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Sample records for muscle reflex thresholds

  1. Aural Acoustic Stapedius-Muscle Reflex Threshold Procedures to Test Human Infants and Adults.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Douglas H; Feeney, M Patrick; Hunter, Lisa L; Fitzpatrick, Denis F

    2017-02-01

    Power-based procedures are described to measure acoustic stapedius-muscle reflex threshold and supra-threshold responses in human adult and infant ears at frequencies from 0.2 to 8 kHz. The stimulus set included five clicks in which four pulsed activators were placed between each pair of clicks, with each stimulus set separated from the next by 0.79 s to allow for reflex decay. Each click response was used to detect the presence of reflex effects across frequency that were elicited by a pulsed broadband-noise or tonal activator in the ipsilateral or contralateral test ear. Acoustic reflex shifts were quantified in terms of the difference in absorbed sound power between the initial baseline click and the later four clicks in each set. Acoustic reflex shifts were measured over a 40-dB range of pulsed activators, and the acoustic reflex threshold was objectively calculated using a maximum 10 likelihood procedure. To illustrate the principles underlying these new reflex tests, reflex shifts in absorbed sound power and absorbance are presented for data acquired in an adult ear with normal hearing and in two infant ears in the initial and follow-up newborn hearing screening exams, one with normal hearing and the other with a conductive hearing loss. The use of absorbed sound power was helpful in classifying an acoustic reflex shift as present or absent. The resulting reflex tests are in use in a large study of wideband clinical diagnosis and monitoring of middle-ear and cochlear function in infant and adult ears.

  2. Paraspinal muscle reflex dynamics.

    PubMed

    Granata, K P; Slota, G P; Bennett, B C

    2004-02-01

    Neuromuscular control of spinal stability may be represented as a control system wherein the paraspinal muscle reflex acts as feedback response to kinetic and kinematic disturbances of the trunk. The influence of preparatory muscle recruitment for the control of spinal stability has been previously examined, but there are few reported studies that characterize paraspinal reflex gain as feedback response. In the current study, the input-output dynamics of paraspinal reflexes were quantified by means of the impulse response function (IRF), with trunk perturbation force representing the input signal and EMG the output signal. Surface EMGs were collected from the trunk muscles in response to a brief anteriorly directed impact force applied to the trunk of healthy participants. Reflex behavior was measured in response to three levels of force impulse, 6.1, 9.2 and 12.0 Ns, and two different levels of external trunk flexion preload, 0 and 110 N anterior force. Reflex EMG was quantifiable in response to 91% of the perturbations. Mean reflex onset latency was 30.7+/-21.3 ms and reflex amplitude increased with perturbation amplitude. Impulse response function gain, G(IRF), was defined as the peak amplitude of the measured IRF and provided a consistent measure of response behavior. EMG reflex amplitude and G(IRF) increased with force impulse. Mean G(IRF) was 2.27+/-1.31% MVC/Ns and demonstrated declining trend with flexion preload. Results agree with a simple systems model of the neuromechanical feedback behavior. The relative contribution of the reflex dynamics to spinal stability must be investigated in future research.

  3. Mentalis muscle related reflexes.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uyanık, Özlem; Ertürk, Özdem; Sohtaoğlu, Melis; Kızıltan, Meral Erdemir

    2016-05-01

    The mentalis muscle (MM) arises from the incisive fossa of the mandible, raises and protrudes the lower lip. Here, we aim to characterize responses obtained from MM by supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli in a group of 16 healthy volunteers who did not have clinical palmomental reflex. Reflex activities were recorded from the MM and orbicularis oculi (O.oc) after supraorbital and median electrical as well as auditory stimuli. Response rates over MM were consistent after each stimulus, however, mean latencies of MM response were longer than O.oc responses by all stimulation modalities. Shapes and amplitudes of responses from O.oc and MM were similar. Based on our findings, we may say that MM motoneurons have connections with trigeminal, vestibulocochlear and lemniscal pathways similar to other facial muscles and electrophysiological recording of MM responses after electrical and auditory stimulation is possible in healthy subjects.

  4. Voluntary and reflex control of the human temporalis muscle.

    PubMed

    Scott, B J J; Mason, A G; Cadden, S W

    2002-07-01

    Electromyographic recordings (EMGs) were made in 10 human subjects from the anterior and posterior parts of the temporalis muscle using skin surface electrodes. The activities produced by voluntary maximal clenching tasks and the reflex responses to electrical stimulation of the muco-gingival junction were studied. In most subjects, maximum activity in both parts of the muscle occurred when clenching in the intercuspal position (anterior temporalis: 7 of 10 subjects; posterior temporalis: 9 of 10 subjects). Clenching maximally in the retruded position usually resulted in less activity; when this activity was expressed as a percentage of the maximum achieved by each subject for that part of the muscle, the median values were: anterior temporalis, 68% and posterior temporalis, 79%. Clenching in the protruded position produced little or no activity (median values: anterior temporalis, 3%; posterior temporalis, 5%). There were no significant differences between the EMG activities of the anterior and posterior parts of the muscle during these tasks when the activities were normalized to the maximum achieved in each part of the muscle. Application of electrical stimuli at the muco-gingival junction (upper incisor region) produced reflex inhibitions and excitations in both parts of the muscle. There were no significant differences in the thresholds of these reflexes between the anterior and posterior parts of the muscle. Furthermore, there was little difference between the two parts of the muscle in terms of the latencies, durations and magnitudes of the responses. Thus the results of the study suggest that there are similar neural control mechanisms for the anterior and posterior parts of the temporalis muscle despite the common view that these parts of the muscle have different functions.

  5. Reflex changes in muscle spindle discharge during a voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Aniss, A M; Gandevia, S C; Burke, D

    1988-03-01

    1. This study was undertaken to determine whether low-threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents from mechanoreceptors in the foot reflexly affect fusimotor neurons innervating the plantar and dorsiflexors of the ankle during voluntary contractions. 2. Recordings were made from 29 identified muscle spindle afferents innervating triceps surae and the pretibial flexors. Trains of electrical stimuli (5 stimuli, 300 impulses per second) were delivered to the sural nerve at the ankle (intensity: 2-4 times sensory threshold) and to the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle (intensity: 1.5-3 times motor threshold for the small muscles of the foot). The stimuli were delivered while the subject maintained an isometric voluntary contraction of the receptor-bearing muscle, sufficient to accelerate the discharge of each spindle ending. This ensured that the fusimotor neurons directed to the ending were active and influencing the spindle discharge. The effects of these stimuli on muscle spindle discharge were assessed using raster displays, frequencygrams, poststimulus time histograms (PSTHs) and cumulative sums ("CUSUMs") of the PSTHs. Reflex effects onto alpha-motoneurons were determined from poststimulus changes in the averaged rectified electromyogram (EMG). Reflex effects of these stimuli onto single-motor units were assessed in separate experiments using PSTHs and CUSUMs. 3. Electrical stimulation of the sural or posterior tibial nerves at nonnoxious levels had no significant effect on the discharge of the 14 spindle endings in the pretibial flexor muscles. The electrical stimuli also produced no significant change in discharge of 11 of 15 spindle endings in triceps surae. With the remaining four endings in triceps surae, the overall change in discharge appeared to be an increase for two endings (at latencies of 60 and 68 ms) and a decrease for two endings (at latencies of 110 and 150 ms). The difference in the incidence of the responses of spindle endings in tibialis

  6. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    PubMed Central

    Sloot, Lizeth H.; van den Noort, Josien C.; van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163–191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during

  7. Reflex control of human jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Türker, Kemal S

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss what is known about the reflex control of the human masticatory system and to propose a method for standardized investigation. Literature regarding the current knowledge of activation of jaw muscles, receptors involved in the feedback control, and reflex pathways is discussed. The reflexes are discussed under the headings of the stimulation conditions. This was deliberately done to remind the reader that under each stimulation condition, several receptor systems are activated, and that it is not yet possible to stimulate only one afferent system in isolation in human mastication experiments. To achieve a method for uniform investigation, we need to set a method for stimulation of the afferent pathway under study with minimal simultaneous activation of other receptor systems. This stimulation should also be done in an efficient and reproducible way. To substantiate our conviction to standardize the stimulus type and parameters, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical and electrical stimuli. For mechanical stimulus to be delivered in a reproducible way, the following precautions are suggested: The stimulus delivery system (often a probe attached to a vibrator) should be brought into secure contact with the area of stimulation. To minimize the slack between the probe, the area to be stimulated should be taken up by the application of pre-load, and the delivered force should be recorded in series. Electrical stimulus has advantages in that it can be delivered in a reproducible way, though its physiological relevance can be questioned. It is also necessary to standardize the method for recording and analyzing the responses of the motoneurons to the stimulation. For that, a new technique is introduced, and its advantages over the currently used methods are discussed. The new method can illustrate the synaptic potential that is induced in the motoneurons without the errors that are unavoidable in the current

  8. Pressurized Wideband Acoustic Stapedial Reflex Thresholds: Normal Development and Relationships to Auditory Function in Infants.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Lisa L; Keefe, Douglas H; Feeney, M Patrick; Fitzpatrick, Denis F

    2017-02-01

    This study analyzed effects of pressurization on wideband acoustic stapedial-muscle reflex (ASR) tests in infants cared for in normal newborn (NN) and neonatal intensive care units (NICU). Effects of hearing-screening outcomes on ASR threshold measurements were also evaluated, and a subsequent longitudinal study established normative threshold ranges over the first year after birth. An initial experiment compared thresholds in newborns measured at ambient pressure in the ear canal and at the tympanometric peak pressure. ASR thresholds for broadband noise were higher for ears that did not pass newborn hearing screening and ASR threshold was 14 dB higher for real-ear compared to coupler conditions. Effects of pressurization were significant for ears that passed screening; thus, ASR testing in infants should be conducted at tympanometric peak pressure. ASR threshold was significantly higher for ears that referred on transient evoked otoacoustic emissions and Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) screening tests and also for ears with conductive and sensorineural hearing loss diagnosed by ABR. Developmental ASR changes were significant over the first year for both normal and NICU infants. Wideband pressurized ASR thresholds are a clinically relevant measure of newborn hearing screening and diagnostic outcomes.

  9. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the H-reflex of muscles of different fibre type composition.

    PubMed

    Goulet, C G; Arsenault, A B; Bourbonnais, D; Levin, M F

    1997-09-01

    Differential effects of repetitive stimulation of low threshold afferents on both the recruitment threshold and motoneuronal excitability of type I and type II motor units have been demonstrated. The present study was aimed at further investigating the differential effects of 30 minutes of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on the H-reflex amplitude (Hmax/2) of the Soleus (SO), gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and medialis (GM) muscles. Eleven healthy subjects were tested in order to evaluate the effects of TENS on either the common peroneal (CPN), saphenous or sural nerve. The experimental session consisted of three consecutive 45 min periods. Within each of these periods, H-reflexes were recorded before, during and after the TENS was applied. It was hypothesized that repetitive low threshold afferent stimulation would either have inhibitory or facilitatory effects on the H-reflex amplitude of the SO or gastrocnemii muscles respectively. Non-parametric Friedman ANOVAs revealed a significant tendency (p < 0.05) toward inhibition of the H-reflex amplitude of the SO and GL muscle during TENS applied over either the CPN or sural nerve, as well as that of the GM during repetitive stimulation of the saphenous nerve. Although the present study failed to reveal any differential effects of TENS on the H-reflex amplitude of muscle on different fibre type content, the significant decrease in H-reflex observed on the triceps surae muscles during TENS applied over the CPN might have promising clinical outcomes for hyperreflexive subjects.

  10. The Effect of the 226-Hz Probe Level on Contralateral Acoustic Stapedius Reflex Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Jessica E.; Feeney, M. Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the 226-Hz probe level on the acoustic stapedius reflex threshold. Method: Contralateral reflex thresholds for a 1000-Hz pure-tone stimulus were obtained from 40 young adults with normal hearing using an experimental system at four 226-Hz probe levels (70, 75, 80, and 85 dB SPL) with…

  11. Intramuscular Neurotrophin-3 normalizes low threshold spinal reflexes, reduces spasms and improves mobility after bilateral corticospinal tract injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kathe, Claudia; Hutson, Thomas Haynes; McMahon, Stephen Brendan; Moon, Lawrence David Falcon

    2016-01-01

    Brain and spinal injury reduce mobility and often impair sensorimotor processing in the spinal cord leading to spasticity. Here, we establish that complete transection of corticospinal pathways in the pyramids impairs locomotion and leads to increased spasms and excessive mono- and polysynaptic low threshold spinal reflexes in rats. Treatment of affected forelimb muscles with an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) encoding human Neurotrophin-3 at a clinically-feasible time-point after injury reduced spasticity. Neurotrophin-3 normalized the short latency Hoffmann reflex to a treated hand muscle as well as low threshold polysynaptic spinal reflexes involving afferents from other treated muscles. Neurotrophin-3 also enhanced locomotor recovery. Furthermore, the balance of inhibitory and excitatory boutons in the spinal cord and the level of an ion co-transporter in motor neuron membranes required for normal reflexes were normalized. Our findings pave the way for Neurotrophin-3 as a therapy that treats the underlying causes of spasticity and not only its symptoms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18146.001 PMID:27759565

  12. Effects of leg pedaling on early latency cutaneous reflexes in upper limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Sasada, Syusaku; Tazoe, Toshiki; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Zehr, E Paul; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2010-07-01

    The functional coupling of neural circuits between the upper and lower limbs involving rhythmic movements is of interest to both motor control research and rehabilitation science. This coupling can be detected by examining the effect of remote rhythmic limb movement on the modulation of reflex amplitude in stationary limbs. The present study investigated the extent to which rhythmic leg pedaling modulates the amplitude of an early latency (peak 30-70 ms) cutaneous reflex (ELCR) in the upper limb muscles. Thirteen neurologically intact volunteers performed leg pedaling (60 or 90 rpm) while simultaneously contracting their arm muscles isometrically. Control experiments included isolated isometric contractions and discrete movements of the leg. ELCRs were evoked by stimulation of the superficial radial nerve with a train of rectangular pulses (three pulses at 333 Hz, intensity 2.0- to 2.5-fold perceptual threshold). Reflex amplitudes were significantly increased in the flexor carpi radialis and posterior deltoid and significantly decreased in the biceps brachii muscles during leg pedaling compared with that during stationary isometric contraction of the lower leg muscles. This effect was also sensitive to cadence. No significant modulation was seen during the isometric contractions or discrete movements of the leg. Additionally, there was no phase-dependent modulation of the ELCR. These findings suggest that activation of the rhythm generating system of the legs affects the excitability of the early latency cutaneous reflex pathways in the upper limbs.

  13. The Middle Ear Muscle Reflex in the Diagnosis of Cochlear Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Michelle D.; Hancock, Kenneth E.; Liberman, M. Charles

    2017-01-01

    Cochlear neuropathy, i.e. the loss of auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) without loss of hair cells, may cause hearing deficits without affecting threshold sensitivity, particularly if the subset of ANFs with high thresholds and low spontaneous rates (SRs) is preferentially lost, as appears to be the case in both aging and noise-damaged cochleas. Because low-SR fibers may also be important drivers of the medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) and middle-ear muscle reflex (MEMR), these reflexes might be sensitive metrics of cochlear neuropathy. To test this hypothesis, we measured reflex strength and reflex threshold in mice with noise-induced neuropathy, as documented by confocal analysis of immunostained cochlear whole-mounts. To assay the MOCR, we measured contra-noise modulation of ipsilateral distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) before and after the administration of curare to block the MEMR or curare + strychnine to also block the MOCR. The modulation of DPOAEs was 1) dominated by the MEMR in anesthetized mice, with a smaller contribution from the MOCR, and 2) significantly attenuated in neuropathic mice, but only when the MEMR was intact. We then measured MEMR growth functions by monitoring contra-noise induced changes in the wideband reflectance of chirps presented to the ipsilateral ear. We found 1) that the changes in wideband reflectance were mediated by the MEMR alone, and 2) that MEMR threshold was elevated and its maximum amplitude was attenuated in neuropathic mice. These data suggest that the MEMR may be valuable in the early detection of cochlear neuropathy. PMID:26657094

  14. The middle ear muscle reflex in the diagnosis of cochlear neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Valero, Michelle D; Hancock, Kenneth E; Liberman, M Charles

    2016-02-01

    Cochlear neuropathy, i.e. the loss of auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) without loss of hair cells, may cause hearing deficits without affecting threshold sensitivity, particularly if the subset of ANFs with high thresholds and low spontaneous rates (SRs) is preferentially lost, as appears to be the case in both aging and noise-damaged cochleas. Because low-SR fibers may also be important drivers of the medial olivocochlear reflex (MOCR) and middle-ear muscle reflex (MEMR), these reflexes might be sensitive metrics of cochlear neuropathy. To test this hypothesis, we measured reflex strength and reflex threshold in mice with noise-induced neuropathy, as documented by confocal analysis of immunostained cochlear whole-mounts. To assay the MOCR, we measured contra-noise modulation of ipsilateral distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) before and after the administration of curare to block the MEMR or curare + strychnine to also block the MOCR. The modulation of DPOAEs was 1) dominated by the MEMR in anesthetized mice, with a smaller contribution from the MOCR, and 2) significantly attenuated in neuropathic mice, but only when the MEMR was intact. We then measured MEMR growth functions by monitoring contra-noise induced changes in the wideband reflectance of chirps presented to the ipsilateral ear. We found 1) that the changes in wideband reflectance were mediated by the MEMR alone, and 2) that MEMR threshold was elevated and its maximum amplitude was attenuated in neuropathic mice. These data suggest that the MEMR may be valuable in the early detection of cochlear neuropathy.

  15. Reflex inhibition of cutaneous and muscle vasoconstrictor neurons during stimulation of cutaneous and muscle nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Kirillova-Woytke, Irina; Baron, Ralf; Jänig, Wilfrid

    2014-05-01

    Cutaneous (CVC) and muscle (MVC) vasoconstrictor neurons exhibit typical reflex patterns to physiological stimulation of somatic and visceral afferent neurons. Here we tested the hypothesis that CVC neurons are inhibited by stimulation of cutaneous nociceptors but not of muscle nociceptors and that MVC neurons are inhibited by stimulation of muscle nociceptors but not of cutaneous nociceptors. Activity in the vasoconstrictor neurons was recorded from postganglionic axons isolated from the sural nerve or the lateral gastrocnemius-soleus nerve in anesthetized rats. The nociceptive afferents were excited by mechanical stimulation of the toes of the ipsilateral hindpaw (skin), by hypertonic saline injected into the ipsi- or contralateral gastrocnemius-soleus muscle, or by heat or noxious cold stimuli applied to the axons in the common peroneal nerve or tibial nerve. The results show that CVC neurons are inhibited by noxious stimulation of skin but not by noxious stimulation of skeletal muscle and that MVC neurons are inhibited by noxious stimulation of skeletal muscle but not by noxious stimulation of skin. These inhibitory reflexes are mostly lateralized and are most likely organized in the spinal cord. Stimulation of nociceptive cold-sensitive afferents does not elicit inhibitory or excitatory reflexes in CVC or MVC neurons. The reflex inhibition of activity in CVC or MVC neurons generated by stimulation of nociceptive cutaneous or muscle afferents during tissue injury leads to local increase of blood flow, resulting in an increase of transport of immunocompetent cells, proteins, and oxygen to the site of injury and enhancing the processes of healing.

  16. Co-contraction modifies the stretch reflex elicited in muscles shortened by a joint perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Gwyn N.; MacKinnon, Colum D.; Trumbower, Randy; Perreault, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Simultaneous contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles acting about a joint influences joint stiffness and stability. Although several studies have shown that reflexes in the muscle lengthened by a joint perturbation are modulated during co-contraction, little attention has been given to reflex regulation in the antagonist (shortened) muscle. The goal of the present study was to determine whether co-contraction gives rise to altered reflex regulation across the joint by examining reflexes in the muscle shortened by a joint perturbation. Reflexes were recorded from electromyographic activity in elbow flexors and extensors while positional perturbations to the elbow joint were applied. Perturbations were delivered during isolated activation of the flexor or extensor muscles as well as during flexor and extensor co-contraction. Across the group, the shortening reflex in the elbow extensor switched from suppression during isolated extensor muscle activation to facilitation during co-contraction. The shortening reflex in the elbow flexor remained suppressive during co-contraction but was significantly smaller compared to the response obtained during isolated elbow flexor activation. This response in the shortened muscle was graded by the level of activation in the lengthened muscle. The lengthening reflex did not change during co-contraction. These results support the idea that reflexes are regulated across multiple muscles around a joint. We speculate that the facilitatory response in the shortened muscle arises through a fast-conducting oligosynaptic pathway involving Ib interneurons. PMID:20878148

  17. Co-contraction modifies the stretch reflex elicited in muscles shortened by a joint perturbation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gwyn N; MacKinnon, Colum D; Trumbower, Randy; Perreault, Eric J

    2010-11-01

    Simultaneous contraction of agonist and antagonist muscles acting about a joint influences joint stiffness and stability. Although several studies have shown that reflexes in the muscle lengthened by a joint perturbation are modulated during co-contraction, little attention has been given to reflex regulation in the antagonist (shortened) muscle. The goal of the present study was to determine whether co-contraction gives rise to altered reflex regulation across the joint by examining reflexes in the muscle shortened by a joint perturbation. Reflexes were recorded from electromyographic activity in elbow flexors and extensors while positional perturbations to the elbow joint were applied. Perturbations were delivered during isolated activation of the flexor or extensor muscles as well as during flexor and extensor co-contraction. Across the group, the shortening reflex in the elbow extensor switched from suppression during isolated extensor muscle activation to facilitation during co-contraction. The shortening reflex in the elbow flexor remained suppressive during co-contraction but was significantly smaller compared to the response obtained during isolated elbow flexor activation. This response in the shortened muscle was graded by the level of activation in the lengthened muscle. The lengthening reflex did not change during co-contraction. These results support the idea that reflexes are regulated across multiple muscles around a joint. We speculate that the facilitatory response in the shortened muscle arises through a fast-conducting oligosynaptic pathway involving Ib interneurons.

  18. Topographical effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the H-reflex of the triceps surae muscles.

    PubMed

    Goulet, C; Arsenault, A B; Bourbonnais, D; Levin, M F

    1994-01-01

    The present study was conducted on eight normal subjects in order to evaluate the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS); 99 Hz, 250 μs pulse duration, applied over either the common peroneal (CPN) or sural nerve, on the H-reflex of the soleus (SO), gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) muscles. Within each session, SO, GL and GM H-reflexes were recorded before (for 5 min), during (for 30 min) and after (for 10 min) TENS was applied at twice the sensory threshold for perception. It was found that, on average, while the stimulation was administered on the CPN: (a) the GL H-reflex amplitude increased by 40% (Friedman test: χ(2) = 11.71, P < 0.05); (b) the SO H-reflex decreased (≥ 10% H(ctrl)), although not in a statistically significant manner, in five of eight subjects; and (c) the GM H-reflex remained, overall, relatively stable. No significant effects of TENS over the sural nerve were found on any of the investigated muscles. The finding of increased H-reflex amplitudes in GL during TENS made it less likely that CPN stimulation had reciprocal inhibitory effects. However, such an increase could be attributed to a selective effect (such as a decrease in the recruitment threshold) on type II motoneurons of the GL. Furthermore, the topographical effects observed on the GL during TENS may reflect selective local effects due to stimulation of a sensory branch of the CPN, the lateral sural nerve, which mainly innervates the skin overlying the GL. The absence of effects noted on the GM during TENS further supports this hypothesis as the cutaneous afferents overlying that muscle were not stimulated. The repetitive cutaneous stimulation over the sural nerve, at the lateral malleolus, may have been too distal to stimulate the cutaneous receptors overlying the SO.

  19. The role of gingival mechanoreceptors in the reflex control of human jaw-closing muscles.

    PubMed

    Louca, C; Vidgeon, S D; Cadden, S W; Linden, R W

    1998-01-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) experiments were undertaken to investigate the jaw reflexes evoked by activation of gingival receptors in 12 humans. EMG recordings were made from an active masseter muscle whilst ramp-plateau mechanical stimuli were applied to the gingiva. Stimuli with a constant rate of rise (0.2 N/msec) and a variable plateau force (up to 2 N), evoked a complex set of short- and long-latency inhibitory and excitatory responses. These occurred as a sequence of inhibition-excitation-inhibition-excitation, although not all of these elements were seen on every occasion. The median thresholds of these four responses ranged from 0.5 to 1 N but overall there were no significant differences between them (p > 0.05, Friedman's ANOVA). In other experiments, the same reflexes were recorded in response to application to the gingiva of 1 N ramp-plateau stimuli (5 msec rise time) and 1 N tap stimuli applied to the adjacent tooth. The application of a local anaesthetic agent to the stimulated gingiva produced reductions in the mean magnitude of almost all the responses but these were significant (p < 0.05; ANOVA) only for the long-latency inhibitions evoked by ramping the gingiva and the long-latency excitations evoked by either stimulus. It is concluded that mechanoreceptors in the gingiva can mediate long-latency inhibitory and excitatory jaw reflexes, and that these receptors may also contribute to long-latency reflexes evoked by tapping teeth. The scarcity of effects of gingival anaesthesia on the short-latency reflexes may be due to such responses being mediated by receptors deeper in the periodontium.

  20. Frequency response of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Patrick A; Dakin, Christopher J; Vardy, Alistair N; Happee, Riender; Siegmund, Gunter P; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2013-10-01

    Vestibular pathways form short-latency disynaptic connections with neck motoneurons, whereas they form longer-latency disynaptic and polysynaptic connections with lower limb motoneurons. We quantified frequency responses of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles to explain between-muscle differences. Two hypotheses were evaluated: 1) that muscle-specific motor-unit properties influence the bandwidth of vestibular reflexes; and 2) that frequency responses of vestibular reflexes differ between neck, back, and lower limb muscles because of neural filtering. Subjects were exposed to electrical vestibular stimuli over bandwidths of 0-25 and 0-75 Hz while recording activity in sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis, erector spinae, soleus, and medial gastrocnemius muscles. Coherence between stimulus and muscle activity revealed markedly larger vestibular reflex bandwidths in neck muscles (0-70 Hz) than back (0-15 Hz) or lower limb muscles (0-20 Hz). In addition, vestibular reflexes in back and lower limb muscles undergo low-pass filtering compared with neck-muscle responses, which span a broader dynamic range. These results suggest that the wider bandwidth of head-neck biomechanics requires a vestibular influence on neck-muscle activation across a larger dynamic range than lower limb muscles. A computational model of vestibular afferents and a motoneuron pool indicates that motor-unit properties are not primary contributors to the bandwidth filtering of vestibular reflexes in different muscles. Instead, our experimental findings suggest that pathway-dependent neural filtering, not captured in our model, contributes to these muscle-specific responses. Furthermore, gain-phase discontinuities in the neck-muscle vestibular reflexes provide evidence of destructive interaction between different reflex components, likely via indirect vestibular-motor pathways.

  1. The Muscle Stretch Reflex throughout the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Ellen; Hameed, Farah; Dhaher, Yasin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The significant sex-disparity in sports-related knee injuries may be due to underlying differences in motor control. While the development of sex-specific movement patterns is likely multi-factorial, this study specifically focuses on the potential modulatory role of sex hormones. Purpose To investigate the muscle stretch reflex (MSR) across the menstrual cycle. We hypothesized that the MSR would fluctuate throughout the menstrual cycle, and that the lowest response would correspond with peak concentrations of estrogen. Methods Nineteen healthy women ages 18–35 participated in this study: 8 eumenorrheic women and 11 women taking oral contraceptives. Serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations, anterior knee laxity (AKL) and the MSR response of the quadriceps muscles were measured three times during the menstrual cycle. Results The MSR response of the RF varied significantly across the menstrual cycle in both groups. Specifically, the RF MSR response was 2.4 times lower during the peri-ovulatory phase when compared to the luteal phase (P = 0.007). The same trend was seen in the VM, but this did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.070). The MSR response of the VL did not change significantly across the menstrual cycle (P = 0.494). A mixed model comparison did not show an association between endogenous concentrations of estradiol and progesterone, exposure to hormonal contraceptives or AKL and the MSR response for any muscle. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the RF MSR response varies throughout the menstrual cycle with the lowest response around the time of ovulation. Additional research is needed to clarify the exact relationship between sex hormones, AKL and the MSR response and to determine the specific origin of the change along the monosynaptic reflex arc. PMID:24091990

  2. A stretch reflex in extraocular muscles of species purportedly lacking muscle spindles

    PubMed Central

    Dancause, Numa; Taylor, Michael D.; Plautz, Erik J.; Radel, Jeffery D.; Whittaker, Thomas; Nudo, Randolph J.; Feldman, Anatol G.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally assumed that proprioceptive feedback plays a crucial role in limb posture and movement. However, the role of afferent signals from extraocular muscles (EOM) in the control of eye movement has been a matter of continuous debate. These muscles have atypical sensory receptors in several species and it has been proposed that they are not supported by stretch reXexes. We recorded electromyographic activity of EOM during passive rotations of the eye in sedated rats and squirrel monkeys and observed typical stretch reXexes in these muscles. Results suggest that there is a similarity in the reXexive control of limb and eye movement, despite substantial differences in their biomechanics and sensory receptors. Like in some limb skeletal muscles, the stretch reflex in EOM in the investigated species might be mediated by other length-sensitive receptors, rather than muscle spindles. PMID:17216145

  3. Low-threshold, short-latency cutaneous reflexes during fictive locomotion in the "semi-chronic" spinal cat.

    PubMed

    LaBella, L A; Niechaj, A; Rossignol, S

    1992-01-01

    Low-threshold, short-latency cutaneous reflexes evoked in ipsilateral hindlimb motor nerves were examined during fictive locomotion. Locomotion in 11 anaemically decerebrated spinal animals (1-3 weeks after transection at T13-L1) was induced by administration of clonidine, L-dopa and nialamide; by administration of the latter two drugs only; or by exteroceptive stimulation in the absence of any drugs. The caudal and lateral cutaneous sural, caudal cutaneous femoral, saphenous and superficial peroneal nerves were stimulated at low threshold (1.5-3 T). Pooled results from all combinations of cutaneous nerves stimulated and muscle nerves recorded show that the initial response was excitatory in 40 of 50 triceps surae and 17 of 20 semitendinosus (St) electroneurograms (ENGs). These excitatory responses occurred at latencies that ranged from 5 to 15 ms and tended to be maximal during the motor nerve's active period in the step cycle (i.e. they were modulated in a phase-dependent manner). Only three inhibitory responses (9-12 ms earliest latency) were encountered in total: in two St ENGs of one animal and in one lateral gastrocnemius-soleus ENG of a different animal. In two animals a "second" excitatory response (15-25 ms latency) was sometimes recorded in triceps surae and St nerves and, interestingly, could be modulated out of phase with the early response. Weak short-latency excitatory reflexes were also found in contralateral St ENGs when examined. Finally, among medial gastrocnemius, lateral gastrocnemius and soleus nerves, excitatory responses due to stimulation of any particular cutaneous nerve tended to be modulated similarly but were of consistently different amplitude among the three. This finding, together with the general observation that excitatory reflexes produced by stimulation of a particular cutaneous nerve were modulated similarly in extensors (or flexors) of different animals, suggests that spinal circuits generating locomotion may indeed exert a

  4. Introduction and validation of a less painful algorithm to estimate the nociceptive flexion reflex threshold.

    PubMed

    Lichtner, Gregor; Golebiewski, Anna; Schneider, Martin H; von Dincklage, Falk

    2015-05-22

    The nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) is a widely used tool to investigate spinal nociception for scientific and diagnostic purposes, but its clinical use is currently limited due to the painful measurement procedure, especially restricting its applicability for patients suffering from chronic pain disorders. Here we introduce a less painful algorithm to assess the NFR threshold. Application of this new algorithm leads to a reduction of subjective pain ratings by over 30% compared to the standard algorithm. We show that the reflex threshold estimates resulting from application of the new algorithm can be used interchangeably with those of the standard algorithm after adjusting for the constant difference between the algorithms. Furthermore, we show that the new algorithm can be applied at shorter interstimulus intervals than are commonly used with the standard algorithm, since reflex threshold values remain unchanged and no habituation effects occur when reducing the interstimulus interval for the new algorithm down to 3s. Finally we demonstrate the utility of the new algorithm to investigate the modulation of nociception through different states of attention. Taken together, the here presented new algorithm could increase the utility of the NFR for investigation of nociception in subjects who were previously not able to endure the measurement procedure, such as chronic pain patients.

  5. Temporal muscle activation assessment by ultrasound imaging during flexor withdrawal reflex and voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Jose, Gomez-Tames; Shuto, Nakamura; Jose, Gonzalez; Wenwei, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Activating flexor reflexes by electrical stimulation has been used as a mechanism to initiate the swing phase or to enhance it for spinal cord injured patients. However, it is necessary to know their contraction dynamics in order to artificially induce them at the right moment of a walking cycle. This requires understanding the temporal activation pattern of both surface and deep muscles simultaneously. This study aimed at developing a system to measure and analyze the temporal activation of both surface and deep muscles during voluntary contraction and flexor reflexes (also called withdrawal reflexes) using ultrasound imaging. A set of experiments were done to verify the validity of the system, while exploring the temporal pattern of muscle activation during flexor reflexes. As a result, we were able to quantify the surface and deep muscle activity by measuring the muscle thickness, pennation angle and long-axis displacement, from the ultrasound images.

  6. Dynamic control of muscle stiffness and H reflex modulation during hopping and jumping in man.

    PubMed Central

    Dyhre-Poulsen, P; Simonsen, E B; Voigt, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The objective of the study was to evaluate the functional effects of reflexes on muscle mechanics during natural voluntary movements. The excitability of the H (Hoffmann) reflex was used as a measure of the excitability of the central component of the stretch reflex. 2. We recorded EMG, ground reaction forces and the H reflex in the soleus muscle in humans while landing from a downward jump, during drop jumping and during hopping. The movements were also recorded by high-speed cinematography. 3. The EMG pattern was adapted to the motor task. When landing the EMG in the soleus muscle and in the anterior tibial muscle showed preinnervation and alternating activity after touch down. When hopping there was little preinnervation in the soleus muscle, and the activity was initiated about 45 ms after touch down by a peak and continued unbroken until lift off. In the drop jumps the EMG pattern depended on the jumping style used by the subject. 4. The H reflex in the soleus muscle was strongly modulated in a manner appropriate to the requirements of the motor task. During landing from a downward jump the H reflex was low at touch down whereas while hopping it was high at touch down. During drop jumping it was variable and influenced by the jumping technique. 5. Muscle stiffness in the ankle joint was negative after touch down when landing, but always positive when hopping. 6. It is suggested that during landing the alternating EMG pattern after touch down was programmed and little influenced by reflexes. During hopping reflexes could contribute to the initial peak and the EMG during lift off. 7. The programmed EMG activity and the suppression of the H reflex while landing probably contribute to the development of the negative stiffness and change the muscles from a spring to a damping unit. PMID:1890636

  7. Anticipatory modulation of neck muscle reflex responses induced by mechanical perturbations of the human forehead.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, Rieko; Kimura, Toshitaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Akai, Masami; Torii, Suguru; Suzuki, Shuji

    2004-08-12

    The aim of this study was to test whether anticipation of upcoming head blow stimuli, which elicit reflex responses in the neck muscle, makes the reflex responses greater or not. In nine healthy subjects the reflex responses were elicited in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle in the eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) conditions, which corresponded to the predictable and unpredictable conditions, respectively. The subjects were instructed not to resist the perturbations after the impact. The results demonstrated that the reflex response of the SCM muscle was significantly smaller in the predictable EO condition than in the unpredictable EC condition (P < 0.05), although no significant differences were observed in either the background EMG activities or the head accelerations. Further, this effect of anticipation was observed only in the later reflex EMG component, which most probably mediated the stretch reflex pathway. In contrast, no significant difference was observed in the early component, which was presumed to be the vestibular-collic reflex. The reduced stretch reflex response was suggested to be functionally relevant to the task requirement, i.e., to let the neck extension movement occur, and not to resist after the impact of the head blow. It was concluded that the anticipation has an effect on reducing the stretch reflex responses in the neck muscle, but does not have any effect on the presumed vestibular-collic reflex under the present experimental paradigm. It is suggested that the gain of the stretch reflex pathway is modulated by anticipatory information of upcoming mechanical event.

  8. Influence of delayed muscle reflexes on spinal stability: model-based predictions allow alternative interpretations of experimental data.

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, Anne; Puta, Christian; Anders, Christoph; de Lussanet, Marc H E; Wagner, Heiko

    2013-10-01

    Model-based calculations indicate that reflex delay and reflex gain are both important for spinal stability. Experimental results demonstrate that chronic low back pain is associated with delayed muscle reflex responses of trunk muscles. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of such time-delayed reflexes on the stability using a simple biomechanical model. Additionally, we compared the model-based predictions with experimental data from chronic low back pain patients and healthy controls using surface-electromyography. Linear stability methods were applied to the musculoskeletal model, which was extended with a time-delayed reflex model. Lateral external perturbations were simulated around equilibrium to investigate the effects of reflex delay and gain on the stability of the human lumbar spine. The model simulations predicted that increased reflex delays require a reduction of the reflex gain to avoid spinal instability. The experimental data support this dependence for the investigated abdominal muscles in chronic low back pain patients and healthy control subjects. Reflex time-delay and gain dependence showed that a delayed reflex latency could have relevant influence on spinal stability, if subjects do not adapt their reflex amplitudes. Based on the model and the experimental results, the relationship between muscle reflex response latency and the maximum of the reflex amplitude should be considered for evaluation of (patho) physiological data. We recommend that training procedures should focus on speeding up the delayed reflex response as well as on increasing the amplitude of these reflexes.

  9. Parallel reflex pathways from flexor muscle afferents evoking resetting and flexion enhancement during fictive locomotion and scratch in the cat.

    PubMed

    Stecina, Katinka; Quevedo, Jorge; McCrea, David A

    2005-11-15

    Reflex actions of muscle afferents in hindlimb flexor nerves were examined on ipsilateral motoneurone activity recorded in peripheral nerves during midbrain stimulation-evoked fictive locomotion and during fictive scratch in decerebrate cats. Trains of stimuli (15-30 shocks at 200 Hz) were delivered during the flexion phase at intensities sufficient to activate both group I and II afferents (5 times threshold, T). In many preparations tibialis anterior (TA) nerve stimulation terminated ongoing flexion and reset the locomotor cycle to extension (19/31 experiments) while extensor digitorum longus (EDL) stimulation increased and prolonged the ongoing flexor phase activity (20/33 preparations). The effects of sartorius, iliopsoas and peroneus longus muscle afferent stimulation were qualitatively similar to those of EDL nerve. Resetting to extension was seen only with higher intensity stimulation (5T) while ongoing flexor activity was often enhanced at group I intensity (2T) stimulation. The effects of flexor nerve stimulation were qualitatively similar during fictive scratch. Reflex reversals were consistently observed in some fictive locomotor preparations. In those cases, EDL stimulation produced a resetting to extension and TA stimulation prolonged the ongoing flexion phase. Occasionally reflex reversals occurred spontaneously during only one of several stimulus presentations. The variable and opposite actions of flexor afferents on the locomotor step cycle indicate the existence of parallel spinal reflex pathways. A hypothetical organization of reflex pathways from flexor muscle afferents to the spinal pattern generator networks with competing actions of group I and group II afferents on the flexor and extensor portions of this central circuitry is proposed.

  10. Reflex (unloading) and (defensive capitulation) responses in human neck muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Corna, S; Ito, Y; von Brevern, M; Bronstein, A M; Gresty, M A

    1996-01-01

    1. We studied unloading and stretch responses in human neck muscle during manoeuvres in which the head pulled against a 2-3 kg weight which could be abruptly released or applied electromagnetically. 2. During head tracking in pitch, unloading of the weight induced inhibition of EMG in the contracting sternocleidomastoid at a mean latency of 24.9 ms in normal subjects and at 41 ms in bilateral labyrinthine-defective subjects, with antagonist (trapezius) excitation at 30.5 and 41.3 ms, respectively. During tracking in yaw, unloading induced inhibition in the contracting splenius capitis (SpC) at a mean latency of 20.4 ms in normal subjects and 25 ms in labyrinthine-defective subjects, with excitation in the antagonist SpC at 22.2 and 24 ms, respectively. 3. If subjects tried to resist an unexpected sideways tug on the head a burst occurred in the stretched SpC at a mean latency of 53.5 ms. When subjects relaxed there was excitation of the shortening of SpC at 75.9 ms, which assisted the imposed motion and is possibly a "defensive reflex". PMID:8910241

  11. Characterization of bulbospongiosus muscle reflexes activated by urethral distension in male rats.

    PubMed

    Tanahashi, Masayuki; Karicheti, Venkateswarlu; Thor, Karl B; Marson, Lesley

    2012-10-01

    The urethrogenital reflex (UGR) is used as a surrogate model of the autonomic and somatic nerve and muscle activity that accompanies ejaculation. The UGR is evoked by distension of the urethra and activation of penile afferents. The current study compares two methods of elevating urethral intraluminal pressure in spinalized, anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 60). The first method, penile extension UGR, involves extracting the penis from the foreskin, so that urethral pressure rises due to a natural anatomical flexure in the penis. The second method, penile clamping UGR, involves penile extension UGR with the addition of clamping of the glans penis. Groups of animals were prepared that either received no additional treatment, surgical shams, or received bilateral nerve cuts (4 nerve cut groups): either the pudendal sensory nerve branch (SbPN), the pelvic nerves, the hypogastric nerves, or all three nerves. Penile clamping UGR was characterized by multiple bursts, monitored by electromyography (EMG) of the bulbospongiosus muscle (BSM) accompanied by elevations in urethral pressure. The penile clamping UGR activity declined across multiple trials and eventually resulted in only a single BSM burst, indicating desensitization. In contrast, the penile extension UGR, without penile clamping, evoked only a single BSM EMG burst that showed no desensitization. Thus, the UGR is composed of two BSM patterns: an initial single burst, termed urethrobulbospongiosus (UBS) reflex and a subsequent multiple bursting pattern (termed ejaculation-like response, ELR) that was only induced with penile clamping urethral occlusion. Transection of the SbPN eliminated the ELR in the penile clamping model, but the single UBS reflex remained in both the clamping and extension models. Pelvic nerve (PelN) transection increased the threshold for inducing BSM activation with both methods of occlusion but actually unmasked an ELR in the penile extension method. Hypogastric nerve (HgN) cuts

  12. Reflex influences on muscle spindle activity in relaxed human leg muscles.

    PubMed

    Gandevia, S C; Miller, S; Aniss, A M; Burke, D

    1986-07-01

    The study was designed to determine whether low-threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents from the foot reflexly activate gamma-motoneurons innervating relaxed muscles of the leg. In 15 experiments multiunit recordings were made from 21 nerve fascicles innervating triceps surae or tibialis anterior. In a further nine experiments the activity of 19 identified single muscle spindle afferents was recorded, 13 from triceps surae, 5 from tibialis anterior, and 1 from extensor digitorum longus. Trains of electrical stimuli (5 stimuli, 300 Hz) were delivered to the sural nerve at the ankle (intensity, twice sensory threshold) and the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle (intensity, 1.1 times motor threshold for the small muscles of the foot). In addition, a tap on the appropriate tendon at varying times after the stimuli was used to assess the dynamic responsiveness of the afferents under study. The conditioning electrical stimuli did not change the discharge of single spindle afferents. Recordings of rectified and averaged multiunit activity also revealed no change in the overall level of background neural activity following the electrical stimuli. The afferent responses to tendon taps did not differ significantly whether or not they were preceded by stimulation of the sural or posterior tibial nerves. These results suggest that low-threshold afferents from the foot do not produce significant activation of fusimotor neurons in relaxed leg muscles, at least as judged by their ability to alter the discharge of muscle spindle afferents. As there may be no effective background activity in fusimotor neurons innervating relaxed human muscles, it is possible that these inputs from the foot could influence the fusimotor system during voluntary contractions when the fusimotor neurons have been brought to firing threshold. In one subject trains of stimuli were delivered to the posterior tibial nerve at painful levels (30 times motor threshold). They produced an acceleration of the

  13. Functional role of muscle reflexes for force generation in the decerebrate walking cat.

    PubMed

    Stein, R B; Misiaszek, J E; Pearson, K G

    2000-06-15

    To quantify the importance of reflexes due to muscle length changes in generating force during walking, we studied high decerebrate cats that walked on a treadmill. One leg was denervated except for the triceps surae and a few other selected muscles. The triceps surae muscles are ankle extensor muscles that attach to the Achilles' tendon which was cut and connected to a muscle puller. In some steps the EMG activity triggered the puller to move the muscle through the pattern of length changes that are normally produced by ankle movements in intact cats walking over ground (simulated walking). In other steps the muscles were held isometrically. The EMG and force produced during the two types of steps were compared. On average about 50 % more EMG was generated during the E2 part of the simulated stance phase in the triceps surae muscles, but not in other muscles studied. Force was increased significantly over the entire stance phase by about 20 %, when muscle stretches simulating walking were applied. However, during much of the stance phase the triceps surae muscles are shortening and so would produce less force. The effect of shortening was assessed in control experiments in which these muscles were stimulated at a constant frequency, either isometrically or during simulated walking movements. By combining data from the walking and control experiments, we estimate that about 35 % of the force produced in the cat ankle extensors during stance is produced by reflexes due to muscle length changes. Other sensory inputs may also contribute to force production, but the total reflex contribution will vary under different conditions of speed, length, loading, task difficulty, etc. Since a substantial percentage of the force in the stance phase of walking is normally produced by muscle reflexes, this force can be continuously adjusted up or down, if the muscles receive extra stretch or unloading during a particular step cycle.

  14. Simultaneous measurement of noise-activated middle-ear muscle reflex and stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Shawn S; Keefe, Douglas H

    2006-06-01

    Otoacoustic emissions serve as a noninvasive probe of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex. Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) elicited by a low-level probe tone may be the optimal type of emission for studying MOC effects because at low levels, the probe itself does not elicit the MOC reflex [Guinan et al. (2003) J. Assoc. Res. Otolaryngol. 4:521]. Based on anatomical considerations, the MOC reflex activated by ipsilateral acoustic stimulation (mediated by the crossed olivocochlear bundle) is predicted to be stronger than the reflex to contralateral stimulation. Broadband noise is an effective activator of the MOC reflex; however, it is also an effective activator of the middle-ear muscle (MEM) reflex, which can make results difficult to interpret. The MEM reflex may be activated at lower levels than measured clinically, and most previous human studies have not explicitly included measurements to rule out MEM reflex contamination. The current study addressed these issues using a higher-frequency SFOAE probe tone to test for cochlear changes mediated by the MOC reflex, while simultaneously monitoring the MEM reflex using a low-frequency probe tone. Broadband notched noise was presented ipsilaterally at various levels to elicit probe-tone shifts. Measurements are reported for 15 normal-hearing subjects. With the higher-frequency probe near 1.5 kHz, only 20% of subjects showed shifts consistent with an MOC reflex in the absence of an MEM-induced shift. With the higher-frequency probe near 3.5 kHz, up to 40% of subjects showed shifts in the absence of an MEM-induced shift. However, these responses had longer time courses than expected for MOC-induced shifts, and may have been dominated by other cochlear processes, rather than MOC reflex. These results suggest caution in the interpretation of effects observed using ipsilaterally presented acoustic activators intended to excite the MOC reflex.

  15. Effects of opioid blockade on nociceptive flexion reflex thresholds and nociceptive responding in hypertensive and normotensive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Louisa; Ring, Christopher; France, Christopher R.; McIntyre, David; Martin, Una

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension and risk for hypertension have been associated with reduced pain sensitivity. It has been hypothesised that endogenous opioids contribute to this hypertensive hypoalgesia. The nociceptive flexion reflex can be used as a tool to investigate modulation of nociceptive transmission at spinal level. The current study employed a double-blind placebo-controlled design to compare the effects of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and placebo on nociceptive flexion reflex thresholds and nociceptive responding in unmedicated patients with essential hypertension and normotensive individuals. Neither nociceptive flexion reflex thresholds nor nociceptive responding differed between hypertensives and normotensives during placebo or naltrexone. These data provide no support for the hypothesis that essential hypertension is characterised by higher levels endogenous opioids in the central nervous system and reveal no association between blood pressure status and nociceptive flexion reflex responses. PMID:18436318

  16. Role of reflex dynamics in spinal stability: intrinsic muscle stiffness alone is insufficient for stability.

    PubMed

    Moorhouse, Kevin M; Granata, Kevin P

    2007-01-01

    Spinal stability is related to both the intrinsic stiffness of active muscle as well as neuromuscular reflex response. However, existing analyses of spinal stability ignore the role of the reflex response, focusing solely on the intrinsic muscle stiffness associated with voluntary activation patterns in the torso musculature. The goal of this study was to empirically characterize the role of reflex components of spinal stability during voluntary trunk extension exertions. Pseudorandom position perturbations of the torso and associated driving forces were recorded in 11 healthy adults. Nonlinear systems-identification analyses of the measured data provided an estimate of total systems dynamics that explained 81% of the movement variability. Proportional intrinsic response was less than zero in more than 60% of the trials, e.g. mean value of P(INT) during the 20% maximum voluntary exertion trunk extension exertions -415+/-354N/m. The negative value indicated that the intrinsic muscle stiffness was not sufficient to stabilize the spine without reflex response. Reflexes accounted for 42% of the total stabilizing trunk stiffness. Both intrinsic and reflex components of stiffness increased significantly with trunk extension effort. Results reveal that reflex dynamics are a necessary component in the stabilizing control of spinal stability.

  17. Role of Reflex Dynamics in Spinal Stability: Intrinsic Muscle Stiffness Alone is Insufficient for Stability

    PubMed Central

    Moorhouse, Kevin M.; Granata, Kevin P.

    2006-01-01

    Spinal stability is related to both the intrinsic stiffness of active muscle as well as neuromuscular reflex response. However, existing analyses of spinal stability ignore the role of the reflex response, focusing solely on the intrinsic muscle stiffness associated with voluntary activation patterns in the torso musculature. The goal of this study was to empirically characterize the role of reflex components of spinal stability during voluntary trunk extension exertions. Pseudorandom position perturbations of the torso and associated driving forces were recorded in 11 healthy adults. Nonlinear systems-identification analyses of the measured data provided an estimate of total systems dynamics that explained 81% of the movement variability. Proportional intrinsic response was less than zero in more than 60% of the trials, e.g. mean value of PINT during the 20% maximum voluntary exertion trunk extension exertions 415±354 N/m. The negative value indicated that the intrinsic muscle stiffness was not sufficient to stabilize the spine without reflex response. Reflexes accounted for 42% of the total stabilizing trunk stiffness. Both intrinsic and reflex components of stiffness increased significantly with trunk extension effort. Results reveal that reflex dynamics are a necessary component in the stabilizing control of spinal stability. PMID:16782106

  18. Gating of trigemino-facial reflex from low-threshold trigeminal and extratrigeminal cutaneous fibres in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A; Scarpini, C

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the size of the test components (R1 and R2) of the trigemino-facial reflex were studied after electrical subliminal conditioning stimulation were applied to the trigeminal, median and sural nerves. After conditioning activation of the trigeminal nerve (below the reflex threshold), the early R1 reflex component showed phasic facilitation, peaking at about 50 ms of interstimulus delay, followed by a long-lasting inhibition recovering at 300-400 ms. The same conditioning stimulation resulted in a monotonic inhibition of the late R2, starting at 15-20 ms, with a maximum at 100-150 ms and lasting 300-400 ms. Intensity threshold for both the R1 and R2 changes ranged from 0.90 to 0.95 times the perception threshold. A similar longlasting inhibition of the R2 reflex response was also seen after conditioning stimulation applied to low-threshold cutaneous afferents of the median and sural nerves. The minimum effective conditioning-test interval was 25-30 ms and 40-45 ms respectively and lasted 600-700 ms. By contrast the early R1 reflex response exhibited a slight long-lasting facilitation with a time course similar to that of the R2 inhibition. The threshold intensity to obtain facilitation of the R1 and inhibition of the R2 test responses after conditioning volley in the median and sural nerves was similar and ranged from 0.9 to 1.2 times the perception threshold. These results demonstrate that low-threshold cutaneous afferents from trigeminal and limb nerves exert powerful control on trigeminal reflex pathways, probably via a common neural substrate. There is evidence that, in addition to any post-synaptic mechanism which might be operating, presynaptic control is a primary factor contributing to these changes. Images PMID:1328539

  19. Muscle, reflex and central components in the control of the ankle joint in healthy and spastic man.

    PubMed

    Sinkjaer, T

    1997-01-01

    In understanding the control of the ankle joint during different motor tasks, we have to investigate at least three components, namely the influence of i) the passive and intrinsic properties of the intact and active muscle system around the joint (termed the non-reflex component), ii) the mechanical importance of the stretch reflex in the stretched and unloaded muscles, and iii) the supraspinal control of the stretch reflex. This thesis is dealing with the importance of the three components in healthy and spastic persons during sitting, standing, and walking. The results are based on stretch reflex and H-reflex measurements from the ankle extensor muscles. During stretch reflex experiments the foot was mounted to a platform (portable during walking) from which the ankle joint torque and the position were measured. To elicit a stretch reflex, the ankle joint was rotated by a strong motor connected to the platform. The mechanical importance of the stretch reflex was investigated by measuring the changes in joint torque. Electrically, the stretch reflex was recorded as the compound muscle action potential through bipolar surface EMG electrodes placed over the soleus muscle. During H-reflex experiments, the tibial nerve was stimulated at the popliteal fossa and the H-reflex recorded over the soleus muscle as during stretch reflex experiments. To investigate how the contractile properties of a muscle in humans depend on the history of activation, we investigated the intrinsic stiffness of the ankle extensors in healthy subjects. At matched background contraction in sitting subjects, a prolonged contraction increased the intrinsic muscle stiffness by 49%. Muscle yielding has been considered especially important for understanding the reflex compensation. We found a general lack of muscle yield and a mechanically important non-reflex stiffness of the ankle extensors showing that non-reflex stiffness is a prominent factor in normal movements of the ankle joint. In both

  20. Effects of contraction intensity on muscle fascicle and stretch reflex behavior in the human triceps surae.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Neil J; Peltonen, Jussi; Ishikawa, Masaki; Komi, Paavo V; Avela, Janne; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Voigt, Michael

    2008-07-01

    The aims of this study were to examine changes in the distribution of a stretch to the muscle fascicles with changes in contraction intensity in the human triceps surae and to relate fascicle stretch responses to short-latency stretch reflex behavior. Thirteen healthy subjects were seated in an ankle ergometer, and dorsiflexion stretches (8 degrees ; 250 degrees /s) were applied to the triceps surae at different moment levels (0-100% of maximal voluntary contraction). Surface EMG was recorded in the medial gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis anterior muscles, and ultrasound was used to measure medial gastrocnemius and soleus fascicle lengths. At low forces, reflex amplitudes increased despite a lack of change or even a decrease in fascicle stretch velocities. At high forces, lower fascicle stretch velocities coincided with smaller stretch reflexes. The results revealed a decline in fascicle stretch velocity of over 50% between passive conditions and maximal force levels in the major muscles of the triceps surae. This is likely to be an important factor related to the decline in stretch reflex amplitudes at high forces. Because short-latency stretch reflexes contribute to force production and stiffness regulation of human muscle fibers, a reduction in afferent feedback from muscle spindles could decrease the efficacy of human movements involving the triceps surae, particularly where high force production is required.

  1. Effect of muscle relaxants on experimental jaw-muscle pain and jaw-stretch reflexes: a double-blind and placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Peter; Wang, Kelun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2003-01-01

    A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled three-way cross-over study was performed to investigate the effect of two muscle relaxants (tolperisone hydrochloride and pridinol mesilate) on experimental jaw-muscle pain and jaw-stretch reflexes. Fifteen healthy men participated in three randomised sessions separated by at least 1 week. In each session 300 mg tolperisone, 8 mg pridinol mesilate or placebo was administered orally as a single dose. One hour after drug administration 0.3 ml hypertonic saline (5.8%) was injected into the right masseter to produce muscle pain. Subjects continuously rated their perceived pain intensity on an electronic 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured and short-latency reflex responses were evoked in the pre-contracted (15% maximal voluntary contraction) masseter and temporalis muscles by a standardised stretch device (1 mm displacement, 10 ms ramp time) before (baseline), 1 h after medication (post-drug), during ongoing experimental muscle pain (pain-post-drug), and 15 min after pain had vanished (post-pain). Analysis of variance demonstrated significantly lower VAS peak pain scores (5.9 +/- 0.4 cm) after administration of tolperisone hydrochloride compared with pridinol mesilate (6.8 +/- 0.4 cm) and placebo (6.6 +/- 0.4 cm) (P=0.020). Administration of pridinol mesilate was associated with a significant decrease in PPTs compared with tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo (P=0.002) after medication, but not after experimental jaw-muscle pain. The normalised peak-to-peak amplitude of the stretch reflexes were not significantly influenced by the test medication (P=0.762), but were in all sessions significantly facilitated during ongoing experimental jaw-muscle pain (P=0.034). In conclusion, tolperisone hydrochloride provides a small, albeit significant reduction in the perceived intensity of experimental jaw-muscle pain whereas the present dose had no effect on the short-latency jaw

  2. Reflex Responsiveness of a Human Hand Muscle When Controlling Isometric Force and Joint Position

    PubMed Central

    Maluf, Katrina S.; Barry, Benjamin K.; Riley, Zachary A.; Enoka, Roger M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective This study compared reflex responsiveness of the first dorsal interosseus muscle during two tasks that employ different strategies to stabilize the finger while exerting the same net muscle torque. Methods Healthy human subjects performed two motor tasks that involved either pushing up against a rigid restraint to exert a constant isometric force equal to 20% of maximum, or maintaining a constant angle at the metacarpophalangeal joint while supporting an equivalent inertial load. Each task consisted of six 40-s contractions during which electrical and mechanical stimuli were delivered. Results The amplitude of short and long latency reflex responses to mechanical stretch did not differ significantly between tasks. In contrast, reflexes evoked by electrical stimulation were significantly greater when supporting the inertial load. Conclusions Agonist motor neurons exhibited heightened reflex responsiveness to synaptic input from heteronymous afferents when controlling the position of an inertial load. Task differences in the reflex response to electrical stimulation were not reflected in the response to mechanical perturbation, indicating a difference in the efficacy of the pathways that mediate these effects. Significance Results from this study suggest that modulation of spinal reflex pathways may contribute to differences in the control of force and position during isometric contractions of the first dorsal interosseus muscle. PMID:17646129

  3. Effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes: evidence for increased muscle spindle sensitivity?

    PubMed

    Horslen, Brian C; Murnaghan, Chantelle D; Inglis, J Timothy; Chua, Romeo; Carpenter, Mark G

    2013-08-01

    Standing balance is often threatened in everyday life. These threats typically involve scenarios in which either the likelihood or the consequence of falling is higher than normal. When cats are placed in these scenarios they respond by increasing the sensitivity of muscle spindles imbedded in the leg muscles, presumably to increase balance-relevant afferent information available to the nervous system. At present, it is unknown whether humans also respond to such postural threats by altering muscle spindle sensitivity. Here we present two studies that probed the effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes. In study 1 we manipulated the threat associated with an increased consequence of a fall by having subjects stand at the edge of an elevated surface (3.2 m). In study 2 we manipulated the threat by increasing the likelihood of a fall by occasionally tilting the support surface on which subjects stood. In both scenarios we used Hoffmann (H) and tendon stretch (T) reflexes to probe the spinal stretch reflex circuit of the soleus muscle. We observed increased T-reflex amplitudes and unchanged H-reflex amplitudes in both threat scenarios. These results suggest that the synaptic state of the spinal stretch reflex is unaffected by postural threat and that therefore the muscle spindles activated in the T-reflexes must be more sensitive in the threatening conditions. We propose that this increase in sensitivity may function to satisfy the conflicting needs to restrict movement with threat, while maintaining a certain amount of sensory information related to postural control.

  4. Interaction between vestibulosympathetic and skeletal muscle reflexes on sympathetic activity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence from animals indicates that skeletal muscle afferents activate the vestibular nuclei and that both vestibular and skeletal muscle afferents have inputs to the ventrolateral medulla. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the interaction between the vestibulosympathetic and skeletal muscle reflexes on muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and arterial pressure in humans. MSNA, arterial pressure, and heart rate were measured in 17 healthy subjects in the prone position during three experimental trials. The three trials were 2 min of 1) head-down rotation (HDR) to engage the vestibulosympathetic reflex, 2) isometric handgrip (IHG) at 30% maximal voluntary contraction to activate skeletal muscle afferents, and 3) HDR and IHG performed simultaneously. The order of the three trials was randomized. HDR and IHG performed alone increased total MSNA by 46 +/- 16 and 77 +/- 24 units, respectively (P < 0.01). During the HDR plus IHG trial, MSNA increased 142 +/- 38 units (P < 0.01). This increase was not significantly different from the sum of the individual trials (130 +/- 41 units). This finding was also observed with mean arterial pressure (sum = 21 +/- 2 mmHg and HDR + IHG = 22 +/- 2 mmHg). These findings suggest that there is an additive interaction for MSNA and arterial pressure when the vestibulosympathetic and skeletal muscle reflexes are engaged simultaneously in humans. Therefore, no central modulation exists between these two reflexes with regard to MSNA output in humans.

  5. F response and H reflex analysis of physiological unity of gravity and antigravity muscles in man.

    PubMed

    García, H A; Fisher, M A

    1977-01-01

    Observational differences between reflex (H reflex) and antidromic (F response) activation of segmental motoneurons by a peripheral electrical stimulus are described. In contrast to H reflexes, the percentage of F responses found after a series of stimuli is directly related to the pick-up field of the recording electrode consistent with this response being due to the variable activation of a small fraction of the available motoneuron pool. Despite the differing physiological mechanisms, both F responses and H reflexes can be used to demonstrate similar relative "central excitatory states" for antigravity muscles (i.e. extensors in the lower extremity and flexors in the upper extremity) and their antagonist gravity muscles. H reflexes were elicited not only in their usual location in certain antigravity muscles but also in unusual locations by length/tension changes in agonist and antagonist groups as well as by passive stretch. The data argue for the physiological unity of similarly acting gravity and antigravity muscles as well as supporting a meaningful role of group II afferents in normal segmental motoneuron pool excitability.

  6. Decoupling of stretch reflex and background muscle activity during anticipatory postural adjustments in humans.

    PubMed

    Vedula, Siddharth; Kearney, Robert E; Wagner, Ross; Stapley, Paul J

    2010-08-01

    We studied the evolution of stretch reflexes in relation to background electromyographic (EMG) activity in the soleus muscle preceding the onset of voluntary arm raise movements. Our objective was to investigate if changes in reflex EMG and muscle activity occur simultaneously and are similarly scaled in amplitude. Ten human subjects stood with each foot on pedals able to exert short dorsiflexor pulses during stance. Subjects were asked to product consistent voluntary arm raise movements to a target upon a visual cue. In (1/4) of trials, no pulse perturbations were given, but in the remaining (3/4)'s of all trials pulses were given randomly during a 600-ms period, from 400 ms before until 200 ms after the onset of the movements. Perturbation trials were sorted into 20-ms bins post hoc, and the amplitude of the reflex EMG component was calculated and compared to the EMG activity obtained when no pulses were given. Results showed that despite exhibiting similar profiles over time, the background EMG consistently inhibited before the reflex EMG did. However, times of reactivation (rebound) were variable across subjects, with background EMG activating before reflex for some subjects and vice versa for others. The minimum values of inhibition, time of inhibition and time of rebound for background and reflex EMG measures did not show significant linear correlations when all subjects' data were considered. These results suggest that reflex and background EMG components of anticipatory postural adjustments evolve differently in time and amplitude. This has implications for the independent control of reflexes and voluntary muscle activity.

  7. Central hyperexcitability as measured with nociceptive flexor reflex threshold in chronic musculoskeletal pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lim, Edwin Choon Wyn; Sterling, Michele; Stone, Andrew; Vicenzino, Bill

    2011-08-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal conditions are increasingly conceived as involving altered central nervous system processing, and impaired nociceptive flexor reflex (NFR) appears to reflect altered central nervous system processing. The primary objective was to synthesize the evidence for impaired NFR in these conditions. The secondary objective was to evaluate the NFR stimuli parameters employed by reviewed studies. Electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, PEDro, Google Scholar, and Cochrane library were searched from the mid-1960s to June 2010. Experimental reports were systematically reviewed and meta-analysis (where possible) was performed. NFR thresholds and parameters of NFR stimuli were extracted. Sixteen trials were identified, 11 of which were suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Compared to healthy controls, standardized mean differences in NFR threshold were significantly lower in subjects with primary headache (-0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.77 to -0.13, P=0.005), fibromyalgia (-0.63; 95% CI -0.93 to -0.34, P<0.0001), knee pain (-1.51; 95% CI -2.10 to -0.93, P<0.00001) and whiplash (-0.73; 95% CI -1.11 to -0.35, P=0.0002). Employed stimuli parameters vary between studies, with inter-pulse duration (P=0.044) being identified by multiple regression analysis as independent predictors of the variability in NFR threshold in healthy controls. The results indicate that there is evidence of central hyperexcitability in people with chronic musculoskeletal pain. Our review also suggests that shorter inter-pulse duration tends to yield smaller variability in NFR threshold. However, further research investigating optimal stimulation parameters is still warranted.

  8. Modulation of Ankle Muscle Postural Reflexes in Stroke: Influence of Weight-bearing Load

    PubMed Central

    Marigold, Daniel S.; Eng, Janice J.; Inglis, J. Timothy

    2011-01-01

    Objective Given the known sensorimotor deficits and asymmetric weight-bearing posture in stroke, the aim of this study was to determine whether stroke affects the modulation of standing postural reflexes with varying weight-bearing load. Methods Ten individuals with chronic stroke and 10 healthy older adult controls were exposed to unexpected forward and backward platform translations while standing. Three different stance conditions were imposed: increased weight-bearing load, decreased weight-bearing load, and self-selected stance. Surface EMG from bilateral ankle dorsiflexors (tibialis anterior) and extensors (gastrocnemius) were recorded and the magnitude of background muscle activity (prior to the platform translation) and postural reflex onset latency and magnitude (75 ms following reflex onset) were determined. Results Load modulation of ankle extensors was found in controls and individuals with stroke. Although controls demonstrated modulation of ankle dorsiflexors to different loads, individuals with stroke did not show this modulation. Further, load did not change the onset latency of postural reflexes of the individuals with stroke. Conclusion The delayed paretic muscle onset latencies in conjunction with impaired modulation of ankle dorsiflexor postural reflexes may contribute to the instability and frequent falls observed among individuals with stroke. Significance The results provide some insight into standing postural reflexes following stroke. PMID:15546787

  9. Receptor mechanisms underlying heterogenic reflexes among the triceps surae muscles of the cat.

    PubMed

    Nichols, T R

    1999-02-01

    The soleus (S), medial gastrocnemius (MG), and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles of the cat are interlinked by rapid spinal reflex pathways. In the decerebrate state, these heterogenic reflexes are either excitatory and length dependent or inhibitory and force dependent. Mechanographic analysis was used to obtain additional evidence that the muscle spindle primary ending and the Golgi tendon organ provide the major contributions to these reflexes, respectively. The tendons of the triceps surae muscles were separated and connected to independent force transducers and servo-controlled torque motors in unanesthetized, decerebrate cats. The muscles were activated as a group using crossed-extension reflexes. Electrical stimulation of the caudal cutaneous sural nerve was used to provide a particularly strong activation of MG and decouple the forces of the triceps surae muscles. During either form of activation, the muscles were stretched either individually or in various combinations to determine the strength and characteristics of autogenic and heterogenic feedback. The corresponding force responses, including both active and passive components, were measured during the changing background tension. During activation of the entire group, the excitatory, heterogenic feedback linking the three muscles was found to be strongest onto LG and weakest onto MG, in agreement with previous results concerning the strengths of heteronymous Ia excitatory postsynaptic potentials among the triceps surae muscles. The inhibition, which is known to affect only the soleus muscle, was dependent on active contractile force and was detected essentially as rapidly as length dependent excitation. The inhibition outlasted the excitation and was blocked by intravenous strychnine. These results indicate that the excitatory and inhibitory effects are dominated by feedback from primary spindle receptors and Golgi tendon organs. The interactions between these two feedback pathways potentially can

  10. Electromyography of superficial and deep neck muscles during isometric, voluntary, and reflex contractions.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, Gunter P; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Brault, John R; Hedenstierna, Sofia; Inglis, J Timothy

    2007-02-01

    Increasingly complex models of the neck neuromusculature need detailed muscle and kinematic data for proper validation. The goal of this study was to measure the electromyographic activity of superficial and deep neck muscles during tasks involving isometric, voluntary, and reflexively evoked contractions of the neck muscles. Three male subjects (28-41 years) had electromyographic (EMG) fine wires inserted into the left sternocleidomastoid, levator scapulae, trapezius, splenius capitis, semispinalis capitis, semispinalis cervicis, and multifidus muscles. Surface electrodes were placed over the left sternohyoid muscle. Subjects then performed: (i) maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs) in the eight directions (45 deg intervals) from the neutral posture; (ii) 50 N isometric contractions with a slow sweep of the force direction through 720 deg; (iii) voluntary oscillatory head movements in flexion and extension; and (iv) initially relaxed reflex muscle activations to a forward acceleration while seated on a sled. Isometric contractions were performed against an overhead load cell and movement dynamics were measured using six-axis accelerometry on the head and torso. In all three subjects, the two anterior neck muscles had similar preferred activation directions and acted synergistically in both dynamic tasks. With the exception of splenius capitis, the posterior and posterolateral neck muscles also showed consistent activation directions and acted synergistically during the voluntary motions, but not during the sled perturbations. These findings suggest that the common numerical-modeling assumption that all anterior muscles act synergistically as flexors is reasonable, but that the related assumption that all posterior muscles act synergistically as extensors is not. Despite the small number of subjects, the data presented here can be used to inform and validate a neck model at three levels of increasing neuromuscular-kinematic complexity: muscles generating forces

  11. Muscle Stiffness and Spinal Stretch Reflex Sensitivity in the Triceps Surae

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, J. Troy; Padua, Darin A; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2008-01-01

    Context: Greater musculotendinous stiffness may enhance spinal stretch reflex sensitivity by improving mechanical coupling of the muscle spindle and the stretch stimulus. This heightened sensitivity would correspond with a shorter latency and higher-amplitude reflex response, potentially enhancing joint stability. Objective: To compare spinal stretch reflex latency and amplitude across groups that differed in musculotendinous stiffness. Design: Static group comparisons. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active individuals (20 men, 20 women). Intervention(s): We verified a sex difference in musculotendinous stiffness and compared spinal stretch reflex latency and amplitude in high-stiffness (men) and low-stiffness (women) groups. We also evaluated relationships between musculotendinous stiffness and spinal stretch reflex latency and amplitude, respectively. Main Outcome Measure(s): Triceps surae musculotendinous stiffness and soleus spinal stretch reflex latency and amplitude were assessed at 30% of a maximal voluntary isometric plantar-flexion contraction. Results: The high-stiffness group demonstrated significantly greater stiffness (137.41 ± 26.99 N/cm) than the low-stiffness group did (91.06 ± 20.10 N/cm). However, reflex latency (high stiffness = 50.11 ± 2.07 milliseconds, low stiffness = 48.26 ± 2.40 milliseconds) and amplitude (high stiffness = 0.28% ± 0.12% maximum motor response, low stiffness = 0.31% ± 0.16% maximum motor response) did not differ significantly across stiffness groups. Neither reflex latency (r = .053, P = .746) nor amplitude (r = .073, P = .653) was related significantly to musculotendinous stiffness. Conclusions: A moderate level of pretension (eg, 30%) likely eliminates series elastic slack; thus, a greater change in force per unit-of-length change (ie, heightened stiffness) would have minimal effects on coupling of the muscle spindle and the stretch stimulus and, therefore, on spinal

  12. Voluntary and reflex control of human back muscles during induced pain

    PubMed Central

    Zedka, Milan; Prochazka, Arthur; Knight, Brian; Gillard, Debby; Gauthier, Michel

    1999-01-01

    Back pain is known to change motor patterns of the trunk. The purpose of this study was to examine the motor output of the erector spinae (ES) muscles during pain in the lumbar region. First, their voluntary activation was assessed during flexion and re-extension of the trunk. Second, effects of cutaneous and muscle pain on the ES stretch reflex were measured, since increased stretch reflex gain has been suggested to underlie increased muscle tone in painful muscles. The trunk movement and electromyographical (EMG) signals from the right and left ES during pain were compared with values before pain. Controlled muscle pain was induced by infusion of 5% saline into the right lumbar ES. Cutaneous pain was elicited by mechanical or electrical stimulation of the dorsal lumbar skin. The stretch reflex was evoked by rapidly indenting the right lumbar ES with a servo-motor prodder. The results from the voluntary task show that muscle pain decreased the modulation depth of ES EMG activity. This pattern was associated with a decreased range and velocity of motion of the painful body segment, which would normally serve to avoid further injury. Interestingly, when subjects overcame this guarding tendency and made exactly the same movements during pain as before pain, the EMG modulation depth was still reduced. The results seem to reconcile the controversy of previous studies, in which both hyper- and hypoactivity of back muscles in pain have been reported. In the tapped muscle, the EMG response consisted of two peaks (latency 19.3 ± 2.1 and 44.6 ± 2.5 ms, respectively) followed by a trough. On the contralateral side the first response was a trough (26.2 ± 3.2 ms) while the second (46.4 ± 4.3 ms) was a peak, similar to the second peak on the tapped side. Cutaneous pain had no effect on the short-latency response but significantly increased the second response on the tapped side. Surprisingly, deep muscle pain had no effect on the stretch reflex. A short-latency reciprocal

  13. Trunk muscle activation during golf swing: Baseline and threshold.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís; Marta, Sérgio; Vaz, João; Fernandes, Orlando; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    There is a lack of studies regarding EMG temporal analysis during dynamic and complex motor tasks, such as golf swing. The aim of this study is to analyze the EMG onset during the golf swing, by comparing two different threshold methods. Method A threshold was determined using the baseline activity recorded between two maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Method B threshold was calculated using the mean EMG activity for 1000ms before the 500ms prior to the start of the Backswing. Two different clubs were also studied. Three-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare methods, muscles and clubs. Two-way mixed Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) with absolute agreement was used to determine the methods reliability. Club type usage showed no influence in onset detection. Rectus abdominis (RA) showed the higher agreement between methods. Erector spinae (ES), on the other hand, showed a very low agreement, that might be related to postural activity before the swing. External oblique (EO) is the first being activated, at 1295ms prior impact. There is a similar activation time between right and left muscles sides, although the right EO showed better agreement between methods than left side. Therefore, the algorithms usage is task- and muscle-dependent.

  14. Reflex inhibition of normal cramp following electrical stimulation of the muscle tendon.

    PubMed

    Khan, Serajul I; Burne, John A

    2007-09-01

    Muscle cramp was induced in one head of the gastrocnemius muscle (GA) in eight of thirteen subjects using maximum voluntary contraction when the muscle was in the shortened position. Cramp in GA was painful, involuntary, and localized. Induction of cramp was indicated by the presence of electromyographic (EMG) activity in one head of GA while the other head remained silent. In all cramping subjects, reflex inhibition of cramp electrical activity was observed following Achilles tendon electrical stimulation and they all reported subjective relief of cramp. Thus muscle cramp can be inhibited by stimulation of tendon afferents in the cramped muscle. When the inhibition of cramp-generated EMG and voluntary EMG was compared at similar mean EMG levels, the area and timing of the two phases of inhibition (I(1), I(2)) did not differ significantly. This strongly suggests that the same reflex pathway was the source of the inhibition in both cases. Thus the cramp-generated EMG is also likely to be driven by spinal synaptic input to the motorneurons. We have found that the muscle conditions that appear necessary to facilitate cramp, a near to maximal contraction of the shortened muscle, are also the conditions that render the inhibition generated by tendon afferents ineffective. When the strength of tendon inhibition in cramping subjects was compared with that in subjects that failed to cramp, it was found to be significantly weaker under the same experimental conditions. It is likely that reduced inhibitory feedback from tendon afferents has an important role in generating cramp.

  15. Assessment of auditory brainstem function in lead-exposed children using stapedius muscle reflexes.

    PubMed

    Counter, S A; Buchanan, Leo H; Ortega, Fernando; van der Velde, Jeannette; Borg, Erik

    2011-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the neurological integrity and physiological status of the auditory brainstem tracts and nuclei in children with chronic lead (Pb) exposure using non-invasive acoustic stapedius reflex (ASR) measurements of afferent and efferent-neuromuscular auditory function. Following audiological examinations, uncrossed (ipsilateral) and crossed (contralateral) brainstem ASR responses were evoked by pure tone (500, 1000, and 2000 Hz), and broadband noise (bandwidth: 125-4000 Hz) stimulus activators. The ASR threshold (ASRT), amplitude growth, and decay/fatigue were measured by conventional clinical middle ear immittance methods in a group of Andean children (age range: 2-18 years) with a history of chronic environmental Pb exposure from occupational Pb glazing. Blood lead (PbB) levels of the study group (n=117) ranged from 4.0 to 83.7 μg/dL with a mean PbB level of 33.5 μg/dL (SD: 23.6; median: 33.0: CDC III Classification). The PbB distribution data indicated that 77.8% (n=91) of the children had PbB levels greater than the CDC action line of 10 μg/dL. Repeatable, normal ASRTs were elicited for ipsilateral (mean: ≤90 dB HL) and contralateral (mean: ≤97 dB HL) stimulation for each acoustic activator. Spearman Rho correlation analysis indicated no significant association between PbB level and ipsilateral or contralateral ASRT for any of the stimulus activators. The ASR amplitude growth results showed typical growth functions with no Pb-associated aberrations. No statistical association was found between ASR decay/adaptation (ASRD) and PbB level for any of the stimulus activators. The results of stapedius muscle reflex testing using several stimulus activators showed no significant relationship between PbB level and the physiological integrity of the auditory brainstem mediated ASR responses in children with chronic Pb exposure and elevated PbB levels.

  16. Muscle afferent potential (`A-wave') in the surface electromyogram of a phasic stretch reflex in normal humans

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Alex. M.; Michie, Patricia T.; Glue, Leonard C. T.

    1972-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper tested the hypothesis that the afferent potential elicited by a tendon tap in an isometrically recorded phasic stretch reflex can be detected in the surface EMG of normal humans when appropriate techniques are used. These techniques involved (1) training the subjects to relax mentally and physically so that the EMG was silent before and immediately after the diphasic MAP which reflects a highly synchronous discharge of afferent impulses from low threshold muscle stretch receptors after a tendon tap, and (2) using a data retrieval computer to summate stimulus-locked potentials in the EMG over a series of 16 samples using taps of uniform peak force and duration on the Achilles tendon to elicit the tendon jerk in the calf muscles. A discrete, diphasic potential (`A-wave') was recorded from EMG electrodes placed on the surface of the skin over the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The `A-wave' afferent potential had the opposite polarity to the corresponding efferent MAP. Under control conditions of relaxation the `A-wave' had a latency after the onset of the tap of 2 msec, the peak to peak amplitude was of the order of 5 μV and the duration was in the range of 6 to 10 msec. Further experiments were conducted to show that the `A-wave' (1) was not an artefact of the instrumentation used, (2) had a threshold at low intensities of stimulation, and (3) could be reliably augmented by using a Jendrassik manoeuvre compared with the potential observed during control (relaxation) conditions. The results support the conclusion that the `A-wave' emanates from the pool of muscle spindles which discharges impulses along group Ia nerve fibres in response to the phasic stretch stimulus because the primary ending of the spindles is known to initiate the stretch reflex and the spindles can be sensitized by fusimotor impulses so that their threshold is lowered as a result of a Jendrassik manoeuvre. The finding has important implications for the

  17. Phase-dependent reflex reversal in human leg muscles during walking.

    PubMed

    Yang, J F; Stein, R B

    1990-05-01

    1. Reflex responses during walking were elicited in humans by stimulation of the tibial nerve at the ankle. The stimulus intensity was controlled by monitoring the M-wave from an intrinsic foot muscle. Responses were observed in the ipsilateral tibialis anterior (TA), soleus (SO), and rectus femoris (RF) muscles. The most reproducible responses were observed at a middle latency between 50 and 90 ms. The responses were most likely of cutaneous origin, because they closely resembled the responses to stimulation of a purely cutaneous nerve, the sural nerve. 2. A reversal in the direction of the middle latency response from excitation to inhibition was observed for the first time within single muscles during walking. Evidence for a reversal was seen in all three muscles examined and in all seven subjects. 3. The reflex reversal could not be elicited in standing. An inhibition whose amplitude varied in a linear fashion with stimulus intensity and background activation level was always observed at middle latency. The responses elicited during standing resembled those during the stance phase of walking. The two tasks shared some common movement goals and appeared to make use of similar reflex pathways.

  18. Dynamic stability of spine using stability-based optimization and muscle spindle reflex.

    PubMed

    Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Hemami, Hooshang; Barin, Kamran; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2008-02-01

    A computational method for simulation of 3-D movement of the trunk under the control of 48 anatomically oriented muscle actions was developed. Neural excitation of muscles was set based on inverse dynamics approach along with the stability-based optimization. The effect of muscle spindle reflex response on the trunk movement stability was evaluated upon the application of a perturbation moment. The method was used to simulate the trunk movement from the upright standing to 60 degrees of flexion. Incorporation of the stability condition as an additional constraint in the optimization resulted in an increase in antagonistic activities demonstrating that the antagonistic co-activation acts to increase the trunk stability in response to self-induced postural internal perturbation. In presence of a 30 Nm flexion perturbation moment, muscle spindles decreased the induced deviation of the position and velocity profiles from the desired ones. The stability-generated co-activation decreased the reflexive response of muscle spindles to the perturbation demonstrating that the rise in muscle co-activation can ameliorate the corruption of afferent neural sensory system at the expense of higher loading of the spine.

  19. Modulation of cutaneous reflexes in human upper limb muscles during arm cycling is independent of activity in the contralateral arm.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Timothy J; Zehr, E Paul; Collins, David F

    2005-02-01

    The amplitudes and signs of cutaneous reflexes are modulated during rhythmic movements of the arms and legs (during walking and arm or leg cycling for instance). This reflex modulation is frequently independent of the background muscle activity and may involve central pattern generator (CPG) circuits. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the nature and degree of coupling between the upper limbs during arm cycling, with regard to the regulation of cutaneous reflexes. Responses to electrical stimulations of the right, superficial radial nerve (five 1 ms pulses, 300 Hz) were recorded bilaterally in six arm muscles of eight participants during arm cycling involving only the limb ipsilateral to the stimulation, only the limb contralateral to the stimulation, and bilateral movement when the limbs were both in-phase and 180 degrees out of phase. The pattern of cutaneous reflex modulation throughout the arm cycle was independent of the functional state of the limb contralateral to the recording site, irrespective of whether recordings were made ipsilateral or contralateral to the stimulation. Furthermore, cutaneous reflexes were significantly (p<0.05) modulated with arm position in only 8% of cases in which the limb containing the responding muscle was either stationary or being moved passively by the experimenter. The results show that there is relatively weak coupling between the arms with regard to the regulation of cutaneous reflexes during rhythmic, cyclical arm movements. This suggests a loose connection between the CPGs for each arm that regulate muscle activity and reflex amplitude during rhythmic movement.

  20. Reflex and cerebellar influences on α and on `rhythmic' and `tonic' γ activity in the intercostal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Corda, M.; von Euler, C.; Lennerstrand, G.

    1966-01-01

    1. Efferent intercostal α and γ activity and afferent intercostal muscle spindle activity were studied in decerebrate cats in response to stimulation of the anterior lobe of the cerebellum and to postural and other reflexes. 2. Low threshold intercostal responses were elicited from lobuli IV and V of the anterior lobe of the cerebellum. 3. The existence of two functionally different types of intercostal γ neurones has been confirmed. These are the `rhythmic' or `specifically respiratory' γ neurones, and the `tonic' γ neurones. 4. In response to cerebellar stimulation, facilitatory, inhibitory and diphasic tetanic and post-tetanic effects were obtained from α and the two types of γ fibres in both external and internal intercostal nerve branches. 5. Generally both inspiratory and expiratory α and γ activity was facilitated in response to tetanic stimulation at contralateral stimulus sites, and inhibited in response to stimulation of ipsilateral sites. 6. `Rhythmic' γ activity appeared to be rather closely linked to the respiratory α activity but the balance between `rhythmic' γ and α was often changed in response to cerebellar stimulation, as indicated by the responses of primary muscle spindle afferents. 7. The `tonic' γ neurones were as a rule more responsive to cerebellar stimulation than were the α and `rhythmic' γ neurones. Long-lasting post-tetanic effects were much more prominent in the `tonic' γ fibres than in the α or `rhythmic' γ fibres. 8. `Rhythmic' γ activity was abolished after cervical transections of the cord. `Tonic' γ activity remained in the spinal preparations although usually at a different discharge rate. 9. `Tonic' γ neurones were more responsive than the `rhythmic' γ neurones to the proprioceptive γ reflex elicited by passive movements of the chest wall as well as to other spinal and supraspinal reflexes. 10. Both `dynamic' and `static' γ fibres seem to be represented in the group of `tonic' intercostal γ neurones. 11

  1. Facilitation and habituation of the startle reflex over the tonically active biceps brachii muscle contralateral to electrical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Alaid, Ssuhir; Tyagi, Indu; Kornhuber, Malte

    2012-10-03

    The aim of the present investigation was to explore the impact of muscle contraction on startle reflex responses after electrical stimuli (single or trains of 3) and to study startle reflex habituation. The electromyogram was recorded over the tonically active biceps brachii muscle in 19 healthy subjects contralateral to electrical stimuli (9-12mA) that were delivered at 1.0 and 0.4Hz over the superficial radial nerve. The muscle contraction level was varied by loading weight on the subject's bent arm (0.0, 1.0 or 1.5kg). Furthermore, short term reflex habituation was investigated using 30 blocks of 5 subsequent stimuli. Startle response amplitudes gained significantly (p<0.05) after (i) train stimuli as compared with single stimuli, during (ii) high versus low levels of muscle contraction, and at (iii) 0.4Hz versus 1.0Hz stimuli. Startle reflex amplitudes decreased significantly by the influence of preceding stimuli (p<0.05). This study provides evidence that the startle reflex can be significantly influenced by weight load, i.e. by volitional influences. Startle reflex investigation over a contracted limb muscle results in a high probability of startle release and thereby improved detection of SR habituation following preceding stimuli.

  2. Effect of sympathetic nervous system activation on the tonic vibration reflex in rabbit jaw closing muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, C; Deriu, F; Passatore, M

    1993-01-01

    1. In precollicular decerebrate rabbits we investigated the effect of sympathetic stimulation, at frequencies within the physiological range, on the tonic vibration reflex (TVR) elicited in jaw closing muscles by small amplitude vibrations applied to the mandible (15-50 microns, 150-180 Hz). The EMG activity was recorded bilaterally from masseter muscle and the force developed by the reflex was measured through an isometric transducer connected with the mandibular symphysis. 2. Unilateral stimulation of the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic by the TVR, and a marked decrease or disappearance of the ipsilateral EMG activity. No significant changes were detected in the EMG contralateral to the stimulated nerve. Bilateral CSN stimulation reduced by 60-90% the force reflexly produced by the jaw closing muscles and strongly decreased or suppressed EMG activity on both sides. This effect was often preceded by a transient TVR enhancement, very variable in amplitude and duration, which was concomitant with the modest increase in pulmonary ventilation induced by the sympathetic stimulation. 3. During bilateral CSN stimulation, an increase in the vibration amplitude by a factor of 1.5-2.5 was sufficient to restore the TVR reduced by sympathetic stimulation. 4. The depressant action exerted by sympathetic activation on the TVR is mediated by alpha-adrenergic receptors, since it was almost completely abolished by the I.V. administration of either phentolamine or prazosin, this last drug being a selective antagonist of alpha 1-adrenoceptors. The sympathetically induced decrease in the TVR was not mimicked by manoeuvres producing a large and sudden reduction or abolition of the blood flow to jaw muscles, such as unilateral or bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. 5. The effect of sympathetic stimulation was not significantly modified after denervation of the inferior dental arch and/or anaesthesia of the temporomandibular joint, i.e. after having reduced

  3. Age-related impaired reflex sensitivity in a human hand muscle.

    PubMed

    Corden, D M; Lippold, O C

    1996-10-01

    1. The rectified and averaged electromyogram (EMG) was recorded from the first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) in normal male and female human subjects, ranging in age from 18 to 67 yr. It was elicited by a brief stretch, given to the outstretched forefinger. 2. The responses to stretch consisted of components W30, the monosynaptic stretch reflex and W60, which is likely to arise in the skin and nonmuscular structures. The figures 30 and 60 refer to the mean latencies, in milliseconds, of the respective waveforms (W). 3. For a group of subjects > 30 yr of age, W30 was significantly smaller than in a group under this age. The size of W60 was not related to age and the W30/W60 ratio was < 0.45 in the older subjects. In the younger group, the ratio was always above 0.5. 4. The fact that the age-related reflex impairment affects only W30 and not W60, indicates that central processing in the motor neuron pool is unlikely to be the mechanism involved in the impairment. 5. Control experiments show that changes in frictional resistance in muscles, joints, and tendons with age, are not large enough to account for these results. 6. Neuromuscular block did not occur in these experiments and could not be implicated in the impaired reflex sensitivity.

  4. Experimental muscle pain decreases the frequency threshold of electrically elicited muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Serrao, Mariano; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Ge, Hong-You; Pierelli, Francesco; Sandrini, Giorgio; Farina, Dario

    2007-09-01

    This study in humans tested the hypothesis that nociceptive muscle afferent input facilitates the occurrence of muscle cramps. In 13 healthy adults, muscle cramps were experimentally induced in the foot by stimulating the tibialis posterior nerve at the ankle with 2-s bursts of stimuli separated by 30 s, with stimulation frequency increasing by 2-Hz increments from 10 Hz until the cramp appeared. The minimum stimulation frequency that induced the cramp was defined "cramp frequency threshold". In 2 days, elicitation of the cramp was performed in the two-feet with and without (baseline condition) injection of hypertonic (painful condition) or isotonic (control condition) saline into the deep midportion of the flexor hallucis brevis muscle, from where surface EMG signals were recorded. The cramp frequency threshold was lower for the painful condition with respect to its baseline (mean +/- SE, hypertonic saline: 25.7 +/- 2.1 Hz, corresponding baseline: 31.2 +/- 2.8 Hz; P < 0.01) while there was no difference between the threshold with isotonic injection with respect to baseline. EMG average rectified value and power spectral frequency were higher during the cramp than immediately before the stimulation that elicited the cramp (pre-cramp: 13.9 +/- 1.6 muV and 75.4 +/- 3.8 Hz, respectively; post-cramp: 19.9 +/- 3.2 muV and 101.6 +/- 6.0 Hz; P < 0.05). The results suggest that nociceptive muscle afferent activity induced by injection of hypertonic saline facilitates the generation of electrically elicited muscle cramps.

  5. Short-Term Plasticity in a Monosynaptic Reflex Pathway to Forearm Muscles after Continuous Robot-Assisted Passive Stepping

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Kamibayashi, Kiyotaka; Kitamura, Taku; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    Both active and passive rhythmic limb movements reduce the amplitude of spinal cord Hoffmann (H-) reflexes in muscles of moving and distant limbs. This could have clinical utility in remote modulation of the pathologically hyperactive reflexes found in spasticity after stroke or spinal cord injury. However, such clinical translation is currently hampered by a lack of critical information regarding the minimum or effective duration of passive movement needed for modulating spinal cord excitability. We therefore investigated the H-reflex modulation in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle during and after various durations (5, 10, 15, and 30 min) of passive stepping in 11 neurologically normal subjects. Passive stepping was performed by a robotic gait trainer system (Lokomat®) while a single pulse of electrical stimulation to the median nerve elicited H-reflexes in the FCR. The amplitude of the FCR H-reflex was significantly suppressed during passive stepping. Although 30 min of passive stepping was sufficient to elicit a persistent H-reflex suppression that lasted up to 15 min, 5 min of passive stepping was not. The duration of H-reflex suppression correlated with that of the stepping. These findings suggest that the accumulation of stepping-related afferent feedback from the leg plays a role in generating short-term interlimb plasticity in the circuitry of the FCR H-reflex. PMID:27499737

  6. Modulation of reflex responses in hand muscles during rhythmical finger tasks in a subject with writer's cramp.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ruiping; Bush, Brian M H

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this study was to examine phase- and task-dependent modulation of stretch reflexes during repetitive finger movements in writer's cramp, and compare them with normal controls from our previous study. A subject with writer's cramp conducted two rhythmic tasks, index finger abduction (RFA) and a pen-squeezing (RPS) task akin to handwriting. Stretch reflexes were evoked by mechanical perturbations at random phases of each task. Surface electromyograms (EMG) were recorded from two hand muscles, first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS). The reflex response and background EMG activity of each muscle were modulated in a phase-dependent manner in both tasks. However, they varied largely in phase during the RFA task, but in approximately inverse phase-relationship during RPS. Reflex sensitivity, as represented by the slope of the linear regression between response and background, was much lower for both muscles in the 'writing' task (RPS) than in the RFA task with its positively correlated responses. These phase- and task-related modulation patterns differed dramatically from those observed in our control subjects, where reflex responses were modulated largely in phase with background activity and reflex sensitivity was much higher, particularly in FDI during RFA and FDS during RPS. The altered reflex modulation patterns in writer's cramp may reflect deficiencies of integration of proprioceptive afferent inputs and reduced inhibition at cortical and spinal levels during writing performance. Results from this case study support clinically identified task-specific feature of focal hand dystonia.

  7. Reflex pathways connect receptors in the human lower leg to the erector spinae muscles of the lower back.

    PubMed

    Clair, J M; Okuma, Y; Misiaszek, J E; Collins, D F

    2009-06-01

    Reflex pathways connect all four limbs in humans. Presently, we tested the hypothesis that reflexes also link sensory receptors in the lower leg with muscles of the lower back (erector spinae; ES). Taps were applied to the right Achilles' tendon and electromyographic activity was recorded from the right soleus and bilaterally from ES. Reflexes were compared between sitting and standing and between standing with the eyes open versus closed. Reflexes were evoked bilaterally in ES and consisted of an early latency excitation, a medium latency inhibition, and a longer latency excitation. During sitting but not standing, the early excitation was larger in the ES muscle ipsilateral to the stimulation (iES) than in the contralateral ES (cES). During standing but not sitting, the longer latency excitation in cES was larger than in iES. This response in cES was also larger during standing compared to sitting. Responses were not significantly different between the eyes open and eyes closed conditions. Taps applied to the lateral calcaneus (heel taps) evoked responses in ES that were not significantly different in amplitude or latency than those evoked by tendon taps, despite a 75-94% reduction in the amplitude of the soleus stretch reflex evoked by the heel taps. Electrical stimulation of the sural nerve, a purely cutaneous nerve at the ankle, evoked ES reflexes that were not significantly different in amplitude but had significantly longer latencies than those evoked by the tendon and heel taps. These results support the hypothesis that reflex pathways connect receptors in the lower leg with muscles of the lower back and show that that the amplitude of these reflexes is modulated by task. Responses evoked by stimulation of the sural nerve establish that reflex pathways connect the ES muscles with cutaneous receptors of the foot. In contrast, the large volley in muscle spindle afferents induced by the tendon taps compared to the heel taps did not alter the ES responses

  8. Prolonged Intermittent Trunk Flexion Increases Trunk Muscles Reflex Gains and Trunk Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Voglar, Matej; Wamerdam, Jeffrey; Kingma, Idsart; Sarabon, Nejc; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of prolonged, intermittent flexion on trunk neuromuscular control. Furthermore, the potential beneficial effects of passive upper body support during flexion were investigated. Twenty one healthy young volunteers participated during two separate visits in which they performed 1 hour of intermittent 60 seconds flexion and 30 seconds rest cycles. Flexion was set at 80% lumbar flexion and was performed with or without upper body support. Before and after intermittent flexion exposure, lumbar range of motion was measured using inertial measurement units and trunk stability was assessed during perturbations applied in the forward direction with a force controlled actuator. Closed-loop system identification was used to determine the trunk translational admittance and reflexes as frequency response functions. The admittance describes the actuator displacement as a function of contact force and to assess reflexes muscle activation was related to actuator displacement. Trunk admittance gain decreased after unsupported flexion, while reflex gain and lumbar range of motion increased after both conditions. Significant interaction effects confirmed a larger increase in lumbar range of motion and reflex gains at most frequencies analysed following unsupported flexion in comparison to supported flexion, probably compensating for decreased passive tissue stiffness. In contrast with some previous studies we found that prolonged intermittent flexion decreased trunk admittance, which implies an increase of the lumped intrinsic and reflexive stiffness. This would compensate for decreased stiffness at the cost of an increase in cumulative low back load. Taking into account the differences between conditions it would be preferable to offer upper body support during activities that require prolonged trunk flexion.

  9. Prolonged Intermittent Trunk Flexion Increases Trunk Muscles Reflex Gains and Trunk Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Wamerdam, Jeffrey; Kingma, Idsart; Sarabon, Nejc; van Dieën, Jaap H.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of prolonged, intermittent flexion on trunk neuromuscular control. Furthermore, the potential beneficial effects of passive upper body support during flexion were investigated. Twenty one healthy young volunteers participated during two separate visits in which they performed 1 hour of intermittent 60 seconds flexion and 30 seconds rest cycles. Flexion was set at 80% lumbar flexion and was performed with or without upper body support. Before and after intermittent flexion exposure, lumbar range of motion was measured using inertial measurement units and trunk stability was assessed during perturbations applied in the forward direction with a force controlled actuator. Closed-loop system identification was used to determine the trunk translational admittance and reflexes as frequency response functions. The admittance describes the actuator displacement as a function of contact force and to assess reflexes muscle activation was related to actuator displacement. Trunk admittance gain decreased after unsupported flexion, while reflex gain and lumbar range of motion increased after both conditions. Significant interaction effects confirmed a larger increase in lumbar range of motion and reflex gains at most frequencies analysed following unsupported flexion in comparison to supported flexion, probably compensating for decreased passive tissue stiffness. In contrast with some previous studies we found that prolonged intermittent flexion decreased trunk admittance, which implies an increase of the lumped intrinsic and reflexive stiffness. This would compensate for decreased stiffness at the cost of an increase in cumulative low back load. Taking into account the differences between conditions it would be preferable to offer upper body support during activities that require prolonged trunk flexion. PMID:27768688

  10. Modulation of soleus H-reflex during shortening and lengthening muscle actions in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Sheng; Zhou, Shi; Cartwright, Colleen

    2015-02-28

    The H-reflex is dependently modulated during isometric and anisometric muscle actions. However, the manner of the H-reflex modulation during dynamic muscle movements in relation to ageing is less stated in the literature. This study was designed to investigate the effects of ageing on soleus (SOL) H-reflex modulation during dynamic muscle actions. Twenty young (24 ± 4 years of age) and 20 older adults (73 ± 5 years of age) voluntarily participated in the study. The SOL H-reflex was measured during passive and active shortening and lengthening muscle actions in a sitting position. The older group showed a lower ratio of the maximal amplitude of H-reflex to M-wave (SOL Hmax/Mmax) during the passive lengthening than that during the passive shortening (shortening: 0.40 ± 0.22 vs. lengthening: 0.15 ± 0.10, P < 0.05), whereas the SOL Hmax/Mmax ratio of the young group was significantly higher during the shortening than that during the lengthening contractions at maximal effort (shortening: 0.51 ± 0.26 vs. lengthening: 0.37 ± 0.18, P < 0.05). These results suggested different modulations of group Ia afferent inputs to the SOL motoneurons during passive and active dynamic muscle actions between young and older adults.

  11. The proprioceptive reflex control of the intercostal muscles during their voluntary activation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J. Newsom; Sears, T. A.

    1970-01-01

    1. A quantitative study has been made of the reflex effects of sudden changes in mechanical load on contracting human intercostal muscles during willed breathing movements involving the chest wall. Averaging techniques were applied to recordings of electromyogram (EMG) and lung volume, and to other parameters of breathing. 2. Load changes were effected for brief periods (10-150 msec) at any predetermined lung volume by sudden connexion of the airway to a pressure source variable between ± 80 cm H2O so that respiratory movement could be either assisted or opposed. In some experiments airway resistance was suddenly reduced by porting from a high to a low resistance external airway. 3. Contracting inspiratory and expiratory intercostal muscles showed a `silent period' with unloading which is attributed to the sudden withdrawal from intercostal motoneurones of monosynaptic excitation of muscle spindle origin. 4. For both inspiratory and expiratory intercostal muscles the typical immediate effect of an increase in load was an inhibitory response (IR) with a latency of about 22 msec followed by an excitatory response (ER) with a latency of 50-60 msec. 5. It was established using brief duration stimuli (< 40 msec) that the IR depended on mechanical events associated with the onset of stimulation, whereas stimuli greater than 40 msec in duration were required to evoke the ER. 6. For constant expiratory flow rate and a constant load, the ER of expiratory intercostal muscles increased as lung volume decreased within the limits set by maximal activation of the motoneurone pool as residual volume was approached. 7. The ER to a constant load increased directly with the expiratory flow rate at which the load applied, also within limits set by maximal activation of the motoneurone pool. 8. For a given load, the ER during phonation was greater than that occurring at a similar expiratory flow rate without phonation when the resistance of the phonating larynx was mimicked by an

  12. Muscle weakness and lack of reflex gain adaptation predominate during post-stroke posture control of the wrist

    PubMed Central

    Meskers, Carel GM; Schouten, Alfred C; de Groot, Jurriaan H; de Vlugt, Erwin; van Hilten, Bob JJ; van der Helm, Frans CT; Arendzen, Hans JH

    2009-01-01

    Background Instead of hyper-reflexia as sole paradigm, post-stroke movement disorders are currently considered the result of a complex interplay between neuronal and muscular properties, modified by level of activity. We used a closed loop system identification technique to quantify individual contributors to wrist joint stiffness during an active posture task. Methods Continuous random torque perturbations applied to the wrist joint by a haptic manipulator had to be resisted maximally. Reflex provoking conditions were applied i.e. additional viscous loads and reduced perturbation signal bandwidth. Linear system identification and neuromuscular modeling were used to separate joint stiffness into the intrinsic resistance of the muscles including co-contraction and the reflex mediated contribution. Results Compared to an age and sex matched control group, patients showed an overall 50% drop in intrinsic elasticity while their reflexive contribution did not respond to provoking conditions. Patients showed an increased mechanical stability compared to control subjects. Conclusion Post stroke, we found active posture tasking to be dominated by: 1) muscle weakness and 2) lack of reflex adaptation. This adds to existing doubts on reflex blocking therapy as the sole paradigm to improve active task performance and draws attention to muscle strength and power recovery and the role of the inability to modulate reflexes in post stroke movement disorders. PMID:19627607

  13. Recruitment properties and significance of short latency reflexes in neck and eye muscles evoked by brief lateral head accelerations.

    PubMed

    Colebatch, James G; Dennis, Danielle L; Govender, Sendhil; Chen, Peggy; Todd, Neil P McAngus

    2014-09-01

    Short lateral head accelerations were applied to investigate the recruitment properties of the reflexes underlying the earliest ocular and cervical electromyographic reflex responses to these disturbances. Components of both reflexes are vestibular dependent and have been termed "ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials" and "cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials", respectively. Previous investigations using a unilateral vestibular stimulus have indicated that some but not all these vestibular-dependent reflexes show a simple power law relationship to stimulus intensity. In particular, crossed otolith-ocular reflexes showed evidence of an inflection separating two types of behaviour. The present stimulus acts bilaterally, and only the earliest crossed otolith-ocular reflex, previously shown to have a strictly unilateral origin, showed evidence of an inflection. Reflex changes in ocular torsion could, in principle, correct for the changes associated with translation for an elevated eye, but our findings indicated that the responses were consistent with previous reports of tilt-type reflexes. For the neck, both vestibular and segmental (muscle spindle) reflexes were evoked and followed power law relationships, without any clear separation in sensitivity. Our findings are consistent with previous evidence of "tilt-like" reflexes evoked by lateral acceleration and suggest that the departure from a power law occurs as a consequence of a unilateral crossed pathway. For the neck, responses to transients are likely to always consist of both vestibular and non-vestibular (segmental) components. Most of the translation-evoked ocular and cervical reflexes appear to follow power law relationship to stimulus amplitude over a physiological range.

  14. Refined distribution of myelinated trigeminal proprioceptive nerve fibres in Mueller's muscle as the mechanoreceptors to induce involuntary reflexive contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles.

    PubMed

    Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Hirasawa, Chihiro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2009-11-01

    Stretching of mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle induces reflexive contraction of not only the levator muscle but also the frontalis muscle as two different eyelid-opening muscles. Previously, we reported that fine neural myelinated structures, acting as mechanoreceptors, were found in the proximal Mueller's muscle. Since there is a risk of misunderstanding that the middle and distal Mueller's muscle does not contain mechanoreceptors and can be invalidated or resected, the accurate distribution of myelinated trigeminal proprioceptive nerve fibres as mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle was refined horizontally in this study. We explored 10 whole Mueller's muscles between the levator muscle and the tarsus of the upper eyelids obtained from five Japanese cadavers. The specimens were serially sliced along the horizontal plane and stained with HE, S-100 protein to determine the presence of Schwann cells, and smooth muscle actin antibody to determine the presence of Mueller's smooth muscle fibres. Although all myelinated nerve fibres in the intermuscular connective tissues among the sympathetically innervated Mueller's multi-unit smooth muscle fibres may not correspond to the proprioceptive nerve fibres, the nerve bundles consisting of multiple myelinated nerve fibres were well distributed in the proximal Mueller's muscle, and single myelinated nerve fibres were well distributed in the middle and distal Mueller's muscle. We believe that the mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle consist of myelinated proprioceptive nerve fibres with nerve endings possibly attached to collagen fibres in the intermuscular connective tissues present among Mueller's smooth muscle fibres. As the myelinated nerve fibres innervate the middle and distal Mueller's muscle to a greater extent than those in the proximal Mueller's muscle, the former may be more important as mechanoreceptors than the latter and should not be invalidated or excised during surgery for treatment of blepharoptosis to

  15. Fusimotor reflexes in relaxed forearm muscles produced by cutaneous afferents from the human hand.

    PubMed Central

    Gandevia, S C; Wilson, L; Cordo, P J; Burke, D

    1994-01-01

    1. This study was designed to determine whether cutaneous receptors in the hand exert reflex effects on fusimotor neurones innervating relaxed muscles. Recordings were made from fifty-four muscle spindle afferents in the radial nerve while the arm was held relaxed in a supporting frame. Cutaneous afferents were activated by trains of stimuli at non-noxious levels to the superficial radial nerve or to the palmar surface of the fingers. 2. For the population of muscle spindle afferents, the mean discharge rate was 7.1 +/- 6.4 Hz (range 0-24 Hz). Thirty-three per cent had no background discharge, and this occurred significantly more often in finger extensors than wrist extensors. 3. Trains of cutaneous stimuli produced no change in the discharge rates of the majority of spindle endings irrespective of whether the spindle afferent had a background discharge or was given one by muscle stretch. However, with two of forty afferents, the stimuli produced an increase in discharge at latencies of 135 and 155 ms. 4. With a further fourteen muscle spindle endings, the dynamic responses to stretch were measured 100-400 ms after the trains of cutaneous stimuli. For four spindle afferents there was a statistically significant change in the dynamic response to stretch occurring at conditioned-stretch intervals of 100-200 ms. For two afferents the dynamic response decreased by 17 and 26% and for two others it increased by about 24 and 37%. 5. While these results support the view that the level of background fusimotor drive is low in the relaxed state, they suggest that there is some dynamic fusimotor drive to completely relaxed muscles operating on the human hand, and that this drive can be altered reflexly by cutaneous afferent inputs from the hand. Images Figure 4 PMID:7837105

  16. Anatomically remote muscle contraction facilitates patellar tendon reflex reinforcement while mental activity does not: a within-participants experimental trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Jendrassik maneuver (JM) is a remote facilitation muscular contraction shown to affect amplitude and temporal components of the human stretch reflex. Conflicting theoretical models exist regarding the neurological mechanism related to its ability to reinforce reflex parameters. One mechanism involves the gamma motoneurons of the fusimotor system, which are subject to both physical and mental activity. A second mechanism describes reduced alpha motoneuron presynaptic inhibition, which is not subject to mental activity. In the current study, we determined if mental activity could be used to create a reflex facilitation comparable to a remote muscle contraction. Method Using a within-participants design, we investigated the relative effect of the JM and a successfully employed mental task (Stroop task) on the amplitude and temporal components of the patellar tendon reflex. Results We found that the addition of mental activity had no influence on the patellar tendon reflex parameters measured, while the JM provided facilitation (increased reflex amplitude, decreased total reflex time). Conclusion The findings from this study support the view that the mechanism for the JM is a reduction in presynaptic inhibition of alpha motoneurons as it is influenced by physical and not mental activity. PMID:22958619

  17. Determination of an Optimal Threshold Value for Muscle Activity Detection in EMG Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Özgünen, Kerem Tuncay; Çelik, Umut; Kurdak, Sanlı Sadi

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly agreed that one needs to use a threshold value in the detection of muscle activity timing in electromyographic (EMG) signal analysis. However, the algorithm for threshold determination lacks an agreement between the investigators. In this study we aimed to determine a proper threshold value in an incremental cycling exercise for accurate EMG signal analysis. Nine healthy recreationally active male subjects cycled until exhaustion. EMG recordings were performed on four low extremity muscle groups; gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), soleus (SOL) and vastus medialis (VM). We have analyzed our data using three different threshold levels: 25%, 35% and 45% of the mean RMS EMG value. We compared the appropriateness of these threshold values using two criteria: (1) significant correlation between the actual and estimated number of bursts and (2) proximity of the regression line of the actual and estimated number of bursts to the line of identity. It had been possible to find a significant correlation between the actual and estimated number of bursts with the 25, 35 and 45% threshold values for the GL muscle. Correlation analyses for the VM muscle had shown that the number of bursts estimated with the 35% threshold value was found to be significantly correlated with the actual number of bursts. For the GM muscle, it had been possible to predict the burst number by using either the 35% or 45% threshold value and for the SOL muscle the 25% threshold value was found as the best predictor for actual number of burst estimation. Detailed analyses of the actual and estimated number of bursts had shown that success of threshold estimation may differ among muscle groups. Evaluation of our data had clearly shown that it is important to select proper threshold values for correct EMG signal analyses. Using a single threshold value for different exercise intensities and different muscle groups may cause misleading results. Key points α priori

  18. The reflex excitation of the soleus muscle of the decerebrate cat caused by vibration applied to its tendon

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P. B. C.

    1966-01-01

    1. Vibration was applied longitudinally to the fully innervated soleus muscle of the decerebrate cat by attaching its tendon to a vibrator. Vibration at frequencies of 50-500/sec with amplitudes of 10 μ upwards caused the muscle to contract reflexly for as long as the vibration was maintained. The response was recorded myographically by a myograph mounted upon the vibrator, and electromyographically by gross `belly-tendon' leads. The reflex contraction produced several hundred g wt. of tension and involved too many motor units for their discharges to be separable. The maintained reflex was abolished by making the preparation spinal or by anaesthetizing it with pentobarbitone, but it persisted after removing the cerebellum. 2. The minimum latency for the appearance of the reflex response at the beginning of a period of vibration was about 10 msec. The latency of cessation of the response at the end of vibration was similarly short. 3. On increasing the amplitude of vibration at any particular frequency in the range 100-300/sec the resulting reflex tension increased to an approximate plateau for amplitudes of vibration of 100-200 μ. Further increase in the amplitude decreased the size of the contraction, though there was no such reduction in records of the `integrated' electromyogram. 4. Such large amplitudes of vibration also reduced the tension, and shortened the duration, of a twitch contraction of the muscle elicited by stimulating its nerve. The strength of a tetanic contraction was much less affected by vibration than was that of the twitch contraction, and the muscle action potential elicited by stimulation of the nerve was unaffected. Thus, large-amplitude vibration influenced the contractile mechanism of the muscle (cf. Buchtal & Kaiser, 1951). 5. Increasing the frequency of vibration increased the value of the plateau tension reached on increasing the amplitude. The effect was, however, relatively small and the largest increase seen was 3 g wt. of

  19. Effects of exercise-induced low back pain on intrinsic trunk stiffness and paraspinal muscle reflexes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Emily M; Bazrgari, Babak; Nussbaum, Maury A; Madigan, Michael L

    2013-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to (1) compare trunk neuromuscular behavior between individuals with no history of low back pain (LBP) and individuals who experience exercise-induced LBP (eiLBP) when pain free, and (2) investigate changes in trunk neuromuscular behavior with eiLBP. Seventeen young adult males participated including eight reporting recurrent, acute eiLBP and nine control participants reporting no history of LBP. Intrinsic trunk stiffness and paraspinal muscle reflex delay were determined in both groups using sudden trunk flexion position perturbations 1-2 days following exercise when the eiLBP participants were experiencing an episode of LBP (termed post-exercise) and 4-5 days following exercise when eiLBP had subsided (termed post-recovery). Post-recovery, when the eiLBP group was experiencing minimal LBP, trunk stiffness was 26% higher in the eiLBP group compared to the control group (p=0.033) and reflex delay was not different (p=0.969) between groups. Trunk stiffness did not change (p=0.826) within the eiLBP group from post-exercise to post-recovery, but decreased 22% within the control group (p=0.002). Reflex delay decreased 11% within the eiLBP group from post-exercise to post-recovery (p=0.013), and increased 15% within the control group (p=0.006). Although the neuromuscular mechanisms associated with eiLBP and chronic LBP may differ, these results suggest that previously-reported differences in trunk neuromuscular behavior between individuals with chronic LBP and healthy controls reflect a combination of inherent differences in neuromuscular behavior between these individuals as well as changes in neuromuscular behavior elicited by pain.

  20. Acute effects of high-frequency microfocal vibratory stimulation on the H reflex of the soleus muscle. A double-blind study in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsi, Enrico; Paone, Paolo; Tassorelli, Cristina; De Icco, Roberto; Moglia, Arrigo; Alvisi, Elena; Marchetta, Lucky; Fresia, Mauro; Montini, Alessandra; Calabrese, Marzia; Versiglia, Vittorio; Sandrini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Summary This study in healthy subjects examined the effects of a system delivering focal microvibrations at high frequency (Equistasi®) on tonic vibration stimulus (TVS)-induced inhibition of the soleus muscle H reflex. High-frequency microvibrations significantly increased the inhibitory effect of TVS on the H reflex for up to three minutes. Moreover, Equistasi® also significantly reduced alpha-motoneuron excitability, as indicated by the changes in the ratio between the maximum-amplitude H reflex (Hmax reflex) and the maximum-amplitude muscle response (Mmax response); this effect was due to reduction of the amplitude of the H reflex because the amplitude of muscle response remained unchanged. The present findings indicate that Equistasi® has a modulatory effect on proprioceptive reflex circuits. Therefore, Equistasi® might interfere with some mechanisms involved in both physiological and pathophysiological control of movement and of posture. PMID:26727706

  1. Aging alters muscle reflex control of autonomic cardiovascular responses to rhythmic contractions in humans.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Weavil, Joshua C; Venturelli, Massimo; Rossman, Matthew J; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Bledsoe, Amber D; Richardson, Russell S; Amann, Markus

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the influence of aging on the group III/IV muscle afferents in the exercise pressor reflex-mediated cardiovascular response to rhythmic exercise. Nine old (OLD; 68 ± 2 yr) and nine young (YNG; 24 ± 2 yr) males performed single-leg knee extensor exercise (15 W, 30 W, 80% max) under control conditions and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing feedback from group III/IV leg muscle afferents. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output, leg blood flow (QL), systemic (SVC) and leg vascular conductance (LVC) were continuously determined. With no hemodynamic effect at rest, fentanyl blockade during exercise attenuated both cardiac output and QL ∼17% in YNG, while the decrease in cardiac output in OLD (∼5%) was significantly smaller with no impact on QL (P = 0.8). Therefore, in the face of similar significant ∼7% reduction in MAP during exercise with fentanyl blockade in both groups, LVC significantly increased ∼11% in OLD, but decreased ∼8% in YNG. The opposing direction of change was reflected in SVC with a significant ∼5% increase in OLD and a ∼12% decrease in YNG. Thus while cardiac output seems to account for the majority of group III/IV-mediated MAP responses in YNG, the impact of neural feedback on the heart may decrease with age and alterations in SVC become more prominent in mediating the similar exercise pressor reflex in OLD. Interestingly, in terms of peripheral hemodynamics, while group III/IV-mediated feedback plays a clear role in increasing LVC during exercise in the YNG, these afferents seem to actually reduce LVC in OLD. These peripheral findings may help explain the limited exercise-induced peripheral vasodilation often associated with aging.

  2. Effect of angular velocity on soleus and medial gastrocnemius H-reflex during maximal concentric and eccentric muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Duclay, Julien; Robbe, Alice; Pousson, Michel; Martin, Alain

    2009-10-01

    At rest, the H-reflex is lower during lengthening than shortening actions. During passive lengthening, both soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) H-reflex amplitudes decrease with increasing angular velocity. This study was designed to investigate whether H-reflex amplitude is affected by angular velocity during concentric and eccentric maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Experiments were performed on nine healthy men. At a constant angular velocity of 60 degrees /s and 20 degrees /s, maximal H-reflex and M-wave potentials were evoked at rest (i.e., H(max) and M(max), respectively) and during concentric and eccentric MVC (i.e., H(sup) and M(sup), respectively). Regardless of the muscle, H(max)/M(max) was lower during lengthening than shortening actions and the H(sup)/M(sup) ratio was higher than H(max)/M(max) during lengthening actions. Whereas no action type and angular velocity effects on the MG H(sup)/M(sup) were found, the SOL H(sup)/M(sup) was lower during eccentric than concentric MVC and this depression was increased with higher angular velocity. Our findings indicate that the depression of the H-reflex amplitude during eccentric compared to concentric MVC depends mainly on the amount of inhibition induced by lengthening action. In conclusion, H-reflex should be evoked during both passive and active dynamic trials to evaluate the plasticity of the spinal loop.

  3. Electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induces involuntary reflex contraction of the frontalis muscles.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Osada, Yoshiro; Ban, Ryokuya

    2013-02-01

    The levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles, despite consisting of slow-twitch fibres that involuntarily sustain eyelid-opening and eyebrow-raising against gravity. To compensate for this anatomical defect, this study hypothetically proposes that initial voluntary contraction of the levator fast-twitch muscle fibres stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle and evokes proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study sought to determine whether unilateral transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle could induce electromyographic responses in the frontalis muscles, with monitoring responses in the orbicularis oculi muscles. The study population included 27 normal subjects and 23 subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis, who displayed persistently raised eyebrows on primary gaze and light eyelid closure. The stimulation induced a short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle of all subjects and long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of normal subjects. However, it did not induce long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis. The orbicularis oculi muscles showed R1 and/or R2 responses. The stimulation might reach not only the proprioceptive fibres, but also other sensory fibres related to the blink or corneal reflex. The experimental system can provoke a monosynaptic short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle, probably through the mesencephalic trigeminal proprioceptive neuron and the frontalis motor neuron, and polysynaptic long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles through an unknown pathway. The latter neural circuit appeared to be engaged by the circumstances of aponeurotic blepharoptosis.

  4. Temporal, but not Directional, Prior Knowledge Shortens Muscle Reflex Latency in Response to Sudden Transition of Support Surface During Walking.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Masahiro; Kawashima, Noritaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system takes advantage of prior knowledge about potential upcoming perturbations for modulating postural reflexes. There are two distinct aspects of prior knowledge: spatial and temporal. This study investigated how each of spatial and temporal prior knowledge contributes to the shortening of muscle response latency. Eleven participants walked on a split-belt treadmill and perturbed by sudden acceleration or deceleration of the right belt at right foot contact. Spatial prior knowledge was given by instruction of possible direction (e.g., only acceleration) of upcoming perturbation at the beginning of an experimental session. Temporal prior knowledge was given to subjects by warning tones at foot contact during three consecutive strides before the perturbation. In response to acceleration perturbation, reflexive muscle activity was observed in soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemius (GAS) muscles. Onset latency of the GAS response was shorter (72 ms vs. 58 ms) when subjects knew the timing of the upcoming perturbation, whereas the latency was independent of directional prior knowledge. SOL onset latency (44 ms) was not influenced by directional nor temporal prior knowledge. Although spinal neural circuit that mediates short-latency reflex was not influenced by the prior knowledge, excitability in supra-spinal neural circuit that mediates medium- and long-latency reflex might be enhanced by knowing the timing of the upcoming perturbation.

  5. The Dynamics of the Stapedial Acoustic Reflex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Sherrin Mary

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis aims to separate the neural and muscular components of the stapedial acoustic reflex, both anatomically and physiologically. It aims to present an hypothesis to account for the differences between ipsilateral and contralateral reflex characteristics which have so far been unexplained, and achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the reflex dynamics. A technique enabling faithful reproduction of the time course of the reflex is used throughout the experimental work. The technique measures tympanic membrane displacement as a result of reflex stapedius muscle contraction. The recorded response can be directly related to the mechanics of the middle ear and stapedius muscle contraction. Some development of the technique is undertaken by the author. A model of the reflex neural arc and stapedius muscle dynamics is evolved that is based upon a second order system. The model is unique in that it includes a latency in the ipsilateral negative feedback loop. Oscillations commonly observed on reflex responses are seen to be produced because of the inclusion of a latency in the feedback loop. The model demonstrates and explains the complex relationships between neural and muscle dynamic parameters observed in the experimental work. This more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between the stapedius dynamics and the neural arc of the reflex would not usually have been possible using human subjects, coupled with a non-invasive measurement technique. Evidence from the experimental work revealed the ipsilateral reflex to have, on average, a 5 dB lower threshold than the contralateral reflex. The oscillatory charcteristics, and the steady state response, of the contralateral reflex are also seen to be significantly different from those of the ipsilateral reflex. An hypothesis to account for the experimental observations is proposed. It is propounded that chemical neurotransmitters

  6. Efficacy and tolerance of repeated oral doses of tolperisone hydrochloride in the treatment of painful reflex muscle spasm: results of a prospective placebo-controlled double-blind trial.

    PubMed

    Pratzel, H G; Alken, R G; Ramm, S

    1996-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of oral tolperisone hydrochloride (Mydocalm) in the treatment of painful reflex muscle spasm was assessed in a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. A total of 138 patients, aged between 20 and 75 years, with painful reflex muscle spasm associated with diseases of the spinal column or proximal joints were enrolled in eight rehabilitation centers. Patients were randomized to receive either 300 mg tolperisone hydrochloride or placebo for a period of 21 days. Both treatment groups recovered during the 3 weeks rehabilitation program. However, tolperisone hydrochloride proved to be significantly superior to placebo: the change score of the pressure pain threshold as the primary target parameter significantly increased during therapy with tolperisone hydrochloride (P = 0.03, valid-case-analysis) compared to the results obtained on placebo treatment. The overall assessment of efficacy by the patient also demonstrated significant differences in favor of tolperisone hydrochloride. Best results were seen in patients aged between 40 and 60 years with a history of complaints shorter than 1 year and with concomitant physical therapy. The evaluation of safety data, i.e., adverse events, biochemical and hematological laboratory parameters, demonstrated no differences between tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo. As a conclusion tolperisone hydrochloride represents an effective and safe treatment of painful reflex muscle spasm without the typical side effects of centrally active muscle relaxants.

  7. Femoral Artery Occlusion Increases Muscle Pressor Reflex and Expression of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Li, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) has an important contribution to pathophysiological changes of homeostasis under conditions of oxygen deprivation as well as ischemia. We examined the effects of femoral artery occlusion on HIF-1α expression in sensory dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of rats. Also, we examined cardiovascular responses to static muscle contraction following femoral occlusion. We hypothesized that hindlimb vascular insufficiency increases the levels of sensory nerves’ HIF-1α and augments autonomic responses induced by activation of muscle afferent nerves. In addition, we examined if the reflex cardiovascular responses were altered as HIF-1α was increased in the DRG neurons. Our data show that HIF-1α was significantly increased in the lumbar DRG neurons 6, 24 and 72 hours after femoral artery ligation as compared with sham control. Administration of dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG), a stabilizer of HIF-α, significantly increased HIF-1α in the lumbar DRG neurons. Furthermore, femoral occlusion enhanced the reflex pressor response to muscle contraction; however, the response was not altered by injection of DMOG. Overall, our results indicate that 1) femoral artery occlusion increases HIF-1α levels of in DRG neurons and contraction-induced pressor response; and 2) an increase in HIF-1α of DRG neurons per se may not alter the muscle pressor reflex. PMID:25346936

  8. Connecting ears to eye muscles: evolution of a 'simple' reflex arc.

    PubMed

    Straka, Hans; Fritzsch, Bernd; Glover, Joel C

    2014-01-01

    Developmental and evolutionary data from vertebrates are beginning to elucidate the origin of the sensorimotor pathway that links gravity and motion detection to image-stabilizing eye movements--the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). Conserved transcription factors coordinate the development of the vertebrate ear into three functional sensory compartments (graviception/translational linear acceleration, angular acceleration and sound perception). These sensory components connect to specific populations of vestibular and auditory projection neurons in the dorsal hindbrain through undetermined molecular mechanisms. In contrast, a molecular basis for the patterning of the vestibular projection neurons is beginning to emerge. These are organized through the actions of rostrocaudally and dorsoventrally restricted transcription factors into a 'hodological mosaic' within which coherent and largely segregated subgroups are specified to project to different targets in the spinal cord and brain stem. A specific set of these regionally diverse vestibular projection neurons functions as the central element that transforms vestibular sensory signals generated by active and passive head and body movements into motor output through the extraocular muscles. The large dynamic range of motion-related sensory signals requires an organization of VOR pathways as parallel, frequency-tuned, hierarchical connections from the sensory periphery to the motor output. We suggest that eyes, ears and functional connections subserving the VOR are vertebrate novelties that evolved into a functionally coherent motor control system in an almost stereotypic organization across vertebrate taxa.

  9. Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness After Inspiratory Threshold Loading in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Sunita; Sheel, A. William; Road, Jeremy D.; Reid, W. Darlene

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Skeletal muscle damage occurs following high-intensity or unaccustomed exercise; however, it is difficult to monitor damage to the respiratory muscles, particularly in humans. The aim of this study was to use clinical measures to investigate the presence of skeletal muscle damage in the inspiratory muscles. Methods: Ten healthy subjects underwent 60 minutes of voluntary inspiratory threshold loading (ITL) at 70% of maximal inspiratory pressure. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures, delayed onset muscle soreness on a visual analogue scale and plasma creatine kinase were measured prior to ITL, and at repeated time points after ITL (4, 24 and 48 hours post-ITL). Results: Delayed onset muscle soreness was present in all subjects 24 hours following ITL (intensity = 22 ± 6 mm; significantly higher than baseline p = 0.02). Muscle soreness was reported primarily in the anterior neck region, and was correlated to the amount of work done by the inspiratory muscles during ITL (r = 0.72, p = 0.02). However, no significant change was observed in maximal inspiratory or expiratory pressures or creatine kinase. Conclusions: These findings suggest that an intense bout of ITL results in muscle soreness primarily in the accessory muscles of inspiration, however, may be insufficient to cause significant muscle damage in healthy adults. PMID:20467514

  10. The neonatal acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Weatherby, L A; Bennett, M J

    1980-01-01

    Probe tones from 220 Hz to 2 000 Hz were used to measure the static and dynamic acoustic impedance of 44 neonates. Acoustic reflex thresholds to broad band noise were obtained from every neonate tested when employing the higher frequency probe tones. The reflex threshold levels measured are similar to those of adults. The static impedance values are discussed to give a possible explanation of why reflex thresholds cannot be detected using conventional 220 Hz impedance bridges.

  11. Strain and load thresholds for cervical muscle recruitment in response to quasi-static tensile stretch of the caprine C5-C6 facet joint capsule.

    PubMed

    Azar, Nadia R; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Chen, Chaoyang; Lu, Ying; Cavanaugh, John M

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the response of cervical muscles to physiologic tensile stretch of cervical facet joint capsule (FJC) at a quasi-static displacement rate of 0.5mm/s. In vivo caprine left C5-C6 FJC preparations were subjected to an incremental tensile displacement paradigm. EMG activity was recorded during FJC stretch from the right trapezius (TR) and multifidus (MF) muscle groups at the C5 and C6 levels and bilaterally from the sternomastoid (SM) and longus colli (LC) muscle groups at the C5-C6 level. Onset of muscular activity was later analyzed using visual and computer-based methods. Capsule load and strain at the time of onset were recorded and compared between the muscle groups. Results indicated capsule load was a better indicator of the tensile stretch thresholds for muscular recruitment than capsule strain. MF responded at significantly smaller capsule loads than TR and LC, while TR and LC activation loads were not significantly different. SM did not respond to physiologic FJC stretch. Muscle group recruitment order reflected the muscles' fiber type compositions and functional roles in the spine. This study provides the first evidence that the cervical ligamento-muscular reflex pathways are activated via tensile FJC stretch and extend to superficial and deep musculature on the anterior and posterior aspects of the neck, ipsilateral and contralateral to the side of FJC stretch.

  12. Effects of a new centrally acting muscle relaxant, NK433 (lanperisone hydrochloride) on spinal reflexes.

    PubMed

    Sakitama, K; Ozawa, Y; Aoto, N; Tomita, H; Ishikawa, M

    1997-10-22

    (-)-(R)-2-methyl-3-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-4'-trifluoromethylpropiophenone++ + monohydrochloride, lanperisone hydrochloride (NK433) administered intravenously or orally depressed the mono- and polysynaptic reflex potential, dorsal root reflex potential, flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers, patellar and flexor reflexes. These effects were reduced by spinal transection. NK433 inhibited the facilitation of the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers that was induced by intrathecal administration of noradrenaline-HCl. (+)-(1R,2R)-2-methyl-3-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)-1-pr opanol (LPS-9)-HCl, a metabolite of NK433, also inhibited the spinal reflexes. Given orally, NK433 had effects more than three times stronger and tending to be longer-lasting than those of eperisone-HCl. These results suggest that NK433 exerts a non-selective inhibition on spinal reflexes and that inhibition of the descending noradrenergic tonic facilitation within the spinal cord is involved in the mechanism of spinal reflex depression by NK433. LPS-9 could contribute to the potent activity of NK433 after oral administration.

  13. Habituation behavior of the medium-latency reflex over the anterior tibial muscle after electrical stimulation of the sural nerve.

    PubMed

    Alaid, S; Hanke, D; Kornhuber, M

    2014-11-07

    Over human leg muscles, three motor responses (MR) can commonly be elicited, namely short-latency reflex (SLR), medium-latency reflex (MLR), and long-latency reflex (LLR). The MLR is less well understood than SLR and LLR. As the response to subsequent stimuli may be used to characterize central influences of an MR, we were interested, whether the MLR differs from SLR and LLR with respect to its habituation and facilitation behavior. MR were examined over the anterior tibial (TA) muscle at different contraction levels after electrical single or train stimuli (time intervals of 3 ms) over the ipsilateral sural nerve. Furthermore, MR were selectively averaged after each of four subsequent stimuli (1Hz, 0.4 Hz, trains-of-3). After single stimuli, the peak latency values were 46.2±2.3 ms, 88.0±5.8 ms (MLR), and 131.7±22.2 ms (LLR). All three MR gained similarly strong and significantly in amplitude when up to 10 kg of weight was loaded compared with no weight load. After train stimuli, the LLR but not SLR and MLR gained significantly in amplitude as compared with single stimuli. Different to SLR and LLR, the MLR showed significant habituation behavior at a stimulus repetition rate of 1Hz but not of 0.4 Hz. Thus, inhibitory interneurons seem to be involved in the MLR pathway.

  14. Single low-threshold afferents innervating the skin of the human foot modulate ongoing muscle activity in the upper limbs.

    PubMed

    Bent, Leah R; Lowrey, Catherine R

    2013-03-01

    We have shown for the first time that single cutaneous afferents in the foot dorsum have significant reflex coupling to motoneurons supplying muscles in the upper limb, particularly posterior deltoid and triceps brachii. These observations strengthen what we know from whole nerve stimulation, that skin on the foot and ankle can contribute to the modulation of interlimb muscles in distant innervation territories. The current work provides evidence of the mechanism behind the reflex, where one single skin afferent can evoke a reflex response, rather than a population. Nineteen of forty-one (46%) single cutaneous afferents isolated in the dorsum or plantar surface of the foot elicited a significant modulation of muscle activity in the upper limb. Identification of single afferents in this reflex indicates the strength of the connection and, ultimately, the importance of foot skin in interlimb coordination. The median response magnitude was 2.29% of background EMG, and the size of the evoked response did not significantly differ among the four mechanoreceptor classes (P > 0.1). Interestingly, although the distribution of afferents types did not differ across the foot dorsum, there was a significantly greater coupling response from receptors located on the medial aspect of the foot dorsum (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the most consistent coupling with upper limb muscles was demonstrated by type I afferents (fast and slowly adapting). This work contributes to the current literature on receptor specificity, supporting the view that individual classes of cutaneous afferents may subserve specific roles in kinesthesia, reflexes, and tactile perception.

  15. Hoffmann reflex is increased after 14 days of daily repeated Achilles tendon vibration for the soleus but not for the gastrocnemii muscles.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Pérot, Chantal

    2012-02-01

    In a previous study, Achilles tendon vibrations were enough to improve the triceps surae (TS) activation capacities and also to slightly increase TS Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) obtained by summing up soleus (Sol) and gastrocnemii (GM and GL) EMGs. The purpose of the present study was to analyze separately Sol and GM or GL reflexes to account for different effects of the vibrations on the reflex excitability of the slow soleus and of the gastrocnemii muscles. A control group (n = 13) and a vibration group (n = 16) were tested in pre-test and post-test conditions. The Achilles tendon vibration program consisted of 1 h of daily vibration (frequency: 50 Hz) applied during 14 days. Maximal Sol, GM and GL H-reflexes, and M-waves were recorded, and their H(max)/M(max) ratios gave the index of reflex excitability. After the vibration protocol, only Sol H(max)/M(max) was enhanced (p < 0.001). The enhanced Sol reflex excitability after vibration is in favor of a decrease in the pre-synaptic inhibition due to the repeated vibrations and the high solicitation of the reflex pathway. Those results of a short period of vibration applied at rest may be limited to the soleus because of its high density in muscle spindles and slow motor units, both structures being very sensitive to vibrations.

  16. The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the intrathecal noradrenaline-induced facilitation of the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakitama, K

    1993-11-01

    The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers (group II flexor reflex) in anesthetized intact rats and on the intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex in anesthetized spinal rats were investigated. In anesthetized intact rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen inhibited the group II flexor reflex dose-dependently, whereas the inhibitory effect of tizanidine-HCl was bell-shaped. The effect of diazepam tended to be saturated. In anesthetized spinal rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl, diazepam and baclofen also depressed the group II flexor reflex, but tizanidine-HCl slightly increased it. The intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex was not affected by mephenesin or diazepam, but was inhibited by tizanidine-HCl, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen. These results suggest that compounds with centrally acting muscle relaxant activity depress the group II flexor reflex in different manners, and the inhibition of descending noradrenergic tonic facilitation within the spinal cord participates in the depressant action of the group II flexor reflex produced by tolperisone-HCl, tizanidine-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen.

  17. Comparison of trunk muscle reflex activation patterns between active and passive trunk flexion-extension loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael W

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of trunk flexion-extension loading on the neuromuscular reflexive latencies and amplitude responses of the trunk musculature. Eighteen male and female subjects (18-27yrs) participated in active and passive trunk flexion extension, performed ∼7days apart. Subjects performed 60 trunk flexion-extension repetitions. Surface electromyography (EMG) was collected bilaterally from paraspinal and abdominal muscles. In the active condition, subjects volitionally moved their trunks, while in the passive condition the dynamometer controlled the movements. The trunk was perturbed before and immediately after 30 repetitions. Latency of muscle onset, latency of first peak, latency of maximum peak, and peak EMG amplitude were evaluated. No differences between conditions, sides, or perturbation session were apparent. Overall latencies were shorter in females (p<.05) and abdominal muscles compared to paraspinals (p<.05). Thoracic paraspinal muscle amplitudes were greater than all other muscles (p<.05). Based upon the present results, the neuromuscular system engages trunk flexor muscles prior to the paraspinals in order to provide possible stabilization of the trunk when flexor moments are generated. Overall, the results indicate no difference in response of the neuromuscular system to active or passive repetitive loading.

  18. Combined, but not individual, blockade of ASIC3, P2X, and EP4 receptors attenuates the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused hindlimb muscles.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Copp, Steven W; Kim, Joyce S; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-12-01

    In healthy humans, tests of the hypothesis that lactic acid, PGE2, or ATP plays a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex proved controversial. The findings in humans resembled ours in decerebrate rats that individual blockade of the receptors to lactic acid, PGE2, and ATP had only small effects on the exercise pressor reflex provided that the muscles were freely perfused. This similarity between humans and rats prompted us to test the hypothesis that in rats with freely perfused muscles combined receptor blockade is required to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex. We first compared the reflex before and after injecting either PPADS (10 mg/kg), a P2X receptor antagonist, APETx2 (100 μg/kg), an activating acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC) channel antagonist, or L161982 (2 μg/kg), an EP4 receptor antagonist, into the arterial supply of the hindlimb of decerebrated rats. We then examined the effects of combined blockade of P2X receptors, ASIC3 channels, and EP4 receptors on the exercise pressor reflex using the same doses, intra-arterial route, and time course of antagonist injections as those used for individual blockade. We found that neither PPADS (n = 5), APETx2 (n = 6), nor L161982 (n = 6) attenuated the reflex. In contrast, combined blockade of these receptors (n = 7) attenuated the peak (↓27%, P < 0.019) and integrated (↓48%, P < 0.004) pressor components of the reflex. Combined blockade injected intravenously had no effect on the reflex. We conclude that combined blockade of P2X receptors, ASIC3 channels, and EP4 receptors on the endings of thin fiber muscle afferents is required to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused hindlimbs.

  19. Surgical desensitisation of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle relieves chronic tension-type headache caused by tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle in patients with aponeurotic blepharoptosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya

    2013-02-01

    Proprioceptively innervated intramuscular connective tissues in Müller's muscle function as exterior mechanoreceptors to induce reflex contraction of the levator and occipitofrontalis muscles. In aponeurotic blepharoptosis, since the levator aponeurosis is disinserted from the tarsus, stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle is increased even on primary gaze to induce phasic and tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle. It was hypothesised that in certain patients with aponeurotic blepharoptosis, the presence of tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle due to the sensitised mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle, can cause chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) associated with occipitofrontalis tenderness. To verify this hypothesis, this study evaluated (1) what differentiates patients with CTTH from patients without CTTH, (2) how pharmacological contraction of Müller's smooth muscle fibres as a method for desensitising the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle affects electromyographic activity of the frontalis muscle, and (3) how surgical aponeurotic reinsertion to desensitise the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle electromyographically or subjectively affects activities of the occipitofrontalis muscle or CTTH. It was found that patients had sustained CTTH when light eyelid closure did not markedly reduce eyebrow elevation. However, pharmacological contraction of Müller's smooth muscle fibres or surgery to desensitise the mechanoreceptor electromyographically reduced the tonic contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle on primary gaze and subjectively relieved aponeurotic blepharoptosis-associated CTTH. Over-stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle on primary gaze may induce CTTH due to tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle. Therefore, surgical desensitisation of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle appears to relieve CTTH.

  20. A threshold-based approach for muscle contraction detection from surface EMG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morantes, Gaudi; Fernández, Gerardo; Altuve, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    Surface electromyographic (SEMG) signals are commonly used as control signals in prosthetic and orthotic devices. Super cial electrodes are placed on the skin of the subject to acquire its muscular activity through this signal. The muscle contraction episode is then in charge of activating and deactivating these devices. Nevertheless, there is no gold standard" to detect muscle contraction, leading to delayed responses and false and missed detections. This fact motivated us to propose a new approach that compares a smoothed version of the SEMG signal with a xed threshold, in order to detect muscle contraction episodes. After preprocessing the SEMG signal, the smoothed version is obtained using a moving average lter, where three di erent window lengths has been evaluated. The detector was tuned by maximizing sensitivity and speci city and evaluated using SEMG signals obtained from the anterior tibial and gastrocnemius muscles, taken during the walking of ve subjects. Compared with traditional detection methods, we obtain a reduction of 3 ms in the detection delay, an increase of 8% in sensitivity but a decrease of 15% in speci city. Future work is directed to the inclusion of a temporal threshold (a double-threshold approach) to minimize false detections and reduce detection delays.

  1. Evoked H-reflex and V-wave responses during maximal isometric, concentric, and eccentric muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Duclay, Julien; Martin, Alain

    2005-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the modulations of H-reflex and V-wave responses during passive and maximal active dynamic actions. Experiments were performed on 16 healthy males [age: 24 +/- 4 (SD) yr]. Maximal H-reflexes (Hmax) and M-waves (MmaxR) were evoked at the same muscle length during passive isometric, shortening and lengthening actions and during maximal voluntary isometric, concentric, and eccentric plantar-flexion. In all contraction types, supra-maximal stimulus intensity was used to evoke the superimposed maximal M wave (MmaxA) and V wave (V) of the soleus muscle. At rest, the Hmax/MmaxR ratio was significantly reduced during lengthening with respect to isometric and shortening actions (P < 0.05). For each action type, the ratio between H reflex superimposed to the contraction (Hsup) and MmaxA was not different from Hmax/MmaxR ratio. When plantar flexors were maximally voluntary activated, the Hsup/MmaxA ratio was still lower during eccentric contraction as compared with isometric and concentric efforts (0.33 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.47 +/- 0.02 and 0.50 +/- 0.03, P < 0.001), whereas V/MmaxA ratios were similar for all contraction types (isometric 0.26 +/- 0.02; concentric 0.23 +/- 0.03, and eccentric 0.24 +/- 0.02; P > 0.05). The V/MmaxA ratio was significantly lower than Hsup/MmaxA during isometric and concentric MVC (P < 0.001). No difference was observed between V/MmaxA and Hsup/MmaxA ratios during eccentric efforts. The H-reflex modulations, present during lengthening actions, were mainly attributed to presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents and to homosynaptic postactivation depression. Results on V wave and H reflex suggest that during eccentric MVC, the spinal loop is specifically modulated by the supra-spinal centers and/or neural mechanisms at spinal level.

  2. Changes in H reflex and neuromechanical properties of the trapezius muscle after 5 weeks of eccentric training: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Vangsgaard, Steffen; Taylor, Janet L; Hansen, Ernst A; Madeleine, Pascal

    2014-06-15

    Trapezius muscle Hoffman (H) reflexes were obtained to investigate the neural adaptations induced by a 5-wk strength training regimen, based solely on eccentric contractions of the shoulder muscles. Twenty-nine healthy subjects were randomized into an eccentric training group (n = 15) and a reference group (n = 14). The eccentric training program consisted of nine training sessions of eccentric exercise performed over a 5-wk period. H-reflex recruitment curves, the maximal M wave (Mmax), maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force, rate of force development (RFD), and electromyographic (EMG) voluntary activity were recorded before and after training. H reflexes were recorded from the middle part of the trapezius muscle by electrical stimulation of the C3/4 cervical nerves; Mmax was measured by electrical stimulation of the accessory nerve. Eccentric strength training resulted in significant increases in the maximal trapezius muscle H reflex (Hmax) (21.4% [5.5-37.3]; P = 0.01), MVC force (26.4% [15.0-37.7]; P < 0.01), and RFD (24.6% [3.2-46.0]; P = 0.025), while no significant changes were observed in the reference group. Mmax remained unchanged in both groups. A significant positive correlation was found between the change in MVC force and the change in EMG voluntary activity in the training group (r = 0.57; P = 0.03). These results indicate that the net excitability of the trapezius muscle H-reflex pathway increased after 5 wk of eccentric training. This is the first study to investigate and document changes in the trapezius muscle H reflex following eccentric strength training.

  3. Increases in vocalization and motor reflex thresholds are influenced by the site of morphine microinjection: comparisons following administration into the periaqueductal gray, ventral medulla, and spinal subarachnoid space.

    PubMed

    Borszcz, G S

    1995-06-01

    The relative influence of morphine microinjected into the periaqueductal gray, ventral medulla (nucleus raphé magnus or nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis), or spinal subarachnoid space on the thresholds of responses organized at spinal (spinal motor reflexes, SMRs), medullary (vocalizations elicited during shock, VDSs), and rhinencephalic-diencephalic (vocalization after discharges, VADs) levels of the neuraxis was assessed. Dose-dependent increases in response thresholds differed with the site of morphine injection. These results indicate that the mu-opiate-receptor-linked systems in the mesencephalon, medulla, and spinal cord exert differential antinociceptive effects on pain behaviors organized at different levels of the neuraxis. A hypothesis is offered regarding the mechanisms through which morphine inhibits nociceptive transmission through various levels of the CNS. VADs are promoted as a model system for analyzing the affective-motivational dimension of the pain experience.

  4. A comparative study of changes operated by sympathetic nervous system activation on spindle afferent discharge and on tonic vibration reflex in rabbit jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Passatore, M; Deriu, F; Grassi, C; Roatta, S

    1996-03-07

    The effect of sympathetic activation on the spindle afferent response to vibratory stimuli eliciting the tonic vibration reflex in jaw closing muscles was studied in precollicularly decerebrate rabbits. Stimulation of the cervical sympathetic trunk, at frequencies within the physiologic range, consistently induced a decrease in spindle response to muscle vibration, which was often preceded by a transient enhancement. Spindle discharge was usually correlated with the EMG activity in the masseter muscle and the tension reflexly developed by jaw muscles. The changes in spindle response to vibration were superimposed on variations of the basal discharge which exhibited different patterns in the studied units, increases in the firing rate being more frequently observed. These effects were mimicked by close arterial injection of the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Data presented here suggest that sympathetically-induced modifications of the tonic vibration reflex are due to changes exerted on muscle spindle afferent information.

  5. Molecular and physiological events in respiratory muscles and blood of rats exposed to inspiratory threshold loading.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Álvarez, Marisol; Sabaté-Brescó, Marina; Vilà-Ubach, Mònica; Gáldiz, Juan B; Alvarez, Francisco J; Casadevall, Carme; Gea, Joaquim; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-05-01

    High-intensity exercise induces oxidative stress and inflammatory events in muscles. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α may alter muscle protein metabolism or promote muscle regeneration. We hypothesized that a program of noninvasive chronic inspiratory loading of different intensities induces a differential pattern of physiological, molecular, and cellular events within rat diaphragms. Antioxidants and TNF-α blockade may influence those events. In the diaphragm, gastrocnemius, and blood of rats exposed to high-intensity inspiratory threshold loads (2 hour every 24 hours for 14 days), with and without treatment with N-acetyl cysteine or infliximab (anti-TNF-α antibody), inflammatory cells and cytokines, superoxide anion production, myogenesis markers, and muscle structure were explored. In all animals, maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP) and body weight were determined. High-intensity inspiratory loading for 2 weeks caused a decline in MIP and body weight, and in the diaphragm induced a reduction in fast-twitch fiber proportions and sizes, whereas inflammatory cells and cytokine levels, including TNF-α immunohistochemical expression, superoxide anion, internal nuclei counts, and markers of myogenesis were increased. Blockade of TNF-α improved respiratory muscle function and structure, and animal weight, and, in the diaphragm, reduced inflammatory cell numbers and superoxide anion production drastically while inducing larger increases in protein and messenger RNA levels and immunohistochemical expression of TNF-α, internal nuclei, and markers of muscle regeneration. Blunting of TNF-α also induced a reduction in blood inflammatory cytokines and superoxide anion production. We conclude that TNF-α synthesized by inflammatory cells or myofibers could have differential effects on muscle structure and function in response to chronic, noninvasive, high-intensity inspiratory threshold loading.

  6. Spatial control of reflexes, posture and movement in normal conditions and after neurological lesions

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Anatol G.; Levin, Mindy F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Control of reflexes is usually associated with central modulation of their sensitivity (gain) or phase-dependent inhibition and facilitation of their influences on motoneurons (reflex gating). Accumulated empirical findings show that the gain modulation and reflex gating are secondary, emergent properties of central control of spatial thresholds at which reflexes become functional. In this way, the system pre-determines, in a feedforward and task-specific way, where, in a spatial domain or a frame of reference, muscles are allowed to work without directly prescribing EMG activity and forces. This control strategy is illustrated by considering reflex adaptation to repeated muscle stretches in healthy subjects, a process associated with implicit learning and generalization. It has also been shown that spasticity, rigidity, weakness and other neurological motor deficits may have a common source – limitations in the range of spatial threshold control elicited by neural lesions. PMID:28149391

  7. Low anaerobic threshold and increased skeletal muscle lactate production in subjects with Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Ciammola, Andrea; Sassone, Jenny; Sciacco, Monica; Mencacci, Niccolò E; Ripolone, Michela; Bizzi, Caterina; Colciago, Clarissa; Moggio, Maurizio; Parati, Gianfranco; Silani, Vincenzo; Malfatto, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial defects that affect cellular energy metabolism have long been implicated in the etiology of Huntington's disease (HD). Indeed, several studies have found defects in the mitochondrial functions of the central nervous system and peripheral tissues of HD patients. In this study, we investigated the in vivo oxidative metabolism of exercising muscle in HD patients. Ventilatory and cardiometabolic parameters and plasma lactate concentrations were monitored during incremental cardiopulmonary exercise in twenty-five HD subjects and twenty-five healthy subjects. The total exercise capacity was normal in HD subjects but notably the HD patients and presymptomatic mutation carriers had a lower anaerobic threshold than the control subjects. The low anaerobic threshold of HD patients was associated with an increase in the concentration of plasma lactate. We also analyzed in vitro muscular cell cultures and found that HD cells produce more lactate than the cells of healthy subjects. Finally, we analyzed skeletal muscle samples by electron microscopy and we observed striking mitochondrial structural abnormalities in two out of seven HD subjects. Our findings confirm mitochondrial abnormalities in HD patients' skeletal muscle and suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction is reflected functionally in a low anaerobic threshold and an increased lactate synthesis during intense physical exercise.

  8. A common neural element receiving rhythmic arm and leg activity as assessed by reflex modulation in arm muscles.

    PubMed

    Sasada, Syusaku; Tazoe, Toshiki; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Futatsubashi, Genki; Ohtsuka, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shinya; Zehr, E Paul; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Neural interactions between regulatory systems for rhythmic arm and leg movements are an intriguing issue in locomotor neuroscience. Amplitudes of early latency cutaneous reflexes (ELCRs) in stationary arm muscles are modulated during rhythmic leg or arm cycling but not during limb positioning or voluntary contraction. This suggests that interneurons mediating ELCRs to arm muscles integrate outputs from neural systems controlling rhythmic limb movements. Alternatively, outputs could be integrated at the motoneuron and/or supraspinal levels. We examined whether a separate effect on the ELCR pathways and cortico-motoneuronal excitability during arm and leg cycling is integrated by neural elements common to the lumbo-sacral and cervical spinal cord. The subjects performed bilateral leg cycling (LEG), contralateral arm cycling (ARM), and simultaneous contralateral arm and bilateral leg cycling (A&L), while ELCRs in the wrist flexor and shoulder flexor muscles were evoked by superficial radial (SR) nerve stimulation. ELCR amplitudes were facilitated by cycling tasks and were larger during A&L than during ARM and LEG. A low stimulus intensity during ARM or LEG generated a larger ELCR during A&L than the sum of ELCRs during ARM and LEG. We confirmed this nonlinear increase in single motor unit firing probability following SR nerve stimulation during A&L. Furthermore, motor-evoked potentials following transcranial magnetic and electrical stimulation did not show nonlinear potentiation during A&L. These findings suggest the existence of a common neural element of the ELCR reflex pathway that is active only during rhythmic arm and leg movement and receives convergent input from contralateral arms and legs.

  9. Cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator muscle are located in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kenya; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Kawagishi, Kyutaro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2012-12-01

    Since the levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles despite being antigravity mixed muscles to involuntarily sustain eyelid opening and eyebrow lifting, this study has proposed a hypothetical mechanism to compensate for this anatomical defect. The voluntary contraction of fast-twitch fibres of the levator muscle stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to evoke proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study confirmed the presence of cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles. After confirming that severing the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induced ipsilateral eyelid ptosis, Fluorogold was applied as a tracer to the proximal stump of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve in rats. Fluorogold labelled the cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons, not in any regions of the rat brain including the trigeminal ganglion, but in the ipsilateral mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neighbouring the locus ceruleus. Some Fluorogold particles accumulated in the area of the locus ceruleus. The trigeminal proprioceptive neurons could be considered centrally displaced ganglion cells to transmit afferent signal from the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to the mesencephalon, where they may be able to make excitatory synaptic connections with both the oculomotor neurons and the frontalis muscle motoneurons for the involuntary coordination of the eyelid and eyebrow activities, and potentially to the locus ceruleus.

  10. Soleus H-reflex gain in humans walking and running under simulated reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, D. P.; Aagaard, P.; Simonsen, E. B.; Farley, C. T.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Hoffmann (H-) reflex is an electrical analogue of the monosynaptic stretch reflex, elicited by bypassing the muscle spindle and directly stimulating the afferent nerve. Studying H-reflex modulation provides insight into how the nervous system centrally modulates stretch reflex responses.A common measure of H-reflex gain is the slope of the relationship between H-reflex amplitude and EMG amplitude. To examine soleus H-reflex gain across a range of EMG levels during human locomotion, we used simulated reduced gravity to reduce muscle activity. We hypothesised that H-reflex gain would be independent of gravity level.We recorded EMG from eight subjects walking (1.25 m s-1) and running (3.0 m s-1) at four gravity levels (1.0, 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 G (Earth gravity)). We normalised the stimulus M-wave and resulting H-reflex to the maximal M-wave amplitude (Mmax) elicited throughout the stride to correct for movement of stimulus and recording electrodes relative to nerve and muscle fibres. Peak soleus EMG amplitude decreased by 30% for walking and for running over the fourfold change in gravity. As hypothesised, slopes of linear regressions fitted to H-reflex versus EMG data were independent of gravity for walking and running (ANOVA, P > 0.8). The slopes were also independent of gait (P > 0.6), contrary to previous studies. Walking had a greater y-intercept (19.9% Mmax) than running (-2.5% Mmax; P < 0.001). At all levels of EMG, walking H-reflex amplitudes were higher than running H-reflex amplitudes by a constant amount. We conclude that the nervous system adjusts H-reflex threshold but not H-reflex gain between walking and running. These findings provide insight into potential neural mechanisms responsible for spinal modulation of the stretch reflex during human locomotion.

  11. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  12. Experimental study of oculocardiac reflex (OCR) with graded stimuli.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Indu; Sharma, Rajeev; Khurana, A K

    2006-01-01

    The present study was conducted to observe the effect of graded mechanical stimuli on occurrence of oculocardiac reflex (OCR). The experiments were carried out in twenty albino rabbits of either sex weighing between 1-2 kg. Changes in heart rate and/or cardiac rhythm (oculocardiac reflex) were studied by applying traction with progressively increasing weights to medial rectus muscle. Mean threshold value of square wave mechanical stimulus just sufficient to produce oculocardiac reflex was found to be 19 +/- 8.52 g. As the traction weights were progressively increased, more and more decrease in heart rate was observed. It was concluded that once the threshold value of stimulus was reached, the oculocardiac reflex showed a graded response with progressively increasing traction weights.

  13. The temporal relationship of thresholds between muscle activity and ventilation during bicycle ramp exercise in community dwelling elderly males

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Satoshi; Higuchi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the appearance time of the ventilatory threshold point and the electromyographic threshold in the activity of the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris long head and gastrocnemius lateral head muscles during ramp cycling exercise in elderly males. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven community dwelling elderly males participated in this study. Subjects performed exercise testing with an expiratory gas analyzer and surface electromyography to evaluate the tested muscle activities during ramp exercise. [Results] The electromyographic threshold for rectus femoris was not valid because the slope after electromyographic threshold was not significant as compared to that before electromyographic threshold. The slope of the regression line for vastus lateralis was significantly decreased after electromyographic threshold while biceps femoris and gastrocnemius were increased. The electromyographic threshold appearance times for vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius were significantly earlier than ventilatory threshold point. There were no difference in electromyographic threshold appearance times among three muscles. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the increase in the slope of the regression line after electromyographic threshold for vastus lateralis was decreased, possibly indicating to postpone muscular fatigue resulting from the activation of biceps femoris and gastrocnemius as biarticular antagonists. This recruitment pattern might be an elderly-specific strategy. PMID:27942152

  14. The effect of tone-reducing orthotic devices on soleus muscle reflex excitability while standing in patients with spasticity following stroke.

    PubMed

    Ibuki, Aileen; Bach, Timothy; Rogers, Douglas; Bernhardt, Julie

    2010-03-01

    Orthoses are commonly prescribed for the management of spasticity but their neurophysiologic effect on spasticity remains unsubstantiated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of three tone-reducing devices (dynamic foot orthosis, muscle stretch, and orthokinetic compression garment) on soleus muscle reflex excitability while standing in patients with spasticity following stroke. A repeated measures intervention study was conducted on 13 patients with stroke selected from a sample of convenience. A custom-made dynamic foot orthosis, a range of motion walker to stretch the soleus muscle and class 1 and class 2 orthokinetic compression garments were assessed using the ratio of maximum Hoffmann reflex amplitude to maximum M-response amplitude (Hmax:Mmax) to determine their effect on soleus muscle reflex excitability. Only 10 subjects were able to complete the testing. There were no significant treatment effects for the interventions (F=1.208, df=3.232, p=0.328); however, when analyzed subject-by-subject, two subjects responded to the dynamic foot orthosis and one of those two subjects also responded to the class 1 orthokinetic compression garment. Overall, the results demonstrated that the tone-reducing devices had no significant effect on soleus reflex excitability suggesting that these tone-reducing orthotic devices have no significant neurophysiologic effect on spasticity.

  15. [Stapedial reflex under auditory masking of bone canal: 1- The effect of white noise on threshold values].

    PubMed

    Cassano, P; Mininni, F; Paulillo, A

    1983-11-30

    The authors have studied the behaviour of the A.R. threshold under bone way masking sent to the vertex. The masking caused changings of the recorded track; a change of the compliance was observed in the 60% of the subjects and a rythmic waving of the (isoelectric) line was observed in 40% of the subjects. Upon these changes the A.R. were recorded for the tone test sent at similar values (almost equal) at those recorded without any kind of masker, even if a threshold shift sometimes big, existed because of the high intensity of the masking noise. The authors are making further researches to explain the meaning of these changes.

  16. The Effects of Temporal and Spatial Predictions on Stretch Reflexes of Ankle Flexor and Extensor Muscles While Standing

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Noritaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate how stretch reflex (SR) responses in the ankle extensor (soleus: SOL) and flexor (tibialis anterior: TA) muscles would be modulated with temporal and/or spatial predictions of external perturbations and whether their effects are specific to the standing posture. SR responses in the SOL/TA were elicited by imposing quick ankle toes-up/toes-down rotations while standing upright and in the supine position. We designed four experimental conditions based on pre-information about perturbations: no information (No Cue), the timing of the perturbation onset (TIM), the direction of the perturbation (DIR), and both the timing and direction of the perturbation (TIM/DIR). Each condition was separated and its order was counterbalanced. In the SR of TA evoked by toes-down rotation, integrated electromyography activities of the late component were significantly reduced in the TIM and TIM/DIR conditions as compared with those in the No Cue and DIR conditions. The occurrence rate of late SR components that reflects how often the reflex response was observed was also lower in the TIM and TIM/DIR conditions as compared with that in the No Cue and DIR conditions. On the other hand, no significant changes were seen among the four conditions in the early SR component in the TA and both SR components in the SOL. The same results in the occurrence rate were found in the supine position. The present results suggest (1) only temporal predictions have a remarkable effect on the SR excitability of the TA, and (2) this effect is independent of posture. PMID:27385043

  17. Long-latency reflexes of elbow and shoulder muscles suggest reciprocal excitation of flexors, reciprocal excitation of extensors, and reciprocal inhibition between flexors and extensors.

    PubMed

    Kurtzer, Isaac; Meriggi, Jenna; Parikh, Nidhi; Saad, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Postural corrections of the upper limb are required in tasks ranging from handling an umbrella in the changing wind to securing a wriggling baby. One complication in this process is the mechanical interaction between the different segments of the arm where torque applied at one joint induces motion at multiple joints. Previous studies have shown the long-latency reflexes of shoulder muscles (50-100 ms after a limb perturbation) account for these mechanical interactions by integrating information about motion of both the shoulder and elbow. It is less clear whether long-latency reflexes of elbow muscles exhibit a similar capability and what is the relation between the responses of shoulder and elbow muscles. The present study utilized joint-based loads tailored to the subjects' arm dynamics to induce well-controlled displacements of their shoulder and elbow. Our results demonstrate that the long-latency reflexes of shoulder and elbow muscles integrate motion from both joints: the shoulder and elbow flexors respond to extension at both joints, whereas the shoulder and elbow extensors respond to flexion at both joints. This general pattern accounts for the inherent flexion-extension coupling of the two joints arising from the arm's intersegmental dynamics and is consistent with spindle-based reciprocal excitation of shoulder and elbow flexors, reciprocal excitation of shoulder and elbow extensors, and across-joint inhibition between the flexors and extensors.

  18. Infant reflexes

    MedlinePlus

    ... in other age groups. These include: Moro reflex Sucking reflex (sucks when area around mouth is touched) ... side that was stroked and begin to make sucking motions. PARACHUTE REFLEX This reflex occurs in slightly ...

  19. Role of the middle ear muscle apparatus in mechanisms of speech signal discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroz, B. S.; Bazarov, V. G.; Sachenko, S. V.

    1980-01-01

    A method of impedance reflexometry was used to examine 101 students with hearing impairment in order to clarify the interrelation between speech discrimination and the state of the middle ear muscles. Ability to discriminate speech signals depends to some extent on the functional state of intraaural muscles. Speech discrimination was greatly impaired in the absence of stapedial muscle acoustic reflex, in the presence of low thresholds of stimulation and in very small values of reflex amplitude increase. Discrimination was not impeded in positive AR, high values of relative thresholds and normal increase of reflex amplitude in response to speech signals with augmenting intensity.

  20. Thresholds of cortical activation of muscle spindles and α motoneurones of the baboon's hand

    PubMed Central

    Koeze, T. H.; Phillips, C. G.; Sheridan, J. D.

    1968-01-01

    1. Much current thinking about voluntary movement assumes that the segmental γ loops can function as a servomechanism operated by the brain. However, the α motoneurones of the baboon's hand receive a powerful monosynaptic (CM) projection from the precentral gyrus. If servo-driving from the same cortical area is to be possible, it must project independently to the fusimotor neurones and have sufficient power to increase the afferent signalling from the muscle spindles. The cortical thresholds for contraction of m. extensor digitorum communis and for acceleration of the discharges of its muscle spindles have therefore been compared. 2. Significant results in this context require that the spindles studied be coupled in parallel with the responding extrafusal muscle fibres. Many spindles were not unloaded by the submaximal contractions evoked by cortical stimulation, although all so tested were unloaded by maximal motor nerve twitches. Reasons are given for thinking that such apparent lack of parallel coupling is an artifact of complex intramuscular anatomy and limitation of shortening by `isometric' myography. 3. A brief burst of corticospinal volleys at 500/sec, which is specially effective in exciting α motoneurones over the CM projection, failed to excite spindle afferents at or below the threshold for a cortical `twitch'. 4. In a few epileptiform discharges, bursts of spindle acceleration occurred independently of the clonic contractions. A relatively direct and independent cortico-fusimotor (CF) projection may therefore exist. 5. Prolonged near-threshold stimulation at 50-100/sec, which allows time for temporal summation in the less direct projections (e.g. cortico-interneuronal, cortico-rubro-spinal) and does not cause frequency-potentiation at CM synapses, gives abundant evidence of independent α and fusimotor projections, whose actions hardly outlast the stimulation period. 6. Although independent CF projections would permit servo-driving in natural

  1. Effect of thumb anaesthesia on weight perception, muscle activity and the stretch reflex in man.

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, C D; Rothwell, J C; Traub, M M

    1979-01-01

    1. We have confirmed the results of Gandevia & McCloskey (1977) on the effect of thumb anaesthesia on perception of weights lifted by the thumb. Weights lifted by flexion feel heavier and weights lifted by extension feel lighter. 2. The change in size of the long-latency stretch reflex in flexor pollicis longus or extensor pollicis longus after thumb anaesthesia cannot explain the effect on weight perception by removal or augmentation of the background servo assistance to muscular contraction. 3. During smooth thumb flexion, thumb anaesthesia increases e.m.g. activity in flexor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis longus for any given opposing torque. 4. During smooth thumb extension the opposite occurs: e.m.g. activity in both extensor and flexor pollicis longus decreases. 5. Clamping the thumb at the proximal phalanx to limit movement solely to the interphalangeal joint reduces or abolishes the effect of anaesthesia on both weight perception and e.m.g. activity during both flexion or extension tasks. 6. Gandevia & McCloskey's findings on the distorting effects of thumb anaesthesia on weight perception cannot be used to support the hypothesis of an efferent monitoring system of the sense of effort. Our results emphasize the close functional relationship between cutaneous and joint afferent information and motor control. PMID:512948

  2. Sex-related differences in descending norepinephrine and serotonin controls of spinal withdrawal reflex during intramuscular saline induced muscle nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jing; Jin, Lin; Zhao, Ye; Sui, Mei-Yu; Huang, Li; Tan, Yong-Xiang; Chen, Yan-Ke; You, Hao-Jun

    2011-04-01

    Sex-associated differences in the perception and modulation of pain have widely been reported in humans as well as animals. The aim of the present study performed in conscious rats of both sexes was to systematically investigate the role of sex in endogenous descending controls of nociceptive paw withdrawal reflex during experimental muscle pain elicited by intramuscular (i.m.) injection with different doses (0.1-0.4 ml of 0.9-5.8%) of saline. Ipsilateral i.m. injection of 0.2-0.4 ml, but not 0.1 ml, isotonic (0.9%, IT) saline elicited long lasting (about 7d), secondary and contralateral mechanical hyperalgesia in female rats, whereas male rats exhibited a bilateral, short-term (less than 1d) mechanical hyperalgesia only during the exposure to 0.4 ml IT saline injection (P < 0.05). A bolus of 0.4 ml, but not 0.1-0.2 ml, IT saline significantly induced a one-week, secondary and contralateral heat hypoalgesia in both male and female rats (P < 0.05). In contrast to the IT saline injection, 0.1 ml hypertonic (5.8%, HT) saline started to evoke bilateral mechanical hyperalgesia in male and female rats. During the HT saline induced muscle nociception, mechanical hyperalgesia in female rats was greater in magnitude and longer in duration than that of in male rats (P < 0.05). Heat hypoalgesia was bilaterally found in male rats receiving either 0.2 ml or 0.4 ml HT saline injection, whereas female rats showed heat hypoalgesia, subjected only to the 0.4 ml HT saline injection (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001). Intrathecal (i.th.) administration of either 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA) or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) significantly attenuated the HT saline induced heat hypoalgesia, not mechanical hyperalgesia, in male rats. By contrast, in female rats i.th. 6-OHDA markedly blocked heat hypoalgesia, and mechanical hyperalgesia was prevented by 5,7-DHT treatment. It is suggested that i.m. injection of saline dose-dependently elicits ipsilateral secondary and contralateral

  3. Using acoustic reflex threshold, auditory brainstem response and loudness judgments to investigate changes in neural gain following acute unilateral deprivation in normal hearing adults.

    PubMed

    Brotherton, Hannah; Plack, Christopher J; Schaette, Roland; Munro, Kevin J

    2017-03-01

    Unilateral auditory deprivation induces a reduction in the acoustic reflex threshold (ART) and an increase in loudness. These findings have been interpreted as a compensatory change in neural gain, governed by changes in excitatory and inhibitory neural inputs. There is also evidence to suggest that changes in neural gain can be measured using the auditory brainstem response (ABR). The present study extended Munro et al. (2014) [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 135, 315-322] by investigating changes after 4 days of unilateral earplug use to: (i) ART, (ii) ABR and (iii) loudness. Because changes may occur during the post-deprivation test session (day 4), ART measurements were taken 1 h and 2 h post-earplug removal. There was a significant reduction in ART in the treatment ear immediately after the removal of the earplug, which is consistent with a compensatory increase in neural gain. A novel finding was the significant return of ARTs to baseline within 2 h of earplug removal. A second novel finding was a significant decrease in the mean amplitude of ABR wave V in the treatment ear, but a significant increase in the control ear, both after 4 days of deprivation. These changes in the ABR are in the opposite direction to those predicted. We were unable to replicate the change in loudness reported in previous deprivation studies; however, the short period of earplug use may have contributed to this null finding.

  4. Contraction threshold and the "hump" component of charge movement in frog skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The delayed component of intramembranous charge movement (hump, I gamma) was studied around the contraction threshold in cut skeletal muscle fibers of the frog (Rana esculenta) in a single Vaseline-gap voltage clamp. Charges (Q) were computed as 50-ms integrals of the ON (QON) and OFF (QOFF) of the asymmetric currents after subtracting a baseline. The hump appeared in parallel with an excess of QON over QOFF by approximately 2.5 nC/mu F. Caffeine (0.75 mM) not only shifted the contraction threshold but moved both the hump and the difference between the ON and OFF charges to more negative membrane potentials. When using 10-mV voltage steps on top of different prepulse levels, the delayed component, if present, was more readily observable. The voltage dependences of the ON and OFF charges measured with these pulses were clearly different: QON had a maximum at or slightly above the contraction threshold, while QOFF increased monotonically in the voltage range examined. Caffeine (0.75 mM) shifted this voltage dependence of QON toward more negative membrane potentials, while that of QOFF was hardly influenced. These results show that the delayed component of intramembranous charge movement either is much slower during the OFF than during the ON, or returns to the OFF position during the pulse. Tetracaine (25 microM) had similar effects on the charge movement currents, shifting the voltage dependence on the ON charge in parallel with the contraction threshold, but to more positive membrane potentials, and leaving QOFF essentially unchanged. The direct difference between the charge movement measured in the presence of caffeine and in control solution was either biphasic or resembled the component isolated by tetracaine, suggesting a common site of caffeine and tetracaine action. The results can be understood if the released Ca plays a direct role in the generation of the hump, as proposed in the first paper of this series (Csernoch et al. 1991. J. Gen. Physiol. 97

  5. Increased PDE5 activity and decreased Rho kinase and PKC activities in colonic muscle from caveolin-1-/- mice impair the peristaltic reflex and propulsion.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Sunila; Bhattacharya, Sayak; Kumar, Divya P; Clay, Chereena; Ross, Gracious; Akbarali, Hamid I; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2013-12-01

    Caveolae are specialized regions of the plasma membrane that concentrate receptors and associated signaling molecules critical in regulation of cellular response to transmitters and hormones. We have determined the effects of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) deletion, caveolin-1 siRNA, and caveolar disruption in mice on the signaling pathways that mediate contraction and relaxation in colonic smooth muscle and on the components of the peristaltic reflex in isolated tissue and propulsion in intact colonic segments. In Cav-1-/- mice, both relaxation and contraction were decreased in smooth muscle cells and muscle strips, as well as during both phases of the peristaltic reflex and colonic propulsion. The decrease in relaxation in response to the nitric oxide (NO) donor was accompanied by a decrease in cGMP levels and an increase in phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) activity. Relaxation by a PDE5-resistant cGMP analog was not affected in smooth muscle of Cav-1-/- mice, suggesting that inhibition of relaxation was due to augmentation of PDE5 activity. Similar effects on relaxation, PDE5 and cGMP were obtained in muscle cells upon disruption of caveolae by methyl-β-cyclodextrin or suppression of Cav-1. Sustained contraction mediated via inhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) activity is regulated by Rho kinase and PKC via phosphorylation of two endogenous inhibitors of MLCP: myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit (MYPT1) and 17-kDa PKC-potentiated protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor protein (CPI-17), respectively. The activity of both enzymes and phosphorylation of MYPT1 and CPI-17 were decreased in smooth muscle from Cav-1-/- mice. We conclude that the integrity of caveolae is essential for contractile and relaxant activity in colonic smooth muscle and the maintenance of neuromuscular function at organ level.

  6. Role of muscle pulleys in producing eye position-dependence in the angular vestibuloocular reflex: a model-based study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurtell, M. J.; Kunin, M.; Raphan, T.; Wall, C. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that the head and eye velocity axes do not always align during compensatory vestibular slow phases. It has been shown that the eye velocity axis systematically tilts away from the head velocity axis in a manner that is dependent on eye-in-head position. The mechanisms responsible for producing these axis tilts are unclear. In this model-based study, we aimed to determine whether muscle pulleys could be involved in bringing about these phenomena. The model presented incorporates semicircular canals, central vestibular pathways, and an ocular motor plant with pulleys. The pulleys were modeled so that they brought about a rotation of the torque axes of the extraocular muscles that was a fraction of the angle of eye deviation from primary position. The degree to which the pulleys rotated the torque axes was altered by means of a pulley coefficient. Model input was head velocity and initial eye position data from passive and active yaw head impulses with fixation at 0 degrees, 20 degrees up and 20 degrees down, obtained from a previous experiment. The optimal pulley coefficient required to fit the data was determined by calculating the mean square error between data and model predictions of torsional eye velocity. For active head impulses, the optimal pulley coefficient varied considerably between subjects. The median optimal pulley coefficient was found to be 0.5, the pulley coefficient required for producing saccades that perfectly obey Listing's law when using a two-dimensional saccadic pulse signal. The model predicted the direction of the axis tilts observed in response to passive head impulses from 50 ms after onset. During passive head impulses, the median optimal pulley coefficient was found to be 0.21, when roll gain was fixed at 0.7. The model did not accurately predict the alignment of the eye and head velocity axes that was observed early in the response to passive head impulses. We found that this alignment could be well predicted if

  7. Effects of leg muscle tendon vibration on group Ia and group II reflex responses to stance perturbation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Marco; Nardone, Antonio; Schieppati, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Stretching the soleus (Sol) muscle during sudden toe-up rotations of the supporting platform in a standing subject evokes a short-latency response (SLR) and a medium-latency response (MLR). The aim of the present investigation was to further explore the afferent and spinal pathways mediating the SLR and MLR in lower limb muscles by means of tendon vibration. In seven subjects, toe-up or toe-down rotations were performed under: (1) control, (2) continuous bilateral vibration at 90 Hz of Achilles' tendon or tibialis anterior (TA) tendon, and (3) post-vibration conditions. Sol and TA background EMG activity and reflex responses were bilaterally recorded and analysed. Toe-up rotations induced SLRs and MLRs in Sol at average latencies of 40 and 66 ms, respectively. During vibration, the latency of both responses increased by about 2 ms. The area of the SLR significantly decreased during vibration, regardless of the underlying background activity, and almost returned to control value post-vibration. The area of Sol MLR was less influenced by vibration than SLR, the reduction being negligible with relatively high background activity. However, contrary to SLR, MLR was even more reduced post-vibration. Toe-down rotations induced no SLR in the TA, while a MLR was evoked at about 81 ms. The area of TA MLR decreased slightly during vibration but much more post-vibration. SLRs and MLRs were differently affected by changing the vibration frequency to 30 Hz: vibration had a negligible effect on the SLR, but still produced a significant effect on the MLR. The independence from the background EMG of the inhibitory effect of vibration upon the SLR suggests that vibration removes a constant amount of the Ia afferent input. This can be accounted for by either presynaptic inhibition of group Ia fibres or a ‘busy-line' phenomenon. The differential effect of vibration on SLRs and MLRs is compatible with the notions that spindle primaries have a higher sensitivity to vibration than

  8. Electrical stimulation cramp threshold frequency correlates well with the occurrence of skeletal muscle cramps.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kevin C; Knight, Kenneth L

    2009-03-01

    The minimum electrical stimulation frequency (HZ) at which a muscle cramps is termed threshold frequency (TF). TF is theorized to represent one's predisposition to cramping; however, TF and cramp occurrence have never been correlated. We hypothesized that TF would be lower in individuals with a cramp history and lower on the second of two days of testing; genetics may partially explain this lower TF. Cramp TF was measured in 19 subjects with (Group 1), and 12 subjects without (Group 2), a cramp history. Group 1 had a lower TF (14.9 +/- 1.3 vs. 25.5 +/- 1.6 HZ; P < 0.001) and a higher family history of cramping than Group 2 (89% vs. 27%; P < 0.001). TF was lower on day 2 (18.3 +/- 0.26 HZ) than day 1 (19.7 +/- 0.25 HZ; P = 0.03). Lower TFs are correlated with cramp history, supporting the inference that lower TFs may represent increased predisposition toward cramping. TF may be used to identify individuals at risk of cramping.

  9. Early modification of stretch reflex in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bergui, M; Paglia, G; Lopiano, L; Quattrocolo, G; Bergamini, L; Bergamasco, B

    1993-07-01

    We stretched quadriceps femoris in healthy subjects and in patients with a recent diagnosis of PD in order to assess whether modifications of the long-latency component of the stretch reflex is an early event in the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). We found a modified mechanical and electromyographic (EMG) behavior in stretching relaxed muscles of patients while voluntary activation greatly reduced differences between normal and Parkinsonian subjects, suggesting that a lower threshold of the response is an early sign in PD.

  10. Similarity in shape, timing and amplitude of H- and T-reflex potentials concurrently recorded along the broad skin area over soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Mineva, A; Dushanova, J; Gerilovsky, L

    1993-06-01

    Variations in shape, timing and amplitude of both mono- and bipolarly measured H- and T-reflex potentials can be influenced to a great extent by the muscle architecture and the peculiarities of the extracellular potential field. The "best point" for bipolar measurements, where the amplitude of the bipolar H- and T-potentials is maximal, occurred for the various subjects at a distance of 3.0 to 5.0 cm below the insertion of the gastrocnemii on the Achilles tendon. In contrast, the corresponding "best point" for monopolar H- and T-potentials is located 5.0 to 9.0 cm below the gastrocnemii insertion. The shape, total duration and timing of H- and T-potentials, concurrently measured at the various points along soleus muscle are similar. When the amplitude of the monopolar H- and T-potentials are levelled at the "best point" for monopolar measurements, the changes in the amplitude of both sets of potentials, monopolarly and bipolarly measured along soleus muscle, are identical. These results imply similar efferent outputs for both H- and T-reflexes, i.e. recruitment of motoneurons of comparable size.

  11. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  12. Reflex transmission to lumbar α-motoneurones in the mouse similar and different to those in the cat.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Eike D; Kalezic, Ivana; Dibaj, Payam; Steffens, Heinz

    2013-07-01

    Investigation and interpretation of defective motor circuitries in transgenic mice required further basic results from wild-type mice. Therefore, we investigated the lumbar motor reflex pattern in anaesthetised mice using intracellular motoneuronal recording and monosynaptic reflex testing. Thresholds and latencies in mice were similar to those in cats: thresholds for monosynaptic (group I) EPSPs were slightly above 1T (T=threshold for the lowest threshold fibres), around 1.5T for group II EPSPs and above 10T for group III EPSPs; group I EPSPs were maximal with a stimulus strength around 2T, group II EPSPs were maximal with 5-8T; latencies to the group I incoming volley were below 1ms for monosynaptic group I EPSPs, around 3ms for polysynaptic group II EPSPs and above 4ms for polysynaptic group III EPSPs. In contrast to reflex actions in the cat, monosynaptic gastrocnemius-soleus reflexes were facilitated by conditioning stimulation of the peroneal, sural and tibial nerves, i.e. by a variety of different, probably flexor reflex afferents. This facilitation persisted after high lumbar spinalisation indicating an independency to supraspinal influences. Nociceptive muscle afferents facilitated the peroneal monosynaptic reflex while nociceptive cutaneous afferents from the foot sole inhibited the ipsilateral but facilitated the contralateral peroneal reflex.

  13. Establishing between-session reliability of TMS-conditioned soleus H-reflexes.

    PubMed

    Gray, W A; Sabatier, M J; Kesar, T M; Borich, M R

    2017-02-15

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) can be used to evaluate descending corticomotor influences on spinal reflex excitability through modulation of the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex). The purpose of this study was to characterize between-session reliability of cortical, spinal, and cortical-conditioned spinal excitability measures collected from the soleus muscle. Thirteen able-bodied young adult participants were tested over four sessions. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify between-session reliability of active motor threshold (AMT), unconditioned H-reflexes (expressed as a percentage of Mmax), and conditioned H-reflexes using short-latency facilitation (SLF) and long-latency facilitation (LLF). Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to assess associations between H-reflex facilitation and unconditioned H-reflex amplitude. Between-session reliability for SLF (ICC=0.71) was higher than for LLF (ICC=0.45), was excellent for AMT (ICC=0.95), and was moderate for unconditioned H-reflexes (ICC=0.63). Our results suggest moderate-to-good reliability of SLF and LLF to evaluate cortical influences on spinal reflex excitability across multiple testing sessions in able-bodied individuals.

  14. Earth-referenced handrail contact facilitates interlimb cutaneous reflexes during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Lamont, Erin V; Zehr, E Paul

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the gating of interlimb cutaneous reflexes is altered by holding an earth-referenced handrail during locomotion. In the first experiment, subjects performed locomotor tasks of varying difficulty (level walking, incline walking, and stair climbing) while lightly holding an earth-referenced rail. In the second experiment, the extent of rail contact and nature of the rail stability (e.g., fixed vs. mobile rail) were varied while subjects performed incline walking. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by delivering trains of electrical stimulation to the sural nerve at the ankle. EMG data were collected continuously from muscles in the upper and lower limbs and trunk. Results showed that modulation of reflexes across the body changed when the rail was held. Most interestingly, a facilitatory reflex in the shoulder extensor posterior deltoid emerged during swing phase only when subjects held a rail. This facilitatory reflex was largest during the more challenging tasks of incline walking and stair climbing, A similar reflex facilitation was observed in the elbow extensor triceps brachii. The observed facilitation of reflexes in triceps brachii and posterior deltoid was specifically expressed only when subjects held an earth-referenced rail. This suggests that interlimb reflexes in arm extensors may be enhanced to make use of a supportive handrail for stability during gait. Therefore, holding a rail may cause global changes in reflex thresholds across the body that may have widespread functional relevance for assisting in the maintenance of postural stability during locomotion.

  15. Suppression of jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes during swallowing in the cat.

    PubMed

    Ono, T; Ishiwata, Y; Kuroda, T; Nakamura, Y

    1999-11-01

    Jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes can be evoked by innocuous as well as noxious afferents from intra-oral structures. It has been reported that the amplitude of the jaw-opening reflex evoked by weak electrical stimulation of the upper lip is subject not only to tonic suppression but also to phase-linked modulation during mastication. In this study, we investigated whether the jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes are modulated during swallowing. Data were obtained from 8 chloralose-anesthetized cats. Reflexes were monitored by electromyographic activities recorded from the anterior digastric, genioglossus, and styloglossus muscles and, after paralysis, by the efferent discharge in the digastric and hypoglossal nerves. Swallowing was elicited either by water dropped on the tongue or by repetitive stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. Jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes were evoked by stimulation of the lingual nerve, and the evoked afferent volley was recorded from the Gasserian ganglion so that the threshold of the lingual nerve could be determined. The following results were obtained: (1) The jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes evoked by stimulation of the low-threshold, but not high-threshold, lingual afferents were remarkably suppressed during swallowing; and (2) both the jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes evoked by low-threshold lingual afferents were suppressed during fictive swallowing after the animals were paralyzed. We conclude that the jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes evoked by low-threshold lingual afferents are suppressed during swallowing by a central motor program.

  16. Pressure-time cell death threshold for albino rat skeletal muscles as related to pressure sore biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Linder-Ganz, Eran; Engelberg, Santiego; Scheinowitz, Mickey; Gefen, Amit

    2006-01-01

    Deep pressure sores (DPS) are associated with inadequate soft tissue perfusion and excessive tissue deformation over critical time durations, as well as with ischemia-reperfusion cycles and deficiency of the lymphatic system. Muscle tissue shows the lowest tolerance to pressure injuries, compared with more superficial tissues. In this communication, we present new histopathology data for muscle tissue of albino (Sprague-Dawley) rats exposed to pressures for 15 or 30 min. These data are superimposed with an extensive literature review of all previous histopathology reported for albino rat skeletal muscles subjected to pressure. The pooled data enabled a new mathematical characterization of the pressure-time threshold for cell death in striated muscle of rats, in the form of a sigmoid pressure-time relation, which extends the previous pressure-time relation to the shorter exposure periods. We found that for pressure exposures shorter than 1 h, the magnitude of pressure is the important factor for causing cell death and the exposure time has little or no effect: even relatively short exposures (15 min - 1 h) to pressures greater than 32 kPa (240 mmHg) cause cell death in rat muscle tissue. For exposures of 2 h or over, again the magnitude of pressure is the important factor for causing cell death: pressures greater than 9 kPa (67 mmHg) applied for over 2 h consistently cause muscle cell death. For the intermediate exposures (between 1 and 2 h), the magnitude of cell-death-causing pressure strongly depends on the time of exposure, i.e., critical pressure levels drop from 32 to 9 kPa. The present sigmoidal pressure-time cell death threshold is useful for design of studies in albino rat models of DPS, and may also be helpful in numerical simulations of DPS development, where there is often a need to extrapolate from tissue pressures to biological damage.

  17. GABAB receptors in the NTS mediate the inhibitory effect of trigeminal nociceptive inputs on parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hisayoshi; Izumi, Hiroshi

    2012-03-15

    The present study was designed to examine whether trigeminal nociceptive inputs are involved in the modulation of parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the jaw muscles. This was accomplished by investigating the effects of noxious stimulation to the orofacial area with capsaicin, and by microinjecting GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor agonists or antagonists into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), on masseter hemodynamics in urethane-anesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the cervical vagus nerve (cVN) in sympathectomized animals bilaterally increased blood flow in the masseter muscle (MBF). Increases in MBF evoked by cVN stimulation were markedly reduced following injection of capsaicin into the anterior tongue in the distribution of the lingual nerve or lower lip, but not when injected into the skin of the dorsum of the foot. Intravenous administration of either phentolamine or propranolol had no effect on the inhibitory effects of capsaicin injection on the increases of MBF evoked by cVN stimulation, which were largely abolished by microinjecting the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen into the NTS. Microinjection of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-35348 into the NTS markedly attenuated the capsaicin-induced inhibition of MBF increase evoked by cVN stimulation, while microinjection of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline did not. Our results indicate that trigeminal nociceptive inputs inhibit vagal-parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the masseter muscle and suggest that the activation of GABA(B) rather than GABA(A) receptors underlies the observed inhibition in the NTS.

  18. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression is lower in areas of the nucleus tractus solitarius excited by skeletal muscle reflexes in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Masaki; Downey, Ryan M.; Squiers, John J.; Squiers, Kathryn E.; Smith, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The functions of the skeletal muscle exercise pressor reflex (EPR) and its mechanically sensitive component are augmented in hypertension producing exaggerated increases in blood pressure during exercise. Afferent information from the EPR is processed in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). Within the NT, nitric oxide (NO), produced via l-arginine oxidation by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), buffers the pressor response to EPR activation. Therefore, EPR overactivity may manifest as a decrease in NO production due to reductions in nNOS. We hypothesized that nNOS protein expression is lower in the NTS of spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) compared with normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Further, we examined whether nNOS is expressed with FOS, a marker of neuronal excitation induced by EPR activation. The EPR and mechanoreflex were intermittently activated for 1 h via hindlimb static contraction or stretch, respectively. These maneuvers produced significantly greater pressor responses in SHR during the first 25 min of stimulation. Within the NTS, nNOS expression was lower from −14.9 to −13.4 bregma in SHR compared with WKY. For example, at −14.5 bregma the number of NTS nNOS-positive cells in SHR (13 ± 1) was significantly less than WKY (23 ± 2). However, the number of FOS-positive cells after muscle contraction in this area was not different (WKY = 82 ± 18; SHR = 75 ± 8). In both groups, FOS-expressing neurons were located within the same areas of the NTS as neurons containing nNOS. These findings demonstrate that nNOS protein expression is lower within NTS areas excited by skeletal muscle reflexes in hypertensive rats. PMID:23564306

  19. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion.

  20. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  1. Caring Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rallis, Sharon F.; Rossman, Gretchen B.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the seven articles in this special issue through the lens of the concept of "caring reflexivity". In joining "caring" and "reflexivity", we deepen the conversation about what constitutes reflexivity, encouraging an explicit focus on the relational. Revisiting the first article,…

  2. The history of examination of reflexes.

    PubMed

    Boes, Christopher J

    2014-12-01

    In the late 1800s, Wilhelm Erb, Joseph Babinski, William Gowers, and others helped develop the neurologic examination as we know it today. Erb was one of the first to emphasize a detailed and systematic neurologic exam and was co-discoverer of the muscle stretch reflex, Gowers began studying the knee jerk shortly after it was described, and Babinski focused on finding reliable signs that could differentiate organic from hysterical paralysis. These physicians and others emphasized the bedside examination of reflexes, which have been an important part of the neurologic examination ever since. This review will focus on the history of the examination of the following muscle stretch and superficial/cutaneous reflexes: knee jerk, jaw jerk, deep abdominal reflexes, superficial abdominal reflexes, plantar reflex/Babinski sign, and palmomental reflex. The history of reflex grading will also be discussed.

  3. Operant conditioning to increase ankle control or decrease reflex excitability improves reflex modulation and walking function in chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Manella, Kathleen J; Roach, Kathryn E; Field-Fote, Edelle C

    2013-06-01

    Ankle clonus is common after spinal cord injury (SCI) and is attributed to loss of supraspinally mediated inhibition of soleus stretch reflexes and maladaptive reorganization of spinal reflex pathways. The maladaptive reorganization underlying ankle clonus is associated with other abnormalities, such as coactivation and reciprocal facilitation of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL), which contribute to impaired walking ability in individuals with motor-incomplete SCI. Operant conditioning can increase muscle activation and decrease stretch reflexes in individuals with SCI. We compared two operant conditioning-based interventions in individuals with ankle clonus and impaired walking ability due to SCI. Training included either voluntary TA activation (TA↑) to enhance supraspinal drive or SOL H-reflex suppression (SOL↓) to modulate reflex pathways at the spinal cord level. We measured clonus duration, plantar flexor reflex threshold angle, timed toe tapping, dorsiflexion (DF) active range of motion, lower extremity motor scores (LEMS), walking foot clearance, speed and distance, SOL H-reflex amplitude modulation as an index of reciprocal inhibition, presynaptic inhibition, low-frequency depression, and SOL-to-TA clonus coactivation ratio. TA↑ decreased plantar flexor reflex threshold angle (-4.33°) and DF active range-of-motion angle (-4.32°) and increased LEMS of DF (+0.8 points), total LEMS of the training leg (+2.2 points), and nontraining leg (+0.8 points), and increased walking foot clearance (+ 4.8 mm) and distance (+12.09 m). SOL↓ decreased SOL-to-TA coactivation ratio (-0.21), increased nontraining leg LEMS (+1.8 points), walking speed (+0.02 m/s), and distance (+6.25 m). In sum, we found increased voluntary control associated with TA↑ outcomes and decreased reflex excitability associated with SOL↓ outcomes.

  4. Sympathetic reflex control of skeletal muscle blood flow in patients with congestive heart failure: evidence for beta-adrenergic circulatory control

    SciTech Connect

    Kassis, E.; Jacobsen, T.N.; Mogensen, F.; Amtorp, O.

    1986-11-01

    Mechanisms controlling forearm muscle vascular resistance (FMVR) during postural changes were investigated in seven patients with severe congestive heart failure (CHF) and in seven control subjects with unimpaired left ventricular function. Relative brachioradial muscle blood flow was determined by the local /sup 133/Xe-washout technique. Unloading of baroreceptors with use of 45 degree upright tilt was comparably obtained in the patients with CHF and control subjects. Control subjects had substantially increased FMVR and heart rate to maintain arterial pressure whereas patients with CHF had decreased FMVR by 51 +/- 11% and had no increase in heart rate despite a fall in arterial pressure during upright tilt. The autoregulatory and local vasoconstrictor reflex responsiveness during postural changes in forearm vascular pressures were intact in both groups. In the patients with CHF, the left axillary nerve plexus was blocked by local anesthesia. No alterations in forearm vascular pressures were observed. This blockade preserved the local regulation of FMVR but reversed the vasodilator response to upright tilt as FMVR increased by 30 +/- 7% (p less than .02). Blockade of central neural impulses to this limb combined with brachial arterial infusions of phentolamine completely abolished the humoral vasoconstriction in the tilted position. Infusions of propranolol to the contralateral brachial artery that did not affect baseline values of heart rate, arterial pressure, or the local reflex regulation of FMVR reversed the abnormal vasodilator response to upright tilt as FMVR increased by 42 +/- 12% (p less than .02). Despite augmented baseline values, forearm venous but not arterial plasma levels of epinephrine increased in the tilted position, as did arteri rather than venous plasma concentrations of norepinephrine in these patients.

  5. Jaw-Opening Reflex and Corticobulbar Motor Excitability Changes During Quiet Sleep in Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Dongyuan; Lavigne, Gilles J.; Lee, Jye-Chang; Adachi, Kazunori; Sessle, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To test the hypothesis that the reflex and corticobulbar motor excitability of jaw muscles is reduced during sleep. Design: Polysomnographic recordings in the electrophysiological study. Setting: University sleep research laboratories. Participants and Interventions: The reflex and corticobulbar motor excitability of jaw muscles was determined during the quiet awake state (QW) and quiet sleep (QS) in monkeys (n = 4). Measurements and Results: During QS sleep, compared to QW periods, both tongue stimulation-evoked jaw-opening reflex peak and root mean square amplitudes were significantly decreased with stimulations at 2-3.5 × thresholds (P < 0.001). The jaw-opening reflex latency during sleep was also significantly longer than during QW. Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) within the cortical masticatory area induced rhythmic jaw movements at a stable threshold (≤ 60 μA) during QW; but during QS, ICMS failed to induce any rhythmic jaw movements at the maximum ICMS intensity used, although sustained jaw-opening movements were evoked at significantly increased threshold (P < 0.001) in one of the monkeys. Similarly, during QW, ICMS within face primary motor cortex induced orofacial twitches at a stable threshold (≤ 35 μA), but the ICMS thresholds were elevated during QS. Soon after the animal awoke, rhythmic jaw movements and orofacial twitches could be evoked at thresholds similar to those before QS. Conclusions: The results suggest that the excitability of reflex and corticobulbar-evoked activity in the jaw motor system is depressed during QS. Citation: Yao D; Lavigne GJ; Lee JC; Adachi K; Sessle BJ. Jaw-opening reflex and corticobulbar motor excitability changes during quiet sleep in non-human primates. SLEEP 2013;36(2):269-280. PMID:23372275

  6. Molecular crowding defines a common origin for the Warburg effect in proliferating cells and the lactate threshold in muscle physiology.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Alexei; Oltvai, Zoltán N

    2011-04-29

    Aerobic glycolysis is a seemingly wasteful mode of ATP production that is seen both in rapidly proliferating mammalian cells and highly active contracting muscles, but whether there is a common origin for its presence in these widely different systems is unknown. To study this issue, here we develop a model of human central metabolism that incorporates a solvent capacity constraint of metabolic enzymes and mitochondria, accounting for their occupied volume densities, while assuming glucose and/or fatty acid utilization. The model demonstrates that activation of aerobic glycolysis is favored above a threshold metabolic rate in both rapidly proliferating cells and heavily contracting muscles, because it provides higher ATP yield per volume density than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. In the case of muscle physiology, the model also predicts that before the lactate switch, fatty acid oxidation increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases to zero with concomitant increase in glucose utilization, in agreement with the empirical evidence. These results are further corroborated by a larger scale model, including biosynthesis of major cell biomass components. The larger scale model also predicts that in proliferating cells the lactate switch is accompanied by activation of glutaminolysis, another distinctive feature of the Warburg effect. In conclusion, intracellular molecular crowding is a fundamental constraint for cell metabolism in both rapidly proliferating- and non-proliferating cells with high metabolic demand. Addition of this constraint to metabolic flux balance models can explain several observations of mammalian cell metabolism under steady state conditions.

  7. Molecular Crowding Defines a Common Origin for the Warburg Effect in Proliferating Cells and the Lactate Threshold in Muscle Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Alexei; Oltvai, Zoltán N.

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis is a seemingly wasteful mode of ATP production that is seen both in rapidly proliferating mammalian cells and highly active contracting muscles, but whether there is a common origin for its presence in these widely different systems is unknown. To study this issue, here we develop a model of human central metabolism that incorporates a solvent capacity constraint of metabolic enzymes and mitochondria, accounting for their occupied volume densities, while assuming glucose and/or fatty acid utilization. The model demonstrates that activation of aerobic glycolysis is favored above a threshold metabolic rate in both rapidly proliferating cells and heavily contracting muscles, because it provides higher ATP yield per volume density than mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. In the case of muscle physiology, the model also predicts that before the lactate switch, fatty acid oxidation increases, reaches a maximum, and then decreases to zero with concomitant increase in glucose utilization, in agreement with the empirical evidence. These results are further corroborated by a larger scale model, including biosynthesis of major cell biomass components. The larger scale model also predicts that in proliferating cells the lactate switch is accompanied by activation of glutaminolysis, another distinctive feature of the Warburg effect. In conclusion, intracellular molecular crowding is a fundamental constraint for cell metabolism in both rapidly proliferating- and non-proliferating cells with high metabolic demand. Addition of this constraint to metabolic flux balance models can explain several observations of mammalian cell metabolism under steady state conditions. PMID:21559344

  8. Development of the Stretch Reflex in the Newborn: Reciprocal Excitation and Reflex Irradiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myklebust, Barbara M.; Gottlieb, Gerald L.

    1993-01-01

    When tendon jerk reflexes were tested in seven newborns from one- to three-days old, stretch reflex responses in all major muscle groups of the lower limb were elicited. This "irradiation of reflexes" is a normal phenomenon in newborns, with the pathway becoming suppressed during normal maturation. In individuals with cerebral palsy,…

  9. Adductor T reflex abnormalities in patients with decreased patellar reflexes.

    PubMed

    Tataroglu, Cengiz; Deneri, Ersin; Ozkul, Ayca; Sair, Ahmet; Yaycioglu, Soner

    2009-08-01

    The adductor reflex (AR) is a tendon reflex that has various features that differ from other tendon reflexes. This reflex was tested in different disorders presenting with diminished patellar reflexes such as diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy (DLRPN), L2-L4 radiculopathy, and distal symmetric diabetic neuropathy (diabetic PNP). The AR and crossed-AR (elicited by tapping the contralateral patellar tendon) were recorded using concentric needle electrodes. Additionally, the patellar T reflex (vm-TR) and vastus medialis H reflex (vm-HR) were recorded using surface electrodes. AR was recorded in only one out of eight patients with DLRPN, but it was recorded in 21 out of 22 patients with L2-L4 radiculopathy (95.5%). Of these reflexes, only AR showed prolonged latency in the L2-L4 radiculopathy group. The latencies of AR, vm-TR, and vm-HR were prolonged in patients with diabetic PNP. We conclude that AR can be useful in the differential diagnosis of some lower motor neuron disorders that present with patellar reflex disturbance. Muscle Nerve 40: 264-270, 2009.

  10. Forces, movements and reflexes produced by pushing human teeth.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brendan J J; Mason, Andrew G; Cadden, Samuel W

    2012-05-01

    Pushing a tooth results in movement of the tooth and reflex inhibition of activity in jaw-closing muscles. The aims of this study were to determine how much tooth movement is required to elicit such reflexes and whether this is dependent on the point of force application to the tooth. Eight experiments were performed on six volunteer subjects. Electromyograms (EMGs) were recorded from a masseter muscle while the subjects produced approximately 12.5 % of the EMG associated with maximal clenching. Reflexes were evoked by pushing at two positions (incisal and cervical) on an upper central incisor. The forces applied and the resulting movements of the tooth were recorded. There was a linear relationship between force and movement regardless of whether the force was incisal or cervical (Pearson's r = 0.91 and r = 0.93 respectively). There were no differences between the slopes or intercepts for these relationships (ANCOVA p = 0.42, p = 0.46 respectively). There were linear relationships between the logarithms of force or movement and the resulting inhibitory reflexes (r = 0.81, 0.79, 0.81 and 0.74 for incisal and cervical forces and incisal and cervical movements, respectively). Again, there were no significant differences between the slopes for these relationships (ANCOVA p = 0.75, p = 0.46 for force and movement, respectively). There were no significant differences between the reflex thresholds for incisal and cervical stimuli in terms of force (0.23 and 0.25 N, ANCOVA p = 0.1) or movement (9.7 and 8.5 μm, ANCOVA p = 0.22). Thus, it appears that neither tooth movements nor jaw reflexes are dependent on the point of force application to a tooth.

  11. Moro reflex

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes This is a normal reflex present in newborn infants. Absence of the Moro reflex in an infant ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Infant and Newborn Care Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., ...

  12. Modulation of heat evoked nociceptive withdrawal reflexes by painful intramuscular conditioning stimulation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Ole K; Mørch, Carsten Dahl; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2006-10-01

    Convergence between cutaneous heat nociceptors and muscles afferents was investigated by applying a phasic, conditioning electrical stimulus to the tibialis anterior muscle (a train of five 1 ms pulses over 21 ms) at varying time intervals relative to a thermal test stimulus used for evoking the withdrawal reflex in humans. The 200 ms thermal stimulus was applied on the dorsum of the foot at an intensity of two times the pain threshold. The conditioning electrical stimulus was applied at an intensity of two times the pain threshold via a set of intramuscular needle electrodes. The conditioning-test interval was varied between -400 ms and 8,000 ms at 17 different intervals. The mean reflex onset latency of reflexes evoked by thermal stimuli alone was 354 +/- 9 ms. A facilitation of the reflex was seen when the conditioning stimulus was applied 275 ms (174 +/- 30% compared to control) and 300 ms (162 +/- 32% compared to control) after the test stimulus onset indicating sensory convergence between muscle afferents (group I-III) and cutaneous Adelta heat nociceptors arriving simultaneously at the spinal cord.

  13. Physiological characteristics of low-threshold mechanoreceptors in joints, muscle and skin in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G

    2005-01-01

    1. The development of microneurography, in which an insulated tungsten microelectrode is inserted into an accessible peripheral or cranial nerve in awake human subjects, has allowed detailed analyses of the signalling capacities of single mechanoreceptive afferents from the skin, muscles and joints. For example, we know much about how the two classes of rapidly adapting (Meissner and Pacinian) and two classes of slowly adapting (Merkel and Ruffini) cutaneous mechanoreceptors encode forces applied normal or tangential to the skin of the hand and the similarities and differences in glabrous versus non-glabrous skin (and receptors associated with hairs). We also know about stretch- and force-sensitive endings in muscle (the muscle spindle and Golgi tendon organ, respectively) and how they behave during passive or active movements or during isometric contractions. In addition, we have characterized the firing properties of mechanoreceptors in the joint capsules of the fingers. However, we know little about sensory nerves in the periosteum, other than that nociceptors and Pacinian corpuscles exist. 2. In addition to studies on the physiology of sensory endings in human subjects, microstimulation through the recording microelectrode has revealed how the brain deals with the sensory information conveyed by a single afferent. From this work, we know that there is specificity in the sensory channels: electrical stimulation of a single Meissner or Pacinian corpuscle generates frequency dependent illusions of 'flutter' or 'vibration', whereas microstimulation of a single Merkel afferent can produce a percept of 'pressure' and stimulation of a single joint afferent can evoke a sensation of 'joint rotation'. Interestingly, the input from a single Ruffini ending in the skin cannot be perceived and the same is true of muscle spindle afferents. So, where does this leave us with osseoperception from the mouth? Given that the periodontal receptors in the vicinity have been lost

  14. The initial effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold of healthy adults: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Ji, Sang Gu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on delayed onset muscle soreness. [Subjects] Forty-five healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: a nerve mobilization group (experimental) and a control group. [Methods] The subjects of the experimental group were administered a median nerve mobilization technique and ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. The subjects in the control group were only administered ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. Muscle fatigue and the pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after the intervention. [Results] The experimental group showed significant improvements in all variables, compared to pre-intervention. Furthermore, the control group showed significant improvements in the pressure pain threshold, compared to pre-intervention. Significant differences in the post-intervention gains in muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold were found between the experimental group and the control group. [Conclusion] Application of the upper extremity neural mobilization technique is considered to have a positive effect on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:27134351

  15. Three Methods for Estimating the Middle-Ear Muscle Reflex (MEMR) Using Otoacoustic Emission (OAE) Measurement Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    threshold. Examples from three experiments show a variety of test outcomes, including simultaneous MEMR and MOCR measurements. In summary, the benefits to...In a separate, informal exercise , colleagues at MIT investigated potential sources of variability in their ears (both of which showed repeatedly...determinable. In summary, the benefits to these methods are that the MEMR test is sensitive, can be derived from the MOCR test, and can be made relatively

  16. Are Electrically Induced Muscle Cramps Able to Increase the Cramp Threshold Frequency, When Induced Once a Week?

    PubMed

    Behringer, Michael; Link, Tobias Walter; Montag, Johannes Caspar Konrad; McCourt, Molly Leigh; Mester, Joachim

    2015-09-28

    The cramp threshold frequency (CTF) is known to be positively correlated with the individual cramp susceptibility. Here we assessed CTF changes after two bouts of electrically induced muscle cramps (EIMCs). The EIMCs (6×5 sec) were unilaterally induced twice (separated by one week) in the gastrocnemius of an intervention group (n=8), while 5 participants served as control. The CTF increased from 25.1±4.6 Hz at baseline to 31.4±9.0 Hz and 31.7±8.5 Hz 24 h after bout 1 and 2 (P<0.05). Thereafter, the CTF declined following both bouts to reach values of 28.0±6.7 Hz and 29.1±7.7 Hz after 72 h after bout 1 and 2. Creatine kinase (CK) activity and perceived discomfort during cramps was lower after bout 2 (P<0.05). CTF, CK, and discomfort did not change in CG. That is, a single bout of EIMCs induces a 24 h CTF increment and a second bout sustains this effect, while perceived discomfort and muscle damage decreases. This short term effect may help athletes to reduce the cramp susceptibility for an important match.

  17. Neuromuscular consequences of reflexive covert orienting.

    PubMed

    Corneil, Brian D; Munoz, Douglas P; Chapman, Brendan B; Admans, Tania; Cushing, Sharon L

    2008-01-01

    Visual stimulus presentation activates the oculomotor network without requiring a gaze shift. Here, we demonstrate that primate neck muscles are recruited during such reflexive covert orienting in a manner that parallels activity recorded from the superior colliculus (SC). Our results indicate the presence of a brainstem circuit whereby reflexive covert orienting is prevented from shifting gaze, but recruits neck muscles, predicting that similarities between SC and neck muscle activity should extend to other cognitive processes that are known to influence SC activity.

  18. Neural mechanisms influencing interlimb coordination during locomotion in humans: presynaptic modulation of forearm H-reflexes during leg cycling.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Klarner, Taryn; Barss, Trevor S; Hundza, Sandra R; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E Paul

    2013-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition of transmission between Ia afferent terminals and alpha motoneurons (Ia PSI) is a major control mechanism associated with soleus H-reflex modulation during human locomotion. Rhythmic arm cycling suppresses soleus H-reflex amplitude by increasing segmental Ia PSI. There is a reciprocal organization in the human nervous system such that arm cycling modulates H-reflexes in leg muscles and leg cycling modulates H-reflexes in forearm muscles. However, comparatively little is known about mechanisms subserving the effects from leg to arm. Using a conditioning-test (C-T) stimulation paradigm, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that changes in Ia PSI underlie the modulation of H-reflexes in forearm flexor muscles during leg cycling. Subjects performed leg cycling and static activation while H-reflexes were evoked in forearm flexor muscles. H-reflexes were conditioned with either electrical stimuli to the radial nerve (to increase Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 20 ms) or to the superficial radial (SR) nerve (to reduce Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 37-47 ms). While stationary, H-reflex amplitudes were significantly suppressed by radial nerve conditioning and facilitated by SR nerve conditioning. Leg cycling suppressed H-reflex amplitudes and the amount of this suppression was increased with radial nerve conditioning. SR conditioning stimulation removed the suppression of H-reflex amplitude resulting from leg cycling. Interestingly, these effects and interactions on H-reflex amplitudes were observed with subthreshold conditioning stimulus intensities (radial n., ∼0.6×MT; SR n., ∼ perceptual threshold) that did not have clear post synaptic effects. That is, did not evoke reflexes in the surface EMG of forearm flexor muscles. We conclude that the interaction between leg cycling and somatosensory conditioning of forearm H-reflex amplitudes is mediated by modulation of Ia PSI pathways. Overall our results support a conservation of neural

  19. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  20. Vestibulo-spinal reflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The specific objectives of experiments designed to investigate postural reflex behavior during sustained weightlessness are discussed. The first is to investigate, during prolonged weightlessness with Hoffmann response (H-reflex) measurement procedures, vestibulo-spinal reflexes associated with vestibular (otolith) responses evoked during an applied linear acceleration. This objective includes not only an evaluation of otolith-induced changes in a major postural muscle but also an investigation with this technique of the adaptive process of the vestibular system and spinal reflex mechanisms to this unique environment. The second objective is to relate space motion sickness to the results of this investigation. Finally, a return to the vestibulo-spinal and postural reflexes to normal values following the flight will be examined. The flight experiment involves activation of nerve tissue (tibial N) with electrical shock and the recording of resulting muscle activity (soleus) with surface electrodes. Soleus/spinal H-reflex testing procedures will be used in conjuction with linear acceleration through the subject's X-axis.

  1. Effects of whole body vibration on motor unit recruitment and threshold.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Ross D; Woledge, Roger C; Martin, Finbarr C; Newham, Di J

    2012-02-01

    Whole body vibration (WBV) has been suggested to elicit reflex muscle contractions but this has never been verified. We recorded from 32 single motor units (MU) in the vastus lateralis of 7 healthy subjects (34 ± 15.4 yr) during five 1-min bouts of WBV (30 Hz, 3 mm peak to peak), and the vibration waveform was also recorded. Recruitment thresholds were recorded from 38 MUs before and after WBV. The phase angle distribution of all MUs during WBV was nonuniform (P < 0.001) and displayed a prominent peak phase angle of firing. There was a strong linear relationship (r = -0.68, P < 0.001) between the change in recruitment threshold after WBV and average recruitment threshold; the lowest threshold MUs increased recruitment threshold (P = 0.008) while reductions were observed in the higher threshold units (P = 0.031). We investigated one possible cause of changed thresholds. Presynaptic inhibition in the soleus was measured in 8 healthy subjects (29 ± 4.6 yr). A total of 30 H-reflexes (stimulation intensity 30% Mmax) were recorded before and after WBV: 15 conditioned by prior stimulation (60 ms) of the antagonist and 15 unconditioned. There were no significant changes in the relationship between the conditioned and unconditioned responses. The consistent phase angle at which each MU fired during WBV indicates the presence of reflex muscle activity similar to the tonic vibration reflex. The varying response in high- and low-threshold MUs may be due to the different contributions of the mono- and polysynaptic pathways but not presynaptic inhibition.

  2. Does Deep Cervical Flexor Muscle Training Affect Pain Pressure Thresholds of Myofascial Trigger Points in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain? A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Billis, Evdokia; Papanikolaou, Dimitra-Tania; Koutsojannis, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Background. We need to understand more about how DNF performs in different contexts and whether it affects the pain threshold over myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Purpose. The objectives were to investigate the effect of neck muscles training on disability and pain and on pain threshold over MTrPs in people with chronic neck pain. Methods. Patients with chronic neck pain were eligible for participation with a Neck Disability Index (NDI) score of over 5/50 and having at least one MTrP on either levator scapulae, upper trapezoid, or splenius capitis muscle. Patients were randomly assigned into either DNF training, superficial neck muscle exercise, or advice group. Generalized linear model (GLM) was used to detect differences in treatment groups over time. Results. Out of 67 participants, 60 (47 females, mean age: 39.45 ± 12.67) completed the study. Neck disability and neck pain were improved over time between and within groups (p < 0.05). However, no differences were found within and between the therapeutic groups (p < 0.05) in the tested muscles' PPTs and in cervicothoracic angle over a 7-week period. Conclusion. All three groups improved over time. This infers that the pain pathways involved in the neck pain relief are not those involved in pain threshold. PMID:27990302

  3. Cutaneous reflex modulation and self-induced reflex attenuation in cerebellar patients.

    PubMed

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Van Calenbergh, Frank; Swinnen, Stephan P; Duysens, Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Modulation of cutaneous reflexes is important in the neural control of walking, yet knowledge about underlying neural pathways is still incomplete. Recent studies have suggested that the cerebellum is involved. Here we evaluated the possible roles of the cerebellum in cutaneous reflex modulation and in attenuation of self-induced reflexes. First we checked whether leg muscle activity during walking was similar in patients with focal cerebellar lesions and in healthy control subjects. We then recorded cutaneous reflex activity in leg muscles during walking. Additionally, we compared reflexes after standard (computer triggered) stimuli with reflexes after self-induced stimuli for both groups. Biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis muscle activity was increased in the patient group compared with the control subjects, suggesting a coactivation strategy to reduce instability of gait. Cutaneous reflex modulation was similar between healthy control subjects and cerebellar patients, but the latter appeared less able to attenuate reflexes to self-induced stimuli. This suggests that the cerebellum is not primarily involved in cutaneous reflex modulation but that it could act in attenuation of self-induced reflex responses. The latter role in locomotion would be consistent with the common view that the cerebellum predicts sensory consequences of movement.

  4. Cutaneous reflex modulation and self-induced reflex attenuation in cerebellar patients

    PubMed Central

    Van Calenbergh, Frank; Swinnen, Stephan P.; Duysens, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of cutaneous reflexes is important in the neural control of walking, yet knowledge about underlying neural pathways is still incomplete. Recent studies have suggested that the cerebellum is involved. Here we evaluated the possible roles of the cerebellum in cutaneous reflex modulation and in attenuation of self-induced reflexes. First we checked whether leg muscle activity during walking was similar in patients with focal cerebellar lesions and in healthy control subjects. We then recorded cutaneous reflex activity in leg muscles during walking. Additionally, we compared reflexes after standard (computer triggered) stimuli with reflexes after self-induced stimuli for both groups. Biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis muscle activity was increased in the patient group compared with the control subjects, suggesting a coactivation strategy to reduce instability of gait. Cutaneous reflex modulation was similar between healthy control subjects and cerebellar patients, but the latter appeared less able to attenuate reflexes to self-induced stimuli. This suggests that the cerebellum is not primarily involved in cutaneous reflex modulation but that it could act in attenuation of self-induced reflex responses. The latter role in locomotion would be consistent with the common view that the cerebellum predicts sensory consequences of movement. PMID:25392164

  5. The reflex effects of nonnoxious sural nerve stimulation on human triceps surae motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Kukulka, C G

    1994-05-01

    1. The effects of low-intensity electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral sural nerve on the reflex response of human triceps surae motor neurons were examined in 169 motor units recorded in 11 adult volunteers: 69 units from soleus (SOL), 48 units from lateral gastrocnemius (LG), and 52 units from medial gastrocnemius (MG). The reflex effects were assessed by the peristimulus time histogram (PSTH) technique, categorized according to onset latencies, and the magnitudes of effects were calculated as percent changes in baseline firing rates. 2. Sural stimulation evoked complex changes in motor-unit firing at onset latencies between 28 and 140 ms. The two most common responses seen in all muscles were a short-latency depression (D1) in firing (mean onset latency = 40 ms) in 42% of all units studied and a secondary enhancement (E2) in firing (mean onset latency = 72 ms) in 43% of all units. In LG, the D1 effect represented a mean decrease in firing of 52% which was statistically different from the changes in MG (42% decrease) and SOL (38% decrease). The magnitudes of E2 effects were similar across muscles with an average of 47% increase in firing. 3. No differences were found in the frequencies of occurrence for the enhancements in firing among the muscles studied. The main difference in reflex responses was the occurrence of an intermediate latency depression (D2) in 27% of the LG units with a mean onset latency of 72 ms. 4. Based on estimates of conduction times for activation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents, the short-latency D1 response likely represents an oligosynaptic spinal reflex with transmission times similar to the Ia reciprocal inhibitory pathway. These findings raise the question as to the possibility of low-threshold cutaneous afferents sharing common interneurons with low-threshold muscle afferent reflexes that have identical onset latencies. The complex reflex effects associated with low-level stimulation of a cutaneous nerve indicate a rich

  6. [Jaw opening reflex: a new electrophysiologic method for objective assessment of trigeminal sensory disorders. I. Method and normal values].

    PubMed

    Hassfeld, S; Meinck, H M

    1992-12-01

    Retrospective analysis of trigeminal nerve evoked potentials in 40 consecutive patients, most of them with traumatic nerve lesions, showed that in 12 cases no trigeminal nerve SEP were obtainable, and 11 of the remaining 28 patients had normal trigeminal nerve SEP. Therefore the jaw-opening reflex was investigated as a potential tool for electrophysiologic analysis of facial sensory disturbances. The jaw-opening reflex was investigated in 60 healthy subjects (31 female, 29 male) aged 23-82 years. It was elicited by electrical 0.1 ms square wave pulses delivered to the lower and upper lips and to the infraorbital region on either side at a rate below 1 per 5s. The EMG responses were recorded from the bilateral masseter and temporalis muscles at a moderate voluntary activation. Under these conditions, the jaw-opening reflex reveals itself as two inhibitory pauses of the ongoing EMG on both sides, the onset latency of the first EMG-suppression being 10-15 ms, and of the second 35-50 ms. Particular attention was paid to the stimulus strength at threshold (TR) to evoke the jaw-opening reflex. We found that the jaw-opening reflex was constantly evoked by weak stimuli applied to the 2nd and 3rd trigeminal branches. Bilateral reflex responses with unilateral stimulation were a regular finding. The reflex responses increase with increasing stimulus strength (Fig. 1). Moderate to forcible activation of the jaw closing muscles is a prerequisite for optimum recordings of the jaw-opening reflex (Fig. 2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B.

    2017-01-01

    The stretch reflex or myotatic reflex refers to the contraction of a muscle in response to its passive stretching by increasing its contractility as long as the stretch is within physiological limits. For ages, it was thought that the stretch reflex was of short latency and it was synonymous with the tendon reflex, subserving the same spinal reflex arc. However, disparities in the status of the two reflexes in certain clinical situations led Marsden and his collaborators to carry out a series of experiments that helped to establish that the two reflexes had different pathways. That the two reflexes are dissociated has been proved by the fact that the stretch reflex and the tendon reflex, elicited by stimulation of the same muscle, have different latencies, that of the stretch reflex being considerably longer. They hypothesized that the stretch reflex had a transcortical course before it reached the spinal motor neurons for final firing. Additionally, the phenomenon of stimulus-sensitive cortical myoclonus lent further evidence to the presence of the transcortical loop where the EEG correlate preceded the EMG discharge. This concept has been worked out by later neurologists in great detail, and the general consensus is that indeed, the stretch reflex is endowed with a conspicuous transcortical component. PMID:28298835

  8. The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B

    2017-01-01

    The stretch reflex or myotatic reflex refers to the contraction of a muscle in response to its passive stretching by increasing its contractility as long as the stretch is within physiological limits. For ages, it was thought that the stretch reflex was of short latency and it was synonymous with the tendon reflex, subserving the same spinal reflex arc. However, disparities in the status of the two reflexes in certain clinical situations led Marsden and his collaborators to carry out a series of experiments that helped to establish that the two reflexes had different pathways. That the two reflexes are dissociated has been proved by the fact that the stretch reflex and the tendon reflex, elicited by stimulation of the same muscle, have different latencies, that of the stretch reflex being considerably longer. They hypothesized that the stretch reflex had a transcortical course before it reached the spinal motor neurons for final firing. Additionally, the phenomenon of stimulus-sensitive cortical myoclonus lent further evidence to the presence of the transcortical loop where the EEG correlate preceded the EMG discharge. This concept has been worked out by later neurologists in great detail, and the general consensus is that indeed, the stretch reflex is endowed with a conspicuous transcortical component.

  9. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to <20% of control in every nerve) by increasing blood pressure levels to >150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  10. Distribution and threshold expression of the tRNA(Lys) mutation in skeletal muscle of patients with myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF).

    PubMed Central

    Boulet, L; Karpati, G; Shoubridge, E A

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the distribution and expression of mutant mtDNAs carrying the A-to-G mutation at position 8344 in the tRNA(Lys) gene in the skeletal muscle of four patients with myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF). The proportion of mutant genomes was greater than 80% of total mtDNAs in muscle samples of all patients and was associated with a decrease in the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX). The vast majority of myoblasts, cloned from the satellite-cell population in the same muscles, were homoplasmic for the mutation. The overall proportion of mutant mtDNAs in this population was similar to that in differentiated muscle, suggesting that the ratio of mutant to wild-type mtDNAs in skeletal muscle is determined either in the ovum or during early development and changes little with age. Translation of all mtDNA-encoded genes was severely depressed in homoplasmic mutant myoblast clones but not in heteroplasmic or wild-type clones. The threshold for biochemical expression of the mutation was determined in heteroplasmic myotubes formed by fusion of different proportions of mutant and wild-type myoblasts. The magnitude of the decrease in translation in myotubes containing mutant mtDNAs was protein specific. Complex I and IV subunits were more affected than complex V subunits, and there was a rough correlation with both protein size and number of lysine residues. Approximately 15% wild-type mtDNAs restored translation and COX activity to near normal levels. These results show that the A-to-G substitution in tRNA(Lys) is a functionally recessive mutation that can be rescued by intraorganellar complementation with a small proportion of wild-type mtDNAs and explain the steep threshold for expression of the MERRF clinical phenotype. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:1334369

  11. Distribution and threshold expression of the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation in skeletal muscle of patients with myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Boulet, L.; Karpati, G. ); Shoubridge, E.A. McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec )

    1992-12-01

    The authors investigated the distribution and expression of mutant mtDNAs carrying the A-to-G mutation at position 8344 in the tRNA[sup Lys] gene in the skeletal muscle of four patients with myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF). The proportion of mutant genomes was greater than 80% of total mtDNAs in muscle samples of all patients and was associated with a decrease in the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX). The vast majority of myoblasts, cloned from the satellite-cell population in the same muscles, were homoplasmic for the mutation. The overall proportion of mutant mtDNAs in this population was similar to that in differentiated muscle, suggesting that the ratio of mutant to wild-type mtDNAs in skeletal muscle is determined either in the ovum or during early development and changes little with age. Translation of all mtDNA-encoded genes was severely depressed in homoplasmic mutant myoblast clones but not in heteroplasmic or wild-type clones. The threshold for biochemical expression of the mutation was determined in heteroplasmic myotubes formed by fusion of different proportions of mutant and wild-type myoblasts. The magnitude of the decrease in translation in myotubes containing mutant mtDNAs was protein specific. Complex I and IV subunits were more affected than complex V subunits, and there was a rough correlation with both protein size and number of lysine residues. Approximately 15% wild-type mtDNAs restored translation and COX activity to near normal levels. These results show that the A-to-G substitution in tRNA[sup Lys] is a functionally recessive mutation that can be rescued by intraorganellar complementation with a small proportion of wild-type mtDNAs and explain the steep threshold for expression of the MERRF clinical phenotype. 40 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. The relation between spasticity and muscle behavior during the swing phase of gait in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bar-On, Lynn; Molenaers, Guy; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Monari, Davide; Feys, Hilde; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-12-01

    There is much debate about how spasticity contributes to the movement abnormalities seen in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). This study explored the relation between stretch reflex characteristics in passive muscles and markers of spasticity during gait. Twenty-four children with CP underwent 3D gait analysis at three walking velocity conditions (self-selected, faster and fastest). The gastrocnemius (GAS) and medial hamstrings (MEHs) were assessed at rest using an instrumented spasticity assessment that determined the stretch-reflex threshold, expressed in terms of muscle lengthening velocity. Muscle activation was quantified with root mean square electromyography (RMS-EMG) during passive muscle stretch and during the muscle lengthening periods in the swing phase of gait. Parameters from passive stretch were compared to those from gait analysis. In about half the children, GAS peak muscle lengthening velocity during the swing phase of gait did not exceed its stretch reflex threshold. In contrast, in the MEHs the threshold was always exceeded. In the GAS, stretch reflex thresholds were positively correlated to peak muscle lengthening velocity during the swing phase of gait at the faster (r = 0.46) and fastest (r = 0.54) walking conditions. In the MEHs, a similar relation was found, but only at the faster walking condition (r = 0.43). RMS-EMG during passive stretch showed moderate correlations to RMS-EMG during the swing phase of gait in the GAS (r = 0.46-0.56) and good correlations in the MEHs (r = 0.69-0.77) at all walking conditions. RMS-EMG during passive stretch showed no correlations to peak muscle lengthening velocity during gait. We conclude that a reduced stretch reflex threshold in the GAS and MEHs constrains peak muscle lengthening velocity during gait in children with CP. With increasing walking velocity, this constraint is more marked in the GAS, but not in the MEHs. Hyper-activation of stretch reflexes during passive stretch is related to

  13. Convergence in Reflex Pathways from Multiple Cutaneous Nerves Innervating the Foot Depends upon the Number of Rhythmically Active Limbs during Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A.; Hundza, Sandra R.; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Neural output from the locomotor system for each arm and leg influences the spinal motoneuronal pools directly and indirectly through interneuronal (IN) reflex networks. While well documented in other species, less is known about the functions and features of convergence in common IN reflex system from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions during remote arm and leg movement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to use spatial facilitation to examine possible convergence in common reflex pathways during rhythmic locomotor limb movements. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked in ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle by stimulating (in random order) the sural nerve (SUR), the distal tibial nerve (TIB), and combined simultaneous stimulation of both nerves (TIB&SUR). Reflexes were evoked while participants performed rhythmic stepping and arm swinging movement with both arms and the leg contralateral to stimulation (ARM&LEG), with just arm movement (ARM) and with just contralateral leg movement (LEG). Stimulation intensities were just below threshold for evoking early latency (<80 ms to peak) reflexes. For each stimulus condition, rectified EMG signals were averaged while participants held static contractions in the stationary (stimulated) leg. During ARM&LEG movement, amplitudes of cutaneous reflexes evoked by combined TIB&SUR stimulation were significantly larger than simple mathematical summation of the amplitudes evoked by SUR or TIB alone. Interestingly, this extra facilitation seen during combined nerve stimulation was significantly reduced when performing ARM or LEG compared to ARM&LEG. We conclude that locomotor rhythmic limb movement induces excitation of common IN reflex pathways from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions. Importantly, activity in this pathway is most facilitated during ARM&LEG movement. These results suggest that transmission in IN reflex pathways is weighted according to the number of limbs directly engaged

  14. Convergence in reflex pathways from multiple cutaneous nerves innervating the foot depends upon the number of rhythmically active limbs during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Hundza, Sandra R; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E Paul

    2014-01-01

    Neural output from the locomotor system for each arm and leg influences the spinal motoneuronal pools directly and indirectly through interneuronal (IN) reflex networks. While well documented in other species, less is known about the functions and features of convergence in common IN reflex system from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions during remote arm and leg movement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to use spatial facilitation to examine possible convergence in common reflex pathways during rhythmic locomotor limb movements. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked in ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle by stimulating (in random order) the sural nerve (SUR), the distal tibial nerve (TIB), and combined simultaneous stimulation of both nerves (TIB&SUR). Reflexes were evoked while participants performed rhythmic stepping and arm swinging movement with both arms and the leg contralateral to stimulation (ARM&LEG), with just arm movement (ARM) and with just contralateral leg movement (LEG). Stimulation intensities were just below threshold for evoking early latency (<80 ms to peak) reflexes. For each stimulus condition, rectified EMG signals were averaged while participants held static contractions in the stationary (stimulated) leg. During ARM&LEG movement, amplitudes of cutaneous reflexes evoked by combined TIB&SUR stimulation were significantly larger than simple mathematical summation of the amplitudes evoked by SUR or TIB alone. Interestingly, this extra facilitation seen during combined nerve stimulation was significantly reduced when performing ARM or LEG compared to ARM&LEG. We conclude that locomotor rhythmic limb movement induces excitation of common IN reflex pathways from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions. Importantly, activity in this pathway is most facilitated during ARM&LEG movement. These results suggest that transmission in IN reflex pathways is weighted according to the number of limbs directly engaged

  15. Excess VO2 during ramp exercise is positively correlated to intercostal muscles deoxyhemoglobin levels above the gas exchange threshold in young trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Oueslati, Ferid; Girard, Olivier; Tabka, Zouhair; Ahmaidi, Said

    2016-07-01

    We assessed respiratory muscles oxygenation responses during a ramp exercise to exhaustion and further explored their relationship with the non-linear increase of VO2 (VO2 excess) observed above the gas-exchange threshold. Ten male cyclists completed a ramp exercise to exhaustion on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 30Wmin(-1) with continuous monitoring of expired gases (breath-by-breath) and oxygenation status of intercostal muscles. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure measurements were taken at rest and at exhaustion. The VO2 excess represents the difference between VO2max observed and VO2max expected using linear equation between the VO2 and the intensity before gas-exchange threshold. The deoxyhemoglobin remained unchanged until 60% of maximal aerobic power (MAP) and thereafter increased significantly by 37±18% and 40±22% at 80% and 100% of MAP, respectively. Additionally, the amplitude of deoxyhemoglobin increase between 60 and 100% of MAP positively correlated with the VO2 excess (r=0.69, p<0.05). Compared to exercise start, the oxygen tissue saturation index decreased from 80% of MAP (-4.8±3.2%, p<0.05) onwards. At exhaustion, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures declined by 7.8±16% and 12.6±10% (both p<0.05), respectively. In summary, our results suggest a significant contribution of respiratory muscles to the VO2 excess phenomenon.

  16. Variability in Hoffmann and tendon reflexes in healthy male subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, E.; Do, S.; Jaweed, M.

    1992-01-01

    There is a time dependent decrease in amplitude of H- and T-reflexes during Zero-G exposure and subsequently an increase in the amplitude of the H-reflex 2-4 hours after return to a 1-G environment. These alterations have been attributed to the adaptation of the human neurosensory system to gravity. The Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) is an acknowledged method to determine the integrity of the monosynaptic reflex arc. However deep tendon reflexes (DTR's or T-reflexes), elicited by striking the tendon also utilize the entire reflex arc. The objective of this study was to compare the variability in latency and amplitude of the two reflexes in healthy subjects. Methods: Nine healthy male subjects, 27-43 years in age, 161-175 cm in height plus 60-86 Kg in weight, underwent weekly testing for four weeks with a Dan-Tec EMG counterpoint EMG system. Subjects were studied prone and surface EMG electrodes were placed on the right and left soleus muscles. The H-reflex was obtained by stimulating the tibial nerve in the politeal fossa with a 0.2 msec square wave pulse delivered at 2 Hz until the maximum H-reflex was obtained. The T-reflex was invoked by tapping the achilles tendon with a self triggering reflex hammer connected to the EMG system. The latencies and amplitudes for the H- and T-reflexes were measured. Results: These data indicate that the amplitudes of these reflexes varied considerably. However, latencies to invoked responses were consistent. The latency of the T-reflex was approximately 3-5 msec longer than the H-reflex. Conclusion: The T-reflex is easily obtained, requires less time, and is more comfortable to perform. Qualitative data can be obtained by deploying self triggering, force plated reflex hammers both in the 1-G and Zero-G environment.

  17. Provocation of aspiration reflexes and their effects on the pattern of cough and reflex apnea in cats.

    PubMed

    Poliacek, I; Tomori, Z; Simera, M; Barani, H; Visnovcova, N; Halasova, E; Donic, V; Jakus, J

    2009-11-01

    Aspiration reflexes (AspRs) manifesting as reflex spasmodic inspirations and their effects on motor pattern of tracheobronchial cough and reflex apnea were studied on 22 spontaneously breathing pentobarbitone-anesthetized cats. AspRs induced during cough inspiration enhanced peak inspiratory (P<0.01) and expiratory (P<0.02) esophageal pressures, amplitudes of diaphragm (P<0.01) and abdominal muscles (P<0.05) EMG activity, and prolonged the entire expiratory period (P<0.01) and total cycle duration (P<0.05) of cough. Transient inhibitions and splits of cough expiration frequently occurred with AspR within active cough expiratory period; however, cough spatiotemporal characteristics were not altered significantly. Sub-threshold nasopharyngeal stimulation failing to provoke AspR had no significant effects on coughing. Hering-Breuer inflation apnea was moderately prolonged by AspRs (20%; P<0.05), unlike the apnea produced by continual mechanical laryngeal stimulation. AspRs are inducible during tested behaviors interacting with their motor pattern. Central mechanisms involving pulmonary stretch receptor stimulation is suggested for modulation of cough and inflation apnea by AspR.

  18. Torso flexion modulates stiffness and reflex response.

    PubMed

    Granata, K P; Rogers, E

    2007-08-01

    Neuromuscular factors that contribute to spinal stability include trunk stiffness from passive and active tissues as well as active feedback from reflex response in the paraspinal muscles. Trunk flexion postures are a recognized risk factor for occupational low-back pain and may influence these stabilizing control factors. Sixteen healthy adult subjects participated in an experiment to record trunk stiffness and paraspinal muscle reflex gain during voluntary isometric trunk extension exertions. The protocol was designed to achieve trunk flexion without concomitant influences of external gravitational moment, i.e., decouple the effects of trunk flexion posture from trunk moment. Systems identification analyses identified reflex gain by quantifying the relation between applied force disturbances and time-dependent EMG response in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Trunk stiffness was characterized from a second order model describing the dynamic relation between the force disturbances versus the kinematic response of the torso. Trunk stiffness increased significantly with flexion angle and exertion level. This was attributed to passive tissue contributions to stiffness. Reflex gain declined significantly with trunk flexion angle but increased with exertion level. These trends were attributed to correlated changes in baseline EMG recruitment in the lumbar paraspinal muscles. Female subjects demonstrated greater reflex gain than males and the decline in reflex gain with flexion angle was greater in females than in males. Results reveal that torso flexion influences neuromuscular factors that control spinal stability and suggest that posture may contribute to the risk of instability injury.

  19. Regulation of muscle stiffness during periodic length changes in the isolated abdomen of the hermit crab.

    PubMed

    Chapple, W D

    1997-09-01

    the mechanoreceptors. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that a robust feedforward regulation of abdominal stiffness during continuous disturbances is achieved by mechanoreceptors signalling the absolute value of changing forces; habituation of the reflex, its high-threshold for low frequency disturbances and the activation kinetics of the muscle further modify reflex dynamics.

  20. Pressure pain thresholds assessed over temporalis, masseter, and frontalis muscles in healthy individuals, patients with tension-type headache, and those with migraine--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Sanne; Petersen, Marie Weinreich; Svendsen, Anette Sand; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-08-01

    A systematic review was conducted to identify and summarize the available scientific literature addressing pressure pain threshold (PPT) values over the temporalis, masseter, and frontalis muscles in healthy humans, patients with tension-type headache (TTH), and those with migraine both in males and females. Six relevant medical databases for the literature search were included: PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane, CINAHL, BioMed Central, and Embase. The search strategy was performed applying 15 keywords (eg, pressure pain threshold, temporalis muscle, tension type headache, pressure algometer) and their combinations. A total of 156 articles were identified, and 40 relevant articles were included. The main outcomes of the systematic review were extracted, and it was demonstrated that the PPT values in general were lower in patients compared with healthy subjects, and this was especially noted for temporalis in both females (migraine: 231.2 ± 38.3 kPa < TTH: 248.4 ± 39.3 kPa < healthy: 282.1 ± 70.8 kPa) and males (migraine: 225.5 ± 61.2 kPa < TTH: 264.2 ± 32.5 kPa < healthy: 314.8 ± 63.3 kPa). The masseter muscle seemed to be more sensitive than the other 2 muscles, in both females (healthy: masseter 194.1 ± 62.7 kPa < frontalis 277.5 ± 51.1 kPa < temporalis 282.1 ± 70.8 kPa) and males (healthy: masseter 248.2 ± 48.4 kPa < temporalis 314.8 ± 63.3 < frontalis 388 kPa). Females had lower PPT values than those of males in temporalis, masseter, and frontalis muscles. This work is the first to systematically review the scientific literature addressing PPT values over craniofacial muscles of healthy subjects, patients with TTH, and those with migraine to provide the PPT value ranges. Based on these findings, a set of guidelines was established to assist future studies including PPT assessments over craniofacial muscles.

  1. Whole-body vibration-induced muscular reflex: Is it a stretch-induced reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Cidem, Muharrem; Sebik, Oguz; Yilmaz, Gizem; Karamehmetoglu, Safak Sahir; Kara, Sadik; Karacan, Ilhan; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Whole-body vibration (WBV) can induce reflex responses in muscles. A number of studies have reported that the physiological mechanisms underlying this type of reflex activity can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to test whether the WBV-induced muscular reflex (WBV-IMR) can be explained as a stretch-induced reflex. [Subjects and Methods] The present study assessed 20 healthy males using surface electrodes placed on their right soleus muscle. The latency of the tendon reflex (T-reflex) as a stretch-induced reflex was compared with the reflex latency of the WBV-IMR. In addition, simulations were performed at 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50 Hz to determine the stretch frequency of the muscle during WBV. [Results] WBV-IMR latency (40.5 ± 0.8 ms; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 39.0–41.9 ms) was significantly longer than T-reflex latency (34.6 ± 0.5 ms; 95% CI: 33.6–35.5 ms) and the mean difference was 6.2 ms (95% CI of the difference: 4.7–7.7 ms). The simulations performed in the present study demonstrated that the frequency of the stretch signal would be twice the frequency of the vibration. [Conclusion] These findings do not support the notion that WBV-IMR can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. PMID:26310784

  2. Characteristics of the spino-bulbo-spinal reflex with evoked EMGs in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T; Miyazawa, T; Fujiwara, T

    1984-08-01

    Training in sports medicine and rehabilitation medicine requires the establishment of conditioned reflexes. Reinforcement of a conditioned reflex is more effective when it is part of a set of two or three reflexes. The late spinal reflexes appearing after conditioning were resolved into a stretch reflex and a spino-bulbo-spinal (SBS) reflex. H and M waves on the tibialis anterior muscle induced by tibial nerve stimulation were determined from the escape potential of the triceps sural muscle contraction. The tibial nerve and peroneal nerve were stimulated bilaterally, and H and M waves from the triceps sural muscle and tibialis anterior muscle were recorded bilaterally. The complete separation method of the late response and the time course of the stretch reflex and SBS reflex that composed the late response are described in this paper.

  3. The acoustic reflex in children without an hermetic seal.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, H; Babecki, S; Thomas, C

    1980-01-01

    In clinical practice with children, the hermetic seal is either often not obtainable or is lost before acoustic reflex measures are obtained. In a recent study, Surr and Schuchman (Archives of Otolaryngology 102, 160--161, 1976.) found that in the majority of cases reflex thresholds could be measured in adults with normal middle ears in the absence of an hermetic seal. This study was designed to find out whether the conclusions of Surr and Schuchman could be extended to children. Sealed and unsealed reflexes were compared in 30 children, ages 3 to 7, with normal middle ears. Results indicated that: (1) approximately two-thirds of the children demonstrated reflexes in the unsealed condition; (2) differences between sealed and unsealed reflex thresholds were not clinically significant; (3) in most cases, unsealed reflexes were measurable at all frequencies or at none; (4) neither size of ear canal volume nor amplitude of the sealed reflex at 10 dB SL seemed to be related to the presence or absence of the unsealed reflex. It was concluded that reflex thresholds obtained in the absence of an hermetic seal may be considered valid but the absence of an unsealed reflex should not be considered diagnostically significant.

  4. Reflexives in Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishida, Maki

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to reconsider reflexives in Japanese through the following three steps: (a) separation of genuine reflexive elements from elements that are confounded as reflexives, (b) classification of reflexive anaphors into subtypes based on their semantic difference, and (c) classification of predicates that occur with…

  5. The nasocardiac reflex.

    PubMed

    Baxandall, M L; Thorn, J L

    1988-06-01

    The oculocardiac reflex is well described and recognised in anaesthesia. The nasocardiac reflex is less well-known. We describe a clinical manifestation of this reflex and describe the relevant anatomy. This reflex may be obtunded during general anaesthesia. during general anaesthesia.

  6. Reflexives in Veracruz Huastec.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constable, Peter G.

    A study examines various Huastec clause types that are reflexive in some sense, including ordinary reflexives, which involve co-reference. Two mutually exclusive morphosyntactic devices are used in Huastec: reflexive pronouns and verbal morphology. In this way, Huastec is like various European languages. Clauses involving reflexive pronouns and…

  7. Hyperekplexia and stiff-man syndrome: abnormal brainstem reflexes suggest a physiological relationship

    PubMed Central

    Khasani, S; Becker, K; Meinck, H

    2004-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hyperekplexia and the stiff-man syndrome (SMS) are both conditions with exaggerated startle suggesting abnormal brainstem function. Investigation of brainstem reflexes may provide insight into disturbed reflex excitation and inhibition underlying these movement disorders. Patients and methods: Using four-channel EMG, we examined four trigeminal brainstem reflexes (monosynaptic masseter, masseter inhibitory, glabella, and orbicularis oculi blink reflexes) and their spread into pericranial muscles in five patients with familial hyperekplexia (FH), two with acquired hyperekplexia (AH), 10 with SMS, and 15 healthy control subjects. Results: Both FH/AH and SMS patients had abnormal propagation of brainstem reflexes into pericranial muscles. All patients with hyperekplexia showed an abnormal short-latency (15–20 ms) reflex in the trapezius muscle with a characteristic clinical appearance ("head retraction jerk") evoked by tactile or electrical stimulation of the trigeminal nerve, but normal monosynaptic masseter reflexes. Inhibitory brainstem reflexes were attenuated in some FH/AH patients. Four of 10 patients with SMS had similar short-latency reflexes in the neck muscles and frequently showed widespread enhancement of other excitatory reflexes, reflex spasms, and attenuation of inhibitory brainstem reflexes. Conclusion: Reflex excitation is exaggerated and inhibition is attenuated in both stiff-man syndrome and familial or acquired hyperekplexia, indicating a physiological relationship. Reflex transmission in the brainstem appears biased towards excitation which may imply dysfunction of inhibitory glycinergic or GABAergic interneurons, or both. PMID:15314112

  8. Linear time delay methods and stability analyses of the human spine. Effects of neuromuscular reflex response.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Timothy C; Granata, Kevin P; Madigan, Michael L; Hendricks, Scott L

    2008-08-01

    Linear stability methods were applied to a biomechanical model of the human musculoskeletal spine to investigate effects of reflex gain and reflex delay on stability. Equations of motion represented a dynamic 18 degrees-of-freedom rigid-body model with time-delayed reflexes. Optimal muscle activation levels were identified by minimizing metabolic power with the constraints of equilibrium and stability with zero reflex time delay. Muscle activation levels and associated muscle forces were used to find the delay margin, i.e., the maximum reflex delay for which the system was stable. Results demonstrated that stiffness due to antagonistic co-contraction necessary for stability declined with increased proportional reflex gain. Reflex delay limited the maximum acceptable proportional reflex gain, i.e., long reflex delay required smaller maximum reflex gain to avoid instability. As differential reflex gain increased, there was a small increase in acceptable reflex delay. However, differential reflex gain with values near intrinsic damping caused the delay margin to approach zero. Forward-dynamic simulations of the fully nonlinear time-delayed system verified the linear results. The linear methods accurately found the delay margin below which the nonlinear system was asymptotically stable. These methods may aid future investigations in the role of reflexes in musculoskeletal stability.

  9. Effects of Static Flexion-relaxation on Paraspinal Reflex Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Kevin P.; Rogers, Ellen; Moorhouse, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Background. Static trunk flexion working postures and disturbed trunk muscle reflexes are related to increased risk of low-back pain. Animal studies conclude that these factors may be related; passive tissue strain in spinal ligaments causes subsequent short-term changes in reflex. Although studies have documented changes in the myoelectric onset angle of flexion-relaxation following prolonged static flexion and cyclic flexion we could find no published evidence related to the human reflex response of the trunk extensor muscles following a period of static flexion-relaxation loading. Methods. Eighteen subjects maintained static lumbar flexion for 15 min. Paraspinal muscle reflexes were elicited both before and after the flexion-relaxation protocol using pseudorandom stochastic force disturbances while recording EMG. Reflex gain was computed from the peak value of the impulse response function relating input force perturbation to EMG response using time-domain deconvolution analyses. Findings. Reflexes showed a trend toward increased gain after the period of flexion-relaxation (P < 0.055) and were increased with trunk extension exertion (P < 0.021). Significant gender differences in reflex gain were observed (P < 0.01). Interpretations. Occupational activities requiring extended periods of trunk flexion contribute to changes in reflex behavior of the paraspinal muscles. Results suggest potential mechanisms by which flexed posture work may contribute to low-back pain. Significant gender differences indicate risk analyses should consider personal factors when considering neuromuscular behavior. PMID:15567532

  10. Role of stretch reflex in voluntary movements. [of human foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, G. L.; Agarwal, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The stretch reflex is often described as a spinal servomechanism, a device for assisting in the regulation of muscle length. Observation of the EMG response to mechanical interruption of voluntary movements fails to demonstrate a significant role for spinal reflexes at 40 msec latency. Two functional responses with latencies of 120 msec and 200 msec, implying supraspinal mediation, are observed.

  11. Effects of stimulation of group I afferents from flexor muscles on heterosynaptic facilitation of monosynaptic reflexes produced by Ia and descending inputs: a test for presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Jiménez, I; Enriquez, M

    1991-01-01

    1. In the chloralose anesthetized cat, conditioning stimulation of group I flexor afferents depresses the monosynaptic potentials generated by Ia afferents in single spinal motoneurons or in populations of motoneurons without affecting the monosynaptic potentials produced by stimulation of descending fibers in the ipsilateral ventromedial fasciculus (VMF). 2. Heterosynaptic facilitation of monosynaptic reflexes was used to test changes in the presynaptic effectiveness of excitatory inputs with direct connections with motoneurons. We found that the heterosynaptic facilitation of Ia origin was reduced by conditioning stimulation of group I afferents from flexors, without affecting the heterosynaptic facilitation produced by stimulation of the VMF. 3. These results confirm and expand previous observations showing that the synaptic effectiveness of descending fibers synapsing with motoneurons is not subjected to a presynaptic control mechanism of the type acting on Ia fiber terminals, and provide further basis for the use of changes in heterosynaptic facilitation of monosynaptic reflexes of Ia origin as an estimate of changes in presynaptic inhibition of Ia fibers (Hultborn et al. 1987a).

  12. Vestibular reflexes of otolith origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Victor J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibular system and its role in the maintenance of posture and in motion sickness is investigated using cats as experimental subjects. The assumption is that better understanding of the physiology of vestibular pathways is not only of intrinsic value, but will help to explain and eventually alleviate the disturbances caused by vestibular malfunction, or by exposure to an unusual environment such as space. The first project deals with the influence on the spinal cord of stimulation of the vestibular labyrinth, particularly the otoliths. A second was concerned with the properties and neural basis of the tonic neck reflex. These two projects are related, because vestibulospinal and tonic neck reflexes interact in the maintenance of normal posture. The third project began with an interest in mechanisms of motion sickness, and eventually shifted to a study of central control of respiratory muscles involved in vomiting.

  13. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  14. Reflex origin of parkinsonian tremor.

    PubMed

    Burne, J A

    1987-08-01

    The 8-Hz wrist tremor seen in normal subjects results from an oscillation in the spinal stretch reflex arc but the resting 4-Hz tremor of Parkinson's disease is believed to result from synchronization of motor unit activity by periodic descending inputs driven by an oscillator which resides within the brain. Accelerometer and smoothed EMG (0.8 to 16.0-Hz pass) recordings of resting tremor were taken from the upper limbs of 10 volunteers with Parkinson's disease for several different limb positions and while the limb was fixed to prevent tremor movements. The smoothed EMG and accelerometer records produced a complex periodic waveform with prominent 4- and 8-Hz components. Spectral analysis of both records produced large peaks at those frequencies which were harmonically related. The appearance of the regular tremor waveform in accelerometer and smoothed EMG records was greatly altered by changes in limb posture in all patients. Fixing of the shoulder and elbow joints only, also altered the smoothed EMG waveform and reduced the tremor amplitude. Fixing of the entire limb removed all signs of synchronization of motor unit activity in raw and smoothed EMG records. Similarly, the prominent 4- and 8-Hz peaks, found in the smoothed EMG power spectra from trembling muscles, were eliminated if the limb was effectively prevented from trembling. These experiments showed that the synchronization of motor unit activity at Parkinson's tremor frequency is wholly dependent on the oscillation in limb position and thus proprioceptive reflex activity. It is suggested that the known properties of the 4-Hz resting tremor of Parkinson's disease can be attributed to a flip-flop oscillation involving the mutually inhibitory connections between the spinal stretch reflexes of antagonist muscles. The supraspinal contribution to the tremor may thus be confined to an "aperiodic" descending facilitation of spinal reflex pathways.

  15. Tissue engineering the mechanosensory circuit of the stretch reflex arc with human stem cells: Sensory neuron innervation of intrafusal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiufang; Colon, Alisha; Akanda, Nesar; Spradling, Severo; Stancescu, Maria; Martin, Candace; Hickman, James J

    2017-04-01

    Muscle spindles are sensory organs embedded in the belly of skeletal muscles that serve as mechanoreceptors detecting static and dynamic information about muscle length and stretch. Through their connection with proprioceptive sensory neurons, sensation of axial body position and muscle movement are transmitted to the central nervous system. Impairment of this sensory circuit causes motor deficits and has been linked to a wide range of diseases. To date, no defined human-based in vitro model of the proprioceptive sensory circuit has been developed. The goal of this study was to develop a human-based in vitro muscle sensory circuit utilizing human stem cells. A serum-free medium was developed to drive the induction of intrafusal fibers from human satellite cells by actuation of a neuregulin signaling pathway. Both bag and chain intrafusal fibers were generated and subsequently validated by phase microscopy and immunocytochemistry. When co-cultured with proprioceptive sensory neurons derived from human neuroprogenitors, mechanosensory nerve terminal structural features with intrafusal fibers were demonstrated. Most importantly, patch-clamp electrophysiological analysis of the intrafusal fibers indicated repetitive firing of human intrafusal fibers, which has not been observed in human extrafusal fibers.

  16. Computation of inverse functions in a model of cerebellar and reflex pathways allows to control a mobile mechanical segment.

    PubMed

    Ebadzadeh, M; Tondu, B; Darlot, C

    2005-01-01

    The command and control of limb movements by the cerebellar and reflex pathways are modeled by means of a circuit whose structure is deduced from functional constraints. One constraint is that fast limb movements must be accurate although they cannot be continuously controlled in closed loop by use of sensory signals. Thus, the pathways which process the motor orders must contain approximate inverse functions of the bio-mechanical functions of the limb and of the muscles. This can be achieved by means of parallel feedback loops, whose pattern turns out to be comparable to the anatomy of the cerebellar pathways. They contain neural networks able to anticipate the motor consequences of the motor orders, modeled by artificial neural networks whose connectivity is similar to that of the cerebellar cortex. These networks learn the direct biomechanical functions of the limbs and muscles by means of a supervised learning process. Teaching signals calculated from motor errors are sent to the learning sites, as, in the cerebellum, complex spikes issued from the inferior olive are conveyed to the Purkinje cells by climbing fibers. Learning rules are deduced by a differential calculation, as classical gradient rules, and they account for the long term depression which takes place in the dendritic arborizations of the Purkinje cells. Another constraint is that reflexes must not impede voluntary movements while remaining at any instant ready to oppose perturbations. Therefore, efferent copies of the motor orders are sent to the interneurones of the reflexes, where they cancel the sensory-motor consequences of the voluntary movements. After learning, the model is able to drive accurately, both in velocity and position, angular movements of a rod actuated by two pneumatic McKibben muscles. Reflexes comparable to the myotatic and tendinous reflexes, and stabilizing reactions comparable to the cerebellar sensory-motor reactions, reduce efficiently the effects of perturbing torques

  17. Deficits in Lower Limb Muscle Reflex Contraction Latency and Peak Force Are Associated With Impairments in Postural Control and Gross Motor Skills of Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Shirley S.M.; Ng, Shamay S.M.; Guo, X.; Wang, Yuling; Chung, Raymond C.K.; Stat, Grad; Ki, W.Y.; Macfarlane, Duncan J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional, exploratory study aimed to compare neuromuscular performance, balance and motor skills proficiencies of typically developing children and those with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and to determine associations of these neuromuscular factors with balance and motor skills performances in children with DCD. One hundred thirty children with DCD and 117 typically developing children participated in the study. Medial hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latencies in response to an unexpected posterior-to-anterior trunk perturbation were assessed by electromyography and accelerometer. Hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle peak force and time to peak force were quantified by dynamometer, and balance and motor skills performances were evaluated with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC). Independent t tests revealed that children with DCD had longer hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latencies (P < 0.001) and lower isometric peak forces (P < 0.001), but not times to peak forces (P > 0.025), than the controls. Multiple regression analysis accounting for basic demographics showed that gastrocnemius peak force was independently associated with the MABC balance subscore and ball skills subscore, accounting for 5.7% (P = 0.003) and 8.5% (P = 0.001) of the variance, respectively. Gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latency also explained 11.4% (P < 0.001) of the variance in the MABC ball skills subscore. Children with DCD had delayed leg muscle activation onset times and lower isometric peak forces. Gastrocnemius peak force was associated with balance and ball skills performances, whereas timing of gastrocnemius muscle activation was a determinant of ball skill performance in the DCD population. PMID:26469921

  18. Abnormalities of the blink reflex in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, S K; Forssell, H; Tenovuo, O

    1997-12-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first report on pain-related abnormalities of the eye blink reflex (BR) in a clinical pain patient population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible neuropathic mechanisms underlying the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), by means of objective electrophysiological examination of the trigemino-facial system. We studied the BR with stimulation of the supraorbital nerve (SON) with particular emphasis on the occurrence of the pain-related ultralate R3 components, and the habituation response of the R2 components. The subjects consisted of eleven BMS patients and 10 healthy control subjects. All patients underwent thorough clinical oral and neurological examinations. The motor function of the trigeminal nerve was assessed with a jaw reflex recording, and a needle-EMG examination of the facial and masticatory muscles was performed in the patients with abnormalities in the BR recordings. The jaw reflexes, the latencies of the BR components, and the needle-EMG examinations were normal in all patients. As a group, the BMS patients had statistically significantly higher stimulus thresholds for the tactile R 1 components of the BR compared with the control subjects. With non-noxious stimulation, the BMS patients showed more frequently pain-related R3 components (11/22 SONs) compared with the controls (3/20 SONs). In addition, four BMS patients had abnormal habituation of the R2 components. In two of these patients, the findings were segmental (i.e., unilateral), coinciding with the side of the subjective BM symptoms. The abnormalities of the BR tests appeared to be related to longer disease duration. Our results suggest a possible pathologic involvement of the nervous system in chronic BMS.

  19. Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity in the Long-Latency Stretch Reflex Following Paired Stimulation from a Wearable Electronic Device.

    PubMed

    Foysal, K M Riashad; de Carvalho, Felipe; Baker, Stuart N

    2016-10-19

    The long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) in human elbow muscles probably depends on multiple pathways; one possible contributor is the reticulospinal tract. Here we attempted to induce plastic changes in the LLSR by pairing noninvasive stimuli that are known to activate reticulospinal pathways, at timings predicted to cause spike timing-dependent plasticity in the brainstem. In healthy human subjects, reflex responses in flexor muscles were recorded following extension perturbations at the elbow. Subjects were then fitted with a portable device that delivered auditory click stimuli through an earpiece, and electrical stimuli around motor threshold to the biceps muscle via surface electrodes. We tested the following four paradigms: biceps stimulus 10 ms before click (Bi-10ms-C); click 25 ms before biceps (C-25ms-Bi); click alone (C only); and biceps alone (Bi only). The average stimulus rate was 0.67 Hz. Subjects left the laboratory wearing the device and performed normal daily activities. Approximately 7 h later, they returned, and stretch reflexes were remeasured. The LLSR was significantly enhanced in the biceps muscle (on average by 49%) after the Bi-10ms-C paradigm, but was suppressed for C-25ms-Bi (by 31%); it was unchanged for Bi only and C only. No paradigm induced LLSR changes in the unstimulated brachioradialis muscle. Although we cannot exclude contributions from spinal or cortical pathways, our results are consistent with spike timing-dependent plasticity in reticulospinal circuits, specific to the stimulated muscle. This is the first demonstration that the LLSR can be modified via paired-pulse methods, and may open up new possibilities in motor systems neuroscience and rehabilitation.

  20. Vestibulocollic reflexes in the absence of head postural control

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Patrick A.; Siegmund, Gunter P.; Happee, Riender; Schouten, Alfred C.

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous electrical vestibular stimulation evokes reflexive responses in appendicular muscles that are suppressed during tasks in which the muscles are not contributing to balance control. In neck muscles, which stabilize the head on the torso and in space, it is unclear whether similar postural task dependence shapes vestibular reflexes. We investigated whether vestibulocollic reflexes are modulated during tasks in which vestibular information is not directly relevant to maintaining the head balanced on the torso. We hypothesized that vestibulocollic reflexes would be 1) evoked when neck muscles are not involved in balancing the head on the torso and 2) invariant across synergistic neck muscle contraction tasks. Muscle activity was recorded bilaterally in sternocleidomastoid and splenius capitis muscles during head-free and head-fixed conditions while subjects were exposed to stochastic electrical vestibular stimulation (±5 mA, 0–75 Hz). Significant vestibular reflex responses (P < 0.05) were observed during head-free and head-fixed trials. Response magnitude and timing were similar between head-free and head-fixed trials for sternocleidomastoid, but splenius capitis magnitudes decreased with the head fixed by ∼25% (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, this indicates that vestibulocollic responses are evoked independent of the requirement to maintain postural control of the head on the torso. Response magnitude and timing were similar across focal muscle contractions (i.e., axial rotation/flexion/extension) provided the muscle was active. In contrast, when subjects cocontracted neck muscles, vestibular-evoked responses decreased in sternocleidomastoid by ∼30–45% (P < 0.05) compared with focal muscle contractions but remained unchanged in splenius capitis. These results indicate robust vestibulocollic reflex coupling, which we suggest functions through its closed-loop influence on head posture to ensure cervical spine stabilization. PMID:25008409

  1. Vestibulocollic reflexes in the absence of head postural control.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Patrick A; Siegmund, Gunter P; Happee, Riender; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    Percutaneous electrical vestibular stimulation evokes reflexive responses in appendicular muscles that are suppressed during tasks in which the muscles are not contributing to balance control. In neck muscles, which stabilize the head on the torso and in space, it is unclear whether similar postural task dependence shapes vestibular reflexes. We investigated whether vestibulocollic reflexes are modulated during tasks in which vestibular information is not directly relevant to maintaining the head balanced on the torso. We hypothesized that vestibulocollic reflexes would be 1) evoked when neck muscles are not involved in balancing the head on the torso and 2) invariant across synergistic neck muscle contraction tasks. Muscle activity was recorded bilaterally in sternocleidomastoid and splenius capitis muscles during head-free and head-fixed conditions while subjects were exposed to stochastic electrical vestibular stimulation (± 5 mA, 0-75 Hz). Significant vestibular reflex responses (P < 0.05) were observed during head-free and head-fixed trials. Response magnitude and timing were similar between head-free and head-fixed trials for sternocleidomastoid, but splenius capitis magnitudes decreased with the head fixed by ∼ 25% (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, this indicates that vestibulocollic responses are evoked independent of the requirement to maintain postural control of the head on the torso. Response magnitude and timing were similar across focal muscle contractions (i.e., axial rotation/flexion/extension) provided the muscle was active. In contrast, when subjects cocontracted neck muscles, vestibular-evoked responses decreased in sternocleidomastoid by ∼ 30-45% (P < 0.05) compared with focal muscle contractions but remained unchanged in splenius capitis. These results indicate robust vestibulocollic reflex coupling, which we suggest functions through its closed-loop influence on head posture to ensure cervical spine stabilization.

  2. The exercise pressor reflex and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-03-01

    The exercise pressor reflex contributes to increases in cardiovascular and ventilatory function during exercise. These reflexive increases are caused by both mechanical stimulation and metabolic stimulation of group III and IV afferents with endings in contracting skeletal muscle. Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex. Recently, an animal model of PAD was established which allows further investigation of possible mechanisms involved in this augmented reflex. Earlier studies have identified ASIC3 channels, bradykinin receptors, P2X receptors, endoperoxide receptors, and thromboxane receptors as playing a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in healthy rats. This review focuses on recent studies using a rat model of PAD in order to determine possible mechanisms contributing to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex seen in patients with this disease.

  3. Surface EMG Recording of the Perioral Reflexes: Preliminary Observations on Stutterers and Nonstutterers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClean, Michael D.

    1987-01-01

    Surface electrodes were used to describe the perioral reflexes in seven stutterers and five nonstutterers and electromyographic (EMG) recordings were obtained at electrode sites associated with the orbicularis oris inferior muscle and the depressor labia inferior muscle. A difference was noted in the pattern of reflex response between the two…

  4. Tonic adrenergic and serotonergic inhibition of a withdrawal reflex in rabbits subjected to different levels of surgical preparation.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, J; Simpson, D A; Clarke, R W

    1999-01-01

    The excitability of the heel-gastrocnemius withdrawal reflex pathway has been monitored in rabbits undergoing surgical preparation for electrophysiological experimentation under Saffan anaesthesia. Reflexes were evoked by percutaneous electrodes inserted at the heel and recorded as electromyograph signals from the ipsilateral medial gastrocnemius muscle. Two levels of surgery were carried out. The "full surgical" preparation was performed under deep Saffan anaesthesia. The trachea, carotid artery, jugular vein and intrathecal space (via a small laminectomy at L1) were cannulated, the animals were decerebrated by suction, and the left hindlimb was immobilized by screw clamps applied to the tibia and the femur. The sciatic nerve and its branches were exposed by bisection of the posterior biceps muscle and the anaesthetic was withdrawn. In the "reduced surgery" preparation, procedures were carried out with a lighter level of Saffan anaesthesia and operated tissues were infiltrated with local anaesthetic. Only the cannulations were performed in these animals. The excitability of the heel-gastrocnemius reflex declined throughout the full surgical preparation, with the median threshold increasing from 0.8 to 4.2 mA (n=19) and responses to suprathreshold stimuli reducing in size. Most of this effect was reversed after surgery was complete and anaesthesia withdrawn subsequent to decerebration. There were no significant changes in reflex excitability during the reduced surgery preparation (n = 15). Animals prepared by each of these protocols were given increasing intrathecal doses of either the selective alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist RX 821002 (0.3 to 300 microg) or the serotonin/5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A-receptor antagonist WAY-100635 (0.01 to 30 microg). Both drugs caused significant, dose-dependent increases in reflex responses, to four to six times pre-drug control in both groups of animals. There were no differences in the effects on reflexes of either drug between

  5. 5-HT4 receptor mediated facilitation of the emptying phase of the peristaltic reflex in the guinea-pig isolated ileum.

    PubMed Central

    Costall, B.; Naylor, R. J.; Tuladhar, B. R.

    1993-01-01

    1. The influence of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor agonists and antagonists on the emptying phase (circular muscle contraction) of the peristaltic reflex was investigated in the guinea-pig isolated ileum. 2. The effect of drug application to the serosal surface was measured as the changes in threshold pressure required to trigger the peristaltic reflex and the interval between the peristaltic strokes. A facilitation or inhibition of peristalsis was defined as a reduction or increase in threshold pressure respectively. 3. Peristalsis was not modified by the inclusion of methysergide (1 microM) and/or ondansetron (2 microM) in the bathing medium. 5-HT (0.1-1.0 microM) caused a facilitation of the peristaltic reflex; the response curve to 5-HT was not altered by the presence of methysergide (1 microM) and ondansetron (2 microM). 4. In the presence of methysergide (1 microM) plus ondansetron (2 microM), 5-HT (7.36 +/- 0.06), 5-methoxytryptamine (7.01 +/- 0.17), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5.43 +/- 0.06), renzapride (6.09 +/- 0.17), (S)-zacopride (5.99 +/- 0.11), (R)-zacopride (5.61 +/- 0.13) and metoclopramide (4.8 +/- 0.65) caused a concentration-related facilitation of the peristaltic reflex, the pEC50 values (mean +/- s.e.mean) being shown in parentheses. 2-Methyl-5-HT was ineffective up to 10 microM. 5. The administration of SDZ 205-557 (1 microM) alone failed to modify the peristaltic reflex, but caused a parallel dextral shift in the concentration-effect curve to 5-HT (apparent pKB 7.38 +/- 0.30). It failed to modify the effect of acetylcholine to enhance the peristaltic reflex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8306103

  6. The spinal reflex cannot be perceptually separated from voluntary movements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arko; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Both voluntary and involuntary movements activate sensors in the muscles, skin, tendon and joints. As limb movement can result from a mixture of spinal reflexes and voluntary motor commands, the cortical centres underlying conscious proprioception might either aggregate or separate the sensory inputs generated by voluntary movements from those generated by involuntary movements such as spinal reflexes. We addressed whether healthy volunteers could perceive the contribution of a spinal reflex during movements that combined both reflexive and voluntary contributions. Volunteers reported the reflexive contribution in leg movements that were partly driven by the knee-jerk reflex induced by a patellar tendon tap and partly by voluntary motor control. In one condition, participants were instructed to kick back in response to a tendon tap. The results were compared to reflexes in a resting baseline condition without voluntary movement. In a further condition, participants were instructed to kick forwards after a tap. Volunteers reported the perceived reflex contribution by repositioning the leg to the perceived maximum displacement to which the reflex moved the leg after each tendon tap. In the resting baseline condition, the reflex was accurately perceived. We found a near-unity slope of linear regressions of perceived on actual reflexive displacement. Both the slope value and the quality of regression fit in individual volunteers were significantly reduced when volunteers were instructed to generate voluntary backward kicks as soon as they detected the tap. In the kick forward condition, kinematic analysis showed continuity of reflex and voluntary movements, but the reflex contribution could be estimated from electromyography (EMG) recording on each trial. Again, participants' judgements of reflexes showed a poor relation to reflex EMG, in contrast to the baseline condition. In sum, we show that reflexes can be accurately perceived from afferent information. However

  7. Interactions with compliant loads alter stretch reflex gains but not intermuscular coordination.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Eric J; Chen, Kuifu; Trumbower, Randy D; Lewis, Gwyn

    2008-05-01

    The human motor system regulates arm mechanics to produce stable postures during interactions with different physical environments. This occurs partly via involuntary mechanisms, including stretch reflexes. Previous single-joint studies demonstrated enhanced reflex sensitivity during interactions with compliant environments, suggesting reflex gain increases to enhance limb stability when that stability is not provided by the environment. This study examined whether similar changes in reflex gain are present throughout the limb following perturbations that simultaneously influence multiple joints. Furthermore, we investigated whether any observed modulation was accompanied by task-specific changes in reflex coordination across muscles, a question that cannot be addressed using single-joint perturbations. Reflexes were elicited during the maintenance of posture by perturbing the arm with a three degrees of freedom robot, configured to have isotropic stiffness of either 10 N/m (compliant) or 10 kN/m (stiff). Perturbation characteristics were matched in both environments. Reflex magnitude was quantified by the average rectified electromyogram, recorded from eight muscles crossing the elbow and shoulder. Reflex coordination was assessed using independent components analysis to compare reflex activation patterns during interactions with stiff and compliant environments. Stretch reflex sensitivity increased significantly in all muscles during interactions with the compliant environment and these changes were not due to changes in background muscle activity. However, there was no significant difference in the reflex coordination patterns observed during interactions with the stiff and compliant environments. These results suggest that reflex modulation occurred through altered use of fixed muscle coordination patterns rather than through a change in reflex coordination.

  8. Performance on the Motor Scale of The McCarthy Scales of Children's Abilities as Related to Home Environment and Neonatal Reflexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    La Veck, Beverly; Hammond, Mary A.

    1982-01-01

    Total motor and cognitive-motor performance at age 4 was related to home environment but not to neonatal reflexes. Large muscle skill was unrelated to environment but did relate to neonatal reflexes among girls. (Author)

  9. Contribution of tonic vibration reflex to the evaluation and diagnosis of cerebellar disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Abbruzzese, G; Abbruzzese, M; Ratto, S; Favale, E

    1982-01-01

    Biceps brachii tonic vibration reflexes were elicited in patients with either focal or diffuse cerebellar damage and spino-cerebellar degenerations. As compared to normal controls, tonic vibration reflex amplitude was reduced in cerebellar patients, particularly in cases with unilateral hemispheric lesion, who exhibited a clear cut tonic vibration reflex asymmetry even when clinical symptoms were mild. These reflexes were absent or very weak in patients with spino-cerebellar degenerations. Muscle vibration induced in most of the patients an enhancement of mild or latent clinical symptoms such as intention tremor, difficulty in muscle relaxation or motor incoordination. PMID:7119815

  10. On Reflexive Data Models

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  11. Visceral and postural reflexes evoked by genital stimulation in urethane-anesthetized female rats.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Gomez, M; Chirino, R; Beyer, C; Komisaruk, B R; Pacheco, P

    1992-03-20

    The present study describes several muscular reflexes produced by genital stimulation, the nerves that subserve them, and the visceral and postural effects induced by these reflexes. Electrical stimulation of the iliococcygeus (ic) and pubococcygeus (pc) (striated) muscles produced movement of the vaginal orifice and wall, membranous urethra, tail and pelvis. Electrical stimulation of the psoas major (pm) or iliacus (i) (striated) muscles produced movements of the lumbar vertebrae and extension of the ipsilateral hindlimb. Sensory mechanostimulation elicited responses of these muscles as follows: stimulation of the perineal skin, clitoral sheath or distal vagina produced reflex contraction of the ic and pc muscles. Stimulation of the cervix produced reflex contraction of the pm and i muscles and also blocked the above reflex contraction of the ic and pc muscles. Both the cervical stimulation-induced blockage of the ic and pc reflex response, and the cervical stimulation-induced activation of pm and i muscles was prevented by bilateral transection of the viscerocutaneous branch of the pelvic nerve. Based on the above observations, it is proposed that stimulation of the vaginal surface of the cervix resulting from penile intromission and/or seminal plug deposition during mating behavior in the rat may reflexively active pm and i, thereby contributing to the hindleg postural rigidity and lordotic dorsiflexion that are characteristic of the normal mating posture in female rats.

  12. Reflex operculoinsular seizures.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Handsun; Tran, Thi Phuoc Yen; Pétrin, Myriam; Boucher, Olivier; Mohamed, Ismail; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2016-03-01

    Activation of specific cortical territories by certain stimuli is known to trigger focal seizures. We report three cases of well documented operculo-insular reflex seizures, triggered by somatosensory stimuli in two and loud noises in the third. Limited operculoinsular resection resulted in an excellent outcome for all. We discuss these observations in regard to the literature on reflex epilepsy and known functions of the insula. [Published with video sequences online].

  13. Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity in the Long-Latency Stretch Reflex Following Paired Stimulation from a Wearable Electronic Device

    PubMed Central

    Foysal, K. M. Riashad; de Carvalho, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    The long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) in human elbow muscles probably depends on multiple pathways; one possible contributor is the reticulospinal tract. Here we attempted to induce plastic changes in the LLSR by pairing noninvasive stimuli that are known to activate reticulospinal pathways, at timings predicted to cause spike timing-dependent plasticity in the brainstem. In healthy human subjects, reflex responses in flexor muscles were recorded following extension perturbations at the elbow. Subjects were then fitted with a portable device that delivered auditory click stimuli through an earpiece, and electrical stimuli around motor threshold to the biceps muscle via surface electrodes. We tested the following four paradigms: biceps stimulus 10 ms before click (Bi-10ms-C); click 25 ms before biceps (C-25ms-Bi); click alone (C only); and biceps alone (Bi only). The average stimulus rate was 0.67 Hz. Subjects left the laboratory wearing the device and performed normal daily activities. Approximately 7 h later, they returned, and stretch reflexes were remeasured. The LLSR was significantly enhanced in the biceps muscle (on average by 49%) after the Bi-10ms-C paradigm, but was suppressed for C-25ms-Bi (by 31%); it was unchanged for Bi only and C only. No paradigm induced LLSR changes in the unstimulated brachioradialis muscle. Although we cannot exclude contributions from spinal or cortical pathways, our results are consistent with spike timing-dependent plasticity in reticulospinal circuits, specific to the stimulated muscle. This is the first demonstration that the LLSR can be modified via paired-pulse methods, and may open up new possibilities in motor systems neuroscience and rehabilitation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This report is the first demonstration that the long-latency stretch reflex can be modified by repeated, precisely timed pairing of stimuli known to activate brainstem pathways. Furthermore, pairing was achieved with a portable electronic device

  14. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  15. The use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to determine the ventilatory threshold and the relation between skeletal muscle oxygenation and RPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessmer, Kathryn Anne

    This study: (1) compared three (i.e., V-slope, Bhambhani et al., 1997, and Belardinelli et al., 1995) techniques of measuring the ventilatory threshold (VT), (2) examined the relation between OMNI RPE and muscle deoxygenation (MD), and (3) evaluated the impact of gender on MD and RPE. Subjects included 20 males and 13 females, aged 25-29 years. A commercial NIRS sensor (NIRS Micro-Run Man model # MRM-96) was placed over the right vastus lateralis and secured with an elastic wrap. Next, each subject underwent a progressive multistage cycle ergometer test to establish the VT using the V-slope method and NIRS methods. The V-slope (58.62 +/- 10.47% VO2peak), Bhambhani et al. 1997 (49.75 +/- 20.13% VO2peak), and Belardinelli et al. 1995 (60.87 +/- 10.15% VO2peak) methods did not result in different (F(2,49) = 2.77, p > 0.05) VT values. The following significant linear regression equation was generated (p = 0.016): OMNI RPE = 5.97 - (15.20)MD (R = -0.20, R 2 = 0.04, and SE = 2.76). The two-way ANOVA (gender x power output) conducted on OMNI RPE revealed a significant main effect for gender ( F(1,193) = 19.53, p < 0.05). Males had lower RPEs (6.32 +/- .17) than females (7.16 +/- .28). A significant main effect for power output was also found (F(9, 193) = 56.21, p < 0.05). In addition, a significant gender x power output interaction was found ( F(7, 193) = 2.11, p < 0.05). With respect to MD, the two-way ANOVA revealed a significant main effect for gender (F(1, 133) = 10.61, p < 0.05). Females had less MD (0.012 +/- .007) than males (0.002 +/- .005). The results of this study indicate that the three methods of determining the VT were not different. MD values decreased with increasing ratings of perceived exertion. RPE differed between genders, with males having lower RPE's than females (p < 0.05). Also, a significant gender x power output interaction was found (p < 0.05). Finally, women experienced less skeletal MD than men during a progressively incremented cycle

  16. Modulation of the stretch reflex during volitional sinusoidal tracking in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M T; Kipnis, A N; Lee, M C; Loewenson, R B; Ebner, T J

    1991-02-01

    Sinusoidal visually-guided wrist tracking, in normal and parkinsonian subjects, was perturbed by torque transients every 90 degrees throughout the movement. Long-latency stretch reflex and volitional EMG amplitude modulations were assessed as functions of the tracking phase. Reflex modulation during tracking, both in wrist flexor and extensor muscles, was found to differ significantly between parkinsonian and normal subjects. In the parkinsonian group, the abnormality consisted of an increased reflex activity during tracking phases in which the muscle was lengthening. At these phases the reflex generated torque is opposite in direction to the volitionally generated torque and the tracking movement. No differences in the unperturbed volitional EMG modulation were observed between groups for this error constrained tracking paradigm. Significant correlations were found between ratings of bradykinesia and the amount of abnormal reflex modulation in the wrist flexor. These data suggest that a component of bradykinesia results from a defective coordination of supraspinal reflex and volitional control systems.

  17. Separating medial olivocochlear from acoustic reflex effects on transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in unanesthetized mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yingyue; Cheatham, Mary Ann; Siegel, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Descending neural pathways in the mammalian auditory system are believed to modulate the function of the peripheral auditory system [3, 8, 10]. These pathways include the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent innervation to the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) and the acoustic reflex pathways mediating middle ear muscle (MEM) contractions. The MOC effects can be monitored noninvasively using otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) [5, 6], which are acoustic byproducts of cochlear function [7]. In this study, we applied a sensitive method to determine when and to what degree contralateral MEM suppression contaminated MOC efferent effects on TEOAEs in unanesthetized mice. The lowest contralateral broadband noise evoking MEM contractions varied across animals. Examples of potential MOC-mediated TEOAE suppression with contralateral noise below MEM contraction thresholds were seen, but this behavior did not occur in the majority of cases.

  18. Muscle activation patterns when passively stretching spastic lower limb muscles of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bar-On, Lynn; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-01-01

    The definition of spasticity as a velocity-dependent activation of the tonic stretch reflex during a stretch to a passive muscle is the most widely accepted. However, other mechanisms are also thought to contribute to pathological muscle activity and, in patients post-stroke and spinal cord injury can result in different activation patterns. In the lower-limbs of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) these distinct activation patterns have not yet been thoroughly explored. The aim of the study was to apply an instrumented assessment to quantify different muscle activation patterns in four lower-limb muscles of children with CP. Fifty-four children with CP were included (males/females n = 35/19; 10.8 ± 3.8 yrs; bilateral/unilateral involvement n =  32/22; Gross Motor Functional Classification Score I-IV) of whom ten were retested to evaluate intra-rater reliability. With the subject relaxed, single-joint, sagittal-plane movements of the hip, knee, and ankle were performed to stretch the lower-limb muscles at three increasing velocities. Muscle activity and joint motion were synchronously recorded using inertial sensors and electromyography (EMG) from the adductors, medial hamstrings, rectus femoris, and gastrocnemius. Muscles were visually categorised into activation patterns using average, normalized root mean square EMG (RMS-EMG) compared across increasing position zones and velocities. Based on the visual categorisation, quantitative parameters were defined using stretch-reflex thresholds and normalized RMS-EMG. These parameters were compared between muscles with different activation patterns. All patterns were dominated by high velocity-dependent muscle activation, but in more than half, low velocity-dependent activation was also observed. Muscle activation patterns were found to be both muscle- and subject-specific (p<0.01). The intra-rater reliability of all quantitative parameters was moderate to good. Comparing RMS-EMG between incremental position

  19. Interindividual differences in H reflex modulation during normal walking.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Erik B; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Alkjaer, Tine; Aagaard, Per; Magnusson, S Peter

    2002-01-01

    Based on previous studies, at least two different types of soleus Hoffmann (H) reflex modulation were likely to be found during normal human walking. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to identify different patterns of modulation of the soleus H reflex and to examine whether or not subjects with different H reflex modulation would exhibit different walking mechanics and different EMG activity. Fifteen subjects walked across two force platforms at 4.5 km/h (+/-10%) while the movements were recorded on video. The soleus H reflex and EMG activity were recorded separately during treadmill walking at 4.5 km/h. Using a two-dimensional analysis joint angles, angular velocities, accelerations, linear velocities and accelerations were calculated, and net joint moments about the ankle, knee and hip joint were computed by inverse dynamics from the video and force plate data. Six subjects (group S) showed a suppressed H reflex during the swing phase, and 9 subjects (group LS) showed increasing reflex excitability during the swing phase. The plantar flexor dominated moment about the ankle joint was greater for group LS. In contrast, the extensor dominated moment about the knee joint was greater for the S group. The hip joint moment was similar for the groups. The EMG activity in the vastus lateralis and anterior tibial muscles was greater prior to heel strike for the S group. These data indicate that human walking exhibits at least two different motor patterns as evaluated by gating of afferent input to the spinal cord, by EMG activity and by walking mechanics. Increasing H reflex excitability during the swing phase appears to protect the subject against unexpected perturbations around heel strike by a facilitated stretch reflex in the triceps surae muscle. Alternatively, in subjects with a suppressed H reflex in the swing phase the knee joint extensors seem to form the primary protection around heel strike.

  20. Sacroiliac joint manipulation decreases the H-reflex.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B A; Dawson, N J; Slack, J R

    1995-03-01

    Joint manipulation is widely utilized clinically to decrease pain and increase the range of motion of joints displaying limited mobility. Evidence of efficacy is based on subjective reports of symptom improvement as well as on the results of clinical trials. Experiments were designed to determine whether or not sacroiliac joint manipulation affects the amplitude of the Hoffman (H) reflex. Surface EMG recordings of the reflex response to electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve in the popliteal fossa were made from the soleus muscle. The averaged amplitudes of H-reflexes were compared on both legs before and after either sacroiliac joint manipulation or a sham procedure. H-reflex amplitude was significantly decreased (12.9%) in the ipsilateral leg (p < 0.001) following a sacroiliac joint manipulation while there was no significant alteration following the sham intervention. There was no significant alteration in reflex excitability in the contralateral leg to the sacroiliac joint manipulation. To further investigate the mechanism of these reflex alterations, the local anaesthetic cream EMLA (Astra Pharmaceuticals) was applied to the skin overlying the sacroiliac joint and the experiments were repeated on a different group of subjects. This was intended to determine if excitation of cutaneous afferents was responsible for the reflex excitability changes. There was still a significant decrease in reflex excitability (10.6%) following sacroiliac joint manipulation (p < 0.001). These findings indicate that joint manipulation exerts physiological effects on the central nervous system, probably at the segmental level. The fact that the changes persisted in the presence of cutaneous anaesthesia suggests that the reflex changes are likely to be mediated by joint and/or muscle afferents.

  1. Temporal development of anticipatory reflex modulation to dynamical interactions during arm movement.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Toshitaka; Gomi, Hiroaki

    2009-10-01

    It is known that somatosensory reflex during voluntary arm movement is modulated anticipatorily according to given tasks or environments. However, when and how reflex amplitude is set remains controversial. Is the reflex modulation completed preparatorily before movement execution or does it vary with the movement? Is the reflex amplitude coded in a temporal manner or in a spatial (or state-dependent) manner? Here we studied these issues while subjects performed planar reaching movements with upcoming opposite (rightward/leftward) directions of force fields. Somatosensory reflex responses of shoulder muscles induced by a small force perturbation were evaluated at several points before the arm encountered predictable force fields after movement start. We found that the shoulder flexor reflex responses were generally higher for the rightward than for the leftward upcoming force fields, whereas the extensor reflex responses were higher for the leftward force field. This reflex amplitude depending on the upcoming force field direction became prominent as the reflex was evoked closer to the force fields, indicating continuous changes in reflex modulation during movement. An additional experiment further showed that the reflex modulation developed as a function of the temporal distance to the force fields rather than the spatial distance. Taken together, the results suggest that, in the force field interaction task, somatosensory reflex amplitude during the course of movement is set anticipatorily on the basis of an estimate of the time-to-contact rather than the state-to-contact, to upcoming dynamical interaction during voluntary movement.

  2. Phase-dependent reversal of the crossed conditioning effect on the soleus Hoffmann reflex from cutaneous afferents during walking in humans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shinya; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Futatsubashi, Genki; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Ohtsuka, Hiroyuki; Ohki, Yukari; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that non-noxious electrical stimulation of the cutaneous nerve innervating the contralateral foot modified the excitability of the Hoffmann (H-) reflex in the soleus muscle (SOL) in a task-dependent manner during standing and walking in humans. To date, however, it remains unclear how the crossed conditioning effect on the SOL H-reflex from the contralateral foot is modified during the various phases of walking. We sought to answer this question in the present study. The SOL H-reflex was evoked in healthy volunteers by an electrical test stimulation (TS) of the right (ipsilateral) posterior tibial nerve at five different phases during treadmill walking (4 km/h). A non-noxious electrical stimulation was delivered to the superficial peroneal nerve of the left (contralateral) ankle ~100 ms before the TS as a conditioning stimulation (CS). This CS significantly suppressed the H-reflex amplitude during the early stance phase, whereas the same CS significantly facilitated the H-reflex amplitude during the late stance phase. The CS alone did not produce detectable changes in the full-wave rectified electromyogram of the SOL. This result indicates that presynaptic mechanisms driven by the activation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents in the contralateral foot play a role in regulating the transmission between the Ia terminal and motoneurons in a phase-dependent manner. The modulation pattern of the crossed conditioning effect on the SOL H-reflex may be functionally relevant for the left-right coordination of leg movements during bipedal walking.

  3. Jaw-opening reflex after CO2 laser stimulation of the perioral region in man.

    PubMed

    Cruccu, G; Romaniello, A

    1998-02-01

    CO2 laser pulses selectively excite A-delta and C mechano-thermal nociceptors in the superficial layers of the skin. To study the jaw-opening reflex elicited by a purely nociceptive input, we delivered laser pulses to the perioral region in 15 subjects. Sensory threshold was very low (9 mJ/mm2). High-intensity noxious laser pulses (more than 4 x sensory threshold) evoked a single phase of electromyogram suppression (laser silent period, LSP) at an onset latency of 70 ms in the contracted masseter and temporal muscles, bilaterally. Even maximum-intensity laser pulses failed to activate the suprahyoid muscles. The recovery curves to paired laser stimuli showed that at short interstimulus intervals the test LSP was strongly suppressed. At about 380 ms it recovered to 50%, i.e. its recovery curve resembled that of the masseter late silent period after electrical mental nerve stimulation (SP2). In experiments studying the interaction with heterotopic stimuli and non-nociceptive responses, chin-taps or electrical shocks delivered to the supraorbital, infraorbital or mental nerves before laser stimulation strongly suppressed the LSP. A preceding perioral laser pulse strongly suppressed the masseter SP evoked by supraorbital stimulation and the SP2 evoked by mental stimulation, but left SPI unaffected. We conclude that the perioral A-delta fibre input elicits a jaw-opening reflex simply by inhibiting the jaw-closers. The LSP response is mediated by a multisynaptic chain of brainstem interneurons and shares with the masseter SP2 part of the central circuit in the ponto-medullary region. We also propose that a common centre processes the various inputs for jaw opening.

  4. [Descending long-loop reflexes in the human spinal cord I. Facilitation of the triceps surae H reflex following stimulation of forelimb afferences (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Meinck, H M

    1976-09-01

    The H reflex in the triceps surae muscle was elicited by just supraliminal stimulation of the tibial nerve. It was conditioned by paired impulses to the brachial plexus or the forelimb nerves and in some cases to other sites of the body. With a conditioning test interval of 32-47 msec a facilitation occurred which reached its maximum at about 80 msec and lasted for about 400 msec. The facilitation evoked by ipsilateral conditioning had a shorter latency than that from contralateral (ipsilateral: 32-42 msec, contralateral; 37-47 msec). The facilitation at the optimum interval (about 80 msec) ranged between 1;5 and 11.3 times of the control values. Ipsilateral conditioning was slightly more effective than the contralateral one (Fig. 1, 2). Stimulation of different forelimb nerves at an interval of 80 msec showed only insignificant differences in the amount of facilitation but was more effective than skin stimulation in the most cases (Fig. 3). Varying the intensity of the conditioning stimulus showed that facilitation occurred with just perceptable stimuli but it became more pronounced as soon as pain threshold (2-3 time of perception threshold) was exceeded (Fig. 3). This suggests that facilitation was mainly due to activation of nociceptor afferents. From the onset of facilitation and the conduction velocities of the respective forelimb and hindlimb afferents (cf. 6) a central reflex lantency of about 43 msec was calculated. To get further insight into the central connections of the reflex loop the H reflex was conditioned by paravertebral stimulation at C5 and L1 level. Both stimuli caused a distinct facilitation. However, the latency of the onset was 10-15 msec shorter with lumbar stimulation than with cervical stimulation. This and the similar time course of facilitation seen in animal experiments (12) suggest that an early part of facilitation is mediated via a descending propriospinal pathway. The major part, however, is supposed to be mediated via supraspinal

  5. Interlimb Reflexes Induced by Electrical Stimulation of Cutaneous Nerves after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Butler, Jane E; Godfrey, Sharlene; Thomas, Christine K

    2016-01-01

    Whether interlimb reflexes emerge only after a severe insult to the human spinal cord is controversial. Here the aim was to examine interlimb reflexes at rest in participants with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury (SCI, n = 17) and able-bodied control participants (n = 5). Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by delivering up to 30 trains of stimuli to either the superficial peroneal nerve on the dorsum of the foot or the radial nerve at the wrist (5 pulses, 300 Hz, approximately every 30 s). Participants were instructed to relax the test muscles prior to the delivery of the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally in proximal and distal arm and leg muscles. Superficial peroneal nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in ipsilateral and contralateral arm and contralateral leg muscles of SCI and control participants. Radial nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in the ipsilateral leg and contralateral arm muscles of control and SCI participants but only contralateral leg muscles of control participants. Interlimb reflexes evoked by superficial peroneal nerve stimulation were longer in latency and duration, and larger in magnitude in SCI participants. Interlimb reflex properties were similar for both SCI and control groups for radial nerve stimulation. Ascending interlimb reflexes tended to occur with a higher incidence in participants with SCI, while descending interlimb reflexes occurred with a higher incidence in able-bodied participants. However, the overall incidence of interlimb reflexes in SCI and neurologically intact participants was similar which suggests that the neural circuitry underlying these reflexes does not necessarily develop after central nervous system injury.

  6. Interlimb Reflexes Induced by Electrical Stimulation of Cutaneous Nerves after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Jane E.; Godfrey, Sharlene; Thomas, Christine K.

    2016-01-01

    Whether interlimb reflexes emerge only after a severe insult to the human spinal cord is controversial. Here the aim was to examine interlimb reflexes at rest in participants with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury (SCI, n = 17) and able-bodied control participants (n = 5). Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by delivering up to 30 trains of stimuli to either the superficial peroneal nerve on the dorsum of the foot or the radial nerve at the wrist (5 pulses, 300 Hz, approximately every 30 s). Participants were instructed to relax the test muscles prior to the delivery of the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally in proximal and distal arm and leg muscles. Superficial peroneal nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in ipsilateral and contralateral arm and contralateral leg muscles of SCI and control participants. Radial nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in the ipsilateral leg and contralateral arm muscles of control and SCI participants but only contralateral leg muscles of control participants. Interlimb reflexes evoked by superficial peroneal nerve stimulation were longer in latency and duration, and larger in magnitude in SCI participants. Interlimb reflex properties were similar for both SCI and control groups for radial nerve stimulation. Ascending interlimb reflexes tended to occur with a higher incidence in participants with SCI, while descending interlimb reflexes occurred with a higher incidence in able-bodied participants. However, the overall incidence of interlimb reflexes in SCI and neurologically intact participants was similar which suggests that the neural circuitry underlying these reflexes does not necessarily develop after central nervous system injury. PMID:27049521

  7. Some effects of vagal blockade on abdominal muscle activation and shortening in awake dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Leevers, A M; Road, J D

    1995-01-01

    1. The mechanisms of abdominal muscle activation are thought to be different during expiratory threshold loading (ETL) compared with hypercapnia. Our objectives in the present study were to determine the effects of removing excitatory vagal feedback on abdominal muscle activation, shortening and pattern of recruitment during ETL and hypercapnia. Six tracheotomized dogs were chronically implanted with sonomicrometer transducers and fine wire EMG electrodes in each of the four abdominal muscles. Muscle length changes and EMG activity were studied in the awake dog during ETL (6 dogs) and CO2 rebreathing (3 dogs), before and after vagal blockade. 2. Following vagal blockade, the change in volume (increase in functional residual capacity, FRC) during ETL was greater and active phasic shortening of all the abdominal muscles was reduced, when shortening was compared with a similar change in lung volume. Similarly, at comparable minute ventilation, abdominal muscle active shortening was also reduced during hypercapnia. The internal muscle layer was recruited preferentially in both control and vagally blocked dogs during both ETL and hypercapnia. 3. The degree of recruitment of the abdominal muscles during ETL and hypercapnia in awake dogs is influenced by vagal feedback, but less so than in anaesthetized dogs. These results illustrate the importance of the vagi and abdominal muscle activation in load compensation. However, vagal reflexes are apparently not contributing to the preferential recruitment of the internal muscle layer. In awake dogs during vagal blockade abdominal muscle recruitment still occurs by extravagal mechanisms. PMID:8568685

  8. Perspective on the human cough reflex

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This review dissects the complex human cough reflex and suggests hypotheses about the evolutionary basis for the reflex. A mechanosensory-induced cough reflex conveys through branches of myelinated Aδ nerve fibers is not chemically reactive (i.e., capsaicin, bradykinin); possibly, its evolution is to prevent the harmful effects of aspiration of gastric or particulate contents into the lungs. This became necessary as the larynx moves closer to the opening of the esophagus as human ancestors adapt phonation over olfaction beginning less than 10 million years ago. The second type of cough reflex, a chemosensory type, is carried by unmyelinated C fibers. Supposedly, its origin dates back when prehistoric humans began living in close proximity to each other and were at risk for infectious respiratory diseases or irritant-induced lung injury. The mechanism for the latter type of cough is analogous to induced pain after tissue injury; and, it is controlled by the identical transient receptor potential vanilloid cation channel (TRPV1). The airways do not normally manifest nociceptive pain from a stimulus but the only consistent response that capsaicin and lung inflammation provoke in healthy human airways is cough. TRPA1, another excitatory ion channel, has been referred to as the "irritant receptor" and its activation also induces cough. For both types of cough, the motor responses are identical and via coordinated, precisely-timed and sequential respiratory events orchestrated by complex neuromuscular networking of the diaphragm, chest and abdominal respiratory muscles, the glottis and parts of the brain. PMID:22074326

  9. Characterization of the pharyngo-UES contractile reflex in humans.

    PubMed

    Shaker, R; Ren, J; Xie, P; Lang, I M; Bardan, E; Sui, Z

    1997-10-01

    Preliminary human studies suggest the presence of an upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex triggered by pharyngeal water stimulation. The purposes of this study were to further characterize this reflex and determine the threshold volume for its activation. We studied 10 healthy young volunteers by manometric technique before and after topical pharyngeal anesthesia. UES pressure responses to various volumes and temperatures of water injected into the pharynx were elucidated. At a threshold volume, rapid-pulse and slow continuous pharyngeal water injection resulted in significant augmentation of UES pressure in all volunteers. Threshold volume for inducing UES contraction averaged 0.1 +/- 0.01 ml for rapid-pulse injection and was significantly smaller than that for slow continuous injection (1.0 +/- 0.2 ml). UES pressure increase duration averaged 16 +/- 4 s. Augmentation of UES resting tone by injection of water with three different temperatures was similar. This augmentation was abolished after topical anesthesia. Conclusions were that stimulation of the human pharynx by injection of minute amounts of water results in a significant increase in resting UES pressure: the pharyngo-UES contractile reflex. The magnitude of pressure increase due to activation of this reflex is not volume or temperature dependent. Loss of pharyngeal sensation abolishes this reflex.

  10. Role of the red nucleus in suppressing the jaw-opening reflex following stimulation of the raphe magnus nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    In a previous study, we found that electrical and chemical stimulation of the red nucleus (RN) suppressed the high-threshold afferent-evoked jaw-opening reflex (JOR). It has been reported that the RN receives bilaterally projection fibers from the raphe magnus nucleus (RMg), and that stimulation of the RMg inhibits the tooth pulp-evoked nociceptive JOR. These facts imply that RMg-induced inhibition of the JOR could be mediated via the RN. The present study first examines whether stimulation of the RMg suppresses the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR. The JOR was evoked by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), and was recorded as the electromyographic response of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. The stimulus intensity was 4.0 (high-threshold) times the threshold. Conditioning electrical stimulation of the RMg significantly suppressed the JOR. A further study then examined whether electrically induced lesions of the RN or microinjection of muscimol into the RN affects RMg-induced suppression of the JOR. Electrically induced lesions of the bilateral RN and microinjection of muscimol into the bilateral RN both reduced the RMg-induced suppression of the JOR. These results suggest that RMg-induced suppression of the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR is mediated by a relay in the RN.

  11. H-reflex modulation in the human medial and lateral gastrocnemii during standing and walking

    PubMed Central

    Makihara, Yukiko; Segal, Richard L.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.; Thompson, Aiko K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The soleus H-reflex is dynamically modulated during walking. However, modulation of the gastrocnemii H-reflexes has not been studied systematically. Methods The medial and lateral gastrocnemii (MG and LG) and soleus H-reflexes were measured during standing and walking in humans. Results Maximum H-reflex amplitude was significantly smaller in MG (mean 1.1 mV) or LG (1.1 mV) than in soleus (3.3 mV). Despite these size differences, the reflex amplitudes of the three muscles were positively correlated. The MG and LG H-reflexes were phase- and task-dependently modulated in ways similar to the soleus H-reflex. Discussion Although there are anatomical and physiological differences between the soleus and gastrocnemii muscles, the reflexes of the three muscles are similarly modulated during walking and between standing and walking. The findings support the hypothesis that these reflexes are synergistically modulated during walking to facilitate ongoing movement. PMID:22190317

  12. Phase-dependent reflex modulation in tibialis anterior during passive viewing of walking.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Frank; Wagner, Heiko; de Lussanet, Marc H E

    2013-03-01

    It is well established that reflexes are highly adaptive, as they depend both on our intention and on the active state of the muscles. Reflex gains change dynamically during actions such as walking and running, with the gain of cutaneous reflexes being increased at the end of the stance phase but decreased at the end of the swing phase in the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. Reflex gains can even change during the mere observation of an action. The mechanisms and functions of such modulations are unclear. It has been suggested that the changed reflex gains prevent the actual performance of actions that we see. However, the modulation of reflexes in response to seeing an action has never been reproduced for the active execution of such actions. In the present study, medium-latency cutaneous reflexes from the TA muscle, of which the activity and reflexes during walking are well known, were measured in human subjects. The results show that the gain changes of the medium-latency responses of the TA are the same as during active walking. We conclude that reflexes do not represent an inhibitory mechanism that prevents motor output during action observation. Instead, our findings provide evidence that even the peripheral spinal motor system is actively involved in the motor resonance processes, without evoking any measurable motor responses.

  13. Changes in Soleus H-Reflex Modulation after Treadmill Training in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodapp, Maike; Vry, Julia; Mall, Volker; Faist, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In healthy children, short latency leg muscle reflexes are profoundly modulated throughout the step cycle in a functionally meaningful way and contribute to the electromyographic (EMG) pattern observed during gait. With maturation of the corticospinal tract, the reflex amplitudes are depressed via supraspinal inhibitory mechanisms. In the soleus…

  14. Effects of Motoneuron Properties on Reflex Stability in Spastic Subjects: A Simulation Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    was tested using a comprehensive model of the reflex pathway. This model included the passive and active components of the triceps surae muscles...became unstable and oscillations developed similar to those observed in spastic patients. In parallel, when reflex delay times typical for triceps ... surae in man were chosen, and motoneuron excitability increased progressively, oscillatory ankle movements were readily elicited. Conversely, as pathway

  15. Experimenting With Baroreceptor Reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Goble, Ross L.

    1988-01-01

    Carotid arteries stimulated by pressure or suction on neck. Baro-Cuff is silicone-rubber chamber that fits on front of subject's neck. Electronic system, stepping motor, bellows, and umbilical tube furnish controlled pressure to chamber. Pressure sensor provides feedback to microprocessor in electronic system. Developed to study blood-pressure-reflex responses of astronauts in outer space. Useful for terrestrial studies of patients with congestive heart failure, chronic diabetes mellitus, and other conditions in which blood-pressure-reflex controls behave abnormally.

  16. The inhibitory control reflex.

    PubMed

    Verbruggen, Frederick; Best, Maisy; Bowditch, William A; Stevens, Tobias; McLaren, Ian P L

    2014-12-01

    Response inhibition is typically considered a hallmark of deliberate executive control. In this article, we review work showing that response inhibition can also become a 'prepared reflex', readily triggered by information in the environment, or after sufficient training, or a 'learned reflex' triggered by the retrieval of previously acquired associations between stimuli and stopping. We present new results indicating that people can learn various associations, which influence performance in different ways. To account for previous findings and our new results, we present a novel architecture that integrates theories of associative learning, Pavlovian conditioning, and executive response inhibition. Finally, we discuss why this work is also relevant for the study of 'intentional inhibition'.

  17. Somatoautonomic reflexes in acupuncture therapy: A review.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae; Kagitani, Fusako; Sato-Suzuki, Ikuko

    2017-03-01

    Oriental therapies such as acupuncture, moxibustion, or Anma, have been used to treat visceral disorders since ancient times. In each of these therapies, stimulation of the skin or underlying muscles leads to excitation of afferent nerves. The sensory information is carried to the central nervous system, where it is transferred to autonomic efferents, thus affecting visceral functions. This neuronal pathway, known as the "somatoautonomic reflex", has been systematically studied by Sato and his colleagues for over a half century. Nearly all their studies were conducted in anesthetized animals, whereas human patients are conscious. Responses in patients or the events following therapeutic somatic stimulation may differ from those observed in anesthetized animals. In fact, it is increasingly apparent that the responses in patients and animals are not always coincident, and the differences have been difficult for clinicians to reconcile. We review the mechanism of the "somatoautonomic reflex" as described in anesthetized animals and then discuss how it can be applied clinically.

  18. Laryngeal and respiratory protective reflexes.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, S M

    2001-12-03

    Swallowing is a complex motor behavior that relies on an interneuronal network of premotor neurons (PMNs) to organize the sequential activity of motor neurons that are active during the buccopharyngeal and esophageal phases. Swallowing PMNs are highly interconnected to multiple areas of the brain stem and the central nervous system and provide a potential anatomic substrate integration of swallowing activity with airway protective reflexes. Because these neurons have synaptic contact with both afferent inputs and motor neurons and exhibit a true central activity, they appear to constitute the swallowing central pattern generator. We studied the viscerotopic organization of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the nucleus ambiguus (NA), the dorsal motor nucleus (DMN), and the hypoglossal nucleus (XII) using cholera toxin horseradish peroxidase (CT-HRP), a sensitive antegrade and retrograde tracer that effectively labels afferent terminal fields within the NTS as well as swallowing motor neurons and their dendritic fields within the NA, DMN, and XII. We used CT-HRP to provide a comprehensive description of the dendritic architecture of NA motor neurons innervating swallowing muscles. We also conducted studies using pseudorabies virus (PRV), a swine alpha-herpesvirus, to map central neural circuits after injection in the peripheral or central nervous systems. One attenuated vaccine strain, Bartha PRV, has preferential affinity for sites of afferent synaptic contact on the cell body and dendrites and a reactive gliosis that effectively isolates the infected neurons and provides a barrier to the nonspecific spread to adjacent neurons. The findings provide a basis for the central integration of swallowing and respiratory protective reflexes.

  19. Reflexivity in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Mary M.; Urcuioli, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    A recent theory of pigeons' equivalence-class formation (Urcuioli, 2008) predicts that reflexivity, an untrained ability to match a stimulus to itself, should be observed after training on two "mirror-image" symbolic successive matching tasks plus identity successive matching using some of the symbolic matching stimuli. One group of pigeons was…

  20. Design and Reflexivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Toorn, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Argues that design, despite frequently well-intentioned ethical starting-points, has become generalized and rudimentary in its substantive and instrumental choices, and naive in its thinking about its own public role. Argues for a "mental ecology," for a multidimensional realistic reflexivity, which makes possible the recuperation of a…

  1. Altered activation patterns by triceps surae stretch reflex pathways in acute and chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Alain; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C J

    2011-10-01

    Spinal reflexes are modified by spinal cord injury (SCI) due the loss of excitatory inputs from supraspinal structures and changes within the spinal cord. The stretch reflex is one of the simplest pathways of the central nervous system and was used presently to evaluate how inputs from primary and secondary muscle spindles interact with spinal circuits before and after spinal transection (i.e., spinalization) in 12 adult decerebrate cats. Seven cats were spinalized and allowed to recover for 1 mo (i.e., chronic spinal state), whereas 5 cats were evaluated before (i.e., intact state) and after acute spinalization (i.e., acute spinal state). Stretch reflexes were evoked by stretching the left triceps surae (TS) muscles. The force evoked by TS muscles was recorded along with the activity of several hindlimb muscles. Stretch reflexes were abolished in the acute spinal state due to an inability to activate TS muscles, such as soleus (Sol) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG). In chronic spinal cats, reflex force had partly recovered but Sol and LG activity remained considerably depressed, despite the fact that injecting clonidine could recruit these muscles during locomotor-like activity. In contrast, other muscles not recruited in the intact state, most notably semitendinosus and sartorius, were strongly activated by stretching TS muscles in chronic spinal cats. Therefore, stretch reflex pathways from TS muscles to multiple hindlimb muscles undergo functional reorganization following spinalization, both acute and chronic. Altered activation patterns by stretch reflex pathways could explain some sensorimotor deficits observed during locomotion and postural corrections after SCI.

  2. Masseter Muscle Activity in Track and Field Athletes: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Nukaga, Hideyuki; Takeda, Tomotaka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Narimatsu, Keishiro; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi; Funato, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Teeth clenching has been shown to improve remote muscle activity (by augmentation of the Hoffmann reflex), and joint fixation (by decreased reciprocal inhibition) in the entire body. Clenching could help maintain balance, improve systemic function, and enhance safety. Teeth clenching from a sports dentistry viewpoint was thought to be important and challenging. Therefore, it is quite important to investigate mastication muscles' activity and function during sports events for clarifying a physiological role of the mastication muscle itself and involvement of mastication muscle function in whole body movement. Running is a basic motion of a lot of sports; however, a mastication muscles activity during this motion was not clarified. Throwing and jumping operation were in a same situation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence or absence of masseter muscle activity during track and field events. In total, 28 track and field athletes took part in the study. The Multichannel Telemetry system was used to monitor muscle activity, and the electromyograms obtained were synchronized with digital video imaging. The masseter muscle activity threshold was set 15% of maximum voluntary clenching. As results, with few exceptions, masseter muscle activity were observed during all analyzed phases of the 5 activities, and that phases in which most participants showed masseter muscle activity were characterized by initial acceleration, such as in the short sprint, from the commencement of throwing to release in both the javelin throw and shot put, and at the take-off and landing phases in both jumps.

  3. Measuring various sizes of H-reflex while monitoring the stimulus condition.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Koichi

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of a new technique that measured various sizes of the soleus H-reflex, while monitoring the stimulus condition. Eight healthy volunteers participated in this experiment. In the new technique, an above-motor-threshold conditioning stimulus was given to the tibial nerve 10-12 ms after a below-motor-threshold test stimulus. The conditioning stimulus evoked a direct M-wave, which was followed by a test-stimulus-evoked H-reflex. This reflex was followed by a conditioning stimulus-evoked H-reflex. The amount of the voluntary-contraction-induced facilitation of the H-reflex was similar for both the new technique and conventional technique, in which an above-motor-threshold test stimulus was given without a conditioning stimulus. Using the new technique, we found that the amount of facilitation increased linearly with the size of the test H-reflex. This technique allows us to evoke various sizes of H-reflex while monitoring a stimulus condition, and is useful for measuring H-reflexes during voluntary movement.

  4. Reliability of the Achilles tendon tap reflex evoked during stance using a pendulum hammer.

    PubMed

    Mildren, Robyn L; Zaback, Martin; Adkin, Allan L; Frank, James S; Bent, Leah R

    2016-01-01

    The tendon tap reflex (T-reflex) is often evoked in relaxed muscles to assess spinal reflex circuitry. Factors contributing to reflex excitability are modulated to accommodate specific postural demands. Thus, there is a need to be able to assess this reflex in a state where spinal reflex circuitry is engaged in maintaining posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pendulum hammer could provide controlled stimuli to the Achilles tendon and evoke reliable muscle responses during normal stance. A second aim was to establish appropriate stimulus parameters for experimental use. Fifteen healthy young adults stood on a forceplate while taps were applied to the Achilles tendon under conditions in which postural sway was constrained (by providing centre of pressure feedback) or unconstrained (no feedback) from an invariant release angle (50°). Twelve participants repeated this testing approximately six months later. Within one experimental session, tap force and T-reflex amplitude were found to be reliable regardless of whether postural sway was constrained (tap force ICC=0.982; T-reflex ICC=0.979) or unconstrained (tap force ICC=0.968; T-reflex ICC=0.964). T-reflex amplitude was also reliable between experimental sessions (constrained ICC=0.894; unconstrained ICC=0.890). When a T-reflex recruitment curve was constructed, optimal mid-range responses were observed using a 50° release angle. These results demonstrate that reliable Achilles T-reflexes can be evoked in standing participants without the need to constrain posture. The pendulum hammer provides a simple method to allow researchers and clinicians to gather information about reflex circuitry in a state where it is involved in postural control.

  5. Preparatory co-activation of the ankle muscles may prevent ankle inversion injuries.

    PubMed

    DeMers, Matthew S; Hicks, Jennifer L; Delp, Scott L

    2017-02-08

    Ankle inversion sprains are the most frequent acute musculoskeletal injuries occurring in physical activity. Interventions that retrain muscle coordination have helped rehabilitate injured ankles, but it is unclear which muscle coordination strategies, if any, can prevent ankle sprains. The purpose of this study was to determine whether coordinated activity of the ankle muscles could prevent excessive ankle inversion during a simulated landing on a 30° incline. We used a set of musculoskeletal simulations to evaluate the efficacy of two strategies for coordinating the ankle evertor and invertor muscles during simulated landing scenarios: planned co-activation and stretch reflex activation with physiologic latency (60-ms delay). A full-body musculoskeletal model of landing was used to generate simulations of a subject dropping onto an inclined surface with each coordination condition. Within each condition, the intensity of evertor and invertor co-activity or stretch reflexes were varied systematically. The simulations revealed that strong preparatory co-activation of the ankle evertors and invertors prior to ground contact prevented ankle inversion from exceeding injury thresholds by rapidly generating eversion moments after initial contact. Conversely, stretch reflexes were too slow to generate eversion moments before the simulations reached the threshold for inversion injury. These results suggest that training interventions to protect the ankle should focus on stiffening the ankle with muscle co-activation prior to landing. The musculoskeletal models, controllers, software, and simulation results are freely available online at http://simtk.org/home/ankle-sprains, enabling others to reproduce the results and explore new injury scenarios and interventions.

  6. Primitive reflexes in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vreeling, F W; Verhey, F R; Houx, P J; Jolles, J

    1993-01-01

    A standardised protocol for the examination of 15 primitive reflexes in which the amplitude and the persistence were scored separately, was applied to 25 patients with Parkinson's disease and an equal number of healthy matched control subjects. Most reflexes were found considerably more often in the patients than in the control subjects, especially the snout, the glabellar tap, and its variant, the nasopalpebral reflex. Only the mouth open finger spread reflex was present more often in the control subjects. For all reflexes except this last, the scores for amplitude and persistence of the reflexes for the control group never exceeded the scores for the patient group. Reflexes persisted more often in the patients than in the control subjects. Parkinsonism alone can explain a large number of primitive reflexes, irrespective of the severity or duration of the disease. In contrast, the number of reflexes was related more closely to cognitive scales. It is concluded that such reflexes may be helpful in diagnosing Parkinson's disease. In addition, a standardised protocol for eliciting and scoring is essential for the study of these reflexes in parkinsonism and other neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:8270937

  7. Spinal reflexes in brain death.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Yesim; Çiftçi, Yeliz; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Akhan, Galip

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous and reflex movements have been described in brain death and these unusual movements might cause uncertainties in diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the presence of spinal reflexes in patients who fulfilled the criteria for brain death. Thirty-two (22 %) of 144 patients presented unexpected motor movements spontaneously or during examinations. These patients exhibited the following signs: undulating toe, increased deep tendon reflexes, plantar responses, Lazarus sign, flexion-withdrawal reflex, facial myokymia, neck-arm flexion, finger jerks and fasciculations. In comparison, there were no significant differences in age, sex, etiology of brain death and hemodynamic laboratory findings in patients with and without reflex motor movement. Spinal reflexes should be well recognized by physicians and it should be born in mind that brain death can be determined in the presence of spinal reflexes.

  8. Calibration of ipsilateral stimulus transducer for acoustic reflex measurements.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S; Osterhammel, P A; Rasmussen, A N; Nielsen, L H

    1995-01-01

    Pure-tone Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Level (RETSPL) of the ipsilateral stimulus receiver for acoustic reflex measurements on Madsen Electronics type Zodiac 901 impedance audiometer is provided. The results, obtained from 20 normal-hearing subjects, are achieved by comparing hearing threshold levels measured using a TDH 39 telephone (calibrated to ISO 389) with thresholds recorded using the ipsilateral stimulus insert phone. The calibration is referenced to an IEC-711 ear simulator and comprises the following frequencies: 125, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000 Hz.

  9. Characteristic appearances of the H-reflex and F-wave with increased stimulus intensity in patients with cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Saitoh, E; Tani, M; Nabeta, R; Daikuya, S; Hirose, H; Wakayama, I; Fujiwara, T

    2002-03-01

    We experienced H-reflex may be evoked with supramaximal stimulation in patients with cerebrovascular disease (CVD). In this study, we investigated the relationship between the characteristic appearances of H-reflex and F-wave with increased stimulus intensity and neurological signs. We examined the H-reflex and F-wave of the affected arm with increased stimulus intensity during muscle relaxation in 31 patients (17 males and 14 females) with hemiparesis caused by CVD. Mean patient age was 56.0 (range 30-82) years. 30 healthy subjects, mean age of 56.2 (range 28-80) were investigated using the same method as controlled group. H-reflex and F-wave with increased stimulus intensity after the median nerve stimulation at the wrist were recorded from the opponence pollicis muscle on the affected side in patients with CVD or right arm in the healthy subjects. Appearance patterns of the H-reflex and F-wave with increased stimulus intensity was separated into four types. Type 1: F-wave appeared with increased stimulus intensity, but there was no H-reflex. Type 2: H-reflex and F-wave both appeared with increased stimulus intensity, but the F-wave followed disappearance of the H-reflex with increased stimulus intensity. Type 3: H-reflex and F-wave both appeared with increased stimulus intensity, but the F-wave appeared during the H-reflex with increased stimulus intensity. Type 4: Only the H-reflex appeared with increased stimulus intensity, but there was no F-wave. Neurological findings including muscle tone and tendon reflex were also evaluated. Findings on muscle tone and tendon reflex were classified into increased (markedly, moderately and slightly), normal and decreased. Results were analyzed as follows; 1) The characteristic appearances of H-reflex and F-wave in the healthy subjects and 2) The relationship between characteristic appearances of waves with increased stimulus intensity and neurological signs in patients with CVD. 1) Pattern of the H-reflex and F-wave with

  10. The Use of an Alternative Extraoral Periapical Technique for Patients with Severe Gag Reflex

    PubMed Central

    e Silva, Mauro Henrique Chagas; Santos, Mariane Floriano Lopes; de Lima, Carolina Oliveira; Campos, Celso Neiva

    2016-01-01

    Gag reflex is a physiologic mechanism that promotes contraction of the muscles of the tongue and pharyngeal walls. Different factors, including intraoral radiographic films and sensors, may trigger this reflex. Patients with severe gag reflex may not be able to tolerate the presence of intraoral radiographic films or sensors during root canal therapy (RCT). This factor may prevent an appropriate intraoral radiograph, which is important in RCT. Different approaches have been used to facilitate dental procedures in patients suffering from severe gag reflex. The use of an extraoral radiographic technique is an alternative method to obtain working length confirmation in patients with severe gag reflex. In this report of 2 cases, the use of an extraoral radiographic technique as an alternative approach during RCT in patients with severe gag reflex associated with phobic behavior and trismus was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27547474

  11. Corporeal reflexivity and autism.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Elinor

    2015-06-01

    Ethnographic video recordings of high functioning children with autism or Aspergers Syndrome in everyday social encounters evidence their first person perspectives. High quality visual and audio data allow detailed analysis of children's bodies and talk as loci of reflexivity. Corporeal reflexivity involves displays of awareness of one's body as an experiencing subject and a physical object accessible to the gaze of others. Gaze, demeanor, actions, and sotto voce commentaries on unfolding situations indicate a range of moment-by-moment reflexive responses to social situations. Autism is associated with neurologically based motor problems (e.g. delayed action-goal coordination, clumsiness) and highly repetitive movements to self-soothe. These behaviors can provoke derision among classmates at school. Focusing on a 9-year-old girl's encounters with peers on the playground, this study documents precisely how autistic children can become enmeshed as unwitting objects of stigma and how they reflect upon their social rejection as it transpires. Children with autism spectrum disorders in laboratory settings manifest diminished understandings of social emotions such as embarrassment, as part of a more general impairment in social perspective-taking. Video ethnography, however, takes us further, into discovering autistic children's subjective sense of vulnerability to the gaze of classmates.

  12. Masseter Muscle Activity in Track and Field Athletes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nukaga, Hideyuki; Takeda, Tomotaka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Narimatsu, Keishiro; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi; Funato, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Teeth clenching has been shown to improve remote muscle activity (by augmentation of the Hoffmann reflex), and joint fixation (by decreased reciprocal inhibition) in the entire body. Clenching could help maintain balance, improve systemic function, and enhance safety. Teeth clenching from a sports dentistry viewpoint was thought to be important and challenging. Therefore, it is quite important to investigate mastication muscles’ activity and function during sports events for clarifying a physiological role of the mastication muscle itself and involvement of mastication muscle function in whole body movement. Running is a basic motion of a lot of sports; however, a mastication muscles activity during this motion was not clarified. Throwing and jumping operation were in a same situation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence or absence of masseter muscle activity during track and field events. In total, 28 track and field athletes took part in the study. The Multichannel Telemetry system was used to monitor muscle activity, and the electromyograms obtained were synchronized with digital video imaging. The masseter muscle activity threshold was set 15% of maximum voluntary clenching. As results, with few exceptions, masseter muscle activity were observed during all analyzed phases of the 5 activities, and that phases in which most participants showed masseter muscle activity were characterized by initial acceleration, such as in the short sprint, from the commencement of throwing to release in both the javelin throw and shot put, and at the take-off and landing phases in both jumps. PMID:27708727

  13. Measurement of the acoustic reflex without a pressure seal.

    PubMed

    Surr, R K; Schuchman, G I

    1976-03-01

    Obtaining a hermetic seal in the external auditory canal is often a major obstacle in impedance audiometry. In the present study, the acoustic reflex threshold was determined for three groups of subjects, first with and then without a pressure-tight seal. It was found that for subjects with normal hearing or sensorineural hearing loss and normal tympanograms, 96% of the measurements obtained without a pressure seal were within 5 dB of those obtained with a seal. Among the subjects who exhibited negative middle ear pressure, the acoustic reflex could be measured consistently at the point of maximum compliance, while no response was observed without a pressure seal.

  14. Effect of hypoxia and hypercapina on the airways defence reflexes.

    PubMed

    Tatár, M; Tarkanov, I A; Korpás, J; Kulik, A M

    1987-01-01

    In experiments on 10 adult anaesthetized cats (pentobarbital 30 mg.kg-1 i.p.) the effect of stimultaneous hypoxia and hypercapnia was studied on the defence respiratory reflexes of the airways. Expiratory reflex and cough were elicited by mechanical stimulation of the airways mucosa, and the obtained values were evaluated on basis of the intrapleural pressure. Inhalation of the hypoxic-hypercapnic gas mixture (11% + 7% CO2 in N2) for 15 minutes led to a significant decrease of respiratory frequency, tidal volume and PaCO2, while pHa and PaCO2 also decreased significantly together with the intensity of the expiratory reflex and that of cough. Recent studies, showed that in the course of the effect of hypoxia (11% O2) and of hypercapnia (5% CO2), cough intensity decreased, but the change was not significant. The decrease of the intensity of respiratory defence reflexes under hypoxic-hypercapnic conditions might have been due to the changes of centrally controlling structures, or to the effector part of the reflex arc, resulting from fatigue of the respiratory muscles. The possible effect of anaesthesia exerting a significant influence on the intensity and character of airways defence reflexes could not be excluded.

  15. Enhancing proprioceptive input to motoneurons differentially affects expression of neurotrophin 3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in rat hoffmann-reflex circuitry.

    PubMed

    Gajewska-Woźniak, Olga; Skup, Małgorzata; Kasicki, Stefan; Ziemlińska, Ewelina; Czarkowska-Bauch, Julita

    2013-01-01

    The importance of neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) for motor control prompted us to ask the question whether direct electrical stimulation of low-threshold muscle afferents, strengthening the proprioceptive signaling, could effectively increase the endogenous pool of this neurotrophin and its receptor TrkC in the Hoffmann-reflex (H-reflex) circuitry. The effects were compared with those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its TrkB receptor. Continuous bursts of stimuli were delivered unilaterally for seven days, 80 min daily, by means of a cuff-electrode implanted over the tibial nerve in awake rats. The H-reflex was recorded in the soleus muscle to control the strength of stimulation. Stimulation aimed at activation of Ia fibers produced a strong increase of NT-3 protein, measured with ELISA, in the lumbar L3-6 segments of the spinal cord and in the soleus muscle. This stimulation exerted much weaker effect on BDNF protein level which slightly increased only in L3-6 segments of the spinal cord. Increased protein level of NT-3 and BDNF corresponded to the changes of NT-3 mRNA and BDNF mRNA expression in L3-6 segments but not in the soleus muscle. We disclosed tissue-specificity of TrkC mRNA and TrkB mRNA responses. In the spinal cord TrkC and TrkB transcripts tended to decrease, whereas in the soleus muscle TrkB mRNA decreased and TrkC mRNA expression strongly increased, suggesting that stimulation of Ia fibers leads to sensitization of the soleus muscle to NT-3 signaling. The possibility of increasing NT-3/TrkC signaling in the neuromuscular system, with minor effects on BDNF/TrkB signaling, by means of low-threshold electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves, which in humans might be applied in non-invasive way, offers an attractive therapeutic tool.

  16. Hip proprioceptors preferentially modulate reflexes of the leg in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Onushko, Tanya; Hyngstrom, Allison; Schmit, Brian D

    2013-07-01

    Stretch-sensitive afferent feedback from hip muscles has been shown to trigger long-lasting, multijoint reflex responses in people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). These reflexes could have important implications for control of leg movements during functional activities, such as walking. Because the control of leg movement relies on reflex regulation at all joints of the limb, we sought to determine whether stretch of hip muscles modulates reflex activity at the knee and ankle and, conversely, whether knee and ankle stretch afferents affect hip-triggered reflexes. A custom-built servomotor apparatus was used to stretch the hip muscles in nine chronic SCI subjects by oscillating the legs about the hip joint bilaterally from 10° of extension to 40° flexion. To test whether stretch-related feedback from the knee or ankle would be affected by hip movement, patellar tendon percussions and Achilles tendon vibration were delivered when the hip was either extending or flexing. Surface electromyograms (EMGs) and joint torques were recorded from both legs. Patellar tendon percussions and Achilles tendon vibration both elicited reflex responses local to the knee or ankle, respectively, and did not influence reflex responses observed at the hip. Rather, the movement direction of the hip modulated the reflex responses local to the joint. The patellar tendon reflex amplitude was larger when the perturbation was delivered during hip extension compared with hip flexion. The response to Achilles vibration was modulated by hip movement, with an increased tonic component during hip flexion compared with extension. These results demonstrate that hip-mediated sensory signals modulate activity in distal muscles of the leg and appear to play a unique role in modulation of spastic muscle activity throughout the leg in SCI.

  17. [Diagnostic significance of the spinal-brain stem polysynaptic reflex and the period of inhibition].

    PubMed

    Ivanichev, G A

    1985-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the radial nerve associated with voluntary contraction of the shoulder girdle inhibited bioelectrical activity not only in the muscles of the hypothenar but also in the proximal muscles. In resting muscles, such stimulation elicited a reflex response with a large latent period. With weak voluntary tension stimulation elicited a reflex response while in the presence of considerable contraction the reflex response merged with bioelectrical activity, with a clearly demonstrable subsequent period of inhibition. The current viewpoint about the antidromal blockade of the segmental motoneurons is debated. It is suggested that the polysynaptic reflex and the inhibition period are connected with the same level of realization -- the oral portions of the brain stem.

  18. The anal reflex elicited by cough and sniff: validation of a neglected clinical sign

    PubMed Central

    Chan, C; Ponsford, S; Swash, M

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is unclear whether contraction of the external anal sphincter (EAS) following a voluntary cough is an integral component of the cough response itself, or a reflex response to the abdominal and pelvic floor dynamics induced by the cough. Clinical experience suggests a reflex origin for this response. Objective: To compare motor latencies for intercostal, abdominal, and EAS muscle contraction after transcranial magnetic stimulation with those following voluntary coughing and sniffing. Methods: A needle electrode inserted into the EAS measured responses, which were confirmed by tonic electromyographic recording. Direct motor latencies from the cerebral cortex to the intercostal, rectus abdominis and EAS muscles were obtained using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Sniff and cough induced responses were also recorded in these muscles. Results: The results suggest that EAS responses following a voluntary cough or sniff represent a polysynaptic reflex. Conclusions: As the cough induced anal reflex response is consistent and easily elicited, its use in clinical neurological examination is appropriate. PMID:15377694

  19. Biting intentions modulate digastric reflex responses to sudden unloading of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anders S; Pruszynski, J Andrew; Edin, Benoni B; Westberg, Karl-Gunnar

    2014-09-01

    Reflex responses in jaw-opening muscles can be evoked when a brittle object cracks between the teeth and suddenly unloads the jaw. We hypothesized that this reflex response is flexible and, as such, is modulated according to the instructed goal of biting through an object. Study participants performed two different biting tasks when holding a peanut half stacked on a chocolate piece between their incisors. In one task, they were asked to split the peanut half only (single-split task), and in the other task, they were asked to split both the peanut and the chocolate in one action (double-split task). In both tasks, the peanut split evoked a jaw-opening muscle response, quantified from electromyogram (EMG) recordings of the digastric muscle in a window 20-60 ms following peanut split. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that the jaw-opening muscle response in the single-split trials was about twice the size of the jaw-opening muscle response in the double-split trials. A linear model that predicted the jaw-opening muscle response on a single-trial basis indicated that task settings played a significant role in this modulation but also that the presplit digastric muscle activity contributed to the modulation. These findings demonstrate that, like reflex responses to mechanical perturbations in limb muscles, reflex responses in jaw muscles not only show gain-scaling but also are modulated by subject intent.

  20. Speech-Muscle Visuomotor Tracking in Dysarthric and Nonimpaired Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClean, Michael D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Surface electrodes were used to describe the perioral reflexes in seven stutterers and five nonstutterers and electromyographic (EMG) recordings were obtained at electrode sites associated with the orbicularis oris inferior muscle and the depressor labia inferior muscle. A difference was noted in the pattern of reflex response between the two…

  1. Wideband detection of middle ear muscle activation using swept-tone distortion product otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Henin, Simon; Long, Glenis R; Thompson, Suzanne

    2014-07-01

    The measurement of efferent-induced suppression of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) using contralateral acoustic stimulation (CAS) is complicated by potential contamination by the middle ear muscle reflex (MEMR), particularly at moderate to high CAS levels. When logarithmically sweeping primaries are used to measure distortion product otoacoustic emissions, the level and phase of the primaries at the entrance of the ear canal may be monitored simultaneously along with the OAEs elicited by the swept-tones. A method of detecting MEMR activation using swept-tones is presented in which the differences in the primaries in the ear canal with and without CAS are examined, permitting evaluation of MEMR effects over a broad frequency range. A range of CAS levels above and below expected contralateral acoustic reflex thresholds permitted evaluation of conditions with and without MEMR activation.

  2. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing.

  3. Nonlinear Connectivity in the Human Stretch Reflex Assessed by Cross-Frequency Phase Coupling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan; Solis-Escalante, Teodoro; Yao, Jun; van der Helm, Frans C T; Dewald, Julius P A; Schouten, Alfred C

    2016-12-01

    Communication between neuronal populations is facilitated by synchronization of their oscillatory activity. Although nonlinearity has been observed in the sensorimotor system, its nonlinear connectivity has not been widely investigated yet. This study investigates nonlinear connectivity during the human stretch reflex based on neuronal synchronization. Healthy participants generated isotonic wrist flexion while receiving a periodic mechanical perturbation to the wrist. Using a novel cross-frequency phase coupling metric, we estimate directional nonlinear connectivity, including time delay, from the perturbation to brain and to muscle, as well as from brain to muscle. Nonlinear phase coupling is significantly stronger from the perturbation to the muscle than to the brain, with a shorter time delay. The time delay from the perturbation to the muscle is 33 ms, similar to the reported latency of the spinal stretch reflex at the wrist. Source localization of nonlinear phase coupling from the brain to the muscle suggests activity originating from the motor cortex, although its effect on the stretch reflex is weak. As such nonlinear phase coupling between the perturbation and muscle activity is dominated by the spinal reflex loop. This study provides new evidence of nonlinear neuronal synchronization in the stretch reflex at the wrist joint with respect to spinal and transcortical loops.

  4. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine.

  5. Motor unit recruitment when neuromuscular electrical stimulation is applied over a nerve trunk compared with a muscle belly: triceps surae.

    PubMed

    Bergquist, A J; Clair, J M; Collins, D F

    2011-03-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) can be delivered over a nerve trunk or muscle belly and can generate contractions by activating motor (peripheral pathway) and sensory (central pathway) axons. In the present experiments, we compared the peripheral and central contributions to plantar flexion contractions evoked by stimulation over the tibial nerve vs. the triceps surae muscles. Generating contractions through central pathways follows Henneman's size principle, whereby low-threshold motor units are activated first, and this may have advantages for rehabilitation. Statistical analyses were performed on data from trials in which NMES was delivered to evoke 10-30% maximum voluntary torque 2-3 s into the stimulation (Time(1)). Two patterns of stimulation were delivered: 1) 20 Hz for 8 s; and 2) 20-100-20 Hz for 3-2-3 s. Torque and soleus electromyography were quantified at the beginning (Time(1)) and end (Time(2); 6-7 s into the stimulation) of each stimulation train. H reflexes (central pathway) and M waves (peripheral pathway) were quantified. Motor unit activity that was not time-locked to each stimulation pulse as an M wave or H reflex ("asynchronous" activity) was also quantified as a second measure of central recruitment. Torque was not different for stimulation over the nerve or the muscle. In contrast, M waves were approximately five to six times smaller, and H reflexes were approximately two to three times larger during NMES over the nerve vs. the muscle. Asynchronous activity increased by 50% over time, regardless of the stimulation location or pattern, and was largest during NMES over the muscle belly. Compared with NMES over the triceps surae muscles, NMES over the tibial nerve produced contractions with a relatively greater central contribution, and this may help reduce muscle atrophy and fatigue when NMES is used for rehabilitation.

  6. [Laryngeal and larynx-associated reflexes].

    PubMed

    Ptok, M; Kühn, D; Miller, S; Jungheim, M; Schroeter, S

    2016-06-01

    The laryngeal adductor reflex and the pharyngoglottal closure reflex protect the trachea and lower respiratory tract against the entrance of foreign material. The laryngeal expiration reflex and the cough reflex serve to propel foreign material, which has penetrated in the cranial direction. The inspiration reflex, the sniff reflex, and the swallowing reflex are further larynx-associated reflexes. In patients with dysphagia the laryngeal adductor reflex can be clinically tested with air pulses. The water swallow test serves to show the integrity of the cough reflex. The sniff reflex is useful to test the abduction function of the vocal folds. Future studies should address laryngeal reflexes more specifically, both for a better understanding of these life-supporting mechanisms and to improve diagnostic procedures in patients with impaired laryngeal function.

  7. A new approach for detecting and analyzing cutaneous reflexes during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Bagna, Maimouna; Bouyer, Laurent J

    2011-03-01

    During human walking, due to their small amplitude, individual cutaneous reflex responses are difficult to detect in surface EMG recordings. In this study, we present a new algorithm to automatically detect individual cutaneous reflex responses and to extract their corresponding onset latency, amplitude, duration, and sign. To discriminate reflex responses from the intrinsic variability of the background EMG, each stimulated cycle is compared with 10 adjacent nonstimulated cycles, looking for consistent differences. In the first 200 ms after stimulation, reflex responses are detected when ≥ 9/10 of these differences are either positive or negative. This approach does not require amplitude thresholds or fixed time windows for reflex detection. To reduce false detections, a postprocessing step selects 50 nonstimulated cycles randomly, processes them through the algorithm as stimulated cycles, and establishes a minimal reflex duration criterion that it then used to validate the detected responses. Validated responses from an entire test session are then reported on a colormap (reflex activity map) from which specific responses can be identified and quantified. The new method was validated in ten participants, three cutaneous nerves, and two protocols (phase modulation and recruitment curves). Compared with the classical method, the new algorithm showed better performance in terms of detection accuracy, specificity, and reliability. Although tested here to evaluate cutaneous reflexes during human walking, the simplicity of this method is such that it could easily be used with other reflexes, signals, and preparations.

  8. Mechanoreceptors and reflex arc in the feline shoulder.

    PubMed

    Solomonow, M; Guanche, C; Wink, C; Knatt, T; Baratta, R V; Lu, Y

    1996-01-01

    A reflex arc from the glenohumeral capsule to the biceps, infraspinatus, supraspinatus, and subscapular muscles was shown in a feline preparation. Branches of the suprascapular and subscapular nerves terminating in the capsule were identified and then stimulated with a 100 microseconds supramaximal pulse at 10 pulses per second. Stimulation of the suprascapular articular nerve elicited electromyographic discharge in the biceps and infraspinatus muscles, whereas stimulation of the subscapular articular nerve elicited electromyographic discharge in the biceps, subscapularis, infraspinatus, and supraspinatus muscles. When the articular nerves were transected between their emergence from the main nerve trunk and the stimulation electrodes, the electromyographic discharge was abolished confirming the afferent nature of the nerves. The mean time delay ( +/- SD) from application of the stimulus to the peak of the recorded electromyographic activity was 3.2 +/- 0.27 msec. Anatomic dissection and staining of the capsule segments where the articular nerves terminated revealed mechanoreceptors consisting primarily of free nerve endings and Golgi tendon organs, Ruffini's endings, and pacinian corpuscles. The existence of a ligamento-muscular reflex arc in the glenohumeral joint extends the concept of passive and active restraints of a joint by virtue of the synergy between ligaments and muscles. That such a reflex exists may advocate modification of surgical repairs of the capsule, leading to preservation of as many neurologic structures as possible; it may also form the foundation for new postsurgical therapeutic modalities.

  9. Reflexive Planning for Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Margaret A.; Kemp, Candace L.; French, Susan; Gafni, Amiram; Joshi, Anju; Rosenthal, Carolyn J.; Davies, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Informed by Giddens' (1991) concept of "reflexive life" planning and the notion of later life as a time of increasing social and financial risk, this research explores the idea of "reflexive planning for later life". We utilize a conceptual model that incorporates three types of planning for later life: public protection, self-insurance, and…

  10. Teaching Reflexivity in Qualitative Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiung, Ping-Chun

    2008-01-01

    Reflexivity has gained paramount status in qualitative inquiry. It is central to debates on subjectivity, objectivity, and, ultimately, the scientific foundation of social science knowledge and research. Although much work on doing reflexivity by researchers and practitioners has been published, scholars have only recently begun to explore how one…

  11. Locomotor training alters the behavior of flexor reflexes during walking in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew C; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K; Rymer, William Zev; Knikou, Maria

    2014-11-01

    In humans, a chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs the excitability of pathways mediating early flexor reflexes and increases the excitability of late, long-lasting flexor reflexes. We hypothesized that in individuals with SCI, locomotor training will alter the behavior of these spinally mediated reflexes. Nine individuals who had either chronic clinically motor complete or incomplete SCI received an average of 44 locomotor training sessions. Flexor reflexes, elicited via sural nerve stimulation of the right or left leg, were recorded from the ipsilateral tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before and after body weight support (BWS)-assisted treadmill training. The modulation pattern of the ipsilateral TA responses following innocuous stimulation of the right foot was also recorded in 10 healthy subjects while they stepped at 25% BWS to investigate whether body unloading during walking affects the behavior of these responses. Healthy subjects did not receive treadmill training. We observed a phase-dependent modulation of early TA flexor reflexes in healthy subjects with reduced body weight during walking. The early TA flexor reflexes were increased at heel contact, progressively decreased during the stance phase, and then increased throughout the swing phase. In individuals with SCI, locomotor training induced the reappearance of early TA flexor reflexes and changed the amplitude of late TA flexor reflexes during walking. Both early and late TA flexor reflexes were modulated in a phase-dependent pattern after training. These new findings support the adaptive capability of the injured nervous system to return to a prelesion excitability and integration state.

  12. Adrenoceptors and colocolonic inhibitory reflex.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S F; Scott, S M; Pilot, M A; Williams, N S

    1999-12-01

    The colocolonic inhibitory reflex is characterized by inhibition of proximal colonic motility induced by distal colonic distension. The aim of this study was to investigate the underlying neural mechanisms of this reflex, in vivo, using an isolated loop of canine colon. In five beagle dogs, motility was recorded from an exteriorized colonic loop via a serosal strain gauge connected to a digital data logger and chart recorder. Inflation of a balloon in the distal colon resulted in inhibition of motility in the isolated loop. Inhibition of motor activity persisted following injection of propranolol (100 microg/kg intravenously), a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, but was abolished following administration of the alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (200 microg/kg intravenously). This study confirms that the colocolonic inhibitory reflex is mediated via the extrinsic nerves to the colon. As the reflex was abolished by alpha2-, but not beta-adrenoceptor blockade, this indicates that the reflex pathway involves alpha2-adrenoceptors.

  13. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  14. Comparison of operant escape and reflex tests of nociceptive sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vierck, Charles J; Yezierski, Robert P

    2015-04-01

    Testing of reflexes such as flexion/withdrawal or licking/guarding is well established as the standard for evaluating nociceptive sensitivity and its modulation in preclinical investigations of laboratory animals. Concerns about this approach have been dismissed for practical reasons - reflex testing requires no training of the animals; it is simple to instrument; and responses are characterized by observers as latencies or thresholds for evocation. In order to evaluate this method, the present review summarizes a series of experiments in which reflex and operant escape responding are compared in normal animals and following surgical models of neuropathic pain or pharmacological intervention for pain. Particular attention is paid to relationships between reflex and escape responding and information on the pain sensitivity of normal human subjects or patients with pain. Numerous disparities between results for reflex and operant escape measures are described, but the results of operant testing are consistent with evidence from humans. Objective reasons are given for experimenters to choose between these and other methods of evaluating the nociceptive sensitivity of laboratory animals.

  15. Postnatal temporal, spatial and modality tuning of nociceptive cutaneous flexion reflexes in human infants.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Laura; Fabrizi, Lorenzo; Patten, Deborah; Worley, Alan; Meek, Judith; Boyd, Stewart; Slater, Rebeccah; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous flexion reflexes are amongst the first behavioural responses to develop and are essential for the protection and survival of the newborn organism. Despite this, there has been no detailed, quantitative study of their maturation in human neonates. Here we use surface electromyographic (EMG) recording of biceps femoris activity in preterm (<37 weeks gestation, GA) and term (≥ 37 weeks GA) human infants, less than 14 days old, in response to tactile, punctate and clinically required skin-breaking lance stimulation of the heel. We show that all infants display a robust and long duration flexion reflex (>4 seconds) to a single noxious skin lance which decreases significantly with gestational age. This reflex is not restricted to the stimulated limb: heel lance evokes equal ipsilateral and contralateral reflexes in preterm and term infants. We further show that infant flexion withdrawal reflexes are not always nociceptive specific: in 29% of preterm infants, tactile stimulation evokes EMG activity that is indistinguishable from noxious stimulation. In 40% of term infants, tactile responses are also present but significantly smaller than nociceptive reflexes. Infant flexion reflexes are also evoked by application of calibrated punctate von Frey hairs (vFh), 0.8-17.2 g, to the heel. Von Frey hair thresholds increase significantly with gestational age and the magnitude of vFh evoked reflexes are significantly greater in preterm than term infants. Furthermore flexion reflexes in both groups are sensitized by repeated vFh stimulation. Thus human infant flexion reflexes differ in temporal, modality and spatial characteristics from those in adults. Reflex magnitude and tactile sensitivity decreases and nociceptive specificity and spatial organisation increases with gestational age. Strong, relatively non-specific, reflex sensitivity in early life may be important for driving postnatal activity dependent maturation of targeted spinal cord sensory circuits.

  16. Operant conditioning of the soleus H-reflex does not induce long-term changes in the gastrocnemius H-reflexes and does not disturb normal locomotion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Makihara, Yukiko; Segal, Richard L.; Wolpaw, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    In normal animals, operant conditioning of the spinal stretch reflex or the H-reflex has lesser effects on synergist muscle reflexes. In rats and people with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), soleus H-reflex operant conditioning can improve locomotion. We studied in normal humans the impact of soleus H-reflex down-conditioning on medial (MG) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) H-reflexes and on locomotion. Subjects completed 6 baseline and 30 conditioning sessions. During conditioning trials, the subject was encouraged to decrease soleus H-reflex size with the aid of visual feedback. Every sixth session, MG and LG H-reflexes were measured. Locomotion was assessed before and after conditioning. In successfully conditioned subjects, the soleus H-reflex decreased 27.2%. This was the sum of within-session (task dependent) adaptation (13.2%) and across-session (long term) change (14%). The MG H-reflex decreased 14.5%, due mainly to task-dependent adaptation (13.4%). The LG H-reflex showed no task-dependent adaptation or long-term change. No consistent changes were detected across subjects in locomotor H-reflexes, EMG activity, joint angles, or step symmetry. Thus, in normal humans, soleus H-reflex down-conditioning does not induce long-term changes in MG/LG H-reflexes and does not change locomotion. In these subjects, task-dependent adaptation of the soleus H-reflex is greater than it is in people with SCI, whereas long-term change is less. This difference from results in people with SCI is consistent with the fact that long-term change is beneficial in people with SCI, since it improves locomotion. In contrast, in normal subjects, long-term change is not beneficial and may necessitate compensatory plasticity to preserve satisfactory locomotion. PMID:24944216

  17. Operant conditioning of the soleus H-reflex does not induce long-term changes in the gastrocnemius H-reflexes and does not disturb normal locomotion in humans.

    PubMed

    Makihara, Yukiko; Segal, Richard L; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Thompson, Aiko K

    2014-09-15

    In normal animals, operant conditioning of the spinal stretch reflex or the H-reflex has lesser effects on synergist muscle reflexes. In rats and people with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), soleus H-reflex operant conditioning can improve locomotion. We studied in normal humans the impact of soleus H-reflex down-conditioning on medial (MG) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) H-reflexes and on locomotion. Subjects completed 6 baseline and 30 conditioning sessions. During conditioning trials, the subject was encouraged to decrease soleus H-reflex size with the aid of visual feedback. Every sixth session, MG and LG H-reflexes were measured. Locomotion was assessed before and after conditioning. In successfully conditioned subjects, the soleus H-reflex decreased 27.2%. This was the sum of within-session (task dependent) adaptation (13.2%) and across-session (long term) change (14%). The MG H-reflex decreased 14.5%, due mainly to task-dependent adaptation (13.4%). The LG H-reflex showed no task-dependent adaptation or long-term change. No consistent changes were detected across subjects in locomotor H-reflexes, EMG activity, joint angles, or step symmetry. Thus, in normal humans, soleus H-reflex down-conditioning does not induce long-term changes in MG/LG H-reflexes and does not change locomotion. In these subjects, task-dependent adaptation of the soleus H-reflex is greater than it is in people with SCI, whereas long-term change is less. This difference from results in people with SCI is consistent with the fact that long-term change is beneficial in people with SCI, since it improves locomotion. In contrast, in normal subjects, long-term change is not beneficial and may necessitate compensatory plasticity to preserve satisfactory locomotion.

  18. Avian reflex and electroencephalogram responses in different states of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Sandercock, Dale A; Auckburally, Adam; Flaherty, Derek; Sandilands, Victoria; McKeegan, Dorothy E F

    2014-06-22

    Defining states of clinical consciousness in animals is important in veterinary anaesthesia and in studies of euthanasia and welfare assessment at slaughter. The aim of this study was to validate readily observable reflex responses in relation to different conscious states, as confirmed by EEG analysis, in two species of birds under laboratory conditions (35-week-old layer hens (n=12) and 11-week-old turkeys (n=10)). We evaluated clinical reflexes and characterised electroencephalograph (EEG) activity (as a measure of brain function) using spectral analyses in four different clinical states of consciousness: conscious (fully awake), semi-conscious (sedated), unconscious-optimal (general anaesthesia), unconscious-sub optimal (deep hypnotic state), as well as assessment immediately following euthanasia. Jaw or neck muscle tone was the most reliable reflex measure distinguishing between conscious and unconscious states. Pupillary reflex was consistently observed until respiratory arrest. Nictitating membrane reflex persisted for a short time (<1 min) after respiratory arrest and brain death (isoelectric EEG). The results confirm that the nictitating membrane reflex is a conservative measure of death in poultry. Using spectral analyses of the EEG waveforms it was possible to readily distinguish between the different states of clinical consciousness. In all cases, when birds progressed from a conscious to unconscious state; total spectral power (PTOT) significantly increased, whereas median (F50) and spectral edge (F95) frequencies significantly decreased. This study demonstrates that EEG analysis can differentiate between clinical states (and loss of brain function at death) in birds and provides a unique integration of reflex responses and EEG activity.

  19. Instability in human forearm movements studied with feed-back-controlled electrical stimulation of muscles.

    PubMed

    Jacks, A; Prochazka, A; Trend, P S

    1988-08-01

    1. Amplitude-modulated electrical stimulation was applied to the elbow flexors and extensors to produce movements of the forearm in normal subjects. The parameters of the modulating (command) signal were set in isometric trials so as to produce equal and opposite background torques, and equal and supportive torque modulations. 2. Bode plots relating forearm movement to command signal (modulating) frequency showed the muscle-load to have a low-pass characteristic similar to that previously described in the cat, and a slightly larger bandwidth than described previously in man. 3. The transduced forearm signals were fed back to provide the command signal to the stimulators via a filter which mimicked the transfer function of muscle spindle primary endings. In effect this replaced the neural part of the reflex arc with an accessible model, but left the muscle-load effector intact. 4. All six subjects developed forearm oscillations (tremor) when the loop gain exceeded a threshold value. The mean tremor frequency at onset was 4.4 Hz, which was similar to that of the equivalent vibration-evoked tremor (previous paper, Prochazka & Trend, 1988). 5. With the linear spindle model, oscillations tended to grow rapidly in amplitude, and the stimuli became painful. The inclusion of a logarithmic limiting element resulted in stable oscillations, without significant alterations in frequency. This allowed us to study the effect on tremor of including analog delays in the loop, mimicking those associated with peripheral nerve transmission and central reflexes. In one subject, loop delays of 0, 20, 40 and 100 ms resulted in tremor at 4.0, 3.6, 3.0 and 2.1 Hz respectively, as quantified by spectral analysis. 6. By considering separately the phase contributions of the different elements of the reflex arc, including delays, it became clear that muscle-load properties were important in setting the upper limit of tremor frequencies which could conceivably be supported by reflexes. 7. The

  20. Interaction between descending input and thoracic reflexes for joint coordination in cockroach: I. descending influence on thoracic sensory reflexes.

    PubMed

    Mu, Laiyong; Ritzmann, Roy E

    2008-03-01

    Tethered cockroaches turn from unilateral antennal contact using asymmetrical movements of mesothoracic (T2) legs (Mu and Ritzmann in J Comp Physiol A 191:1037-1054, 2005). During the turn, the leg on the inside of the turn (the inside T2 leg) has distinctly different motor patterns from those in straight walking. One possible neural mechanism for the transformation from walking to inside leg turning could be that the descending commands alter a few critical reflexes that start a cascade of physical changes in leg movement or posture, leading to further alterations. This hypothesis has two implications: first, the descending activities must be able to influence thoracic reflexes. Second, one should be able to initiate the turning motor pattern without descending signals by mimicking a point farther down in the reflex cascade. We addressed the first implication in this paper by experiments on chordotonal organ reflexes. The activity of depressor muscle (Ds) and slow extensor tibia muscle (SETi) was excited and inhibited by stretching and relaxing the femoral chordotonal organ. However, the Ds responses were altered after eliminating the descending activity, while the SETi responses remain similar. The inhibition to Ds activity by stretching the coxal chordotonal organ was also altered after eliminating the descending activity.

  1. The spatial organization of central sensitization of hind limb flexor reflexes in the decerebrated, spinalized rabbit.

    PubMed

    Clarke, R W; Harris, J

    2001-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the location of a noxious stimulus and the magnitude and duration of the plastic effects induced by that stimulus in withdrawal reflexes acting about the knee and the ankle, in rabbits. Reflexes were evoked in the nerves to the anterior tibial and semitendinosus flexor muscles by electrical stimulation at the toes. Repetitive, high intensity electrical stimulation of nerve trunks (sural, medial gastrocnemius, superficial peroneal, tibial, 100 pulses, 20 V, 1 ms at 0.5 Hz) was generally found to be a poor method for inducing central sensitization in these flexor reflexes. 'Natural' noxious stimulation induced more reliable enhancement of both reflexes. Mechanical (clamp) or chemical (mustard oil) stimulation of the heel induced prolonged (median duration >30 min) increases in reflexes to both muscles. Mechanical (clamp and superficial pinch) or chemical (mustard oil) stimulation of the toes, and injection of bradykinin into the gastrocnemius muscles or into the soft tissues of the sole of the foot, also led to enhancement of both reflexes, with the median duration of potentiation between 7 and 30 min. The effects obtained from deep tissue stimulation were generally weaker than those obtained after stimulation of superficial structures. These data show that there were no major differences in the effects obtained from the heel vs the toes, or between the two reflexes. It appears that the spatial organization of the spinal mechanisms underlying central sensitization of flexor withdrawal reflexes is rather more crudely drawn than that pertaining to the reflexes themselves. Furthermore, the data indicate that in the present preparation, afferents from deep tissues are no more effective in generating central sensitization than those from superficial structures.

  2. New Insight into Fat, Muscle and Bone Relationship in Women: Determining the Threshold at Which Body Fat Assumes Negative Relationship with Bone Mineral Density

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pei-Yang; Ilich, Jasminka Z.; Brummel-Smith, Ken; Ghosh, Sunita

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim was to investigate the relationships among lean mass (LM), fat mass (FM), and bone mineral density (BMD) in women stratified by body mass index (BMI) (BMI – normal-weight, overweight, obese) and to determine threshold at which body fat assumes negative relationship with BMD. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study in 471 healthy Caucasian women, aged 18-67 years. BMD, LM, and FM were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Analysis of variance with Bonferroni corrections was used to test the BMI group differences. Linear regression was used to examine independent contributions of LM and FM on BMD of various skeletal sites (controlling for age and height). In overweight/obese women PROC LOESS plots were used to determine the inflection points at which either LM or FM relationship with BMD changes direction. Separate analyses in pre- and post-menopausal women were conducted as well. Results: Spine and femoral neck BMD were not different among three BMI groups while total body, femur and radius BMD were statistically different (the highest in the obese group). Linear regression revealed that LM had significant positive association with BMD of various skeletal sites in all groups. FM showed a negative association with BMD of femoral neck and femur in normal-weight and spine in overweight women, but a positive association with radius in obese women. Inflection points showed that body fat between 33% and 38% assumed negative relationship with BMD for most skeletal sites in overweight and obese women. Conclusions: Although LM has strong positive relationship with BMD, FM above 33% in overweight/obese women is negatively related to BMD of most skeletal sites. Therefore, overweight/obesity after certain amount of FM, may not be a protective factor against osteoporosis in females. For clinical practice in women, it is important to maintain LM and keep FM accrual below ~30% body fat to maintain good skeletal health. PMID:25538842

  3. Bedding material affects mechanical thresholds, heat thresholds and texture preference

    PubMed Central

    Moehring, Francie; O’Hara, Crystal L.; Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known that the bedding type animals are housed on can affect breeding behavior and cage environment. Yet little is known about its effects on evoked behavior responses or non-reflexive behaviors. C57BL/6 mice were housed for two weeks on one of five bedding types: Aspen Sani Chips® (standard bedding for our institute), ALPHA-Dri®, Cellu-Dri™, Pure-o’Cel™ or TEK-Fresh. Mice housed on Aspen exhibited the lowest (most sensitive) mechanical thresholds while those on TEK-Fresh exhibited 3-fold higher thresholds. While bedding type had no effect on responses to punctate or dynamic light touch stimuli, TEK-Fresh housed animals exhibited greater responsiveness in a noxious needle assay, than those housed on the other bedding types. Heat sensitivity was also affected by bedding as animals housed on Aspen exhibited the shortest (most sensitive) latencies to withdrawal whereas those housed on TEK-Fresh had the longest (least sensitive) latencies to response. Slight differences between bedding types were also seen in a moderate cold temperature preference assay. A modified tactile conditioned place preference chamber assay revealed that animals preferred TEK-Fresh to Aspen bedding. Bedding type had no effect in a non-reflexive wheel running assay. In both acute (two day) and chronic (5 week) inflammation induced by injection of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant in the hindpaw, mechanical thresholds were reduced in all groups regardless of bedding type, but TEK-Fresh and Pure-o’Cel™ groups exhibited a greater dynamic range between controls and inflamed cohorts than Aspen housed mice. PMID:26456764

  4. Lower esophageal sphincter relaxation reflex kinetics: effects of peristaltic reflexes and maturation in human premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Pena, Eneysis M; Parks, Vanessa N; Peng, Juan; Fernandez, Soledad A; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; Shaker, Reza; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R

    2010-12-01

    We defined the sensory-motor characteristics of the lower esophageal sphincter relaxation (LESR) (stimulus threshold volume, response onset, and relaxation period, relaxation magnitude, nadir) during maturation in human neonates. We hypothesized that LESR kinetics differs during maturation and with peristaltic reflex type. Basal and adaptive esophageal motility testing was performed (N = 20 premature neonates) at 34.7 and 39.1 wk (time 1 and time 2). Effects of midesophageal provocation with graded stimuli (N = 1,267 stimuli, air and liquids) on LESR kinetics during esophagodeglutition response (EDR) and secondary peristalsis (SP) were analyzed by mixed models. Frequency of LESR with basal primary peristalsis were different during maturation (P = 0.03). During adaptive responses with maturation, 1) the frequencies of peristaltic reflexes and LESR were similar; 2) liquid stimuli resulted in a shorter LESR response latency and LESR nadir and greater LESR magnitude (all P < 0.05); 3) media differences were noted with LESR response latency (air vs. liquids, P < 0.02); and 4) infusion flow rate-LESR were different (P < 0.01 for air and liquids). Mechanistically, 1) frequency of LESR was greater during peristaltic reflexes at both times (vs. none, P < 0.0001); 2) LESR response latency, duration, and time to complete LESR were longer with EDR (all P < 0.05, vs. SP at time 2); and 3) graded stimulus volume LESR were different for air and liquids (P < 0.01). In conclusion, sensory-motor characteristics of LESR depend on the mechanosensitive properties of the stimulus (media, volume, flow), type of peristaltic reflex, and postnatal maturation. Maturation modulates an increased recruitment of inhibitory pathways that favor LESR.

  5. Effect of reversible dorsal cold block on the persistence of inhibition generated by spinal reflexes.

    PubMed

    Miller, J F; Paul, K D; Jiang, B; Rymer, W Z; Heckman, C J

    1995-01-01

    The effects of bilateral focal cooling of dorsolateral thoracic spinal cord on segmental reflex pathways to the triceps surae muscles were assessed in decerebrate cats from the reflex forces produced by single shocks or trains of electrical stimuli applied to the ipsilateral caudal cutaneous sural and the contralateral tibial nerves. The validity of the dorsal cold block technique as a substitute for acute surgical dorsal hemisection was established by showing that focal cooling reliably reproduced the stretch-induced "clasp knife" inhibition of triceps surae reflexive force seen following dorsal hemisection. Under control (warm) conditions, the inhibitory components of electrically evoked ipsilateral sural and contralateral tibial reflexes faded rapidly during sustained trains, with a resultant production of large-amplitude reflex force as measured from either the entire triceps surae or from the medial gastrocnemius muscle alone. Dorsal cold block greatly reduced the amplitude of reflexive force evoked by sustained electrical stimulation of either nerve. Indeed, the cold block completely reversed the sign of train-evoked reflexes to a net inhibition of reflex force output in one-half of the sural and one-half of the contralateral tibial stimulation experiments. Peak transient forces evoked by single shocks to the sural or contralateral tibial nerves were also sometimes reduced, but this result was more variable than for prolonged nerve stimulation. The persistence of activity in segmental inhibitory pathways during dorsal cold block, as indicated by instances of reflex sign reversal, suggests that descending bulbospinal pathways traversing the dorsolateral funiculi may be responsible for "fading" of segmental inhibitory reflex components in decerebrate cats with intact spinal cords during sustained afferent input. The possibility that the enhanced magnitude and duration of segmental inhibition during cold block will increase the likelihood of disruption of the

  6. Measurement of a single tendon reflex in conjunction with a myogram - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A generalized hyperreflexia was observed in Skylab 2 crew members immediately postflight. Duration of the Achilles reflex was significantly shortened. Further shortening was observed on the fourth day after recovery. At the 16th and 29th postrecovery days a lengthening of the reflex was observed in two of the three crew members. The muscle potential intervals were shortened immediately postflight and remained shortened throughout the 29 day postflight evaluation period.

  7. Spindle activity and monosynaptic reflex excitability during foreperiod.

    PubMed

    Gerilovsky, L; Struppler, A; Altmann, H; Velho, F

    1983-11-01

    Healthy volunteers were instructed to perform an isometric plantar foot flexion as quickly as possible after a foreperiod (FP) of 1000 msec defined by two clicks (warning signal (WS) and response signal (RS). In 6 volunteers the H reflex was evoked in triceps surae muscle and recorded by surface electrodes (stimulus intensity 30% of maximum). The H reflex was elicited at WS and RS as well as during FP at intervals of 100 msec. H reflex amplitudes were taken as a sign of monosynaptic reflex excitability (MSRE). Amplitudes during FP were compared with the average control values at rest. Relaxation of lower limb muscles before and during FP was controlled by EMG. MSRE was increased in the first part of FP with a maximum at 300 msec after WS and decreased in the second part, with a minimum at 800 msec after WS. In a second series of experiments, in 10 volunteers, single fiber activity from primary muscle spindle afferents was recorded with tungsten electrodes from deep peroneal nerve (6 records) and from tibial nerve (3 records). The activity of primary spindle afferents before and during the FP was calculated by instantaneous discharge frequency and histograms of spike distribution. The EMG was taken from sural triceps and anterior tibial muscles with needle electrodes; a mechanogram of tendon deflection was taken by an appropriate strain gauge. In 5 primary afferents without spontaneous activity at rest and during FP, discharge started with a delay of 10-15 msec after the onset of EMG activity during the motor reaction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Differences in motor activation of voluntary and reflex cough in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lasserson, D; Mills, K; Arunachalam, R; Polkey, M; Moxham, J; Kalra, L

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To study motor activation patterns of voluntary and reflex cough adjusted for cough flow rates. Methods Surface electromyography (EMG) and cough flow rate were measured in 10 healthy volunteers. Voluntary cough was assessed for 20 efforts in each quintile of increasing cough flow rate. Reflex cough was assessed for 25 efforts produced by nebulised l‐tartaric acid. EMG was recorded over the expiratory (rectus abdominis, obliques, lower intercostals) and accessory (trapezius, pectoralis major, deltoid, latissimus dorsi) muscles. EMG activity, burst duration and onset were compared for each quintile of voluntary cough, and between voluntary and reflex cough matched for cough flow rate. Results EMG activity and burst duration of expiratory and accessory muscles during voluntary cough increased in proportion to cough flow. Expiratory muscles had longer EMG burst duration (difference 68 ms (95% CI 34 to 102), p<0.01) and earlier onset of EMG activity (difference 44 ms (95% CI 20 to 68), p<0.0001) compared with accessory muscles. EMG activity in all muscles was increased (mean 110.2% v 56.1%, p<0.001) and burst duration (mean 206 ms v 280 ms, p = 0.013) decreased in reflex cough compared with voluntary cough of equal flow rate. There were no differences in EMG onset (difference 8 ms (95% CI 25 to −9) or burst duration (difference 27 ms (95% CI 58 to −4) between expiratory and accessory muscles. Conclusions Functional organisation of motor activity differs between voluntary and reflex cough. Voluntary cough is characterised by sequential activation whereas reflex cough is associated with early and simultaneous activation of expiratory and accessory muscles. PMID:16601089

  9. Reflex responses at the human ankle: the importance of tendon compliance.

    PubMed Central

    Rack, P M; Ross, H F; Thilmann, A F; Walters, D K

    1983-01-01

    Subjects with active stretch reflexes responded to an imposed sinusoidal movement of the ankle joint with a reflex force whose amplitude and timing varied widely with changes in the frequency of movement. At some frequency between 6 and 8 Hz, the reflex force tended to offset the non-reflex component of resistance, and thus to reduce the total resistance to movement. At this frequency the reflex response was particularly vigorous, with a deep modulation of electromyogram (e.m.g.) activity and a displacement of the joint stiffness vectors far from their high frequency values. The total resistance to movement might then be small, or it might be zero, or the reflex might actually assist the movement. As the frequency of movement was decreased through this critical range, the timing of the reflex response to movement changed rapidly with an abrupt advancement of the triceps surae e.m.g. signal, and a wide separation of the joint stiffness vectors as they passed close to the origin. This result was attributed to a changing distribution of the movement between the muscle fibres and an elastic Achilles tendon. It was assumed that at most frequencies the muscle fibres resisted extension, so that a major part of the imposed movement went into stretching the tendon; when, however, at 6-8 Hz, the reflex response was so timed as to reduce or abolish the resistance of the muscle fibres, more of the movement would take place in them. The muscle spindles would 'see' this larger movement of the muscle fibres, and generate correspondingly more reflex activity. A simplified model of the muscle-tendon combination behaves in a way that supports this view, and the available information about the human Achilles tendon indicates that it is sufficiently compliant for such an explanation. Therefore, movements imposed on the ankle joint would not necessarily be 'seen' by the muscle spindles, since they would be modified by transmission through a compliant tendon. By assuming a value for the

  10. [Effect of noise on changes in the acoustic reflex].

    PubMed

    Zivić, Ljubica; Zivić, Djordje

    2003-01-01

    Acoustic, stapedial reflex represents a response of the m. stapedius to a sonic excitation of supra speech intensity. It is the constitutive part of impendancmetric investigations, it is performed on the same apparatus after tympanometry, and it is the inseparable part in representation of impendancmetric findings. Until now, the most frequently monitored parameters of acoustic reflex of clinical importance are: threshold, amplitude, output and input angle of the reflex curve. The aim of this work was to performed detailed analysis of mentioned parameters in workers exposed to extensive action of industrial noise of known physical characteristics (of different durations) and to establish which changes occurred in these workers, to what extent and under which conditions. Investigations included 173 industrial workers (346 ears), which work in working unit "Forge", where during the working process noise is produced which is above permissible limits and of the unfavorable frequency content. Workers were divided into two groups. The first group consisted of workers who were spending the whole working time in the workroom with noise above permissible limits, the second group consisted of workers who were spending 3 hours of the working time in that workroom, while the control group consisted of workers who were spending the whole working time in that workroom but they did not have any hearing impairment. Workers of the first and the second group had the hearing impairment, which occurred exclusively as a consequence of chronical acoustic trauma. For all the workers the anamnesis was taken, as well as ORL status and audiometric and impendancmetric investigations were performed, namely the tympanometry and acoustic reflex. Results have shown that the acoustic reflex threshold at 500 Hz and at 1000 Hz for the first group (95.10 dB) was increased with respect to the reflex threshold of the second and the control group (84 dB). At higher frequencies of 2000 Hz and 4000 Hz an

  11. The Reflexive Suffix -V in Hualapai.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sohn, Joong-Sun

    1995-01-01

    Like many other languages, Hualapai employs the reflexive suffix for several different grammatical purposes. Unlike those languages, however, constructions with a reflexive marker in Hualapai are usually not ambiguous with respect to the expected meanings. This paper identifies four functions that the reflexive suffix may have: reflexive,…

  12. Proprioceptive reflexes in patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Schouten, A C; Van de Beek, W J T; Van Hilten, J J; Van der Helm, F C T

    2003-07-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) is a syndrome that frequently follows an injury and is characterized by sensory, autonomic and motor features of the affected extremities. One of the more common motor features of RSD is tonic dystonia, which is caused by impairment of inhibitory interneuronal spinal circuits. In this study the circuits that modulate the gain of proprioceptive reflexes of the shoulder musculature are quantitatively assessed in 19 RSD patients, 9 of whom presented with dystonia. The proprioceptive reflexes are quantified by applying two types of force disturbances: (1) disturbances with a fixed low frequency and a variable bandwidth and (2) disturbances with a small bandwidth around a prescribed centre frequency. Compared to controls, patients have lower reflex gains for velocity feedback in response to the disturbances around a prescribed centre frequency. Additionally, patients with dystonia lack the ability to generate negative reflex gains for position feedback, for these same disturbances. Proprioceptive reflexes to the disturbances with a fixed low frequency and variable bandwidth present no difference between patients and controls. Although dystonia in the RSD patients was limited to the distal musculature, the results suggest involvement of interneuronal circuits that mediate postsynaptic inhibition of the motoneurons of the proximal musculature.

  13. Deficits in Lower Limb Muscle Reflex Contraction Latency and Peak Force Are Associated With Impairments in Postural Control and Gross Motor Skills of Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Guo, X; Wang, Yuling; Chung, Raymond C K; Stat, Grad; Ki, W Y; Macfarlane, Duncan J

    2015-10-01

    This cross-sectional, exploratory study aimed to compare neuromuscular performance, balance and motor skills proficiencies of typically developing children and those with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and to determine associations of these neuromuscular factors with balance and motor skills performances in children with DCD.One hundred thirty children with DCD and 117 typically developing children participated in the study. Medial hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latencies in response to an unexpected posterior-to-anterior trunk perturbation were assessed by electromyography and accelerometer. Hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle peak force and time to peak force were quantified by dynamometer, and balance and motor skills performances were evaluated with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC).Independent t tests revealed that children with DCD had longer hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latencies (P < 0.001) and lower isometric peak forces (P < 0.001), but not times to peak forces (P > 0.025), than the controls. Multiple regression analysis accounting for basic demographics showed that gastrocnemius peak force was independently associated with the MABC balance subscore and ball skills subscore, accounting for 5.7% (P = 0.003) and 8.5% (P = 0.001) of the variance, respectively. Gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latency also explained 11.4% (P < 0.001) of the variance in the MABC ball skills subscore.Children with DCD had delayed leg muscle activation onset times and lower isometric peak forces. Gastrocnemius peak force was associated with balance and ball skills performances, whereas timing of gastrocnemius muscle activation was a determinant of ball skill performance in the DCD population.

  14. Interactions between the jaw-opening reflex and mastication.

    PubMed

    Lund, J P; Rossignol, S; Murakami, T

    1981-07-01

    Electrical stimulation of the anterior hard palate or upper lip was used to evoke the jaw-opening reflex in rabbits lightly anesthetized with urethane. The amplitude of each excitatory response recorded in the digastric electromyogram during mastication was compared with the mean amplitude of 10 prior control responses. When weak stimuli were used, the mean amplitude of the reflex dropped markedly during mastication and was smallest when the digastric muscle was inactive (closing and occlusal phases of the masticatory cycle). As the stimulus strength was increased, the size of the response during closing rose progressively until it exceeded values obtained during the control period or the jaw-opening phase. In addition, strong stimuli altered the total cycle length and the duration and amplitude of muscle activity in a phase-dependent manner. Stimuli given during closing were particularly effective in causing inhibition of jaw-closing muscle activity and in reducing the velocity and amplitude of closure. It is concluded that the cyclical gain changes of the reflex response to noxious stimuli are controlled to a large extent by premotoneuronal mechanisms and that the overall effect on the masticatory cycle structure is phase dependent.

  15. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex

    PubMed Central

    Wider, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient hepatic O2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to the loss of appetite or dietary restriction. PMID:27656314

  16. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex

    PubMed Central

    Wider, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient hepatic O2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in the stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to loss of appetite or dietary restriction. PMID:28168086

  17. Jaw stretch reflexes in children.

    PubMed

    Finan, Donald S; Smith, Anne

    2005-07-01

    The substantial morphological transformations that occur during human development present the nervous system with a considerable challenge in terms of motor control. Variability of skilled motor performance is a hallmark of a developing system. In adults, the jaw stretch reflex contributes to the functional stability of the jaw. We have investigated the response properties of the jaw stretch reflex in two groups of young children and a group of young adults. Response latencies increased with development, and all age groups produced stimulus-magnitude-dependent increases in reflex gain and resulting biting force. Reflex gain was largest for the older children (9-10 years), yet net increases in resulting biting force were comparable across age groups. These data and earlier experiments suggest that oral sensorimotor pathways mature throughout childhood in concert with the continued acquisition of complex motor skills.

  18. Reflex Principles of Immunological Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ulf; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    The reasoning that neural reflexes maintain homeostasis in other body organs, and that the immune system is innervated, prompted a search for neural circuits that regulate innate and adaptive immunity. This elucidated the inflammatory reflex, a prototypical reflex circuit that maintains immunological homeostasis. Molecular products of infection or injury activate sensory neurons traveling to the brainstem in the vagus nerve. The arrival of these incoming signals generates action potentials that travel from the brainstem to the spleen and other organs. This culminates in T cell release of acetylcholine, which interacts with α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChR) on immunocompetent cells to inhibit cytokine release in macrophages. Herein is reviewed the neurophysiological basis of reflexes that provide stability to the immune system, the neural- and receptor-dependent mechanisms, and the potential opportunities for developing novel therapeutic devices and drugs that target neural pathways to treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:22224768

  19. Triceps surae stretch reflex modulation after a mechanically evoked ankle dorsiflexion during the swing phase of human running.

    PubMed

    Scohier, Mikael; De Jaeger, Dominique; Schepens, Benedicte

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to mechanically evoke a triceps surae stretch reflex during the swing phase of running, to study its within-the-step phase dependency. Seven participants ran on a treadmill at 2.8 m·s-1 wearing an exoskeleton capable of evoking a sudden ankle dorsiflexion. We measured the electromyographic activity of the soleus, medial and lateral gastrocnemii just after the perturbation to evaluate the triceps surae stretch reflex. Similar perturbations were also delivered at rest. Our results showed that the stretch reflex was suppressed during the swing phase of running, except in late swing where a late reflex response was observed. At rest, all triceps surae muscles showed an early reflex response to stretch. Our findings suggest that the triceps surae short/medium-latency stretch reflex cannot be evoked during swing phase and thus cannot contribute to the control of the locomotor pattern after aperturbation during this phase.

  20. A quantification of the relationship between neuronal responses in the rat rostral ventromedial medulla and noxious stimulation-evoked withdrawal reflexes.

    PubMed

    Devonshire, I M; Kwok, C H T; Suvik, A; Haywood, A R; Cooper, A H; Hathway, G J

    2015-07-01

    The rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) regulates a range of involuntary behaviours but is most often associated with nociception via the action of pronociceptive ON cells and antinociceptive OFF cells. The phasic responses of ON and OFF cells determine whether or not incoming noxious signals provoke a withdrawal reflex, and previous studies have suggested that reflex RVM activity patterns actively shape motor output. Here we challenged the model by using juvenile rats, which are known to exhibit markedly different reflex responses compared with adults. By recording single-cell activity in the RVM and the electromyography responses of hindlimb flexor muscles to noxious thermal stimulation we found that the juvenile reflex had a shorter onset latency, was larger in amplitude and exhibited a decreased rise time compared with the adult reflex. The responses of ON and OFF cells faithfully tracked the shorter onset latency of the reflex by also responding earlier and, thus, still preceded the reflex. However, neither the reflex amplitude nor the ongoing response profile was predicted by the firing rate of RVM cells in either age group. Instead we found a close correspondence between RVM activity and the reflex only during the initiation of the response. Furthermore, the short rise time of the juvenile reflex was reflected in higher rates of change of both ON and OFF cell firing. Our data suggest that the RVM is associated only with the initiation of reflexes and does not shape ongoing muscle activity, which is more likely to be subserved by downstream spinal processes.

  1. Context-dependent modulation of cutaneous reflex amplitudes during forward and backward leg cycling.

    PubMed

    Zehr, E Paul; Hundza, Sandra R; Balter, Jaclyn E; Loadman, Pamela M

    2009-10-01

    We used amplitude modulation of cutaneous reflexes during leg cycling as a paradigm to investigate neural control mechanisms regulating forward (FWD) and backward (BWD) rhythmic limb movement. Our prediction was a simple reversal of reflex modulation during BWD leg cycling and context-dependent reflex modulation. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by electrical stimulation delivered to the superficial peroneal (SP) and distal tibial (TIB) nerves at the ankle. EMG recordings were collected from muscles acting at the hip, knee, and ankle. Kinematic data were also collected at these joints. Cutaneous reflexes were analyzed according to the phase of movement in which they were evoked. When functional phases (i.e., flexion or extension) of cycling were matched between FWD and BWD, background EMG and reflex modulation patterns were generally similar. The reflex patterns when compared at similar functional phases presented as a simple reversal suggesting FWD and BWD cycling are regulated by similar neural mechanisms. The general reflex regulation of limb trajectory was maintained between cycling directions in accordance with the task requirements of the movement direction.

  2. Prior experience does not alter modulation of cutaneous reflexes during manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling.

    PubMed

    MacGillivray, Megan K; Klimstra, Marc; Sawatzky, Bonita; Zehr, E Paul; Lam, Tania

    2013-05-01

    Previous research has reported that training and experience influence H-reflex amplitude during rhythmic activity; however, little research has yet examined the influence of training on cutaneous reflexes. Manual wheelchair users (MWUs) depend on their arms for locomotion. We postulated that the daily dependence and high amount of use of the arms for mobility in MWUs would show differences in cutaneous reflex modulation during upper limb cyclic movements compared with able-bodied control subjects. We hypothesized that MWUs would demonstrate increased reflex response amplitudes for both manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling tasks. The superficial radial nerve was stimulated randomly at different points of the movement cycle of manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling in MWUs and able-bodied subjects naive to wheeling. Our results showed that there were no differences in amplitude modulation of early- or middle-latency cutaneous reflexes between the able-bodied group and the MWU group. However, there were several differences in amplitude modulation of cutaneous reflexes between tasks (manual wheeling and symmetrical arm cycling). Specifically, differences were observed in early-latency responses in the anterior and posterior deltoid muscles and biceps and triceps brachii as well as in middle-latency responses in the anterior and posterior deltoid. These data suggest that manual wheeling experience does not modify the pattern of cutaneous reflex amplitude modulation during manual wheeling. The differences in amplitude modulation of cutaneous reflexes between tasks may be a result of mechanical differences (i.e., hand contact) between tasks.

  3. EMG feedback tasks reduce reflexive stiffness during force and position perturbations.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Patrick A; Happee, Riender; van der Helm, Frans C T; Schouten, Alfred C

    2011-08-01

    Force and position perturbations are widely applied to identify muscular and reflexive contributions to posture maintenance of the arm. Both task instruction (force vs. position) and the inherently linked perturbation type (i.e., force perturbations-position task and position perturbations-force tasks) affect these contributions and their mutual balance. The goal of this study is to explore the modulation of muscular and reflexive contributions in shoulder muscles using EMG biofeedback. The EMG biofeedback provides a harmonized task instruction to facilitate the investigation of perturbation type effects irrespective of task instruction. External continuous force and position perturbations with a bandwidth of 0.5-20 Hz were applied at the hand while subjects maintained prescribed constant levels of muscular co-activation using visual feedback of an EMG biofeedback signal. Joint admittance and reflexive impedance were identified in the frequency domain, and parametric identification separated intrinsic muscular and reflexive feedback properties. In tests with EMG biofeedback, perturbation type (position and force) had no effect on joint admittance and reflexive impedance, indicating task as the dominant factor. A reduction in muscular and reflexive stiffness was observed when performing the EMG biofeedback task relative to the position task. Reflexive position feedback was effectively suppressed during the equivalent EMG biofeedback task, while velocity and acceleration feedback were both decreased by approximately 37%. This indicates that force perturbations with position tasks are a more effective paradigm to investigate complete dynamic motor control of the arm, while EMG tasks tend to reduce the reflexive contribution.

  4. The posture-related interaction between Ia-afferent and descending input on the spinal reflex excitability in humans.

    PubMed

    Bove, Marco; Trompetto, Carlo; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Schieppati, Marco

    2006-04-24

    The separate and combined depressive effects induced by vibration and standing on the soleus H-reflex have been studied by administering Achilles' tendon vibration in prone position and during stance. Without vibration, H-reflex amplitude was larger under prone than standing condition. Vibration reduced the reflex both in prone position and even more during stance. When vibration was superimposed to inclined stance (greater EMG background), the reflex was reduced of the same absolute amount as when it was superimposed to normal stance. When vibration was superimposed on stance with minimal or no background EMG, the reflex disappeared. These results confirm that both upright posture and vibration have a strong depressive effect on the H-reflex. They also show that muscle activity during stance is enough for overcoming the reflex depression. These findings provide information about the origin of the disfacilitatory effects on the monosynaptic reflex pathway, contribute to the understanding of the posture-related mechanisms responsible for the modulation of the spinal reflex excitability, and allow arguing in favour of a minor but adaptable role for the short latency stretch reflex in the control of quiet unperturbed stance.

  5. The laryngeal cough reflex in congenital muscular torticollis: is it a new finding?

    PubMed

    Yim, Shin-Young; Lee, Il Yung; Cho, Kye Hee; Kim, Jong Kyu; Lee, Il Jae; Park, Myong-Chul

    2010-02-01

    Cinical experience has shown us that some infants with congenital muscular torticollis have a cough reflex while stretching the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The objective of this study is to present a case series with the maneuver inducing the cough reflex and facial color change and to provide the possible mechanism underlying this phenomenon. This is a case series from a prospective cohort. Among 290 children with congenital muscular torticollis who came to a single torticollis clinic from January to December 2008, the children who showed cough reflex were consecutively enrolled. Twenty-four infants (8.28%) showed the cough reflex. The age of first presentation with congenital muscular torticollis was 37.65 +/- 19.60 days old. They showed 57.5 +/- 7.3 degrees of the passive cervical rotation to the congenital muscular torticollis side at the initial visit. The mean thickness of the sternocleidomastoid muscle in those with cough reflex was 13.79 +/- 1.96 mm at the side of congenital muscular torticollis and 5.43 +/- 0.85 mm on the contralateral side. The cough reflex disappeared, and 90 degrees of passive cervical rotation to the congenital muscular torticollis side were regained with stretching exercises and/or surgical release in all 24 children. One of the possible mechanisms for this cough reflex is surmised to be the mechanical irritation of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve during the maneuver, which is one of the branches of the vagus nerve and is responsible for the sensation of the mucous membrane of the larynx. 8.28% of the infants with congenital muscular torticollis showed positive sign of cough reflex and had at least double or more thickness of the sternocleidomastoid muscle compared with that of unaffected sternocleidomastoid muscle and, at the same time, had 60 degrees or less of passive cervical rotation toward the affected side. To the best of our literature review, this laryngeal cough reflex is a new finding that has never been

  6. Wipe and flexion reflexes of the frog. II. Response to perturbations.

    PubMed

    Schotland, J L; Rymer, W Z

    1993-05-01

    1. To evaluate the hypothesis that the neural control of sensorimotor transformations may be simplified by using a single control variable, we compared the movement kinematics and muscle activity patterns [electromyograms (EMGs)] of the frog during flexion withdrawal and the hind limb-hind limb wipe reflex before and after adding an external load. In addition, the flexibility of spinal cord circuitry underlying the hind limb-hind limb wipe reflex was evaluated by comparing wipes before and after removal of one of the contributing muscles by cutting a muscle nerve. 2. The kinematics of the movements were recorded using a WATSMART infrared emitter-detector system and quantified using principal-components analysis to provide a measure of the shape (eigenvalues) and orientation (eigenvector coefficients) of the movement trajectories. The neural pattern coordinating the movements was characterized by the latencies and magnitudes of EMGs of seven muscles acting at the hip, knee, and ankle. These variables were compared 1) during flexion withdrawal and the initial movement segment of the limb during the hind limb-hind limb wipe reflex in both unrestrained movements and in movements executed when a load equal to approximately 10% of the animal's body weight was attached to a distal limb segment and 2) during the initial movement segment of the wipe reflex before and after cutting the nerve to the knee flexor-hip extensor, iliofibularis. 3. Addition of the load had no discernible effect on the end-point position of the foot during either reflex. However, during the loaded flexion reflex, the ankle joint did not move until after the hip and knee joints had moved to their normal positions. This delayed flexion of the ankle was accompanied by large increases in the magnitude of EMG activity in two ankle muscles that exceeded the levels found during unrestrained movements. Significant changes in the temporal organization of the EMG pattern accompanied the change in joint angle

  7. Carotid baroreceptor-muscle sympathetic relation in humans.

    PubMed

    Rea, R F; Eckberg, D L

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the relation between carotid distending pressure and muscle sympathetic activity in humans. Carotid baroreceptors of nine healthy subjects were compressed or stretched for 5 s with graded neck pressure or suction (+40 to -65 mmHg), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded. The results delineate several features of human baroreflex function. First, the carotid-muscle sympathetic relation is well described by an inverse sigmoid function. Second, a linear relation exists between carotid distending pressure and sympathetic outflow over a range of approximately 25 mmHg. Third, sympathetic responses to changes of carotid pressures are asymmetric; increases of sympathetic activity during carotid compression are much greater than reductions of sympathetic activity during carotid stretch. Fourth, at rest, normal subjects operate near the threshold level for sympathetic excitation. Thus the carotid-muscle sympathetic baroreflex is poised to oppose reductions more effectively than elevations of arterial pressure, and the range of pressures over which the reflex is active is wider than thought hitherto.

  8. Interaction of tonic labyrinth and neck reflexes in man.

    PubMed

    Aiello, I; Rosati, G; Sau, G F; Lentinu, M E; Tidore, B S; Sotgiu, S; Cacciotto, R; Posadinu, D; Muzzu, S; Manca, I

    1992-04-01

    Interaction of tonic labyrinth and neck reflexes was studied in 3 healthy volunteers by analyzing changes in Soleus H-Reflex (SHR) area in relation to both lateral tiltings and neck rotations. By using a Kermath chair each subject was tilted laterally from the vertical to the left and to the right up 15 degrees in steps of 5 degrees and at the same time the longitudinal body axis, keeping the head fixed, was rotated to the right and to the left up to 15 degrees in steps of 5 degrees. All combinations of lateral tiltings and neck rotations were tested. Each test position was followed by a return to 0 degree for both rotation and tilting (control position). Twelve H-reflexes of right soleus muscle were recorded in each test and control position and the changes in RSHR area were expressed as percentage variations from the mean value absorbed in the pretest and post-test control position. Our data indicate that in man, as in animals, labyrinth and neck reflexes act in the opposite direction, and that in the static condition their contribution to postural stabilization is equal.

  9. Short-latency tachycardia evoked by stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents.

    PubMed

    Gelsema, A J; Bouman, L N; Karemaker, J M

    1985-04-01

    The short-latency effect on heart rate of peripheral nerve stimulation was studied in decerebrate cats. Selective activation (17-40 microA, 100 Hz, 1 s long) of low-threshold fibers in the nerves to the triceps surae muscle yielded isometric contractions of maximal force that were accompanied by a cardiac cycle length shortening within 0.4 s from the start of stimulation. This effect was abolished by pharmacologically induced neuromuscular blockade. The cardiac cycle length shortening during paralysis reappeared after a 6- to 10-fold increase of the stimulation strength. Cutaneous (sural) nerve stimulation (15-25 microA, 100 Hz, 1 s long) elicited reflex contractions in the stimulated limb, which were also accompanied by a cardiac acceleration with similar latency. Paralysis prevented the reflex contractions and reduced the cardiac response in some cats and abolished it in others. The response reappeared in either case after a 5- to 10-fold increase of the stimulus strength. It is concluded that muscle nerve and cutaneous nerve activity both cause a similar cardiac acceleration with a latency of less than 0.4 s. The response to muscle nerve stimulation is elicited by activity in group III afferents. It is excluded that the cardiac response to nerve stimulation is secondary to a change in the respiratory pattern.

  10. Mechanisms within the spinal cord are involved in the movement-induced attenuation of an H reflex in the dog.

    PubMed

    Misiaszek, J E; Barclay, J K; Brooke, J D

    1996-11-01

    1. H reflexes were elicited in the second interosseous muscle of the hindpaw of the anesthetized dog during passive rotation of the shank about the ipsilateral or contralateral knee. Reflexes sampled at four points in the cycle of movement were compared with stationary controls. For both the ipsilateral and contralateral limb manipulations, reflexes were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) across the cycle of movement. Position-related modulation of the reflex amplitude was not detected (P > 0.05) in either instance. 2. The experiments were then repeated after the spinal transection of each animal at the level of T13. Passive rotation about either the ipsilateral or contralateral knee significantly attenuated (P < 0.05) the H reflex across a cycle of movement in the spinal dog. There was little difference in the amount of inhibition produced by the movement between the intact and spinal animals. On average, the reflex was attenuated 29 +/- 2.4% (mean +/- SE) in the intact animals and 32 +/- 2.1% in the spinal animals. 3. It is concluded that passive rotation about the knee of either leg leads to suppression of the H reflex of the second interosseous muscle both in the ipsilateral, moving leg and the contralateral, stationary one. This reflex suppression occurs across the cycle of movement. The mediating circuitry lies within the spinal cord, caudal to T13.

  11. Velocity-dependent suppression of the soleus H-reflex during robot-assisted passive stepping.

    PubMed

    Masugi, Yohei; Kitamura, Taku; Kamibayashi, Kiyotaka; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Ogata, Toru; Kawashima, Noritaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2015-01-01

    The amplitude of the Hoffmann (H)-reflex in the soleus (Sol) muscle is known to be suppressed during passive stepping compared with during passive standing. The reduction of the H-reflex is not due to load-related afferent inputs, but rather to movement-related afferent inputs from the lower limbs. To elucidate the underlying neural mechanisms of this inhibition, we investigated the effects of the stepping velocity on the Sol H-reflex during robot-assisted passive stepping in 11 healthy subjects. The Sol H-reflexes were recorded during passive standing and stepping at five stepping velocities (stride frequencies: 14, 21, 28, 35, and 42 min(-1)) in the air. The Sol H-reflexes were significantly inhibited during passive stepping as compared with during passive standing, and reduced in size as the stepping velocity increased. These results indicate that the extent of H-reflex suppression increases with increasing movement-related afferent inputs from the lower limbs during passive stepping. The velocity dependence suggests that the Ia afferent inputs from lower-limb muscles around the hip and knee joints are most probably related to this inhibition.

  12. Sneeze reflex: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Songu, Murat; Cingi, Cemal

    2009-06-01

    Sneezing is a protective reflex, and is sometimes a sign of various medical conditions. Sneezing has been a remarkable sign throughout the history. In Asia and Europe, superstitions regarding sneezing extend through a wide range of races and countries, and it has an ominous significance. Although sneezing is a protective reflex response, little else is known about it. A sneeze (or sternutation) is expulsion of air from the lungs through the nose and mouth, most commonly caused by the irritation of the nasal mucosa. Sneezing can further be triggered through sudden exposure to bright light, a particularly full stomach and physical stimulants of the trigeminal nerve, as a result of central nervous system pathologies such as epilepsy, posterior inferior cerebellar artery syndrome or as a symptom of psychogenic pathologies. In this first comprehensive review of the sneeze reflex in the English literature, we aim to review the pathophysiology, etiology, diagnosis, treatment and complications of sneezing.

  13. Threshold Graph Limits and Random Threshold Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Diaconis, Persi; Holmes, Susan; Janson, Svante

    2010-01-01

    We study the limit theory of large threshold graphs and apply this to a variety of models for random threshold graphs. The results give a nice set of examples for the emerging theory of graph limits. PMID:20811581

  14. The muscle spindle as a feedback element in muscle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, L. T.; Iannone, A. M.; Ewing, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The muscle spindle, the feedback element in the myotatic (stretch) reflex, is a major contributor to muscular control. Therefore, an accurate description of behavior of the muscle spindle during active contraction of the muscle, as well as during passive stretch, is essential to the understanding of muscle control. Animal experiments were performed in order to obtain the data necessary to model the muscle spindle. Spectral density functions were used to identify a linear approximation of the two types of nerve endings from the spindle. A model reference adaptive control system was used on a hybrid computer to optimize the anatomically defined lumped parameter estimate of the spindle. The derived nonlinear model accurately predicts the behavior of the muscle spindle both during active discharge and during its silent period. This model is used to determine the mechanism employed to control muscle movement.

  15. Tricyclic analogs cyclobenzaprine, amitriptyline and cyproheptadine inhibit the spinal reflex transmission through 5-HT(2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Honda, Motoko; Nishida, Takashi; Ono, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    The centrally acting muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine decreases the amplitude of monosynaptic reflex potentials by inhibiting the facilitatory descending serotonergic influences in the spinal cord. Interestingly, the structure of cyclobenzaprine is much similar to those of amitriptyline and cyproheptadine. In the present study, we attempted to elucidate the relationship between 5-HT(2) receptor antagonistic and inhibitory effects of cyclobenzaprine, amitriptyline, cyproheptadine and ketanserin on the spinal reflexes. Cyclobenzaprine, amitriptyline, cyproheptadine, and ketanserin significantly inhibited facilitatory effects of 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) on flexor reflexes and mono- and polysynaptic spinal reflex potentials in spinalized rats. In intact rats, these drugs significantly reduced the mono- and polysynaptic reflex potentials. 5-HT depletion significantly prevented the depression of the spinal reflex potentials induced by these drugs. These results suggest that the inhibitory effects of cyclobenzaprine, amitriptyline, and cyproheptadine on mono- and polysynaptic reflex potentials are due to the inhibition of descending serotonergic systems through 5-HT(2) receptors in the spinal cord.

  16. Analysis of the corneal reflex with air puff: normal controls and patient groups.

    PubMed

    Varolgüneŝ, N; Celebisoy, N; Akyürekli, O; Pehlivan, M; Akyürekli, O

    1999-09-01

    Though there are several reports published about the corneal reflex elicited by different methods, a standardized electrophysiologic study with air puff in man has not been published. The aim of this study is to standardize the corneal reflex elicited by air puff to cornea. The authors studied the corneal reflex with air puff and direct touch by using a standardized method in patients with thalamic hemorrhage (n = 15), hemispheric infarction (n = 9), brainstem infarction (n = 9), multiple sclerosis (n = 12), and Bell's palsy (n = 12) and in normal control subjects (n = 21). The conventional blink reflex (BR) was also studied. The reflex responses were recorded from both orbicularis oculi muscles by air puff and direct touch to cornea in addition to the electrical stimulation of the supraorbital nerve. No statistical difference could be detected between the responses elicited by air puff or direct touch to cornea (P > 0.05). Corneal reflex responses were statistically different from the R2 response of the BR (P < 0.005). Because the responses elicited by direct touch and air puff to cornea are identical, air puff to cornea can be used confidently to study the corneal reflex.

  17. How Can Hypnodontics Manage Severe Gag Reflex for Root Canal Therapy? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Mohsen; zarenejad, Nafiseh; Parirokh, Masoud; Zahedpasha, Samir

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, severe involuntary gagging can have a severe impact on treatment procedure. There are many ways to ease the gag reflex, one of which is hypnosis. A 34-year-old male was referred for root canal treatment of a molar tooth. He had not received any dental treatments for the past nine years due to fear of severe gag reflex. Three hypnotic sessions based upon eye fixation, progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery techniques were spent for psychosomatic management. The gag reflex was controlled and reduced to a normal level, and the required dental treatments including root canal therapy and restoration were performed successfully. This report shows that hypnosis can control gag reflex for dental treatments. PMID:27141226

  18. The relationship between dynamic balancing ability and posture-related modulation of the soleus H-reflex.

    PubMed

    Kawaishi, Yu; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Soleus H-reflex reveals down modulation with increased postural difficulty. Role of this posture-related reflex modulation is thought to shift movement control toward higher motor centers in order to facilitate more precise postural control. Present study hypothesized that the ability to modulate H-reflex is related to one's ability to dynamically balance while in an unstable posture. This study examined the relationship between dynamic balancing ability and soleus H-reflex posture-related modulation. Thirty healthy adults participated. The soleus maximal H-reflex (Hmax), motor response (Mmax), and background EMG activity (bEMG) were obtained during three postural conditions: prone, open-legged standing, and closed-legged standing. Hmax/Mmax ratios were normalized via the corresponding bEMG in order to remove the effects of background muscle activity from the obtained H-reflex. Reflex modulation was calculated as the ratio of the normalized Hmax/Mmax ratios in one postural condition to another posture in a more difficult condition. Dynamic balancing ability was assessed by testing stability while standing on a wobble board. A significant negative correlation was observed between balancing scores and reflex modulation from open-legged standing to closed-legged standing. This suggests that the ability to modulate monosynaptic stretch reflex excitability in response to a changing posture is a significant factor for dynamic balancing.

  19. Modulation of soleus H reflex by lateral tilting in man.

    PubMed

    Aiello, I; Rosati, G; Sau, G F; Cacciotto, R; Lentinu, M E; Tidore, B; Traccis, S

    1992-04-01

    Static vestibular influences on extensor tone of the lower limbs in man were studied by analyzing the changes in right soleus H-reflex (RSHR) area in relation to lateral tiltings. Eight normal adult volunteers were tested in an experimental situation designed to minimize all afferent inputs, except the vestibular ones. Each subject was seated on a chair which could be tilted laterally from the vertical to both sides. Lateral tiltings were applied at a random order from the vertical (0 degree, control position) to 4 degrees, 8 degrees, 12 degrees, 16 degrees, and 20 degrees of both sides (test positions). The results showed inhibition in SHR area of the leg ipsilateral to the tilting and facilitation of the contralateral SHR. These data indicate that, in man, as in the decerebrate cat, tonic labyrinth reflexes act asymmetrically and that, in static condition, the vestibular system modulates muscle tone of the lower limbs adequately to counteract lateral perturbation of upright position.

  20. Prediction of Hearing Sensitivity from Acoustic Reflexes in Mentally Retarded Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niswander, Paul S.; Ruth, Roger A.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of the sensitivity prediction from acoustic reflex (SPAR) technique to estimate hearing loss in 32 trainable mentally retarded Ss (adults and young adults with normal to profound hearing loss) was investigated by comparing measured pure-tone thresholds determined through tangible-reinforcement operant-conditioning audiometry with…

  1. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology.

  2. Peripheral δ-opioid receptors attenuate the exercise pressor reflex.

    PubMed

    Leal, Anna K; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kim, Joyce; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P

    2013-10-15

    In rats with ligated femoral arteries, the exercise pressor reflex is exaggerated, an effect that is attenuated by stimulation of peripheral μ-opioid receptors on group IV metabosensitive afferents. In contrast, δ-opioid receptors are expressed mostly on group III mechanosensitive afferents, a finding that prompted us to determine whether stimulation of these opioid receptors could also attenuate the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in "ligated" rats. We found femoral arterial injection of [D-Pen2,D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE; 1.0 μg), a δ-opioid agonist, significantly attenuated the pressor and cardioaccelerator components of the exercise pressor reflex evoked by hindlimb muscle contraction in both rats with ligated and patent femoral arteries. DPDPE significantly decreased the pressor responses to muscle mechanoreflex activation, evoked by tendon stretch, in ligated rats only. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect in either group on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to capsaicin (0.2 μg), which primarily stimulates group IV afferents. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to lactic acid (24 mM), which stimulates group III and IV afferents, in rats with patent femoral arteries but significantly decreased the pressor response in ligated rats. Western blots revealed the amount of protein comprising the δ-opioid receptor was greater in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with ligated femoral arteries than in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with patent femoral arteries. Our findings support the hypothesis that stimulation of δ-opioid receptors on group III afferents attenuated the exercise pressor reflex.

  3. Peripheral δ-opioid receptors attenuate the exercise pressor reflex

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kim, Joyce; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2013-01-01

    In rats with ligated femoral arteries, the exercise pressor reflex is exaggerated, an effect that is attenuated by stimulation of peripheral μ-opioid receptors on group IV metabosensitive afferents. In contrast, δ-opioid receptors are expressed mostly on group III mechanosensitive afferents, a finding that prompted us to determine whether stimulation of these opioid receptors could also attenuate the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in “ligated” rats. We found femoral arterial injection of [D-Pen2,D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE; 1.0 μg), a δ-opioid agonist, significantly attenuated the pressor and cardioaccelerator components of the exercise pressor reflex evoked by hindlimb muscle contraction in both rats with ligated and patent femoral arteries. DPDPE significantly decreased the pressor responses to muscle mechanoreflex activation, evoked by tendon stretch, in ligated rats only. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect in either group on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to capsaicin (0.2 μg), which primarily stimulates group IV afferents. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to lactic acid (24 mM), which stimulates group III and IV afferents, in rats with patent femoral arteries but significantly decreased the pressor response in ligated rats. Western blots revealed the amount of protein comprising the δ-opioid receptor was greater in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with ligated femoral arteries than in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with patent femoral arteries. Our findings support the hypothesis that stimulation of δ-opioid receptors on group III afferents attenuated the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:23934854

  4. Aging affects passive stiffness and spindle function of the rat soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Rosant, Cédric; Nagel, Marie-Danielle; Pérot, Chantal

    2007-04-01

    Aging affects many motor functions, notably the spinal stretch reflexes and muscle spindle sensitivity. Spindle activation also depends on the elastic properties of the structures linked to the proprioceptive receptors. We have calculated a spindle efficacy index, SEI, for old rats. This index relates the spindle sensitivity, deduced from electroneurograms recording (ENG), to the passive stiffness of the muscle. Spindle sensitivity and passive incremental stiffness were calculated during ramp and hold stretches imposed on pseudo-isolated soleus muscles of control rats (aged 4 months, n=12) and old rats (aged 24 months, n=16). SEI were calculated for the dynamic and static phases of ramp (1-80 mm/s) and for hold (0.5-2mm) stretches imposed at two reference lengths: length threshold for spindle afferents discharges, L(n) (neurogram length) and slack length, L(s). The passive incremental stiffness was calculated from the peak and steady values of passive tension, measured under the stretch conditions used for the ENG recordings, and taking into account the muscle cross-sectional area. The pseudo-isolated soleus muscles were also stretched to establish the stress-strain relationship and to calculate muscle stiffness constant. The contralateral muscle was used to count muscle spindles and spindle fibers (ATPase staining) and immunostained to identify MyHC isoforms. L(n) and L(s) lengths were not significantly different in the control group, while L(n) was significantly greater than L(s) in old muscles. Under dynamic conditions, the SEI of old muscles was the same as in controls at L(s), but it was significantly lower than in controls at L(n) due to increased passive incremental stiffness under the stretch conditions used to analyze the ENG. Under static conditions, the SEI of old muscles was significantly lower than control values at all the stretch amplitudes and threshold lengths tested, due to increased passive incremental stiffness and decreased spindle sensitivity

  5. [Dry immersion effects on the mechanisms of metabolic-reflex regulation of hemodynamics during muscular work].

    PubMed

    Bravyĭ, Ia R; Bersenev, E Iu; Missina, S S; Borovik, A S; Sharova, A P; Vinogradova, O L

    2008-01-01

    Effects of 4-d dry immersion on metabolic-reflex regulation of hemodynamics were evaluated during local static work (30% of maximum voluntary effort) of the talocrural extensors. One group of immersed test-subjects received low-frequency electrostimulation of leg muscles to offset the immersion effect on EMG of working muscles. Metabolic-reflex regulation was evaluated through comparison of cardiovascular responses to physical tests with and w/o post-exercise vascular occlusion. Immersion vaguely increased heart rate and reduced systolic arterial pressure in resting subjects; however, it did not have a distinct effect on arterial pressure and HR during muscular work or metabolic-reflex potentiation of hemodynamic shifts.

  6. Reflexive aerostructures: increased vehicle survivability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margraf, Thomas W.; Hemmelgarn, Christopher D.; Barnell, Thomas J.; Franklin, Mark A.

    2007-04-01

    Aerospace systems stand to benefit significantly from the advancement of reflexive aerostructure technologies for increased vehicle survivability. Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) is developing lightweight, healable composite systems for use as primary load-bearing aircraft components. The reflexive system is comprised of piezoelectric structural health monitoring systems, localized thermal activation systems, and lightweight, healable composite structures. The reflexive system is designed to mimic the involuntary human response to damage. Upon impact, the structural health monitoring system will identify the location and magnitude of the damage, sending a signal to a discrete thermal activation control system to resistively heat the shape memory polymer (SMP) matrix composite above activation temperature, resulting in localized shape recovery and healing of the damaged areas. CRG has demonstrated SMP composites that can recover 90 percent of flexural yield stress and modulus after postfailure healing. During the development, CRG has overcome issues of discrete activation, structural health monitoring integration, and healable resin systems. This paper will address the challenges associated with development of a reflexive aerostructure, including integration of structural health monitoring, discrete healing, and healable shape memory resin systems.

  7. Tibialis anterior stretch reflex in early stance is suppressed by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zuur, Abraham T; Christensen, Mark S; Sinkjær, Thomas; Grey, Michael J; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2009-01-01

    A rapid plantar flexion perturbation in the early stance phase of walking elicits a large stretch reflex in tibialis anterior (TA). In this study we use repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to test if this response is mediated through a transcortical pathway. TA stretch reflexes were elicited in the early stance phase of the step cycle during treadmill walking. Twenty minutes of 1 Hz rTMS at 115% resting motor threshold (MTr) significantly decreased (P < 0.05) the magnitude of the later component of the reflex at a latency of ∼100 ms up to 25 min after the rTMS. Control experiments in which stretch reflexes were elicited during sitting showed no effect on the spinally mediated short and medium latency stretch reflexes (SLR and MLR) while the long latency stretch reflex (LLR) and the motor-evoked potential (MEP) showed a significant decrease 10 min after 115% MTr rTMS. This study demonstrates that 1 Hz rTMS applied to the leg area of the motor cortex can suppress the long latency TA stretch reflex during sitting and in the stance phase of walking. These results are in line with the hypothesis that the later component of the TA stretch reflex in the stance phase of walking is mediated by a transcortical pathway. An alternative explanation for the observed results is that the reflex is mediated by subcortical structures that are affected by the rTMS. This study also shows that rTMS may be used to study the neural control of walking. PMID:19237419

  8. Enhanced D1 and D2 inhibitions induced by low-frequency trains of conditioning stimuli: differential effects on H- and T-reflexes and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mezzarane, Rinaldo André; Magalhães, Fernando Henrique; Chaud, Vitor Martins; Elias, Leonardo Abdala; Kohn, André Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Mechanically evoked reflexes have been postulated to be less sensitive to presynaptic inhibition (PSI) than the H-reflex. This has implications on investigations of spinal cord neurophysiology that are based on the T-reflex. Preceding studies have shown an enhanced effect of PSI on the H-reflex when a train of ~10 conditioning stimuli at 1 Hz was applied to the nerve of the antagonist muscle. The main questions to be addressed in the present study are if indeed T-reflexes are less sensitive to PSI and whether (and to what extent and by what possible mechanisms) the effect of low frequency conditioning, found previously for the H-reflex, can be reproduced on T-reflexes from the soleus muscle. We explored two different conditioning-to-test (C-T) intervals: 15 and 100 ms (corresponding to D1 and D2 inhibitions, respectively). Test stimuli consisted of either electrical pulses applied to the posterior tibial nerve to elicit H-reflexes or mechanical percussion to the Achilles tendon to elicit T-reflexes. The 1 Hz train of conditioning electrical stimuli delivered to the common peroneal nerve induced a stronger effect of PSI as compared to a single conditioning pulse, for both reflexes (T and H), regardless of C-T-intervals. Moreover, the conditioning train of pulses (with respect to a single conditioning pulse) was proportionally more effective for T-reflexes as compared to H-reflexes (irrespective of the C-T interval), which might be associated with the differential contingent of Ia afferents activated by mechanical and electrical test stimuli. A conceivable explanation for the enhanced PSI effect in response to a train of stimuli is the occurrence of homosynaptic depression at synapses on inhibitory interneurons interposed within the PSI pathway. The present results add to the discussion of the sensitivity of the stretch reflex pathway to PSI and its functional role.

  9. The effects of the cerebral, cerebellar and vestibular systems on the head stabilization reflex.

    PubMed

    Bademkiran, Fikret; Uludag, Burhanettin; Guler, Ayse; Celebisoy, Nese

    2016-05-01

    The head stabilization reflex (HSR) is a brain stem reflex which appears in the neck muscles in response to sudden head position changes and brings the head to its previous position. The reflex mechanism has not been understood. The afferent fibers come from cervical muscle spindles, vestibular structures, and the accessory nerve, the efferents from the accessory nerve. In this study, we aim to investigate the roles of supraspinal neural structures and the vestibular system on the HSR. The patient group consisted of 86 patients (33 cerebral cortical lesion, 14 cerebellar syndrome and 39 vestibular inexcitability or hypoexcitability); the control group was composed of 32 healthy volunteers. Concentric needle electrodes were inserted into the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) and the accessory nerves were stimulated with the electrical stimulator. A reflex response of about 45-55 ms was obtained from the contralateral SCM muscle. 50 % of cases had bilateral loss whereas 37 % of cases with unilateral cerebellar lesions had an ipsilateral reflex loss. Bilateral HSR loss was detected in 84 % of cases with bilateral cerebellar lesions. Bilateral reflex loss was observed in 70 % of patients with unilateral cortical lesions and 94 % of those with bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Ipsilateral HSR loss was observed in 55 % of cases with unilateral vestibular dysfunction. It was discovered that supraspinal structures and the vestibular system may have an excitatory effect on HSR. This effect may be lost in supra-segmental and vestibular dysfunctions. The localization value of HSR was found to be rather poor in our study.

  10. Maturation of upstream and downstream esophageal reflexes in human premature neonates: the role of sleep and awake states.

    PubMed

    Jadcherla, Sudarshan R; Chan, Chin Yee; Fernandez, Soledad; Splaingard, Mark

    2013-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the sensory-motor characteristics of aerodigestive reflexes are dependent on stimulus type and volumes, sleep or awake states, and maturation. Thirteen neonates were studied at 33.6 ± 0.5 wk (time 1) and 37.3 ± 0.5 wk (time 2) postmenstrual age using multimodal provocative esophageal manometry concurrent with video polysomnography. Effects of graded volumes (399 infusions at time 1, 430 infusions at time 2) of midesophageal stimulation with air, water, and apple juice on the sensory thresholds and recruitment frequency of upper esophageal sphincter (UES), esophageal body, and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) reflexes were investigated during sleep and awake states. Sensory thresholds for aerodigestive reflexes between maturational stages were similar. Increased frequency recruitment of UES contractile reflex, LES relaxation reflex, and peristaltic reflexes were noted at time 2 (all, P < 0.05). Graded stimulus-response relationships were evident at time 1 and time 2 during awake and sleep states (P < 0.05). Secondary peristalsis vs. esophago-deglutition response proportions during sleep at time 1 vs. time 2 (P = 0.001) and awake vs. sleep at time 2 (P = 0.02) were distinct. We concluded that sensory-motor effects of esophageal mechanosensitivity, osmosensitivity, and chemosensitivity are advanced in sleep with maturation. Sleep further modulates the frequency recruitment and the type of aerodigestive reflexes.

  11. The amplitude of interlimb cutaneous reflexes in the leg is influenced by fingertip touch and vision during treadmill locomotion.

    PubMed

    Forero, Juan; Misiaszek, John E

    2015-06-01

    Light touch at the fingertip has been shown to influence postural control during standing and walking. Interlimb cutaneous reflexes have been proposed to provide a neural link between the upper and lower limbs to assist in interlimb coordination during activities such as walking. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that cutaneous sensory pathways linking the arm and leg will be facilitated if subjects use light touch to assist with postural control during treadmill walking. To test this, interlimb cutaneous reflexes from the median nerve, serving the skin contact region, and radial nerve, serving an irrelevant sensory territory, were tested in the legs of subjects walking on treadmill in an unstable environment. Interlimb cutaneous reflexes were tested while subjects (a) touched or (b) did not touch a stable contact with their fingertip, and while the eyes were either (c) open or (d) closed. Reflexes arising from both nerves were facilitated when vision was removed that was then ameliorated when touch was provided. These changes in reflex amplitude during the eyes closed conditions were mirrored by changes in background muscle activity. We suggest that this facilitation of interlimb reflexes from both nerves arises from a generalized increase in excitability related to the postural anxiety of walking on a treadmill with the eyes closed, which is then restored by the provision of light touch. However, the influence of touch when the eyes were open differed depending upon the nerve stimulated. Radial nerve reflexes in the legs were suppressed when touch was provided, mirroring a suppression in the background muscle activity. In contrast, median nerve reflexes in the leg were larger when touch was provided with the eyes open, despite a suppression of background muscle activity. This nerve-specific effect of touch on the amplitude of the interlimb cutaneous reflexes suggests that touch sensory information from the median nerve was facilitated when that input was

  12. Adaptive changes of the locomotor pattern and cutaneous reflexes during locomotion studied in the same cats before and after spinalization.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Alain; Rossignol, Serge

    2008-06-15

    Descending supraspinal inputs exert powerful influences on spinal reflex pathways in the legs. Removing these inputs by completely transecting the spinal cord changes the state (i.e. the configuration of the spinal circuitry) of the locomotor network and undoubtedly generates a reorganization of reflex pathways. To study changes in reflex pathways after a complete spinalization, we recorded spinal reflexes during locomotion before and after a complete transection of the spinal cord at the 13th thoracic segment in cats. We chronically implanted electrodes in three cats, to record electromyography (EMG) in several hindlimb muscles and around the left tibial (Tib) nerve at the ankle to elicit reflexes during locomotion before and after spinalization in the same cat. Control values of kinematics, EMGs and reflexes were obtained during intact locomotion for 33-60 days before spinalization. After spinalization, cats were trained 3-5 times a week on a motorized treadmill. Recordings resumed once a stable spinal locomotion was achieved (26-43 days), with consistent plantar foot placement and full hindquarter weight support without perineal stimulation. Changes in Tib nerve reflex responses after spinalization in the same cat during locomotion were found in all muscles studied and were often confined to specific phases of the step cycle. The most remarkable change was the appearance of short-latency excitatory responses in some ipsilateral ankle extensors during stance. Short-latency excitatory responses in the ipsilateral tibialis anterior were increased during stance, whereas in other flexors such as semitendinosus and sartorius, increases were mostly confined to swing. Longer-latency excitatory responses in ipsilateral flexors were absent or reduced. Responses evoked in limb muscles contralateral to stimulation were generally increased throughout the step cycle. These reflex changes after spinalization provide important clues regarding the functional reorganization of

  13. Sacculo-ocular reflex connectivity in cats.

    PubMed

    Isu, N; Graf, W; Sato, H; Kushiro, K; Zakir, M; Imagawa, M; Uchino, Y

    2000-04-01

    The otolith system contributes to the vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) when the head moves linearly in the horizontal plane or tilts relative to gravity. The saccules are thought to detect predominantly accelerations along the gravity vector. Otolith-induced vertical eye movements following vertical linear accelerations are attributed to the saccules. However, information on the neural circuits of the sacculo-ocular system is limited, and the effects of saccular inputs on extraocular motoneurons remain unclear. In the present study, synaptic responses to saccular-nerve stimulation were recorded intracellularly from identified motoneurons of all twelve extraocular muscles. Experiments were successfully performed in eleven cats. Individual motoneurons of the twelve extraocular muscles--the bilateral superior recti (SR), inferior recti (IR), superior obliques (SO), inferior obliques (IO), lateral recti (LR), and medial recti (MR) were identified antidromically following bipolar stimulation of their respective nerves. The saccular nerve was selectively stimulated by a pair of tungsten electrodes after removing the utricular nerve and the ampullary nerves of the semicircular canals. Stimulus intensities were determined from the stimulus-response curves of vestibular N1 field potentials in order to avoid current spread. Intracellular recordings were performed from 129 extraocular motoneurons. The majority of the neurons showed no response to saccular-nerve stimulation. In 17 (30%) of 56 extraocular motoneurons related to vertical eye movements (bilateral SR and IR), depolarizing and/or hyperpolarizing postsynaptic potentials (PSPs) were observed in response to saccular-nerve stimulation. The latencies of PSPs ranged from 2.3 to 8.9 ms, indicating that the extraocular motoneurons received neither monosynaptic nor disynaptic inputs from saccular afferents. The majority of the latencies of the depolarization, including depolarization-hyperpolarization, were in the range of 2

  14. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  15. The intrinsic stiffness of the in vivo lumbar spine in response to quick releases: implications for reflexive requirements.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen H M; McGill, Stuart M

    2009-10-01

    Torso muscles contribute both intrinsic and reflexive stiffness to the spine; recent modeling studies indicate that intrinsic stiffness alone is sometimes insufficient to maintain stability in dynamic situations. The purpose of this study was to experimentally test this idea by limiting muscular reflexive responses to sudden trunk perturbations. Nine healthy males lay on a near-frictionless apparatus and were subjected to quick trunk releases from the neutral position into flexion or right-side lateral bend. Different magnitudes of moment release were accomplished by having participants contract their musculature to create a range of moment levels. EMG was recorded from 12 torso muscles and three-dimensional lumbar spine rotations were monitored. A second-order linear model of the trunk was employed to estimate trunk stiffness and damping during each quick release. Participants displayed very limited reflex responses to the quick load release paradigms, and consequently underwent substantial trunk displacements (>50% flexion range of motion and >70% lateral bend range of motion in the maximum moment trials). Trunk stiffness increased significantly with significant increases in muscle activation, but was still unable to prevent the largest trunk displacements in the absence of reflexes. Thus, it was concluded that the intrinsic stiffness of the trunk was insufficient to adequately prevent the spine from undergoing potentially harmful rotational displacements. Voluntary muscular responses were more apparent than reflexive responses, but occurred too late and of too low magnitude to sufficiently make up for the limited reflexes.

  16. Modulation of the mandibular stretch reflex sensitivity during various phases of rhythmic open-close movements in humans.

    PubMed

    van der Bilt, A; Ottenhoff, F A; van der Glas, H W; Bosman, F; Abbink, J H

    1997-04-01

    The muscle spindles of the jaw elevator muscles provide positive feedback to the alpha motoneurons. It is generally assumed that the feedback is modulated during chewing so that counterproductive forces of the jaw elevator muscles can be avoided during jaw opening. Our aim was to investigate the modulation of the muscle spindle input to the alpha motoneurons during various phases of open-close movements in man. To that end, subjects made rhythmic open-close movements at their natural chewing frequency. A force impulse (5 N, 10 ms), eliciting a jaw-jerk reflex, was unexpectedly applied. The impulse was applied to the mandible at 8 different phases during an open-close cycle, but only 1 impulse per cycle. Jaw movement and surface EMG of the masseter and temporal muscles on both sides were recorded during 3 cycles without an impulse and 3 succeeding cycles with an impulse. To examine whether the modulation of the mandibular stretch reflex sensitivity depends on the food resistance, we applied an additional external force on the mandible, counteracting closing of the jaw each cycle. Two experimental sessions were performed in random order, i.e., without force and with an additional force of 20 N. We observed pronounced reflexes at the onset of jaw closing, during the closing phase, and at occlusion. No or only weak jaw-jerk reflexes were present during jaw opening. The reflex amplitudes at occlusion were larger when an external force was present. This increase in reflex amplitude may be the result of an adjusted gamma motoneuron activity, from pre-motor inhibition, or from both. The reflex amplitudes elicited during jaw closing were not correlated with the phase of the movement.

  17. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles A A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  18. Toward reflexive climate adaptation research

    DOE PAGES

    Preston, Benjamin L.; Rickards, Lauren; Fünfgeld, Hartmut; ...

    2015-06-22

    Climate adaptation research is expanding very quickly within an increasingly reflexive society where the relationship between academia and other social institutions is in a state of flux. Tensions exist between the two dominant research orientations of research about and research for adaptation. In particular, the research community is challenged to develop processes for successfully executing transdisciplinary research for adaptation when academic institutions and researchers are largely structured around traditional, disciplinary expertise and funding models. One tool for helping to manage this tension is a third, more reflexive, orientation toward adaptation research that is emerging in the literature. Finally, this newmore » ‘research on adaptation research’ promises to help enhance understanding of the research enterprise itself and how it can become more adaptive.« less

  19. Toward reflexive climate adaptation research

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Benjamin L.; Rickards, Lauren; Fünfgeld, Hartmut; Keenan, Rodney J.

    2015-06-22

    Climate adaptation research is expanding very quickly within an increasingly reflexive society where the relationship between academia and other social institutions is in a state of flux. Tensions exist between the two dominant research orientations of research about and research for adaptation. In particular, the research community is challenged to develop processes for successfully executing transdisciplinary research for adaptation when academic institutions and researchers are largely structured around traditional, disciplinary expertise and funding models. One tool for helping to manage this tension is a third, more reflexive, orientation toward adaptation research that is emerging in the literature. Finally, this new ‘research on adaptation research’ promises to help enhance understanding of the research enterprise itself and how it can become more adaptive.

  20. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While evidence supports efficacy of acupuncture and/or dry needling in treating musculoskeletal pain, it is unclear which needling method is most effective. This study aims to determine the effects of depth of needle penetration on muscle pain. Methods A total of 22 healthy volunteers performed repeated eccentric contractions to induce muscle soreness in their extensor digital muscle. Subjects were assigned randomly to four groups, namely control group, skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle), muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and non-segmental group (depth of 10 mm: the anterior tibial muscle). Pressure pain threshold and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured at a point 20 mm distal to the maximum tender point on the second day after the exercise. Results Pressure pain thresholds of skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) were significantly higher than the control group, whereas the electrical pain threshold at fascia of muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) was a significantly higher than control group; however, there was no significant difference between the control and other groups. Conclusion The present study shows that acupuncture stimulation of muscle increases the PPT and EPT of fascia. The depth of needle penetration is important for the relief of muscle pain. PMID:21696603

  1. Heterosynaptic long-term depression of craniofacial nociception: divergent effects on pain perception and blink reflex in man.

    PubMed

    Yekta, Sareh Said; Lamp, Susanne; Ellrich, Jens

    2006-04-01

    Noxious low-frequency stimulation (LFS) of presynaptic nerve fibers induces long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission. In vitro studies suggest a sole homosynaptic effect. Consequently, the present study addressed the hypothesis that LTD of craniofacial nociception in man is mediated by a homosynaptic mechanism. Nociceptive supraorbital afferents were excited by electric pulses via a concentric electrode in ten healthy volunteers. The electrically evoked bilateral blink reflex (BR) was recorded from both orbicularis oculi muscles by surface electrodes. The BR was evoked in blocks of ten electric stimuli each (0.1 Hz) with an interblock interval of 8 min. Conditioning noxious LFS (1 Hz, 20 min) was applied via concentric electrode either to the same site as BR test stimuli (ipsilateral) or to the corresponding contralateral forehead area (contralateral). LFS and test stimulus intensities corresponded to about threefold the pain threshold. After three baseline stimulus blocks, either conditioning ipsilateral or contralateral LFS were applied or stimulation was interrupted for 20 min as a control task. Afterwards, test stimulation blocks were continued for 40 min. Each volunteer participated in all three sessions on different days. Noxious LFS induced LTD of the BR independently from the side of conditioning stimulation. Pain perception decreased after ipsilateral LFS but not after contralateral LFS. The bilateral effect of noxious LFS on the BR provides evidence for heterosynaptic LTD based on bilateral projections of supraorbital nerve afferents onto spinal trigeminal nuclei. The divergent effect on pain perception may be due to a preferential contralateral projection of nociceptive afferents onto reflex interneurons but not onto trigeminothalamic projection neurons.

  2. Leg muscle activation during gait in Parkinson's disease: influence of body unloading.

    PubMed

    Dietz, V; Leenders, K L; Colombo, G

    1997-10-01

    The effect of body unloading (75, 50 and 25% of body weight) on upper and lower leg muscle activation during stepping on a treadmill was investigated in groups of patients with Parkinson's disease and age-matched healthy subjects. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that impaired extensor load receptor function exists in the patients. A strong load sensitivity was found for the gastrocnemius (GM) electromyographic (EMG) activity (i.e. EMG amplitude decreased with unloading during stepping in both groups of subjects). The change in the EMG amplitude of the rectus femoris was less dependent upon the load but was observed to be more pronounced in the patients. Upper and lower leg flexor muscles were relatively load-insensitive. The absolute GM EMG amplitude during the stance phase of stepping with normal body loading was significantly smaller in the patients than in the healthy subjects. It is suggested that the latter observation is due to a change in the threshold or bias of the extensor load reflex mechanism in the patients. The slope or gain of this reflex appears to be preserved.

  3. Effects of aromatic solvents on acoustic reflexes mediated by central auditory pathways.

    PubMed

    Campo, Pierre; Maguin, Katy; Lataye, Robert

    2007-10-01

    From previous in vivo investigations, it has been shown that toluene can mimic the effects of cholinergic receptor antagonists and may thereby modify the response of protective acoustic reflexes. The current study aimed to define the relative effects of aromatic solvents on the middle ear and inner ear acoustic reflexes. Toward this end, the cochlear microphonic (CMP) elicited with a band noise centered at 4 kHz, and the compound action potential (CAP) elicited with 4-kHz tone pips was measured in rats. Both potentials were recorded before, during, and after triggering the protective reflexes by a 110-dB SPL contralateral octave band noise centered at 12.5 kHz (12.5 kHz-OBN). In several rats, the middle ear muscles were severed to identify the relative effects of toluene on the two reflexes. While the reflex elicitor was capable of decreasing both the CMP and CAP amplitudes, an injection of 116.2 mM toluene cancelled this suppressor effect induced by the contralateral sound. In the rats with nonfunctional middle ear muscles, a solvent injection did not modify the electrophysiological responses of the cochlea. Different solvents were tested to study the relationship of the chemical structure of the solvents on the acoustic reflexes. The present study showed that aromatic solvents can inhibit the action of the middle ear reflex by their anticholinergic effect on the efferent motoneurons. An aromatic nucleus and the presence of one side chain of no more than 3 C seem to be required in the solvent structure to inhibit the efferent motoneurons.

  4. Artificial balancer - supporting device for postural reflex.

    PubMed

    Wojtara, Tytus; Sasaki, Makoto; Konosu, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Masashi; Shimoda, Shingo; Alnajjar, Fady; Kimura, Hidenori

    2012-02-01

    The evolutionarily novel ability to keep ones body upright while standing or walking, the human balance, deteriorates in old age or can be compromised after accidents or brain surgeries. With the aged society, age related balance problems are on the rise. Persons with balance problems are more likely to fall during their everyday life routines. Especially in elderly, falls can lead to bone fractures making the patient bedridden, weakening the body and making it more prone to other diseases. Health care expenses for a fall patient are often very high. There is a great deal of research being done on exoskeletons and power assists. However, these technologies concentrate mainly on the amplifications of human muscle power while balance has to be provided by the human themself. Our research has been focused on supporting human balance in harmony with the human's own posture control mechanisms such as postural reflexes. This paper proposes an artificial balancer that supports human balance through acceleration of a flywheel attached to the body. Appropriate correcting torques are generated through our device based on the measurements of body deflections. We have carried out experiments with test persons standing on a platform subject to lateral perturbations and ambulatory experiments while walking on a balance beam. These experiments have demonstrated the effectiveness of our device in supporting balance and the possibility of enhancing balance-keeping capability in human beings through the application of external torque.

  5. Quantification of neural reflex and muscular intrinsic contributions to parkinsonian rigidity.

    PubMed

    Xia, RuiPing; Muthumani, Anburaj; Mao, Zhi-Hong; Powell, Douglas W

    2016-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by rigidity, bradykinesia, resting tremor, and postural instability. Rigidity, defined as an increased resistance to passive movement of a joint, progresses faster than other motor signs in PD. Rigidity is attributable to both exaggerated neural reflex and altered muscle mechanical properties. However, little is known about the contributions of individual components to rigidity. Further, there is no evidence regarding the effects of dopaminergic medication on individual components. Objectives of this study were to quantify the contributions of neural reflexes and intrinsic muscle properties to rigidity and investigate the effects of medication on each contributing component. Joint torque and muscle activities of the wrist in 14 patients and 14 controls were measured during externally induced movements. Each subject with PD was tested in Off- and On-medication states. A system identification technique was applied to differentiate and quantify the neural reflex and intrinsic mechanical components. A mixed model of ANOVA was performed to compare the differences between the two components of rigidity for both groups, and to compare between the Off- and On-medication states for patients. The results showed that reflex and intrinsic components are comparable (p > 0.05), and both are enhanced in subjects with PD than in the controls (p < 0.05). Medication decreased the reflex component of rigidity (p < 0.01). It is concluded that both reflex and intrinsic factors are responsible for rigidity. Present findings are clinically significant as they may provide guidance in development of effective therapeutic interventions.

  6. Stretch Reflex as a Simple Measure to Evaluate the Efficacy of Potential Flight Countermeasures Using the Bed Rest Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerisano, J. M.; Reschke, M. F.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Harm, D. L.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spaceflight is acknowledged to have significant effects on the major postural muscles. However, it has been difficult to separate the effects of ascending somatosensory changes caused by the unloading of these muscles during flight from changes in sensorimotor function caused by a descending vestibulo-cerebellar response to microgravity. It is hypothesized that bed rest is an adequate model to investigate postural muscle unloading given that spaceflight and bed rest may produce similar results in both nerve axon and muscle tissue. METHODS: To investigate this hypothesis, stretch reflexes were measured on 18 subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 deg at a peak velocity of approximately 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender and compared with spaceflight data. RESULTS: Although no gender differences were found, bed rest induced changes in reflex latency and CV similar to the ones observed during spaceflight. Also, a relationship between CV and loss of muscle strength in the lower leg was observed for most bed rest subjects. CONCLUSION: Even though bed rest (limb unloading) alone may not mimic all of the synaptic and muscle tissue loss that is observed as a result of spaceflight, it can serve as a working analog of flight for the evaluation of potential countermeasures that may be beneficial in mitigating unwanted changes in the major postural muscles that are observed post flight.

  7. A survey of spinal dorsal horn neurones encoding the spatial organization of withdrawal reflexes in the rat.

    PubMed

    Schouenborg, J; Weng, H R; Kalliomäki, J; Holmberg, H

    1995-01-01

    The withdrawal reflex pathways to hindlimb muscles have an elaborate spatial organization in the rat. In short, the distribution of sensitivity within the cutaneous receptive field of a single muscle has a spatial pattern that is a mirror image of the spatial pattern of the withdrawal of the skin surface ensuing on contraction in the respective muscle. In the present study, a search for neurones encoding the specific spatial input-output relationship of withdrawal reflexes to single muscles was made in the lumbosacral spinal cord in halothane/nitrous oxide-anaesthetized rats. The cutaneous receptive fields of 147 dorsal horn neurones in the L4-5 segments receiving a nociceptive input and a convergent input from A and C fibres from the hindpaw were studied. The spatial pattern of the response amplitude within the receptive fields of 118 neurones was quantitatively compared with those of withdrawal reflexes to single muscles. Response patterns exhibiting a high similarity to those of withdrawal reflexes to single muscles were found in 27 neurones located in the deep dorsal horn. Twenty-six of these belonged to class 2 (responding to tactile and nociceptive input) and one belonged to class 3 (responding only to nociceptive input). None of the neurones tested (n = 20) with reflex-like response patterns could be antidromically driven from the upper cervical cord, suggesting that they were spinal interneurones. With some overlap, putative interneurones of the withdrawal reflexes to the plantar flexors of the digits, the plantar flexors of the ankle, the pronators, the dorsiflexors of the ankle, and a flexor of the knee, were found in succession in a mediolateral direction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Effects of Bed Rest on Conduction Velocity of the Triceps Surae Stretch Reflex and Postural Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Wood, S. J.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Esteves, J. T.; Taylor, L. C.; DeDios, Y. E.; Harm, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite rigorous exercise and nutritional management during space missions, astronauts returning from microgravity exhibit neuromuscular deficits and a significant loss in muscle mass in the postural muscles of the lower leg. Similar changes in the postural muscles occur in subjects participating in long-duration bed rest studies. These adaptive muscle changes manifest as a reduction in reflex conduction velocity during head-down bed rest. Because the stretch reflex encompasses both the peripheral (muscle spindle and nerve axon) and central (spinal synapse) components involved in adaptation to calf muscle unloading, it may be used to provide feedback on the general condition of neuromuscular function, and might be used to evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures aimed at preserving muscle mass and function during periods of unloading. Stretch reflexes were measured on 18 control subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 deg head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 degrees at a peak velocity of about 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender. Computerized posturography was also conducted on these same subjects before and after bed rest as part of the standard measures. Peak-to-peak sway was measured during Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) to evaluate changes in the ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Although no gender differences were found, a significant increase in reflex latency and a significant decrease in CV were observed during the bed

  9. Components of the neural circuitry of the vaginocavernosus reflex in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Yolanda; Rodríguez-Antolín, Jorge; Nicolás, Leticia; Martínez-Gómez, Margarita; Lucio, Rosa Angélica

    2010-01-10

    In mammals the mechanisms underlying female sexual and reproductive biology are poorly understood. Little attention has been paid to striated muscles and their neural regulation. The aim of the present study was to describe the components of the vaginocavernosus reflex in adult rabbits. It was found that mechanical stimulation of the glans of the clitoris and the perineal vagina induced electromyographic (EMG) responses in bulbocavernosus (Bcm) and ischiocavernosus (Icm) muscles. Unilateral and bilateral nerve transection indicated that the clitoral nerve is the main afferent path of the reflex and that it recruits ipsilateral and contralateral perineal motoneurons. Injection of horseradish peroxides-wheat germ agglutinin (HRP-WGA) into the Bcm and Icm labeled spinal motoneurons scattered in L7 and S1 segments. According to the results of this study and previous work, the elements of the vaginocavernosus reflex may be described as follows. Mechanical receptors are located in the glans clitoris and in the wall of the perineal vagina. The main afferent pathway is the clitoral nerve. It activates ipsilateral and contralateral Bcm and Icm motoneurons in lumbosacral segments. Axons of efferent neurons travel through the clitoral and ischiocavernosus nerves, and the effectors are the Bcm and Icm perineal muscles. Identification of neural components of the vaginocavernosus reflex in rabbits will allow the use of this animal as a model to assess the physiological characteristics of the perineal motoneurons as well as the contribution of the Bcm and Icm in female urogenital functions.

  10. Transcutaneous spinal cord direct current stimulation inhibits the lower limb nociceptive flexion reflex in human beings.

    PubMed

    Cogiamanian, Filippo; Vergari, Maurizio; Schiaffi, Elena; Marceglia, Sara; Ardolino, Gianluca; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2011-02-01

    Aiming at developing a new, noninvasive approach to spinal cord neuromodulation, we evaluated whether transcutaneous direct current (DC) stimulation induces long-lasting changes in the central pain pathways in human beings. A double-blind crossover design was used to investigate the effects of anodal direct current (2mA, 15min) applied on the skin overlying the thoracic spinal cord on the lower-limb flexion reflex in a group of 11 healthy volunteers. To investigate whether transcutaneous spinal cord DC stimulation (tsDCS) acts indirectly on the nociceptive reflex by modulating excitability in mono-oligosynaptic segmental reflex pathways, we also evaluated the H-reflex size from soleus muscle after tibial nerve stimulation. In our healthy subjects, anodal thoracic tsDCS reduced the total lower-limb flexion reflex area by 40.25% immediately after stimulation (T0) and by 46.9% 30min after stimulation offset (T30). When we analyzed the 2 lower-limb flexion reflex components (RII tactile and RIII nociceptive) separately, we found that anodal tsDCS induced a significant reduction in RIII area with a slight but not significant effect on RII area. After anodal tsDCS, the RIII area decreased by 27% at T0 and by 28% at T30. Both sham and active tsDCS left all the tested H-reflex variables unchanged. None of our subjects reported adverse effects after active stimulation. These results suggest that tsDCS holds promise as a tool that is complementary or alternative to drugs and invasive spinal cord electrical stimulation for managing pain. Thoracic transcutaneous direct current stimulation induces depression of nociceptive lower limb flexion reflex in human beings that persists after stimulation offset; this form of stimulation holds promise as a tool that is complementary or alternative to drugs and invasive spinal cord electrical stimulation for managing pain.

  11. Abnormal corticospinal tract modulation of the soleus H reflex in patients with pure spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Serranová, Teresa; Valls-Solé, Josep; Muñoz, Esteban; Genís, David; Jech, Robert; Seeman, Pavel

    2008-05-23

    Central motor conduction time (CMCT) is usually abnormally prolonged in leg muscles of patients with pure hereditary spastic paraparesis (PHSP). One consequence of such abnormality should be an abnormal timing in the modulation of segmental reflexes, which might be more relevant for the pathophysiology of spasticity-related gait disturbances than just the CMCT delay. We examined the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on the soleus H reflex in 13 control subjects and 11 PHSP patients using a conditioning (TMS) and test (H reflex) paradigm. Interstimulus interval (ISI) was 0-100 ms in steps of 10 ms. The amplitude of the H reflex at each interval was expressed as percentage of the control H reflex and the conditioned curves were compared between control subjects and patients. In control subjects, TMS-induced facilitation of the H reflex with two well-defined phases: early (ISIs 10 and 20 ms) and late (ISIs 70-90 ms). In patients, the early phase of facilitation was significantly reduced, while there was facilitation at 40 ms that was not present in control subjects. However, neither the characteristics of the MEP nor the differential modulation of the H reflex correlated significantly with clinical measures of motor dysfunction. Our results indicate an abnormal effect of TMS on the H reflex in PHSP patients. This suggests that the excitability of interneurons and soleus motoneurons is not modified in tune with the arrival of descending inputs. Desynchronization of the descending volley may contribute to both the lack of early facilitation and the presence of abnormal facilitatory phases.

  12. Role of the flocculus of the cerebellum in motor learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highstein, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Structure-function studies at the systems level are an effective method for understanding the relationship of the central nervous system to behavior. Motor learning or adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex is a clear example wherein this approach has been productive. During a vestibulo-ocular reflex the brain converts a head velocity signal, transduced through the vestibular semicircular canals, into an eye movement command delivered to the extraocular muscles. If the viewed target remains on the fovea of the retina, the reflex is compensatory, and its gain, eye velocity/head velocity, is one. When the image of the viewed object slips across the retina, visual acuity decreases, and the gain of the reflex, which is no longer one, is plastically adapted or adjusted until retinal stability is restored. The anatomic substrate for this plasticity thus involves brain structures in which visual-vestibular interaction can potentially occur, as well as vestibular and visual sensory and oculomotor motor structures. Further, it has been known for many years that removal of the flocculus of the cerebellum permanently precludes further vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation, demonstrating the involvement of the cerebellum in this behavior. Maekawa and Simpson (J Neurophysiol 1973;36: 649-66) discovered that one visual input to the flocculus involved the accessory optic system and the inferior olive. Ensuing work has demonstrated that the visual signals used to adapt the vestibulo-ocular reflex are transmitted by this accessory optic system to the flocculus and subsequently to brain stem structures involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex plasticity. Presently the inclusive list of anatomic sites involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex circuitry and its adaptive plasticity is small. Our laboratory continues to believe that this behavior should be caused by interactions within this small class of neurons. By studying each class of identified neuron and its interactions with others within

  13. Muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  14. Acute Effects of Kinesio Taping on Knee Extensor Peak Torque and Stretch Reflex in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Simon S.; Yeung, Ella W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Kinesio Tex tape (KT) is used to prevent and treat sports-related injuries and to enhance muscle performance. It has been proposed that the direction of taping may either facilitate or inhibit the muscle by having different effects on cutaneous receptors that modulate excitability of the motor neurons. This study had 2 goals. First, we wished to determine if KT application affects muscle performance and if the method of application facilitates or inhibits muscle performance. This was assessed by measuring isokinetic knee extension peak torque in the knee extensor. Second, we assessed neurological effects of taping on the excitability of the motor neurons by measuring the reflex latency and action potential by electromyography (EMG) in the patellar reflex. The study was a single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial with 28 healthy volunteers with no history of knee injuries. Participants received facilitative KT treatment, inhibitory KT treatment, or Hypafix taping of the knee extensor. There were significant differences in the peak torque between 3 treatments (F(2,54) = 4.873, P < 0.01). Post hoc analysis revealed that facilitative KT treatment resulted in higher knee extensor peak torque performance than inhibitory KT treatment (P = 0.036, effect size 0.26). There were, however, no significant differences in the reflex latency (F(2,54) = 2.84, P = 0.067) nor in the EMG values (F(2,54) = 0.18, P = 0.837) in the patellar reflex between the 3 taping applications. The findings suggest that the direction of KT application over the muscle has specific effects on muscle performance. Given the magnitude of effect is small, interpretation of clinical significance should be considered with caution. The underlying mechanism warrants further investigation. PMID:26825916

  15. Influence of lower body negative pressure release on soleus H reflex, respiratory sensations and reflexes in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ashima; Raj, Hans; Gupta, Uday A; Srivastava, Niraj

    2010-09-30

    Using a physiological model of acutely increasing venous return into the lungs, i.e. by applying and then releasing lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to mimic the natural stimulus of juxtapulmonary capillary (J) or pulmonary C fibre receptors, produced an immediate and significant reduction in the amplitude of the Hoffman (H) reflex by 81±4% (P=0.001) in a majority of subjects 70% (n=5). Accompanying this was a notable change in the respiratory pattern with tidal volume (V(T)) increasing in all subjects from (mean) 0.462±.038 to 0.777±.061l/min (P=0.001) and the respiratory rate (F(R)) in 40% from 14±1 to 24±0.8 breaths/min. A feeling of pressure in throat, upper chest was reported by all and a shortness of breath-by 70% of the subjects. These were similar in nature to the respiratory sensations felt with threshold doses of intravenous lobeline, a well-established chemical stimulant of J receptors. All effects lasted for 15-20s and within a minute the parameters resumed their earlier control values. In animals, respiratory augmentation and locomotion inhibition are well-established reflexes of J receptors - this simultaneous though transitory reduction in H reflex amplitude reflecting change in the excitability of the motoneurone pool and appearance of respiratory effects, is the first demonstration in human subjects of the two reflexes appearing in response to a sudden increase in pulmonary blood flow that mimics the natural stimulus of these receptors.

  16. The role of reflexes in the resting tremor of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rack, P M; Ross, H F

    1986-02-01

    Forces and electromyograms were recorded from patients with Parkinson's disease during imposed joint movements. Muscles which were stretched by 3 to 5 Hz sinusoidally alternating movements often showed vigorous bursts of EMG activity whose timing established that it was a reflex response to the movement. The same movements provoke no stretch reflex response from normal subjects. When resting tremor was present the driven movements sometimes entrained it, and the bursts of EMG activity then became locked to the imposed movement. On other occasions the tremor activity continued at its own rate; EMG bursts then occurred at times unrelated to the movement, and the irregular force records reflected a conflict between the movement and the muscle activity. Tremor was most consistently entrained when a large mass of muscle was driven through a large movement at a frequency that was close to the usual tremor frequency. Tremor which involved synchronous contractions of muscles at different joints was often resistant to the effects of our imposed movements, but it could sometimes also be entrained by large movements of a single joint. When tremor was entrained by a driving movement, the EMG discharge was indistinguishable from a reflex response, and the limb exerted forces on the machinery which had the timing and magnitude that would be expected of a reflex response. Spontaneous tremor in the same subjects had frequencies which altered in the predicted way with changes of mechanical load. We conclude that peripheral reflexes are more important in parkinsonian tremor than has often been supposed, although afferent activity from the moving limb probably interacts with other potentially oscillatory mechanisms.

  17. Generalized versus partial reflex seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Spina, Edoardo; Mondello, Stefania; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2014-08-01

    In this review we assess our currently available knowledge about reflex seizures with special emphasis on the difference between "generalized" reflex seizures induced by visual stimuli, thinking, praxis and language tasks, and "focal" seizures induced by startle, eating, music, hot water, somatosensory stimuli and orgasm. We discuss in particular evidence from animal, clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies supporting the concept that "generalized" reflex seizures, usually occurring in the setting of IGE, should be considered as focal seizures with quick secondary generalization. We also review recent advances in genetic and therapeutic approach of reflex seizures.

  18. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    PubMed

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project.

  19. Trigemino-cervical reflex in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Ayşegül; Uzun, Nurten; Örnek, Nurettin İrem; Ünalan, Halil; Karamehmetoğlu, Şafak Sahir; Kızıltan, Meral E

    2014-09-19

    Abnormal enhancement of polysynaptic brainstem reflexes has been previously reported in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). We aimed to investigate trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR) in SCI since it may reflect alterations in the connections of trigeminal proprioceptive system and cervical motoneurons. Consecutive 14 patients with SCI and 16 healthy subjects were included in this study. All patients were in the chronic phase. TCR was recorded over sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and splenius capitis (SC) muscles by stimulation of infraorbital nerve. We measured onset latency, amplitudes and durations of responses and compared between groups. We obtained stable responses over both muscles after one sided stimulation in healthy volunteers whereas probability of TCR was decreased in patients over both SCM (78.6% vs. 100%, p=0.050) and SC (71.4% vs. 100%, p=0.022). The absence of TCR was related to use of oral baclofen (≥50mg/day). However, when present, responses of SCI group had higher amplitudes and were more persistent. We demonstrated that TCR probability was similar to healthy subjects in SCI patients who used no or low dose oral baclofen. But it had higher amplitudes and longer durations. It was not obtained in only two patients who used oral baclofen more than 50mg/day.

  20. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  1. Structural cure for reflex syncope?

    PubMed

    Sulke, Neil; Eysenck, William; Badiani, Sveeta; Furniss, Stephen

    2016-01-20

    The ROX Coupler is a device that allows creation of a central arteriovenous anastomosis at the iliac level. The device has been shown to improve exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and is CE marked for the treatment of resistant and uncontrolled hypertension. Reflex syncope is a challenging clinical condition with limited proven therapeutic options. We describe the resolution of symptoms and tilt table response of a patient who underwent insertion of a ROX Coupler to treat hypertension, and also incidentally had pre-existing vasodepressor syncope.

  2. Effects of 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on long-latency reflexes and cortical relay time.

    PubMed

    Tataroglu, Cengiz; Sair, Ahmet; Parlaz, Ahu; Deneri, Ersin

    2011-06-01

    Long-latency reflexes (LLRs) of hand muscles include a transcortical component. Cortical relay time estimated by the subtraction of motor and somatosensory evoked potentials from LLR reflects the physiology of the central neural pathway of LLR. It is believed that 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the primary motor cortex can decrease cortical excitability for approximately 15 minutes at intracortical level. The aim of the study was to analyze LLR and cortical relay time before and after 1-Hz rTMS. Long-latency reflex and H reflex obtained from the thenar muscles by electrical stimulation of the median nerve of 16 healthy subjects. Additionally, motor evoked potentials and somatosensory evoked potentials were also recorded. Cortical relay time was calculated by the subtraction of motor evoked potential and somatosensory evoked potential latencies from LLR. These electrophysiologic recordings were performed before and after 15 minutes of 1-Hz rTMS over the motor area for the thenar muscles in the primary motor cortex. The amplitudes of LLR and motor evoked potential were significantly decreased after rTMS, but the H reflex of the thenar muscle and somatosensory evoked potentials were unchanged. The major finding of our study was a shortened duration of cortical relay time after rTMS. In conclusion, our findings suggest that the LLR of the thenar muscles has a transcortical pathway and cortical relay time that can give some information about the physiology of the intracortical pathway of LLR.

  3. A new objective method for acquisition and quantification of reflex receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Michael Brun; Manresa, José Biurrun; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2015-03-01

    The nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) is a polysynaptic spinal reflex correlated with pain perception. Assessment of this objective physiological measure constitutes the core of existing methods for quantification of reflex receptive fields (RRFs), which however still suffer from a certain degree of subjective involvement. This article proposes a strictly objective methodology for RRF quantification based on automated identification of NWR thresholds (NWR-Ts). Nociceptive withdrawal reflex thresholds were determined for 10 individual stimulation sites using an interleaved up-down staircase method. Reflexes were detected from electromyography by evaluation of interval peak z scores and application of conduction velocity analysis. Reflex receptive field areas were quantified from interpolated mappings of NWR-Ts and compared with existing RRF quantifications. A total of 3 repeated measures were performed in 2 different sessions to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the various quantifications, using coefficients of repeatability (CRs) and hypothetical sample sizes. The novel quantifications based on identification of NWR-Ts showed a similar level of reliability within and between sessions, whereas existing quantifications all demonstrated worse between-session than within-session reliability. The NWR-T-based quantifications required a smaller sample size than any of the existing RRF measures to detect a clinically relevant effect in a crossover study design involving more than 1 session. Of all measures, quantification from mapping of inversed NWR-Ts demonstrated superior reliability both within (CR, 0.25) and between sessions (CR, 0.28). The study presents a more reliable and robust quantification of the RRF to be used as biomarker of pain hypersensitivity in clinical and experimental research.

  4. Botulinum toxin injection causes hyper-reflexia and increased muscle stiffness of the triceps surae muscle in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pingel, Jessica; Wienecke, Jacob; Lorentzen, Jakob; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-12-01

    Botulinum toxin is used with the intention of diminishing spasticity and reducing the risk of development of contractures. Here, we investigated changes in muscle stiffness caused by reflex activity or elastic muscle properties following botulinum toxin injection in the triceps surae muscle in rats. Forty-four rats received injection of botulinum toxin in the left triceps surae muscle. Control measurements were performed on the noninjected contralateral side in all rats. Acute experiments were performed, 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk following injection. The triceps surae muscle was dissected free, and the Achilles tendon was cut and attached to a muscle puller. The resistance of the muscle to stretches of different amplitudes and velocities was systematically investigated. Reflex-mediated torque was normalized to the maximal muscle force evoked by supramaximal stimulation of the tibial nerve. Botulinum toxin injection caused severe atrophy of the triceps surae muscle at all time points. The force generated by stretch reflex activity was also strongly diminished but not to the same extent as the maximal muscle force at 2 and 4 wk, signifying a relative reflex hyperexcitability. Passive muscle stiffness was unaltered at 1 wk but increased at 2, 4, and 8 wk (P < 0.01). These data demonstrate that botulinum toxin causes a relative increase in reflex stiffness, which is likely caused by compensatory neuroplastic changes. The stiffness of elastic elements in the muscles also increased. The data are not consistent with the ideas that botulinum toxin is an efficient antispastic medication or that it may prevent development of contractures.

  5. Autonomic reflexes in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Lagercrantz, H; Edwards, D; Henderson-Smart, D; Hertzberg, T; Jeffery, H

    1990-01-01

    Some autonomic nervous reflexes often tested in adult medicine have been studied in 21 preterm infants (25-37 gestational weeks). The aim was to develop such tests for preterm infants and see if there were any differences in babies with recurrent apnea and bradycardia and babies who had been exposed to sympathicolytic drugs before birth. To test sympathetic nervous activity the peripheral vascular resistance was measured before and during 45 degrees of head-up tilting. To test parasympathetic nervous activity the degree of bradycardia was measured in response to cold face test (application of an ice-cube on the fore-head) and laryngeal stimulation with saline. Finally the heart rate changes after a sudden noise (85 dB) were studied as an indicator of both sympathetic and vagal activity. The peripheral resistance was found to be relatively low in these preterm infants, particularly in some infants tested at the postnatal age of about two months. Heart rate and mean blood pressure did not change during tilting, while the peripheral resistance increased significantly mainly due to lowered limb blood flow. The median decrease of the heart rate during the cold face test was 20.0% and during laryngeal receptor stimulation 23.7%. The sudden noise usually caused a biphasic heart rate response. An autonomic nervous reflex score was calculated and found to be negative (parasympathetic) in infants with recurrent prolonged apnea and bradycardia and positive in infants with clinical signs of increased sympathetic nervous activity.

  6. Excitability changes of somatic and viscero-somatic nociceptive reflexes in the decerebrate-spinal rabbit: role of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Laird, J M; de la Rubia, P G; Cervero, F

    1995-12-01

    1. Wind-up (frequency-dependent potentiation of the responses of spinal neurones to stimulation of unmyelinated afferents) and other N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated phenomena have been proposed as key mechanisms underlying persistent pain states. In this study we have compared wind-up in visceral and somatic nociceptive pathways to examine the possible contribution of these mechanisms to visceral pain and hyperalgesia. 2. Experiments were performed on thirteen decerebrate spinalized rabbits. A somato-somatic (SS) reflex (evoked by stimulating skin and muscle afferents from the L2 spinal nerve) and a viscero-somatic (VS) reflex (evoked by stimulating visceral afferents in the splanchnic nerve) were recorded from the L1 spinal nerve. The reflexes consisted of an early (A fibre) and a late (C fibre) component. 3. Conditioning trains of sixteen high intensity electrical stimuli at 1 Hz were applied to the somatic or visceral nerve. These conditioning stimuli did not produce wind-up in the early component of either reflex but evoked powerful wind-up in the late SS reflex (mean percentage of baseline +/- S.E.M., 191 +/- 30%). In contrast wind-up was weak or absent in the late VS reflex (mean percentage of baseline +/- S.E.M., 21 +/- 6%). Conditioning of somatic afferents facilitated both the early and late SS reflex but strongly depressed the early and late VS reflex. Conditioning of visceral afferents had little effect on the early SS reflex, but depressed the early VS reflex and the late components of both reflexes. 4. Intravenous administration (1-10 mg kg-1) of the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine dose-dependently inhibited the strong wind-up in the late SS reflex and the weak wind-up in the late VS reflex, but also dose-dependently inhibited the early and late components of both baseline reflexes. 5. We conclude that neural mechanisms other than wind-up may underlie the development of visceral pain and hyperalgesia. The present results emphasize the

  7. Presynaptic modulation of spinal reflexes.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Quevedo, J; Eguibar, J R

    1993-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that independent sets of interneurons mediate presynaptic inhibition of primary and secondary muscle spindles and of tendon organ afferents. There is also evidence that the information which flows through different intraspinal collaterals of a single muscle spindle or tendon organ afferent fiber is selectively affected by electrical stimulation of the motor cortex. These studies suggest that presynaptic inhibition plays an important role in the selection of the sensory signals required for the execution of a specific motor task.

  8. The grasp and other primitive reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Schott, J; Rossor, M

    2003-01-01

    Primitive reflexes are typically present in childhood, suppressed during normal development, and may reappear with diseases of the brain, particularly those affecting the frontal lobes. In this review we discuss some historical aspects surrounding these reflexes, how they might be elicited and interpreted, and their potential clinical utility in modern neurological practice. PMID:12700289

  9. Creating a Complex Schedule with "REFLEX."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kren, George M.; Christakes, George

    1991-01-01

    Discusses "REFLEX," a software package for scheduling. Explores the program's applications in preparing a departmental class schedule. Explains that "REFLEX" includes a filter function and some attributes of a spreadsheet but lacks the ability to interact with other databases. Concludes that the program can make scheduling…

  10. Reflex wind-up in early chronic spinal injury: plasticity of motor outputs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Michael D; Frigon, Alain; Hurteau, Marie-France; Cain, Charlette; Heckman, Charles J

    2017-03-01

    In this study we evaluate temporal summation (wind-up) of reflexes in select distal and proximal hindlimb muscles in response to repeated stimuli of the distal tibial or superficial peroneal nerves in cats 1 month following complete spinal transection. This report is a continuation of our companion paper on reflex wind-up in the intact and acutely spinalized cat. To evaluate reflex wind-up in both studies we recorded EMG signals from the following left hindlimb muscles: lateral gastrocnemius (LG), tibialis anterior (TA), semitendinosus (ST) and sartorius (Srt) in response to 10 electrical pulses to the tibial or superficial peroneal nerves. Two distinct components of the reflex responses were considered, a short latency compound action potential (CAP) and a longer duration bout of sustained activity (SA). These two response types were shown to be differentially modified by acute spinal injury in our companion paper (Frigon, Johnson et al. 2012). We show that these responses exhibit continued plasticity during the 1-month recovery period following acute spinalization. During this early chronic phase, wind-up of SA responses returned to pre-injury levels in one muscle, the ST, but remained depressed in all other muscles tested. In contrast CAP response amplitudes, which were initially potentiated following acute transection, returned to pre-injury levels in all muscles except for Srt, which continued to show marked increase. These findings illustrate that spinal elements exhibit considerable plasticity during the recovery process following spinal injury and highlight the importance of considering SA and CAP responses as distinct phenomena with unique underlying neural mechanisms.

  11. Repetitive jumping and sprinting until exhaustion alters hamstring reflex responses and tibial translation in males and females.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Wassermann, Franziska; Plewka, Antje; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries is considerably higher in females than in males and the underlying mechanisms are still under debate. Research indicates that the neuromuscular system of females and males might respond differently to the same fatigue protocol due to differences in muscle activation during movement tasks. This study analyzed sex differences in hamstring reflex responses and posterior-anterior tibial translation (TT) before and after fatiguing exercise. We measured the isolated movement of the tibia relative to the femur as a consequence of mechanically induced TT in standing subjects as well as muscle activity of the hamstrings before and after repetitive jumping and sprinting until exhaustion. Muscle fatigue delayed reflex onset latencies in females and males. A reduction in reflex responses associated with an increased TT was observed after fatiguing exercise for both sexes. Data indicate that the used fatigue protocol altered the latency and magnitude of reflex responses as well as TT in females and males. Based on the results of previous research and the outcome of this study, it might be that sex-specific effects of fatigue on reflex activity and mechanical stability of the knee depend on the kind of fatiguing exercise.

  12. Electromyographic study of polysynaptic responses from muscles not supplied by the stimulated nerve: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Vernea, J

    1978-01-01

    15 subjects with normal neurological examinations, 7 hemiplegic patients, 5 patients with dementia and 4 with Parkinsonism were examined. A 1msec duration pulse below the pain threshold was applied to the median and ulnar nerves at the elbow and wrist. The activities of the biceps, triceps, flexor carpi radialis, forearm extensors and abductor pollicis brevis were recorded with surface electrodes. The most frequently observed response in normal subjects and hemiplegic patients occurred in the biceps, and had a latency of about 30msec. The other frequently elicited response in normal subjects and hemiplegic patients was in the forearm extensors. Recovery curves were obtained for the biceps response. A significant difference between normal subjects and hemiplegic patients was found. In the patients suffering from Parkinsonism, as well as in demented patients, one could record easily polysynpatic reflexes from other forearm muscles. This suggests the presence of basal ganglia damage in atrophic dementias.

  13. Propranolol, but not naloxone, enhances spinal reflex bladder activity and reduces pudendal inhibition in cats.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Marc J; Xiao, Zhiying; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of β-adrenergic and opioid receptors in spinal reflex bladder activity and in the inhibition induced by pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) or tibial nerve stimulation (TNS). Spinal reflex bladder contractions were induced by intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid in α-chloralose-anesthetized cats after an acute spinal cord transection (SCT) at the thoracic T9/T10 level. PNS or TNS at 5 Hz was applied to inhibit these spinal reflex contractions at 2 and 4 times the threshold intensity (T) for inducing anal or toe twitch, respectively. During a cystrometrogram (CMG), PNS at 2T and 4T significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity from 58.0 ± 4.7% to 85.8 ± 10.3% and 96.5 ± 10.7%, respectively, of saline control capacity, while TNS failed to inhibit spinal reflex bladder contractions. After administering propranolol (3 mg/kg iv, a β₁/β₂-adrenergic receptor antagonist), the effects of 2T and 4T PNS on bladder capacity were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced to 64.5 ± 9.5% and 64.7 ± 7.3%, respectively, of the saline control capacity. However, the residual PNS inhibition (about 10% increase in capacity) was still statistically significant (P < 0.05). Propranolol treatment also significantly (P = 0.0019) increased the amplitude of bladder contractions but did not change the control bladder capacity. Naloxone (1 mg/kg iv, an opioid receptor antagonist) had no effect on either spinal reflex bladder contractions or PNS inhibition. At the end of experiments, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg iv, a ganglionic blocker) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions. This study indicates an important role of β₁/β₂-adrenergic receptors in pudendal inhibition and spinal reflex bladder activity.

  14. Genioglossus reflex inhibition to upper-airway negative-pressure stimuli during wakefulness and sleep in healthy males

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Danny J; McEvoy, R Doug; George, Kate E; Thomson, Kieron J; Catcheside, Peter G

    2007-01-01

    During wakefulness, obstructive sleep apnoea patients appear to compensate for an anatomically narrow upper airway by increasing upper airway dilator muscle activity, e.g. genioglossus, at least partly via a negative-pressure reflex that may be diminished in sleep. Previous studies have assessed the negative-pressure reflex using multi-unit, rectified, moving-time-average EMG recordings during brief pulses of negative upper-airway pressure. However, moving-time averaging probably obscures the true time-related reflex morphology, potentially masking transient excitatory and inhibitory components. This study aimed to re-examine the genioglossus negative-pressure reflex in detail, without moving-time averaging. Bipolar fine-wire electrodes were inserted per orally into the genioglossus muscle in 17 healthy subjects. Two upper airway pressure catheters were inserted per nasally. Genioglossus EMG reflex responses were generated via negative-pressure stimuli (∼−10 cmH2O at the choanae, 250 ms duration) delivered during wakefulness and sleep. Ensemble-averaged, rectified, genioglossus EMG recordings demonstrated reflex activation (onset latency 26 ± 1 ms; peak amplitude 231 ± 29% of baseline) followed by a previously unreported suppression (peak latency 71 ± 4 ms; 67 ± 8% of baseline). Single-motor-unit activity, clearly identifiable in ∼10% of trials in six subjects, showed a concomitant increase in the interspike interval from baseline (26 ± 9 ms, P = 0.01). Genioglossus negative-pressure reflex morphology and amplitude of the initial peak were maintained in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep but suppression amplitude was more pronounced during NREM and declined further during REM sleep compared to wakefulness. These data indicate there are both excitatory and inhibitory components to the genioglossus negative-pressure reflex which are differentially affected by state. PMID:17395627

  15. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Danner, Simon M; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-07-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22-60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5-26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits.

  16. Aging attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The vestibular system contributes to sympathetic activation by engagement of the otolith organs. However, there is a significant loss of vestibular function with aging. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine if young and older individuals differ in their cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to otolithic stimulation (ie, head-down rotation, HDR). We hypothesized that responses to otolithic stimulation would be attenuated in older adults because of morphological and physiological alterations that occur in the vestibular system with aging. METHODS AND RESULTS: Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and head rotation were measured during HDR in 11 young (26 +/- 1 years) and 11 older (64 +/- 1 years) subjects in the prone posture. Five older subjects performed head rotation (chin to chest) in the lateral decubitus position, which simulates HDR but does not alter afferent inputs from the vestibular system. MSNA responses to HDR were significantly attenuated in older as compared with young subjects (P<0.01). MSNA increased in the older subjects by only 12 +/- 5% as compared with 85 +/- 16% in the young. Furthermore, HDR elicited significant reductions in mean arterial blood pressure in older (Delta-6 +/- 1 mm Hg; P<0.01) but not young subjects (Delta1 +/- 1 mm Hg). In contrast to HDR, head rotation performed in the lateral decubitus position did not elicit hypotension. MSNA responses to baroreceptor unloading and the cold pressor test were not different between the age groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that aging attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans and may contribute to the increased prevalence of orthostatic hypotension with age.

  17. Dynamic iso-resistive trunk extension simulation: contributions of the intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms to spinal stability.

    PubMed

    Davarani, S Zeinali; Shirazi-Adl, A; Hemami, H; Mousavi, S J; Parnianpour, M

    2007-01-01

    The effects of external resistance on the recruitment of trunk muscles and the role of intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms to ensure the spinal stability are significant issues in spinal biomechanics. A computational model of spine under the control of 48 anatomically oriented muscle actions was used to simulate iso-resistive trunk movements. Neural excitation of muscles was attained based on inverse dynamics approach along with the stability-based optimization. The effect of muscle spindle reflex response on the trunk movement stability was evaluated upon the application of a perturbation moment. In this study, the trunk extension movement at various resistance levels while extending from 60 degrees flexion to the upright posture was investigated. Incorporation of the stability condition as an additional constraint in the optimization algorithm increased antagonistic activities for all resistance levels demonstrating that the co-activation caused an increase in the intrinsic stiffness of the spine and its stability in a feed-forward manner. During the acceleration phase of the movement, extensors activity increased while flexors activity decreased in response to the higher resistance. The co-activation ratio noticed in the braking phase of the movement increased with higher resistance. In presence of a 30 Nm flexion perturbation moment, reflexive feed-back noticeably decreased the induced deviation of the velocity and position profiles from the desired ones at all resistance levels. The stability-generated co-activation decreased the reflexive response of muscle spindles to the perturbation demonstrating that both intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms contribute to the trunk stability. The rise in muscle co-activation can ameliorate the corruption of afferent neural sensory system at the expense of higher loading of the spine.

  18. Training-Specific Neural Plasticity in Spinal Reflexes after Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Susan K.; Roy, Francois D.; Gorassini, Monica A.

    2016-01-01

    The neural plasticity of spinal reflexes after two contrasting forms of walking training was determined in individuals with chronic, motor-incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Endurance Training involved treadmill walking for as long as possible, and Precision Training involved walking precisely over obstacles and onto targets overground. Twenty participants started either Endurance or Precision Training for 2 months and then crossed over after a 2-month rest period to the other form of training for 2 months. Measures were taken before and after each phase of training and rest. The cutaneomuscular reflex (CMR) during walking was evoked in the soleus (SOL) and tibialis anterior muscles by stimulating the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle. Clonus was estimated from the EMG power in the SOL during unperturbed walking. The inhibitory component of the SOL CMR was enhanced after Endurance but not Precision Training. Clonus did not change after either form of training. Participants with lower reflex excitability tended to be better walkers (i.e., faster walking speeds) prior to training, and the reduction in clonus was significantly correlated with the improvement in walking speed and distance. Thus, reflex excitability responded in a training-specific way, with the reduction in reflex excitability related to improvements in walking function. Trial registration number is NCT01765153. PMID:27725887

  19. HRS Threshold Adjustment Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skapik, Joe

    1991-07-01

    This test will determine the optimal, non-standard discriminator thresholds for the few anomalous channels on each HRS detector. A 15 second flat field observation followed by a 210 second dark count is performed at each of 10 discriminator threshold values for each detector. The result of the test will be the optimal threshold values to be entered into the PDB. Edited 4/30/91 to add comments to disable/re-enable cross-talk tables.

  20. History of the cushing reflex.

    PubMed

    Fodstad, Harald; Kelly, Patrick J; Buchfelder, Michael

    2006-11-01

    Increasing systolic and pulse pressure with bradycardia and respiratory irregularity are signs of increased intracranial pressure, leading to cerebral herniation and fatal brainstem compression. This phenomenon, the vasopressor response, is generally known as the Cushing reflex based on Harvey Cushing's experimental work in Europe in 1901 and 1902. However, similar experiments had been carried out decades earlier by others, notably Paul Cramer, Ernst von Bergmann, Ernst von Leyden, Georg Althann, Friedrich Jolly, Friedrich Pagenstecher, Henri Duret, Bernard Naunyn, and Julius Schreiber. Cushing initially failed to give credit to the work of these predecessors. Nonetheless, he studied the brain's reaction to compression more carefully than previous researchers and offered an improved explanation of the pathophysiology of the phenomenon named after him.

  1. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  2. Auditory effects on the motor responses after magnetic cortical stimulation and on the H-reflexes in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, K; Wang, Y; Shimoda, M; Shimoyama, R; Yokoyama, Y; Takahashi, K

    1994-03-01

    The effects of sound on the responses in teh abductor pollicis brevis muscle after magnetic cortical stimulation and on the H-reflexes in the wrist and finger flexor muscles were examined. Magnetic cortical stimulation and electrical stimulation eliciting H-reflexes were conditioned by sound stimulation. This sound stimulation did not produce the electromyographic response by itself. In the control subjects, sound stimulation produced an increase of the motor responses after cortical stimulation at intervals of 100, 150, 200 and 250 ms. The increase was greater in the patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In the control subjects, sound stimulation produced an increase of the H-reflexes at intervals of 50, 100, 150 and 200 ms. This H-reflex increase in the PD patients was less than in the normal subjects. The reticular system might play a role in the abnormal motor control system in PD patients.

  3. Excitability changes in human forearm corticospinal projections and spinal reflex pathways during rhythmic voluntary movement of the opposite limb

    PubMed Central

    Carson, R G; Riek, S; Mackey, D C; Meichenbaum, D P; Willms, K; Forner, M; Byblow, W D

    2004-01-01

    Rhythmic movements brought about by the contraction of muscles on one side of the body give rise to phase-locked changes in the excitability of the homologous motor pathways of the opposite limb. Such crossed facilitation should favour patterns of bimanual coordination in which homologous muscles are engaged simultaneously, and disrupt those in which the muscles are activated in an alternating fashion. In order to examine these issues, we obtained responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), to stimulation of the cervicomedullary junction (cervicomedullary-evoked potentials, CMEPs), to peripheral nerve stimulation (H-reflexes and f-waves), and elicited stretch reflexes in the relaxed right flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle during rhythmic (2 Hz) flexion and extension movements of the opposite (left) wrist. The potentials evoked by TMS in right FCR were potentiated during the phases of movement in which the left FCR was most strongly engaged. In contrast, CMEPs were unaffected by the movements of the opposite limb. These results suggest that there was systematic variation of the excitability of the motor cortex ipsilateral to the moving limb. H-reflexes and stretch reflexes recorded in right FCR were modulated in phase with the activation of left FCR. As the f-waves did not vary in corresponding fashion, it appears that the phasic modulation of the H-reflex was mediated by presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents. The observation that both H-reflexes and f-waves were depressed markedly during movements of the opposite indicates that there may also have been postsynaptic inhibition or disfacilitation of the largest motor units. Our findings indicate that the patterned modulation of excitability in motor pathways that occurs during rhythmic movements of the opposite limb is mediated primarily by interhemispheric interactions between cortical motor areas. PMID:15331684

  4. A Comparison of Total and Intrinsic Muscle Stiffness Among Flexors and Extensors of the Ankle, Knee and Elbow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Sandra M.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined 3 methods that assessed muscle stiffness. Muscle stiffness has been quantified by tissue reactive force (transverse stiffness), vibration, and force (or torque) over displacement. Muscle stiffness also has two components: reflex (due to muscle sensor activity) and intrinsic (tonic firing of motor units, elastic nature of actin and myosin cross bridges, and connective tissue). This study compared three methods of measuring muscle stiffness of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs of the ankle, knee and elbow.

  5. Selective facilitation of responses to cortical stimulation of proximal and distal arm muscles by precision tasks in man.

    PubMed

    Schieppati, M; Trompetto, C; Abbruzzese, G

    1996-03-01

    1. The responses of the first dorsal interosseus (1DI), opponens pollicis (OP), extensor digitorum communis (EDC), brachioradialis (BR), biceps brachii (BB) and anterior deltoid (AD) muscles to magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex were recorded during different motor tasks. 2. Two precision and two power isometric tasks were investigated. The precision tasks were a pincer grip ('grip') and a thrust against a target with the wrist ('push'). In the former, the prime movers were the intrinsic hand muscles, while the proximal muscles played a postural role. In the latter, the prime movers were the proximal muscles. In both tasks, force was controlled through visual feedback. The power tasks required encirclement of a cylinder with the fingers ('grasp'), or sustaining a weight suspended at wrist level ('load'). 3. Magnetic stimulation was applied in eight subjects by a coil placed over the vertex at 1.1-1.2 times the motor threshold for the most excitable muscles. This produced in the prime mover muscles larger motor-evoked responses (MEPs) during grip or push tasks than grasp or load tasks, in spite of similar background EMG levels. During grip tasks, only one of the two prime movers showed task-dependent changes. In the postural muscle AD there was no significant difference between MEPs during grip and grasp tasks; however, BB responses were larger during grasp than grip tasks. 4. MEPs simultaneously recorded in the prime movers were plotted against each other. The slope of the regression line for AD versus BB was larger in push than load tasks, whilst the changes in MEPs of 1DI and OP were independent during both grip and grasp tasks. 5. In three subjects, MEPs were also elicited by electrical stimulation during grip and grasp tasks. MEP changes tended to parallel those obtained for magnetic stimulation, but the increase in size of the electrically evoked MEPs during the precision task was smaller. 6. In all subjects the median and ulnar nerves were stimulated

  6. Soleus and vastus medialis H-reflexes: similarities and differences while standing or lying during varied knee flexion angles.

    PubMed

    Alrowayeh, Hesham N; Sabbahi, Mohamed A; Etnyre, Bruce

    2005-06-15

    The H-reflex may be a useful measure to examine the lower extremity muscles activation and inhibition following an injury. Recording the vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes in healthy subjects while standing or lying during varied knee flexion angles may establish a reference for comparison for patients with ACL injury. Vastus medialis and soleus H-reflexes were recorded from 14 healthy subjects while lying and standing during 0, 30, 45, and 60 degrees knee flexion. EMG unit was used to electrically stimulate the tibial and femoral nerves (using 0.5 ms pulses at 0.2 pps of H-maximum amplitude) and to record four traces of the soleus and vastus medialis H-wave and one trace of the M-wave peak-to-peak amplitudes. Repeated measures three-way ANOVAs were calculated with the global alpha=0.05. Results showed that (1) the average soleus H-reflex amplitude was significantly less during standing than lying across all knee flexion conditions, (2) the average vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes showed no measurable significant differences between neutral standing compared with lying, (3) the average vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes were significantly greater during standing knee flexion conditions (30, 45, and 60 degrees ) than lying or neutral standing, and (4) there were no differences between soleus and vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes during lying across all knee flexion conditions. Data from H/M ratio follow the same pattern of H-amplitude. Recording the vastus medialis H-reflex amplitude during standing and knee flexion may be a reflective of the knee function. It is more specific than the soleus H-reflex because it reflects the changes in the excitability of the quadriceps motoneurons acting directly around the knee joint.

  7. Surface electromyogram and muscle ultrasonography for detection of muscle fasciculations in pediatric peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Oguri, Masayoshi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Okazaki, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Wataru; Ohno, Koyo; Togawa, Masami; Fukuda, Chisako; Saito, Yuko; Nishino, Ichizo; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-16

    A 12-year-old girl presented with talipes equinus of both legs, attenuation of upper and lower limb tendon reflexes, thermal hyperalgesia, and reduction of vibratory sensation. On clinical examination, muscle twitches of fingers of both hands, as well as the abductor halluces and the dorsal interossei muscles of the right foot were observed. Nerve conduction velocity was significantly declined in the upper and lower extremities. Needle electromyography (EMG) was not performed; however, ultrasonography revealed repetitive, semi-regular muscle twitches lasting 0.2-0.4s, concomitant with muscle discharges on surface EMG in the right foot muscles. These findings were compatible with contraction fasciculation in muscles under chronic reinnervation. Nerve and muscle biopsies were suggestive of chronic motor, sensory, and autonomic neuropathy. This is the first case of pediatric peripheral neuropathy where muscle fasciculation was noninvasively identified by simultaneous surface EMG and ultrasonography.

  8. The Reflexes of the Fundus Oculi

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, A. J.

    1940-01-01

    The fundus reflexes reveal, in a manner not yet completely understood, the texture and contour of the reflecting surfaces and the condition of the underlying tissues. In this way they may play an important part in the biomicroscopy of the eye. The physiological reflexes are seen at their best in the eyes of young subjects, in well-pigmented eyes, with undilated pupils and with emmetropic refraction. Their absence during the first two decades, or their presence after the forties, their occurrence in one eye only, their appearance, disappearance or change of character should suggest the possibility of some pathological state. The investigation and interpretation of the reflexes are notably assisted by comparing the appearances seen with long and short wave lights such as those of the sodium and mercury vapour lamps, in addition to the usual ophthalmoscopic lights. Most of the surface reflexes disappear in the light of the sodium lamp, sometimes revealing important changes in the deeper layers of the retina and choroid. The physiological reflexes, chiefly formed on the surface of the internal limiting membrane, take the forms of the familiar watered silk or patchy reflexes, the peri-macular halo, the fan reflex in the macular depression and the reflex from the foveal pit. The watered silk or patchy reflexes often show a delicate striation which follows the pattern of the nerve-fibre layer, or there may be a granular or criss-cross texture. Reflexes which entirely lack these indications of “texture” should be considered as possibly pathological. This applies to the “beaten metal” reflexes and to those formed on the so-called hyaloid membrane. The occurrence of physiological reflexes in linear form is doubtful, and the only admittedly physiological punctate reflexes are the so-called Gunn's dots. Surface reflexes which are broken up into small points or flakes are pathological, and are most frequently seen in the central area of the fundus in cases of pigmentary

  9. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  10. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  11. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart because it controls the heartbeat. Skeletal Muscle Now, let's talk about the kind of muscle ... soccer ball into the goal. These are your skeletal muscles — sometimes called striated (say: STRY-ay-tud) muscle ...

  12. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  13. Increase in group II excitation from ankle muscles to thigh motoneurones during human standing

    PubMed Central

    Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique; Nicolas, Guillaume; Marque, Philippe; Iglesias, Caroline; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Emmanuel

    2005-01-01

    In standing subjects, we investigated the excitation of quadriceps (Q) motoneurones by muscle afferents from tibialis anterior (TA) and the excitation of semitendinosus (ST) motoneurones by muscle afferents from gastrocnemius medialis (GM). Standing with a backward lean stretches the anterior muscle pair (TA and Q) and they must be cocontracted to maintain balance. Equally, forward lean stretches the posterior muscle pair (GM and ST) and they must be cocontracted. We used these conditions of enhanced lean to increase the influence of γ static motoneurones on muscle spindle afferents, which enhances the background input from these afferents to extrafusal motoneurones. The effects of the conditioning volleys on motoneurone excitability was estimated using the modulation of the on-going rectified EMG and of the H reflex. Stimulation of afferents from TA in the deep peroneal nerve at 1.5–2 × MT (motor threshold) evoked early group I and late group II excitation of Q motoneurones. Stimulation of afferents in the GM nerve at 1.3–1.8 MT evoked only late group II excitation of ST motoneurones. The late excitation produced by the group II afferents was significantly greater when subjects were standing and leaning than when they voluntarily cocontracted the same muscle pairs at the same levels of activation. The early effect produced by the group I afferents was unchanged. We propose that this increase in excitation by group II afferents reflects a posture-related withdrawal of a tonic inhibition that is exerted by descending noradrenergic control and is specific to the synaptic actions of group II afferents. PMID:15860524

  14. Electrophysiology of the palmomental reflex in normal and parkinsonian subjects.

    PubMed

    Caccia, M R; Galimberti, V; Valla, P; Osio, M; Dezuanni, E; Mangoni, A

    1996-01-01

    The palmomental reflex (PMR), obtained by mechanical stimulation of the skin of the thenar and hypothenar eminences of the hand and recording the surface EMG response from the chin muscles homolateral and contralateral to the side of stimulation, was studied in normal subjects and in a group of akinetic parkinsonians, both de novo and treated. PMR was present in most subjects of both groups. No differences regarding the incidence of the PMR homolateral to stimulation of the thenar eminence was found between controls and patients, and it was non-habituating in both groups. When the hypothenar eminence was stimulated, the PMR was present in about half of the subjects of both groups. PMR was present contralaterally in both normal and patients, whereas bilateral PMR prevailed in parkinsonians. Latency and duration of the reflex were significantly shorter in parkinsonians than in controls. The data are discussed in the light of the pathophysiology of the PMR putative pathways in normal subjects and in Parkinson's disease.

  15. Vestibulosympathetic reflex during orthostatic challenge in aging humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monahan, Kevin D.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    Aging attenuates the increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and elicits hypotension during otolith organ engagement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to determine the neural and cardiovascular responses to otolithic engagement during orthostatic stress in older adults. We hypothesized that age-related impairments in the vestibulosympathetic reflex would persist during orthostatic challenge in older subjects and might compromise arterial blood pressure regulation. MSNA, arterial blood pressure, and heart rate responses to head-down rotation (HDR) performed with and without lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in prone subjects were measured. Ten young (27 +/- 1 yr) and 11 older subjects (64 +/- 1 yr) were studied prospectively. HDR performed alone elicited an attenuated increase in MSNA in older subjects (Delta106 +/- 28 vs. Delta20 +/- 7% for young and older subjects). HDR performed during simultaneous orthostatic stress increased total MSNA further in young (Delta53 +/- 15%; P < 0.05) but not older subjects (Delta-5 +/- 4%). Older subjects demonstrated consistent significant hypotension during HDR performed both alone (Delta-6 +/- 2 mmHg) and during LBNP (Delta-7 +/- 2 mmHg). These data provide experimental support for the concept that age-related impairments in the vestibulosympathetic reflex persist during orthostatic challenge in older adults. Furthermore, these findings are consistent with the concept that age-related alterations in vestibular function might contribute to altered orthostatic blood pressure regulation with age in humans.

  16. Reflex origin for the slowing of motoneurone firing rates in fatigue of human voluntary contractions.

    PubMed Central

    Bigland-Ritchie, B R; Dawson, N J; Johansson, R S; Lippold, O C

    1986-01-01

    During fatigue from a sustained maximal voluntary contraction (m.v.c.) the mean motoneurone discharge rates decline. In the present experiments we found no recovery of firing rates after 3 min of rest if the fatigued muscle was kept ischaemic, but near full recovery 3 min after the blood supply was restored. Since 3 min is thus sufficient time for recovery of any central changes in excitability, the results support the hypothesis that, during fatigue, motoneurone firing rates may be regulated by a peripheral reflex originating in response to fatigue-induced changes within the muscle. PMID:3560001

  17. Relationship of Postural Reflexes to Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rider, Barbara A.

    1972-01-01

    The fact that the children with learning disorders had significantly more abnormal reflexes than did the normal children lends empirical support to the theory of minimal neurological impairment as a factor in the etiology of learning disabilities. (Author)

  18. Demonstrating the Stretch Reflex: A Mechanical Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batavia, Mitchell; McDonough, Andrew L.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the concept of stretch reflexes to students using a mechanical model. The model provides a dynamic multisensory experience using movement, light, and sound. Describes the construction design. (SAH)

  19. The legacy of care as reflexive learning

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta Rodríguez; Moya, Jose Luis Medina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze whether the tutor's use of reflexive strategies encourages the students to reflect. The goal is to discover what type of strategies can help to achieve this and how tutors and students behave in the practical context. Method: a qualitative and ethnographic focus was adopted. Twenty-seven students and 15 tutors from three health centers participated. The latter had received specific training on reflexive clinical tutoring. The analysis was developed through constant comparisons of the categories. Results: the results demonstrate that the tutors' use of reflexive strategies such as didactic questioning, didactic empathy and pedagogical silence contributes to encourage the students' reflection and significant learning. Conclusions: reflexive practice is key to tutors' training and students' learning. PMID:27305180

  20. On the Second Language Acquisition of Spanish Reflexive Passives and Reflexive Impersonals by French- and English-Speaking Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Annie

    2006-01-01

    This study, a partial replication of Bruhn de Garavito (1999a; 1999b), investigates the second language (L2) acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by French- and English-speaking adults at an advanced level of proficiency. The L2 acquisition of Spanish reflexive passives and reflexive impersonals by native French and…

  1. Acute provoked reflex seizures induced by thinking.

    PubMed

    Nevler, Naomi; Gandelman-Marton, Revital

    2012-11-01

    Thinking epilepsy is a rare form of reflex epilepsy that can be induced by specific cognitive tasks, and occurs mainly in idiopathic generalized epilepsies. We report a case of complex partial seizures triggered by thinking in a young man with acute bacterial meningitis and a remote head injury. This case illustrates that thinking-induced reflex seizures can be partial and can be provoked by an acute brain insult.

  2. Triceps surae short latency stretch reflexes contribute to ankle stiffness regulation during human running.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Neil J; Carty, Christopher P; Barrett, Rod S

    2011-01-01

    During human running, short latency stretch reflexes (SLRs) are elicited in the triceps surae muscles, but the function of these responses is still a matter of controversy. As the SLR is primarily mediated by Ia afferent nerve fibres, various methods have been used to examine SLR function by selectively blocking the Ia pathway in seated, standing and walking paradigms, but stretch reflex function has not been examined in detail during running. The purpose of this study was to examine triceps surae SLR function at different running speeds using Achilles tendon vibration to modify SLR size. Ten healthy participants ran on an instrumented treadmill at speeds between 7 and 15 km/h under 2 Achilles tendon vibration conditions: no vibration and 90 Hz vibration. Surface EMG from the triceps surae and tibialis anterior muscles, and 3D lower limb kinematics and ground reaction forces were simultaneously collected. In response to vibration, the SLR was depressed in the triceps surae muscles at all speeds. This coincided with short-lasting yielding at the ankle joint at speeds between 7 and 12 km/h, suggesting that the SLR contributes to muscle stiffness regulation by minimising ankle yielding during the early contact phase of running. Furthermore, at the fastest speed of 15 km/h, the SLR was still depressed by vibration in all muscles but yielding was no longer evident. This finding suggests that the SLR has greater functional importance at slow to intermediate running speeds than at faster speeds.

  3. Group I projections from intrinsic foot muscles to motoneurones of leg and thigh muscles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Marque, Philippe; Nicolas, Guillaume; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique; Gautier, Julien; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Pierrot-Deseilligny, Emmanuel

    2001-01-01

    Group I projections from intrinsic plantar muscles to motoneurones (MNs) of human leg and thigh muscles were investigated. Changes in firing probability of single motor units (MUs) in the tibialis anterior (TA), peroneus brevis (Per brev), soleus (Sol), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), vastus lateralis (VL), semitendinosus (ST) and biceps (Bi) were studied after electrical stimuli applied to: (i) the tibial nerve (TN) at ankle level, (ii) the corresponding homonymous nerve, and (iii) the skin of the heel, to mimic the TN-induced cutaneous sensation.Homonymous facilitation, attributable to monosynaptic Ia excitation, was found in all the sampled units. Early heteronymous excitation elicited by TN stimulation was found in many MUs. Later effects (3–5 ms central delay) were bigger and more frequently observed: excitation in most TA and Per brev MUs, and inhibition in most Sol, GM and Bi MUs and in many ST and VL MUs. The low threshold (∼0.5–0.6 × motor threshold) and the inability of a pure cutaneous stimulation to reproduce these effects (except the late excitation in TA MUs) indicate that they were due to stimulation of group I muscle afferents.The early excitation was accepted to be monosynaptic when its central delay differed from that of the homonymous Ia excitation by less than 0.5 ms. Such a significant TN-induced monosynaptic Ia excitation was found in MUs belonging to all leg and thigh motor nuclei tested. Although its mean strength was relatively weak, it is argued that these monosynaptic connections might affect already depolarized MNs.The late excitation found in TA and Per brev MUs is argued to be mediated through interneurones located rostral to MNs.The late suppression, found in most Sol, GM and Bi MUs, and in many ST and VL MUs, was the dominant effect. It was accompanied by an inhibition of the Sol and quadriceps H reflexes at rest, and therefore reflects an inhibition directed to MNs. Its long latency is argued to reflect transmission by

  4. Spinal manipulation results in immediate H-reflex changes in patients with unilateral disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Floman, Y; Liram, N; Gilai, A N

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this clinical investigation was to determine whether the abnormal H-reflex complex present in patients with S1 nerve root compression due to lumbosacral disc herniation is improved by single-session lumbar manipulation. Twenty-four patients with unilateral disc herniation at the L5-S1 level underwent spinal H-reflex electro-physiological evaluation. This was carried out before and after single-session lumbar manipulation in the side-lying position. Eligibility criteria for inclusion in the study were: predominant sciatica, no motor or sphincteric involvement, unilateral disc herniation at the L5-S1 level on CT or MR imaging, age between 20 and 50 years. H-reflex responses were recorded bilaterally from the gastrosoleous muscle following stimulation of tibial sensory fibers in the popliteal fossa. H-reflex amplitude in millivolts (HR-A) and H-reflex latency in milliseconds (HR-L) were measured from the spinal reflex response. Pre- and post-manipulation measurements were compared between the affected side and the healthy side. Statistical evaluation was performed by the Wilcoxon matched-pairs test (SPSS). Thirteen patients displayed abnormal H-reflex parameters prior to lumbar manipulation, indicating an S1 nerve root lesion. The mean amplitude was found to be significantly lower on the side of disc herniation than on the normal, healthy side (P = 0.0037). Following manipulation, the abnormal HR-A increased significantly on the affected side while the normal HR-A on the healthy side remained unchanged (P = 0.0045). There was a significant difference between latencies on the affected side and those on the healthy side (P = 0.003). Following manipulation there was a trend toward decreased HR-L. However, this trend did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.3877). Eight patients displayed no H-reflex abnormalities before or after manipulation. Their respective HR-A and HR-L values did not change significantly following manipulation. Three additional

  5. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles.

    PubMed

    Smilde, Hiltsje A; Vincent, Jake A; Baan, Guus C; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Cope, Tim C; Maas, Huub

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles.

  6. [How I investigate...respiratory muscle disorders].

    PubMed

    Lehance, C; Close, P; Bury, Th

    2004-01-01

    As for other skeletal muscles, ventilatory muscle performance can be described in terms of strength and endurance. Ventilatory muscle strength is measured, for example, as the maximum inspiratory and expiratory mouth pressures. It is now a routine procedure in many pulmonary function laboratories. Measurements of ventilatory muscle endurance are more difficult but two general types of tests are used: maximum voluntary ventilation and inspiratory threshold loading.

  7. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  8. Double Photoionization Near Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehlitz, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The threshold region of the double-photoionization cross section is of particular interest because both ejected electrons move slowly in the Coulomb field of the residual ion. Near threshold both electrons have time to interact with each other and with the residual ion. Also, different theoretical models compete to describe the double-photoionization cross section in the threshold region. We have investigated that cross section for lithium and beryllium and have analyzed our data with respect to the latest results in the Coulomb-dipole theory. We find that our data support the idea of a Coulomb-dipole interaction.

  9. Elbow spasticity during passive stretch-reflex: clinical evaluation using a wearable sensor system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spasticity is a prevalent chronic condition among persons with upper motor neuron syndrome that significantly impacts function and can be costly to treat. Clinical assessment is most often performed with passive stretch-reflex tests and graded on a scale, such as the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS). However, these scales are limited in sensitivity and are highly subjective. This paper shows that a simple wearable sensor system (angle sensor and 2-channel EMG) worn during a stretch-reflex assessment can be used to more objectively quantify spasticity in a clinical setting. Methods A wearable sensor system consisting of a fibre-optic goniometer and 2-channel electromyography (EMG) was used to capture data during administration of the passive stretch-reflex test for elbow flexor and extensor spasticity. A kinematic model of unrestricted passive joint motion was used to extract metrics from the kinematic and EMG data to represent the intensity of the involuntary reflex. Relationships between the biometric results and clinical measures (MAS, isometric muscle strength and passive range of motion) were explored. Results Preliminary results based on nine patients with varying degrees of flexor and extensor spasticity showed that kinematic and EMG derived metrics were strongly correlated with one another, were correlated positively (and significantly) with clinical MAS, and negatively correlated (though mostly non-significant) with isometric muscle strength. Conclusions We conclude that a wearable sensor system used in conjunction with a simple kinematic model can capture clinically relevant features of elbow spasticity during stretch-reflex testing in a clinical environment. PMID:23782931

  10. Gravity and Neuronal Adaptation. Neurophysiology of Reflexes from Hypo- to Hypergravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Krause, Anne; Freyler, Kathrin; Gollhofer, Albert

    2017-02-01

    Introduction: For interplanetary and orbital missions in human space flight, knowledge about the gravity-sensitivity of the central nervous system (CNS) is required. The objective of this study was to assess neurophysiological correlates in variable hetero gravity conditions in regard to their timing and shaping. Methods: In ten subjects, peripheral nerve stimulation was used to elicit H-reflexes and M-waves in the M. soleus in Lunar, Martian, Earth and hypergravity. Gravity-dependencies were described by means of reflex latency, inter-peak-interval, duration, stimulation threshold and maximal amplitudes. Experiments were executed during the CNES/ESA/DLR JEPPFs. Results: H-reflex latency, inter-peak-interval and duration decreased with increasing gravitation (P<0.05); likewise, M-wave inter-peak-interval was diminished and latency prolonged with increasing gravity (P<0.05). Stimulation threshold of H-reflexes and M-waves decreased (P<0.05) while maximal amplitudes increased with an increase in gravitation (P<0.05). Conclusion: Adaptations in neurophysiological correlates in hetero gravity are associated with a shift in timing and shaping. For the first time, our results indicate that synaptic and axonal nerve conduction velocity as well as axonal and spinal excitability are diminished with reduced gravitational forces on the Moon and Mars and gradually increased when gravitation is progressively augmented up to hypergravity. Interrelated with the adaptation in threshold we conclude that neuronal circuitries are significantly affected by gravitation. As a consequence, movement control and countermeasures may be biased in extended space missions involving transitions between different force environments.

  11. Gravity and Neuronal Adaptation - Neurophysiology of Reflexes from Hypo- to Hypergravity Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritzmann, Ramona; Krause, Anne; Freyler, Kathrin; Gollhofer, Albert

    2016-10-01

    Introduction: For interplanetary and orbital missions in human space flight, knowledge about the gravity-sensitivity of the central nervous system (CNS) is required. The objective of this study was to assess neurophysiological correlates in variable hetero gravity conditions in regard to their timing and shaping. Methods: In ten subjects, peripheral nerve stimulation was used to elicit H-reflexes and M-waves in the M. soleus in Lunar, Martian, Earth and hypergravity. Gravity-dependencies were described by means of reflex latency, inter-peak-interval, duration, stimulation threshold and maximal amplitudes. Experiments were executed during the CNES/ESA/DLR JEPPFs. Results: H-reflex latency, inter-peak-interval and duration decreased with increasing gravitation (P<0.05); likewise, M-wave inter-peak-interval was diminished and latency prolonged with increasing gravity (P<0.05). Stimulation threshold of H-reflexes and M-waves decreased (P<0.05) while maximal amplitudes increased with an increase in gravitation (P<0.05). Conclusion: Adaptations in neurophysiological correlates in hetero gravity are associated with a shift in timing and shaping. For the first time, our results indicate that synaptic and axonal nerve conduction velocity as well as axonal and spinal excitability are diminished with reduced gravitational forces on the Moon and Mars and gradually increased when gravitation is progressively augmented up to hypergravity. Interrelated with the adaptation in threshold we conclude that neuronal circuitries are significantly affected by gravitation. As a consequence, movement control and countermeasures may be biased in extended space missions involving transitions between different force environments.

  12. Increased spinal reflex excitability is associated with enhanced central activation during voluntary lengthening contractions in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyosub E; Corcos, Daniel M; Hornby, T George

    2015-07-01

    This study of chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) subjects investigated patterns of central motor drive (i.e., central activation) of the plantar flexors using interpolated twitches, and modulation of soleus H-reflexes during lengthening, isometric, and shortening muscle actions. In a recent study of the knee extensors, SCI subjects demonstrated greater central activation ratio (CAR) values during lengthening (i.e., eccentric) maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), compared with during isometric or shortening (i.e., concentric) MVCs. In contrast, healthy controls demonstrated lower lengthening CAR values compared with their isometric and shortening CARs. For the present investigation, we hypothesized SCI subjects would again produce their highest CAR values during lengthening MVCs, and that these increases in central activation were partially attributable to greater efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission during muscle lengthening following SCI. Results show SCI subjects produced higher CAR values during lengthening vs. isometric or shortening MVCs (all P < 0.001). H-reflex testing revealed normalized H-reflexes (maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratios) were greater for SCI than controls during passive (P = 0.023) and active (i.e., 75% MVC; P = 0.017) lengthening, suggesting facilitation of Ia transmission post-SCI. Additionally, measures of spinal reflex excitability (passive lengthening maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratio) in SCI were positively correlated with soleus electromyographic activity and CAR values during lengthening MVCs (both P < 0.05). The present study presents evidence that patterns of dynamic muscle activation are altered following SCI, and that greater central activation during lengthening contractions is partly due to enhanced efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission.

  13. Quantitative Pilomotor Axon-Reflex Test – A Novel Test of Pilomotor Function

    PubMed Central

    Siepmann, T.; Gibbons, C. H.; Illigens, B. M.; Lafo, J. A.; Brown, C. M.; Freeman, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cutaneous autonomic function can be quantified by the assessment of sudomotor and vasomotor responses. Although piloerector muscles are innervated by the sympathetic nervous system, there are, at present, no methods to quantify pilomotor function. This study aims to quantify piloerection using phenylephrine in humans. Design Pilot study. Setting Hospital based study. Participants Twenty-two healthy volunteers (18 males, 4 females) aged 24–48 years participated in several studies. Interventions Piloerection was stimulated by iontophoresis of 1% phenylephrine. Silicone impressions of piloerection were quantified by number and area. The direct and indirect response to phenylephrine iontophoresis was compared on both forearms, after pretreatment to topical and subcutaneous lidocaine and iontophoresis of normal saline. Results Iontophoresis of phenylephrine induced piloerection in both the direct and axon-reflex mediated regions with similar responses in both arms. Topical lidocaine blocked axon-reflex mediated piloerection post-iontophoresis (control 66.6±19.2 impressions vs. lidocaine 7.2±4.3 impressions; P<0.001). Subcutaneous lidocaine completely blocked piloerection. The area of axon-reflex mediated piloerection was also attenuated in the lidocaine treated region post-iontophoresis (46.2±16.1 cm2 vs. 7.2±3.9 cm2, P<0.0001). Piloerection was delayed in the axon-reflex region compared to the direct region. Normal saline did not cause piloerection. Conclusions Phenylephrine provokes piloerection directly and indirectly through an axon-reflex mediated response that is attenuated by lidocaine. Piloerection is not stimulated by iontophoresis of normal saline alone. The quantitative pilomotor axon-reflex test (QPART) may complement other measures of cutaneous autonomic nerve fiber function. PMID:22868966

  14. Fear conditioned potentiation of the acoustic blink reflex in patients with cerebellar lesions

    PubMed Central

    Maschke, M.; Drepper, J.; Kindsvater, K.; Kolb, F.; Diener, H.; Timmann, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate whether the human cerebellum takes part in fear conditioned potentiation of the acoustic blink reflex.
METHODS—A group of 10 cerebellar patients (eight patients with lesions involving the medial cerebellum, two patients with circumscribed lesions of the cerebellar hemispheres) was compared with a group of 16 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. The fear conditioned potentiation paradigm consisted of three phases. During the first, habituation phase subjects received 20 successive acoustic blink stimuli. In the subsequent fear conditioning phase, subjects passed through 20 paired presentations of the unconditioned fear stimulus (US; an electric shock) and the conditioned stimulus (CS; a light). Thereafter, subjects underwent the potentiation phase, which consisted of a pseudorandom order of 12 trials of the acoustic blink stimulus alone, 12 acoustic blink stimuli paired with the conditioned stimulus, and six conditioned stimuli paired with the unconditioned stimulus. The EMG of the acoustic blink reflex was recorded at the orbicularis oculi muscles. The potentiation effect was determined as the difference in normalised peak amplitude of the blink reflex evoked by pairs of CS and acoustic blink stimuli and evoked by the acoustic stimulus alone.
RESULTS—In the habituation phase, short term habituation of the acoustic blink reflex was preserved in all cerebellar patients. However, in the potentiation phase, the potentiation effect of the blink reflex was significantly reduced in patients with medial cerebellar lesions compared with the controls (mean (SD) potentiation effect (%), patients: −6.4 (15.3), controls: 21.6 (35.6)), but was within normal limits in the two patients with lateral lesions.
CONCLUSIONS—The present findings suggest that the human medial cerebellum is involved in associative learning of non-specific aversive reactions—that is, the fear conditioned potentiation of the acoustic blink reflex

  15. Acceleration dependence and task-specific modulation of short- and medium-latency reflexes in the ankle extensors.

    PubMed

    Finley, James M; Dhaher, Yasin Y; Perreault, Eric J

    2013-08-01

    Involuntary responses to muscle stretch are often composed of a short-latency reflex (SLR) and more variable responses at longer latencies such as the medium-latency (MLR) and long-latency stretch reflex (LLR). Although longer latency reflexes are enhanced in the upper limb during stabilization of external loads, it remains unknown if they have a similar role in the lower limb. This uncertainty results in part from the inconsistency with which longer latency reflexes have been observed in the lower limb. A review of the literature suggests that studies that only observe SLRs have used perturbations with large accelerations, possibly causing a synchronization of motoneuron refractory periods or an activation of force-dependent inhibition. We therefore hypothesized that the amplitude of longer latency reflexes would vary with perturbation acceleration. We further hypothesized that if longer latency reflexes were elicited, they would increase in amplitude during control of an unstable load, as has been observed in the upper limb. These hypotheses were tested at the ankle while subjects performed a torque or position control task. SLR and MLR reflex components were elicited by ankle flexion perturbations with a fixed peak velocity and variable acceleration. Both reflex components initially scaled with acceleration, however, while the SLR continued to increase at high accelerations, the MLR weakened. At accelerations that reliably elicited MLRs, both the SLR and MLR were reduced during control of the unstable load. These findings clarify the conditions required to elicit MLRs in the ankle extensors and provide additional evidence that rapid feedback pathways are downregulated when stability is compromised in the lower limb.

  16. Acceleration dependence and task-specific modulation of short- and medium-latency reflexes in the ankle extensors

    PubMed Central

    Finley, James M; Dhaher, Yasin Y; Perreault, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Involuntary responses to muscle stretch are often composed of a short-latency reflex (SLR) and more variable responses at longer latencies such as the medium-latency (MLR) and long-latency stretch reflex (LLR). Although longer latency reflexes are enhanced in the upper limb during stabilization of external loads, it remains unknown if they have a similar role in the lower limb. This uncertainty results in part from the inconsistency with which longer latency reflexes have been observed in the lower limb. A review of the literature suggests that studies that only observe SLRs have used perturbations with large accelerations, possibly causing a synchronization of motoneuron refractory periods or an activation of force-dependent inhibition. We therefore hypothesized that the amplitude of longer latency reflexes would vary with perturbation acceleration. We further hypothesized that if longer latency reflexes were elicited, they would increase in amplitude during control of an unstable load, as has been observed in the upper limb. These hypotheses were tested at the ankle while subjects performed a torque or position control task. SLR and MLR reflex components were elicited by ankle flexion perturbations with a fixed peak velocity and variable acceleration. Both reflex components initially scaled with acceleration, however, while the SLR continued to increase at high accelerations, the MLR weakened. At accelerations that reliably elicited MLRs, both the SLR and MLR were reduced during control of the unstable load. These findings clarify the conditions required to elicit MLRs in the ankle extensors and provide additional evidence that rapid feedback pathways are downregulated when stability is compromised in the lower limb. PMID:24303134

  17. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  18. The effect of titrated fentanyl on suppressed cough reflex in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kelly, H E; Shaw, G M; Brett, C N; Greenwood, F M; Huckabee, M L

    2016-05-01

    Cough suppression is part of the pharmacodynamic profile of opioids. We investigated the impact of clinical doses of fentanyl on suppressing the cough reflex. Thirteen volunteers received 2 μg.kg(-1) of fentanyl in a divided administration protocol. Three minutes after each administration and at 10 min intervals during washout, suppressed cough reflex testing with nebulised citric acid was performed and compared with fentanyl effect-site concentration. Mean (SD) citric acid concentration provoking cough increased from 0.5 (0.28) mol.l(-1) at baseline to 1.2 (0.50) mol.l(-1) after 2 μg.kg(-1) of fentanyl (p = 0.01). Mean (SD) fentanyl effect-site concentration after the final dose of fentanyl was 1.89 (0.05) ng.ml(-1) . A strong positive correlation was found between suppressed cough reflex thresholds and fentanyl effect-site concentrations during both fentanyl administration and washout phases of the study (r(2) = 0.79, p = 0.01). The mean (SD) length of time for return of suppressed cough response was 44.6 (18.8) min. Clinically relevant doses of fentanyl produced cough reflex suppression in healthy volunteers.

  19. Jaw, blink and corneal reflex latencies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, E A; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Barendswaard, E C; Arts, R J

    1985-01-01

    Jaw, blink and corneal reflexes, which all involve the trigeminal system, were recorded in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis; thirty-seven of these patients were classified as having definite multiple sclerosis and 17 as indefinite multiple sclerosis, according to Schumacher's criteria. The jaw reflex was abnormal less frequently than either of the other two reflexes, but in four cases it was the only abnormal reflex found. Testing a combination of two or three trigeminal reflexes did not yield a higher incidence of abnormalities than testing the blink or corneal reflex alone. Nine patients showed abnormal reflexes which were unexpected on the basis of clinical symptoms. The combined recordings demonstrate at least one abnormal reflex in 74% of the patients. The various types of reflex abnormalities reflect major damage to different parts of the trigeminal system and may therefore make an important contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:4087004

  20. The trigeminocardiac reflex – a comparison with the diving reflex in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Frederic; Schaller, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) has previously been described in the literature as a reflexive response of bradycardia, hypotension, and gastric hypermotility seen upon mechanical stimulation in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve. The diving reflex (DR) in humans is characterized by breath-holding, slowing of the heart rate, reduction of limb blood flow and a gradual rise in the mean arterial blood pressure. Although the two reflexes share many similarities, their relationship and especially their functional purpose in humans have yet to be fully elucidated. In the present review, we have tried to integrate and elaborate these two phenomena into a unified physiological concept. Assuming that the TCR and the DR are closely linked functionally and phylogenetically, we have also highlighted the significance of these reflexes in humans. PMID:25995761

  1. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  2. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  3. Muscle spindle composition and distribution in human young masseter and biceps brachii muscles reveal early growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Osterlund, Catharina; Liu, Jing-Xia; Thornell, Lars-Eric; Eriksson, Per-Olof

    2011-04-01

    Significant changes in extrafusal fiber type composition take place in the human masseter muscle from young age, 3-7 years, to adulthood, in parallel with jaw-face skeleton growth, changes of dentitions and improvement of jaw functions. As motor and sensory control systems of muscles are interlinked, also the intrafusal fiber population, that is, muscle spindles, should undergo age-related changes in fiber type appearance. To test this hypothesis, we examined muscle spindles in the young masseter muscle and compared the result with previous data on adult masseter spindles. Also muscle spindles in the young biceps brachii muscle were examined. The result showed that muscle spindle composition and distribution were alike in young and adult masseter. As for the adult masseter, young masseter contained exceptionally large muscle spindles, and with the highest spindle density and most complex spindles found in the deep masseter portion. Hence, contrary to our hypothesis, masseter spindles do not undergo major morphological changes between young age and adulthood. Also in the biceps, young spindles were alike adult spindles. Taken together, the results showed that human masseter and biceps muscle spindles are morphologically mature already at young age. We conclude that muscle spindles in the human young masseter and biceps precede the extrafusal fiber population in growth and maturation. This in turn suggests early reflex control and proprioceptive demands in learning and maturation of jaw motor skills. Similarly, well-developed muscle spindles in young biceps reflect early need of reflex control in learning and performing arm motor behavior.

  4. Stance control is not affected by paresis and reflex hyperexcitability: the case of spastic patients

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, A; Galante, M; Lucas, B; Schieppati, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Spastic patients were studied to understand whether stance unsteadiness is associated with changes in the control of voluntary force, muscle tone, or reflex excitability, rather than to abnormal posture connected to the motor deficit itself.
METHODS—Twenty four normal subjects, 12 patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), seven by spastic paraparesis, and 14 by hemiparesis were studied. All patients featured various degrees of spasticity and paresis but were free from clinically evident sensory deficits. Body sway during quiet upright stance was assessed through a stabilometric platform under both eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions. The sudden rotation of a supporting platform, in a toe up and toe down direction respectively, evoked short (SLR) and medium latency (MLR) reflex responses to stretch of the soleus or the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle.
RESULTS—No relation was found between clinical findings (tone, muscle strength, tendon reflexes, plantar response, and duration of disease) and body sway. On average, all patient groups exhibited a forward shift of the centre of foot pressure (CFP) with respect to normal subjects; in addition, paraparetic and to a much larger extent hemiparetic patients showed a lateral shift of CFP. Body sway area was significantly increased only in the hemiparetic patients. No relation was found between position of the CFP and sway within any patient group. Soleus SLR was increased in all patients with respect to normal subjects. TA SLR was often seen in both patients with ALS and paraparetic patients, but only rarely in normal subjects and hemiparetic patients. However, no relation was found between amplitude of soleus or TA SLRs and stabilometric variables. The frequency and size of soleus MLR and TA MLR were decreased in all patients. These responses were decreased in size and not modulated by background EMG in the affected leg of hemiparetic patients, suggesting a disturbed control of

  5. The ischiourethralis muscle of the rat: anatomy, innervation, and function.

    PubMed

    Dail, W G; Sachs, B D

    1991-02-01

    The ischiourethralis (IU), a striated perineal muscle presumed to be involved in sexual reflexes, was studied in the rat. The paired muscle arises from the penile crus and the penile bulb and unites in a raphe over the deep dorsal vein of the penis. Retrograde tracing studies show that the muscle is innervated by neurons in the dorsolateral nucleus of the lumbar spinal cord, a pudendal nerve motor nucleus which also innervates the ischiocavernosus muscle. Excision of the IU muscle did not interfere with the ability of males to display normal copulatory behavior, nor did it affect significantly the number and intensity of reflexive erections. It nevertheless remains possible that the IU may contribute to intense glans erection by compressing the deep dorsal vein.

  6. Altered timing of postural reflexes contributes to falling in persons with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Marigold, Daniel S; Eng, Janice J

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine differences in the timing of postural reflexes and changes in kinematics between those who fell (fallers) in response to standing platform translations and those who did not (non-fallers). Forty-four persons with stroke were exposed to unexpected forward and backward platform translations while standing. Surface electromyography from bilateral tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris were recorded along with kinematic data. Those that fell in response to the translations were compared to those who did not fall in terms of (1) postural reflex onset latency, (2) the time interval between the activation of distal and proximal muscles (i.e. intralimb coupling), and (3) changes in joint angles and trunk motion. Approximately 85% of falls occurred in response to the forward translations. Postural reflex onset latencies were delayed and intralimb coupling durations were longer in the faller versus non-faller group. At the time that the platform completed the translating motion (300 ms), the faller group demonstrated higher trunk velocity, greater change in paretic ankle angle, and the trunk was further behind the ankle compared to the non-faller group. This study suggests that following platform translations, delays in the timing of postural reflexes and disturbed intralimb coupling result in changes in kinematics, which contribute to falls in persons with stroke.

  7. Altered Timing of Postural Reflexes Contributes to Falling in Persons with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marigold, Daniel S.; Eng, Janice J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine differences in the timing of postural reflexes and changes in kinematics between those who fell (Fallers) in response to standing platform translations and those who did not (Non-fallers). Forty-four persons with stroke were exposed to unexpected forward and backward platform translations while standing. Surface electromyography from bilateral tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris were recorded along with kinematic data. Those that fell in response to the translations were compared to those who did not fall in terms of (1) postural reflex onset latency, (2) the time interval between the activation of distal and proximal muscles (i.e. intralimb coupling), and (3) changes in joint angles and trunk motion. Approximately 85% of falls occurred in response to the forward translations. Postural reflex onset latencies were delayed and intralimb coupling durations were longer in the Faller versus Non-faller group. At the time that the platform completed the translating motion (300 ms), the Faller group demonstrated higher trunk velocity, greater change in paretic ankle angle, and the trunk was further behind the ankle compared to the Non-faller group. This study suggests that following platform translations, delays in the timing of postural reflexes and disturbed intralimb coupling result in changes in kinematics, which contribute to falls in persons with stroke. PMID:16418855

  8. Short and long latency jaw-opening reflex responses elicited by mechanical stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Y; Stohler, C S; Shimada, K; Ash, M M

    1985-01-01

    Jaw-opening reflex responses elicited by tapping the chin during maximum clenching in incisal edge-to-edge contact position were studied in 10 healthy subjects. Stimuli were also delivered during weak clenching on a rubber stamp, separating the incisors by approx. 10 mm and protruding the mandible to the edge-to-edge incisor relationship. All four central incisors were stimulated simultaneously. With weak stimuli, there was a short-latency (9.5 ms) digastric response which may have had a disynaptic pathway. Taps of moderate strength produced long-latency (20 ms) responses, and sometimes a short-latency (9.5 ms) component as well. Strong (non-painful) taps produced an even longer-latency digastric response, 30 ms or more following the stimulus with less synchronization than earlier responses. Jaw-jerk reflexes occurred 8.5 ms following the tap, independently of the magnitude of the stimulus. Local anaesthesia of the upper and lower incisors abolished the digastric muscle response. Thus large periodontal afferents may be responsible for the early digastric reflex activity and smaller fibres for later effects. Temporal summation of the reflex response probably occurred when all incisors were stimulated simultaneously.

  9. Using ESO Reflex with Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järveläinen, P.; Savolainen, V.; Oittinen, T.; Maisala, S.; Ullgrén, M. Hook, R.

    2008-08-01

    ESO Reflex is a prototype graphical workflow system, based on Taverna, and primarily intended to be a flexible way of running ESO data reduction recipes along with other legacy applications and user-written tools. ESO Reflex can also readily use the Taverna Web Services features that are based on the Apache Axis SOAP implementation. Taverna is a general purpose Web Service client, and requires no programming to use such services. However, Taverna also has some restrictions: for example, no numerical types such integers. In addition the preferred binding style is document/literal wrapped, but most astronomical services publish the Axis default WSDL using RPC/encoded style. Despite these minor limitations we have created simple but very promising test VO workflow using the Sesame name resolver service at CDS Strasbourg, the Hubble SIAP server at the Multi-Mission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST) and the WESIX image cataloging and catalogue cross-referencing service at the University of Pittsburgh. ESO Reflex can also pass files and URIs via the PLASTIC protocol to visualisation tools and has its own viewer for VOTables. We picked these three Web Services to try to set up a realistic and useful ESO Reflex workflow. They also demonstrate ESO Reflex abilities to use many kind of Web Services because each of them requires a different interface. We describe each of these services in turn and comment on how it was used

  10. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  11. Effect of Short-Term Exposure to High Particulate Levels on Cough Reflex Sensitivity in Healthy Tourists: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ryuhei; Gui, Peijun; Ito, Kumiko; Kohzuki, Masahiro; Ebihara, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have reported a relationship between particulate air pollution and respiratory symptoms or decline in lung function, but information about acute effects of short-term exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) on cough and pulmonary function is scarce. Objective: To investigate the effect of short-term exposure to high concentrations of PM on the cough reflex threshold, urge-to-cough, pulmonary function, and cough-related quality of life in a group of healthy non-resident volunteers visiting Beijing, China. Methods: Seventeen healthy residents of Sendai, Japan, who planned to attend a meeting in Beijing, were recruited. We checked local air quality and measured cough reflex thresholds, urge-to-cough, pulmonary function, and Leicester Cough Questionnaire-acute (LCQ-acute) scores in the volunteers before, during, and after their trip to Beijing. Results: The PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations in Beijing were significantly higher than those in Japan on the measurement days. Cough reflex thresholds, expressed as nebulized citric acid concentrations required to induce ≥ 2 and ≥ 5 coughs, were significantly lower during the stay in Beijing than before or after the visit. Vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and FEV1/FVC were significantly lower during the stay in Beijing than before the trip. Similarly, the urge-to-cough threshold was significantly lower during the stay in Beijing than after the trip, as was the total LCQ-acute score. Conclusion: We tentatively concluded that short-term exposure to high PM concentrations may have adverse effects on cough reflex and urge-to-cough thresholds, pulmonary function, and cough-related quality of life. PMID:28217195

  12. Mitochondrial threshold effects.

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Rodrigue; Faustin, Benjamin; Rocher, Christophe; Malgat, Monique; Mazat, Jean-Pierre; Letellier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    The study of mitochondrial diseases has revealed dramatic variability in the phenotypic presentation of mitochondrial genetic defects. To attempt to understand this variability, different authors have studied energy metabolism in transmitochondrial cell lines carrying different proportions of various pathogenic mutations in their mitochondrial DNA. The same kinds of experiments have been performed on isolated mitochondria and on tissue biopsies taken from patients with mitochondrial diseases. The results have shown that, in most cases, phenotypic manifestation of the genetic defect occurs only when a threshold level is exceeded, and this phenomenon has been named the 'phenotypic threshold effect'. Subsequently, several authors showed that it was possible to inhibit considerably the activity of a respiratory chain complex, up to a critical value, without affecting the rate of mitochondrial respiration or ATP synthesis. This phenomenon was called the 'biochemical threshold effect'. More recently, quantitative analysis of the effects of various mutations in mitochondrial DNA on the rate of mitochondrial protein synthesis has revealed the existence of a 'translational threshold effect'. In this review these different mitochondrial threshold effects are discussed, along with their molecular bases and the roles that they play in the presentation of mitochondrial diseases. PMID:12467494

  13. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  14. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of muscle aches and pain is fibromyalgia , a condition that causes tenderness in your muscles ... imbalance, such as too little potassium or calcium Fibromyalgia Infections, including the flu, Lyme disease , malaria , muscle ...

  15. Submaximal fatigue of the hamstrings impairs specific reflex components and knee stability.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Mark; Gollhofer, Albert

    2007-05-01

    Rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most serious sports-related injuries and requires long recovery time. The quadriceps and hamstring muscles are functionally important to control stability of the knee joint complex. Fatigue, however, is an important factor that may influence stabilizing control and thus cause ACL injuries. The objective of this study was therefore to assess how submaximal fatigue exercises of the hamstring muscles affect anterior tibial translation as a direct measure of knee joint stability. While 15 test participants were standing upright with the knees in 30 degrees of flexion, anterior tibial translation was induced by a force of 315 N. Two linear potentiometers placed on the tibial tuberosity and the patella recorded tibial motion relative to the femur. Reflex latencies and neuromuscular hamstring activity were determined using surface electromyography (EMG). Muscle fatigue produced a significant longer latency for the monosynaptic reflex latencies, whereas no differences in the latencies of the medium latency component were found. Fatigue significantly reduced EMG amplitudes of the short and medium latency components. These alterations were in line with significantly increased anterior tibial translation. Our results suggest that hamstring fatigue is effectively associated with mechanical loss of knee stability. This decrease in joint stability may at least in part explain higher risk of ACL injury, especially in fatigued muscles. Furthermore, we discuss why the present findings indicate that reduced motor activity rather than the extended latency of the first hamstring response is the reason for possible failure.

  16. Ligamento-muscular protective reflex in the lumbar spine of the feline.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, M; Harris, M; Solomonow, M; Zhou, B; Lu, Y; Baratta, R V

    1998-08-01

    A ligamento-muscular protective reflex in the lumbar spine was demonstrated in a feline model. Stimulating electrodes were applied to the supraspinous ligament between several lumbar vertebra (L1 to L6) while recording myoelectric discharge from the paraspinal muscles at the L3, L4 and L5, bilaterally. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was present in the paraspinal muscles bilaterally, upon stimulation of the supraspinous ligament, in six preparations. The EMG discharge was strongest in the muscles one level below that of the stimulated ligament, whereas weaker EMG signals were recorded from as far as two levels above and below. The mean time delay between the application of the stimulus to the ligament to the resulting EMG ranged from 2.52 to 2.77 ms at all levels. Stimulation of the supraspinous ligament in the L6 segment resulted in a weak reflex response, and stimulation in the L7 segment did not produce any EMG activity. It was concluded that mechanoreceptors in the supraspinous ligament at the L1/6 levels may initiate sensory signals upon strain of the ligament, during flexion. This, in turn, causes contraction of the paraspinal muscles, bilaterally, to extend the spine and prevent possible damage to the ligament while maintaining stability. The results may add to the understanding of low back pain, and to the formulation of surgical procedures which could spare the neural supply of the ligament, allowing advanced physiotherapeutic modalities to be implemented for post-surgical rehabilitation.

  17. Effect of sublingual nitrate on respiratory reflexes arising from stimulation of juxta-pulmonary capillary (J) receptors by i.v. lobeline and short duration exercise.

    PubMed

    Anand, Ashima; Srivastava, Niraj; Raj, Hans

    2012-05-31

    Juxta-pulmonary capillary (J or pulmonary C fiber) receptors are stimulated by an increase in pulmonary blood flow and give rise to respiratory acceleration and related sensations and inhibit exercise. However, the reverse, i.e., the effect of reducing pulmonary blood flow on their reflexes, is as yet not known. This was investigated by carrying out a placebo-controlled study on the acute effects of a single dose (0.4 mg) of sublingual glyceryl nitrate (GTN), known to shift blood from the central to the peripheral circulation, on the respiratory parameters of exercising healthy subjects and on their responses to i.v. lobeline. In 10 subjects, GTN use delayed the first appearance of respiratory sensations from 9.08 ± 0.9 min to 11 min (P=0.002), reduced the increase in minute ventilation by the end of 10 min of exercise (P=0.003) and increased its duration by 1-4s and doubled it in the remaining one subject. In a majority of 8 of them, the effect of GTN on i.v. lobeline-induced respiratory reflexes and sensations was a significant increase in the dose required (P=0.006) for producing threshold effects and in the latency of their appearance (P=0.003). The latter feature points to a reduction in blood flow in the lung parenchyma where these receptors are located and to which they are sensitive. As this would have led to a reduced stimulation of these receptors, it would account for the delayed appearance of respiratory symptoms, a reduction in ventilatory increase and prolongation of exercise duration. We demonstrated a mechanism of reducing the stimulus level of J receptors by reducing pulmonary blood flow by means of pharmacological sequestration with GTN use, which then led to a reduction in the magnitude of respiratory and viscerosomatic reflexes, while noting at the same time that changes in blood flow in the pulmonary bed do not directly influence limb muscles, tendons and joints which also determine exercise output.

  18. Primary afferent depolarization and flexion reflexes produced by radiant heat stimulation of the skin.

    PubMed

    Burke, R E; Rudomin, P; Vyklický, L; Zajac, F E

    1971-02-01

    1. The reflex effects of pulses of intense radiant heat applied to the skin of the central plantar pad have been studied in unanaesthetized (decerebrate) spinal cats.2. Pad heat pulses produced flexion of the ipsilateral hind limb and increased ipsilateral flexor monosynaptic reflexes, due to post-synaptic excitation of flexor alpha motoneurones. These effects were accompanied by reduction of extensor monosynaptic reflexes and post-synaptic inhibition of extensor motoneurones.3. Ipsilateral (and contralateral) pad heat pulses consistently evoked negative dorsal root potentials (DRPs) as well as increased excitability of both cutaneous and group Ib muscle afferent terminals. The excitability of group Ia afferents was sometimes also increased during pad heat pulses, but to a lesser extent.4. Pad heat pulses produced negative DRPs in preparations in which positive DRP components could be demonstrated following electrical stimulation of both skin and muscle nerves.5. The motor and primary afferent effects of heat pulses always accompanied one another, beginning after the pad surface temperature had reached rather high levels (usually 48-55 degrees C).6. Negative DRPs increased excitability of cutaneous and group Ib afferents, and motoneurone activation produced by pad heat pulses was essentially unmodified when conduction in large myelinated afferents from the central plantar pad was blocked by cooling the posterior tibial nerve trunk.7. It is concluded that adequate noxious activation of cutaneous afferents of small diameter produces primary afferent depolarization in a variety of large diameter afferent fibres, as well as post-synaptic effects in alpha motoneurones.

  19. Primary afferent depolarization and flexion reflexes produced by radiant heat stimulation of the skin

    PubMed Central

    Burke, R. E.; Rudomin, P.; Vyklický, L.; Zajac, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    1. The reflex effects of pulses of intense radiant heat applied to the skin of the central plantar pad have been studied in unanaesthetized (decerebrate) spinal cats. 2. Pad heat pulses produced flexion of the ipsilateral hind limb and increased ipsilateral flexor monosynaptic reflexes, due to post-synaptic excitation of flexor alpha motoneurones. These effects were accompanied by reduction of extensor monosynaptic reflexes and post-synaptic inhibition of extensor motoneurones. 3. Ipsilateral (and contralateral) pad heat pulses consistently evoked negative dorsal root potentials (DRPs) as well as increased excitability of both cutaneous and group Ib muscle afferent terminals. The excitability of group Ia afferents was sometimes also increased during pad heat pulses, but to a lesser extent. 4. Pad heat pulses produced negative DRPs in preparations in which positive DRP components could be demonstrated following electrical stimulation of both skin and