitochondrial energy homeostasis under nutrient-stress conditions by deacetylating ATP synthase proteins. Conclusion: Our data suggest that acetylome signaling contributes to mitochondrial energy homeostasis by SIRT3-mediated deacetylation of ATP synthase proteins. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 551–564. PMID:24252090

  16. Current best practice in rehabilitation in interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Atsuhito; Cox, Narelle S; Holland, Anne E

    2017-02-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a group of chronic respiratory diseases characterized by dyspnoea on exertion and decline in health-related quality of life (HRQL). People with ILD experience significant exercise limitation with contributors that include ventilatory limitation, impaired gas exchange, decreased cardiac function and skeletal muscle dysfunction. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is well established in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as a means to overcome exercise limitation and improve activity-related dyspnoea. There is increasing evidence for similar effects of PR in people with ILD. This review discusses the evidence for PR in ILD, outlines the essential components of PR in this population, and highlights special considerations for exercise training in people with ILD. Possible future directions for PR research in people with ILD are explored.

  17. [The temperature control for cancer thermotherapy using interstitial microwave antenna].

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiaoli; Wang, Lili; Wang, Wenbing

    2006-12-01

    The basic objective of microwave hyperthermia is to raise the temperature in the tumor tissue without overheating point for a long time. It's difficult to achieve uniform temperature distribution using the continuous heating without changing the antenna shape and inserting position. In this paper, the interstitial antenna worked in the frequency of 2450 MHz inserted into an infinite muscle model is studied. The Finite Difference Time Domoin (FDTD) method was used to calculate the electromagnetic field, while the finite difference method (FDM) was used to analyze the temperature distribution in tumor tissue. The simulation results show that the long-time evenly heating can be achieved by using the alternately heating process and the treatment area can be changed by adjusting input power.

  18. Interstitial cells of Cajal, the Maestro in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Mostafa, Randa M; Moustafa, Yasser M; Hamdy, Hosam

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are important players in the symphony of gut motility. They have a very significant physiological role orchestrating the normal peristaltic activity of the digestive system. They are the pacemaker cells in gastrointestinal (GI) muscles. Absence, reduction in number or altered integrity of the ICC network may have a dramatic effect on GI system motility. More understanding of ICC physiology will foster advances in physiology of gut motility which will help in a future breakthrough in the pharmacological interventions to restore normal motor function of GI tract. This mini review describes what is known about the physiologic function and role of ICCs in GI system motility and in a variety of GI system motility disorders. PMID:20614479

  19. Complementary and Alternative Therapies as Treatment Approaches for Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Kristene E

    2002-01-01

    The management of interstitial cystitis (IC) is predominantly the reduction of the symptoms of frequency, urgency, and pain. Multimodal treatment approaches for IC are helpful in customizing therapy for individual patients. Complementary and alternative therapies are a quintessential addition to the therapeutic armamentarium and frequently include dietary modification, nutraceuticals, bladder training, neuromodulation, stress reduction, and sex therapy. Dietary modification involves elimination of bladder irritants, fluid regulation, and a bowel regimen. Nutraceuticals studied for the treatment of IC include calcium glycerophosphate, L-arginine, mucopolysaccharides, bioflavinoids, and Chinese herbs. Bladder training is effective after pain reduction. The neuromodulation of high-tone pelvic-floor muscle dysfunction is achieved with physical therapy and acupuncture. Stress reduction and sex therapy are best administered by a qualified stress manager and sex therapist. Multimodal, nonconventional management may add efficacy to the treatment of IC. PMID:16986031

  20. Mechanisms of charge transfer in human copper ATPases ATP7A and ATP7B.

    PubMed

    Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco; Smeazzetto, Serena

    2017-04-01

    ATP7A and ATP7B are Cu(+) -transporting ATPases of subclass IB and play a fundamental role in intracellular copper homeostasis. ATP7A/B transfer Cu(+) ions across the membrane from delivery to acceptor proteins without establishing a free Cu(+) gradient. Transfer of copper across the membrane is coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Current measurements on solid supported membranes (SSM) were performed to investigate the mechanism of copper-related charge transfer across ATP7A and ATP7B. SSM measurements demonstrated that electrogenic copper displacement occurs within ATP7A/B following addition of ATP and formation of the phosphorylated intermediate. Comparison of the time constants for cation displacement in ATP7A/B and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) -ATPase is consistent with the slower phosphoenzyme formation in copper ATPases. Moreover, ATP-dependent copper transfer in ATP7A/B is not affected by varying the pH, suggesting that net proton counter-transport may not occur in copper ATPases. Platinum anticancer drugs activate ATP7A/B and are subjected to ATP-dependent vectorial displacement with a mechanism analogous to that of copper. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 69(4):218-225, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. Urine markers of interstitial cystitis.

    PubMed

    Erickson, D R

    2001-06-01

    This article describes the current state of the art with regard to urine markers of interstitial cystitis (IC), and describes the areas that need continuing research. Articles referenced in MEDLINE that describe urine alterations in IC were reviewed. Additional articles were identified by cross-referencing. The different marker alterations were tabulated. The relevant articles were discussed, considering different purposes for urine markers including: (1) diagnosing IC; (2) confirming a specific pathophysiology for IC; and (3) predicting or following response to a specific treatment. Currently, 2 markers (glycoprotein-51 and antiproliferative factor [APF]) clearly separate IC and control subjects, with minimal overlap. Markers that correlate with specific bladder biopsy features include 1,4-methylimidazole acetic acid and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), which correlate with mast cell density, and interleukin (IL)-6, which correlates with mononuclear inflammation. Markers that changed after treatment were as follows: (1) nitric oxide synthase and cyclic guanosine monophosphate increased with oral L-arginine; (2) ECP decreased with subcutaneous heparin; (3) prostaglandin E(2) and kallikrein decreased after bladder distention; (4) neutrophil chemotactic activity decreased after dimethyl sulfoxide; (5) IL-2 inhibitor decreased after oral nifedipine; (6) IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 decreased after bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine; and (7) APF and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor changed to or toward normal levels after bladder distention or sacral nerve stimulation. A larger number of urine alterations have been reported, and a few are being pursued further by correlating with bladder biopsy findings or treatment responses. Further research is needed.

  2. How does interstitial cystitis begin?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Interstitial cystitis (IC) does not start as an endstage disease, it has a beginning when symptoms are milder, intermittent and the disease is misdiagnosed. To determine how IC develops patients were interviewed on when their symptoms began, what they were and are now as well as the various diagnoses that they received before they were determined to have IC. Methods One hundred female IC patients were screened. They filled out a questionnaire asking about the age their disease presented, their initial and current symptoms, what their original diagnoses were, effect of the menstrual cycle and sexual activity on their symptoms and about any relatives with bladder symptoms or a current diagnosis of IC. Results By age 30, 81% of patients had bladder symptoms, 21% before age 10. The first symptom was frequency in 81%, pain present in 59% and the symptoms were intermittent in 64%. Most common early misdiagnosis was UTI in 74% with 93% reporting negative urine cultures. Sex was painful and causes symptom flares in 82%, symptoms flared the week before the menses in 75%. Most common gynecologic diagnosis was yeast vaginitis, 42%. Urge incontinence was present in 33%. There were 51% that reported bladder symptoms in a first degree female relative. Conclusions IC begins primarily with frequency and is intermittent in most patients with symptom flares associated with sexual activity. Pain and urgency incontinence tend to be a later symptoms. When IC flares the most common misdiagnosis is UTI. Symptoms begin before age 30 in most but an IC diagnosis is often not made until age 40. Genetics appear to play a significant role. It is important to consider these facts when evaluating women with “early IC” because correct diagnosis will result in proper therapy and reduced health care costs. PMID:26816860

  3. Detecting ATP release by a biosensor method.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Seiji; Hazama, Akihiro; Dutta, Amal K; Sabirov, Ravshan Z; Okada, Yasunobu

    2004-11-09

    Cells release adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) into the extracellular space in response to various stimuli. This released ATP plays an important physiological role in cell-to-cell signal transduction. The bulk ATP concentration can be detected using a conventional luciferin-luciferase assay. However, the ATP concentration in the vicinity of the cell surface is often different from the bulk concentration because of its rapid degradation by ecto-ATPases and because of delayed diffusion due to unstirred layer effects. Here, we describe a simple biosensor method to measure the local ATP concentration on the cell surface in real time. The method is based on the ATP-dependent opening of ligand-gated cation channels of purinergic P2X receptors expressed in undifferentiated pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells or in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells stably transfected with recombinant P2X2 purinergic receptors. Under the whole-cell configuration of patch-clamp, a sensor PC12 cell or HEK293 is positioned within the proximity of a target cell, and the P2X-mediated currents induced by ATP released from a given site on the target cell surface is measured. The ATP release is quantified by a calibration procedure utilizing local puff applications of ATP at preset concentrations.

  4. Unexpected role of the copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced vascular smooth

    SciTech Connect

    Ashino, T.; Varadarajan, S.; Urao, N.; Oshikawa, J.; Chen, G. -F.; Wang, H.; Huo, Y.; Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; McKinney, R. D.; Maryon, E. B.; Kaplan, J. H.; Ushio-Fukai, M.; Fukai, T.

    2010-09-09

    Copper, an essential nutrient, has been implicated in vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis with unknown mechanism. Bioavailability of intracellular copper is regulated not only by the copper importer CTR1 (copper transporter 1) but also by the copper exporter ATP7A (Menkes ATPase), whose function is achieved through copper-dependent translocation from trans-Golgi network (TGN). Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) promotes vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key component of neointimal formation. To determine the role of copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Depletion of ATP7A inhibited VSMC migration in response to PDGF or wound scratch in a CTR1/copper-dependent manner. PDGF stimulation promoted ATP7A translocation from the TGN to lipid rafts, which localized at the leading edge, where it colocalized with PDGF receptor and Rac1, in migrating VSMCs. Mechanistically, ATP7A small interfering RNA or CTR small interfering RNA prevented PDGF-induced Rac1 translocation to the leading edge, thereby inhibiting lamellipodia formation. In addition, ATP7A depletion prevented a PDGF-induced decrease in copper level and secretory copper enzyme precursor prolysyl oxidase (Pro-LOX) in lipid raft fraction, as well as PDGF-induced increase in LOX activity. In vivo, ATP7A expression was markedly increased and copper accumulation was observed by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy at neointimal VSMCs in wire injury model. These findings suggest that ATP7A plays an important role in copper-dependent PDGF-stimulated VSMC migration via recruiting Rac1 to lipid rafts at the leading edge, as well as regulating LOX activity. This may contribute to neointimal formation after vascular injury. Our findings provide insight into ATP7A as a novel therapeutic target for vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis.

  5. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-03-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or 'bathing solution' ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r(2) = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature.

  6. Temperature-dependent release of ATP from human erythrocytes: mechanism for the control of local tissue perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Kalsi, Kameljit K; González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    Human limb muscle and skin blood flow increases significantly with elevations in temperature, possibly through physiological processes that involve temperature-sensitive regulatory mechanisms. Here we tested the hypothesis that the release of the vasodilator ATP from human erythrocytes is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature both in vitro and in vivo, and examined potential channel/transporters involved. To investigate the source of ATP release, whole blood, red blood cells (RBCs), plasma and serum were heated in vitro to 33, 36, 39 and 42°C. In vitro heating augmented plasma or ‘bathing solution’ ATP in whole blood and RBC samples, but not in either isolated plasma or serum samples. Heat-induced ATP release was blocked by niflumic acid and glibenclamide, but was not affected by inhibitors of nucleoside transport or anion exchange. Heating blood to 42°C enhanced (P < 0.05) membrane protein abundance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in RBCs. In a parallel in vivo study in humans exposed to whole-body heating at rest and during exercise, increases in muscle temperature from 35 to 40°C correlated strongly with elevations in arterial plasma ATP (r2 = 0.91; P = 0.0001), but not with femoral venous plasma ATP (r2 = 0.61; P = 0.14). In vitro, however, the increase in ATP release from RBCs was similar in arterial and venous samples heated to 39°C. Our findings demonstrate that erythrocyte ATP release is sensitive to physiological increases in temperature, possibly via activation of CFTR-like channels, and suggest that temperature-dependent release of ATP from erythrocytes might be an important mechanism regulating human limb muscle and skin perfusion in conditions that alter blood and tissue temperature. PMID:22227202

  7. ATP increases the migration of microglia across the brain endothelial cell monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Tomoji; Inagaki, Manato; Fujita, Yu; Kimoto, Takehiro; Tanabe-Fujimura, Chiaki; Zou, Kun; Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Komano, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral microcapillary endothelium, known as the blood–brain barrier (BBB), acts as a barrier between the blood and the interstitial fluid of the brain. The BBB therefore controls the passage of nutrients into the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia show a specific affinity for migration into the CNS, and this migration appears to occur independently of BBB integrity. To study the migration of microglia across the BBB, we developed an in vitro co-culture system of mouse brain endothelial cells (MBECs) and Ra2 microglia using Transwell inserts. We first investigated the influence of microglia or ATP, a microglial chemotactic factor, on MBEC barrier integrity. The addition of microglia or ATP led to the disruption of the MBEC monolayer and significantly decreased barrier function as measured by trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and electric cell–substrate impedance sensing (ECIS). Furthermore, ATP promoted the migration of microglia but not macrophages across the MBEC monolayer. An inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) decreased the transmigration of microglia in our system, indicating that MMPs play a role in microglial chemotaxis. We specifically identify a role for microglia-derived MMP-2. In conclusion, we offer evidence that microglia migration across the brain endothelial cell monolayer is increased in the presence of ATP in a manner that involves MMP secretion. PMID:26934979

  8. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-07-22

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum-classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO4(2-) state, but in the H2PγO4(-) state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3(-)) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes.

  9. Profiling Protein Kinases and Other ATP Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis Using Acyl-ATP Probes*

    PubMed Central

    Villamor, Joji Grace; Kaschani, Farnusch; Colby, Tom; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Zhao, David; Kaiser, Markus; Patricelli, Matthew P.; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Many protein activities are driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Here, we explore the ATP binding proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using acyl-ATP (AcATP)1 probes. These probes target ATP binding sites and covalently label lysine residues in the ATP binding pocket. Gel-based profiling using biotinylated AcATP showed that labeling is dependent on pH and divalent ions and can be competed by nucleotides. The vast majority of these AcATP-labeled proteins are known ATP binding proteins. Our search for labeled peptides upon in-gel digest led to the discovery that the biotin moiety of the labeled peptides is oxidized. The in-gel analysis displayed kinase domains of two receptor-like kinases (RLKs) at a lower than expected molecular weight, indicating that these RLKs lost the extracellular domain, possibly as a result of receptor shedding. Analysis of modified peptides using a gel-free platform identified 242 different labeling sites for AcATP in the Arabidopsis proteome. Examination of each individual labeling site revealed a preference of labeling in ATP binding pockets for a broad diversity of ATP binding proteins. Of these, 24 labeled peptides were from a diverse range of protein kinases, including RLKs, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and calcium-dependent kinases. A significant portion of the labeling sites could not be assigned to known nucleotide binding sites. However, the fact that labeling could be competed with ATP indicates that these labeling sites might represent previously uncharacterized nucleotide binding sites. A plot of spectral counts against expression levels illustrates the high specificity of AcATP probes for protein kinases and known ATP binding proteins. This work introduces profiling of ATP binding activities of a large diversity of proteins in plant proteomes. The data have been deposited in ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD000188. PMID:23722185

  10. Use of xanthine oxidase inhibitor febuxostat inhibits renal interstitial inflammation and fibrosis in unilateral ureteral obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Omori, Hiroki; Kawada, Noritaka; Inoue, Kazunori; Ueda, Yoshiyasu; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Matsui, Isao; Kaimori, Jyunya; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Moriyama, Toshiki; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2012-08-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is the common pathway in progressive renal diseases, where oxidative stress promotes inflammation and macrophage infiltration. Febuxostat is a novel nonpurine xanthine oxidase (XO)-specific inhibitor for treating hyperuricemia. While some reports suggest a relationship between hyperuricemia and chronic kidney disease (CKD), the renoprotective mechanism of an XO inhibitor in CKD remains unknown. Recent reports have focused on XO as a source of oxidative stress. Here, we investigate the potential of febuxostat to reduce fibrogenic and inflammatory responses in an established interstitial fibrosis model-unilateral ureteric obstruction (UUO). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: sham-operated group, vehicle-treated UUO group, and febuxostat-treated UUO group. Treatment with febuxostat diminished XO activity in obstructed kidneys, and suppressed nitrotyrosine, a marker of oxidative stress. Consequently, febuxostat inhibited early proinflammatory cytokine expression, followed by a reduction of interstitial macrophage infiltration. In addition, febuxostat suppressed transforming growth factor-β messenger RNA expression, thereby ameliorating smooth muscle alpha actin and type I collagen expression. Our results provide evidence for the renoprotective action of febuxostat against the formation of interstitial fibrosis. A decrease in macrophage infiltration and interstitial fibrosis, along with a decrease of the oxidative stress marker, strongly suggests the existence of a causal relationship between them. Febuxostat may have therapeutic value in slowing or preventing interstitial fibrosis in patients with CKD.

  11. Pyrazinoic acid decreases the proton motive force, respiratory ATP synthesis activity, and cellular ATP levels.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Haagsma, Anna C; Pham, Hoang; Maaskant, Janneke J; Mol, Selena; Lill, Holger; Bald, Dirk

    2011-11-01

    Pyrazinoic acid, the active form of the first-line antituberculosis drug pyrazinamide, decreased the proton motive force and respiratory ATP synthesis rates in subcellular mycobacterial membrane assays. Pyrazinoic acid also significantly lowered cellular ATP levels in Mycobacterium bovis BCG. These results indicate that the predominant mechanism of killing by this drug may operate by depletion of cellular ATP reserves.

  12. [Modern Views on Children's Interstitial Lung Disease].

    PubMed

    Boĭtsova, E V; Beliashova, M A; Ovsiannikov, D Iu

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILD, diffuse lung diseases) are a heterogeneous group of diseases in which a pathological process primarily involved alveoli and perialveolar interstitium, resulting in impaired gas exchange, restrictive changes of lung ventilation function and diffuse interstitial changes detectable by X-ray. Children's interstitial lung diseases is an topical problem ofpediatricpulmonoogy. The article presents current information about classification, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment and prognosis of these rare diseases. The article describes the differences in the structure, pathogenesis, detection of various histological changes in children's ILD compared with adult patients with ILD. Authors cite an instance of registers pediatric patients with ILD. The clinical semiotics of ILD, the possible results of objective research, the frequency of symptoms, the features of medical history, the changes detected on chest X-rays, CT semiotics described in detail. Particular attention was paid to interstitial lung diseases, occurring mainly in newborns and children during the first two years of life, such as congenital deficiencies of surfactant proteins, neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy, pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis. The diagnostic program for children's ILD, therapy options are presented in this article.

  13. [Methods and clinical results of interstitial thermoradiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Seegenschmiedt, M H; Sauer, R

    1989-05-01

    Besides percutaneous hyperthermia techniques, some new interstitial procedures have been developed and included into the arsenal of radiotherapists. As compared to percutaneous techniques, considerable benefits are offered by interstitial methods: a more homogeneous distribution of therapeutical temperatures, a better sparing of normal tissue, the possibility to treat deep tumors, and better therapy control and evaluation by extensive "thermal mapping" within the target volume. This study presents the technical principles and the clinical possibilities of the interstitial hyperthermia methods developed hitherto: resistive radiofrequency hyperthermia, radiative microwave hyperthermia, inductive ferromagnetic seed hyperthermia, and conductive hot-water perfusion hyperthermia. Until now, interstitial thermo-radiotherapy was only performed during some phase I/II studies. It was applied for palliative reasons in persisting and recurrent tumors accessible for implantation and situated in superficial to semi-deep locations with no or insufficient response to differently combined treatment modalities (surgery, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy). The preliminary clinical results obtained in almost 300 patients are quite promising: complete remission rates up to 70% have been achieved. Interstitial hyperthermia represents an effective and safe therapy modality, especially when combined with radiotherapy in palliative tumor therapy. At present, several prospective randomized multicentric studies are conducted to investigate its value as adjuvant therapy modality.

  14. Invasive diagnostic techniques in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Venerino; Ravaglia, Claudia; Gurioli, Carlo; Piciucchi, Sara; Dubini, Alessandra; Cavazza, Alberto; Chilosi, Marco; Rossi, Andrea; Tomassetti, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosing interstitial lung diseases (f-ILDs) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders in which the aetiology may be identified or, not infrequently, remain unknown. Establishing a correct diagnosis of a distinct f-ILD requires a multidisciplinary approach, integrating clinical profile, physiological and laboratory data, radiological appearance and, when appropriate, histological findings. Surgical lung biopsy is still considered the most important diagnostic tool as it is able to provide lung samples large enough for identification of complex patterns such as usual interstitial pneumonitis (UIP) and nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis. However, this procedure is accompanied by significant morbidity and mortality. Bronchoalveolar lavage is still a popular diagnostic tool allowing identification of alternative diagnoses in patients with suspected idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) when an increase in lymphocytes is detected. Conventional transbronchial lung biopsy has a very low sensitivity in detecting the UIP pattern and its role in this clinical-radiological context is marginal. The introduction of less invasive methods such as transbronchial cryobiopsy show great promise to clinical practice as they can be used to obtain samples large enough to morphologically support a diagnosis of IPF or other idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, along with fewer complications. Recent advances in the field suggest that less invasive methods of lung sampling, without significant side effects, in combination with other diagnostic methods could replace the need for surgical lung biopsy in the future. Indeed, these new multidisciplinary procedures may become the main diagnostic work-up method for patients with suspected idiopathic interstitial pneumonia.

  15. Meat Science and Muscle Biology Symposium: stem cell niche and postnatal muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Bi, P; Kuang, S

    2012-03-01

    Stem cell niche plays a critical role in regulating the behavior and function of adult stem cells that underlie tissue growth, maintenance, and regeneration. In the skeletal muscle, stem cells, called satellite cells, contribute to postnatal muscle growth and hypertrophy, and thus, meat production in agricultural animals. Satellite cells are located adjacent to mature muscle fibers underneath a sheath of basal lamina. Microenvironmental signals from extracellular matrix mediated by the basal lamina and from the host myofiber both impinge on satellite cells to regulate their activity. Furthermore, several types of muscle interstitial cells, including intramuscular preadipocytes and connective tissue fibroblasts, have recently been shown to interact with satellite cells and actively regulate the growth and regeneration of postnatal skeletal muscles. From this regard, interstitial adipogenic cells are not only important for marbling and meat quality, but also represent an additional cellular component of the satellite cell niche. At the molecular level, these interstitial cells may interact with satellite cells through cell surface ligands, such as delta-like 1 homolog (Dlk1) protein whose overexpression is thought to be responsible for muscle hypertrophy in callipyge sheep. In fact, extracellular Dlk1 protein has been shown to promote the myogenic differentiation of satellite cells. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms within the stem cell niche that regulate satellite cell differentiation and maintain muscle homeostasis may lead to promising approaches to optimizing muscle growth and composition, thus improving meat production and quality.

  16. Creatine supplementation enhances anaerobic ATP synthesis during a single 10 sec maximal handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Yuko; Hamaoka, Takafumi; Katsumura, Toshihito; Kuwamori, Masasuke; Kimura, Naoto; Sako, Takayuki; Chance, Britton

    2003-02-01

    Forearm muscles of twelve healthy male subjects (age = 22.3 +/- 1.1 years (mean +/- S.E.)) were examined during a 10 sec maximal dynamic handgrip exercise (Ex10) using 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy before and after ingestion with 30 g creatine (Cr) monohydrate or placebo per day for 14 days. Cr supplementation produced a 11.5 +/- 4.6% increase in the resting muscle phosphocreatine (PCr) concentration and a 65.0 +/- 4.2% increase in the PCr degradation during Ex10. ATP synthesis rate through PCr hydrolysis and total anaerobic ATP synthesis rate during Ex10 increased from 0.64 +/- 0.08 (pre-value) to 0.86 +/- 0.14 mmol/kg ww/sec (post-value, p < 0.05) and from 0.97 +/- 0.16 (pre-value) to 1.33 +/- 0.27 mmol/kg ww/sec (post-value, p < 0.05), respectively. An increase in total anaerobic ATP synthesis during Ex10 after Cr supplementation positively correlated with the increase in ATP synthesis through PCr hydrolysis. Cr supplementation produced a 15.1 +/- 3.8% increase in the mean power output during Ex10. There was no significant difference in the mean power output per unit of total anaerobic ATP synthesis during Ex10 between before and after Cr supplementation. ATP synthesis rate through PCr hydrolysis positively correlated with mean power output during Ex10 in all twelve subjects after treatment (r = 0.58, p < 0.05). The results suggest that Cr supplementation enhanced PCr degradation during Ex10. It is strongly indicated that an improvement in performance during Ex10 was associated with the increased PCr availability for the synthesis of ATP.

  17. ATP-triggered anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Disanto, Rocco; Tai, Wanyi; Gu, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli-triggered drug delivery systems have been increasingly used to promote physiological specificity and on-demand therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here we utilize adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a trigger for the controlled release of anticancer drugs. We demonstrate that polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with an ATP-binding aptamer-incorporated DNA motif can selectively release the intercalating doxorubicin via a conformational switch when in an ATP-rich environment. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ATP-responsive nanovehicles is 0.24 μM in MDA-MB-231 cells, a 3.6-fold increase in the cytotoxicity compared with that of non-ATP-responsive nanovehicles. Equipped with an outer shell crosslinked by hyaluronic acid, a specific tumour-targeting ligand, the ATP-responsive nanocarriers present an improvement in the chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumour growth using xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumour-bearing mice. This ATP-triggered drug release system provides a more sophisticated drug delivery system, which can differentiate ATP levels to facilitate the selective release of drugs.

  18. ATP in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema.

    PubMed

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Braber, Saskia; Nazary, Maiwand; Givi, Masoumh Ezzati; Nijkamp, Frans P; Folkerts, Gert

    2009-10-01

    Extracellular ATP is a signaling molecule that often serves as a danger signal to alert the immune system of tissue damage. This molecule activates P2 nucleotide receptors, that include the ionotropic P2X receptors and metabotropic P2Y receptors. Recently, it has been reported that ATP accumulates in the airways of both asthmatic patients and sensitized mice after allergen challenge. The role and function of ATP in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are not well understood. In this study we investigated the effect of cigarette smoke on purinergic receptors and ATP release by neutrophils. Neutrophils and their mediators are key players in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema. Here we demonstrated that in an in vivo model of cigarette smoke-induced lung emphysema, the amount of ATP was increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Moreover, activation of neutrophils with cigarette smoke extract induced ATP release. Treatment of neutrophils with apyrase (catalyses the hydrolysis of ATP to yield AMP) and suramin (P2-receptor antagonist) abrogated the release of CXCL8 and elastase induced by cigarette smoke extract and exogenous ATP. These observations indicate that activation of purinergic signaling by cigarette smoke may take part in the pathogenesis of lung emphysema.

  19. ATP synthase: two motors, two fuels.

    PubMed

    Oster, G; Wang, H

    1999-04-15

    FoF1 ATPase is the universal protein responsible for ATP synthesis. The enzyme comprises two reversible rotary motors: Fo is either an ion 'turbine' or an ion pump, and F1 is either a hydrolysis motor or an ATP synthesizer. Recent biophysical and biochemical studies have helped to elucidate the operating principles for both motors.

  20. The role of Ca2+ signaling in the coordination of mitochondrial ATP production with cardiac work

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    The heart is capable of balancing the rate of mitochondrial ATP production with utilization continuously over a wide range of activity. This results in a constant phosphorylation potential despite a large change in metabolite turnover. The molecular mechanisms responsible for generating this energy homeostasis are poorly understood. The best candidate for a cytosolic signaling molecule reflecting ATP hydrolysis is Ca2+. Since Ca2+ initiates and powers muscle contraction as well as serves as the primary substrate for SERCA, Ca2+ is an ideal feed-forward signal for priming ATP production. With the sarcoplasmic reticulum to cytosolic Ca2+ gradient near equilibrium with the free energy of ATP, cytosolic Ca2+ release is exquisitely sensitive to the cellular energy state providing a feedback signal. Thus, Ca2+ can serve as a feed-forward and feedback regulator of ATP production. Consistent with this notion is the correlation of cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ with work in numerous preparations as well as the localization of mitochondria near Ca2+ release sites. How cytosolic Ca2+ signaling might regulate oxidative phosphorylation is a focus of this review. The relevant Ca2+ sensitive sites include several dehydrogenases and substrate transporters together with a post-translational modification of F1-FO-ATPase and cytochrome oxidase. Thus, Ca2+ apparently activates both the generation of the mitochondrial membrane potential as well as utilization to produce ATP. This balanced activation extends the energy homeostasis observed in the cytosol into the mitochondria matrix in the never resting heart. PMID:19481532

  1. Plasma changes in endotoxin and anaphylactic shock (ATP, ADP and Creatine phosphorus).

    PubMed

    Jabs, C M; Ferrell, W J; Robb, H J

    1979-01-01

    Decisive patterns have been demonstrated in plasma adenosine 5' triphosphate (ATP) levels in both endotoxin and anaphylactic shock which correlate with periods of low platelet counts, low arterial pressures and abnormal electrocardiograms. When these irregularities were occurring, the plasma ATP level was low; when improvement occurred, the plasma ATP level rose. Plasma ATP levels appear to be an index to the metabolic state of the animal. The plasma creatine phosphate (CP) level showed a tendency to decrease when the ATP level dropped in anaphylactic shock, although the CP level did not recover to the same extent as the ATP level. In endotoxin shock, the plasma CP level increased on an average of six-fold. It is proposed that this rise resulted from either CP mobilization from tissues, for the purpose of replenishing the energy deficient myocardial muscle, or possible leakage from damaged cells. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) plasma values were measured in both anaphylactic and endotoxin shock. High initial ADP values were prone towards a more severe anaphylactic reaction and a shorter survival time in the endotoxin shock experiments.

  2. [ATP in the metabolism of ruminants].

    PubMed

    Bergner, H

    1991-10-01

    The ATP yield from the carbohydrates of anaerobically living microorganisms in the rumen amounts to only 5-10% of the ATP yield of the intermediary metabolism in the presence of oxygen. Vital functions and thus microbial protein synthesis are due to protein degradation in the rumen. The ATP yield in the intermediary metabolism of ruminants is mainly achieved from propionate and microbial protein by means of gluconeogenesis because the absorption of glucose from digested starch is very low. The relationships between ATP yield in the rumen and the processes of glucose provision for the production of lactose as well as the protein content of the milk are shown. As important processes of ATP production in microorganisms from easily soluble carbohydrates take place in silage preparations before feed intake, the corresponding consequences for the metabolism of high-performance cows fed with silage are shown.

  3. An overview of interstitial brachytherapy and hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, B.B.; Harney, J.

    1989-11-01

    Interstitial thermoradiotherapy, an experimental cancer treatment that combines interstitial radiation implants (brachytherapy) and interstitial hyperthermia, is in the early stages of investigation. In accordance with the procedure used in a current national trial protocol, a 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered after catheters are placed into the tumor area while the patient is under general anesthesia. This is immediately followed by loading of radioactive Iridium-192 seeds into the catheters for a defined period of time. Once the prescribed radiation dose is delivered, the radioactive sources are removed and a second, 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered. Clinical trials with hyperthermia in combination with radiation have increased in recent years. Nurses caring for these patients need to become more knowledgeable about this investigational therapy. This paper provides an overview of the biologic rationale for this therapy, as well as a description of the delivery method and clinical application. Specific related nursing interventions are defined in a nursing protocol.23 references.

  4. Interstitial Lung Disease Induced by Pazopanib Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Shotaro; Sakamoto, Noriho; Hara, Shintaro; Hara, Atsuko; Kakugawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Yoichi; Futsuki, Yoji; Izumikawa, Koichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Although pneumothorax has been reported to be a major pulmonary adverse event in patients treated with pazopanib, a multikinase inhibitor, drug-induced interstitial lung disease (DILD) has not been reported. A 74-year-old Japanese man who received pazopanib for the treatment of femoral leiomyosarcoma and lung metastasis presented with dyspnea and fatigue. He had mild interstitial pneumonia when pazopanib treatment was initiated. Chest computed tomography revealed progressive bilateral ground-glass opacity (GGO) and traction bronchiectasis. We diagnosed DILD due to pazopanib. The patient's pazopanib treatment was interrupted and a steroid was administered. The symptoms and GGO were improved with treatment. Physicians should be aware of DILD due to pazopanib in patients with pre-existing interstitial lung disease. PMID:28050004

  5. Photodynamic therapy: superficial and interstitial illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Katarina; Bendsoe, Niels; Axelsson, Johan; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Svanberg, Sune

    2010-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is reviewed using the treatment of skin tumors as an example of superficial lesions and prostate cancer as an example of deep-lying lesions requiring interstitial intervention. These two applications are among the most commonly studied in oncological PDT, and illustrate well the different challenges facing the two modalities of PDT-superficial and interstitial. They thus serve as good examples to illustrate the entire field of PDT in oncology. PDT is discussed based on the Lund University group's over 20 yr of experience in the field. In particular, the interplay between optical diagnostics and dosimetry and the delivery of the therapeutic light dose are highlighted. An interactive multiple-fiber interstitial procedure to deliver the required therapeutic dose based on the assessment of light fluence rate and sensitizer concentration and oxygen level throughout the tumor is presented.

  6. Timolol-induced interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hetain; Wilches, Lina Vanessa; Guerrero, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Timolol maleate is a non-selective beta-adrenergic receptor blocking agent with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of open-angle glaucoma. A 76 year old female who presented with productive cough, progressive dyspnea and hypoxia after starting timolol maleate opthalamic drops following glaucoma surgery. The patient was diagnosed with interstitial lung disease secondary to timolol treatment and after cessation of the offending agent along with corticosteroid treatment, symptoms improved drastically. Elimination of other possible causes of disease along with evolution of radiological and functional signs left us with a diagnosis of timolol-induced interstitial lung disease. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of timolol-induced interstitial lung disease. PMID:26236595

  7. ATP-gamma-S shifts the operating point of outer hair cell transduction towards scala tympani.

    PubMed

    Bobbin, Richard P; Salt, Alec N

    2005-07-01

    ATP receptor agonists and antagonists alter cochlear mechanics as measured by changes in distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE). Some of the effects on DPOAEs are consistent with the hypothesis that ATP affects mechano-electrical transduction and the operating point of the outer hair cells (OHCs). This hypothesis was tested by monitoring the effect of ATP-gamma-S on the operating point of the OHCs. Guinea pigs anesthetized with urethane and with sectioned middle ear muscles were used. The cochlear microphonic (CM) was recorded differentially (scala vestibuli referenced to scala tympani) across the basal turn before and after perfusion (20 min) of the perilymph compartment with artificial perilymph (AP) and ATP-gamma-S dissolved in AP. The operating point was derived from the cochlear microphonics (CM) recorded in response low frequency (200 Hz) tones at high level (106, 112 and 118 dB SPL). The analysis procedure used a Boltzmann function to simulate the CM waveform and the Boltzmann parameters were adjusted to best-fit the calculated waveform to the CM. Compared to the initial perfusion with AP, ATP-gamma-S (333 microM) enhanced peak clipping of the positive peak of the CM (that occurs during organ of Corti displacements towards scala tympani), which was in keeping with ATP-induced displacement of the transducer towards scala tympani. CM waveform analysis quantified the degree of displacement and showed that the changes were consistent with the stimulus being centered on a different region of the transducer curve. The change of operating point meant that the stimulus was applied to a region of the transducer curve where there was greater saturation of the output on excursions towards scala tympani and less saturation towards scala vestibuli. A significant degree of recovery of the operating point was observed after washing with AP. Dose response curves generated by perfusing ATP-gamma-S (333 microM) in a cumulative manner yielded an EC(50) of 19.8 micro

  8. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Robert; Ryu, Jay H

    2012-03-01

    Cigarette smoke, a toxic collection of thousands of chemicals generated from combustion of tobacco, is recognized as the primary causative agent of certain diffuse interstitial and bronchiolar lung diseases. Most patients afflicted with these disorders are cigarette smokers, and smoking cessation has been shown to be capable of inducing disease remission and should occupy a pivotal role in the management of all smokers with these diffuse lung diseases. The role of pharmacotherapy with corticosteroids or other immunomodulating agents is not well established but may be considered in patients with progressive forms of smoking-related interstitial lung diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Interstitial cystitis. A challenge for the clinician].

    PubMed

    Young, Pablo; Finn, Bárbara C; González, Martín; Comercio, Laura P; Quezel, Mariano; Bruetman, Julio E

    2010-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis is characterized by over 6 months of chronic pain, pressure and discomfort felt in the lower pelvis or bladder. It is often relieved with voiding, along with daytime frequency and nocturia in the absence of an urinary tract infection. The disorder can be divided clinically into two groups -ulcerative and non-ulcerative- based on cystoscopic findings and response to treatment. Management follows an approach of applying the least invasive therapy that affords sufficient relief of symptoms. We report a case of a patient with interstitial cystitis. The diagnosis was performed by symptoms and lesion in the cystoscopy and excellent response to amitriptyline.

  10. Computer-assisted interstitial laser coagulation for BPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Gideon; Barrett, Adrian R. W.; Ng, Wan S.; Lim, Liam G.; Cheng, Wai S.

    2001-06-01

    Interstitial laser thermotherapy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that utilizes laser to coagulate and treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. This study explores the use of a computer-assisted interstitial laser coagulation system to aid surgeons in performing this procedure.

  11. A tale of two compartments: interstitial versus blood glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Eda; Tamborlane, William V

    2009-06-01

    Self-monitoring of blood glucose was described as one of the most important advancements in diabetes management since the invention of insulin in 1920. Recent advances in glucose sensor technology for measuring interstitial glucose concentrations have challenged the dominance of glucose meters in diabetes management, while raising questions about the relationships between interstitial and blood glucose levels. This article will review the differences between interstitial and blood glucose and some of the challenges in measuring interstitial glucose levels accurately.

  12. Edemagenic gain and interstitial fluid volume regulation.

    PubMed

    Dongaonkar, R M; Quick, C M; Stewart, R H; Drake, R E; Cox, C S; Laine, G A

    2008-02-01

    Under physiological conditions, interstitial fluid volume is tightly regulated by balancing microvascular filtration and lymphatic return to the central venous circulation. Even though microvascular filtration and lymphatic return are governed by conservation of mass, their interaction can result in exceedingly complex behavior. Without making simplifying assumptions, investigators must solve the fluid balance equations numerically, which limits the generality of the results. We thus made critical simplifying assumptions to develop a simple solution to the standard fluid balance equations that is expressed as an algebraic formula. Using a classical approach to describe systems with negative feedback, we formulated our solution as a "gain" relating the change in interstitial fluid volume to a change in effective microvascular driving pressure. The resulting "edemagenic gain" is a function of microvascular filtration coefficient (K(f)), effective lymphatic resistance (R(L)), and interstitial compliance (C). This formulation suggests two types of gain: "multivariate" dependent on C, R(L), and K(f), and "compliance-dominated" approximately equal to C. The latter forms a basis of a novel method to estimate C without measuring interstitial fluid pressure. Data from ovine experiments illustrate how edemagenic gain is altered with pulmonary edema induced by venous hypertension, histamine, and endotoxin. Reformulation of the classical equations governing fluid balance in terms of edemagenic gain thus yields new insight into the factors affecting an organ's susceptibility to edema.

  13. Lymphomatoid granulomatosis mimicking interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Braham, Emna; Ayadi-Kaddour, Aïda; Smati, Belhassen; Ben Mrad, Sonia; Besbes, Mohammed; El Mezni, Faouzi

    2008-11-01

    Lymphoid granulomatosis is a rare form of pulmonary angiitis. This case report presents a patient with lymphoid granulomatosis in whom the clinical presentation, radiological features and the partial response to corticosteroid therapy mimicked interstitial lung disease. Lymphoid granulomatosis was only diagnosed at post-mortem examination. The range of reported clinical presentations, diagnostic approaches and outcomes are described.

  14. [Interstitial processes of the lungs in childhood].

    PubMed

    Popper, H

    2017-07-01

    Interstitial processes in the lungs of children can be due to several underlying diseases. Knowledge of the child's age is important as genetic aberrations play a major role in diseases in the first 2 years, whereas immunological diseases are more common starting in kindergarden age. In general lung diseases are rare in children, which makes the diagnostics difficult and results in a delayed diagnosis. In addition, pediatric pulmonologists are often very reluctant to perform lung biopsies due to a lack of a specialized pathologist. In order to make a contribution to the diagnostics of pediatric pulmonary diseases, pathologists should be specialized in pulmonary pathology, have a good knowledge of genetic methods and fetal lung development, which includes the genetic factors involved in lung growth and differentiation. A close cooperation with the pediatric pulmonologist is necessary and each patient should be discussed jointly on an interstitial lung disease board to promote the quality of diagnostics. The pathologist should be aware that the developing lungs of children are not just a smaller form of adult lungs and often react very differently. In this article, we mainly focus on diffuse infiltration patterns, such as ground glass and reticulonodular infiltrations as described in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Localized interstitial processes, which can sometimes be tumor-like and malformations are not dealt with; however, vascular malformations are included as these often manifest as diffuse interstitial infiltrations and must therefore be taken into consideration for the differential diagnostics.

  15. Acute and subacute idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) may have an acute or subacute presentation, or acute exacerbation may occur in a previously subclinical or unrecognized chronic IIP. Acute or subacute IIPs include acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP), cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP), acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (AE-IPF) and AE-NSIP. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) including connective tissue disease (CTD) associated ILD, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, drug-induced lung disease and diffuse alveolar haemorrhage need to be differentiated from acute and subacute IIPs. Despite the severe lack of randomized controlled trials for the treatment of acute and subacute IIPs, the mainstream treatment remains corticosteroid therapy. Other potential therapies reported in the literature include corticosteroids and immunosuppression, antibiotics, anticoagulants, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, autoantibody-targeted treatment, antifibrotics and hemoperfusion therapy. With regard to mechanical ventilation, patients in recent studies with acute and subacute IIPs have shown better survival than those in previous studies. Therefore, a careful value-laden decision about the indications for endotracheal intubation should be made for each patient. Noninvasive ventilation may be beneficial to reduce ventilator associated pneumonia.

  16. Interstitial lung disease probably caused by imipramine.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Prasanna R; Ravi, Ranjani; Gouda, Sinddalingana; Stanley, Weena; Hande, Manjunath H

    2014-01-01

    Drugs are rarely associated with causing interstitial lung disease (ILD). We report a case of a 75-year-old woman who developed ILD after exposure to imipramine. To our knowledge, this is one of the rare cases of ILD probably caused due to imipramine. There is need to report such rare adverse effects related to ILD and drugs for better management of ILD.

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Joshua J; Brown, Kevin K

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting 1% of the US population. Patients can have extra-articular manifestations of their disease and the lungs are commonly involved. RA can affect any compartment of the respiratory system and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the lung is abnormal in over half of these patients. Interstitial lung disease is a dreaded complication of RA. It is more prevalent in smokers, males, and those with high antibody titers. The pathogenesis is unknown but data suggest an environmental insult in the setting of a genetic predisposition. Smoking may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease through citrullination of protein in the lung leading to the development of autoimmunity. Patients usually present in middle age with cough and dyspnea. Pulmonary function testing most commonly shows reduced diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide and HRCT reveals a combination of reticulation and ground glass abnormalities. The most common pattern on HRCT and histopathology is usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP), with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia seen less frequently. There are no large-scale well-controlled treatment trials. In severe or progressive cases, treatment usually consists of corticosteroids with or without a cytotoxic agent for 6 months or longer. RA interstitial lung disease is progressive; over half of patients show radiographic progression within 2 years. Patients with a UIP pattern on biopsy have a survival similar to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27790009

  18. Metal-Dependent Regulation of ATP7A and ATP7B in Fibroblast Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lenartowicz, Malgorzata; Moos, Torben; Ogórek, Mateusz; Jensen, Thomas G.; Møller, Lisbeth B.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of one of the copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B leads to the rare X-linked disorder Menkes Disease (MD) or the rare autosomal disorder Wilson disease (WD), respectively. In order to investigate whether the ATP7A and the ATP7B genes may be transcriptionally regulated, we measured the expression level of the two genes at various concentrations of iron, copper, and insulin. Treating fibroblasts from controls or from individuals with MD or WD for 3 and 10 days with iron chelators revealed that iron deficiency led to increased transcript levels of both ATP7A and ATP7B. Copper deficiency obtained by treatment with the copper chelator led to a downregulation of ATP7A in the control fibroblasts, but surprisingly not in the WD fibroblasts. In contrast, the addition of copper led to an increased expression of ATP7A, but a decreased expression of ATP7B. Thus, whereas similar regulation patterns for the two genes were observed in response to iron deficiency, different responses were observed after changes in the access to copper. Mosaic fibroblast cultures from female carriers of MD treated with copper or copper chelator for 6–8 weeks led to clonal selection. Cells that express the normal ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at high copper concentrations, whereas more surprisingly, cells that express the mutant ATP7A allele had a selective growth advantage at low copper concentrations. Thus, although the transcription of ATP7A is regulated by copper, clonal growth selection in mosaic cell cultures is affected by the level of copper. Female carriers of MD are rarely affected probably due to a skewed inactivation of the X-chromosome bearing the ATP7A mutation. PMID:27587995

  19. Pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis in a patient with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Morrison, A K; Patel, M; Johnson, S L; LeGallo, R; Teague, W G; Vergales, B

    2016-05-17

    Pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis is an interstitial lung disease of childhood that has been increasingly reported over the past decade. Here, we present a case of pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis associated with trisomy 21, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and congenital heart disease in a 34 week premature infant.

  20. Interstitial stromal progenitors during kidney development: here, there and everywhere.

    PubMed

    Fanni, Daniela; Gerosa, Clara; Vinci, Laura; Ambu, Rossano; Dessì, Angelica; Eyken, Peter Van; Fanos, Vassilios; Faa, Gavino

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the renal interstitium has been identified as the site of multiple cell types, giving rise to multiple contiguous cellular networks with multiple fundamental structural and functional roles. Few studies have been carried out on the morphological and functional properties of the stromal/interstitial renal cells during the intrauterine life. This work was aimed at reviewing the peculiar features of renal interstitial stem/progenitor cells involved in kidney development. The origin of the renal interstitial progenitor cells remains unknown. During kidney development, besides the Six2 + cells of the cap mesenchyme, a self-renewing progenitor population, characterized by the expression of Foxd1, represents the first actor of the non-nephrogenic lineage. Foxd1 + interstitial progenitors originate the cortical and the renal medullary interstitial progenitors. Here, the most important stromal/interstitial compartments present in the developing human kidney will be analyzed: capsular stromal cells, cortical interstitial cells, medullary interstitial cells, the interstitium inside the renal stem cell niche, Hilar interstitial cells and Ureteric interstitial cells. Data reported here indicate that the different interstitial compartments of the developing kidney are formed by different cell types that characterize the different renal areas. Further studies are needed to better characterize the different pools of renal interstitial progenitors and their role in human nephrogenesis.

  1. Identification of ATP-binding regions in the RyR1 Ca²⁺ release channel.

    PubMed

    Popova, Olga B; Baker, Mariah R; Tran, Tina P; Le, Tri; Serysheva, Irina I

    2012-01-01

    ATP is an important modulator of gating in type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), also known as a Ca²⁺ release channel in skeletal muscle cells. The activating effect of ATP on this channel is achieved by directly binding to one or more sites on the RyR1 protein. However, the number and location of these sites have yet to be determined. To identify the ATP-binding regions within RyR1 we used 2N₃ATP-2',3'-Biotin-LC-Hydrazone (BioATP-HDZ), a photo-reactive ATP analog to covalently label the channel. We found that BioATP-HDZ binds RyR1 specifically with an IC₅₀ = 0.6±0.2 mM, comparable with the reported EC50 for activation of RyR1 with ATP. Controlled proteolysis of labeled RyR1 followed by sequence analysis revealed three fragments with apparent molecular masses of 95, 45 and 70 kDa that were crosslinked by BioATP-HDZ and identified as RyR1 sequences. Our analysis identified four glycine-rich consensus motifs that can potentially constitute ATP-binding sites and are located within the N-terminal 95-kDa fragment. These putative nucleotide-binding sequences include amino acids 699-704, 701-706, 1081-1084 and 1195-1200, which are conserved among the three RyR isoforms. Located next to the N-terminal disease hotspot region in RyR1, these sequences may communicate the effects of ATP-binding to channel function by tuning conformational motions within the neighboring cytoplasmic regulatory domains. Two other labeled fragments lack ATP-binding consensus motifs and may form non-canonical ATP-binding sites. Based on domain topology in the 3D structure of RyR1 it is also conceivable that the identified ATP-binding regions, despite their wide separation in the primary sequence, may actually constitute the same non-contiguous ATP-binding pocket within the channel tetramer.

  2. Hyaluronan in Tubular and Interstitial Nephrocalcinosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkoelen, Carl F.

    2007-04-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is the major glycosaminoglycan (GAG) component of the renal medullary interstitium. HA is extremely large (up to 104 kDa) and composed of thousands repeating disaccharides of glucuronic acid (GlcUA) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). HA is synthesized by hyaluronan synthases (HASs) and degraded by hyaluronidases (Hyals). The production of HA by renomedullary interstitial cells is mediated by local osmolality. When excess water needs to be excreted, increased interstitial HA seems to antagonize water reabsorption, while the opposite occurs during water conservation. Hence, papillary interstitial HA is low and Hyal high during anti-diuresis, whereas during diuresis HA is high and Hyal low. The polyanion HA plays a role in the reabsorption of hypotonic fluid by immobilizing cations (Na+) via the carboxylate (COO-) groups of GlcUA. The binding of Ca2+ to anionic HA is probably also responsible for the fact that the papilla does not become a stone despite the extremely high interstitial phosphate and oxalate. HA is also an excellent crystal binding molecule. The expression of HA at the luminal surface of renal tubular cells leads to tubular nephrocalcinosis (tubular NC). Calcium staining methods (Von Kossa, Yasue) demonstrated that crystallization inhibitors cannot avoid the occasional precipitation of calcium phosphate in the papillary interstitium (interstitial NC). These crystals are probably immediately immobilized by the gel-like HA matrix. After ulcerating through the pelvic wall the calcified matrix becomes a Randall's plaque. The attachment of calcium oxalate crystals from the primary urine to plaque may ultimately lead to the development of clinical stones in the renal calyces (nephrolithiasis).

  3. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  4. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  5. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  6. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart because it controls the heartbeat. Skeletal Muscle Now, let's talk about the kind of muscle ... soccer ball into the goal. These are your skeletal muscles — sometimes called striated (say: STRY-ay-tud) muscle ...

  7. Cloning of the cDNA for the human ATP synthase OSCP subunit (ATP5O) by exon trapping and mapping to chromosome 21q22.1-q22.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Haiming; Morris, M.A.; Rossier, C.

    1995-08-10

    Exon trapping was used to clone portions of potential genes from human chromosome 21. One trapped sequence showed striking homology with the bovine and rat ATP synthase OSCP (oligomycin sensitivity conferring protein) subunit. We subsequently cloned the full-length human ATP synthase OSCP cDNA (GDB/HGMW approved name ATP50) from infant brain and muscle libraries and determined its nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence (EMBL/GenBank Accession No. X83218). The encoded polypeptide contains 213 amino acids, with more than 80% identity to bovine and murine ATPase OSCP subunits and over 35% identity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and sweet potato sequences. The human ATP5O gene is located at 21q22.1-q22.2, just proximal to D21S17, in YACs 860G11 and 838C7 of the Chumakov et al. YAC contig. The gene is expressed in all human tissues examined, most strongly in muscle and heart. This ATP5O subunit is a key structural component of the stalk of the mitochondrial respiratory chain F{sub 1}F{sub 0}-ATP synthase and as such may contribute in a gene dosage-dependent manner to the phenotype of Down syndrome (trisomy 21). 39 refs., 5 figs.

  8. [Interstitial lung disease as an initial manifestation of dermatomyositis].

    PubMed

    Shen, Min; Gong, Yulin; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Fengchun; Tang, Fulin

    2014-11-25

    manifestation is a common complication and a major mortality cause of dermatomyositis inpatients. And the frequent clinical pathology types are organic and non-specific interstitial pneumonias. Symptoms of skin and muscle, creatine kinase and anti-synthetase antibodies should be closely monitored.

  9. Diode lasers for interstitial laser coagulation of the prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschter, Rolf; Perlmutter, Aaron P.; Anson, K.; Jahnen, P.; Vargas Stuve, Juan C.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Sroka, Ronald; Hofstetter, Alfons G.; Vaughan, Darracott E., Jr.

    1995-05-01

    The concept of interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) of the prostate is the generation of intraprostatic lesions of large volumes, which secondarily are resorbed. In previously published experimental and clinical studies Nd:YAG lasers in combination with specially designed light guides were used. The aim of this study was to examine the suitability of diode lasers to be used in ILC. Diode lasers of various wavelengths (805 nm, 830 nm, 950 nm and 980 nm) with different interstitial applicators (predominantly diffusor tips) were tested in vitro (potatoes, turkey muscle, porcine liver) and in vivo (canine prostate). In vitro experiments were done with various powers and radiation times in order to evaluate the maximum lesion size achievable without tissue carbonization. This depended on the length of the applicator and could measure more than 20 mm. To get large lesion volumes with short radiation times, but to avoid charring, in vivo graded powers were favorable. These were optimized for some systems. In the canine prostate, lesion diameters of up to 15 mm were achieved. For clinical use, interstitial applicators were inserted into the bulky BPH transurethrally through a cystoscope under direct vision, either directly or aided by an introducer system. The number of fiber placements depended on the size and configuration of the gland and varied between 3 and 16. With the 980 nm diode laser and an applicator with conical beam pattern, irradiation was performed for 3 minutes per fiber placement using stepwise reduced power (20 W for 30 s, 15 W for 30 s, 10 W for 30 s and 7 W for 90 s). With the 830 nm diode laser and diffusor tip, the initial power of 10 W was reduced to 5 W within 4 minutes total radiation time. From 1993, 19 patients were treated with diode lasers (830 and 980 nm). Three months follow-up in 15 patients treated with 830 nm showed an AUA-score change from 18.9 to 5.9 and a peak flow rate change from 7.8 to 15.2 ml/s.

  10. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  11. Customized ATP towpreg. [Automated Tow Placement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandusky, Donald A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Baucom, Robert M.; Johnston, Norman J.

    1992-01-01

    Automated tow placement (ATP) utilizes robotic technology to lay down adjacent polymer-matrix-impregnated carbon fiber tows on a tool surface. Consolidation and cure during ATP requires that void elimination and polymer matrix adhesion be accomplished in the short period of heating and pressure rolling that follows towpreg ribbon placement from the robot head to the tool. This study examined the key towpreg ribbon properties and dimensions which play a significant role in ATP. Analysis of the heat transfer process window indicates that adequate heating can be achieved at lay down rates as high as 1 m/sec. While heat transfer did not appear to be the limiting factor, resin flow and fiber movement into tow lap gaps could be. Accordingly, consideration was given to towpreg ribbon having uniform yet non-rectangular cross sections. Dimensional integrity of the towpreg ribbon combined with customized ribbon architecture offer great promise for processing advances in ATP of high performance composites.

  12. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  13. Cleanup MAC and MBA code ATP

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, V.K.

    1994-10-17

    The K Basins Materials Accounting (MAC) and Material Balance (MBA) database system had some minor code cleanup performed to its code. This ATP describes how the code was to be tested to verify its correctness.

  14. The Rotary Mechanism of the ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Robert K.; Scanlon, Joanne A. Baylis; Al-Shawi, Marwan K.

    2008-01-01

    The FOF1 ATP synthase is a large complex of at least 22 subunits, more than half of which are in the membranous FO sector. This nearly ubiquitous transporter is responsible for the majority of ATP synthesis in oxidative and photo-phosphorylation, and its overall structure and mechanism have remained conserved throughout evolution. Most examples utilize the proton motive force to drive ATP synthesis except for a few bacteria, which use a sodium motive force. A remarkable feature of the complex is the rotary movement of an assembly of subunits that plays essential roles in both transport and catalytic mechanisms. This review addresses the role of rotation in catalysis of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and the transport of protons or sodium. PMID:18515057

  15. Impact of age on exercise-induced ATP supply during supramaximal plantar flexion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Trinity, Joel D.; Hart, Corey R.; Kim, Seong-Eun; Groot, H. Jonathan; Fur, Yann Le; Sorensen, Jacob R.; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the physiological factors responsible for exercise intolerance and bioenergetic alterations with age are poorly understood due, at least in art, to the confounding effect of reduced physical activity in the elderly. Thus, in 40 healthy young (22 ± 2 yr) and old (74 ± 8 yr) activity-matched subjects, we assessed the impact of age on: 1) the relative contribution of the three major pathways of ATP synthesis (oxidative ATP synthesis, glycolysis, and the creatine kinase reaction) and 2) the ATP cost of contraction during high-intensity exercise. Specifically, during supramaximal plantar flexion (120% of maximal aerobic power), to stress the functional limits of the skeletal muscle energy systems, we used 31P-labeled magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess metabolism. Although glycolytic activation was delayed in the old, ATP synthesis from the main energy pathways was not significantly different between groups. Similarly, the inferred peak rate of mitochondrial ATP synthesis was not significantly different between the young (25 ± 8 mM/min) and old (24 ± 6 mM/min). In contrast, the ATP cost of contraction was significantly elevated in the old compared with the young (5.1 ± 2.0 and 3.7 ± 1.7 mM·min−1·W−1, respectively; P < 0.05). Overall, these findings suggest that, when young and old subjects are activity matched, there is no evidence of age-related mitochondrial and glycolytic dysfunction. However, this study does confirm an abnormal elevation in exercise-induced skeletal muscle metabolic demand in the old that may contribute to the decline in exercise capacity with advancing age. PMID:26041112

  16. Macrophage-to-Myofibroblast Transition Contributes to Interstitial Fibrosis in Chronic Renal Allograft Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Jun; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Hong-Feng; To, Ka-Fai; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Lan, Hui-Yao; Chen, Jiang-Hua

    2017-02-16

    Interstitial fibrosis is an important contributor to graft loss in chronic renal allograft injury. Inflammatory macrophages are associated with fibrosis in renal allografts, but how these cells contribute to this damaging response is not clearly understood. Here, we investigated the role of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition in interstitial fibrosis in human and experimental chronic renal allograft injury. In biopsy specimens from patients with active chronic allograft rejection, we identified cells undergoing macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition by the coexpression of macrophage (CD68) and myofibroblast (α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) markers. CD68(+)/α-SMA(+) cells accounted for approximately 50% of the myofibroblast population, and the number of these cells correlated with allograft function and the severity of interstitial fibrosis. Similarly, in C57BL/6J mice with a BALB/c renal allograft, cells coexpressing macrophage markers (CD68 or F4/80) and α-SMA composed a significant population in the interstitium of allografts undergoing chronic rejection. Fate-mapping in Lyz2-Cre/Rosa26-Tomato mice showed that approximately half of α-SMA(+) myofibroblasts in renal allografts originated from recipient bone marrow-derived macrophages. Knockout of Smad3 protected against interstitial fibrosis in renal allografts and substantially reduced the number of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells. Furthermore, the majority of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells in human and experimental renal allograft rejection coexpressed the M2-type macrophage marker CD206, and this expression was considerably reduced in Smad3-knockout recipients. In conclusion, our studies indicate that macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition contributes to interstitial fibrosis in chronic renal allograft injury. Moreover, the transition of bone marrow-derived M2-type macrophages to myofibroblasts in the renal allograft is regulated via a Smad3-dependent mechanism.

  17. Usual interstitial pneumonia and smoking-related interstitial fibrosis display epithelial to mesenchymal transition in fibroblastic foci.

    PubMed

    Fabro, Alexandre Todorovic; Minatel, Igor Otavio; Rangel, Maristela Peres; Halbwedl, Iris; Parra, Edwin Roger; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza; Popper, Helmut

    2014-09-01

    Fibroblastic foci (FF) are a major histological feature of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and collagen vascular diseases (non-IPF). In addition, FF are occasionally associated with smoking-related interstitial fibrosis (SRIF). Recent studies have suggested a role for epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in pulmonary fibrogenesis. Here, we investigated whether EMT was present in patients with IPF (n = 19), non-IPF (n = 17), and SRIF (n = 16) using morphometric immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy. All patients had received lung biopsies or lobectomies for lung cancer. IPF and non-IPF patients displayed restrictive lung function patterns, whereas those with SRIF presented mixed patterns. Cells within FF presented high number of alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA)-staining cells; however, the foci of IPF patients showed comparatively lower number. Moreover, colocalization of thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF1) and αSMA within FF showed low number of staining cells for IPF and SRIF in comparison to non-IPF (p < 0.01). Nevertheless, all groups displayed colocalization of high rate of TTF1(+)-cells and low rate of αSMA(+)-cells within hyperplastic epithelioid cells in FF. Also, we observed areas with low proportion of TTF1(+)cells and αSMA(+)cells, which were present in SRIF and non-IPF more often than IPF (p < 0.001). Electron microscopy revealed small breaks in the alveolar basal lamina, which allowed epithelioid cells to directly contact the collagenous matrix and fibroblasts. Three-dimensional reconstruction revealed intense αSMA staining within some epithelioid cells, suggesting that they had gained a mesenchymal phenotype. These findings constitute the first report of EMT in SRIF and suggest that EMT occurs more prominently in SRIF and non-IPF than IPF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of mitochondria in spontaneous rhythmic activity and intracellular calcium waves in the guinea pig gallbladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Balemba, Onesmo B; Bartoo, Aaron C; Nelson, Mark T; Mawe, Gary M

    2008-02-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling has been implicated in spontaneous rhythmic activity in smooth muscle and interstitial cells of Cajal. In this investigation we evaluated the effect of mitochondrial inhibitors on spontaneous action potentials (APs), Ca(2+) flashes, and Ca(2+) waves in gallbladder smooth muscle (GBSM). Disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential with carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone, carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone, rotenone, and antimycin A significantly reduced or eliminated APs, Ca(2+) flashes, and Ca(2+) waves in GBSM. Blockade of ATP production with oligomycin did not alter APs or Ca(2+) flashes but significantly reduced Ca(2+) wave frequency. Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and Ca(2+) release with Ru360 and CGP-37157, respectively, reduced the frequency of Ca(2+) flashes and Ca(2+) waves in GBSM. Similar to oligomycin, cyclosporin A did not alter AP and Ca(2+) flash frequency but significantly reduced Ca(2+) wave activity. These data suggest that mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling is necessary for the generation of spontaneous electrical activity and may therefore play an important role in gallbladder tone and motility.

  19. Identification of ATP diphosphohydrolase activity in human term placenta using a novel assay for AMP.

    PubMed

    Papamarcaki, T; Tsolas, O

    1990-09-03

    Human term placenta contains an ATP diphosphohydrolase activity which hydrolyses ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate and ADP to AMP and a second mole of inorganic phosphate. The activity has a pH optimum between 8.0 and 8.5. Magnesium or calcium ions are required for maximum activity. Other nucleoside phosphates, p-nitrophenyl phosphate or sodium pyrophosphate, are not hydrolysed. The activity is not due to ATPases, or to myokinase, as determined by the use of inhibitors. NaF and NaN3 were found to inhibit strongly the activity thus identifying it as an ATP diphosphohydrolase. A sensitive enzymatic assay for measurement of AMP, one of the products of the reaction, was established, based on the strong inhibition of muscle fructose 1,6-biphosphatase by AMP. The range of the assay was 0.05-0.8 microM AMP. ATP diphosphohydrolase was found to have a rate of AMP production from ADP twice the rate from ATP. Under the same conditions, the assay for Pi release, on the other hand, gave velocities similar to each other for the two substrates. The activity appears to be identical to the ADP-hydrolysing activity in placenta reported by others.

  20. Proton-dependent inhibition of yeast and brain hexokinases by aluminum in ATP preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Womack, F C; Colowick, S P

    1979-01-01

    The aluminum present as a contaminant in ATP preparations can cause strong inhibition of yeast hexokinase P-II activity at pH 7.0 or below but has little or no inhibitory effect at a pH of 7.5 or greater. The inhibition is reversed by citrate, 3-phosphoglycerate, malate, phosphate, and catecholamines, all of which have previously been described as activators of hexokinase at low pH. We suggest that these agents activate the enzyme only by virtue of their ability to coordinate with aluminum present in the assay system. The presence of aluminum is also responsible for the "negative cooperativity" observed at low pH with respect to Mg . ATP concentration--i.e., the inhibition by aluminum is uncompetitive at low Mg . ATP concentrations but becomes competitive at high Mg . ATP concentrations. The inhibition is thought to be due to formation of a complex of Al . ATP with the enzyme, with a dissociation constant (Ki) of 0.1 microM. Yeast hexokinase P-I is somewhat less sensitive to A1 than is hexokinase P-II, and yeast glucokinase is not detectably affected. The hexokinase in rat brain (type I) shows a pH-dependent inhibition by Al similar to that observed with the yeast hexokinases, whereas the rat muscle (type II) enzyme is less sensitive, suggesting a possible relationship to aluminum encephalopathy in man. PMID:116225

  1. Primitive ATP-activated P2X receptors: discovery, function and pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Samuel J.

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine 5-triphosphate (ATP) is omnipresent in biology. It is therefore no surprise that organisms have evolved multifaceted roles for ATP, exploiting its abundance and restriction of passive diffusion across biological membranes. A striking role is the emergence of ATP as a bona fide transmitter molecule, whereby the movement of ATP across membranes serves as a chemical message through a direct ligand-receptor interaction. P2X receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate fast responses to the transmitter ATP in mammalian cells including central and sensory neurons, vascular smooth muscle, endothelium, and leukocytes. Molecular cloning of P2X receptors and our understanding of structure-function relationships has provided sequence information with which to query an exponentially expanding wealth of genome sequence information including protist, early animal and human pathogen genomes. P2X receptors have now been cloned and characterized from a number of simple organisms. Such work has led to surprising new cellular roles for the P2X receptors family and an unusual phylogeny, with organisms such as Drosophila and C. elegans notably lacking P2X receptors despite retaining ionotropic receptors for other common transmitters that are present in mammals. This review will summarize current work on the evolutionary biology of P2X receptors and ATP as a signaling molecule, discuss what can be drawn from such studies when considering the action of ATP in higher animals and plants, and outline how simple organisms may be exploited experimentally to inform P2X receptor function in a wider context. PMID:24367292

  2. A tenth atp gene and the conserved atpI gene of a Bacillus atp operon have a role in Mg2+ uptake

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, David B.; Wang, ZhenXiong; Wei, Yi; Kent, Rebecca; Guffanti, Arthur A.; Banciu, Horia; Bechhofer, David H.; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2003-01-01

    The atp operon of alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4, as in most prokaryotes, contains the eight structural genes for the F-ATPase (ATP synthase), which are preceded by an atpI gene that encodes a membrane protein of unknown function. A tenth gene, atpZ, has been found in this operon, which is upstream of and overlapping with atpI. Most Bacillus species, and some other bacteria, possess atpZ homologues. AtpZ is predicted to be a membrane protein with a hairpin topology, and was detected by Western analyses. Deletion of atpZ, atpI, or atpZI from B. pseudofirmus OF4 led to a requirement for a greatly increased concentration of Mg2+ for growth at pH 7.5. Either atpZ, atpI, or atpZI complemented the similar phenotype of a triple mutant of Salmonella typhimurium (MM281), which is deficient in Mg2+ uptake. atpZ and atpI, separately and together, increased the Mg2+-sensitive 45Ca2+ uptake by vesicles of an Escherichia coli mutant that is defective in Ca2+ and Na+ efflux. We hypothesize that AtpZ and AtpI, as homooligomers, and perhaps as heterooligomers, are Mg2+ transporter, Ca2+ transporter, or channel proteins. Such proteins could provide Mg2+, which is required by ATP synthase, and also support charge compensation, when the enzyme is functioning in the hydrolytic direction; e.g., during cytoplasmic pH regulation. PMID:12917488

  3. X-linked spinal muscular atrophy in mice caused by autonomous loss of ATP7A in the motor neuron

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Victoria L.; Dale, Jeffery M.; Garcia, Michael L.; Weisman, Gary A.; Lee, Jaekwon; Gitlin, Jonathan D.; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    ATP7A is a copper transporting P-type ATPase that is essential for cellular copper homeostasis. Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene result in Menkes disease, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder resulting in seizures, hypotonia, and failure to thrive due to systemic copper deficiency. Most recently, rare missense mutations in ATP7A that do not impact systemic copper homeostasis have been shown to cause X-linked Spinal Muscular Atrophy type 3 (SMAX3), a distal hereditary motor neuropathy. An understanding of the mechanistic and pathophysiological basis of SMAX3 is currently lacking, in part because the disease-causing mutations have been shown to confer both loss- and gain-of-function properties to ATP7A, and because there is currently no animal model of the disease. In this study, the Atp7a gene was specifically deleted in the motor neurons of mice resulting in a degenerative phenotype consistent with the clinical features in affected patients with SMAX3, including the progressive deterioration of gait, age-dependent muscle atrophy, denervation of neuromuscular junctions, and a loss of motor neuron cell bodies. Taken together these data reveal autonomous requirements for ATP7A that reveal essential roles for copper in the maintenance and function of the motor neuron, and suggest that SMAX3 is caused by a loss of ATP7A function that specifically impacts in the spinal motor neuron. PMID:25639447

  4. X-linked spinal muscular atrophy in mice caused by autonomous loss of ATP7A in the motor neuron.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Victoria L; Dale, Jeffery M; Garcia, Michael L; Weisman, Gary A; Lee, Jaekwon; Gitlin, Jonathan D; Petris, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    ATP7A is a copper-transporting P-type ATPase that is essential for cellular copper homeostasis. Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP7A gene result in Menkes disease, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder resulting in seizures, hypotonia and failure to thrive, due to systemic copper deficiency. Most recently, rare missense mutations in ATP7A that do not impact systemic copper homeostasis have been shown to cause X-linked spinal muscular atrophy type 3 (SMAX3), a distal hereditary motor neuropathy. An understanding of the mechanistic and pathophysiological basis of SMAX3 is currently lacking, in part because the disease-causing mutations have been shown to confer both loss- and gain-of-function properties to ATP7A, and because there is currently no animal model of the disease. In this study, the Atp7a gene was specifically deleted in the motor neurons of mice, resulting in a degenerative phenotype consistent with the clinical features in affected patients with SMAX3, including the progressive deterioration of gait, age-dependent muscle atrophy, denervation of neuromuscular junctions and a loss of motor neuron cell bodies. Taken together, these data reveal autonomous requirements for ATP7A that reveal essential roles for copper in the maintenance and function of the motor neuron, and suggest that SMAX3 is caused by a loss of ATP7A function that specifically impacts the spinal motor neuron.

  5. ATP Synthesis in the Extremely Halophilic Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The proton-translocating ATPases are multimeric enzymes that carry out a multitude of essential functions. Their origin and evolution represent a seminal event in the early evolution of life. Amino acid sequences of the two largest subunits from archaeal ATPases (A-ATPases), vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases), and FOF1-ATP syntheses (FATPases) suggest these ATPases evolved from an ancestral vacuolar-like ATP syntheses. A necessary consequence of this notion is that the A-ATPases are ATP syntheses. With the possible exception of the A-ATPase from Halobacterium salinarium. no A-ATPase has been demonstrated to synthesize ATP. The evidence for this case is dubious since ATP synthesis occurs only when conditions are distinctively unphysiological. We demonstrated that ATP synthesis in H.saccharovorum is inconsistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. In order to determine if this phenomenon was unique to H. saccharovorum, ATP synthesis was examined in various extremely halophilic bacteria with the goal of ascertaining if it resembled what occurred in a. saccharovorum, or was consistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. A-, V-, and F-type ATPases respond singularly to certain inhibitors. Therefore, the effect of these inhibitors on ATP synthesis in several extreme halophiles was determined. Inhibitors that either blocked or collapsed proton-gradients inhibited the steady state synthesis of ATP thus verifying that synthesis took place at the expense of a proton gradient. Azide, an inhibitor of F-ATPases inhibited ATP synthesis. Since the arginine-dependent synthesis of ATP, which occurs by way of substrate-level phosphorylation, was unaffected by azide, it was unlikely that azide acted as an "uncoupler." N -ethylmaleimide and nitrate, which inhibit V- and A-ATPases, either did not inhibit ATP synthesis or resulted in higher steady-state levels of ATP. These results suggest there are two types of proton-motive ATPases in the extreme halophiles (and presumably in other

  6. ATP Synthesis in the Extremely Halophilic Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The proton-translocating ATPases are multimeric enzymes that carry out a multitude of essential functions. Their origin and evolution represent a seminal event in the early evolution of life. Amino acid sequences of the two largest subunits from archaeal ATPases (A-ATPases), vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases), and FOF1-ATP syntheses (FATPases) suggest these ATPases evolved from an ancestral vacuolar-like ATP syntheses. A necessary consequence of this notion is that the A-ATPases are ATP syntheses. With the possible exception of the A-ATPase from Halobacterium salinarium. no A-ATPase has been demonstrated to synthesize ATP. The evidence for this case is dubious since ATP synthesis occurs only when conditions are distinctively unphysiological. We demonstrated that ATP synthesis in H.saccharovorum is inconsistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. In order to determine if this phenomenon was unique to H. saccharovorum, ATP synthesis was examined in various extremely halophilic bacteria with the goal of ascertaining if it resembled what occurred in a. saccharovorum, or was consistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. A-, V-, and F-type ATPases respond singularly to certain inhibitors. Therefore, the effect of these inhibitors on ATP synthesis in several extreme halophiles was determined. Inhibitors that either blocked or collapsed proton-gradients inhibited the steady state synthesis of ATP thus verifying that synthesis took place at the expense of a proton gradient. Azide, an inhibitor of F-ATPases inhibited ATP synthesis. Since the arginine-dependent synthesis of ATP, which occurs by way of substrate-level phosphorylation, was unaffected by azide, it was unlikely that azide acted as an "uncoupler." N -ethylmaleimide and nitrate, which inhibit V- and A-ATPases, either did not inhibit ATP synthesis or resulted in higher steady-state levels of ATP. These results suggest there are two types of proton-motive ATPases in the extreme halophiles (and presumably in other

  7. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  8. Deriving Sediment Interstitial Water Remediation Goals ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document contains a methodology for developing interstitial water remediation goals (IWRGs) for nonionic organic pollutants (toxicants) in sediments for the protection of benthic organisms. The document provides the basis for using the final chronic values (FCVs) from EPA’s aquatic water quality criteria (AWQC) for the protection of aquatic life to set the IWRGs for toxicants in sediments. Concentrations of the toxicants in the sediment interstitial water are measured using passive sampling. This document also discusses how to evaluate the consistency between passive sampling measurements and sediment toxicity test results. When these data are consistent, one can be reasonably assured that the causes of toxicity to benthic organisms in the sediment have been correctly identified and that the developed IWRGs for the toxicants will be protective of the benthic organisms at the site. The consistency evaluation is an important step in developing defensible IWRGs. To assist in developing defensible IWRGs.

  9. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  10. Irradiation system for interstitial photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, L.; Stolik, S.; De la Rosa, J.

    2013-11-01

    Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy (IPDT) is a promising form of treatment of deep-seated and bulky malignant tumors, based on the lethal cell response to the photochemical reactions when drug is light activated in presence of oxygen. In order to accomplish an effective internal illumination, laser sources are preferably used because of two important reasons: the monochromatic light can be confined to the narrow absorption band of the drug and the laser beam is easily focused into optical fibers. In this work the development of a diode-laser-light-source is presented. The system is tuned by temperature to get a better match in the 5-ALA absorption band. This system also comprises a trifurcated fiber system to accomplish interstitial illumination.

  11. Uncommon causes of occupational interstitial lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Gong, H

    1996-09-01

    Uncommon causes of occupational interstitial lung disease, or pneumoconiosis, are being increasingly recognized and diagnosed. The fibrogenic potential of numerous types of respirable inorganic particles remains poorly understood but is significantly determined by lung deposition and clearance, the agent's size and solubility, host susceptibility, and other factors. Microanalytic techniques have improved the identification of uncommon or unusual biopersistent particles or elements in fibrotic lung tissue. Recent findings in workers exposed to manmade vitreous fibers, silicon carbide, talc, titanium, cerium, and polyvinyl chloride provide new clinical insights into not only their specific fibrogenic capabilities but also in the broader appreciation that many cases of unexplained interstitial lung disease may be caused by occupational exposures to one or more uncommon airborne substances.

  12. [Alveolo-interstitial pneumonia due to Temozolamide].

    PubMed

    Guilleminault, L; Carré, P; de Luca, K; Beau Salinas, F; Autret-Leca, E; Narciso, B; Diot, P

    2008-09-01

    Temozolomide is an alkylating agent approved for treatment of glioblastoma in association with radiotherapy. We report the case of a 56 year old woman presenting with alveolo-interstitial pneumonia after treatment with Temozolomide. Initially she received induction treatment with Temozolomide and concomitant radiotherapy for bifocal high grade glioblastoma. A month later she received, as scheduled, the first course of Temozolomide maintenance chemotherapy. Grade II dyspnoea developed a few days later. High resolution computed tomography showed alveolo-interstitial opacities with basal predominance, associated with alveolar nodules. Broncho-alveolar lavage showed a lymphocytosis. No bacteria were isolated from microbiological samples. A final diagnosis of drug-induced pneumonia was based on the time sequence and absence of other causes. There is little literature concerning the pulmonary toxicity of Temozolomide. However, our case report of drug-induced pneumonia and similar observations in the databases of regional pharmacovigilance centres suggest that this side effect should be included in the summary of product characteristics.

  13. Interstitial hyperthermia in combination with brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, C T; Douple, E B; Strohbehn, J W; Eaton, W L; Trembly, B S; Wong, T Z

    1983-07-01

    Flexible coaxial cables were modified to serve as microwave antennas operating at a frequency of 915 MHz. These antennas were inserted into nylon afterloading tubes that had been implanted in tumors using conventional interstitial implantation techniques for iridium-192 seed brachytherapy. The tumor volume was heated to 42-45 degrees C within 15 minutes and heating was continued for a total of 1 hour per treatment. Immediately following a conventional brachytherapy dose and removal of the iridium seeds the tumors were heated again in a second treatment. This interstitial technique for delivering local hyperthermia should be compatible with most brachytherapy methods. The technique has proved so far to be practical and without complications. Temperature distributions obtained in tissue phantoms and a patient are described.

  14. RTOG quality assurance guidelines for interstitial hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Emami, B; Stauffer, P; Dewhirst, M W; Prionas, S; Ryan, T; Corry, P; Herman, T; Kapp, D S; Myerson, R J; Samulski, T

    1991-05-01

    This document specifies the current recommendations for quality assurance for hyperthermia administration with interstitial techniques as specified by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). The document begins by providing a brief description of the physical principles behind the use of the three most commonly used methods of interstitial hyperthermia: radiofrequency (RF-LCF), microwave antennas, and ferromagnetic seeds. Emphasis is placed on features that effect quality assurance. Specific recommendations are provided for: a) Pretreatment planning and equipment performance checks, b) Implant considerations and documentation, c) Thermometry, and d) Safety procedures. Specific details regarding quality assurance issues that are common to all local and regional hyperthermia methods are outlined in previous documents sponsored by the RTOG. It is anticipated that technological advances may lead to future modifications of this document.

  15. Interstitial devices for treating deep seated tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril; Cathignol, Dominique; Prat, Frédéric; Melodelima, David; Salomir, Rares; Theillère, Yves; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2006-05-01

    Techniques using intracavitary or interstitial applicators have been proposed because extracorporeal HIFU techniques are not always suitable for deep-seated tumors. Bones or gaseous pockets may indeed be located in the intervening tissue. The objective is to bring the ultrasound source as close as possible to the target through natural routes in order to minimize the effects of attenuation and phase aberration along the ultrasound pathway. Under these circumstances, it becomes possible to use higher frequency, thus increasing the ultrasonic absorption coefficient and resulting in more efficient heating of the treatment region. In contrast to extra-corporeal applicators, the design of interstitial probes imposes additional constraints relative to size and ergonomy. The goal of this paper is to present the range of miniature interstitial applicators we developed at INSERM for various applications. The sources are rotating plane water-cooled transducers that operate at a frequency between 3 and 10 MHz depending on the desired therapeutic depth. The choice of a plane transducer rather than divergent sources permits to extend the therapeutic depth and to enhance the angular selectivity of the treatment Rotating single element flat transducer can also be replaced by cylindrical arrays for rotating electronically a reconstructed plane wave. When extended zone of coagulation are required, original therapeutic modalities combining cavitation and thermal effects are used. These methods consist in favoring in depth heating by increasing the acoustic attenuation away from the transducer with the presence of bubbles. When associated to modern imaging modalities, these minimally invasive therapeutic devices offer very promising options for cancer treatment. For examples, two versions of an image-guided esophageal applicator are designed: one uses a retractable ultrasound mini probe for the positioning of the applicator, while the other is MRI compatible and offers on line

  16. Cellular Evidence of Telocytes as Novel Interstitial Cells Within the Magnum of Chicken Oviduct.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Zhu, Xudong; Wang, Lingling; Ahmed, Nisar; Huang, Yufei; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Qian; Ullah, Shakeeb; Liu, Tengfei; Guo, Dawei; Brohi, Sarfaraz Ahmed; Chen, Qiusheng

    2017-01-24

    Telocytes are a novel type of interstitial cell that has been identified in many organs of mammals, but there is little information available on these cells in avian species. This study shows the latest findings associated with telocytes in the muscular layer and lamina propria of the magnum of chicken oviduct analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Telocytes are characterized by telopodes, which are thin and long prolongations, and a small amount of cytoplasm rich with mitochondria. Spindle- or triangular-shaped telocytes were detected at various locations in the magnum. In the muscular layer, telocytes have direct connection with smooth muscle cells. The cell body of telocytes along with their long telopodes mainly exists in the interstitial space between the smooth muscle bundles, whereas large numbers of short telopodes are scattered in between the smooth muscle cells. In the lamina propria, extremely long telopodes are twisting around each other and are usually collagen embedded. Both in the lamina propria and muscular layer, telocytes have a close relationship with other cell types, such as immune cells and blood vessels. Telopodes appear with dichotomous branching alternating between the podom and podomer, forming a 3D network structure with complex homo- and heterocellular junctions. In addition, a distinctive size of the vesicles is visible around the telopodes and may be released from telopodes because of the close relation between the vesicle and telopode. All characteristics of telocytes in the magnum indicate that telocytes may play a potential, but important, role in the pathogenesis of oviduct diseases.

  17. Interstitial loop transformations in FeCr

    SciTech Connect

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Osetsky, Yuri N.; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-03-27

    Here, we improve the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) algorithm by integrating the Activation Relaxation Technique nouveau (ARTn), a powerful open-ended saddle-point search method, into the algorithm. We use it to investigate the reaction of 37-interstitial 1/2[1 1 1] and 1/2[View the MathML source] loops in FeCr at 10 at.% Cr. They transform into 1/2[1 1 1], 1/2[View the MathML source], [1 0 0] and [0 1 0] 74-interstitial clusters with an overall barrier of 0.85 eV. We find that Cr decoration locally inhibits the rotation of crowdions, which dictates the final loop orientation. Moreover, the final loop orientation depends on the details of the Cr decoration. Generally, a region of a given orientation is favored if Cr near its interface with a region of another orientation is able to inhibit reorientation at this interface more than the Cr present at the other interfaces. Also, we find that substitutional Cr atoms can diffuse from energetically unfavorable to energetically favorable sites within the interlocked 37-interstitial loops conformation with barriers of less than 0.35 eV.

  18. Interstitial loop transformations in FeCr

    DOE PAGES

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Osetsky, Yuri N.; Stoller, Roger E.; ...

    2015-03-27

    Here, we improve the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) algorithm by integrating the Activation Relaxation Technique nouveau (ARTn), a powerful open-ended saddle-point search method, into the algorithm. We use it to investigate the reaction of 37-interstitial 1/2[1 1 1] and 1/2[View the MathML source] loops in FeCr at 10 at.% Cr. They transform into 1/2[1 1 1], 1/2[View the MathML source], [1 0 0] and [0 1 0] 74-interstitial clusters with an overall barrier of 0.85 eV. We find that Cr decoration locally inhibits the rotation of crowdions, which dictates the final loop orientation. Moreover, the final loop orientationmore » depends on the details of the Cr decoration. Generally, a region of a given orientation is favored if Cr near its interface with a region of another orientation is able to inhibit reorientation at this interface more than the Cr present at the other interfaces. Also, we find that substitutional Cr atoms can diffuse from energetically unfavorable to energetically favorable sites within the interlocked 37-interstitial loops conformation with barriers of less than 0.35 eV.« less

  19. Breast conservation treatment with perioperative interstitial irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, L.; Mansfield, C.M.; Jewell, W.R.; Reddy, E.K.; Thomas, J.H.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1987-10-01

    Limited resection of the breast combined with radiation has proved to be as effective as more radical surgery in treating early breast cancer. At the University of Kansas Medical Center, the radiotherapy consists of an interstitial implant at the time of lumpectomy to deliver an interstitial boost dose to the tumor bed with iridium-192 immediately following the surgical procedure. An axillary node dissection is also performed at the time of lumpectomy. A dose of 2000 cGy is delivered to the tumor bed between 40 and 60 h. Two to three weeks later, 4500-5000 cGy is delivered to the entire breast with external beam radiation over 5-5.5 weeks. One hundred breasts in 98 patients were so treated between June 1982 and February 1986, with 2 carcinomas in situ, 40 stage I, 51 stage II, and 7 stage III cancers, consisting of 2 TIS, 54 T1, 39 T2, and 5 T3 lesions. Locoregional control with a median follow-up of 31 months was 98%. One recurrence was in a different quadrant, and the other revealed predominantly the in situ component. Immediate implant did not compromise wound healing or cosmesis. The cosmetic result was graded as good to excellent in 88% of the breasts. Our preliminary results appear to suggest a better local control with immediate interstitial irradiation.

  20. Temperature control in interstitial laser cancer immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.; Holmes, Kyland; Burnett, Corinthius; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2003-07-01

    Positive results of Laser-Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy (LACI) have been reported previously in the irradiation of superficial tumors. This paper reports the effect of LACI using laser interstitial therapy approach. We hypothesize that the maximum immuno response depends on laser induced tumor temperature. The measurement of tumor temperature is crucial to ensure necrosis by thermal damage and immuno response. Wister Furth female rats in this study were inoculated with 13762 MAT B III rat mammary adinocarcinoma. LACI started seven to ten days following inoculation. Contrary to surface irradation, we applied laser interstitial irradiation of tumor volume to maximize the energy deposition. A diode laser with a wavelength of 805 nm was used for tumor irradiation. The laser energy was delivered inside the tumor through a quartz fiber. Tumor temperature was measured with a micro thermocouple (interstitial), while the tumor surface temperature was controlled with an IR detector. The temperature feedback demonstrates that it is possible to maintain the average tumor temperature at the same level with reasonable accuracy in the desired range from 65°C-85°C. In some experiments we used microwave thermometry to control average temperature in deep tissue for considerable period of time, to cause maximum thermal damage to the tumor. The experimental set-up and the different temperature measurement techniques are reported in detail, including the advantages and disadvantages for each method.

  1. Blockade of Extracellular ATP Effect by Oxidized ATP Effectively Mitigated Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis (EAU)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ronglan; Liang, Dongchun; Sun, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Various pathological conditions are accompanied by ATP release from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. Extracellular ATP (eATP) functions as a signaling molecule by activating purinergic P2 purine receptors. The key P2 receptor involved in inflammation was identified as P2X7R. Recent studies have shown that P2X7R signaling is required to trigger the Th1/Th17 immune response, and oxidized ATP (oxATP) effectively blocks P2X7R activation. In this study we investigated the effect of oxATP on mouse experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Our results demonstrated that induced EAU in B6 mice was almost completely abolished by the administration of small doses of oxATP, and the Th17 response, but not the Th1 response, was significantly weakened in the treated mice. Mechanistic studies showed that the therapeutic effects involve the functional change of a number of immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and regulatory T cells. OxATP not only directly inhibits the T cell response; it also suppresses T cell activation by altering the function of DCs and Foxp3+ T cell. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of P2X7R activation effectively exempts excessive autoimmune inflammation, which may indicate a possible therapeutic use in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27196432

  2. Blockade of Extracellular ATP Effect by Oxidized ATP Effectively Mitigated Induced Mouse Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis (EAU).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ronglan; Liang, Dongchun; Sun, Deming

    2016-01-01

    Various pathological conditions are accompanied by ATP release from the intracellular to the extracellular compartment. Extracellular ATP (eATP) functions as a signaling molecule by activating purinergic P2 purine receptors. The key P2 receptor involved in inflammation was identified as P2X7R. Recent studies have shown that P2X7R signaling is required to trigger the Th1/Th17 immune response, and oxidized ATP (oxATP) effectively blocks P2X7R activation. In this study we investigated the effect of oxATP on mouse experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Our results demonstrated that induced EAU in B6 mice was almost completely abolished by the administration of small doses of oxATP, and the Th17 response, but not the Th1 response, was significantly weakened in the treated mice. Mechanistic studies showed that the therapeutic effects involve the functional change of a number of immune cells, including dendritic cells (DCs), T cells, and regulatory T cells. OxATP not only directly inhibits the T cell response; it also suppresses T cell activation by altering the function of DCs and Foxp3+ T cell. Our results demonstrated that inhibition of P2X7R activation effectively exempts excessive autoimmune inflammation, which may indicate a possible therapeutic use in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  3. Synthetic peptides target ATP translocase of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ to block ATP uptake

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As an obligate intracellular pathogen, ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) may act as an “energy parasite” by importing ATP from its host’s cells. We previously demonstrated that the Las translocase NttA (gb|ACX71867.1) is functional in Escherichia coli and enables the direct import of ATP/ADP...

  4. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles.

    PubMed

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-07-12

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission.

  5. ATP: The crucial component of secretory vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Domínguez, Natalia; Pardo, Marta R.; González-Santana, Ayoze; Westhead, Edward W.; Borges, Ricardo; Machado, José David

    2016-01-01

    The colligative properties of ATP and catecholamines demonstrated in vitro are thought to be responsible for the extraordinary accumulation of solutes inside chromaffin cell secretory vesicles, although this has yet to be demonstrated in living cells. Because functional cells cannot be deprived of ATP, we have knocked down the expression of the vesicular nucleotide carrier, the VNUT, to show that a reduction in vesicular ATP is accompanied by a drastic fall in the quantal release of catecholamines. This phenomenon is particularly evident in newly synthesized vesicles, which we show are the first to be released. Surprisingly, we find that inhibiting VNUT expression also reduces the frequency of exocytosis, whereas the overexpression of VNUT drastically increases the quantal size of exocytotic events. To our knowledge, our data provide the first demonstration that ATP, in addition to serving as an energy source and purinergic transmitter, is an essential element in the concentration of catecholamines in secretory vesicles. In this way, cells can use ATP to accumulate neurotransmitters and other secreted substances at high concentrations, supporting quantal transmission. PMID:27342860

  6. Magnetic field affects enzymatic ATP synthesis.

    PubMed

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A

    2008-10-01

    The rate of ATP synthesis by creatine kinase extracted from V. xanthia venom was shown to depend on the magnetic field. The yield of ATP produced by enzymes with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions in catalytic sites increases by 7-8% at 55 mT and then decreases at 80 mT. For enzyme with 25Mg2+ ion in a catalytic site, the ATP yield increases by 50% and 70% in the fields 55 and 80 mT, respectively. In the Earth field the rate of ATP synthesis by enzyme, in which Mg2+ ion has magnetic nucleus 25Mg, is 2.5 times higher than that by enzymes, in which Mg2+ ion has nonmagnetic, spinless nuclei 24Mg or 26Mg. Both magnetic field effect and magnetic isotope effect demonstrate that the ATP synthesis is an ion-radical process, affected by Zeeman interaction and hyperfine coupling in the intermediate ion-radical pair.

  7. Experimental depletion of different renal interstitial cell populations

    SciTech Connect

    Bohman, S.O.; Sundelin, B.; Forsum, U.; Tribukait, B.

    1988-04-01

    To define different populations of renal interstitial cells and investigate some aspects of their function, we studied the kidneys of normal rats and rats with hereditary diabetes insipidus (DI, Brattleboro) after experimental manipulations expected to alter the number of interstitial cells. DI rats showed an almost complete loss of interstitial cells in their renal papillae after treatment with a high dose of vasopressin. In spite of the lack of interstitial cells, the animals concentrated their urine to the same extent as vasopressin-treated normal rats, indicating that the renomedullary interstitial cells do not have an important function in concentrating the urine. The interstitial cells returned nearly to normal within 1 week off vasopressin treatment, suggesting a rapid turnover rate of these cells. To further distinguish different populations of interstitial cells, we studied the distribution of class II MHC antigen expression in the kidneys of normal and bone-marrow depleted Wistar rats. Normal rats had abundant class II antigen-positive interstitial cells in the renal cortex and outer medulla, but not in the inner medulla (papilla). Six days after 1000 rad whole body irradiation, the stainable cells were almost completely lost, but electron microscopic morphometry showed a virtually unchanged volume density of interstitial cells in the cortex and outer medulla, as well as the inner medulla. Thus, irradiation abolished the expression of the class II antigen but caused no significant depletion of interstitial cells.

  8. Skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  9. The role of K⁺ conductances in regulating membrane excitability in human gastric corpus smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Ko, Eun-Ju; Ahn, Ki Duck; Kim, Sung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-04-01

    Changes in resting membrane potential (RMP) regulate membrane excitability. K(+) conductance(s) are one of the main factors in regulating RMP. The functional role of K(+) conductances has not been studied the in human gastric corpus smooth muscles (HGCS). To examine the role of K(+) channels in regulation of RMP in HGCS we employed microelectrode recordings, patch-clamp, and molecular approaches. Tetraethylammonium and charybdotoxin did not affect the RMP, suggesting that BK channels are not involved in regulating RMP. Apamin, a selective small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (SK) blocker, did not show a significant effect on the membrane excitability. 4-Aminopyridine, a Kv channel blocker, caused depolarization and increased the duration of slow wave potentials. 4-Aminopyridine also inhibited a delayed rectifying K(+) current in isolated smooth muscle cells. End-product RT-PCR gel detected Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 in human gastric corpus muscles. Glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (KATP) blocker, did not induce depolarization, but nicorandil, a KATP opener, hyperpolarized HGCS, suggesting that KATP are expressed but not basally activated. Kir6.2 transcript, a pore-forming subunit of KATP was expressed in HGCS. A low concentration of Ba(2+), a Kir blocker, induced strong depolarization. Interestingly, Ba(2+)-sensitive currents were minimally expressed in isolated smooth muscle cells under whole-cell patch configuration. KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) transcript was expressed in HGCS. Unique K(+) conductances regulate the RMP in HGCS. Delayed and inwardly rectifying K(+) channels are the main candidates in regulating membrane excitability in HGCS. With the development of cell dispersion techniques of interstitial cells, the cell-specific functional significance will require further analysis.

  10. Voltage dependence of ATP secretion in mammalian taste cells.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Roman A; Rogachevskaja, Olga A; Khokhlov, Alexander A; Kolesnikov, Stanislav S

    2008-12-01

    Mammalian type II taste cells release the afferent neurotransmitter adenosine triphosphate (ATP) through ATP-permeable ion channels, most likely to be connexin (Cx) and/or pannexin hemichannels. Here, we show that ion channels responsible for voltage-gated (VG) outward currents in type II cells are ATP permeable and demonstrate a strong correlation between the magnitude of the VG current and the intensity of ATP release. These findings suggest that slowly deactivating ion channels transporting the VG outward currents can also mediate ATP secretion in type II cells. In line with this inference, we studied a dependence of ATP secretion on membrane voltage with a cellular ATP sensor using different pulse protocols. These were designed on the basis of predictions of a model of voltage-dependent transient ATP efflux. Consistently with curves that were simulated for ATP release mediated by ATP-permeable channels deactivating slowly, the bell-like and Langmuir isotherm-like potential dependencies were characteristic of ATP secretion obtained for prolonged and short electrical stimulations of taste cells, respectively. These observations strongly support the idea that ATP is primarily released via slowly deactivating channels. Depolarizing voltage pulses produced negligible Ca(2+) transients in the cytoplasm of cells releasing ATP, suggesting that ATP secretion is mainly governed by membrane voltage under our recording conditions. With the proviso that natural connexons and pannexons are kinetically similar to exogenously expressed hemichannels, our findings suggest that VG ATP release in type II cells is primarily mediated by Cx hemichannels.

  11. The cost of muscle power production: muscle oxygen consumption per unit work increases at low temperatures in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Frank; Tallis, Jason A; James, Rob S

    2014-06-01

    Metabolic energy (ATP) supply to muscle is essential to support activity and behaviour. It is expected, therefore, that there is strong selection to maximise muscle power output for a given rate of ATP use. However, the viscosity and stiffness of muscle increases with a decrease in temperature, which means that more ATP may be required to achieve a given work output. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ATP use increases at lower temperatures for a given power output in Xenopus laevis. To account for temperature variation at different time scales, we considered the interaction between acclimation for 4 weeks (to 15 or 25°C) and acute exposure to these temperatures. Cold-acclimated frogs had greater sprint speed at 15°C than warm-acclimated animals. However, acclimation temperature did not affect isolated gastrocnemius muscle biomechanics. Isolated muscle produced greater tetanus force, and faster isometric force generation and relaxation, and generated more work loop power at 25°C than at 15°C acute test temperature. Oxygen consumption of isolated muscle at rest did not change with test temperature, but oxygen consumption while muscle was performing work was significantly higher at 15°C than at 25°C, regardless of acclimation conditions. Muscle therefore consumed significantly more oxygen at 15°C for a given work output than at 25°C, and plastic responses did not modify this thermodynamic effect. The metabolic cost of muscle performance and activity therefore increased with a decrease in temperature. To maintain activity across a range of temperature, animals must increase ATP production or face an allocation trade-off at lower temperatures. Our data demonstrate the potential energetic benefits of warming up muscle before activity, which is seen in diverse groups of animals such as bees, which warm flight muscle before take-off, and humans performing warm ups before exercise. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. [Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis: a clinicopathologic entity, histologic pattern or unclassified group of heterogeneous interstitial pneumonitis?].

    PubMed

    Morais, António; Moura, M Conceição Souto; Cruz, M Rosa; Gomes, Isabel

    2004-01-01

    Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (NSIP) initially described by Katzenstein and Fiorelli in 1994, seems to be a distinct clinicopathologic entity among idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis (IIP). Besides different histologic features from other IIP, NSIP is characterized by a better long-term outcome, associated with a better steroids responsiveness than idiopathic pulmonar fibrosis (IPF), where usually were included. Thus, differentiating NSIP from other IIP, namely IPF is very significant, since it has important therapeutic and prognostic implications. NSIP encloses different pathologies, namely those with inflammatory predominance (cellular subtype) or fibrous predominance (fibrosing subtype). NSIP is reviewed and discussed by the authors, after two clinical cases description.

  13. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  14. Dynamic regulation of extracellular ATP in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Cora Lilia; Corradi, Gerardo; Lauri, Natalia; Marginedas-Freixa, Irene; Leal Denis, María Florencia; Enrique, Nicolás; Mate, Sabina María; Milesi, Verónica; Ostuni, Mariano Anibal; Herlax, Vanesa; Schwarzbaum, Pablo Julio

    2017-04-04

    We studied the kinetics of extracellular ATP (ATPe) in Escherichia coli and their outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) stimulated with amphipatic peptides melittin (MEL) and mastoparan 7 (MST7). Real-time luminometry was used to measure ATPe kinetics, ATP release, and ATPase activity. The latter was also determined by following [(32)P]Pi released from [γ-(32)P]ATP. E. coli was studied alone, co-incubated with Caco-2 cells, or in rat jejunum segments. In E. coli, the addition of [γ-(32)P]ATP led to the uptake and subsequent hydrolysis of ATPe. Exposure to peptides caused an acute 3-fold (MST7) and 7-fold (MEL) increase in [ATPe]. In OMVs, ATPase activity increased linearly with [ATPe] (0.1-1 µM). Exposure to MST7 and MEL enhanced ATP release by 3-7 fold, with similar kinetics to that of bacteria. In Caco-2 cells, the addition of ATP to the apical domain led to a steep [ATPe] increase to a maximum, with subsequent ATPase activity. The addition of bacterial suspensions led to a 6-7 fold increase in [ATPe], followed by an acute decrease. In perfused jejunum segments, exposure to E. coli increased luminal ATP 2 fold. ATPe regulation of E. coli depends on the balance between ATPase activity and ATP release. This balance can be altered by OMVs, which display their own capacity to regulate ATPe. E. coli can activate ATP release from Caco-2 cells and intestinal segments, a response which in vivo might lead to intestinal release of ATP from the gut lumen.

  15. Inhibition of ATP Synthase by Chlorinated Adenosine Analogue

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lisa S.; Nowak, Billie J.; Ayres, Mary L.; Krett, Nancy L.; Rosen, Steven T.; Zhang, Shuxing; Gandhi, Varsha

    2009-01-01

    8-Chloroadenosine (8-Cl-Ado) is a ribonucleoside analogue that is currently in clinical trial for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Based on the decline in cellular ATP pool following 8-Cl-Ado treatment, we hypothesized that 8-Cl-ADP and 8-Cl-ATP may interfere with ATP synthase, a key enzyme in ATP production. Mitochondrial ATP synthase is composed of two major parts; FO intermembrane base and F1 domain, containing α and β subunits. Crystal structures of both α and β subunits that bind to the substrate, ADP, are known in tight binding (αdpβdp) and loose binding (αtpβtp) states. Molecular docking demonstrated that 8-Cl-ADP/8-Cl-ATP occupied similar binding modes as ADP/ATP in the tight and loose binding sites of ATP synthase, respectively, suggesting that the chlorinated nucleotide metabolites may be functional substrates and inhibitors of the enzyme. The computational predictions were consistent with our whole cell biochemical results. Oligomycin, an established pharmacological inhibitor of ATP synthase, decreased both ATP and 8-Cl-ATP formation from exogenous substrates, however, did not affect pyrimidine nucleoside analogue triphosphate accumulation. Synthesis of ATP from ADP was inhibited in cells loaded with 8-Cl-ATP. These biochemical studies are in consent with the computational modeling; in the αtpβtp state 8-Cl-ATP occupies similar binding as ANP, a non-hydrolyzable ATP mimic that is a known inhibitor. Similarly, in the substrate binding site (αdpβdp) 8-Cl-ATP occupies a similar position as ATP mimic ADP-BeF3 −. Collectively, our current work suggests that 8-Cl-ADP may serve as a substrate and the 8-Cl-ATP may be an inhibitor of ATP synthase. PMID:19477165

  16. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  17. Real-time electrochemical detection of ATP and H2O2 release in freshly isolated kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Palygin, Oleg; Levchenko, Vladislav; Ilatovskaya, Daria V.; Pavlov, Tengis S.; Ryan, Robert P.; Cowley, Allen W.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides such as adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) and reactive oxygen species are essential local signaling molecules in the kidney. However, measurements of changes in the interstitial concentrations of these substances in response to various stimuli remain hindered due to limitations of existing experimental techniques. The goal of this study was to develop a novel approach suitable for real-time measurements of ATP and H2O2 levels in freshly isolated rat kidney. Rats were anesthetized and the kidneys were flushed to clear blood before isolation for consequent perfusion. The perfused kidneys were placed into a bath solution and dual simultaneous amperometric recordings were made with the enzymatic microelectrode biosensors detecting ATP and H2O2. It was found that basal levels of H2O2 were increased in Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats fed a high-salt diet compared with SS and Sprague-Dawley rats fed a low-salt diet and that medulla contained higher levels of H2O2 compared with cortex in both strains. In contrast, ATP levels did not change in SS rats when animals were fed a high-salt diet. Importantly, angiotensin II via AT1 receptor induced rapid release of both ATP and H2O2 and this effect was enhanced in SS rats. These results demonstrate that ATP and H2O2 are critical in the development of salt-sensitive hypertension and that the current method represents a unique powerful approach for the real-time monitoring of the changes in endogenous substance levels in whole organs. PMID:23594827

  18. Stable nuclear expression of ATP8 and ATP6 genes rescues a mtDNA Complex V null mutant

    PubMed Central

    Boominathan, Amutha; Vanhoozer, Shon; Basisty, Nathan; Powers, Kathleen; Crampton, Alexandra L.; Wang, Xiaobin; Friedricks, Natalie; Schilling, Birgit; Brand, Martin D.; O'Connor, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    We explore the possibility of re-engineering mitochondrial genes and expressing them from the nucleus as an approach to rescue defects arising from mitochondrial DNA mutations. We have used a patient cybrid cell line with a single point mutation in the overlap region of the ATP8 and ATP6 genes of the human mitochondrial genome. These cells are null for the ATP8 protein, have significantly lowered ATP6 protein levels and no Complex V function. Nuclear expression of only the ATP8 gene with the ATP5G1 mitochondrial targeting sequence appended restored viability on Krebs cycle substrates and ATP synthesis capabilities but, failed to restore ATP hydrolysis and was insensitive to various inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Co-expressing both ATP8 and ATP6 genes under similar conditions resulted in stable protein expression leading to successful integration into Complex V of the oxidative phosphorylation machinery. Tests for ATP hydrolysis / synthesis, oxygen consumption, glycolytic metabolism and viability all indicate a significant functional rescue of the mutant phenotype (including re-assembly of Complex V) following stable co-expression of ATP8 and ATP6. Thus, we report the stable allotopic expression, import and function of two mitochondria encoded genes, ATP8 and ATP6, resulting in simultaneous rescue of the loss of both mitochondrial proteins. PMID:27596602

  19. Phenotype Transformation of Aortic Valve Interstitial Cells Due to Applied Shear Stresses Within a Microfluidic Chip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinmei; Lee, Joohyung; Ali, Mir; Kim, Jungkyu; Lacerda, Carla M R

    2017-06-15

    Despite valvular heart diseases constituting a significant medical problem, the acquisition of information describing their pathophysiology remains difficult. Due to valvular size, role and location within the body, there is a need for in vitro systems that can recapitulate disease onset and progression. This study combines the development of an in vitro model and its application in the mechanical stimulation of valvular cell transformation. Specifically, porcine aortic valvular interstitial cells (PAVIC) were cultured on polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic devices with or without exposure to shear stresses. Mechanobiological responses of valvular interstitial cells were evaluated at shear stresses ranging from 0 to 4.26 dyn/cm(2). When flow rates were higher than 0.78 dyn/cm(2), cells elongated and aligned with the flow direction. In addition, we found that shear stress enhanced the formation of focal adhesions and up-regulated PAVIC transformation, assessed by increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor β. This study reveals a link between the action of shear forces, cell phenotype transformation and focal adhesion formation. This constitutes the first step towards the development of co-cultures (interstitial-endothelial cells) on organ-on-a-chip devices, which will enable studies of the signaling pathways regulating force-induced valvular degeneration in microtissues and potential discovery of valvular degeneration therapies.

  20. Persistent activation of autophagy in kidney tubular cells promotes renal interstitial fibrosis during unilateral ureteral obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Man J.; Ding, Han-Fei; Huang, Shuang; Hill, Joseph A.; Yin, Xiao-Ming; Dong, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Renal fibrosis is the final, common pathway of end-stage renal disease. Whether and how autophagy contributes to renal fibrosis remains unclear. Here we first detected persistent autophagy in kidney proximal tubules in the renal fibrosis model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in mice. UUO-associated fibrosis was suppressed by pharmacological inhibitors of autophagy and also by kidney proximal tubule-specific knockout of autophagy-related 7 (PT-Atg7 KO). Consistently, proliferation and activation of fibroblasts, as indicated by the expression of ACTA2/α-smooth muscle actin and VIM (vimentin), was inhibited in PT-Atg7 KO mice, so was the accumulation of extracellular matrix components including FN1 (fibronectin 1) and collagen fibrils. Tubular atrophy, apoptosis, nephron loss, and interstitial macrophage infiltration were all inhibited in these mice. Moreover, these mice showed a specific suppression of the expression of a profibrotic factor FGF2 (fibroblast growth factor 2). In vitro, TGFB1 (transforming growth factor β 1) induced autophagy, apoptosis, and FN1 accumulation in primary proximal tubular cells. Inhibition of autophagy suppressed FN1 accumulation and apoptosis, while enhancement of autophagy increased TGFB1-induced-cell death. These results suggest that persistent activation of autophagy in kidney proximal tubules promotes renal interstitial fibrosis during UUO. The profibrotic function of autophagy is related to the regulation on tubular cell death, interstitial inflammation, and the production of profibrotic factors. PMID:27123926

  1. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate attenuates unilateral ureteral obstruction-induced renal interstitial fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanqiu; Wang, Bowen; Du, Feng; Su, Xuesong; Sun, Guangping; Zhou, Guangyu; Bian, Xiaohui; Liu, Na

    2015-04-01

    The severity of tubulointerstitial fibrosis is regarded as an important determinant of renal prognosis. Therapeutic strategies targeting tubulointerstitial fibrosis have been considered to have potential in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. This study aims to evaluate the protective effects of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a green tea polyphenol, against renal interstitial fibrosis in mice. EGCG was administrated intraperitoneally for 14 days in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). The results of our histological examination showed that EGCG alleviated glomerular and tubular injury and attenuated renal interstitial fibrosis in UUO mice. Furthermore, the inflammatory responses induced by UUO were inhibited, as represented by decreased macrophage infiltration and inflammatory cytokine production. Additionally, the expression of type I and III collagen in the kidney were reduced by EGCG, which indicated an inhibition of extracellular matrix accumulation. EGCG also caused an up-regulation in α-smooth muscle actin expression and a down-regulation in E-cadherin expression, indicating the inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. These changes were found to be in parallel with the decreased level of TGF-β1 and phosphorylated Smad. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that EGCG could attenuate renal interstitial fibrosis in UUO mice, and this renoprotective effect might be associated with its effects of inflammatory responses alleviation and TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway inhibition.

  2. Continuous intravenous infusion of ATP in humans yields large expansions of erythrocyte ATP pools but extracellular ATP pools are elevated only at the start followed by rapid declines.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, Eliezer; Salikhova, Anna; Abraham, Edward H

    2015-06-01

    The pharmacokinetics of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) was investigated in a clinical trial that included 15 patients with advanced malignancies (solid tumors). ATP was administered by continuous intravenous infusions of 8 h once weekly for 8 weeks. Three values of blood ATP levels were determined. These were total blood (erythrocyte) and blood plasma (extracellular) ATP pools along with the initial rate of release of ATP into the blood plasma. We found that values related to erythrocyte ATP pools showed great variability (diversity) among individuals (standard deviation of about 30-40% of mean at baseline). It was discovered that erythrocyte baseline ATP pool sizes are unique to each individual and that they fall within a narrow range in each individual. At the end of an 8 h continuous intravenous infusion of ATP, intracellular erythrocyte ATP pools were increased in the range of 40-60% and extracellular ATP declined from elevated levels achieved at the beginning and middle of the infusion, to baseline levels. The ability of erythrocytes to sequester exogenously administered ATP to this degree, after its initial conversion to adenosine in the blood plasma is unexpected, considering that some of the adenosine is likely to have been degraded by in vivo catabolic activities or taken up by organs. The data suggest that administration of ATP by short-term intravenous infusions, of up to 4 h, may be a favorable way for elevating extracellular ATP pools. A large fraction of the total exogenously administered ATP is sequestered into the intracellular compartments of the erythrocytes after an 8 h intravenous infusion. Erythrocytes loaded with ATP are known to release their ATP pools by the application of previously established agents or conditions applied locally or globally to circulating erythrocytes. Rapid degradation of intravenously administered ATP to adenosine and subsequent accumulation of ATP inside erythrocytes indicate the existence of very effective mechanisms

  3. Local detection of mechanically induced ATP release from bone cells with ATP microbiosensors.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Elena; Liedert, Astrid; Ignatius, Anita; Mizaikoff, Boris; Kranz, Christine

    2013-06-15

    The mechanically induced release of adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) from osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1) was measured in real time. A stretching device integrated into scanning electrochemical microscopy was developed to apply controlled mechanical strain to MC3T3-E1 cells. For ATP secretion, a stepwise yet uniform mechanical stress was imposed onto MC3T3-E1 cells. The ATP biosensors were positioned at a distance of approximately 30-40 μm above the cell surface. Calibration functions were recorded prior to the cell measurements and revealed a linear response up to 40 μM with a sensitivity of 1-5pA/μM ATP. Stretching MC3T3-E1 cells up to 21% resulted in a concentration of 30.57±4.82 μM of extracellular ATP (N=12) detected above the cell surface. As a control experiment, nifedipine, a L-type voltage sensitive calcium channel (L-VSCC) inhibitor was applied, which blocks Ca(2+)entry from the outer medium into the cell. Inhibition resulted in a significantly smaller amount of released ATP, i.e., 7.08±1.93 μM ATP (N=10). Further control experiments with glucose microbiosensors did not yield significant changes of the baseline current (N=8). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Sulfide-based ATP production in Urechis unicinctus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhuojun; Bao, Zhenmin; Wang, Sifeng; Zhang, Zhifeng

    2010-05-01

    We measured sulfide-based ATP production by isolated mitochondria from four tissues of Urechis unicinctus and the effects of inhibitors of respiratory complexes on ATP production were evaluated. The results show that these mitochondria could oxidize sulfide to produce ATP. The yield of sulfide-stimulated ATP varied from 5 nmol ATP/min/mg to 90 nmol ATP/min/mg according to the sulfide concentration and the source of the mitochondria. The maximum ATP synthesis occurred in hindgut mitochondria using 5 μmol/L sulfide as a substrate. The effects of inhibitors (Rotenone, Antimycin A, Cyanide, and Salicylhydroxamic acid) on mitochondrial ATP production varied with the source of the mitochondria. Our results indicate that sulfide-based ATP production and the associated electron transport pathway are tissue-specific in U. unicinctus.

  5. Dynein ATPase pathway: ATP analogs and regulation by phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Chilcote, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Three biochemical aspects of 22S dynein from Tetrahymena cilia have been investigated: its ATP binding polypeptides and the manner in which they bind ATP, its AMPPNP-induced dissociation from microtubules, and its phosphorylation. We have attempted to identify the polypeptides of dynein that bind ATP, i.e., the active site polypeptides, with the photoaffinity ATP analog 8-N{sub 3}ATP. The 8-N{sub 3}ATP has been shown to bind to dyneins active sites and in a manner similar to that of ATP. Upon irradiation, (2-{sup 3}H)8-N{sub 3}ATP covalently labels the three heavy chains, i.e., heads, which is detected by autoradiography of SDS PAG's. Thus, the three heads are considered to be the three active sites of dynein. AMPPNP is a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog which we have assayed for the ability to induce dynein dissociation from microtubules.

  6. [Streptococcal infection, acute kidney failure and interstitial nephritis].

    PubMed

    Faurie, R E; Prado, A C

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between streptococcal infection and renal disease has been object of multiple studies. Streptococcal infection may induce acute glomerulonephritis or interstitial nephritis. We report a patient with a streptococcal infection who developed acute renal failure. The renal biopsy showed an acute interstitial nephritis, with an interstitium infiltrate with a significant number of eosinophils. We review the causes of acute renal failure associated with streptococcal infection, specially acute interstitial nephritis.

  7. Myosin motor domain lever arm rotation is coupled to ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Highsmith, S; Polosukhina, K; Eden, D

    2000-10-10

    We have investigated coupling of lever arm rotation to the ATP binding and hydrolysis steps for the myosin motor domain. In several current hypotheses of the mechanism of force production by muscle, the primary mechanical feature is the rotation of a lever arm that is a subdomain of the myosin motor domain. In these models, the lever arm rotates while the myosin motor domain is free, and then reverses the rotation to produce force while it is bound to actin. These mechanical steps are coupled to steps in the ATP hydrolysis cycle. Our hypothesis is that ATP hydrolysis induces lever arm rotation to produce a more compact motor domain that has stored mechanical energy. Our approach is to use transient electric birefringence techniques to measure changes in hydrodynamic size that result from lever arm rotation when various ligands are bound to isolated skeletal muscle myosin motor domain in solution. Results for ATP and CTP, which do support force production by muscle fibers, are compared to those of ATPgammaS and GTP, which do not. Measurements are also made of conformational changes when the motor domain is bound to NDP's and PP(i) in the absence and presence of the phosphate analogue orthovanadate, to determine the roles the nucleoside moieties of the nucleotides have on lever arm rotation. The results indicate that for the substrates investigated, rotation does not occur upon substrate binding, but is coupled to the NTP hydrolysis step. The data are consistent with a model in which only substrates that produce a motor domain-NDP-P(i) complex as the steady-state intermediate make the motor domain more compact, and only those substrates support force production.

  8. Firefly bioluminescent assay of ATP in the presence of ATP extractant by using liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kamidate, Tamio; Yanashita, Kenji; Tani, Hirofumi; Ishida, Akihiko; Notani, Mizuyo

    2006-01-01

    Liposomes containing phosphatidylcholine (PC) and cholesterol (Chol) were applied to the enhancer for firefly bioluminescence (BL) assay for ATP in the presence of cationic surfactants using as an extractant for the release of ATP from living cells. Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) was used as an ATP extractant. However, BAC seriously inhibited the activity of luciferase, thus resulting in the remarkable decrease in the sensitivity of the BL assay for ATP. On the other hand, we found that BAC was associated with liposomes to form cationic liposomes containing BAC. The association rate of BAC with liposomes was faster than that of BAC with luciferase. As a result, the inhibitory effect of BAC on luciferase was eliminated in the presence of liposomes. In addition, cationic liposomes thus formed enhanced BL emission. BL measurement conditions were optimized in terms of liposome charge type, liposome size, and total concentration of PC and Chol. ATP can be sensitively determined without dilution of analytical samples by using liposomes. The detection limit of ATP with and without liposomes was 100 amol and 25 fmol in aqueous ATP standard solutions containing 0.06% BAC, respectively. The method was applied to the determination of ATP in Escherichia coli extracts. The BL intensity was linear from 4 x 10(4) to 1 x 10(7) cells mL(-1) in the absence of liposomes. On the other hand, the BL intensity was linear from 4 x 10(3) to 4 x 10(6) cells mL(-1) in the presence of liposomes. The detection limit of ATP in E. coli extracts was improved by a factor of 10 via use of liposomes.

  9. Mechanisms that match ATP supply to demand in cardiac pacemaker cells during high ATP demand

    PubMed Central

    Yaniv, Yael; Spurgeon, Harold A.; Ziman, Bruce D.; Lyashkov, Alexey E.

    2013-01-01

    The spontaneous action potential (AP) firing rate of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) involves high-throughput signaling via Ca2+-calmodulin activated adenylyl cyclases (AC), cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA), and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent phosphorylation of SR Ca2+ cycling and surface membrane ion channel proteins. When the throughput of this signaling increases, e.g., in response to β-adrenergic receptor activation, the resultant increase in spontaneous AP firing rate increases the demand for ATP. We hypothesized that an increase of ATP production to match the increased ATP demand is achieved via a direct effect of increased mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca2+m) and an indirect effect via enhanced Ca2+-cAMP/PKA-CaMKII signaling to mitochondria. To increase ATP demand, single isolated rabbit SANCs were superfused by physiological saline at 35 ± 0.5°C with isoproterenol, or by phosphodiesterase or protein phosphatase inhibition. We measured cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ and flavoprotein fluorescence in single SANC, and we measured cAMP, ATP, and O2 consumption in SANC suspensions. Although the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate was accompanied by an increase in O2 consumption, the ATP level and flavoprotein fluorescence remained constant, indicating that ATP production had increased. Both Ca2+m and cAMP increased concurrently with the increase in AP firing rate. When Ca2+m was reduced by Ru360, the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate in response to isoproterenol was reduced by 25%. Thus, both an increase in Ca2+m and an increase in Ca2+ activated cAMP-PKA-CaMKII signaling regulate the increase in ATP supply to meet ATP demand above the basal level. PMID:23604710

  10. Mechanisms that match ATP supply to demand in cardiac pacemaker cells during high ATP demand.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Yael; Spurgeon, Harold A; Ziman, Bruce D; Lyashkov, Alexey E; Lakatta, Edward G

    2013-06-01

    The spontaneous action potential (AP) firing rate of sinoatrial node cells (SANCs) involves high-throughput signaling via Ca(2+)-calmodulin activated adenylyl cyclases (AC), cAMP-mediated protein kinase A (PKA), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-dependent phosphorylation of SR Ca(2+) cycling and surface membrane ion channel proteins. When the throughput of this signaling increases, e.g., in response to β-adrenergic receptor activation, the resultant increase in spontaneous AP firing rate increases the demand for ATP. We hypothesized that an increase of ATP production to match the increased ATP demand is achieved via a direct effect of increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)m) and an indirect effect via enhanced Ca(2+)-cAMP/PKA-CaMKII signaling to mitochondria. To increase ATP demand, single isolated rabbit SANCs were superfused by physiological saline at 35 ± 0.5°C with isoproterenol, or by phosphodiesterase or protein phosphatase inhibition. We measured cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) and flavoprotein fluorescence in single SANC, and we measured cAMP, ATP, and O₂ consumption in SANC suspensions. Although the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate was accompanied by an increase in O₂ consumption, the ATP level and flavoprotein fluorescence remained constant, indicating that ATP production had increased. Both Ca(2+)m and cAMP increased concurrently with the increase in AP firing rate. When Ca(2+)m was reduced by Ru360, the increase in spontaneous AP firing rate in response to isoproterenol was reduced by 25%. Thus, both an increase in Ca(2+)m and an increase in Ca(2+) activated cAMP-PKA-CaMKII signaling regulate the increase in ATP supply to meet ATP demand above the basal level.

  11. Idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Belloli, Elizabeth A; Beckford, Rosemarie; Hadley, Ryan; Flaherty, Kevin R

    2016-02-01

    Non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) is an interstitial lung disease that may be idiopathic or secondary to connective tissue disease, toxins or numerous other causes. Idiopathic NSIP is a rare diagnosis and requires exclusion of these other possible causes. Patients typically present in mid-adulthood with dyspnoea, cough and often constitutional symptoms including fever and fatigue. The disease has a female predominance, and more than 50% of patients have never smoked. Physical exam features mild hypoxaemia and inspiratory rales. Pulmonary function tests demonstrate restriction and a low diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include predominantly lower lobe subpleural reticular changes, traction bronchiectasis and ground-glass opacities; honeycombing is rarely seen. An evaluation of the underlying pathology is necessary for a firm diagnosis. Histologically, alveolar and interstitial mononuclear cell inflammation and fibrosis are seen in a temporally uniform pattern with preserved underlying alveolar architecture. NSIP must be differentiated from other parenchymal lung diseases including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. A thorough exposure history and assessment for underlying connective tissue diseases are highly important, as positive findings in these categories would likely denote a case of secondary NSIP. A multi-disciplinary discussion that includes pulmonologist(s), radiologist(s) and pathologist(s) assists in reaching a consensus diagnosis and improves diagnostic accuracy. Treatment of idiopathic NSIP, although not well proven, is generally instituted in the form of immunosuppression. Prognosis is favourable compared with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, although the diagnosis still carries an attributable mortality. Herein we will summarize the clinical characteristics and management of idiopathic NSIP.

  12. Current concepts and dilemmas in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jay H.; Moua, Teng; Azadeh, Natalya; Baqir, Misbah; Yi, Eunhee S.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias comprise approximately one-third of interstitial lung diseases (also called diffuse parenchymal infiltrative lung diseases). The classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias has undergone several revisions since the initial description of 40 years ago, and the most recent version was published in 2013. Although some aspects have been clarified, this group of heterogeneous disorders continues to be a source of confusion and misunderstanding in clinical applications. In this article, we explore several topical themes in the evaluation and management of patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. PMID:27853529

  13. Diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema treated by lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Matta, Reva; Matta, Judy; Hage, Pierre; Nassif, Yolla; Mansour, Nabil; Diab, Nabil

    2011-10-01

    Persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema is a rare condition that occurs in preterm infants on mechanical ventilation, characterized by abnormal accumulation of air in the pulmonary interstitium, due to disruption of the basement membrane. Diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema is observed when small cysts are noted in all lobes of the lung. The management of infants suffering from diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema varies according to severity and stability of the patient, being either conservative treatment or aggressive surgical treatment by pneumonectomy. We report a case of an unstable patient with diffuse persistent interstitial pulmonary emphysema successfully treated by lobectomy as a form of conservative surgical approach.

  14. Migration of Di- and Tri-Interstitials in Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Posselt, Matthias; Gao, Fei; Zwicker, D

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive study on the migration of di- and tri-interstitials in silicon is performed using classical molecular dynamics simulations with the Stillinger-Weber potential. The initial di- and tri-interstitial configurations with the lowest formation energies are determined, and then, the defect migration is investigated for temperatures between 800 and 1600 K. The defect diffusivity and the self-diffusion coefficient per defect are calculated. Compared to the mono-interstitial, the di-interstitial migrates faster, whereas the tri-interstitial diffuses slower. The migration mechanism of the di-interstitial shows a pronounced dependence on the temperature. Like in the case of the mono-interstitial, the mobility of the di-interstitial is higher than the mobility of the lattice atoms during the defect diffusion. On the other hand, the tri-interstitial mobility is lower than the corresponding atomic mobility. The results are compared with data from the literature and the implications of the present results for the analysis of experimental data on defect evolution and migration are discussed.

  15. Defects involving interstitial boron in low-temperature irradiated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khirunenko, L. I.; Sosnin, M. G.; Duvanskii, A. V.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Riemann, H.

    2016-12-01

    Interstitial boron-related defects in silicon subjected to irradiation with 5 MeV electrons at a temperature of 80 K are investigated by Fourier-transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. This study demonstrates the radiation-enhanced annealing of interstitial boron during irradiation. We have revealed the interaction, which occurs in the course of irradiation, of diffusing interstitial boron atoms with one another and with interstitial oxygen. The local vibrational modes associated with these defects are identified, and the thermal stability of the defects is determined.

  16. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  17. Collagen gene expression in radiation interstitial pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Yun-hong; Wang, De-wen; Cui Cai-bin

    1994-12-31

    By using type I and type III collagen cDNA probe and cDNA-mRNA in situ hybridization, we observed the changes of rat lung {alpha} 1(I) and {alpha} 1(III) collagen gene expression in radiation interstitial pneumonitis. The results showed that the expressed cell of type I and type III collagen were scattered within the fibroblasts in the thickened interalveolar walls. The type I and type III collagen mRNA content in irradiated animals were higher than those in the controls at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Energy demand and supply in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Barclay, C J

    2017-03-12

    The energy required for muscle contraction is provided by the breakdown of ATP but the amount of ATP in muscles cells is sufficient to power only a short duration of contraction. Buffering of ATP by phosphocreatine, a reaction catalysed by creatine kinase, extends the duration of activity possible but sustained activity depends on continual regeneration of PCr. This is achieved using ATP generated by oxidative processes and, during intense activity, by anaerobic glycolysis. The rate of ATP breakdown ranges from 70 to 140 mM min(-1) during isometric contractions of various intensity to as much as 400 mM min(-1) during intense, dynamic activity. The maximum rate of oxidative energy supply in untrained people is ~50 mM min(-1) which, if the contraction duty cycle is 0.5 as is often the case in cyclic activity, is sufficient to match an ATP breakdown rate during contraction of 100 mM min(-1). During brief, intense activity the rate of ATP turnover can exceed the rates of PCr regeneration by combined oxidative and glycolytic energy supply, resulting in a net decrease in PCr concentration. Glycolysis has the capacity to produce between 30 and 50 mM of ATP so that, for example, anaerobic glycolysis could provide ATP at an average of 100 mM min(-1) over 30 s of exhausting activity. The creatine kinase reaction plays an important role not only in buffering ATP but also in communicating energy demand from sites of ATP breakdown to the mitochondria. In that role, creatine kinases acts to slow and attenuate the response of mitochondria to changes in energy demand.

  19. Interstitial hydraulic conductivity and interstitial fluid pressure for avascular or poorly vascularized tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, L J; Schlesinger, M

    2015-09-07

    A correct description of the hydraulic conductivity is essential for determining the actual tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) distribution. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the hydraulic conductivities both in a tumor and normal tissue are constant, and that a tumor has a much larger interstitial hydraulic conductivity than normal tissue. The abrupt transition of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface leads to non-physical results (the hydraulic conductivity and the slope of the TIFP are not continuous at tumor surface). For the sake of simplicity and the need to represent reality, we focus our analysis on avascular or poorly vascularized tumors, which have a necrosis that is mostly in the center and vascularization that is mostly on the periphery. We suggest that there is an intermediary region between the tumor surface and normal tissue. Through this region, the interstitium (including the structure and composition of solid components and interstitial fluid) transitions from tumor to normal tissue. This process also causes the hydraulic conductivity to do the same. We introduce a continuous variation of the hydraulic conductivity, and show that the interstitial hydraulic conductivity in the intermediary region should be monotonically increasing up to the value of hydraulic conductivity in the normal tissue in order for the model to correspond to the actual TIFP distribution. The value of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface should be the lowest in value. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a new heating needle for interstitial hyperthermia compatible with interstitial radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, H; Tanaka, M; Matsuo, R; Fukuda, H; Yamada, R; Yamamoto, I

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new heating needle for interstitial hyperthermia compatible with brachytherapy. We studied the heating characteristics of interstitial needles and the usefulness of these needles for interstitial hyperthermia. As heating needles, we used MicroSelectron HDR interstitial needles. These needles were only heated at the metal tip, and were insulated in the middle and grounded from the top. The hyperthermia system was based on the principles of RF capacitive heating, and we used a Thermotron RF-8. We examined whether the temperature and the heating area could be elevated to a level required for hyperthermia. Good heating was obtained around the metal tip of the needle. The heating area of the longitudinal axis of the needle varied with the length of the metal part, while the transverse heating area of the needle was almost unchanged. If heating was performed while maintaining the elevation of temperature in each needle at the same level using variable coils (tuning box), heating was homogeneous over the regions in accordance with the arrangement of the needles. With this heating system, the temperature rises easily, and a uniform temperature distribution can be obtained.

  1. A reusable prepositioned ATP reaction chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Luminescence biometer detects presence of life by means of light-emitting chemical reaction of luciferin and luciferase with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that occurs in all living cells. Amount of light in reaction chamber is measured to determine presence and extent of life.

  2. Monitoring enzymatic ATP hydrolysis by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Hintze, Christian; Marx, Andreas; Drescher, Malte

    2014-07-14

    An adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analogue modified with two nitroxide radicals is developed and employed to study its enzymatic hydrolysis by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. For this application, we demonstrate that EPR holds the potential to complement fluorogenic substrate analogues in monitoring enzymatic activity.

  3. Calcium and ATP control multiple vital functions.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Ole H; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-08-05

    Life on Planet Earth, as we know it, revolves around adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a universal energy storing molecule. The metabolism of ATP requires a low cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, and hence tethers these two molecules together. The exceedingly low cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration (which in all life forms is kept around 50-100 nM) forms the basis for a universal intracellular signalling system in which Ca(2+) acts as a second messenger. Maintenance of transmembrane Ca(2+) gradients, in turn, requires ATP-dependent Ca(2+) transport, thus further emphasizing the inseparable links between these two substances. Ca(2+) signalling controls the most fundamental processes in the living organism, from heartbeat and neurotransmission to cell energetics and secretion. The versatility and plasticity of Ca(2+) signalling relies on cell specific Ca(2+) signalling toolkits, remodelling of which underlies adaptive cellular responses. Alterations of these Ca(2+) signalling toolkits lead to aberrant Ca(2+) signalling which is fundamental for the pathophysiology of numerous diseases from acute pancreatitis to neurodegeneration. This paper introduces a theme issue on this topic, which arose from a Royal Society Theo Murphy scientific meeting held in March 2016.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'.

  4. Electric Field Driven Torque in ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Miller, John H.; Rajapakshe, Kimal I.; Infante, Hans L.; Claycomb, James R.

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring. PMID:24040370

  5. Electric field driven torque in ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Miller, John H; Rajapakshe, Kimal I; Infante, Hans L; Claycomb, James R

    2013-01-01

    FO-ATP synthase (FO) is a rotary motor that converts potential energy from ions, usually protons, moving from high- to low-potential sides of a membrane into torque and rotary motion. Here we propose a mechanism whereby electric fields emanating from the proton entry and exit channels act on asymmetric charge distributions in the c-ring, due to protonated and deprotonated sites, and drive it to rotate. The model predicts a scaling between time-averaged torque and proton motive force, which can be hindered by mutations that adversely affect the channels. The torque created by the c-ring of FO drives the γ-subunit to rotate within the ATP-producing complex (F1) overcoming, with the aid of thermal fluctuations, an opposing torque that rises and falls with angular position. Using the analogy with thermal Brownian motion of a particle in a tilted washboard potential, we compute ATP production rates vs. proton motive force. The latter shows a minimum, needed to drive ATP production, which scales inversely with the number of proton binding sites on the c-ring.

  6. Electrophysiological effects of ATP on brain neurones.

    PubMed

    Illes, P; Nieber, K; Nörenberg, W

    1996-12-01

    1. The electrophysiological effects of ATP on brain neurones are either due to the direct activation of P2 purinoceptors by the unmetabolized nucleotide or to the indirect activation of P1. purinoceptors by the degradation product adenosine. 2. Two subtypes of P2 purinoceptors are involved, a ligand-activated ion channel (P2X) and a G protein-coupled receptor (P2Y). Hence, the stimulation of P2X purinoceptors leads to a cationic conductance increase, while the stimulation of P2Y purinoceptors leads to a G protein-mediated opening or closure of potassium channels. 3. ATP may induce a calcium-dependent potassium current by increasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. This is due either to the entry of Ca2+ via P2X purinoceptors or to the activation of metabotropic P2Y purinoceptors followed by signaling via the G protein/phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) cascade. Eventually, IP3 releases Ca2+ from its intracellular pools. 4. There is no convincing evidence for the presence of P2U purinoceptors sensitive to both ATP and UTP, or pyrimidinoceptors sensitive to UTP only, in the central nervous system (CNS). 5. ATP-sensitive P2X and P2Y purinoceptors show a wide distribution in the CNS and appear to regulate important neuronal functions.

  7. Muscle metabolism during exercise in dogs after 8-week confinement.

    PubMed

    Kruk, B; Brzezinska, Z; Nazar, K; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H; Falecka-Wieczorek, I; Greenleaf, J E

    1996-09-01

    Several indicators of muscle metabolism were measured in dogs during exercise following 8 weeks of confinement in cages. Muscle tissue samples were studied at rest and following exercise for adenine nucleotides, creatine phosphate, creatine, glycogen, pyruvate, and lactate. Results indicate that confinement results in less efficient metabolic responses to exercise, decreased muscle glycogen at rest, and changes in the equilibrium between ATP breakdown and resynthesis during exercise.

  8. The Importance of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shboul, Othman A.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility function and its regulation is a complex process involving collaboration and communication of multiple cell types such as enteric neurons, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), and smooth muscle cells. Recent advances in GI research made a better understanding of ICC function and their role in the GI tract, and studies based on different types of techniques have shown that ICC, as an integral part of the GI neuromuscular apparatus, transduce inputs from enteric motor neurons, generate intrinsic electrical rhythmicity in phasic smooth muscles, and have a mechanical sensation ability. Absence or improper function of these cells has been linked to some GI tract disorders. This paper provides a general overview of ICC; their discovery, subtypes, function, locations in the GI tract, and some disorders associated with their loss or disease, and highlights some controversial issues with regard to the importance of ICC in the GI tract. PMID:23319032

  9. The role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in cellular function and protection in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Tinker, Andrew; Aziz, Qadeer; Thomas, Alison

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP) are widely distributed and present in a number of tissues including muscle, pancreatic beta cells and the brain. Their activity is regulated by adenine nucleotides, characteristically being activated by falling ATP and rising ADP levels. Thus, they link cellular metabolism with membrane excitability. Recent studies using genetically modified mice and genomic studies in patients have implicated KATP channels in a number of physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we focus on their role in cellular function and protection particularly in the cardiovascular system. PMID:24102106

  10. Interstitial Condensation Risk at Thermal Rehabilitated Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, I.; Bliuc, I.; Iacob, A.; Dumitrescu, L.; Pescaru, R. A.; Helepciuc, C.

    2016-11-01

    The increasing thermal insulation degree of existing residential buildings, aiming to reduce the energy requirements for ensuring the indoor comfort, has as expected effect the elimination of condensation risk. However, in some cases this phenomenon occurs, both on the inner surface of the closing element and also in its structure. The surface condensation causes can be identified and can be easily removed. Instead, the causes and even the presence of interstitial condensation are more difficult to be observed. But the moistening of the insulation materials and the reduction of thermal insulation capacity or even its total degradation, contravene into a large extent or totally to the main purpose of the additional thermal protection. To avoid such situations, it is necessary to respect some principles concerning the structure, resulted from the knowledge of the water vapour diffusion behaviour of various materials. It is known that condensation vulnerability is higher for the additional thermal protection solutions by disposing the insulating material on the inside surface of the closing element. But practice has shown that the condensation phenomenon is not totally excluded neither in the case of outside thermal insulation - which is the current solution applied to the rehabilitation works - if the principles mentioned above are not known and respected. In this paper two models are compared on which the risk of interstitial condensation can be checked. The analysis made on two structures of exterior walls with thermal insulation demonstrates the need for additional verifications before proposing a solution for thermal rehabilitation of the envelope elements.

  11. Interstitial Pulmonary Edema Following Bromocarbamide Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Sugihara, H.; Hagedorn, M.; Bōttcher, D.; Neuhof, H.; Mittermayer, Ch.

    1974-01-01

    Bromocarbamides are sleep-inducing drugs which can lead, in man, to intoxication and death due to respiratory failure. To prove whether hemodynamic factors or the changed endothelial permeability induce pulmonary edema, animal experiments were performed. The fine structural changes in pulmonary edema in rabbits were observed at 60, 90 and 120 minutes after oral administration. The major findings were a) large blebs between capillary endothelium and alveolar epithelium and b) interstitial edema of the vessel wall. The bleb contents were much less electron dense than the blood contents in the capillary. Colloidal carbon did not enter the bleb or the edematous interstitial tissue. Exogenous peroxidase uptake in pinocytotie vesicles increased in pathologic cases. The hemodynamic measurements in animal receiving artificial respiration which maintained the blood pO2 at a steady state showed similar blebs in the pulmonary vessels, indicating that anoxia is not the major cause of the vascular lesion. Moreover, pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance could be held in the normal range in artificially respirated animals under bromocarbamide intoxication. Thus, hemodynamic factors are not likely to play a pathogenetic role in bringing about pulmonary edema. The chief, early factor is the increased endothelial permeability due to increased cytoplasmic transport. From this a practical suggestion for treating patients with bromocarbamide intoxication is derived: the usual fluid replacement in shock patients should be handled with great care to avoid fluid overload of the lung. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6 PMID:4835993

  12. Interstitial Fe in MgO

    SciTech Connect

    Mølholt, T. E. Gislason, H. P.; Ólafsson, S.; Mantovan, R.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Svane, A.; Weyer, G.; Masenda, H.; Naidoo, D.; Bharuth-Ram,