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Sample records for muscle reflex thresholds

  1. Electrical middle ear muscle reflex: use in cochlear implant programming.

    PubMed

    Hodges, A V; Balkany, T J; Ruth, R A; Lambert, P R; Dolan-Ash, S; Schloffman, J J

    1997-09-01

    Programming of multichannel cochlear implants (CIs) requires subjective responses to a series of sophisticated psychophysical percepts. It is often difficult for young prelinguistically deaf children to provide adequate responses for device fitting. This is especially true in setting levels of maximum comfortable loudness, whereby failure to indicate growth of loudness may result in elevation of stimulus levels to the threshold of pain. The acoustic or stapedial muscle reflex has been used previously to provide objective confirmation of acoustic stimulation, and there have been attempts to use the reflex in hearing aid fitting. It has also been suggested that electrically elicited middle ear muscle reflexes (eMEMR) may have applicability in confirming and quantifying electrical stimulation through a CI. To assess the relationship between eMEMR characteristics and levels of loudness perception with CIs, determine reliability of the response, and investigate potential use of eMEMR in CI programming, 25 postlinguistically deafened adult CI users were evaluated. Reflexes have also been attempted on 40 children, with responses present in 31 (71%). Comfort levels predicted by eMEMR were highly correlated with those obtained through subjective judgments in the adult subjects. The eMEMR provides an objective, accurate, and rapid method of estimating maximum comfortable loudness levels, which may be useful in the initial programming of young implant recipients.

  2. Sweet Taste and Menthol Increase Cough Reflex Thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Paul M.; Breslin, Paul A.S.; Dalton, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Cough is a vital protective reflex that is triggered by both mechanical and chemical stimuli. The current experiments explored how chemosensory stimuli modulate this important reflex. Cough thresholds were measured using a single-inhalation capsaicin challenge. Experiment 1 examined the impact of sweet taste: Cough thresholds were measured after rinsing the mouth with a sucrose solution (sweet) or with water (control). Experiment 2 examined the impact of menthol: Cough thresholds were measured after inhaling headspace above a menthol solution (menthol vapor) or headspace above the mineral oil solvent (control). Experiment 3 examined the impact of rinsing the mouth with a (bitter) sucrose octaacetate solution. Rinsing with sucrose and inhaling menthol vapor significantly increased measured cough thresholds. Rinsing with sucrose octaacete caused a non-significant decrease in cough thresholds, an important demonstration of specificity. Decreases in cough reflex sensitivity from sucrose or menthol could help explain why cough syrups without pharmacologically active ingredients are often almost as effective as formulations with an added drug. Further, the results support the idea that adding menthol to cigarettes might make tobacco smoke more tolerable for beginning smokers, at least in part, by reducing the sensitivity of an important airway defense mechanism. PMID:22465565

  3. Sweet taste and menthol increase cough reflex thresholds.

    PubMed

    Wise, Paul M; Breslin, Paul A S; Dalton, Pamela

    2012-06-01

    Cough is a vital protective reflex that is triggered by both mechanical and chemical stimuli. The current experiments explored how chemosensory stimuli modulate this important reflex. Cough thresholds were measured using a single-inhalation capsaicin challenge. Experiment 1 examined the impact of sweet taste: Cough thresholds were measured after rinsing the mouth with a sucrose solution (sweet) or with water (control). Experiment 2 examined the impact of menthol: Cough thresholds were measured after inhaling headspace above a menthol solution (menthol vapor) or headspace above the mineral oil solvent (control). Experiment 3 examined the impact of rinsing the mouth with a (bitter) sucrose octaacetate solution. Rinsing with sucrose and inhaling menthol vapor significantly increased measured cough thresholds. Rinsing with sucrose octaacete caused a non-significant decrease in cough thresholds, an important demonstration of specificity. Decreases in cough reflex sensitivity from sucrose or menthol could help explain why cough syrups without pharmacologically active ingredients are often almost as effective as formulations with an added drug. Further, the results support the idea that adding menthol to cigarettes might make tobacco smoke more tolerable for beginning smokers, at least in part, by reducing the sensitivity of an important airway defense mechanism. PMID:22465565

  4. Objective intraoperative method to record averaged electromyographic stapedius muscle reflexes in cochlear implant patients.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, B; Harris, S; Shallop, J K

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a procedure to measure the averaged stapedius muscle reflex in response to electrical stimulation (AESR) with a cochlear implant. The AESR, as activated by ipsilateral stimulation with a cochlear implant, was investigated intra-operatively in a series of 12 children. After the cochlear implant was placed into the cochlea and secured by the surgeon, an electromyographic (EMG) needle electrode was gently placed into the stapedius muscle. During stimulation of the cochlear implant, the stapedius reflex was monitored visually (VESR) and as an averaged EMG response (AESR). Consistent AESRs were obtained in 7 of the 12 children. These measures provide a method to obtain stapedius muscle responses that may be helpful in the programming of young children with cochlear implants. Comparative post-operative measures were also obtained, including behavioral threshold levels, behavioral comfort levels, and the contralateral stapedius reflex threshold (ESR) on selected electrodes.

  5. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    PubMed Central

    Sloot, Lizeth H.; van den Noort, Josien C.; van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163–191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during

  6. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    PubMed

    Sloot, Lizeth H; van den Noort, Josien C; van der Krogt, Marjolein M; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163-191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during

  7. Cardiovascular regulation by skeletal muscle reflexes in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Megan N.; Mizuno, Masaki; Mitchell, Jere H.

    2011-01-01

    Heart rate and blood pressure are elevated at the onset and throughout the duration of dynamic or static exercise. These neurally mediated cardiovascular adjustments to physical activity are regulated, in part, by a peripheral reflex originating in contracting skeletal muscle termed the exercise pressor reflex. Mechanically sensitive and metabolically sensitive receptors activating the exercise pressor reflex are located on the unencapsulated nerve terminals of group III and group IV afferent sensory neurons, respectively. Mechanoreceptors are stimulated by the physical distortion of their receptive fields during muscle contraction and can be sensitized by the production of metabolites generated by working skeletal myocytes. The chemical by-products of muscle contraction also stimulate metaboreceptors. Once activated, group III and IV sensory impulses are transmitted to cardiovascular control centers within the brain stem where they are integrated and processed. Activation of the reflex results in an increase in efferent sympathetic nerve activity and a withdrawal of parasympathetic nerve activity. These actions result in the precise alterations in cardiovascular hemodynamics requisite to meet the metabolic demands of working skeletal muscle. Coordinated activity by this reflex is altered after the development of cardiovascular disease, generating exaggerated increases in sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, heart rate, and vascular resistance. The basic components and operational characteristics of the reflex, the techniques used in human and animals to study the reflex, and the emerging evidence describing the dysfunction of the reflex with the advent of cardiovascular disease are highlighted in this review. PMID:21841019

  8. Conditioning the middle ear reflex at sensation levels below reflex threshold: air jet and electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    McDaniel-Bacon, L; Fulton, R T; Laskowski, R P

    1980-01-01

    An ABAB functional analysis, conditioning and generalization, design was used in 3 experiments (2 were formal studies and 1 was empirical in nature) to investigate the conditionability of the middle ear reflex. The conditioned stimuli were subreflex threshold pure tones of various frequencies and intensities. The unconditioned stimulus (UCS) was an auricular air jet to the contralateral ear in the first experiment and cutaneous electrical stimulation to the ipsolateral, probe ear in the last 2 experiments. Reflexes were monitored by an otoadmittance meter, storage oscilloscope, and strip chart recorder. In the first experiment (air jet UCS), no subjects met the conditioning criterion within the maximum presentation of 400 paired trials, despite pilot evidence which indicated conditioning was feasible. In the second experiment (electrical stimulation UCS), 2 subjects met conditioning criterion; however, only one subject reconditioned and demonstrated partial generalization to other conditioned stimuli. In the third experiment (electrical stimulation UCS), one of 3 subjects who had previously been unconditionable with the air jet UCS met conditioning and reconditioning criterion and demonstrated partial generalization. Results indicate that the middle ear reflex can be conditioned to be elicited by subreflex threshold pure tones, however, results are limited.

  9. The Effect of the 226-Hz Probe Level on Contralateral Acoustic Stapedius Reflex Thresholds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Jessica E.; Feeney, M. Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the 226-Hz probe level on the acoustic stapedius reflex threshold. Method: Contralateral reflex thresholds for a 1000-Hz pure-tone stimulus were obtained from 40 young adults with normal hearing using an experimental system at four 226-Hz probe levels (70, 75, 80, and 85 dB SPL) with…

  10. [Correlation between electrically-induced stapedius reflex and discomfort threshold in cochlear implant patients].

    PubMed

    Gattaz, G; Battmer, R D; Lehnhardt, E; Gnadeberg, D

    1992-12-01

    Electrically elicited stapedius reflex thresholds are an objective criteria for the fitting of speech processors in very young children. Reflex thresholds generally fit well within the upper third of a subject's individual dynamic range, the difference between electrical threshold of hearing, (T) and maximum comfort (C) levels and can be used to predict ultimate behavioral maximum comfort levels. In acoustically elicited stapedius reflexes a saturation of impedance amplitude can be registered at approximately 110 dB, which is 90% of the dynamic range. Assuming a similar relationship for the electrically elicited stapedius reflex there would be two values within the dynamic range which could be used for extrapolation of the threshold level. In the present study, the electrically elicited stapedius reflex was examined in 16 deaf patients who had received 22-channel Clark/NUCLEUS cochlear implants. Using an apical, a medial and a basal electrode pair, different stimulation positions within the cochlea were tested. The contralateral reflexes could be elicited in 11 patients (69%). A saturation of the reflex amplitude was recordable in 10 subjects, at least in one of the electrode pairs. The reflex saturation in all cases was located close to the uncomfortable loudness level within the subjects' dynamic ranges (at 95% dynamic). This finding is comparable to acoustic matter. As a result, these data together with reflex threshold data suggest a means for predicting to predict the threshold levels.

  11. Intramuscular Neurotrophin-3 normalizes low threshold spinal reflexes, reduces spasms and improves mobility after bilateral corticospinal tract injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kathe, Claudia; Hutson, Thomas Haynes; McMahon, Stephen Brendan; Moon, Lawrence David Falcon

    2016-01-01

    Brain and spinal injury reduce mobility and often impair sensorimotor processing in the spinal cord leading to spasticity. Here, we establish that complete transection of corticospinal pathways in the pyramids impairs locomotion and leads to increased spasms and excessive mono- and polysynaptic low threshold spinal reflexes in rats. Treatment of affected forelimb muscles with an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV) encoding human Neurotrophin-3 at a clinically-feasible time-point after injury reduced spasticity. Neurotrophin-3 normalized the short latency Hoffmann reflex to a treated hand muscle as well as low threshold polysynaptic spinal reflexes involving afferents from other treated muscles. Neurotrophin-3 also enhanced locomotor recovery. Furthermore, the balance of inhibitory and excitatory boutons in the spinal cord and the level of an ion co-transporter in motor neuron membranes required for normal reflexes were normalized. Our findings pave the way for Neurotrophin-3 as a therapy that treats the underlying causes of spasticity and not only its symptoms. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18146.001 PMID:27759565

  12. Auditory Brainstem Circuits That Mediate the Middle Ear Muscle Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Sudeep; Windsor, Alanna Marie; Lee, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    The middle ear muscle (MEM) reflex is one of two major descending systems to the auditory periphery. There are two middle ear muscles (MEMs): the stapedius and the tensor tympani. In man, the stapedius contracts in response to intense low frequency acoustic stimuli, exerting forces perpendicular to the stapes superstructure, increasing middle ear impedance and attenuating the intensity of sound energy reaching the inner ear (cochlea). The tensor tympani is believed to contract in response to self-generated noise (chewing, swallowing) and nonauditory stimuli. The MEM reflex pathways begin with sound presented to the ear. Transduction of sound occurs in the cochlea, resulting in an action potential that is transmitted along the auditory nerve to the cochlear nucleus in the brainstem (the first relay station for all ascending sound information originating in the ear). Unknown interneurons in the ventral cochlear nucleus project either directly or indirectly to MEM motoneurons located elsewhere in the brainstem. Motoneurons provide efferent innervation to the MEMs. Although the ascending and descending limbs of these reflex pathways have been well characterized, the identity of the reflex interneurons is not known, as are the source of modulatory inputs to these pathways. The aim of this article is to (a) provide an overview of MEM reflex anatomy and physiology, (b) present new data on MEM reflex anatomy and physiology from our laboratory and others, and (c) describe the clinical implications of our research. PMID:20870664

  13. Transient reversal of the stretch reflex in human arm muscles.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, F; Borghese, N A; Carrozzo, M

    1991-09-01

    1. Load perturbation responses can violate the law of reciprocal innervation between antagonist muscles under particular conditions. Thus flexor and extensor muscles of wrist and elbow joints are reflexly coactivated by the impact of a ball on the hand during a catching task. The aim of this study was to determine whether reflex coactivation can be preset within the central nervous system (CNS) or whether it is entirely due to the peripheral stimulus. To this end, we studied the behavior of stretch reflex responses of arm muscles evoked by torque motor perturbations applied before and during the catching task. 2. Subjects were instructed to catch a ball dropped from 1.6 m. A torque motor delivered perturbations to the elbow joint, resulting in angular motion at both elbow and wrist joints because of their dynamic mechanical coupling. Two series of experiments were performed that differed in the perturbation waveform. In the first series, a single torque pulse could be randomly applied at different times during the task. The corresponding responses were recovered by subtracting the average of the unperturbed trials from the averages of perturbed trials. In the second series of experiments, a train of pseudorandom pulses was applied continuously during each trial. The time-varying impulse responses were computed at 20-ms intervals by cross-correlation methods. 3. The pattern of the short-latency electromyographic responses evoked by either single pulses or pseudorandom perturbations obeyed the law of reciprocal innervation of antagonist muscles under basal conditions. However, the pattern of the responses evoked by the same perturbations around the time of ball impact on the hand consisted of a substantial coactivation of both stretched and shortening muscles. Reflex coactivation resulted from response patterns that differed at different joints. At the elbow, reflex coactivation resulted from a transient reversal of the direction of the short-latency responses of

  14. Effects of postural and voluntary muscle contraction on modulation of the soleus H reflex by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-López, Jessica; Selvi, Aikaterini; Solà-Valls, Núria; Casanova-Molla, Jordi; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2015-12-01

    Modulation of spinal reflexes depends largely on the integrity of the corticospinal tract. A useful method to document the influence of descending tracts on reflexes is to examine the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on the soleus H reflex elicited by posterior tibial nerve electrical stimuli (PTS). In 12 healthy volunteers, we investigated how postural or voluntary muscle contraction modified such descending modulation. We first characterized the effects of TMS at 95 % of motor threshold for leg responses on the H reflex elicited by a preceding PTS at inter-stimuli intervals (ISIs) between 0 and 120 ms at rest and, then, during voluntary plantar flexion (pf), dorsal flexion (df), and standing still (ss). During pf, there was an increase in the facilitation of the H reflex at ISIs 0-20 ms. During df, there were no effects of TMS on the H reflex. During ss, there was inhibition at ISIs 40-60 ms. Our observations suggest that muscle contraction prevails over the baseline effects of TMS on the soleus H reflex. While contraction of the antagonist (df) suppressed most of the effects, contraction of the agonist had different effects depending on the type of activity (pf or ss). The characterization of the interaction between descending corticospinal volleys and segmental peripheral inputs provides useful information on motor control for physiological research and further understanding of the effects of spinal cord lesions.

  15. Muscle reflex in heart failure: the role of exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han-Jun; Zucker, Irving H.; Wang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Exercise evokes sympathetic activation and increases blood pressure and heart rate (HR). Two neural mechanisms that cause the exercise-induced increase in sympathetic discharge are central command and the exercise pressor reflex (EPR). The former suggests that a volitional signal emanating from central motor areas leads to increased sympathetic activation during exercise. The latter is a reflex originating in skeletal muscle which contributes significantly to the regulation of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems during exercise. The afferent arm of this reflex is composed of metabolically sensitive (predominantly group IV, C-fibers) and mechanically sensitive (predominately group III, A-delta fibers) afferent fibers. Activation of these receptors and their associated afferent fibers reflexively adjusts sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve activity during exercise. In heart failure, the sympathetic activation during exercise is exaggerated, which potentially increases cardiovascular risk and contributes to exercise intolerance during physical activity in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. A therapeutic strategy for preventing or slowing the progression of the exaggerated EPR may be of benefit in CHF patients. Long-term exercise training (ExT), as a non-pharmacological treatment for CHF increases exercise capacity, reduces sympatho-excitation and improves cardiovascular function in CHF animals and patients. In this review, we will discuss the effects of ExT and the mechanisms that contribute to the exaggerated EPR in the CHF state. PMID:23060821

  16. Frequency response of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Patrick A; Dakin, Christopher J; Vardy, Alistair N; Happee, Riender; Siegmund, Gunter P; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2013-10-01

    Vestibular pathways form short-latency disynaptic connections with neck motoneurons, whereas they form longer-latency disynaptic and polysynaptic connections with lower limb motoneurons. We quantified frequency responses of vestibular reflexes in neck, back, and lower limb muscles to explain between-muscle differences. Two hypotheses were evaluated: 1) that muscle-specific motor-unit properties influence the bandwidth of vestibular reflexes; and 2) that frequency responses of vestibular reflexes differ between neck, back, and lower limb muscles because of neural filtering. Subjects were exposed to electrical vestibular stimuli over bandwidths of 0-25 and 0-75 Hz while recording activity in sternocleidomastoid, splenius capitis, erector spinae, soleus, and medial gastrocnemius muscles. Coherence between stimulus and muscle activity revealed markedly larger vestibular reflex bandwidths in neck muscles (0-70 Hz) than back (0-15 Hz) or lower limb muscles (0-20 Hz). In addition, vestibular reflexes in back and lower limb muscles undergo low-pass filtering compared with neck-muscle responses, which span a broader dynamic range. These results suggest that the wider bandwidth of head-neck biomechanics requires a vestibular influence on neck-muscle activation across a larger dynamic range than lower limb muscles. A computational model of vestibular afferents and a motoneuron pool indicates that motor-unit properties are not primary contributors to the bandwidth filtering of vestibular reflexes in different muscles. Instead, our experimental findings suggest that pathway-dependent neural filtering, not captured in our model, contributes to these muscle-specific responses. Furthermore, gain-phase discontinuities in the neck-muscle vestibular reflexes provide evidence of destructive interaction between different reflex components, likely via indirect vestibular-motor pathways.

  17. Measuring the electrical stapedius reflex with stapedius muscle electromyogram recordings.

    PubMed

    Clement, Ryan S; Carter, Paul M; Kipke, Daryl R

    2002-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a correlation between cochlear implant recipients' comfort levels (C level, upper limit of dynamic range of stimulation) and the contralateral electrical stapedius reflex (ESR) threshold, detected by acoustic impedance change. However, the utility of the approach is limited because many recipients have no detectable impedance change. The goals of this study were to investigate the utility of the stapedial electromyogram (EMG) for estimating onset and strength of the ESR. Ketamine-anesthetized guinea pigs were implanted with Nucleus electrode arrays and stimulated with biphasic current pulse trains (250 pps) via a Cochlear Corporation CI24M stimulator. Typical EMG recordings (obtained with bipolar microwire electrodes) contained easily detectable unit potentials up to 300 microV in amplitude. Growth response curves (obtained from threshold-crossing counts or rms of the EMG signal) were typically monotonic with dynamic ranges spanning 700 microA or 8 dB. Based on adaptation and temporal properties, the stimulus protocol (500 ms duration with 4-5 s interstimulus intervals) was adequate for producing independent responses. The data presented are consistent with ESR characteristics (acoustic impedance technique) of cochlear implant recipients and with EMG properties of acoustically stimulated guinea pigs. Use of the EMG for characterizing the ESR may eventually be applied to human cochlear implant recipients as a guide in setting the upper limit of the dynamic range.

  18. Temporal muscle activation assessment by ultrasound imaging during flexor withdrawal reflex and voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Jose, Gomez-Tames; Shuto, Nakamura; Jose, Gonzalez; Wenwei, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Activating flexor reflexes by electrical stimulation has been used as a mechanism to initiate the swing phase or to enhance it for spinal cord injured patients. However, it is necessary to know their contraction dynamics in order to artificially induce them at the right moment of a walking cycle. This requires understanding the temporal activation pattern of both surface and deep muscles simultaneously. This study aimed at developing a system to measure and analyze the temporal activation of both surface and deep muscles during voluntary contraction and flexor reflexes (also called withdrawal reflexes) using ultrasound imaging. A set of experiments were done to verify the validity of the system, while exploring the temporal pattern of muscle activation during flexor reflexes. As a result, we were able to quantify the surface and deep muscle activity by measuring the muscle thickness, pennation angle and long-axis displacement, from the ultrasound images.

  19. Dynamic control of muscle stiffness and H reflex modulation during hopping and jumping in man.

    PubMed Central

    Dyhre-Poulsen, P; Simonsen, E B; Voigt, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The objective of the study was to evaluate the functional effects of reflexes on muscle mechanics during natural voluntary movements. The excitability of the H (Hoffmann) reflex was used as a measure of the excitability of the central component of the stretch reflex. 2. We recorded EMG, ground reaction forces and the H reflex in the soleus muscle in humans while landing from a downward jump, during drop jumping and during hopping. The movements were also recorded by high-speed cinematography. 3. The EMG pattern was adapted to the motor task. When landing the EMG in the soleus muscle and in the anterior tibial muscle showed preinnervation and alternating activity after touch down. When hopping there was little preinnervation in the soleus muscle, and the activity was initiated about 45 ms after touch down by a peak and continued unbroken until lift off. In the drop jumps the EMG pattern depended on the jumping style used by the subject. 4. The H reflex in the soleus muscle was strongly modulated in a manner appropriate to the requirements of the motor task. During landing from a downward jump the H reflex was low at touch down whereas while hopping it was high at touch down. During drop jumping it was variable and influenced by the jumping technique. 5. Muscle stiffness in the ankle joint was negative after touch down when landing, but always positive when hopping. 6. It is suggested that during landing the alternating EMG pattern after touch down was programmed and little influenced by reflexes. During hopping reflexes could contribute to the initial peak and the EMG during lift off. 7. The programmed EMG activity and the suppression of the H reflex while landing probably contribute to the development of the negative stiffness and change the muscles from a spring to a damping unit. PMID:1890636

  20. Introduction and validation of a less painful algorithm to estimate the nociceptive flexion reflex threshold.

    PubMed

    Lichtner, Gregor; Golebiewski, Anna; Schneider, Martin H; von Dincklage, Falk

    2015-05-22

    The nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) is a widely used tool to investigate spinal nociception for scientific and diagnostic purposes, but its clinical use is currently limited due to the painful measurement procedure, especially restricting its applicability for patients suffering from chronic pain disorders. Here we introduce a less painful algorithm to assess the NFR threshold. Application of this new algorithm leads to a reduction of subjective pain ratings by over 30% compared to the standard algorithm. We show that the reflex threshold estimates resulting from application of the new algorithm can be used interchangeably with those of the standard algorithm after adjusting for the constant difference between the algorithms. Furthermore, we show that the new algorithm can be applied at shorter interstimulus intervals than are commonly used with the standard algorithm, since reflex threshold values remain unchanged and no habituation effects occur when reducing the interstimulus interval for the new algorithm down to 3s. Finally we demonstrate the utility of the new algorithm to investigate the modulation of nociception through different states of attention. Taken together, the here presented new algorithm could increase the utility of the NFR for investigation of nociception in subjects who were previously not able to endure the measurement procedure, such as chronic pain patients.

  1. Contralateral suppression of distortion product otoacoustic emissions and the middle-ear muscle reflex in human ears.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2008-03-01

    Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were measured in the absence and presence of contralateral noise at five levels--below, equal to, and above the middle-ear muscle (MEM) reflex threshold. The resultant changes in DPOAE level and phase were dependent on stimulus frequency and noise level. Both low-level noise, believed to elicit the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex, and high-level noise, thought to activate both MOC and MEM reflexes, significantly decreased the DPOAE level. However, the shift from sole MOC effect to mixed MOC and MEM effects was not as dramatic as we thought. While low-level noise resulted in a minimum DPOAE phase change, high-level noise caused a substantial phase lead for 1 and 2kHz. With increasing frequency, phase lag became more notable. The present study suggests the following: (1) DPOAE contralateral suppression by low-level sound most likely does not involve the effect of the MEM reflex and signal crossover; and (2) combined analysis of DPOAE level and phase changes warrants further investigations to overcome the difficulty in separating the effects of MOC efferents and MEM contraction. The results also imply that OAE measurement has the potential for being used to investigate the effect of the MEM reflex on sound transmission. PMID:18258398

  2. Influence of delayed muscle reflexes on spinal stability: model-based predictions allow alternative interpretations of experimental data.

    PubMed

    Liebetrau, Anne; Puta, Christian; Anders, Christoph; de Lussanet, Marc H E; Wagner, Heiko

    2013-10-01

    Model-based calculations indicate that reflex delay and reflex gain are both important for spinal stability. Experimental results demonstrate that chronic low back pain is associated with delayed muscle reflex responses of trunk muscles. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of such time-delayed reflexes on the stability using a simple biomechanical model. Additionally, we compared the model-based predictions with experimental data from chronic low back pain patients and healthy controls using surface-electromyography. Linear stability methods were applied to the musculoskeletal model, which was extended with a time-delayed reflex model. Lateral external perturbations were simulated around equilibrium to investigate the effects of reflex delay and gain on the stability of the human lumbar spine. The model simulations predicted that increased reflex delays require a reduction of the reflex gain to avoid spinal instability. The experimental data support this dependence for the investigated abdominal muscles in chronic low back pain patients and healthy control subjects. Reflex time-delay and gain dependence showed that a delayed reflex latency could have relevant influence on spinal stability, if subjects do not adapt their reflex amplitudes. Based on the model and the experimental results, the relationship between muscle reflex response latency and the maximum of the reflex amplitude should be considered for evaluation of (patho) physiological data. We recommend that training procedures should focus on speeding up the delayed reflex response as well as on increasing the amplitude of these reflexes.

  3. Reflexes in cat ankle muscles after landing from falls.

    PubMed

    Prochazka, A; Schofield, P; Westerman, R A; Ziccone, S P

    1977-11-01

    1. Electrical activity and length of ankle muscles were recorded by telemetry during free fall and landing in cats. 2. After foot contact, there was a delay in onset of stretch of ankle extensors of between 8 and 11 ms. High-speed cinematography showed the delay to be associated with rapid initial dorsiflexion of the toes. 3. Electromyograms (e.m.g.) from lateral gastrocnemius increased in amplitude prior to landing. An early depression of lateral gastrocnemius e.m.g. commenced at 8 ms after foot contact, and was followed by a large peak of activity commencing some 8 ms after the first increase in lateral gastrocnemius length. 4. Local anaesthesia of the plantar cushion did not alter this pattern of response. 5. The early inhibition of lateral gastrocnemius was attributed to the action on lateral gastrocnemius motoneurones of non-cutaneous afferents responding to the initial toe dorsiflexion. Additional autogenetic inhibition may also have contributed. 6. The subsequent peak of e.m.g. was at a latenty consistent with a rapid stretch reflex, and occurred soon enough for the resulting active tension to contribute significantly to the extensor force during body deceleration.

  4. Trunk Muscle Reflex Amplitudes Increased in Patients With Subacute, Recurrent LBP Treated With a 10-Week Stabilization Exercise Program

    PubMed Central

    Navalgund, Anand; Buford, John A.; Briggs, Mathew S.; Givens, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Altered trunk muscle reflexes have been observed in patients with low back pain (LBP). Altered reflexes may contribute to impaired postural control, and possibly recurrence of LBP. Specific stabilization exercise (SSE) programs have been shown to decrease the risk of LBP recurrence in a select group of patients with acute, first episode LBP. It is not known if trunk muscle reflex responses improve with resolution of subacute, recurrent LBP when treated with a SSE program. A perturbation test was used to compare trunk muscle reflexes in patients with subacute, recurrent LBP, before and after 10 weeks of a SSE program and a group of matched control subjects (CNTL). The LBP group pre therapy had delayed trunk muscle reflexes compared with the CNTL group. Post therapy reflex latencies remained delayed, but amplitudes increased. Increased reflex amplitudes could limit excessive movement of the spine when perturbed; potentially helping prevent recurrence. PMID:22964879

  5. The influence of increased muscle spindle sensitivity on Achilles tendon jerk and H-reflex in relaxed human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Durand, Christiane

    2002-01-01

    Whether the fusimotor system contributes to reflex gain changes during reinforcement maneuvers is re-examined in the light of new data. Recently, from direct recordings of spindle afferent activity originating from ankle flexor muscles, we showed that mental computation increased the muscle spindle mechanical sensitivity in completely relaxed human subjects without concomitant alpha-motoneuron activation, providing evidence for selective fusimotor drive activation. In the present study, the effects of mental computation were investigated on monosynaptic reflexes elicited in non-contracting soleus muscle either by direct nerve stimulation (Hoffmann reflex, H) or by tendon tap (Tendinous reflex, T). The aim was to relate the time course of the changes in reflex size to the increase in spindle sensitivity during mental task in order to explore whether fusimotor activation can influence the size of the monosynaptic reflex. The results show changes in reflex amplitude that parallel the increase in muscle spindle sensitivity. When T-reflex is consistently facilitated during mental effort, the H-reflex is either depressed or facilitated, depending on the subjects. These findings suggest that the increased activity in muscle spindle primary endings may account for mental computation-induced changes in both tendon jerk and H-reflex. The facilitation of T-reflex is attributed to the enhanced spindle mechanical sensitivity and the inhibition of H-reflex is attributed to post-activation depression following the increased Ia ongoing discharge. This study supports the view that the fusimotor sensitization of muscle spindles is responsible for changes in both the mechanically and electrically elicited reflexes. It is concluded that the fusimotor drive contributed to adjustment of the size of tendon jerk and H-reflex during mental effort. The possibility that a mental computation task may also operate by reducing the level of presynaptic inhibition is discussed on the basis of H-reflex

  6. Gating of trigemino-facial reflex from low-threshold trigeminal and extratrigeminal cutaneous fibres in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A; Scarpini, C

    1992-01-01

    Changes in the size of the test components (R1 and R2) of the trigemino-facial reflex were studied after electrical subliminal conditioning stimulation were applied to the trigeminal, median and sural nerves. After conditioning activation of the trigeminal nerve (below the reflex threshold), the early R1 reflex component showed phasic facilitation, peaking at about 50 ms of interstimulus delay, followed by a long-lasting inhibition recovering at 300-400 ms. The same conditioning stimulation resulted in a monotonic inhibition of the late R2, starting at 15-20 ms, with a maximum at 100-150 ms and lasting 300-400 ms. Intensity threshold for both the R1 and R2 changes ranged from 0.90 to 0.95 times the perception threshold. A similar longlasting inhibition of the R2 reflex response was also seen after conditioning stimulation applied to low-threshold cutaneous afferents of the median and sural nerves. The minimum effective conditioning-test interval was 25-30 ms and 40-45 ms respectively and lasted 600-700 ms. By contrast the early R1 reflex response exhibited a slight long-lasting facilitation with a time course similar to that of the R2 inhibition. The threshold intensity to obtain facilitation of the R1 and inhibition of the R2 test responses after conditioning volley in the median and sural nerves was similar and ranged from 0.9 to 1.2 times the perception threshold. These results demonstrate that low-threshold cutaneous afferents from trigeminal and limb nerves exert powerful control on trigeminal reflex pathways, probably via a common neural substrate. There is evidence that, in addition to any post-synaptic mechanism which might be operating, presynaptic control is a primary factor contributing to these changes. Images PMID:1328539

  7. Catching a ball: contributions of intrinsic muscle stiffness, reflexes, and higher order responses.

    PubMed

    Bennett, D J; Gorassini, M; Prochazka, A

    1994-05-01

    In three sets of experiments in nine normal subjects and a patient with a percutaneous wrist-stabilizing splint, we quantified the open-loop gain (OLG) of the stretch reflex acting about the elbow. The subjects exerted a steady mean flexing force and were instructed not to intervene (i.e., not to resist actively) when force or displacement perturbations were imposed on the forearm. The method was either to reconstruct transmission around the entire loop in a two-part experiment, or to use the attenuation of external perturbations in normal and electrically stimulated muscle to compute gain. Across all experiments, the mean magnitude of stretch reflex OLG was close to unity in the frequency range 1-2 Hz, and declined at higher frequencies, as required to ensure stability, given that the phase lag approached 180 degrees at 5 Hz. Inherent muscle stiffness was approximately equal to reflex stiffness. In functional terms, an OLG of 1 means that the yield caused by a force perturbation is approximately halved by reflex action (prevailing inherent muscle stiffness is doubled). Automatic scaling of reflex transmission at Ia/alpha-motoneuronal synapses ensures that the OLG remains close to unity as inherent stiffness increases. Trials in the patient with the wrist fixator gave similar results, indicating that the reflexes were proprioceptive ly mediated. In a fourth experiment in which the task was to catch a heavy ball, we compared the efficacy of inherent muscle stiffness and reflexes alone, with the subject's intentional reactions, which included predictive and voluntary components of response. The latter were far more effective in maintaining the position of the hand after the ball was caught than inherent and reflex stiffnesses alone. We conclude that stability requirements limit the extent to which stretch reflexes can augment inherent muscle stiffness. When inherent muscle stiffness is low, such as in our ball-catching task, the reflex stiffness is also low, and

  8. Interaction between vestibulosympathetic and skeletal muscle reflexes on sympathetic activity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence from animals indicates that skeletal muscle afferents activate the vestibular nuclei and that both vestibular and skeletal muscle afferents have inputs to the ventrolateral medulla. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the interaction between the vestibulosympathetic and skeletal muscle reflexes on muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and arterial pressure in humans. MSNA, arterial pressure, and heart rate were measured in 17 healthy subjects in the prone position during three experimental trials. The three trials were 2 min of 1) head-down rotation (HDR) to engage the vestibulosympathetic reflex, 2) isometric handgrip (IHG) at 30% maximal voluntary contraction to activate skeletal muscle afferents, and 3) HDR and IHG performed simultaneously. The order of the three trials was randomized. HDR and IHG performed alone increased total MSNA by 46 +/- 16 and 77 +/- 24 units, respectively (P < 0.01). During the HDR plus IHG trial, MSNA increased 142 +/- 38 units (P < 0.01). This increase was not significantly different from the sum of the individual trials (130 +/- 41 units). This finding was also observed with mean arterial pressure (sum = 21 +/- 2 mmHg and HDR + IHG = 22 +/- 2 mmHg). These findings suggest that there is an additive interaction for MSNA and arterial pressure when the vestibulosympathetic and skeletal muscle reflexes are engaged simultaneously in humans. Therefore, no central modulation exists between these two reflexes with regard to MSNA output in humans.

  9. [Posterior auricular muscle reflex in the study of the facial muscle function].

    PubMed

    Parmigiani, F; Buratti, C

    1998-02-01

    To date the study of facial nerve function is based on just two tests: electroneurography (ENGH) and electromyography (EMG). Nevertheless neither of these tests gives reliable results until 8-10 days after onset of the paralysis. The authors have used an evoked auditory potential--more specifically the posterior auricular muscle reflex (PAMr) which is directly activated by the VII cranial nerve in the brainstem after acoustical stimulation. They first tested this method in normal subjects and later in patients with Bell's Palsy and the Ramsey Hunt Syndrome. The authors assert the predictive capacity of this test, in particular, underlining the clear-cut relationship between the time required for the paralysis to heal and the difference in side-to-side PAMr latency. While the sensitivity of the ENGH and PAMr tests are similar, PAMr makes staging of the evolution possible on the 2nd day after onset.

  10. F response and H reflex analysis of physiological unity of gravity and antigravity muscles in man.

    PubMed

    García, H A; Fisher, M A

    1977-01-01

    Observational differences between reflex (H reflex) and antidromic (F response) activation of segmental motoneurons by a peripheral electrical stimulus are described. In contrast to H reflexes, the percentage of F responses found after a series of stimuli is directly related to the pick-up field of the recording electrode consistent with this response being due to the variable activation of a small fraction of the available motoneuron pool. Despite the differing physiological mechanisms, both F responses and H reflexes can be used to demonstrate similar relative "central excitatory states" for antigravity muscles (i.e. extensors in the lower extremity and flexors in the upper extremity) and their antagonist gravity muscles. H reflexes were elicited not only in their usual location in certain antigravity muscles but also in unusual locations by length/tension changes in agonist and antagonist groups as well as by passive stretch. The data argue for the physiological unity of similarly acting gravity and antigravity muscles as well as supporting a meaningful role of group II afferents in normal segmental motoneuron pool excitability.

  11. Trunk muscle activation during golf swing: Baseline and threshold.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís; Marta, Sérgio; Vaz, João; Fernandes, Orlando; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    There is a lack of studies regarding EMG temporal analysis during dynamic and complex motor tasks, such as golf swing. The aim of this study is to analyze the EMG onset during the golf swing, by comparing two different threshold methods. Method A threshold was determined using the baseline activity recorded between two maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Method B threshold was calculated using the mean EMG activity for 1000ms before the 500ms prior to the start of the Backswing. Two different clubs were also studied. Three-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare methods, muscles and clubs. Two-way mixed Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) with absolute agreement was used to determine the methods reliability. Club type usage showed no influence in onset detection. Rectus abdominis (RA) showed the higher agreement between methods. Erector spinae (ES), on the other hand, showed a very low agreement, that might be related to postural activity before the swing. External oblique (EO) is the first being activated, at 1295ms prior impact. There is a similar activation time between right and left muscles sides, although the right EO showed better agreement between methods than left side. Therefore, the algorithms usage is task- and muscle-dependent.

  12. Trunk muscle activation during golf swing: Baseline and threshold.

    PubMed

    Silva, Luís; Marta, Sérgio; Vaz, João; Fernandes, Orlando; Castro, Maria António; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    There is a lack of studies regarding EMG temporal analysis during dynamic and complex motor tasks, such as golf swing. The aim of this study is to analyze the EMG onset during the golf swing, by comparing two different threshold methods. Method A threshold was determined using the baseline activity recorded between two maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). Method B threshold was calculated using the mean EMG activity for 1000ms before the 500ms prior to the start of the Backswing. Two different clubs were also studied. Three-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare methods, muscles and clubs. Two-way mixed Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) with absolute agreement was used to determine the methods reliability. Club type usage showed no influence in onset detection. Rectus abdominis (RA) showed the higher agreement between methods. Erector spinae (ES), on the other hand, showed a very low agreement, that might be related to postural activity before the swing. External oblique (EO) is the first being activated, at 1295ms prior impact. There is a similar activation time between right and left muscles sides, although the right EO showed better agreement between methods than left side. Therefore, the algorithms usage is task- and muscle-dependent. PMID:23816264

  13. Activity of latissimus dorsi muscle during inspiratory threshold loads.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Levi, M; Gea, J; Monells, J; Aran, X; Aguar, M C; Broquetas, J M

    1995-03-01

    The ability of the latissimus dorsi muscle (LD) to participate as an accessory inspiratory muscle has been the subject of controversy. Electromyographic (EGM) activity of LD was evaluated in 11 healthy subjects (aged 30 +/- 2 yrs; forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 106 +/- 5% predicted; maximal inspiratory pressure (Pmax), 120 +/- 6 cmH2O) under different breathing conditions. The ipsilateral biceps brachii was chosen as the control muscle. The EMG was recorded from surface electrodes, but needle electrodes were also used for LD evaluation in a subset of three subjects. The EMG signal from both muscles was recorded simultaneously, rectified and integrated, with subtraction of the electrocardiographic signal. Situations evaluated were: 1) maximal voluntary contraction (MVC); 2) apnoea; and 3) breathing under progressive inspiratory threshold loads (20-100% Pmax, at 20% intervals). A close relationship was evident between LD recordings from surface and needle electrodes (r = 0.975). Activity of LD at baseline was 1.8 +/- 0.4% MVC, and showed a phasic increase during inspiration under loads. This change had a linear tendency and was significant for loads corresponding to 40, 60, 80 and 100% of Pmax when compared to the control muscle. At this latter level, LD activity was equivalent to 32 +/- 5% MVC (range 11-61%), whereas mean activity of the control muscle was less than 7.5% MVC.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7789491

  14. Ligament-muscle reflex arc after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: electromyographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Biedert, R M; Zwick, E B

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a ligament-muscle reflex arc exists between the bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and the hamstring muscle group. We studied four patients, average age 34.2 years (range 32-36 years). The mean time between the ACL reconstruction and the study examination was 56.2 months (range 5-108 months). All patients underwent a second-look arthroscopy for meniscal injuries, cyclops lesions, or adhesions. Five patients with a normal ACL served as a control group before we performed an arthroscopic meniscectomy. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was measured using fine wire electrodes under two different testing conditions. No unequivocal EMG activity could be detected in the ACL-reconstructed knees when we pulled on the graft or in the controls. Three of four patients and all controls felt pain when we touched the graft or normal ACL or applied strain on it with the hook. In conclusion, the ACL autograft presents a noxious sensory innervation, the Lachman test maneuver stimulates a reflex arc with hamstrings activation, and an unequivocal ligament-muscle reflex arc from the graft to the hamstring muscle group could not be demonstrated. PMID:9833113

  15. Muscle afferent potential (`A-wave') in the surface electromyogram of a phasic stretch reflex in normal humans

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Alex. M.; Michie, Patricia T.; Glue, Leonard C. T.

    1972-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper tested the hypothesis that the afferent potential elicited by a tendon tap in an isometrically recorded phasic stretch reflex can be detected in the surface EMG of normal humans when appropriate techniques are used. These techniques involved (1) training the subjects to relax mentally and physically so that the EMG was silent before and immediately after the diphasic MAP which reflects a highly synchronous discharge of afferent impulses from low threshold muscle stretch receptors after a tendon tap, and (2) using a data retrieval computer to summate stimulus-locked potentials in the EMG over a series of 16 samples using taps of uniform peak force and duration on the Achilles tendon to elicit the tendon jerk in the calf muscles. A discrete, diphasic potential (`A-wave') was recorded from EMG electrodes placed on the surface of the skin over the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The `A-wave' afferent potential had the opposite polarity to the corresponding efferent MAP. Under control conditions of relaxation the `A-wave' had a latency after the onset of the tap of 2 msec, the peak to peak amplitude was of the order of 5 μV and the duration was in the range of 6 to 10 msec. Further experiments were conducted to show that the `A-wave' (1) was not an artefact of the instrumentation used, (2) had a threshold at low intensities of stimulation, and (3) could be reliably augmented by using a Jendrassik manoeuvre compared with the potential observed during control (relaxation) conditions. The results support the conclusion that the `A-wave' emanates from the pool of muscle spindles which discharges impulses along group Ia nerve fibres in response to the phasic stretch stimulus because the primary ending of the spindles is known to initiate the stretch reflex and the spindles can be sensitized by fusimotor impulses so that their threshold is lowered as a result of a Jendrassik manoeuvre. The finding has important implications for the

  16. Programming the cochlear implant based on electrical acoustic reflex thresholds: patient performance.

    PubMed

    Spivak, L G; Chute, P M; Popp, A L; Parisier, S C

    1994-10-01

    The electrical acoustic reflex threshold (EART) has been shown to be a reliable estimate of behavioral comfort levels in both child and adult cochlear implant patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for using EARTs for programming the Nucleus cochlear implant. EARTs and behavioral comfort levels were obtained from 7 adult implant patients. Two programs or "maps" were made for each patient, one based on behavioral comfort levels and one based on EARTs. Performance on open set tests of speech recognition was measured with each map. Mean data suggest that speech perception is similar with both maps. Analysis of individual data revealed that, whereas 2 subjects performed better with the C-level maps, the remaining 5 subjects tended to perform either better with the EART map or equally well with both maps. These results suggest that EARTs may be an adequate substitute for comfort levels when programming the implant for patients who are unable to make reliable psychophysical judgments.

  17. Dynamic stability of spine using stability-based optimization and muscle spindle reflex.

    PubMed

    Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Hemami, Hooshang; Barin, Kamran; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2008-02-01

    A computational method for simulation of 3-D movement of the trunk under the control of 48 anatomically oriented muscle actions was developed. Neural excitation of muscles was set based on inverse dynamics approach along with the stability-based optimization. The effect of muscle spindle reflex response on the trunk movement stability was evaluated upon the application of a perturbation moment. The method was used to simulate the trunk movement from the upright standing to 60 degrees of flexion. Incorporation of the stability condition as an additional constraint in the optimization resulted in an increase in antagonistic activities demonstrating that the antagonistic co-activation acts to increase the trunk stability in response to self-induced postural internal perturbation. In presence of a 30 Nm flexion perturbation moment, muscle spindles decreased the induced deviation of the position and velocity profiles from the desired ones. The stability-generated co-activation decreased the reflexive response of muscle spindles to the perturbation demonstrating that the rise in muscle co-activation can ameliorate the corruption of afferent neural sensory system at the expense of higher loading of the spine.

  18. Electrophysiological aspects of the middle ear muscle reflex in the rat: latency, rise time and effect on sound transmission.

    PubMed

    van den Berge, H; Kingma, H; Kluge, C; Marres, E H

    1990-10-01

    The latency, the rise time and the influence of the acoustic reflex on sound transmission were investigated in the adult rat during ketamin anesthesia. This was done by recordings of the cochlear microphonics (CM) and electromyographic (EMG) recordings of the reflex responses of the tensor tympani muscle. The acoustic reflex was elicited by contralateral acoustic stimuli of which the intensity and frequency was varied. Ipsilaterally, the effect on sound transmission was determined by estimating the change in amplitude of the CM's of ipsilateral administered subliminal stimuli. It was shown that both the tensor tympani muscle and the stapedius muscle contribute in the reflex. The latency as well as the rise time of the reflex determined by CM recordings showed to be short (minimal values: 12 and 7 ms respectively). The mean latency of the tensor tympani muscle reflex, measured by EMG, was about 7 ms. The attenuation of 0.25-8 kHz tone bursts upto 115 dB SPL is limited to a mean maximum of 15 dB SPL. The maximal attenuation was shown to occur at 1 kHz. Frequencies above 2 kHz appeared to be the best elicitor of the middle ear muscle reflex.

  19. Single motor unit activity in human extraocular muscles during the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Weber, Konrad P; Rosengren, Sally M; Michels, Rike; Sturm, Veit; Straumann, Dominik; Landau, Klara

    2012-07-01

    Motor unit activity in human eye muscles during the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is not well understood, since the associated head and eye movements normally preclude single unit recordings. Therefore we recorded single motor unit activity following bursts of skull vibration and sound, two vestibular otolith stimuli that elicit only small head and eye movements. Inferior oblique (IO) and inferior rectus (IR) muscle activity was measured in healthy humans with concentric needle electrodes. Vibration elicited highly synchronous, short-latency bursts of motor unit activity in the IO (latency: 10.5 ms) and IR (14.5 ms) muscles. The activation patterns of the two muscles were similar, but reciprocal, with delayed activation of the IR muscle. Sound produced short-latency excitation of the IO muscle (13.3 ms) in the eye contralateral to the stimulus. Simultaneous needle and surface recordings identified the IO as the muscle of origin of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) thus validating the physiological basis of this recently developed clinical test of otolith function. Single extraocular motor unit recordings provide a window into neural activity in humans that can normally only be examined using animal models and help identify the pathways of the translational VOR from otoliths to individual eye muscles.

  20. Changes in H-reflex amplitude to muscle stretch and lengthening in humans.

    PubMed

    Budini, Francesco; Tilp, Markus

    2016-07-01

    Spinal reflex excitability is traditionally assessed to investigate neural adjustments that occur during human movement. Different experimental procedures are known to condition spinal reflex excitability. Among these, lengthening movements and static stretching the human triceps have been investigated over the last 50 years. The purpose of this review is to shed light on several apparent incongruities in terms of magnitude and duration of the reported results. In the present review dissimilarities in neuro-spinal changes are examined in relation to the methodologies applied to condition and measure them. Literature that investigated three different conditioning procedures was reviewed: passive dorsiflexion, active dorsiflexion through antagonists shortening and eccentric plantar-flexors contractions. Measurements were obtained before, during and after lengthening or stretching. Stimulation intensities and time delays between conditioning procedures and stimuli varied considerably. H-reflex decreases immediately as static stretching is applied and in proportion to the stretch degree. During dorsiflexions the inhibition is stronger with greater dorsiflexion angular velocity and at lower nerve stimulation intensities, while it is weaker if any concomitant muscle contraction is performed. Within 2 s after a single passive dorsiflexion movement, H-reflex is strongly inhibited, and this effect disappears within 15 s. Dorsiflexions repeated over 1 h and prolonged static stretching training induce long-lasting inhibition. This review highlights that the apparent disagreement between studies is ascribable to small methodological differences. Lengthening movements and stretching can strongly influence spinal neural pathways. Results interpretation, however, needs careful consideration of the methodology applied. PMID:27089411

  1. Reflex and cerebellar influences on α and on `rhythmic' and `tonic' γ activity in the intercostal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Corda, M.; von Euler, C.; Lennerstrand, G.

    1966-01-01

    1. Efferent intercostal α and γ activity and afferent intercostal muscle spindle activity were studied in decerebrate cats in response to stimulation of the anterior lobe of the cerebellum and to postural and other reflexes. 2. Low threshold intercostal responses were elicited from lobuli IV and V of the anterior lobe of the cerebellum. 3. The existence of two functionally different types of intercostal γ neurones has been confirmed. These are the `rhythmic' or `specifically respiratory' γ neurones, and the `tonic' γ neurones. 4. In response to cerebellar stimulation, facilitatory, inhibitory and diphasic tetanic and post-tetanic effects were obtained from α and the two types of γ fibres in both external and internal intercostal nerve branches. 5. Generally both inspiratory and expiratory α and γ activity was facilitated in response to tetanic stimulation at contralateral stimulus sites, and inhibited in response to stimulation of ipsilateral sites. 6. `Rhythmic' γ activity appeared to be rather closely linked to the respiratory α activity but the balance between `rhythmic' γ and α was often changed in response to cerebellar stimulation, as indicated by the responses of primary muscle spindle afferents. 7. The `tonic' γ neurones were as a rule more responsive to cerebellar stimulation than were the α and `rhythmic' γ neurones. Long-lasting post-tetanic effects were much more prominent in the `tonic' γ fibres than in the α or `rhythmic' γ fibres. 8. `Rhythmic' γ activity was abolished after cervical transections of the cord. `Tonic' γ activity remained in the spinal preparations although usually at a different discharge rate. 9. `Tonic' γ neurones were more responsive than the `rhythmic' γ neurones to the proprioceptive γ reflex elicited by passive movements of the chest wall as well as to other spinal and supraspinal reflexes. 10. Both `dynamic' and `static' γ fibres seem to be represented in the group of `tonic' intercostal γ neurones. 11

  2. Short-Term Plasticity in a Monosynaptic Reflex Pathway to Forearm Muscles after Continuous Robot-Assisted Passive Stepping

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Kamibayashi, Kiyotaka; Kitamura, Taku; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E. Paul; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    Both active and passive rhythmic limb movements reduce the amplitude of spinal cord Hoffmann (H-) reflexes in muscles of moving and distant limbs. This could have clinical utility in remote modulation of the pathologically hyperactive reflexes found in spasticity after stroke or spinal cord injury. However, such clinical translation is currently hampered by a lack of critical information regarding the minimum or effective duration of passive movement needed for modulating spinal cord excitability. We therefore investigated the H-reflex modulation in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle during and after various durations (5, 10, 15, and 30 min) of passive stepping in 11 neurologically normal subjects. Passive stepping was performed by a robotic gait trainer system (Lokomat®) while a single pulse of electrical stimulation to the median nerve elicited H-reflexes in the FCR. The amplitude of the FCR H-reflex was significantly suppressed during passive stepping. Although 30 min of passive stepping was sufficient to elicit a persistent H-reflex suppression that lasted up to 15 min, 5 min of passive stepping was not. The duration of H-reflex suppression correlated with that of the stepping. These findings suggest that the accumulation of stepping-related afferent feedback from the leg plays a role in generating short-term interlimb plasticity in the circuitry of the FCR H-reflex. PMID:27499737

  3. Short-Term Plasticity in a Monosynaptic Reflex Pathway to Forearm Muscles after Continuous Robot-Assisted Passive Stepping.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Kamibayashi, Kiyotaka; Kitamura, Taku; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E Paul; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    Both active and passive rhythmic limb movements reduce the amplitude of spinal cord Hoffmann (H-) reflexes in muscles of moving and distant limbs. This could have clinical utility in remote modulation of the pathologically hyperactive reflexes found in spasticity after stroke or spinal cord injury. However, such clinical translation is currently hampered by a lack of critical information regarding the minimum or effective duration of passive movement needed for modulating spinal cord excitability. We therefore investigated the H-reflex modulation in the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle during and after various durations (5, 10, 15, and 30 min) of passive stepping in 11 neurologically normal subjects. Passive stepping was performed by a robotic gait trainer system (Lokomat(®)) while a single pulse of electrical stimulation to the median nerve elicited H-reflexes in the FCR. The amplitude of the FCR H-reflex was significantly suppressed during passive stepping. Although 30 min of passive stepping was sufficient to elicit a persistent H-reflex suppression that lasted up to 15 min, 5 min of passive stepping was not. The duration of H-reflex suppression correlated with that of the stepping. These findings suggest that the accumulation of stepping-related afferent feedback from the leg plays a role in generating short-term interlimb plasticity in the circuitry of the FCR H-reflex.

  4. Reflex tracheal smooth muscle contraction and bronchial vasodilation evoked by airway cooling in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pisarri, T E; Giesbrecht, G G

    1997-05-01

    Cooling intrathoracic airways by filling the pulmonary circulation with cold blood alters pulmonary mechanoreceptor discharge. To determine whether this initiates reflex changes that could contribute to airway obstruction, we measured changes in tracheal smooth muscle tension and bronchial arterial flow evoked by cooling. In nine chloralose-anesthetized open-chest dogs, the right pulmonary artery was cannulated and perfused; the left lung, ventilated separately, provided gas exchange. With the right lung phasically ventilated, filling the right pulmonary circulation with 5 degrees C blood increased smooth muscle tension in an innervated upper tracheal segment by 23 +/- 6 (SE) g from a baseline of 75 g. Contraction began within 10 s of injection and was maximal at approximately 30s. The response was abolished by cervical vagotomy. Bronchial arterial flow increased from 8 +/- 1 to 13 +/- 2 ml/min, with little effect on arterial blood pressure. The time course was similar to that of the tracheal response. This response was greatly attenuated after cervical vagotomy. Blood at 20 degrees C also increased tracheal smooth muscle tension and bronchial flow, whereas 37 degrees C blood had little effect. The results suggested that alteration of airway mechanoreceptor discharge by cooling can initiate reflexes that contribute to airway obstruction. PMID:9134906

  5. The proprioceptive reflex control of the intercostal muscles during their voluntary activation.

    PubMed

    Davis, J N; Sears, T A

    1970-08-01

    1. A quantitative study has been made of the reflex effects of sudden changes in mechanical load on contracting human intercostal muscles during willed breathing movements involving the chest wall. Averaging techniques were applied to recordings of electromyogram (EMG) and lung volume, and to other parameters of breathing.2. Load changes were effected for brief periods (10-150 msec) at any predetermined lung volume by sudden connexion of the airway to a pressure source variable between +/- 80 cm H(2)O so that respiratory movement could be either assisted or opposed. In some experiments airway resistance was suddenly reduced by porting from a high to a low resistance external airway.3. Contracting inspiratory and expiratory intercostal muscles showed a ;silent period' with unloading which is attributed to the sudden withdrawal from intercostal motoneurones of monosynaptic excitation of muscle spindle origin.4. For both inspiratory and expiratory intercostal muscles the typical immediate effect of an increase in load was an inhibitory response (IR) with a latency of about 22 msec followed by an excitatory response (ER) with a latency of 50-60 msec.5. It was established using brief duration stimuli (< 40 msec) that the IR depended on mechanical events associated with the onset of stimulation, whereas stimuli greater than 40 msec in duration were required to evoke the ER.6. For constant expiratory flow rate and a constant load, the ER of expiratory intercostal muscles increased as lung volume decreased within the limits set by maximal activation of the motoneurone pool as residual volume was approached.7. The ER to a constant load increased directly with the expiratory flow rate at which the load applied, also within limits set by maximal activation of the motoneurone pool.8. For a given load, the ER during phonation was greater than that occurring at a similar expiratory flow rate without phonation when the resistance of the phonating larynx was mimicked by an

  6. Muscle Weakness Thresholds for Prediction of Diabetes in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark D.; Zhang, Peng; Choksi, Palak; Markides, Kyriakos S.; Al Snih, Soham

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the known links between weakness and early mortality, what remains to be fully understood is the extent to which strength preservation is associated with protection from cardiometabolic diseases such as diabetes. Purpose The purposes of this study were to determine the association between muscle strength and diabetes among adults, and to identify age- and sex-specific thresholds of low strength for detection of risk. Methods A population-representative sample of 4,066 individuals, aged 20–85 years, was included from the combined 2011–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey datasets. Strength was assessed using a hand-held dynamometer, and the single largest reading from either hand was normalized to body mass. A logistic regression model was used to assess the association between normalized grip strength and risk of diabetes, as determined by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels (≥6.5% [≥48 mmol/mol]), while controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, anthropometric measures, and television viewing time. Results For every 0.05 decrement in normalized strength, there was a 1.26 times increased adjusted odds for diabetes in men and women. Women were at lower odds of having diabetes (OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.29–0.82), whereas age, waist circumference and lower income were inversely associated. Optimal sex- and age-specific weakness thresholds to detect diabetes were 0.56, 0.50, and 0.45 for men, and 0.42, 0.38, and 0.33 for women, for ages 20–39 years, 40–59 years, and 60–80 years. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance We present thresholds of strength that can be incorporated into a clinical setting for identifying adults that are at risk for developing diabetes, and that might benefit from lifestyle interventions to reduce risk. PMID:26744337

  7. Oxidative stress exaggerates skeletal muscle contraction-evoked reflex sympathoexcitation in rats with hypertension induced by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Koba, Satoshi; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Kano, Naoko; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Muscle contraction stimulates thin fiber muscle afferents and evokes reflex sympathoexcitation. In hypertension, this reflex is exaggerated. ANG II, which is elevated in hypertension, has been reported to trigger the production of superoxide and other reactive oxygen species. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that increased ANG II in hypertension exaggerates skeletal muscle contraction-evoked reflex sympathoexcitation by inducing oxidative stress in the muscle. In rats, subcutaneous infusion of ANG II at 450 ng·kg(-1)·min(-1) for 14 days significantly (P < 0.05) elevated blood pressure compared with sham-operated (sham) rats. Electrically induced 30-s hindlimb muscle contraction in decerebrate rats with hypertension evoked larger renal sympathoexcitatory and pressor responses [+1,173 ± 212 arbitrary units (AU) and +35 ± 5 mmHg, n = 10] compared with sham normotensive rats (+419 ± 103 AU and +13 ± 2 mmHg, n = 11). Tempol, a SOD mimetic, injected intra-arterially into the hindlimb circulation significantly reduced responses in hypertensive rats, whereas this compound had no effect on responses in sham rats. Tiron, another SOD mimetic, also significantly reduced reflex renal sympathetic and pressor responses in a subset of hypertensive rats (n = 10). Generation of muscle superoxide, as evaluated by dihydroethidium staining, was increased in hypertensive rats. RT-PCR and immunoblot experiments showed that mRNA and protein for gp91(phox), a NADPH oxidase subunit, in skeletal muscle tissue were upregulated in hypertensive rats. Taken together, hese results suggest that increased ANG II in hypertension induces oxidative stress in skeletal muscle, thereby exaggerating the muscle reflex.

  8. Recruitment properties and significance of short latency reflexes in neck and eye muscles evoked by brief lateral head accelerations.

    PubMed

    Colebatch, James G; Dennis, Danielle L; Govender, Sendhil; Chen, Peggy; Todd, Neil P McAngus

    2014-09-01

    Short lateral head accelerations were applied to investigate the recruitment properties of the reflexes underlying the earliest ocular and cervical electromyographic reflex responses to these disturbances. Components of both reflexes are vestibular dependent and have been termed "ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials" and "cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials", respectively. Previous investigations using a unilateral vestibular stimulus have indicated that some but not all these vestibular-dependent reflexes show a simple power law relationship to stimulus intensity. In particular, crossed otolith-ocular reflexes showed evidence of an inflection separating two types of behaviour. The present stimulus acts bilaterally, and only the earliest crossed otolith-ocular reflex, previously shown to have a strictly unilateral origin, showed evidence of an inflection. Reflex changes in ocular torsion could, in principle, correct for the changes associated with translation for an elevated eye, but our findings indicated that the responses were consistent with previous reports of tilt-type reflexes. For the neck, both vestibular and segmental (muscle spindle) reflexes were evoked and followed power law relationships, without any clear separation in sensitivity. Our findings are consistent with previous evidence of "tilt-like" reflexes evoked by lateral acceleration and suggest that the departure from a power law occurs as a consequence of a unilateral crossed pathway. For the neck, responses to transients are likely to always consist of both vestibular and non-vestibular (segmental) components. Most of the translation-evoked ocular and cervical reflexes appear to follow power law relationship to stimulus amplitude over a physiological range.

  9. Selective recruitment of high-threshold human motor units during voluntary isotonic lengthening of active muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, A; Romanò, C; Schieppati, M

    1989-01-01

    threshold torque of recruitment among all the units. In addition, the amplitudes of both the action potential and the threshold torque were higher in the case of L units than in the case of S and S + L units. Most L units could be voluntarily recruited only in the case of ballistic isometric or isotonic contraction. 5. Occasionally, L units were directly activated by electrical stimulation of motor fibres and their conduction velocity was in the higher range for alpha-axons. In contrast, nerve stimulation could induce a reflex activation of S and S + L units.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2585297

  10. Acoustic reflex and general anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Z

    1983-01-01

    Infant and small children are not always able to cooperate in impedance measurements. For this reason it was decided, -in special cases, -to perform acoustic reflex examination under general anaesthesia. The first report on stapedius reflex and general anaesthesia was published by Mink et al. in 1981. Under the effect of Tiobutabarbital, Propanidid and Diazepam there is no reflex response. Acoustic reflex can be elicited with Ketamin-hydrochlorid and Alphaxalone-alphadolone acetate narcosis. The reflex threshold remains unchanged and the amplitude of muscle contraction is somewhat increased. The method was used: 1. to assess the type and degree of hearing loss in children with cleft palate and/or lip prior to surgery. 2. to exclude neuromuscular disorders with indication of pharyngoplasties. 3. to quantify hearing level in children--mostly multiply handicapped--with retarded speech development. The results of Behavioral Observation and Impedance Audiometry are discussed and evaluated.

  11. Refined distribution of myelinated trigeminal proprioceptive nerve fibres in Mueller's muscle as the mechanoreceptors to induce involuntary reflexive contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles.

    PubMed

    Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Hirasawa, Chihiro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2009-11-01

    Stretching of mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle induces reflexive contraction of not only the levator muscle but also the frontalis muscle as two different eyelid-opening muscles. Previously, we reported that fine neural myelinated structures, acting as mechanoreceptors, were found in the proximal Mueller's muscle. Since there is a risk of misunderstanding that the middle and distal Mueller's muscle does not contain mechanoreceptors and can be invalidated or resected, the accurate distribution of myelinated trigeminal proprioceptive nerve fibres as mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle was refined horizontally in this study. We explored 10 whole Mueller's muscles between the levator muscle and the tarsus of the upper eyelids obtained from five Japanese cadavers. The specimens were serially sliced along the horizontal plane and stained with HE, S-100 protein to determine the presence of Schwann cells, and smooth muscle actin antibody to determine the presence of Mueller's smooth muscle fibres. Although all myelinated nerve fibres in the intermuscular connective tissues among the sympathetically innervated Mueller's multi-unit smooth muscle fibres may not correspond to the proprioceptive nerve fibres, the nerve bundles consisting of multiple myelinated nerve fibres were well distributed in the proximal Mueller's muscle, and single myelinated nerve fibres were well distributed in the middle and distal Mueller's muscle. We believe that the mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle consist of myelinated proprioceptive nerve fibres with nerve endings possibly attached to collagen fibres in the intermuscular connective tissues present among Mueller's smooth muscle fibres. As the myelinated nerve fibres innervate the middle and distal Mueller's muscle to a greater extent than those in the proximal Mueller's muscle, the former may be more important as mechanoreceptors than the latter and should not be invalidated or excised during surgery for treatment of blepharoptosis to

  12. Long-latency component of the stretch reflex in human muscle is not mediated by intramuscular stretch receptors.

    PubMed

    Corden, D M; Lippold, O C; Buchanan, K; Norrington, C

    2000-07-01

    Reflex responses to mechanical stimulation of muscle (brief imposed movement) were investigated. Reflexes were elicited in the forefinger, recording from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI), and in the foot, recording from soleus. These responses typically consisted of a short-latency component (M1) and a long-latency component (M2) at 33 ms and 53 ms, respectively, after the stimulus in the case of FDI, and 37 ms and 68 ms, respectively, in soleus upon stimulation of the sole of the foot. Normally, when a muscle is stretched by a mechanical stimulus (either naturally or by an experimentally imposed movement), both skin receptors and muscle stretch receptors are activated. It is possible, however, to devise stimulation parameters where this is not the case. Fixating the finger with plasticine enables the effects of skin stimulation to be studied without stretching the FDI muscle. On the other hand, tapping a long tendon allows muscle stretch receptors to be activated without involving skin or subcutaneous structures. Component M1 was always abolished by finger fixation in 40 trials on 10 subjects, with M2 being essentially unchanged in latency, duration, or amplitude. Reflex responses were obtained in soleus muscle in nine experiments by prodding the sole of the foot (thereby stimulating both skin and muscle stretch receptors). Alternatively, the tendo achilles was prodded (which solely activates stretch receptors in the muscle). In the former, M1 and M2 were generated. In the latter, only M1 was produced. It is concluded that the long-latency component of the stretch reflex, M2, originates in skin and/or subcutaneous nerve terminals and that no part of M2 originates in muscle stretch receptors. PMID:10899195

  13. Neural control of rhythmic human arm movement: phase dependence and task modulation of hoffmann reflexes in forearm muscles.

    PubMed

    Zehr, E Paul; Collins, David F; Frigon, Alain; Hoogenboom, Nienke

    2003-01-01

    Although we move our arms rhythmically during walking, running, and swimming, we know little about the neural control of such movements. Our working hypothesis is that neural mechanisms controlling rhythmic movements are similar in the human lumbar and cervical spinal cord. Thus reflex modulation during rhythmic arm movement should be similar to that seen during leg movement. Our main experimental hypotheses were that the amplitude of H-reflexes in the forearm muscles would be modulated during arm movement (i.e., phase-dependent) and would be inhibited during cycling compared with static contraction (i.e., task-dependent). Furthermore, to determine the locus of any modulation, we tested the effect that active and passive movement of the ipsilateral (relative to stimulated arm) and contralateral arm had on H-reflex amplitude. Subjects performed rhythmic arm cycling on a custom-made hydraulic ergometer in which the two arms could be constrained to move together (180 degrees out of phase) or could rotate independently. Position of the stimulated limb in the movement cycle is described with respect to the clock face. H-reflexes were evoked at 12, 3, 6, and 9 o'clock positions during static contraction as well as during rhythmic arm movements. Reflex amplitudes were compared between tasks at equal M wave amplitudes and similar levels of electromyographic (EMG) activity in the target muscle. Surface EMG recordings were obtained bilaterally from flexor carpi radialis as well as from other muscles controlling the wrist, elbow, and shoulder. Compared with reflexes evoked during static contractions, movement of the stimulated limb attenuated H-reflexes by 50.8% (P < 0.005), 65.3% (P < 0.001), and 52.6% (P < 0.001) for bilateral, active ipsilateral, and passive ipsilateral movements, respectively. In contrast, movement of the contralateral limb did not significantly alter H-reflex amplitude. H-reflexes were also modulated by limb position (P < 0.005). Thus task- and phase

  14. Comparison of the depression of H-reflexes following previous activation in upper and lower limb muscles in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Durand, C; Jones, K E; Adams, S; Bawa, P

    1999-05-01

    When conditioning-testing (C-T) stimuli are applied to Ia afferents to elicit H-reflexes, the test reflex is abolished immediately following the conditioning reflex. As the C-T interval is increased, the test response slowly begins to recover, taking several hundred milliseconds to attain control values. The time course of this recovery is known as the H-reflex recovery curve. H-reflex recovery curves were compared using surface EMG and single motor unit activities in lower limb soleus and upper limb flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscles in seven healthy human subjects. Under rest conditions, the recovery of H-reflexes and single motor unit activity was slow for soleus; the recovery was not complete even in 1 s. In comparison, the recovery was very fast for FCR motor units, occurring in 200-300 ms. The effects of rate of stimulation (0.1-10.0 imp/s) were also examined on the magnitude of H-reflex responses. The reflex response declined with increasing rate of stimulation, the decline being slightly greater in soleus than in FCR. When these phenomena were examined with voluntary facilitation of the spinal cord, the time of recovery shortened and the effect of stimulus rate also diminished. Changes with background facilitation were greater in FCR than in soleus. The differences between the two muscles are attributed mainly to differences in presynaptic inhibition in the two spinal segments, and/or to the differences in dynamics of the transmitter release in terminals of Ia afferents synapsing with slow soleus motoneurons and those synapsing with the fast FCR motoneurons.

  15. Comparison of the depression of H-reflexes following previous activation in upper and lower limb muscles in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Durand, C; Jones, K E; Adams, S; Bawa, P

    1999-05-01

    When conditioning-testing (C-T) stimuli are applied to Ia afferents to elicit H-reflexes, the test reflex is abolished immediately following the conditioning reflex. As the C-T interval is increased, the test response slowly begins to recover, taking several hundred milliseconds to attain control values. The time course of this recovery is known as the H-reflex recovery curve. H-reflex recovery curves were compared using surface EMG and single motor unit activities in lower limb soleus and upper limb flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscles in seven healthy human subjects. Under rest conditions, the recovery of H-reflexes and single motor unit activity was slow for soleus; the recovery was not complete even in 1 s. In comparison, the recovery was very fast for FCR motor units, occurring in 200-300 ms. The effects of rate of stimulation (0.1-10.0 imp/s) were also examined on the magnitude of H-reflex responses. The reflex response declined with increasing rate of stimulation, the decline being slightly greater in soleus than in FCR. When these phenomena were examined with voluntary facilitation of the spinal cord, the time of recovery shortened and the effect of stimulus rate also diminished. Changes with background facilitation were greater in FCR than in soleus. The differences between the two muscles are attributed mainly to differences in presynaptic inhibition in the two spinal segments, and/or to the differences in dynamics of the transmitter release in terminals of Ia afferents synapsing with slow soleus motoneurons and those synapsing with the fast FCR motoneurons. PMID:10333012

  16. Acute effects of high-frequency microfocal vibratory stimulation on the H reflex of the soleus muscle. A double-blind study in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Alfonsi, Enrico; Paone, Paolo; Tassorelli, Cristina; De Icco, Roberto; Moglia, Arrigo; Alvisi, Elena; Marchetta, Lucky; Fresia, Mauro; Montini, Alessandra; Calabrese, Marzia; Versiglia, Vittorio; Sandrini, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Summary This study in healthy subjects examined the effects of a system delivering focal microvibrations at high frequency (Equistasi®) on tonic vibration stimulus (TVS)-induced inhibition of the soleus muscle H reflex. High-frequency microvibrations significantly increased the inhibitory effect of TVS on the H reflex for up to three minutes. Moreover, Equistasi® also significantly reduced alpha-motoneuron excitability, as indicated by the changes in the ratio between the maximum-amplitude H reflex (Hmax reflex) and the maximum-amplitude muscle response (Mmax response); this effect was due to reduction of the amplitude of the H reflex because the amplitude of muscle response remained unchanged. The present findings indicate that Equistasi® has a modulatory effect on proprioceptive reflex circuits. Therefore, Equistasi® might interfere with some mechanisms involved in both physiological and pathophysiological control of movement and of posture. PMID:26727706

  17. Aging alters muscle reflex control of autonomic cardiovascular responses to rhythmic contractions in humans.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Weavil, Joshua C; Venturelli, Massimo; Rossman, Matthew J; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Bledsoe, Amber D; Richardson, Russell S; Amann, Markus

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the influence of aging on the group III/IV muscle afferents in the exercise pressor reflex-mediated cardiovascular response to rhythmic exercise. Nine old (OLD; 68 ± 2 yr) and nine young (YNG; 24 ± 2 yr) males performed single-leg knee extensor exercise (15 W, 30 W, 80% max) under control conditions and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing feedback from group III/IV leg muscle afferents. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output, leg blood flow (QL), systemic (SVC) and leg vascular conductance (LVC) were continuously determined. With no hemodynamic effect at rest, fentanyl blockade during exercise attenuated both cardiac output and QL ∼17% in YNG, while the decrease in cardiac output in OLD (∼5%) was significantly smaller with no impact on QL (P = 0.8). Therefore, in the face of similar significant ∼7% reduction in MAP during exercise with fentanyl blockade in both groups, LVC significantly increased ∼11% in OLD, but decreased ∼8% in YNG. The opposing direction of change was reflected in SVC with a significant ∼5% increase in OLD and a ∼12% decrease in YNG. Thus while cardiac output seems to account for the majority of group III/IV-mediated MAP responses in YNG, the impact of neural feedback on the heart may decrease with age and alterations in SVC become more prominent in mediating the similar exercise pressor reflex in OLD. Interestingly, in terms of peripheral hemodynamics, while group III/IV-mediated feedback plays a clear role in increasing LVC during exercise in the YNG, these afferents seem to actually reduce LVC in OLD. These peripheral findings may help explain the limited exercise-induced peripheral vasodilation often associated with aging.

  18. Aging alters muscle reflex control of autonomic cardiovascular responses to rhythmic contractions in humans.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Simranjit K; Weavil, Joshua C; Venturelli, Massimo; Rossman, Matthew J; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Bledsoe, Amber D; Richardson, Russell S; Amann, Markus

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the influence of aging on the group III/IV muscle afferents in the exercise pressor reflex-mediated cardiovascular response to rhythmic exercise. Nine old (OLD; 68 ± 2 yr) and nine young (YNG; 24 ± 2 yr) males performed single-leg knee extensor exercise (15 W, 30 W, 80% max) under control conditions and with lumbar intrathecal fentanyl impairing feedback from group III/IV leg muscle afferents. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac output, leg blood flow (QL), systemic (SVC) and leg vascular conductance (LVC) were continuously determined. With no hemodynamic effect at rest, fentanyl blockade during exercise attenuated both cardiac output and QL ∼17% in YNG, while the decrease in cardiac output in OLD (∼5%) was significantly smaller with no impact on QL (P = 0.8). Therefore, in the face of similar significant ∼7% reduction in MAP during exercise with fentanyl blockade in both groups, LVC significantly increased ∼11% in OLD, but decreased ∼8% in YNG. The opposing direction of change was reflected in SVC with a significant ∼5% increase in OLD and a ∼12% decrease in YNG. Thus while cardiac output seems to account for the majority of group III/IV-mediated MAP responses in YNG, the impact of neural feedback on the heart may decrease with age and alterations in SVC become more prominent in mediating the similar exercise pressor reflex in OLD. Interestingly, in terms of peripheral hemodynamics, while group III/IV-mediated feedback plays a clear role in increasing LVC during exercise in the YNG, these afferents seem to actually reduce LVC in OLD. These peripheral findings may help explain the limited exercise-induced peripheral vasodilation often associated with aging. PMID:26386110

  19. Electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induces involuntary reflex contraction of the frontalis muscles.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Osada, Yoshiro; Ban, Ryokuya

    2013-02-01

    The levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles, despite consisting of slow-twitch fibres that involuntarily sustain eyelid-opening and eyebrow-raising against gravity. To compensate for this anatomical defect, this study hypothetically proposes that initial voluntary contraction of the levator fast-twitch muscle fibres stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle and evokes proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study sought to determine whether unilateral transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle could induce electromyographic responses in the frontalis muscles, with monitoring responses in the orbicularis oculi muscles. The study population included 27 normal subjects and 23 subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis, who displayed persistently raised eyebrows on primary gaze and light eyelid closure. The stimulation induced a short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle of all subjects and long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of normal subjects. However, it did not induce long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis. The orbicularis oculi muscles showed R1 and/or R2 responses. The stimulation might reach not only the proprioceptive fibres, but also other sensory fibres related to the blink or corneal reflex. The experimental system can provoke a monosynaptic short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle, probably through the mesencephalic trigeminal proprioceptive neuron and the frontalis motor neuron, and polysynaptic long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles through an unknown pathway. The latter neural circuit appeared to be engaged by the circumstances of aponeurotic blepharoptosis.

  20. Temporal, but not Directional, Prior Knowledge Shortens Muscle Reflex Latency in Response to Sudden Transition of Support Surface During Walking

    PubMed Central

    Shinya, Masahiro; Kawashima, Noritaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    The central nervous system takes advantage of prior knowledge about potential upcoming perturbations for modulating postural reflexes. There are two distinct aspects of prior knowledge: spatial and temporal. This study investigated how each of spatial and temporal prior knowledge contributes to the shortening of muscle response latency. Eleven participants walked on a split-belt treadmill and perturbed by sudden acceleration or deceleration of the right belt at right foot contact. Spatial prior knowledge was given by instruction of possible direction (e.g., only acceleration) of upcoming perturbation at the beginning of an experimental session. Temporal prior knowledge was given to subjects by warning tones at foot contact during three consecutive strides before the perturbation. In response to acceleration perturbation, reflexive muscle activity was observed in soleus (SOL) and gastrocnemius (GAS) muscles. Onset latency of the GAS response was shorter (72 ms vs. 58 ms) when subjects knew the timing of the upcoming perturbation, whereas the latency was independent of directional prior knowledge. SOL onset latency (44 ms) was not influenced by directional nor temporal prior knowledge. Although spinal neural circuit that mediates short-latency reflex was not influenced by the prior knowledge, excitability in supra-spinal neural circuit that mediates medium- and long-latency reflex might be enhanced by knowing the timing of the upcoming perturbation. PMID:26903838

  1. [The threshold levels of the stapedius reflex depending on the relationship between the gas pressure in the external auditory meatus and the middle ear].

    PubMed

    Petrov, S M; Azizov, G R; Gritsiuk, M I; Timenko, A N

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to detect and elucidate effects of a single factor (gas pressure) responsible for the threshold levels of stapedius reflex. It was shown that the threshold reflexes were recorded at 105 dB SPL when the gas pressure in the external auditory meatus decreased by 150-200 pPa against the atmospheric pressure and when it increased by 100-150 pPa. These effects can be accounted for by the reduced compliance of the tympanic membrane and different changes in the state of the auditory ossicles undergoing compression and tension. When entering the most comfortable stapedial reflex levels into the patient's tuning chart, an account should be taken of the maximum value of tympanic membrane compliance. PMID:25377672

  2. The Dynamics of the Stapedial Acoustic Reflex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Sherrin Mary

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. This thesis aims to separate the neural and muscular components of the stapedial acoustic reflex, both anatomically and physiologically. It aims to present an hypothesis to account for the differences between ipsilateral and contralateral reflex characteristics which have so far been unexplained, and achieve a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the reflex dynamics. A technique enabling faithful reproduction of the time course of the reflex is used throughout the experimental work. The technique measures tympanic membrane displacement as a result of reflex stapedius muscle contraction. The recorded response can be directly related to the mechanics of the middle ear and stapedius muscle contraction. Some development of the technique is undertaken by the author. A model of the reflex neural arc and stapedius muscle dynamics is evolved that is based upon a second order system. The model is unique in that it includes a latency in the ipsilateral negative feedback loop. Oscillations commonly observed on reflex responses are seen to be produced because of the inclusion of a latency in the feedback loop. The model demonstrates and explains the complex relationships between neural and muscle dynamic parameters observed in the experimental work. This more comprehensive understanding of the interaction between the stapedius dynamics and the neural arc of the reflex would not usually have been possible using human subjects, coupled with a non-invasive measurement technique. Evidence from the experimental work revealed the ipsilateral reflex to have, on average, a 5 dB lower threshold than the contralateral reflex. The oscillatory charcteristics, and the steady state response, of the contralateral reflex are also seen to be significantly different from those of the ipsilateral reflex. An hypothesis to account for the experimental observations is proposed. It is propounded that chemical neurotransmitters

  3. Nitric oxide and noradrenaline contribute to the temperature threshold of the axon reflex response to gradual local heating in human skin.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Belinda L; Meendering, Jessica R; Wong, Brett J; Minson, Christopher T

    2006-05-01

    The initial skin blood flow response to rapid local heating is an axon reflex, which may be mediated by calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P released from C-fibres. We investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) and noradrenaline on the temperature threshold for the axon reflex during gradual local heating. 36 subjects participated in two studies. Using microdialysis, we examined the following interventions: NO synthase inhibition (10 mM N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, L-NAME); low-dose NO infusion (1.0 microM sodium nitroprusside, SNP); adrenergic blockade (10 mM bretylium tosylate); and low-dose (0.1 microM) noradrenaline infusion. Laser-Doppler flowmetry was used to measure red blood cell flux. Skin was heated at a rate of 0.1 degrees C min(-1) from 33 degrees C to 40 degrees C. Compared to control skin sites, the axon reflex response was shifted to a higher temperature in 4 subjects in the L-NAME sites (control, 37.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C, n = 16; L-NAME, 39.8 +/- 0.1 degrees C, n = 4; P < 0.001) and absent in 12 subjects. The response was also absent in L-NAME plus low-dose SNP sites and not altered by low-dose SNP infusion alone. Adrenergic blockade, with and without low-dose noradrenaline infusion, also abolished the axon reflex response in all subjects. Low-dose noradrenaline infusion alone shifted the axon reflex to a significantly lower temperature threshold compared to control sites (control, 38.2 +/- 0.5 degrees C; noradrenaline, 37.7 +/- 0.4 degrees C, P < 0.05, n = 5). These results suggest that endogenous NO and noradrenaline contribute to the temperature threshold of the axon reflex response during gradual local heating of the skin.

  4. The relationship between electrical acoustic reflex thresholds and behavioral comfort levels in children and adult cochlear implant patients.

    PubMed

    Spivak, L G; Chute, P M

    1994-04-01

    The accuracy with which behavioral comfort levels could be predicted by the electrically elicited acoustic reflex threshold (EART) was examined in 35 Nucleus Cochlear Implant patients (16 adults and 19 children). EARTs were obtained by stimulating bipolar pairs of electrodes through the Nucleus Diagnostic Programming System and monitoring the change in middle ear admittance in the ear contralateral to the implanted ear. EARTs were successfully elicited in 24 patients. EARTs differed from behavioral comfort levels by a mean of 19.4 stimulus level units for adults and 9.6 stimulus level units for children. While EARTs were found to be acceptably close to behavioral comfort levels in four adults and eight children, EARTs significantly overestimated or underestimated comfort levels in the rest. The results of this study suggested that while the EART does not accurately predict comfort levels in all cases, it may provide valuable information regarding levels which should not be exceeded when programming the cochlear implant. Cautious use of information available from the EART may prove useful for programming the cochlear implant in children or adults who are unable to make reliable psychophysical judgments.

  5. Habituation behavior of the medium-latency reflex over the anterior tibial muscle after electrical stimulation of the sural nerve.

    PubMed

    Alaid, S; Hanke, D; Kornhuber, M

    2014-11-01

    Over human leg muscles, three motor responses (MR) can commonly be elicited, namely short-latency reflex (SLR), medium-latency reflex (MLR), and long-latency reflex (LLR). The MLR is less well understood than SLR and LLR. As the response to subsequent stimuli may be used to characterize central influences of an MR, we were interested, whether the MLR differs from SLR and LLR with respect to its habituation and facilitation behavior. MR were examined over the anterior tibial (TA) muscle at different contraction levels after electrical single or train stimuli (time intervals of 3 ms) over the ipsilateral sural nerve. Furthermore, MR were selectively averaged after each of four subsequent stimuli (1Hz, 0.4 Hz, trains-of-3). After single stimuli, the peak latency values were 46.2±2.3 ms, 88.0±5.8 ms (MLR), and 131.7±22.2 ms (LLR). All three MR gained similarly strong and significantly in amplitude when up to 10 kg of weight was loaded compared with no weight load. After train stimuli, the LLR but not SLR and MLR gained significantly in amplitude as compared with single stimuli. Different to SLR and LLR, the MLR showed significant habituation behavior at a stimulus repetition rate of 1Hz but not of 0.4 Hz. Thus, inhibitory interneurons seem to be involved in the MLR pathway.

  6. Nociceptive flexion reflex thresholds and pain during rest and computer game play in patients with hypertension and individuals at risk for hypertension.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Louisa; Ring, Christopher; France, Christopher R; al'Absi, Mustafa; McIntyre, David; Carroll, Douglas; Martin, Una

    2007-09-01

    Supraspinal pain modulation may explain hypertensive hypoalgesia. We compared nociceptive flexion reflex (NFR) thresholds and pain during rest and computer game play in hypertensives and normotensives (Experiment 1) and normotensives with and without hypertensive parents (Experiment 2). The game was selected to modulate activity in pain pathways. NFR thresholds did not differ between groups during rest or game play. Pain ratings never differed between hypertensives and normotensives, whereas individuals with hypertensive parents reported less pain during the first two NFR assessments, compared to those without. NFR thresholds and pain were reduced by game play compared to rest. The failure of game play to differentially modulate NFR thresholds or associated pain reports between groups argues against enhanced supraspinal modulation of nociception and pain in hypertensives and those at increased risk for hypertension. PMID:17686566

  7. Infant reflexes

    MedlinePlus

    ... neck reflex; Galant reflex; Truncal incurvation; Rooting reflex; Parachute reflex; Grasp reflex ... was stroked and begin to make sucking motions. PARACHUTE REFLEX This reflex occurs in slightly older infants ...

  8. [Skin temperature and lactate threshold during muscle work in sportsmen].

    PubMed

    Akimov, E B; Son'kin, V D

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to estimate change of a thermal condition of an organism during exhausting work (maximal aerobic test) on cycle ergometer on the basis of studying of dynamics of temperature of a forehead skin. Regularly training 20 men have taken part in the research--sportsmen of various specializations (skiers, rock-climbers, boxers, etc.). Temperature of forehead skin was registered by infrared thermovision chamber Nec TH 9100SL. These results compared with the data of measurements of heart rate, gas exchange, the lactate concentration in peripheral blood, and also with anthropometrical characteristics. It was shown that on dynamics of skin temperature at maximal work load it was possible to divide all subjects into 2 unequal groups: 1 (2/3 subjects, the majority of which trains endurance) - after temperature decrease take place its smooth increase up to refusal ofwork; 2 (1/3 subjects, concerning various sports specializations)--from the moment of the beginning of active evaporation of sweat the temperature decreases to the work termination. In group 1 lactate threshold (lactate concentration in blood--4 mm/l) corresponds to the beginning of rise in temperature after its decrease as a result of sweat evaporation. In group 2 lactate threshold was necessary on a phase of decrease in temperature at the moment of active evaporation of sweat. Distinctions between groups in structure of correlation relationship between the measured indicators are revealed, inversion of a sign ofcorrelation quotient in some cases were shown. Thus significant distinctions between groups in the level of the working capacity indicators were not revealed. All it testifies to existence possibility at least two various successful strategy of urgent adaptation of system of thermoregulation to intense muscular work.

  9. Single low-threshold afferents innervating the skin of the human foot modulate ongoing muscle activity in the upper limbs.

    PubMed

    Bent, Leah R; Lowrey, Catherine R

    2013-03-01

    We have shown for the first time that single cutaneous afferents in the foot dorsum have significant reflex coupling to motoneurons supplying muscles in the upper limb, particularly posterior deltoid and triceps brachii. These observations strengthen what we know from whole nerve stimulation, that skin on the foot and ankle can contribute to the modulation of interlimb muscles in distant innervation territories. The current work provides evidence of the mechanism behind the reflex, where one single skin afferent can evoke a reflex response, rather than a population. Nineteen of forty-one (46%) single cutaneous afferents isolated in the dorsum or plantar surface of the foot elicited a significant modulation of muscle activity in the upper limb. Identification of single afferents in this reflex indicates the strength of the connection and, ultimately, the importance of foot skin in interlimb coordination. The median response magnitude was 2.29% of background EMG, and the size of the evoked response did not significantly differ among the four mechanoreceptor classes (P > 0.1). Interestingly, although the distribution of afferents types did not differ across the foot dorsum, there was a significantly greater coupling response from receptors located on the medial aspect of the foot dorsum (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the most consistent coupling with upper limb muscles was demonstrated by type I afferents (fast and slowly adapting). This work contributes to the current literature on receptor specificity, supporting the view that individual classes of cutaneous afferents may subserve specific roles in kinesthesia, reflexes, and tactile perception.

  10. The effect of sleep on reflex genioglossus muscle activation by stimuli of negative airway pressure in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, R L; Innes, J A; Morrell, M J; Shea, S A; Guz, A

    1994-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of sleep on reflex pharyngeal dilator muscle activation by stimuli of negative airway pressure in human subjects. Intra-oral bipolar surface electrodes were used to record genioglossus electromyogram (EMG) responses to 500 ms duration pressure stimuli of 0 and -25 cmH2O applied, via a face-mask, in four normal subjects. Stimuli were applied during early inspiration in wakefulness and in periods of non-rapid-eye-movement (non-REM) sleep, defined by electroencephalographic (EEG) criteria. The rectified and integrated EMG responses to repeated interventions were bin averaged for the 0 and -25 cmH2O stimuli applied in wakefulness and sleep. Response latency was defined as the time when the EMG activity significantly increased above prestimulus levels. Response magnitude was quantified as the in ratio of the EMG activity for an 80 ms post-stimulus period to an 80 ms prestimulus period; data from after the subject's voluntary reaction time for tongue protrusion (range, 150-230 ms) were not analysed. Application of the -25 cmH2O stimuli caused genioglossus muscle activation in wakefulness and sleep, but in all subjects response magnitude was reduced in sleep (mean decrease, 61%; range, 52-82%; P = 0.011, Student's paired t test). In addition, response latency was increased in sleep in each subject (mean latency awake, 38 ms; range, 30-50 ms; mean latency asleep, 75 ms; range, 40-110 ms; P = 0.072, Student's paired t test). Application of the -25 cmH2O stimuli caused arousal from sleep on 90% occasions, but in all cases the reflex genioglossus muscle responses (maximum latency, 110 ms) always proceeded any sign of EEG arousal (mean time to arousal, 643 ms; range, 424-760 ms). These results show that non-REM sleep attenuates reflex genioglossus muscle activation by stimuli of negative airway pressure. Attenuation of this reflex by sleep may impair the ability of the upper airway to defend itself from suction collapse by

  11. Combined, but not individual, blockade of ASIC3, P2X, and EP4 receptors attenuates the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused hindlimb muscles.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Copp, Steven W; Kim, Joyce S; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-12-01

    In healthy humans, tests of the hypothesis that lactic acid, PGE2, or ATP plays a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex proved controversial. The findings in humans resembled ours in decerebrate rats that individual blockade of the receptors to lactic acid, PGE2, and ATP had only small effects on the exercise pressor reflex provided that the muscles were freely perfused. This similarity between humans and rats prompted us to test the hypothesis that in rats with freely perfused muscles combined receptor blockade is required to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex. We first compared the reflex before and after injecting either PPADS (10 mg/kg), a P2X receptor antagonist, APETx2 (100 μg/kg), an activating acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC) channel antagonist, or L161982 (2 μg/kg), an EP4 receptor antagonist, into the arterial supply of the hindlimb of decerebrated rats. We then examined the effects of combined blockade of P2X receptors, ASIC3 channels, and EP4 receptors on the exercise pressor reflex using the same doses, intra-arterial route, and time course of antagonist injections as those used for individual blockade. We found that neither PPADS (n = 5), APETx2 (n = 6), nor L161982 (n = 6) attenuated the reflex. In contrast, combined blockade of these receptors (n = 7) attenuated the peak (↓27%, P < 0.019) and integrated (↓48%, P < 0.004) pressor components of the reflex. Combined blockade injected intravenously had no effect on the reflex. We conclude that combined blockade of P2X receptors, ASIC3 channels, and EP4 receptors on the endings of thin fiber muscle afferents is required to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused hindlimbs.

  12. Combined, but not individual, blockade of ASIC3, P2X, and EP4 receptors attenuates the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused hindlimb muscles.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Copp, Steven W; Kim, Joyce S; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-12-01

    In healthy humans, tests of the hypothesis that lactic acid, PGE2, or ATP plays a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex proved controversial. The findings in humans resembled ours in decerebrate rats that individual blockade of the receptors to lactic acid, PGE2, and ATP had only small effects on the exercise pressor reflex provided that the muscles were freely perfused. This similarity between humans and rats prompted us to test the hypothesis that in rats with freely perfused muscles combined receptor blockade is required to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex. We first compared the reflex before and after injecting either PPADS (10 mg/kg), a P2X receptor antagonist, APETx2 (100 μg/kg), an activating acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC) channel antagonist, or L161982 (2 μg/kg), an EP4 receptor antagonist, into the arterial supply of the hindlimb of decerebrated rats. We then examined the effects of combined blockade of P2X receptors, ASIC3 channels, and EP4 receptors on the exercise pressor reflex using the same doses, intra-arterial route, and time course of antagonist injections as those used for individual blockade. We found that neither PPADS (n = 5), APETx2 (n = 6), nor L161982 (n = 6) attenuated the reflex. In contrast, combined blockade of these receptors (n = 7) attenuated the peak (↓27%, P < 0.019) and integrated (↓48%, P < 0.004) pressor components of the reflex. Combined blockade injected intravenously had no effect on the reflex. We conclude that combined blockade of P2X receptors, ASIC3 channels, and EP4 receptors on the endings of thin fiber muscle afferents is required to attenuate the exercise pressor reflex in rats with freely perfused hindlimbs. PMID:26472871

  13. Surgical desensitisation of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle relieves chronic tension-type headache caused by tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle in patients with aponeurotic blepharoptosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya

    2013-02-01

    Proprioceptively innervated intramuscular connective tissues in Müller's muscle function as exterior mechanoreceptors to induce reflex contraction of the levator and occipitofrontalis muscles. In aponeurotic blepharoptosis, since the levator aponeurosis is disinserted from the tarsus, stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle is increased even on primary gaze to induce phasic and tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle. It was hypothesised that in certain patients with aponeurotic blepharoptosis, the presence of tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle due to the sensitised mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle, can cause chronic tension-type headache (CTTH) associated with occipitofrontalis tenderness. To verify this hypothesis, this study evaluated (1) what differentiates patients with CTTH from patients without CTTH, (2) how pharmacological contraction of Müller's smooth muscle fibres as a method for desensitising the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle affects electromyographic activity of the frontalis muscle, and (3) how surgical aponeurotic reinsertion to desensitise the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle electromyographically or subjectively affects activities of the occipitofrontalis muscle or CTTH. It was found that patients had sustained CTTH when light eyelid closure did not markedly reduce eyebrow elevation. However, pharmacological contraction of Müller's smooth muscle fibres or surgery to desensitise the mechanoreceptor electromyographically reduced the tonic contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle on primary gaze and subjectively relieved aponeurotic blepharoptosis-associated CTTH. Over-stretching of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle on primary gaze may induce CTTH due to tonic reflexive contraction of the occipitofrontalis muscle. Therefore, surgical desensitisation of the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle appears to relieve CTTH.

  14. Changes in H reflex and neuromechanical properties of the trapezius muscle after 5 weeks of eccentric training: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Vangsgaard, Steffen; Taylor, Janet L; Hansen, Ernst A; Madeleine, Pascal

    2014-06-15

    Trapezius muscle Hoffman (H) reflexes were obtained to investigate the neural adaptations induced by a 5-wk strength training regimen, based solely on eccentric contractions of the shoulder muscles. Twenty-nine healthy subjects were randomized into an eccentric training group (n = 15) and a reference group (n = 14). The eccentric training program consisted of nine training sessions of eccentric exercise performed over a 5-wk period. H-reflex recruitment curves, the maximal M wave (Mmax), maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force, rate of force development (RFD), and electromyographic (EMG) voluntary activity were recorded before and after training. H reflexes were recorded from the middle part of the trapezius muscle by electrical stimulation of the C3/4 cervical nerves; Mmax was measured by electrical stimulation of the accessory nerve. Eccentric strength training resulted in significant increases in the maximal trapezius muscle H reflex (Hmax) (21.4% [5.5-37.3]; P = 0.01), MVC force (26.4% [15.0-37.7]; P < 0.01), and RFD (24.6% [3.2-46.0]; P = 0.025), while no significant changes were observed in the reference group. Mmax remained unchanged in both groups. A significant positive correlation was found between the change in MVC force and the change in EMG voluntary activity in the training group (r = 0.57; P = 0.03). These results indicate that the net excitability of the trapezius muscle H-reflex pathway increased after 5 wk of eccentric training. This is the first study to investigate and document changes in the trapezius muscle H reflex following eccentric strength training.

  15. A threshold-based approach for muscle contraction detection from surface EMG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morantes, Gaudi; Fernández, Gerardo; Altuve, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    Surface electromyographic (SEMG) signals are commonly used as control signals in prosthetic and orthotic devices. Super cial electrodes are placed on the skin of the subject to acquire its muscular activity through this signal. The muscle contraction episode is then in charge of activating and deactivating these devices. Nevertheless, there is no gold standard" to detect muscle contraction, leading to delayed responses and false and missed detections. This fact motivated us to propose a new approach that compares a smoothed version of the SEMG signal with a xed threshold, in order to detect muscle contraction episodes. After preprocessing the SEMG signal, the smoothed version is obtained using a moving average lter, where three di erent window lengths has been evaluated. The detector was tuned by maximizing sensitivity and speci city and evaluated using SEMG signals obtained from the anterior tibial and gastrocnemius muscles, taken during the walking of ve subjects. Compared with traditional detection methods, we obtain a reduction of 3 ms in the detection delay, an increase of 8% in sensitivity but a decrease of 15% in speci city. Future work is directed to the inclusion of a temporal threshold (a double-threshold approach) to minimize false detections and reduce detection delays.

  16. A common neural element receiving rhythmic arm and leg activity as assessed by reflex modulation in arm muscles.

    PubMed

    Sasada, Syusaku; Tazoe, Toshiki; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Futatsubashi, Genki; Ohtsuka, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shinya; Zehr, E Paul; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi

    2016-04-01

    Neural interactions between regulatory systems for rhythmic arm and leg movements are an intriguing issue in locomotor neuroscience. Amplitudes of early latency cutaneous reflexes (ELCRs) in stationary arm muscles are modulated during rhythmic leg or arm cycling but not during limb positioning or voluntary contraction. This suggests that interneurons mediating ELCRs to arm muscles integrate outputs from neural systems controlling rhythmic limb movements. Alternatively, outputs could be integrated at the motoneuron and/or supraspinal levels. We examined whether a separate effect on the ELCR pathways and cortico-motoneuronal excitability during arm and leg cycling is integrated by neural elements common to the lumbo-sacral and cervical spinal cord. The subjects performed bilateral leg cycling (LEG), contralateral arm cycling (ARM), and simultaneous contralateral arm and bilateral leg cycling (A&L), while ELCRs in the wrist flexor and shoulder flexor muscles were evoked by superficial radial (SR) nerve stimulation. ELCR amplitudes were facilitated by cycling tasks and were larger during A&L than during ARM and LEG. A low stimulus intensity during ARM or LEG generated a larger ELCR during A&L than the sum of ELCRs during ARM and LEG. We confirmed this nonlinear increase in single motor unit firing probability following SR nerve stimulation during A&L. Furthermore, motor-evoked potentials following transcranial magnetic and electrical stimulation did not show nonlinear potentiation during A&L. These findings suggest the existence of a common neural element of the ELCR reflex pathway that is active only during rhythmic arm and leg movement and receives convergent input from contralateral arms and legs. PMID:26961103

  17. Cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator muscle are located in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kenya; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Kawagishi, Kyutaro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2012-12-01

    Since the levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles despite being antigravity mixed muscles to involuntarily sustain eyelid opening and eyebrow lifting, this study has proposed a hypothetical mechanism to compensate for this anatomical defect. The voluntary contraction of fast-twitch fibres of the levator muscle stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to evoke proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study confirmed the presence of cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles. After confirming that severing the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induced ipsilateral eyelid ptosis, Fluorogold was applied as a tracer to the proximal stump of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve in rats. Fluorogold labelled the cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons, not in any regions of the rat brain including the trigeminal ganglion, but in the ipsilateral mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neighbouring the locus ceruleus. Some Fluorogold particles accumulated in the area of the locus ceruleus. The trigeminal proprioceptive neurons could be considered centrally displaced ganglion cells to transmit afferent signal from the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to the mesencephalon, where they may be able to make excitatory synaptic connections with both the oculomotor neurons and the frontalis muscle motoneurons for the involuntary coordination of the eyelid and eyebrow activities, and potentially to the locus ceruleus.

  18. Low anaerobic threshold and increased skeletal muscle lactate production in subjects with Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Ciammola, Andrea; Sassone, Jenny; Sciacco, Monica; Mencacci, Niccolò E; Ripolone, Michela; Bizzi, Caterina; Colciago, Clarissa; Moggio, Maurizio; Parati, Gianfranco; Silani, Vincenzo; Malfatto, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial defects that affect cellular energy metabolism have long been implicated in the etiology of Huntington's disease (HD). Indeed, several studies have found defects in the mitochondrial functions of the central nervous system and peripheral tissues of HD patients. In this study, we investigated the in vivo oxidative metabolism of exercising muscle in HD patients. Ventilatory and cardiometabolic parameters and plasma lactate concentrations were monitored during incremental cardiopulmonary exercise in twenty-five HD subjects and twenty-five healthy subjects. The total exercise capacity was normal in HD subjects but notably the HD patients and presymptomatic mutation carriers had a lower anaerobic threshold than the control subjects. The low anaerobic threshold of HD patients was associated with an increase in the concentration of plasma lactate. We also analyzed in vitro muscular cell cultures and found that HD cells produce more lactate than the cells of healthy subjects. Finally, we analyzed skeletal muscle samples by electron microscopy and we observed striking mitochondrial structural abnormalities in two out of seven HD subjects. Our findings confirm mitochondrial abnormalities in HD patients' skeletal muscle and suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction is reflected functionally in a low anaerobic threshold and an increased lactate synthesis during intense physical exercise.

  19. The effects of smartphone use on upper extremity muscle activity and pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minkyung; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Won, Jinyoung; Yang, Jinjun; Park, Sookyoung; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle activity and pressure-induced pain in the upper extremities are affected by smartphone use, and to compare the effects of phone handling with one hand and with both hands. [Subjects] The study subjects were asymptomatic women 20–22 years of age. [Methods] The subjects sat in a chair with their feet on the floor and the elbow flexed, holding a smartphone positioned on the thigh. Subsequently, the subjects typed the Korean anthem for 3 min, one-handed or with both hands. Each subject repeated the task three times, with a 5-min rest period between tasks to minimize fatigue. Electromyography (EMG) was used to record the muscle activity of the upper trapezius (UT), extensor pollicis longus (EPL), and abductor pollicis (AP) during phone operation. We also used a dolorimeter to measure the pressure-induced pain threshold in the UT. [Results] We observed higher muscle activity in the UT, AP, and EPL in one-handed smartphone use than in its two-handed use. The pressure-induced pain threshold of the UT was lower after use of the smartphone, especially after one-handed use. [Conclusion] Our results show that smartphone operation with one hand caused greater UT pain and induced increased upper extremity muscle activity. PMID:26180311

  20. Respiratory and abdominal muscle responses to expiratory threshold loading in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Cerny, F; Armitage, L; Hirsch, J A; Bishop, B

    1992-03-01

    We hypothesized that the hyperinflation and pulmonary dysfunction of cystic fibrosis (CF) would distort feedback and therefore alter the abdominal muscle response to graded expiratory threshold loads (ETLs). We compared the respiratory and abdominal muscle responses with graded ETLs of seven CF patients with severe lung dysfunction with those of matched healthy control subjects in the supine and 60 degrees head-up positions. Breathing frequency, tidal volume, and ventilatory timing were determined from inspiratory flow recordings. Abdominal electromyograms (EMGs) were detected with surface electrodes placed unilaterally over the external and internal oblique and the rectus abdominis muscles. Thresholds, times of onset, and durations of phasic abdominal activity were determined from raw EMGs; peak amplitudes were determined from integrated EMGs. Graded ETLs were imposed by submerging a tube from the expiratory port of the breathing valve into a column of water at depths of 0-25 cmH2O. We found that breathing frequency, tidal volume, and expired minute ventilation were higher in CF patients than in control subjects during low ETLs; a change in body position did not alter these ventilatory responses in the CF patients but did in the control subjects. All CF patients, but none of the control subjects, had tonic abdominal activity while supine. CF patients recruited abdominal muscles at lower loads, earlier in the respiratory cycle, and to a higher recruitment level in both positions than the control subjects, but burst duration of phasic activity was not different between groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Soleus H-reflex gain in humans walking and running under simulated reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, D. P.; Aagaard, P.; Simonsen, E. B.; Farley, C. T.; Dyhre-Poulsen, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Hoffmann (H-) reflex is an electrical analogue of the monosynaptic stretch reflex, elicited by bypassing the muscle spindle and directly stimulating the afferent nerve. Studying H-reflex modulation provides insight into how the nervous system centrally modulates stretch reflex responses.A common measure of H-reflex gain is the slope of the relationship between H-reflex amplitude and EMG amplitude. To examine soleus H-reflex gain across a range of EMG levels during human locomotion, we used simulated reduced gravity to reduce muscle activity. We hypothesised that H-reflex gain would be independent of gravity level.We recorded EMG from eight subjects walking (1.25 m s-1) and running (3.0 m s-1) at four gravity levels (1.0, 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 G (Earth gravity)). We normalised the stimulus M-wave and resulting H-reflex to the maximal M-wave amplitude (Mmax) elicited throughout the stride to correct for movement of stimulus and recording electrodes relative to nerve and muscle fibres. Peak soleus EMG amplitude decreased by 30% for walking and for running over the fourfold change in gravity. As hypothesised, slopes of linear regressions fitted to H-reflex versus EMG data were independent of gravity for walking and running (ANOVA, P > 0.8). The slopes were also independent of gait (P > 0.6), contrary to previous studies. Walking had a greater y-intercept (19.9% Mmax) than running (-2.5% Mmax; P < 0.001). At all levels of EMG, walking H-reflex amplitudes were higher than running H-reflex amplitudes by a constant amount. We conclude that the nervous system adjusts H-reflex threshold but not H-reflex gain between walking and running. These findings provide insight into potential neural mechanisms responsible for spinal modulation of the stretch reflex during human locomotion.

  2. Dual Modulation of Nociception and Cardiovascular Reflexes during Peripheral Ischemia through P2Y1 Receptor-Dependent Sensitization of Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Queme, Luis F.; Ross, Jessica L.; Lu, Peilin; Hudgins, Renita C.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous musculoskeletal pain disorders are based in dysfunction of peripheral perfusion and are often comorbid with altered cardiovascular responses to muscle contraction/exercise. We have recently found in mice that 24 h peripheral ischemia induced by a surgical occlusion of the brachial artery (BAO) induces increased paw-guarding behaviors, mechanical hypersensitivity, and decreased grip strength. These behavioral changes corresponded to increased heat sensitivity as well as an increase in the numbers of chemosensitive group III/IV muscle afferents as assessed by an ex vivo forepaw muscles/median and ulnar nerves/dorsal root ganglion (DRG)/spinal cord (SC) recording preparation. Behaviors also corresponded to specific upregulation of the ADP-responsive P2Y1 receptor in the DRGs. Since group III/IV muscle afferents have separately been associated with regulating muscle nociception and exercise pressor reflexes (EPRs), and P2Y1 has been linked to heat responsiveness and phenotypic switching in cutaneous afferents, we sought to determine whether upregulation of P2Y1 was responsible for the observed alterations in muscle afferent function, leading to modulation of muscle pain-related behaviors and EPRs after BAO. Using an afferent-specific siRNA knockdown strategy, we found that inhibition of P2Y1 during BAO not only prevented the increased mean blood pressure after forced exercise, but also significantly reduced alterations in pain-related behaviors. Selective P2Y1 knockdown also prevented the increased firing to heat stimuli and the BAO-induced phenotypic switch in chemosensitive muscle afferents, potentially through regulating membrane expression of acid sensing ion channel 3. These results suggest that enhanced P2Y1 in muscle afferents during ischemic-like conditions may dually regulate muscle nociception and cardiovascular reflexes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our current results suggest that P2Y1 modulates heat responsiveness and chemosensation in muscle afferents

  3. An Intelligent Computerized Stretch Reflex Measurement System For Clinical And Investigative Neurology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, P. M.; Chutkow, J. G.; Riggs, M. T.; Cristiano, V. D.

    1987-05-01

    We describe the design of a reliable, user-friendly preprototype system for quantifying the tendon stretch reflexes in humans and large mammals. A hand-held, instrumented reflex gun, the impactor of which contains a single force sensor, interfaces with a computer. The resulting test system can deliver sequences of reproducible stimuli at graded intensities and adjustable durations to a muscle's tendon ("tendon taps"), measure the impacting force of each tap, and record the subsequent reflex muscle contraction from the same tendon -- all automatically. The parameters of the reflex muscle contraction include latency; mechanical threshold; and peak time, peak magnitude, and settling time. The results of clinical tests presented in this paper illustrate the system's potential usefulness in detecting neurologic dysfunction affecting the tendon stretch reflexes, in documenting the course of neurologic illnesses and their response to therapy, and in clinical and laboratory neurologic research.

  4. Parecoxib increases muscle pain threshold and relieves shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hufei; Liu, Xinhe; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Zimeng; Zhang, Xu-Yu; Xie, Hong-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP) remains a common problem after laparoscopies. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between pressure pain threshold (PPT) of different muscles and PLSP after gynecologic laparoscopy, and to explore the effect of parecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on the changes of PPT. Materials and methods The patients were randomly allocated into two groups; group P and group C. In group P, parecoxib 40 mg was intravenously infused at 30 minutes before surgery and 8 and 20 hours after surgery. In group C, normal saline was infused at the corresponding time point. PPT assessment was performed 1 day before surgery and at postoperative 24 hours by using a pressure algometer at bilateral shoulder muscles (levator scapulae and supraspinatus) and forearm (flexor carpi ulnaris). Meanwhile, bilateral shoulder pain was evaluated through visual analog scale score at 24 hours after surgery. Results Preoperative PPT level of the shoulder, but not of the forearm, was significantly and negatively correlated with the intensity of ipsilateral PLSP. In group C, PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, decreased after laparoscopy at postoperative 24 hours. The use of parecoxib significantly improved the decline of PPT levels of bilateral shoulder muscles (all P<0.01). Meanwhile, parecoxib reduced the incidence of PLSP (group P: 45% vs group C: 83.3%; odds ratio: 0.164; 95% confidence interval: 0.07–0.382; P<0.001) and the intensity of bilateral shoulder pain (both P<0.01). Conclusion Preoperative PPT levels of shoulder muscles are closely associated with the severity of shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy. PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, significantly decreased after surgery. Parecoxib improved the decrease of PPT and relieved PLSP.

  5. Parecoxib increases muscle pain threshold and relieves shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hufei; Liu, Xinhe; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Zimeng; Zhang, Xu-Yu; Xie, Hong-Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Postlaparoscopic shoulder pain (PLSP) remains a common problem after laparoscopies. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between pressure pain threshold (PPT) of different muscles and PLSP after gynecologic laparoscopy, and to explore the effect of parecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on the changes of PPT. Materials and methods The patients were randomly allocated into two groups; group P and group C. In group P, parecoxib 40 mg was intravenously infused at 30 minutes before surgery and 8 and 20 hours after surgery. In group C, normal saline was infused at the corresponding time point. PPT assessment was performed 1 day before surgery and at postoperative 24 hours by using a pressure algometer at bilateral shoulder muscles (levator scapulae and supraspinatus) and forearm (flexor carpi ulnaris). Meanwhile, bilateral shoulder pain was evaluated through visual analog scale score at 24 hours after surgery. Results Preoperative PPT level of the shoulder, but not of the forearm, was significantly and negatively correlated with the intensity of ipsilateral PLSP. In group C, PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, decreased after laparoscopy at postoperative 24 hours. The use of parecoxib significantly improved the decline of PPT levels of bilateral shoulder muscles (all P<0.01). Meanwhile, parecoxib reduced the incidence of PLSP (group P: 45% vs group C: 83.3%; odds ratio: 0.164; 95% confidence interval: 0.07–0.382; P<0.001) and the intensity of bilateral shoulder pain (both P<0.01). Conclusion Preoperative PPT levels of shoulder muscles are closely associated with the severity of shoulder pain after gynecologic laparoscopy. PPT levels of shoulder muscles, but not of forearm muscles, significantly decreased after surgery. Parecoxib improved the decrease of PPT and relieved PLSP. PMID:27695359

  6. Superposition of H reflexes on steady contractions in man.

    PubMed Central

    Rüegg, D G; Krauer, R; Drews, H

    1990-01-01

    1. The aim of the investigation was to study the influence of steady isometric contractions on H reflexes of human soleus muscle. 2. Stimulating and recording conditions were hardly affected by plantar flexions which subjects maintained in a force matching task. 3. If the interval between a preceding control and the test stimulus was less than 8 s the test H reflex was depressed in the relaxed subject. The depression was diminished or removed if the test reflex was superimposed on a background activity. The interval between control and test H reflex was at least 8 s in the following experiments. 4. H reflexes were nearly independent of steady plantar flexions on which they were superimposed. In some subjects, there was a slight increase with increasing torque. During dorsal flexions, H reflexes in all subjects were inhibited with increasing torque. 5. The relationship between test H reflexes, control H reflexes and background activity was evaluated by varying pseudo-randomly stimulus intensity and steady flexion torque. The surface defined by this three-dimensional relation approximated a plane suggesting linear properties of the H reflex. In some subjects threshold intensity decreased slightly with torque, in others it was constant. 6. In response to a warning signal, human subjects initiated steady plantar or dorsal flexions in both feet and, at the same time, they started to concentrate on a light at the onset of which they performed a unilateral ballistic plantar contraction as fast as possible. The relations between H reflex and maintained flexion force during the warning period of the reaction time task were identical to those during force matching, showing that the behavioural context did not modulate the relations. 7. The relations were also the same if reflexes were evoked bi- or unilaterally, illustrating the absence of a mutual modification of simultaneously evoked H reflexes. 8. The relation was the same with ipsilateral matching and relaxed

  7. The Effects of Temporal and Spatial Predictions on Stretch Reflexes of Ankle Flexor and Extensor Muscles While Standing

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Noritaka; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate how stretch reflex (SR) responses in the ankle extensor (soleus: SOL) and flexor (tibialis anterior: TA) muscles would be modulated with temporal and/or spatial predictions of external perturbations and whether their effects are specific to the standing posture. SR responses in the SOL/TA were elicited by imposing quick ankle toes-up/toes-down rotations while standing upright and in the supine position. We designed four experimental conditions based on pre-information about perturbations: no information (No Cue), the timing of the perturbation onset (TIM), the direction of the perturbation (DIR), and both the timing and direction of the perturbation (TIM/DIR). Each condition was separated and its order was counterbalanced. In the SR of TA evoked by toes-down rotation, integrated electromyography activities of the late component were significantly reduced in the TIM and TIM/DIR conditions as compared with those in the No Cue and DIR conditions. The occurrence rate of late SR components that reflects how often the reflex response was observed was also lower in the TIM and TIM/DIR conditions as compared with that in the No Cue and DIR conditions. On the other hand, no significant changes were seen among the four conditions in the early SR component in the TA and both SR components in the SOL. The same results in the occurrence rate were found in the supine position. The present results suggest (1) only temporal predictions have a remarkable effect on the SR excitability of the TA, and (2) this effect is independent of posture. PMID:27385043

  8. Long-latency reflexes of elbow and shoulder muscles suggest reciprocal excitation of flexors, reciprocal excitation of extensors, and reciprocal inhibition between flexors and extensors.

    PubMed

    Kurtzer, Isaac; Meriggi, Jenna; Parikh, Nidhi; Saad, Kenneth

    2016-04-01

    Postural corrections of the upper limb are required in tasks ranging from handling an umbrella in the changing wind to securing a wriggling baby. One complication in this process is the mechanical interaction between the different segments of the arm where torque applied at one joint induces motion at multiple joints. Previous studies have shown the long-latency reflexes of shoulder muscles (50-100 ms after a limb perturbation) account for these mechanical interactions by integrating information about motion of both the shoulder and elbow. It is less clear whether long-latency reflexes of elbow muscles exhibit a similar capability and what is the relation between the responses of shoulder and elbow muscles. The present study utilized joint-based loads tailored to the subjects' arm dynamics to induce well-controlled displacements of their shoulder and elbow. Our results demonstrate that the long-latency reflexes of shoulder and elbow muscles integrate motion from both joints: the shoulder and elbow flexors respond to extension at both joints, whereas the shoulder and elbow extensors respond to flexion at both joints. This general pattern accounts for the inherent flexion-extension coupling of the two joints arising from the arm's intersegmental dynamics and is consistent with spindle-based reciprocal excitation of shoulder and elbow flexors, reciprocal excitation of shoulder and elbow extensors, and across-joint inhibition between the flexors and extensors.

  9. Role of the middle ear muscle apparatus in mechanisms of speech signal discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moroz, B. S.; Bazarov, V. G.; Sachenko, S. V.

    1980-01-01

    A method of impedance reflexometry was used to examine 101 students with hearing impairment in order to clarify the interrelation between speech discrimination and the state of the middle ear muscles. Ability to discriminate speech signals depends to some extent on the functional state of intraaural muscles. Speech discrimination was greatly impaired in the absence of stapedial muscle acoustic reflex, in the presence of low thresholds of stimulation and in very small values of reflex amplitude increase. Discrimination was not impeded in positive AR, high values of relative thresholds and normal increase of reflex amplitude in response to speech signals with augmenting intensity.

  10. Motor cortical plasticity in extrinsic hand muscles is determined by the resting thresholds of overlapping representations.

    PubMed

    Mirdamadi, J L; Suzuki, L Y; Meehan, S K

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the properties that govern the effectiveness of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) interventions is critical to clinical application. Extrapolation to clinical populations has been limited by high inter-subject variability and a focus on intrinsic muscles of the hand in healthy populations. Therefore, the current study assessed variability of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS), a patterned TMS protocol, across an agonist-antagonist pair of extrinsic muscles of the hand. Secondarily, we assessed whether concurrent agonist contraction could enhance the efficacy of cTBS. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were simultaneously recorded from the agonist flexor (FCR) and antagonist extensor (ECR) carpi radialis before and after cTBS over the FCR hotspot. cTBS was delivered with the FCR relaxed (cTBS-Relax) or during isometric wrist flexion (cTBS-Contract). cTBS-Relax suppressed FCR MEPs evoked from the FCR hotspot. However, the extent of FCR MEP suppression was strongly correlated with the relative difference between FCR and ECR resting motor thresholds. cTBS-Contract decreased FCR suppression but increased suppression of ECR MEPs elicited from the FCR hotspot. The magnitude of ECR MEP suppression following cTBS-Contract was independent of the threshold-amplitude relationships observed with cTBS-Relax. Contraction alone had no effect confirming the effect of cTBS-Contract was driven by the interaction between neuromuscular activity and cTBS. Interactions across muscle representations should be taken into account when predicting cTBS outcomes in healthy and clinical populations. Contraction during cTBS may be a useful means of focusing aftereffects when differences in baseline excitability across overlapping agonist-antagonist cortical representations may mitigate the inhibitory effect of cTBS.

  11. Motor cortical plasticity in extrinsic hand muscles is determined by the resting thresholds of overlapping representations.

    PubMed

    Mirdamadi, J L; Suzuki, L Y; Meehan, S K

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the properties that govern the effectiveness of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) interventions is critical to clinical application. Extrapolation to clinical populations has been limited by high inter-subject variability and a focus on intrinsic muscles of the hand in healthy populations. Therefore, the current study assessed variability of continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS), a patterned TMS protocol, across an agonist-antagonist pair of extrinsic muscles of the hand. Secondarily, we assessed whether concurrent agonist contraction could enhance the efficacy of cTBS. Motor evoked potentials (MEP) were simultaneously recorded from the agonist flexor (FCR) and antagonist extensor (ECR) carpi radialis before and after cTBS over the FCR hotspot. cTBS was delivered with the FCR relaxed (cTBS-Relax) or during isometric wrist flexion (cTBS-Contract). cTBS-Relax suppressed FCR MEPs evoked from the FCR hotspot. However, the extent of FCR MEP suppression was strongly correlated with the relative difference between FCR and ECR resting motor thresholds. cTBS-Contract decreased FCR suppression but increased suppression of ECR MEPs elicited from the FCR hotspot. The magnitude of ECR MEP suppression following cTBS-Contract was independent of the threshold-amplitude relationships observed with cTBS-Relax. Contraction alone had no effect confirming the effect of cTBS-Contract was driven by the interaction between neuromuscular activity and cTBS. Interactions across muscle representations should be taken into account when predicting cTBS outcomes in healthy and clinical populations. Contraction during cTBS may be a useful means of focusing aftereffects when differences in baseline excitability across overlapping agonist-antagonist cortical representations may mitigate the inhibitory effect of cTBS. PMID:27425211

  12. Effects of altered afferent articular input on sensation, proprioception, muscle tone and sympathetic reflex responses.

    PubMed

    Slosberg, M

    1988-10-01

    The influence of afferent articular and periarticular input on muscle tone, joint mobility, proprioception and pain is of considerable interest to practitioners using manipulation. It has long been hypothesized that dysfunctional articulations may generate altered patterns of afferent input. This article reviews the relevant studies that have investigated the impact of articular input on efferent activity under normal conditions and under conditions of altered joint function. The findings suggest that sensory input does have a substantial effect on efferent function and sensation. Furthermore, the studies indicate that the pattern of articular input may be significantly modified by joint inflammation, trauma and effusion and result in changes of muscle tone, joint mobility, proprioception and pain. PMID:3069947

  13. Influence of choking and arm lock technique in judo on the acoustic reflex threshold (art) in healthy well-trained male and female judoka.

    PubMed

    Raschka, Christoph; Koch, Horst Josef; Rau, Rüdiger

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this controlled parallel group study was to assess the effects of standardized choke holds (test) and arm lock techniques (controls) in on the acoustic hearing threshold. 104 (test group, 32 female subjects and 72 male subjects, mean age = 28.0 years, SD = 7.9 years) and 51 experienced judoka (controls. 21 female subjects, 30 male subjects; mean age = 26.8 years; SD = 13.2 years) participated. Acoustic reflex thresholds (ART [dB]) were measured separately before and after each manoeuvre both for air and bone conduction of the right and left side. The difference Dart of the ART before and after a manoeuvre (Dart = ARTbefore - ARTafter) was calculated. Data were presented descriptively and nonparametric statistics was applied for nonrelated (Kruskal Wallis ANOVA) or related samples (Friedman ANOVA). Wilcoxon tests were used for pre/post comparisons of original ART values. The effect of choking on Dart was significantly different from the effect of the arm lock technique on Dart independent of the experimental condition. A significant influence of applied frequencies on Dart was ascertained if a choking technique was used. For all frequency ranges applied a highly significant improvement of the ART after choking was found. With regard to bone conduction thresholds increased by an average of 6.1 dB and for air conduction the average increase was 4.9 dB. On the contrary, arm locks induced a slight mean deterioration of the ART for bone conduction of 1.8 dB. The ART for bone conduction also showed a trend towards a reduction after arm locks with a mean decrease of about 1.2 dB. In conclusion, standardized choking manoeuvres reduced the ART corresponding to an improved hearing both with regard to air and bone conduction. Such an effect on hearing ability was not found for arm lock techniques.

  14. Clinical interest of postural and vestibulo-ocular reflex changes induced by cervical muscles and skull vibration in compensated unilateral vestibular lesion patients.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Georges; Lion, Alexis; Gauchard, Gérome C; Herpin, Guillaume; Magnusson, Måns; Perrin, Philippe P

    2013-01-01

    Skull vibration induces nystagmus in unilateral vestibular lesion (UVL) patients. Vibration of skull, posterior cervical muscles or inferior limb muscles alters posture in recent UVL patients. This study aimed to investigate the postural effect of vibration in chronic compensated UVL patients. Vibration was applied successively to vertex, each mastoid, each side of posterior cervical muscles and of triceps surae in 12 UVL patients and 9 healthy subjects. Eye movements were recorded with videonystagmography. Postural control was evaluated in eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions. Sway area, sway path, anteroposterior and medio-lateral sways were recorded.A vibration induced nystagmus (VIN) beating toward the healthy side was obtained for each UVL patient during mastoid vibration. In EO, only sway path was higher in UVL group during vibration of mastoids and posterior cervical muscles.The EO postural impairments of UVL patients could be related to the eye movements or VIN, leading to visual perturbations, or to a proprioceptive error signal, providing an erroneous representation of head position. The vibration-induced sway was too small to be clinically useful. Vestibulo-ocular reflex observed with videonystagmography during mastoid vibration seems more relevant to reveal chronic UVL than vestibulo-spinal reflex observed with posturography.

  15. Behaviour of heart rate and electrical muscle activity in the simultaneous dynamic action of larger and smaller sets of muscles in the permanent performance threshold range.

    PubMed

    Weber, H; Naumann, H J; Jentsch, A; Tröger, B; Wunderlich, H

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken to assess more comprehensively and with greater differentiation the reduction in the absolute electrical muscle activity (aEA) determined by different investigations in the permanent performance threshold range of the cardiovascular system (HKS) by means of the behaviour of the aEA of the highly stressed leg muscles and little stressed forearm muscles. Six healthy, untrained male subjects operated a hand ergograph alone in one test, and, in four more tests, in combination with a constant bicycle ergometer load of 40, 60, 80, and 100 W, respectively. As a result of these tests, a relative reduction in aEA for the leg muscles and an absolute reduction in aEA for the forearm muscles could be identified in the permanent performance threshold range of the HKS. Therefore, aEA is also considered to be an indicator of general stress that can define the permanent performance threshold range of the HKS more completely. The reduction in aEA is probably an expression of a negative feedback from the cardiovascular system to the neuromuscular system induced by the central nervous system.

  16. The impact of rectification on the electrically evoked long-latency reflex of the biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Alaid, Ssuhir; Kornhuber, Malte E

    2013-11-27

    Long latency reflexes (LLR) were elicited electrically and obtained by full wave rectified and non-rectified data recordings in 10 healthy subjects. After single or train stimuli (sensory radial nerve; interstimulus interval 3ms) amplitude and peak latency values were measured over the bent biceps brachii (BB) muscle, either without or with 1.5kg weight load. After rectification, mean LLR amplitude values made up 30% of the non-rectified data, independent from the stimulus type and weight load. In the non-rectified data, a significant gain in amplitude resulted from train stimuli compared with single stimuli, and from weight load compared to no weight load. No such significant difference was detected when rectified data were analysed. Furthermore, average amplitude values of rectified and non-rectified curves were studied using 11 sine waves and damped sine waves with equal phase intervals that were varied from 0° up to 34.4°. Phase shifts ranging from 10° to 25° resulted in excess amplitude decline of rectified data compared with non-rectified data. The long and polysynaptic course that LLR information takes leads to considerable overlap of responses to subsequent stimuli. This overlap of motor unit potentials forming the LLR obviously results in excess amplitude cancellation after rectification as shown for sine and damped sine waves. Rectification leads to an increase in the frequency content of the data that renders it prone to phase cancellation. In the present study, this cancellation was harmful as it prevented detection of important factors of influence such as stimulus strength and motor unit recruitment level.

  17. Role of muscle pulleys in producing eye position-dependence in the angular vestibuloocular reflex: a model-based study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurtell, M. J.; Kunin, M.; Raphan, T.; Wall, C. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    It is well established that the head and eye velocity axes do not always align during compensatory vestibular slow phases. It has been shown that the eye velocity axis systematically tilts away from the head velocity axis in a manner that is dependent on eye-in-head position. The mechanisms responsible for producing these axis tilts are unclear. In this model-based study, we aimed to determine whether muscle pulleys could be involved in bringing about these phenomena. The model presented incorporates semicircular canals, central vestibular pathways, and an ocular motor plant with pulleys. The pulleys were modeled so that they brought about a rotation of the torque axes of the extraocular muscles that was a fraction of the angle of eye deviation from primary position. The degree to which the pulleys rotated the torque axes was altered by means of a pulley coefficient. Model input was head velocity and initial eye position data from passive and active yaw head impulses with fixation at 0 degrees, 20 degrees up and 20 degrees down, obtained from a previous experiment. The optimal pulley coefficient required to fit the data was determined by calculating the mean square error between data and model predictions of torsional eye velocity. For active head impulses, the optimal pulley coefficient varied considerably between subjects. The median optimal pulley coefficient was found to be 0.5, the pulley coefficient required for producing saccades that perfectly obey Listing's law when using a two-dimensional saccadic pulse signal. The model predicted the direction of the axis tilts observed in response to passive head impulses from 50 ms after onset. During passive head impulses, the median optimal pulley coefficient was found to be 0.21, when roll gain was fixed at 0.7. The model did not accurately predict the alignment of the eye and head velocity axes that was observed early in the response to passive head impulses. We found that this alignment could be well predicted if

  18. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  19. Reflex transmission to lumbar α-motoneurones in the mouse similar and different to those in the cat.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Eike D; Kalezic, Ivana; Dibaj, Payam; Steffens, Heinz

    2013-07-01

    Investigation and interpretation of defective motor circuitries in transgenic mice required further basic results from wild-type mice. Therefore, we investigated the lumbar motor reflex pattern in anaesthetised mice using intracellular motoneuronal recording and monosynaptic reflex testing. Thresholds and latencies in mice were similar to those in cats: thresholds for monosynaptic (group I) EPSPs were slightly above 1T (T=threshold for the lowest threshold fibres), around 1.5T for group II EPSPs and above 10T for group III EPSPs; group I EPSPs were maximal with a stimulus strength around 2T, group II EPSPs were maximal with 5-8T; latencies to the group I incoming volley were below 1ms for monosynaptic group I EPSPs, around 3ms for polysynaptic group II EPSPs and above 4ms for polysynaptic group III EPSPs. In contrast to reflex actions in the cat, monosynaptic gastrocnemius-soleus reflexes were facilitated by conditioning stimulation of the peroneal, sural and tibial nerves, i.e. by a variety of different, probably flexor reflex afferents. This facilitation persisted after high lumbar spinalisation indicating an independency to supraspinal influences. Nociceptive muscle afferents facilitated the peroneal monosynaptic reflex while nociceptive cutaneous afferents from the foot sole inhibited the ipsilateral but facilitated the contralateral peroneal reflex.

  20. GABAB receptors in the NTS mediate the inhibitory effect of trigeminal nociceptive inputs on parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hisayoshi; Izumi, Hiroshi

    2012-03-15

    The present study was designed to examine whether trigeminal nociceptive inputs are involved in the modulation of parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the jaw muscles. This was accomplished by investigating the effects of noxious stimulation to the orofacial area with capsaicin, and by microinjecting GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor agonists or antagonists into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), on masseter hemodynamics in urethane-anesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the cervical vagus nerve (cVN) in sympathectomized animals bilaterally increased blood flow in the masseter muscle (MBF). Increases in MBF evoked by cVN stimulation were markedly reduced following injection of capsaicin into the anterior tongue in the distribution of the lingual nerve or lower lip, but not when injected into the skin of the dorsum of the foot. Intravenous administration of either phentolamine or propranolol had no effect on the inhibitory effects of capsaicin injection on the increases of MBF evoked by cVN stimulation, which were largely abolished by microinjecting the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen into the NTS. Microinjection of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-35348 into the NTS markedly attenuated the capsaicin-induced inhibition of MBF increase evoked by cVN stimulation, while microinjection of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline did not. Our results indicate that trigeminal nociceptive inputs inhibit vagal-parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the masseter muscle and suggest that the activation of GABA(B) rather than GABA(A) receptors underlies the observed inhibition in the NTS.

  1. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression is lower in areas of the nucleus tractus solitarius excited by skeletal muscle reflexes in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Masaki; Downey, Ryan M.; Squiers, John J.; Squiers, Kathryn E.; Smith, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The functions of the skeletal muscle exercise pressor reflex (EPR) and its mechanically sensitive component are augmented in hypertension producing exaggerated increases in blood pressure during exercise. Afferent information from the EPR is processed in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS). Within the NT, nitric oxide (NO), produced via l-arginine oxidation by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), buffers the pressor response to EPR activation. Therefore, EPR overactivity may manifest as a decrease in NO production due to reductions in nNOS. We hypothesized that nNOS protein expression is lower in the NTS of spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) compared with normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Further, we examined whether nNOS is expressed with FOS, a marker of neuronal excitation induced by EPR activation. The EPR and mechanoreflex were intermittently activated for 1 h via hindlimb static contraction or stretch, respectively. These maneuvers produced significantly greater pressor responses in SHR during the first 25 min of stimulation. Within the NTS, nNOS expression was lower from −14.9 to −13.4 bregma in SHR compared with WKY. For example, at −14.5 bregma the number of NTS nNOS-positive cells in SHR (13 ± 1) was significantly less than WKY (23 ± 2). However, the number of FOS-positive cells after muscle contraction in this area was not different (WKY = 82 ± 18; SHR = 75 ± 8). In both groups, FOS-expressing neurons were located within the same areas of the NTS as neurons containing nNOS. These findings demonstrate that nNOS protein expression is lower within NTS areas excited by skeletal muscle reflexes in hypertensive rats. PMID:23564306

  2. Caring Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rallis, Sharon F.; Rossman, Gretchen B.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the seven articles in this special issue through the lens of the concept of "caring reflexivity". In joining "caring" and "reflexivity", we deepen the conversation about what constitutes reflexivity, encouraging an explicit focus on the relational. Revisiting the first article, we argue that…

  3. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold

    PubMed Central

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  4. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion. PMID:27190439

  5. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    PubMed

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion.

  6. Organization of sensory input to the nociceptive-specific cutaneous trunk muscle reflex in rat, an effective experimental system for examining nociception and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Petruska, Jeffrey C.; Barker, Darrell F.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Trainer, Robert; Fransen, James W.; Seidman, Peggy A.; Soto, Roy G.; Mendell, Lorne M.; Johnson, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Detailed characterization of neural circuitries furthers our understanding of how nervous systems perform specific functions and enables the use of those systems to test hypotheses. We have characterized the sensory input to the cutaneous trunk muscle (CTM; also cutaneus trunci (rat) or cutaneus maximus (mouse)) reflex (CTMR), which manifests as a puckering of the dorsal thoracolumbar skin and is selectively driven by noxious stimuli. CTM electromyography (EMG) and neurogram recordings in naïve rats revealed that CTMR responses were elicited by natural stimuli and electrical stimulation of all segments from C4 to L6, a much greater extent of segmental drive to the CTMR than previously described. Stimulation of some subcutaneous paraspinal tissue can also elicit this reflex. Using a selective neurotoxin, we also demonstrate differential drive of the CTMR by trkA-expressing and non-expressing small diameter afferents. These observations highlight aspects of the organization of the CTMR system which make it attractive for studies of nociception and anesthesiology and plasticity of primary afferents, motoneurons, and the propriospinal system. We use the CTMR system to qualitatively and quantitatively demonstrate that experimental pharmacological treatments can be compared to controls applied either to the contralateral side or to another segment, with the remaining segments providing controls for systemic or other treatment effects. These data indicate the potential for using the CTMR system as both an invasive and non-invasive quantitative assessment tool providing improved statistical power and reduced animal use. PMID:23983104

  7. Operant conditioning to increase ankle control or decrease reflex excitability improves reflex modulation and walking function in chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Manella, Kathleen J; Roach, Kathryn E; Field-Fote, Edelle C

    2013-06-01

    Ankle clonus is common after spinal cord injury (SCI) and is attributed to loss of supraspinally mediated inhibition of soleus stretch reflexes and maladaptive reorganization of spinal reflex pathways. The maladaptive reorganization underlying ankle clonus is associated with other abnormalities, such as coactivation and reciprocal facilitation of tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL), which contribute to impaired walking ability in individuals with motor-incomplete SCI. Operant conditioning can increase muscle activation and decrease stretch reflexes in individuals with SCI. We compared two operant conditioning-based interventions in individuals with ankle clonus and impaired walking ability due to SCI. Training included either voluntary TA activation (TA↑) to enhance supraspinal drive or SOL H-reflex suppression (SOL↓) to modulate reflex pathways at the spinal cord level. We measured clonus duration, plantar flexor reflex threshold angle, timed toe tapping, dorsiflexion (DF) active range of motion, lower extremity motor scores (LEMS), walking foot clearance, speed and distance, SOL H-reflex amplitude modulation as an index of reciprocal inhibition, presynaptic inhibition, low-frequency depression, and SOL-to-TA clonus coactivation ratio. TA↑ decreased plantar flexor reflex threshold angle (-4.33°) and DF active range-of-motion angle (-4.32°) and increased LEMS of DF (+0.8 points), total LEMS of the training leg (+2.2 points), and nontraining leg (+0.8 points), and increased walking foot clearance (+ 4.8 mm) and distance (+12.09 m). SOL↓ decreased SOL-to-TA coactivation ratio (-0.21), increased nontraining leg LEMS (+1.8 points), walking speed (+0.02 m/s), and distance (+6.25 m). In sum, we found increased voluntary control associated with TA↑ outcomes and decreased reflex excitability associated with SOL↓ outcomes.

  8. Sympathetic reflex control of skeletal muscle blood flow in patients with congestive heart failure: evidence for beta-adrenergic circulatory control

    SciTech Connect

    Kassis, E.; Jacobsen, T.N.; Mogensen, F.; Amtorp, O.

    1986-11-01

    Mechanisms controlling forearm muscle vascular resistance (FMVR) during postural changes were investigated in seven patients with severe congestive heart failure (CHF) and in seven control subjects with unimpaired left ventricular function. Relative brachioradial muscle blood flow was determined by the local /sup 133/Xe-washout technique. Unloading of baroreceptors with use of 45 degree upright tilt was comparably obtained in the patients with CHF and control subjects. Control subjects had substantially increased FMVR and heart rate to maintain arterial pressure whereas patients with CHF had decreased FMVR by 51 +/- 11% and had no increase in heart rate despite a fall in arterial pressure during upright tilt. The autoregulatory and local vasoconstrictor reflex responsiveness during postural changes in forearm vascular pressures were intact in both groups. In the patients with CHF, the left axillary nerve plexus was blocked by local anesthesia. No alterations in forearm vascular pressures were observed. This blockade preserved the local regulation of FMVR but reversed the vasodilator response to upright tilt as FMVR increased by 30 +/- 7% (p less than .02). Blockade of central neural impulses to this limb combined with brachial arterial infusions of phentolamine completely abolished the humoral vasoconstriction in the tilted position. Infusions of propranolol to the contralateral brachial artery that did not affect baseline values of heart rate, arterial pressure, or the local reflex regulation of FMVR reversed the abnormal vasodilator response to upright tilt as FMVR increased by 42 +/- 12% (p less than .02). Despite augmented baseline values, forearm venous but not arterial plasma levels of epinephrine increased in the tilted position, as did arteri rather than venous plasma concentrations of norepinephrine in these patients.

  9. Development of the Stretch Reflex in the Newborn: Reciprocal Excitation and Reflex Irradiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myklebust, Barbara M.; Gottlieb, Gerald L.

    1993-01-01

    When tendon jerk reflexes were tested in seven newborns from one- to three-days old, stretch reflex responses in all major muscle groups of the lower limb were elicited. This "irradiation of reflexes" is a normal phenomenon in newborns, with the pathway becoming suppressed during normal maturation. In individuals with cerebral palsy, however, the…

  10. Comparison of electromyography fatigue threshold in lower limb muscles in trained cyclists and untrained non-cyclists.

    PubMed

    Smirmaul, B P C; Dantas, J L; Fontes, E B; Altimari, L R; Okano, A H; Moraes, A C

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and compare the Electromyographic Fatigue Threshold (EMG(FT)) determined in the Vastus Lateralis (VL), Rectus Femoris (RF), Biceps Femoris (BF), Semitendinosus (ST) and Tibialis Anterior (TA) during stationary cycling in trained cyclists and non-cyclists. Using a cycle ergometer, 13 cyclists (28.4 +/- 6.9 years; 70.3 +/- 13 kg; 176.1 +/- 8.5 cm) and 11 non-cyclists (25.8 +/- 4 years; 73 +/- 9.1 kg; 175 +/- 6.4 cm), performed a maximum incremental test (ITmax) (90 rpm) to determine the (EMG(FT)). Maximal power output (W(PEAK)) reached by cyclists was higher than for non-cyclists (372.6 W and 248.9 W respectively) (P < 0.01). For the five muscles analyzed in cyclists, EMG(FT) occurred at 85.7% of cases in the VL, 92.9% in RE 78.6% in BE 78.6% in ST and 50% in TA, while in the non-cyclists group, this occurrence was 100% to muscle VL, 100% to RF, 92.6% to BF, 78.6% to ST, and 78.6% to TA. Analyzing the percentage corresponding to the power at EMG(FT) in relation to W(PEAK) reached, no differences between groups were observed for RF, BF and ST, however VL and TA, as well as the mean from all muscles were lower for cyclists than non-cyclists (P < 0.05). The present results showed that EMG(FT) is more easily identified in RF and VL muscles for both groups, and it may be an interesting method to evaluate the adaptive responses from aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms during cycling training programs.

  11. The initial effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold of healthy adults: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon; Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Ji, Sang Gu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an upper extremity neural mobilization technique on delayed onset muscle soreness. [Subjects] Forty-five healthy subjects were randomly assigned to two groups: a nerve mobilization group (experimental) and a control group. [Methods] The subjects of the experimental group were administered a median nerve mobilization technique and ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. The subjects in the control group were only administered ultrasound for the biceps brachii muscle. Muscle fatigue and the pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after the intervention. [Results] The experimental group showed significant improvements in all variables, compared to pre-intervention. Furthermore, the control group showed significant improvements in the pressure pain threshold, compared to pre-intervention. Significant differences in the post-intervention gains in muscle fatigue and pressure pain threshold were found between the experimental group and the control group. [Conclusion] Application of the upper extremity neural mobilization technique is considered to have a positive effect on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:27134351

  12. Are Electrically Induced Muscle Cramps Able to Increase the Cramp Threshold Frequency, When Induced Once a Week?

    PubMed Central

    Link, Tobias Walter; Montag, Johannes Caspar Konrad; McCourt, Molly Leigh; Mester, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The cramp threshold frequency (CTF) is known to be positively correlated with the individual cramp susceptibility. Here we assessed CTF changes after two bouts of electrically induced muscle cramps (EIMCs). The EIMCs (6×5 sec) were unilaterally induced twice (separated by one week) in the gastrocnemius of an intervention group (n=8), while 5 participants served as control. The CTF increased from 25.1±4.6 Hz at baseline to 31.4±9.0 Hz and 31.7±8.5 Hz 24 h after bout 1 and 2 (P<0.05). Thereafter, the CTF declined following both bouts to reach values of 28.0±6.7 Hz and 29.1±7.7 Hz after 72 h after bout 1 and 2. Creatine kinase (CK) activity and perceived discomfort during cramps was lower after bout 2 (P<0.05). CTF, CK, and discomfort did not change in CG. That is, a single bout of EIMCs induces a 24 h CTF increment and a second bout sustains this effect, while perceived discomfort and muscle damage decreases. This short term effect may help athletes to reduce the cramp susceptibility for an important match. PMID:26605029

  13. Are Electrically Induced Muscle Cramps Able to Increase the Cramp Threshold Frequency, When Induced Once a Week?

    PubMed

    Behringer, Michael; Link, Tobias Walter; Montag, Johannes Caspar Konrad; McCourt, Molly Leigh; Mester, Joachim

    2015-09-28

    The cramp threshold frequency (CTF) is known to be positively correlated with the individual cramp susceptibility. Here we assessed CTF changes after two bouts of electrically induced muscle cramps (EIMCs). The EIMCs (6×5 sec) were unilaterally induced twice (separated by one week) in the gastrocnemius of an intervention group (n=8), while 5 participants served as control. The CTF increased from 25.1±4.6 Hz at baseline to 31.4±9.0 Hz and 31.7±8.5 Hz 24 h after bout 1 and 2 (P<0.05). Thereafter, the CTF declined following both bouts to reach values of 28.0±6.7 Hz and 29.1±7.7 Hz after 72 h after bout 1 and 2. Creatine kinase (CK) activity and perceived discomfort during cramps was lower after bout 2 (P<0.05). CTF, CK, and discomfort did not change in CG. That is, a single bout of EIMCs induces a 24 h CTF increment and a second bout sustains this effect, while perceived discomfort and muscle damage decreases. This short term effect may help athletes to reduce the cramp susceptibility for an important match.

  14. Muscle repositioning: combining subjective and objective feedbacks in the teaching and practice of a reflex-based myofascial release technique.

    PubMed

    Bertolucci, Luiz Fernando

    2010-03-17

    Muscle Repositioning (MR) is a new style of myofascial release that elicits involuntary motor reactions detectable by electromyography. This article describes the principal theoretical and practical concepts of MR, and summarizes a workshop presented October 31, 2009, after the Second International Fascia Research Congress, held at Vrije Universitiet, Amsterdam.The manual mechanical input of MR integrates the client's body segments into a block, which is evident as a result of the diagnostic manual oscillations the practitioner imparts to the client's body. Segmental integration is achieved when the client's body responds as a unit to the oscillatory assessment. It appears that manually sustaining the condition of segmental integration evokes involuntary muscle reactions, which reactions might correspond to mechanisms that maintain homeostasis, such as pandiculation. It might be that these reactions are part of the MR mechanism of action and underlie its clinically observed efficacy in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders.For the practitioner and the client alike, segmental integration provides unique sensations. In teaching MR, these paired sensations can be used as kinesthetic feedback resources, because quality of touch can be guided by the client's reported sensations, which should match the practitioner's sensations. Another form of feedback with respect to quality of touch is the visually discernable degree of segmental integration. Finally, because the involuntary motor activity elicited by the MR touch can be objectively monitored through electromyography and possibly other instrumented measurements, the MR approach might yield objectivity, precision, and reproducibility-features seldom found in manual therapies.

  15. Muscle repositioning: combining subjective and objective feedbacks in the teaching and practice of a reflex-based myofascial release technique.

    PubMed

    Bertolucci, Luiz Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Muscle Repositioning (MR) is a new style of myofascial release that elicits involuntary motor reactions detectable by electromyography. This article describes the principal theoretical and practical concepts of MR, and summarizes a workshop presented October 31, 2009, after the Second International Fascia Research Congress, held at Vrije Universitiet, Amsterdam.The manual mechanical input of MR integrates the client's body segments into a block, which is evident as a result of the diagnostic manual oscillations the practitioner imparts to the client's body. Segmental integration is achieved when the client's body responds as a unit to the oscillatory assessment. It appears that manually sustaining the condition of segmental integration evokes involuntary muscle reactions, which reactions might correspond to mechanisms that maintain homeostasis, such as pandiculation. It might be that these reactions are part of the MR mechanism of action and underlie its clinically observed efficacy in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders.For the practitioner and the client alike, segmental integration provides unique sensations. In teaching MR, these paired sensations can be used as kinesthetic feedback resources, because quality of touch can be guided by the client's reported sensations, which should match the practitioner's sensations. Another form of feedback with respect to quality of touch is the visually discernable degree of segmental integration. Finally, because the involuntary motor activity elicited by the MR touch can be objectively monitored through electromyography and possibly other instrumented measurements, the MR approach might yield objectivity, precision, and reproducibility-features seldom found in manual therapies. PMID:21589699

  16. Neural control of rhythmic, cyclical human arm movement: task dependency, nerve specificity and phase modulation of cutaneous reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Zehr, E Paul; Kido, Aiko

    2001-01-01

    The organization and pattern of cutaneous reflex modulation during rhythmic cyclical movements of the human upper limbs has received much less attention than that afforded the lower limb. Our working hypothesis is that control mechanisms underlying the modulation of cutaneous reflex amplitude during rhythmic arm movement are similar to those that control reflex modulation in the leg. Thus, we hypothesized that cutaneous reflexes would show task dependency and nerve specificity in the upper limb during rhythmic cyclical arm movement as has been demonstrated in the human lower limb. EMG was recorded from 10 muscles crossing the human shoulder, elbow and wrist joints while bilateral whole arm rhythmic cyclical movements were performed on a custom-made, hydraulic apparatus. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked with trains (5× 1.0 ms pulses at 300 Hz) of electrical stimulation delivered at non-noxious intensities (∼2× threshold for radiating parasthesia) to the superficial radial, median and ulnar nerves innervating the hand. Cutaneous reflexes were typically modulated with the movement cycle (i.e. phase dependency was observed). There was evidence for nerve specificity of cutaneous reflexes during rhythmic movement of the upper limbs. Task-dependent modulation was also seen as cutaneous reflexes were of larger amplitude or inhibitory (reflex reversal) during arm cycling as compared to static contraction. While there are some differences in the patterns of cutaneous reflex modulation seen between the arms and legs, it is concluded that cutaneous reflexes are modulated similarly in the upper and lower limbs implicating similar motor control mechanisms. PMID:11744775

  17. Muscle Repositioning: Combining Subjective and Objective Feedbacks in the Teaching and Practice of a Reflex-Based Myofascial Release Technique

    PubMed Central

    Bertolucci, Luiz Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Muscle Repositioning (MR) is a new style of myofascial release that elicits involuntary motor reactions detectable by electromyography. This article* describes the principal theoretical and practical concepts of MR, and summarizes a workshop presented October 31, 2009, after the Second International Fascia Research Congress, held at Vrije Universitiet, Amsterdam. The manual mechanical input of MR integrates the client’s body segments into a block, which is evident as a result of the diagnostic manual oscillations the practitioner imparts to the client’s body. Segmental integration is achieved when the client’s body responds as a unit to the oscillatory assessment. It appears that manually sustaining the condition of segmental integration evokes involuntary muscle reactions, which reactions might correspond to mechanisms that maintain homeostasis, such as pandiculation. It might be that these reactions are part of the MR mechanism of action and underlie its clinically observed efficacy in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. For the practitioner and the client alike, segmental integration provides unique sensations. In teaching MR, these paired sensations can be used as kinesthetic feedback resources, because quality of touch can be guided by the client’s reported sensations, which should match the practitioner’s sensations. Another form of feedback with respect to quality of touch is the visually discernable degree of segmental integration. Finally, because the involuntary motor activity elicited by the MR touch can be objectively monitored through electromyography and possibly other instrumented measurements, the MR approach might yield objectivity, precision, and reproducibility—features seldom found in manual therapies. PMID:21589699

  18. A reflex resonance model of vocal vibrato.

    PubMed

    Titze, Ingo R; Story, Brad; Smith, Marshall; Long, Russel

    2002-05-01

    A reflex mechanism with a long latency (>40 ms) is implicated as a plausible cause of vocal vibrato. At least one pair of agonist-antagonist muscles that can change vocal-fold length is needed, such as the cricothyroid muscle paired with the thyroarytenoid muscle, or the cricothyroid muscle paired with the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle or a strap muscle. Such an agonist-antagonist muscle pair can produce negative feedback instability in vocal-fold length with this long reflex latency, producing oscillations on the order of 5-7 Hz. It is shown that singers appear to increase the gain in the reflex loop to cultivate the vibrato, which grows out of a spectrum of 0-15-Hz physiologic tremors in raw form. PMID:12051447

  19. A reflex resonance model of vocal vibrato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titze, Ingo R.; Story, Brad; Smith, Marshall; Long, Russel

    2002-05-01

    A reflex mechanism with a long latency (>40 ms) is implicated as a plausible cause of vocal vibrato. At least one pair of agonist-antagonist muscles that can change vocal-fold length is needed, such as the cricothyroid muscle paired with the thyroarytenoid muscle, or the cricothyroid muscle paired with the lateral cricoarytenoid muscle or a strap muscle. Such an agonist-antagonist muscle pair can produce negative feedback instability in vocal-fold length with this long reflex latency, producing oscillations on the order of 5-7 Hz. It is shown that singers appear to increase the gain in the reflex loop to cultivate the vibrato, which grows out of a spectrum of 0-15-Hz physiologic tremors in raw form.

  20. Are H-reflex and M-wave recruitment curve parameters related to aerobic capacity?

    PubMed

    Piscione, Julien; Grosset, Jean-François; Gamet, Didier; Pérot, Chantal

    2012-10-01

    Soleus Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) amplitude is affected by a training period and type and level of training are also well known to modify aerobic capacities. Previously, paired changes in H-reflex and aerobic capacity have been evidenced after endurance training. The aim of this study was to investigate possible links between H- and M-recruitment curve parameters and aerobic capacity collected on a cohort of subjects (56 young men) that were not involved in regular physical training. Maximal H-reflex normalized with respect to maximal M-wave (H(max)/M(max)) was measured as well as other parameters of the H- or M-recruitment curves that provide information about the reflex or direct excitability of the motoneuron pool, such as thresholds of stimulus intensity to obtain H or M response (H(th) and M(th)), the ascending slope of H-reflex, or M-wave recruitment curves (H(slp) and M(slp)) and their ratio (H(slp)/M(slp)). Aerobic capacity, i.e., maximal oxygen consumption and maximal aerobic power (MAP) were, respectively, estimated from a running field test and from an incremental test on a cycle ergometer. Maximal oxygen consumption was only correlated with M(slp), an indicator of muscle fiber heterogeneity (p < 0.05), whereas MAP was not correlated with any of the tested parameters (p > 0.05). Although higher H-reflex are often described for subjects with a high aerobic capacity because of endurance training, at a basic level (i.e., without training period context) no correlation was observed between maximal H-reflex and aerobic capacity. Thus, none of the H-reflex or M-wave recruitment curve parameters, except M(slp), was related to the aerobic capacity of young, untrained male subjects.

  1. The vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans: neural interactions between cardiovascular reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    1. Over the past 5 years, there has been emerging evidence that the vestibular system regulates sympathetic nerve activity in humans. We have studied this issue in humans by using head-down rotation (HDR) in the prone position. 2. These studies have clearly demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and calf vascular resistance during HDR. These responses are mediated by engagement of the otolith organs and not the semicircular canals. 3. However, differential activation of sympathetic nerve activity has been observed during HDR. Unlike MSNA, skin sympathetic nerve activity does not increase with HDR. 4. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes (i.e. barorereflexes and skeletal muscle reflexes) has shown an additive interaction for MSNA. 5. The additive interaction between the baroreflexes and vestibulosympathetic reflex suggests that the vestibular system may assist in defending against orthostatic challenges in humans by elevating MSNA beyond that of the baroreflexes. 6. In addition, the further increase in MSNA via otolith stimulation during isometric handgrip, when arterial pressure is elevated markedly, indicates that the vestibulosympathetic reflex is a powerful activator of MSNA and may contribute to blood pressure and flow regulation during dynamic exercise. 7. Future studies will help evaluate the importance of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in clinical conditions associated with orthostatic hypotension.

  2. Vestibulo-spinal reflex mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.

    1981-01-01

    The specific objectives of experiments designed to investigate postural reflex behavior during sustained weightlessness are discussed. The first is to investigate, during prolonged weightlessness with Hoffmann response (H-reflex) measurement procedures, vestibulo-spinal reflexes associated with vestibular (otolith) responses evoked during an applied linear acceleration. This objective includes not only an evaluation of otolith-induced changes in a major postural muscle but also an investigation with this technique of the adaptive process of the vestibular system and spinal reflex mechanisms to this unique environment. The second objective is to relate space motion sickness to the results of this investigation. Finally, a return to the vestibulo-spinal and postural reflexes to normal values following the flight will be examined. The flight experiment involves activation of nerve tissue (tibial N) with electrical shock and the recording of resulting muscle activity (soleus) with surface electrodes. Soleus/spinal H-reflex testing procedures will be used in conjuction with linear acceleration through the subject's X-axis.

  3. Cutaneous reflex modulation and self-induced reflex attenuation in cerebellar patients.

    PubMed

    Hoogkamer, Wouter; Van Calenbergh, Frank; Swinnen, Stephan P; Duysens, Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Modulation of cutaneous reflexes is important in the neural control of walking, yet knowledge about underlying neural pathways is still incomplete. Recent studies have suggested that the cerebellum is involved. Here we evaluated the possible roles of the cerebellum in cutaneous reflex modulation and in attenuation of self-induced reflexes. First we checked whether leg muscle activity during walking was similar in patients with focal cerebellar lesions and in healthy control subjects. We then recorded cutaneous reflex activity in leg muscles during walking. Additionally, we compared reflexes after standard (computer triggered) stimuli with reflexes after self-induced stimuli for both groups. Biceps femoris and gastrocnemius medialis muscle activity was increased in the patient group compared with the control subjects, suggesting a coactivation strategy to reduce instability of gait. Cutaneous reflex modulation was similar between healthy control subjects and cerebellar patients, but the latter appeared less able to attenuate reflexes to self-induced stimuli. This suggests that the cerebellum is not primarily involved in cutaneous reflex modulation but that it could act in attenuation of self-induced reflex responses. The latter role in locomotion would be consistent with the common view that the cerebellum predicts sensory consequences of movement.

  4. Moro reflex

    MedlinePlus

    ... infants. Absence of the Moro reflex in an infant is abnormal. Absence on both sides suggests damage to the brain or spinal cord. Absence on only one side suggests either a broken shoulder bone or an injury to the group of nerves that run from ...

  5. [The oculocardiac reflex during vitrectomy under neuroleptanalgesia].

    PubMed

    Dornberger, I; Quast, D; Velhagen, K H; Bellach, J; Guckler, A

    1991-01-01

    Oculocardiac reflex (OCR) is a frequently occurring complication in eye operations. It is a trigemino-vagal reflex characterised by the clinical occurrence of bradycardia and other cardiac rhythm disturbances following manipulations on the eye and its surroundings especially after traction of the external eye muscles. In this paper based on an analysis of 402 anaesthesia records, a bradycardia frequency (f = less than 60/min) of 31.8% was noted while other rhythm disturbances occurred in 5.7%. Predisposition facts were identified as age over 50, hypertension and cardiac diseases requiring medication with cardiac drugs. The frequency of OCR is considerably lowered by diabetes mellitus. Examination of 159 traction measurements made at the lateral rectus muscle revealed that the first manipulation made at the rectus bulbi superior muscle resulted in a statistically significantly stronger reflex activity than at the other muscles. In a further series of investigations in which rectus bulbi superior muscle was tested last, this muscle again showed the biggest frequency deviation. Only determination of the percentage heart rate decrease is suitable for characterising reflex activity. The frequency of the reflex occurring in our study was 71.7%, the result being reduced by the high proportion of diabetics, who are relatively reflex insensitive.

  6. Reflexives in Mohawk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonvillain, Nancy

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the meanings and uses of two reflexive morphemes in the Mohawk language. Reflexive "atat" is shown to have both reflexive and reciprocal meanings. It is also realized in kinship terms and in the transitive pronominal prefix "yutat." Semi-reflexive "at" has some reflexive functions, and can mark middle voice and…

  7. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to <20% of control in every nerve) by increasing blood pressure levels to >150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  8. Convergence in reflex pathways from multiple cutaneous nerves innervating the foot depends upon the number of rhythmically active limbs during locomotion.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Hundza, Sandra R; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E Paul

    2014-01-01

    Neural output from the locomotor system for each arm and leg influences the spinal motoneuronal pools directly and indirectly through interneuronal (IN) reflex networks. While well documented in other species, less is known about the functions and features of convergence in common IN reflex system from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions during remote arm and leg movement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to use spatial facilitation to examine possible convergence in common reflex pathways during rhythmic locomotor limb movements. Cutaneous reflexes were evoked in ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle by stimulating (in random order) the sural nerve (SUR), the distal tibial nerve (TIB), and combined simultaneous stimulation of both nerves (TIB&SUR). Reflexes were evoked while participants performed rhythmic stepping and arm swinging movement with both arms and the leg contralateral to stimulation (ARM&LEG), with just arm movement (ARM) and with just contralateral leg movement (LEG). Stimulation intensities were just below threshold for evoking early latency (<80 ms to peak) reflexes. For each stimulus condition, rectified EMG signals were averaged while participants held static contractions in the stationary (stimulated) leg. During ARM&LEG movement, amplitudes of cutaneous reflexes evoked by combined TIB&SUR stimulation were significantly larger than simple mathematical summation of the amplitudes evoked by SUR or TIB alone. Interestingly, this extra facilitation seen during combined nerve stimulation was significantly reduced when performing ARM or LEG compared to ARM&LEG. We conclude that locomotor rhythmic limb movement induces excitation of common IN reflex pathways from cutaneous afferents innervating different foot regions. Importantly, activity in this pathway is most facilitated during ARM&LEG movement. These results suggest that transmission in IN reflex pathways is weighted according to the number of limbs directly engaged

  9. [Oculorespiratory reflex].

    PubMed

    Thirion, B; Marchal, F; Pétry, L; George, J L; Crance, J P; Haberer, J P

    1990-01-01

    The lack of interest about oculorespiratory reflex (ORR) in surgery and experimental studies is obvious. However the authors insist on the importance of its clinical traduction. The purpose of this study is to determinate an experimental model with titration of stimulus (pressure or traction) and therapeutic test. Our first Results prove the clinic entity of O.R.R. In first conclusion, we can insist on the importance of ventilatory assistance during squint surgery and on the monitoring of PE CO2 and Sa O2.

  10. Variability in Hoffmann and tendon reflexes in healthy male subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, E.; Do, S.; Jaweed, M.

    1992-01-01

    There is a time dependent decrease in amplitude of H- and T-reflexes during Zero-G exposure and subsequently an increase in the amplitude of the H-reflex 2-4 hours after return to a 1-G environment. These alterations have been attributed to the adaptation of the human neurosensory system to gravity. The Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) is an acknowledged method to determine the integrity of the monosynaptic reflex arc. However deep tendon reflexes (DTR's or T-reflexes), elicited by striking the tendon also utilize the entire reflex arc. The objective of this study was to compare the variability in latency and amplitude of the two reflexes in healthy subjects. Methods: Nine healthy male subjects, 27-43 years in age, 161-175 cm in height plus 60-86 Kg in weight, underwent weekly testing for four weeks with a Dan-Tec EMG counterpoint EMG system. Subjects were studied prone and surface EMG electrodes were placed on the right and left soleus muscles. The H-reflex was obtained by stimulating the tibial nerve in the politeal fossa with a 0.2 msec square wave pulse delivered at 2 Hz until the maximum H-reflex was obtained. The T-reflex was invoked by tapping the achilles tendon with a self triggering reflex hammer connected to the EMG system. The latencies and amplitudes for the H- and T-reflexes were measured. Results: These data indicate that the amplitudes of these reflexes varied considerably. However, latencies to invoked responses were consistent. The latency of the T-reflex was approximately 3-5 msec longer than the H-reflex. Conclusion: The T-reflex is easily obtained, requires less time, and is more comfortable to perform. Qualitative data can be obtained by deploying self triggering, force plated reflex hammers both in the 1-G and Zero-G environment.

  11. Distribution and threshold expression of the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation in skeletal muscle of patients with myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Boulet, L.; Karpati, G. ); Shoubridge, E.A. McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec )

    1992-12-01

    The authors investigated the distribution and expression of mutant mtDNAs carrying the A-to-G mutation at position 8344 in the tRNA[sup Lys] gene in the skeletal muscle of four patients with myoclonus epilepsy and ragged-red fibers (MERRF). The proportion of mutant genomes was greater than 80% of total mtDNAs in muscle samples of all patients and was associated with a decrease in the activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX). The vast majority of myoblasts, cloned from the satellite-cell population in the same muscles, were homoplasmic for the mutation. The overall proportion of mutant mtDNAs in this population was similar to that in differentiated muscle, suggesting that the ratio of mutant to wild-type mtDNAs in skeletal muscle is determined either in the ovum or during early development and changes little with age. Translation of all mtDNA-encoded genes was severely depressed in homoplasmic mutant myoblast clones but not in heteroplasmic or wild-type clones. The threshold for biochemical expression of the mutation was determined in heteroplasmic myotubes formed by fusion of different proportions of mutant and wild-type myoblasts. The magnitude of the decrease in translation in myotubes containing mutant mtDNAs was protein specific. Complex I and IV subunits were more affected than complex V subunits, and there was a rough correlation with both protein size and number of lysine residues. Approximately 15% wild-type mtDNAs restored translation and COX activity to near normal levels. These results show that the A-to-G substitution in tRNA[sup Lys] is a functionally recessive mutation that can be rescued by intraorganellar complementation with a small proportion of wild-type mtDNAs and explain the steep threshold for expression of the MERRF clinical phenotype. 40 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Excess VO2 during ramp exercise is positively correlated to intercostal muscles deoxyhemoglobin levels above the gas exchange threshold in young trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Oueslati, Ferid; Girard, Olivier; Tabka, Zouhair; Ahmaidi, Said

    2016-07-01

    We assessed respiratory muscles oxygenation responses during a ramp exercise to exhaustion and further explored their relationship with the non-linear increase of VO2 (VO2 excess) observed above the gas-exchange threshold. Ten male cyclists completed a ramp exercise to exhaustion on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 30Wmin(-1) with continuous monitoring of expired gases (breath-by-breath) and oxygenation status of intercostal muscles. Maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure measurements were taken at rest and at exhaustion. The VO2 excess represents the difference between VO2max observed and VO2max expected using linear equation between the VO2 and the intensity before gas-exchange threshold. The deoxyhemoglobin remained unchanged until 60% of maximal aerobic power (MAP) and thereafter increased significantly by 37±18% and 40±22% at 80% and 100% of MAP, respectively. Additionally, the amplitude of deoxyhemoglobin increase between 60 and 100% of MAP positively correlated with the VO2 excess (r=0.69, p<0.05). Compared to exercise start, the oxygen tissue saturation index decreased from 80% of MAP (-4.8±3.2%, p<0.05) onwards. At exhaustion, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures declined by 7.8±16% and 12.6±10% (both p<0.05), respectively. In summary, our results suggest a significant contribution of respiratory muscles to the VO2 excess phenomenon.

  13. Whole-body vibration-induced muscular reflex: Is it a stretch-induced reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Cidem, Muharrem; Sebik, Oguz; Yilmaz, Gizem; Karamehmetoglu, Safak Sahir; Kara, Sadik; Karacan, Ilhan; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Whole-body vibration (WBV) can induce reflex responses in muscles. A number of studies have reported that the physiological mechanisms underlying this type of reflex activity can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. Thus, the primary objective of this study was to test whether the WBV-induced muscular reflex (WBV-IMR) can be explained as a stretch-induced reflex. [Subjects and Methods] The present study assessed 20 healthy males using surface electrodes placed on their right soleus muscle. The latency of the tendon reflex (T-reflex) as a stretch-induced reflex was compared with the reflex latency of the WBV-IMR. In addition, simulations were performed at 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, and 50 Hz to determine the stretch frequency of the muscle during WBV. [Results] WBV-IMR latency (40.5 ± 0.8 ms; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 39.0–41.9 ms) was significantly longer than T-reflex latency (34.6 ± 0.5 ms; 95% CI: 33.6–35.5 ms) and the mean difference was 6.2 ms (95% CI of the difference: 4.7–7.7 ms). The simulations performed in the present study demonstrated that the frequency of the stretch signal would be twice the frequency of the vibration. [Conclusion] These findings do not support the notion that WBV-IMR can be explained by reference to a stretch-induced reflex. PMID:26310784

  14. Wireless quantified reflex device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoyne, Robert Charles

    The deep tendon reflex is a fundamental aspect of a neurological examination. The two major parameters of the tendon reflex are response and latency, which are presently evaluated qualitatively during a neurological examination. The reflex loop is capable of providing insight for the status and therapy response of both upper and lower motor neuron syndromes. Attempts have been made to ascertain reflex response and latency, however these systems are relatively complex, resource intensive, with issues of consistent and reliable accuracy. The solution presented is a wireless quantified reflex device using tandem three dimensional wireless accelerometers to obtain response based on acceleration waveform amplitude and latency derived from temporal acceleration waveform disparity. Three specific aims have been established for the proposed wireless quantified reflex device: 1. Demonstrate the wireless quantified reflex device is reliably capable of ascertaining quantified reflex response and latency using a quantified input. 2. Evaluate the precision of the device using an artificial reflex system. 3.Conduct a longitudinal study respective of subjects with healthy patellar tendon reflexes, using the wireless quantified reflex evaluation device to obtain quantified reflex response and latency. Aim 1 has led to the steady evolution of the wireless quantified reflex device from a singular two dimensional wireless accelerometer capable of measuring reflex response to a tandem three dimensional wireless accelerometer capable of reliably measuring reflex response and latency. The hypothesis for aim 1 is that a reflex quantification device can be established for reliably measuring reflex response and latency for the patellar tendon reflex, comprised of an integrated system of wireless three dimensional MEMS accelerometers. Aim 2 further emphasized the reliability of the wireless quantified reflex device by evaluating an artificial reflex system. The hypothesis for aim 2 is that

  15. Hyperekplexia and stiff-man syndrome: abnormal brainstem reflexes suggest a physiological relationship

    PubMed Central

    Khasani, S; Becker, K; Meinck, H

    2004-01-01

    Background and objectives: Hyperekplexia and the stiff-man syndrome (SMS) are both conditions with exaggerated startle suggesting abnormal brainstem function. Investigation of brainstem reflexes may provide insight into disturbed reflex excitation and inhibition underlying these movement disorders. Patients and methods: Using four-channel EMG, we examined four trigeminal brainstem reflexes (monosynaptic masseter, masseter inhibitory, glabella, and orbicularis oculi blink reflexes) and their spread into pericranial muscles in five patients with familial hyperekplexia (FH), two with acquired hyperekplexia (AH), 10 with SMS, and 15 healthy control subjects. Results: Both FH/AH and SMS patients had abnormal propagation of brainstem reflexes into pericranial muscles. All patients with hyperekplexia showed an abnormal short-latency (15–20 ms) reflex in the trapezius muscle with a characteristic clinical appearance ("head retraction jerk") evoked by tactile or electrical stimulation of the trigeminal nerve, but normal monosynaptic masseter reflexes. Inhibitory brainstem reflexes were attenuated in some FH/AH patients. Four of 10 patients with SMS had similar short-latency reflexes in the neck muscles and frequently showed widespread enhancement of other excitatory reflexes, reflex spasms, and attenuation of inhibitory brainstem reflexes. Conclusion: Reflex excitation is exaggerated and inhibition is attenuated in both stiff-man syndrome and familial or acquired hyperekplexia, indicating a physiological relationship. Reflex transmission in the brainstem appears biased towards excitation which may imply dysfunction of inhibitory glycinergic or GABAergic interneurons, or both. PMID:15314112

  16. Reflexives in Veracruz Huastec.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constable, Peter G.

    A study examines various Huastec clause types that are reflexive in some sense, including ordinary reflexives, which involve co-reference. Two mutually exclusive morphosyntactic devices are used in Huastec: reflexive pronouns and verbal morphology. In this way, Huastec is like various European languages. Clauses involving reflexive pronouns and…

  17. Role of stretch reflex in voluntary movements. [of human foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, G. L.; Agarwal, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The stretch reflex is often described as a spinal servomechanism, a device for assisting in the regulation of muscle length. Observation of the EMG response to mechanical interruption of voluntary movements fails to demonstrate a significant role for spinal reflexes at 40 msec latency. Two functional responses with latencies of 120 msec and 200 msec, implying supraspinal mediation, are observed.

  18. Modulation of two types of jaw-opening reflex by stimulation of the red nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Yajima, Eriko; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Nagamine, Yasuhiro; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2013-08-01

    The red nucleus (RN) is divided cytoarchitecturally into two parts, the parvicellular part (RPC) and the magnocellular part (RMC). The present study aims, first, to compare the effects of RN stimulation between low- and high-threshold afferents-evoked jaw opening reflexes (JORs), and secondly to compare the size of these effects in the RPC and RMC. Experiments were performed on rats anesthetized with urethane-chloralose. The JOR was evoked by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve and was recorded as the electromyographic response of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. The stimulus intensity was either 1.2 (low-threshold) or 4.0 (high-threshold) times that necessary to elicit the JOR. Conditioning electrical stimulation of the RN significantly facilitated the JOR evoked by the low-threshold afferents. On the other hand, conditioning electrical stimulation of the RN significantly suppressed the JOR evoked by the high-threshold afferents. Microinjection of monosodium glutamate into the RN also facilitated the JOR evoked by the low-threshold afferents, but suppressed that evoked by high-threshold afferents. Facilitation did not differ between the RMC and the RPC. Suppression by the RMC stimulation was significantly greater than that by the RPC stimulation. These results suggest that the RN has distinct functional roles in the control of the JOR. PMID:23708019

  19. Hamstrings stretch reflex in human spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Burke, David; Gillies, J. D.; Lance, James W.

    1971-01-01

    In 16 patients with spastic paralysis the hamstrings stretch reflex was found to increase as the velocity of stretch increased, and generally to subside after movement ceased. These effects are attributable to the dynamic property of the primary spindle ending. The stretch reflex commonly appeared in only the last third of the stretching movement and was maximal as the knee became fully extended. This is consistent with the static properties of the primary and secondary spindle endings, and accounts for the absence of the clasp-knife phenomenon in the spastic hamstrings. The difference in the nature of the stretch reflex in spastic flexor and extensor muscles is best explained by the differential reflex effects of group II afferent fibres which facilitate flexor motoneurones and inhibit extensor motoneurones. PMID:4255176

  20. Vestibular reflexes of otolith origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Victor J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibular system and its role in the maintenance of posture and in motion sickness is investigated using cats as experimental subjects. The assumption is that better understanding of the physiology of vestibular pathways is not only of intrinsic value, but will help to explain and eventually alleviate the disturbances caused by vestibular malfunction, or by exposure to an unusual environment such as space. The first project deals with the influence on the spinal cord of stimulation of the vestibular labyrinth, particularly the otoliths. A second was concerned with the properties and neural basis of the tonic neck reflex. These two projects are related, because vestibulospinal and tonic neck reflexes interact in the maintenance of normal posture. The third project began with an interest in mechanisms of motion sickness, and eventually shifted to a study of central control of respiratory muscles involved in vomiting.

  1. Deficits in Lower Limb Muscle Reflex Contraction Latency and Peak Force Are Associated With Impairments in Postural Control and Gross Motor Skills of Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Shirley S.M.; Ng, Shamay S.M.; Guo, X.; Wang, Yuling; Chung, Raymond C.K.; Stat, Grad; Ki, W.Y.; Macfarlane, Duncan J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional, exploratory study aimed to compare neuromuscular performance, balance and motor skills proficiencies of typically developing children and those with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and to determine associations of these neuromuscular factors with balance and motor skills performances in children with DCD. One hundred thirty children with DCD and 117 typically developing children participated in the study. Medial hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latencies in response to an unexpected posterior-to-anterior trunk perturbation were assessed by electromyography and accelerometer. Hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle peak force and time to peak force were quantified by dynamometer, and balance and motor skills performances were evaluated with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC). Independent t tests revealed that children with DCD had longer hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latencies (P < 0.001) and lower isometric peak forces (P < 0.001), but not times to peak forces (P > 0.025), than the controls. Multiple regression analysis accounting for basic demographics showed that gastrocnemius peak force was independently associated with the MABC balance subscore and ball skills subscore, accounting for 5.7% (P = 0.003) and 8.5% (P = 0.001) of the variance, respectively. Gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latency also explained 11.4% (P < 0.001) of the variance in the MABC ball skills subscore. Children with DCD had delayed leg muscle activation onset times and lower isometric peak forces. Gastrocnemius peak force was associated with balance and ball skills performances, whereas timing of gastrocnemius muscle activation was a determinant of ball skill performance in the DCD population. PMID:26469921

  2. Embodied Self-Reflexivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagis, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on G. H. Mead and Merleau-Ponty, this paper aims to extend our understanding of self-reflexivity beyond the notion of a discursive, abstract, and symbolic process. It offers a framework for embodied self-reflexivity, which anchors the self in the reflexive capacity of bodily sensations. The data consist of two years of ethnographic…

  3. Computation of inverse functions in a model of cerebellar and reflex pathways allows to control a mobile mechanical segment.

    PubMed

    Ebadzadeh, M; Tondu, B; Darlot, C

    2005-01-01

    The command and control of limb movements by the cerebellar and reflex pathways are modeled by means of a circuit whose structure is deduced from functional constraints. One constraint is that fast limb movements must be accurate although they cannot be continuously controlled in closed loop by use of sensory signals. Thus, the pathways which process the motor orders must contain approximate inverse functions of the bio-mechanical functions of the limb and of the muscles. This can be achieved by means of parallel feedback loops, whose pattern turns out to be comparable to the anatomy of the cerebellar pathways. They contain neural networks able to anticipate the motor consequences of the motor orders, modeled by artificial neural networks whose connectivity is similar to that of the cerebellar cortex. These networks learn the direct biomechanical functions of the limbs and muscles by means of a supervised learning process. Teaching signals calculated from motor errors are sent to the learning sites, as, in the cerebellum, complex spikes issued from the inferior olive are conveyed to the Purkinje cells by climbing fibers. Learning rules are deduced by a differential calculation, as classical gradient rules, and they account for the long term depression which takes place in the dendritic arborizations of the Purkinje cells. Another constraint is that reflexes must not impede voluntary movements while remaining at any instant ready to oppose perturbations. Therefore, efferent copies of the motor orders are sent to the interneurones of the reflexes, where they cancel the sensory-motor consequences of the voluntary movements. After learning, the model is able to drive accurately, both in velocity and position, angular movements of a rod actuated by two pneumatic McKibben muscles. Reflexes comparable to the myotatic and tendinous reflexes, and stabilizing reactions comparable to the cerebellar sensory-motor reactions, reduce efficiently the effects of perturbing torques

  4. The effect of dry needling on pain, pressure pain threshold and disability in patients with a myofascial trigger point in the upper trapezius muscle.

    PubMed

    Ziaeifar, Maryam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Karimi, Noureddin; Nourbakhsh, Mohammad Reza

    2014-04-01

    Dry needling (DN) has been used recently by physical therapists as a therapy of choice for patients with myofascial trigger points (TrP). The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effect of DN in the treatment of TrPs in the upper trapezius (UT) muscle. A sample of convenience of 33 patients with TrP in the UT muscle participated in this study. Patients were randomly assigned to a standard (N = 17) or experimental group (N = 16). The treatment protocol for the standard group consisted of trigger point compression technique (TCT) on MTP, while the patients in the experimental group received DN. Pain intensity and pressure pain thresholds were assessed for both groups before and after the treatment sessions. In addition, the Disability of Arm, Hand, and Shoulder (DASH) was administered. Statistical analysis (paired t-test) revealed a significant improvement in pain, PPT and DASH scores after treatment in the experimental (DN) and standard (TCT) group compared with before treatment (P < 0.05). The ANCOVA revealed significant differences between the DN and TCT groups on the post-measurement VAS score (P = 0.01). There was, however, no significant difference between the two groups on the post-measurement score of the PPT (P = 0.08) and DASH (P = 0.34). DN produces an improvement in pain intensity, PPT and DASH and may be prescribed for subjects with TrP in UT muscles especially when pain relief is the goal of the treatment.

  5. The menace reflex.

    PubMed

    van Ballegoij, Wouter J C; Koehler, Peter J; Meulen, Bastiaan C Ter

    2015-06-01

    The menace reflex (blink reflex to visual threat) tests visual processing at the bedside in patients who cannot participate in normal visual field testing. We reviewed a collection of recently discovered historical movies showing the experiments of the Dutch physiologist Gysbertus Rademaker (1887-1957), exploring the anatomy of this reflex by making cerebral lesions in dogs. The experiments show not only that the menace reflex is cortically mediated, but also that lesions outside the visual cortex can abolish the reflex. Therefore, although often erroneously used in this way, an absent menace does not always indicate a visual field deficit.

  6. The menace reflex.

    PubMed

    van Ballegoij, Wouter J C; Koehler, Peter J; Meulen, Bastiaan C Ter

    2015-06-01

    The menace reflex (blink reflex to visual threat) tests visual processing at the bedside in patients who cannot participate in normal visual field testing. We reviewed a collection of recently discovered historical movies showing the experiments of the Dutch physiologist Gysbertus Rademaker (1887-1957), exploring the anatomy of this reflex by making cerebral lesions in dogs. The experiments show not only that the menace reflex is cortically mediated, but also that lesions outside the visual cortex can abolish the reflex. Therefore, although often erroneously used in this way, an absent menace does not always indicate a visual field deficit. PMID:25670870

  7. Vestibulocollic reflexes in the absence of head postural control

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Patrick A.; Siegmund, Gunter P.; Happee, Riender; Schouten, Alfred C.

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous electrical vestibular stimulation evokes reflexive responses in appendicular muscles that are suppressed during tasks in which the muscles are not contributing to balance control. In neck muscles, which stabilize the head on the torso and in space, it is unclear whether similar postural task dependence shapes vestibular reflexes. We investigated whether vestibulocollic reflexes are modulated during tasks in which vestibular information is not directly relevant to maintaining the head balanced on the torso. We hypothesized that vestibulocollic reflexes would be 1) evoked when neck muscles are not involved in balancing the head on the torso and 2) invariant across synergistic neck muscle contraction tasks. Muscle activity was recorded bilaterally in sternocleidomastoid and splenius capitis muscles during head-free and head-fixed conditions while subjects were exposed to stochastic electrical vestibular stimulation (±5 mA, 0–75 Hz). Significant vestibular reflex responses (P < 0.05) were observed during head-free and head-fixed trials. Response magnitude and timing were similar between head-free and head-fixed trials for sternocleidomastoid, but splenius capitis magnitudes decreased with the head fixed by ∼25% (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, this indicates that vestibulocollic responses are evoked independent of the requirement to maintain postural control of the head on the torso. Response magnitude and timing were similar across focal muscle contractions (i.e., axial rotation/flexion/extension) provided the muscle was active. In contrast, when subjects cocontracted neck muscles, vestibular-evoked responses decreased in sternocleidomastoid by ∼30–45% (P < 0.05) compared with focal muscle contractions but remained unchanged in splenius capitis. These results indicate robust vestibulocollic reflex coupling, which we suggest functions through its closed-loop influence on head posture to ensure cervical spine stabilization. PMID:25008409

  8. Vestibulocollic reflexes in the absence of head postural control.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Patrick A; Siegmund, Gunter P; Happee, Riender; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    Percutaneous electrical vestibular stimulation evokes reflexive responses in appendicular muscles that are suppressed during tasks in which the muscles are not contributing to balance control. In neck muscles, which stabilize the head on the torso and in space, it is unclear whether similar postural task dependence shapes vestibular reflexes. We investigated whether vestibulocollic reflexes are modulated during tasks in which vestibular information is not directly relevant to maintaining the head balanced on the torso. We hypothesized that vestibulocollic reflexes would be 1) evoked when neck muscles are not involved in balancing the head on the torso and 2) invariant across synergistic neck muscle contraction tasks. Muscle activity was recorded bilaterally in sternocleidomastoid and splenius capitis muscles during head-free and head-fixed conditions while subjects were exposed to stochastic electrical vestibular stimulation (± 5 mA, 0-75 Hz). Significant vestibular reflex responses (P < 0.05) were observed during head-free and head-fixed trials. Response magnitude and timing were similar between head-free and head-fixed trials for sternocleidomastoid, but splenius capitis magnitudes decreased with the head fixed by ∼ 25% (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, this indicates that vestibulocollic responses are evoked independent of the requirement to maintain postural control of the head on the torso. Response magnitude and timing were similar across focal muscle contractions (i.e., axial rotation/flexion/extension) provided the muscle was active. In contrast, when subjects cocontracted neck muscles, vestibular-evoked responses decreased in sternocleidomastoid by ∼ 30-45% (P < 0.05) compared with focal muscle contractions but remained unchanged in splenius capitis. These results indicate robust vestibulocollic reflex coupling, which we suggest functions through its closed-loop influence on head posture to ensure cervical spine stabilization.

  9. Abnormalities of the blink reflex in burning mouth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, S K; Forssell, H; Tenovuo, O

    1997-12-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first report on pain-related abnormalities of the eye blink reflex (BR) in a clinical pain patient population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the possible neuropathic mechanisms underlying the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), by means of objective electrophysiological examination of the trigemino-facial system. We studied the BR with stimulation of the supraorbital nerve (SON) with particular emphasis on the occurrence of the pain-related ultralate R3 components, and the habituation response of the R2 components. The subjects consisted of eleven BMS patients and 10 healthy control subjects. All patients underwent thorough clinical oral and neurological examinations. The motor function of the trigeminal nerve was assessed with a jaw reflex recording, and a needle-EMG examination of the facial and masticatory muscles was performed in the patients with abnormalities in the BR recordings. The jaw reflexes, the latencies of the BR components, and the needle-EMG examinations were normal in all patients. As a group, the BMS patients had statistically significantly higher stimulus thresholds for the tactile R 1 components of the BR compared with the control subjects. With non-noxious stimulation, the BMS patients showed more frequently pain-related R3 components (11/22 SONs) compared with the controls (3/20 SONs). In addition, four BMS patients had abnormal habituation of the R2 components. In two of these patients, the findings were segmental (i.e., unilateral), coinciding with the side of the subjective BM symptoms. The abnormalities of the BR tests appeared to be related to longer disease duration. Our results suggest a possible pathologic involvement of the nervous system in chronic BMS.

  10. Assessment of Hyperactive Reflexes in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactive reflexes are commonly observed in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) but there is a lack of convenient and quantitative characterizations. Patellar tendon reflexes were examined in nine SCI patients and ten healthy control subjects by tapping the tendon using a hand-held instrumented hammer at various knee flexion angles, and the tapping force, quadriceps EMG, and knee extension torque were measured to characterize patellar tendon reflexes quantitatively in terms of the tendon reflex gain (Gtr), contraction rate (Rc), and reflex loop time delay (td). It was found that there are significant increases in Gtr and Rc and decrease in td in patients with spinal cord injury as compared to the controls (P < 0.05). This study presented a convenient and quantitative method to evaluate reflex excitability and muscle contraction dynamics. With proper simplifications, it can potentially be used for quantitative diagnosis and outcome evaluations of hyperreflexia in clinical settings. PMID:25654084

  11. The exercise pressor reflex and peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Stone, Audrey J; Kaufman, Marc P

    2015-03-01

    The exercise pressor reflex contributes to increases in cardiovascular and ventilatory function during exercise. These reflexive increases are caused by both mechanical stimulation and metabolic stimulation of group III and IV afferents with endings in contracting skeletal muscle. Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have an augmented exercise pressor reflex. Recently, an animal model of PAD was established which allows further investigation of possible mechanisms involved in this augmented reflex. Earlier studies have identified ASIC3 channels, bradykinin receptors, P2X receptors, endoperoxide receptors, and thromboxane receptors as playing a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex in healthy rats. This review focuses on recent studies using a rat model of PAD in order to determine possible mechanisms contributing to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex seen in patients with this disease.

  12. Vibration paradox and H-reflex suppression: is H-reflex suppression results from distorting effect of vibration?

    PubMed

    Cakar, H I; Cidem, M; Kara, S; Karacan, I

    2014-09-01

    Vibration paradox is that an increase in muscles activity coexists with the inhibition of H-reflex during vibration. The H-reflex suppression may be due to the movement of stimulating electrode during vibration. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis. Fifteen healthy young adult males participated in this study. The soleus myoelectrical activities were evaluated by surface electromyography (SEMG). The vibration was applied only to the left leg and the H-reflex of soleus muscle was measured in the right leg to prevent the probable measurement errors caused by the movement of stimulating electrode. The Hmax/Mmax ratio of the right soleus isolated from vibration effects significantly decreased during the left leg vibration. As a result, this study shows that the H-reflex is suppressed during the vibration and the movement of the stimulating electrode has no role on the suppression of H-reflex.

  13. Role of the lateral reticular nucleus in suppressing the jaw-opening reflex following stimulation of the red nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Yajima, Eriko; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2014-03-01

    We found in a previous study that stimulation of the red nucleus (RN) facilitated the low-threshold afferent-evoked jaw-opening reflex (JOR) and suppressed the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR. It has been reported that the RN projections to the contralateral lateral reticular nucleus (LRt), and stimulation of the LRt inhibits the nociceptive JOR. These facts suggest that RN-induced modulation of the JOR is mediated via the LRt. We investigated whether electrically induced lesions of the LRt, or microinjection of muscimol into the LRt, affects RN-induced modulation of the JOR. The JOR was evoked by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), and was recorded as the electromyographic response of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. The stimulus intensity was either 1.2 (low-threshold) or 4.0 (high-threshold) times the threshold. Electrically induced lesion of the LRt and microinjection of muscimol into the LRt reduced the RN-induced suppression of the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR, but did not affect the RN-induced facilitation of the low-threshold afferent-evoked JOR. These results suggest that the RN-induced suppression of the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR is mediated by a relay in the contralateral LRt. PMID:24370814

  14. Increased amplitude of cutaneous reflexes during human running as compared to standing.

    PubMed

    Duysens, J; Tax, A A; Trippel, M; Dietz, V

    1993-06-11

    The amplitude of H-reflexes is decreased during walking as compared to standing and a further reduction is seen during running as compared to walking. Does a similar reduction occur for reflexes elicited by cutaneous stimulation? To answer this question, the electromyographic (EMG) responses in biceps femoris (BF) and tibialis anterior (TA) to a 20 ms train of 5 electrical pulses, were recorded. This stimulus was applied to the sural nerve at the ankle, either at 16 different phases of the step cycle in human volunteers running on a treadmill at 8 km/h or at different isometric contraction levels of TA and BF in the same subjects during standing, imitating the postures of different phases of the step cycle. The mean latency of the main responses in BF of all subjects was 76 ms. Similar responses (P2), with a latency of 79 ms were seen in TA in 6 of the 10 subjects. For a constant strength of stimulation (2 times perception threshold) during isometric contractions at different levels in early stance imitation, the mean reflex ratio's (reflex/background) of BF and TA responses were 1.07 and 0.53, respectively, while the ratio's for these 2 muscles during running were 1.78 and 1.1. The higher reflex ratio's in running were primarily due to the large facilitatory responses, which were present during most of the step cycle but rarely during voluntary contractions in the subjects during standing. At the end of the swing phase, however, the responses in BF and TA were predominantly suppressive, as were most of the responses to stimulation applied to the standing subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Incontinence of urine due to instability of micturition reflexes: Part I. Detrusor reflex instability.

    PubMed

    Mahony, D T; Laferte, R O; Blais, D J

    1980-03-01

    Micturition reflex instability may result from malfunction of the detrusor reflex or instability of the pudendal nucleus which innervates the pelvic floor muscles and external sphincter. Detrusor instability is the result of sacral micturition reflex center (SMRC) hyperexcitability. This may be caused by underinhibition or overfacilitation of the SMRC, and there are both central and peripheral causes of each. Detrusor hypertrophy may invoke chronic overactivity of the detrusodetrusor facilitative reflex causing SMRC overfacilitation. Similarly, distal urethral stricture and/or chronic urethritis causing chronic overactivity of the urethrodetrusor facilitative reflex is a common cause of SMRC overfacilitation. Pathologic relaxation and weakness of the striated muscles of the pelvic floor and perineum resulting in underactivity of the perineodetrusor inhibitory reflex, is a common cause of SMRC underinhibition. In adult women these factors often coexist. Each may predispose to stress-induced detrusor instability and are often seen in association with, or are confused with, true stress incontinence. The distinguishing characteristics of detrusor hypertonicity and detrusor hyperreflexia are reviewed, and the various mechanisms of pseudostress incontinence and of urgency incontinence are discussed in detail.

  16. The spinal reflex cannot be perceptually separated from voluntary movements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arko; Haggard, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Both voluntary and involuntary movements activate sensors in the muscles, skin, tendon and joints. As limb movement can result from a mixture of spinal reflexes and voluntary motor commands, the cortical centres underlying conscious proprioception might either aggregate or separate the sensory inputs generated by voluntary movements from those generated by involuntary movements such as spinal reflexes. We addressed whether healthy volunteers could perceive the contribution of a spinal reflex during movements that combined both reflexive and voluntary contributions. Volunteers reported the reflexive contribution in leg movements that were partly driven by the knee-jerk reflex induced by a patellar tendon tap and partly by voluntary motor control. In one condition, participants were instructed to kick back in response to a tendon tap. The results were compared to reflexes in a resting baseline condition without voluntary movement. In a further condition, participants were instructed to kick forwards after a tap. Volunteers reported the perceived reflex contribution by repositioning the leg to the perceived maximum displacement to which the reflex moved the leg after each tendon tap. In the resting baseline condition, the reflex was accurately perceived. We found a near-unity slope of linear regressions of perceived on actual reflexive displacement. Both the slope value and the quality of regression fit in individual volunteers were significantly reduced when volunteers were instructed to generate voluntary backward kicks as soon as they detected the tap. In the kick forward condition, kinematic analysis showed continuity of reflex and voluntary movements, but the reflex contribution could be estimated from electromyography (EMG) recording on each trial. Again, participants' judgements of reflexes showed a poor relation to reflex EMG, in contrast to the baseline condition. In sum, we show that reflexes can be accurately perceived from afferent information. However

  17. What is a reflex?

    PubMed Central

    Truog, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty in diagnosing disorders of consciousness, and specifically in determining whether consciousness has been lost or retained, poses challenging scientific and ethical questions. Recent neuroimaging-based tests for consciousness have cast doubt on the reliability of behavioral criteria in assessing states of consciousness and generate new questions about the assumptions used in formulating coherent diagnostic criteria. The reflex, a foundational diagnostic tool, offers unique insight into these disorders; behaviors produced by unconscious patients are thought to be purely reflexive, whereas those produced by conscious patients can be volitional. Further investigation, however, reveals that reflexes cannot be reliably distinguished from conscious behaviors on the basis of any generalizable empirical characteristics. Ambiguity between reflexive and conscious behaviors undermines the capacity of the reflex to distinguish between disorders of consciousness and has implications for how these disorders should be conceptualized in future diagnostic criteria. PMID:26085602

  18. Comparison of muscle and joint pressure-pain thresholds in patients with complex regional pain syndrome and upper limb pain of other origin.

    PubMed

    Mainka, Tina; Bischoff, Florian S; Baron, Ralf; Krumova, Elena K; Nicolas, Volkmar; Pennekamp, Werner; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Vollert, Jan; Westermann, Andrea; Maier, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Pain localized in the deep tissues occurs frequently in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In addition, hyperalgesia to blunt pressure over muscles is common in CRPS, but it often appears in limb pain of other origin as well. Considering that 3-phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS) reveals periarticular enhanced bone metabolism in CRPS, joint-associated hyperalgesia to blunt pressure might be a more specific finding than hyperalgesia over muscles. In 34 patients with upper limb pain (18 CRPS, 16 non-CRPS; diagnosed in accordance to the Budapest criteria) and in 18 healthy controls, pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over the thenar (PPTThenar), the metacarpophalangeal (PPTMCP), and the proximal interphalangeal (PPTPIP) joints using a pressure algometer (Somedic, Sweden). Beforehand, all patients had received TPBS for diagnostic purposes independently of the study. Region-of-interest (ROI) ratios (mineralization phase) for the MCP and PIP, excluding fracture sites, were correlated with the PPT. In CRPS, all ROI ratios were significantly increased and all PPT of the affected hand were decreased compared to non-CRPS (PPTThenar: 243±150kPa vs 358±197kPa, PPTMCP: 80±67kPa vs 159±93kPa, PPTPIP: 80±56kPa vs 184±110kPa; P<.01) and controls (PPTThenar: 478±106kPa, PPTMCP: 254±50kPa, PPTPIP: 275±76kPa; P<.01). A PPTThenar below 293kPa revealed 77% sensitivity but only 63% specificity, whereas a PPTPIP below 102kPa had 82% sensitivity and 94% specificity to identify CRPS. Only in CRPS were PPTMCP and PPTPIP correlated significantly inversely with the ROI ratio (MCP: r=-0.439, PIP: r=-0.447). PPTPIP shows higher specificity for CRPS type I than PPTThenar without loss of sensitivity. Therefore, measurement of joint PPT could be a noninvasive diagnostic tool reflecting increased bone metabolism assessed by TPBS as a sign of bone pathophysiology.

  19. Cardiovascular Reflexes Activity and Their Interaction during Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac output and arterial blood pressure increase during dynamic exercise notwithstanding the exercise-induced vasodilation due to functional sympatholysis. These cardiovascular adjustments are regulated in part by neural reflexes which operate to guarantee adequate oxygen supply and by-products washout of the exercising muscles. Moreover, they maintain adequate perfusion of the vital organs and prevent excessive increments in blood pressure. In this review, we briefly summarize neural reflexes operating during dynamic exercise with particular emphasis on their interaction. PMID:26557662

  20. On Reflexive Data Models

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S.

    2000-08-20

    An information system is reflexive if it stores a description of its current structure in the body of stored information and is acting on the base of this information. A data model is reflexive, if its language is meta-closed and can be used to build such a system. The need for reflexive data models in new areas of information technology applications is argued. An attempt to express basic notions related to information systems is made in the case when the system supports and uses meta-closed representation of the data.

  1. Disturbed Paraspinal Reflex Following Prolonged Flexion-Relaxation and Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Ellen L.; Granata, Kevin P.

    2006-01-01

    Study Design. Repeated measures experimental study of the effect of flexion-relaxation, recovery, and gender on paraspinal reflex dynamics. Objective. To determine the effect of prolonged flexion-relaxation and recovery time on reflex behavior in human subjects. Summary of Background Data. Prolonged spinal flexion has been shown to disturb the paraspinal reflex activity in both animals and human beings. Laxity in passive tissues of the spine from flexion strain may contribute to desensitization of mechanoreceptors. Animal studies indicate that recovery of reflexes may take up to several hours. Little is known about human paraspinal reflex behavior following flexion tasks or the recovery of reflex behavior following the flexion tasks. Methods. A total of 25 subjects performed static flexionrelaxation tasks. Paraspinal muscle reflexes were recorded before and immediately after flexion-relaxation and after a recovery period. Reflexes were quantified from systems identification analyses of electromyographic response in relation to pseudorandom force disturbances applied to the trunk. Results. Trunk angle measured during flexion-relaxation postures was significantly higher following static flexion-relaxation tasks (P < 0.001), indicating creep deformation of passive supporting structures in the trunk. Reflex response was diminished following flexion-relaxation (P < 0.029) and failed to recover to baseline levels during 16 minutes of recovery. Conclusion. Reduced reflex may indicate that the spine is less stable following prolonged flexion-relaxation and, therefore, susceptible to injury. The absence of recovery in reflex after a substantial time indicates that increased low back pain risk from flexion-relaxation may persist after the end of the flexion task. PMID:16582860

  2. Tendon reflex is suppressed during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Yilmaz, Gizem; Sebik, Oguz; Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2016-10-01

    In this study we have investigated the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on the tendon reflex (T-reflex) amplitude. Fifteen young adult healthy volunteer males were included in this study. Records of surface EMG of the right soleus muscle and accelerometer taped onto the right Achilles tendon were obtained while participant stood upright with the knees in extension, on the vibration platform. Tendon reflex was elicited before and during WBV. Subjects completed a set of WBV. Each WBV set consisted of six vibration sessions using different frequencies (25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50Hz) applied randomly. In each WBV session the Achilles tendon was tapped five times with a custom-made reflex hammer. The mean peak-to-peak (PP) amplitude of T-reflex was 1139.11±498.99µV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). The maximum PP amplitude of T-reflex was 1333±515μV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). No significant differences were obtained in the mean acceleration values of Achilles tendon with tapping between before and during vibration sessions. This study showed that T-reflex is suppressed during WBV. T-reflex suppression indicates that the spindle primary afferents must have been pre-synaptically inhibited during WBV similar to the findings in high frequency tendon vibration studies. PMID:27485766

  3. Tendon reflex is suppressed during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Yilmaz, Gizem; Sebik, Oguz; Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2016-10-01

    In this study we have investigated the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on the tendon reflex (T-reflex) amplitude. Fifteen young adult healthy volunteer males were included in this study. Records of surface EMG of the right soleus muscle and accelerometer taped onto the right Achilles tendon were obtained while participant stood upright with the knees in extension, on the vibration platform. Tendon reflex was elicited before and during WBV. Subjects completed a set of WBV. Each WBV set consisted of six vibration sessions using different frequencies (25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50Hz) applied randomly. In each WBV session the Achilles tendon was tapped five times with a custom-made reflex hammer. The mean peak-to-peak (PP) amplitude of T-reflex was 1139.11±498.99µV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). The maximum PP amplitude of T-reflex was 1333±515μV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). No significant differences were obtained in the mean acceleration values of Achilles tendon with tapping between before and during vibration sessions. This study showed that T-reflex is suppressed during WBV. T-reflex suppression indicates that the spindle primary afferents must have been pre-synaptically inhibited during WBV similar to the findings in high frequency tendon vibration studies.

  4. Muscle activation patterns when passively stretching spastic lower limb muscles of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bar-On, Lynn; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-01-01

    The definition of spasticity as a velocity-dependent activation of the tonic stretch reflex during a stretch to a passive muscle is the most widely accepted. However, other mechanisms are also thought to contribute to pathological muscle activity and, in patients post-stroke and spinal cord injury can result in different activation patterns. In the lower-limbs of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) these distinct activation patterns have not yet been thoroughly explored. The aim of the study was to apply an instrumented assessment to quantify different muscle activation patterns in four lower-limb muscles of children with CP. Fifty-four children with CP were included (males/females n = 35/19; 10.8 ± 3.8 yrs; bilateral/unilateral involvement n =  32/22; Gross Motor Functional Classification Score I-IV) of whom ten were retested to evaluate intra-rater reliability. With the subject relaxed, single-joint, sagittal-plane movements of the hip, knee, and ankle were performed to stretch the lower-limb muscles at three increasing velocities. Muscle activity and joint motion were synchronously recorded using inertial sensors and electromyography (EMG) from the adductors, medial hamstrings, rectus femoris, and gastrocnemius. Muscles were visually categorised into activation patterns using average, normalized root mean square EMG (RMS-EMG) compared across increasing position zones and velocities. Based on the visual categorisation, quantitative parameters were defined using stretch-reflex thresholds and normalized RMS-EMG. These parameters were compared between muscles with different activation patterns. All patterns were dominated by high velocity-dependent muscle activation, but in more than half, low velocity-dependent activation was also observed. Muscle activation patterns were found to be both muscle- and subject-specific (p<0.01). The intra-rater reliability of all quantitative parameters was moderate to good. Comparing RMS-EMG between incremental position

  5. The Grasp Reflex and Moro Reflex in Infants: Hierarchy of Primitive Reflex Responses

    PubMed Central

    Futagi, Yasuyuki; Toribe, Yasuhisa; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The plantar grasp reflex is of great clinical significance, especially in terms of the detection of spasticity. The palmar grasp reflex also has diagnostic significance. This grasp reflex of the hands and feet is mediated by a spinal reflex mechanism, which appears to be under the regulatory control of nonprimary motor areas through the spinal interneurons. This reflex in human infants can be regarded as a rudiment of phylogenetic function. The absence of the Moro reflex during the neonatal period and early infancy is highly diagnostic, indicating a variety of compromised conditions. The center of the reflex is probably in the lower region of the pons to the medulla. The phylogenetic meaning of the reflex remains unclear. However, the hierarchical interrelation among these primitive reflexes seems to be essential for the arboreal life of monkey newborns, and the possible role of the Moro reflex in these newborns was discussed in relation to the interrelationship. PMID:22778756

  6. Diagnostic Thresholds for Quantitative REM Sleep Phasic Burst Duration, Phasic and Tonic Muscle Activity, and REM Atonia Index in REM Sleep Behavior Disorder with and without Comorbid Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    McCarter, Stuart J.; St. Louis, Erik K.; Duwell, Ethan J.; Timm, Paul C.; Sandness, David J.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Silber, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to determine whether phasic burst duration and conventional REM sleep without atonia (RSWA) methods could accurately diagnose REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) patients with comorbid OSA. Design: We visually analyzed RSWA phasic burst durations, phasic, “any,” and tonic muscle activity by 3-s mini-epochs, phasic activity by 30-s (AASM rules) epochs, and conducted automated REM atonia index (RAI) analysis. Group RSWA metrics were analyzed and regression models fit, with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves determining the best diagnostic cutoff thresholds for RBD. Both split-night and full-night polysomnographic studies were analyzed. Setting: N/A. Participants: Parkinson disease (PD)-RBD (n = 20) and matched controls with (n = 20) and without (n = 20) OSA. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: All mean RSWA phasic burst durations and muscle activities were higher in PD-RBD patients than controls (P < 0.0001), and RSWA associations with PD-RBD remained significant when adjusting for age, gender, and REM AHI (P < 0.0001). RSWA muscle activity (phasic, “any”) cutoffs for 3-s mini-epoch scorings were submentalis (SM) (15.5%, 21.6%), anterior tibialis (AT) (30.2%, 30.2%), and combined SM/AT (37.9%, 43.4%). Diagnostic cutoffs for 30-s epochs (AASM criteria) were SM 2.8%, AT 11.3%, and combined SM/AT 34.7%. Tonic muscle activity cutoff of 1.2% was 100% sensitive and specific, while RAI (SM) cutoff was 0.88. Phasic muscle burst duration cutoffs were: SM (0.65) and AT (0.79) seconds. Combining phasic burst durations with RSWA muscle activity improved sensitivity and specificity of RBD diagnosis. Conclusions: This study provides evidence for REM sleep without atonia diagnostic thresholds applicable in Parkinson disease-REM sleep behavior disorder (PD-RBD) patient populations with comorbid OSA that may be useful toward distinguishing PD-RBD in typical outpatient populations. Citation: McCarter SJ, St. Louis EK, Duwell EJ, Timm PC

  7. The use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to determine the ventilatory threshold and the relation between skeletal muscle oxygenation and RPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessmer, Kathryn Anne

    This study: (1) compared three (i.e., V-slope, Bhambhani et al., 1997, and Belardinelli et al., 1995) techniques of measuring the ventilatory threshold (VT), (2) examined the relation between OMNI RPE and muscle deoxygenation (MD), and (3) evaluated the impact of gender on MD and RPE. Subjects included 20 males and 13 females, aged 25-29 years. A commercial NIRS sensor (NIRS Micro-Run Man model # MRM-96) was placed over the right vastus lateralis and secured with an elastic wrap. Next, each subject underwent a progressive multistage cycle ergometer test to establish the VT using the V-slope method and NIRS methods. The V-slope (58.62 +/- 10.47% VO2peak), Bhambhani et al. 1997 (49.75 +/- 20.13% VO2peak), and Belardinelli et al. 1995 (60.87 +/- 10.15% VO2peak) methods did not result in different (F(2,49) = 2.77, p > 0.05) VT values. The following significant linear regression equation was generated (p = 0.016): OMNI RPE = 5.97 - (15.20)MD (R = -0.20, R 2 = 0.04, and SE = 2.76). The two-way ANOVA (gender x power output) conducted on OMNI RPE revealed a significant main effect for gender ( F(1,193) = 19.53, p < 0.05). Males had lower RPEs (6.32 +/- .17) than females (7.16 +/- .28). A significant main effect for power output was also found (F(9, 193) = 56.21, p < 0.05). In addition, a significant gender x power output interaction was found ( F(7, 193) = 2.11, p < 0.05). With respect to MD, the two-way ANOVA revealed a significant main effect for gender (F(1, 133) = 10.61, p < 0.05). Females had less MD (0.012 +/- .007) than males (0.002 +/- .005). The results of this study indicate that the three methods of determining the VT were not different. MD values decreased with increasing ratings of perceived exertion. RPE differed between genders, with males having lower RPE's than females (p < 0.05). Also, a significant gender x power output interaction was found (p < 0.05). Finally, women experienced less skeletal MD than men during a progressively incremented cycle

  8. Some effects of vagal blockade on abdominal muscle activation and shortening in awake dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Leevers, A M; Road, J D

    1995-01-01

    1. The mechanisms of abdominal muscle activation are thought to be different during expiratory threshold loading (ETL) compared with hypercapnia. Our objectives in the present study were to determine the effects of removing excitatory vagal feedback on abdominal muscle activation, shortening and pattern of recruitment during ETL and hypercapnia. Six tracheotomized dogs were chronically implanted with sonomicrometer transducers and fine wire EMG electrodes in each of the four abdominal muscles. Muscle length changes and EMG activity were studied in the awake dog during ETL (6 dogs) and CO2 rebreathing (3 dogs), before and after vagal blockade. 2. Following vagal blockade, the change in volume (increase in functional residual capacity, FRC) during ETL was greater and active phasic shortening of all the abdominal muscles was reduced, when shortening was compared with a similar change in lung volume. Similarly, at comparable minute ventilation, abdominal muscle active shortening was also reduced during hypercapnia. The internal muscle layer was recruited preferentially in both control and vagally blocked dogs during both ETL and hypercapnia. 3. The degree of recruitment of the abdominal muscles during ETL and hypercapnia in awake dogs is influenced by vagal feedback, but less so than in anaesthetized dogs. These results illustrate the importance of the vagi and abdominal muscle activation in load compensation. However, vagal reflexes are apparently not contributing to the preferential recruitment of the internal muscle layer. In awake dogs during vagal blockade abdominal muscle recruitment still occurs by extravagal mechanisms. PMID:8568685

  9. Separating medial olivocochlear from acoustic reflex effects on transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in unanesthetized mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yingyue; Cheatham, Mary Ann; Siegel, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Descending neural pathways in the mammalian auditory system are believed to modulate the function of the peripheral auditory system [3, 8, 10]. These pathways include the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferent innervation to the cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) and the acoustic reflex pathways mediating middle ear muscle (MEM) contractions. The MOC effects can be monitored noninvasively using otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) [5, 6], which are acoustic byproducts of cochlear function [7]. In this study, we applied a sensitive method to determine when and to what degree contralateral MEM suppression contaminated MOC efferent effects on TEOAEs in unanesthetized mice. The lowest contralateral broadband noise evoking MEM contractions varied across animals. Examples of potential MOC-mediated TEOAE suppression with contralateral noise below MEM contraction thresholds were seen, but this behavior did not occur in the majority of cases.

  10. Interlimb Reflexes Induced by Electrical Stimulation of Cutaneous Nerves after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Jane E.; Godfrey, Sharlene; Thomas, Christine K.

    2016-01-01

    Whether interlimb reflexes emerge only after a severe insult to the human spinal cord is controversial. Here the aim was to examine interlimb reflexes at rest in participants with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury (SCI, n = 17) and able-bodied control participants (n = 5). Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by delivering up to 30 trains of stimuli to either the superficial peroneal nerve on the dorsum of the foot or the radial nerve at the wrist (5 pulses, 300 Hz, approximately every 30 s). Participants were instructed to relax the test muscles prior to the delivery of the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally in proximal and distal arm and leg muscles. Superficial peroneal nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in ipsilateral and contralateral arm and contralateral leg muscles of SCI and control participants. Radial nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in the ipsilateral leg and contralateral arm muscles of control and SCI participants but only contralateral leg muscles of control participants. Interlimb reflexes evoked by superficial peroneal nerve stimulation were longer in latency and duration, and larger in magnitude in SCI participants. Interlimb reflex properties were similar for both SCI and control groups for radial nerve stimulation. Ascending interlimb reflexes tended to occur with a higher incidence in participants with SCI, while descending interlimb reflexes occurred with a higher incidence in able-bodied participants. However, the overall incidence of interlimb reflexes in SCI and neurologically intact participants was similar which suggests that the neural circuitry underlying these reflexes does not necessarily develop after central nervous system injury. PMID:27049521

  11. Perspective on the human cough reflex

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This review dissects the complex human cough reflex and suggests hypotheses about the evolutionary basis for the reflex. A mechanosensory-induced cough reflex conveys through branches of myelinated Aδ nerve fibers is not chemically reactive (i.e., capsaicin, bradykinin); possibly, its evolution is to prevent the harmful effects of aspiration of gastric or particulate contents into the lungs. This became necessary as the larynx moves closer to the opening of the esophagus as human ancestors adapt phonation over olfaction beginning less than 10 million years ago. The second type of cough reflex, a chemosensory type, is carried by unmyelinated C fibers. Supposedly, its origin dates back when prehistoric humans began living in close proximity to each other and were at risk for infectious respiratory diseases or irritant-induced lung injury. The mechanism for the latter type of cough is analogous to induced pain after tissue injury; and, it is controlled by the identical transient receptor potential vanilloid cation channel (TRPV1). The airways do not normally manifest nociceptive pain from a stimulus but the only consistent response that capsaicin and lung inflammation provoke in healthy human airways is cough. TRPA1, another excitatory ion channel, has been referred to as the "irritant receptor" and its activation also induces cough. For both types of cough, the motor responses are identical and via coordinated, precisely-timed and sequential respiratory events orchestrated by complex neuromuscular networking of the diaphragm, chest and abdominal respiratory muscles, the glottis and parts of the brain. PMID:22074326

  12. Changes in Soleus H-Reflex Modulation after Treadmill Training in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodapp, Maike; Vry, Julia; Mall, Volker; Faist, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In healthy children, short latency leg muscle reflexes are profoundly modulated throughout the step cycle in a functionally meaningful way and contribute to the electromyographic (EMG) pattern observed during gait. With maturation of the corticospinal tract, the reflex amplitudes are depressed via supraspinal inhibitory mechanisms. In the soleus…

  13. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  14. Role of the red nucleus in suppressing the jaw-opening reflex following stimulation of the raphe magnus nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Iwasaki, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    In a previous study, we found that electrical and chemical stimulation of the red nucleus (RN) suppressed the high-threshold afferent-evoked jaw-opening reflex (JOR). It has been reported that the RN receives bilaterally projection fibers from the raphe magnus nucleus (RMg), and that stimulation of the RMg inhibits the tooth pulp-evoked nociceptive JOR. These facts imply that RMg-induced inhibition of the JOR could be mediated via the RN. The present study first examines whether stimulation of the RMg suppresses the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR. The JOR was evoked by electrical stimulation of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN), and was recorded as the electromyographic response of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle. The stimulus intensity was 4.0 (high-threshold) times the threshold. Conditioning electrical stimulation of the RMg significantly suppressed the JOR. A further study then examined whether electrically induced lesions of the RN or microinjection of muscimol into the RN affects RMg-induced suppression of the JOR. Electrically induced lesions of the bilateral RN and microinjection of muscimol into the bilateral RN both reduced the RMg-induced suppression of the JOR. These results suggest that RMg-induced suppression of the high-threshold afferent-evoked JOR is mediated by a relay in the RN. PMID:24929104

  15. Corneomandibular reflex: Anatomical basis

    PubMed Central

    Pistacchi, Michele; Gioulis, Manuela; Mazzon, Davide; Marsala, Sandro Zambito

    2015-01-01

    Corneomandibular reflex is a pathological phenomenon evident in cases of severe brainstem damage. It is considered to be a pathological exteroceptive reflex, associated with precentro bulbar tract lesions. The sign is useful in distinguishing central neurological injuries to metabolic disorders in acutely comatose patients, localizing lesions to the upper brainstem area, determining the depth of coma and its evolution, providing evidence of uncal or transtentorial herniation in acute cerebral hemisphere lesions, and it is a marker of supraspinal level impairment in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. This sign was evident in a patient with severe brain damage. We discuss the literature findings and its relevance in prognosis establishment. PMID:26752910

  16. Experimenting With Baroreceptor Reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, Dwain L.; Goble, Ross L.

    1988-01-01

    Carotid arteries stimulated by pressure or suction on neck. Baro-Cuff is silicone-rubber chamber that fits on front of subject's neck. Electronic system, stepping motor, bellows, and umbilical tube furnish controlled pressure to chamber. Pressure sensor provides feedback to microprocessor in electronic system. Developed to study blood-pressure-reflex responses of astronauts in outer space. Useful for terrestrial studies of patients with congestive heart failure, chronic diabetes mellitus, and other conditions in which blood-pressure-reflex controls behave abnormally.

  17. Reflex control of immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tracey, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation can cause damage and even death. What controls this primitive and potentially lethal innate immune response to injury and infection? Molecular and neurophysiological studies during the past decade have revealed a pivotal answer: immunity is coordinated by neural circuits that operate reflexively The afferent arc of the reflex consists of nerves that sense injury and infection. This activates efferent neural circuits, including the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway that modulate immune responses and the progression of inflammatory diseases. It might be possible to develop therapeutics that target neural networks for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:19461672

  18. The limitations of the tendon jerk as a marker of pathological stretch reflex activity in human spasticity.

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, S J; Ross, H F; Thilmann, A F

    1993-01-01

    The motor disorders associated with human spasticity arise, partly from a pathological increase in the excitability of muscle stretch reflexes. In clinical practice, reflex excitability is commonly assessed by grading the reflex response to a blow delivered to the tendon of a muscle. This is a much simpler response than the complex patterns of activity which may be elicited following muscle stretch caused by active or passive movement. Changes in the biceps brachii tendon jerk response have been followed over the first year after stroke in a group of hemiparetic patients and compared with changes in short and medium latency reflex responses elicited by imposed elbow flexion of initially relaxed spastic muscle and with the development of the late reflex responses which contribute to spastic hypertonia. A progressive increase in tendon jerk responses occurred over the first year following stroke, whereas reflex responses to imposed displacement, in particular the late reflex responses contributing to muscle hypertonia, reached their peak excitability one to three months after stroke, with a subsequent reduction in activity. The tendon jerk reflex therefore provides an incomplete picture of the pathological changes in the reflex responses in spasticity. PMID:8505646

  19. Reliability of the Achilles tendon tap reflex evoked during stance using a pendulum hammer.

    PubMed

    Mildren, Robyn L; Zaback, Martin; Adkin, Allan L; Frank, James S; Bent, Leah R

    2016-01-01

    The tendon tap reflex (T-reflex) is often evoked in relaxed muscles to assess spinal reflex circuitry. Factors contributing to reflex excitability are modulated to accommodate specific postural demands. Thus, there is a need to be able to assess this reflex in a state where spinal reflex circuitry is engaged in maintaining posture. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pendulum hammer could provide controlled stimuli to the Achilles tendon and evoke reliable muscle responses during normal stance. A second aim was to establish appropriate stimulus parameters for experimental use. Fifteen healthy young adults stood on a forceplate while taps were applied to the Achilles tendon under conditions in which postural sway was constrained (by providing centre of pressure feedback) or unconstrained (no feedback) from an invariant release angle (50°). Twelve participants repeated this testing approximately six months later. Within one experimental session, tap force and T-reflex amplitude were found to be reliable regardless of whether postural sway was constrained (tap force ICC=0.982; T-reflex ICC=0.979) or unconstrained (tap force ICC=0.968; T-reflex ICC=0.964). T-reflex amplitude was also reliable between experimental sessions (constrained ICC=0.894; unconstrained ICC=0.890). When a T-reflex recruitment curve was constructed, optimal mid-range responses were observed using a 50° release angle. These results demonstrate that reliable Achilles T-reflexes can be evoked in standing participants without the need to constrain posture. The pendulum hammer provides a simple method to allow researchers and clinicians to gather information about reflex circuitry in a state where it is involved in postural control.

  20. Reflexivity in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Mary M.; Urcuioli, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    A recent theory of pigeons' equivalence-class formation (Urcuioli, 2008) predicts that reflexivity, an untrained ability to match a stimulus to itself, should be observed after training on two "mirror-image" symbolic successive matching tasks plus identity successive matching using some of the symbolic matching stimuli. One group of pigeons was…

  1. [A new method for deep reflex muscular massage].

    PubMed

    Aksenova, A M

    1997-01-01

    The idea of deep reflex muscular massage rests on the existence of a strong relationship between structural and functional changes in the skeletal muscles and visceral condition. The massage can be used for management of acute states in combination with herbs, food additives, reduced drug dosages, exercises, thermotherapy.

  2. Measuring various sizes of H-reflex while monitoring the stimulus condition.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Koichi

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of a new technique that measured various sizes of the soleus H-reflex, while monitoring the stimulus condition. Eight healthy volunteers participated in this experiment. In the new technique, an above-motor-threshold conditioning stimulus was given to the tibial nerve 10-12 ms after a below-motor-threshold test stimulus. The conditioning stimulus evoked a direct M-wave, which was followed by a test-stimulus-evoked H-reflex. This reflex was followed by a conditioning stimulus-evoked H-reflex. The amount of the voluntary-contraction-induced facilitation of the H-reflex was similar for both the new technique and conventional technique, in which an above-motor-threshold test stimulus was given without a conditioning stimulus. Using the new technique, we found that the amount of facilitation increased linearly with the size of the test H-reflex. This technique allows us to evoke various sizes of H-reflex while monitoring a stimulus condition, and is useful for measuring H-reflexes during voluntary movement.

  3. Reflex control of the circulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Fadel, P J

    2015-12-01

    Appropriate cardiovascular and hemodynamic adjustments are necessary to meet the metabolic demands of working skeletal muscle during exercise. Alterations in the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system are fundamental in ensuring these adjustments are adequately made. Several neural mechanisms are responsible for the changes in autonomic activity with exercise and through complex interactions, contribute to the cardiovascular and hemodynamic changes in an intensity-dependent manner. This short review is from a presentation made at the Saltin Symposium June 2-4, 2015 in Copenhagen, Denmark. As such, the focus will be on reflex control of the circulation with an emphasis on the work of the late Dr. Bengt Saltin. Moreover, a concerted effort is made to highlight the novel and insightful concepts put forth by Dr. Saltin in his last published review article on the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow in humans. Thus, the multiple roles played by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) including its ability to induce vasodilatation, override sympathetic vasoconstriction and stimulate skeletal muscle afferents (exercise pressor reflex) are discussed and a conceptual framework is set suggesting a major role of ATP in blood flow regulation during exercise.

  4. Primitive reflexes in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vreeling, F W; Verhey, F R; Houx, P J; Jolles, J

    1993-01-01

    A standardised protocol for the examination of 15 primitive reflexes in which the amplitude and the persistence were scored separately, was applied to 25 patients with Parkinson's disease and an equal number of healthy matched control subjects. Most reflexes were found considerably more often in the patients than in the control subjects, especially the snout, the glabellar tap, and its variant, the nasopalpebral reflex. Only the mouth open finger spread reflex was present more often in the control subjects. For all reflexes except this last, the scores for amplitude and persistence of the reflexes for the control group never exceeded the scores for the patient group. Reflexes persisted more often in the patients than in the control subjects. Parkinsonism alone can explain a large number of primitive reflexes, irrespective of the severity or duration of the disease. In contrast, the number of reflexes was related more closely to cognitive scales. It is concluded that such reflexes may be helpful in diagnosing Parkinson's disease. In addition, a standardised protocol for eliciting and scoring is essential for the study of these reflexes in parkinsonism and other neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:8270937

  5. Spinal reflexes in brain death.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Yesim; Çiftçi, Yeliz; Incesu, Tülay Kurt; Seçil, Yaprak; Akhan, Galip

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous and reflex movements have been described in brain death and these unusual movements might cause uncertainties in diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the presence of spinal reflexes in patients who fulfilled the criteria for brain death. Thirty-two (22 %) of 144 patients presented unexpected motor movements spontaneously or during examinations. These patients exhibited the following signs: undulating toe, increased deep tendon reflexes, plantar responses, Lazarus sign, flexion-withdrawal reflex, facial myokymia, neck-arm flexion, finger jerks and fasciculations. In comparison, there were no significant differences in age, sex, etiology of brain death and hemodynamic laboratory findings in patients with and without reflex motor movement. Spinal reflexes should be well recognized by physicians and it should be born in mind that brain death can be determined in the presence of spinal reflexes.

  6. The Use of an Alternative Extraoral Periapical Technique for Patients with Severe Gag Reflex

    PubMed Central

    e Silva, Mauro Henrique Chagas; Santos, Mariane Floriano Lopes; de Lima, Carolina Oliveira; Campos, Celso Neiva

    2016-01-01

    Gag reflex is a physiologic mechanism that promotes contraction of the muscles of the tongue and pharyngeal walls. Different factors, including intraoral radiographic films and sensors, may trigger this reflex. Patients with severe gag reflex may not be able to tolerate the presence of intraoral radiographic films or sensors during root canal therapy (RCT). This factor may prevent an appropriate intraoral radiograph, which is important in RCT. Different approaches have been used to facilitate dental procedures in patients suffering from severe gag reflex. The use of an extraoral radiographic technique is an alternative method to obtain working length confirmation in patients with severe gag reflex. In this report of 2 cases, the use of an extraoral radiographic technique as an alternative approach during RCT in patients with severe gag reflex associated with phobic behavior and trismus was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27547474

  7. The Use of an Alternative Extraoral Periapical Technique for Patients with Severe Gag Reflex.

    PubMed

    E Silva, Mauro Henrique Chagas; Coelho, Marcelo Santos; Santos, Mariane Floriano Lopes; de Lima, Carolina Oliveira; Campos, Celso Neiva

    2016-01-01

    Gag reflex is a physiologic mechanism that promotes contraction of the muscles of the tongue and pharyngeal walls. Different factors, including intraoral radiographic films and sensors, may trigger this reflex. Patients with severe gag reflex may not be able to tolerate the presence of intraoral radiographic films or sensors during root canal therapy (RCT). This factor may prevent an appropriate intraoral radiograph, which is important in RCT. Different approaches have been used to facilitate dental procedures in patients suffering from severe gag reflex. The use of an extraoral radiographic technique is an alternative method to obtain working length confirmation in patients with severe gag reflex. In this report of 2 cases, the use of an extraoral radiographic technique as an alternative approach during RCT in patients with severe gag reflex associated with phobic behavior and trismus was successfully demonstrated. PMID:27547474

  8. Masseter Muscle Activity in Track and Field Athletes: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Nukaga, Hideyuki; Takeda, Tomotaka; Nakajima, Kazunori; Narimatsu, Keishiro; Ozawa, Takamitsu; Ishigami, Keiichi; Funato, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Teeth clenching has been shown to improve remote muscle activity (by augmentation of the Hoffmann reflex), and joint fixation (by decreased reciprocal inhibition) in the entire body. Clenching could help maintain balance, improve systemic function, and enhance safety. Teeth clenching from a sports dentistry viewpoint was thought to be important and challenging. Therefore, it is quite important to investigate mastication muscles’ activity and function during sports events for clarifying a physiological role of the mastication muscle itself and involvement of mastication muscle function in whole body movement. Running is a basic motion of a lot of sports; however, a mastication muscles activity during this motion was not clarified. Throwing and jumping operation were in a same situation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence or absence of masseter muscle activity during track and field events. In total, 28 track and field athletes took part in the study. The Multichannel Telemetry system was used to monitor muscle activity, and the electromyograms obtained were synchronized with digital video imaging. The masseter muscle activity threshold was set 15% of maximum voluntary clenching. As results, with few exceptions, masseter muscle activity were observed during all analyzed phases of the 5 activities, and that phases in which most participants showed masseter muscle activity were characterized by initial acceleration, such as in the short sprint, from the commencement of throwing to release in both the javelin throw and shot put, and at the take-off and landing phases in both jumps. PMID:27708727

  9. An artificial muscle computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marc O'Brien, Benjamin; Alexander Anderson, Iain

    2013-03-01

    We have built an artificial muscle computer based on Wolfram's "2, 3" Turing machine architecture, the simplest known universal Turing machine. Our computer uses artificial muscles for its instruction set, output buffers, and memory write and addressing mechanisms. The computer is very slow and large (0.15 Hz, ˜1 m3); however by using only 13 artificial muscle relays, it is capable of solving any computable problem given sufficient memory, time, and reliability. The development of this computer shows that artificial muscles can think—paving the way for soft robots with reflexes like those seen in nature.

  10. Reflexivity in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Mary M; Urcuioli, Peter J

    2010-11-01

    A recent theory of pigeons' equivalence-class formation (Urcuioli, 2008) predicts that reflexivity, an untrained ability to match a stimulus to itself, should be observed after training on two "mirror-image" symbolic successive matching tasks plus identity successive matching using some of the symbolic matching stimuli. One group of pigeons was trained in this fashion; a second group was trained similarly but with successive oddity (rather than identity). Subsequently, comparison-response rates on novel matching versus mismatching sequences with the remaining symbolic matching stimuli were measured on nonreinforced probe trials. Higher rates were observed on matching than on mismatching probes in the former group. The opposite effect--higher rates on mismatching than matching probes--was mostly absent in the latter group, despite being predicted by the theory. Nevertheless, the ostensible reflexivity effect observed in former group may be the first time this phenomenon has been demonstrated in any animal.

  11. Calibration of ipsilateral stimulus transducer for acoustic reflex measurements.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S; Osterhammel, P A; Rasmussen, A N; Nielsen, L H

    1995-01-01

    Pure-tone Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Level (RETSPL) of the ipsilateral stimulus receiver for acoustic reflex measurements on Madsen Electronics type Zodiac 901 impedance audiometer is provided. The results, obtained from 20 normal-hearing subjects, are achieved by comparing hearing threshold levels measured using a TDH 39 telephone (calibrated to ISO 389) with thresholds recorded using the ipsilateral stimulus insert phone. The calibration is referenced to an IEC-711 ear simulator and comprises the following frequencies: 125, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000 Hz.

  12. Biting intentions modulate digastric reflex responses to sudden unloading of the jaw.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anders S; Pruszynski, J Andrew; Edin, Benoni B; Westberg, Karl-Gunnar

    2014-09-01

    Reflex responses in jaw-opening muscles can be evoked when a brittle object cracks between the teeth and suddenly unloads the jaw. We hypothesized that this reflex response is flexible and, as such, is modulated according to the instructed goal of biting through an object. Study participants performed two different biting tasks when holding a peanut half stacked on a chocolate piece between their incisors. In one task, they were asked to split the peanut half only (single-split task), and in the other task, they were asked to split both the peanut and the chocolate in one action (double-split task). In both tasks, the peanut split evoked a jaw-opening muscle response, quantified from electromyogram (EMG) recordings of the digastric muscle in a window 20-60 ms following peanut split. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that the jaw-opening muscle response in the single-split trials was about twice the size of the jaw-opening muscle response in the double-split trials. A linear model that predicted the jaw-opening muscle response on a single-trial basis indicated that task settings played a significant role in this modulation but also that the presplit digastric muscle activity contributed to the modulation. These findings demonstrate that, like reflex responses to mechanical perturbations in limb muscles, reflex responses in jaw muscles not only show gain-scaling but also are modulated by subject intent.

  13. Group I fibers: pressor reflex and cardiac activity.

    PubMed

    Decandia, G F; Decandia, M; Orani, G P

    1991-09-01

    Experiments were performed on cats to see whether stimulation of group I afferent fibers from gastrocnemius-soleus muscles induced changes in cardiac activity, in addition to the increase in systemic arterial pressure already established. The results show that the increase in arterial pressure is accompanied by an increase in systolic left ventricular pressure, without any significant changes in cardiac inotropism and chronotropism. It is concluded that the cardiac innervation is not an important efferent pathway of the pressor reflex evoked by stimulating group I afferent fibers, and that the reflex increase in arterial pressure depends mainly on an increase in peripheral vascular resistance. PMID:1742468

  14. Recovery cycle of the masseter inhibitory reflex in man.

    PubMed

    Cruccu, G; Agostino, R; Fornarelli, M; Inghilleri, M; Manfredi, M

    1984-08-24

    The masseter inhibitory reflex from stimulation of the mental nerve has been recorded electromyographically in 10 healthy subjects. The recovery cycle of the two silent periods interrupting the tonic contraction of the masseter muscles have been studied with the paired shock technique. There was a clear dissociation between the recovery of early and late inhibition, the latter being far more affected by a preceding impulse. It is concluded that the two silent periods are mediated by separate neural nets. The differences with the recovery curves of the two components of the blink reflex are discussed.

  15. Bone conducted vibration activates the vestibulo-ocular reflex in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Vulovic, Vedran; Curthoys, Ian S

    2011-08-10

    The aim of the study was: (a) to test whether short duration (6 ms) 500 Hz bone-conducted vibration (BCV) of the skull in alert head free guinea pigs would elicit eye movements; (b) to test whether these eye movements were vestibular in origin; and (c) to determine whether they corresponded to human eye movements to such stimuli. In this way we sought to establish the guinea pig as an acceptable model for testing the mechanism of the effect BCV on the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Consistent short-latency stimulus-locked responses to BCV were observed. The magnitude of eye displacement was directly related to stimulus intensity as recorded by accelerometers cemented onto the animal's skull. The strongest and most consistent response component was intorsion of both eyes. In lateral-eyed animals intorsion is produced by the combined contraction of the inferior rectus and superior oblique muscles. In humans the same pair of muscles acts to cause depression of the eye. To test whether the movements were vestibular we selectively ablated the vestibular endorgans: 3 of the 8 animals underwent a bilateral intratympanic injection of gentamicin, an ototoxic aminoglycoside antibiotic, to ablate their vestibular receptors. After ablation there was an overall reduction in the magnitude of eye displacement, as well as a reduction in the effectiveness of the BCV stimulus to elicit eye movements. The animals' hearing, as measured by the threshold for auditory brainstem responses, remained unchanged after gentamicin, confirming that the cochlea was not affected. The reduced magnitude of responses after vestibular receptor ablation demonstrates that the eye-movement responses to BCV are probably caused by the stimulation of vestibular receptors, which in turn activate the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

  16. Wideband detection of middle ear muscle activation using swept-tone distortion product otoacoustic emissions.

    PubMed

    Henin, Simon; Long, Glenis R; Thompson, Suzanne

    2014-07-01

    The measurement of efferent-induced suppression of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) using contralateral acoustic stimulation (CAS) is complicated by potential contamination by the middle ear muscle reflex (MEMR), particularly at moderate to high CAS levels. When logarithmically sweeping primaries are used to measure distortion product otoacoustic emissions, the level and phase of the primaries at the entrance of the ear canal may be monitored simultaneously along with the OAEs elicited by the swept-tones. A method of detecting MEMR activation using swept-tones is presented in which the differences in the primaries in the ear canal with and without CAS are examined, permitting evaluation of MEMR effects over a broad frequency range. A range of CAS levels above and below expected contralateral acoustic reflex thresholds permitted evaluation of conditions with and without MEMR activation.

  17. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing. PMID:23791780

  18. No evidence hip joint angle modulates intrinsically produced stretch reflex in human hopping.

    PubMed

    Gibson, W; Campbell, A; Allison, G

    2013-09-01

    Motor output in activities such as walking and hopping is suggested to be mediated neurally by purported stretch reflex augmentation of muscle output. Reflex EMG activity during these tasks has been frequently investigated in the soleus muscle; with alterations in reflex amplitude being associated with changes in hip joint angle/phase of the gait cycle. Previous work has focussed on reflex activity induced by an artificial perturbation or by induction of H-reflexes. As such, it is currently unknown if stretch reflex activity induced intrinsically (as part of the task) is modulated by changes in hip joint angle. This study investigated whether hip joint angle modulated reflex EMG 'burst' activity during a hopping task performed on a custom-built partially reclined sleigh. Ten subjects participated; EMG and kinematic data (VICON motor capture system) was collected for each hop cycle. Participants completed 5 sets of 30s of self-paced hopping in (1) hip neutral and (2) hip 60° flexion conditions. There was no difference in EMG 'burst' activity or in sagittal plane kinematics (knee/ankle) in the hopping task between the two conditions. The results indicate that during a functional task such as hopping, changes in hip angle do not alter the stretch reflex-like activity associated with landing.

  19. Is the cutaneous silent period an opiate-sensitive nociceptive reflex?

    PubMed

    Inghilleri, Maurizio; Conte, Antonella; Frasca, Vittorio; Berardelli, Alfredo; Manfredi, Mario; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2002-05-01

    In humans, high-intensity electrical stimuli delivered to the fingers induce an inhibitory effect on C7-T1 motoneurons. This inhibitory reflex, called the cutaneous silent period (CSP) is considered a defense response specific for the human upper limbs. It is not clear whether the CSP-like other defense responses such as the corneal reflex and the R III reflex-is an opiate-sensitive nociceptive reflex. Because opiates suppress some, but not all, nociceptive reflexes, we studied the effect of the narcotic-analgesic drug fentanyl on the CSP and the R III reflex. The CSP was recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle in seven normal subjects during voluntary contraction, before and 10 and 20 min after fentanyl injection. To assess possible fentanyl-induced changes, we also tested the effect of finger stimulation on motor evoked potentials (MEPs) elicited in the FDI muscle by transcranial magnetic stimulation before and after fentanyl injection. Fentanyl-induced changes were also studied on the R III reflex recorded from the biceps femoris muscle. Fentanyl, as expected, suppressed the R III reflex but failed to change the inhibitory effect of finger stimulation on FDI motoneurons. Finger stimulation reduced the size of MEPs in the FDI, and fentanyl injection left this inhibitory effect unchanged. The differential fentanyl-induced modulation of the CSP and R III reflex provides evidence that the CSP circuit is devoid of mu-opiate receptors and is therefore an opiate-insensitive nociceptive reflex, which may be useful in the assessment of central-acting, non-opioid drugs.

  20. Internal organization in the human jaw muscles.

    PubMed

    Hannam, A G; McMillan, A S

    1994-01-01

    The human jaw muscles are essential to mastication and play an important part in craniofacial growth. They contribute to dental and articular forces, deform the mandible, and, like other tissues, are subject to disorders, often manifested as pain. The literature describes how their contraction is controlled by the nervous system, and how their general structure and function contribute to craniofacial biology, but there has been little appraisal of their internal organization. Most of these muscles are not simple; they are multipennate, complexly layered, and divided by aponeuroses. This arrangement provides substantial means for differential contraction. In many ways, jaw muscle fibers are intrinsically dissimilar from those found in other skeletal muscles, because they are arranged in homogeneous clusters and generally reveal type I or type II histochemical profiles. Most are type I and are distributed preferentially in the anterior and deeper parts of the jaw closers. Additionally, most motor unit (MU) territories are smaller than those in the limbs. There is circumstantial evidence for intramuscular partitioning based in part on innervation by primary muscle nerve branches. During normal function. MU recruitment and the rate coding of MU firing in human jaw muscles follow the general principles established for the limbs, but even here they differ in important respects. Jaw muscle MUs do not have stable force recruitment thresholds and seem to rely more on rate coding than on sequential unit recruitment to grade the amplitude of muscle contraction. Unlike those in the limbs, their twitch tensions correlate weakly with MU fatiguability and contraction speed, probably because there are so few slow, fatigue-resistant MUs in the jaw muscles. Moreover, the type I fibers that are present in such large numbers do not contract as slowly as normally expected. To complicate matters, estimation of jaw MU twitch tensions is extremely difficult, because it is affected by the

  1. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine. PMID:12031298

  2. Modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine: effects of attention and habituation on the blink reflex.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Murasecco, Donatella; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Gallai, Virgilio; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-06-01

    The modulation of trigeminal reflex excitability in migraine patients was evaluated during the asymptomatic phase by studying the effects of attention, habituation and preconditioning stimulus on the R2 and R3 components of the blink reflex (BR). Fifty patients suffering from migraine without aura, 20 affected by migraine with aura and 35 sex- and age-matched controls were selected. In subgroups of migraine with-aura and without-aura patients, and normal controls, the blink reflex was elicited during different cognitive situations: (a) spontaneous mental activity; (b) stimulus anticipation; (c) recognition of target numbers. In the remaining subjects, R2 and R3 habituation was evaluated by repetitive stimulation at 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 s intervals. The R2 and R3 recovery curves were also computed. A reduced R3 threshold with a normal pain threshold was found in migraine with-aura and without-aura patients; the R3 component was not significantly correlated with the pain thresholds in patients and controls. The R2 and R3 components were less influenced by the warning of the stimulus in migraine without-aura and migraine with-aura patients, in comparison with the control group. A slight increase of both R2 and R3 recovery after preconditioning stimulus was also observed in migraine patients, probably caused by a phenomenon of trigeminal hyperexcitability persisting after the last attack. The abnormal BR modulation by alerting expresses in migraine a dysfunction of adaptation capacity to environmental conditions, probably predisposing to migraine.

  3. Reduced postactivation depression of soleus H reflex and root evoked potential after transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jennifer C; Stein, Richard B; Roy, François D

    2015-07-01

    Postactivation depression of the Hoffmann (H) reflex is associated with a transient period of suppression following activation of the reflex pathway. In soleus, the depression lasts for 100-200 ms during voluntary contraction and up to 10 s at rest. A reflex root evoked potential (REP), elicited after a single pulse of transcutaneous stimulation to the thoracolumbar spine, has been shown to exhibit similar suppression. The present study systematically characterized the effect of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on postactivation depression using double-pulse H reflexes and REPs. A TMS pulse reduced the period of depression to 10-15 ms for both reflexes. TMS could even produce postactivation facilitation of the H reflex, as the second reflex response was increased to 243 ± 51% of control values at the 75-ms interval. The time course was qualitatively similar for the REP, yet the overall increase was less. While recovery of the H reflex was slower in the relaxed muscle, the profile exhibited a distinct bimodal shape characterized by an early peak at the 25-ms interval, reaching 72 ± 23% of control values, followed by a trough at 50 ms, and then a gradual recovery at intervals > 50 ms. The rapid recovery of two successively depressed H reflexes, ∼ 25 ms apart, was also possible with double-pulse TMS. The effect of the TMS-induced corticospinal excitation on postactivation depression may be explained by a combination of pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, although further investigation is required to distinguish between them.

  4. Locomotor training alters the behavior of flexor reflexes during walking in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew C; Mummidisetty, Chaithanya K; Rymer, William Zev; Knikou, Maria

    2014-11-01

    In humans, a chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) impairs the excitability of pathways mediating early flexor reflexes and increases the excitability of late, long-lasting flexor reflexes. We hypothesized that in individuals with SCI, locomotor training will alter the behavior of these spinally mediated reflexes. Nine individuals who had either chronic clinically motor complete or incomplete SCI received an average of 44 locomotor training sessions. Flexor reflexes, elicited via sural nerve stimulation of the right or left leg, were recorded from the ipsilateral tibialis anterior (TA) muscle before and after body weight support (BWS)-assisted treadmill training. The modulation pattern of the ipsilateral TA responses following innocuous stimulation of the right foot was also recorded in 10 healthy subjects while they stepped at 25% BWS to investigate whether body unloading during walking affects the behavior of these responses. Healthy subjects did not receive treadmill training. We observed a phase-dependent modulation of early TA flexor reflexes in healthy subjects with reduced body weight during walking. The early TA flexor reflexes were increased at heel contact, progressively decreased during the stance phase, and then increased throughout the swing phase. In individuals with SCI, locomotor training induced the reappearance of early TA flexor reflexes and changed the amplitude of late TA flexor reflexes during walking. Both early and late TA flexor reflexes were modulated in a phase-dependent pattern after training. These new findings support the adaptive capability of the injured nervous system to return to a prelesion excitability and integration state.

  5. Operant conditioning of the soleus H-reflex does not induce long-term changes in the gastrocnemius H-reflexes and does not disturb normal locomotion in humans.

    PubMed

    Makihara, Yukiko; Segal, Richard L; Wolpaw, Jonathan R; Thompson, Aiko K

    2014-09-15

    In normal animals, operant conditioning of the spinal stretch reflex or the H-reflex has lesser effects on synergist muscle reflexes. In rats and people with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), soleus H-reflex operant conditioning can improve locomotion. We studied in normal humans the impact of soleus H-reflex down-conditioning on medial (MG) and lateral gastrocnemius (LG) H-reflexes and on locomotion. Subjects completed 6 baseline and 30 conditioning sessions. During conditioning trials, the subject was encouraged to decrease soleus H-reflex size with the aid of visual feedback. Every sixth session, MG and LG H-reflexes were measured. Locomotion was assessed before and after conditioning. In successfully conditioned subjects, the soleus H-reflex decreased 27.2%. This was the sum of within-session (task dependent) adaptation (13.2%) and across-session (long term) change (14%). The MG H-reflex decreased 14.5%, due mainly to task-dependent adaptation (13.4%). The LG H-reflex showed no task-dependent adaptation or long-term change. No consistent changes were detected across subjects in locomotor H-reflexes, EMG activity, joint angles, or step symmetry. Thus, in normal humans, soleus H-reflex down-conditioning does not induce long-term changes in MG/LG H-reflexes and does not change locomotion. In these subjects, task-dependent adaptation of the soleus H-reflex is greater than it is in people with SCI, whereas long-term change is less. This difference from results in people with SCI is consistent with the fact that long-term change is beneficial in people with SCI, since it improves locomotion. In contrast, in normal subjects, long-term change is not beneficial and may necessitate compensatory plasticity to preserve satisfactory locomotion.

  6. Teaching Reflexivity in Qualitative Interviewing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiung, Ping-Chun

    2008-01-01

    Reflexivity has gained paramount status in qualitative inquiry. It is central to debates on subjectivity, objectivity, and, ultimately, the scientific foundation of social science knowledge and research. Although much work on doing reflexivity by researchers and practitioners has been published, scholars have only recently begun to explore how one…

  7. Reflexive Planning for Later Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Margaret A.; Kemp, Candace L.; French, Susan; Gafni, Amiram; Joshi, Anju; Rosenthal, Carolyn J.; Davies, Sharon

    2004-01-01

    Informed by Giddens' (1991) concept of "reflexive life" planning and the notion of later life as a time of increasing social and financial risk, this research explores the idea of "reflexive planning for later life". We utilize a conceptual model that incorporates three types of planning for later life: public protection, self-insurance, and…

  8. The VO(2)-on kinetics in constant load exercise sub-anaerobic threshold reflects endothelial function and dysfunction in muscle microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Maione, D; Cicero, A Fg; Bacchelli, S; Cosentino, E R; Degli Esposti, D; Manners, D N; Rinaldi, E R; Rosticci, M; Senaldi, R; Ambrosioni, E; Borghi, C

    2015-01-01

    To propose a test to evaluate endothelial function, based on VO(2) on-transition kinetics in sub-anaerobic threshold (AT) constant load exercise, we tested healthy subjects and patients with ischemic-hypertensive cardiopathy by two cardiopulmonary tests on a cycle ergometer endowed with an electric motor to overcome initial inertia: a pre-test and, after at least 24 h, one 6 min constant load exercise at 90 % AT. We measured net phase 3 VO(2)-on kinetics and, by phase 2 time constant (tau), valued endothelial dysfunction. We found shorter tau in repeated tests, shorter time between first and second test, by persisting endothelium-dependent arteriolar vasodilatation and/or several other mechanisms. Reducing load to 80 % and 90 % AT did not produce significant changes in tau of healthy volunteers, while in heart patients an AT load of 70 %, compared to 80 % AT, shortened tau (delta=4.38+/-1.65 s, p=0.013). In heart patients, no correlation was found between NYHA class, ejection fraction (EF), and the two variables derived from incremental cycle cardio-pulmonary exercise, as well as between EF and tau; while NYHA class groups were well correlated with tau duration (r=0.92, p=0.0001). Doxazosin and tadalafil also significantly reduced tau. In conclusion, the O(2) consumption kinetics during the on-transition of constant load exercise below the anaerobic threshold are highly sensitive to endothelial function in muscular microcirculation, and constitute a marker for the evaluation of endothelial dysfunction.

  9. Reflex myoclonus in olivopontocerebellar atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, M E; Artieda, J; Zubieta, J L; Obeso, J A

    1994-01-01

    The presence of reflex myoclonus in response to touching and pin-pricking the wrist or stretching the fingers and to photic stimulation was assessed in 24 patients with a presumed diagnosis of olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) and in 30 age matched control subjects. Reflex myoclonus to soma-esthetic stimulation was found in 23 patients and in none of the controls. Photic myoclonus was present in 12 patients and in none of the controls. Electrophysiological study of the reflex myoclonus showed enhanced (> 10 microV) somatosensory evoked potentials and an associated reflex electromyographic discharge (C-wave) in 15 patients. These findings indicate that reflex myoclonus is common in OPCA and probably of cortical origin. Images PMID:8158179

  10. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot. PMID:26662874

  11. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  12. Comparison of operant escape and reflex tests of nociceptive sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vierck, Charles J; Yezierski, Robert P

    2015-04-01

    Testing of reflexes such as flexion/withdrawal or licking/guarding is well established as the standard for evaluating nociceptive sensitivity and its modulation in preclinical investigations of laboratory animals. Concerns about this approach have been dismissed for practical reasons - reflex testing requires no training of the animals; it is simple to instrument; and responses are characterized by observers as latencies or thresholds for evocation. In order to evaluate this method, the present review summarizes a series of experiments in which reflex and operant escape responding are compared in normal animals and following surgical models of neuropathic pain or pharmacological intervention for pain. Particular attention is paid to relationships between reflex and escape responding and information on the pain sensitivity of normal human subjects or patients with pain. Numerous disparities between results for reflex and operant escape measures are described, but the results of operant testing are consistent with evidence from humans. Objective reasons are given for experimenters to choose between these and other methods of evaluating the nociceptive sensitivity of laboratory animals.

  13. Avian reflex and electroencephalogram responses in different states of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Sandercock, Dale A; Auckburally, Adam; Flaherty, Derek; Sandilands, Victoria; McKeegan, Dorothy E F

    2014-06-22

    Defining states of clinical consciousness in animals is important in veterinary anaesthesia and in studies of euthanasia and welfare assessment at slaughter. The aim of this study was to validate readily observable reflex responses in relation to different conscious states, as confirmed by EEG analysis, in two species of birds under laboratory conditions (35-week-old layer hens (n=12) and 11-week-old turkeys (n=10)). We evaluated clinical reflexes and characterised electroencephalograph (EEG) activity (as a measure of brain function) using spectral analyses in four different clinical states of consciousness: conscious (fully awake), semi-conscious (sedated), unconscious-optimal (general anaesthesia), unconscious-sub optimal (deep hypnotic state), as well as assessment immediately following euthanasia. Jaw or neck muscle tone was the most reliable reflex measure distinguishing between conscious and unconscious states. Pupillary reflex was consistently observed until respiratory arrest. Nictitating membrane reflex persisted for a short time (<1 min) after respiratory arrest and brain death (isoelectric EEG). The results confirm that the nictitating membrane reflex is a conservative measure of death in poultry. Using spectral analyses of the EEG waveforms it was possible to readily distinguish between the different states of clinical consciousness. In all cases, when birds progressed from a conscious to unconscious state; total spectral power (PTOT) significantly increased, whereas median (F50) and spectral edge (F95) frequencies significantly decreased. This study demonstrates that EEG analysis can differentiate between clinical states (and loss of brain function at death) in birds and provides a unique integration of reflex responses and EEG activity.

  14. Hearing threshold and heart rate in men after repeated exposure to dynamic muscle work, sinusoidal vs stochastic whole body vibration and stable broadband noise.

    PubMed

    Manninen, O

    1984-01-01

    Changes in the temporary hearing threshold ( TTS2 ) and heart rate (HR) were examined in subjects exposed to stable noise, whole body vibration and dynamic muscular work at a dry-bulb temperature of 30 degrees C. The exposure combinations consisted of three categories of dynamic muscular work with varying loads ( 2W , 4W , 8W ), of two categories of noise and of three categories of vibration. The noise categories were: (1) no noise, and (2) stable, broadband (bandwidth 0.2-16.0 kHz) A-weighted noise with an intensity of 90 dB. The vibration categories were: (1) no vibration, (2) sinusoidal whole body vibration (Z-axis) with a frequency of 5 Hz, and (3) stochastic broadband (bandwidth 2.8-11.2 Hz) whole body vibration. A single test consisted of a control period of 30 min, three consecutive exposure periods of 16 min, each followed by a 4-min post-exposure interval and a recovery period of 15 min. The results of the variance analyses indicated that noise had the most notable effect on the TTS2 values at the hearing frequencies of both 4 and 6 kHz. Of the paired combinations, noise plus vibration and noise plus dynamic muscular work caused the most obvious combined effects. The combined effect of all three factors (noise, vibration and work) on the TTS2 values after three consecutive exposure periods was significant at the 2.5% level at the 4 kHz hearing frequency and at the 5% level at the 6 kHz hearing frequency. The added effect of vibration on enhanced TTS2 values was particularly clear when the vibration was stochastic and when the subjects had a low ( 2W ) working efficiency. Increasing the working efficiency, on the other hand, seemed to retard increases in the hearing threshold. Thus TTS2 values seemed to reflect the changes in HR values. It is as if the low rate of cardiovascular activity during light dynamic muscular work had enabled the manifestation of the cardiovascular effects of noise and vibration; during strenuous dynamic muscular work, however, the

  15. Tonic vibration reflex in Holmes-Adie syndrome: an electrophysiological study

    PubMed Central

    Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Abbruzzese, Michele; Favale, Emilio; Ratto, Sandro

    1979-01-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying benign areflexia were studied in six patients with Holmes-Adie syndrome. No impairment of sensory conduction velocity of sural nerve was found. A normal tonic vibration reflex was obtained in all patients. H reflex was absent in five patients, but responses like F waves were recorded in three subjects. These findings suggest that muscle spindles are not affected and that spinal motoneurone excitability is normal. PMID:512669

  16. Measurement of a single tendon reflex in conjunction with a myogram - The second manned Skylab mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A generalized hyperreflexia was observed in Skylab 2 crew members immediately postflight. Duration of the Achilles reflex was significantly shortened. Further shortening was observed on the fourth day after recovery. At the 16th and 29th postrecovery days a lengthening of the reflex was observed in two of the three crew members. The muscle potential intervals were shortened immediately postflight and remained shortened throughout the 29 day postflight evaluation period.

  17. Differences in motor activation of voluntary and reflex cough in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lasserson, D; Mills, K; Arunachalam, R; Polkey, M; Moxham, J; Kalra, L

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To study motor activation patterns of voluntary and reflex cough adjusted for cough flow rates. Methods Surface electromyography (EMG) and cough flow rate were measured in 10 healthy volunteers. Voluntary cough was assessed for 20 efforts in each quintile of increasing cough flow rate. Reflex cough was assessed for 25 efforts produced by nebulised l‐tartaric acid. EMG was recorded over the expiratory (rectus abdominis, obliques, lower intercostals) and accessory (trapezius, pectoralis major, deltoid, latissimus dorsi) muscles. EMG activity, burst duration and onset were compared for each quintile of voluntary cough, and between voluntary and reflex cough matched for cough flow rate. Results EMG activity and burst duration of expiratory and accessory muscles during voluntary cough increased in proportion to cough flow. Expiratory muscles had longer EMG burst duration (difference 68 ms (95% CI 34 to 102), p<0.01) and earlier onset of EMG activity (difference 44 ms (95% CI 20 to 68), p<0.0001) compared with accessory muscles. EMG activity in all muscles was increased (mean 110.2% v 56.1%, p<0.001) and burst duration (mean 206 ms v 280 ms, p = 0.013) decreased in reflex cough compared with voluntary cough of equal flow rate. There were no differences in EMG onset (difference 8 ms (95% CI 25 to −9) or burst duration (difference 27 ms (95% CI 58 to −4) between expiratory and accessory muscles. Conclusions Functional organisation of motor activity differs between voluntary and reflex cough. Voluntary cough is characterised by sequential activation whereas reflex cough is associated with early and simultaneous activation of expiratory and accessory muscles. PMID:16601089

  18. Deficits in Lower Limb Muscle Reflex Contraction Latency and Peak Force Are Associated With Impairments in Postural Control and Gross Motor Skills of Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Fong, Shirley S M; Ng, Shamay S M; Guo, X; Wang, Yuling; Chung, Raymond C K; Stat, Grad; Ki, W Y; Macfarlane, Duncan J

    2015-10-01

    This cross-sectional, exploratory study aimed to compare neuromuscular performance, balance and motor skills proficiencies of typically developing children and those with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) and to determine associations of these neuromuscular factors with balance and motor skills performances in children with DCD.One hundred thirty children with DCD and 117 typically developing children participated in the study. Medial hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latencies in response to an unexpected posterior-to-anterior trunk perturbation were assessed by electromyography and accelerometer. Hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle peak force and time to peak force were quantified by dynamometer, and balance and motor skills performances were evaluated with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (MABC).Independent t tests revealed that children with DCD had longer hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latencies (P < 0.001) and lower isometric peak forces (P < 0.001), but not times to peak forces (P > 0.025), than the controls. Multiple regression analysis accounting for basic demographics showed that gastrocnemius peak force was independently associated with the MABC balance subscore and ball skills subscore, accounting for 5.7% (P = 0.003) and 8.5% (P = 0.001) of the variance, respectively. Gastrocnemius muscle activation onset latency also explained 11.4% (P < 0.001) of the variance in the MABC ball skills subscore.Children with DCD had delayed leg muscle activation onset times and lower isometric peak forces. Gastrocnemius peak force was associated with balance and ball skills performances, whereas timing of gastrocnemius muscle activation was a determinant of ball skill performance in the DCD population.

  19. [Reflexes, instincts, emotions and passions].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Alberto Portera

    2008-01-01

    In animals of the same species, the reflexes, having evolved similarly, in a few milliseconds, automatically activate the corresponding reflex arch and without the intervention of the animal generate the adequate response: medullary, mesencephalic or trans-hemispheric. These neurophysiological functions have allowed the animals to be free from predators and increasy their longevity and, as a consequence, the appearance of numerous species during millions of years. A further step in the reflexes evolution, the instincts emerged and their activity, a result of neuro-hormonal functions, stimulates the male's sexual appetite when the females are receptive for their copulation and fecundation. PMID:18924359

  20. Exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate and anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Naoyuki

    2003-06-01

    I investigated whether muscular contraction evokes cardiorespiratory increases (exercise pressor reflex) in alpha-chloralose- and chloral hydrate-anesthetized and precollicular, midcollicular, and postcollicular decerebrated rats. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and minute ventilation (Ve) were recorded before and during 1-min sciatic nerve stimulation, which induced static contraction of the triceps surae muscles, and during 1-min stretch of the calcaneal tendon, which selectively stimulated mechanosensitive receptors in the muscles. Anesthetized rats showed various patterns of MAP response to both stimuli, i.e., biphasic, depressor, pressor, and no response. Sciatic nerve stimulation to muscle in precollicular decerebrated rats always evoked spontaneous running, so the exercise pressor reflex was not determined from these preparations. None of the postcollicular decerebrated rats showed a MAP response or spontaneous running. Midcollicular decerebrated rats consistently showed biphasic blood pressure response to both stimulations. The increases in MAP, HR, and Ve were related to the tension developed. The static contractions in midcollicular decerebrated rats (381 +/- 65 g developed tension) significantly increased MAP, HR, and Ve from 103 +/- 12 to 119 +/- 24 mmHg, from 386 +/- 30 to 406 +/- 83 beats/min, and from 122 +/- 7 to 133 +/- 25 ml/min, respectively. After paralysis, sciatic nerve stimulation had no effect on MAP, HR, or Ve. These results indicate that the midcollicular decerebrated rat can be a model for the study of the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:12543631

  1. Triceps surae stretch reflex modulation after a mechanically evoked ankle dorsiflexion during the swing phase of human running.

    PubMed

    Scohier, Mikael; De Jaeger, Dominique; Schepens, Benedicte

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to mechanically evoke a triceps surae stretch reflex during the swing phase of running, to study its within-the-step phase dependency. Seven participants ran on a treadmill at 2.8 m·s-1 wearing an exoskeleton capable of evoking a sudden ankle dorsiflexion. We measured the electromyographic activity of the soleus, medial and lateral gastrocnemii just after the perturbation to evaluate the triceps surae stretch reflex. Similar perturbations were also delivered at rest. Our results showed that the stretch reflex was suppressed during the swing phase of running, except in late swing where a late reflex response was observed. At rest, all triceps surae muscles showed an early reflex response to stretch. Our findings suggest that the triceps surae short/medium-latency stretch reflex cannot be evoked during swing phase and thus cannot contribute to the control of the locomotor pattern after aperturbation during this phase.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex.

    PubMed

    Wider, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient hepatic O2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to the loss of appetite or dietary restriction. PMID:27656314

  3. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex

    PubMed Central

    Wider, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient hepatic O2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to the loss of appetite or dietary restriction. PMID:27656314

  4. Metabolic syndrome and the hepatorenal reflex

    PubMed Central

    Wider, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Insufficient hepatic O2 in animal and human studies has been shown to elicit a hepatorenal reflex in response to increased hepatic adenosine, resulting in stimulation of renal as well as muscle sympathetic nerve activity and activating the renin angiotensin system. Low hepatic ATP, hyperuricemia, and hepatic lipid accumulation reported in metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients may reflect insufficient hepatic O2 delivery, potentially accounting for the sympathetic overdrive associated with MetS. This theoretical concept is supported by experimental results in animals fed a high fructose diet to induce MetS. Hepatic fructose metabolism rapidly consumes ATP resulting in increased adenosine production and hyperuricemia as well as elevated renin release and sympathetic activity. This review makes the case for the hepatorenal reflex causing sympathetic overdrive and metabolic syndrome in response to exaggerated splanchnic oxygen consumption from excessive eating. This is strongly reinforced by the fact that MetS is cured in a matter of days in a significant percentage of patients by diet, bariatric surgery, or endoluminal sleeve, all of which would decrease splanchnic oxygen demand by limiting nutrient contact with the mucosa and reducing the nutrient load due to the loss of appetite or dietary restriction.

  5. Crossed reflex reversal during human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Gervasio, Sabata; Farina, Dario; Sinkjær, Thomas; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2013-05-01

    During human walking, precise coordination between the two legs is required in order to react promptly to any sudden hazard that could threaten stability. The networks involved in this coordination are not yet completely known, but a direct spinal connection between soleus (SOL) muscles has recently been revealed. For this response to be functional, as previously suggested, we hypothesize that it will be accompanied by a reaction in synergistic muscles, such as gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), and that a reversal of the response would occur when an opposite reaction is required. In the present study, surface EMGs of contralateral SOL and GL were analyzed after tibial nerve (TN), sural nerve (SuN), and medial plantar nerve (MpN) stimulation during two tasks in which opposite reactions are functionally expected: normal walking (NW), just before ipsilateral heel strike, and hybrid walking (HW) (legs walking in opposite directions), at ipsilateral push off and contralateral touchdown. Early crossed facilitations were observed in the contralateral GL after TN stimulation during NW, and a reversal of such responses occurred during HW. These results underline the functional significance of short-latency crossed responses and represent the first evidence for short-latency reflex reversal in the contralateral limb for humans. Muscle afferents seem to mediate the response during NW, while during HW cutaneous afferents are likely involved. It is thus possible that different afferents mediate the crossed response during different tasks.

  6. Interaction of Baroreceptor and Chemoreceptor Reflexes MODULATION OF THE CHEMORECEPTOR REFLEX BY CHANGES IN BARORECEPTOR ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Heistad, Donald D.; Abboud, Francois M.; Mark, Allyn L.; Schmid, Phillip G.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the level of arterial pressure and degree of baroreceptor activation affect responses to stimulation of chemoreceptors. Chemoreceptors were stimulated by injecting nicotine into the common carotid artery of anesthetized and paralyzed dogs. Responses were observed in the innervated gracilis muscle, perfused at constant flow while perfusion pressure was measured. Arterial pressure was lowered by bleeding the animals and raised by transient occlusion of the descending aorta. Vasoconstrictor responses to stimulation of chemoreceptors were enhanced by hypotension and inhibited by elevation of arterial pressure. Potentiation of the chemoreceptor reflex by hemorrhagic hypotension was not the result of altered vascular resistance in the gracilis muscle, sensitization of chemoreceptors by catecholamines or acidosis, or changes in cerebral perfusion pressure. Additional studies were done in which we excluded the possibility that the changes resulted from direct effects of changes in arterial pressure on chemoreceptors. Both carotid bifurcations were isolated and perfused. On one side, pressure was raised to stimulate the carotid sinus baroreceptors. On the other side, the carotid body chemoreceptors were stimulated by nicotine or by hypoxic and hypercapnic blood. Activation of baroreceptors on one side attenuated the vasoconstrictor response to chemoreceptor stimulation on the other side. This excludes a direct effect of changes in arterial pressure on the chemoreceptors and suggests a central interaction of these reflexes. We conclude that vasoconstrictor responses to stimulation of chemoreceptors are potentiated by hypotension and inhibited by transient hypertension. These effects appear to result at least in part from a central interaction of chemoreceptor and baroreceptor reflexes. PMID:4825222

  7. [Muscular spasms associated with a reflex sympathetic dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Tola, M A; Gutiérrez, J M; Llamazares, O; Yugueros, I

    1996-10-01

    The appearance of involuntary movements in the clinical course of reflex sympathetic dystrophy (DSR) constitutes a rare clinical entity. In this context, the most frequent changes in movements are muscle spasms and focal dystonia, although postural tremor, muscle weakness and rhythmic myoclonus have also been described. The disorder is more frequent in young women and in the lower limbs. It may have a focal, segmental, multifocal, hemicorporal or symmetrical distribution. It is almost always secondary to local trauma. The pathogenesis and most effective treatment are unknown. We present the case of a 62 year old woman with muscle spasms of both legs and feet as a complication of spontaneously appearing DSR. The electromyogram showed continuous non-rhythmic discharges with morphologically normal motor unit potentials in both anterior tibial muscles. The clinical course and symptomatic improvement following treatment with benzodiazepine seems to suggest that the disorder is of central origin. PMID:8983730

  8. The posture-related interaction between Ia-afferent and descending input on the spinal reflex excitability in humans.

    PubMed

    Bove, Marco; Trompetto, Carlo; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Schieppati, Marco

    2006-04-24

    The separate and combined depressive effects induced by vibration and standing on the soleus H-reflex have been studied by administering Achilles' tendon vibration in prone position and during stance. Without vibration, H-reflex amplitude was larger under prone than standing condition. Vibration reduced the reflex both in prone position and even more during stance. When vibration was superimposed to inclined stance (greater EMG background), the reflex was reduced of the same absolute amount as when it was superimposed to normal stance. When vibration was superimposed on stance with minimal or no background EMG, the reflex disappeared. These results confirm that both upright posture and vibration have a strong depressive effect on the H-reflex. They also show that muscle activity during stance is enough for overcoming the reflex depression. These findings provide information about the origin of the disfacilitatory effects on the monosynaptic reflex pathway, contribute to the understanding of the posture-related mechanisms responsible for the modulation of the spinal reflex excitability, and allow arguing in favour of a minor but adaptable role for the short latency stretch reflex in the control of quiet unperturbed stance.

  9. The laryngeal cough reflex in congenital muscular torticollis: is it a new finding?

    PubMed

    Yim, Shin-Young; Lee, Il Yung; Cho, Kye Hee; Kim, Jong Kyu; Lee, Il Jae; Park, Myong-Chul

    2010-02-01

    Cinical experience has shown us that some infants with congenital muscular torticollis have a cough reflex while stretching the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The objective of this study is to present a case series with the maneuver inducing the cough reflex and facial color change and to provide the possible mechanism underlying this phenomenon. This is a case series from a prospective cohort. Among 290 children with congenital muscular torticollis who came to a single torticollis clinic from January to December 2008, the children who showed cough reflex were consecutively enrolled. Twenty-four infants (8.28%) showed the cough reflex. The age of first presentation with congenital muscular torticollis was 37.65 +/- 19.60 days old. They showed 57.5 +/- 7.3 degrees of the passive cervical rotation to the congenital muscular torticollis side at the initial visit. The mean thickness of the sternocleidomastoid muscle in those with cough reflex was 13.79 +/- 1.96 mm at the side of congenital muscular torticollis and 5.43 +/- 0.85 mm on the contralateral side. The cough reflex disappeared, and 90 degrees of passive cervical rotation to the congenital muscular torticollis side were regained with stretching exercises and/or surgical release in all 24 children. One of the possible mechanisms for this cough reflex is surmised to be the mechanical irritation of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve during the maneuver, which is one of the branches of the vagus nerve and is responsible for the sensation of the mucous membrane of the larynx. 8.28% of the infants with congenital muscular torticollis showed positive sign of cough reflex and had at least double or more thickness of the sternocleidomastoid muscle compared with that of unaffected sternocleidomastoid muscle and, at the same time, had 60 degrees or less of passive cervical rotation toward the affected side. To the best of our literature review, this laryngeal cough reflex is a new finding that has never been

  10. Instability in human forearm movements studied with feed-back-controlled muscle vibration.

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, A; Trend, P S

    1988-01-01

    1. Frequency-modulated vibration was applied to the elbow flexor and extensor tendons to produce reflex movements of the forearm in normal subjects. The modulating (command) signal caused equal and opposite deviations from the 40 Hz carrier frequency so that when flexor vibratory frequency increased, extensor frequency decreased, and vice versa. 2. It is argued that the movements resulted largely from the reflex action of muscle spindle primary afferents whose firing frequency had been 'taken over' and modulated by the vibration. 3. Bode plots relating forearm movements to command signal (modulating) frequency showed the transfer function of the Ia afferent-CNS-muscle-load system to have a low-pass filter characteristic. The phase lag of movement on command increased progressively with command signal frequency, exceeding 180 deg at 3-4 Hz. 4. The transduced forearm movements were fed back to provide the command signal to the vibrators (and thus indirectly to the spindle afferents) via a filter mimicking the dynamic responsiveness of muscle spindle primary endings. Our aim was to 'break into' the reflex arc, and re-route it so that we could artificially vary the gain without significantly altering the dynamics of the pathway. 5. Nearly all subjects developed forearm oscillations (tremor) when the gain exceeded a threshold value. Subjects varied widely in their threshold, though for a given subject the threshold remained fairly constant from day to day. The results suggest that reflexly active individuals may not have a large safety margin with respect to forearm instability. 6. The frequency range of the oscillations observed in seven subjects was 3-8 Hz. The frequencies depended upon the level of flexor-extensor co-contraction, and increased from 3 to 5 Hz at 10% co-contraction to 5-8 Hz at 100% co-contraction. An analysis of the mechanical impedance of the arm provided estimates of tremor frequencies consistent with these results. 7. These unexpectedly low tremor

  11. Characteristics of stapedius muscle electromyograms elicited by cochlear implant stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Clement, R S; Kipke, D R

    2004-01-01

    The electrical stapedius reflex (ESR) threshold, detected by eardrum acoustic impedance change, is strongly correlated with cochlear implant recipients' behavioral comfort levels. However reports suggest acoustic impedance changes are not detectable in 30-40% of patients. The goals of this study were to develop an animal model and investigate the characteristics of the stapedius muscle electromyogram (SEMG) elicited by a cochlear implant, as an alternative measure of ESR activation. Bipolar tungsten micro wire electrodes recorded the SEMG signal from the stapedius muscle of 6 rats. The cochlea was implanted with a multichannel intracochlear electrode that delivered biphasic electrical pulses. Maximum SEMG potentials were 20-500 microV (mean: 174 microV) or 8-42 dB SNR (mean: 24 dB). The dynamic range of the responses that reached saturation were approximately 10 dB, with threshold inversely dependent on pulse-width and electrode separation. The electrical brainstem response (EABR) threshold was 5.6 dB lower than the ESR threshold on average, but the standard deviation was relatively high (2.4 dB), suggesting that these two signals could provide independent information for objective cochlear implant fitting. Post-operative SEMGs were recorded in several animals; including one animal for up to 63 days. The results suggest the overall feasibility of the approach for objective cochlear implant fitting.

  12. Reduced stretch-reflex sensitivity after exhausting stretch-shortening cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Nicol, C; Komi, P V; Horita, T; Kyröläinen, H; Takala, T E

    1996-01-01

    The stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) is an effective and natural form of muscle function but, when repeated with sufficient intensity or duration, it may lead to muscle damage and functional defects. A reduced tolerance to impact has been reported, which may be partly attributed to a reduced stretch-reflex potentiation. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of SSC-induced metabolic fatigue and muscle damage on the efficacy of stretch reflexes, as judged by the electromyograph (EMG) response of two shank muscles (lateral gastrocnemius LG, soleus SOL) to controlled ramp stretches. These EMG responses were recorded before and immediately after exhausting SSC-type leg exercise and 2 h, 2 days and 4 days later. Serum concentrations of creatine kinase ([CK]), myoglobin and lactate were measured repetitively along the protocol. Two maximal vertical drop jumps and counter-movement jumps were performed after each reflex test. The exhausting SSC-type exercise induced an immediate reduction (P < 0.05) with a delayed short-term recovery of the LG peak-to-peak reflex amplitude. This was not accompanied by significant changes in the reflex latency. The drop jump performance remained slightly but significantly reduced (P < 0.05) until the 2nd day postexercise. Peak [CK] appeared for all the subjects on the 2nd day, suggesting the presence of muscle damage. The increase in [CK] between the 2nd h and the 2nd day postexercise was found to be negatively related (P < 0.001) to the relative changes in the drop jump height. Furthermore, a significant relationship (P < 0.05) was found between recovery of the stretch reflex in LG and the decrease of [CK] between the 2nd and the 4th day. These findings support the hypothesis of a reduced stretch-reflex sensitivity. While the exact mechanisms of the reflex inhibition remain unclear, it is emphasized that the delayed recovery of the reflex sensitivity could have resulted from the progressive inflammation that develops in

  13. The muscle spindle as a feedback element in muscle control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, L. T.; Iannone, A. M.; Ewing, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    The muscle spindle, the feedback element in the myotatic (stretch) reflex, is a major contributor to muscular control. Therefore, an accurate description of behavior of the muscle spindle during active contraction of the muscle, as well as during passive stretch, is essential to the understanding of muscle control. Animal experiments were performed in order to obtain the data necessary to model the muscle spindle. Spectral density functions were used to identify a linear approximation of the two types of nerve endings from the spindle. A model reference adaptive control system was used on a hybrid computer to optimize the anatomically defined lumped parameter estimate of the spindle. The derived nonlinear model accurately predicts the behavior of the muscle spindle both during active discharge and during its silent period. This model is used to determine the mechanism employed to control muscle movement.

  14. Modulation of Stretch Reflexes of the Finger Flexors by Sensory Feedback From the Proximal Upper Limb Poststroke

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Gilles; Kamper, Derek G.; Kahn, Jennifer H.; Rymer, William Z.; Schmit, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Neural coupling of proximal and distal upper limb segments may have functional implications in the recovery of hemiparesis after stroke. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether the stretch reflex response magnitude of spastic finger flexor muscles poststroke is influenced by sensory input from the shoulder and the elbow and whether reflex coupling of muscles throughout the upper limb is altered in spastic stroke survivors. Through imposed extension of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints, stretch of the relaxed finger flexors of the four fingers was imposed in 10 relaxed stroke subjects under different conditions of proximal sensory input, namely static arm posture (3 different shoulder/elbow postures) and electrical stimulation (surface stimulation of biceps brachii or triceps brachii, or none). Fast (300°/s) imposed stretch elicited stretch reflex flexion torque at the MCP joints and reflex electromyographic (EMG) activity in flexor digitorum superficialis. Both measures were greatest in an arm posture of 90° of elbow flexion and neutral shoulder position. Biceps stimulation resulted in greater MCP stretch reflex flexion torque. Fast imposed stretch also elicited reflex EMG activity in nonstretched heteronymous upper limb muscles, both proximal and distal. These results suggest that in the spastic hemiparetic upper limb poststroke, sensorimotor coupling of proximal and distal upper limb segments is involved in both the increased stretch reflex response of the finger flexors and an increased reflex coupling of heteronymous muscles. Both phenomena may be mediated through changes poststroke in the spinal reflex circuits and/or in the descending influence of supraspinal pathways. PMID:19571191

  15. Proprioceptive neuropathy affects normalization of the H-reflex by exercise after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Keeler, Benjamin E.; Siegfried, Rachel; Houlé, John D.; Lemay, Michel A.

    2009-01-01

    The H-reflex habituates at relatively low frequency (10 Hz) stimulation in the intact spinal cord, but loss of descending inhibition resulting from spinal cord transection reduces this habituation. There is a return towards a normal pattern of low-frequency habituation in the reflex activity with cycling exercise of the affected hind limbs. This implies that repetitive passive stretching of the muscles in spinalized animals and the accompanying stimulation of large (Group I and II) proprioceptive fibers has modulatory effects on spinal cord reflexes after injury. To test this hypothesis, we induced pyridoxine neurotoxicity that preferentially affects large dorsal root ganglia neurons in intact and spinalized rats. Pyridoxine or saline injections were given twice daily (IP) for 6 weeks and half of the spinalized animals were subjected to cycling exercise during that period. After 6 weeks, the tibial nerve was stimulated electrically and recordings of M and H waves were made from interosseous muscles of the hind paw. Results show that pyridoxine treatment completely eliminated the H-reflex in spinal intact animals. In contrast, transection paired with pyridoxine treatment resulted in a reduction of the frequency-dependent habituation of the H-reflex that was not affected by exercise. These results indicate that normal Group I and II afferent input is critical to achieve exercise-based reversal of hyper-reflexia of the H-reflex after spinal cord injury. PMID:19913536

  16. Restoring walking after spinal cord injury: operant conditioning of spinal reflexes can help.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Aiko K; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2015-04-01

    People with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently suffer motor disabilities due to spasticity and poor muscle control, even after conventional therapy. Abnormal spinal reflex activity often contributes to these problems. Operant conditioning of spinal reflexes, which can target plasticity to specific reflex pathways, can enhance recovery. In rats in which a right lateral column lesion had weakened right stance and produced an asymmetrical gait, up-conditioning of the right soleus H-reflex, which increased muscle spindle afferent excitation of soleus, strengthened right stance and eliminated the asymmetry. In people with hyperreflexia due to incomplete SCI, down-conditioning of the soleus H-reflex improved walking speed and symmetry. Furthermore, modulation of electromyographic activity during walking improved bilaterally, indicating that a protocol that targets plasticity to a specific pathway can trigger widespread plasticity that improves recovery far beyond that attributable to the change in the targeted pathway. These improvements were apparent to people in their daily lives. They reported walking faster and farther, and noted less spasticity and better balance. Operant conditioning protocols could be developed to modify other spinal reflexes or corticospinal connections; and could be combined with other therapies to enhance recovery in people with SCI or other neuromuscular disorders.

  17. Absent quadriceps reflex with distant toe flexor response: An underrecognized neurological sign.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Diego Z; Boes, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    As opposed to finger flexion response upon tapping the styloid process with absent brachioradialis reflex (inverted brachioradialis reflex), toe flexion response upon patellar percussion with absent quadriceps reflex is a quite underrecognized neurological sign, and has been reported only once in the literature. Similar to the inverted brachioradialis reflex, this sign can also be useful for neurological localization. We hereby report a patient presenting with signs and symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy in the setting of an anterior epidural mass compressing the cauda equina at L2-L4, without evidence of myelopathy. Upon examination, the patient had bilateral absent quadriceps reflexes with a right toe flexor response when the right patella was percussed. An absent quadriceps reflex with distant toe flexor response is proposed as a lower extremity equivalent of the inverted brachioradialis reflex, likely localizing to L3-L4 levels. Spindle hypersensitivity due to lack of reciprocal inhibition from antagonist muscles is hypothesized as a possible underlying mechanism. Further observations should help clarify the most common underlying etiology (radicular vs. radiculomyelopathy). Neurologists should be able to recognize this sign, as it can be helpful for neurological localization. PMID:27458829

  18. Tricyclic analogs cyclobenzaprine, amitriptyline and cyproheptadine inhibit the spinal reflex transmission through 5-HT(2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Honda, Motoko; Nishida, Takashi; Ono, Hideki

    2003-01-01

    The centrally acting muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine decreases the amplitude of monosynaptic reflex potentials by inhibiting the facilitatory descending serotonergic influences in the spinal cord. Interestingly, the structure of cyclobenzaprine is much similar to those of amitriptyline and cyproheptadine. In the present study, we attempted to elucidate the relationship between 5-HT(2) receptor antagonistic and inhibitory effects of cyclobenzaprine, amitriptyline, cyproheptadine and ketanserin on the spinal reflexes. Cyclobenzaprine, amitriptyline, cyproheptadine, and ketanserin significantly inhibited facilitatory effects of 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) on flexor reflexes and mono- and polysynaptic spinal reflex potentials in spinalized rats. In intact rats, these drugs significantly reduced the mono- and polysynaptic reflex potentials. 5-HT depletion significantly prevented the depression of the spinal reflex potentials induced by these drugs. These results suggest that the inhibitory effects of cyclobenzaprine, amitriptyline, and cyproheptadine on mono- and polysynaptic reflex potentials are due to the inhibition of descending serotonergic systems through 5-HT(2) receptors in the spinal cord.

  19. The effect of cannabinoids on the stretch reflex in multiple sclerosis spasticity.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Lucio; Mori, Laura; Canneva, Stefania; Colombano, Federica; Currà, Antonio; Fattapposta, Francesco; Bandini, Fabio; Capello, Elisabetta; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Trompetto, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this observational study was to assess the efficacy of a tetrahydrocannabinol-cannabidiol (THC : CBD) oromucosal spray on spasticity using the stretch reflex in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Numeric rating scale (NRS) for spasticity, modified Ashworth scale (MAS), and the stretch reflex were assessed before and during treatment in 57 MS patients with spasticity eligible for THC : CBD treatment. A significant reduction in stretch reflex amplitude as well as significant reductions of NRS and MAS scores were observed. There was a low concordance between the three measures (stretch reflex, NRS, and MAS), likely related to the different aspects of muscle hypertonia assessed. Stretch reflex responders were taking a significantly higher number of puffs, whereas no differences were found in the responders by the other scales, suggesting that a higher dosage would add benefit if tolerated. The present study confirms the efficacy of cannabinoids in reducing spasticity in patients with MS, suggesting a higher sensitivity and specificity of the stretch reflex compared with other measures. As an objective and quantitative measure of spasticity, the stretch reflex is particularly useful to assess the effects of cannabinoids on spinal excitability and may play a role in future pharmacological studies. PMID:27003093

  20. Absent quadriceps reflex with distant toe flexor response: An underrecognized neurological sign.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Diego Z; Boes, Christopher J

    2016-10-01

    As opposed to finger flexion response upon tapping the styloid process with absent brachioradialis reflex (inverted brachioradialis reflex), toe flexion response upon patellar percussion with absent quadriceps reflex is a quite underrecognized neurological sign, and has been reported only once in the literature. Similar to the inverted brachioradialis reflex, this sign can also be useful for neurological localization. We hereby report a patient presenting with signs and symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy in the setting of an anterior epidural mass compressing the cauda equina at L2-L4, without evidence of myelopathy. Upon examination, the patient had bilateral absent quadriceps reflexes with a right toe flexor response when the right patella was percussed. An absent quadriceps reflex with distant toe flexor response is proposed as a lower extremity equivalent of the inverted brachioradialis reflex, likely localizing to L3-L4 levels. Spindle hypersensitivity due to lack of reciprocal inhibition from antagonist muscles is hypothesized as a possible underlying mechanism. Further observations should help clarify the most common underlying etiology (radicular vs. radiculomyelopathy). Neurologists should be able to recognize this sign, as it can be helpful for neurological localization.

  1. The relationship between dynamic balancing ability and posture-related modulation of the soleus H-reflex.

    PubMed

    Kawaishi, Yu; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2016-02-01

    Soleus H-reflex reveals down modulation with increased postural difficulty. Role of this posture-related reflex modulation is thought to shift movement control toward higher motor centers in order to facilitate more precise postural control. Present study hypothesized that the ability to modulate H-reflex is related to one's ability to dynamically balance while in an unstable posture. This study examined the relationship between dynamic balancing ability and soleus H-reflex posture-related modulation. Thirty healthy adults participated. The soleus maximal H-reflex (Hmax), motor response (Mmax), and background EMG activity (bEMG) were obtained during three postural conditions: prone, open-legged standing, and closed-legged standing. Hmax/Mmax ratios were normalized via the corresponding bEMG in order to remove the effects of background muscle activity from the obtained H-reflex. Reflex modulation was calculated as the ratio of the normalized Hmax/Mmax ratios in one postural condition to another posture in a more difficult condition. Dynamic balancing ability was assessed by testing stability while standing on a wobble board. A significant negative correlation was observed between balancing scores and reflex modulation from open-legged standing to closed-legged standing. This suggests that the ability to modulate monosynaptic stretch reflex excitability in response to a changing posture is a significant factor for dynamic balancing.

  2. How Can Hypnodontics Manage Severe Gag Reflex for Root Canal Therapy? A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramazani, Mohsen; zarenejad, Nafiseh; Parirokh, Masoud; Zahedpasha, Samir

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, severe involuntary gagging can have a severe impact on treatment procedure. There are many ways to ease the gag reflex, one of which is hypnosis. A 34-year-old male was referred for root canal treatment of a molar tooth. He had not received any dental treatments for the past nine years due to fear of severe gag reflex. Three hypnotic sessions based upon eye fixation, progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery techniques were spent for psychosomatic management. The gag reflex was controlled and reduced to a normal level, and the required dental treatments including root canal therapy and restoration were performed successfully. This report shows that hypnosis can control gag reflex for dental treatments. PMID:27141226

  3. How Can Hypnodontics Manage Severe Gag Reflex for Root Canal Therapy? A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ramazani, Mohsen; Zarenejad, Nafiseh; Parirokh, Masoud; Zahedpasha, Samir

    2016-01-01

    In endodontics, severe involuntary gagging can have a severe impact on treatment procedure. There are many ways to ease the gag reflex, one of which is hypnosis. A 34-year-old male was referred for root canal treatment of a molar tooth. He had not received any dental treatments for the past nine years due to fear of severe gag reflex. Three hypnotic sessions based upon eye fixation, progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery techniques were spent for psychosomatic management. The gag reflex was controlled and reduced to a normal level, and the required dental treatments including root canal therapy and restoration were performed successfully. This report shows that hypnosis can control gag reflex for dental treatments. PMID:27141226

  4. Spanish Reflexives: A Critique of Pedagogical Descriptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Anthony G.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses pedagogical descriptions in high school textbooks covering Spanish reflexive verb constructions. Points out that these textbooks rarely contain the full reflexive construction displayed with all the grammatical persons and complete English glosses. (17 references) (Author/CK)

  5. Graphic Sequences of Spanish Nominals and Reflexives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozano, Anthony G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of graphics for clarifying paradigmatic and syntagmatic relationships of nominals is described. This approach improves student understanding of reflexive, pseudo-reflexive, and nonreflexive sequences. (Contains seven references.) (Author/LB)

  6. [Clinical relevance of cardiopulmonary reflexes in anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Guerri-Guttenberg, R A; Siaba-Serrate, F; Cacheiro, F J

    2013-10-01

    The baroreflex, chemoreflex, pulmonary reflexes, Bezold-Jarisch and Bainbridge reflexes and their interaction with local mechanisms, are a demonstration of the richness of cardiovascular responses that occur in human beings. As well as these, the anesthesiologist must contend with other variables that interact by attenuating or accentuating cardiopulmonary reflexes such as, anesthetic drugs, surgical manipulation, and patient positioning. In the present article we review these reflexes and their clinical relevance in anesthesiology.

  7. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lienhard, Karin; Cabasson, Aline; Meste, Olivier; Colson, Serge S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG) spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV) exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental) and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p < 0.05), and was significantly correlated to the sEMG signal without the spikes of the respective muscle (r range: 0.54 - 0.92, p < 0.05). This finding indicates that reflex activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity. Key points The spikes observed in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity The motion artifacts are more pronounced in the first spike than the following spikes in the sEMG spectrum Reflex activity during WBV exercises is enhanced with an additional load of approximately 50% of the body mass PMID:25729290

  8. Changes in spinal reflex excitability associated with motor sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Lungu, Ovidiu; Frigon, Alain; Piché, Mathieu; Rainville, Pierre; Rossignol, Serge; Doyon, Julien

    2010-05-01

    There is ample evidence that motor sequence learning is mediated by changes in brain activity. Yet the question of whether this form of learning elicits changes detectable at the spinal cord level has not been addressed. To date, studies in humans have revealed that spinal reflex activity may be altered during the acquisition of various motor skills, but a link between motor sequence learning and changes in spinal excitability has not been demonstrated. To address this issue, we studied the modulation of H-reflex amplitude evoked in the flexor carpi radialis muscle of 14 healthy individuals between blocks of movements that involved the implicit acquisition of a sequence versus other movements that did not require learning. Each participant performed the task in three conditions: "sequence"-externally triggered, repeating and sequential movements, "random"-similar movements, but performed in an arbitrary order, and "simple"- involving alternating movements in a left-right or up-down direction only. When controlling for background muscular activity, H-reflex amplitude was significantly more reduced in the sequence (43.8 +/- 1.47%. mean +/- SE) compared with the random (38.2 +/- 1.60%) and simple (31.5 +/- 1.82%) conditions, while the M-response was not different across conditions. Furthermore, H-reflex changes were observed from the beginning of the learning process up to when subjects reached asymptotic performance on the motor task. Changes also persisted for >60 s after motor activity ceased. Such findings suggest that the excitability in some spinal reflex circuits is altered during the implicit learning process of a new motor sequence.

  9. Peripheral δ-opioid receptors attenuate the exercise pressor reflex.

    PubMed

    Leal, Anna K; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kim, Joyce; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P

    2013-10-15

    In rats with ligated femoral arteries, the exercise pressor reflex is exaggerated, an effect that is attenuated by stimulation of peripheral μ-opioid receptors on group IV metabosensitive afferents. In contrast, δ-opioid receptors are expressed mostly on group III mechanosensitive afferents, a finding that prompted us to determine whether stimulation of these opioid receptors could also attenuate the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in "ligated" rats. We found femoral arterial injection of [D-Pen2,D-Pen5]enkephalin (DPDPE; 1.0 μg), a δ-opioid agonist, significantly attenuated the pressor and cardioaccelerator components of the exercise pressor reflex evoked by hindlimb muscle contraction in both rats with ligated and patent femoral arteries. DPDPE significantly decreased the pressor responses to muscle mechanoreflex activation, evoked by tendon stretch, in ligated rats only. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect in either group on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to capsaicin (0.2 μg), which primarily stimulates group IV afferents. DPDPE (1.0 μg) had no effect on the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to lactic acid (24 mM), which stimulates group III and IV afferents, in rats with patent femoral arteries but significantly decreased the pressor response in ligated rats. Western blots revealed the amount of protein comprising the δ-opioid receptor was greater in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with ligated femoral arteries than in dorsal root ganglia innervating hindlimbs with patent femoral arteries. Our findings support the hypothesis that stimulation of δ-opioid receptors on group III afferents attenuated the exercise pressor reflex.

  10. Prediction of Hearing Sensitivity from Acoustic Reflexes in Mentally Retarded Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niswander, Paul S.; Ruth, Roger A.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of the sensitivity prediction from acoustic reflex (SPAR) technique to estimate hearing loss in 32 trainable mentally retarded Ss (adults and young adults with normal to profound hearing loss) was investigated by comparing measured pure-tone thresholds determined through tangible-reinforcement operant-conditioning audiometry with…

  11. Reflexive and Reciprocal Elements in Ixil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayres, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Reflexives and reciprocals in Ixil, a Mayan language of Guatemala, appear to have features that distinguish them from reflexives surveyed in typological studies such as Faltz (1985) and Geniusiene (1987). Third person reflexives and reciprocals seem to have the form of a possessed noun optionally followed by a possessor NP. Moreover, reflexives…

  12. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles Print A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  13. Cutaneous reflex responses and their central nervous pathways studied in man.

    PubMed

    Jenner, J R; Stephens, J A

    1982-12-01

    1. Cutaneous reflex responses have been recorded in human first dorsal interosseous and extensor digitorum brevis muscles following electrical stimulation of the digital nerves of the index finger and second toe respectively.2. Recordings have been made in normal subjects and in patients with central nervous lesions.3. Cutaneous reflex responses in first dorsal interosseous were triphasic, consisting of initial short latency excitation, followed by inhibition, followed by prominent long latency excitation. Cutaneous reflex responses in extensor digitorum brevis were biphasic, consisting of short and long latency periods of excitation.4. Estimated central delay for the initial excitatory components of the cutaneous reflex in first dorsal interosseous and extensor digitorum brevis muscles ranged from 2.4 to 6.2 ms (mean 4.6 ms) and 0.6 to 4.1 ms (mean 2.3 ms) respectively.5. Differences in latency between short and long latency excitatory components of the cutaneous reflexes recorded in first dorsal interosseous and extensor digitorum brevis muscles ranged from 16 to 18 ms (mean 17.3 ms) and 27 to 32 ms (mean 29.3 ms) respectively.6. Differences in time delay between short and long latency excitation in first dorsal interosseous and extensor digitorum brevis muscles when compared in individual subjects ranged from 9 to 14 ms (mean 12 ms). These values lay within 0-7 ms (mean 4 ms) of estimates in each subject of conduction time along central pathways between T12 and C7 spinal segments.7. Differences in latency between short and long latency excitatory components of the cutaneous reflex recorded in first dorsal interosseous were 3.5-8.5 ms longer than the estimated minimum time for impulse conduction along a pathway travelling through the dorsal columns to cerebral cortex and returning by way of the corticospinal tract.8. The long latency excitatory component of the cutaneous reflex in first dorsal interosseous muscle is reduced and often delayed in patients with

  14. Monosynaptic reflexes in the superficial forearm flexors in man and their clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Deschuytere, J; Rosselle, N; De Keyser, C

    1976-06-01

    Indirect motor responses with the characteristics of the H wave were recorded from the flexor carpi radialis and the palmaris longus muscles in normal adults. A series of experiments has been performed, constituting circumstantial arguments for the monosynaptic nature of these reflex responses. The findings in pathological conditions, which corroborated this point of view, are documented briefly.

  15. Influences of Changes in the Level of Support and Walking Speed on the H Reflex of the Soleus Muscle and Circulatory Dynamics on Body Weight-supported Treadmill Training: Investigation in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shinichi; Oya, Yosuke; Iwata, Jun; Someya, Fujiko

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the therapeutic usefulness of treadmill walking using a body weight support device (BWS), changes in circulatory dynamics and muscle activities with various levels of support were investigated. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were divided into 3 groups: 20% BWS, 40% BWS, and full body weight (FBW). The subjects walked at maximum and normal speeds. Under each condition, H and M waves and skin temperature before and after walking and changes in the heart rate during walking were measured. [Results] The heart rate continued to increase after 3 minutes of FBW at the maximum walking speed, but a steady state was reached after 3 minutes under the other walking conditions. Regarding skin temperature, no significant difference from that at rest was noted 30 minutes after walking at the normal speed, but it was significantly higher than that at rest at 30 minutes after walking at the maximum speed. The H/M ratio was significantly higher after walking at the maximum walking speed in the FBW and 20% BWS groups compared with the 40% BWS groups. [Conclusion] Treatment with 40% BWS at the maximum walking speed was safe for the circulatory system and may be effective in elevating the skin temperature for a prolonged period compared with the effects of the other walking conditions at normal speed.

  16. Effect of the middle ear reflex on sound transmission to the inner ear of rat.

    PubMed

    Pilz, P K; Ostwald, J; Kreiter, A; Schnitzler, H U

    1997-03-01

    The effect of the acoustic middle ear reflex (MER) was quantified using electrodes chronically implanted in the middle ears of rats. Cochlear microphonics (CM) and middle ear muscle EMG were measured under light Ketamin anesthesia after stimulation with tone pulses of 5-20 kHz ranging between 75 and 120 dB SPL. With increasing intensity, the CM measured before the onset of the MER increased to a maximum amplitude and then decreased with higher SPLs. At 10 kHz this maximum was reached at 95 dB SPL, for other stimulus frequencies at higher SPLs. After a latency of 10-20 ms, CM to 10 kHz stimuli of 80-95 dB SPL were decreased by the attenuating action of the MER. The lowest threshold of the MER was also measured at 10 kHz (77 dB SPL in the mean). To stimuli greater than 100 dB SPL after a latency of 6-10 ms, the CM amplitude was increased. That this CM increase to intense stimuli is caused by the action of the MER was confirmed by control experiments such as cutting the tendons of the middle ear muscles. The CM decrease to stimuli below 100 dB SPL, as well as the increase to very intense stimuli, can be explained by sound attenuation caused by the MER, together with the nonlinear dependence of CM amplitude on stimulus level. The observed shift of the maxima of the CM input-output function by the MER to higher stimulus levels probably indicates an increase of the dynamic range of the ear.

  17. Suppression of Thyroarytenoid Muscle Responses During Repeated Air Pressure Stimulation of the Laryngeal Mucosa in Awake Humans

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, Pamela Reed; Poletto, Christopher J.; Mann, Eric A.; Ludlow, Christy L.

    2008-01-01

    Repeated stimulation of the laryngeal mucosa occurs during speech. Single stimuli, however, can elicit laryngeal adductor responses (LAR). Our hypothesis was that the LAR to repeated rapid air pressure stimuli are centrally suppressed in humans. Hooked wire electrodes were inserted into the thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles bilaterally and into the posterior cricoarytenoid muscle on one side. Pairs of air puff stimuli were presented to the mucosa over the arytenoids at pressure levels three times threshold with inter-stimulus intervals from 250 to 5000 ms. Bilateral thyroarytenoid responses occurred at around 150 ms to over 70% of initial stimuli. With repeated presentation at intervals of 2 seconds or less, the percent occurrence decreased to less than 40% and response amplitudes were reduced by 50%. Central suppression of adductor responses to repeated air puff stimuli may allow speakers to produce voice without eliciting reflexive spasms which could disrupt speech. PMID:15895780

  18. Modulation of the soleus H-reflex following galvanic vestibular stimulation and cutaneous stimulation in prone human subjects.

    PubMed

    Lowrey, Catherine R; Bent, Leah R

    2009-08-01

    There is evidence to suggest that vestibular and somatosensory inputs may interact when they are processed by the central nervous system, although the nature of the individual sensory contributions to this interaction is unknown. We examined the effects of a combined vestibular and cutaneous conditioning stimulus on the motoneuron pool that supplies the soleus muscle via the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex). We applied galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS; bipolar, binaural, 500 ms, 2.5-mA square-wave pulse) and cutaneous stimulation (medial plantar nerve; 11 ms, three-pulse train, 200 HZ) to prone human subjects and examined changes in the amplitude of the H-reflex. GVS alone caused facilitation (approximately 20%) of the H-reflex, whereas ipsilateral cutaneous stimulation alone caused a 26% inhibition. Paired GVS and cutaneous stimulation resulted in a linear summation of the individual conditioning effects. H-reflex amplitudes observed after paired conditioning with GVS and cutaneous stimulation could be predicted from the amplitudes observed with individual conditioning. These results suggest that in the prone position, when the muscles are not posturally engaged, vestibular and somatosensory information appear to sum in a linear fashion to influence the reflex response of lower limb motoneurons. Muscle Nerve 40: 213-220, 2009.

  19. Effect of acupuncture depth on muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background While evidence supports efficacy of acupuncture and/or dry needling in treating musculoskeletal pain, it is unclear which needling method is most effective. This study aims to determine the effects of depth of needle penetration on muscle pain. Methods A total of 22 healthy volunteers performed repeated eccentric contractions to induce muscle soreness in their extensor digital muscle. Subjects were assigned randomly to four groups, namely control group, skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle), muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and non-segmental group (depth of 10 mm: the anterior tibial muscle). Pressure pain threshold and electrical pain threshold of the skin, fascia and muscle were measured at a point 20 mm distal to the maximum tender point on the second day after the exercise. Results Pressure pain thresholds of skin group (depth of 3 mm: the extensor digital muscle) and muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) were significantly higher than the control group, whereas the electrical pain threshold at fascia of muscle group (depth of 10 mm: the extensor digital muscle) was a significantly higher than control group; however, there was no significant difference between the control and other groups. Conclusion The present study shows that acupuncture stimulation of muscle increases the PPT and EPT of fascia. The depth of needle penetration is important for the relief of muscle pain. PMID:21696603

  20. Acid-sensing ion channels contribute to the metaboreceptor component of the exercise pressor reflex

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Jennifer L.; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2009-01-01

    The exercise pressor reflex is evoked by both mechanical and metabolic stimuli arising in contracting skeletal muscle. Recently, the blockade of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) with amiloride and A-316567 attenuated the reflex. Moreover, amiloride had no effect on the mechanoreceptor component of the reflex, prompting us to determine whether ASICs contributed to the metaboreceptor component of the exercise pressor reflex. The metaboreceptor component can be assessed by measuring mean arterial pressure during postcontraction circulatory occlusion when only the metaboreceptors are stimulated. We examined the effects of amiloride (0.5 μg/kg), A-317567 (10 mM, 0.5 ml), and saline (0.5 ml) on the pressor response to and after static contraction while the circulation was occluded in 30 decerebrated cats. Amiloride (n = 11) and A-317567 (n = 7), injected into the arterial supply of the triceps surae muscles, attenuated the pressor responses both to contraction while the circulation was occluded and to postcontraction circulatory occlusion (all, P < 0.05). Saline (n = 11), however, had no effect on the pressor responses to contraction while the circulation was occluded or to postcontraction circulatory occlusion (both, P > 0.79). Our findings led us to conclude that ASICs contribute to the metaboreceptor component of the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:19465550

  1. [Features of the lifting reflex in the white rat following prolonged space flight (effect of weightlessness and artificial gravity)].

    PubMed

    Aĭzikov, G S; Markin, A S; Mokrousova, A V

    1981-12-01

    The latent time of the lifting reflex (LTLR) was studied in weightless and centrifuged SPF-Wistar rats before and after 19-day space flights onboard Cosmos-936 and 1129. The LTLR was determined when the lifting reflex was induced in a special trainer on the basis of the mechanical component of muscle reaction (MCMR) and electromyography of the oculomotor and gastrocnemius muscles. The LTLR persisted in all the animals postflight. The LTLR of weightless rats as determined by the MCMR increased significantly, and as determined by electromyography, remained unchanged. Centrifuged rats did not show significant changes in the LPLR. It is believed that the initial stages of the lifting reaction - vestibular receptors and conductive pathways - remained unaltered in weightlessness. Changes in the LPLR observed after prolonged space flights are consequent on muscle function, representing the final stage of the lifting reflex.

  2. Muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  3. Reflex modulation of airflow dynamics through the upper airway.

    PubMed

    Seelagy, M M; Schwartz, A R; Russ, D B; King, E D; Wise, R A; Smith, P L

    1994-06-01

    We studied the effect of respiratory reflexes on maximal inspiratory flow (VImax) and its mechanical determinants, pharyngeal critical pressure (Pcrit) and nasal resistance, in an isolated feline upper airway preparation. Chemoreceptor reflexes were evaluated by varying inspired oxygen and end-tidal CO2 concentrations. At each gas concentration, we found that changes in VImax were related to changes in Pcrit. As CO2 increased, Pcrit became increasingly subatmospheric (P < 0.02), indicating reductions in pharyngeal collapsibility. In contrast, progressive hypoxia had no effect on Pcrit. We then examined the effects of vagal afferents and upper airway mucosal receptors on airflow dynamics at three levels of CO2. We confirmed that CO2 increased VImax (P < 0.01) and decreased Pcrit to more subatmospheric levels (P < 0.05) in both the presence and absence of vagal and airway mucosal afferent activity. Moreover, airway mucosal afferents led to smaller reductions in Pcrit (a less collapsible airway) (P < 0.05), whereas vagal afferents led to a larger increase in Pcrit (a more collapsible pharynx) under hypercapnic conditions (P < 0.01). We conclude that CO2 had a major effect on pharyngeal collapsability and that its effect was modulated by vagal and mucosal afferents. We speculate that the sensitivity and threshold to reflex CO2 responses play a major role in the maintenance of airway patency.

  4. Toward reflexive climate adaptation research

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Benjamin L.; Rickards, Lauren; Fünfgeld, Hartmut; Keenan, Rodney J.

    2015-06-22

    Climate adaptation research is expanding very quickly within an increasingly reflexive society where the relationship between academia and other social institutions is in a state of flux. Tensions exist between the two dominant research orientations of research about and research for adaptation. In particular, the research community is challenged to develop processes for successfully executing transdisciplinary research for adaptation when academic institutions and researchers are largely structured around traditional, disciplinary expertise and funding models. One tool for helping to manage this tension is a third, more reflexive, orientation toward adaptation research that is emerging in the literature. Finally, this new ‘research on adaptation research’ promises to help enhance understanding of the research enterprise itself and how it can become more adaptive.

  5. Toward reflexive climate adaptation research

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Preston, Benjamin L.; Rickards, Lauren; Fünfgeld, Hartmut; Keenan, Rodney J.

    2015-06-22

    Climate adaptation research is expanding very quickly within an increasingly reflexive society where the relationship between academia and other social institutions is in a state of flux. Tensions exist between the two dominant research orientations of research about and research for adaptation. In particular, the research community is challenged to develop processes for successfully executing transdisciplinary research for adaptation when academic institutions and researchers are largely structured around traditional, disciplinary expertise and funding models. One tool for helping to manage this tension is a third, more reflexive, orientation toward adaptation research that is emerging in the literature. Finally, this newmore » ‘research on adaptation research’ promises to help enhance understanding of the research enterprise itself and how it can become more adaptive.« less

  6. Human stretch reflex pathways reexamined

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Ş. Utku; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Sebik, Oğuz; Berna Ünver, M.; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Reflex responses of tibialis anterior motor units to stretch stimuli were investigated in human subjects. Three types of stretch stimuli were applied (tap-like, ramp-and-hold, and half-sine stretch). Stimulus-induced responses in single motor units were analyzed using the classical technique, which involved building average surface electromyogram (SEMG) and peristimulus time histograms (PSTH) from the discharge times of motor units and peristimulus frequencygrams (PSF) from the instantaneous discharge rates of single motor units. With the use of SEMG and PSTH, the tap-like stretch stimulus induced five separate reflex responses, on average. With the same single motor unit data, the PSF technique indicated that the tap stimulus induced only three reflex responses. Similar to the finding using the tap-like stretch stimuli, ramp-and-hold stimuli induced several peaks and troughs in the SEMG and PSTH. The PSF analyses displayed genuine increases in discharge rates underlying the peaks but not underlying the troughs. Half-sine stretch stimuli induced a long-lasting excitation followed by a long-lasting silent period in SEMG and PSTH. The increase in the discharge rate, however, lasted for the entire duration of the stimulus and continued during the silent period. The results are discussed in the light of the fact that the discharge rate of a motoneuron has a strong positive linear association with the effective synaptic current it receives and hence represents changes in the membrane potential more directly and accurately than the other indirect measures. This study suggests that the neuronal pathway of the human stretch reflex does not include inhibitory pathways. PMID:24225537

  7. Stretch Reflex as a Simple Measure to Evaluate the Efficacy of Potential Flight Countermeasures Using the Bed Rest Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cerisano, J. M.; Reschke, M. F.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Harm, D. L.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spaceflight is acknowledged to have significant effects on the major postural muscles. However, it has been difficult to separate the effects of ascending somatosensory changes caused by the unloading of these muscles during flight from changes in sensorimotor function caused by a descending vestibulo-cerebellar response to microgravity. It is hypothesized that bed rest is an adequate model to investigate postural muscle unloading given that spaceflight and bed rest may produce similar results in both nerve axon and muscle tissue. METHODS: To investigate this hypothesis, stretch reflexes were measured on 18 subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 deg at a peak velocity of approximately 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender and compared with spaceflight data. RESULTS: Although no gender differences were found, bed rest induced changes in reflex latency and CV similar to the ones observed during spaceflight. Also, a relationship between CV and loss of muscle strength in the lower leg was observed for most bed rest subjects. CONCLUSION: Even though bed rest (limb unloading) alone may not mimic all of the synaptic and muscle tissue loss that is observed as a result of spaceflight, it can serve as a working analog of flight for the evaluation of potential countermeasures that may be beneficial in mitigating unwanted changes in the major postural muscles that are observed post flight.

  8. Temperature affects maximum H-reflex amplitude but not homosynaptic postactivation depression.

    PubMed

    Racinais, Sébastien; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to determinate the effect of hyperthermia on transmission efficacy of the Ia-afferent spinal pathway. Recruitment curves of the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) and compound motor potential (M-wave) along with homosynaptic postactivation depression (HPAD) recovery curves were obtained in 14 volunteers in two controlled ambient temperatures that resulted in significantly different core temperatures (CON, core temperature ∼37.3°C; and HOT, core temperature ∼39.0°C). Electromyographic responses were obtained from the soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles following electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve at varying intensities and paired pulse frequencies (0.07-10 Hz). Results showed that maximal amplitude of the H-reflex was reached for a similar intensity of stimulation in CON and HOT (both muscles P > 0.47), with a similar associated M-wave (both muscles P > 0.69) but was significantly decreased in HOT as compared to CON (all P < 0.05), whether expressed in absolute terms (-50% in SOL, -32% in MG) or when normalized to the maximum M-wave (-23% in SOL, -32% in MG). The HPAD recovery curve was not affected by the elevated core temperature (both muscles P > 0.23). Taken together, these results suggest that hyperthermia can alter neuromuscular transmission across the neuromuscular junction and/or muscle membrane as well as transmission efficacy of the Ia-afferent pathway, albeit the latter not via an increase in HPAD.

  9. Effects of Bed Rest on Conduction Velocity of the Triceps Surae Stretch Reflex and Postural Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Wood, S. J.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Esteves, J. T.; Taylor, L. C.; DeDios, Y. E.; Harm, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite rigorous exercise and nutritional management during space missions, astronauts returning from microgravity exhibit neuromuscular deficits and a significant loss in muscle mass in the postural muscles of the lower leg. Similar changes in the postural muscles occur in subjects participating in long-duration bed rest studies. These adaptive muscle changes manifest as a reduction in reflex conduction velocity during head-down bed rest. Because the stretch reflex encompasses both the peripheral (muscle spindle and nerve axon) and central (spinal synapse) components involved in adaptation to calf muscle unloading, it may be used to provide feedback on the general condition of neuromuscular function, and might be used to evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures aimed at preserving muscle mass and function during periods of unloading. Stretch reflexes were measured on 18 control subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 deg head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 degrees at a peak velocity of about 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender. Computerized posturography was also conducted on these same subjects before and after bed rest as part of the standard measures. Peak-to-peak sway was measured during Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) to evaluate changes in the ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Although no gender differences were found, a significant increase in reflex latency and a significant decrease in CV were observed during the bed

  10. Impaired Sacculocollic Reflex in Lateral Medullary Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonhye; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine saccular dysfunction by measuring cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP) and to correlate abnormality of cVEMP with results of other vestibular function tests in lateral medullary infarction (LMI). Methods: We recorded cVEMP in 21 patients with LMI documented on MRI. cVEMP was induced by a short tone burst and was recorded in contracting sternocleidomastoid muscle while patients turned their heads forcefully to the contralateral side against resistance. Patients also underwent video-oculographic recording of spontaneous, gaze-evoked and head shaking nystagmus (HSN), evaluation of ocular tilt reaction (OTR), measurement of the subjective visual vertical (SVV) tilt, bithermal caloric tests, and audiometry. Results: Nine patients (43%) showed abnormal cVEMP, unilateral in seven and bilateral in two. The cVEMP abnormalities included decreased p13–n23 amplitude in four, delayed p13/n23 responses in five, and both decreased and delayed responses in two. The abnormal cVEMP was ipsilesional in five, contralesional in two, and bilateral in two. The prevalence of OTR/SVV tilt, spontaneous nystagmus, and HSN did not differ between the patients with normal and abnormal cVEMP. Conclusion: cVEMP was abnormal in approximately half of the patients with LMI. The abnormal cVEMP indicates damage to the descending sacculocollic reflex pathway or disruption of commissural modulation between the vestibular nuclei. PMID:21415908

  11. Artificial balancer - supporting device for postural reflex.

    PubMed

    Wojtara, Tytus; Sasaki, Makoto; Konosu, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Masashi; Shimoda, Shingo; Alnajjar, Fady; Kimura, Hidenori

    2012-02-01

    The evolutionarily novel ability to keep ones body upright while standing or walking, the human balance, deteriorates in old age or can be compromised after accidents or brain surgeries. With the aged society, age related balance problems are on the rise. Persons with balance problems are more likely to fall during their everyday life routines. Especially in elderly, falls can lead to bone fractures making the patient bedridden, weakening the body and making it more prone to other diseases. Health care expenses for a fall patient are often very high. There is a great deal of research being done on exoskeletons and power assists. However, these technologies concentrate mainly on the amplifications of human muscle power while balance has to be provided by the human themself. Our research has been focused on supporting human balance in harmony with the human's own posture control mechanisms such as postural reflexes. This paper proposes an artificial balancer that supports human balance through acceleration of a flywheel attached to the body. Appropriate correcting torques are generated through our device based on the measurements of body deflections. We have carried out experiments with test persons standing on a platform subject to lateral perturbations and ambulatory experiments while walking on a balance beam. These experiments have demonstrated the effectiveness of our device in supporting balance and the possibility of enhancing balance-keeping capability in human beings through the application of external torque. PMID:22169384

  12. Role of the flocculus of the cerebellum in motor learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Highstein, S M

    1998-09-01

    Structure-function studies at the systems level are an effective method for understanding the relationship of the central nervous system to behavior. Motor learning or adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex is a clear example wherein this approach has been productive. During a vestibulo-ocular reflex the brain converts a head velocity signal, transduced through the vestibular semicircular canals, into an eye movement command delivered to the extraocular muscles. If the viewed target remains on the fovea of the retina, the reflex is compensatory, and its gain, eye velocity/head velocity, is one. When the image of the viewed object slips across the retina, visual acuity decreases, and the gain of the reflex, which is no longer one, is plastically adapted or adjusted until retinal stability is restored. The anatomic substrate for this plasticity thus involves brain structures in which visual-vestibular interaction can potentially occur, as well as vestibular and visual sensory and oculomotor motor structures. Further, it has been known for many years that removal of the flocculus of the cerebellum permanently precludes further vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation, demonstrating the involvement of the cerebellum in this behavior. Maekawa and Simpson (J Neurophysiol 1973;36: 649-66) discovered that one visual input to the flocculus involved the accessory optic system and the inferior olive. Ensuing work has demonstrated that the visual signals used to adapt the vestibulo-ocular reflex are transmitted by this accessory optic system to the flocculus and subsequently to brain stem structures involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex plasticity. Presently the inclusive list of anatomic sites involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex circuitry and its adaptive plasticity is small. Our laboratory continues to believe that this behavior should be caused by interactions within this small class of neurons. By studying each class of identified neuron and its interactions with others within

  13. Transcutaneous spinal cord direct current stimulation inhibits the lower limb nociceptive flexion reflex in human beings.

    PubMed

    Cogiamanian, Filippo; Vergari, Maurizio; Schiaffi, Elena; Marceglia, Sara; Ardolino, Gianluca; Barbieri, Sergio; Priori, Alberto

    2011-02-01

    Aiming at developing a new, noninvasive approach to spinal cord neuromodulation, we evaluated whether transcutaneous direct current (DC) stimulation induces long-lasting changes in the central pain pathways in human beings. A double-blind crossover design was used to investigate the effects of anodal direct current (2mA, 15min) applied on the skin overlying the thoracic spinal cord on the lower-limb flexion reflex in a group of 11 healthy volunteers. To investigate whether transcutaneous spinal cord DC stimulation (tsDCS) acts indirectly on the nociceptive reflex by modulating excitability in mono-oligosynaptic segmental reflex pathways, we also evaluated the H-reflex size from soleus muscle after tibial nerve stimulation. In our healthy subjects, anodal thoracic tsDCS reduced the total lower-limb flexion reflex area by 40.25% immediately after stimulation (T0) and by 46.9% 30min after stimulation offset (T30). When we analyzed the 2 lower-limb flexion reflex components (RII tactile and RIII nociceptive) separately, we found that anodal tsDCS induced a significant reduction in RIII area with a slight but not significant effect on RII area. After anodal tsDCS, the RIII area decreased by 27% at T0 and by 28% at T30. Both sham and active tsDCS left all the tested H-reflex variables unchanged. None of our subjects reported adverse effects after active stimulation. These results suggest that tsDCS holds promise as a tool that is complementary or alternative to drugs and invasive spinal cord electrical stimulation for managing pain. Thoracic transcutaneous direct current stimulation induces depression of nociceptive lower limb flexion reflex in human beings that persists after stimulation offset; this form of stimulation holds promise as a tool that is complementary or alternative to drugs and invasive spinal cord electrical stimulation for managing pain.

  14. Role of the flocculus of the cerebellum in motor learning of the vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highstein, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Structure-function studies at the systems level are an effective method for understanding the relationship of the central nervous system to behavior. Motor learning or adaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex is a clear example wherein this approach has been productive. During a vestibulo-ocular reflex the brain converts a head velocity signal, transduced through the vestibular semicircular canals, into an eye movement command delivered to the extraocular muscles. If the viewed target remains on the fovea of the retina, the reflex is compensatory, and its gain, eye velocity/head velocity, is one. When the image of the viewed object slips across the retina, visual acuity decreases, and the gain of the reflex, which is no longer one, is plastically adapted or adjusted until retinal stability is restored. The anatomic substrate for this plasticity thus involves brain structures in which visual-vestibular interaction can potentially occur, as well as vestibular and visual sensory and oculomotor motor structures. Further, it has been known for many years that removal of the flocculus of the cerebellum permanently precludes further vestibulo-ocular reflex adaptation, demonstrating the involvement of the cerebellum in this behavior. Maekawa and Simpson (J Neurophysiol 1973;36: 649-66) discovered that one visual input to the flocculus involved the accessory optic system and the inferior olive. Ensuing work has demonstrated that the visual signals used to adapt the vestibulo-ocular reflex are transmitted by this accessory optic system to the flocculus and subsequently to brain stem structures involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex plasticity. Presently the inclusive list of anatomic sites involved in vestibulo-ocular reflex circuitry and its adaptive plasticity is small. Our laboratory continues to believe that this behavior should be caused by interactions within this small class of neurons. By studying each class of identified neuron and its interactions with others within

  15. The "temporalis-inhibitory reflex" in post-lumbar puncture headache.

    PubMed

    Wallasch, T M; Niemann, U; Strenge, H

    1992-01-01

    Nausea and rigidity of the neck muscles, typical symptoms of post-lumbar puncture syndrome (PPS), may also be found in patients suffering from chronic headache of the tension-type. A decreased duration of the late suppression period of temporal muscle activity indicating a central disturbance of pericranial muscle control, can be observed in these patients. We have studied the temporalis-inhibitory reflex in 47 neurological inpatients requiring lumbar puncture. There were no significant differences of latencies or durations of temporalis silent periods between patients with and without PPS before, and 48 h following, lumbar puncture. PMID:1292957

  16. Acute Effects of Kinesio Taping on Knee Extensor Peak Torque and Stretch Reflex in Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Simon S; Yeung, Ella W

    2016-01-01

    Kinesio Tex tape (KT) is used to prevent and treat sports-related injuries and to enhance muscle performance. It has been proposed that the direction of taping may either facilitate or inhibit the muscle by having different effects on cutaneous receptors that modulate excitability of the motor neurons. This study had 2 goals. First, we wished to determine if KT application affects muscle performance and if the method of application facilitates or inhibits muscle performance. This was assessed by measuring isokinetic knee extension peak torque in the knee extensor. Second, we assessed neurological effects of taping on the excitability of the motor neurons by measuring the reflex latency and action potential by electromyography (EMG) in the patellar reflex. The study was a single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial with 28 healthy volunteers with no history of knee injuries. Participants received facilitative KT treatment, inhibitory KT treatment, or Hypafix taping of the knee extensor. There were significant differences in the peak torque between 3 treatments (F(2,54) = 4.873, P < 0.01). Post hoc analysis revealed that facilitative KT treatment resulted in higher knee extensor peak torque performance than inhibitory KT treatment (P = 0.036, effect size 0.26). There were, however, no significant differences in the reflex latency (F(2,54) = 2.84, P = 0.067) nor in the EMG values (F(2,54) = 0.18, P = 0.837) in the patellar reflex between the 3 taping applications. The findings suggest that the direction of KT application over the muscle has specific effects on muscle performance. Given the magnitude of effect is small, interpretation of clinical significance should be considered with caution. The underlying mechanism warrants further investigation.

  17. [Reflexivity: a critical issue in qualitative research].

    PubMed

    de la Cuesta-Benjumea, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Reflexivity is an English term that Spanish speaking people have to assign a technical meaning. Reflexivity expresses the conscience of researchers conscience and refers to their connection with the study's situation. It is a process by which researchers step back to critically exam the effect they have on the study and the impact of their interactions with participants. The reflexive process is embedded in all research levels and is present in all the research phases, from the research question to fieldwork, from data analysis to writing the final report. Nevertheless, the question is not so much to engage in reflective activities but to be a reflexive researcher. Reflexivity is a human ability that is present during social interactions. For this reason it is present in qualitative research. A self inquirer can be addressed as it is constructed by the relationships and interactions that are established with study participants. Reflexivity has an educational character that continues after the study is completed. PMID:21531602

  18. Task-dependent changes in the responses to low-threshold cutaneous afferent volleys in the human lower limb.

    PubMed

    Burke, D; Dickson, H G; Skuse, N F

    1991-01-01

    1. In seven human subjects who were standing without support the sural nerves were stimulated electrically using trains of non-painful stimuli (five pulses at 300 Hz), designed to activate afferents from cutaneous mechanoreceptors. The reflex effects of the stimulus train on different muscles of the ipsilateral and contralateral legs were sought in post-stimulus averages of rectified EMG. Changes in the pattern of reflex influence were investigated when the subjects maintained different postures. 2. Clear reflex responses were seen in ipsilateral tibialis anterior, soleus, biceps femoris and vastus lateralis, but only when the muscles were actively contracting. In each muscle, inhibition was the dominant reflex response within the first 100 ms. In four of the seven subjects, reflex changes were detectable in the contralateral tibialis anterior and soleus, the peak-to-peak modulation within the first 200 ms being 25-50% of that for the homologous ipsilateral muscle. 3. When subjects attempted to stand on a tilted platform, an unstable platform or on one leg with the other flexed, different combinations of muscles were active, involving both flexors and extensors or predominantly flexors or predominantly extensors. In each posture the reflex effects were demonstrable only in the active muscles. 4. With ipsilateral tibialis anterior, there were task-dependent changes in the short-latency components of the EMG response, approximately 60 ms and 80 ms after the stimulus. When seated performing voluntary contractions these components were difficult to define, and when standing on a platform tilted toe-up they were small. When the ipsilateral leg was flexed or when standing on an unstable base, these early components were more prominent in each subject. With contralateral tibialis anterior, the dominant reflex pattern was inhibition when seated and contracting voluntarily, and facilitation during bipedal stance tilted toe-up. These changes in reflex pattern could not be

  19. CARA Risk Assessment Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Warning remediation threshold (Red threshold): Pc level at which warnings are issued, and active remediation considered and usually executed. Analysis threshold (Green to Yellow threshold): Pc level at which analysis of event is indicated, including seeking additional information if warranted. Post-remediation threshold: Pc level to which remediation maneuvers are sized in order to achieve event remediation and obviate any need for immediate follow-up maneuvers. Maneuver screening threshold: Pc compliance level for routine maneuver screenings (more demanding than regular Red threshold due to additional maneuver uncertainty).

  20. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    PubMed

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project.

  1. Generalized versus partial reflex seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Spina, Edoardo; Mondello, Stefania; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2014-08-01

    In this review we assess our currently available knowledge about reflex seizures with special emphasis on the difference between "generalized" reflex seizures induced by visual stimuli, thinking, praxis and language tasks, and "focal" seizures induced by startle, eating, music, hot water, somatosensory stimuli and orgasm. We discuss in particular evidence from animal, clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies supporting the concept that "generalized" reflex seizures, usually occurring in the setting of IGE, should be considered as focal seizures with quick secondary generalization. We also review recent advances in genetic and therapeutic approach of reflex seizures.

  2. Portraying Reflexivity in Health Services Research.

    PubMed

    Rae, John; Green, Bill

    2016-09-01

    A model is proposed for supporting reflexivity in qualitative health research, informed by arguments from Bourdieu and Finlay. Bourdieu refers to mastering the subjective relation to the object at three levels-the overall social space, the field of specialists, and the scholastic universe. The model overlays Bourdieu's levels of objectivation with Finlay's three stages of research (pre-research, data collection, and data analysis). The intersections of these two ways of considering reflexivity, displayed as cells of a matrix, pose questions and offer prompts to productively challenge health researchers' reflexivity. Portraiture is used to show how these challenges and prompts can facilitate such reflexivity, as illustrated in a research project. PMID:26935721

  3. Reflex receptive fields are enlarged in patients with musculoskeletal low back and neck pain.

    PubMed

    Biurrun Manresa, José A; Neziri, Alban Y; Curatolo, Michele; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Andersen, Ole K

    2013-08-01

    Pain hypersensitivity has been consistently detected in chronic pain conditions, but the underlying mechanisms are difficult to investigate in humans and thus poorly understood. Patients with endometriosis pain display enlarged reflex receptive fields (RRF), providing a new perspective in the identification of possible mechanisms behind hypersensitivity states in humans. The primary hypothesis of this study was that RRF are enlarged in patients with musculoskeletal pain. Secondary study end points were subjective pain thresholds and nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) thresholds after single and repeated (temporal summation) electrical stimulation. Forty chronic neck pain patients, 40 chronic low back pain patients, and 24 acute low back pain patients were tested. Electrical stimuli were applied to 10 sites on the sole of the foot to quantify the RRF, defined as the area of the foot from where a reflex was evoked. For the secondary end points, electrical stimuli were applied to the cutaneous innervation area of the sural nerve. All patient groups presented enlarged RRF areas compared to pain-free volunteers (P<.001). Moreover, they also displayed lower NWR and pain thresholds to single and repeated electrical stimulation (P<.001). These results demonstrate that musculoskeletal pain conditions are characterized by enlarged RRF, lowered NWR and pain thresholds, and facilitated temporal summation, most likely caused by widespread spinal hyperexcitability. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying these pain conditions, and it supports the use of the RRF and NWR as objective biomarkers for pain hypersensitivity in clinical and experimental pain research. PMID:23707309

  4. Device for rapid quantification of human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses.

    PubMed

    Sprenkle, J M; Eckberg, D L; Goble, R L; Schelhorn, J J; Halliday, H C

    1986-02-01

    We designed, constructed, and evaluated a new device to characterize the human carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex response relation rapidly. We designed this system for study of reflex responses of astronauts before, during, and after space travel. The system comprises a new tightly sealing silicone rubber neck chamber, a stepping motor-driven electro-deposited nickel bellows pressure system, capable of delivering sequential R-wave-triggered neck chamber pressure changes between +40 and -65 mmHg, and a microprocessor-based electronics system for control of pressure steps and analysis and display of responses. This new system provokes classic sigmoid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses with threshold, linear, and saturation ranges in most human volunteers during one held expiration.

  5. Facilitation from hand muscles innervated by the ulnar nerve to the extensor carpi radialis motoneurone pool in humans: a study with an electromyogram-averaging technique.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Ogawa, Keiichi; Sato, Toshiaki; Nakano, Haruki; Fujii, Hiromi; Shindo, Masaomi; Naito, Akira

    2012-10-01

    Effects of low-threshold afferents of hand muscles innervated by the ulnar nerve on an excitability of the extensor carpi radialis (ECR) motoneurone pool in humans were examined using an electromyogram-averaging (EMG-A) technique. Changes of EMG-A of ECR exhibiting 10% of the maximum contraction by electrical stimulation to the ulnar nerve at the wrist (ES-UN) and mechanical stimulation to the hypothenar muscles (MS-HTM) and first dorsal interosseus (MS-FDI) were evaluated in eight normal human subjects. The ES-UN with the intensity immediately below the motor threshold and MS-HTM and -FDI with the intensity below the threshold of the tendon(T)-reflex were delivered. Early and significant peaks in EMG-A were produced by ES-UN, MS-HTM, and MS-FDI in eight of eight subjects. The mean amplitudes of the peaks by ES-UN, MS-HTM, and MS-FDI were, respectively, 121.9%, 139.3%, and 149.9% of the control EMG (100%). The difference between latencies of the peaks by ES-UN and MS-HTM, and ES-UN and MS-FDI was almost equivalent to that of the Hoffmann(H)- and T-reflexes of HTM and FDI, respectively. The peaks by ES-UN, MS-HTM, and MS-FDI diminished with tonic vibration stimulation (TVS) to HTM and FDI, respectively. These findings suggest that group Ia afferents of the hand muscles facilitate the ECR motoneurone pool.

  6. Increased H-reflex excitability is not accompanied by changes in neural drive following 24 days of unilateral lower limb suspension.

    PubMed

    Seynnes, Olivier R; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Horstman, Astrid M; Narici, Marco V

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the gain in soleus H-reflex excitability induced by unilateral lower limb suspension (ULLS) is associated with changes in neural drive to the plantar flexor muscles. Six male subjects (23 ± 2 years, 187 ± 7 cm, 79 ± 9 kg) underwent 24 days of ULLS of the dominant limb. Plantar flexor maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque, activation capacity (twitch interpolation), soleus maximal electromyographic (EMG) activity, Hoffman (H)-reflex, and the first volitional (V) wave normalized to the compound muscle action potential (M-wave) were quantified before and after ULLS. Following ULLS, MVC torque decreased by 15% (P < 0.05). However, neither activation capacity nor EMG activity was significantly altered after the suspension. The V-wave remained unchanged consistently after ULLS, whereas the H-reflex increased significantly (+20%). Furthermore, there was no significant relationship between changes in H-reflex and V-wave over the ULLS period. These findings indicate that 24 days of ULLS can result in a substantial reduction of muscle strength without any apparent change in voluntary activation capacity. H-reflex and V-wave findings suggest that the spinal adaptations that underlie the unloading-induced increase in resting soleus H-reflex excitability did not significantly affect the efferent motor output to the plantar flexor muscles. PMID:19229968

  7. Interaction of a combination of morphine and ketamine on the nociceptive flexion reflex in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Bossard, Anne-Elisabeth; Guirimand, Frédéric; Fletcher, Dominique; Gaude-Joindreau, Valérie; Chauvin, Marcel; Bouhassira, Didier

    2002-07-01

    Experimental studies in animals have suggested that a combination of morphine and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists may have additive or synergistic analgesic effects. To further study the nature of the interaction between these two classes of analgesic agents, we analyzed the effects of morphine, ketamine and their combination on electrophysiological recordings of the nociceptive flexion RIII reflex in 12 healthy volunteers. Morphine (0.1 mg/kg), ketamine (0.1 mg/kg followed by 4 microg/kg/min) or their combination were administered intravenously according to a double-blind, placebo controlled and cross-over design. The RIII reflex was recorded from the biceps femoris and elicited by electrical stimulation of the sural nerve. The effects of the drugs were tested on: (1) the stimulus-response curves of the reflex up to the tolerance threshold (frequency of stimulation: 0.1Hz); (2) the progressive increase of the reflex and painful sensations (i.e. wind-up phenomenon) induced by a series of 15 electrical stimuli at a frequency of 1Hz (intensity: 20% above threshold). The stimulus-response curve of the nociceptive RIII reflex was significantly reduced after injection of a combination of ketamine and morphine, but was not modified when placebo or each of the active drugs was administered alone. The wind-up of the RIII reflex and painful sensation was not significantly altered after the injection of placebo, ketamine, morphine or their combination. In conclusion, the present electrophysiological results in humans demonstrate a synergistic interaction between morphine and ketamine, which tends to confirm the interest of using this type of combination in the clinical context. The differential effects observed on the recruitment curve and wind-up indicate, however, that the mechanisms of the interaction between opiates and NMDA receptor antagonists are not univocal but depend on the modality of activation of the nociceptive afferents. PMID:12098616

  8. A new objective method for acquisition and quantification of reflex receptive fields.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Michael Brun; Manresa, José Biurrun; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2015-03-01

    The nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR) is a polysynaptic spinal reflex correlated with pain perception. Assessment of this objective physiological measure constitutes the core of existing methods for quantification of reflex receptive fields (RRFs), which however still suffer from a certain degree of subjective involvement. This article proposes a strictly objective methodology for RRF quantification based on automated identification of NWR thresholds (NWR-Ts). Nociceptive withdrawal reflex thresholds were determined for 10 individual stimulation sites using an interleaved up-down staircase method. Reflexes were detected from electromyography by evaluation of interval peak z scores and application of conduction velocity analysis. Reflex receptive field areas were quantified from interpolated mappings of NWR-Ts and compared with existing RRF quantifications. A total of 3 repeated measures were performed in 2 different sessions to evaluate the test-retest reliability of the various quantifications, using coefficients of repeatability (CRs) and hypothetical sample sizes. The novel quantifications based on identification of NWR-Ts showed a similar level of reliability within and between sessions, whereas existing quantifications all demonstrated worse between-session than within-session reliability. The NWR-T-based quantifications required a smaller sample size than any of the existing RRF measures to detect a clinically relevant effect in a crossover study design involving more than 1 session. Of all measures, quantification from mapping of inversed NWR-Ts demonstrated superior reliability both within (CR, 0.25) and between sessions (CR, 0.28). The study presents a more reliable and robust quantification of the RRF to be used as biomarker of pain hypersensitivity in clinical and experimental research.

  9. Repetitive jumping and sprinting until exhaustion alters hamstring reflex responses and tibial translation in males and females.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Martin; Mau-Moeller, Anett; Wassermann, Franziska; Plewka, Antje; Bader, Rainer; Bruhn, Sven

    2015-11-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries is considerably higher in females than in males and the underlying mechanisms are still under debate. Research indicates that the neuromuscular system of females and males might respond differently to the same fatigue protocol due to differences in muscle activation during movement tasks. This study analyzed sex differences in hamstring reflex responses and posterior-anterior tibial translation (TT) before and after fatiguing exercise. We measured the isolated movement of the tibia relative to the femur as a consequence of mechanically induced TT in standing subjects as well as muscle activity of the hamstrings before and after repetitive jumping and sprinting until exhaustion. Muscle fatigue delayed reflex onset latencies in females and males. A reduction in reflex responses associated with an increased TT was observed after fatiguing exercise for both sexes. Data indicate that the used fatigue protocol altered the latency and magnitude of reflex responses as well as TT in females and males. Based on the results of previous research and the outcome of this study, it might be that sex-specific effects of fatigue on reflex activity and mechanical stability of the knee depend on the kind of fatiguing exercise.

  10. Threshold quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding.

  11. Reflexive Practice: To Enhance Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebuck, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of reflexive practice activities designed to enhance learning for first year law students at James Cook University, Australia. The paper considers various aspects of student learning and explores connections between reflexive practice and concepts such as deep learning, understanding, motivation and engagement, and…

  12. [Non-reflex activity of the CNS].

    PubMed

    Brozek, G

    1995-06-01

    Recent studies of biological rhythms have modified Sherrington's concept of nervous system as exclusively reflexive to include the fact that some neural activity is also endogenously rhythmic. Reflexes are undoubtedly the most important components of animal's and human behavior. But are reflexes the basic units of all complex movements and acts? Rhythmical movements such as respiration, walking and running and other forms of locomotion, as well as rhythmical alimentary processes such as respiration, walking and running and other forms of locomotion, as well as rhythmical alimentary processes such as licking, mastication, and the peristaltic propulsion of nutrients and waste are examples of acts controlled by intrinsic oscillators, so called central pattern generators. Information from the periphery is, however, essential for controlling the extent and rate of movements. Between reflex and non-reflex activity it is possible to place complex species-specific responses called by ethologists fixed-action patterns. Recent investigators have shown that many complex sequences of behavior like speech or piano playing are determined by an internal plan, rather than being generated by a "chain" of reflexes. Non-reflexive activity appears earlier in ontogeny, and is probably phylogenetically older than reflexes.

  13. The Effect of Mechanical Vibration Stimulation of Perception Subthreshold on the Muscle Force and Muscle Reaction Time of Lower Leg.

    PubMed

    Kim, Huigyun; Kwak, Kiyoung; Kim, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of mechanical vibration stimulation on the muscle force and muscle reaction time of lower leg according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A vibration stimulation with perception threshold intensity was applied on the Achilles tendon and tibialis anterior tendon. EMG measurement and analysis system were used to analyze the change of muscle force and muscle reaction time according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A root-mean-square (RMS) value was extracted using analysis software and Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) and Premotor Time (PMT) were analyzed. The measurement results showed that perception threshold was different from application sites of vibration frequency. Also, the muscle force and muscle reaction time showed difference according to the presence of vibration, frequency, and intensity. This result means that the vibration stimulation causes the change on the muscle force and muscle reaction time and affects the muscles of lower leg by the characteristics of vibration stimulation.

  14. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  15. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  16. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  17. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... the removal of a small piece of muscle tissue for examination. ... dystrophy Myopathic changes (destruction of the muscle) Necrosis (tissue death) of muscle Necrotizing vasculitis Traumatic muscle damage Polymyositis Additional conditions ...

  18. Propranolol, but not naloxone, enhances spinal reflex bladder activity and reduces pudendal inhibition in cats.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Marc J; Xiao, Zhiying; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of β-adrenergic and opioid receptors in spinal reflex bladder activity and in the inhibition induced by pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) or tibial nerve stimulation (TNS). Spinal reflex bladder contractions were induced by intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid in α-chloralose-anesthetized cats after an acute spinal cord transection (SCT) at the thoracic T9/T10 level. PNS or TNS at 5 Hz was applied to inhibit these spinal reflex contractions at 2 and 4 times the threshold intensity (T) for inducing anal or toe twitch, respectively. During a cystrometrogram (CMG), PNS at 2T and 4T significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity from 58.0 ± 4.7% to 85.8 ± 10.3% and 96.5 ± 10.7%, respectively, of saline control capacity, while TNS failed to inhibit spinal reflex bladder contractions. After administering propranolol (3 mg/kg iv, a β₁/β₂-adrenergic receptor antagonist), the effects of 2T and 4T PNS on bladder capacity were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced to 64.5 ± 9.5% and 64.7 ± 7.3%, respectively, of the saline control capacity. However, the residual PNS inhibition (about 10% increase in capacity) was still statistically significant (P < 0.05). Propranolol treatment also significantly (P = 0.0019) increased the amplitude of bladder contractions but did not change the control bladder capacity. Naloxone (1 mg/kg iv, an opioid receptor antagonist) had no effect on either spinal reflex bladder contractions or PNS inhibition. At the end of experiments, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg iv, a ganglionic blocker) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions. This study indicates an important role of β₁/β₂-adrenergic receptors in pudendal inhibition and spinal reflex bladder activity.

  19. Propranolol, but not naloxone, enhances spinal reflex bladder activity and reduces pudendal inhibition in cats.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Marc J; Xiao, Zhiying; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Schwen, Zeyad; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of β-adrenergic and opioid receptors in spinal reflex bladder activity and in the inhibition induced by pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) or tibial nerve stimulation (TNS). Spinal reflex bladder contractions were induced by intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid in α-chloralose-anesthetized cats after an acute spinal cord transection (SCT) at the thoracic T9/T10 level. PNS or TNS at 5 Hz was applied to inhibit these spinal reflex contractions at 2 and 4 times the threshold intensity (T) for inducing anal or toe twitch, respectively. During a cystrometrogram (CMG), PNS at 2T and 4T significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity from 58.0 ± 4.7% to 85.8 ± 10.3% and 96.5 ± 10.7%, respectively, of saline control capacity, while TNS failed to inhibit spinal reflex bladder contractions. After administering propranolol (3 mg/kg iv, a β₁/β₂-adrenergic receptor antagonist), the effects of 2T and 4T PNS on bladder capacity were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced to 64.5 ± 9.5% and 64.7 ± 7.3%, respectively, of the saline control capacity. However, the residual PNS inhibition (about 10% increase in capacity) was still statistically significant (P < 0.05). Propranolol treatment also significantly (P = 0.0019) increased the amplitude of bladder contractions but did not change the control bladder capacity. Naloxone (1 mg/kg iv, an opioid receptor antagonist) had no effect on either spinal reflex bladder contractions or PNS inhibition. At the end of experiments, hexamethonium (10 mg/kg iv, a ganglionic blocker) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the amplitude of the reflex bladder contractions. This study indicates an important role of β₁/β₂-adrenergic receptors in pudendal inhibition and spinal reflex bladder activity. PMID:25394827

  20. A Comparison of Total and Intrinsic Muscle Stiffness Among Flexors and Extensors of the Ankle, Knee and Elbow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Sandra M.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined 3 methods that assessed muscle stiffness. Muscle stiffness has been quantified by tissue reactive force (transverse stiffness), vibration, and force (or torque) over displacement. Muscle stiffness also has two components: reflex (due to muscle sensor activity) and intrinsic (tonic firing of motor units, elastic nature of actin and myosin cross bridges, and connective tissue). This study compared three methods of measuring muscle stiffness of agonist-antagonist muscle pairs of the ankle, knee and elbow.

  1. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Danner, Simon M.; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22–60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5–26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits. PMID:25904708

  2. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Danner, Simon M; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-07-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22-60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5-26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits. PMID:25904708

  3. Dynamic iso-resistive trunk extension simulation: contributions of the intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms to spinal stability.

    PubMed

    Davarani, S Zeinali; Shirazi-Adl, A; Hemami, H; Mousavi, S J; Parnianpour, M

    2007-01-01

    The effects of external resistance on the recruitment of trunk muscles and the role of intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms to ensure the spinal stability are significant issues in spinal biomechanics. A computational model of spine under the control of 48 anatomically oriented muscle actions was used to simulate iso-resistive trunk movements. Neural excitation of muscles was attained based on inverse dynamics approach along with the stability-based optimization. The effect of muscle spindle reflex response on the trunk movement stability was evaluated upon the application of a perturbation moment. In this study, the trunk extension movement at various resistance levels while extending from 60 degrees flexion to the upright posture was investigated. Incorporation of the stability condition as an additional constraint in the optimization algorithm increased antagonistic activities for all resistance levels demonstrating that the co-activation caused an increase in the intrinsic stiffness of the spine and its stability in a feed-forward manner. During the acceleration phase of the movement, extensors activity increased while flexors activity decreased in response to the higher resistance. The co-activation ratio noticed in the braking phase of the movement increased with higher resistance. In presence of a 30 Nm flexion perturbation moment, reflexive feed-back noticeably decreased the induced deviation of the velocity and position profiles from the desired ones at all resistance levels. The stability-generated co-activation decreased the reflexive response of muscle spindles to the perturbation demonstrating that both intrinsic and reflexive mechanisms contribute to the trunk stability. The rise in muscle co-activation can ameliorate the corruption of afferent neural sensory system at the expense of higher loading of the spine.

  4. Acute Whole-Body Vibration does not Facilitate Peak Torque and Stretch Reflex in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Ella W.; Lau, Cheuk C.; Kwong, Ada P.K.; Sze, Yan M.; Zhang, Wei Y.; Yeung, Simon S.

    2014-01-01

    The acute effect of whole-body vibration (WBV) training may enhance muscular performance via neural potentiation of the stretch reflex. The purpose of this study was to investigate if acute WBV exposure affects the stretch induced knee jerk reflex [onset latency and electromechanical delay (EMD)] and the isokinetic knee extensor peak torque performance. Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention group received WBV in a semi-squat position at 30° knee flexion with an amplitude of 0.69 mm, frequency of 45 Hz, and peak acceleration of 27.6 m/s2 for 3 minutes. The control group underwent the same semii-squatting position statically without exposure of WBV. Two-way mixed repeated measures analysis of variance revealed no significant group effects differences on reflex latency of rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL; p = 0.934 and 0.935, respectively) EMD of RF and VL (p = 0.474 and 0.551, respectively) and peak torque production (p = 0.483) measured before and after the WBV. The results of this study indicate that a single session of WBV exposure has no potentiation effect on the stretch induced reflex and peak torque performance in healthy young adults. Key Points There is no acute potentiation of stretch reflex right after whole body vibration. Acute whole body vibration does not improve mus-cle peak torque performance in healthy young adults. PMID:24570602

  5. Training-Specific Neural Plasticity in Spinal Reflexes after Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Susan K.; Roy, Francois D.; Gorassini, Monica A.

    2016-01-01

    The neural plasticity of spinal reflexes after two contrasting forms of walking training was determined in individuals with chronic, motor-incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Endurance Training involved treadmill walking for as long as possible, and Precision Training involved walking precisely over obstacles and onto targets overground. Twenty participants started either Endurance or Precision Training for 2 months and then crossed over after a 2-month rest period to the other form of training for 2 months. Measures were taken before and after each phase of training and rest. The cutaneomuscular reflex (CMR) during walking was evoked in the soleus (SOL) and tibialis anterior muscles by stimulating the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle. Clonus was estimated from the EMG power in the SOL during unperturbed walking. The inhibitory component of the SOL CMR was enhanced after Endurance but not Precision Training. Clonus did not change after either form of training. Participants with lower reflex excitability tended to be better walkers (i.e., faster walking speeds) prior to training, and the reduction in clonus was significantly correlated with the improvement in walking speed and distance. Thus, reflex excitability responded in a training-specific way, with the reduction in reflex excitability related to improvements in walking function. Trial registration number is NCT01765153. PMID:27725887

  6. Aging attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The vestibular system contributes to sympathetic activation by engagement of the otolith organs. However, there is a significant loss of vestibular function with aging. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to determine if young and older individuals differ in their cardiovascular and sympathetic responses to otolithic stimulation (ie, head-down rotation, HDR). We hypothesized that responses to otolithic stimulation would be attenuated in older adults because of morphological and physiological alterations that occur in the vestibular system with aging. METHODS AND RESULTS: Arterial blood pressure, heart rate, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and head rotation were measured during HDR in 11 young (26 +/- 1 years) and 11 older (64 +/- 1 years) subjects in the prone posture. Five older subjects performed head rotation (chin to chest) in the lateral decubitus position, which simulates HDR but does not alter afferent inputs from the vestibular system. MSNA responses to HDR were significantly attenuated in older as compared with young subjects (P<0.01). MSNA increased in the older subjects by only 12 +/- 5% as compared with 85 +/- 16% in the young. Furthermore, HDR elicited significant reductions in mean arterial blood pressure in older (Delta-6 +/- 1 mm Hg; P<0.01) but not young subjects (Delta1 +/- 1 mm Hg). In contrast to HDR, head rotation performed in the lateral decubitus position did not elicit hypotension. MSNA responses to baroreceptor unloading and the cold pressor test were not different between the age groups. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that aging attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex in humans and may contribute to the increased prevalence of orthostatic hypotension with age.

  7. Threshold Concepts in Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loertscher, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Threshold concepts can be identified for any discipline and provide a framework for linking student learning to curricular design. Threshold concepts represent a transformed understanding of a discipline, without which the learner cannot progress and are therefore pivotal in learning in a discipline. Although threshold concepts have been…

  8. Excitability changes in human forearm corticospinal projections and spinal reflex pathways during rhythmic voluntary movement of the opposite limb

    PubMed Central

    Carson, R G; Riek, S; Mackey, D C; Meichenbaum, D P; Willms, K; Forner, M; Byblow, W D

    2004-01-01

    Rhythmic movements brought about by the contraction of muscles on one side of the body give rise to phase-locked changes in the excitability of the homologous motor pathways of the opposite limb. Such crossed facilitation should favour patterns of bimanual coordination in which homologous muscles are engaged simultaneously, and disrupt those in which the muscles are activated in an alternating fashion. In order to examine these issues, we obtained responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), to stimulation of the cervicomedullary junction (cervicomedullary-evoked potentials, CMEPs), to peripheral nerve stimulation (H-reflexes and f-waves), and elicited stretch reflexes in the relaxed right flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle during rhythmic (2 Hz) flexion and extension movements of the opposite (left) wrist. The potentials evoked by TMS in right FCR were potentiated during the phases of movement in which the left FCR was most strongly engaged. In contrast, CMEPs were unaffected by the movements of the opposite limb. These results suggest that there was systematic variation of the excitability of the motor cortex ipsilateral to the moving limb. H-reflexes and stretch reflexes recorded in right FCR were modulated in phase with the activation of left FCR. As the f-waves did not vary in corresponding fashion, it appears that the phasic modulation of the H-reflex was mediated by presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferents. The observation that both H-reflexes and f-waves were depressed markedly during movements of the opposite indicates that there may also have been postsynaptic inhibition or disfacilitation of the largest motor units. Our findings indicate that the patterned modulation of excitability in motor pathways that occurs during rhythmic movements of the opposite limb is mediated primarily by interhemispheric interactions between cortical motor areas. PMID:15331684

  9. Soleus and vastus medialis H-reflexes: similarities and differences while standing or lying during varied knee flexion angles.

    PubMed

    Alrowayeh, Hesham N; Sabbahi, Mohamed A; Etnyre, Bruce

    2005-06-15

    The H-reflex may be a useful measure to examine the lower extremity muscles activation and inhibition following an injury. Recording the vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes in healthy subjects while standing or lying during varied knee flexion angles may establish a reference for comparison for patients with ACL injury. Vastus medialis and soleus H-reflexes were recorded from 14 healthy subjects while lying and standing during 0, 30, 45, and 60 degrees knee flexion. EMG unit was used to electrically stimulate the tibial and femoral nerves (using 0.5 ms pulses at 0.2 pps of H-maximum amplitude) and to record four traces of the soleus and vastus medialis H-wave and one trace of the M-wave peak-to-peak amplitudes. Repeated measures three-way ANOVAs were calculated with the global alpha=0.05. Results showed that (1) the average soleus H-reflex amplitude was significantly less during standing than lying across all knee flexion conditions, (2) the average vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes showed no measurable significant differences between neutral standing compared with lying, (3) the average vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes were significantly greater during standing knee flexion conditions (30, 45, and 60 degrees ) than lying or neutral standing, and (4) there were no differences between soleus and vastus medialis H-reflex amplitudes during lying across all knee flexion conditions. Data from H/M ratio follow the same pattern of H-amplitude. Recording the vastus medialis H-reflex amplitude during standing and knee flexion may be a reflective of the knee function. It is more specific than the soleus H-reflex because it reflects the changes in the excitability of the quadriceps motoneurons acting directly around the knee joint.

  10. Mechanical effect of muscle spindles in the canine external intercostal muscles.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Dimitri; De Troyer, André

    2003-04-01

    High-frequency mechanical vibration of the ribcage increases afferent activity from external intercostal muscle spindles, but the effect of this procedure on the mechanical behaviour of the respiratory system is unknown. In the present study, we have measured the changes in external intercostal muscle length and the craniocaudal displacement of the ribs during ribcage vibration (40 Hz) in anaesthetized dogs. With vibration, external intercostal inspiratory activity increased by approximately 50 %, but the respiratory changes in muscle length and rib displacement were unaltered. A similar response was obtained after the muscles in the caudal segments of the ribcage were sectioned and the caudally oriented force exerted by these muscles on the rib was removed, thus suggesting that activation of external intercostal muscle spindles by vibration generates little tension. Prompted by this observation, we also examined the role played by the external intercostal muscle spindles in determining the respiratory displacement of the ribs during breathing against high inspiratory airflow resistances. Although resistances consistently elicited prominent reflex increases in external intercostal inspiratory activity, the normal inspiratory cranial displacement of the ribs was reversed into an inspiratory caudal displacement. Also, this caudal rib displacement was essentially unchanged after section of the external intercostal muscles, whereas it was clearly enhanced after denervation of the parasternal intercostals. These findings indicate that stretch reflexes in external intercostal muscles confer insufficient tension on the muscles to significantly modify the mechanical behaviour of the respiratory system. PMID:12626677

  11. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  12. [Urinary urgency and reflex incontinence].

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, H

    1991-07-01

    Urge and reflex incontinence are caused by detrusor dysfunction:urgency may be due to hyperactivity or hypersensitivity of the bladder. Neurogenic hyperactivity of the detrusor is called detrusor hyperreflexia: the neurogenic uninhibited bladder is caused by incomplete, and the so-called reflex bladder by complete, suprasacral lesions. The pathophysiology of symptomatic and idiopathic detrusor hyperactivity and the therapeutic armentarium are described. Bladder drill together with biofeedback and pharmacotherapy with spasmolytic drugs - several potent spasmolytic drugs with different modes of action are available - are the basis of treatment for hyperactivity and hypersensitivity of the detrusor. An alternative is electrostimulation: stimulation of the afferents of the pudendal nerve, via the pelvic floor (anal, vaginal), percutaneously (dorsal nerve of the penis, clitoric nerve) or by the implantation of electrodes results in inhibition of the detrusor. Most (80-90%) patients can be treated successfully by conservative means. Operative measurements comprise bladder denervation and bladder augmentation. The results of bladder denervation by transtrigonal phenolization of the pelvic plexus are highly controversial. In patients with uncontrollable hyperactivity of the detrusor, augmentation of the bladder (e.g. clam ileocystoplasty) is the method of choice, while for those with uncontrollable hypersensitivity of the detrusor, cystectomy followed by bladder substitution should be performed as a last resort. Treatment for urinary incontinence due to detrusor hyperreflexia must be selected bearing in mind that bladder emptying is inadequate, in most cases because of dyssynergia between detrusor and external sphincter. Therapy is basically aimed at transforming hyperreflexia of the detrusor into hyporeflexia, primarily by potent spasmolytic drugs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Astronomical Data Reduction Workflows with Reflex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, P.; Bramich, D.; Forchi, V.; Freudling, W.; Garcia-Dabó, C. E.; klein Gebbinck, M.; Modigliani, A.; Moehler, S.; Romaniello, M.

    2014-05-01

    Reflex (http://www.eso.org/reflex) is an environment that provides an easy and flexible way to reduce VLT/VLTI science data using the ESO. Its top-level functionalities are: (1) Reflex allows to graphically specify the sequence in which the data reduction steps are executed, including conditional stops, loops and conditional branches, (2) Reflex makes it easy to inspect the intermediate and final data products and to repeat selected processing steps to optimize the data reduction, (3) the data organization necessary to reduce the data is built into the system and is fully automatic, (4) advanced users can plug-in their own Python or IDL modules and steps into the data reduction sequence, and (5) Reflex supports the development of data reduction workflows based on the ESO Common Pipeline Library. Reflex is based on the concept of a scientific workflow, whereby the data reduction cascade is rendered graphically and data seamlessly flow from one processing step to the next. It is distributed with a number of complete test datasets so that users can immediately start experimenting and familiarize themselves with the system (http://www.eso.org/pipelines). In this demo, we present the latest version of Reflex and its applications for astronomical data reduction processes.

  14. The role of preparation in tuning anticipatory and reflex responses during catching.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, F; Maioli, C

    1989-01-01

    The pattern of muscle responses associated with catching a ball in the presence of vision was investigated by independently varying the height of the drop and the mass of the ball. It was found that the anticipatory EMG responses comprised early and late components. The early components were produced at a roughly constant latency (about 130 msec) from the time of ball release. Their mean amplitude decreased with increasing height of fall. Late components represented the major build-up of muscle activity preceding the ball's impact and were accompanied by limb flexion. Their onset time was roughly constant (about 100 msec) with respect to the time of impact (except in wrist extensors). This indicates that the timing of these responses was based on an accurate estimate of the instantaneous values of the time-to-contact (time remaining before impact). The mean amplitude of the late anticipatory responses increased linearly with the expected momentum of the ball at impact. The reflex responses evoked by the ball's impact consisted in a short-latency coactivation of flexor and extensor muscles at the elbow and wrist joints. Their mean amplitude generally increased with the intensity of the perturbation both in the stretched muscles and in the shortening muscles. We argue that both the anticipatory and the reflex coactivation are centrally preset in preparation for catching and are instrumental for stabilizing limb posture after impact. A model with linear, time-varying viscoelastic coefficients was used to assess the neural and mechanical contributions to the damping of limb oscillations induced by the ball's impact. The model demonstrates that (1) anticipatory muscle stiffening and anticipatory flexion of the limb are synergistic in building up resistance of the hand to vertical displacement and (2) the reflex coactivation produces a further increment of hand stiffness and viscosity which tends to offset the decrement which would result from the limb extension produced

  15. The Reflexes of the Fundus Oculi

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, A. J.

    1940-01-01

    The fundus reflexes reveal, in a manner not yet completely understood, the texture and contour of the reflecting surfaces and the condition of the underlying tissues. In this way they may play an important part in the biomicroscopy of the eye. The physiological reflexes are seen at their best in the eyes of young subjects, in well-pigmented eyes, with undilated pupils and with emmetropic refraction. Their absence during the first two decades, or their presence after the forties, their occurrence in one eye only, their appearance, disappearance or change of character should suggest the possibility of some pathological state. The investigation and interpretation of the reflexes are notably assisted by comparing the appearances seen with long and short wave lights such as those of the sodium and mercury vapour lamps, in addition to the usual ophthalmoscopic lights. Most of the surface reflexes disappear in the light of the sodium lamp, sometimes revealing important changes in the deeper layers of the retina and choroid. The physiological reflexes, chiefly formed on the surface of the internal limiting membrane, take the forms of the familiar watered silk or patchy reflexes, the peri-macular halo, the fan reflex in the macular depression and the reflex from the foveal pit. The watered silk or patchy reflexes often show a delicate striation which follows the pattern of the nerve-fibre layer, or there may be a granular or criss-cross texture. Reflexes which entirely lack these indications of “texture” should be considered as possibly pathological. This applies to the “beaten metal” reflexes and to those formed on the so-called hyaloid membrane. The occurrence of physiological reflexes in linear form is doubtful, and the only admittedly physiological punctate reflexes are the so-called Gunn's dots. Surface reflexes which are broken up into small points or flakes are pathological, and are most frequently seen in the central area of the fundus in cases of pigmentary

  16. [Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex].

    PubMed

    Yin, Shuhui; Zhao, Ke

    2015-12-01

    The understanding of rectoanal inhibitory reflex (RAIR) is progressing for the latest 100 years. From the discovery of its important role in diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease to all aspects of its development, reflex pathways, neural regulation and physiological functions, there have been more in-depth explorations. It is now recognized that a number of other diseases also have a more specific performance of RAIR. It has become an important and indispensable part to anorectal manometry. Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex is reviewed in this article.

  17. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles.

    PubMed

    Smilde, Hiltsje A; Vincent, Jake A; Baan, Guus C; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Cope, Tim C; Maas, Huub

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles.

  18. Changes in muscle spindle firing in response to length changes of neighboring muscles.

    PubMed

    Smilde, Hiltsje A; Vincent, Jake A; Baan, Guus C; Nardelli, Paul; Lodder, Johannes C; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Cope, Tim C; Maas, Huub

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal muscle force can be transmitted to the skeleton, not only via its tendons of origin and insertion but also through connective tissues linking the muscle belly to surrounding structures. Through such epimuscular myofascial connections, length changes of a muscle may cause length changes within an adjacent muscle and hence, affect muscle spindles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epimuscular myofascial forces on feedback from muscle spindles in triceps surae muscles of the rat. We hypothesized that within an intact muscle compartment, muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but can also sense length changes that occur as a result of changing the length of synergistic muscles. Action potentials from single afferents were measured intra-axonally in response to ramp-hold release (RHR) stretches of an agonistic muscle at different lengths of its synergist, as well as in response to synergist RHRs. A decrease in force threshold was found for both soleus (SO) and lateral gastrocnemius afferents, along with an increase in length threshold for SO afferents. In addition, muscle spindle firing could be evoked by RHRs of the synergistic muscle. We conclude that muscle spindles not only signal length changes of the muscle in which they are located but also local length changes that occur as a result of changing the length and relative position of synergistic muscles. PMID:27075540

  19. [Statocyst regulation of the heart and statokinetic reflexes in the crab, Hemigrapsus sanguineus, during linear acceleration].

    PubMed

    Kuntsova, M Ia; Sveshnikov, V G; Timofeeva, E V

    1978-01-01

    In experiments on the shore crab H. sanguineus studies have been made of the effect of variable longitudinal acceleration during swinging (for 15--30 min) upon cardiac activity and gravitational reflexes. High sensitivity of gravitational receptors of the canal statocyst to the effect of acceleration was demonstrated. Removal of the statocysts increases the frequency and amplitude of cardiac contractions as revealed by ECG recording. Changes in stato-kinetic coordinations cause both the disorder of overturning reactions and the disorder of reciprocal inhibition in antagonistic muscles of the dactylopodite. Statocyst regulation of skeletal muscles and heart is presumably realised via contralateral inhibitory canal which is sensitive to linear accelerations.

  20. Vestibulosympathetic reflex during orthostatic challenge in aging humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monahan, Kevin D.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    Aging attenuates the increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and elicits hypotension during otolith organ engagement in humans. The purpose of the present study was to determine the neural and cardiovascular responses to otolithic engagement during orthostatic stress in older adults. We hypothesized that age-related impairments in the vestibulosympathetic reflex would persist during orthostatic challenge in older subjects and might compromise arterial blood pressure regulation. MSNA, arterial blood pressure, and heart rate responses to head-down rotation (HDR) performed with and without lower body negative pressure (LBNP) in prone subjects were measured. Ten young (27 +/- 1 yr) and 11 older subjects (64 +/- 1 yr) were studied prospectively. HDR performed alone elicited an attenuated increase in MSNA in older subjects (Delta106 +/- 28 vs. Delta20 +/- 7% for young and older subjects). HDR performed during simultaneous orthostatic stress increased total MSNA further in young (Delta53 +/- 15%; P < 0.05) but not older subjects (Delta-5 +/- 4%). Older subjects demonstrated consistent significant hypotension during HDR performed both alone (Delta-6 +/- 2 mmHg) and during LBNP (Delta-7 +/- 2 mmHg). These data provide experimental support for the concept that age-related impairments in the vestibulosympathetic reflex persist during orthostatic challenge in older adults. Furthermore, these findings are consistent with the concept that age-related alterations in vestibular function might contribute to altered orthostatic blood pressure regulation with age in humans.

  1. An adaptive detector of genioglossus EMG reflex using Berkner transform for time latency measurement in OSA pathophysiological studies.

    PubMed

    Guméry, Pierre Yves; Roux-Buisson, Hervé; Meignen, Sylvain; Comyn, François Louis; Dematteis, Maurice; Wuyam, Bernard; Pépin, Jean Louis; Lévy, Patrick

    2005-08-01

    To investigate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome mechanisms, we developed a device to measure the surface electromyogram (EMG) time latency reflex of the genioglossus muscle stimulated by time and amplitude calibrated negative pharyngeal pressure drops. The reflex signals were found to be disturbed by transient signals that generate false alarms. Thus, to reduce false alarm occurrences we designed an adaptive multiscale method. Continuous wavelet transform (CWT) is widely used in biomedical signal event detection processes. The Berkner transform is an approximation of a CWT that is based on a hierarchical scheme similar to discrete wavelet transform. We used the Berkner transform to build a multiscale detector because it offers the possibility of maxima coefficients linkage that leads to good accuracy in reflex onset localization. As a contribution to this novel approach we used a reconstruction formula to develop an adaptive method for scale range determination in our surface EMG reflex detector. Finally, we characterized our detector in terms of accuracy and robustness, first on synthesized signals and second, on signals acquired on apneic patients and healthy subjects. Preliminary results showed a significant difference (p < 0.01) between the two populations regarding the genioglossus muscle mean latency time. These physiological findings may partly explain why the upper airway protective reflex occurring when a negative pressure is applied to the upper airway is ineffective in OSA patients, leading to pharyngeal collapse.

  2. The legacy of care as reflexive learning

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta Rodríguez; Moya, Jose Luis Medina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze whether the tutor's use of reflexive strategies encourages the students to reflect. The goal is to discover what type of strategies can help to achieve this and how tutors and students behave in the practical context. Method: a qualitative and ethnographic focus was adopted. Twenty-seven students and 15 tutors from three health centers participated. The latter had received specific training on reflexive clinical tutoring. The analysis was developed through constant comparisons of the categories. Results: the results demonstrate that the tutors' use of reflexive strategies such as didactic questioning, didactic empathy and pedagogical silence contributes to encourage the students' reflection and significant learning. Conclusions: reflexive practice is key to tutors' training and students' learning. PMID:27305180

  3. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  4. The role of exaggerated patellar tendon reflex in knee joint position sense in patients with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Manikowska, Faustyna; Chen, Brian Po-Jung; Jóźwiak, Marek; Lebiedowska, Maria K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to determine if exaggerated patellar tendon jerk affects knee joint position sense (JPS) in cerebral palsy (CP) patients, by comparing JPS of the knee between participants with normal and exaggerated reflexes. The thresholds for reflex classification were based upon the data from able-bodied volunteers. JPS was measured as the ability of a subject (with eyes closed) to replicate a knee joint position demonstrated by an examiner. Tendon jerk was measured as the moment of force in response to patellar tendon taps. Data was collected from 27 limbs of CP patients (N=14) and 36 limbs of able-bodied volunteers (N=18). JPS was less accurate (p=0.014) in limbs with non-exaggerated reflexes (50.28±43.63%) than in control limbs (11.84±10.85%). There was no significant difference (p=0.08) in JPS accuracy between limbs with exaggerated reflexes (18.66±15.50%) and control limbs. Our data suggests that one component of sensorimotor impairment, JPS, is not as commonly affected in CP patients as previously reported. JPS of the knee is reduced in limbs with non-exaggerated reflexes; however in limbs with exaggerated reflexes which is seen in the majority of CP patients, JPS is not affected.

  5. Abnormal postural reflexes in a patient with pontine ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Cantello, Roberto; Magistrelli, Luca; Terazzi, Emanuela; Grossini, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The control of body posture is a complex activity that needs a very close relationship between different structures, such as the vestibular system, and the muscle and joint receptors of the neck. Damage of even one of these structures can lead to abnormal postural reflexes. We describe a case of a woman with a left pontine ischaemia who developed a 'dystonic' extensor posture of the left limbs while turned on the right side. This clinical picture differs from previous reports on the subject, and may relate to ischaemic damage of a pontine structure involved in posture control, or of adjacent neural connections to be yet identified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported in the literature. Clinical examples of an altered interplay between vestibular and neck receptors are rare. PMID:26561222

  6. Pharyngeal airway protective reflexes are triggered before the maximum volume of fluid that the hypopharynx can safely hold is exceeded

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Kulwinder; Surapaneni, Sri Naveen; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Hafeezullah, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Aerodigestive reflexes triggered by pharyngeal stimulation can protect the airways by clearing fluid from the pharynx. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the maximum capacity of fluid that can safely dwell in the hypopharynx [hypopharyngeal safe volume (HPSV)] before spilling into the larynx and the threshold volumes required to trigger pharyngoglottal closure reflex (PGCR), pharyngo-upper esophageal sphincter contractile reflex (PUCR), and reflexive pharyngeal swallow (RPS). Twenty-five healthy volunteers (mean age 24 yr, 8 males) were studied in the semi-inclined supine position. PGCR, PUCR, and RPS were elicited using techniques of concurrent upper esophageal sphincter manometry and pharyngo-laryngoscopy. The hypopharynx was then anesthetized to abolish RPS. HPSV was determined by infusing water in the pharynx, and perfusion was stopped when the infusate reached the superior margin of the interarytenoid fold. The threshold volumes for triggering PGCR, PUCR, and RPS by slow and rapid injections before pharyngeal anesthesia were 0.18 ± 0.02 and 0.09 ± 0.02 ml; 0.20 ± 0.020 and 0.13 ± 0.04 ml; and 0.61 ± 0.04 and 0.4 ± 0.06 ml, respectively. All of the above volumes were significantly smaller than the HPSV (0.70 ± 0.06 ml, P < 0.01) except for the threshold volume to elicit RPS during slow perfusion, which was not significantly different (P = 0.23). We conclude that pharyngeal aerodigestive reflexes are triggered by both slow and rapid pharyngeal perfusion of water at significantly smaller volumes than the maximum capacity of the hypopharynx to safely hold contents without spilling into the airway. These reflexes thereby aid in prevention of aspiration. PMID:21566013

  7. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy following traumatic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the upper extremity of patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries are reported. Both patients had very incomplete lesions with early neurological recovery, suggesting an underlying central cord syndrome. Although reflex sympathetic dystrophy is often seen following stroke, it has only rarely been documented in traumatic myelopathy, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain syndromes in the extremities of paraplegic or quadriplegic patients. PMID:6728500

  8. The pupillary light reflex in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, C J

    1981-01-01

    In 19 normal subjects the pupillary reflex to light was studied over a range of stimulus intensities by infrared electronic pupillography and analysed by a computer technique. Increasing stimulus intensity was associated with an increase in direct light reflex amplitude and maximum rate of constriction and redilatation. Latency from stimulus to onset of response-decreased with increasing stimulus intensity. The normal range for each of these parameters is given and the significance of these results in clinical pupillary assessment discussed. PMID:7326222

  9. Amplification of interlimb reflexes evoked by stimulating the hand simultaneously with conditioning from the foot during locomotion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Widespread interlimb reflexes evoked in leg muscles by cutaneous stimulation of the hand are phase-modulated and behaviorally relevant to produce functional changes in ankle trajectory during walking. These reflexes are complementary to the segmental responses evoked by stimulation at the ankle. Despite differences in the expression of reflex amplitude based upon site of nerve stimulation, there are some common features as well, suggesting the possibility of shared interneuronal pathways. Currently little is known about integration or shared reflex systems from interlimb cutaneous networks during human locomotion. Here we investigated convergent reflex effects following cutaneous stimulation of the hand and foot during arm and leg cycling (AL) by using spatial facilitation. Participants performed AL cycling and static activation of the target muscle knee extensor vastus lateralis (VL) in 3 different randomly ordered nerve stimulation conditions: 1) superficial radial nerve (SR; input from hand); 2) superficial peroneal nerve (SP; input from foot); and, 3) combined stimulation (SR + SP). Stimuli were applied around the onset of rhythmic EMG bursts in VL corresponding to the onset of the power or leg extension phase. Results During AL cycling, small inhibitory (~80 ms) and large facilitatory reflexes (~100 ~ 150 ms) were seen in VL. The amplitudes of the facilitatory responses with SR + SP stimulation were significantly larger than those for SP or SR stimulation alone. The facilitation was also significantly larger than the simple mathematical summation of amplitudes from SP and SR trials. This indicates extra facilitation beyond what would be accounted for by serial neuronal processing and was not observed during static activation. Conclusions We conclude that AL cycling activates shared interneurons in convergent reflex pathways from cutaneous inputs innervating the hand and leg. This enhanced activity has functional implications for corrective

  10. The Reflexes of the Fundus Oculi

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, A. J.

    1940-01-01

    The fundus reflexes reveal, in a manner not yet completely understood, the texture and contour of the reflecting surfaces and the condition of the underlying tissues. In this way they may play an important part in the biomicroscopy of the eye. The physiological reflexes are seen at their best in the eyes of young subjects, in well-pigmented eyes, with undilated pupils and with emmetropic refraction. Their absence during the first two decades, or their presence after the forties, their occurrence in one eye only, their appearance, disappearance or change of character should suggest the possibility of some pathological state. The investigation and interpretation of the reflexes are notably assisted by comparing the appearances seen with long and short wave lights such as those of the sodium and mercury vapour lamps, in addition to the usual ophthalmoscopic lights. Most of the surface reflexes disappear in the light of the sodium lamp, sometimes revealing important changes in the deeper layers of the retina and choroid. The physiological reflexes, chiefly formed on the surface of the internal limiting membrane, take the forms of the familiar watered silk or patchy reflexes, the peri-macular halo, the fan reflex in the macular depression and the reflex from the foveal pit. The watered silk or patchy reflexes often show a delicate striation which follows the pattern of the nerve-fibre layer, or there may be a granular or criss-cross texture. Reflexes which entirely lack these indications of “texture” should be considered as possibly pathological. This applies to the “beaten metal” reflexes and to those formed on the so-called hyaloid membrane. The occurrence of physiological reflexes in linear form is doubtful, and the only admittedly physiological punctate reflexes are the so-called Gunn's dots. Surface reflexes which are broken up into small points or flakes are pathological, and are most frequently seen in the central area of the fundus in cases of pigmentary

  11. Increased spinal reflex excitability is associated with enhanced central activation during voluntary lengthening contractions in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyosub E; Corcos, Daniel M; Hornby, T George

    2015-07-01

    This study of chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) subjects investigated patterns of central motor drive (i.e., central activation) of the plantar flexors using interpolated twitches, and modulation of soleus H-reflexes during lengthening, isometric, and shortening muscle actions. In a recent study of the knee extensors, SCI subjects demonstrated greater central activation ratio (CAR) values during lengthening (i.e., eccentric) maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), compared with during isometric or shortening (i.e., concentric) MVCs. In contrast, healthy controls demonstrated lower lengthening CAR values compared with their isometric and shortening CARs. For the present investigation, we hypothesized SCI subjects would again produce their highest CAR values during lengthening MVCs, and that these increases in central activation were partially attributable to greater efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission during muscle lengthening following SCI. Results show SCI subjects produced higher CAR values during lengthening vs. isometric or shortening MVCs (all P < 0.001). H-reflex testing revealed normalized H-reflexes (maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratios) were greater for SCI than controls during passive (P = 0.023) and active (i.e., 75% MVC; P = 0.017) lengthening, suggesting facilitation of Ia transmission post-SCI. Additionally, measures of spinal reflex excitability (passive lengthening maximal SOL H-reflex-to-maximal M-wave ratio) in SCI were positively correlated with soleus electromyographic activity and CAR values during lengthening MVCs (both P < 0.05). The present study presents evidence that patterns of dynamic muscle activation are altered following SCI, and that greater central activation during lengthening contractions is partly due to enhanced efficacy of Ia-α motoneuron transmission. PMID:25972590

  12. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  13. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, M.A.

    1983-08-31

    The invention is a method and apparatus for providing a reflex ring laser system for amplifying an input laser pulse. The invention is particularly useful in laser fusion experiments where efficient production of high-energy and high power laser pulses is required. The invention comprises a large aperture laser amplifier in an unstable ring resonator which includes a combination spatial filter and beam expander having a magnification greater than unity. An input pulse is injected into the resonator, e.g., through an aperture in an input mirror. The injected pulse passes through the amplifier and spatial filter/expander components on each pass around the ring. The unstable resonator is designed to permit only a predetermined number of passes before the amplified pulse exits the resonator. On the first pass through the amplifier, the beam fills only a small central region of the gain medium. On each successive pass, the beam has been expanded to fill the next concentric non-overlapping region of the gain medium.

  14. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  15. Contribution of polysynaptic pathways in the mediation and plasticity of Aplysia gill and siphon withdrawal reflex: evidence for differential modulation.

    PubMed

    Trudeau, L E; Castellucci, V F

    1992-10-01

    The gill and siphon withdrawal (GSW) reflex of Aplysia is centrally mediated by a monosynaptic and a polysynaptic pathway between sensory and motor neurons. The first objective of this article was to evaluate quantitatively the relative importance of these two components in the mediation of the GSW reflex. We have used an artificial sea water (ASW) solution containing a high concentration of divalent cations to raise the action potential threshold of the interneurons without affecting the monosynaptic component of the reflex (2:1 ASW). Compound EPSPs induced in gill or siphon motor neurons by direct stimulation of the siphon nerve or by tactile stimulation of the siphon skin were reduced by more than 75% in 2:1 ASW. These results indicate that interneurons intercalated between sensory and motor neurons are responsible for a considerable proportion of the afferent input to the motor neurons of the reflex. The second objective of this article was to compare the modulation of the monosynaptic and polysynaptic pathways. We have evaluated their respective contribution in sensitization of the GSW reflex by testing the effects of two neuromodulators of the reflex, 5-HT and small cardioactive peptide B (SCPB). We found that these two neuromodulators have a differential action on the two components of the GSW neuronal network. The polysynaptic pathway was more facilitated than the monosynaptic pathway by the neuropeptide SCPB. By contrast, 5-HT displayed an opposite selectivity. These results suggest that the polysynaptic component of the neuronal network underlying the GSW reflex is very important for its mediation. The data also indicate that the monosynaptic and polysynaptic components of the reflex can be differentially modulated. The diversity of modulatory actions at various sites of the GSW network should be relevant for learning-associated modifications in the intact animal.

  16. Blockade of acid sensing ion channels attenuates the exercise pressor reflex in cats

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Shawn G; Kindig, Angela E; Kaufman, Marc P

    2007-01-01

    Although thin fibre muscle afferents possess acid sensing ion channels (ASICs), their contribution to the exercise pressor reflex is not known. This lack of information is partly attributable to the fact that there is no known selective in vivo antagonist for ASICs. Although amiloride has been shown to antagonize ASICs, it also has been shown to antagonize voltage-gated sodium channels, thereby impairing impulse conduction in sensory nerves. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that lactic acid accumulation in exercising muscle acted on ASICs located on thin fibre muscle afferents to evoke the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex. To test this hypothesis, we determined in decerebrate cats if amiloride attenuated the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to static contraction, to tendon stretch and to arterial injections of lactic acid and capsaicin. We found a dose of amiloride (0.5 μg kg−1; i.a.) that attenuated the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to both contraction and lactic acid injection, but had no effect on the responses to stretch and capsaicin. A higher dose of amiloride (5 μg kg−1, i.a.) not only blocked the pressor and cardioaccelerator responses to lactic acid and contraction, but also attenuated the responses to stretch and to capsaicin, manoeuvers in which ASICs probably play no significant role. In addition, we found that the low dose of amiloride (0.5 μg kg−1) had no effect on the responses of muscle spindles to tendon stretch and to succinylcholine, whereas the high dose (5 μg kg−1) attenuated the responses to both. Our data suggest the low dose of amiloride used in our experiments selectively blocked ASICs, whereas the high dose blocked ASICs and impulse conduction in muscle afferents. We conclude that ASICs play a role in the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex. PMID:17395635

  17. Temperature affects maximum H-reflex amplitude but not homosynaptic postactivation depression

    PubMed Central

    Racinais, Sébastien; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determinate the effect of hyperthermia on transmission efficacy of the Ia-afferent spinal pathway. Recruitment curves of the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) and compound motor potential (M-wave) along with homosynaptic postactivation depression (HPAD) recovery curves were obtained in 14 volunteers in two controlled ambient temperatures that resulted in significantly different core temperatures (CON, core temperature ∼37.3°C; and HOT, core temperature ∼39.0°C). Electromyographic responses were obtained from the soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles following electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve at varying intensities and paired pulse frequencies (0.07–10 Hz). Results showed that maximal amplitude of the H-reflex was reached for a similar intensity of stimulation in CON and HOT (both muscles P > 0.47), with a similar associated M-wave (both muscles P > 0.69) but was significantly decreased in HOT as compared to CON (all P < 0.05), whether expressed in absolute terms (−50% in SOL, −32% in MG) or when normalized to the maximum M-wave (−23% in SOL, −32% in MG). The HPAD recovery curve was not affected by the elevated core temperature (both muscles P > 0.23). Taken together, these results suggest that hyperthermia can alter neuromuscular transmission across the neuromuscular junction and/or muscle membrane as well as transmission efficacy of the Ia-afferent pathway, albeit the latter not via an increase in HPAD. PMID:24303108

  18. Acceleration dependence and task-specific modulation of short- and medium-latency reflexes in the ankle extensors

    PubMed Central

    Finley, James M; Dhaher, Yasin Y; Perreault, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Involuntary responses to muscle stretch are often composed of a short-latency reflex (SLR) and more variable responses at longer latencies such as the medium-latency (MLR) and long-latency stretch reflex (LLR). Although longer latency reflexes are enhanced in the upper limb during stabilization of external loads, it remains unknown if they have a similar role in the lower limb. This uncertainty results in part from the inconsistency with which longer latency reflexes have been observed in the lower limb. A review of the literature suggests that studies that only observe SLRs have used perturbations with large accelerations, possibly causing a synchronization of motoneuron refractory periods or an activation of force-dependent inhibition. We therefore hypothesized that the amplitude of longer latency reflexes would vary with perturbation acceleration. We further hypothesized that if longer latency reflexes were elicited, they would increase in amplitude during control of an unstable load, as has been observed in the upper limb. These hypotheses were tested at the ankle while subjects performed a torque or position control task. SLR and MLR reflex components were elicited by ankle flexion perturbations with a fixed peak velocity and variable acceleration. Both reflex components initially scaled with acceleration, however, while the SLR continued to increase at high accelerations, the MLR weakened. At accelerations that reliably elicited MLRs, both the SLR and MLR were reduced during control of the unstable load. These findings clarify the conditions required to elicit MLRs in the ankle extensors and provide additional evidence that rapid feedback pathways are downregulated when stability is compromised in the lower limb. PMID:24303134

  19. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  20. Pausing at the Threshold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Patrick K.

    2015-01-01

    Since about 2003, the notion of threshold concepts--the central ideas in any field that change how learners think about other ideas--have become difficult to escape at library conferences and in general information literacy discourse. Their visibility will likely only increase because threshold concepts figure prominently in the Framework for…

  1. Threshold Concepts in Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine threshold concepts in the context of teaching and learning first-year university economics. It outlines some of the arguments for using threshold concepts and provides examples using opportunity cost as an exemplar in economics. Design/ Methodology/Approach: The paper provides an overview of the…

  2. Jaw, blink and corneal reflex latencies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, E A; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Barendswaard, E C; Arts, R J

    1985-01-01

    Jaw, blink and corneal reflexes, which all involve the trigeminal system, were recorded in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis; thirty-seven of these patients were classified as having definite multiple sclerosis and 17 as indefinite multiple sclerosis, according to Schumacher's criteria. The jaw reflex was abnormal less frequently than either of the other two reflexes, but in four cases it was the only abnormal reflex found. Testing a combination of two or three trigeminal reflexes did not yield a higher incidence of abnormalities than testing the blink or corneal reflex alone. Nine patients showed abnormal reflexes which were unexpected on the basis of clinical symptoms. The combined recordings demonstrate at least one abnormal reflex in 74% of the patients. The various types of reflex abnormalities reflect major damage to different parts of the trigeminal system and may therefore make an important contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:4087004

  3. The effect of titrated fentanyl on suppressed cough reflex in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kelly, H E; Shaw, G M; Brett, C N; Greenwood, F M; Huckabee, M L

    2016-05-01

    Cough suppression is part of the pharmacodynamic profile of opioids. We investigated the impact of clinical doses of fentanyl on suppressing the cough reflex. Thirteen volunteers received 2 μg.kg(-1) of fentanyl in a divided administration protocol. Three minutes after each administration and at 10 min intervals during washout, suppressed cough reflex testing with nebulised citric acid was performed and compared with fentanyl effect-site concentration. Mean (SD) citric acid concentration provoking cough increased from 0.5 (0.28) mol.l(-1) at baseline to 1.2 (0.50) mol.l(-1) after 2 μg.kg(-1) of fentanyl (p = 0.01). Mean (SD) fentanyl effect-site concentration after the final dose of fentanyl was 1.89 (0.05) ng.ml(-1) . A strong positive correlation was found between suppressed cough reflex thresholds and fentanyl effect-site concentrations during both fentanyl administration and washout phases of the study (r(2) = 0.79, p = 0.01). The mean (SD) length of time for return of suppressed cough response was 44.6 (18.8) min. Clinically relevant doses of fentanyl produced cough reflex suppression in healthy volunteers. PMID:26919658

  4. The effect of titrated fentanyl on suppressed cough reflex in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kelly, H E; Shaw, G M; Brett, C N; Greenwood, F M; Huckabee, M L

    2016-05-01

    Cough suppression is part of the pharmacodynamic profile of opioids. We investigated the impact of clinical doses of fentanyl on suppressing the cough reflex. Thirteen volunteers received 2 μg.kg(-1) of fentanyl in a divided administration protocol. Three minutes after each administration and at 10 min intervals during washout, suppressed cough reflex testing with nebulised citric acid was performed and compared with fentanyl effect-site concentration. Mean (SD) citric acid concentration provoking cough increased from 0.5 (0.28) mol.l(-1) at baseline to 1.2 (0.50) mol.l(-1) after 2 μg.kg(-1) of fentanyl (p = 0.01). Mean (SD) fentanyl effect-site concentration after the final dose of fentanyl was 1.89 (0.05) ng.ml(-1) . A strong positive correlation was found between suppressed cough reflex thresholds and fentanyl effect-site concentrations during both fentanyl administration and washout phases of the study (r(2) = 0.79, p = 0.01). The mean (SD) length of time for return of suppressed cough response was 44.6 (18.8) min. Clinically relevant doses of fentanyl produced cough reflex suppression in healthy volunteers.

  5. The trigeminocardiac reflex – a comparison with the diving reflex in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lemaitre, Frederic; Schaller, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminocardiac reflex (TCR) has previously been described in the literature as a reflexive response of bradycardia, hypotension, and gastric hypermotility seen upon mechanical stimulation in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve. The diving reflex (DR) in humans is characterized by breath-holding, slowing of the heart rate, reduction of limb blood flow and a gradual rise in the mean arterial blood pressure. Although the two reflexes share many similarities, their relationship and especially their functional purpose in humans have yet to be fully elucidated. In the present review, we have tried to integrate and elaborate these two phenomena into a unified physiological concept. Assuming that the TCR and the DR are closely linked functionally and phylogenetically, we have also highlighted the significance of these reflexes in humans. PMID:25995761

  6. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  7. Differential involvement of two cortical masticatory areas in modulation of the swallowing reflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Tsuji, Kojun; Ariyasinghe, Sajjiv; Fukuhara, Takako; Yamada, Aki; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Nakamura, Yuki; Iwata, Koichi; Inoue, Makoto

    2012-10-24

    To clarify the functional role of cortical descending inputs involved in the swallowing reflex, the effect of electrical stimulation of two cortical masticatory areas (CMAs: A- and P-area) on rhythmic jaw movements (RJMs) and superior laryngeal nerve (SLN)-evoked swallows were studied. RJMs and swallowing reflex were elicited by repetitive electrical stimulation of CMAs and the SLN, respectively. The electromyographic activities of jaw-closer (masseter), jaw-opener (digastric), and laryngeal-elevator (thyrohyoid) muscles were recorded to identify the RJMs and swallowing reflex. The number of evoked swallows was significantly lower, and swallowing interval was significantly longer during A-area stimulation compared with those without stimulation. Conversely, these parameters were not significantly altered during P-area stimulation. The inhibition of swallows by A-area stimulation was not affected by an increase in sensory input by wooden stick application between upper and lower teeth, or A-area stimulation preceding SLN stimulation. The present findings suggest that the swallowing reflex is inhibited by activation of the A-area, but not the P-area. Since no changes in swallows were seen after the increase in intraoral sensory input and prior activation of masticatory central pattern generator (CPG), swallowing inhibition may be mediated by direct inputs from the A-area or inputs via the masticatory CPG into the swallowing CPG.

  8. The perils of thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font-Clos, Francesc; Pruessner, Gunnar; Moloney, Nicholas R.; Deluca, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The thresholding of time series of activity or intensity is frequently used to define and differentiate events. This is either implicit, for example due to resolution limits, or explicit, in order to filter certain small scale physics from the supposed true asymptotic events. Thresholding the birth-death process, however, introduces a scaling region into the event size distribution, which is characterized by an exponent that is unrelated to the actual asymptote and is rather an artefact of thresholding. As a result, numerical fits of simulation data produce a range of exponents, with the true asymptote visible only in the tail of the distribution. This tail is increasingly difficult to sample as the threshold is increased. In the present case, the exponents and the spurious nature of the scaling region can be determined analytically, thus demonstrating the way in which thresholding conceals the true asymptote. The analysis also suggests a procedure for detecting the influence of the threshold by means of a data collapse involving the threshold-imposed scale.

  9. Using ESO Reflex with Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järveläinen, P.; Savolainen, V.; Oittinen, T.; Maisala, S.; Ullgrén, M. Hook, R.

    2008-08-01

    ESO Reflex is a prototype graphical workflow system, based on Taverna, and primarily intended to be a flexible way of running ESO data reduction recipes along with other legacy applications and user-written tools. ESO Reflex can also readily use the Taverna Web Services features that are based on the Apache Axis SOAP implementation. Taverna is a general purpose Web Service client, and requires no programming to use such services. However, Taverna also has some restrictions: for example, no numerical types such integers. In addition the preferred binding style is document/literal wrapped, but most astronomical services publish the Axis default WSDL using RPC/encoded style. Despite these minor limitations we have created simple but very promising test VO workflow using the Sesame name resolver service at CDS Strasbourg, the Hubble SIAP server at the Multi-Mission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST) and the WESIX image cataloging and catalogue cross-referencing service at the University of Pittsburgh. ESO Reflex can also pass files and URIs via the PLASTIC protocol to visualisation tools and has its own viewer for VOTables. We picked these three Web Services to try to set up a realistic and useful ESO Reflex workflow. They also demonstrate ESO Reflex abilities to use many kind of Web Services because each of them requires a different interface. We describe each of these services in turn and comment on how it was used

  10. Double Photoionization Near Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehlitz, Ralf

    2007-01-01

    The threshold region of the double-photoionization cross section is of particular interest because both ejected electrons move slowly in the Coulomb field of the residual ion. Near threshold both electrons have time to interact with each other and with the residual ion. Also, different theoretical models compete to describe the double-photoionization cross section in the threshold region. We have investigated that cross section for lithium and beryllium and have analyzed our data with respect to the latest results in the Coulomb-dipole theory. We find that our data support the idea of a Coulomb-dipole interaction.

  11. ATP induces sustained facilitation of craniofacial nociception through P2X receptors on neck muscle nociceptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Makowska, A; Panfil, C; Ellrich, J

    2006-06-01

    Noxious input from neck muscles probably plays a key role in tension-type headache pathophysiology. ATP selectively excites group III and IV muscle afferents in vitro. Accordingly, ATP infusion into trapezius muscle induces strong pain and local tenderness in healthy man. The present study addresses the impact of ATP on neck muscle nociception in anaesthetized mice. Craniofacial nociceptive processing was tested by the jaw-opening reflex via noxious electrical tongue stimulation. Within 2 h after injection of 100 nmol/l or 1 micromol/l ATP into semispinal neck muscles, reflex integrals significantly increased by 114% or 328%, respectively. Preceding intramuscular administration of the P2X receptor antagonist PPADS (3-100 nmol/l) suppressed the ATP effect. Subsequent application of PPADS (100 nmol/l) caused a total recovery of facilitated reflex to baseline values. ATP induces sustained facilitation of craniofacial nociception by prolonged excitation of P2X receptors in neck muscles. PMID:16686909

  12. Loudness changes resulting from an electrically induced middle-ear reflex.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunn, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was conducted in order to determine the changes in loudness brought about by electro-cutaneous elicitation of the middle-ear reflex. Subjects were required to judge the relative loudness of the second of three consecutive 30-msec bursts of tone, the second tone being accompanied by an electrical shock to the external auditory meatus, capable of eliciting a contraction of the middle-ear muscles. The difference between these judgments and those of the control condition (shock on the arm) was taken to represent a measure of the attenuation provided by contraction of the middle-ear muscles. Test tones were 500, 1000, 2000, and 3000 Hz at levels of 65, 75, 85, 95, and 105 dB. The results indicate that the middle-ear reflex decreases the middle-ear's transmission mainly for low-frequency sounds. The results fail to lend support to the Loeb-Riopelle hypothesis that the middle-ear reflex acts as a limiter, rather than a linear attenuator.

  13. Tonic muscle pain does not increase fusimotor drive to human leg muscles: implications for chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2013-06-01

    Experimental pain induced in animals has shown that noxious stimulation of group III and IV afferents increases the firing of muscle spindles via a reflex excitation of fusimotor (γ) motoneurones. Chronic muscle pain has been hypothesized to develop as a result of a vicious cycle involving this mechanism. In order to explore the effects of long-lasting muscle pain on the fusimotor system, single unit muscle spindle afferents were recorded from 15 subjects. Afferent activity was recorded from foot and ankle extensor muscles whilst infusing hypertonic saline into the tibialis anterior muscle of the ipsilateral leg, producing moderate-strong pain lasting for ∼60 min. A change in fusimotor drive was inferred by observing changes in the mean discharge rate of spontaneously active muscle spindle afferents. Homonymous and heteronymous muscles remained relaxed and showed no increase in activity, arguing against any fusimotor-driven increase in motor activity, and there was no net change in the firing of muscle spindle afferents. We conclude that long-lasting stimulation of group III and IV afferents fails to excite fusimotor neurones and increase muscle spindle discharge. Accordingly, the vicious cycle theory has no functional basis for the development of myalgia in human subjects. PMID:23417691

  14. Reflex Control of Robotic Gait Using Human Walking Data

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Catherine A.; Meng, Lin; Conway, Bernard A.; Porr, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Control of human walking is not thoroughly understood, which has implications in developing suitable strategies for the retraining of a functional gait following neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Bipedal robots allow us to investigate simple elements of the complex nervous system to quantify their contribution to motor control. RunBot is a bipedal robot which operates through reflexes without using central pattern generators or trajectory planning algorithms. Ground contact information from the feet is used to activate motors in the legs, generating a gait cycle visually similar to that of humans. Rather than developing a more complicated biologically realistic neural system to control the robot's stepping, we have instead further simplified our model by measuring the correlation between heel contact and leg muscle activity (EMG) in human subjects during walking and from this data created filter functions transferring the sensory data into motor actions. Adaptive filtering was used to identify the unknown transfer functions which translate the contact information into muscle activation signals. Our results show a causal relationship between ground contact information from the heel and EMG, which allows us to create a minimal, linear, analogue control system for controlling walking. The derived transfer functions were applied to RunBot II as a proof of concept. The gait cycle produced was stable and controlled, which is a positive indication that the transfer functions have potential for use in the control of assistive devices for the retraining of an efficient and effective gait with potential applications in SCI rehabilitation. PMID:25347544

  15. Reflex control of robotic gait using human walking data.

    PubMed

    Macleod, Catherine A; Meng, Lin; Conway, Bernard A; Porr, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Control of human walking is not thoroughly understood, which has implications in developing suitable strategies for the retraining of a functional gait following neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury (SCI). Bipedal robots allow us to investigate simple elements of the complex nervous system to quantify their contribution to motor control. RunBot is a bipedal robot which operates through reflexes without using central pattern generators or trajectory planning algorithms. Ground contact information from the feet is used to activate motors in the legs, generating a gait cycle visually similar to that of humans. Rather than developing a more complicated biologically realistic neural system to control the robot's stepping, we have instead further simplified our model by measuring the correlation between heel contact and leg muscle activity (EMG) in human subjects during walking and from this data created filter functions transferring the sensory data into motor actions. Adaptive filtering was used to identify the unknown transfer functions which translate the contact information into muscle activation signals. Our results show a causal relationship between ground contact information from the heel and EMG, which allows us to create a minimal, linear, analogue control system for controlling walking. The derived transfer functions were applied to RunBot II as a proof of concept. The gait cycle produced was stable and controlled, which is a positive indication that the transfer functions have potential for use in the control of assistive devices for the retraining of an efficient and effective gait with potential applications in SCI rehabilitation. PMID:25347544

  16. Effect of wearing a mouthguard on the vestibulocollic reflex.

    PubMed

    Mizumachi, Makoto; Sumita, Yosuke; Ueno, Toshiaki

    2008-04-01

    It has been speculated that the use of a mouthguard improves athletic ability such as muscular strength and equilibrium. The postural system is equipped with response patterns that correct for unexpected perturbations. These responses are driven by immediate feedback from visual, vestibular, and somatosensory information. These are integrated by the central nervous system. We analysed the possibility that wearing a mouthguard influences vestibular information via the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR) in the sagittal plane. The input of the VCR is vestibular afferent activity and its output is neck muscle activation. With the subject in the supine position, the apparatus used in this study induces the VCR by subjecting the head to abrupt vertical acceleration by sudden free fall under the head's own weight. Surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings in the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) of 14 participants were analysed. There were no significant differences in the amplitude of the VCR within the left and right SCM whether subjects were or were not wearing a mouthguard (P=0.3227 within left SCM; P=0.9686 within right SCM). These results suggest that wearing a mouthguard has no effect on the VCR in the sagittal plane when supine, and so that vestibular sensory information is unaffected by wearing a mouthguard, in this context. Further research is required to examine whether this also holds true in more functional, upright and dynamic body positions.

  17. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Patrick A.; Siegmund, Gunter P.; Schouten, Alfred C.; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3). This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0–20 Hz). In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system’s contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls. PMID:25620919

  18. Task, muscle and frequency dependent vestibular control of posture.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Patrick A; Siegmund, Gunter P; Schouten, Alfred C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system is crucial for postural control; however there are considerable differences in the task dependence and frequency response of vestibular reflexes in appendicular and axial muscles. For example, vestibular reflexes are only evoked in appendicular muscles when vestibular information is relevant to postural control, while in neck muscles they are maintained regardless of the requirement to maintain head on trunk balance. Recent investigations have also shown that the bandwidth of vestibular input on neck muscles is much broader than appendicular muscles (up to a factor of 3). This result challenges the notion that vestibular reflexes only contribute to postural control across the behavioral and physiological frequency range of the vestibular organ (i.e., 0-20 Hz). In this review, we explore and integrate these task-, muscle- and frequency-related differences in the vestibular system's contribution to posture, and propose that the human nervous system has adapted vestibular signals to match the mechanical properties of the system that each group of muscles controls.

  19. Repeated elicitation of the acoustic startle reflex leads to sensitisation in subsequent avoidance behaviour and induces fear conditioning

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Autonomous reflexes enable animals to respond quickly to potential threats, prevent injury and mediate fight or flight responses. Intense acoustic stimuli with sudden onsets elicit a startle reflex while stimuli of similar intensity but with longer rise times only cause a cardiac defence response. In laboratory settings, habituation appears to affect all of these reflexes so that the response amplitude generally decreases with repeated exposure to the stimulus. The startle reflex has become a model system for the study of the neural basis of simple learning processes and emotional processing and is often used as a diagnostic tool in medical applications. However, previous studies did not allow animals to avoid the stimulus and the evolutionary function and long-term behavioural consequences of repeated startling remain speculative. In this study we investigate the follow-up behaviour associated with the startle reflex in wild-captured animals using an experimental setup that allows individuals to exhibit avoidance behaviour. Results We present evidence that repeated elicitation of the acoustic startle reflex leads to rapid and pronounced sensitisation of sustained spatial avoidance behaviour in grey seals (Halichoerus grypus). Animals developed rapid flight responses, left the exposure pool and showed clear signs of fear conditioning. Once sensitised, seals even avoided a known food source that was close to the sound source. In contrast, animals exposed to non-startling (long rise time) stimuli of the same maximum sound pressure habituated and flight responses waned or were absent from the beginning. The startle threshold of grey seals expressed in units of sensation levels was comparable to thresholds reported for other mammals (93 dB). Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the acoustic startle reflex plays a crucial role in mediating flight responses and strongly influences the motivational state of an animal beyond a short-term muscular response by

  20. Neural reflexes in inflammation and immunity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian immune system and the nervous system coevolved under the influence of infection and sterile injury. Knowledge of homeostatic mechanisms by which the nervous system controls organ function was originally applied to the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, and other body systems. Development of advanced neurophysiological and immunological techniques recently enabled the study of reflex neural circuits that maintain immunological homeostasis, and are essential for health in mammals. Such reflexes are evolutionarily ancient, dating back to invertebrate nematode worms that possess primitive immune and nervous systems. Failure of these reflex mechanisms in mammals contributes to nonresolving inflammation and disease. It is also possible to target these neural pathways using electrical nerve stimulators and pharmacological agents to hasten the resolution of inflammation and provide therapeutic benefit. PMID:22665702

  1. Laryngeal Reflexes: Physiology, Technique and Clinical Use

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the current level of knowledge and techniques available for the study of laryngeal reflexes. Overall, the larynx is under constant control of several systems (including respiration, swallowing and cough) as well as sensory-motor reflex responses involving glossopharyngeal, pharyngeal, laryngeal and tracheobronchial sensory receptors. Techniques for the clinical assessment of these reflexes are emerging and need to be examined for sensitivity and specificity in identifying laryngeal sensory disorders. Quantitative assessment methods for the diagnosis of sensory reductions as well as sensory hypersensitivity may account for laryngeal disorders such as chronic cough, paradoxical vocal fold disorder and muscular tension dysphonia. The development of accurate assessment techniques could improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in these disorders. PMID:26241237

  2. Reflexive composites: self-healing composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margraf, Thomas W., Jr.; Barnell, Thomas J.; Havens, Ernie; Hemmelgarn, Christopher D.

    2008-03-01

    Cornerstone Research Group Inc. has developed reflexive composites achieving increased vehicle survivability through integrated structural awareness and responsiveness to damage. Reflexive composites can sense damage through integrated piezoelectric sensing networks and respond to damage by heating discrete locations to activate the healable polymer matrix in areas of damage. The polymer matrix is a modified thermoset shape memory polymer that heals based on phenomena known as reptation. In theory, the reptation healing phenomena should occur in microseconds; however, during experimentation, it has been observed that to maximize healing and restore up to 85 % of mechanical properties a healing cycle of at least three minutes is required. This paper will focus on work conducted to determine the healing mechanisms at work in CRG's reflexive composites, the optimal healing cycles, and an explanation of the difference between the reptation model and actual healing times.

  3. Reflex: Graphical workflow engine for data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ESO Reflex development Team

    2014-01-01

    Reflex provides an easy and flexible way to reduce VLT/VLTI science data using the ESO pipelines. It allows graphically specifying the sequence in which the data reduction steps are executed, including conditional stops, loops and conditional branches. It eases inspection of the intermediate and final data products and allows repetition of selected processing steps to optimize the data reduction. The data organization necessary to reduce the data is built into the system and is fully automatic; advanced users can plug their own modules and steps into the data reduction sequence. Reflex supports the development of data reduction workflows based on the ESO Common Pipeline Library. Reflex is based on the concept of a scientific workflow, whereby the data reduction cascade is rendered graphically and data seamlessly flow from one processing step to the next. It is distributed with a number of complete test datasets so users can immediately start experimenting and familiarize themselves with the system.

  4. Patients with spastic hemiplegia at different recovery stages: evidence of reciprocal modulation of early/late reflex responses.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, I K; el-Abd, M A; Dietz, V

    1993-04-01

    Reflex electromyographic (EMG) muscle responses were recorded from abductor pollicis brevis (APB) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of fifty patients with spastic hemiplegia. Responses in the muscles were evoked during voluntary muscle contraction (about 20% of maximum voluntary effort) by submaximal but suprathreshold electrical stimulation of the median (at the wrist) and common peroneal (at the neck of the fibula) nerves respectively. Three EMG peaks (R1, R2 and R3) could be recorded after the direct muscle response (M). There was only a slight difference in R1-R2 latency interval of about 5 ms between upper and lower limbs on the unaffected side of the patients making it unlikely that this late response of the lower limb involves a long loop pathway, although this possibility cannot be discounted for the later, R3, response. Reflex behaviour was analysed for three clinical identifiable recovery stages of voluntary movements in the spastic limbs (synergistic, isolated and useful movements). The major finding was that an increase in the amplitude of the early response "R1" was associated with a decreased amplitude and delayed latency of the late response "R2" on the spastic side. The amplitude of R1 in the three different recovery stages decreased significantly, whereas the amplitude of R2 increased significantly with improvement of the functional stage of the limb. A significant negative linear correlation was found between R1 and R2 amplitude changes in upper as well as lower limbs. A refractoriness of the motor neuron pool as a possible explanation for the decreased R2 amplitude could be discounted. These findings together with recent work on reflex development in children support the hypothesis of reciprocal modulation of early and late reflex signals by supraspinal motor centers. PMID:8482959

  5. Exercise-induced muscle cramp. Proposed mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Bentley, S

    1996-06-01

    Muscle cramp is a common, painful, physiological disturbance of skeletal muscle. Many athletes are regularly frustrated by exercise-induced muscle cramp yet the pathogenesis remains speculative with little scientific research on the subject. This has resulted in a perpetuation of myths as to the cause and treatment of it. There is a need for scientifically based protocols for the management of athletes who suffer exercise-related muscle cramp. This article reviews the literature and neurophysiology of muscle cramp occurring during exercise. Disturbances at various levels of the central and peripheral nervous system and skeletal muscle are likely to be involved in the mechanism of cramp and may explain the diverse range of conditions in which cramp occurs. The activity of the motor neuron is subject to a multitude of influences including peripheral receptor sensory input, spinal reflexes, inhibitory interneurons in the spinal cord, synaptic and neurotransmitter modulation and descending CNS input. The muscle spindle and golgi tendon organ proprioceptors are fundamental to the control of muscle length and tone and the maintenance of posture. Disturbance in the activity of these receptors may occur through faulty posture, shortened muscle length, intense exercise and exercise to fatigue, resulting in increased motor neuron activity and motor unit recruitment. The relaxation phase of muscle contraction is prolonged in a fatigued muscle, raising the likelihood of fused summation of action potentials if motor neuron activity delivers a sustained high firing frequency. Treatment of cramp is directed at reducing muscle spindle and motor neuron activity by reflex inhibition and afferent stimulation. There are no proven strategies for the prevention of exercise-induced muscle cramp but regular muscle stretching using post-isometric relaxation techniques, correction of muscle balance and posture, adequate conditioning for the activity, mental preparation for competition and

  6. Physiopharmacology of the peristaltic reflex: an update.

    PubMed

    De Ponti, F; Cosentino, M; Lecchini, S; Frigo, G M; Crema, A

    1991-06-01

    The peristaltic reflex is one of the simplest models which can be used to study the function of enteric neurons by recording intestinal motor activity. Peristalsis consists of a coordinated, aborally propagating motor activity which requires the functional integrity of receptor pathways, excitatory and inhibitory neural pathways and neuromuscular junctions. Luminal distension elicits polarized responses: an ascending excitatory response (ascending contraction) and a descending inhibitory response (descending relaxation). The present paper reviews the most recent acquisitions on the neural pathways and neurotransmitters involved in the regulation of the peristaltic reflex.

  7. Suppression of the swallowing reflex by stimulation of the red nucleus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Yoshihide; Tsuji, Kojun; Tsujimura, Takanori; Ishizuka, Ken'Ichi; Inoue, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    We study whether the red nucleus is involved in control of swallowing. The swallowing reflex was induced in anesthetized rats by repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. The electromyographic activities of the mylohyoid and thyrohyoid muscles were recorded in order to identify the swallowing reflex. Repetitive electrical stimulation applied to the red nucleus reduced the number of swallows. The onset latency of the first swallow was increased during repetitive electrical stimulation applied to the magnocellular part of the red nucleus. Microinjection of monosodium glutamate into the red nucleus also reduced the number of swallows. The onset latency of the first swallow was increased after microinjection of monosodium glutamate into the magnocellular part of the red nucleus. These results imply that the red nucleus is involved in the control of swallowing.

  8. Hemifacial spasm and posterior auricular muscle.

    PubMed

    Kiziltan, M; Sahin, R; Uzun, N; Kiziltan, G

    2006-09-01

    We aimed to investigate to which extent posterior auricular muscle (PAM) was affected and whether it contributed to the reflex activity in hemifacial spasm (HFS) patients. 19 HFS patients' spasm activities were recorded from facial muscles. Spasm activity of PAM was recorded synchronously on the symptomatic side in all patients. Lateral spread of blink reflex to orbicularis oris and PAMs were recorded in all but two patients. Botulinum toxin was applied to the PAM with the 14 patients presenting tinnitus, "clicking" or a "ticking" sound on the sane side and other positive auricular symptoms. After treatment, there was symptomatic improvement in 9 of 14 patients. The patients presenting with auricular symptoms and showing spasm activity in their PAMs can be thought as a candidate for botulinum toxin treatment scheme.

  9. Blends of rostral and caudal scratch reflex motor patterns elicited by simultaneous stimulation of two sites in the spinal turtle.

    PubMed

    Stein, P S; Camp, A W; Robertson, G A; Mortin, L I

    1986-08-01

    Simultaneous tactile stimulation of 2 sites on the body surface of a spinal turtle elicits complex blends of the scratch forms and motor patterns associated with each site. Our previous work has utilized 1-site stimulation to elicit distinct forms of the scratch reflex in the spinal turtle (Mortin et al., 1985; Robertson et al., 1985). Using this paradigm, stimulation of a site on the shell bridge anterior to the hindlimb elicits a rostral scratch reflex in which the dorsum of the foot rubs against the stimulated site; stimulation of a site near the tail elicits a caudal scratch reflex in which the heel or side of the foot rubs against the stimulated site (Mortin et al., 1985). During each scratch cycle, the monoarticular knee extensor muscle is active when the limb rubs against the stimulated site, and there is rhythmic alternation between hip protractor and hip retractor muscle activity (Robertson et al., 1985). In a rostral scratch, the monoarticular knee extensor muscle is active during the latter portion of hip protractor muscle activity; in a caudal scratch, the monoarticular knee extensor muscle is active near the end of hip retractor muscle activity. Pure-form motor patterns that are similar to those recorded from these muscles during movement can be recorded from the corresponding nerves in a spinal turtle immobilized with a neuromuscular blocking agent (Robertson et al., 1985). In this paper, we describe blend responses to simultaneous stimulation of 2 sites, one in the rostral scratch and the other in the caudal scratch receptive field. During these blends, the responding hindlimb rubs against both stimulated sites in one continuous movement sequence.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3746408

  10. Changes in H-reflex and V-waves following spinal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Imran Khan; Türker, Kemal S; Flavel, Stanley; Kinget, Mat; Duehr, Jens; Haavik, Heidi

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates whether spinal manipulation leads to neural plastic changes involving cortical drive and the H-reflex pathway. Soleus evoked V-wave, H-reflex, and M-wave recruitment curves and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) in surface electromyography (SEMG) signals of the plantar flexors were recorded from ten subjects before and after manipulation or control intervention. Dependent measures were compared with 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD as post hoc test, p was set at 0.05. Spinal manipulation resulted in increased MVC (measured with SEMG) by 59.5 ± 103.4 % (p = 0.03) and force by 16.05 ± 6.16 4 % (p = 0.0002), increased V/M max ratio by 44.97 ± 36.02 % (p = 0.006), and reduced H-reflex threshold (p = 0.018). Following the control intervention, there was a decrease in MVC (measured with SEMG) by 13.31 ± 7.27 % (p = 0.001) and force by 11.35 ± 9.99 % (p = 0.030), decreased V/M max ratio (23.45 ± 17.65 %; p = 0.03) and a decrease in the median frequency of the power spectrum (p = 0.04) of the SEMG during MVC. The H-reflex pathway is involved in the neural plastic changes that occur following spinal manipulation. The improvements in MVC following spinal manipulation are likely attributed to increased descending drive and/or modulation in afferents. Spinal manipulation appears to prevent fatigue developed during maximal contractions. Spinal manipulation appears to alter the net excitability of the low-threshold motor units, increase cortical drive, and prevent fatigue. PMID:25579661

  11. Effects of muscle potential depression and muscle stimulation caused by different insulation coating configurations on cardiac pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Toshimi; Yamada, Kenichi; Okubo, Naoko; Nitta, Takashi; Ochi, Masami; Shimizu, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    Insulation coating was added to the external pacemaker surface to prevent unnecessary electric current leakage to the periphery because the pulse generator body is used as an anode in unipolar pacing. However, a model without insulation coating has recently been used, so we studied the effects on muscle potential inhibition and muscle stimulation of pacemakers in unipolar pacing with different parts of the pacemaker body coated with insulation. Case comparisons were made for the following models: insulated except for the center of one side (33, group C), insulated except for the peripheral zone (10, group E), and noncoated models (11, group N). The muscle detection threshold voltage, muscle detection threshold pulse duration, muscle potential sensing threshold (MP), and lead resistance were measured. A comparison was made of the amount of energy (En) needed to reach the muscle stimulation threshold. For MP values, there was no significant statistical difference between group C and E, whereas a significant difference was present between group C and N and between group E and N. For En values, there was a significant difference between group C and E and between group C and N, but there was no significant difference between group E and N. The muscle potential sensing threshold dose not have a change in group E and much muscle stimulation energy is needed. The muscle potential sensing threshold was low in group N, requiring much muscle stimulation energy. Based on these results, it is usually not necessary to coat the pacemaker with insulation for unipolar pacing.

  12. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  13. Effects of Lateral Funiculus Sparing, Spinal Lesion Level, and Gender on Recovery of Bladder Voiding Reflexes and Hematuria in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Sunny L.; Brady, Tiffany D.; Dugan, Victoria P.; Armstrong, James E.; Hubscher, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Deficits in bladder function are complications following spinal cord injury (SCI), severely affecting quality of life. Normal voiding function requires coordinated contraction of bladder and urethral sphincter muscles dependent upon intact lumbosacral reflex arcs and integration of descending and ascending spinal pathways. We previously reported, in electrophysiological recordings, that segmental reflex circuit neurons in anesthetized male rats were modulated by a bilateral spino-bulbo-spinal pathway in the mid-thoracic lateral funiculus. In the present study, behavioral measures of bladder voiding reflexes and hematuria (hemorrhagic cystitis) were obtained to assess the correlation of plasticity-dependent recovery to the degree of lateral funiculus sparing and mid-thoracic lesion level. Adult rats received mid-thoracic-level lesions at one of the following severities: complete spinal transection; bilateral dorsal column lesion; unilateral hemisection; bilateral dorsal hemisection; a bilateral lesion of the lateral funiculi and dorsal columns; or a severe contusion. Voiding function and hematuria were evaluated by determining whether the bladder was areflexic (requiring manual expression, i.e., “crede maneuver”), reflexive (voiding initiated by perineal stroking), or “automatic” (spontaneous voiding without caretaker assistance). Rats with one or both lateral funiculi spared (i.e., bilateral dorsal column lesion or unilateral hemisection) recovered significantly faster than animals with bilateral lateral funiculus lesions, severe contusion, or complete transection. Bladder reflex recovery time was significantly slower the closer a transection lesion was to T10, suggesting that proximity to the segmental sensory and sympathetic innervation of the upper urinary tract (kidney, ureter) should be avoided in the choice of lesion level for SCI studies of micturition pathways. In addition, hematuria duration was significantly longer in males, compared to

  14. Do agility and skull architecture influence the geometry of the mammalian vestibulo-ocular reflex?

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Nathan; Cox, Philip G

    2010-04-01

    The spatial arrangement of the semicircular canals and extraocular muscles of the eye has been of considerable interest, particularly to researchers working on adaptations of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Here we offer the first, extensive comparative analysis of the spatial relationships between each extraocular muscle and the canal providing its primary excitatory stimulus. The sample consisted of 113 specimens, representing 51 extant mammalian species. Hypotheses tested included that variations in the spatial alignments are linked with differences of skull morphology and with differences of agility during locomotion. Internal morphologies were visualized with magnetic resonance imaging and were measured with landmark-based vectors and planes. Values for body mass and agility were taken from the existing literature. Data were investigated for trends and associations with standard bivariate and multivariate statistical methods as well as with phylogenetically adjusted bivariate methods. The findings clearly show that species differences in the alignment of each extraocular muscle relative to the canal providing its primary excitatory stimulus are closely associated with changes of orbit morphology. The results also indicate that the actions of the oblique muscles interchange with those of the superior and inferior recti muscles when comparing lateral-eyed (rabbit) with frontal-eyed species (cat). There was only weak evidence to support the notion that canal-muscle alignments differ significantly among species according to how agile they are. The results suggest that semicircular canal morphology is arranged primarily for detecting head movements and then secondarily, if at all, for diminishing the burden of transforming vestibulo-ocular reflex signals in the most agile species.

  15. Evidence for a local sympathetic venoarteriolar ''reflex'' in the dog hindleg

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, O.; Amtorp, O.; Faris, I.; Agerskov, K.

    1983-05-01

    The study was performed in order to determine whether a local sympathetic venoarteriolar ''reflex'' is present in the dog hindleg. Femoral artery blood flow was measured by an electromagnetic flowmeter probe, and blood flow in the thigh muscle and subcutaneous tissue distally in the paw was measured by the local 133Xe washout technique. Twenty experiments were carried out in seven dogs unilaterally sympathectomized 2-4 weeks previously. Resting vascular tone did not differ in the sympathectomized and nonsympathectomized legs. In the control leg, venous pressure elevation caused a decrease in femoral blood flow of 49% corresponding to an increase in vascular resistance of 58%. In muscle and subcutaneous tissue vascular resistance increased by 81% and 35%, respectively. In the denervated leg, venous stasis caused no change in total vascular resistance. In muscle the vascular resistance increased by only 24%. In subcutaneous tissue, vascular resistance decreased by 12%. The effect of acute lumbar sympathectomy was studied in another group of seven dogs. Operation caused an immediate decrease in vascular resistance of 40%. The increase in vascular resistance during venous stasis in the total leg, as well as in muscle and subcutaneous tissue, was not affected. However, acute lumbar sympathectomy combined with injection of phenoxybenzamine into the femoral artery almost abolished the vasoconstriction induced by venous stasis. In muscle, the increase in vascular resistance was still present, but considerably attenuated. In subcutaneous tissue, the normal response was completely blocked. Finally, local suction induced vasoconstriction in an adjoining area not subjected to changes in vascular transmural pressure, an effect that could be blocked by local neural blockade at the site of suction. The results strongly suggest that a local sympathetic veno-arteriolar (axon) ''reflex'' is present in muscle and subcutaneous tissue in the dog hindleg.

  16. Central nervous system control of the laryngeal muscles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2005-01-01

    Laryngeal muscle control may vary for different functions such as: voice for speech communication, emotional expression during laughter and cry, breathing, swallowing, and cough. This review discusses the control of the human laryngeal muscles for some of these different functions. Sensori-motor aspects of laryngeal control have been studied by eliciting various laryngeal reflexes. The role of audition in learning and monitoring ongoing voice production for speech is well known; while the role of somatosensory feedback is less well understood. Reflexive control systems involving central pattern generators may contribute to swallowing, breathing and cough with greater cortical control during volitional tasks such as voice production for speech. Volitional control is much less well understood for each of these functions and likely involves the integration of cortical and subcortical circuits. The new frontier is the study of the central control of the laryngeal musculature for voice, swallowing and breathing and how volitional and reflexive control systems may interact in humans. PMID:15927543

  17. Affective modulation of the startle reflex and the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of personality: The role of sensitivity to reward.

    PubMed

    Aluja, Anton; Blanch, Angel; Blanco, Eduardo; Balada, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated differences in the amplitude of startle reflex and Sensitivity to Reward (SR) and Sensitivity to Punishment (SP) personality variables of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). We hypothesized that subjects with higher scores in SR would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to pleasant pictures than lower scores, while higher scores in SP would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to unpleasant pictures than subjects with lower scores in this dimension. The sample consisted of 112 healthy female undergraduate psychology students. Personality was assessed using the short version of the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ). Laboratory anxiety was controlled by the State Anxiety Inventory. The startle blink reflex was recorded electromyographically (EMG) from the right orbicularis oculi muscle as a response to the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) pleasant, neutral and unpleasant pictures. Subjects higher in SR obtained a significant higher startle reflex response in pleasant pictures than lower scorers (48.48 vs 46.28, p<0.012). Subjects with higher scores in SP showed a light tendency of higher startle responses in unpleasant pictures in a non-parametric local regression graphical analysis (LOESS). The findings shed light on the relationships among the impulsive-disinhibited personality, including sensitivity to reward and emotions evoked through pictures of emotional content.

  18. Affective modulation of the startle reflex and the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory of personality: The role of sensitivity to reward.

    PubMed

    Aluja, Anton; Blanch, Angel; Blanco, Eduardo; Balada, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated differences in the amplitude of startle reflex and Sensitivity to Reward (SR) and Sensitivity to Punishment (SP) personality variables of the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). We hypothesized that subjects with higher scores in SR would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to pleasant pictures than lower scores, while higher scores in SP would obtain a higher startle reflex when exposed to unpleasant pictures than subjects with lower scores in this dimension. The sample consisted of 112 healthy female undergraduate psychology students. Personality was assessed using the short version of the Sensitivity to Punishment and Sensitivity Reward Questionnaire (SPSRQ). Laboratory anxiety was controlled by the State Anxiety Inventory. The startle blink reflex was recorded electromyographically (EMG) from the right orbicularis oculi muscle as a response to the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) pleasant, neutral and unpleasant pictures. Subjects higher in SR obtained a significant higher startle reflex response in pleasant pictures than lower scorers (48.48 vs 46.28, p<0.012). Subjects with higher scores in SP showed a light tendency of higher startle responses in unpleasant pictures in a non-parametric local regression graphical analysis (LOESS). The findings shed light on the relationships among the impulsive-disinhibited personality, including sensitivity to reward and emotions evoked through pictures of emotional content. PMID:25447471

  19. Evaluating the Reflexive Practices in a Learning Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruno, Andreina; Galuppo, Laura; Gilardi, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Reflexivity is a primary requirement for professional work. Our aim was to describe a methodology suitable for detecting the development of reflexive practice through the analysis of 59 Master's degree students' journals. We explore the use and changes of reflexive practice in relation to the settings and activities of the course using analysis of…

  20. On Reflection: Is Reflexivity Necessarily Beneficial in Intercultural Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blasco, Maribel

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how the concept of reflexivity is used in intercultural education. Reflexivity is often presented as a key learning goal in acquiring intercultural competence (ICC). Yet, reflexivity can be defined in different ways, and take different forms across time and space, depending on the concepts of selfhood that prevail and how…

  1. Reflex ankle stiffness is inversely correlated with natural body sway.

    PubMed

    Julien, Brianna L; Bendrups, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    We aimed to determine whether effective ankle stiffness (EAS), measured during slow unperceived perturbations of stance, is related to natural anterior-posterior body sway. Because the perturbations are not perceived, any neural component of the response to perturbation is assumed to be "reflex", in the broad sense of an involuntary response to a stimulus. Subjects stood on a force platform for three 10-min trials. EAS was obtained from the average slope (Δτ/Δα) of the relation between ankle torque (τ) and ankle angle (α), recorded during repeated perturbations delivered at the waist by a weak spring. EAS was normalised using the subject's "load stiffness" (LS), calculated from mass (m) and height (h) above the ankle joint (m·g·h). Sway was obtained from fluctuations in ankle angle prior to perturbation. Variation in EAS and sway between subjects provided spread of data for correlation. There were no significant changes in EAS or sway across trials. All subjects had higher EAS than LS and mean EAS (1124 N m/rad) was significantly greater (p<0.01) than mean LS (531 N m/rad). There was a strong significant inverse correlation between mean sway and mean normalised EAS (r=-0.68, p=0.03). We conclude that the body, in response to slow unperceived perturbations, simulates an inverted pendulum with a stiffness of about twice LS and that EAS is largely generated by neural modulation of postural muscles. The inverse correlation between EAS and body sway suggests that the reflex mechanisms responding to perturbation also influence the extent of natural sway. PMID:27004645

  2. Long lasting activity of nociceptive muscular afferents facilitates bilateral flexion reflex pattern in the feline spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, E D; Steffens, H; Pilyavskii, A I; Maisky, V A; Brück, W; Dibaj, P; Sears, T A

    2015-06-01

    Chronic muscular limb pain requires the adoption of motor patterns distinct from the classic ipsilateral flexion, crossed extension and corresponding reciprocal inhibitions to acute exteroceptive stimulation. Using selective chemical activation of group III/IV afferents in gastrocnemius-soleus (GS) muscles we investigated bilaterally their reflex responses conditioned by (a) acute 'myositis' induced by intramuscular carrageenan; and (b) sub-acute 'myositis' induced by infusion of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Reflex transmission was detected by monosynaptic testing and c-fos staining used to identify increased neuronal activity. In all control experiments with chemical stimulation of group III/IV afferents, ipsilateral responses conformed to the flexor reflex pattern. However, the expected contralateral facilitation of GS motoneurones occurred in fewer than 50% trials while only 9% of trials induced contralateral inhibition of flexor posterior-biceps-semitendinosus (PBSt) motoneurones. During carrageenan acute myositis contralateral PBSt was transiently facilitated by selective activation of group III/IV afferents. During CFA-induced myositis, contralateral only inhibition of GS motoneurones occurred instead of any facilitation, while bidirectionally a crossed facilitation of PBST dominated. These reflex changes were mirrored in an enhanced number of neurones with enhanced c-fos expression. Muscle pain, particularly if chronically persistent, requires another behavioural response pattern than acute exteroceptive pain.

  3. A Reflexive Model for Teaching Instructional Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shambaugh, Neal; Magliaro, Susan

    2001-01-01

    Documents a five-year study of two instructors who collaborated on formally studying their teaching of a master's level instructional design course. Outlines their views on learning, teaching, and instructional design (ID), describes the ID course, and explains the reflexive instructional model used, in which the teachers examined their teaching…

  4. Biological Motion Cues Trigger Reflexive Attentional Orienting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Jinfu; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng; Jiang, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The human visual system is extremely sensitive to biological signals around us. In the current study, we demonstrate that biological motion walking direction can induce robust reflexive attentional orienting. Following a brief presentation of a central point-light walker walking towards either the left or right direction, observers' performance…

  5. Taking Control of Reflexive Social Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ristic, Jelena; Kingstone, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Attention is shifted reflexively to where other people are looking. It has been argued by a number of investigators that this social attention effect reflects the obligatory bottom-up activation of domain-specific modules within the inferior temporal (IT) cortex that are specialized for processing face and gaze information. However, it is also the…

  6. Reflex Anuria After Renal Tumor Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Kervancioglu, Selim Sirikci, Akif; Erbagci, Ahmet

    2007-04-15

    We report a case of reflex anuria after transarterial embolization of a renal tumor. Anuria developed immediately after embolization and resolved 74 hr following the procedure. We postulate that reflux anuria in our case was related to mechanoreceptors, chemoreceptors, or both, as these are stimulated by the occluded blood vessels, ischemia, and edema of the normal renal tissue of an embolized kidney.

  7. Plasma quiescence in a reflex discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Jerde, L.; Friedman, S.; Carr, W.; Seidl, M.

    1980-02-01

    A thermionic cathode reflex discharge and the plasma it produces are studied. It is found that extremely quiescent plasmas can be produced when the electron-loss rate due to classical diffusion is equal to the ion-loss rate. Particle and power balances for the quiescent plasma are obtained, and the average electron energy loss per ion produced is determined.

  8. Doing Reflexivity: Moments of Unbecoming and Becoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Alison; Allan, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers an account of a reflexive "trip" undertaken by a professional doctoral student and her supervisor. It presents a series of vignettes which offer an account of unbecomings and becomings encountered by the student. Making use of a dialogic approach in which the supervisor responds to the student, we suggest this method of…

  9. Dilemmas and Deliberations in Reflexive Ethnographic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janean Valerie

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces insights into the challenges and dilemmas experienced whilst researching students' interpretations and understandings of the Behaviour Management in Schools policy in Western Australia. Journal records, supported by student transcripts, are woven together in a reflexive ethnographic journey--from the beginning phase of…

  10. Reflectivity, Reflexivity and Situated Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malthouse, Richard; Roffey-Barentsen, Jodi; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an aspect of reflective practice referred to as situated reflective practice. The overarching theory is derived from social theories of structuration and reflexivity. In particular, from Giddens' theory of structuration, which sees social life as an interplay of agency and structure. Discussion of the research reported…

  11. Reflexive Learning: Stages towards Wisdom with Dreyfus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The Dreyfus (2001) account of seven stages of learning is considered in the context of the Dreyfus (1980s) account of five stages of skill development. The two new stages, Mastery and Practical Wisdom, make more explicit certain themes implicit in the five-stage account. In this way Dreyfus (2001) encourages a more reflexive approach. The themes…

  12. Novel Analog For Muscle Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Ryder, Jeff; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd. Elizabeth; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Hackney, Kyle; Fiedler, James; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Existing models (such as bed rest) of muscle deconditioning are cumbersome and expensive. We propose a new model utilizing a weighted suit to manipulate strength, power, or endurance (function) relative to body weight (BW). Methods: 20 subjects performed 7 occupational astronaut tasks while wearing a suit weighted with 0-120% of BW. Models of the full relationship between muscle function/BW and task completion time were developed using fractional polynomial regression and verified by the addition of pre-and postflightastronaut performance data for the same tasks. Splineregression was used to identify muscle function thresholds below which task performance was impaired. Results: Thresholds of performance decline were identified for each task. Seated egress & walk (most difficult task) showed thresholds of leg press (LP) isometric peak force/BW of 18 N/kg, LP power/BW of 18 W/kg, LP work/BW of 79 J/kg, isokineticknee extension (KE)/BW of 6 Nm/kg, and KE torque/BW of 1.9 Nm/kg.Conclusions: Laboratory manipulation of relative strength has promise as an appropriate analog for spaceflight-induced loss of muscle function, for predicting occupational task performance and establishing operationally relevant strength thresholds.

  13. Vestibulosympathetic reflex during mental stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Jason R.; Ray, Chester A.; Cooke, William H.

    2002-01-01

    Increases in sympathetic neural activity occur independently with either vestibular or mental stimulation, but it is unknown whether sympathetic activation is additive or inhibitive when both stressors are combined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the combined effects of vestibular and mental stimulation on sympathetic neural activation and arterial pressure in humans. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), arterial pressure, and heart rate were recorded in 10 healthy volunteers in the prone position during 1) head-down rotation (HDR), 2) mental stress (MS; using arithmetic), and 3) combined HDR and MS. HDR significantly (P < 0.05) increased MSNA (9 +/- 2 to 13 +/- 2 bursts/min). MS significantly increased MSNA (8 +/- 2 to 13 +/- 2 bursts/min) and mean arterial pressure (87 +/- 2 to 101 +/- 2 mmHg). Combined HDR and MS significantly increased MSNA (9 +/- 1 to 16 +/- 2 bursts/min) and mean arterial pressure (89 +/- 2 to 100 +/- 3 mmHg). Increases in MSNA (7 +/- 1 bursts/min) during the combination trial were not different from the algebraic sum of each trial performed alone (8 +/- 2 bursts/min). We conclude that the interaction for MSNA and arterial pressure is additive during combined vestibular and mental stimulation. Therefore, vestibular- and stress-mediated increases of MSNA appear to occur independently in humans.

  14. Prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex vs. auditory brainstem response for hearing assessment.

    PubMed

    Longenecker, R J; Alghamdi, F; Rosen, M J; Galazyuk, A V

    2016-09-01

    The high prevalence of noise-induced and age-related hearing loss in the general population has warranted the use of animal models to study the etiology of these pathologies. Quick and accurate auditory threshold determination is a prerequisite for experimental manipulations targeting hearing loss in animal models. The standard auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurement is fairly quick and translational across species, but is limited by the need for anesthesia and a lack of perceptual assessment. The goal of this study was to develop a new method of hearing assessment utilizing prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the acoustic startle reflex, a commonly used tool that measures detection thresholds in awake animals, and can be performed on multiple animals simultaneously. We found that in control mice PPI audiometric functions are similar to both ABR and traditional operant conditioning audiograms. The hearing thresholds assessed with PPI audiometry in sound exposed mice were also similar to those detected by ABR thresholds one day after exposure. However, three months after exposure PPI threshold shifts were still evident at and near the frequency of exposure whereas ABR thresholds recovered to the pre-exposed level. In contrast, PPI audiometry and ABR wave one amplitudes detected similar losses. PPI audiometry provides a high throughput automated behavioral screening tool of hearing in awake animals. Overall, PPI audiometry and ABR assessments of the auditory system are robust techniques with distinct advantages and limitations, which when combined, can provide ample information about the functionality of the auditory system. PMID:27349914

  15. Effects of Visual Cortex Activation on the Nociceptive Blink Reflex in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Sava, Simona L.; de Pasqua, Victor; Magis, Delphine; Schoenen, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR). Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia. PMID:24936654

  16. Effects of visual cortex activation on the nociceptive blink reflex in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sava, Simona L; de Pasqua, Victor; Magis, Delphine; Magis, Delphine; Schoenen, Jean; Schoenen, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Bright light can cause excessive visual discomfort, referred to as photophobia. The precise mechanisms linking luminance to the trigeminal nociceptive system supposed to mediate this discomfort are not known. To address this issue in healthy human subjects we modulated differentially visual cortex activity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or flash light stimulation, and studied the effect on supraorbital pain thresholds and the nociceptive-specific blink reflex (nBR). Low frequency rTMS that inhibits the underlying cortex, significantly decreased pain thresholds, increased the 1st nBR block ipsi- and contralaterally and potentiated habituation contralaterally. After high frequency or sham rTMS over the visual cortex, and rMS over the right greater occipital nerve we found no significant change. By contrast, excitatory flash light stimulation increased pain thresholds, decreased the 1st nBR block of ipsi- and contralaterally and increased habituation contralaterally. Our data demonstrate in healthy subjects a functional relation between the visual cortex and the trigeminal nociceptive system, as assessed by the nociceptive blink reflex. The results argue in favour of a top-down inhibitory pathway from the visual areas to trigemino-cervical nociceptors. We postulate that in normal conditions this visuo-trigeminal inhibitory pathway may avoid disturbance of vision by too frequent blinking and that hypoactivity of the visual cortex for pathological reasons may promote headache and photophobia. PMID:24936654

  17. Chronic Contusion Spinal Cord Injury Impairs Ejaculatory Reflexes in Male Rats: Partial Recovery by Systemic Infusions of Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist 7OHDPAT.

    PubMed

    Kozyrev, Natalie; Staudt, Michael D; Brown, Arthur; Coolen, Lique M

    2016-05-15

    Chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) causes major disruption of ejaculatory function in men. Ejaculation is a reflex and the spinal generator for ejaculatory reflexes in the rat has been located in the lumbosacral spinal cord. The effects of SCI on the rat spinal ejaculation generator and ejaculatory reflexes remain understudied. The first goal of the current study was to establish the effects of chronic SCI on the function of the spinal ejaculation generator. Male rats received a contusion injury of the spinal cord at spinal level T6-T7. Ejaculatory reflexes elicited by electrical stimulation of the dorsal penile nerve (DPN) were evaluated in injured and control rats at 4-6 weeks following SCI. SCI males demonstrated significant reductions in bursting of the bulbocavernosus muscle (BCM), an indicator for expulsion phase of ejaculation, and in seminal vesicle pressure (SVP) increases, an indicator for the emission phase of ejaculation, following DPN stimulation. Thus, contusion SCI resulted in long-term impairment of ejaculatory reflexes. The D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-2-(di-N-propylamino) tetralin (7OHDPAT) facilitates ejaculation in spinal cord intact rats, thus the second goal of the current study was to test whether subcutaneous infusions of 7OHDPAT can facilitate ejaculatory reflexes in rats with chronic SCI. Male rats received a contusion injury at T6-T7 and effects of systemic administration of 7OHDPAT (1 mg/kg) were tested 4-5 weeks following injury. Results showed that 7OHDPAT administration facilitated ejaculatory reflexes in SCI males with or without DPN stimulation, provided that supraspinal inputs to the lumbar cord were severed by transection just prior to evaluating the reflex. Thus, 7OHDPAT administration in SCI males was able to overcome the detrimental effects of SCI on ejaculatory reflexes.

  18. Amiloride Selectively Blocks the Low Threshold (T) Calcium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Cha-Min; Presser, Fernando; Morad, Martin

    1988-04-01

    More than one type of voltage-gated calcium channel has been identified in muscle cells and neurons. Many specific organic and inorganic blockers of the conventional, slowly inactivating high threshold (L) calcium channel have been reported. No specific blockers of the low threshold (T) channel have been as yet identified. Amiloride, a potassium sparing diuretic, has now been shown to selectively block the low threshold calcium channel in mouse neuroblastoma and chick dorsal root ganglion neurons. The selective blockade of the T-type calcium channel will allow identification of this channel in different tissues and characterization of its specific physiological role.

  19. Muscle pain: animal and human experimental and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Marchettini, P

    1993-10-01

    The search for the identification of the sensory apparatus encoding muscle pain sensation in humans is recounted. Basic neurophysiologic animal studies, leading to a description of slowly conducting afferent from muscle and definition of high threshold polymodal muscle nociceptors, and pioneer psychophysic human studies together with recent microneurographic experiments in humans are described. The phenomena of muscle pain broad localization and distant referral are discussed, and clinical implications are extrapolated to interpret muscle pain as a localizing sign of mononeuropathy or radiculopathy. The identification of human muscle nociceptors has defined the scientific standard to test emerging clinical descriptions having muscle pain as a symptom.

  20. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  1. Self-Sustained Motor Activity Triggered by Interlimb Reflexes in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury, Evidence of Functional Ascending Propriospinal Pathways

    PubMed Central

    McNulty, Penelope A.; Burke, David

    2013-01-01

    The loss or reduction of supraspinal inputs after spinal cord injury provides a unique opportunity to examine the plasticity of neural pathways within the spinal cord. In a series of nine experiments on a patient, quadriplegic due to spinal cord injury, we investigated interlimb reflexes and self-sustained activity in completely paralyzed and paretic muscles due to a disinhibited propriospinal pathway. Electrical stimuli were delivered over the left common peroneal nerve at the fibular head as single stimuli or in trains at 2–100 Hz lasting 1 s. Single stimuli produced a robust interlimb reflex twitch in the contralateral thumb at a mean latency 69 ms, but no activity in other muscles. With stimulus trains the thumb twitch occurred at variable subharmonics of the stimulus rate, and strong self-sustained activity developed in the contralateral wrist extensors, outlasting both the stimuli and the thumb reflex by up to 20 s. Similar behavior was recorded in the ipsilateral wrist extensors and quadriceps femoris of both legs, but not in the contralateral thenar or peroneal muscles. The patient could not terminate the self-sustained activity voluntarily, but it was abolished on the left by attempted contractions of the paralyzed thumb muscles of the right hand. These responses depend on the functional integrity of an ascending propriospinal pathway, and highlight the plasticity of spinal circuitry following spinal cord injury. They emphasize the potential for pathways below the level of injury to generate movement, and the role of self-sustained reflex activity in the sequelae of spinal cord injury. PMID:23936543

  2. Increased long-latency reflex activity as a sufficient explanation for childhood hypertonic dystonia: a neuromorphic emulation study

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Won J.; Niu, Chuanxin M.; Sanger, Terence D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder that interferes with daily movements and can have a devastating effect on quality of life for children and their families. Although injury to basal ganglia is associated with dystonia, the neurophysiological mechanisms leading to the clinical manifestations of dystonia are not understood. Previous work suggested that long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) is hyperactive in children with hypertonia due to secondary dystonia. We hypothesize that abnormal activity in motor cortices may cause an increase in the long-latency stretch reflex leading to hypertonia. Approach We modelled two possibilities of hyperactive LLSR by either creating a tonic involuntary drive to cortex, or increasing the synaptic gain in cortical neurons. Both models are emulated using programmable Very-Large-Scale-Integrated-circuit (VLSI) hardware to test their sufficiency for producing dystonic symptoms. The emulation includes a joint with two Hill-type muscles, realistic muscle spindles, and 2,304 Izhikevich-type spiking neurons. The muscles are regulated by a monosynaptic spinal pathway with 32ms delay and a long-latency pathway with 64ms loop-delay representing transcortical/supra-spinal connections. Main results When the limb is passively stretched, both models produce involuntary resistance with increased antagonist EMG responses similar to human data; also the muscle relaxation is delayed similar to human data. Both models predict reduced range of motion in voluntary movements. Significance Although our model is a highly simplified and limited representation of reflex pathways, it shows that increased activity of the long-latency stretch reflex is by itself sufficient to cause many of the features of hypertonic dystonia. PMID:25946372

  3. Self-sustained motor activity triggered by interlimb reflexes in chronic spinal cord injury, evidence of functional ascending propriospinal pathways.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Penelope A; Burke, David

    2013-01-01

    The loss or reduction of supraspinal inputs after spinal cord injury provides a unique opportunity to examine the plasticity of neural pathways within the spinal cord. In a series of nine experiments on a patient, quadriplegic due to spinal cord injury, we investigated interlimb reflexes and self-sustained activity in completely paralyzed and paretic muscles due to a disinhibited propriospinal pathway. Electrical stimuli were delivered over the left common peroneal nerve at the fibular head as single stimuli or in trains at 2-100 Hz lasting 1 s. Single stimuli produced a robust interlimb reflex twitch in the contralateral thumb at a mean latency 69 ms, but no activity in other muscles. With stimulus trains the thumb twitch occurred at variable subharmonics of the stimulus rate, and strong self-sustained activity developed in the contralateral wrist extensors, outlasting both the stimuli and the thumb reflex by up to 20 s. Similar behavior was recorded in the ipsilateral wrist extensors and quadriceps femoris of both legs, but not in the contralateral thenar or peroneal muscles. The patient could not terminate the self-sustained activity voluntarily, but it was abolished on the left by attempted contractions of the paralyzed thumb muscles of the right hand. These responses depend on the functional integrity of an ascending propriospinal pathway, and highlight the plasticity of spinal circuitry following spinal cord injury. They emphasize the potential for pathways below the level of injury to generate movement, and the role of self-sustained reflex activity in the sequelae of spinal cord injury.

  4. State-dependent and reflex drives to the upper airway: basic physiology with clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Stuart W.; Malhotra, Atul

    2013-01-01

    The root cause of the most common and serious of the sleep disorders is impairment of breathing, and a number of factors predispose a particular individual to hypoventilation during sleep. In turn, obstructive hypopneas and apneas are the most common of the sleep-related respiratory problems and are caused by dysfunction of the upper airway as a conduit for airflow. The overarching principle that underpins the full spectrum of clinical sleep-related breathing disorders is that the sleeping brain modifies respiratory muscle activity and control mechanisms and diminishes the ability to respond to respiratory distress. Depression of upper airway muscle activity and reflex responses, and suppression of arousal (i.e., “waking-up”) responses to respiratory disturbance, can also occur with commonly used sedating agents (e.g., hypnotics and anesthetics). Growing evidence indicates that the sometimes critical problems of sleep and sedation-induced depression of breathing and arousal responses may be working through common brain pathways acting on common cellular mechanisms. To identify these state-dependent pathways and reflex mechanisms, as they affect the upper airway, is the focus of this paper. Major emphasis is on the synthesis of established and recent findings. In particular, we specifically focus on 1) the recently defined mechanism of genioglossus muscle inhibition in rapid-eye-movement sleep; 2) convergence of diverse neurotransmitters and signaling pathways onto one root mechanism that may explain pharyngeal motor suppression in sleep and drug-induced brain sedation; 3) the lateral reticular formation as a key hub of respiratory and reflex drives to the upper airway. PMID:23970535

  5. Intra-abdominal Pressures during Voluntary and Reflex Cough

    PubMed Central

    Addington, W Robert; Stephens, Robert E; Phelipa, Michael M; Widdicombe, John G; Ockey, Robin R

    2008-01-01

    Background Involuntary coughing such as that evoked from the larynx, the laryngeal cough reflex (LCR), triggers a coordinated contraction of the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic muscles, which increases intra-abdominal pressure (IAP), displaces the diaphragm upwards and generates the expiratory force for cough and airway clearance. Changes in the IAP during voluntary cough (VC) and the LCR can be measured via a pressure catheter in the bladder. This study evaluated the physiological characteristics of IAP generated during VC and the LCR including peak and mean pressures and calculations of the area under the curve (AUC) values during the time of the cough event or epoch. Methods Eleven female subjects between the ages of 18 and 75 underwent standard urodynamic assessment with placement of an intravesicular catheter with a fiberoptic strain gauge pressure transducer. The bladder was filled with 200 ml of sterile water and IAP recordings were obtained with VC and the induced reflex cough test (RCT) using nebulized inhaled 20% tartaric acid to induce the LCR. IAP values were used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC) by the numerical integration of intravesicular pressure over time (cm H2O·s). Results The mean (± SEM) AUC values for VC and the LCR were 349.6 ± 55.2 and 986.6 ± 116.8 cm H2O·s (p < 0.01). The mean IAP values were 45.6 ± 4.65 and 44.5 ± 9.31 cm H2O (NS = .052), and the peak IAP values were 139.5 ± 14.2 and 164.9 ± 15.8 cm H2O (p = 0.07) for VC and LCR, respectively. Conclusion The induced LCR is the involuntary rapid and repeated synchronous expiratory muscle activation that causes and sustains an elevated IAP over time, sufficient for airway protection. VC and LCR have different neurophysiological functions. Quantification of the LCR using AUC values and mean or peak IAP values may be useful as a clinical tool for determining neurophysiological airway protection status and provide a quantitative assessment of changes in a patient

  6. Ascending and descending reflex motor activity of recto-anal region-cholinergic and nitrergic implications in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Radomirov, Radomir; Ivancheva, Christina; Brading, Alison F; Itzev, Dimitar; Rakovska, Angelina; Negrev, Negrin

    2009-04-29

    The implications of cholinergic and nitrergic transmissions in ascending and descending reflex motor pathways of recto-anal region in rat model were evaluated using: (i) electrical stimulation; (ii) triple organ bath; and (iii) morphological techniques. Electrical stimulation to anal canal induced simultaneous ascending contractile responses of longitudinal and circular muscles of proximal rectum, local contraction of anal canal or contraction followed by relaxation of internal anal sphincter when external sphincter was dissected off. The stimulation of proximal rectum elicited local contractions of both rectal layers and descending contractions of internal sphincter or anal canal. Tetrodotoxin (0.1 microM) prevented the electrically elicited events. The ascending excitatory responses and the local and ascending contractions of longitudinal muscle were more pronounced than those of circular muscle suggesting dominant role of ascending reflex pathways and of longitudinal muscle in rectal motor activity. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-containing fibres and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase-positive neurons were observed in myenteric ganglia of rectum and anal canal. NG-nitro-l-arginine (0.5mM) increased the contractile ascending and descending responses. During atropine (0.3 microM) treatment the ascending and descending contractions were suppressed but not abolished and a relaxation revealed in ascending response of circular muscle and in descending responses of internal anal sphincter and anal canal. The relaxation was decreased by NG-nitro-l-arginine and increased by l-arginine (0.5mM). The results suggest that cholinergic excitatory ascending and descending pathways and nitric oxide-dependent inhibitory ascending neurotransmission(s) to rectal circular muscle and inhibitory descending to internal anal sphincter and anal canal are involved in reflex circuitry controlling motor activity of recto-anal region.

  7. Crossing the Writing Threshold.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Carol Lea

    What pushes a writer over the edge of thought into text production--over what may be called "the writing threshold?" This is the moment when the thoughts in a writer's mind, the writing situation, and personal motivations create a momentum that results in a pattern of written words. There is evidence that not everyone crosses the writing threshold…

  8. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  9. Modulation of the initial light reflex during affective picture viewing.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Robert R; Bradley, Margaret M; Lang, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    An initial reflexive constriction of the pupil to stimulation-the light reflex-is primarily modulated by brightness, but is attenuated when participants are under threat of shock (i.e., fear-inhibited light reflex). The present study assessed whether the light reflex is similarly attenuated when viewing emotional pictures. Pupil diameter was recorded while participants viewed erotic, violent, and neutral scenes that were matched in brightness; scrambled versions identical in brightness were also presented as an additional control. Compared to viewing neutral scenes, the light reflex was reliably modulated by hedonic content, with significant attenuation both when viewing unpleasant as well as pleasant pictures. No differences in the light reflex were found among scrambled versions. Thus, emotional modulation of the initial light reflex is not confined to a context of fear and is not indicative of brightness differences when viewing pictures of natural scenes.

  10. Vestibulo-spinal response modification as determined with the H-reflex during the Spacelab-1 flight.

    PubMed

    Reschke, M F; Anderson, D J; Homick, J L

    1986-01-01

    Our laboratory at the Johnson Space Center has employed the H-reflex recorded from the soleus muscle as a method of monosynaptic reflex testing in conjunction with vertical linear acceleration to assess modification of utriculo-saccular function induced through prolonged exposure to microgravity. It was hypothesized that exposure to free fall would reduce the necessity for postural reflexes in the major leg muscles, and that postural modification would reflect a change, not in the peripheral vestibular organs, but more centrally. This postural adjustment would reflect a sensory motor rearrangement where otolith receptor input was reinterpreted to provide an environmentally appropriate response. In addition to the H-reflex (which was the only inflight measurement), vestibulo-spinal EMG from the gastrocnemius, and self-motion reports were obtained in response to a sudden earth vertical fall. Preflight, inflight and postflight motion sickness reports were also recorded, and related to the H-reflex data. The results indicated that early inflight H-reflex amplitude was similar to that recorded preflight, but that measurements obtained later in the flight (day seven) did not show a change in potentiation as a function of the different drop to shock intervals. Immediate postflight H-reflex response in three of the four astronauts tested showed a rebound effect. Postflight gastrocnemius EMG in response to the sudden fall did not show a significant change from preflight values. However, one crewman who was tested early postflight did show an increase in EMG activity in response to the sudden fall. This immediate postflight effect returned to baseline rapidly. Self-motion perception obtained inflight suggested that the early inflight drops were perceived like those preflight. Drops later inflight were described as sudden, fast, hard and translational in nature. Immediately postflight the drops were perceived like those late inflight, and the astronauts said that they did not

  11. Anaerobic threshold in total artificial heart animals.

    PubMed

    Chiang, B Y; Pantalos, G; Burns, G L; Long, J W; Khanwilkar, P S; Everett, S D; Mohammad, S F; Olsen, D B

    1994-01-01

    The anaerobic threshold represents an objective measure of functional capacity and is useful in assessment of pulmonary and cardiovascular dysfunction. This study determined the anaerobic threshold in total artificial heart animals and evaluated the performance of the total artificial heart system. Five animals with total artificial hearts were put under incremental exercise testing after exercise training. The intensity of exercise ranged from 2.0 to 4.5 km/hr, with an increment of 0.5 km/hr every 3 min. The anaerobic threshold was 6.72 +/- 0.84 ml/kg/min as detected by the lactate method, and 6.48 +/- 0.79 by the CO2 method. The value of the anaerobic threshold in total artificial heart animals implies that the performance capacity of a total artificial heart is not sufficient to meet the oxygen requirements of vigorously exercising skeletal muscle. The protocol does not allow for driving parameter changes during exercise, and this situation, combined with the manual mode of the control system used, was inadequate to allow the total artificial heart animals to exercise more vigorously. Using an automatic control mode might be helpful, as well as considering the relationship between indices of oxygen metabolism, such as oxygen delivery, oxygen consumption, and oxygen extraction rate, in the control algorithms in total artificial heart control systems.

  12. Vestibular perceptual thresholds to angular rotation in acute unilateral vestibular paresis and with galvanic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, Nicholas J; Cousins, Sian; Seemungal, Barry M; Gresty, Michael A; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2011-09-01

    Studies of compensation of injury to the human vestibular system have, in the main, focused on the vestibular-ocular reflex. Probing vestibular perception allows more of the sensory pathway to be assessed. We present a novel paradigm for simultaneously testing vestibular perceptual and nystagmic thresholds to angular acceleration around an earth vertical axis. The perceptual thresholds can be modulated asymmetrically in normal subjects by DC galvanic stimulation with the head flexed in the roll plane, as expected from the main torsional plane of action of the galvanic stimulus. The perceptual and nystagmic thresholds were bilaterally elevated in acute vestibular neuritis, a unilateral condition, possibly due to central suppression of vestibular input. The degree of asymmetry in thresholds was small in comparison with the large caloric asymmetry present in the patients, indicating a relatively preserved capacity for near-threshold performance of the non-damaged labyrinth both in the "on" and "off" directions.

  13. Short-latency crossed responses in the human biceps femoris muscle

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Andrew J T; Kamavuako, Ernest N; Geertsen, Svend S; Farina, Dario; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Interlimb reflexes contribute to the central neural co-ordination between different limbs in both humans and animals. Although commissural interneurons have only been directly identified in animals, spinally-mediated interlimb reflexes have been discovered in a number of human lower limb muscles, indicating their existence in humans. The present study aimed to investigate whether short-latency crossed-spinal reflexes are present in the contralateral biceps femoris (cBF) muscle following ipsilateral knee (iKnee) joint rotations during a sitting task, where participants maintained a slight pre-contraction in the cBF. Following iKnee extension joint rotations, an inhibitory reflex was observed in the surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the cBF, whereas a facilitatory reflex was observed in the cBF following iKnee flexion joint rotations. The onset latency of both cBF reflexes was 44 ms, which is too fast for a transcortical pathway to contribute. The cBF inhibitory and facilitatory reflexes followed the automatic gain control principle, with the size of the response increasing as the level of background pre-contraction in the cBF muscle increased. In addition to the surface EMG, both short-latency inhibitory and facilitatory cBF reflexes were recorded directly at the motor unit level by i.m. EMG, and the same population of cBF motor units that were inhibited following iKnee extension joint rotations were facilitated following iKnee flexion joint rotations. Therefore, parallel interneuronal pathways (probably involving commissural interneurons) from ipsilateral afferents to common motoneurons in the contralateral leg can probably explain the perturbation direction-dependent reversal in the sign of the short-latency cBF reflex. PMID:25970767

  14. Differential modulation of crossed and uncrossed reflex pathways by clonidine in adult cats following complete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Alain; Johnson, Michael D; Heckman, C J

    2012-02-15

    Clonidine, an α-noradrenergic agonist, facilitates hindlimb locomotor recovery after complete spinal transection (i.e. spinalization) in adult cats. However, the mechanisms involved in clonidine-induced functional recovery are poorly understood. Sensory feedback from the legs is critical for hindlimb locomotor recovery in spinalized mammals and clonidine could alter how spinal neurons respond to peripheral inputs in adult spinalized cats. To test this hypothesis we evaluated the effect of clonidine on the responses of hindlimb muscles, primarily in the left hindlimb, evoked by stretching the left triceps surae muscles and by stimulating the right tibial and superficial peroneal nerves in eight adult decerebrate cats that were spinalized 1 month before the terminal experiment. Cats were not trained following spinalization. Clonidine had no consistent effect on responses of ipsilateral muscles evoked by triceps surae muscle stretch. However, clonidine consistently potentiated the amplitude and duration of crossed extensor responses. Moreover, following clonidine injection, stretch and tibial nerve stimulation triggered episodes of locomotor-like activity in approximately one-third of trials. Differential effects of clonidine on crossed reflexes and on ipsilateral responses to muscle stretch indicate an action at a pre-motoneuronal site. We conclude that clonidine facilitates hindlimb locomotor recovery following spinalization in untrained cats by enhancing the excitability of central pattern generating spinal neurons that also participate in crossed extensor reflex transmission.

  15. Functioning of peripheral Ia pathways in infants with typical development: responses in antagonist muscle pairs.

    PubMed

    Teulier, Caroline; Ulrich, Beverly D; Martin, Bernard

    2011-02-01

    In muscle responses of proprioceptive origin, including the stretch/tendon reflex (T-reflex), the corresponding reciprocal excitation and irradiation to distant muscles have been described from newborn infants to older adults. However, the functioning of other responses mediated primarily by Ia-afferents has not been investigated in infants. Understanding the typical development of these multiple pathways is critical to determining potential problems in their development in populations affected by neurological disease, such as spina bifida or cerebral palsy. Hence, the goal of the present study was to quantify the excitability of Ia-mediated responses in lower limb muscles of infants with typical development. These responses were elicited by mechanical stimulation applied to the distal tendons of the gastrocnemius-soleus (GS), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (QAD) muscles of both legs in twelve 2- to 10-month-old infants and recorded simultaneously in antagonist muscle pairs by surface EMG. Tendon taps alone elicited responses in either, both or neither muscle. The homonymous response (T-reflex) was less frequent in the TA than the GS or QAD muscle. An 80 Hz vibration superimposed on tendon taps induced primarily an inhibition of monosynaptic responses; however, facilitation also occurred in either muscle of the recorded pair. These responses were not influenced significantly by age or gender. Vibration alone produced a tonic reflex response in the vibrated muscle (TVR) and/or the antagonist muscle (AVR). However, for the TA muscle the TVR was more frequently elicited in older than younger infants. High variability was common to all responses. Overall, the random distribution and inconsistency of muscle responses suggests that the gain of Ia-mediated feedback is unstable. We propose that during infancy the central nervous system needs to learn to set stable feedback gain, or destination of proprioceptive assistance, based on their use during functional

  16. Functioning of peripheral Ia pathways in infants with typical development: responses in antagonist muscle pairs.

    PubMed

    Teulier, Caroline; Ulrich, Beverly D; Martin, Bernard

    2011-02-01

    In muscle responses of proprioceptive origin, including the stretch/tendon reflex (T-reflex), the corresponding reciprocal excitation and irradiation to distant muscles have been described from newborn infants to older adults. However, the functioning of other responses mediated primarily by Ia-afferents has not been investigated in infants. Understanding the typical development of these multiple pathways is critical to determining potential problems in their development in populations affected by neurological disease, such as spina bifida or cerebral palsy. Hence, the goal of the present study was to quantify the excitability of Ia-mediated responses in lower limb muscles of infants with typical development. These responses were elicited by mechanical stimulation applied to the distal tendons of the gastrocnemius-soleus (GS), tibialis anterior (TA) and quadriceps (QAD) muscles of both legs in twelve 2- to 10-month-old infants and recorded simultaneously in antagonist muscle pairs by surface EMG. Tendon taps alone elicited responses in either, both or neither muscle. The homonymous response (T-reflex) was less frequent in the TA than the GS or QAD muscle. An 80 Hz vibration superimposed on tendon taps induced primarily an inhibition of monosynaptic responses; however, facilitation also occurred in either muscle of the recorded pair. These responses were not influenced significantly by age or gender. Vibration alone produced a tonic reflex response in the vibrated muscle (TVR) and/or the antagonist muscle (AVR). However, for the TA muscle the TVR was more frequently elicited in older than younger infants. High variability was common to all responses. Overall, the random distribution and inconsistency of muscle responses suggests that the gain of Ia-mediated feedback is unstable. We propose that during infancy the central nervous system needs to learn to set stable feedback gain, or destination of proprioceptive assistance, based on their use during functional

  17. Mathematical Modelling of Muscle Effect on the Kinematics of the Head-Neck Complex in a Frontal Car Collision: A Parameter Study.

    PubMed

    Wittek; Kajzer

    1998-01-01

    A 2-dimensional multibody model of the head-neck complex with muscle elements was developed to estimate the influence of muscles on the kinematics of the head-neck complex in a frontal car collision. With this model the authors evaluated how strongly the calculated influence of muscles depends on 3 important factors: (a) impact severity, (b) reflex time, and (c) parameters that determine characteristics of different components of the muscle model. When muscles were triggered at the beginning of impact, the maximum angle of the head flexion was decreased by the muscles by 40% in a frontal collision with an acceleration of 15 g. The influence of muscles was significant for reflex times lower than 60 (80) ms. The calculated influence of muscles was not sensitive to most parameters of the muscle model.

  18. Disturbance Compensating Control of a Biped Walking Machine Based on Reflex Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funabashi, Hiroaki; Takeda, Yukio; Itoh, Shigenari; Higuchi, Masaru

    A control system that utilizes the concept of reflex control in animals is proposed for a biped walking machine with consideration of compensation of external disturbances. A walking machine was modeled as a sequential machine, and a series of single-reflex motions was synthesized for it. A hierarchical three-level control system was constructed. As disturbances, two types of external forces were considered: “impulsive” force with a large magnitude and short action-time and “continuous” force with a small magnitude and long action time. Appropriate state variables for rapid and reliable sensing of each disturbance were investigated and the thresholds of their values used as the triggers for changing the gait from a periodic gait to a disturbance compensation one were determined. Motions of disturbance compensation gaits were determined by combining some single-reflex motions. A control system for an experimental biped walking machine whose mass is 18kg, total height is 0.66m, step length is 0.25m and walking cycle is 133 steps/min was constructed and tested. The proposed control system enabled the walking machine to successfully avoid tumbling when it was subjected to the two external forces and return to a periodic gait.

  19. Trazodone Increases the Respiratory Arousal Threshold in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and a Low Arousal Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Danny J.; Malhotra, Atul; Wellman, Andrew; White, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: The effect of common sedatives on upper airway physiology and breathing during sleep in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been minimally studied. Conceptually, certain sedatives may worsen OSA in some patients. However, sleep and breathing could improve with certain sedatives in patients with OSA with a low respiratory arousal threshold. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that trazodone increases the respiratory arousal threshold in patients with OSA and a low arousal threshold. Secondary aims were to examine the effects of trazodone on upper airway dilator muscle activity, upper airway collapsibility, and breathing during sleep. Design: Patients were studied on 4 separate nights according to a within-subjects cross-over design. Setting: Sleep physiology laboratory. Patients: Seven patients with OSA and a low respiratory arousal threshold. Interventions: In-laboratory polysomnograms were obtained at baseline and after 100 mg of trazodone was administered, followed by detailed overnight physiology experiments under the same conditions. During physiology studies, continuous positive airway pressure was transiently lowered to measure arousal threshold (negative epiglottic pressure prior to arousal), dilator muscle activity (genioglossus and tensor palatini), and upper airway collapsibility (Pcrit). Measurements and Results: Trazodone increased the respiratory arousal threshold by 32 ± 6% (-11.5 ± 1.4 versus -15.3 ± 2.2 cmH2O, P < 0.01) but did not alter the apnea-hypopnea index (39 ± 12 versus 39 ± 11 events/h sleep, P = 0.94). Dilator muscle activity and Pcrit also did not systematically change with trazodone. Conclusions: Trazodone increases the respiratory arousal threshold in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and a low arousal threshold without major impairment in dilator muscle activity or upper airway collapsibility. However, the magnitude of change in arousal threshold was insufficient to overcome the compromised upper airway

  20. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy associated with antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Falasca, G F; Toly, T M; Reginato, A J; Schraeder, P L; O'Connor, C R

    1994-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSDS) complicating antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy is not well acknowledged in the neurologic literature. We report 4 patients with reflex sympathetic dystrophy that occurred while they were receiving AEDs. All patients had shoulder and hand involvement, which in 2 was bilateral, and 1 had ipsilateral foot involvement. Two patients did not respond to a change in AEDs, but all improved with a course of prednisone. One patient with phenobarbital (PB)-associated RSDS relapsed on inadvertent rechallenge with secobarbital. A review of the literature showed that several other fibrosing disorders are associated with AED administration, including Dupuytren's contractures, frozen shoulder, plantar and hand nodules, and Peyronie's disease. RSD associated with AEDs is important to recognize because it may result in permanent disability if treatment is delayed.

  1. Breakpoints in ventilation, cerebral and muscle oxygenation, and muscle activity during an incremental cycling exercise

    PubMed Central

    Racinais, Sebastien; Buchheit, Martin; Girard, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to locate the breakpoints of cerebral and muscle oxygenation and muscle electrical activity during a ramp exercise in reference to the first and second ventilatory thresholds. Twenty-five cyclists completed a maximal ramp test on an electromagnetically braked cycle-ergometer with a rate of increment of 25 W/min. Expired gazes (breath-by-breath), prefrontal cortex and vastus lateralis (VL) oxygenation [Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)] together with electromyographic (EMG) Root Mean Square (RMS) activity for the VL, rectus femoris (RF), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles were continuously assessed. There was a non-linear increase in both cerebral deoxyhemoglobin (at 56 ± 13% of the exercise) and oxyhemoglobin (56 ± 8% of exercise) concomitantly to the first ventilatory threshold (57 ± 6% of exercise, p > 0.86, Cohen's d < 0.1). Cerebral deoxyhemoglobin further increased (87 ± 10% of exercise) while oxyhemoglobin reached a plateau/decreased (86 ± 8% of exercise) after the second ventilatory threshold (81 ± 6% of exercise, p < 0.05, d > 0.8). We identified one threshold only for muscle parameters with a non-linear decrease in muscle oxyhemoglobin (78 ± 9% of exercise), attenuation in muscle deoxyhemoglobin (80 ± 8% of exercise), and increase in EMG activity of VL (89 ± 5% of exercise), RF (82 ± 14% of exercise), and BF (85 ± 9% of exercise). The thresholds in BF and VL EMG activity occurred after the second ventilatory threshold (p < 0.05, d > 0.6). Our results suggest that the metabolic and ventilatory events characterizing this latter cardiopulmonary threshold may affect both cerebral and muscle oxygenation levels, and in turn, muscle recruitment responses. PMID:24782786

  2. Photic sneeze reflex in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Katz, B; Melles, R B; Swenson, M R; Schneider, J A

    1990-12-01

    Photic induced sneeze is a reflex that occurs in certain individuals after exposure to bright light. Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism in which nonprotein cystine accumulates within lysosomes. The pathognomonic ocular manifestation of cystinosis is corneal crystal deposition. We observed photic induced sneezes during ophthalmoscopic examination in five of 19 patients with nephropathic cystinosis (26%). We report on this observation and discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms for photic induced sneezing in cystinosis.

  3. Photic sneeze reflex in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, B; Melles, R B; Swenson, M R; Schneider, J A

    1990-01-01

    Photic induced sneeze is a reflex that occurs in certain individuals after exposure to bright light. Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism in which nonprotein cystine accumulates within lysosomes. The pathognomonic ocular manifestation of cystinosis is corneal crystal deposition. We observed photic induced sneezes during ophthalmoscopic examination in five of 19 patients with nephropathic cystinosis (26%). We report on this observation and discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms for photic induced sneezing in cystinosis. PMID:2275931

  4. Photic sneeze reflex in nephropathic cystinosis.

    PubMed

    Katz, B; Melles, R B; Swenson, M R; Schneider, J A

    1990-12-01

    Photic induced sneeze is a reflex that occurs in certain individuals after exposure to bright light. Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism in which nonprotein cystine accumulates within lysosomes. The pathognomonic ocular manifestation of cystinosis is corneal crystal deposition. We observed photic induced sneezes during ophthalmoscopic examination in five of 19 patients with nephropathic cystinosis (26%). We report on this observation and discuss possible pathophysiological mechanisms for photic induced sneezing in cystinosis. PMID:2275931

  5. Inhaled toluene can modulate the effects of anesthetics on the middle-ear acoustic reflex.

    PubMed

    Campo, Pierre; Venet, Thomas; Thomas, Aurélie; Cour, Chantal; Castel, Blandine; Nunge, Hervé; Cosnier, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Toluene (Tol) is an organic solvent widely used in the industry. It is also abused as an inhaled solvent, and can have deleterious effects on hearing. Recently, it was demonstrated that Tol has both anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic effects, and that it also inhibits voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. This paper describes a study of the effects of inhaled Tol on rats anesthetized with isoflurane, pentobarbital, or a mixture of ketamine/xylazine. Hearing was tested using distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAEs) associated with a contralateral noise to evaluate contraction of the middle-ear muscles. This allowed us to assess the interactions between the effects of Tol and anesthesia on the central nervous system (CNS). Although both anesthetics and Tol are known to inhibit the middle-ear acoustic reflex, our data indicated that inhaled Tol counterbalances the effects of anesthetic in a dose-dependent manner. In other terms, Tol can increase the amplitude of the middle-ear reflex in anesthetized rats, whatever the nature of the anesthetic used. This indicates that inhaling Tol (a Ca(2+)-channel-blocking drug) modifies the potency of anesthesia, and thereby the amplitude of the middle-ear reflex.

  6. Ivane S. Beritashvili (1884-1974): from spinal cord reflexes to image-driven behavior.

    PubMed

    Tsagareli, M G; Doty, R W

    2009-10-20

    Ivane Beritashvili ("Beritoff" in Russian, and often in Western languages) was a major figure in 20th-century neuroscience. Mastering the string galvanometer, he founded the electrophysiology of spinal cord reflexes, showing that inhibition is a distinctly different process from excitation, contrary to the concepts of his famous mentor, Wedensky. Work on postural reflexes with Magnus was cut short by World War I, but he later demonstrated that navigation in two-dimensional space without vision is a function solely of the vestibular system rather than of muscle proprioception. Persevering in his experiments despite postwar turmoil he founded an enduring Physiology Institute in Tbilisi, where he pursued an ingenious and extensive investigation of comparative memory in vertebrates. This revealed the unique nature of mammalian memory processes, which he forthrightly called "image driven," and distinguished them unequivocally from those underlying conditional reflexes. For some 30 years the Stalinist terror confined his publications to the Russian language. Work with his colleague, Chichinadze, discovering that memory confined to one cerebral hemisphere could be accessed by the other via a specific forebrain commissure, did reach the West, and ultimately led to recognition of the fascinating "split brain" condition. In the 1950s he was removed from his professorial position for 5 years as being "anti-Pavlovian." Restored to favor, he was honorary president of the "Moscow Colloquium" that saw the foundation of the International Brain Research Organization. PMID:19589370

  7. Network problem threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gejji, Raghvendra, R.

    1992-01-01

    Network transmission errors such as collisions, CRC errors, misalignment, etc. are statistical in nature. Although errors can vary randomly, a high level of errors does indicate specific network problems, e.g. equipment failure. In this project, we have studied the random nature of collisions theoretically as well as by gathering statistics, and established a numerical threshold above which a network problem is indicated with high probability.

  8. Quantification of the stapedial reflex reveals delayed responses in autism.

    PubMed

    Lukose, Richard; Brown, Kevin; Barber, Carol M; Kulesza, Randy Joseph

    2013-10-01

    Autism is a developmental disorder characterized, in part, by sensory abnormalities. It is well established that most if not all patients with autism have problems with auditory processing, ranging from deafness to hyperacusis, and physiological testing of auditory function (i.e. auditory brain stem responses) implicates brain stem dysfunction in autism. Additionally, previous research from this lab has revealed significantly fewer auditory brain stem neurons in autistic subjects as young as 2 years of age. These observations have led us to hypothesize that objective, noninvasive measures of auditory function can be used as an early screening tool to identify neonates with an elevated risk of carrying a diagnosis of autism. Here, we provide a detailed quantitative investigation of the acoustic stapedial reflex (ASR), a three- or four-neuron brain stem circuit, in young autistic subjects and normal developing controls. Indeed, we find significantly lower thresholds, responses occurring at significantly longer latency and right-left asymmetry in autistic subjects. The results from this investigation support deficits in auditory function as a cardinal feature of autism and suggest that individuals with autism can be identified by their ASR responses. PMID:23825093

  9. A postnatal switch in GABAergic control of spinal cutaneous reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Hathway, Gareth; Harrop, Emily; Baccei, Mark; Walker, Suellen; Moss, Andrew; Fitzgerald, Maria

    2007-01-01

    GABAergic signalling exerts powerful inhibitory control over spinal tactile and nociceptive processing but during development GABA can be depolarizing and the functional consequences of this upon neonatal pain processing is unknown. Here we show a postnatal switch in tonic GABAA receptor (GABAAR) modulation of cutaneous tactile and nociceptive reflexes from excitation to inhibition, but only in the intact spinal cord. Neonatal and 21-day old (P21) rats were intrathecally treated with one of the GABAAR antagonists bicuculline and gabazine with both compounds dose-dependently decreasing hindpaw mechanical and thermal withdrawal thresholds in P21 rats but increasing them in P3 neonates. Intrathecal gabazine also produced an increase in the cutaneous evoked EMG response of the biceps femoris in P21 rates while lowering the response in neonates. Injections of 3H-gabazine in the L4-L5 region at P3 confirmed that gabazine binding was restricted to the lumbar spinal cord. Spinalisation of P3 neonates at the upper thoracic level prior to drug application reversed the behavioural and EMG responses to GABA antagonists so that they resembled those of P21 rats. The effects of spinalisation were consistent with gabazine facilitation of ventral root potentials observed in isolated neonatal spinal cord. These data show a marked postnatal developmental switch in GABAergic control of neonatal nociception that is mediated by supraspinal structures and illustrate the importance of studying developmental circuits in the intact nervous system. PMID:16420421

  10. Basic Gravitational Reflexes in the Larval Frog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    This investigation was designed to determine how a primitive vertebrate, the bullfrog tadpole, is able to sense and process gravitational stimuli. Because of the phylogenetic similarities of the vestibular systems in all vertebrates, the understanding of the gravitational reflexes in this relatively simple vertebrate should elucidate a skeletal framework on a elementary level, upon which the more elaborate reflexes of higher vertebrates may be constructed. The purpose of this study was to understand how the nervous system of the larval amphibian processes gravitational information. This study involved predominantly electrophysiological investigations of the isolated, alert (forebrain removed) bullfrog tadpole head. The focus of these experiments is threefold: (1) to understand from whole extraocular nerve recordings the signals sent to the eye following static gravitational tilt of the head; (2) to localize neuronal centers responsible for generating these signals through reversible pharmacological ablation of these centers; and (3) to record intracellularly from neurons within these centers in order to determine the single neuron's role in the overall processing of the center. This study has provided information on the mechanisms by which a primitive vertebrate processes gravitational reflexes.

  11. The mechano-gated channel inhibitor GsMTx4 reduces the exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated femoral arteries.

    PubMed

    Copp, Steven W; Kim, Joyce S; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor; Kaufman, Marc P

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical and metabolic stimuli arising from contracting muscles evoke the exercise pressor reflex. This reflex is greater in a rat model of simulated peripheral arterial disease in which a femoral artery is chronically ligated than it is in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. The role played by the mechanically sensitive component of the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in ligated rats is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the mechano-gated channel inhibitor GsMTx4, a relatively selective inhibitor of mechano-gated Piezo channels, reduces the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats with ligated femoral arteries. Injection of 10 μg of GsMTx4 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced the pressor response to Achilles tendon stretch (a purely mechanical stimulus) but had no effect on the pressor responses to intra-arterial injection of α,β-methylene ATP or lactic acid (purely metabolic stimuli). Moreover, injection of 10 μg of GsMTx4 into the arterial supply of the hindlimb reduced both the integrated pressor area (control 535 ± 21, GsMTx4 218 ± 24 mmHg·s; P < 0.01), peak pressor (control 29 ± 2, GsMTx4 14 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.01), and renal sympathetic nerve responses to electrically induced intermittent hindlimb muscle contraction (a mixed mechanical and metabolic stimulus). The reduction of the integrated pressor area during contraction caused by GsMTx4 was greater in rats with ligated femoral arteries than it was in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. We conclude that the mechanically sensitive component of the reflex contributes to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex during intermittent hindlimb muscle contractions in rats with ligated femoral arteries. PMID:26921442

  12. Reconstruction of atonic bladder innervation after spinal cord injury: A bladder reflex arc with afferent and efferent pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Jun; Li, Guitao; Luo, Dixin; Sun, Hongtao; Qi, Yong; Li, Yiyi; Jin, Xunjie

    2015-11-01

    Background Establishing bladder reflex arcs only with the efferent pathway to induce micturition after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been successful. However, the absence of sensory function and micturition desires can lead to serious complications. Objectives To reconstruct a bladder reflex arc with both afferent and efferent pathways to achieve atonic bladder innervation after SCI. Methods A reflex arc was established by microanastomosis of the S2 dorsal root to the peripheral process of the L5 dorsal ganglion and the L5 ventral root to the S2 ventral root. The functions of the reflex arc were evaluated using electrophysiology, wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) tracing, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) immunocytochemistry analysis. Hind-paw motion was evaluated by CatWalk gait. Results Compound action potentials and compound muscle action potentials were recorded at the right L5 dorsal root following electrical stimulation of right S2 dorsal root. Similar to the control side, these were not significantly different before or after the spinal cord destruction between L6 and S4. WGA-HRP tracing and CGRP immunocytochemistry showed that construction of the afferent and efferent pathways of the bladder reflex arc encouraged axonal regeneration of motor and sensory nerves, which then made contact with the anterior and posterior horns of the spinal cord, ultimately reestablishing axoplasmic transportation. Gait analysis showed that at 3 months following the operation, only the regularity index was significantly different as compared with 1 day before the operation, other parameters showing no difference. Conclusion Bladder reflex arc with the afferent and efferent pathways reconstructs the micturition function without great influence on the motion of leg.

  13. Anatomic patterning in the expression of vestibulosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.; McAllen, R. M.

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the possibility that expression of vestibulosympathetic reflexes (VSR) is related to a nerve's anatomic location rather than its target organ, we compared VSR recorded from the same type of postganglionic fiber [muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC)] located at three different rostrocaudal levels: hindlimb, forelimb, and face. Experiments were performed on chloralose-anesthetized cats, and vestibular afferents were stimulated electrically. Single MVC unit activity was extracted by spike shape analysis of few-fiber recordings, and unit discrimination was confirmed by autocorrelation. Poststimulus time histogram analysis revealed that about half of the neurons were initially inhibited by vestibular stimulation (type 1 response), whereas the other MVC fibers were initially strongly excited (type 2 response). MVC units with types 1 and 2 responses were present in the same nerve fascicle. Barosensitivity was equivalent in the two groups, but fibers showing type 1 responses fired significantly faster than those giving type 2 responses (0.29 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.20 +/- 0.02 Hz). Nerve fibers with type 1 responses were most common in the hindlimb (21 of 29 units) and least common in the face (2 of 11 units), the difference in relative proportion being significant (P < 0.05, chi(2) test). These results support the hypothesis that VSR are anatomically patterned.

  14. Pharmacological Isolation of Cognitive Components Influencing the Pupillary Light Reflex.

    PubMed

    Steinhauer, Stuart R; Condray, Ruth; Pless, Misha L

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive operations can be detected by reduction of the pupillary light response. Neurophysiological pathways mediating this reduction have not been distinguished. We utilized selective blockade of pupillary sphincter or dilator muscles to isolate parasympathetic or sympathetic activity during cognition, without modifying central processes. Pupil diameter was measured during the light reaction in 29 normal adults under three processing levels: No Task, during an easy task (Add 1), or a difficult task (Subtract 7). At three separate sessions, the pupil was treated with placebo, tropicamide (blocking the muscarinic sphincter receptor), or dapiprazole (blocking the adrenergic dilator receptor). With placebo, pupil diameter increased with increasing task difficulty. The light reaction was reduced only in the Subtract 7 condition. Dapiprazole (which decreased overall diameter) showed similar task-related changes in diameter and light reflex as for placebo. Following tropicamide (which increased overall diameter), there was a further increase in diameter only in the difficult task. Findings suggest two separate inhibitory components at the parasympathetic oculomotor center. Changes in baseline diameter are likely related to reticular activation. Inhibition of the light reaction in the difficult task is likely associated with cortical afferents. Sustained sympathetic activity also was present during the difficult task.

  15. Evolution of Gustatory Reflex Systems in the Brainstems of Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The great number of species of teleosts permits highly specialized forms to evolve to occupy particular niches. This diversity allows for extreme variations in brain structure according to particular sensory or motor adaptations. In the case of the taste system, goldfish (Carassius auratus) and some carps have evolved a specialized intraoral food-sorting apparatus along with corresponding specializations of gustatory centers in the brainstem. A comparison of circuitry within the complex vagal lobe of goldfish, and the of simpler gustatory lobes in catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) shows numerous similarities in organization and neurotransmitters. Double labeling studies using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and biotinylated dextran amine in catfish shows a direct projection from the vagal lobe to the motoneurons of nuc. ambiguus which innervate oropharyngeal musculature. Thus a 3-neuron reflex arc connects gustatory input to motor output. In the vagal lobe of goldfish, a similar 3-neuron arc can be identified: from primary gustatory afferent, to vagal lobe interneuron, thence to dendrites of the vagal motoneurons that innervate the pharyngeal muscles. Thus despite large differences in the gross appearance of the vagal gustatory systems in the brains of catfish and goldfish, the essential connectivity and circuitry is similar. This suggests that evolutionary change in the central nervous system largely proceeds by rearrangement and elaboration of existing systems, rather than by addition of new structures or circuits. PMID:20160963

  16. Novel Analog For Muscle Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Ryder, Jeff; Buxton, Roxanne; Redd, Elizabeth; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa; Hackney, Kyle; Fiedler, James; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Existing models of muscle deconditioning are cumbersome and expensive (ex: bedrest). We propose a new model utilizing a weighted suit to manipulate strength, power or endurance (function) relative to body weight (BW). Methods: 20 subjects performed 7 occupational astronaut tasks while wearing a suit weighted with 0-120% of BW. Models of the full relationship between muscle function/BW and task completion time were developed using fractional polynomial regression and verified by the addition of pre- and post-flight astronaut performance data using the same tasks. Spline regression was used to identify muscle function thresholds below which task performance was impaired. Results: Thresholds of performance decline were identified for each task. Seated egress & walk (most difficult task) showed thresholds of: leg press (LP) isometric peak force/BW of 18 N/kg, LP power/BW of 18 W/kg, LP work/ BW of 79 J/kg, knee extension (KE) isokinetic/BW of 6 Nm/Kg and KE torque/BW of 1.9 Nm/kg. Conclusions: Laboratory manipulation of strength / BW has promise as an appropriate analog for spaceflight-induced loss of muscle function for predicting occupational task performance and establishing operationally relevant exercise targets.

  17. Role of the brain stem in tibial inhibition of the micturition reflex in cats.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Matthew C; Slater, Rick C; Shen, Bing; Xiao, Zhiying; Wang, Jicheng; Lee, Andy; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the role of the brain stem in inhibition of bladder reflexes induced by tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) in α-chloralose-anesthetized decerebrate cats. Repeated cystometrograms (CMGs) were performed by infusing saline or 0.25% acetic acid (AA) to elicit normal or overactive bladder reflexes, respectively. TNS (5 or 30 Hz) at three times the threshold (3T) intensity for inducing toe movement was applied for 30 min between CMGs to induce post-TNS inhibition or applied during the CMGs to induce acute TNS inhibition. Inhibition was evident as an increase in bladder capacity without a change in amplitude of bladder contractions. TNS applied for 30 min between saline CMGs elicited prolonged (>2 h) poststimulation inhibition that significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity to 30-60% above control; however, TNS did not produce this effect during AA irritation. TNS applied during CMGs at 5 Hz but not 30 Hz significantly (P < 0.01) increased bladder capacity to 127.3 ± 6.1% of saline control or 187.6 ± 5.0% of AA control. During AA irritation, naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist) administered intravenously (1 mg/kg) or directly to the surface of the rostral brain stem (300-900 μg) eliminated acute TNS inhibition and significantly (P < 0.05) reduced bladder capacity to 62.8 ± 22.6% (intravenously) or 47.6 ± 25.5% (brain stem application). Results of this and previous studies indicate 1) forebrain circuitry rostral to the pons is not essential for TNS inhibition; and 2) opioid receptors in the brain stem have a critical role in TNS inhibition of overactive bladder reflexes but are not involved in inhibition of normal bladder reflexes. PMID:26017973

  18. Role of the brain stem in tibial inhibition of the micturition reflex in cats

    PubMed Central

    Ferroni, Matthew C.; Slater, Rick C.; Shen, Bing; Xiao, Zhiying; Wang, Jicheng; Lee, Andy; Roppolo, James R.; de Groat, William C.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of the brain stem in inhibition of bladder reflexes induced by tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) in α-chloralose-anesthetized decerebrate cats. Repeated cystometrograms (CMGs) were performed by infusing saline or 0.25% acetic acid (AA) to elicit normal or overactive bladder reflexes, respectively. TNS (5 or 30 Hz) at three times the threshold (3T) intensity for inducing toe movement was applied for 30 min between CMGs to induce post-TNS inhibition or applied during the CMGs to induce acute TNS inhibition. Inhibition was evident as an increase in bladder capacity without a change in amplitude of bladder contractions. TNS applied for 30 min between saline CMGs elicited prolonged (>2 h) poststimulation inhibition that significantly (P < 0.05) increased bladder capacity to 30–60% above control; however, TNS did not produce this effect during AA irritation. TNS applied during CMGs at 5 Hz but not 30 Hz significantly (P < 0.01) increased bladder capacity to 127.3 ± 6.1% of saline control or 187.6 ± 5.0% of AA control. During AA irritation, naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist) administered intravenously (1 mg/kg) or directly to the surface of the rostral brain stem (300–900 μg) eliminated acute TNS inhibition and significantly (P < 0.05) reduced bladder capacity to 62.8 ± 22.6% (intravenously) or 47.6 ± 25.5% (brain stem application). Results of this and previous studies indicate 1) forebrain circuitry rostral to the pons is not essential for TNS inhibition; and 2) opioid receptors in the brain stem have a critical role in TNS inhibition of overactive bladder reflexes but are not involved in inhibition of normal bladder reflexes. PMID:26017973

  19. [Electrostimulation of the pelvic floor muscles in urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Tjelum, K B; Lose, G; Abel, I; Pedersen, L M

    1994-04-11

    External electrical stimulation is a simple, noninvasive and inexpensive treatment modality, which is useful in the treatment of stress- and/or idiopathic urge incontinence. The mode of action arises from excitation of the pudendal nerves leading to direct and reflex contraction of pelvic floor muscles and a reflex inhibition of the detrusor. Treatment can be applied either as a weak long-term stimulation at home, as a short-term maximal stimulation in clinic, hospital or home treatment. Approximately 50%-75% of incontinent patients are either cured or improved and the adverse effects are sparse. Electrostimulation seems to be valuable in the treatment of incontinence.

  20. Locomotion as an emergent property of muscle contractile dynamics.

    PubMed

    Biewener, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscles share many common, highly conserved features of organization at the molecular and myofilament levels, giving skeletal muscle fibers generally similar and characteristic mechanical and energetic properties; properties well described by classical studies of muscle mechanics and energetics. However, skeletal muscles can differ considerably in architectural design (fiber length, pinnation, and connective tissue organization), as well as fiber type, and how they contract in relation to the timing of neuromotor activation and in vivo length change. The in vivo dynamics of muscle contraction is, therefore, crucial to assessing muscle design and the roles that muscles play in animal movement. Architectural differences in muscle-tendon organization combined with differences in the phase of activation and resulting fiber length changes greatly affect the time-varying force and work that muscles produce, as well as the energetic cost of force generation. Intrinsic force-length and force-velocity properties of muscles, together with their architecture, also play important roles in the control of movement, facilitating rapid adjustments to changing motor demands. Such adjustments complement slower, reflex-mediated neural feedback control of motor recruitment. Understanding how individual fiber forces are integrated to whole-muscle forces, which are transmitted to the skeleton for producing and controlling locomotor movement, is therefore essential for assessing muscle design in relation to the dynamics of movement.

  1. Delayed onset muscle soreness in neck/shoulder muscles.

    PubMed

    Nie, Hongling; Kawczynski, Adam; Madeleine, Pascal; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present study is to: (1) induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) in the neck and shoulder muscles; (2) compare the pressure pain sensitivity of muscle belly with that of musculotendinous tissue after DOMS; (3) examine the gender differences in the development of DOMS. An eccentric shoulder exercise was developed to induce DOMS on neck/shoulder muscles using a specially designed dynamometer. Eccentric shoulder contraction consisted of 5 bouts, each bout lasted 3min, with 3min rest period between each bout. The right shoulder was elevating against a downward pressure force of 110% maximal voluntary contraction force exerted by the dynamometer. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) of 11 sites (seven sites measured were muscle belly and four sites were myotendinous area) on neck/shoulder region were measured before, immediately after, 24 and 48h after exercise. Pain intensity, pain area and index of McGill pain questionnaire were assessed and all were increased after exercise. DOMS was induced in the shoulder muscles. PPT was significantly decreased and reached lowest values at 24h. The muscle belly sites are more sensitive to pain than the musculotendinous sites. No gender differences were found in any of the parameters used to assess the development of DOMS. DOMS did not distribute evenly in the neck/shoulder region. Soreness after exercise in the neck and shoulder seems not to be among the conditions that produce predominant musculoskeletal pain in females.

  2. Role of COX-2 in cough reflex sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin in patients with sinobronchial syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sinobronchial syndrome is a cause of chronic productive cough. Inflammatory mediators are involved in the pathophysiology of chronic productive cough. Accumulating evidences indicate that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, one of the inducible isoforms of COX, is a key element in the pathophysiological process of a number of inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the role of COX-2 in chronic productive cough in patients with sinobronchial syndrome known as neutrophilic bronchial inflammation. Methods The effect of etodolac, a potent COX-2 inhibitor, on cough response to inhaled capsaicin was examined in 15 patients with sinobronchial syndrome in a randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over study. Capsaicin cough threshold, defined as the lowest concentration of capsaicin eliciting five or more coughs, was measured as an index of airway cough reflex sensitivity. Results The cough threshold was significantly (p < 0.03) increased after two-week treatment with etodolac (200 mg twice a day orally) compared with placebo [37.5 (GSEM 1.3) vs. 27.2 (GSEM 1.3) μM]. Conclusions These findings indicate that COX-2 may be a possible modulator augmenting airway cough reflex sensitivity in patients with sinobronchial syndrome. PMID:20696045

  3. Dynamic exercise training prevents exercise pressor reflex overactivity in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Masaki; Iwamoto, Gary A; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Mitchell, Jere H; Smith, Scott A

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular responses to exercise are exaggerated in hypertension. We previously demonstrated that this heightened cardiovascular response to exercise is mediated by an abnormal skeletal muscle exercise pressor reflex (EPR) with important contributions from its mechanically and chemically sensitive components. Exercise training attenuates exercise pressor reflex function in healthy subjects as well as in heart failure rats. However, whether exercise training has similar physiological benefits in hypertension remains to be elucidated. Thus we tested the hypothesis that the EPR overactivity manifest in hypertension is mitigated by exercise training. Changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in response to muscle contraction, passive muscle stretch, and hindlimb intra-arterial capsaicin administration were examined in untrained normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYUT; n = 6), exercise-trained WKY (WKYET; n = 7), untrained spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRUT; n = 8), and exercise-trained SHR (SHRET; n = 7). Baseline MAP after decerebration was significantly decreased by 3 mo of wheel running in SHRET (104 ± 9 mmHg) compared with SHRUT (125 ± 10 mmHg). As previously reported, the pressor and renal sympathetic responses to muscle contraction, stretch, and capsaicin administration were significantly higher in SHRUT than WKYUT. Exercise training significantly attenuated the enhanced contraction-induced elevations in MAP (SHRUT: 53 ± 11 mmHg; SHRET: 19 ± 3 mmHg) and RSNA (SHRUT: 145 ± 32%; SHRET: 57 ± 11%). Training produced similar attenuating effects in SHR during passive stretch and capsaicin administration. These data demonstrate that the abnormally exaggerated EPR function that develops in hypertensive rats is significantly diminished by exercise training.

  4. Peripheral venous distension elicits a blood pressure raising reflex in young and middle-aged adults.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Evan L; Brian, Michael S; Coyle, Dana E; Edwards, David G; Stocker, Sean D; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2016-06-01

    Distension of peripheral veins in humans elicits a pressor and sympathoexcitatory response that is mediated through group III/IV skeletal muscle afferents. There is some evidence that autonomic reflexes mediated by these sensory fibers are blunted with increasing age, yet to date the venous distension reflex has only been studied in young adults. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the venous distension reflex would be attenuated in middle-aged compared with young adults. Nineteen young (14 men/5 women, 25 ± 1 yr) and 13 middle-aged (9 men/4 women, 50 ± 2 yr) healthy normotensive participants underwent venous distension via saline infusion through a retrograde intravenous catheter in an antecubital vein during limb occlusion. Beat-by-beat blood pressure, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and model flow-derived cardiac output (Q), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were recorded throughout the trial. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased during the venous distension in both young (baseline 83 ± 2, peak 94 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.05) and middle-aged adults (baseline 88 ± 2, peak 103 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.05). MSNA also increased in both groups [young: baseline 886 ± 143, peak 1,961 ± 242 arbitrary units (AU)/min; middle-aged: baseline 1,164 ± 225, peak 2,515 ± 404 AU/min; both P < 0.05]. TPR (P < 0.001), but not Q (P = 0.76), increased during the trial. However, the observed increases in blood pressure, MSNA, and TPR were similar between young and middle-aged adults. Additionally, no correlation was found between age and the response to venous distension (all P > 0.05). These findings suggest that peripheral venous distension elicits a pressor and sympathetic response in middle-aged adults similar to the response observed in young adults. PMID:27053648

  5. Noxious stimuli do not determine reflex cardiorespiratory effects in anesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, G; Legramante, J M; Iellamo, F; Frisardi, G; Cassarino, S; Peruzzi, G

    1996-12-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine whether the stimulation of an exclusively pain-sensing receptive field (dental pulp) could determine cardiorespiratory effects in animals in which the cortical integration of the peripheral information is abolished by deep anesthesia. In 15 anesthetized (alpha-chloralose and urethan) rabbits, low (3-Hz)- and high-frequency (100-Hz) electrical dental pulp stimulation was performed. Because this stimulation caused dynamic and static reflex contractions of the digastric muscles leading to jaw opening jaw-opening reflex (JOR); an indirect sign of algoceptive fiber activation], experimentally induced direct dynamic and static contractions of the digastric muscle were also performed. The low- and high-frequency stimulation of the dental pulp determined cardiovascular [systolic arterial pressure (SAP): -21.7 +/- 4.6 and 10.8 +/- 4.7 mmHg, respectively] and respiratory [pulmonary ventilation (VE): 145.1 +/- 44.9 and 109.3 +/- 28.4 ml/min, respectively] reflex responses similar to those observed during experimentally induced dynamic (SAP: -17.5 +/- 4.2 mmHg; VE: 228.0 +/- 58.5 ml/min) and static (SAP: 5.8 +/- 1.5 mmHg; VE: 148.0 +/- 75.3 ml/min) muscular contractions. The elimination of digastric muscular contraction (JOR) obtained by muscular paralysis did away with the cardiovascular changes induced by dental pulp stimulation, the effectiveness of which in stimulating dental pulp receptors has been shown by recording trigeminal-evoked potentials in six additional rabbits. The main conclusion was that, in deeply anesthetized animals, an algesic stimulus is unable to determine cardiorespiratory effects, which appear to be exclusively linked to the stimulation of ergoreceptors induced by muscular contraction.

  6. Adapting human postural reflexes following localized cerebrovascular lesion: analysis of bilateral long latency responses.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, R P; Badke, M B; Duncan, P W

    1986-01-22

    The symmetry and adaptability of long latency stretch responses was studied in a group of 4 adult hemiplegics and 5 normals of similar age. Subjects stood on a moveable platform which directly rotated the ankles unexpectedly during a series of horizontal anterioposterior (AP) translations. When the platform was rotated toes-up, long latency discharge of gastrocnemius and hamstring muscles enhanced loss of balance by pulling the body backwards. Toes-down platform rotation elicited a reflex response from tibialis anterior and quadriceps which inappropriately pulled the body forward. Attenuation of these long latency responses was necessary to minimize functional destabilization. Normal and stroke subjects demonstrated appropriate suppression of long latency responses, but the magnitude of attenuation was not uniform in hemiplegics. Adaptation was decreased in the proximal synergists compared to normal. Latency of muscle activation in the paretic limb was prolonged, and a preference for initial non-paretic limb activation was evident. Both lower extremities in hemiplegics showed a disruption of timing between distal and proximal synergists. These results suggest that stroke victims retain or recover the ability to modulate stretch reflex activity for balance. Temporal and spatial response asymmetries surface as critical factors underlying disequilibrium associated with localized cerebrovascular lesion. PMID:3942897

  7. Stochastic versus deterministic variability in simple neuronal circuits: I. Monosynaptic spinal cord reflexes.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, T; Schiff, S J; Sauer, T; Gossard, J P; Burke, R E

    1994-01-01

    Long time series of monosynaptic Ia-afferent to alpha-motoneuron reflexes were recorded in the L7 or S1 ventral roots in the cat. Time series were collected before and after spinalization at T13 during constant amplitude stimulations of group Ia muscle afferents in the triceps surae muscle nerves. Using autocorrelation to analyze the linear correlation in the time series demonstrated oscillations in the decerebrate state (4/4) that were eliminated after spinalization (5/5). Three tests for determinism were applied to these series: 1) local flow, 2) local dispersion, and 3) nonlinear prediction. These algorithms were validated with time series generated from known deterministic equations. For each experimental and theoretical time series used, matched time-series of stochastic surrogate data were generated to serve as mathematical and statistical controls. Two of the time series collected in the decerebrate state (2/4) demonstrated evidence for deterministic structure. This structure could not be accounted for by the autocorrelation in the data, and was abolished following spinalization. None of the time series collected in the spinalized state (0/5) demonstrated evidence of determinism. Although monosynaptic reflex variability is generally stochastic in the spinalized state, this simple driven system may display deterministic behavior in the decerebrate state. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7948680

  8. Reflex Seizures Triggered by Diaper Change in Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Subki, Ahmed H; Alasmari, Aishah S; Jan, Fadi M; Moria, Feras A; Jan, Mohammed M

    2016-07-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe epilepsy syndrome characterized by early onset of multiple types of seizures. We report the first case of reflex seizures triggered by diaper change in a girl at 9 months old and 2 years old with a mutation in the SCN1A gene causing DS. Reflex seizures have been reported in patients with DS provoked by increased body temperature or visual stimulation. The case we report widens the spectrum of triggers causing reflex seizures in children with DS. Cortical hyperexcitability resulting from the genetic defect explains the tendency to experience such reflex seizures.

  9. Role of the heart and peripheral resistance in the reflex effect of group I afferent fibers on blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Orani, G P; Decandia, M

    1994-03-01

    Experiments were done on anesthetized and curarized cats to see whether the increase in blood pressure caused by electrical stimulation of group I afferent fibers is related to a direct reflex effect on the heart. The reflex effect of electrical stimulation of group I afferent fibers from the gastrocnemius-soleus muscles on the arterial pressure, the left ventricular pressure, the inotropic state of the left ventricle (dP50/dt) and the heart rate were compared before and after beta-blockade with propranolol (0.1 mg/kg intravenously) to reduce a possible direct effect on the heart. The same comparison was made before and after alpha-blockade with phentolamine (2.5 mg/kg intravenously) to keep the peripheral resistance constant. Electrical stimulation of group I afferent fibers caused an increase in the blood pressure, the left ventricular pressure and, to some extent, the inotropic state of the left ventricle and the heart rate. The beta-blockade had no significant effect on these increases, while the alpha-blockade abolished the increase in blood pressure. It is concluded that the effect of stimulation of group I afferent fibers on the blood pressure is not dependent on a direct reflex effect on the heart, but can be better explained by a reflex increase in the peripheral resistance. PMID:8204793

  10. Coloring geographical threshold graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Percus, Allon; Muller, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    We propose a coloring algorithm for sparse random graphs generated by the geographical threshold graph (GTG) model, a generalization of random geometric graphs (RGG). In a GTG, nodes are distributed in a Euclidean space, and edges are assigned according to a threshold function involving the distance between nodes as well as randomly chosen node weights. The motivation for analyzing this model is that many real networks (e.g., wireless networks, the Internet, etc.) need to be studied by using a 'richer' stochastic model (which in this case includes both a distance between nodes and weights on the nodes). Here, we analyze the GTG coloring algorithm together with the graph's clique number, showing formally that in spite of the differences in structure between GTG and RGG, the asymptotic behavior of the chromatic number is identical: {chi}1n 1n n / 1n n (1 + {omicron}(1)). Finally, we consider the leading corrections to this expression, again using the coloring algorithm and clique number to provide bounds on the chromatic number. We show that the gap between the lower and upper bound is within C 1n n / (1n 1n n){sup 2}, and specify the constant C.

  11. Laser threshold magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeske, Jan; Cole, Jared H.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new type of sensor, which uses diamond containing the optically active nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) centres as a laser medium. The magnetometer can be operated at room-temperature and generates light that can be readily fibre coupled, thereby permitting use in industrial applications and remote sensing. By combining laser pumping with a radio-frequency Rabi-drive field, an external magnetic field changes the fluorescence of the NV- centres. We use this change in fluorescence level to push the laser above threshold, turning it on with an intensity controlled by the external magnetic field, which provides a coherent amplification of the readout signal with very high contrast. This mechanism is qualitatively different from conventional NV--based magnetometers which use fluorescence measurements, based on incoherent photon emission. We term our approach laser threshold magnetometer (LTM). We predict that an NV--based LTM with a volume of 1 mm3 can achieve shot-noise limited dc sensitivity of 1.86 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}} and ac sensitivity of 3.97 fT /\\sqrt{{{Hz}}}.

  12. The pattern of excitation of human lower limb motoneurones by probable group II muscle afferents.

    PubMed

    Simonetta-Moreau, M; Marque, P; Marchand-Pauvert, V; Pierrot-Deseilligny, E

    1999-05-15

    1. Heteronymous group II effects were investigated in the human lower limb. Changes in firing probability of single motor units in quadriceps (Q), biceps (Bi), semitendinosus (ST), gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and tibialis anterior (TA) were studied after electrical stimuli between 1 and 3 times motor threshold (MT) applied to common peroneal (CP), superficial (SP) and deep (DP) peroneal, Bi and GM nerves in those nerve-muscle combinations without recurrent inhibition. 2. Stimulation of the CP and Bi nerves evoked in almost all of the explored Q motor units a biphasic excitation with a low-threshold early peak, attributable to non-monosynaptic group I excitation, and a higher threshold late peak. When the CP nerve was cooled (or the stimulation applied to a distal branch, DP), the increase in latency was greater for the late than for the early peak, indicating that the late excitation is due to stimulation of afferents with a slower conduction velocity than group I fibres, presumably in the group II range. In ST motor units the group II excitation elicited by stimulation of the GM and SP nerves was particularly large and frequent, and the non-monosynaptic group I excitation was often replaced by an inhibition. 3. A late group II-induced excitation from CP to Q motoneurones and from GM and SP to ST motoneurones was also observed when using the H reflex as a test. 4. The electrical threshold and conduction velocity of the largest diameter fibres evoking the group II excitation were estimated to be 2.1 and 0.65 times those of the fastest Ia afferents, respectively. In the combinations tested in the present investigation the group II input seemed to be primarily of muscle origin. 5. The potent heteronymous group II excitation of motoneurones of both flexors and extensors of the knee contrasted with the absence of a group II effect from DP to GM and from GM to TA. In none of the combinations explored was there any evidence for group II inhibition of motoneurones. The

  13. Blood flow restriction training and the exercise pressor reflex: a call for concern.

    PubMed

    Spranger, Marty D; Krishnan, Abhinav C; Levy, Phillip D; O'Leary, Donal S; Smith, Scott A

    2015-11-01

    Blood flow restriction (BFR) training (also known as Kaatsu training) is an increasingly common practice employed during resistance exercise by athletes attempting to enhance skeletal muscle mass and strength. During BFR training, blood flow to the exercising muscle is mechanically restricted by placing flexible pressurizing cuffs around the active limb proximal to the working muscle. This maneuver results in the accumulation of metabolites (e.g., protons and lactic acid) in the muscle interstitium that increase muscle force and promote muscle growth. Therefore, the premise of BFR training is to simulate and receive the benefits of high-intensity resistance exercise while merely performing low-intensity resistance exercise. This technique has also been purported to provide health benefits to the elderly, individuals recovering from joint injuries, and patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation. Since the seminal work of Alam and Smirk in the 1930s, it has been well established that reductions in blood flow to exercising muscle engage the exercise pressor reflex (EPR), a reflex that significantly contributes to the autonomic cardiovascular response to exercise. However, the EPR and its likely contribution to the BFR-mediated cardiovascular response to exercise is glaringly missing from the scientific literature. Inasmuch as the EPR has been shown to generate exaggerated increases in sympathetic nerve activity in disease states such as hypertension (HTN), heart failure (HF), and peripheral artery disease (PAD), concerns are raised that BFR training can be used safely for the rehabilitation of patients with cardiovascular disease, as has been suggested. Abnormal BFR-induced and EPR-mediated cardiovascular complications generated during exercise could precipitate adverse cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events (e.g., cardiac arrhythmia, myocardial infarction, stroke and sudden cardiac death). Moreover, although altered EPR function in HTN, HF, and PAD underlies our

  14. Taking control of reflexive social attention.

    PubMed

    Ristic, Jelena; Kingstone, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Attention is shifted reflexively to where other people are looking. It has been argued by a number of investigators that this social attention effect reflects the obligatory bottom-up activation of domain-specific modules within the inferior temporal (IT) cortex that are specialized for processing face and gaze information. However, it is also the case that top-down factors may modulate the activation of IT cells. Here we examined behaviorally whether reflexive social orienting is purely automatic or sensitive to top-down modulation. Participants were shown an ambiguous stimulus that could be perceived either as representing EYES or a CAR. In we demonstrated between groups that an automatic shift of attention, equivalent to that triggered by a schematic FACE, occurred only when the stimulus was referred to as possessing EYES. In all participants received the EYES and CAR conditions. When the stimulus was first referred to as a CAR and then as EYES, an attentional shift was only present for the EYES condition. However, when the stimulus was first referred to as possessing EYES, and then later as a CAR, attentional shifts were observed for both conditions. These data indicate that the emergence of a reflexive social attention effect is influenced by top-down mechanisms but in an asymmetrical manner. Top-down processes appear to be effective for triggering IT involvement, that is, for perceiving a stimulus as a face, which produces the social attention effect. But top-down mechanisms are ineffective once IT involvement has been triggered. That is, once a stimulus has been seen as having eyes, it continues to be seen that way, and accordingly, the social attention effect persists. PMID:15617667

  15. Methodological Reflexivity: Towards Evolving Methodological Frameworks through Critical and Reflexive Deliberations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raven, Glenda

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author argues for a central and critical role for "reflexivity in research" with the aim of developing and strengthening not only everyone's understanding of what everyone does in environmental education research, but also how, and why everyone does it. In a narrative account of methodological issues that occurred within, and…

  16. Dysphoric milk ejection reflex: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dysphoric Milk Ejection Reflex (D-MER) is an abrupt emotional "drop" that occurs in some women just before milk release and continues for not more than a few minutes. The brief negative feelings range in severity from wistfulness to self-loathing, and appear to have a physiological cause. The authors suggest that an abrupt drop in dopamine may occur when milk release is triggered, resulting in a real or relative brief dopamine deficit for affected women. Clinicians can support women with D-MER in several ways; often, simply knowing that it is a recognized phenomenon makes the condition tolerable. Further study is needed. PMID:21645333

  17. Multi-MA reflex triode research.

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, Stephen Brian; Commisso, Robert J.; Weber, Bruce V.; Riordan, John C.; Allen, Raymond J.; Goyer, John R.; Murphy, Donald P.; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef

    2010-08-01

    The Reflex Triode can efficiently produce and transmit medium energy (10-100 keV) x-rays. Perfect reflexing through thin converter can increase transmission of 10-100 keV x-rays. Gamble II experiment at 1 MV, 1 MA, 60 ns - maximum dose with 25 micron tantalum. Electron orbits depend on the foil thickness. Electron orbits from LSP used to calculate path length inside tantalum. A simple formula predicts the optimum foil thickness for reflexing converters. The I(V) characteristics of the diode can be understood using simple models. Critical current dominates high voltage triodes, bipolar current is more important at low voltage. Higher current (2.5 MA), lower voltage (250 kV) triodes are being tested on Saturn at Sandia. Small, precise, anode-cathode gaps enable low impedance operation. Sample Saturn results at 2.5 MA, 250 kV. Saturn dose rate could be about two times greater. Cylindrical triode may improve x-ray transmission. Cylindrical triode design will be tested at 1/2 scale on Gamble II. For higher current on Saturn, could use two cylindrical triodes in parallel. 3 triodes in parallel require positive polarity operation. 'Triodes in series' would improve matching low impedance triodes to generator. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Physics of reflex triodes from Gamble II experiments (1 MA, 1 MV) - (a) Converter thickness 1/20 of CSDA range optimizes x-ray dose; (b) Simple model based on electron orbits predicts optimum thickness from LSP/ITS calculations and experiment; (c) I(V) analysis: beam dynamics different between 1 MV and 250 kV; (2) Multi-MA triode experiments on Saturn (2.5 MA, 250 kV) - (a) Polarity inversion in vacuum, (b) No-convolute configuration, accurate gap settings, (c) About half of current produces useful x-rays, (d) Cylindrical triode one option to increase x-ray transmission; and (3) Potential to increase Saturn current toward 10 MA, maintaining voltage and outer diameter - (a) 2 (or 3) cylindrical triodes in parallel, (b) Triodes

  18. Thermosensitivity of muscle: high-intensity thermal stimulation of muscle tissue induces muscle pain in humans

    PubMed Central

    Graven-Nielsen, T; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Mense, S

    2002-01-01

    Small-calibre afferent units responding to thermal stimuli have previously been reported to exist in muscle. The question as to whether these receptors in humans mediate subjective thermal sensations from muscle remains unresolved. The aims of the present study were to determine in humans whether intramuscular injection of warm and cold isotonic saline elicits temperature sensations, muscle pain or any other sensations. In 15 subjects, no thermal sensations assessed on a temperature visual analogue scale (VAS) could be detected with intramuscular injections of isotonic saline (1.5 ml) into the anterior tibial muscle at temperatures ranging from 8 to 48 °C. The same subjects recorded strongly increasing scores on a temperature VAS when thermal stimuli in the same intensity range were applied to the skin overlying the muscle by a contact thermode. However, i.m. isotonic saline of 48 °C induced muscle pain with peak scores of 3.2 ± 0.8 cm on a VAS scale ranging from 0 to 10 cm. Using the the McGill pain questionnaire a subgroup, of subjects qualitatively described the pain using the ‘thermal hot’ and ‘dullness’ word groups. Temperature measurements within the muscle during the stimulating injections showed that the time course of the pain sensation elicited by saline at 48 °C paralleled that of the intramuscular temperature and far outlasted the injection time. The present data show that high-intensity thermal stimulation of muscle is associated with muscle pain. High-threshold warm-sensitive receptors may mediate the pain following activation by temperatures of 48 °C or more. Taken together, the data indicate that thermosensation from a given volume of muscle is less potent than nociception. PMID:11956350

  19. Apomorphine effect on pain threshold in Parkinson's disease: a clinical and positron emission tomography study.

    PubMed

    Dellapina, Estelle; Gerdelat-Mas, Angélique; Ory-Magne, Fabienne; Pourcel, Laure; Galitzky, Monique; Calvas, Fabienne; Simonetta-Moreau, Marion; Thalamas, Claire; Payoux, Pierre; Brefel-Courbon, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) frequently experience pain that could be in part due to central modification of nociception. In this randomized controlled double blind study, we compared the effect of apomorphine versus placebo on pain thresholds and pain-induced cerebral activity in 25 patients with PD. Subjective pain threshold (using thermal stimulation, thermotest), objective pain threshold (nociceptive flexion reflex), and cerebral activity (H(2)(15)O PET) during noxious and innocuous stimulations were performed. Neither subjective nor objective pain thresholds nor pain activation profile were modified by apomorphine compared with placebo in 25 PD patients. Apomorphine has no effect on pain processing in PD. We suggest that other monoamine systems than dopaminergic system could be involved.

  20. Wh-filler-gap dependency formation guides reflexive antecedent search

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Michael; Ackerman, Lauren; Baumann, Peter; Potter, David; Yoshida, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies on online sentence processing have shown that the parser can resolve non-local dependencies rapidly and accurately. This study investigates the interaction between the processing of two such non-local dependencies: wh-filler-gap dependencies (WhFGD) and reflexive-antecedent dependencies. We show that reflexive-antecedent dependency resolution is sensitive to the presence of a WhFGD, and argue that the filler-gap dependency established by WhFGD resolution is selected online as the antecedent of a reflexive dependency. We investigate the processing of constructions like (1), where two NPs might be possible antecedents for the reflexive, namely which cowgirl and Mary. Even though Mary is linearly closer to the reflexive, the only grammatically licit antecedent for the reflexive is the more distant wh-NP, which cowgirl. (1). Which cowgirl did Mary expect to have injured herself due to negligence? Four eye-tracking text-reading experiments were conducted on examples like (1), differing in whether the embedded clause was non-finite (1 and 3) or finite (2 and 4), and in whether the tail of the wh-dependency intervened between the reflexive and its closest overt antecedent (1 and 2) or the wh-dependency was associated with a position earlier in the sentence (3 and 4). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate the parser accesses the result of WhFGD formation during reflexive antecedent search. The resolution of a wh-dependency alters the representation that reflexive antecedent search operates over, allowing the grammatical but linearly distant antecedent to be accessed rapidly. In the absence of a long-distance WhFGD (Experiments 3 and 4), wh-NPs were not found to impact reading times of the reflexive, indicating that the parser's ability to select distant wh-NPs as reflexive antecedents crucially involves syntactic structure. PMID:26500579

  1. Cyclic modulation of the H-reflex in a wrist flexor during rhythmic flexion-extension movements of the ipsilateral foot.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, F; Cavallari, P; Leocani, L

    1998-02-01

    In 12 subjects, each sitting on an armchair with the right forearm prone, the H-reflex elicited in the resting flexor carpi radialis muscle underwent cyclic excitability changes correlated with rhythmic flexion-extension movements of the ipsilateral foot (frequency of oscillations between 1.5 and 2.5 Hz). During foot plantar flexion, the H-reflex underwent a clear-cut increase, the maximum facilitation falling, in most subjects, within the second half of that phase; then, a gradual reduction in size led the reflex amplitude back to the initial value at the end of foot dorsal extension. If present also when the wrist and the ankle are moved together, this facilitation should favour the in-phase (isodirectional) association between movements and, conversely, hinder the anti-phase coupling.

  2. Heterosynaptic facilitation of tail sensory neuron synaptic transmission during habituation in tail-induced tail and siphon withdrawal reflexes of Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Stopfer, M; Carew, T J

    1996-08-15

    In cellular studies of habituation, such as in the gill and siphon withdrawal reflex to tactile stimulation of the siphon of Aplysia, a mechanism that has emerged as an explanation for response decrement during habituation is homosynaptic depression at sensory neurons mediating the behavioral response. We have examined the contribution of homosynaptic depression to habituation in sensory neurons that contribute to two reflex behaviors in Aplysia, tail withdrawal and siphon withdrawal, both elicited by threshold-level tail stimulation. In a companion paper (this issue), we reported that repeated tail stimulation, identical to that producing habituation in siphon withdrawal in freely moving animals, also produces habituation in reduced preparations. In this paper, we extend these behavioral findings by showing that in reduced preparations, identical tail stimulation also produces habituation of the tail withdrawal reflex. In addition, our cellular experiments show that (1) identified sensory and motor neurons in both reflex systems respond to identical repeated tail stimulation; in sensory neurons it produces a progressive decrease in spike number and increase in spike latency, and in motor neurons it produces progressive decrement in complex EPSPs and spike output. (2) Homosynaptic depression of the tail sensory neuron to tail motor neuron synapse does occur when the sensory neurons are activated repetitively by intracellular current. (3) Homosynaptic depression at this synapse does not occur when the sensory neurons are activated repetitively by threshold-level tail stimuli that elicit the behavioral reflex and cause habituation; rather, the sensory neurons exhibit significant heterosynaptic facilitation. Thus, in these reflexes, habituation is not accompanied by homosynaptic depression at the sensory neurons, suggesting that the plasticity underlying habituation occurs primarily at interneuronal sites.

  3. Trigeminal and carotid body inputs controlling vascular resistance in muscle during post-contraction hyperaemia in cats.

    PubMed

    de Burgh Daly, M; Cook, M N

    1999-03-01

    1. In anaesthetized cats, the effects of stimulation of the receptors in the nasal mucosa and carotid body chemoreceptors on vascular resistance in hindlimb skeletal muscle were studied to see whether the responses were the same in active as in resting muscle. The measurements of vascular resistance were taken, first, in resting muscle, and second, in the immediate post-contraction hyperaemic phase that followed a 30 s period of isometric contractions. 2. Stimulation of the receptors in the nasal mucosa caused reflex apnoea and vasoconstriction in muscle. The latter response was attenuated when the test was repeated during post-contraction hyperaemia. 3. Stimulations of the carotid bodies were made during a period of apnoea evoked reflexly by electrical stimulation of both superior laryngeal nerves. This apnoea prevented any effects of changes in respiration on the carotid body reflex vascular responses. Stimulation of the carotid bodies evoked hindlimb muscle vasoconstriction. In the post-contraction hyperaemic period, the response was reduced or abolished. A similar attenuation of the reflex vasoconstrictor responses occurred in decentralized muscles stimulated through their motor roots in the cauda equina. 4. Evidence is presented that the attenuation of the vasoconstrictor responses evoked by the two reflexes is a phenomenon localized to the contracting muscles themselves resulting from an interaction between sympathetic neuronal activity and the local production of metabolites. 5. The results are discussed in relation to the metabolic needs of tissues in relation to asphyxial defence mechanisms such as occur in the diving response. PMID:10050020

  4. Full-Field Pupillary Light Responses, Luminance Thresholds, and Light Discomfort Thresholds in CEP290 Leber Congenital Amaurosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Collison, Frederick T.; Park, Jason C.; Fishman, Gerald A.; McAnany, J. Jason; Stone, Edwin M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate visual function in patients with CEP290 Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA-CEP290), using three full-field tests that can be performed by patients with poor fixation. Methods Six patients (age range, 9–39 years) with LCA-CEP290 participated in the study. Stimuli for all three tests (full-field stimulus test [FST], pupillometry, and light discomfort threshold [LDT] testing) were generated by the Diagnosys ColorDome ganzfeld, by using achromatic stimuli as well as long- and short-wavelength stimuli to target rod and cone photoreceptors with all three tests and, in the latter two tests, melanopsin photoreceptors. Results Dark-adapted FST thresholds in LCA-CEP290 patients were cone mediated and elevated between 4.8 and 6.2 log units above the normal achromatic threshold. The FST threshold was not measurable in one patient. The rod-mediated transient pupillary light reflex (PLR) was absent in all but the youngest patient, where unreliable responses precluded PLR quantification. Cone-mediated transient PLRs were subnormal in five patients, and absent in another. Sustained melanopsin-mediated PLRs were measurable in all patients. Full-field LDT thresholds were elevated compared to normal controls, and were lower for short-wavelengh than for long-wavelength stimuli. Conclusions The FST thresholds and transient PLRs were cone mediated in our cohort LCA-CEP290 patients. Rod-mediated PLRs were undetectable, whereas melanopsin-mediated sustained responses were detected in all patients, suggesting a relative preservation of inner-retina function. The LDT elevations for the patients are somewhat paradoxical, given their subjective perception of photoaversion. Relative aversion to short-wavelength light suggests influence from melanopsin on LDTs in these patients. PMID:26529047

  5. Airway reflexes, autonomic function, and cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed Central

    Widdicombe, J; Lee, L Y

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we review the cardiovascular responses to the inhalation of irritants and pollutants. Many sensory receptors in the respiratory system, from nose to alveoli, respond to these irritants and set up powerful reflex changes, including those in the cardiovascular system. Systemic hypotension or hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, bradycardia, tachycardia, and dysrhythmias have all been described previously. Most of the experiments have been acute and have been performed on anesthetized experimental animals. Experiments on humans suggest we have similar sensory systems and reflex responses. However, we must use caution when applying the animal results to humans. Most animal experiments, unlike those with humans, have been performed using general anesthesia, with irritants administered in high concentrations, and often to a restricted part of the respiratory tract. Species differences in the response to irritants are well established. We must be even more careful when applying the results of acute experiments in animals to the pathophysiologic changes observed in prolonged exposure to environmental pollution in humans. PMID:11544167

  6. Cough reflex sensitization from esophagus and nose.

    PubMed

    Hennel, Michal; Brozmanova, Mariana; Kollarik, Marian

    2015-12-01

    The diseases of the esophagus and nose are among the major factors contributing to chronic cough although their role in different patient populations is debated. Studies in animal models and in humans show that afferent C-fiber activators applied on esophageal or nasal mucosa do not initiate cough, but enhance cough induced by inhaled irritants. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of esophageal and nasal C-fibers contribute to cough reflex hypersensitivity observed in chronic cough patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic rhinitis, respectively. The afferent nerves mediating cough sensitization from the esophagus are probably the neural crest-derived vagal jugular C-fibers. In addition to their responsiveness to high concentration of acid typical for gastroesophageal reflux (pH < 5), esophageal C-fibers also express receptors for activation by weakly acidic reflux such as receptors highly sensitive to acid and receptors for bile acids. The nature of sensory pathways from the nose and their activators relevant for cough sensitization are less understood. Increased cough reflex sensitivity was also reported in many patients with GERD or rhinitis who do not complain of cough indicating that additional endogenous or exogenous factors may be required to develop chronic coughing in these diseases.

  7. Reflexivity in Teams: A Review and New Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Konradt, Udo; Otte, Kai-Philip; Schippers, Michaéla C; Steenfatt, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Team reflexivity posits that the extent to which teams reflect upon and adapt their functioning is positively related to team performance. While remarkable progress has been made to provide evidence of this relationship, the underlying framework is missing elements of current theoretical streams for analyzing and describing teamwork, leaving the diversity of effects of team reflexivity often untouched. In this article, we present an update for this framework, by reviewing previous research on reflexivity, addressing gaps in the literature, and revising the original model by integrating feedback and dynamic team effectiveness frameworks for describing temporal developments of reflexivity. We furthermore propose a new dimensional structure for reflexivity, relying on prior work conceptualizing teams as information-processing systems that learn and advance through social-cognitive elements. Our model is therefore not only suitable for explaining the diverse set of relationships between team reflexivity on outcomes, but also provides valuable directions for viewing reflexivity as process that takes place during both transition and action phases of teamwork. We conclude with implications for managers, identify limitations, and propose an agenda for further research into this area. This article contributes an extended perspective relevant for further theory development and for effectively managing reflexivity in teams. PMID:26457836

  8. Iris Pigmentation and Fractionated Reaction and Reflex Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Bruce D.; And Others

    Behavioral measures, fractionated reaction and reflex times by means of electromyography, were used to determine if the eye color differences are found in the central or peripheral regions of the nervous system. The purpose of this research was to determine the truth of the hypothesis that dark-eyed individuals have faster reflex and reaction time…

  9. Ultimate concerns in late modernity: Archer, Bourdieu and reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, David; Woodman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Through a critique of Margaret Archer's theory of reflexivity, this paper explores the theoretical contribution of a Bourdieusian sociology of the subject for understanding social change. Archer's theory of reflexivity holds that conscious 'internal conversations' are the motor of society, central both to human subjectivity and to the 'reflexive imperative' of late modernity. This is established through critiques of Bourdieu, who is held to erase creativity and meaningful personal investments from subjectivity, and late modernity is depicted as a time when a 'situational logic of opportunity' renders embodied dispositions and the reproduction of symbolic advantages obsolete. Maintaining Archer's focus on 'ultimate concerns' in a context of social change, this paper argues that her theory of reflexivity is established through a narrow misreading and rejection of Bourdieu's work, which ultimately creates problems for her own approach. Archer's rejection of any pre-reflexive dimensions to subjectivity and social action leaves her unable to sociologically explain the genesis of 'ultimate concerns', and creates an empirically dubious narrative of the consequences of social change. Through a focus on Archer's concept of 'fractured reflexivity', the paper explores the theoretical necessity of habitus and illusio for understanding the social changes that Archer is grappling with. In late modernity, reflexivity is valorized just as the conditions for its successful operation are increasingly foreclosed, creating 'fractured reflexivity' emblematic of the complex contemporary interaction between habitus, illusio, and accelerating social change.

  10. [The development of I. P. Pavlov's conditioned reflex theory].

    PubMed

    Kim, O J

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849-1936), a Russian physiologist who presented for the first time the systematic theory of the function of the brain that controls the whole behavior of animals, i.e. higher nervous activity through experimental studies. This paper, principally based on Lectures on Conditioned Reflexes (1928), investigates the development of conditioned reflex theory from its beginning by dividing it into three periods. First, during the period from 1898 to 1906, the fundamental concept of conditioned reflex was established and the study of conditioned reflex became an independent discipline. From 1907 to 1916, the second period, Pavlov theorized on higher nervous activity on the basis of extensive data from his laboratory experiments of conditioned reflex. And Pavlov complemented conditioned reflex theory, during the third period from 1916 to 1928, and extended the boundaries of it through applications of conditioned reflex theory to psychopathology and typology. The study contributes to the understanding that conditioned reflex theory was historically developed, and not presented as a complete form from the beginning, and that Pavlov intended to study the higher nervous activity through the method of neurophysiology.

  11. [Value of blink reflex studies in neurosurgical problems].

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, Z; Nahser, H C; Nau, H E

    1983-09-01

    Blinking reflex studies were done in neurosurgical patients with processes in the posterior fossa and idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. Alterations were found in space occupying, ischemic, and traumatic lesions of the trigemino-facial system. The analysis of the components of the blinking reflex can give hints to the site of the lesion and also to the prognosis of the underlying process.

  12. Ultimate concerns in late modernity: Archer, Bourdieu and reflexivity.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, David; Woodman, Dan

    2015-12-01

    Through a critique of Margaret Archer's theory of reflexivity, this paper explores the theoretical contribution of a Bourdieusian sociology of the subject for understanding social change. Archer's theory of reflexivity holds that conscious 'internal conversations' are the motor of society, central both to human subjectivity and to the 'reflexive imperative' of late modernity. This is established through critiques of Bourdieu, who is held to erase creativity and meaningful personal investments from subjectivity, and late modernity is depicted as a time when a 'situational logic of opportunity' renders embodied dispositions and the reproduction of symbolic advantages obsolete. Maintaining Archer's focus on 'ultimate concerns' in a context of social change, this paper argues that her theory of reflexivity is established through a narrow misreading and rejection of Bourdieu's work, which ultimately creates problems for her own approach. Archer's rejection of any pre-reflexive dimensions to subjectivity and social action leaves her unable to sociologically explain the genesis of 'ultimate concerns', and creates an empirically dubious narrative of the consequences of social change. Through a focus on Archer's concept of 'fractured reflexivity', the paper explores the theoretical necessity of habitus and illusio for understanding the social changes that Archer is grappling with. In late modernity, reflexivity is valorized just as the conditions for its successful operation are increasingly foreclosed, creating 'fractured reflexivity' emblematic of the complex contemporary interaction between habitus, illusio, and accelerating social change. PMID:26434655

  13. Bourdieu and Science Studies: Toward a Reflexive Sociology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Two of Bourdieu's fundamental contributions to science studies--the reflexive analysis of the social and human sciences and the concept of an intellectual field--are used to frame a reflexive study of the history and social studies of science and technology as an intellectual field in the United States. The universe of large, Ph.D.-granting…

  14. The proboscis extension reflex not elicited in Magachilid bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) will reflexively extend their proboscis in response to antennal stimulation with sucrose solution. For decades, the proboscis extension reflex (PER) of honey bees has been used as a tool to further the understanding of their cognitive processes, such as learning and m...

  15. A Movement Account of Long-Distance Reflexives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Rebecca Katherine

    2013-01-01

    This thesis examines reflexive pronouns, such as Icelandic "sig" (Cf. Thrainsson 2007), which may be bound from outside of an infinitive clause (which I call MD "medium distance" binding) in addition to being bound locally. I propose that such reflexives are linked to their antecedents via sisterhood followed by movement: the…

  16. Reflexivity of Discomfort in Insider-Outsider Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamdan, Amani K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses my position as an Arab Muslim woman researcher who is affiliated with a Western university, researching Arab Muslim Canadian women. I discuss how reflexivity has emerged as an element of my research endeavours. Various notions of reflexivity in educational research have been expressed in the literature, yet I focus on what it…

  17. [The development of I. P. Pavlov's conditioned reflex theory].

    PubMed

    Kim, O J

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of Ivan Petrovich Pavlov (1849-1936), a Russian physiologist who presented for the first time the systematic theory of the function of the brain that controls the whole behavior of animals, i.e. higher nervous activity through experimental studies. This paper, principally based on Lectures on Conditioned Reflexes (1928), investigates the development of conditioned reflex theory from its beginning by dividing it into three periods. First, during the period from 1898 to 1906, the fundamental concept of conditioned reflex was established and the study of conditioned reflex became an independent discipline. From 1907 to 1916, the second period, Pavlov theorized on higher nervous activity on the basis of extensive data from his laboratory experiments of conditioned reflex. And Pavlov complemented conditioned reflex theory, during the third period from 1916 to 1928, and extended the boundaries of it through applications of conditioned reflex theory to psychopathology and typology. The study contributes to the understanding that conditioned reflex theory was historically developed, and not presented as a complete form from the beginning, and that Pavlov intended to study the higher nervous activity through the method of neurophysiology. PMID:11618531

  18. Reflexivity in Teams: A Review and New Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Konradt, Udo; Otte, Kai-Philip; Schippers, Michaéla C; Steenfatt, Corinna

    2016-01-01

    Team reflexivity posits that the extent to which teams reflect upon and adapt their functioning is positively related to team performance. While remarkable progress has been made to provide evidence of this relationship, the underlying framework is missing elements of current theoretical streams for analyzing and describing teamwork, leaving the diversity of effects of team reflexivity often untouched. In this article, we present an update for this framework, by reviewing previous research on reflexivity, addressing gaps in the literature, and revising the original model by integrating feedback and dynamic team effectiveness frameworks for describing temporal developments of reflexivity. We furthermore propose a new dimensional structure for reflexivity, relying on prior work conceptualizing teams as information-processing systems that learn and advance through social-cognitive elements. Our model is therefore not only suitable for explaining the diverse set of relationships between team reflexivity on outcomes, but also provides valuable directions for viewing reflexivity as process that takes place during both transition and action phases of teamwork. We conclude with implications for managers, identify limitations, and propose an agenda for further research into this area. This article contributes an extended perspective relevant for further theory development and for effectively managing reflexivity in teams.

  19. Approaches to Reflexivity: Navigating Educational and Career Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyke, Martin; Johnston, Brenda; Fuller, Alison

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a critical appraisal of approaches to reflexivity in sociology. It uses data from social network research to argue that Archer's approach to reflexivity provides a valuable lens with which to understand how people navigate their education and career pathways. The paper is also critical of Archer's methodology and typology of…

  20. Reflexive Management Learning: An Integrative Review and a Conceptual Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, Richard J.; Cullen, John G.

    2012-01-01

    The scale and reach of the recent global financial has created a fresh wave of interest in exploring more sustainable forms of management. A central thrust behind this trend in the practice of management development and education has been the accentuation of reflexivity. There are many variations in how reflexivity is understood, and this article…

  1. Stretch-shortening cycle: a powerful model to study normal and fatigued muscle.

    PubMed

    Komi, P V

    2000-10-01

    Stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) in human skeletal muscle gives unique possibilities to study normal and fatigued muscle function. The in vivo force measurement systems, buckle transducer technique and optic fiber technique, have revealed that, as compared to a pure concentric action, a non-fatiguing SSC exercise demonstrates considerable performance enhancement with increased force at a given shortening velocity. Characteristic to this phenomenon is very low EMG-activity in the concentric phase of the cycle, but a very pronounced contribution of the short-latency stretch-reflex component. This reflex contributes significantly to force generation during the transition (stretch-shortening) phase in SSC action such as hopping and running. The amplitude of the stretch reflex component - and the subsequent force enhancement - may vary according to the increased stretch-load but also to the level of fatigue. While moderate SSC fatigue may result in slight potentiation, the exhaustive SSC fatigue can dramatically reduce the same reflex contribution. SSC fatigue is a useful model to study the processes of reversible muscle damage and how they interact with muscle mechanics, joint and muscle stiffness. All these parameters and their reduction during SSC fatigue changes stiffness regulation through direct influences on muscle spindle (disfacilitation), and by activating III and IV afferent nerve endings (proprioseptic inhibition). The resulting reduced stretch reflex sensitivity and muscle stiffness deteriorate the force potentiation mechanisms. Recovery of these processes is long lasting and follows the bimodal trend of recovery. Direct mechanical disturbances in the sarcomere structural proteins, such as titin, may also occur as a result of an exhaustive SSC exercise bout.

  2. The Effect of Mechanical Vibration Stimulation of Perception Subthreshold on the Muscle Force and Muscle Reaction Time of Lower Leg

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Huigyun; Kwak, Kiyoung; Kim, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of mechanical vibration stimulation on the muscle force and muscle reaction time of lower leg according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A vibration stimulation with perception threshold intensity was applied on the Achilles tendon and tibialis anterior tendon. EMG measurement and analysis system were used to analyze the change of muscle force and muscle reaction time according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A root-mean-square (RMS) value was extracted using analysis software and Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) and Premotor Time (PMT) were analyzed. The measurement results showed that perception threshold was different from application sites of vibration frequency. Also, the muscle force and muscle reaction time showed difference according to the presence of vibration, frequency, and intensity. This result means that the vibration stimulation causes the change on the muscle force and muscle reaction time and affects the muscles of lower leg by the characteristics of vibration stimulation. PMID:27382244

  3. Parametric exploration of the fear-inhibited light reflex.

    PubMed

    Hourdaki, Eugenia; Giakoumaki, Stella G; Grinakis, Vangelis; Theou, Katerina; Karataraki, Maria; Bitsios, Panos

    2005-07-01

    The effect of various parameters on