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Sample records for muscle relaxant mebeverine

  1. Neural control of muscle relaxation in echinoderms.

    PubMed

    Elphick, M R; Melarange, R

    2001-03-01

    Smooth muscle relaxation in vertebrates is regulated by a variety of neuronal signalling molecules, including neuropeptides and nitric oxide (NO). The physiology of muscle relaxation in echinoderms is of particular interest because these animals are evolutionarily more closely related to the vertebrates than to the majority of invertebrate phyla. However, whilst in vertebrates there is a clear structural and functional distinction between visceral smooth muscle and skeletal striated muscle, this does not apply to echinoderms, in which the majority of muscles, whether associated with the body wall skeleton and its appendages or with visceral organs, are made up of non-striated fibres. The mechanisms by which the nervous system controls muscle relaxation in echinoderms were, until recently, unknown. Using the cardiac stomach of the starfish Asterias rubens as a model, it has been established that the NO-cGMP signalling pathway mediates relaxation. NO also causes relaxation of sea urchin tube feet, and NO may therefore function as a 'universal' muscle relaxant in echinoderms. The first neuropeptides to be identified in echinoderms were two related peptides isolated from Asterias rubens known as SALMFamide-1 (S1) and SALMFamide-2 (S2). Both S1 and S2 cause relaxation of the starfish cardiac stomach, but with S2 being approximately ten times more potent than S1. SALMFamide neuropeptides have also been isolated from sea cucumbers, in which they cause relaxation of both gut and body wall muscle. Therefore, like NO, SALMFamides may also function as 'universal' muscle relaxants in echinoderms. The mechanisms by which SALMFamides cause relaxation of echinoderm muscle are not known, but several candidate signal transduction pathways are discussed here. The SALMFamides do not, however, appear to act by promoting release of NO, and muscle relaxation in echinoderms is therefore probably regulated by at least two neuronal signalling systems acting in parallel. Recently, other

  2. Progressive muscle relaxation, yoga stretching, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Ghoncheh, Shahyad; Smith, Jonathan C

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and yoga stretching (hatha) exercises. Forty participants were randomly divided into two groups and taught PMR or yoga stretching exercises. Both groups practiced once a week for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, practitioners of PMR displayed higher levels of relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement at Week 4 and higher levels of Mental Quiet and Joy as a posttraining aftereffect at Week 5. Contrary to what was hypothesized, groups did not display different levels of R-States Energized or Aware. Results suggest the value of supplementing traditional somatic conceptualizations of relaxation with the psychological approach embodied in ABC relaxation theory. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  3. Progressive muscle relaxation, breathing exercises, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Smith, J C

    2001-12-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) and breathing exercises. Forty-two students were divided randomly into two groups and taught PMR or breathing exercises. Both groups practiced for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, PMR practitioners displayed greater increments in relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement, while breathing practitioners displayed higher levels of R-State Strength and Awareness. Slight differences emerged at Weeks 1 and 2; major differences emerged at Weeks 4 and 5. A delayed and potentially reinforcing aftereffect emerged for PMR only after five weeks of training--increased levels of Mental Quiet and Joy. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  4. Muscle Relaxation Therapy in Hyperkinesis: Is It Effective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatara, Vinod; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The literature on two forms of muscle relaxation training (electro-myographic (EMG) biofeedback and progressive muscle relaxation) with learning disabled and hyperkinetic children is reviewed and the authors' own study is discussed. (Author/PHR)

  5. The mechanics of mouse skeletal muscle when shortening during relaxation.

    PubMed

    Barclay, C J; Lichtwark, G A

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic properties of relaxing skeletal muscle have not been well characterised but are important for understanding muscle function during terrestrial locomotion, during which a considerable fraction of muscle work output can be produced during relaxation. The purpose of this study was to characterise the force-velocity properties of mouse skeletal muscle during relaxation. Experiments were performed in vitro (21 degrees C) using bundles of fibres from mouse soleus and EDL muscles. Isovelocity shortening was applied to muscles during relaxation following short tetanic contractions. Using data from different contractions with different shortening velocities, curves relating force output to shortening velocity were constructed at intervals during relaxation. The velocity component included contributions from shortening of both series elastic component (SEC) and contractile component (CC) because force output was not constant. Early in relaxation force-velocity relationships were linear but became progressively more curved as relaxation progressed. Force-velocity curves late in relaxation had the same curvature as those for the CC in fully activated muscles but V(max) was reduced to approximately 50% of the value in fully activated muscles. These results were the same for slow- and fast-twitch muscles and for relaxation following maximal tetani and brief, sub-maximal tetani. The measured series elastic compliance was used to partition shortening velocity between SEC and CC. The curvature of the CC force-velocity relationship was constant during relaxation. The SEC accounted for most of the shortening and work output during relaxation and its power output during relaxation exceeded the maximum CC power output. It is proposed that unloading the CC, without any change in its overall length, accelerated cross-bridge detachment when shortening was applied during relaxation.

  6. Silperisone: a centrally acting muscle relaxant.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Sándor

    2006-01-01

    Silperisone is a tolperisone like organosilicon compound with centrally acting muscle relaxant properties. Studies in mice showed that silperisone may have less propensity to cause CNS depressant or motor side effects than tolperisone or other antispastic drugs. In cats and rats, silperisone was an effective suppressant of monosynaptic and polysynaptic spinal reflexes and decerebrate rigidity. Its suppressant effect on the spinal reflexes was also demonstrated in the isolated hemisected rat spinal cord in vitro. The in vivo potency and efficacy of silperisone by i.v administration were similar to those of tolperisone and eperisone. However, in cats by intraduodenal administration and in mice by oral administration its duration of action was much longer and its functional bioavailability much higher than of the other two drugs. With regard to its profile of actions silperisone was similar to tolperisone with minor differences. The most striking difference was in pontine facilitation and bulbar inhibition of the patellar reflex. Tolperisone depressed both, whereas silperisone inhibited only the former. The mechanism underlying the spinal reflex depressant effects of silperisone involves the blockade of voltage gated neuronal sodium and calcium channels leading to a decreased release of excitatory transmitter and reduced neuronal excitability. In addition, silperisone has potassium channel blocking effect, which is stronger than that of tolperisone. Silperisone is absorbed rapidly and is extensively metabolized in rats. However, its metabolism in dogs and particularly in humans is much less extensive. The elimination half-life of silperisone in humans is 12 to 16 h, so that it can be administered once or twice daily. Phase I clinical studies with silperisone at doses up to 150 mg/day failed to detect any adverse effects at plasma concentrations considered to be effective in the preclinical tests. These findings suggested that silperisone might be a useful antispastic

  7. [Viscoelastic properties of relaxed papillary muscle at physiological hypertrophy].

    PubMed

    Smoliuk, L T; Lisin, R V; Kuznetsov, D A; Protsenko, Iu L

    2012-01-01

    Viscoelastic properties of relaxed rat papillary muscles at physiological hypertrophy (intensive swimming for 5 weeks) have been obtained. It has been ascertained that viscoelastic properties of hypertrophied muscles are not significantly distinguished from those of control papillary muscles. A three-dimensional model of myocardial fascicle has been verified in compliance with experimental data of biomechanical tests of hypertrophied muscles. Elastic and viscous parameters of structural elements of the model negligibly differ from the parameters of the model of a control muscle. It is shown that physiological hypertrophy has a slight influence on viscoelastic properties of papillary muscles.

  8. The Effects of Exercise on Muscle Tension and Subsequent Muscle Relaxation Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balog, Linda Farrah

    1983-01-01

    A study investigated effects of acute exercise: (1) on overall body relaxation, as measured by the reaction of the frontalis muscle; and (2) as an aid to biofeedback-induced relaxation. Exercise did not promote generalized relaxation in this study, nor did it affect the learning of biofeedback techniques. (Author/PP)

  9. The origin of biexponential T2 relaxation in muscle water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, W. C.; LeBlanc, A. D.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    Two theories have been proposed to explain the multiexponential transverse relaxation of muscle water protons: "anatomical" and "chemical" compartmentation. In an attempt to obtain evidence to support one or the other of these two theories, interstitial and intracellular macromolecular preparations were studied and compared with rat muscle tissue by proton NMR transverse relaxation (T2) measurements. All macromolecule preparations displayed monoexponential T2 decay. Membrane alteration with DMSO/glycerin did not eliminate the biexponential T2 decay of muscle tissue. Maceration converted biexponential T2 decay of muscle tissue to single exponential decay. It is concluded that the observed two component exponential T2 decay of muscle represents anatomical compartmentation of tissue water, probably intracellular versus extracellular.

  10. Study on contraction and relaxation of experimentally denervated and immobilized muscles: Comparison with dystrophic muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takamori, M.; Tsujihata, M.; Mori, M.; Hazama, R.; Ide, Y.

    1980-01-01

    The contraction-relaxation mechanism of experimentally denervated and immobilized muscles of the rabbit is examined. Results are compared with those of human dystrophic muscles, in order to elucidate the role and extent of the neurotrophic factor, and the role played by the intrinsic activity of muscle in connection with pathogenesis and pathophysiology of this disease.

  11. Oral Muscle Relaxant May Induce Immediate Allergic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Gyu-Young; Hwang, Eui Kyung; Moon, Jae-Young; Ye, Young-Min; Shim, Jae-Jeong; Kang, Kyung-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Eperisone and afloqualone act by relaxing both skeletal and vascular smooth muscles to improve circulation and suppress pain reflex. These drugs are typically prescribed with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as painkillers. However, there have been no reports on serious adverse reactions to oral muscle relaxants; and this is the first report to describe three allergic reactions caused by eperisone and afloqualone. All three patients had histories of allergic reactions after oral intake of multiple painkillers, including oral muscle relaxants and NSAIDs, for chronic muscle pain. An open-label oral challenge test was performed with each drug to confirm which drugs caused the systemic reactions. All patients experienced the same reactions within one hour after oral intake of eperisone or afloqualone. The severity of these reactions ranged from laryngeal edema to hypotension. To confirm that the systemic reaction was caused by eperisone or afloqualone, skin prick testing and intradermal skin tests were performed with eperisone or afloqualone extract in vivo, and basophil activity tests were performed after stimulation with these drugs in vitro. In one patient with laryngeal edema, the intradermal test with afloqualone extract had a positive result, and CD63 expression levels on basophils increased in a dose-dependent manner by stimulation with afloqualone. We report three allergic reactions caused by oral muscle relaxants that might be mediated by non-immunoglobulin E-mediated responses. Since oral muscle relaxants such as eperisone and afloqualone are commonly prescribed for chronic muscle pain and can induce severe allergic reactions, we should prescribe them carefully. PMID:22665359

  12. Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Pain Perception in Abdominal Surgery Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    subjects (36%) had cholecystectomies, one subject (9%) had an appendectomy, one subject (9%) had a hysterectomy, four subjects (36%) had tubal ligations ...hysterectomies, three subjects (30%) had tubal ligations or fulgarations, five subjects (50%) had diagnostic laparoscopies, and one subject (10%) was classified...muscle relaxation could decrease pain perception, analgesic use, and anxiety in post -operative abdominal surgery patients. Review of demographic data

  13. Multiple sources of passive stress relaxation in muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Linke, Wolfgang A; Leake, Mark C

    2004-08-21

    The forces developed during stretch of nonactivated muscle consist of velocity-sensitive (viscous/viscoelastic) and velocity-insensitive (elastic) components. At the myofibrillar level, the elastic-force component has been described in terms of the entropic-spring properties of the giant protein titin, but entropic elasticity cannot account for viscoelastic properties, such as stress relaxation. Here we examine the contribution of titin to passive stress relaxation of isolated rat-cardiac myofibrils depleted of actin by gelsolin treatment. Monte Carlo simulations show that, up to approximately 5 s after a stretch, the time course of stress relaxation can be described assuming unfolding of 1-2 immunoglobulin domains per titin molecule. For extended periods of stress relaxation, the simulations failed to correctly describe the myofibril data, suggesting that in situ, titin-Ig domains may be more stable than predicted in earlier single-molecule atomic-force-microscopy studies. The reasons behind this finding remain unknown; simply assuming a reduced unfolding probability of domains--an effect found here by AFM force spectroscopy on titin-Ig domains in the presence of a chaperone, alpha-B-crystallin--did not help correctly simulate the time course of stress relaxation. We conclude that myofibrillar stress relaxation likely has multiple sources. Evidence is provided that in intact myofibrils, an initial, rapid phase of stress relaxation results from viscous resistance due to the presence of actin filaments.

  14. A novel formulation for mebeverine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hamid, Sameh M; Abdel-Hady, Seham E; El-Shamy, Abdel-Hamid A; El-Dessouky, Hadir F

    2007-10-01

    The antispasmodic drug mebeverine hydrochloride was formulated into a film-forming gel to be used as a topical local anesthetic. A mixture of cellulose derivatives was used as a base. Additives were used to enhance the release as well as the residence time. Formulations were characterized in terms of drug release, mucoadhesion and rheology. Clinically, the selected formula has shown faster onset (p = 0.0156), longer duration (p = 0.0313), better film residence (p = 0.0313), and no foreign body sensation (p = 0.0313) in comparison to Solcoseryl dental paste. Histopathological examination showed no change in inflammatory cells count, concluding that this topical anesthetic is efficacious and safe orally.

  15. Spectroscopic Studies of the Super Relaxed State of Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Naber, Nariman; Pate, Edward; Canton, Marcella; Reggiani, Carlo; Cooke, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In the super-relaxed state of myosin, ATPase activity is strongly inhibited by binding of the myosin heads to the core of the thick filament in a structure known as the interacting-heads motif. In the disordered relaxed state myosin heads are not bound to the core of the thick filament and have an ATPase rate that is 10 fold greater. In the interacting-heads motif the two regulatory light chains appear to bind to each other. We have made single cysteine mutants of the regulatory light chain, placed both paramagnetic and fluorescent probes on them, and exchanged them into skinned skeletal muscle fibers. Many of the labeled light chains tended to disrupt the stability of the super-relaxed state, and showed spectral changes in the transition from the disordered relaxed state to the super-relaxed state. These data support the putative interface between the two regulatory light chains identified by cryo electron microscopy and show that both the divalent cation bound to the regulatory light chain and the N-terminus of the regulatory light chain play a role in the stability of the super-relaxed state. One probe showed a shift to shorter wavelengths in the super-relaxed state such that a ratio of intensities at 440nm to that at 520nm provided a measure of the population of the super-relaxed state amenable for high throughput screens for finding potential pharmaceuticals. The results provide a proof of concept that small molecules that bind to this region can destabilize the super-relaxed state and provide a method to search for small molecules that do so leading to a potentially effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes and obesity. PMID:27479128

  16. Spectroscopic Studies of the Super Relaxed State of Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Nogara, Leonardo; Naber, Nariman; Pate, Edward; Canton, Marcella; Reggiani, Carlo; Cooke, Roger

    2016-01-01

    In the super-relaxed state of myosin, ATPase activity is strongly inhibited by binding of the myosin heads to the core of the thick filament in a structure known as the interacting-heads motif. In the disordered relaxed state myosin heads are not bound to the core of the thick filament and have an ATPase rate that is 10 fold greater. In the interacting-heads motif the two regulatory light chains appear to bind to each other. We have made single cysteine mutants of the regulatory light chain, placed both paramagnetic and fluorescent probes on them, and exchanged them into skinned skeletal muscle fibers. Many of the labeled light chains tended to disrupt the stability of the super-relaxed state, and showed spectral changes in the transition from the disordered relaxed state to the super-relaxed state. These data support the putative interface between the two regulatory light chains identified by cryo electron microscopy and show that both the divalent cation bound to the regulatory light chain and the N-terminus of the regulatory light chain play a role in the stability of the super-relaxed state. One probe showed a shift to shorter wavelengths in the super-relaxed state such that a ratio of intensities at 440nm to that at 520nm provided a measure of the population of the super-relaxed state amenable for high throughput screens for finding potential pharmaceuticals. The results provide a proof of concept that small molecules that bind to this region can destabilize the super-relaxed state and provide a method to search for small molecules that do so leading to a potentially effective treatment for Type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  17. Airway epithelial-derived factor relaxes pulmonary vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Farah, Omar R; Li, Dongge; McIntyre, Brendan A S; Pan, Jingyi; Belik, Jaques

    2009-01-01

    The factors controlling the pulmonary vascular resistance under physiological conditions are poorly understood. We have previously reported on an apparent cross talk between the airway and adjacent pulmonary arterial bed where a factor likely derived from the bronchial epithelial cells reduced the magnitude of agonist-stimulated force in the vascular smooth muscle. The main purpose of this investigation was to evaluate whether bronchial epithelial cells release a pulmonary arterial smooth muscle relaxant factor. Conditioned media from SPOC-1 or BEAS-2B, a rat- and a human-derived bronchial epithelial cell line, respectively, were utilized. This media significantly relaxed precontracted adult but not fetal pulmonary arterial muscle in an oxygen tension-dependent manner. This response was mediated via soluble guanylate cyclase, involving AKT/PI3-kinase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Airway epithelial cell-conditioned media increased AKT phosphorylation in pulmonary smooth muscle cells (SMC) and reduced intracellular calcium change following ATP stimulation to a significantly greater extent than observed for bronchial SMC. The present data strongly support the evidence for bronchial epithelial cells releasing a stable and soluble factor capable of inducing pulmonary arterial SMC relaxation. We speculate that under physiological conditions, the maintenance of a low pulmonary vascular resistance, postnatally, is in part modulated by the airway epithelium.

  18. Muscle Relaxation of the Foot Reduces Corticospinal Excitability of Hand Muscles and Enhances Intracortical Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kouki; Muraoka, Tetsuro; Mizuguchi, Nobuaki; Nakagawa, Kento; Nakata, Hiroki; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The object of this study was to clarify the effects of foot muscle relaxation on activity in the primary motor cortex (M1) of the hand area. Subjects were asked to volitionally relax the right foot from sustained contraction of either the dorsiflexor (tibialis anterior; TA relaxation) or plantarflexor (soleus; SOL relaxation) in response to an auditory stimulus. Single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was delivered to the hand area of the left M1 at different time intervals before and after the onset of TA or SOL relaxation. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the right extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and flexor carpi radialis (FCR). MEP amplitudes of ECR and FCR caused by single-pulse TMS temporarily decreased after TA and SOL relaxation onset, respectively, as compared with those of the resting control. Furthermore, short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) of ECR evaluated with paired-pulse TMS temporarily increased after TA relaxation onset. Our findings indicate that muscle relaxation of the dorsiflexor reduced corticospinal excitability of the ipsilateral hand muscles. This is most likely caused by an increase in intracortical inhibition.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation in muscle water.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B M; Puon, P S

    1981-01-01

    The origin of the nonexponentiality of proton spin echoes of skeletal muscle has been carefully examined. It is shown that the slowly decaying part of the proton spin echoes is not due to extracellular water. First, for muscle from mice with in vivo deuteration, the deuteron spin echoes were also nonexponential, but the slowly decaying part had a larger weighing factor. Second, for glycerinated muscle in which cell membranes were disrupted, the proton spin echoes were similar to those in intact muscle. Third, the nonexponentiality of the proton spin echoes in intact muscle increased when postmortem rigor set in. Finally, when the lifetimes of extracellular water and intracellular water were taken into account in the exchange, it was found that the two types of water would not give two resolvable exponentials with the observed decay constants. It is suggested that the unusually short T2's and the nonexponential character of the spin echoes of proton and deuteron in muscle water are mainly due to hydrogen exchange between water and functional groups in the protein filaments. These groups have large dipolar or quadrupolar splittings, and undergo hydrogen exchange with water at intermediate rates. The exchange processes and their effects on the spin echoes are pH-dependent. The dependence of transverse relaxation of pH was observed in glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers. PMID:7272437

  20. Investigation of the muscle relaxant activity of nitrazepam.

    PubMed

    Date, S K; Hemavathi, K G; Gulati, O D

    1984-11-01

    Administered intravenously in decerebrate cats nitrazepam or diazepam (0.0625 to 0.5 mg/kg) produced dose-related inhibition of the ipsilateral extensor reflex. Nitrazepam (0.25 mg/kg i.v.) produced a significantly greater (P less than 0.001) inhibition than that produced by diazepam (0.25 mg/kg i.v.). Nitrazepam or diazepam (0.0625-4 mg/kg i.v.) had no effect on the contractions of directly stimulated (120 V, 5 msec, 0.1 Hz) quadriceps femoris muscle and on the contractions of tibialis anterior muscle produced by stimulating the cut peripheral end of the lateral popliteal nerve (8 V, 1.5 msec, 0.1 Hz). Nitrazepam or diazepam (0.125-0.5 mg/kg i.v.) produced dose-related depressor responses in cats anaesthetized with chloralose or pentobarbitone. Nitrazepam produced a depressor response at 0.0625 mg/kg dose while diazepam did not. The drugs did not appear to have any deleterious effect on the veins removed 6 hr after the first exposure to the drugs as evidenced by lack of histological changes. It is concluded that nitrazepam and diazepam produce central muscle relaxation by inhibiting polysynaptic pathways in the spinal cord. The potency of nitrazepam appears to be greater than that of diazepam. Definitive evidence has been provided that the peripheral neuromuscular or direct muscular actions are not involved in the muscular relaxation produced by the two drugs.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of muscle relaxation induced by Kundalini yoga with the help of EMG integrator.

    PubMed

    Narayan, R; Kamat, A; Khanolkar, M; Kamat, S; Desai, S R; Dhume, R A

    1990-10-01

    The present work is aimed to quantify the degree of relaxation of muscle under the effects of Kundalini Yoga with the help of EMG integrator. The data collected from 8 individuals (4 males 4 females) on the degree of muscle relaxation at the end of meditation revealed a significantly decreased muscle activity amounting to 58% of the basal level in both the sexes.

  2. The comparative effects of aminoglycoside antibiotics and muscle relaxants on electrical field stimulation response in rat bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Min, Chang Ho; Min, Young Sil; Lee, Sang Joon; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-06-01

    It has been reported that several aminoglycoside antibiotics have a potential of prolonging the action of non-depolarizing muscle relaxants by drug interactions acting pre-synaptically to inhibit acetylcholine release, but antibiotics itself also have a strong effect on relaxing the smooth muscle. In this study, four antibiotics of aminoglycosides such as gentamicin, streptomycin, kanamycin and neomycin were compared with skeletal muscle relaxants baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine, and a smooth muscle relaxant, papaverine. The muscle strips isolated from the rat bladder were stimulated with pulse trains of 40 V in amplitude and 10 s in duration, with pulse duration of 1 ms at the frequency of 1-8 Hz, at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 Hz respectively. To test the effect of four antibiotics on bladder smooth muscle relaxation, each of them was treated cumulatively from 1 μM to 0.1 mM with an interval of 5 min. Among the four antibiotics, gentamicin and neomycin inhibited the EFS response. The skeletal muscle relaxants (baclofen, tubocurarine, pancuronium and succinylcholine) and inhibitory neurotransmitters (GABA and glycine) did not show any significant effect. However, papaverine, had a significant effect in the relaxation of the smooth muscle. It was suggested that the aminoglycoside antibiotics have inhibitory effect on the bladder smooth muscle.

  3. Time Course of Corticospinal Excitability and Intracortical Inhibition Just before Muscle Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tomotaka; Sugawara, Kenichi; Ogahara, Kakuya; Higashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), we investigated how short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) was involved with transient motor cortex (M1) excitability changes observed just before the transition from muscle contraction to muscle relaxation. Ten healthy participants performed a simultaneous relaxation task of the ipsilateral finger and foot, relaxing from 10% of their maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force after the go signal. In the simple reaction time (RT) paradigm, single or paired TMS pulses were randomly delivered after the go signal, and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were recorded from the right first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. We analyzed the time course prior to the estimated relaxation reaction time (RRT), defined here as the onset of voluntary relaxation. SICI decreased in the 80–100 ms before RRT, and MEPs were significantly greater in amplitude in the 60–80 ms period before RRT than in the other intervals in single-pulse trials. TMS pulses did not effectively increase RRT. These results show that cortical excitability in the early stage, before muscle relaxation, plays an important role in muscle relaxation control. SICI circuits may vary between decreased and increased activation to continuously maintain muscle relaxation during or after a relaxation response. With regard to M1 excitability dynamics, we suggest that SICI also dynamically changes throughout the muscle relaxation process. PMID:26858619

  4. Smooth muscle relaxing flavonoids and terpenoids from Conyza filaginoides.

    PubMed

    Mata, R; Rojas, A; Acevedo, L; Estrada, S; Calzada, F; Rojas, I; Bye, R; Linares, E

    1997-02-01

    Activity-guided fractionation of the smooth muscle relaxing, chloroform-methanol (1:1) extract of Conyza filaginoides (D.C.) Hieron (Asteraceae) led to the isolation of three flavonoids (quercetin 3-glucoside, rutin, and pinostrobin), one sterol (alpha-spinasterol), a sesquiterpenoid (beta-caryophyllene 4,5-alpha-oxide), and two triterpenoids (erythrodiol and 3-beta-tridecanoyloxy-28-hydroxyolean-12-ene). 3-beta-Tridecanoyloxy-28-hydroxy-olean-12-ene is a new naturally occurring terpenoid. All the isolated compounds induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the spontaneous contractions of rat ileum. The spasmolytic activity exhibited by the extract and active principles tends to support the traditional use of C filaginoides as an antispasmodic agent.

  5. Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Therapy in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeng Jin; Na, Yeon Kyung; Hong, Hae Sook

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation therapy (PMRT) on cortisol level, the Stress Arousal Checklist (SACL) score, blood pressure, and heart rate in colorectal cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Forty-six patients were divided into control and experimental groups. Cortisol levels, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured before surgery and between 8:00 and 11:00 a.m. on the first, third, and fifth days after surgery. SACL score was measured before surgery and on the fifth day after surgery at the same time points. PMRT was performed twice a day for 5 days. Analyses of covariance with advanced covariate levels and t tests showed that PMRT helps colorectal cancer patients achieve a lower stress response and provides an important basis for stress control.

  6. Modification of motor cortex excitability during muscle relaxation in motor learning.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kenichi; Tanabe, Shigeo; Suzuki, Tomotaka; Saitoh, Kei; Higashi, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    We postulated that gradual muscle relaxation during motor learning would dynamically change activity in the primary motor cortex (M1) and modify short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI). Thus, we compared changes in M1 excitability both pre and post motor learning during gradual muscle relaxation. Thirteen healthy participants were asked to gradually relax their muscles from an isometric right wrist extension (30% maximum voluntary contraction; MVC) using a tracking task for motor learning. Single or paired transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied at either 20% or 80% of the downward force output during muscle release from 30% MVC, and we compared the effects of motor learning immediately after the 1st and 10th blocks. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) from the extensor and flexor carpi radialis (ECR and FCR) were then measured and compared to evaluate their relationship before and after motor learning. In both muscles and each downward force output, motor cortex excitability during muscle relaxation was significantly increased following motor learning. In the ECR, the SICI in the 10th block was significantly increased during the 80% waveform decline compared to the SICI in the 1st block. In the FCR, the SICI also exhibited a greater inhibitory effect when muscle relaxation was terminated following motor learning. During motor training, acquisition of the ability to control muscle relaxation increased the SICI in both the ECR and FCR during motor termination. This finding aids in our understanding of the cortical mechanisms that underlie muscle relaxation during motor learning.

  7. Reflex influences on muscle spindle activity in relaxed human leg muscles.

    PubMed

    Gandevia, S C; Miller, S; Aniss, A M; Burke, D

    1986-07-01

    The study was designed to determine whether low-threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents from the foot reflexly activate gamma-motoneurons innervating relaxed muscles of the leg. In 15 experiments multiunit recordings were made from 21 nerve fascicles innervating triceps surae or tibialis anterior. In a further nine experiments the activity of 19 identified single muscle spindle afferents was recorded, 13 from triceps surae, 5 from tibialis anterior, and 1 from extensor digitorum longus. Trains of electrical stimuli (5 stimuli, 300 Hz) were delivered to the sural nerve at the ankle (intensity, twice sensory threshold) and the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle (intensity, 1.1 times motor threshold for the small muscles of the foot). In addition, a tap on the appropriate tendon at varying times after the stimuli was used to assess the dynamic responsiveness of the afferents under study. The conditioning electrical stimuli did not change the discharge of single spindle afferents. Recordings of rectified and averaged multiunit activity also revealed no change in the overall level of background neural activity following the electrical stimuli. The afferent responses to tendon taps did not differ significantly whether or not they were preceded by stimulation of the sural or posterior tibial nerves. These results suggest that low-threshold afferents from the foot do not produce significant activation of fusimotor neurons in relaxed leg muscles, at least as judged by their ability to alter the discharge of muscle spindle afferents. As there may be no effective background activity in fusimotor neurons innervating relaxed human muscles, it is possible that these inputs from the foot could influence the fusimotor system during voluntary contractions when the fusimotor neurons have been brought to firing threshold. In one subject trains of stimuli were delivered to the posterior tibial nerve at painful levels (30 times motor threshold). They produced an acceleration of the

  8. Multivariable Dynamic Ankle Mechanical Impedance With Relaxed Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunglae; Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2015-01-01

    Neurological or biomechanical disorders may distort ankle mechanical impedance and thereby impair locomotor function. This paper presents a quantitative characterization of multivariable ankle mechanical impedance of young healthy subjects when their muscles were relaxed, to serve as a baseline to compare with pathophysiological ankle properties of biomechanically and/or neurologically impaired patients. Measurements using a highly backdrivable wearable ankle robot combined with multi-input multi-output stochastic system identification methods enabled reliable characterization of ankle mechanical impedance in two degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) simultaneously, the sagittal and frontal planes. The characterization included important ankle properties unavailable from single DOF studies: coupling between DOFs and anisotropy as a function of frequency. Ankle impedance in joint coordinates showed responses largely consistent with a second-order system consisting of inertia, viscosity, and stiffness in both seated (knee flexed) and standing (knee straightened) postures. Stiffness in the sagittal plane was greater than in the frontal plane and furthermore, was greater when standing than when seated, most likely due to the stretch of bi-articular muscles (medial and lateral gastrocnemius). Very low off-diagonal partial coherences implied negligible coupling between dorsiflexion-plantarflexion and inversion-eversion. The directions of principal axes were tilted slightly counterclockwise from the original joint coordinates. The directional variation (anisotropy) of ankle impedance in the 2-D space formed by rotations in the sagittal and frontal planes exhibited a characteristic “peanut” shape, weak in inversion-eversion over a wide range of frequencies from the stiffness dominated region up to the inertia dominated region. Implications for the assessment of neurological and biomechanical impairments are discussed. PMID:24686292

  9. The influence of motor cortical stimulus intensity on the relaxation rate of human lower limb muscles.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Chris J; Bredius, Marlous S; Molenaar, Joery P; Gandevia, Simon C

    2013-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) allows an in vivo assessment of the rate of muscle relaxation during a voluntary contraction. It is unknown if this method can be applied to lower limb muscles, and the effect of stimulus intensity on relaxation rate has not been investigated in any muscle group. The present study sought to address these unknowns. A secondary aim was to test the sensitivity of the method to a change in muscle length by comparing the relaxation rate of the plantar flexor muscles with the gastrocnemius at short and long lengths. Seven subjects performed 21 maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs) of the dorsiflexors (DF) and plantar flexors with a knee angle of either 90° or 180° (PF90 and PF180, respectively). TMS intensity ranged from 40 to 100% stimulator output in intervals of 10%. Relaxation rates increased with stimulus intensity but were equivalent to maximal output at 50 (DF and PF90) or 60% (PF180). MVC torque was greater, and the rate of relaxation was faster for PF180 compared to PF90. The main findings are that TMS can be used to measure relaxation rates of lower limb muscles, and these rates are robust provided the stimulus intensity is above a critical threshold. The dependency of plantar flexor relaxation rate on the length of the fast-twitch gastrocnemius fibers reinforces published temperature and fatigue data which show that the method is sensitive to the contractile properties of the muscle fibers which are actively contributing to torque production.

  10. The effect of progressive muscle relaxation on daily cortisol secretion.

    PubMed

    Chellew, Karin; Evans, Phil; Fornes-Vives, Joana; Pérez, Gerardo; Garcia-Banda, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation (APMR) is a much used stress-management technique. Its efficacy relevant to placebo control is already established in the literature and the primary aim of the present study was to ascertain whether its proven impact on psychological stress measures is matched by a decrease in prevailing levels of the stress-associated hormone cortisol, using accurate and robust measurement based on multiple sampling of full diurnal cortisol secretion profiles. First-year university students can face significant stress in adjustment to academic demands and immersion in a novel social network and provided a convenient study population. One hundred and one first-year students completed APMR with prevailing stress levels assessed a week before and after intervention. Both cortisol and self-report measures were significantly reduced post-intervention by 8% and 10%, respectively. The efficacy of the intervention was independent of, and not modulated by neuroticism, gender, age and smoking status. We also demonstrated that cortisol reduction was unlikely to have been a consequence of adaptation to any initial cortisol elevation prompted by the challenge of the demanding saliva collection protocol. We conclude that the efficacy of APMR in this population extends to reduction in biologically expressed stress levels as well as levels based solely on self-report.

  11. Muscle relaxant activity of Elaeagnus angustifolia L. fruit seeds in mice.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Ramezani, Mohammad; Namjo, Nazanin

    2003-02-01

    Muscle relaxant effect of Elaeagnus angustifolia L. (Elaeagnaceae) fruit seeds was studied in mice using traction test. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts (i.p) induced a muscle relaxant effect in a dose dependent manner as effective as diazepam (1 mg/kg). The aqueous extract was partitioned with methanol-chloroform (MeCh) and n-butanol (Bu.) saturated with water. The MeCh and Bu. fractions did not show activity. Preliminary phytochemical tests showed that the extract contains flavonoid. The results suggested that E. angustifolia fruit seeds exerted muscle relaxant activity via flavonoid component(s).

  12. Compliance Accelerates Relaxation in Muscle by Allowing Myosin Heads to Move Relative to Actin.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2016-02-02

    The mechanisms that limit the speed at which striated muscles relax are poorly understood. This work presents, to our knowledge, novel simulations that show that the time course of relaxation is accelerated by interfilamentary movement resulting from series compliance; force drops faster when myosin heads move relative to actin during relaxation. This insight was obtained by using cross-bridge distribution techniques to simulate the mechanical behavior of half-sarcomeres that were connected in series with springs of varying stiffness. (The springs mimic the combined effects of half-sarcomere heterogeneity and muscle's series elastic component.) Half-sarcomeres that shortened by >∼10 nm when they were activated subsequently relaxed with a biphasic profile; force initially declined slowly and approximately linearly before collapsing with a fast exponential time course. Stretches imposed during the linear phase quickened relaxation, while shortening movements prolonged the time course. These predictions are consistent with data from experiments performed by many other groups using single muscle fibers and isolated myofibrils. When half-sarcomeres were linked to stiff springs (so that they did not shorten appreciably during the simulations), force relaxed with a slow exponential time course and did not show biphasic behavior. Together, these results suggest that fast relaxation of striated muscle is an emergent property that reflects multiscale interactions within the muscle architecture. The nonlinear behavior during relaxation reflects perturbations to the dynamic coupling of regulated binding sites and cycling myosin heads that are induced by interfilamentary movement.

  13. Relaxation of uterine and aortic smooth muscle by glaucolides D and E from Vernonia liatroides.

    PubMed

    Campos, María; Oropeza, Martha; Ponce, Héctor; Fernández, Jaquelina; Jimenez-Estrada, Manuel; Torres, Héctor; Reyes-Chilpa, Ricardo

    2003-01-01

    Vernonia spp. (Asteraceae) are used in herbolaria in Latin America in menstrual and stomach disorders, suggesting smooth muscle relaxing properties of some of their chemical constituents. For pharmacological support for this belief, sesquiterpene lactones glaucolides D and E were assayed on isolated rat smooth muscle. Glaucolide E proved more potent than glaucolide D to relax high KCl- or noradrenaline-induced contractions in aorta and to relax the high KCl-contraction in uterus. Hirsutinolide-type sesquiterpene lactone also was tested but displayed no effect. Relaxation of smooth muscle by structurally related sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide has been attributed mainly to the alpha-methylene gamma-lactone moiety; because glaucolides D and E lack this functional group, their relaxant properties may rely on other alkylating sites such as C10 of the germacra-1(10),4-diene-4-epoxide skeleton.

  14. Effects of Progressive Muscle Relaxation Intervention in Extremity Fracture Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Qin; Deng, Yun-Long; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Richmond, Christopher J; Tang, Ying; Zhou, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of progressive muscle relaxation on state anxiety and self-efficacy in hospitalized patients admitted for an extremity fracture receiving elective surgery. Eighty four patients met the inclusion criteria and all were randomly assigned to either the progressive muscle relaxation group or the control group. The control group received standard orthopedic nursing care, and the experimental group received standard care along with daily progressive muscle relaxation throughout their hospitalization. The State Anxiety Inventory and Self-Efficacy Scales were administered before and after the intervention. Both paired-sample t tests and independent t tests showed that progressive muscle relaxation is effective in reducing state anxiety and enhancing the self-efficacy of patients with extremity fracture undergoing an elective surgery.

  15. [Muscle relaxants and neuromuscular monitoring - Introduction for a safe clinical application].

    PubMed

    Döcker, Dennis; Walther, Andreas

    2012-05-01

    The use of muscle relaxants facilitates endotracheal intubation and ameliorates the conditions of surgery. But, their use should be controlled - otherwise there will be postoperative residual curarisation which can lead to patient discomfort up to severe medical complications. Therefore, an appropriate surveillance via objective neuromuscular monitoring is essential. This article gives a review of the basic principles of muscle relaxants, their clinical application and the surveillance of their effects and degradation.

  16. The Effects of Audiotaped Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training on the Reading Performance of Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Howard; Pica, Louis, Jr.

    A study examined the degree to which audiotaped progressive muscle relaxation training influenced the oral and silent reading performance of eight adolescents who were legally classified as emotionally disturbed. A single-case ABAB withdrawal design was used to examine the effects of relaxation training on oral reading. In addition, a…

  17. Compliance Accelerates Relaxation in Muscle by Allowing Myosin Heads to Move Relative to Actin

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that limit the speed at which striated muscles relax are poorly understood. This work presents, to our knowledge, novel simulations that show that the time course of relaxation is accelerated by interfilamentary movement resulting from series compliance; force drops faster when myosin heads move relative to actin during relaxation. This insight was obtained by using cross-bridge distribution techniques to simulate the mechanical behavior of half-sarcomeres that were connected in series with springs of varying stiffness. (The springs mimic the combined effects of half-sarcomere heterogeneity and muscle’s series elastic component.) Half-sarcomeres that shortened by >∼10 nm when they were activated subsequently relaxed with a biphasic profile; force initially declined slowly and approximately linearly before collapsing with a fast exponential time course. Stretches imposed during the linear phase quickened relaxation, while shortening movements prolonged the time course. These predictions are consistent with data from experiments performed by many other groups using single muscle fibers and isolated myofibrils. When half-sarcomeres were linked to stiff springs (so that they did not shorten appreciably during the simulations), force relaxed with a slow exponential time course and did not show biphasic behavior. Together, these results suggest that fast relaxation of striated muscle is an emergent property that reflects multiscale interactions within the muscle architecture. The nonlinear behavior during relaxation reflects perturbations to the dynamic coupling of regulated binding sites and cycling myosin heads that are induced by interfilamentary movement. PMID:26840730

  18. MECHANISMS OF SMOOTH MUSCLE RELAXATION THROUGH THE ANODAL CURRENT STIMULATION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, RELAXATION(PHYSIOLOGY), STIMULATION(PHYSIOLOGY), ELECTRICITY, IONS, ELECTROLYTES(PHYSIOLOGY), OSMOTIC PRESSURE, NERVES, NERVE FIBERS, CONTRACTION, HEART, CATS , DOGS , CRUSTACEA, JAPAN.

  19. Abnormal cortical mechanisms in voluntary muscle relaxation in de novo parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Labyt, Etienne; Cassim, François; Devos, David; Bourriez, Jean-Louis; Destée, Alain; Guieu, Jean-Daiel; Defebvre, Luc; Derambure, Philippe

    2005-06-01

    This study aimed at elucidating how the cortical mechanism underlying the preparation and the postmovement phase of voluntary hand muscle relaxation is affected in Parkinson's disease. Event-related mu and beta (de)synchronization (ERD/S) related to voluntary muscle contraction and relaxation were recorded in 16 untreated, akineto-rigid, predominantly hemiparkinsonian patients. The results were compared with data from 10 age-matched, healthy subjects. In the muscle relaxation task, the subject held the wrist in an extended position and then let the hand drop by voluntarily relaxing wrist extensor contraction, i.e., without any overt, associated muscle contraction. In the muscle contraction task, subjects performed a self-initiated brief wrist extension. A same pattern of ERD/S was observed in control subjects and parkinsonian patients performing the motor tasks with their less affected limb. In contrast, related to voluntary relaxation performed with the more affected limb, a delayed mu and beta ERD and a disappearance of beta ERS were revealed. These results demonstrate that the pattern of cortical oscillatory activity in a relaxation task is abnormal in parkinsonian patients. The authors suggest that this may be due to anomalous activity in inhibitory motor cortical systems and impaired sensorimotor integration of afferent inputs from muscle and joint receptors.

  20. Contractile force and intracellular Ca2+ during relaxation of canine tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gunst, S J; Bandyopadhyay, S

    1989-08-01

    Muscle strips loaded with the Ca2+ indicator aequorin were studied in vitro to determine the effects of inhibitory stimuli on force and cytosolic free Ca2+. In muscles contracted isometrically with acetylcholine (ACh), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), carbachol, decreases in muscle force caused by isoproterenol (10(-5) M) or forskolin (10(-5) M) were accompanied by proportional decreases in aequorin luminescence. A similar relationship between decreases in muscle force and aequorin luminescence was observed when muscles were relaxed by stimulating Na+-K+-ATPase activity. These results suggest that the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile proteins was not decreased during adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent relaxation. However, aequorin luminescence did not decrease when muscles contracted by K+ depolarization were relaxed with isoproterenol. Incubation of muscles in forskolin depressed increases in both force and aequorin luminescence in response to 5-HT or ACh. Incubation of muscles in isoproterenol had a similar effect on responses to 5-HT but depressed increases in force without depressing increases in luminescence in response to ACh. Results indicate that under most conditions the reduction of cytosolic Ca2+ plays an important role in the cAMP-dependent relaxation of canine tracheal smooth muscle.

  1. Stress Testing Recovery EMG for Evaluation of Biofeedback and Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sime, Wesley E.; DeGood, Douglas E.

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess biofeedback (BF) and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and placebo-control training by means of a post-training transfer test. The subjects for the research were 30 women. Initial tests consisted of measuring the electromyographic response of the frontalis muscle of the forehead to stress. After…

  2. The Effect of Relaxation Exercises for the Masticator Muscles on Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMD).

    PubMed

    Bae, Youngsook; Park, Yongnam

    2013-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of relaxation exercises for the masticator muscles on the limited ROM and pain of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 10 men and 31 women in their 20s and 30s. They were randomly divided into no treatment, active exercises and relaxation exercise for the masticator muscle groups. The exercise groups performed exercises three times or more a day over a period of four weeks, performing exercise for 10 minutes each time. Before and after the four weeks, all the subjects were measured for ROM, deviation, occlusion, and pain in the temporomandibular joint. [Results] ROM, deviation and pain showed statistically significant in improvements after the intervention in the active exercise and relaxation exercise for the masticator muscle groups. Deviation also showed a statistically significant difference between the active exercise and relaxation exercise groups. [Conclusion] The results verify that as with active exercises, relaxation exercises for the masticatory muscles are an effective treatment for ROM and pain in TMD. Particularly, masticatory muscle relaxation exercises were found to be a treatment that is also effective for deviation.

  3. Smooth muscle relaxant activity of Crocus sativus (saffron) and its constituents: possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari-Zaer, Amin; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Saffron, Crocus sativus L. (C. sativus) is rich in carotenoids and used in traditional medicine for treatment of various conditions such as coughs, stomach disorders, amenorrhea, asthma and cardiovascular disorders. These therapeutic effects of the plant are suggested to be due to its relaxant effect on smooth muscles. The effect of C. sativus and its constituents on different smooth muscles and the underlying mechanisms have been studied. Several studies have shown the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents including safranal, crocin, crocetin and kaempferol on blood vessels. In addition, it was reported that saffron stigma lowers systolic blood pressure. The present review highlights the relaxant effects of C. sativus and its constituents on various smooth muscles. The possible mechanisms of this relaxing effect including activation of ß2-adrenoceptors, inhibition of histamine H1 and muscarinic receptors and calcium channels and modulation of nitric oxide (NO) are also reviewed.

  4. Anionic cyclophanes as potential reversal agents of muscle relaxants by chemical chelation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Kenneth S; Fielding, Lee; Mason, Rona; Muir, Alan W; Rees, David C; Thorn, Simon; Zhang, Ming Qiang

    2002-03-11

    A series of carboxyl-containing cyclophanes have been designed and synthesised as chemical chelators (or host molecules) of cationic muscle relaxant drugs (or guest molecules). Three of these cyclophane derivatives, 1-3, have been shown by NMR to form 1:1 complexes with the muscle relaxants pancuronium, and gallamine, in D(2)O, with association constants up to 10(4) M(-1). When tested in an in vitro chick biventer muscle preparation, the cyclophanes reversed the neuromuscular block induced by pancuronium and gallamine, with having the most effective reversal against pancuronium (EC(50) 40 microM.

  5. Muscle anatomy is a primary determinant of muscle relaxation dynamics in the lobster (Panulirus interruptus) stomatogastric system.

    PubMed

    Thuma, Jeffrey B; Harness, Patricia I; Koehnle, Thomas J; Morris, Lee G; Hooper, Scott L

    2007-11-01

    We stained sarcomere thin filaments with fluorescently labeled phalloidin, measured sarcomere and muscle length, and calculated sarcomere number in pyloric and gastric mill muscles. A wide range of sarcomere lengths (3.25-12.29 microm), muscle lengths (5.9-21.1 mm), and sarcomere numbers (648-3,036) were observed. Sarcomere number differences occurred both because of changes in sarcomere length and muscle length, and sarcomere and muscle length varied independently. This independence, the wide range of sarcomere numbers present, and the muscles being all 'slow', graded muscles allowed us to use these data to test Huxley and Neidergerke's (1954) hypothesis that muscle dynamics depend on sarcomere number. The time constants of exponential fits to contraction relaxations were used to measure muscle dynamics, and comparison of theoretical predictions and experimental results quantitatively confirm the predicted dependence. The differing dynamics of the various pyloric muscles are likely functionally important, and the dependence of muscle dynamics on sarcomere number implies that sarcomere number is likely closely regulated in these muscles. The stomatogastric system may thus be an excellent model system for studying the mechanisms regulating muscle sarcomere number.

  6. Effect of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on the Fatigue and Quality of Life Among Iranian Aging Persons.

    PubMed

    Hassanpour-Dehkordi, Ali; Jalali, Amir

    2016-07-01

    Since the elderly population is increasing rapidly in developing countries which may decrease the physical activity and exercise and in turn could affect the elderly's quality of life, this study aimed to investigate the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on the elderly's quality of life in Iran. In a randomized clinical trial, participants were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. For the intervention group, muscular progressive relaxation was run three days per week for three months (totally 36 sessions). In relaxation, a patient contract a group of his/her muscles in each step and relaxes them after five seconds and finally loosens all muscles and takes five deep breaths. Each session lasts for 45 minutes. The instrument of data gathering consisted of questionnaires on individual's demographic data and quality of life SF-36. After intervention, quality of life increased significantly in the patients undergoing muscular progressive relaxation and fatigue severity decreased significantly in the intervention group compared to prior to intervention. In addition, there was a statistically significant difference in mean score of physical performance, restricted activity after physical problem, energy, socially function, physical pain, overall hygiene, and quality of life between intervention and control groups. By implementing regular and continuous progressive muscle relaxation, quality of life could be increased in different dimensions in the elderly and the context could be provided to age healthily and enjoy higher health and autonomy. Therefore, all of the therapeutic staffs are recommended to implement this plan to promote the elderly's quality of life.

  7. Role of BKCa in Stretch-Induced Relaxation of Colonic Smooth Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jie; Xin, Fang; Liu, Ping; Zhao, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Si-Tao; Han, Peng; Huang, Hai-Xia; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Stretch-induced relaxation has not been clearly identified in gastrointestinal tract. The present study is to explore the role of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BKCa) in stretch-induced relaxation of colon. The expression and currents of BKCa were detected and the basal muscle tone and contraction amplitude of colonic smooth muscle strips were measured. The expression of BKCa in colon is higher than other GI segments (P < 0.05). The density of BKCa currents was very high in colonic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). BKCa in rat colonic SMCs were sensitive to stretch. The relaxation response of colonic SM strips to stretch was attenuated by charybdotoxin (ChTX), a nonspecific BKCa blocker (P < 0.05). After blocking enteric nervous activities by tetrodotoxin (TTX), the stretch-induced relaxation did not change (P > 0.05). Still, ChTX and iberiotoxin (IbTX, a specific BKCa blocker) attenuated the relaxation of the colonic muscle strips enduring stretch (P < 0.05). These results suggest stretch-activation of BKCa in SMCs was involved in the stretch-induced relaxation of colon. Our study highlights the role of mechanosensitive ion channels in SMCs in colon motility regulation and their physiological and pathophysiological significance is worth further study.

  8. Role of BKCa in Stretch-Induced Relaxation of Colonic Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Stretch-induced relaxation has not been clearly identified in gastrointestinal tract. The present study is to explore the role of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BKCa) in stretch-induced relaxation of colon. The expression and currents of BKCa were detected and the basal muscle tone and contraction amplitude of colonic smooth muscle strips were measured. The expression of BKCa in colon is higher than other GI segments (P < 0.05). The density of BKCa currents was very high in colonic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). BKCa in rat colonic SMCs were sensitive to stretch. The relaxation response of colonic SM strips to stretch was attenuated by charybdotoxin (ChTX), a nonspecific BKCa blocker (P < 0.05). After blocking enteric nervous activities by tetrodotoxin (TTX), the stretch-induced relaxation did not change (P > 0.05). Still, ChTX and iberiotoxin (IbTX, a specific BKCa blocker) attenuated the relaxation of the colonic muscle strips enduring stretch (P < 0.05). These results suggest stretch-activation of BKCa in SMCs was involved in the stretch-induced relaxation of colon. Our study highlights the role of mechanosensitive ion channels in SMCs in colon motility regulation and their physiological and pathophysiological significance is worth further study. PMID:28018918

  9. beta. -adrenergic relaxation of smooth muscle: differences between cells and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Scheid, C.R.

    1987-09-01

    The present studies were carried out in an attempt to resolve the controversy about the Na/sup +/ dependence of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation in smooth muscle. Previous studies on isolated smooth muscle cells from the toad stomach had suggested that at least some of the actions of ..beta..-adrenergic agents, including a stimulatory effect on /sup 45/Ca efflux, were dependent on the presence of a normal transmembrane Na/sup +/ gradient. Studies by other investigators using tissues derived from mammalian sources had suggested that the relaxing effect of ..beta..-adrenergic agents was Na/sup +/ independent. Uncertainty remained as to whether these discrepancies reflected differences between cells and tissues or differences between species. Thus, in the present studies, the authors utilized both tissues and cells from the same source, the stomach muscle of the toad Bufo marinus, and assessed the Na/sup +/ dependence of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation. They found that elimination of a normal Na/sup +/ gradient abolished ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation of isolated cells. In tissues, however, similar manipulations had no effect on relaxation. The reasons for this discrepancy are unclear but do not appear to be attributable to changes in smooth muscle function following enzymatic dispersion. Thus the controversy concerning the mechanisms of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation may reflect inherent differences between tissues and cells.

  10. Adverse reactions to suxamethonium and other muscle relaxants under general anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Vervloet, D.; Nizankowska, E.; Arnaud, A.; Senft, M.; Alazia, M.; Charpin, J.

    1983-06-01

    The mechanisms of anaphylactic reactions to muscle relaxants under general anesthesia are not completely understood. Extending an earlier study, we report 41 cases of anaphylactic shock investigated by intradermal skin tests with muscle relaxants (suxamethonium, pancuronium, gallamine, nortoxiferine), in vitro leukocyte histamine release, and Prausnitz-Kuestner tests. Intradermal tests were significantly positive at concentrations ranging from 10 to 10(5) times less than those in controls. Reproducibility tested for suxamethonium at a 1-year interval in five patients was good. Histamine release induced by muscle relaxants in Tris-albumin-Ca++-Mg++ buffer showed positive results in 8/25 instances and was inhibited by antigen excess in seven cases. Addition of 50% deuterium oxide (D2O) caused significant increase of histamine release in positive cases and induced release in all five negative cases studied. Muscle relaxant-induced histamine release was inhibited by in vitro anti-IgE leukocyte desensitization. The mean maximal histamine release dropped from 58.2% +/- 9.7 to 5.8% +/- 2 (p less than 0.01). Similarly, leukocyte desensitization also inhibited histamine release induced by anti-IgE but not by formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine or poly-L-arginine. Prausnitz-Kuestner tests were positive in five out of 21 cases studied and became negative after heat inactivation. These results confirm the usefulness of intradermal skin tests in diagnosis of patients' reaction to muscle relaxants and suggest an IgE-mediated rather than an idiosyncratic mechanism.

  11. Muscle relaxation for individuals having tattoos removed through laser treatment: possible effects regarding anxiety and pain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Faye; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Chen, Ching; Hsieh, Yu-Lian; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Hung, Chi-Fa; Lin, Shu-Ching; Tsai, Hsiu-Huang; Wang, Liang-Jen

    2016-08-01

    Effectively managing pain is vital for the well-being and satisfaction of patients undergoing dermatologic treatments involving lasers. This study investigates the potential outcome of using muscle relaxation techniques to reduce pain among people having their tattoos removed with laser treatment. This study consists of 56 participants (mean age 18.1 ± 2.1 years) that had tattoos removed using the principle of selective photothermolysis. These participants underwent muscle relaxation before receiving the laser treatment. Their peripheral skin temperatures (PST) were measured both at the beginning and the end of the muscle relaxation period. Then, the Beck Anxiety Inventory was applied to evaluate anxiety levels. Once the laser treatment was completed, pain levels were measured using a visual analogue scale. A total of 125 person-sessions of laser treatment and psychometric assessments were performed in this study. The muscle relaxation method significantly increased the PST of the participants while reducing the levels of anxiety and pain throughout the course of the laser treatment procedure. The PST, anxiety scores, and pain scores all showed significant correlations with one another. According to the results obtained, this study proposes that muscle relaxation techniques be considered possibly auxiliary treatment options for individuals having tattoos removed through laser treatment. Additional studies with a comparison group and a larger sample size are required in the future to confirm the effectiveness of such intervention.

  12. Repeated sugammadex reversal of muscle relaxation during lumbar spine surgery with intraoperative neurophysiological multimodal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Errando, C L; Blanco, T; Díaz-Cambronero, Ó

    2016-11-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during spine surgery is usually acomplished avoiding muscle relaxants. A case of intraoperative sugammadex partial reversal of the neuromuscular blockade allowing adequate monitoring during spine surgery is presented. A 38 year-old man was scheduled for discectomy and vertebral arthrodesis throughout anterior and posterior approaches. Anesthesia consisted of total intravenous anesthesia plus rocuronium. Intraoperatively monitoring was needed, and the muscle relaxant reverted twice with low dose sugammadex in order to obtain adequate responses. The doses of sugammadex used were conservatively selected (0.1mg/kg boluses increases, total dose needed 0.4mg/kg). Both motor evoqued potentials, and electromyographic responses were deemed adequate by the neurophysiologist. If muscle relaxation was needed in the context described, this approach could be useful to prevent neurological sequelae. This is the first study using very low dose sugammadex to reverse rocuronium intraoperatively and to re-establish the neuromuscular blockade.

  13. [Muscle relaxants in Germany 2005: a comparison of application customs in hospitals and private practices].

    PubMed

    Fink, H; Geldner, G; Fuchs-Buder, T; Hofmockel, R; Ulm, K; Wallek, B; Blobner, M

    2006-06-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate application customs of muscles relaxants in hospitals compared to their use in private practice. Of the 3,260 questionnaires sent-out, 66.9% could be analyzed. Of these 54% were from anesthetists in private practice, 41% from heads of hospital anesthesia departments and 5% from heads of level one hospital anesthesia departments. The first difference between private practices and hospitals was the number of available muscle relaxants: 87% of private practices use 1-3 relaxants, whereas 79% of hospitals use 3-5. Another apparent difference was the relationship between general anesthesia and the number of intubations: 60% of private practices have over 80% of general anesthesia cases, but only 50% of these patients are intubated. On the contrary, two thirds of the hospitals have 50-80% general anesthesia cases and 60-70% of patients are intubated. The main wish for an ideal muscle relaxant was independent of private practice or hospital, short onset time, followed by fast recovery. In accordance 74% of anesthetists in hospitals and 72% of anesthetists in private practice voiced the wish for a non-depolarizing succinylcholine substitute. The results of this nationwide survey suggest that time pressure in combination with an increased specialization of anesthetists in private practice are the main factors for availability and use of muscle relaxants in routine anesthesia.

  14. Electromechanical delay components during skeletal muscle contraction and relaxation in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Fabio; Cè, Emiliano; Rampichini, Susanna; Limonta, Eloisa; Venturelli, Massimo; Monti, Elena; Bet, Luciano; Fossati, Barbara; Meola, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The electromechanical delay during muscle contraction and relaxation can be partitioned into mainly electrochemical and mainly mechanical components by an EMG, mechanomyographic, and force combined approach. Component duration and measurement reliability were investigated during contraction and relaxation in a group of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, n = 13) and in healthy controls (n = 13). EMG, mechanomyogram, and force were recorded in DM1 and in age- and body-matched controls from tibialis anterior (distal muscle) and vastus lateralis (proximal muscle) muscles during maximum voluntary and electrically-evoked isometric contractions. The electrochemical and mechanical components of the electromechanical delay during muscle contraction and relaxation were calculated off-line. Maximum strength was significantly lower in DM1 than in controls under both experimental conditions. All electrochemical and mechanical components were significantly longer in DM1 in both muscles. Measurement reliability was very high in both DM1 and controls. The high reliability of the measurements and the differences between DM1 patients and controls suggest that the EMG, mechanomyographic, and force combined approach could be utilized as a valid tool to assess the level of neuromuscular dysfunction in this pathology, and to follow the efficacy of pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions.

  15. Prolonged contraction-relaxation cycle of fast-twitch muscles in parvalbumin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Schwaller, B; Dick, J; Dhoot, G; Carroll, S; Vrbova, G; Nicotera, P; Pette, D; Wyss, A; Bluethmann, H; Hunziker, W; Celio, M R

    1999-02-01

    The calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) occurs at high concentrations in fast-contracting vertebrate muscle fibers. Its putative role in facilitating the rapid relaxation of mammalian fast-twitch muscle fibers by acting as a temporary buffer for Ca2+ is still controversial. We generated knockout mice for PV (PV -/-) and compared the Ca2+ transients and the dynamics of contraction of their muscles with those from heterozygous (PV +/-) and wild-type (WT) mice. In the muscles of PV-deficient mice, the decay of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) after 20-ms stimulation was slower compared with WT mice and led to a prolongation of the time required to attain peak twitch tension and to an extension of the half-relaxation time. The integral [Ca2+]i in muscle fibers of PV -/- mice was higher and consequently the force generated during a single twitch was approximately 40% greater than in PV +/- and WT animals. Acceleration of the contraction-relaxation cycle of fast-twitch muscle fibers by PV may confer an advantage in the performance of rapid, phasic movements.

  16. Prolongation of Relaxation Time in Extraocular Muscles With Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Adult Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Krysta R.; Stevens, Shanlee M.; McLoon, Linda K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested the hypothesis that short-term treatment with brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) would alter the contractile characteristics of rabbit extraocular muscle (EOM). Methods One week after injections of BDNF in adult rabbit superior rectus muscles, twitch properties were determined in treated and control muscles in vitro. Muscles were also examined for changes in mean cross-sectional areas, neuromuscular junction size, and percent of myofibers expressing specific myosin heavy chain isoforms, and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCA) 1 and 2. Results Brain derived neurotrophic factor–treated muscles had prolonged relaxation times compared with control muscles. Time to 50% relaxation, time to 100% relaxation, and maximum rate of relaxation were increased by 24%, 27%, and 25%, respectively. No significant differences were seen in time to peak force, twitch force, or maximum rate of contraction. Brain derived neurotrophic factor treatment significantly increased mean cross-sectional areas of slow twitch and tonic myofibers, with increased areas ranging from 54% to 146%. Brain derived neurotrophic factor also resulted in an increased percentage of slow twitch myofibers in the orbital layers, ranging from 54% to 77%, and slow-tonic myofibers, ranging from 44% to 62%. No significant changes were seen SERCA1 or 2 expression or in neuromuscular junction size. Conclusions Short-term treatment with BDNF significantly prolonged the duration and rate of relaxation time and increased expression of both slow-twitch and slow-tonic myosin-expressing myofibers without changes in neuromuscular junctions or SERCA expression. The changes induced by BDNF treatment might have potential therapeutic value in dampening/reducing uncontrolled eye oscillations in nystagmus. PMID:27802489

  17. Effects of fiber type and diet on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times of skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mardini, I.A.; McCarter, R.J.; Fullerton, G.D.

    1986-03-01

    NMR studies of muscle have typically used muscles of mixed fiber composition and have not taken into account the metabolic state of the host. Samples of psoas (type IIB fibers) and soleus (type I fibers) muscles were obtained from 3 groups of rabbits: group C, fed regular chow; group DK fed a potassium deficient diet; and group HC fed a high cholesterol diet. The T/sub 1/ and T/sub 2/ relaxation times of psoas and soleus muscles were not significantly different for group C. Following dietary manipulation, (groups KD and HC), however, the relaxation times of the psoas and soleus muscles were significantly different. There was also a significant difference in water content of psoas muscles in groups KD and HC vs. group C but the observed differences in NMR results could be only partially accounted for by the shift in water content. The authors results suggest that (1) changes in ion or cholesterol concentration are capable of inducing changes in water bonding and structuring in muscle tissues; (2) diet must be added to the growing list of environmental factors that can cause NMR contrast changes; (3) selective use of muscles rich in one fiber type or another for NMR measurements could provide either control or diagnostic information, related to changes in body composition.

  18. Multivariable static ankle mechanical impedance with relaxed muscles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunglae; Ho, Patrick; Rastgaar, Mohammad A; Krebs, Hermano I; Hogan, Neville

    2011-07-07

    Quantitative characterization of ankle mechanical impedance is important to understand how the ankle supports lower-extremity functions during interaction with the environment. This paper reports a novel procedure to characterize static multivariable ankle mechanical impedance. An experimental protocol using a wearable therapeutic robot, Anklebot, enabled reliable measurement of torque and angle data in multiple degrees of freedom simultaneously, a combination of inversion-eversion and dorsiflexion-plantarflexion. The measured multivariable torque-angle relation was represented as a vector field, and approximated using a method based on thin-plate spline smoothing with generalized cross validation. The vector field enabled assessment of several important characteristics of static ankle mechanical impedance, which are not available from prior single degree of freedom studies: the directional variation of ankle mechanical impedance, the extent to which the ankle behaves as a spring, and evidence of uniquely neural contributions. The method was validated by testing a simple physical "mock-up" consisting of passive elements. Experiments with young unimpaired subjects quantified the behavior of the maximally relaxed human ankle, showing that ankle mechanical impedance is spring-like but strongly direction-dependent, being weakest in inversion. Remarkably, the analysis was sufficiently sensitive to detect a subtle but statistically significant deviation from spring-like behavior if subjects were not fully relaxed. This method may provide new insight about the function of the ankle, both unimpaired and after biomechanical or neurological injury.

  19. Differences in myosin head arrangement on relaxed thick filaments from Lethocerus and rabbit muscles.

    PubMed

    Levine, R J

    1997-10-01

    Relaxed thick filaments from insect asynchronous flight muscle appear different from those of other striated muscles, both in sections and as separated, negatively-stained structures. Unlike relaxed filaments of scallops, chelicerate arthropods, or vertebrate striated muscle, all of which display a predominantly helical arrangement of surface myosin heads, insect asynchronous flight muscle filaments appear striped, with cross-striations or shelves at spacings of 14.5 nm. Using a bifunctional agent to cross-link the active sites of nearest-neighbour myosin heads we previously demonstrated that the helical arrays on the surfaces of scallop, arthropod, fish and frog filaments are produced by the association of two oppositely-oriented myosin heads, each of which originates from an axially sequential molecule within the same helical strand. The effect of similarly cross-linking nearest-neighbour heads with the bifunctional agent 3,3'-dithiobis[3'(2')-O-(6-propionylamino)hexanoyl]adenosine 5'-triphosphate in the presence of vanadate on the solubility of thick filaments separated from Lethocerus indirect flight muscle (an insect asynchronous flight muscle) and rabbit psoas muscle was examined. After incubation on high salt, treated rabbit filaments retained their length and surface myosin, while untreated filaments and those with severed cross-links dissolved, indicating that the myosin head arrangement on rabbit filaments is similar to those previously studied. Treated indirect flight muscles filaments, however, separated into distinct segments of variable lengths, usually multiples of 150 nm, while untreated filaments and those with severed cross-links dissolved completely. This implies that intermolecular associations on indirect flight muscles filaments most likely occur between circumferentially-adjacent heads within each crown, but originating from different helical strands. We interpret this difference in the relaxed orientations of splayed myosin heads on the two

  20. Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Cognitive Restructuring: Potential Problems and Proposed Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiselica, Mark S.; Baker, Stanley B.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews common problems experienced by clients during progressive muscle relaxation training (PMRT) and summarizes pertinent solutions to those problems. Discusses difficulties and solutions related to cognitive restructuring training. Notes that cognitive restructuring is often used to enhance effectiveness of PMRT. Concludes with suggestions for…

  1. Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Aggression among Elementary Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopata, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    A study evaluated the effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) as a proactive single-component aggression-reduction intervention for 24 students (ages 6- 9) classified as having emotional disabilities in a day school/treatment program. Students also had histories of aggressive behavior. Results supported PMR as a proactive short-term…

  2. Efficacy of Abbreviated Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training: A Quantitative Review of Behavioral Medicine Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Charles R.; Hoyle, Rick H.

    1993-01-01

    Conducted quantitative review of research in which abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation training (APRT) was used as intervention for psychophysiological and stress-related disorders. Calculated strength of association between APRT and outcome measures for 29 experiments published after 1980. APRT was most strongly associated with improvement…

  3. The Effects of Audiotaped Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training on the Reading Performance of Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Howard; Pica, Louis, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Examines the degree to which audiotaped progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) training influenced the oral and silent reading performance of eight adolescents who were legally classified as emotionally disturbed. Finds that PMR training can have a positive influence on the reading performance of emotionally disturbed adolescents. (MG)

  4. An Evaluation of Progressive Muscle Relaxation on Stress Related Symptoms in a Geriatric Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Berry, Stephen

    1981-01-01

    Studied the effect of progressive muscle relaxation training on a group of anxious older widows (N=10). Found training decreased the severity of stress-related disorders when compared with controls. Results indicated, with state anxiety, improvement continued during home practice after treatment. (Author/JAC)

  5. Osmotic effects on the T2 relaxation decay of in vivo muscle.

    PubMed

    Gambarota, G; Cairns, B E; Berde, C B; Mulkern, R V

    2001-09-01

    Saline solutions are commonly employed as a vehicle for drugs administered intramuscularly. In this study, in vivo measurements of spin-spin relaxation (T2) processes by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed to investigate the distribution of water in rat masseter muscle tissue after intramuscular injection of saline solutions of varying tonicity. Prior to saline injection, image-based T2 relaxation decay of muscle was monoexponential. After injection of saline, the T2 relaxation decay became multiexponential. Non-negative least squares (NNLS) analysis of the decay curves revealed two relaxation components: a fast component (T2 = 20-40 ms) and a slow component (T2 = 150-400 ms), which are assigned to intra- and extracellular water protons, respectively. Injection of hypertonic saline solutions significantly increased the extracellular water component in muscle tissue compared to isotonic saline solutions, an effect which lasted for more than 60 min. These findings suggest that MRI techniques may be useful to investigate the effect of hyper- or hypotonic solutions on muscle tissue in vivo.

  6. Quantitative grip strength assessment as a means of evaluating muscle relaxation in mice.

    PubMed

    Nevins, M E; Nash, S A; Beardsley, P M

    1993-01-01

    The effects of various centrally acting drugs and some peripherally acting agents on the forelimb grip strength of CD-1 mice were explored. Forelimb grip strength was assessed by use of a strain gauge to measure the lateral pull force, in grams, exerted by mice as an index of muscle relaxation. The muscle relaxants, diazepam, midazolam, baclofen, methocarbamol, dantrolene sodium and the neuromuscular blocking agents, succinylcholine and pancuronium bromide, dose-dependently reduced forelimb grip strength. 2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid (AP7), which has also been shown to have muscle relaxant effects, also reduced grip strength. Pentobarbital, ethanol, phencyclidine, ketamine and chlorpromazine reduced grip strength at doses which produced behavioral impairments. Lithium chloride, a toxic compound used to induce taste aversions, and clonidine, at doses which affect blood pressure, body temperature and locomotor activity, did not affect grip strength. In addition, stimulant doses of amphetamine and caffeine, but not of morphine, increased grip strength in a dose-dependent manner. These results extend previous findings and suggest that this forelimb grip strength procedure may be a useful screening test for the identification of the potential muscle relaxant properties of drugs.

  7. Antibodies probe for folded monomeric myosin in relaxed and contracted smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, A; Trybus, K M; Bowman, D S; Fay, F S

    1994-09-01

    Regulatory light chain phosphorylation is required for assembly of smooth and non-muscle myosins in vitro, but its effect on polymerization within the cell is not understood. Relaxed smooth muscle cells contain dephosphorylated thick filaments, but this does not exclude the presence of a pool of folded myosin monomers which could be recruited to assemble when phosphorylated, thus forming part of smooth muscle's activation pathway. To test this hypothesis, relaxed and contracted avian gizzard cryosections were labeled with a fluorescently conjugated monoclonal antibody specific for the folded monomeric conformation, or with an antibody against the tip of the tail whose epitope is accessible in the monomeric but not the filamentous state. Fluorescence intensity observed in the two physiological states was quantitated by digital imaging microscopy. Only trace amounts of folded monomeric myosin were detected in both the relaxed and contracted states. The amount of monomer also did not increase when alpha-toxin permeabilized gizzard was equilibrated in a solvent that disassembles filaments in vitro. Assembly/disassembly is therefore unlikely to play a major role in regulating the contraction/relaxation cycle in smooth muscle cells.

  8. The relaxant effect of Nigella sativa on smooth muscles, its possible mechanisms and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Keyhanmanesh, Rana; Gholamnezhad, Zahra; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossien

    2014-12-01

    Nigella sativa (N. sativa) is a spice plant which has been traditionally used for culinary and medicinal purposes. Different therapeutic properties including the beneficial effects on asthma and dyspnea, digestive and gynecology disorders have been described for the seeds of N. sativa. There is evidence of the relaxant effects of this plant and some of its constituents on different types of smooth muscle including rabbit aorta, rabbit jejunum and trachea. The relaxant effect of N. sativa could be of therapeutic importance such as bronchodilation in asthma, vasodilation in hypertension and therapeutic effect on digestive or urogenital disorders. Therefore in the present article, the relaxant effects of N. sativa and its constituents on smooth muscles and its possible mechanisms as well as clinical application of this effect were reviewed.

  9. Laryngeal mask airway without muscle relaxant in femoral head replacement in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    KONG, MING; LI, BEIPING; TIAN, YUNPING

    2016-01-01

    The number of elderly patients undergoing femoral head replacement surgeries is on the increase. These patients often suffer from comorbidity such as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications, which limits the ability of medical teams to employ anesthesia. Thus, alternative methods are required. The aim of this study was to examine the advantage of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) in the absence of muscle relaxant in elderly patients undergoing femoral head replacement operations. Fifty patients (27 males and 23 females) undergoing femoral head replacements were selected for the study between March 2013 and May 2014. The mean value for the age in this group was 74.6±12.5 years. The patients were randomly distributed into two groups of 25. One group was designated as the treatment group and the second group as the control group. For the treatment group, LMA without muscle relaxant was used, and the control group received routine anesthesia. Variations in heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and oxygen saturation (SPO2) in the two groups were monitored at different times. Clinical efficacy and muscle relaxation effects were also analyzed. For the treatment group, the HR, MAP and SPO2 measurements did not reveal any significant variation while these values in the control group demonstrated important dissimilarities. Time to recovery, time to extubation and incidence of throat pain in the treatment group were all markedly decreased as compared to those in control group. The operation time in the treatment group was not significantly different to that of control group. The satisfaction of the muscle relaxation effect in the treatment group was significantly higher than that in the control group while the incidence of adverse reactions was not considerably different. In conclusion, the use of LMA without using muscle relaxant in femoral head replacement surgeries performed on elderly patients showed to be effective and safe. PMID:26889218

  10. Smooth muscle relaxing activity of gentiopicroside isolated from Gentiana spathacea.

    PubMed

    Rojas, A; Bah, M; Rojas, J I; Gutiérrez, D M

    2000-12-01

    Bioassay directed fractionation of the (1:1) chloroform-methanol extract of Gentiana spathacea H.B.K (Gentianaceae) led to the isolation of gentiopicroside (gentiopricrin) (1), the major spasmolytic component of the plant. Gentiopicroside inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, the spontaneous contractions of isolated guinea pig ileum. Contractions induced by histamine, acetylcholine, BaCl2 and KCl on the ileum were also significantly blocked by this monoterpene glucoside, which suggests that this compound might be interfering with calcium influx into the smooth muscle cells.

  11. Comparison of sensory modes of biofeedback in relaxation training of frontalis muscle.

    PubMed

    Chen, W

    1981-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of various sensory modes of EMG biofeedback to relaxation training of the frontalis muscle. 19 male and 29 female subjects were randomly selected from a pool of college volunteers. They were then randomly assigned 12 each to audiofeedback, visual feedback, audiovisual feedback, and no feedback groups. There were 11 20-min. sessions per subject. Subjects in the biofeedback groups were trained to reduce muscle tension voluntarily by utilizing Cyborg J33 EMG portable trainers. The subjects in the three feedback groups exhibited significantly lower muscle tension than did the subjects in the no-feedback control group. There were no significant differences in relaxation among the three feedback groups.

  12. Study of anisotropy in nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times of water protons in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kasturi, S R; Chang, D C; Hazlewood, C F

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropy of the spin-lattice relaxation time (T1) and the spin-spin relaxation times (T2) of water protons in skeletal muscle tissue have been studied by the spin-echo technique. Both T1 and T2 have been measured for the water protons of the tibialis anterior muscle of mature male rats for theta = 0, 55, and 90 degrees, where theta is the orientation of the muscle fiber with respect to the static field. The anisotropy in T1 and T2 has been measured at temperatures of 28, -5 and -10 degrees C. No significant anisotropy was observed in the T1 of the tissue water, while an average anisotropy of approximately 5% was observed in T2 at room temperature. The average anisotropy of T2 at -5 and -10 degrees C was found to be approximately 2 and 1.3%, respectively. PMID:6266530

  13. Cervical flexion-relaxation response to neck muscle fatigue in males and females.

    PubMed

    Nimbarte, Ashish D; Zreiqat, Majed M; Chowdhury, Suman Kanti

    2014-12-01

    In this study the effect of muscle fatigue on the cervical spine flexion-relaxation response was studied. Twenty healthy participants (10 males and 10 females) were recruited for data collection. The Sorenson protocol was utilized to induce neck muscle fatigue. Surface electromyography and optical motion capture systems were used to measure neck muscle activation and head-neck posture, respectively. A post-fatigue reduction in the Flexion-Relaxation Ratio (FRR) and higher FRR for females compared to males were observed. A post-fatigue decrease was also observed in the onset and offset angles resulting in an expansion of the myoelectric silence period. Gender had no effect on the onset and offset angles of the silence period. Post-fatigue shift in the onset and offset angles and the expansion of the silence period indicate an increased contribution by the passive viscoelastic tissues in stabilizing the cervical spine under fatigued condition.

  14. [Mydeton: a centrally acting muscle relaxant drug from Gedeon Richter LTD].

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Pál; Tarnawa, István; Kovács, Gyula; Szombathelyi, Zsolt; Farkas, Sándor

    2002-01-01

    Since its introduction in 1959 tolperisone hydrochloride (Mydeton) is still one of the leading products of Gedeon Richter Ltd. It has been successfully applied for treating different painful muscle spasms. The compound is successfully marketed also by several foreign, mostly Japanese, pharmaceutical companies, as a central muscle relaxant agent. The present summary overviews the pharmacology of tolperisone, with special emphasize on its still partly understood way of action. Data from the scientific literature as well as our own experimental results strongly support the hypothesis that inhibition of voltage gated sodium channels is a major component of the mechanism of action of tolperisone. The paper also summarizes the clinical results with tolperisone and the perspectives of the therapeutic use of centrally acting muscle relaxants.

  15. Fusimotor reflexes in relaxed forearm muscles produced by cutaneous afferents from the human hand.

    PubMed Central

    Gandevia, S C; Wilson, L; Cordo, P J; Burke, D

    1994-01-01

    1. This study was designed to determine whether cutaneous receptors in the hand exert reflex effects on fusimotor neurones innervating relaxed muscles. Recordings were made from fifty-four muscle spindle afferents in the radial nerve while the arm was held relaxed in a supporting frame. Cutaneous afferents were activated by trains of stimuli at non-noxious levels to the superficial radial nerve or to the palmar surface of the fingers. 2. For the population of muscle spindle afferents, the mean discharge rate was 7.1 +/- 6.4 Hz (range 0-24 Hz). Thirty-three per cent had no background discharge, and this occurred significantly more often in finger extensors than wrist extensors. 3. Trains of cutaneous stimuli produced no change in the discharge rates of the majority of spindle endings irrespective of whether the spindle afferent had a background discharge or was given one by muscle stretch. However, with two of forty afferents, the stimuli produced an increase in discharge at latencies of 135 and 155 ms. 4. With a further fourteen muscle spindle endings, the dynamic responses to stretch were measured 100-400 ms after the trains of cutaneous stimuli. For four spindle afferents there was a statistically significant change in the dynamic response to stretch occurring at conditioned-stretch intervals of 100-200 ms. For two afferents the dynamic response decreased by 17 and 26% and for two others it increased by about 24 and 37%. 5. While these results support the view that the level of background fusimotor drive is low in the relaxed state, they suggest that there is some dynamic fusimotor drive to completely relaxed muscles operating on the human hand, and that this drive can be altered reflexly by cutaneous afferent inputs from the hand. Images Figure 4 PMID:7837105

  16. Predicting the activation states of the muscles governing upper esophageal sphincter relaxation and opening

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Corinne A.; Hammer, Michael J.; Cock, Charles; Dinning, Philip; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Costa, Marcello; McCulloch, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation and deactivation of neural inputs to these muscles, including the intrinsic cricopharyngeus (CP) and extrinsic submental (SM) muscles, results in their mechanical activation or deactivation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure, and ultimately reduces or promotes flow of content. By measuring the changes in diameter, using intraluminal impedance, and the concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure, it is possible to determine when the muscles are passively or actively relaxing or contracting. From these “mechanical states” of the muscle, the neural inputs driving the specific motor behaviors of the UES can be inferred. In this study we compared predictions of UES mechanical states directly with the activity measured by electromyography (EMG). In eight subjects, pharyngeal pressure and impedance were recorded in parallel with CP- and SM-EMG activity. UES pressure and impedance swallow profiles correlated with the CP-EMG and SM-EMG recordings, respectively. Eight UES muscle states were determined by using the gradient of pressure and impedance with respect to time. Guided by the level and gradient change of EMG activity, mechanical states successfully predicted the activity of the CP muscle and SM muscle independently. Mechanical state predictions revealed patterns consistent with the known neural inputs activating the different muscles during swallowing. Derivation of “activation state” maps may allow better physiological and pathophysiological interpretations of UES function. PMID:26767985

  17. Monitoring of variations in the speed of sound in contracting and relaxing muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, M. Zakir; Voigt, Horst; Grill, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    Beside of changes in the shape of contracting and relaxing muscle, which can be monitored with ultrasound, also changes in the velocity of ultrasound are expected. To observe such changes with high resolution for the gastrocnemius muscle of athletes a novel detection scheme has been developed. As already introduced for the detection of sideways expansion of the muscle, ultrasonic transducers are mounted sideways on opposing positions of the skin. To detect variations of the speed of sound, the expansion of the muscle is suppressed by mechanical clamping. Under this condition, any variation in the time-of-flight of ultrasonic signals can only be introduced by a variation of the speed of sound along the path of the ultrasound transit signal. The observed rather small variations of the speed of sound are compared to the signals obtained by ultrasound monitoring for the extension and contraction observed for free sideways motion (unclamped muscle). Opposite to the general behavior of a free muscle the clamped muscle shows a diminishing time-of-flight under contraction relating to an increase in the sound velocity. Since clamping also reduces effects of inertia, the influence of inertia on muscle dynamics can be illustrated by comparison of measurements on clamped and free muscle.

  18. Non-Selective Cation Channels Mediate Chloroquine-Induced Relaxation in Precontracted Mouse Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Er; Ma, Yun-Fei; Chen, Weiwei; Zhai, Kui; Qin, Gangjian; Guo, Donglin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao; Shen, Jin-Hua; Ji, Guangju; Liu, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Bitter tastants can induce relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle by activating big-conductance potassium channels (BKs) or by inactivating voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (VDLCCs). In this study, a new pathway for bitter tastant-induced relaxation was defined and investigated. We found nifedipine-insensitive and bitter tastant chloroquine-sensitive relaxation in epithelium-denuded mouse tracheal rings (TRs) precontracted with acetylcholine (ACH). In the presence of nifedipine (10 µM), ACH induced cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and cell shortening in single airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs), and these changes were inhibited by chloroquine. In TRs, ACH triggered a transient contraction under Ca2+-free conditions, and, following a restoration of Ca2+, a strong contraction occurred, which was inhibited by chloroquine. Moreover, the ACH-activated whole-cell and single channel currents of non-selective cation channels (NSCCs) were blocked by chloroquine. Pyrazole 3 (Pyr3), an inhibitor of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) channels, partially inhibited ACH-induced contraction, intracellular Ca2+ elevation, and NSCC currents. These results demonstrate that NSCCs play a role in bitter tastant-induced relaxation in precontracted airway smooth muscle. PMID:24992312

  19. Transverse Relaxation and Magnetization Transfer in Skeletal Muscle: Effect of pH

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Elizabeth A.; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Does, Mark D.; Damon, Bruce M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise increases the intracellular T2 (T2,i) of contracting muscles. The mechanism(s) for the T2,i increase have not been fully described, and may include increased intracellular free water and acidification. These changes may alter chemical exchange processes between intracellular free water and proteins. In this study, the hypotheses were tested that 1) pH changes T2,i by affecting the rate of magnetization transfer (MT) between free intracellular water and intracellular proteins and 2) the magnitude of the T2,i effect depends on acquisition mode (localized or non-localized) and echo spacing. Frog gastrocnemius muscles were excised and their intracellular pH was either kept at physiological pH (7.0) or modified to model exercising muscle (pH 6.5). The intracellular transverse relaxation rate (R2,i =1/T2,i) always decreased in the acidic muscles, but the changes were greater when measured using more rapid refocusing rates. The MT rate from the macromolecular proton pool to the free water proton pool, its reverse rate, and the spin-lattice relaxation rate of water decreased in acidic muscles. It is concluded that intracellular acidification alters the R2,i of muscle water in a refocusing rate-dependent manner and that the R2,i changes are correlated with changes in the MT rate between macromolecules and free intracellular water. PMID:19097244

  20. Pharmacological properties of NK433, a new centrally acting muscle relaxant.

    PubMed

    Sakitama, K; Ozawa, Y; Aoto, N; Nakamura, K; Ishikawa, M

    1995-01-24

    The pharmacological properties of NK433 ((-)-(R)-2-methyl-3-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-4'-trifluoromethylpropiophenone+ ++ monohydrochloride), a novel muscle relaxant, were investigated. NK433 inhibited intercollicular decerebrate rigidity (gamma-rigidity) and anemic decerebrate rigidity (alpha-rigidity) dose dependently. NK433 was stronger in inhibiting gamma-rigidity than alpha-rigidity. NK433 inhibited the increase in muscle spindle discharges induced by pinna pinching (gamma-activity) without affecting muscle spindle discharges or neuromuscular transmission. At muscle relaxant doses in decerebrate rigidities, NK433 did not affect the muscle tone induced by morphine-HCl nor that of normal animals. These results suggest that NK433 selectively depresses the excessive muscle tone of decerebrate rigidities through its effects on the central nervous system, and inhibition of gamma-activity causes a preferential depression of gamma-rigidity in comparison to alpha-rigidity. In i.v. experiments, the effects of NK433 on decerebrate rigidities were similar to those of eperisone-HCl and tolperisone-HCl, but in p.o. experiments, NK433 was at least 3 times as potent as eperisone-HCl and tolperisone-HCl.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide mediates hypoxia-induced relaxation of trout urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dombkowski, Ryan A; Doellman, Meredith M; Head, Sally K; Olson, Kenneth R

    2006-08-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a recently identified gasotransmitter that may mediate hypoxic responses in vascular smooth muscle. H2S also appears to be a signaling molecule in mammalian non-vascular smooth muscle, but its existence and function in non-mammalian non-vascular smooth muscle have not been examined. In the present study we examined H2S production and its physiological effects in urinary bladder from steelhead and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and evaluated the relationship between H2S and hypoxia. H2S was produced by trout bladders, and its production was sensitive to inhibitors of cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathionine gamma-lyase. H2S produced a dose-dependent relaxation in unstimulated and carbachol pre-contracted bladders and inhibited spontaneous contractions. Bladders pre-contracted with 80 mmol l(-1) KCl were less sensitive to H2S than bladders contracted with either 80 mmol l(-1) KC2H3O2 (KAc) or carbachol, suggesting that some of the H2S effects are mediated through an ion channel. However, H2S relaxation of bladders was not affected by the potassium channel inhibitors, apamin, charybdotoxin, 4-aminopyridine, and glybenclamide, or by chloride channel/exchange inhibitors 4,4'-Diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid disodium salt, tamoxifen and glybenclamide, or by the presence or absence of extracellular HCO3-. Inhibitors of neuronal mechanisms, tetrodotoxin, strychnine and N-vanillylnonanamide were likewise ineffective. Hypoxia (aeration with N2) also relaxed bladders, was competitive with H2S for relaxation, and it was equally sensitive to KCl, and unaffected by neuronal blockade or the presence of extracellular HCO3-. Inhibitors of H2S synthesis also inhibited hypoxic relaxation. These experiments suggest that H2S is a phylogenetically ancient gasotransmitter in non-mammalian non-vascular smooth muscle and that it serves as an oxygen sensor/transducer, mediating the effects of hypoxia.

  2. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups.

  3. Mebeverine-loaded electrospun nanofibers: physicochemical characterization and dissolution studies.

    PubMed

    Illangakoon, Upulitha Eranka; Nazir, Tahir; Williams, Gareth R; Chatterton, Nicholas P

    2014-01-01

    Both fast dissolving and sustained release drug delivery systems (DDSs) comprising mebeverine hydrochloride (MB-HCl) embedded in either povidone (PVP) K60 or Eudragit(®) L 100-55 nanofibers have been prepared by electrospinning. The fibers are found to have cylindrical morphologies with smooth surfaces, except at high drug loadings that appear to induce surface roughness (PVP) or fragmentation (Eudragit). There is a general increase in fiber diameter with drug loading. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction demonstrate that the drug exists in an amorphous state in the fibers. Infrared spectroscopy data indicate that the drug has good compatibility with the polymer, whereas nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses confirmed that the MB-HCl was not degraded during the spinning process. In vitro dissolution tests of the PVP fiber mats show them to dissolve within 10 s, an improved dissolution profile over the pure drug. The Eudragit fibers show pH-dependent drug release profiles, with only very limited release at pH 2.0 but sustained release over approximately 8 h at pH 6.8. The Eudragit nanofibers have the potential to be developed as oral DDSs for localized drug release in the intestinal tract, whereas the PVP materials may find the application as buccal delivery systems or suppositories.

  4. Thrombospondin-1 limits ischemic tissue survival by inhibiting nitric oxide–mediated vascular smooth muscle relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg, Jeff S.; Hyodo, Fuminori; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Romeo, Martin J.; Abu-Asab, Mones; Tsokos, Maria; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Wink, David A.; Krishna, Murali C.

    2007-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP pathway, by relaxing vascular smooth muscle cells, is a major physiologic regulator of tissue perfusion. We now identify thrombospondin-1 as a potent antagonist of NO for regulating F-actin assembly and myosin light chain phosphorylation in vascular smooth muscle cells. Thrombospondin-1 prevents NO-mediated relaxation of precontracted vascular smooth muscle cells in a collagen matrix. Functional magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated that an NO-mediated increase in skeletal muscle perfusion was enhanced in thrombospondin-1–null relative to wild-type mice, implicating endogenous thrombospondin-1 as a physiologic antagonist of NO-mediated vasodilation. Using a random myocutaneous flap model for ischemic injury, tissue survival was significantly enhanced in thrombospondin-1–null mice. Improved flap survival correlated with increased recovery of oxygen levels in the ischemic tissue of thrombospondin-1–null mice as measured by electron paramagnetic resonance oximetry. These findings demonstrate an important antag-onistic relation between NO/cGMP signaling and thrombospondin-1 in vascular smooth muscle cells to regulate vascular tone and tissue perfusion. PMID:17082319

  5. Force depression and relaxation kinetics after active shortening and deactivation in mouse soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Van Noten, P; Van Leemputte, M

    2013-03-15

    After active shortening, isometric force production capacity of muscle is reduced (force depression, FD). The mechanism is incompletely understood but increasing cross-bridge detachment and/or decreasing attachment rate might be involved. Therefore we aimed to investigate the relation between work delivered during shortening (W), and change in half-relaxation time (Δ0.5RT) and change in the slow phase of muscle relaxation (Δkslow), considered as a marker for cross-bridge detachment rate, after shortening and after a short (0.7s) interruption of activation (deactivation). We hypothesized that shortening induces an accelerated relaxation related to W which is, similar to FD, largely abolished by a short deactivation. In 10 incubated supra-maximally stimulated mouse soleus muscles, we varied the amount of FD at L0 by varying shortening amplitude (0.6, 1.2 and 2.4mm). We found that W not only induces FD (R(2)=0.92) but also a dose dependent accelerated relaxation (R(2)=0.88 and R(2)=0.77 for respectively Δkslow and Δ0.5RT). In cyclic movements this is of functional significance, because the loss in force generating capacity might be (partially) compensated by faster relaxation. After a short deactivation, both FD and Δkslow were largely abolished but Δ0.5RT remained largely present. Under the assumption that Δkslow reflects a change in cross-bridge detachment rate, these results support the idea that FD is an intrinsic sarcomeric property originating from a work induced reduction of the number of force generating cross-bridges, however not via decreased attachment but via increased detachment rate.

  6. Effects of Telfairia occidentalis (fluted pumpkin; Cucurbitaceae) in mouse models of convulsion, muscle relaxation, and depression.

    PubMed

    Akindele, Abidemi J; Ajao, Mutiu Y; Aigbe, Flora R; Enumah, Uchenna S

    2013-09-01

    Telfairia occidentalis (Cucurbitaceae) is a leafy vegetable used in soup and folk medicine in southern Nigeria. Ethnobotanical survey revealed that preparations of the plant are used in the treatment of central nervous system-related disorders including convulsion. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of the hydroethanolic leaf extract of T. occidentalis in mouse models of convulsion, muscle relaxation, and depression. The strychnine and isoniazid convulsion, traction and climbing muscle relaxation, and forced swim and tail suspension depression tests were used in this study. The extract was administered orally (p.o.) at dose range of 25-800 mg/kg while distilled water (10 mL/kg p.o.) served as negative control. Diazepam (5 mg/kg p.o.) was used as positive control in the convulsion and muscle relaxation models while imipramine (64 mg/kg p.o.) served the same purpose in the depression tests. T. occidentalis significantly increased the onset (P<.001) and reduced the duration of convulsion (P<.05, .01) in the strychnine test and increased the time to death (P<.05, .01, .001) in the isoniazid model. The extract insignificantly increased the reaction time in the traction test while it significantly increased the time in the climbing test (P<.001). In the forced swim and tail suspension models, T. occidentalis significantly (P<.001) and dose-dependently increased the duration of immobility. The results obtained in this study suggest that the hydroethanolic leaf extract of T. occidentalis possesses anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant properties, thus justifying its folkloric use.

  7. Evaluation of skeletal muscle relaxant activity of aqueous extract of Nerium oleander flowers in Albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Tirumalasetti, Jayasree; Patel, Maulik; Shaikh, Ubedulla; Harini, K.; Shankar, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Nerium oleander is traditionally used in various diseases because of its medicinal properties. One of its uses is in musculoskeletal disorder. The aim of the study was to evaluate the skeletal muscle relaxant activity of the aqueous extract of Nerium oleander flowers (AENOF) in albino rats in comparison with diazepam. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 Swiss albino rats aged 6–7 weeks, of either sex, weighing about 100–150 g, were taken, and after acute toxicity studies two different doses were selected. The animals were divided into four different groups. The first group was kept as the control (normal saline), second as the standard (diazepam) and the remaining two groups as Test I and Test II, and given different doses of the AENOF. Skeletal muscle relaxant activity (motor coordination) on Rotarod and locomotor activity on photoactometer was performed. Statistical analysis was carried out by using analysis of variance, followed by Dunnett's multiple comparison tests. Results: The result from the Actophotometer test and Rotarod test showed that the extract of AENOF significantly reduced (P < 0.05) the motor coordination of the tested animals. Conclusions: Our data indicates that AENOF possesses skeletal muscle relaxant activities. PMID:26288474

  8. The role of magnesium sulfate in tracheal intubation without muscle relaxation in patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Hassan-Ali; Hashemi, Seyed Jalal; Montazeri, Kamran; Dehghani, Alireza; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Muscle relaxant agents usually use to facilitate tracheal intubation; however, sometimes limitations exist. Magnesium (Mg) sulfate is a candidate for muscle relaxant substitute. This study was designed to determine the effect of Mg sulfate accompanied with propofol and fentanyl in patients undergoing ophthalmic surgery. Materials and Methods: In a double-blind randomized protocol and before tracheal intubation, Mg sulfate 40, 45, or 50 mg/kg in 100 ml of saline (Groups 1–3, respectively) or saline alone (Group 4) were administrated intravenously in 100 patients (n = 25 in each group) with the American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) physical Status I, II, or III. The patients' intubation condition in all subjects were determined and described. Results: The patients' demographic data including age, ASA, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, intraocular pressure, and body mass index were not significantly different between the groups. A better mask ventilation feasibility in Mg sulfate 45 group (Group 2) was observed when compared with Mg sulfate 50 (Group 3) (P = 0.022) and saline group (Group 4) (P = 0.021). In addition, the vocal cord movement and muscle relaxant requirement in saline group were significantly different from others groups (P < 0.05). The laryngoscopic time in saline group was greater than other groups significantly (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Intravenous administration of Mg sulfate accompanied with propofol and fentanyl facilitates the tracheal intubation without neuromuscular blocking agents. To avoid Mg level increasing in plasma; however, the low dose of Mg sulfate is suggested. PMID:28163742

  9. HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous quantification of desmethylmebeverine acid, mebeverine acid and mebeverine alcohol in human plasma along with its application to a pharmacokinetics study.

    PubMed

    Moskaleva, Natalia E; Baranov, Pavel A; Mesonzhnik, Natalia V; Appolonova, Svetlana A

    2017-05-10

    A new simple, rapid and sensitive high pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for simultaneous analysis of mebeverine metabolites as: mebeverine alcohol (MAL), mebeverine acid (MAC) and desmethylmebeverine acid (DMAC) in human plasma. Sample preparation was performed by protein precipitation following the separation of analytes using an Acquity UPLC BEN C8 column 1.7 mm 2.1×50mm (Waters, USA). (2)H5-desmethylmebeverine acid ((2)H5-DMAC) was used as the internal standard (IS). The proposed method was validated with linear ranges of 0.1-10ng/mL; 1-100ng/mL and 5-1000ng/mL for MAL, MAC and DMAC, respectively. Accuracy for all analytes (%RE), given as deviation between nominal and measured concentration and assay variability (CV) ranged from -4.04% to 4.60% and from 0.31% to 6.43% respectively both for within- and between-run. The overall recoveries for all metabolites were above 85%. The proposed method was used successfully for analysis of real samples from a pharmacokinetics study.

  10. Effects of progressive muscle relaxation training on anxiety and quality of life of inpatients with ectopic pregnancy receiving methotrexate treatment.

    PubMed

    Pan, Li; Zhang, Jingping; Li, Lihua

    2012-08-01

    We explored the effects of progressive muscle relaxation training on anxiety and health-related quality of life of patients with ectopic pregnancy receiving methotrexate treatment. Ninety inpatients receiving this treatment were randomly assigned to a progressive muscle relaxation group (n = 45) or a control group (n = 45). The control group received standard single-dose methotrexate treatment, and the experimental group received methotrexate and additional muscle relaxation training until hospital discharge. The patients were evaluated with the state form of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and SF-36 shortly after admission and before discharge from the hospital. Both covariance analysis and repeated measures ANOVA showed that muscle relaxation training can effectively improve the anxiety and health-related quality of life of patients with ectopic pregnancy receiving methotrexate treatment in an inpatient setting.

  11. Correlation between vestibular sensitization and leg muscle relaxation under weightlessness simulated by water immersion.

    PubMed

    Mitarai, G; Mano, T; Yamazaki, Y

    1981-01-01

    The experiments were designed to determine the contribution of the leg muscle relaxation to the sensitization of the vestibular function under weightlessness, The neuromuscular unit (NMU) discharges were continuously recorded with microelectrodes from the anti-gravitational soleus muscle and its antagonist, the tibialis anterior, of a man standing first upright on the level floor of a dry water tank, and then gradually being immersed in water till it reached his neck; while he was buoyed with an airtube placed under his armpit. In each of the successive states, the caloric nystagmus was evoked, analyzed and compared with the NMU discharge as well as with subjective symptoms associated with the nystagmus. The results indicate that the nystagmogenic activity had a significant correlation with the appearance of the active NMU in the soleus, and they also suggest that the reduction of ascending signals from the antigravity muscles might be one of the causes of atypical vestibular responses occuring in weightlessness.

  12. Metabolic alterations induced in cultured skeletal muscle by stretch-relaxation activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfaludy, Sophia; Shansky, Janet; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1989-01-01

    Muscle cells differentiated in vitro are repetitively stretched and relaxed in order to determine the presence of short- and long-term alterations occurring in glucose uptake and lactate efflux that are similar to the metabolic alterations occurring in stimulated organ-cultured muscle and in vivo skeletal muscle during the active state. It is observed that whereas mechanical stimulation increases these metabolic parameters within 4-6 h of starting activity, unstimulated basal rates in control cultures also increase during this period of time, and by 8 h, their rates have reached or exceeded the rates in continuously stimulated cells. Measurements of these parameters in media of different compositions show that activity-induced long-term alterations in the parameters occur independently of growth factors in serium and embryo extracts.

  13. The effect of progressive muscle relaxation on pregnant women's general health

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Azam; Sirati-Nir, Masoud; Ebadi, Abbas; Aliasgari, Matin; Hajiamini, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy may be accompanied by serious physiological and psychological changes as it is a stressful period in a woman's life. So, this study was conducted to determine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on pregnant women's general health. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 60 primigravida women admitted to the prenatal clinic of selected hospitals in Iran constituted the study population. Using purposive sampling method, the level of general health of the women was measured with General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28). Then, the samples were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. Three 1.5–2 h relaxation training sessions were held for the experimental group. After 8 weeks, the level of general health of both groups was measured again. Finally, the collected data were analyzed using Chi-square and paired t-test (P < 0.05). Results: Total mean score of general health of the experimental group and the control group before the intervention was 35.83 (6.92) and 29.46 (8.3), respectively, and after the intervention, the respective scores were 20.2 (5.61) and 27.85 (8.24). Although after the intervention both groups showed an increased level of general health, the difference in general health between before and after intervention was significant in the experimental group (P < 0.001). Furthermore, comparison of variations in mean scores of general health level before and after intervention in the two groups showed a significant difference (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Given that the results showed the effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation on pregnant women's general health, the prenatal clinics can include a training program for progressive muscle relaxation in the routine training programs for pregnant women. PMID:26793248

  14. The effects of experimental muscle and skin pain on the static stretch sensitivity of human muscle spindles in relaxed leg muscles

    PubMed Central

    Birznieks, Ingvars; Burton, Alexander R; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2008-01-01

    Animal studies have shown that noxious inputs onto γ-motoneurons can cause an increase in the activity of muscle spindles, and it has been proposed that this causes a fusimotor-driven increase in muscle stiffness that is believed to underlie many chronic pain syndromes. To test whether experimental pain also acts on the fusimotor system in humans, unitary recordings were made from 19 spindle afferents (12 Ia, 7 II) located in the ankle and toe extensors or peronei muscles of awake human subjects. Muscle pain was induced by bolus intramuscular injection of 0.5 ml 5% hypertonic saline into tibialis anterior (TA); skin pain was induced by 0.2 ml injection into the overlying skin. Changes in fusimotor drive to the muscle spindles were inferred from changes in the mean discharge frequency and discharge variability of spindle endings in relaxed muscle. During muscle pain no afferents increased their discharge activity: seven afferents (5 Ia, 2 II) showed a decrease and six (4 Ia, 2 II) afferents were not affected. During skin pain of 13 afferents discharge rate increased in one (Ia) and decreased in two (1 Ia, 1 II). On average, the overall discharge rate decreased during muscle pain by 6.1% (P < 0.05; Wilcoxon), but remained essentially the same during skin pain. There was no detectable correlation between subjective pain level and the small change in discharge rate of muscle spindles. Irrespective of the type of pain, discharge variability parameters were not influenced (P > 0.05; Wilcoxon). We conclude that, contrary to the ‘vicious cycle’ hypothesis, acute activation of muscle or skin nociceptors does not cause a reflex increase in fusimotor drive in humans. Rather, our results are more aligned with the pain adaptation model, based on clinical studies predicting pain-induced reductions of agonist muscle activity. PMID:18403422

  15. Cyclic AMP relaxes swine arterial smooth muscle predominantly by decreasing cell Ca2+ concentration.

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, N L; Rembold, C M; Richard, H M; Murphy, R A

    1991-01-01

    1. Our objective was to evaluate the mechanism of cyclic AMP-dependent arterial smooth muscle relaxation. Cyclic AMP-dependent relaxation has been proposed to result from either (a) a decrease in intracellular [Ca2+] or (b) a decrease in [Ca2+] sensitivity of myosin light chain kinase by protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation of myosin kinase. 2. We evaluated these proposed mechanisms by examining forskolin-induced changes in aequorin-estimated myoplasmic [Ca2+], [cyclic AMP], myosin phosphorylation and stress generation in agonist-stimulated or KCl-depolarized swine common carotid media tissues. 3. Forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, increased [cyclic AMP] and reduced [Ca2+], myosin phosphorylation and stress in tissues pre-contracted with phenylephrine or histamine. This relaxation was not associated with an alteration of the [Ca2+] sensitivity of phosphorylation, nor the dependence of stress on phosphorylation. 4. Forskolin pre-treatment attenuated, but did not abolish, agonist-induced increases in [Ca2+] and stress. 5. These results suggest that cyclic AMP-induced relaxation of the agonist-stimulated swine carotid media is primarily caused by cyclic AMP-mediated decreases in myoplasmic [Ca2+]. PMID:1654411

  16. Three-dimensional organization of troponin on cardiac muscle thin filaments in the relaxed state.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shixin; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Orzechowski, Marek; Craig, Roger; Trinick, John; White, Howard; Lehman, William

    2014-02-18

    Muscle contraction is regulated by troponin-tropomyosin, which blocks and unblocks myosin binding sites on actin. To elucidate this regulatory mechanism, the three-dimensional organization of troponin and tropomyosin on the thin filament must be determined. Although tropomyosin is well defined in electron microscopy helical reconstructions of thin filaments, troponin density is mostly lost. Here, we determined troponin organization on native relaxed cardiac muscle thin filaments by applying single particle reconstruction procedures to negatively stained specimens. Multiple reference models led to the same final structure, indicating absence of model bias in the procedure. The new reconstructions clearly showed F-actin, tropomyosin, and troponin densities. At the 25 Å resolution achieved, troponin was considerably better defined than in previous reconstructions. The troponin density closely resembled the shape of troponin crystallographic structures, facilitating detailed interpretation of the electron microscopy density map. The orientation of troponin-T and the troponin core domain established troponin polarity. Density attributable to the troponin-I mobile regulatory domain was positioned where it could hold tropomyosin in its blocking position on actin, thus suggesting the underlying structural basis of thin filament regulation. Our previous understanding of thin filament regulation had been limited to known movements of tropomyosin that sterically block and unblock myosin binding sites on actin. We now show how troponin, the Ca(2+) sensor, may control these movements, ultimately determining whether muscle contracts or relaxes.

  17. Myosin Heads Contribute to the Maintenance of Filament Order in Relaxed Rabbit Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bershitsky, Sergey Y.; Koubassova, Natalia A.; Bennett, Pauline M.; Ferenczi, Michael A.; Shestakov, Dmitry A.; Tsaturyan, Andrey K.

    2010-01-01

    Raising the temperature of rabbit skeletal muscle from ∼0°C to ∼20°C has been shown to enhance the helical organization of the myosin heads and to change the intensities of the 10 and 11 equatorial reflections. We show here by time-resolved x-ray diffraction combined with temperature jump that the movement of the heads to enhance the organized myosin helix occurs at the same fast rate as the change in the intensities of the equatorial reflections. However, model calculations indicate that the change in the equatorials cannot be explained simply in terms of the movement of myosin heads. Analysis of electron micrographs of transverse sections of relaxed muscle fibers cryofixed at ∼5°C and ∼35°C shows that in addition to the reorganization of the heads the thin and thick filaments are less constrained to their positions in the hexagonal filament lattice in the warm muscle than in the cold. Incorporating the changes in filament order in model calculations reconciles these with the observed changes in equatorial reflections. We suggest the thin filaments in the cold muscle are boxed into their positions by the thermal movement of the disordered myosin heads. In the warmer muscle, the packed-down heads leave the thin filaments more room to diffuse laterally. PMID:20858427

  18. Relaxation of soman-induced contracture of airway smooth muscle in vitro. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Filbert, M.G.; Moore, D.H.; Adler, M.

    1992-12-31

    A possible role for beta-adrenergic agonists in the management of bronchoconstriction resulting from exposure to anticholinesterase compounds was investigated in vitro in canine tracheal smooth muscle. Norepinephrine, salbutamol and isoproterenol produced partial relaxation of soman-induced contractures. However, the relaxation induced was not sustained; muscle tensions returned to pretreatment levels within minutes despite the continued presence of beta-agonists. Increasing cAMP levels with the non beta-agonist bronchodilators such as thoophylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, or forskolin, a specific stimulator of adenylate cyclase, resulted in more complete and longer lasting relaxation, suggesting that beta-adrenoceptor desensitization may contribute to the failure by beta-agonists to produce sustained relaxation. Nerve agents, Soman, Toxicity, Airway smooth muscle, In vitro, Physiology, Effects.

  19. [Intracellular signal systems in the epithelium- and endothelium-dependent relaxation of smooth muscles].

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; Kovalev, I V; Baskakov, M B; Medvedev, M A

    2001-01-01

    The research of mechanisms of a regulation electrical and contractile of properties of unstriated muscles of an internals remains by an actual problem of modern physiology and medicine. Already now it is possible to state that the efficacy of means of correction of distresses of an internals depends on a degree of a level of scrutiny of these mechanisms. Among physiologically active substances effecting on smooth muscle cells (SM), the special relaxing factor synthesized by endotheliocytes, epithelial cells and SM. Identified by the majority of the explorers as oxide of nitrogen (NO), relaxing factor responds for exhibiting of many myogenic responses of pots and pneumatic routes. The mechanisms of synthesis and implementation of effects of this factor in SM cells up to the extremity are not clarified. The considerable advance in learning mechanisms of operation relaxing factor on SM is connected to discovering of ability of some nitro compounds to replicate NO-dependent relaxing effects in these cells. The main systems of intracellular regulation are involved in mechanisms of implementation endothelial and epithelial local regulatory effects on SM. The majority of the explorers bind an epithelium-dependent release phenomenon SM to an activation of a solvable fraction guanilatcyclase, found in the majority of cells, and effects of cGMP-dependent protein kinases. There are reports on ability of inhibitors NO-sintase to depress a release phenomenon SM of pots and bronchuses, about dependence of a mechanical strain SM of pots and respiratory tract from a contents cGMP in cells. However there are datas giving establishments to guess, that alongside with guanilatciclase in a release phenomenon SM, induced relaxing factors or nitro compounds, the immediate involvement is accepted by cAMP-dependent protein kinases. The most probable point of interaction cAMP and cGMP-dependent processes is phospodiesterase of cyclic nucleotides. It citosolium the enzyme labilized by

  20. Effects of Ginger and Its Constituents on Airway Smooth Muscle Relaxation and Calcium Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Siviski, Matthew E.; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Carrie; Hoonjan, Bhupinder; Emala, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of asthma has increased in recent years, and is characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and inflammation. Many patients report using alternative therapies to self-treat asthma symptoms as adjuncts to short-acting and long-acting β-agonists and inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). As many as 40% of patients with asthma use herbal therapies to manage asthma symptoms, often without proven efficacy or known mechanisms of action. Therefore, investigations of both the therapeutic and possible detrimental effects of isolated components of herbal treatments on the airway are important. We hypothesized that ginger and its active components induce bronchodilation by modulating intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in airway smooth muscle (ASM). In isolated human ASM, ginger caused significant and rapid relaxation. Four purified constituents of ginger were subsequently tested for ASM relaxant properties in both guinea pig and human tracheas: [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol induced rapid relaxation of precontracted ASM (100–300 μM), whereas [10]-gingerol failed to induce relaxation. In human ASM cells, exposure to [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol, but not [10]-gingerol (100 μM), blunted subsequent Ca2+ responses to bradykinin (10 μM) and S-(−)-Bay K 8644 (10 μM). In A/J mice, the nebulization of [8]-gingerol (100 μM), 15 minutes before methacholine challenge, significantly attenuated airway resistance, compared with vehicle. Taken together, these novel data show that ginger and its isolated active components, [6]-gingerol, [8]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol, relax ASM, and [8]-gingerol attenuates airway hyperresponsiveness, in part by altering [Ca2+]i regulation. These purified compounds may provide a therapeutic option alone or in combination with accepted therapeutics, including β2-agonists, in airway diseases such as asthma. PMID:23065130

  1. An effective solution for capturing the single twitch of muscle: application to monitor muscle relaxation.

    PubMed

    Colak, Omer H; Girard, Emmanuelle; Krejci, Eric

    2014-09-01

    In this study, a fast algorithm was developed to capture of train of four and to filter extra contraction and noises. A low pass filter created to filter extra contraction and high frequency noises. Then, a TCA algorithm designed to capturing of the single twitch of muscle. The algorithm updated to remove embedded extra contraction and to derive boundary values in this location from cubic spline interpolation. Efficiency of TCA and effect of extra contraction tested in time and frequency domain.

  2. Slowed relaxation and preserved maximal force in soleus muscles of mice with targeted disruption of the Serca2 gene in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sjåland, Cecilie; Lunde, Per Kristian; Swift, Fredrik; Munkvik, Morten; Ericsson, Madelene; Lunde, Marianne; Boye, Sigurd; Christensen, Geir; Ellingsen, Øyvind; Sejersted, Ole M; Andersson, Kristin B

    2011-12-15

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases (SERCAs) play a major role in muscle contractility by pumping Ca(2+) from the cytosol into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) store, allowing muscle relaxation and refilling of the SR with releasable Ca(2+). Decreased SERCA function has been shown to result in impaired muscle function and disease in human and animal models. In this study, we present a new mouse model with targeted disruption of the Serca2 gene in skeletal muscle (skKO) to investigate the functional consequences of reduced SERCA2 expression in skeletal muscle. SkKO mice were viable and basic muscle structure was intact. SERCA2 abundance was reduced in multiple muscles, and by as much as 95% in soleus muscle, having the highest content of slow-twitch fibres (40%). The Ca(2+) uptake rate was significantly reduced in SR vesicles in total homogenates. We did not find any compensatory increase in SERCA1 or SERCA3 abundance, or altered expression of several other Ca(2+)-handling proteins. Ultrastructural analysis revealed generally well-preserved muscle morphology, but a reduced volume of the longitudinal SR. In contracting soleus muscle in vitro preparations, skKO muscles were able to fully relax, but with a significantly slowed relaxation time compared to controls. Surprisingly, the maximal force and contraction rate were preserved, suggesting that skKO slow-twitch fibres may be able to contribute to the total muscle force despite loss of SERCA2 protein. Thus it is possible that SERCA-independent mechanisms can contribute to muscle contractile function.

  3. H2 Receptor-Mediated Relaxation of Circular Smooth Muscle in Human Gastric Corpus: the Role of Nitric Oxide (NO).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eok; Kim, Dae Hoon; Kim, Young Chul; Han, Joung-Ho; Choi, Woong; Kim, Chan Hyung; Jeong, Hye Won; Park, Seon-Mee; Yun, Sei Jin; Choi, Song-Yi; Sung, Rohyun; Kim, Young Ho; Yoo, Ra Young; Sun, Park Hee; Kim, Heon; Song, Young-Jin; Xu, Wen-Xie; Yun, Hyo-Yung; Lee, Sang Jin

    2014-10-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of histamine on gastric motility and its specific receptor in the circular smooth muscle of the human gastric corpus. Histamine mainly produced tonic relaxation in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner, although histamine enhanced contractility in a minor portion of tissues tested. Histamine-induced tonic relaxation was nerve-insensitive because pretreatment with nerve blockers cocktail (NBC) did not inhibit relaxation. Additionally, K(+) channel blockers, such as tetraethylammonium (TEA), apamin (APA), and glibenclamide (Glib), had no effect. However, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo (4,3-A) quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), did inhibit histamine-induced tonic relaxation. In particular, histamine-induced tonic relaxation was converted to tonic contraction by pretreatment with L-NAME. Ranitidine, the H2 receptor blocker, inhibited histamine-induced tonic relaxation. These findings suggest that histamine produced relaxation in circular smooth muscle of human gastric smooth muscle through H2 receptor and NO/sGC pathways.

  4. Stochastic resonance whole body vibration increases perceived muscle relaxation but not cardiovascular activation: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Elfering, Achim; Burger, Christian; Schade, Volker; Radlinger, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the acute effects of stochastic resonance whole body vibration (SR-WBV), including muscle relaxation and cardiovascular activation. METHODS Sixty-four healthy students participated. The participants were randomly assigned to sham SR-WBV training at a low intensity (1.5 Hz) or a verum SR-WBV training at a higher intensity (5 Hz). Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR) and self-reported muscle relaxation were assessed before and immediately after SR-WBV. RESULTS Two factorial analyses of variance (ANOVA) showed a significant interaction between pre- vs post-SR-WBV measurements and SR-WBV conditions for muscle relaxation in the neck and back [F(1,55) = 3.35, P = 0.048, η2 = 0.07]. Muscle relaxation in the neck and back increased in verum SR-WBV, but not in sham SR-WBV. No significant changes between pre- and post-training levels of SBD, DBD and HR were observed either in sham or verum SR-WBV conditions. With verum SR-WBV, improved muscle relaxation was the most significant in participants who reported the experience of back, neck or shoulder pain more than once a month (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION A single session of SR-WBV increased muscle relaxation in young healthy individuals, while cardiovascular load was low. An increase in musculoskeletal relaxation in the neck and back is a potential mediator of pain reduction in preventive worksite SR-WBV trials. PMID:27900274

  5. The effects of music relaxation and muscle relaxation techniques on sleep quality and emotional measures among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Blanaru, Monica; Bloch, Boaz; Vadas, Limor; Arnon, Zahi; Ziv, Naomi; Kremer, Ilana; Haimov, Iris

    2012-07-26

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), an anxiety disorder with lifetime prevalence of 7.8%, is characterized by symptoms that develop following exposure to traumatic life events and that cause an immediate experience of intense fear, helplessness or horror. PTSD is marked by recurrent nightmares typified by the recall of intrusive experiences and by extended disturbance throughout sleep. Individuals with PTSD respond poorly to drug treatments for insomnia. The disadvantages of drug treatment for insomnia underline the importance of non-pharmacological alternatives. Thus, the present study had three aims: first, to compare the efficiency of two relaxation techniques (muscular relaxation and progressive music relaxation) in alleviating insomnia among individuals with PTSD using both objective and subjective measures of sleep quality; second, to examine whether these two techniques have different effects on psychological indicators of PTSD, such as depression and anxiety; and finally, to examine how initial PTSD symptom severity and baseline emotional measures are related to the efficiency of these two relaxation methods. Thirteen PTSD patients with no other major psychiatric or neurological disorders participated in the study. The study comprised one seven-day running-in, no-treatment period, followed by two seven-day experimental periods. The treatments constituted either music relaxation or muscle relaxation techniques at desired bedtime. These treatments were randomly assigned. During each of these three experimental periods, subjects' sleep was continuously monitored with a wrist actigraph (Ambulatory Monitoring, Inc.), and subjects were asked to fill out several questionnaires concerned with a wide spectrum of issues, such as sleep, depression, and anxiety. Analyses revealed a significant increase in objective and subjective sleep efficiency and a significant reduction in depression level following music relaxation. Moreover, following music relaxation, a highly

  6. [The effect of EMG level by EMG biofeedback with progressive muscle relaxation training on tension headache].

    PubMed

    Ro, U J; Kim, N C; Kim, H S

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess if EMG biofeedback training with progressive muscle relaxation training is effective in reducing the EMG level in patients with tension headaches. This study which lasted from 23 October to 30 December 1989, was conducted on 10 females who were diagnosed as patients with tension headaches and selected from among volunteers at C. University in Seoul. The process of the study was as follows: First, before the treatment, the baseline was measured for two weeks and the level of EMG was measured five times in five minutes. And then EMG biofeedback training was used for six weeks, 12 sessions in all, and progressive muscle relaxation was done at home by audio tape over eight weeks. Each session was composed of a 5-minute baseline, two 5-minute EMG biofeedback training periods and a 5-minute self-control stage. Each stage was followed by a five minute rest period. So each session took a total of 40 minutes. The EMG level was measured by EMG biofeedback (Autogenic-Cyborg: M 130 EMG module). The results were as follows: 1. The average age of the subjects was 44.1 years and the average history of headache was 10.6 years (range: 6 months-20 years). 2. The level of EMG was lowest between the third and the fourth week of the training except in Cases I and IV. 3. The patients began to show a nonconciliatory attitude at the first session of the fifth week of the training.

  7. Changes in muscle strength, relaxation rate and fatiguability during the human menstrual cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, R; Niclos, B B; Rutherford, O M

    1996-01-01

    1. The effect of the different phases of the menstrual cycle on skeletal muscle strength, contractile properties and fatiguability was investigated in ten young, healthy females. Results were compared with a similar group on the combined (non-phasic) oral contraceptive pill (OC). Cycle phases were divided into the early and mid-follicular, mid-cycle (ovulatory) and mid- and late luteal. Cycle phases were estimated from the first day of the menstrual bleed. 2. Subjects were studied weekly through two complete cycles. Measurements included quadriceps and handgrip maximum voluntary isometric force and the relaxation times, force-frequency relationship and fatigue index of the quadriceps during percutaneous stimulation at a range of frequencies from 1 to 100 Hz. 3. In the women not taking the OC there was a significant increase of about 11% in quadriceps and handgrip strength at mid-cycle compared with both the follicular and luteal phases. Accompanying the increases in strength there was a significant slowing of relaxation and increase in fatiguability at mid-cycle. No changes in any parameter were found in the women taking the OC. 4. The changes in muscle function at mid-cycle may be due to the increase in oestrogen that occurs prior to ovulation. PMID:8735711

  8. The muscle relaxant thiocolchicoside is an antagonist of GABAA receptor function in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Carta, Mario; Murru, Luca; Botta, Paolo; Talani, Giuseppe; Sechi, GianPietro; De Riu, PierLuigi; Sanna, Enrico; Biggio, Giovanni

    2006-09-01

    Thiocolchicoside (TCC) is used clinically for its muscle relaxant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties, and it has been shown to interact with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors (GABAARs) and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in the rat central nervous system. In contrast to a proposed agonistic action at these two types of inhibitory receptors, pharmacological evidence has shown that, under certain conditions, TCC manifests convulsant activity in animals and humans. We now show that the phasic and tonic GABAAR-mediated currents recorded from Purkinje cells and granule neurons, respectively, in parasagittal cerebellar slices from adult male rats were inhibited by TCC in a concentration-dependent manner. The median inhibitory concentrations of TCC for these effects were approximately 0.15 and approximately 0.9 microM, respectively. TCC did not potentiate GABABR-mediated currents in hippocampal slices, suggesting that its muscle relaxant action is not mediated by GABABRs. Intraperitoneal injection of TCC in rats either alone or in combination with negative modulators of GABAergic transmission revealed convulsant and proconvulsant actions of this drug. Our data, consistent with clinical observations of the epileptogenic effect of this compound, suggest that TCC is a potent competitive antagonist of GABAAR function.

  9. Modeling of twitch fade based on slow interaction of nondepolarizing muscle relaxants with the presynaptic receptors.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Shashi B; Amann, Anton; Nigrovic, Vladimir

    2006-08-01

    Nondepolarizing muscle relaxants (MRs) diminish the indirectly evoked single twitch due to their binding to the postsynaptic receptors. Additionally, the MRs produce progressive diminution of successive twitches upon repetitive stimulation (fade). Our study addresses the generation of fade as observed under clinical situation. The study was conducted in two phases. In the clinical part, we have evaluated the time course of twitch depression and fade following the administration of several doses of three MRs (rocuronium, pancuronium, and cisatracurium). In the second part, we have modified our model of neuromuscular transmission to simulate the time course of twitch depression and fade. The MR was assumed to bind to a single site on the presynaptic receptor to produce fade. The rates of interaction with the presynaptic receptors were characterized in terms of the arbitrarily assigned equilibrium dissociation constant and the half-life for dissociation of the presynaptic complex. A method was developed to relate the release of acetylcholine to the occupancy of the presynaptic receptors. The strength of the first and the fourth twitch was calculated from the peak concentration of the activated postsynaptic receptors, i.e., of those receptors with both sites occupied by acetylcholine. Our results indicate that, while the affinity of the MR for the presynaptic receptor plays little role in the time course of fade, the rate of dissociation of the complex between the presynaptic receptors and the muscle relaxant may be critical in determining the time course of fade. Tentative estimates of this parameter are offered.

  10. High frequency characteristics of elasticity of skeletal muscle fibres kept in relaxed and rigor state.

    PubMed

    De Winkel, M E; Blangé, T; Treijtel, B W

    1994-04-01

    The viscoelastic properties of crossbridges in rigor state are studied by means of application of small length changes, completed within 30 microseconds, to isometric skinned fibre segments of the iliofibularis muscle of the frog in relaxed and rigor state and measurement of the tension response. Results are expressed as a complex Young's modulus, the real part of which denotes normalized stiffness, while the imaginary part denotes normalized viscous mechanical impedance. Young's modulus was examined over a wide frequency range varying from 5 Hz up to 50 kHz. Young's modulus can be interpreted in terms of stiffness and viscous friction of the half-sarcomere or in terms of elastic changes in tension and recovery upon a step length change. The viscoelastic properties of half-sarcomeres of muscle fibre segments in rigor state showed strong resemblance to those of activated fibres in that shortening a muscle fibre in rigor state resulted in an immediate drop in tension, after which half of the drop in tension was recovered. The following slower phases of tension recovery--a subsequent drop in tension and slow completion of tension recovery--as seen in the activated state, do not occur in rigor state. The magnitude of Young's moduli of fibres in rigor state generally decreased from a value of 3.12 x 10(7) N m-2 at 40 kHz to 1.61 x 10(7) N m-2 at about 100 Hz. Effects of increased viscosity of the incubation medium, decreased interfilament distance in the relaxed state and variation of rigor tension upon frequency dependence of complex Young's modulus have been investigated. Variation of tension of crossbridges in rigor state influenced to some extent the frequency dependence of the Young's modulus. Recovery in relaxed state is not dependent on the viscosity of the medium. Recovery in rigor is slowed down at raised viscosity of the incubation medium, but less than half the amount expected if viscosity of the medium would be the cause of internal friction of the half

  11. Conditions of endotracheal intubation with and without muscle relaxant in children.

    PubMed

    Rizvanović, Nermina; Čaušević, Senada; Šabanović, Adisa

    2017-02-01

    Aim To compare intubation conditions and hemodynamic response of two induction regimens, with or without muscle relaxant using a combination of either fentanyl and propofol or propofol and suxamethonium. Methods A total of 80 children aged 4-12 years were enrolled in a prospective randomized double-blinded study. Children were randomly allocated in two equal groups. In group F induction was done with fentanyl and propofol, while propofol and suxamethonium were used in group S. Intubation conditions were assessed using Copenhagen Consensus Score (CCS), based on ease of laryngoscopy, position of vocal cords, degree of coughing, jaw relaxation and limb movements. Systolic blood pressure (SBP),diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were observed at preinduction, postinduction and postintubation at 1, 3 and 5 minute. Results Clinically acceptable CCS was found in 95% of patients in group F versus 100% in group S. Intubation conditions wereexcellent in 85%, good in 10% and poor in 5% of patients in group F. In the group F, signifficantly lower SBP and MAP postinduction and postintubation at 1 and 3 minute, and lower DBP postinduction and postintubation at 1 minute (p<0.05) was found comparing to group S. In group S, significantly higher postinduction and postintubation HR at 1 minute was found comparing to group F (p<0.05). Conclusion Induction combination fentanyl-propofol provide acceptable intubation conditions comparable with suxamethonium in children. This induction regimen ensures better hemodynamic stability associated with endotracheal intubation. It could be recommended for intubation when muscle relaxants are not indicated.

  12. Endotracheal intubation without muscle relaxants in children using remifentanil and propofol: Comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Naziri, Freshteh; Amiri, Hakimeh Alereza; Rabiee, Mozaffar; Banihashem, Nadia; Nejad, Farhad Mohammad; Shirkhani, Ziba; Solimanian, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Endotracheal intubation is essential during general anesthesia and muscle relaxant drugs provide ideal conditions for this purpose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the intubating condition of remifentanil combined with propofol without muscle relaxant. Materials and Methods: In this prospective randomized study, 60 children aged 3-12 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II were included. All the children were premedicated with 0.05 mg/kg midazolam and 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine 5 min before the induction of anesthesia with 3 mg/kg propofol. Then, they were allocated randomly to receive either 2 μg/kg remifentanil (group R) or 1.5 mg/kg succinylcholine (group S). Tracheal intubation was attempted 90 s after the administration of propofol. The quality of intubation was assessed by using Copenhagen score based on jaw relaxation, ease of laryngoscopy, position of vocal cord, coughing and limb movement. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded before and after induction, and 1, 3, 5 min after intubation. Results: There was no significant difference in intubating condition between the two groups (P = 0.11). Intubation condition was excellent in 26 of 30 (86.7%) patients in the group R compared with 30 (100%) patients in the group S. We observed significant difference in heart rate and systolic blood pressure over time between two groups (P = 0.02, P = 0.03 respectively). After intubation, we had higher heart rate and systolic blood pressure with a significant difference in group S compared with group R (P = 0.006, P = 0.018). None of the children had a chest rigidity, laryngospasm, and hypoxia. Conclusions: In premedicated children, propofol-remifentanil combination provides adequate conditions for tracheal intubation that is comparable with succinylcholine. Hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation was controlled better in group R. PMID:26543458

  13. Differential Effects of 7 and 16 Groups of Muscle Relaxation Training Following Repeated Submaximal Intensity Exercise in Young Football Players.

    PubMed

    Sharifah Maimunah, S M P; Hashim, H A

    2016-02-01

    This study compares two versions of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) training (7 and 16 muscle groups) on oxygen consumption (VO2), heart rates, rating of perceived exertion and choice reaction time. Football (soccer) players (N = 26; M age = 13.4 yr., SD = 0.5) were randomly assigned to either 7 muscle groups PMR, 16 muscle groups PMR, or a control group. PMR training requires the participants to tense a muscle, hold the muscle contraction, and then relax it. Measurement was conducted prior to and after the completion of 12 sessions of PMR. The dependent variables were measured following four bouts of intermittent exercise consisting of 12 min. of running at 60% VO2max for 10 min. followed by running at 90% VO2max for 2 min. with a 3-min. rest for each bout. Lower VO2, heart rate, perceived exertion, and quicker reaction time were expected in both relaxation groups compared to the control group. The results revealed a significant reduction in heart rates and choice reaction time for both relaxation groups, but the longer version produced significantly quicker choice reaction time.

  14. A Psychophysiological Comparison of the Effects of Three Relaxation Techniques: Respiratory Manipulation Training, Progressive Muscle Relaxation, and Pleasant Imagery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, David J.

    A within-subjects, three condition design was employed to examine the effects of three relaxation techniques on blood pressures, pulse rates, and self-report measures of relaxation for 12 college students. Respiratory Manipulation Training incorporated instructions to exhale and not to inhale for as long as possible. When breathing could no longer…

  15. β-Adrenoceptor-mediated Relaxation of Urinary Bladder Muscle in β2-Adrenoceptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Propping, Stefan; Lorenz, Kristina; Michel, Martin C.; Wirth, Manfred P.; Ravens, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: In order to characterize the β-adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes involved in agonist-stimulated relaxation of murine urinary bladder we studied the effects of (-)-isoprenaline and CL 316,243 on tonic contraction and spontaneous contractions in detrusor strips of wild-type (WT) and β2-AR knockout (β2-AR KO) mice. Materials and Methods: Urinary bladders were isolated from male WT and β2-AR KO mice. β-AR subtype expression was determined with quantitative real-time PCR. Intact muscle strips pre-contracted with KCl (40 mM) were exposed to cumulatively increasing concentrations of (-)-isoprenaline or β3-AR agonist CL 316,243 in the presence and absence of the subtype-selective β-AR blockers CGP 20712A (β1-ARs), ICI 118,551 (β2-ARs), and L748,337 (β3-ARs). Results: Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed lack of β2-AR expression in bladder tissue from β2-AR KO mice. In isolated detrusor strips, pre-contraction with KCl increased basal tone and enhanced spontaneous activity significantly more in β2-AR KO than in WT. (-)-Isoprenaline relaxed tonic tension and attenuated spontaneous activity with similar potency, but the concentrations required were two orders of magnitude higher in β2-AR KO than WT. The concentration-response curves (CRCs) for relaxation were not affected by CGP 20712A (300 nM), but were shifted to the right by ICI 118,551 (50 nM) and L748,337 (10 μM). The -logEC50 values for (-)-isoprenaline in WT and β2-AR KO tissue were 7.98 and 6.00, respectively, suggesting a large receptor reserve of β2-AR. (-)-CL 316,243 relaxed detrusor and attenuated spontaneous contractions from WT and β2-AR KO mice with a potency corresponding to the drug’s affinity for β3-AR. L743,337 shifted the CRCs to the right. Conclusion: Our findings in β2-AR KO mice suggest that there is a large receptor reserve for β2-AR in WT mice so that this β-AR subtype will mediate relaxation of tone and attenuation of spontaneous activity under physiological

  16. A clinical and pharmacologic review of skeletal muscle relaxants for musculoskeletal conditions.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Frank A; Barkin, Robert L; Barkin, Stacie

    2005-01-01

    Muscle strains and other musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a leading cause of work absenteeism. Muscle pain, spasm, swelling, and inflammation are symptomatic of strains. The precise relationship between musculoskeletal pain and spasm is not well understood. The dictum that pain induces spasm, which causes more pain, is not substantiated by critical analysis. The painful muscle may not show EMG activity, and when there is, the timing and intensity often do not correlate with the pain. Clinical and physiologic studies show that pain tends to inhibit rather than facilitate reflex contractile activity. The decision to treat and choice of therapy are largely dictated by the duration, severity of symptoms, and degree of dysfunction. Trigger point injections are sometimes used with excellent results in the treatment of muscle spasm in myofacial pain and low-back pain. NSAIDs are used with much greater frequency than oral skeletal muscle relaxants (SMRs) or opioids in the treatment of acute MSDs. Unfortunately, remarkably little sound science guides the choice of drug for the treatment of acute, uncomplicated MSDs, and the evaluation of efficacy of one agent over another is complicated by numerous factors. Only a limited number of high-quality, randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) provide evidence of the effectiveness of NSAIDs or SMRs in the treatment of acute, uncomplicated MSDs. The quality of design, execution, and reporting of trials for the treatment of MSDs needs to be improved. The combination of an SMR and an NSAID or COX-2 inhibitor or the combination of SMR and tramadol/acetaminophen is superior to single agents alone.

  17. Circular and longitudinal muscles shortening indicates sliding patterns during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nirali; Jiang, Yanfen; Mittal, Ravinder K; Kim, Tae Ho; Ledgerwood, Melissa; Bhargava, Valmik

    2015-09-01

    Esophageal axial shortening is caused by longitudinal muscle (LM) contraction, but circular muscle (CM) may also contribute to axial shortening because of its spiral morphology. The goal of our study was to show patterns of contraction of CM and LM layers during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR). In rats, esophageal and LES morphology was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry, and function with the use of piezo-electric crystals and manometry. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve was used to induce esophageal contractions. In 18 healthy subjects, manometry and high frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging during swallow-induced esophageal contractions and TLESR were evaluated. CM and LM thicknesses were measured (40 swallows and 30 TLESRs) as markers of axial shortening, before and at peak contraction, as well as during TLESRs. Animal studies revealed muscular connections between the LM and CM layers of the LES but not in the esophagus. During vagal stimulated esophageal contraction there was relative movement between the LM and CM. Human studies show that LM-to-CM (LM/CM) thickness ratio at baseline was 1. At the peak of swallow-induced contraction LM/CM ratio decreased significantly (<1), whereas the reverse was the case during TLESR (>2). The pattern of contraction of CM and LM suggests sliding of the two muscles. Furthermore, the sliding patterns are in the opposite direction during peristalsis and TLESR.

  18. Circular and longitudinal muscles shortening indicates sliding patterns during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nirali; Jiang, Yanfen; Mittal, Ravinder K.; Kim, Tae Ho; Ledgerwood, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal axial shortening is caused by longitudinal muscle (LM) contraction, but circular muscle (CM) may also contribute to axial shortening because of its spiral morphology. The goal of our study was to show patterns of contraction of CM and LM layers during peristalsis and transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation (TLESR). In rats, esophageal and LES morphology was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry, and function with the use of piezo-electric crystals and manometry. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve was used to induce esophageal contractions. In 18 healthy subjects, manometry and high frequency intraluminal ultrasound imaging during swallow-induced esophageal contractions and TLESR were evaluated. CM and LM thicknesses were measured (40 swallows and 30 TLESRs) as markers of axial shortening, before and at peak contraction, as well as during TLESRs. Animal studies revealed muscular connections between the LM and CM layers of the LES but not in the esophagus. During vagal stimulated esophageal contraction there was relative movement between the LM and CM. Human studies show that LM-to-CM (LM/CM) thickness ratio at baseline was 1. At the peak of swallow-induced contraction LM/CM ratio decreased significantly (<1), whereas the reverse was the case during TLESR (>2). The pattern of contraction of CM and LM suggests sliding of the two muscles. Furthermore, the sliding patterns are in the opposite direction during peristalsis and TLESR. PMID:26045610

  19. A comparative study of potassium-induced relaxation in vascular smooth muscle of tiger salamanders and rats.

    PubMed

    Malvin, G M; Webb, R C

    1984-07-01

    This study compares potassium-induced relaxation in vascular tissue of an amphibian (Ambystoma tigrinum) and a mammal (rat). Aortas (salamanders) and tail arteries (rats) were cut into helical strips for isometric force recording. After norepinephrine-induced contraction in potassium-free solution, arteries relaxed in response to added potassium (1-20 mmol/l). Potassium-induced relaxation was greater in rat tail arteries than in salamander aortas. Half-maximal relaxation occurred at a potassium concentration of approximately 3 mmol/l in both species. Ouabain inhibited potassium-induced relaxation; salamanders were more sensitive to the glycoside than rats. Potassium-induced relaxation decreased as the temperature of the bathing medium was lowered; half-maximal inhibition occurred at 19 and 29 degrees C for salamander aortas and rat tail arteries, respectively. Potassium-induced relaxation also varied with the interval in potassium-free solution, the hydrogen ion concentration (rats only), and the magnitude of norepinephrine-induced contraction. It appears that the cellular mechanism causing potassium-induced relaxation is similar in blood vessels of salamanders and rats. The observations are consistent with the hypothesis that stimulated electrogenic sodium transport produced membrane hyperpolarization and relaxation in vascular smooth muscle.

  20. The effect of progressive muscle relaxation method on test anxiety in nursing students

    PubMed Central

    Zargarzadeh, Maryam; Shirazi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Concerning the prevalence of test anxiety among nursing students and presence of stress in nursing education years, this study was conducted to determine the effect of progressive muscle relaxation method on test anxiety among nursing students of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2013. Materials and Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in three stages on 49 male and female nursing students divided into two groups (study and control). In the pre-test stage, demographic data and Sarason anxiety questionnaires were filled by 94 students (of terms 3 and 4). Then, in the intervention stage, the students having test anxiety were assigned to two groups (study and control), and the progressive muscle relaxation method was performed in the experiment group in four sessions. Then, the students did this method two times a day until final exams, immediately following which they filled the self-reported checklists. On the first day of the final exams, test anxiety questionnaire was filled by the two groups again. The collected data were analyzed by the statistical tests, i.e. χ2, paired t-test, independent sample t-test, Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon tests, using SPSS 18. Results: Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the mean scores of test anxiety after intervention between the two groups of study and control (P = 0.00), but this difference was not significant before intervention (P = 0.76). Also, in the study group, there was a significant difference in the mean scores of test anxiety before and after intervention (P = 0.00), but this difference was not significant in the control group (P = 0.09). Mann–Whitney test showed no significant difference in categorization of test anxiety scores before intervention in the study and control groups (P = 0.60), but the difference was significant after intervention (P = 0.00). Wilcoxon test showed a significant difference in categorization of test anxiety scores in the study group

  1. Total cytoplasmic calcium in relaxed and maximally contracted rabbit portal vein smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, M; Shuman, H; Somlyo, A P; Somlyo, A V

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of total cytoplasmic Ca in vascular smooth muscle was measured by electron probe microanalysis of strips of rabbit portal anterior mesenteric vein that were rapidly frozen either when relaxed or during a maintained (30 min) maximal contraction stimulated with high K and noradrenaline. Strips were also frozen and analysed after incubation in Ca-free, high-Mg2+ solution. Probe diameters of 0.1-0.2 micron and 1.0-1.5 micron were used to measure, respectively, cytoplasmic and cellular (including stored) Ca. There was a highly significant increase (P less than 0.0005) in cytoplasmic Ca of 1.0 +/- 0.2 (S.D.) mmol Ca/kg dry wt. from 0.8 +/- 0.2 (S.E. of mean) mmol/kg dry wt. (n = 262 spectra, six animals) to 1.8 +/- 0.2 (S.E. of mean) mmol Ca/kg dry wt. (n = 296 spectra, six animals), during maximal contraction. This increase is greater than can be accounted for by Ca binding to calmodulin and to myosin, suggesting the presence of other Ca-binding proteins in smooth muscle. A small amount (0.4-0.6 mmol/kg dry wt.) of cytoplasmic Ca remained after incubation in Ca-free, high-Mg2+ EGTA solution. This tightly bound, cytoplasmic Ca is insufficient to account for the total amount of divalent cation known to be bound to F-actin. We conclude that Mg is the major inexchangeably bound cation in F-actin in smooth as in striated muscle. In the contracted muscles, the cellular Ca concentration, measured with the large probes that include Ca stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.), was 3.2 +/- 0.3 (S.E. of mean) mmol Ca/kg dry wt. (n = 93), significantly higher than the cytoplasmic Ca concentration measured with small probes. This value of cellular Ca is probably an underestimate, as the large-diameter probes did not cover all of the peripheral s.r. The cellular Ca (measured with large probes) was highest in the contracted and lower in the relaxed tissue, and was significantly reduced in the muscles incubated in Ca-free solution. In contracted muscle, cytoplasmic

  2. Improving Academic Performance and Working Memory in Health Science Graduate Students Using Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Kurt K; Blyler, Diane

    Research involving working memory has indicated that stress and anxiety compete for attentional resources when a person engages in attention-dependent cognitive processing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of perceived stress and state anxiety on working memory and academic performance among health science students and to explore whether the reduction of stress and anxiety was achieved through progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) training. A convenience sample of 128 graduate students participated in this study. Using an experimental pretest-posttest design, we randomly assigned participants to a PMR group or a control group. Results indicated that PMR reduced state anxiety, F(1, 126) = 15.58, p < .001, thereby freeing up working memory and leading to improved academic performance in the treatment group. The results of this study contribute to the literature on Attentional Control Theory by clarifying the process through which working memory and anxiety affect cognitive performance.

  3. Inhibition of mouth skeletal muscle relaxation by flavonoids of Cistus ladanifer L.: a plant defense mechanism against herbivores.

    PubMed

    Sosa, T; Chaves, N; Alias, J C; Escudero, J C; Henao, F; Gutiérrez-Merino, C

    2004-06-01

    Cistus ladanifer exudate is a potent inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (Ca2+-pump) of rabbit skeletal muscle, a well-established model for active transport that plays a leading role in skeletal muscle relaxation. The low concentration of exudate needed to produce 50% of the maximum inhibition of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase activity, 40-60 microg/ml, suggests that eating only a few milligrams of C. ladanifer leaves can impair the relaxation of the mouth skeletal muscle of herbivores, as the exudate reaches up to 140 mg/g of dry leaves in summer season. The flavonoid fraction of the exudate accounts fully for the functional impairment of the sarcoplasmic reticulum produced by the exudate (up to a dose of 250-300 microg/ml). The flavonoids present in this exudate impair the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum function at two different levels: (i) by inhibition of the Ca2+-ATPase activity, and (ii) by decreasing the steady state ATP-dependent Ca2+-accumulation. Among the exudate flavonoids, apigenin and 3,7-di-O-methyl kaempferol are the most potent inhibitors of the skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum. We conclude that the flavonoids of this exudate can elicit an avoidance reaction of the herbivores eating C. ladanifer leaves through impairment of mouth skeletal muscle relaxation.

  4. Effects of the hold and relax-agonist contraction technique on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness after exercise in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to verify the effects of the hold relax-agonist contraction and passive straight leg raising techniques on muscle activity, fatigue, and range of motion of the hip joint after the induction of delayed onset muscle soreness in the hamstring muscle. [Subjects] Sixty subjects were randomly assigned to a hold relax-agonist contraction group and a passive straight leg raising group. [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group underwent hold relax-agonist contraction at the hamstring muscle, while subjects in the control group underwent passive straight leg raising at the hamstring muscle. [Results] Subjects in the hold relax-agonist contraction group showed a significant increase in hamstring muscle activity and hip joint angle and a significant decrease in muscle fatigue. In the passive straight leg raising group, the hip joint angle increased significantly after the intervention. In the hold relax-agonist contraction group, hamstring muscle activity increased significantly and muscle fatigue decreased significantly. [Conclusion] We conclude that the hold relax-agonist contraction technique may be beneficial for improving muscle activation and decreasing muscle fatigue. PMID:26644691

  5. Effects of the hold and relax-agonist contraction technique on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness after exercise in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to verify the effects of the hold relax-agonist contraction and passive straight leg raising techniques on muscle activity, fatigue, and range of motion of the hip joint after the induction of delayed onset muscle soreness in the hamstring muscle. [Subjects] Sixty subjects were randomly assigned to a hold relax-agonist contraction group and a passive straight leg raising group. [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group underwent hold relax-agonist contraction at the hamstring muscle, while subjects in the control group underwent passive straight leg raising at the hamstring muscle. [Results] Subjects in the hold relax-agonist contraction group showed a significant increase in hamstring muscle activity and hip joint angle and a significant decrease in muscle fatigue. In the passive straight leg raising group, the hip joint angle increased significantly after the intervention. In the hold relax-agonist contraction group, hamstring muscle activity increased significantly and muscle fatigue decreased significantly. [Conclusion] We conclude that the hold relax-agonist contraction technique may be beneficial for improving muscle activation and decreasing muscle fatigue.

  6. Pre-treatment with α-hederin increases β-adrenoceptor mediated relaxation of airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Anne; Gosens, Reinoud; Meurs, Herman; Häberlein, Hanns

    2011-01-15

    Preparations of ivy leaves dry extract with secretolytic and bronchiolytic efficacy are widely used for the treatment of acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases. The mechanism by which ivy preparations improve lung functions is not fully understood. Here, we tested the influence of the three main saponins of ivy, α-hederin, hederacoside C and hederagenin, on the contraction and relaxation behaviour of isolated bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips by isometric tension measurements. None of the tested compounds altered histamine or methacholine-induced contraction of the smooth muscle strips. In contrast, the isoprenaline-induced relaxation of 100μM methacholine precontracted muscle strips was significantly enhanced when pre-treated with 1μM of α-hederin for 18h. The pre-treatment with hederacoside C or hederagenin had no effect on isoprenaline-induced relaxation. For the first time the bronchiolytic effect of α-hederin was demonstrated by isometric tension measurements using bovine tracheal smooth muscle strips. α-Hederin increases isoprenaline-induced relaxation indirectly, probably by inhibiting heterologous desensitization induced by high concentrations of muscarinic ligands like methacholine.

  7. A Survey of the Use of Antiepileptic and Muscle Relaxant Medication in a Sample of Children with Neuromotor Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Bobby G.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A longitudinal survey of 424 preschoolers and infants with neuromotor disorders served by a children's rehabilitation center was conducted to determine the number who were receiving muscle relaxant or anticonvulsant medication, as well as average daily dosages. An increase in the number of antiepileptic prescriptions was found from 1962 to 1986.…

  8. Tolperisone: a typical representative of a class of centrally acting muscle relaxants with less sedative side effects.

    PubMed

    Quasthoff, Stefan; Möckel, Claudia; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Schreibmayer, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Tolperisone, a piperidine derivative, is assigned to the group of centrally acting muscle relaxants and has been in clinical use now for decades. The review summarizes the known pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, toxicology and side effects in humans and the clinical use of tolperisone. A future perspective for further exploration of this drug is given.

  9. Oblique section 3-D reconstruction of relaxed insect flight muscle reveals the cross-bridge lattice in helical registration.

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, H; Lucaveche, C; Reedy, M K; Taylor, K A

    1994-01-01

    In this work we examined the arrangement of cross-bridges on the surface of myosin filaments in the A-band of Lethocerus flight muscle. Muscle fibers were fixed using the tannic-acid-uranyl-acetate, ("TAURAC") procedure. This new procedure provides remarkably good preservation of native features in relaxed insect flight muscle. We computed 3-D reconstructions from single images of oblique transverse sections. The reconstructions reveal a square profile of the averaged myosin filaments in cross section view, resulting from the symmetrical arrangement of four pairs of myosin heads in each 14.5-nm repeat along the filament. The square profiles form a very regular right-handed helical arrangement along the surface of the myosin filament. Furthermore, TAURAC fixation traps a near complete 38.7 nm labeling of the thin filaments in relaxed muscle marking the left-handed helix of actin targets surrounding the thick filaments. These features observed in an averaged reconstruction encompassing nearly an entire myofibril indicate that the myosin heads, even in relaxed muscle, are in excellent helical register in the A-band. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:7819494

  10. The use of time-resolved X-ray diffraction and sample techniques for studying the muscle structure during relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazina, A. A.; Gadzhiev, A. M.; Gerasimov, V. S.; Gorbunova, N. P.; Sergienko, P. M.; Korneev, V. N.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Baru, S. E.

    1995-02-01

    The use of the modern time-resolved X-ray diffraction and sample technique has played an important role in studying muscle structures during contraction at various physiological conditions. We represent time-resolved X-ray data on equatorial diffraction and tension response of the frog sartorius muscle during relaxation. The measurements of the time-course of the intensity change of reflections (1,0), (1,1) and the background under them give a possibility to study the effect of potentiation of contraction by repetitive stimulation in fresh and tired muscles. Model calculations of meridional diffraction patterns for various configurations of cross-bridges in the relaxation phase were carried out.

  11. Anticonvulsant and muscle relaxant activity of the ethanolic extract of stems of Dendrophthoe falcata (Linn. F.) in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sinoriya, Pooja; Irchhaiya, R.; Sharma, Bhawna; Sahu, Gayatri; Kumar, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the anticonvulsant and muscle relxant activity of ethanolic extract of stems of Dendrophthoe falcata in mice. Materials and Methods: The ethanolic extract of stems of D. falcata (100, 300 and 500 mg/kg, p.o.) was studied for its anticonvulsant effect on maximal electroshock-induced seizures and muscle relaxant activity at the same dose level using rota rod and traction test in mice. Results: Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed presence of proteins, carbohydrates, glycosides, steroids, triterpenes, flavonoids, tannins and phenolic compounds. D. falcata ethanolic extract (DFEE) (100, 300 and 500 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly (P<0.001) inhibited seizures induced by MES, reduced the duration of Hind limb tonic extensor phase (HLTE) and a decline in motor coordination. Conclusion: The ethanolic extract possesses anticonvulsant activity and muscle relaxant activity. PMID:22144780

  12. Dietary polyphenols generate nitric oxide from nitrite in the stomach and induce smooth muscle relaxation.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Bárbara S; Gago, Bruno; Barbosa, Rui M; Laranjinha, João

    2009-11-09

    Nitrite, considered a biological waste and toxic product, is being regarded as an important physiological molecule in nitric oxide (NO) biochemistry. Because the interaction of dietary phenolic compounds and nitrite would be kinetically (due to the high concentrations achieved) and thermodynamically (on basis of the redox potentials) feasible in the stomach, we have studied the potential reduction of nitrite by polyphenols present in several dietary sources. By measuring the time courses of *NO production in simulated gastric juice (pH 2), the efficiency of the compounds studied is as follows: Epicatechin-3-O-gallate>quercetin>procyanidin B8 dimer>oleuropein>procyanidin B2 dimer>chlorogenic acid>epicatechin>catechin>procyanidin B5 dimer. The initial rates of *NO production fall in a narrow range (ca. 1-5 microMs(-1)) but the distinct kinetics of the decay of *NO signals suggest that competition reactions for *NO are operative. The proof of concept that, in the presence of nitrite, phenol-containing dietary products induce a strong increase of *NO in the stomach was established in an in vivo experiment with healthy volunteers consuming lettuce, onions, apples, wine, tea, berries and cherries. Moreover, selected mixtures of oleuropein and catechin with low nitrite (1 microM) were shown to induce muscle relaxation of stomach strips in a structure-dependent way. Data presented here brings strong support to the concept that polyphenols consumed in a variety of dietary products, under gastric conditions, reduce nitrite to *NO that, in turn, may exert a biological impact as a local relaxant.

  13. Airway smooth muscle relaxant effects of the cocaine pyrolysis product, methylecgonidine.

    PubMed

    el-Fawal, H A; Wood, R W

    1995-03-01

    Methylecgonidine (anhydroecgonine methylester; MEG) is produced when cocaine base ("crack") is heated. Since crack smoking can produce significant airway toxicity and the role of MEG in this toxicity is unknown, we determined the effects of MEG on guinea pig isolated tracheal rings. Trachea do not contract in response to MEG; rather, MEG (10(-9) to 10(-3) M) dose-dependently relaxed tissue precontracted with 2 x 10(-3) M acetylcholine (ACh). MEG (10(-9) to 10(-6) M) reduced the magnitude of contractions induced by ACh, carbachol, histamine and KCl in a nonsurmountable manner; the maximal response to these agents was not restored after repeated washing. MEG did not affect contractions induced by BaCl2. 4-Diphenyl acetoxymethyl piperidine methiodide (4-DAMP; 10(-7) M), in the presence or absence of MEG (10(-7) M), shifted the dose-effect curve for ACh 30-fold to the right. After washing, sensitivity to ACh was fully recovered in tissues exposed to 4-DAMP alone, but was still reduced to 50% of control in tissues exposed to 4-DAMP and MEG. The effects of MEG were unlike those of cocaine which, at 10(-7) to 10(-5) M, increased the magnitude of contractions induced by ACh (10(-9) to 2 x 10(-3) M); MEG (10(-7) M) abolished this increase. The mechanism by which MEG relaxes tracheal smooth muscle has not been established, but it is likely to be independent of direct interaction with sites that mediate the effects of the bronchoconstrictor agents used in this study.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Relaxation of tracheal smooth muscle independent on functional epithelium cells induced by lidocaine, bupivacaine and isomers in rats.

    PubMed

    Lautner, Roberto Q; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele; Sudo, Roberto T

    2009-05-21

    Lidocaine is a local anesthetic which has been used to protect spasm reaction during tracheal intubation and bronchoscopy. We compared the potency of lidocaine, bupivacaine (RS(+/-)-bupivacaine) and isomers (S(-)-bupivacaine and R(+)-bupivacaine) to promote relaxation of tracheal smooth muscle. Relaxation of airways smooth muscle can be dependent on the release of relaxing factors by epithelium such as prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO). Possible mechanisms involved in the tracheal smooth muscle relaxation induced by these local anesthetics were evaluated in preparation in which the epithelium layer was intact or denuded. Bupivacaine and its isomers were approximately six to eleven-fold more potent than lidocaine to promote relaxation on acetylcholine-induced contraction in tracheal rings. The concentration of lidocaine, RS(+/-)-bupivacaine, S(-)-bupivacaine and R(+)-bupivacaine necessary to produce a 50% reduction of maximal contraction to acetylcholine (IC(50)) in tracheal rings with intact epithelium was 1.25+/-0.01, 0.11+/-0.01, 0.15+/-0.01, 0.19+/-0.01 mM, respectively. Removal of epithelium or exposure to N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, indomethacin did not alter the IC(50). However, calcium influx of depolarized tracheal smooth muscle was inhibited by lidocaine, bupivacaine and isomers. S(-)-bupivacaine reduced by 78.8+/-7.4% the calcium influx followed by RS(+/-)-bupivacaine (41.8+/-6.7%) and R(+)-bupivacaine (25.6+/-9.5%). In conclusion, local anesthetic action was stereoselective and partially dependent on blockade of Ca(2+) influx to muscular cells. The isomer S(-)-bupivacaine is more potent and less toxic which could represent a valuable clinical advantage to use as broncholitic agent.

  15. EMG activities of the quadratus lumborum and erector spinae muscles during flexion-relaxation and other motor tasks.

    PubMed

    Andersson, E A; Oddsson, L I E; Grundström, H; Nilsson, J; Thorstensson, A

    1996-10-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to provide new information on the myoelectrical activation of the quadratus lumborum, the deep lateral and the superficial medial lumbar erector spinae, the psoas, and the iliacus muscles in various motor tasks. DESIGN: An intramuscular electromyographic study was performed. BACKGROUND: The contribution of individual deep trunk muscles to the stability of the lumbar spine is relatively unknown in different tasks, including the flexion-relaxation phenomenon. METHODS: Seven healthy subjects participated. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted with a needle guided by ultrasound. RESULTS: The highest activity observed for quadratus lumborum and deep lateral erector spinae occurred in ipsilateral trunk flexion in a side-lying position and for superficial medial erector spinae during bilateral leg lift in a prone position. Quadratus lumborum and deep lateral erector spinae were activated when the flexion-relaxation phenomenon was present for superficial medial erector spinae, i.e. when its activity ceased in the latter part of full forward flexion of the trunk, held relaxed and kyphotic. CONCLUSIONS: In general, the activation of the investigated muscles showed a high degree of task specificity, where activation of a certain muscle was not always predictable from its anatomical arrangement and mechanical advantage.

  16. Effects of fatigue and reduced intracellular pH on segment dynamics in 'isometric' relaxation of frog muscle fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Curtin, N A; Edman, K A

    1989-01-01

    1. Longitudinal movements of marked segments of single fibres from the anterior tibialis muscle were recorded during tetanus and relaxation under isometric (fixed-end) conditions. 2. During relaxation, shortening and lengthening of different segments occurred simultaneously, starting at about the same time as the end of the linear fall of force (shoulder on the force record). 3. Variations in intracellular pH, measured with pH-sensitive microelectrodes, along the length of fibres were not statistically significant, and are unlikely to be responsible for the non-uniform behaviour of different segments. 4. As expected from earlier studies, both fatigue (produced by increasing tetanus duration or decreasing the time between tetani) and intracellular acidification (produced by raised extracellular CO2), reduced the tetanus force and prolonged the linear phase of force decline in relaxation. Each treatment delayed the start and markedly reduced the amount of segment movement in relaxation. 5. Fatigue and intracellular acidification have a smaller effect on force during stretching than on force produced under isometric conditions. This may contribute to making the segments behave in a more uniform way during relaxation under these conditions. 6. Changes in the Ca2+ uptake mechanisms are also discussed as possible causes for the changes in segment behaviour in relaxation. PMID:2600846

  17. Progressive muscle relaxation improves anxiety and depression of pulmonary arterial hypertension patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunping; Wang, Ranran; Tang, Jingqun; Chen, Chen; Tan, Ling; Wu, Zhongshi; Yu, Fenglei; Wang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    We explored the effects of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) on anxiety, depression, and quality of life (QOL) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). One hundred and thirty Han Chinese patients with PAH were randomly assigned to a PMR group (n = 65) and a control group (n = 65). In a 12-week study duration, the PMR group received hospital-based group and in-home PMR practice, while the control group received hospital-based mild group stretching and balance exercises. The control group and the PMR group were comparable at baseline. After 12 weeks of intervention, the PMR group showed significant improvement in anxiety, depression, overall QOL, and the mental component summary score of QOL (P < 0.05) but not the physical component summary score of QOL or the 6-minute walking distance. In contrast, the control group showed no significant improvement in any of the variables. Moreover, the PMR group showed significant improvement in all QOL mental health domains (P < 0.05) but not the physical health domains. In contrast, the control group showed no significant improvement in any QOL domain. In conclusion, this study suggests that PMR practice is effective in improving anxiety, depression, and the mental health components of QOL in patients with PAH.

  18. Muscle relaxing activity of Hyssopus officinalis essential oil on isolated intestinal preparations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mei; Battinelli, Lucia; Daniele, Claudia; Melchioni, Cristiana; Salvatore, Giuseppe; Mazzanti, Gabriela

    2002-03-01

    The muscle relaxing activity of the essential oil of Hyssopus officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) and some of its main components (isopinocamphone, limonene and beta-pinene) was studied on isolated preparations of guinea-pig and rabbit intestine. The essential oil and isopinocamphone inhibited the acetylcholine- and BaCl2-induced contractions in guinea-pig ileum in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 42.4 microg/ml and 61.9 microg/ml to acetylcholine; 48.3 microg/ml and 70.4 microg/ml to BaCl2) whereas limonene or beta-pinene left tissue contraction unchanged. In guinea-pig ileum H. officinalis essential oil also blocked the contractions induced by CaCl2. In isolated rabbit jejunum the essential oil reduced the amplitude of spontaneous movements and decreased the basal tone; neither haemoglobin, methylene blue, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or propranolol blocked the myorelaxant effect.

  19. Effect of progressive muscle relaxation versus intake of ginger powder on dysmenorrhoea amongst the nursing students in Pune.

    PubMed

    Halder, Annesa

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the comparative efficacy of progressive muscle relaxation and the oral intake of ginger on symptoms of dysmenorrhoea among nursing students of Pune, Maharashtra. The study students (n = 75) were divided into three groups, two experimental and one control Ginger powder 1 gm per dose was administered twice a day with warm water after meal to the second experimental group during the first three days of their menstruation. Main outcome measures were the severity of selected symptoms of dysmenorrhoea. The daily symptom calendar, a 5-point Likert Scale was used to assess the severity of selected symptoms of dysmenorrhoea. Main outcome measures were the severity of selected symptoms of dysmenorrhoea, which were analysed using MANOVA. It was concluded that in treating symptoms of dysmenorrhoea, ginger powder has efficacy superior to progressive muscle relaxation.

  20. The influence of stress and energy level on learning muscle relaxation during gross-motor task performance using electromyographic feedback.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, H; Voerman, G E; Hermens, H J

    2006-09-01

    The aim was to investigate the influence of mood on learning muscle relaxation. Self-reported mood (assessed by the Stress-Energy Checklist) at baseline was related to learning muscle relaxation induced by electromyographic feedback training during performance of a gross-motor task. Feedback training was provided either intermittently (Intermittent Feedback Task, IF, n=12) or continuously (Continuous Feedback Task, CF, n=9). Results reveal a negative correlation between the learning effect at short-term and energy dimension for the IF Task. It can be concluded that mood experienced prior to a learning task is relevant for the learning effect and this effect may be dependent on the schedule of feedback used.

  1. Progressive muscle relaxation therapy for atopic dermatitis: objective assessment of efficacy.

    PubMed

    Bae, Byung Gi; Oh, Sang Ho; Park, Chang Ook; Noh, Seongmin; Noh, Ji Yeon; Kim, Kyung Ran; Lee, Kwang Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to validate the efficacy of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) in patients with atopic dermatitis and to evaluate the serological parameters that may serve as objective measures of the efficacy of PMR. A total of 25 patients with atopic dermatitis were randomly assigned to either a PMR group (n = 15) or a control group (n = 10). Serum levels of nerve growth, neuropeptide Y, and Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) were measured at baseline and after one month. At baseline, only anxiety was positively correlated with pruritus score (state anxiety: R = 0.496, p = 0.014; trait anxiety: R = 0.423, p = 0.04). Serum levels of neuropeptide Y were inversely related to the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) (state anxiety: R = -0.475, p = 0.019; trait anxiety: R = -0.418, p = 0.042) and pruritus scores (R = -0.451, p = 0.035). After one month of PMR therapy, the degree of pruritus and loss of sleep was significantly decreased in the PMR group (p < 0.001), but not among controls. State anxiety scores showed significant improvement after treatment only in the PMR group (p = 0.005). There were no significant changes in the serological parameters in either group. Reductions in Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) scores were significant, but similar, in both groups. PMR may be a useful adjunctive modality for the management of atopic dermatitis through the reduction of anxiety. No change was found in biological parameters, but it was observed that neuropeptide Y may be related to high levels of anxiety in atopic dermatitis at baseline.

  2. Mechanical Impedance of the Non-loaded Lower Leg with Relaxed Muscles in the Transverse Plane

    PubMed Central

    Ficanha, Evandro Maicon; Ribeiro, Guilherme Aramizo; Rastgaar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the protocols and results of the experiments for the estimation of the mechanical impedance of the humans’ lower leg in the External–Internal direction in the transverse plane under non-load bearing condition and with relaxed muscles. The objectives of the estimation of the lower leg’s mechanical impedance are to facilitate the design of passive and active prostheses with mechanical characteristics similar to the humans’ lower leg, and to define a reference that can be compared to the values from the patients suffering from spasticity. The experiments were performed with 10 unimpaired male subjects using a lower extremity rehabilitation robot (Anklebot, Interactive Motion Technologies, Inc.) capable of applying torque perturbations to the foot. The subjects were in a seated position, and the Anklebot recorded the applied torques and the resulting angular movement of the lower leg. In this configuration, the recorded dynamics are due mainly to the rotations of the ankle’s talocrural and the subtalar joints, and any contribution of the tibiofibular joints and knee joint. The dynamic mechanical impedance of the lower leg was estimated in the frequency domain with an average coherence of 0.92 within the frequency range of 0–30 Hz, showing a linear correlation between the displacement and the torques within this frequency range under the conditions of the experiment. The mean magnitude of the stiffness of the lower leg (the impedance magnitude averaged in the range of 0–1 Hz) was determined as 4.9 ± 0.74 Nm/rad. The direct estimation of the quasi-static stiffness of the lower leg results in the mean value of 5.8 ± 0.81 Nm/rad. An analysis of variance shows that the estimated values for the stiffness from the two experiments are not statistically different. PMID:26697424

  3. Antispasmodic and relaxant effects of the hidroalcoholic extract of Pimpinella anisum (Apiaceae) on rat anococcygeus smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Tirapelli, Carlos R; de Andrade, Claudia R; Cassano, Adriano O; De Souza, Fernando A; Ambrosio, Sergio R; da Costa, Fernando B; de Oliveira, Ana M

    2007-03-01

    The present work describes the mechanisms involved in the muscle relaxant effect of ethanol:water (40:60, 60:40 and 80:20) aerial parts extracts of Pimpinella anisum. Three hidroalcoholic extracts in which the proportion of ethanol was 40% (HA(40%)), 60% (HA(60%)) or 80% (HA(80%)) were tested for activity in the rat anococcygeus smooth muscle. The three extracts (50 microg/mL) inhibited acetylcholine-induced contraction. The extract HA(60%) (5-50 microg/mL) concentration dependently relaxed acetylcholine-pre-contracted tissues (31.55+/-3.56%). Conversely, HA(40%) and HA(80%) did not exert relaxant action. Pre-incubation of the preparations with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 microM), 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 3 microM) and oxyhemoglobin (10 microM) reduced the relaxation induced by HA(60%) (percentage of relaxation: 6.81+/-1.86%, 13.13+/-5.87% and 2.12+/-1.46%, respectively). Neither indomethacin (10 microM) nor tetraethylammonium (1 mM) affected the relaxation induced by HA(60%). Incubation of the tissues with L-NAME significantly enhanced the maximal contraction induced by acetylcholine, indicating an inhibitory role for NO in the modulation of the contractile response of anococcygeus smooth muscle to acetylcholine. However, simultaneous addition of L-NAME and HA(60%) resulted in an effect similar to that observed with L-NAME alone, further confirming the observation that Pimpinella anisum acts by realizing NO. Additionally, HA(60%) did not alter CaCl(2)-induced contraction. Collectively, our results provide functional evidence that the effects elicited by the hidroalcoholic extract of Pimpinella anisum involve the participation of NO and subsequent activation of the NO-cGMP pathway. The relaxant action displayed by Pimpinella anisum justifies its use in the folk medicine as an antispasmodic agent.

  4. Conserved Intramolecular Interactions Maintain Myosin Interacting-Heads Motifs Explaining Tarantula Muscle Super-Relaxed State Structural Basis.

    PubMed

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Qi, Dan; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Zhu, Jingui; Bilbao, Aivett; Gillilan, Richard E; Hu, Songnian; Padrón, Raúl

    2016-03-27

    Tarantula striated muscle is an outstanding system for understanding the molecular organization of myosin filaments. Three-dimensional reconstruction based on cryo-electron microscopy images and single-particle image processing revealed that, in a relaxed state, myosin molecules undergo intramolecular head-head interactions, explaining why head activity switches off. The filament model obtained by rigidly docking a chicken smooth muscle myosin structure to the reconstruction was improved by flexibly fitting an atomic model built by mixing structures from different species to a tilt-corrected 2-nm three-dimensional map of frozen-hydrated tarantula thick filament. We used heavy and light chain sequences from tarantula myosin to build a single-species homology model of two heavy meromyosin interacting-heads motifs (IHMs). The flexibly fitted model includes previously missing loops and shows five intramolecular and five intermolecular interactions that keep the IHM in a compact off structure, forming four helical tracks of IHMs around the backbone. The residues involved in these interactions are oppositely charged, and their sequence conservation suggests that IHM is present across animal species. The new model, PDB 3JBH, explains the structural origin of the ATP turnover rates detected in relaxed tarantula muscle by ascribing the very slow rate to docked unphosphorylated heads, the slow rate to phosphorylated docked heads, and the fast rate to phosphorylated undocked heads. The conservation of intramolecular interactions across animal species and the presence of IHM in bilaterians suggest that a super-relaxed state should be maintained, as it plays a role in saving ATP in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscles.

  5. Structure of myosin filaments from relaxed Lethocerus flight muscle by cryo-EM at 6 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhongjun; Taylor, Dianne W.; Reedy, Michael K.; Edwards, Robert J.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a cryo–electron microscopy three-dimensional image reconstruction of relaxed myosin II–containing thick filaments from the flight muscle of the giant water bug Lethocerus indicus. The relaxed thick filament structure is a key element of muscle physiology because it facilitates the reextension process following contraction. Conversely, the myosin heads must disrupt their relaxed arrangement to drive contraction. Previous models predicted that Lethocerus myosin was unique in having an intermolecular head-head interaction, as opposed to the intramolecular head-head interaction observed in all other species. In contrast to the predicted model, we find an intramolecular head-head interaction, which is similar to that of other thick filaments but oriented in a distinctly different way. The arrangement of myosin’s long α-helical coiled-coil rod domain has been hypothesized as either curved layers or helical subfilaments. Our reconstruction is the first report having sufficient resolution to track the rod α helices in their native environment at resolutions ~5.5 Å, and it shows that the layer arrangement is correct for Lethocerus. Threading separate paths through the forest of myosin coiled coils are four nonmyosin peptides. We suggest that the unusual position of the heads and the rod arrangement separated by nonmyosin peptides are adaptations for mechanical signal transduction whereby applied tension disrupts the myosin heads as a component of stretch activation. PMID:27704041

  6. Fast and Slow Gating Relaxations in the Muscle Chloride Channel Clc-1

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Alessio; Pusch, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Gating of the muscle chloride channel CLC-1 involves at least two processes evidenced by double-exponential current relaxations when stepping the voltage to negative values. However, there is little information about the gating of CLC-1 at positive voltages. Here, we analyzed macroscopic gating of CLC-1 over a large voltage range (from −160 to +200 mV). Activation was fast at positive voltages but could be easily followed using envelope protocols that employed a tail pulse to −140 mV after stepping the voltage to a certain test potential for increasing durations. Activation was biexponential, demonstrating the presence of two gating processes. Both time constants became exponentially faster at positive voltages. A similar voltage dependence was also seen for the fast gate time constant of CLC-0. The voltage dependence of the time constant of the fast process of CLC-1, τf, was steeper than that of the slow one, τs (apparent activation valences were zf ∼ −0.79 and zs ∼ −0.42) such that at +200 mV the two processes became kinetically distinct by almost two orders of magnitude (τf ∼ 16 μs, τs ∼ 1 ms). This voltage dependence is inconsistent with a previously published gating model for CLC-1 (Fahlke, C., A. Rosenbohm, N. Mitrovic, A.L. George, and R. Rüdel. 1996. Biophys. J. 71:695–706). The kinetic difference at 200 mV allowed us to separate the steady state open probabilities of the two processes assuming that they reflect two parallel (not necessarily independent) gates that have to be open simultaneously to allow ion conduction. Both open probabilities could be described by Boltzmann functions with gating valences around one and with nonzero “offsets” at negative voltages, indicating that the two “gates” never close completely. For comparison with single channel data and to correlate the two gating processes with the two gates of CLC-0, we characterized their voltage, pHint, and [Cl]ext dependence, and the dominant myotonia inducing

  7. Co-axial bioassay of a smooth muscle relaxant factor released from guinea-pig tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, L B; Paterson, J W; Goldie, R G

    1989-01-01

    -oxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitor BW 755C (150 microM) and the leukotriene receptor antagonist FPL 55712 (10 microM) each failed significantly to alter EpDRF-mediated relaxation of vascular smooth muscle suggesting that EpDRF is not a prostanoid. Platelet activating factor (Pat) failed to cause relaxation of endothelium-denuded rat aorta, indicating that this mediator was also not EpDRF. 7. EpDRF was also released from human bronchial segments. 8. This study provides direct evidence for the release of an EpDRF from non-diseased airway tissue and further suggests that healthy airway reactivity to spasmogens is modulated by the release of an endogenous protective, spasmolytic substance. The bronchial hyperreactivity of asthma may be partly caused by attenuated production of such an inhibitory signal.

  8. On central muscle relaxants, strychnine-insensitive glycine receptors and two old drugs: zoxazolamine and HA-966.

    PubMed

    McMillen, B A; Williams, H L; Lehmann, H; Shepard, P D

    1992-01-01

    Zoxazolamine is in the centrally-acting muscle relaxant class of drugs, which reportedly act by decreasing CNS interneuronal activity. These drugs, but not anxiolytics, decrease dopaminergic turnover and induce a pacemaker-like discharge pattern in dopaminergic neurons. A mechanism for these effects was not found in previous reports. We observed that (+)-HA-966, an inhibitor of the glycine modulatory site on the NMDA receptor, has a similar effect on dopaminergic impulse flow, which suggested that this may be the possible site of action of classical muscle relaxants. However, a competitive antagonist of NMDA receptors, NPC-12626, had little effect on impulse flow. Binding of 20 nM [3H]-glycine to cortical synaptosomal membranes was inhibited by (+)-HA-966, IC50 = 3.16 microM, but only poorly by zoxazolamine, IC50 V 474 microM, and chlorzoxazone, a related drug, caused no displacement. The drugs were then tested for protection from amphetamine neurotoxicity. Neither 50 mg/kg zoxazolamine nor 30 mg/kg (+)-HA-966 prevented (+)-amphetamine (0.1 mmol/kg plus 10 mg/kg iprindole) depletion of striatal dopamine (DA), but 3.0 mg/kg of MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, did protect DA content. Since baclofen induces a regular firing rate in DA neurons, zoxazolamine and (+)-HA-966 were tested for displacement of 10 nM [3H]-1-baclofen from cortical synaptosomal GABAb receptors, but were ineffective. Thus, the effects of these muscle relaxants on DA neurons are mediated by a mechanism other than strychnine-insensitive glycine or GABAb receptors.

  9. Nitric oxide relaxes circular smooth muscle of rat distal colon through RhoA/Rho-kinase independent Ca2+ desensitisation

    PubMed Central

    Colpaert, Erwin E; Levent, Adnan; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study in circular smooth muscle of rat distal colon was to determine whether Ca2+ desensitisation, in addition to mechanisms lowering cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt), was involved in the relaxation elicited by nitric oxide (NO). Changes in isometric tension and [Ca2+]cyt were recorded simultaneously in fura-2-loaded strips. In methacholine (10−5 M)-precontracted preparations, exogenous NO (10−4 M), adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP; 10−3 M) and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 1 ms, 40 V, 4 Hz, 1 min) induced a decrease in smooth muscle tension, which was accompanied by a fall in [Ca2+]cyt. The sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATP-ase (SERCA) inhibitor thapsigargin (10−6 M) did not exert an influence on the decrease in tension produced by exogenous NO, but significantly attenuated the fall in [Ca2+]cyt. Both the relaxation and the fall in [Ca2+]cyt to ATP and EFS were unaffected by thapsigargin. Calyculin-A (10−6 M), a myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) inhibitor, significantly reduced the decrease in tension elicited by exogenous NO, but did not alter the fall in [Ca2+]cyt to exogenous NO. Inactivating RhoA by exoenzyme C3 (2 μg ml−1) or inhibiting Rho-kinase with (+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl) cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride monohydrate (Y-27632; 10−5 M) had no effect on the decrease of both tension and [Ca2+]cyt generated by exogenous NO. This paper demonstrates that a RhoA/Rho-kinase independent Ca2+ desensitisation pathway contributes to the relaxation by NO in circular smooth muscle strips of rat distal colon. PMID:15655498

  10. Kinetics of cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are linked and determined by properties of the cardiac sarcomere

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of myocardial contraction and relaxation kinetics is currently incompletely understood. When the amplitude of contraction is increased via the Frank-Starling mechanism, the kinetics of the contraction slow down, but when the amplitude of contraction is increased with either an increase in heart rate or via β-adrenergic stimulation, the kinetics speed up. It is also unknown how physiological mechanisms affect the kinetics of contraction versus those of relaxation. We investigated contraction-relaxation coupling in isolated trabeculae from the mouse and rat and stimulated them to contract at various temperatures, frequencies, preloads, and in the absence and presence of β-adrenergic stimulation. In each muscle at least 16 different conditions were assessed, and the correlation coefficient of the speed of contraction and relaxation was very close (generally >0.98). Moreover, in all but one of the analyzed murine strains, the ratio of the minimum rate of the derivative of force development (dF/dt) over maximum dF/dt was not significantly different. Only in trabeculae isolated from myosin-binding protein-C mutant mice was this ratio significantly lower (0.61 ± 0.07 vs. 0.84 ± 0.02 in 11 other strains of mice). Within each strain, this ratio was unaffected by modulation of length, frequency, or β-adrenergic stimulation. Rat trabeculae showed identical results; the balance between kinetics of contraction and relaxation was generally constant (0.85 ± 0.04). Because of the great variety in underlying excitation-contraction coupling in the assessed strains, we concluded that contraction-relation coupling is a property residing in the cardiac sarcomere. PMID:20656885

  11. H2S relaxes isolated human airway smooth muscle cells via the sarcolemmal K(ATP) channel.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Robert; DeSantiago, Breann; Lee, Danielle Y; Yang, Guangdong; Kim, Jae Yeon; Foster, D Brian; Chan-Li, Yee; Horton, Maureen R; Panettieri, Reynold A; Wang, Rui; An, Steven S

    2014-03-28

    Here we explored the impact of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on biophysical properties of the primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM)-the end effector of acute airway narrowing in asthma. Using magnetic twisting cytometry (MTC), we measured dynamic changes in the stiffness of isolated ASM, at the single-cell level, in response to varying doses of GYY4137 (1-10mM). GYY4137 slowly released appreciable levels of H2S in the range of 10-275 μM, and H2S released was long lived. In isolated human ASM cells, GYY4137 acutely decreased stiffness (i.e. an indicator of the single-cell relaxation) in a dose-dependent fashion, and stiffness decreases were sustained in culture for 24h. Human ASM cells showed protein expressions of cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE; a H2S synthesizing enzyme) and ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. The KATP channel opener pinacidil effectively relaxed isolated ASM cells. In addition, pinacidil-induced ASM relaxation was completely inhibited by the treatment of cells with the KATP channel blocker glibenclamide. Glibenclamide also markedly attenuated GYY4137-mediated relaxation of isolated human ASM cells. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that H2S causes the relaxation of human ASM and implicate as well the role for sarcolemmal KATP channels. Finally, given that ASM cells express intrinsic enzymatic machinery of generating H2S, we suggest thereby this class of gasotransmitter can be further exploited for potential therapy against obstructive lung disease.

  12. Force and intracellular Ca2+ during cyclic nucleotide-mediated relaxation of rat anococcygeus muscle and the effects of cyclopiazonic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, G. L.; Wendt, I. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. Simultaneous recordings of tension and [Ca2+]i were made in rat anococcygeus muscle strips to investigate possible mechanisms involved during cyclic nucleotide-mediated relaxation. Relaxation of pre-contracted muscles was induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) or forskolin and the effects of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) on these responses were examined. 2. In muscles pre-contracted with 0.2 microM phenylephrine addition of SNP (10 microM) caused a rapid and near complete relaxation of force. This was accompanied by a decrease in [Ca2+]i, however, this was not of a comparable magnitude to the decrease in force. The level of [Ca2+]i in muscles relaxed with SNP was shown to be associated with substantially higher force levels in the absence of SNP. Forskolin (10 microM) caused a slower, essentially complete relaxation which was associated with a proportional decrease in [Ca2+]i. 3. In muscles pretreated with SNP or forskolin subsequent responses to phenylephrine were attenuated with both force and [Ca2+]i rising slowly to attain eventually levels similar to those observed when the relaxant was applied to pre-contracted muscles. 4. Exposure of the muscles to the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor, CPA (10 microM), resulted in a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i which, in most cases, was not associated with any force development. The relaxation and decrease in [Ca2+]i in response to both SNP and forskolin were attenuated and substantially slowed in the presence of CPA. Overall the extent of this attenuation was greater for SNP. For both SNP and forskolin, CPA attenuated the decrease in [Ca2+]i to a greater extent than the decrease in force. In some cases, SNP-mediated relaxation in the presence of CPA was observed with almost no detectable change in [Ca2+]i. 5. The results suggest that, in the rat anococcygeus muscle under normal circumstances, a lowering of [Ca2+]i can fully account for the relaxation induced by forskolin but not for that induced by SNP, where

  13. Do sleep hygiene measures and progressive muscle relaxation influence sleep bruxism? Report of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Valiente López, M; van Selms, M K A; van der Zaag, J; Hamburger, H L; Lobbezoo, F

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of sleep hygiene measures combined with relaxation techniques in the management of sleep bruxism (SB) in a double-blind, parallel, controlled, randomised clinical trial design. Sixteen participants (mean ± s.d. age = 39·9 ± 10·8 years) were randomly assigned to a control group (n = 8) or to the experimental treatment group (n = 8). Participants belonging to the latter group were instructed to perform sleep hygiene measures and progressive muscle relaxation techniques for a 4-week period. Two polysomnographic recordings, including bilateral masseter electromyographic activity, were made: one prior to the treatment and the other after the treatment period. The number of bruxism episodes per hour, the number of burst per hour and the bruxism time index (i.e. the percentage of total sleep time spent bruxing) were established as outcome variables. No significant differences could be observed between the outcome measures obtained before and after the 4-week period, neither for the sleep bruxism variables nor for the sleep variables. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no effect of sleep hygiene measures together with progressive relaxation techniques on sleep bruxism or sleep over a 4-week observation period.

  14. A birefringence study of changes in myosin orientation during relaxation of skinned muscle fibers induced by photolytic ATP release.

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, M; Ferenczi, M A; Irving, M

    1994-01-01

    The birefringence of isolated skinned fibers from rabbit psoas muscle was measured continuously during relaxation from rigor produced by photolysis of caged ATP at sarcomere length 2.8-2.9 microns, ionic strength 0.1 M, 15 degrees C. Birefringence, the difference in refractive index between light components polarized parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis, depends on the average degree of alignment of the myosin head domain with the fiber axis. After ATP release birefringence increased by 5.8 +/- 0.7% (mean +/- SE, n = 6) with two temporal components. A small fast component had an amplitude of 0.9 +/- 0.2% and rate constant of 63 s-1. By the completion of this component, the instantaneous stiffness had decreased to about half the rigor value, and the force response to a step stretch showed a rapid (approximately 1000 s-1) recovery phase. Subsequently a large slow birefringence component with rate constant 5.1 s-1 accompanied isometric force relaxation. Inorganic phosphate (10 mM) did not affect the fast birefringence component but accelerated the slow component and force relaxation. The fast birefringence component was probably caused by formation of myosin.ATP or myosin.ADP.Pi states that are weakly bound to actin. The average myosin head orientation at the end of this component is slightly more parallel to the fiber axis than in rigor. PMID:7811926

  15. Cyanide and sulfide interact with nitrogenous compounds to influence the relaxation of various smooth muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Kruszyna, H.; Kruszyna, R.; Smith, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    Sodium nitroprusside relaxed guinea pig ileum after the segment had been submaximally contracted by either histamine or acetylcholine, intact isolated rabbit gall bladder after submaximal contraction by either acetylcholine or cholecystokinin octapeptide, and rat pulmonary artery helical strips after submaximal contraction with norepinephrine. In each of these cases the relaxation produced by nitroprusside was at least partially reversed by the subsequent addition of excess sodium cyanide. Cyanide, however, in nontoxic concentrations did not reverse the spasmolytic effects of hydroxylamine hydrochloride, sodium azide, nitroglycerin, sodium nitrite, or nitric oxide hemoglobin on guinea pig ileum, nor did cyanide alone in the same concentrations have any effect. The similar interaction between nitroprusside and cyanide on rabbit aortic strips is not dependent on the presence of an intact endothelia cell layer. Also, on rabbit aortic strips and like cyanide, sodium sulfide reversed the spasmolytic effects of azide and hydroxylamine, but it had little or no effect on the relaxation induced by papaverine. Unlike cyanide, however, sulfide augmented the relaxation induced by nitroprusside, and it reversed the effects of nitric oxide hemoglobin, nitroglycerin, and nitrite. A direct chemical reaction between sulfide and nitroprusside may account for the difference between it and cyanide. Although evidence was obtained also for a direct chemical reaction between sulfide and norepinephrine, that reaction does not seem to have played a role in these results.

  16. Effect of muscle relaxants on experimental jaw-muscle pain and jaw-stretch reflexes: a double-blind and placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Peter; Wang, Kelun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2003-01-01

    A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled three-way cross-over study was performed to investigate the effect of two muscle relaxants (tolperisone hydrochloride and pridinol mesilate) on experimental jaw-muscle pain and jaw-stretch reflexes. Fifteen healthy men participated in three randomised sessions separated by at least 1 week. In each session 300 mg tolperisone, 8 mg pridinol mesilate or placebo was administered orally as a single dose. One hour after drug administration 0.3 ml hypertonic saline (5.8%) was injected into the right masseter to produce muscle pain. Subjects continuously rated their perceived pain intensity on an electronic 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured and short-latency reflex responses were evoked in the pre-contracted (15% maximal voluntary contraction) masseter and temporalis muscles by a standardised stretch device (1 mm displacement, 10 ms ramp time) before (baseline), 1 h after medication (post-drug), during ongoing experimental muscle pain (pain-post-drug), and 15 min after pain had vanished (post-pain). Analysis of variance demonstrated significantly lower VAS peak pain scores (5.9 +/- 0.4 cm) after administration of tolperisone hydrochloride compared with pridinol mesilate (6.8 +/- 0.4 cm) and placebo (6.6 +/- 0.4 cm) (P=0.020). Administration of pridinol mesilate was associated with a significant decrease in PPTs compared with tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo (P=0.002) after medication, but not after experimental jaw-muscle pain. The normalised peak-to-peak amplitude of the stretch reflexes were not significantly influenced by the test medication (P=0.762), but were in all sessions significantly facilitated during ongoing experimental jaw-muscle pain (P=0.034). In conclusion, tolperisone hydrochloride provides a small, albeit significant reduction in the perceived intensity of experimental jaw-muscle pain whereas the present dose had no effect on the short-latency jaw

  17. The vestibular system does not modulate fusimotor drive to muscle spindles in relaxed leg muscles of subjects in a near-vertical position.

    PubMed

    Knellwolf, T P; Hammam, E; Macefield, V G

    2016-05-01

    It has been shown that sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS) has no effect on the firing of spontaneously active muscle spindles in either relaxed or voluntarily contracting human leg muscles. However, all previous studies have been conducted on subjects in a seated position. Given that independent vestibular control of muscle spindle firing would be more valuable during postural threat, we tested the hypothesis that this modulation would become apparent for subjects in a near-vertical position. Unitary recordings were made from 18 muscle spindle afferents via tungsten microelectrodes inserted percutaneously into the common peroneal nerve of awake human subjects laying supine on a motorized tilt table. All recorded spindle afferents were spontaneously active at rest, and each increased its firing rate during a weak static contraction. Sinusoidal bipolar binaural galvanic vestibular stimulation (±2 mA, 100 cycles) was applied to the mastoid processes at 0.8 Hz. This continuous stimulation produced a sustained illusion of "rocking in a boat" or "swinging in a hammock." The subject was then moved into a near-vertical position (75°), and the stimulation repeated. Despite robust vestibular illusions, none of the fusimotor-driven spindles exhibited phase-locked modulation of firing during sinusoidal GVS in either position. We conclude that this dynamic vestibular stimulus was insufficient to modulate the firing of fusimotor neurons in the near-vertical position. However, this does not mean that the vestibular system cannot modulate the sensitivity of muscle spindles via fusimotor neurons in free unsupported standing, when reliance on proprioceptive feedback is higher.

  18. Role of Na+-K+ ATPase in cyclic GMP-mediated relaxation of canine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, J; Tagaya, E; Nishimura, K; Isono, K; Nagai, A

    1997-01-01

    Sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+-K+ ATPase) plays a role in the regulation of vascular tone, but contribution of this enzyme to nitrovasodilator-induced pulmonary vasodilatation remains uncertain. We thus studied the interaction between guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) and Na+-K+ ATPase in smooth muscle cells isolated from canine pulmonary artery. To assess the contractile properties, changes in smooth muscle cell length were determined microscopically. Application of potassium chloride (KCl) shortened the cell length, an effect which was reduced by sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo-cyclic GMP in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of cells with the cyclic GMP-dependent kinase inhibitor KT 5823 (2 μM) abolished the effects of sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. Ouabain (0.3 μM) did not alter the KCl-induced muscle shortening, but inhibited the relaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. Incubation of smooth muscle cells with sodium nitroprusside concentration-dependently increased intracellular cyclic GMP levels and ouabain-sensitive 86Rb uptake, and these values were significantly correlated. In the presence of KT 5823, sodium nitroprusside increased cyclic GMP levels but did not alter ouabain-sensitive 86Rb uptake. These results suggest that there is a link between accumulation of intracellular cyclic GMP and activation of sarcolemmal Na+-K+ ATPase in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and that this link may be involved in the sodium nitroprusside-induced pulmonary vasodilatation. PMID:9298536

  19. Mechanism of Relaxation Via TASK-2 Channels in Uterine Circular Muscle of Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seung Hwa; Sung, Rohyun; Suzuki, Hikaru; Choi, Woong; Park, Yeon Jin; Ji, Ill Woon; Kim, Chan Hyung; Myung, Sun Chul; Lee, Moo Yeol; Kang, Tong Mook; You, Ra Young; Lee, Kwang Ju; Lim, Seung Woon; Yun, Hyo-Yung; Song, Young-Jin; Xu, Wen-Xie; Lee, Sang Jin

    2013-01-01

    Plasma pH can be altered during pregnancy and at labor. Membrane excitability of smooth muscle including uterine muscle is suppressed by the activation of K+ channels. Because contractility of uterine muscle is regulated by extracellular pH and humoral factors, K+ conductance could be connected to factors regulating uterine contractility during pregnancy. Here, we showed that TASK-2 inhibitors such as quinidine, lidocaine, and extracellular acidosis produced contraction in uterine circular muscle of mouse. Furthermore, contractility was significantly increased in pregnant uterine circular muscle than that of non-pregnant muscle. These patterns were not changed even in the presence of tetraetylammonium (TEA) and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Finally, TASK-2 inhibitors induced strong myometrial contraction even in the presence of L-methionine, a known inhibitor of stretchactivated channels in myometrium. When compared to non-pregnant myometrium, pregnant myometrium showed increased immunohistochemical expression of TASK-2. Therefore, TASK-2, seems to play a key role during regulation of myometrial contractility in the pregnancy and provides new insight into preventing preterm delivery. PMID:23946696

  20. Compartmental relaxation and diffusion tensor imaging measurements in vivo in lambda-carrageenan-induced edema in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Fan, Reuben H; Does, Mark D

    2008-07-01

    Integrated diffusion tensor T(2) measurements were made on normal and edematous rat muscle, and the data were fitted with one- and two-compartment models, respectively. Edematous muscle exhibited a short-lived component (T(2) = 28 +/- 6 ms), with diffusion characteristics similar to that of normal muscle, and a long-lived component (T(2) = 96 +/- 27 ms), with greater mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and lower fractional anisotropy (FA). With this two-component description of diffusion and relaxation, values of ADC and FA estimated with a conventional pulsed-gradient spin-echo sequence will depend on the echo time, relative fraction of short-lived and long-lived water signals, and the intrinsic ADC and FA values within the tissue. On the basis of the relative differences in water diffusion properties between long-lived and short-lived water signals, as well as the similarities between the short-lived component and normal tissue, it is postulated that these two signal components largely reflect intracellular and extracellular water.

  1. Hydrogen sulphide inhibits Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors and relaxes airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Piedras, Isabel; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose F

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is a signalling molecule that appears to regulate diverse cell physiological process in several organs and systems including vascular and airway smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction. Decreases in endogenous H2S synthesis have been associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases and asthma. Here we investigated the mechanism of airway SMC relaxation induced by H2S in small intrapulmonary airways using mouse lung slices and confocal and phase-contrast video microscopy. Exogenous H2S donor Na2S (100 μm) reversibly inhibited Ca2+ release and airway contraction evoked by inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) uncaging in airway SMCs. Similarly, InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction was inhibited by endogenous H2S precursor l-cysteine (10 mm) but not by l-serine (10 mm) or either amino acid in the presence of dl-propargylglycine (PPG). Consistent with the inhibition of Ca2+ release through InsP3 receptors (InsP3Rs), Na2S reversibly inhibited acetylcholine (ACh)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in airway SMCs. In addition, Na2S, the H2S donor GYY-4137, and l-cysteine caused relaxation of airways pre-contracted with either ACh or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Na2S-induced airway relaxation was resistant to a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) and a protein kinase G inhibitor (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPS). The effects of H2S on InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release and contraction as well as on the relaxation of agonist-contracted airways were mimicked by the thiol-reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT, 10 mm) and inhibited by the oxidizing agent diamide (30 μm). These studies indicate that H2S causes airway SMC relaxation by inhibiting Ca2+ release through InsP3Rs and consequent reduction of agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in SMCs. The results suggest a novel role for endogenously produced H2S that involves the modulation of InsP3-evoked Ca2+ release – a cell-signalling system of critical importance for many physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID

  2. Relaxation, [Ca2+]i and [Mg2+]i during prolonged tetanic stimulation of intact, single fibres from mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Westerblad, H; Allen, D G

    1994-01-01

    1. In skeletal muscle there is generally a slowing of relaxation with increasing tetanus duration and it has been suggested that this is due to Ca2+ loading of parvalbumin (PA). To study this we have produced prolonged tetani in intact, single fibres from a mouse foot muscle which contain a high concentration of PA. We measured the rate of tension relaxation and also various aspects of Ca2+ handling. 2. During 'interrupted' tetani (15 repeated cycles of 100 ms with stimulation and 50 ms without) we observed a marked slowing of the relaxation both under control conditions and in acidosis (obtained by increasing the bath CO2 content). This slowing was not accompanied by any reduction of the initial rate of decline of the free myoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), which was measured with indo-1. 3. The functioning of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) pump after tetani of various durations was analysed by plotting d[Ca2+]i/dt vs. [Ca2+]i during the final slow decline of [Ca2+]i after tetani. This analysis showed that the rate of SR Ca2+ pumping after a 1 s tetanus is less than half of that after a 100 ms tetanus. 4. The amplitude of the tail of [Ca2+]i 250 ms into relaxation was measured after tetani of various durations. This amplitude increased with tetanus duration and could be fitted to the sum of one exponential and one linear function. The exponential component increased with a time constant of 0.17 s and probably reflects Ca2+ loading of PA. 5. Ca2+ binding to PA will displace Mg2+ and hence the free myoplasmic concentration of Mg2+ ([Mg2+]i) will increase. To study this we used the fluorescent Mg2+ indicator furaptra. The results showed an increase of [Mg2+]i during prolonged tetani which, after removing the Ca2+ component of the fluorescent signal, amounted to about 0.5 mM. 6. A model of Ca2+ movements and tension production in skeletal muscle was used. The model showed that the increase of the amplitude of [Ca2+]i tails after tetani of various durations can

  3. Comparison of relaxation responses of cavernous and trigonal smooth muscles from rabbits by alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists; prazosin, terazosin, doxazosin, and tamsulosin.

    PubMed Central

    Seo, K. K.; Lee, M. Y.; Lim, S. W.; Kim, S. C.

    1999-01-01

    Alpha1a-adrenergic receptor (AR) primarily mediates the contraction of the prostatic and cavernous smooth muscles. Among clinically available alpha1-AR antagonists for the medical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), tamsulosin has a modest selectivity for alpha1A- and alpha1D- over alpha1B-ARs. To compare the effects of various alpha1-AR antagonists on relaxation responses of cavernous and trigonal smooth muscles, isometric tension studies with relatively selective (tamsulosin) and non-selective (prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin) alpha1A-AR antagonists, were conducted in the cavernous and trigonal muscle strips of rabbits (n=10 each). Tamsulosin had the strongest inhibitory effect on contraction of trigonal smooth muscle among the various alpha1-AR antagonists, and the inhibitory activities of prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin were not statistically different. All alpha1-AR antagonists caused concentration-dependent relaxation of the cavernous muscle strips. Tamsulosin was shown to have greater potency than prazosin (more than 100-fold), doxazosin (more than 1000-fold), and terazosin (more than 1000-fold), in relaxation of cavernous smooth muscle. In conclusion, tamsulosin might be the most effective drug among the four commonly used alpha1-AR antagonists for the medical management of BPH. Tamsulosin might be a potential substitute for phentolamine in combination with vasoactive agents as an intracavernous injection therapy for patients with erectile dysfunction. PMID:10102527

  4. Both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduce the facing-the-viewer bias in biological motion perception.

    PubMed

    Heenan, Adam; Troje, Nikolaus F

    2014-01-01

    Biological motion stimuli, such as orthographically projected stick figure walkers, are ambiguous about their orientation in depth. The projection of a stick figure walker oriented towards the viewer, therefore, is the same as its projection when oriented away. Even though such figures are depth-ambiguous, however, observers tend to interpret them as facing towards them more often than facing away. Some have speculated that this facing-the-viewer bias may exist for sociobiological reasons: Mistaking another human as retreating when they are actually approaching could have more severe consequences than the opposite error. Implied in this hypothesis is that the facing-towards percept of biological motion stimuli is potentially more threatening. Measures of anxiety and the facing-the-viewer bias should therefore be related, as researchers have consistently found that anxious individuals display an attentional bias towards more threatening stimuli. The goal of this study was to assess whether physical exercise (Experiment 1) or an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2) would significantly affect facing-the-viewer biases. We hypothesized that both physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation would decrease facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers, but not for bottom- or top-half-only human stimuli, as these carry less sociobiological relevance. On the other hand, we expected that the anxiety induction task (Experiment 2) would increase facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. In both experiments, participants completed anxiety questionnaires, exercised on a treadmill (Experiment 1) or performed an anxiety induction/reduction task (Experiment 2), and then immediately completed a perceptual task that allowed us to assess their facing-the-viewer bias. As hypothesized, we found that physical exercise and progressive muscle relaxation reduced facing-the-viewer biases for full stick figure walkers only. Our results provide

  5. Rock Tea extract (Jasonia glutinosa) relaxes rat aortic smooth muscle by inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    Valero, Marta Sofía; Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Garrido, Irene; Langa, Elisa; Berzosa, César; López, Víctor; Gómez-Rincón, Carlota; Murillo, María Divina; Köhler, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    In traditional herbal medicine, Rock Tea (Jasonia glutinosa) is known for its prophylactic and therapeutic value in various disorders including arterial hypertension. However, the mechanism by which Rock Tea exerts blood pressure-lowering actions has not been elucidated yet. Our aim was to demonstrate vasorelaxing effects of Rock Tea extract and to reveal its possible action mechanism. Isometric myography was conducted on high-K+-precontracted rings from rat thoracic aorta and tested extracts at concentrations of 0.5-5 mg/ml. Whole-cell patch-clamp experiments were performed in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (line A7r5) to determine blocking effects on L-type Ca(2+) channels. Rock Tea extract relaxed the aorta contracted by high [K+] concentration dependently with an EC50 of ≈2.4 mg/ml and produced ≈75 % relaxation at the highest concentration tested. The L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, verapamil (10(-6) M), had similar effects. Rock Tea extract had no effect in nominally Ca(2+)-free high-K(+) buffer but significantly inhibited contractions to re-addition of Ca(2+). Rock Tea extract inhibited the contractions induced by the L-type Ca(2+) channel activator Bay K 8644 (10(-5) M) and by phenylephrine (10(-6) M). Rock Tea extract and Y-27632 (10(-6) M), Rho-kinase inhibitor, had similar effects and the respective effects were not additive. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated that Rock Tea extract (2.5 mg/ml) virtually abolished L-type Ca(2+) currents in A7r5. We conclude that Rock Tea extract produced vasorelaxation of rat aorta and that this relaxant effect is mediated by inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels. Rock Tea extracts may be of phytomedicinal value for prevention and adjuvant treatment of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Education, progressive muscle relaxation therapy, and exercise for the treatment of night eating syndrome. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Maraldo, Toni M; Vercellone, Allison C; Gagne, Danielle A

    2015-06-01

    Night eating syndrome (NES) is a circadian rhythm disorder in which food intake is shifted toward the end of the day, interfering with sleep. According to the biobehavioral model of NES, the disorder is the result of a genetic predisposition that, coupled with stress, leads to enhanced reuptake of serotonin, thereby dysregulating circadian rhythms and decreasing satiety. Using the biobehavioral model as a guide, we developed a brief behavioral intervention using education, relaxation strategies, and exercise to address the core symptoms of NES. In this pilot randomized controlled clinical trial, 44 participants with NES were randomly assigned to an educational group (E; n = 14), E plus progressive muscle relaxation therapy (PMR; n = 15); or PMR plus exercise (PMR Plus, n = 15). Participants received a baseline intervention with 1- and 3-week follow-up sessions. Effectiveness analyses showed that participants in all three groups evidenced significant reductions on measures of NES symptoms (p < .001), depression (p < .05), anxiety (p < .01), and perceived stress (p < .05). However, the only significant between group change was for the percent of food eaten after the evening meal, with the PMR group showing the greatest reduction (-30.54%), followed by the PMR Plus group (-20.42%) and the E group (-9.5%); only the difference between the PMR and E groups was statistically significant (p = .012). Reductions in NES scores were significantly associated with reductions on measures of depression (r = .47; p < .01) and perceived stress (r = .37; p < .05), but not anxiety (r = .26, p = ns). Results support the role of education and relaxation in the behavioral treatment of NES.

  7. Effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation therapy as a worksite health promotion program in the automobile assembly line

    PubMed Central

    SUNDRAM, Bala Murali; DAHLUI, Maznah; CHINNA, Karuthan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) as part of a Worksite Health Promotion Program on self-perceived stress, anxiety and depression among male automotive assembly-line workers through a quasi-experimental trial. Two assembly plants were chosen with one receiving PMR therapy and the other Pamphlets. Intention-to-treat analysis was conducted to test the effectiveness of the relaxation therapy. Stress, Depression and Anxiety levels were measured using the shortened DASS-21 questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Independent sample t test and Repeated-measures analysis of variance to test the significance of the effects of intervention (time * group) for the measures of Stress, Depression and Anxiety. Significant favourable intervention effects on stress were found in the PMR group (Effect size=0.6) as compared to the Pamphlet group (Effect size=0.2). There was a significant group *time interaction effect (p<0.001) on Stress levels. Depression and Anxiety levels were minimal at baseline in both the groups with mild or no reduction in levels. The improvement in stress levels showed the potential of PMR therapy as a coping strategy at the workplace. Further research in this field is necessary to examine the beneficial effects of coping strategies in the workplace. PMID:26726829

  8. Effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation therapy as a worksite health promotion program in the automobile assembly line.

    PubMed

    Sundram, Bala Murali; Dahlui, Maznah; Chinna, Karuthan

    2016-06-10

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) as part of a Worksite Health Promotion Program on self-perceived stress, anxiety and depression among male automotive assembly-line workers through a quasi-experimental trial. Two assembly plants were chosen with one receiving PMR therapy and the other Pamphlets. Intention-to-treat analysis was conducted to test the effectiveness of the relaxation therapy. Stress, Depression and Anxiety levels were measured using the shortened DASS-21 questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Independent sample t test and Repeated-measures analysis of variance to test the significance of the effects of intervention (time * group) for the measures of Stress, Depression and Anxiety. Significant favourable intervention effects on stress were found in the PMR group (Effect size=0.6) as compared to the Pamphlet group (Effect size=0.2). There was a significant group *time interaction effect (p<0.001) on Stress levels. Depression and Anxiety levels were minimal at baseline in both the groups with mild or no reduction in levels. The improvement in stress levels showed the potential of PMR therapy as a coping strategy at the workplace. Further research in this field is necessary to examine the beneficial effects of coping strategies in the workplace.

  9. Smooth muscle relaxation activity of an aqueous extract of dried immature fruit of Poncirus trifoliata (PF-W) on an isolated strip of rat ileum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu-Sang; Shim, Won-Sik; dela Peña, Ike Campomayor; Seo, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Woo-Young; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Kim, Dae-Duk; Chung, Suk-Jae; Cheong, Jae-Hoon; Shim, Chang-Koo

    2013-08-01

    We demonstrated that an aqueous extract of dried immature fruit of Poncirus trifoliate (PF-W) produces relaxation of intestinal smooth muscle using the ileac strips of a rat. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism of its relaxant activity was investigated. PF-W was prepared using the standard extraction protocol. A 1.5 - 2 cm long rat ileac strip was placed in an organ bath with Tyrode's solution and smooth muscle contractility was recorded by connecting it to a force transducer. Various compounds were added to the organ baths, and changes in muscular contractility were measured. PF-W concentration-dependently induced relaxation of rat ileac strips that were contracted both spontaneously and via acetylcholine treatment. Various potassium channel blockers did not inhibit the relaxation by PF-W. No difference in the effect of PF-W was observed between ileac strips treated with low (20 mM) and high concentrations (60 mM) of KCl. PF-W inhibited the contraction of rat ileac strips induced by extracellular calcium. PF-W acts as a potent smooth muscle relaxant, implicating its possible action as a rapid acting reliever for abdominal pains and a cure for intestinal convulsion. Considering that PF-W also exhibits prokinetic activity, its use in various gastrointestinal disorders seems promising.

  10. Pharmacologic specificity of nicotinic receptor-mediated relaxation of muscarinic receptor precontracted human gastric clasp and sling muscle fibers within the gastroesophageal junction.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Alan S; Vegesna, Anil K; Miller, Larry S; Barbe, Mary F; Tiwana, Mansoor; Hussain, Kashif; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2011-07-01

    Relaxation of gastric clasp and sling muscle fibers is involved the transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations underlying the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). These fibers do not contribute tone to the high-pressure zone in GERD patients, indicating their role in pathophysiology. This study identifies some mediators of the nicotine-induced relaxation of muscarinic receptor precontracted gastric clasp and sling fibers. Muscle strips from organ donors precontracted with bethanechol were relaxed with nicotine and then rechallenged after washing and adding inhibitors tetrodotoxin (TTX), the nitric-oxide synthase inhibitor L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol, the glycine receptor antagonist strychnine or ginkgolide B, and the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline or 2-(3-carboxypropyl)-3-amino-6-(4 methoxyphenyl)pyridazinium bromide [(gabazine) SR95531]. TTX only inhibited clasp fiber relaxations. L-NAME and propranolol inhibited, and ginkgolide B was ineffective in both. SR95531 was ineffective in clasp fibers and partially effective in sling fibers. Strychnine and bicuculline prevented relaxations with low potency, indicating actions not on glycine or GABA(A) receptors but more consistent with nicotinic receptor blockade. Bethanechol-precontracted fibers were relaxed by the nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine and by the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (clasp fibers only) but not by the glycine receptor agonist taurine or glycine or the GABA(A) agonist muscimol. These data indicate that nicotinic receptor activation mediates relaxation via release of nitric oxide in clasp and sling fibers, norepinephrine acting on β-adrenoceptors in clasp fibers, and GABA acting on GABA(A) receptors in sling fibers. Agents that selectively prevent these relaxations may be useful in the treatment of GERD.

  11. The Effects of Group Relaxation Training/Large Muscle Exercise, and Parental Involvement on Attention to Task, Impulsivity, and Locus of Control among Hyperactive Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Sally S.; Omizo, Michael M.

    1984-01-01

    The study examined the effects of group relaxation training/large muscle exercise and parental involvement on attention to task, impulsivity, and locus of control among 34 hyperactive boys. Following treatment both experimental groups recorded significantly higher attention to task, lower impulsivity, and lower locus of control scores. (Author/CL)

  12. Frequency-Specific Synchronization in the Bilateral Subthalamic Nuclei Depending on Voluntary Muscle Contraction and Relaxation in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kenji; Yokochi, Fusako; Iwamuro, Hirokazu; Kawasaki, Takashi; Hamada, Kohichi; Isoo, Ayako; Kimura, Katsuo; Okiyama, Ryoichi; Taniguchi, Makoto; Ushiba, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    The volitional control of muscle contraction and relaxation is a fundamental component of human motor activity, but how the processing of the subcortical networks, including the subthalamic nucleus (STN), is involved in voluntary muscle contraction (VMC) and voluntary muscle relaxation (VMR) remains unclear. In this study, local field potentials (LFPs) of bilateral STNs were recorded in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) while performing externally paced VMC and VMR tasks of the unilateral wrist extensor muscle. The VMC- or VMR-related oscillatory activities and their functional couplings were investigated over the theta (4–7 Hz), alpha (8–13 Hz), beta (14–35 Hz), and gamma (40–100 Hz) frequency bands. Alpha and beta desynchronizations were observed in bilateral STNs at the onset of both VMC and VMR tasks. On the other hand, theta and gamma synchronizations were prominent in bilateral STNs specifically at the onset of the VMC task. In particular, just after VMC, theta functional coupling between the bilateral STNs increased, and the theta phase became coupled to the gamma amplitude within the contralateral STN in a phase-amplitude cross-frequency coupled manner. On the other hand, the prominent beta-gamma cross-frequency couplings observed in the bilateral STNs at rest were reduced by the VMC and VMR tasks. These results suggest that STNs are bilaterally involved in the different performances of muscle contraction and relaxation through the theta-gamma and beta-gamma networks between bilateral STNs in patients with PD. PMID:27064969

  13. Basic Aspects of the Pharmacodynamics of Tolperisone, A Widely Applicable Centrally Acting Muscle Relaxant

    PubMed Central

    Tekes, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Tolperisone (2-methyl-1-(4-methylphenyl)-3-piperidin-1-ylpropan-1-one hydro-chloride) was introduced in the clinical practice more than forty years ago and is still evaluated as a widely applicable compound in pathologically elevated skeletal muscle tone (spasticity) and related pains of different origin. In the present review, basic pharmacodynamic effects measured on whole animals, analyses of its actions on cell and tissue preparations and molecular mechanism of action on sodium and calcium channels are summarized as recently significantly new data were reported. PMID:25132868

  14. Basic aspects of the pharmacodynamics of tolperisone, a widely applicable centrally acting muscle relaxant.

    PubMed

    Tekes, Kornelia

    2014-01-01

    Tolperisone (2-methyl-1-(4-methylphenyl)-3-piperidin-1-ylpropan-1-one hydro-chloride) was introduced in the clinical practice more than forty years ago and is still evaluated as a widely applicable compound in pathologically elevated skeletal muscle tone (spasticity) and related pains of different origin. In the present review, basic pharmacodynamic effects measured on whole animals, analyses of its actions on cell and tissue preparations and molecular mechanism of action on sodium and calcium channels are summarized as recently significantly new data were reported.

  15. Knee muscle strength correlates with joint cartilage T2 relaxation time in young participants with risk factors for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Macías-Hernández, Salvador Israel; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Ramírez-Mora, Isabel; Cortés-González, Socorro; Morones-Alba, Juan Daniel; Olascoaga-Gómez, Andrea; Coronado-Zarco, Roberto; Soria-Bastida, María de Los Angeles; Nava-Bringas, Tania Inés; Cruz-Medina, Eva

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to correlate T2 relaxation time (T2RT), measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with quadriceps and hamstring strength in young participants with risk factors for knee osteoarthritis (OA). A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with participants between 20 and 40 years of age, without diagnosis of knee OA. Their T2 relaxation time was measured through MRI, and their muscle strength (MS) was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer. Seventy-one participants were recruited, with an average age of 28.3 ± 5.5 years; 39 (55 %) were females. Negative correlations were found between T2RT and quadriceps peak torque (QPT) in males in the femur r = -0.46 (p = 0.01), tibia r = -0.49 (p = 0.02), and patella r = -0.44 (p = 0.01). In women, correlations were found among the femur r = -0.43 (p = 0.01), tibia r = -0.61 (p = 0.01), and patella r = -0.32 (p = 0.05) and among hamstring peak torque (HPT), in the femur r = -0.46 (p = 0.01), hamstring total work (HTW) r = -0.42 (p = 0.03), and tibia r = -0.33 (p = 0.04). Linear regression models showed good capacity to predict T2RT through QPT in both genders. The present study shows that early changes in femoral, tibial, and patellar cartilage are significantly correlated with MS, mainly QPT, and that these early changes might be explained by MS, which could play an important role in pre-clinical phases of the disease.

  16. Changes in the maximum speed of shortening of frog muscle fibres early in a tetanic contraction and during relaxation.

    PubMed

    Josephson, R K; Edman, K A

    1998-03-01

    1. Isotonic shortening velocities at very light loads were examined in single fibres of the anterior tibialis muscle of the frog, Rana temporaria, using load-clamp recording and slack tests (temperature, 1-3 degrees C; initial sarcomere length, 2.25 microns). 2. Shortening velocities at very light loads (force-clamp recording) were found to be higher early in the rise of a tetanic contraction than during the plateau of the contraction. The upper limit of the load at which there was elevated shortening velocity early in the contraction was 1.5-5.4% of the maximum tetanic tension (Fo) depending on the particular fibre. 3. The maximum shortening velocity determined using the slack test method (Vo) was as much as 30% greater early in a contraction than at the tetanic plateau. Vo was elevated above the plateau level up to about 30 ms after the end of the latent period, which is equivalent to the time required for the force in an isometric contraction to rise to about 30% of Fo. Vo is depressed below the plateau value during relaxation at the cessation of stimulation. 4. Stimulation studies show that the cross-bridge model of Huxley (1957) predicts the maximum shortening velocity to be greater early in a contraction, when new actin binding sites are becoming activated and new cross-bridge connections are being formed rapidly, than during steady-state contraction. The elevated shortening velocity in the model is a consequence of new cross-bridges being formed in the pulling configuration, and there being a delay before the newly added bridges are dragged beyond their equilibrium position so they begin to retard shortening. The model also predicts that maximum shortening velocity should be depressed below the plateau level during early relaxation as cross-bridge binding sites are rapidly removed from the active population.

  17. Identification of BPIFA1/SPLUNC1 as an epithelium-derived smooth muscle relaxing factor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tongde; Huang, Julianne; Moore, Patrick J.; Little, Michael S.; Walton, William G.; Fellner, Robert C.; Alexis, Neil E.; Peter Di, Y.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Tilley, Stephen L.; Tarran, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by inflammation, mucus hypersecretion and abnormal airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. Bacterial permeability family member A1, BPIFA1, is a secreted innate defence protein. Here we show that BPIFA1 levels are reduced in sputum samples from asthmatic patients and that BPIFA1 is secreted basolaterally from healthy, but not asthmatic human bronchial epithelial cultures (HBECs), where it suppresses ASM contractility by binding to and inhibiting the Ca2+ influx channel Orai1. We have localized this effect to a specific, C-terminal α-helical region of BPIFA1. Furthermore, tracheas from Bpifa1−/− mice are hypercontractile, and this phenotype is reversed by the addition of recombinant BPIFA1. Our data suggest that BPIFA1 deficiency in asthmatic airways promotes Orai1 hyperactivity, increased ASM contraction and airway hyperresponsiveness. Strategies that target Orai1 or the BPIFA1 deficiency in asthma may lead to novel therapies to treat this disease. PMID:28165446

  18. Utility of NBD-Cl for the spectrophotometric determination of some skeletal muscle relaxant and antihistaminic drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Hanaa M.; EL-Henawee, Magda M.; Ragab, Gamal H.; El-Hay, Soad S. Abd

    2007-08-01

    A simple, accurate, precise and sensitive colorimetric method for the determination of some skeletal muscle relaxant drugs, namely orphenadrine citrate ( I), baclofen ( II), antihistaminic drugs as acrivastine ( III) and fexofenadine hydrochloride ( IV) is described. This method is based on the formation of charge transfer complex with 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl) in non-aqueous medium. The orange color products were measured at 472, 465, 475 and 469 nm for drugs I, II, III and IV, respectively. The optimization of various experimental conditions was described. Beer's Law was obeyed in the range (2.5-17.5), (5-70), (2.5-25) and (10-50) μg/ml for drugs I, II, III and IV, respectively. The molar absorptivity ( ɛ), sandell sensitivity, detection (LOD) and quantitation limits (LOQ) are calculated. The procedure was favorably applied for determination of certain pharmaceutical dosage forms containing the studied drugs. The obtained results were compared with the official and reported methods. There were no significant differences between proposed, reported and the official methods.

  19. Flexion Relaxation Ratio Not Responsive to Acutely Induced Low Back Pain from a Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Maggie E.; Bishop, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The flexion relaxation ratio (FRR) has been suggested as a measure of muscular performance in patients with low back pain (LBP). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the FRR was responsive to acute LBP produced from a delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) protocol. Methods. Fifty-one pain-free volunteers performed DOMS to induce LBP. Current pain intensity, trunk flexion range of motion (ROM), and passive straight leg raise (SLR) were measured at baseline, 24 and 48 hours after DOMS. Participants were categorized into pain groups based on reported current pain intensity. Changes in FRR, trunk flexion ROM, and SLR ROM were examined using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. Results. Pain group was not found to have a significant effect on FRR (F1,29 = 0.054, P = 0.818), nor were there any two-way interactions for changes in FRR. The pain group had decreased trunk flexion ROM compared to the minimal pain group (F1,38 = 7.21, P = 0.011), but no decreases in SLR ROM (F1,38 = 3.51, P = 0.057) over time. Interpretation. There were no differences in FRR based on reported pain intensity of LBP from a DOMS protocol. The responsiveness of FRR might be limited in patients with acute onset LBP of muscular origin. PMID:27335879

  20. Latent Period of Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Irisawa, H

    1961-10-27

    The latent period of relaxation of molluscan myocardium due to anodal current is much longer than that of contraction. Although the rate and the grade of relaxation are intimately related to both the stimulus condition and the muscle tension, the latent period of relaxation remains constant, except when the temperature of the bathing fluid is changed.

  1. Effectiveness of Home-Based Cupping Massage Compared to Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain—A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Romy; Materdey, Svitlana; Cramer, Holger; Haller, Heidemarie; Stange, Rainer; Dobos, Gustav; Rampp, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Chronic neck pain is a major public health problem with very few evidence-based complementary treatment options. This study aimed to test the efficacy of 12 weeks of a partner-delivered home-based cupping massage, compared to the same period of progressive muscle relaxation in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain. Patients were randomly assigned to self-directed cupping massage or progressive muscle relaxation. They were trained and asked to undertake the assigned treatment twice weekly for 12 weeks. Primary outcome measure was the current neck pain intensity (0–100 mm visual analog scale; VAS) after 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures included pain on motion, affective pain perception, functional disability, psychological distress, wellbeing, health-related quality of life, pressure pain thresholds and adverse events. Sixty one patients (54.1±12.7 years; 73.8%female) were randomized to cupping massage (n = 30) or progressive muscle relaxation (n = 31). After treatment, both groups showed significantly less pain compared to baseline however without significant group differences. Significant effects in favor of cupping massage were only found for wellbeing and pressure pain thresholds. In conclusion, cupping massage is no more effective than progressive muscle relaxation in reducing chronic non-specific neck pain. Both therapies can be easily used at home and can reduce pain to a minimal clinically relevant extent. Cupping massage may however be better than PMR in improving well-being and decreasing pressure pain sensitivity but more studies with larger samples and longer follow-up periods are needed to confirm these results. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01500330 PMID:23762355

  2. Nitric oxide induces muscular relaxation via cyclic GMP-dependent and -independent mechanisms in the longitudinal muscle of the mouse duodenum.

    PubMed

    Serio, Rosa; Zizzo, Maria Grazia; Mulè, Flavia

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, in mouse duodenum, the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the relaxation of longitudinal muscle evoked by nerve activation and the coupled action mechanism. Electrical field stimulation (EFS; 0.5 ms, 10-s train duration, supramaximal voltage, at various frequencies) under nonadrenergic noncholinergic conditions evoked muscular relaxation occasionally followed, at the higher stimulus frequencies, by rebound contractions. Inhibition of the synthesis of NO by N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 microM) virtually abolished the evoked relaxation. The relaxation was reduced also by apamin (0.1 microM) and by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 1 microM), a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor. The coadministration of apamin and ODQ produced additive effects on the responses to EFS. Sodium nitroprusside (0.1-100 microM) produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the phasic spontaneous activity and at the highest dose used suppressed phasic activity and induced muscular relaxation. These effects were tetrodotoxin and L-NAME resistant and were antagonized both by apamin and by ODQ. 8-Bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (0.1-100 microM) reduced in a concentration-dependent manner the spontaneous mechanical activity and at 100 microM suppressed the phasic activity and induced muscular relaxation, not antagonized by apamin. This study indicates that NO is the primary transmitter released by inhibitory nerves supplying the longitudinal muscle of mouse duodenum and that guanylate cyclase stimulation and opening of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels are independent mechanisms working in parallel to mediate NO action.

  3. Endothelium-dependent relaxation and hyperpolarization of canine coronary artery smooth muscles in relation to the electrogenic Na-K pump.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, G.; Hashitani, H.; Suzuki, H.

    1989-01-01

    1 In the smooth muscle cells of canine coronary artery, acetylcholine (ACh) produced a transient, endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization of the membrane. A similar hyperpolarization was also elicited by exposure to Krebs solution after incubation of the artery in K-free solution for 30 min. 2 A hyperpolarization of reproducible amplitude was generated when ACh was applied at intervals greater than 30 min. Repetitive application of ACh at 15 min intervals caused a successive reduction in the amplitude of hyperpolarization. 3 The reduction in the amplitude of relaxation during five successive applications of ACh at 15 min intervals was less than 10% of the first relaxation. 4 The ACh-induced hyperpolarization was blocked by atropine but not by ouabain, whereas the K-free induced hyperpolarization was blocked by ouabain. In low Na (Li-substituted) solution, ACh still induced a hyperpolarization but the K-free induced hyperpolarization was absent. 5 In coronary artery precontracted by high-K solution, ACh produced an endothelium-dependent relaxation, without membrane hyperpolarization. The associated relaxation was resistant to ouabain but sensitive to atropine. 6 It is concluded that in the canine coronary artery, the electrogenic Na-K pump does not contribute to the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarization or relaxation. The results are consistent with the release of two different inhibitory factors from the vascular endothelium. PMID:2590775

  4. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors fail to cause relaxation, but couple via Gi/Go to the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in carotid artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Michael; Challiss, R A John; Standen, Nicholas B; Boyle, John P

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize which cannabinoid receptors, if any, are present on rat carotid artery smooth muscle. Additionally, the effects of cannabinoids on carotid artery tone, on cyclic AMP accumulation and on forskolin-induced relaxation were examined in the same tissue.Stimulation of carotid arteries with forskolin (10 μM) significantly increased cyclic AMP accumulation, an effect that was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the cannabinoid receptor agonist, methanandamide.Similar inhibition was seen with the CB1 agonist HU-210 but this inhibition was not mimicked by the CB2 agonist, WIN 55,2212-2.The inhibitory effect of methanandamide on cyclic AMP accumulation was prevented by incubation of the arteries with pertussis toxin and was significantly reduced by LY320135, a selective CB1 antagonist, but not by SR 144528, a CB2-selective antagonist.Methanandamide failed to relax carotid arteries pre-contracted with phenylephrine, but inhibited forskolin-induced relaxation of these arteries. This functional inhibition of relaxation by methanandamide was inhibited by CB1-selective (LY320135 and SR 141716A), but not a CB2-selective antagonist (SR 144528).These data demonstrate the presence of functional G protein-linked cannabinoid receptors of the CB1 subtype in the rat carotid artery, but show that these receptors inhibit cyclic AMP accumulation rather than cause relaxation. PMID:10516638

  5. Evidence for the primary role for 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(v) channels in beta(3)-adrenoceptor-mediated, cyclic AMP-independent relaxations of guinea-pig gastrointestinal smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Takahiro; Tanaka, Yoshio; Koike, Katsuo

    2003-02-01

    Gastrointestinal smooth muscles exhibit relaxation in response to the stimulation of beta-adrenoceptors with catecholamines. Subtypes of beta-adrenoceptors which mediate catecholamine-elicited relaxations in gastrointestinal smooth muscles are predominantly atypical beta-adrenoceptors including beta(3)-adrenoceptors. Gastrointestinal smooth muscle relaxations mediated via beta(3)-adrenoceptors can occur independently of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) elevation. One of the mechanisms responsible for cyclic AMP-independent smooth muscle relaxation following activation of G(s) protein-coupled receptors could be activation of voltage-gated K(+) channels. In the present study, possible contribution of two types of K(+) (large-conductance, Ca(2+)-sensitive and voltage-gated K(+), BK(Ca); voltage-gated, K(v)) channels to beta(3)-adrenoceptor-mediated, cyclic AMP-independent relaxations was compared in gastric fundus and duodenum smooth muscles isolated from the guinea-pig. In these gastrointestinal smooth muscles, three catecholamines ((-)-isoprenaline, (-)-noradrenaline and (-)-adrenaline) and two beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonists ((R(*), R(*))-(+/-)-4-[2-[(2-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl)amino]propyl]phenoxyacetic acid sodium (BRL37344) and (+/-)-[4-[3-[(1,1-dimethylethyl)amino]-2-hydroxypropoxy] -1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one] hydrochloride ((+/-)-CGP12177A)) elicited a concentration-dependent relaxation in the presence of beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptor antagonists. The relaxations were unaffected by an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, SQ-22536 (100 microM), which indicates their characteristic of cyclic AMP-independency. On the other hand, the SQ-22536-resistant, beta(3)-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxant components were potently attenuated when the tone was raised using high-KCl (80 mM) or in the presence of a K(v) channel blocker, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 1-3 mM). Iberiotoxin (100 nM), a selective blocker of BK(Ca) channels which significantly

  6. Effects of epithelium removal on relaxation of airway smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, S. G.; Togo, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. We have studied the effect of epithelium removal on relaxation of guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or stimulation of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) inhibitory nerves. Also examined were the effects of inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). 2. Epithelium removal produced a 3.6 +/- 0.4 fold leftward shift in the VIP concentration-response curve. The supersensitivity to VIP, following epithelium removal was abolished by phosphoramidon or thiorphan (NEP inhibitors), but unaffected by captopril (an ACE inhibitor). In intact trachea, the NEP inhibitors produced leftward shifts in the VIP curves similar to those produced by epithelium removal. 3. In contrast to responses to exogenous VIP, neurogenic NANC inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation were affected neither by epithelial denudation nor by the peptidase inhibitors. 4. As in previous studies, epithelium removal increased tracheal sensitivity to isoprenaline. This was not altered by pretreatment with a cocktail of peptidase inhibitors. Thus, the effect of the NEP inhibitors on responses to VIP appears to be relatively specific. 5. These data indicate that exogenous VIP is a substrate for airway NEP, since inhibition of the enzyme potentiates the peptide. This is further evidence that the airway epithelium provides a source for the metabolism of mediators. 6. In guinea-pig trachea the NEP responsible for cleaving VIP may be located largely in the epithelial layer, since NEP inhibition was without effect on sensitivity to VIP in epithelium-denuded preparations. If VIP is a NANC inhibitory neurotransmitter in this tissue its degradation endogenously does not appear to involve epithelial NEP. PMID:2196967

  7. Relaxant effects of NKH477, a new water-soluble forskolin derivative, on guinea-pig tracheal smooth muscle: the role of Ca2+-activated K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Satake, K; Takagi, K; Kodama, I; Honjo, H; Toyama, J; Shibata, S

    1998-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the bronchorelaxant action of NKH477, a newly developed water-soluble forskolin derivative, were investigated in guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle. In muscles precontracted with 3 μM histamine, NKH477 (1 nM–1 μM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease of isometric tension, resulting in a complete relaxation at 300 nM. The EC50 for the relaxation was 32.6±4.3 nM (n=6). In the presence of 30 or 90 nM iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective blocker of the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channel, the relaxing action of NKH477 on the histamine-induced contraction was inhibited, giving rise to a parallel shift of the concentration-response curves; the EC50 of NKH477 was increased to 131.4±20.4 nM at 30 nM IbTX (n=4), and 125.3±12.2 nM at 90 nM IbTX (n=4). Pretreatment of muscles with 30 mM tetraethylammonium (TEA) caused a similar rightward shift of the concentration-response curve to NKH477 with an increase of the EC50 to 139.8±18.4 nM (n=5). In contrast, the relaxing action of NKH477 was unaffected by 10 μM glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker, or by 100 nM apamin, a blocker of small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels. In muscles pretreated with 1 μM nifedipine, a blocker of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDC), 30–90 nM IbTX did not affect the relaxant effects of NKH477 on the histamine-induced contraction. In muscles precontracted by a K+-rich (40 mM) solution, NKH477 caused only minimal relaxation (19.8±1.7%, n=4) even at the highest concentration (1 μM). In experiments to measure the ratio of fura-2 fluorescence signals (R340/380) as an index of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), the application of 100 nM NKH477 or 200 nM isoprenaline to the preparation precontracted by 3 μM histamine resulted in a decrease in [Ca2+]i in association with a decrease in tension. The reduction of [Ca2+]i and tension by NKH477 was 47.0±5.6% and 62.8±7

  8. How to Make the Ghosts in my Bedroom Disappear? Focused-Attention Meditation Combined with Muscle Relaxation (MR Therapy)—A Direct Treatment Intervention for Sleep Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Jalal, Baland

    2016-01-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a common state of involuntary immobility occurring at sleep onset or offset. It can include terrifying hypnogogic or hypnopompic hallucinations of menacing bedroom intruders. Unsurprisingly, the experience is associated with great fear and horror worldwide. To date, there exist no direct treatment intervention for SP. In this article, I propose for the first time a type of focused inward-attention meditation combined with muscle relaxation as a direct intervention to be applied during the attack, to ameliorate and possibly eliminate it (what could be called, meditation-relaxation or MR therapy for SP). The intervention includes four steps: (1) reappraisal of the meaning of the attack; (2) psychological and emotional distancing; (3) inward focused-attention meditation; (4) muscle relaxation. The intervention promotes attentional shift away from unpleasant external and internal stimuli (i.e., terrifying hallucinations and bodily paralysis sensations) unto an emotionally pleasant internal object (e.g., a positive memory). It may facilitate a relaxed meditative state characterized by a shift from sympathetic to parasympathetic dominance, associated with greater levels of alpha activity (which may lead to drowsiness and potentially sleep). The procedure may also reduce the initial panic and arousal that occur when realizing one is paralyzed. In addition, I present a novel Panic-Hallucination (PH) Model of Sleep Paralysis; describing how through escalating cycles of fear and panic-like autonomic arousal, a positive feedback loop is created that worsens the attack (e.g., leading to longer and more fearful episodes), drives content of hallucinations, and causes future episodes of SP. Case examples are presented to illustrate the feasibility of MR therapy for SP. PMID:26858675

  9. How to Make the Ghosts in my Bedroom Disappear? Focused-Attention Meditation Combined with Muscle Relaxation (MR Therapy)-A Direct Treatment Intervention for Sleep Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Baland

    2016-01-01

    Sleep paralysis (SP) is a common state of involuntary immobility occurring at sleep onset or offset. It can include terrifying hypnogogic or hypnopompic hallucinations of menacing bedroom intruders. Unsurprisingly, the experience is associated with great fear and horror worldwide. To date, there exist no direct treatment intervention for SP. In this article, I propose for the first time a type of focused inward-attention meditation combined with muscle relaxation as a direct intervention to be applied during the attack, to ameliorate and possibly eliminate it (what could be called, meditation-relaxation or MR therapy for SP). The intervention includes four steps: (1) reappraisal of the meaning of the attack; (2) psychological and emotional distancing; (3) inward focused-attention meditation; (4) muscle relaxation. The intervention promotes attentional shift away from unpleasant external and internal stimuli (i.e., terrifying hallucinations and bodily paralysis sensations) unto an emotionally pleasant internal object (e.g., a positive memory). It may facilitate a relaxed meditative state characterized by a shift from sympathetic to parasympathetic dominance, associated with greater levels of alpha activity (which may lead to drowsiness and potentially sleep). The procedure may also reduce the initial panic and arousal that occur when realizing one is paralyzed. In addition, I present a novel Panic-Hallucination (PH) Model of Sleep Paralysis; describing how through escalating cycles of fear and panic-like autonomic arousal, a positive feedback loop is created that worsens the attack (e.g., leading to longer and more fearful episodes), drives content of hallucinations, and causes future episodes of SP. Case examples are presented to illustrate the feasibility of MR therapy for SP.

  10. Additional in-series compliance reduces muscle force summation and alters the time course of force relaxation during fixed-end contractions.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Dean L; Launikonis, Bradley S; Cresswell, Andrew G; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-11-15

    There are high mechanical demands placed on skeletal muscles in movements requiring rapid acceleration of the body or its limbs. Tendons are responsible for transmitting muscle forces, but, because of their elasticity, can manipulate the mechanics of the internal contractile apparatus. Shortening of the contractile apparatus against the stretch of tendon affects force generation according to known mechanical properties; however, the extent to which differences in tendon compliance alter force development in response to a burst of electrical impulses is unclear. To establish the influence of series compliance on force summation, we studied electrically evoked doublet contractions in the cane toad peroneus muscle in the presence and absence of a compliant artificial tendon. Additional series compliance reduced tetanic force by two-thirds, a finding predicted based on the force-length property of skeletal muscle. Doublet force and force-time integral expressed relative to the twitch were also reduced by additional series compliance. Active shortening over a larger range of the ascending limb of the force-length curve and at a higher velocity, leading to a progressive reduction in force-generating potential, could be responsible. Muscle-tendon interaction may also explain the accelerated time course of force relaxation in the presence of additional compliance. Our findings suggest that a compliant tendon limits force summation under constant-length conditions. However, high series compliance can be mechanically advantageous when a muscle-tendon unit is actively stretched, permitting muscle fibres to generate force almost isometrically, as shown during stretch-shorten cycles in locomotor activities. Restricting active shortening would likely favour rapid force development.

  11. Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain eliminates force-dependent changes in relaxation rates in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, J R; Diffee, G M; Huang, X P; Moss, R L

    1998-01-01

    The rate of relaxation from steady-state force in rabbit psoas fiber bundles was examined before and after phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC). Relaxation was initiated using diazo-2, a photolabile Ca2+ chelator that has low Ca2+ binding affinity (K(Ca) = 4.5 x 10(5) M(-1)) before photolysis and high affinity (K(Ca) = 1.3 x 10(7) M(-1)) after photolysis. Before phosphorylating RLC, the half-times for relaxation initiated from 0.27 +/- 0.02, 0.51 +/- 0.03, and 0.61 +/- 0.03 Po were 90 +/- 6, 140 +/- 6, and 182 +/- 9 ms, respectively. After phosphorylation of RLC, the half-times for relaxation from 0.36 +/- 0.03 Po, 0.59 +/- 0.03 Po, and 0.65 +/- 0.02 Po were 197 +/- 35 ms, 184 +/- 35 ms, and 179 +/- 22 ms. This slowing of relaxation rates from steady-state forces less than 0.50 Po was also observed when bundles of fibers were bathed with N-ethylmaleimide-modified myosin S-1, a strongly binding cross-bridge derivative of S1. These results suggest that phosphorylation of RLC slows relaxation, most likely by slowing the apparent rate of transition of cross-bridges from strongly bound (force-generating) to weakly bound (non-force-generating) states, and reduces or eliminates Ca2+ and cross-bridge activation-dependent changes in relaxation rates. PMID:9449336

  12. Comparison of the Short-Term Outcomes after Postisometric Muscle Relaxation or Kinesio Taping Application for Normalization of the Upper Trapezius Muscle Tone and the Pain Relief: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ptaszkowski, Kuba; Slupska, Lucyna; Paprocka-Borowicz, Małgorzata; Kołcz-Trzęsicka, Anna; Zwierzchowski, Kamil; Halska, Urszula; Przestrzelska, Monika; Mucha, Dariusz; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the resting bioelectrical activity of the upper trapezius muscle (the UT muscle) before and after one of the two interventions: postisometric muscle relaxation (PIR) and Kinesio Taping (KT). Moreover a comparison between group results was conducted. From the initial 61 volunteers, 52 were selected after exclusion criteria and were allocated randomly to 2 groups: PIR group and KT group. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and completion of the intervention. The primary outcome measure was change in bioelectrical activity of UT muscle evaluated by surface electromyography (sEMG). Secondary outcomes included subjective assessment of pain using visual analogue scale (VAS). Significant differences were found only in KT group: the average resting bioelectrical activity decreased by 0.8 μV (p = 0.0237) and the average VAS result reduced by 2.0 points (p = 0.0001). Greater decrease of VAS results was recorded in KT group compared to PIR group (p = 0.0010). Both PIR and KT intervention did not influence significantly the resting bioelectrical activity of UT muscle. KT application was better for pain relief in the studied sample compared with PIR intervention. PMID:26347792

  13. The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the intrathecal noradrenaline-induced facilitation of the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakitama, K

    1993-11-01

    The effects of centrally acting muscle relaxants on the flexor reflex mediated by group II afferent fibers (group II flexor reflex) in anesthetized intact rats and on the intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex in anesthetized spinal rats were investigated. In anesthetized intact rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen inhibited the group II flexor reflex dose-dependently, whereas the inhibitory effect of tizanidine-HCl was bell-shaped. The effect of diazepam tended to be saturated. In anesthetized spinal rats, mephenesin, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl, diazepam and baclofen also depressed the group II flexor reflex, but tizanidine-HCl slightly increased it. The intrathecal noradrenaline-HCl-induced facilitation of the group II flexor reflex was not affected by mephenesin or diazepam, but was inhibited by tizanidine-HCl, tolperisone-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen. These results suggest that compounds with centrally acting muscle relaxant activity depress the group II flexor reflex in different manners, and the inhibition of descending noradrenergic tonic facilitation within the spinal cord participates in the depressant action of the group II flexor reflex produced by tolperisone-HCl, tizanidine-HCl, chlorpromazine-HCl and baclofen.

  14. Molecular mechanism of telokin-mediated disinhibition of myosin light chain phosphatase and cAMP/cGMP-induced relaxation of gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Khromov, Alexander S; Momotani, Ko; Jin, Li; Artamonov, Mykhaylo V; Shannon, John; Eto, Masumi; Somlyo, Avril V

    2012-06-15

    Phospho-telokin is a target of elevated cyclic nucleotide concentrations that lead to relaxation of gastrointestinal and some vascular smooth muscles (SM). Here, we demonstrate that in telokin-null SM, both Ca(2+)-activated contraction and Ca(2+) sensitization of force induced by a GST-MYPT1(654-880) fragment inhibiting myosin light chain phosphatase were antagonized by the addition of recombinant S13D telokin, without changing the inhibitory phosphorylation status of endogenous MYPT1 (the regulatory subunit of myosin light chain phosphatase) at Thr-696/Thr-853 or activity of Rho kinase. Cyclic nucleotide-induced relaxation of force in telokin-null ileum muscle was reduced but not correlated with a change in MYPT1 phosphorylation. The 40% inhibited activity of phosphorylated MYPT1 in telokin-null ileum homogenates was restored to nonphosphorylated MYPT1 levels by addition of S13D telokin. Using the GST-MYPT1 fragment as a ligand and SM homogenates from WT and telokin KO mice as a source of endogenous proteins, we found that only in the presence of endogenous telokin, thiophospho-GST-MYPT1 co-precipitated with phospho-20-kDa myosin regulatory light chain 20 and PP1. Surface plasmon resonance studies showed that S13D telokin bound to full-length phospho-MYPT1. Results of a protein ligation assay also supported interaction of endogenous phosphorylated MYPT1 with telokin in SM cells. We conclude that the mechanism of action of phospho-telokin is not through modulation of the MYPT1 phosphorylation status but rather it contributes to cyclic nucleotide-induced relaxation of SM by interacting with and activating the inhibited full-length phospho-MYPT1/PP1 through facilitating its binding to phosphomyosin and thus accelerating 20-kDa myosin regulatory light chain dephosphorylation.

  15. Spectrophotometric determination of benzydamine HCl, levamisole HCl and mebeverine HCl through ion-pair complex formation with methyl orange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Didamony, Akram M.

    2008-03-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive spectrophotometric method has been proposed for the assay of benzydamine HCl (BENZ), levamisole HCl (LEV) and mebeverine HCl (MBV) in bulk and pharmaceutical formulations. The method based on the reaction of the selected drugs with methyl orange (MO) in buffered aqueous solution at pH 3.6. The formed yellow ion-pair complexes were extracted with dichloromethane and measured quantitatively with maximum absorption at 422 nm. The analytical parameters and their effects on the reported systems are investigated. The extracts are intensely colored and very stable at room temperature. The calibration graphs were linear over the concentration range of 2-10 μg ml -1 for BENZ, 6-24 μg ml -1 for LEV and 4-14 μg ml -1 for MBV. The stoichiometry of the reaction was found to be 1:1 in all cases and the conditional stability constant ( Kf) of the complexes have been calculated. The proposed method was successfully extended to pharmaceutical preparations-tablets. Excipients used as additive in commercial formulations did not interfere in the analysis. The proposed method can be recommended for quality control and routine analysis where time, cost effectiveness and high specificity of analytical technique are of great importance.

  16. Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of progressive resistance training compared to progressive muscle relaxation in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy: the BEST study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is one of the most common and distressing side effects of cancer and its treatment. During and after radiotherapy breast cancer patients often suffer from CRF which frequently impairs quality of life (QoL). Despite the high prevalence of CRF in breast cancer patients and the severe impact on the physical and emotional well-being, effective treatment methods are scarce. Physical activity for breast cancer patients has been reported to decrease fatigue, to improve emotional well-being and to increase physical strength. The pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms of CRF and the molecular-biologic changes induced by exercise, however, are poorly understood. In the BEST trial we aim to assess the effects of resistance training on fatigue, QoL and physical fitness as well as on molecular, immunological and inflammatory changes in breast cancer patients during adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods/design The BEST study is a prospective randomized, controlled intervention trial investigating the effects of a 12-week supervised progressive resistance training compared to a 12-week supervised muscle relaxation training in 160 patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant radiotherapy. To determine the effect of exercise itself beyond potential psychosocial group effects, patients in the control group perform a group-based progressive muscle relaxation training. Main inclusion criterion is histologically confirmed breast cancer stage I-III after lumpectomy or mastectomy with indication for adjuvant radiotherapy. Main exclusion criteria are acute infectious diseases, severe neurological, musculosceletal or cardiorespiratory disorders. The primary endpoint is cancer-related fatigue; secondary endpoints include immunological and inflammatory parameters analyzed in peripheral blood, saliva and urine. In addition, QoL, depression, physical performance and cognitive capacity will be assessed. Discussion The BEST study is the first randomized

  17. Using General Anesthesia plus Muscle Relaxant in a Patient with Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type IV: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiu-Fen; Wang, Dong-Xin; Ma, Daqing

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a rare genetic disease characterized by degeneration of spinal cord motor neurons, which results in hypotonia and muscle weakness. Patients with type IV SMA often have onset of weakness from adulthood. Anesthetic management is often difficult in these patients as a result of muscle weakness and hypersensitivity to neuromuscular blocking agents as shown by (Lunn and Wang; 2008, Simic; 2008, and Cifuentes-Diaz et al.; 2002). Herein we report a case of anesthetic management of a patient with SMA type IV for mammectomy and review some other cases of SMA patients receiving different kinds of anesthesia. PMID:22606392

  18. Trypsin induces biphasic muscle contraction and relaxation via transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and neurokinin receptors 1/2 in porcine esophageal body.

    PubMed

    Xiaopeng, Bai; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Ihara, Eikichi; Hirano, Katsuya; Nakano, Kayoko; Hirano, Mayumi; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2017-02-15

    Duodenal reflux of fluids containing trypsin relates to refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Esophageal peristalsis and clearance are important factors in GERD pathogenesis. However, the function of trypsin in esophageal body contractility is not fully understood. In this study, effects of trypsin on circular smooth muscle (CSM) and longitudinal smooth muscle (LSM) of the porcine esophageal body were examined. Trypsin elicited a concentration dependent biphasic response, a major contraction and a subsequent relaxation only in CSM. In CSM, contraction occurred at trypsin concentrations of 100nM and relaxation at 1μM. A proteinase-activated receptor (PAR)2 activating peptide, SLIGKV-NH2 (1mM), induced a monophasic contraction. Those responses were unaffected by tetrodotoxin though abolished by the gap junction uncouplers carbenoxolone and octanol. They were also partially inhibited by a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist and abolished by combination of neurokinin receptor 1 (NK1) and NK2 antagonists, but not by an NK3 antagonist, suggesting a PAR2-TRPV1-substance P pathway in sensory neurons. Substance P (100nM), an agonist for various NK receptors (NK1, NK2 and NK3) with differing affinities, induced significant contraction in CSM, but not in LSM. The contraction was also blocked by the combination of NK1 and NK2 antagonists, but not by the NK3 antagonist. Moreover, substance P-induced contractions were unaffected by the TRPV1 antagonist, but inhibited by a gap junction uncoupler. In conclusion, trypsin induced a biphasic response only in CSM and this was mediated by PAR2, TRPV1 and NK1/2. Gap junctions were indispensable in this tachykinin-induced response.

  19. Auricular Acupuncture Versus Progressive Muscle Relaxation in Patients with Anxiety Disorders or Major Depressive Disorder: A Prospective Parallel Group Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    de Lorent, Lukas; Agorastos, Agorastos; Yassouridis, Alexander; Kellner, Michael; Muhtz, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    Although acupuncture treatment is increasingly in demand among psychiatric patients, to date no studies have investigated the effectiveness of auricular acupuncture (AA) in treating anxiety disorders or major depressive disorder. Thus, this study aimed to compare the effectiveness of AA versus progressive muscle relaxation (PMR), a standardized and accepted relaxation method. We examined 162 patients with a primary diagnosis of anxiety disorder or major depressive disorder, and each patient chose between treatment with AA, executed according to the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association protocol, and treatment with PMR. Each group had treatments twice a week for 4 weeks. Before and after treatment, each participant rated four items on a visual analog scale: anxiety, tension, anger/aggression, and mood. Statistical analyses were performed with the original visual analog scale scores and the Change-Intensity Index, an appropriate indicator of the difference between two values of a variable. Our results show that treatment with AA significantly decreased tension, anxiety, and anger/aggression throughout the 4 weeks, but did not elevate mood. Between AA and PMR, no statistically significant differences were found at any time. Thus, we suggest that both AA and PMR may be useful, equally-effective additional interventions in the treatment of the above-mentioned disorders.

  20. Vascular Protective Effect of an Ethanol Extract of Camellia japonica Fruit: Endothelium-Dependent Relaxation of Coronary Artery and Reduction of Smooth Muscle Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Park, Sin-Hee; Shim, Bong-Sup; Yoon, Jun-Seong; Lee, Hyun-Ho; Lee, Hye-Won; Yoo, Seok-Bong; Wi, An-Jin; Park, Whoa-Shig; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Dong-Wok; Oak, Min-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Camellia japonica is a popular garden plant in Asia and widely used as cosmetic sources and traditional medicine. However, the possibility that C. japonica affects cardiovascular system remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate vascular effects of an extract of C. japonica. Vascular reactivity was assessed in organ baths using porcine coronary arteries and inhibition of proliferation and migration were assessed using human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). All four different parts, leaf, stem, flower, and fruits, caused concentration-dependent relaxations and C. japonica fruit (CJF) extract showed the strongest vasorelaxation and its effect was endothelium dependent. Relaxations to CJF were markedly reduced by inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibitor of PI3-kinase, but not affected by inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated response. CJF induced activated a time- and concentration-dependent phosphorylation of eNOS in endothelial cells. Altogether, these studies have demonstrated that CJF is a potent endothelium-dependent vasodilator and this effect was involved in, at least in part, PI3K-eNOS-NO pathway. Moreover, CJF attenuated TNF-α induced proliferation and PDGF-BB induced migration of VSMCs. The present findings indicate that CJF could be a valuable candidate of herbal medicine for cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

  1. Chronic administration of imipramine but not agomelatine and moclobemide affects the nitrergic relaxation of rabbit corpus cavernosum smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gocmez, Semil Selcen; Utkan, Tijen; Gacar, Nejat

    2013-08-15

    Sexual dysfunction is a common and underestimated effect of antidepressants. However, the mechanism by which these drugs cause erectile dysfunction is unclear. We investigated the reactivity of the corpus cavernosum of rabbits that were treated with either chronic imipramine, which is a tricyclic agent; agomelatine, which is a melatonergic agonist and serotonin 5HT(2c) antagonist; or moclobemide, which is a reversible inhibitor of monoamine-oxidase A. Twenty rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: the control group (n=5), the imipramine-treated group (n=5), which received i.p. injections of 10 mg/kg/day of imipramine, the moclobemide-treated group (n=5), which received i.p. injections of 20 mg/kg/day of moclobemide, and the agomelatine-treated group (n=5), which was orally administered 10 mg/kg/day of agomelatine. The reactivities of corpus cavernosum tissue obtained from the antidepressant-treated and the control groups were studied in organ chambers after the animals were subjected to 21 days of drug administration. The acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent and the electrical field stimulation (EFS)-induced neurogenic relaxation of the corpus cavernosum of the imipramine-treated group was significantly decreased compared with the control group. However, neither the acetylcholine- nor EFS-induced relaxation was changed in the moclobemide- or agomelatine-treated groups. There were no change in the relaxant response to the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside and contractile response to KCl between the groups. This study suggests that chronic imipramine treatment but not agomelatine and moclobemide treatments causes significant functional changes in the penile erectile tissue of rabbits and that these changes may contribute to the development of impotence.

  2. Support vector regression and artificial neural network models for stability indicating analysis of mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride mixtures in pharmaceutical preparation: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naguib, Ibrahim A.; Darwish, Hany W.

    2012-02-01

    A comparison between support vector regression (SVR) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) multivariate regression methods is established showing the underlying algorithm for each and making a comparison between them to indicate the inherent advantages and limitations. In this paper we compare SVR to ANN with and without variable selection procedure (genetic algorithm (GA)). To project the comparison in a sensible way, the methods are used for the stability indicating quantitative analysis of mixtures of mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride in binary mixtures as a case study in presence of their reported impurities and degradation products (summing up to 6 components) in raw materials and pharmaceutical dosage form via handling the UV spectral data. For proper analysis, a 6 factor 5 level experimental design was established resulting in a training set of 25 mixtures containing different ratios of the interfering species. An independent test set consisting of 5 mixtures was used to validate the prediction ability of the suggested models. The proposed methods (linear SVR (without GA) and linear GA-ANN) were successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical tablets containing mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride mixtures. The results manifest the problem of nonlinearity and how models like the SVR and ANN can handle it. The methods indicate the ability of the mentioned multivariate calibration models to deconvolute the highly overlapped UV spectra of the 6 components' mixtures, yet using cheap and easy to handle instruments like the UV spectrophotometer.

  3. Simultaneous determination of sulpiride and mebeverine by HPLC method using fluorescence detection: application to real human plasma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A new simple, rapid and sensitive reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of sulpiride (SUL) and mebeverine Hydrochloride (MEB) in the presence of their impurities and degradation products. The separation of these compounds was achieved within 6 min on a 250 mm, 4.6 mm i.d., 5 m particle size Waters®-C18 column using isocractic mobile phase containing a mixture of acetonitrile and 0.01 M dihydrogenphosphate buffer (45:55) at pH = 4.0. The analysis was performed at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min with fluorescence-detection at excitation 300 nm and emission at 365 nm. The concentration-response relationship was linear over a concentration range of 10- 100 ng/mL for both MEB and SUL with a limit of detection 0.73 ng/mL and 0.85 ng/mL for MEB and SUL respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of both MEB and SUL in bulk with average recoveries of 100.22 ± 0.757% and 99.96 ± 0.625% respectively, and in commercial tablets with average recoveries of 100.04 ± 0.93% and 100.03 ± 0.376% for MEB and SUL respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of MEB metabolite (veratic acid) in real plasma simultaneously with SUL. The mean% recoveries (n = 3) for both MEB metabolite (veratic acid) and SUL were 100.36 ± 2.92 and 99.06 ± 2.11 for spiked human plasma respectively. For real human plasma, the mean% recoveries (n = 3) were and respectively. PMID:22333299

  4. Relaxant effect of ethanol extract of Carum carvi on dispersed intestinal smooth muscle cells of the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Al-Essa, Mohammed K; Shafagoj, Yanal A; Mohammed, Faysal I; Afifi, Fatma U

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates the direct effects of Carum carvi L. (Apiaceae) ethanol extract on dispersed intestinal smooth muscle cells (SMC) of guinea pigs. Effects of the plant extract on SMC and of acetylcholine (Ach) on extract pretreated SMC were measured by micrometric scanning technique. Three different extract concentrations (2.5 mg/mL, 250 mug/mL, and 25 mug/mL) were used. Ethanol extract of C. carvi reduced significantly the response of dispersed SMC to Ach. Pretreatment of SMC with the highest concentration of C. carvi ethanol extract (2.5 mg/mL) has significantly inhibited the response of SMC to Ach. The data obtained indicate a dose-dependent inhibition of the contraction induced by Ach. This response may explain, in part, the beneficial effect of caraway in relieving gastrointestinal symptoms associated with dyspepsia.

  5. The effect of improvisation-assisted desensitization, and music-assisted progressive muscle relaxation and imagery on reducing pianists' music performance anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngshin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two music therapy approaches, improvisation-assisted desensitization, and music-assisted progressive muscle relaxation and imagery on ameliorating the symptoms of music performance anxiety (MPA) among student pianists. Thirty female college pianists (N = 30) were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: (a) improvised music-assisted desensitization group (n = 15), or (b) music-assisted progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and imagery group (n = 15). All participants received 6 weekly music therapy sessions according to their assigned group. Two lab performances were provided; one before and one after the 6 music therapy sessions, as the performance stimuli for MPA. All participants completed pretest and posttest measures that included four types of visual analogue scales (MPA, stress, tension, and comfort), the state portion of Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Music Performance Anxiety Questionnaire (MPAQ) developed by Lehrer, Goldman, and Strommen (1990). Participants' finger temperatures were also measured. When results of the music-assisted PMR and imagery condition were compared from pretest to posttest, statistically significant differences occurred in 6 out of the 7 measures-MPA, tension, comfort, STAI, MPAQ, and finger temperature, indicating that the music-assisted PMR and imagery treatment was very successful in reducing MPA. For the improvisation-assisted desensitization condition, the statistically significant decreases in tension and STAI, with increases in finger temperature indicated that this approach was effective in managing MPA to some extent. When the difference scores for the two approaches were compared, there was no statistically significant difference between the two approaches for any of the seven measures. Therefore, no one treatment condition appeared more effective than the other. Although statistically significant differences were not found between

  6. Evidence that additional mechanisms to cyclic GMP mediate the decrease in intracellular calcium and relaxation of rabbit aortic smooth muscle to nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Robert M; Griswold, Mark C; Yaghoubi, Mohammad; Komalavilas, Padmini; Lincoln, Thomas M; Cohen, Richard A

    1998-01-01

    The role of cyclic GMP in the ability of nitric oxide (NO) to decrease intracellular free calcium concentration [Ca2+]i and divalent cation influx was studied in rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells in primary culture. In cells stimulated with angiotensin II (AII, 10−7 M), NO (10−10–10−6 M) increased cyclic GMP levels measured by radioimmunoassay and decreased [Ca2+]i and cation influx as indicated by fura-2 fluorimetry.Zaprinast (10−4 M), increased NO-stimulated levels of cyclic GMP by 3–20 fold. Although the phosphodiesterase inhibitor lowered the level of [Ca2+]i reached after administration of NO, the initial decreases in [Ca2+]i initiated by NO were not significantly different in magnitude or duration from those that occurred in the absence of zaprinast.The guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, H-(1,2,4) oxadiazolo(4,3-a) quinoxallin-1-one (ODQ, 10−5 M), blocked cyclic GMP accumulation and activation of protein kinase G, as measured by back phosphorylation of the inositol trisphosphate receptor. ODQ and Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS, a protein kinase G inhibitor, decreased the effects of NO, 10−10–10−8 M, but the decrease in [Ca2+]i or cation influx caused by higher concentrations of NO (10−7–10−6 M) were unaffected. Relaxation of intact rabbit aorta rings to NO (10−7–10−5 M) also persisted in the presence of ODQ without a significant increase in cyclic GMP. Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS blocked the decreases in cation influx caused by a cell permeable cyclic GMP analog, but ODQ and/or the protein kinase G inhibitor had no significant effect on the decrease caused by NO.Although inhibitors of cyclic GMP, protein kinase G and phosphodiesterase can be shown to affect the decrease in [Ca2+]i and cation influx via protein kinase G, these studies indicate that when these mechanisms are blocked, cyclic GMP-independent mechanisms also contribute significantly to the decrease in [Ca2+]i and smooth muscle relaxation to NO. PMID:9886761

  7. Relaxation-compensated CEST-MRI at 7 T for mapping of creatine content and pH--preliminary application in human muscle tissue in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rerich, Eugenia; Zaiss, Moritz; Korzowski, Andreas; Ladd, Mark E; Bachert, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The small biomolecule creatine is involved in energy metabolism. Mapping of the total creatine (mostly PCr and Cr) in vivo has been done with chemical shift imaging. Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) allows an alternative detection of creatine via water MRI. Living tissue exhibits CEST effects from different small metabolites, including creatine, with four exchanging protons of its guanidinium group resonating about 2 ppm from the water peak and hence contributing to the amine proton CEST peak. The intermediate exchange rate (≈ 1000 Hz) of the guanidinium protons requires high RF saturation amplitude B1. However, strong B1 fields also label semi-solid magnetization transfer (MT) effects originating from immobile protons with broad linewidths (~kHz) in the tissue. Recently, it was shown that endogenous CEST contrasts are strongly affected by the MT background as well as by T1 relaxation of the water protons. We show that this influence can be corrected in the acquired CEST data by an inverse metric that yields the apparent exchange-dependent relaxation (AREX). AREX has some useful linearity features that enable preparation of both concentration, and--by using the AREX-ratio of two RF irradiation amplitudes B1--purely exchange-rate-weighted CEST contrasts. These two methods could be verified in phantom experiments with different concentration and pH values, but also varying water relaxation properties. Finally, results from a preliminary application to in vivo CEST imaging data of the human calf muscle before and after exercise are presented. The creatine concentration increases during exercise as expected and as confirmed by (31)P NMR spectroscopic imaging. However, the estimated concentrations obtained by our method were higher than the literature values: cCr,rest=24.5±3.74mM to cCr,ex=38.32±13.05mM. The CEST-based pH method shows a pH decrease during exercise, whereas a slight increase was observed by (31)P NMR spectroscopy.

  8. The relaxant and spasmogenic effects of some xanthine derivatives acting on guinea-pig isolated trachealis muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Small, R. C.; Boyle, J. P.; Cortijo, J.; Curtis-Prior, P. B.; Davies, J. M.; Foster, R. W.; Hofer, P.

    1988-01-01

    1. Caffeine (10 mM)-induced relaxation of guinea-pig isolated trachealis was attenuated and converted to a small spasmogenic response on cooling to 22 degrees C. The relaxant response was restored on rewarming to 37 degrees C and was abolished by indomethacin (2.8 microM). Cooling to 22 degrees C in the presence of indomethacin revealed spasmogenic responses to caffeine which were abolished on rewarming to 37 degrees C. 2. Trachealis treated with indomethacin (2.8 microM) was repeatedly dosed with acetylcholine (ACh, 10 microM). Caffeine (1 or 10 mM), added as each ACh-induced spasm reached equilibrium, transiently augmented but then suppressed the spasm. On cooling from 37 degrees C to 12 degrees C, the increment in spasm evoked by caffeine increased relative to the spasm evoked by ACh. 3. Trachealis treated with indomethacin (2.8 microM) was repeatedly dosed with caffeine (10 mM). At 37 degrees C caffeine had little effect but it caused spasm when the tissue was cooled to 32 degrees C. Spasm amplitude increased as cooling progressed to 12 degrees C. Similar results were obtained with caffeine (1 mM). 4. At 37 degrees C, caffeine, enprofylline, 1,3,7,9-tetramethylxanthinium (TMX), theobromine, theophylline, xanthine and forskolin each caused concentration-dependent suppression of tracheal tone. Among the xanthine derivatives the rank order of potency was enprofylline greater than theophylline greater than caffeine greater than theobromine greater than xanthine greater than TMX. 5. In trachealis treated with indomethacin (2.8 microM) and maintained at 12 degrees C, the xanthines each caused concentration-dependent spasm. The rank order of potency was theobromine greater than or equal to theophylline greater than or equal to caffeine greater than or equal to enprofylline greater than xanthine greater than TMX. Forskolin was devoid of spasmogenic activity. 6. Trachealis treated with indomethacin (2.8 microM) and maintained at 12 degrees C, was repeatedly dosed with

  9. sup 31 P and sup 1 H NMR studies of the structure of enzyme-bound substrate complexes of lobster muscle arginine kinase: Relaxation measurements with Mn(II) and Co(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Jarori, G.K.; Ray, B.D.; Rao, B.D.N. )

    1989-11-28

    The paramagnetic effects of Mn(II) and Co(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rates of {sup 31}P nuclei of ATP and ADP and of Mn(II) on the spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine bound to arginine kinase from lobster tail muscle have been measured. Temperature variation of {sup 31}P relaxation rates in E-MnADP and E-MnATP yields activation energies ({Delta}E) in the range 6-10 kcal/mol. Thus, the {sup 31}P relaxation rates in these complexes are exchange limited and cannot provide structural information. However, the relaxation rates in E-CoADP and E-CoATP exhibit frequency dependence and {Delta}E values in the range 1-2 kcal/mol; i.e., these rates depend upon {sup 31}P-Co(II) distances. These distances were calculated to be in the range 3.2-4.5 {angstrom}, appropriate for direct coordination between Co(II) and the phosphoryl groups. The paramagnetic effect of Mn(II) on the {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate of the {delta} protons of arginine in the E-MnADP-Arg complex was also measured at three frequencies. From the frequency dependence of the relaxation rate an effective {tau}{sub C} of 0.6 ns has also been calculated, which is most likely to be the electron spin relaxation rate ({tau}{sub S1}) for Mn(II) in this complex. The distance estimated on the basis of the reciprocal sixth root of the average relaxation rate of the {delta} protons was 10.9 {plus minus} 0.3 {angstrom}.

  10. Oxygen-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Vascular Smooth Muscle and Their Possible Role in Hypoxic Arterial Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco-Obregon, A.; Urena, J.; Lopez-Barneo, J.

    1995-05-01

    We have investigated the modifications of cytosolic [Ca2+] and the activity of Ca2+ channels in freshly dispersed arterial myocytes to test whether lowering O_2 tension (PO_2) directly influences Ca2+ homeostasis in these cells. Unclamped cells loaded with fura-2 AM exhibit oscillations of cytosolic Ca2+ whose frequency depends on extracellular Ca2+ influx. Switching from a PO_2 of 150 to 20 mmHg leads to a reversible attenuation of the Ca2+ oscillations. In voltage-clamped cells, hypoxia reversibly reduces the influx of Ca2+ through voltage-dependent channels, which can account for the inhibition of the Ca2+ oscillations. Low PO_2 selectively inhibits L-type Ca2+ channel activity, whereas the current mediated by T-type channels is unaltered by hypoxia. The effect of low PO_2 on the L-type channels is markedly voltage dependent, being more apparent with moderate depolarizations. These findings demonstrate the existence of O_2-sensitive, voltage-dependent, Ca2+ channels in vascular smooth muscle that may critically contribute to the local regulation of circulation.

  11. NS19504: A Novel BK Channel Activator with Relaxing Effect on Bladder Smooth Muscle Spontaneous Phasic Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Bernhard; Rode, Frederik; Jørgensen, Susanne; Nardi, Antonio; Korsgaard, Mads P. G.; Hougaard, Charlotte; Bonev, Adrian D.; Brown, William D.; Dyhring, Tino; Strøbæk, Dorte; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Christophersen, Palle; Grunnet, Morten; Nelson, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK, KCa1.1, MaxiK) are important regulators of urinary bladder function and may be an attractive therapeutic target in bladder disorders. In this study, we established a high-throughput fluorometric imaging plate reader–based screening assay for BK channel activators and identified a small-molecule positive modulator, NS19504 (5-[(4-bromophenyl)methyl]-1,3-thiazol-2-amine), which activated the BK channel with an EC50 value of 11.0 ± 1.4 µM. Hit validation was performed using high-throughput electrophysiology (QPatch), and further characterization was achieved in manual whole-cell and inside-out patch-clamp studies in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing hBK channels: NS19504 caused distinct activation from a concentration of 0.3 and 10 µM NS19504 left-shifted the voltage activation curve by 60 mV. Furthermore, whole-cell recording showed that NS19504 activated BK channels in native smooth muscle cells from guinea pig urinary bladder. In guinea pig urinary bladder strips, NS19504 (1 µM) reduced spontaneous phasic contractions, an effect that was significantly inhibited by the specific BK channel blocker iberiotoxin. In contrast, NS19504 (1 µM) only modestly inhibited nerve-evoked contractions and had no effect on contractions induced by a high K+ concentration consistent with a K+ channel–mediated action. Collectively, these results show that NS19504 is a positive modulator of BK channels and provide support for the role of BK channels in urinary bladder function. The pharmacologic profile of NS19504 indicates that this compound may have the potential to reduce nonvoiding contractions associated with spontaneous bladder overactivity while having a minimal effect on normal voiding. PMID:24951278

  12. A comparative study of smart spectrophotometric methods for simultaneous determination of a skeletal muscle relaxant and an analgesic in combined dosage form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Hesham; Mohamed, Dalia

    2015-04-01

    Six simple, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods were developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of the analgesic drug; paracetamol (PARA) and the skeletal muscle relaxant; dantrolene sodium (DANT). Three methods are manipulating ratio spectra namely; ratio difference (RD), ratio subtraction (RS) and mean centering (MC). The other three methods are utilizing the isoabsorptive point either at zero order namely; absorbance ratio (AR) and absorbance subtraction (AS) or at ratio spectrum namely; amplitude modulation (AM). The proposed spectrophotometric procedures do not require any preliminary separation step. The accuracy, precision and linearity ranges of the proposed methods were determined. The selectivity of the developed methods was investigated by analyzing laboratory prepared mixtures of the drugs and their combined dosage form. Standard deviation values are less than 1.5 in the assay of raw materials and capsules. The obtained results were statistically compared with each other and with those of reported spectrophotometric ones. The comparison showed that there is no significant difference between the proposed methods and the reported methods regarding both accuracy and precision.

  13. Differential effects of mindful breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and loving-kindness meditation on decentering and negative reactions to repetitive thoughts.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Greg; Greeson, Jeff; Senville, Joanna

    2010-10-01

    Decentering has been proposed as a potential mechanism of mindfulness-based interventions but has received limited empirical examination to date in experimental studies comparing mindfulness meditation to active comparison conditions. In the present study, we compared the immediate effects of mindful breathing (MB) to two alternative stress-management techniques: progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and loving-kindness meditation (LKM) to test whether decentering is unique to mindfulness meditation or common across approaches. Novice meditators (190 female undergraduates) were randomly assigned to complete one of three 15-min stress-management exercises (MB, PMR, or LKM) presented by audio recording. Immediately after the exercise, participants completed measures of decentering, frequency of repetitive thoughts during the exercise, and degree of negative reaction to thoughts. As predicted, participants in the MB condition reported greater decentering relative to the other two conditions. The association between frequency of repetitive thought and negative reactions to thoughts was relatively weaker in the MB condition than in the PMR and LKM conditions, in which these two variables were strongly and positively correlated. Consistent with the construct of decentering, the relative independence between these two variables in the MB condition suggests that mindful breathing may help to reduce reactivity to repetitive thoughts. Taken together, results help to provide further evidence of decentering as a potential mechanism that distinguishes mindfulness practice from other credible stress-management approaches.

  14. A Randomized Controlled Trial for the Effectiveness of Progressive Muscle Relaxation and Guided Imagery as Anxiety Reducing Interventions in Breast and Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Andreas; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Bozas, Evangelos; Paikousis, Lefkios

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the effectiveness of guided imagery (GI) and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) as stress reducing interventions in patients with prostate and breast cancer who undergo chemotherapy. Methods. Patients were randomly assigned to either the control group or the intervention group (PMR and GI). Patients were observed for a total duration of 3 weeks and assessed with the SAS and BECK-II questionnaires for anxiety and depression, respectively, in addiotion to two biological markers (saliva cortisol and saliva amylase) (trial registration number: NCT01275872). Results. 256 patients were registered and 236 were randomly assigned. In total 104 were randomised to the control group and 104 to the intervention group. Intervention's mean anxiety score and depression score changes were significantly different compared to the control's (b = -29.4, p < 0.001; b = -29.4, p < 0.001, resp.). Intervention group's cortisol levels before the intervention (0.30 ± 0.25) gradually decreased up to week 3 (0.16 ± 0.18), whilst the control group's cortisol levels before the intervention (0.21 ± 0.22) gradually increased up to week 3 (0.44 ± 0.35). The same interaction appears for the Amylase levels (p < 0.001). Conclusions. The findings showed that patients with prostate and breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy treatment can benefit from PMR and GI sessions to reduce their anxiety and depression.

  15. A comparative study of smart spectrophotometric methods for simultaneous determination of a skeletal muscle relaxant and an analgesic in combined dosage form.

    PubMed

    Salem, Hesham; Mohamed, Dalia

    2015-04-05

    Six simple, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods were developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of the analgesic drug; paracetamol (PARA) and the skeletal muscle relaxant; dantrolene sodium (DANT). Three methods are manipulating ratio spectra namely; ratio difference (RD), ratio subtraction (RS) and mean centering (MC). The other three methods are utilizing the isoabsorptive point either at zero order namely; absorbance ratio (AR) and absorbance subtraction (AS) or at ratio spectrum namely; amplitude modulation (AM). The proposed spectrophotometric procedures do not require any preliminary separation step. The accuracy, precision and linearity ranges of the proposed methods were determined. The selectivity of the developed methods was investigated by analyzing laboratory prepared mixtures of the drugs and their combined dosage form. Standard deviation values are less than 1.5 in the assay of raw materials and capsules. The obtained results were statistically compared with each other and with those of reported spectrophotometric ones. The comparison showed that there is no significant difference between the proposed methods and the reported methods regarding both accuracy and precision.

  16. Culturally adapted CBT (CA-CBT) for Latino women with treatment-resistant PTSD: a pilot study comparing CA-CBT to applied muscle relaxation.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Devon E; Hofmann, Stefan G; Rivera, Edwin; Otto, Michael W; Pollack, Mark H

    2011-04-01

    We examined the therapeutic efficacy of a culturally adapted form of CBT (CA-CBT) for PTSD as compared to applied muscle relaxation (AMR) for female Latino patients with treatment-resistant PTSD. Participants were randomized to receive either CA-CBT (n = 12) or AMR (n = 12), and were assessed before treatment, after treatment, and at a 12-week follow-up. The treatments were manualized and delivered in the form of group therapy across 14 weekly sessions. Assessments included a measure of PTSD, anxiety, culturally relevant idioms of distress (nervios and ataque de nervios), and emotion regulation ability. Patients receiving CA-CBT improved significantly more than in the AMR condition. Effect size estimates showed very large reductions in PTSD symptoms from pretreatment to posttreatment in the CA-CBT group (Cohen's d = 2.6) but only modest improvements in the AMR group (0.8). These results suggest that CA-CBT can be beneficial for previously treatment-resistant PTSD in Latino women.

  17. Guided Imagery And Progressive Muscle Relaxation as a Cluster of Symptoms Management Intervention in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Charalambous, Andreas; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Bozas, Evaggelos; Marcou, Yiola; Kitsios, Petros; Paikousis, Lefkios

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients receiving chemotherapy often experience many different symptoms that can be difficult to alleviate and ultimately negatively influence their quality of life. Such symptoms include pain, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and retching, anxiety and depression. There is a gap in the relevant literature on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural and relaxation techniques in symptom clusters. The study reflects this gap in the literature and aimed to test the effectiveness of Guided Imagery (GI) and Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) on a cluster of symptoms experienced by patients undergoing chemotherapy. Methods This was a randomized control trial with 208 patients equally assigned either in the intervention or the control group. Measurements in both groups were collected at baseline and at completion of intervention (4 weeks). Patients were assessed for pain, fatigue, nausea, vomiting and retching, anxiety and depression. The overall management of the cluster was also assessed based on the patients’ self-reported health related quality of life-HRQoL. Chi-square tests (X2), independent T-tests and Linear Mixed Models were calculated. Results Patients in the intervention group experienced lower levels of Fatigue (p<0.0.0225), and Pain (p = 0.0003) compared to those in the control group and experienced better HRQoL (p<0.0001) [PRE-POST: Intervention: Pain 4.2(2.5) - 2.5(1.6), Fatigue 27.6(4.1) - 19.3(4.1), HRQoL 54.9(22.7) - 64.5(23), Control: Pain 3.5(1.7) - 4.8(1.5), Fatigue 28.7(4.1) - 32.5(3.8), HRQoL 51.9(22.3)– 41.2(24.1)]. Nausea, vomiting and retching occurred significantly less often in the intervention group [pre-post: 25.4(5.9)– 20.6(5.6) compared to the control group (17.8(6.5)– 22.7(5.3) (F = 58.50 p<0.0001). More patients in the control group (pre:n = 33-post:n = 47) were found to be moderately depressed compared to those in the intervention group (pre:n = 35-post:n = 15) (X2 = 5.93; p = 0.02). Conclusion This study provided evidence

  18. Relaxation: A Fourth "R" for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick, A. B.

    Relaxation training helps the individual handle tension through concentrating upon efficient use of muscles. A program of progressive relaxation can be easily incorporated into elementary and secondary schools. Objectives of such a program include the following: (a) to learn to relax technically for purposes of complete rest (deep muscle…

  19. Relaxed heaps

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, J.R. ); Gabow, H.N.; Shrairman, R. ); Tarjan, R.E. )

    1988-11-01

    The relaxed heap is a priority queue data structure that achieves the same amortized time bounds as the Fibonacci heap - a sequence of m decrease key and n delete min operations takes time O(m + n log n). A variant of relaxed heaps achieves similar bounds in the worst case - O(1) time for decrease key and O(log n) for delete min. Relaxed heaps give a processor-efficient parallel implementation of Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, and hence other algorithms in network optimization. A relaxed heap is a type of binomial queue that allows heap order to be violated.

  20. Reconditioning aging muscles.

    PubMed

    Kraus, H

    1978-06-01

    Weakness or stiffness of key posture muscles can cause much of the disability seen in elderly patients. Too much tension and too little exercise greatly increase the natural loss of muscular fitness with age. A systematic program of exercise, stressing relaxation and stretching of tight muscles and strenghthening of weak muscles, can improve physical fitness. The program must be tailored to the patient, starting with relaxation and gentle limbering exercises and proceeding ultimately to vigorous muscle-stretching exercises. Muscle aches and pain from tension and muscle imbalance are to be expected. Relaxation relieves tension pain, and strengthening weak muscles and stretching tight muscles will correct muscle imbalance. To prevent acute muscle spasm, the patient should avoid excessive exertion and increase exercise intensity gradually.

  1. Evidence that epithelium-dependent relaxation of vascular smooth muscle detected by co-axial bioassays is not attributable to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Spina, D; Fernandes, L B; Preuss, J M; Hay, D W; Muccitelli, R M; Page, C P; Goldie, R G

    1992-04-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to examine further the contribution of hypoxia to airway epithelium-dependent relaxation of rat aorta in the co-axial bioassay. 2. Endothelium-denuded rat aorta contracted with phenylephrine (0.05 microM) relaxed in a time-dependent manner (t1/2 = 8.3 +/- 0.4 min, n = 38) when the bathing solution was bubbled with 95% N2 and 5% CO2. In co-axial bioassays, the t1/2 for histamine (100 microM; guinea-pig trachea)- and methacholine (100 microM; rabbit bronchus)- induced relaxation was 1.9 +/- 0.2 min (n = 14) and 1.2 +/- 0.1 min (n = 26), respectively. 3. Hypoxia-induced relaxation was not associated with a rise in intracellular guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP). This contrasts with previous findings of an elevation in cyclic GMP associated with epithelium-dependent relaxation of rat aorta in co-axial bioassays. 4. Hypoxia-induced vascular relaxation was antagonized by the ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker, glibenclamide (100 microM). In contrast, glibenclamide (100 microM) failed to inhibit histamine (100 microM; guinea-pig trachea)- and methacholine (0.1-100 microM; rabbit bronchus)-induced release of epithelium-derived inhibitory factor (EpDIF), in co-axial bioassays. Glibenclamide (100 microM) antagonized BRL 38227 (lemakalin), but not isoprenaline-induced relaxation of phenylephrine-contracted rat aorta. 5. These data strongly suggest that the airway epithelium-dependent relaxant responses observed in co-axial bioassays cannot be attributed to hypoxia.

  2. Nitric oxide pathway-mediated relaxant effect of aqueous sesame leaves extract (Sesamum radiatum Schum. & Thonn.) in the guinea-pig isolated aorta smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Konan, André B; Datté, Jacques Y; Yapo, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    Background Sesamum radiatum Schum. & Thonn. (Pedaliaceae) is an annual herbaceous plant, which belongs to the family Pedaliaceae and genus Sesamum. Sesame is used in traditional medicine in Africa and Asia for many diseases treatment. Sesame plant especially the leaves, seed and oil are consumed locally as a staple food by subsistence farmers. The study analyses the relaxation induced by the aqueous extract of leaves from sesame (ESera), compared with those of acetylcholine (ACh) in the guinea-pig aortic preparations (GPAPs), in order to confirm the use in traditional medicine for cardiovascular diseases. Methods The longitudinal strips of aorta of animals were rapidly removed from animals. The aorta was immediately placed in a Mac Ewen solution. Experiments were performed in preparations with intact endothelium as well as in aortae where the endothelium had been removed. The preparations were suspended between two L-shaped stainless steel hooks in a 10 ml organ bath with Mac Ewen solution. The isometric contractile force of the aorta strips of guinea-pig were recorded by using a strain gauge. All both drugs caused concentration-dependent relaxations responses. Results The aqueous extract of leaves from sesame ESera (1 × 10-7 – 0.1 μg/ml) caused a graded relaxation in GPAPs with intact endothelium, with a EC50-value of 1 × 10-4 μg/ml. The same effect was observed with ACh (7 × 10-2 nM – 7 × 10-1 μM), which caused relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. The relaxation in response to ESera and, like that to ACh in GPAPs without endothelium, was fully abolished. Destruction of the endothelium or incubation with the nitric oxyde synthase inhibitor (L-NNA) significantly enhanced the inhibition of the relaxation response to ESera. Moreover, all concentrations induced vasoconstrictions. However, L-NNA produced a significant displacement to the right (about 65-fold) of the relaxation response to ESera. Similar results were obtained with ACh. Both

  3. A comparison of in vitro relaxant responses to ipratropium bromide, β-adrenoceptor agonists and theophylline in feline bronchial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Leemans, Jérôme; Kirschvink, Nathalie; Gustin, Pascal

    2012-07-01

    This study compares the potency and efficacy of different relaxant drugs including anticholinergic, β-adrenergic and methylxanthine agents on acetylcholine-contracted feline bronchi, and investigates the influence of the initial muscarinic-induced tone on bronchodilator response. Feline bronchi were removed from euthanased client-owned cats and were contracted with acetylcholine to cause either 40% or 80% of the acetylcholine maximal contraction. The efficacy and potency of bronchodilating drugs were obtained from cumulative dose-response curves with efficacy (E(max)) as the maximal relaxant response and potency (-logEC(50)) as the logarithm of the concentration of drug inducing 50% of maximal relaxation. Under low contractile tone (40%), all bronchodilators relaxed feline bronchi in a concentration-dependent manner with the following rank order of potency: formoterol>ipratropium bromide>fenoterol>isoprenaline>salbutamol≥salmeterol>theophylline. E(max) values ranged from 80% to 100% depending on the tested drug. Constriction of feline bronchi with high-dose acetylcholine (80%) caused a rightward and downward shift of the β(2)-mimetic dose-response curves. Significant decreases in -logEC(50) and E(max) values were reported for salbutamol, formoterol and salmeterol. This study provides evidence that existing classes of bronchodilators produce effective relaxation of acetylcholine-contracted feline bronchi and that airway responsiveness to β(2)-stimulants is dependent on the magnitude of the initial muscarinic-induced tone. The clinical relevance of these in vitro findings has yet to be explored in clinical trials.

  4. Anxiety and Anger Symptoms in Hwabyung Patients Improved More following 4 Weeks of the Emotional Freedom Technique Program Compared to the Progressive Muscle Relaxation Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jin Woo; Chung, Sun Yong; Kim, Sang Young; Lee, Jung Hwan; Kim, Jong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is a meridian-based psychological therapy. The present clinical trial investigates the effectiveness of EFT as a new treatment option for Hwabyung (HB) patients experiencing anger and compares the efficacy to the Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR), the conventional meditation technique. Methods. The EFT and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) methods were performed on 27 HB patients, and their capacities to alleviate anxiety, anger, and emotional status were compared. After a 4-week program, a survey was conducted; patients then completed a self-training program for 4 weeks, followed by a second survey. Results. During the initial 4 weeks, the EFT group experienced a significant decrease in the HB symptom scale, anger state, and paranoia ideation (p < 0.05). Over the entire 9-week interval, there were significant decreases in the HB symptom scale, anxiety state, anger state, anger trait, somatization, anxiety, hostility, and so on in EFT group (p < 0.05). Conclusion. The EFT group showed improved psychological symptoms and physical symptoms greater than those observed in the PMR group. EFT more effectively alleviated HB symptoms compared to PMR. EFT group showed better maintenance during self-training, suggesting good model of self-control treatment in HB patients.

  5. Anxiety and Anger Symptoms in Hwabyung Patients Improved More following 4 Weeks of the Emotional Freedom Technique Program Compared to the Progressive Muscle Relaxation Program: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jin Woo; Chung, Sun Yong; Kim, Sang Young; Lee, Jung Hwan; Kim, Jong Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is a meridian-based psychological therapy. The present clinical trial investigates the effectiveness of EFT as a new treatment option for Hwabyung (HB) patients experiencing anger and compares the efficacy to the Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR), the conventional meditation technique. Methods. The EFT and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) methods were performed on 27 HB patients, and their capacities to alleviate anxiety, anger, and emotional status were compared. After a 4-week program, a survey was conducted; patients then completed a self-training program for 4 weeks, followed by a second survey. Results. During the initial 4 weeks, the EFT group experienced a significant decrease in the HB symptom scale, anger state, and paranoia ideation (p < 0.05). Over the entire 9-week interval, there were significant decreases in the HB symptom scale, anxiety state, anger state, anger trait, somatization, anxiety, hostility, and so on in EFT group (p < 0.05). Conclusion. The EFT group showed improved psychological symptoms and physical symptoms greater than those observed in the PMR group. EFT more effectively alleviated HB symptoms compared to PMR. EFT group showed better maintenance during self-training, suggesting good model of self-control treatment in HB patients. PMID:26539218

  6. Review of Theoretical Prediction Models for Organic Extract Metabolites, Effect of Drying Temperature on Smooth Muscle Relaxing Activity Induced by Organic Extracts Specially Cecropia Obtusifolia Portal and Web Server Predictors of Drug-Protein Interaction.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Crespo, Francisco; García-Mera, Xerardo; Guillén-Poot, Mónica Anahi; May-Díaz, Héctor Fernado; Tun-Suárez, Adrián; Aguirre-Crespo, A; Hernández-Rodríguez, J; Vergara-Galicia, Jorge; Rodríguez-López, V; Prado-Prado, Francisco J

    2015-02-19

    Cecropia obtusifolia bertol is medicinal specie used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus and hypertension and it has scientific studies that support the traditional use. However, it is required to understand the influence of drying temperature on the yield and pharmacological activity. Drying rate, extraction efficiency, changes in the UV-Vis spectrum and estimating chlorophylls were stimulated with the increasing temperature. Finally, relaxant activity of vascular smooth muscle is increased by 70ºC and reducing ability by the method of CARF increases with temperature. Analytical studies are required to identify changes in the metabolic content and those that ensure the safety and efficacy for human consumption. In this sense, bioinformatic studies may be helpful. Studies such as QSAR can help us to study these metabolites derived from natural products. MIND-BETS model and NL MIND-BETS model to predict DPIs was introduced using MARCH-INSIDE (MI) software to calculate structural parameters for drugs and enzymes respectively. We firstly revised the state-of-art on the design with review of previous works with hypertension activity based on theoretical studies. A study, evaluating the effect of drying temperature of leaves of C. obtusifolia on the relaxing of vascular smooth muscle, antioxidant activity and the presence of chlorophylls, with a focus on Cecropia metabolites. Last, we carried out QSAR studies using MIND-BEST and NL MIND-BEST web servers in order to understand the essential metabolites structural requirement for binding with receptors for FDA proteins.

  7. Creep after loading in relaxed and contracted (KC1 or K2SO4 depolarized) smooth muscle (taenia coli of the guinea pig).

    PubMed

    Greven, K; Hohorst, B

    1975-08-29

    1. The time course of creep in the taenia coli of the guinea pig was recorded during 2000 sec (33 min 20 sec) in the relaxed (Ca2+-free bath solution with verapamil) and contracted (KCl or K2SO4 depolarized) states. 2. The variations in initial length before loading (l0), immediate elastic extension after loading (lE), and creep (N) were standardized with respoect to volume (cm/cm3) and compared among the different states. 3. Immediate elastic extension (lE) and particularly creep after 2000 sec (N2000) are minimal in the relaxed and maximal in the K2SO4-contracted state. The values in the KCl-contracted state are probably affected by intracellular swelling. Statistically, there is a significant difference between the overall length (l0 + lE + N2000) in the relaxed and in the K2SO4-contracted state when creep ends. 4. The hyperbolic relation of N to dN/dt representing the time course of creep mentioned in an earlier paper is reconfirmed for the relaxed as well as for the contracted state. 5. The parameters of the equation giving this relation are calculated from the experimental data. They characterize elastic properties and inner friction during creep. It is shown that the parameters of inner friction diminish more than those characterizing the elastic properties if the preparation is changed from the relaxed into the contracted state by K2SO4-depolarization. 6. In the discussion further evidence is given that not only changes in the diameter of the preparation but also changes of the intracellular elements must be responsible for the altered time course of creep during contraction.

  8. Relaxation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Environ Corporation's relaxation system is built around a body lounge, a kind of super easy chair that incorporates sensory devices. Computer controlled enclosure provides filtered ionized air to create a feeling of invigoration, enhanced by mood changing aromas. Occupant is also surrounded by multidimensional audio and the lighting is programmed to change colors, patterns, and intensity periodically. These and other sensory stimulators are designed to provide an environment in which the learning process is stimulated, because research has proven that while an individual is in a deep state of relaxation, the mind is more receptive to new information.

  9. Application of first-derivative UV-spectrophotometry, TLC-densitometry and liquid chromatography for the simultaneous determination of mebeverine hydrochloride and sulpiride.

    PubMed

    El Walily, A F; El Gindy, A; Bedair, M F

    1999-11-01

    Three methods are described for the simultaneous determination of mebeverine hydrochloride (MB) and sulpiride (SU) in combined pharmaceutical tablets. The first method depends on first-derivative ultraviolet spectrophotometry, with zero-crossing measurement method. The first derivative amplitudes at 214.2 and 221.6 nm were selected for the assay of MB and SU, respectively. Calibration graphs follow Beer's law in the range of 10-30 and 2-8 microg/ml(-1), and the linearity was satisfactory (r = 0.9999), for MB and SU, respectively. The second method was based on the application of the thin layer chromatographic separation of both drugs followed by the densitometric measurements of their spot areas. After separation on silica gel GF254 plates, using ethanol: diethyl ether: triethylamine (70:30:1 v/v) as the mobile phase, the chromatographic zones corresponding to the spots of MB and SU were scanned at 262 and 240 nm, respectively. The calibration function was established in the ranges of 4-12 microg for MB and 2-8 microg for SU. The third method was an internal standard procedure based on high performance liquid chromatographic separation of the two drugs on a reversed-phase, Bondapak CN column. The detection was done at 243 nm using buclizine hydrochloride as internal standard. All chromatographic methods showed good linearity, precision and reproducibility. No spectral or chromatographic interference from the tablet excipients were found. The proposed methods were successfully applied to the assay of commercial tablets and content uniformity test. The procedures were rapid, simple and suitable for quality control application.

  10. Which treatment for low back pain? A factorial randomised controlled trial comparing intravenous analgesics with oral analgesics in the emergency department and a centrally acting muscle relaxant with placebo over three days [ISRCTN09719705

    PubMed Central

    Havel, Christof; Sieder, Anna; Herkner, Harald; Domanovits, Hans; Schmied, Mascha; Segel, Rudolf; Koreny, Maria; Laggner, Anton N; Müllner, Marcus

    2001-01-01

    Background About two thirds of adults suffer from backpain at some time during their life. In the emergency room many patients with acute back pain are treated with intravenous non-steroidal analgesics. Whether this treatment is superior to oral administration of non-steroidal analgesics is unknown. Intravenous administration, however, requires considerable amounts of resources and accounts for high workload in busy clinics. In the further course centrally acting muscle relaxants are prescribed but the effectiveness remains unclear. The objective of this study is on the one hand to compare the effectiveness of intravenous with oral non-steroidal analgesics for acute treatment and on the other hand to compare the effectiveness of a centrally active muscle relaxant with placebo given for three days after presentation to the ED (emergency department). Methods/Design This study is intended as a randomised controlled factorial trial mainly for two reasons: (1) the sequence of treatments resembles the actual proceedings in every-day clinical practice, which is important for the generalisability of the results and (2) this design allows to take interactions between the two sequential treatment strategies into account. There is a patient preference arm included because patients preference is an important issue providing valuable information: (1) it allows to assess the interaction between desired treatment and outcome, (2) results can be extrapolated to a wider group while (3) conserving the advantages of a fully randomised controlled trial. Conclusion We hope to shed more light on the effectiveness of treatment modalities available for acute low back pain. PMID:11716789

  11. Which treatment for low back pain? A factorial randomised controlled trial comparing intravenous analgesics with oral analgesics in the emergency department and a centrally acting muscle relaxant with placebo over three days [ISRCTN09719705].

    PubMed

    Havel, Christof; Sieder, Anna; Herkner, Harald; Domanovits, Hans; Schmied, Mascha; Segel, Rudolf; Koreny, Maria; Laggner, Anton N; Müllner, Marcus

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About two thirds of adults suffer from backpain at some time during their life. In the emergency room many patients with acute back pain are treated with intravenous non-steroidal analgesics. Whether this treatment is superior to oral administration of non-steroidal analgesics is unknown. Intravenous administration, however, requires considerable amounts of resources and accounts for high workload in busy clinics. In the further course centrally acting muscle relaxants are prescribed but the effectiveness remains unclear. The objective of this study is on the one hand to compare the effectiveness of intravenous with oral non-steroidal analgesics for acute treatment and on the other hand to compare the effectiveness of a centrally active muscle relaxant with placebo given for three days after presentation to the ED (emergency department). METHODS/DESIGN: This study is intended as a randomised controlled factorial trial mainly for two reasons: (1) the sequence of treatments resembles the actual proceedings in every-day clinical practice, which is important for the generalisability of the results and (2) this design allows to take interactions between the two sequential treatment strategies into account. There is a patient preference arm included because patients preference is an important issue providing valuable information: (1) it allows to assess the interaction between desired treatment and outcome, (2) results can be extrapolated to a wider group while (3) conserving the advantages of a fully randomised controlled trial. CONCLUSION: We hope to shed more light on the effectiveness of treatment modalities available for acute low back pain.

  12. Changes in sarcoplasmic metabolite concentrations and pH associated with the catch contraction and relaxation of the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis measured by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Ishii, N; Mitsumori, F; Takahashi, K

    1991-06-01

    The sarcoplasmic concentrations of phosphorus metabolites and pH (pHin) were measured in the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. During an active contraction induced by 10(-3) acetylcholine, the concentration of arginine phosphate ([Arg-P]in) decreased from the resting value of 7.47 +/- 0.26 (mean +/- SE, n = 8) to 6.67 +/- 0.29 (n = 6) mumol g-1, and that of inorganic phosphate (Pi) consistently increased from 0.84 +/- 0.06 (n = 7) to 1.61 +/- 0.12 (n = 5) mumol g-1. In the 'catch' state following the active contraction, these concentrations were close to their resting levels, indicating that the catch is an inactive state. 5-hydroxytryptamine caused a rapid relaxation of the catch, which was associated with a slight decrease in [Arg-P]in and an increase in pHin by ca 0.2 units. The sarcoplasmic concentration of ATP (mean, 1.6 mumol g-1) did not change throughout the contraction-relaxation cycle.

  13. Relaxation Techniques for Handicapped Children: A Review of Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zipkin, Dvora

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses four major relaxation training approaches used with handicapped children: progressive muscle relaxation, biofeedback, yoga, and mental relaxation, which includes guided fantasy, imagery, and meditation. Descriptions of these techniques, the effects of their use with various populations, and reviews of recent studies of their…

  14. BK channel-mediated relaxation of urinary bladder smooth muscle: a novel paradigm for phosphodiesterase type 4 regulation of bladder function.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wenkuan; Li, Ning; Cheng, Qiuping; Petkov, Georgi V

    2014-04-01

    Elevation of intracellular cAMP and activation of protein kinase A (PKA) lead to activation of large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels, thus attenuation of detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) contractility. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which pharmacological inhibition of cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) with rolipram or Ro-20-1724 (C(15)H(22)N(2)O(3)) suppresses guinea pig DSM excitability and contractility. We used high-speed line-scanning confocal microscopy, ratiometric fluorescence Ca(2+) imaging, and perforated whole-cell patch-clamp techniques on freshly isolated DSM cells, along with isometric tension recordings of DSM isolated strips. Rolipram caused an increase in the frequency of Ca(2+) sparks and the spontaneous transient BK currents (TBKCs), hyperpolarized the cell membrane potential (MP), and decreased the intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Blocking BK channels with paxilline reversed the hyperpolarizing effect of rolipram and depolarized the MP back to the control levels. In the presence of H-89 [N-[2-[[3-(4-bromophenyl)-2-propenyl]amino]ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride], a PKA inhibitor, rolipram did not cause MP hyperpolarization. Rolipram or Ro-20-1724 reduced DSM spontaneous and carbachol-induced phasic contraction amplitude, muscle force, duration, and frequency, and electrical field stimulation-induced contraction amplitude, muscle force, and tone. Paxilline recovered DSM contractility, which was suppressed by pretreatment with PDE4 inhibitors. Rolipram had reduced inhibitory effects on DSM contractility in DSM strips pretreated with paxilline. This study revealed a novel cellular mechanism whereby pharmacological inhibition of PDE4 leads to suppression of guinea pig DSM contractility by increasing the frequency of Ca(2+) sparks and the functionally coupled TBKCs, consequently hyperpolarizing DSM cell MP. Collectively, this decreases the global intracellular Ca(2+) levels and DSM

  15. Natural relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by natural inflation, we propose a relaxation mechanism consistent with inflationary cosmology that explains the hierarchy between the electroweak scale and Planck scale. This scenario is based on a selection mechanism that identifies the low-scale dynamics as the one that is screened from UV physics. The scenario also predicts the near-criticality and metastability of the Standard Model (SM) vacuum state, explaining the Higgs boson mass observed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Once Majorana right-handed neutrinos are introduced to provide a viable reheating channel, our framework yields a corresponding mass scale that allows for the seesaw mechanism as well as for standard thermal leptogenesis. We argue that considering singlet scalar dark matter extensions of the proposed scenario could solve the vacuum stability problem and discuss how the cosmological constant problem is possibly addressed.

  16. Breathing and Relaxation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... level is often dependent on his or her breathing pattern. Therefore, people with chronic lung conditions may ...

  17. Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassel, Russell N.; Cassel, Susie L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes Relaxation Assessment with Varied Structured Milieu (RELAX), a clinical program designed to assess the degree to which an individual is able to demonstrate self-control for overall general relaxation. The program is designed for use with the Cassel Biosensors biofeedback equipment. (JAC)

  18. Factors contributing to thixotropy of inspiratory muscles.

    PubMed

    Izumizaki, Masahiko; Shibata, Masahiko; Homma, Ikuo

    2004-06-25

    Thixotropy is a passive property of the skeletal muscle dependent on the muscle's immediate history of contraction and length change. Thixotropic properties of inspiratory muscles, introduced by forceful muscle contraction at an inflated lung volume, cause an increased end-expiratory position (EEP) of the rib cage. We searched for factors contributing to the development of inspiratory muscle thixotropy in nine healthy subjects. Using induction plethysmography, we examined aftereffects on EEP of the duration of inspiratory muscle contraction and subsequent muscle relaxation. We also studied effects of inspiratory effort intensity measured by mouth pressure at different lung volumes. EEP elevation was noted subsequent to 5-s contraction followed by 2-s relaxation and was enhanced when conditioned at higher lung volumes with a strong inspiratory effort. Our results suggest four factors that influence inspiratory muscle thixotropy: (1) intensity of muscle contraction, (2) lung volume when contraction occurs, (3) duration of contraction, and (4) muscle relaxation.

  19. Myocardial contraction-relaxation coupling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Since the pioneering work of Henry Pickering Bowditch in the late 1800s to early 1900s, cardiac muscle contraction has remained an intensely studied topic for several reasons. The heart is located centrally in our body, and its pumping motion demands the attention of the observer. The contraction of the heart encompasses a complex interplay of mechanical, chemical, and electrical properties, and its function can thus be studied from any of these viewpoints. In addition, diseases of the heart are currently killing more people in the Westernized world than any other disease. When combined with the increasing emphasis of research to be clinically relevant, this contributes to the heart remaining a topic of continued basic and clinical investigation. Yet, there are significant aspects of cardiac muscle contraction that are still not well understood. A big complication of the study of cardiac muscle contraction is that there exists no equilibrium among many of the important governing parameters, which include pre- and afterload, intracellular ion concentrations, membrane potential, and velocity and direction of movement. Thus the classic approach of perturbing an equilibrium or a steady state to learn about the role of the perturbing factor in the system cannot be unambiguously interpreted, since each of the parameters that govern contraction are constantly changing, as well as constantly changing their interaction with each other. In this review, presented as the 54th Bowditch Lecture at Experimental Biology meeting in Anaheim in April 2010, I will revisit several governing factors of cardiac muscle relaxation by applying newly developed tools and protocols to isolated cardiac muscle tissue in which the dynamic interactions between the governing factors of contraction and relaxation can be studied. PMID:20852049

  20. Relaxation/Covert Rehearsal for Problematic Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fling, Sheila; McKenzie, Patricia

    A study was conducted to determine whether group relaxation training combined with guided fantasy as a method of covert cognitive rehearsal would be more effective than story-listening or no special treatment in enabling "problematic" children to decrease muscle tension, activity level, and behavior problems and to increase academic performance…

  1. Evaluation of Multiple Component Relaxation Training with Developmentally Disabled Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calamari, John E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A specific progressive muscle relaxation training procedure was combined with auditory electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback, modeling, and reinforcement procedures to teach relaxation skills to 32 mentally retarded adults. The procedure was effective in reducing subjects' EMG levels and activity levels. Intellectual and adaptive behavior levels…

  2. Providing Relaxation Training to Cancer Chemotherapy Patients: A Comparison of Three Delivery Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Michael P.; Burish, Thomas G.

    1987-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of three strategies for delivering relaxation training to cancer chemotherapy patients who were experiencing treatment-related side effects. Professionally, as opposed to paraprofessionally, administered or audiotaped progressive muscle-relaxation training and guided relaxation imagery reduced emotional distress and…

  3. The Effects of Biofeedback and Relaxation Training on Memory Tasks among Hyperactive Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omizo, Michael M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study examined the effects of biofeedback and relaxation training on memory tasks among 48 hyperactive boys (9-11 years old). Relaxation training in combination with biofeedback was useful in helping the boys achieve better muscle relaxation and perform better on a paired-associate memory task than did a control group. (Author/CB)

  4. PARAMAGNETIC RELAXATION IN CRYSTALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CRYSTALS, PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE, RELAXATION TIME , CRYSTAL DEFECTS, QUARTZ, GLASS, STRAIN(MECHANICS), TEMPERATURE, NUCLEAR SPINS, HYDROGEN, CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, FLUORIDES, COLOR CENTERS, PHONONS, OXYGEN.

  5. [A study on Korean concepts of relaxation].

    PubMed

    Park, J S

    1992-01-01

    Relaxation technique is an independent nursing intervention used in various stressful situations. The concept of relaxation must be explored for the meaning given by the people in their traditional thought and philosophy. Korean relaxation technique, wanting to become culturally acceptable and effective, is learning to recognize and develop Korean concepts, experiences, and musics of relaxation. This study was aimed at discovering Korean concepts, experiences and musics of relaxation and contributing the development of the relaxation technique for Korean people. The subjects were 59 nursing students, 39 hospitalized patients, 61 housewives, 21 rural residents and 16 researchers. Data were collected from September 4th to October 24th, 1991 by interviews or questionnaires. The data analysis was done by qualitative research method, and validity assured by conformation of the concept and category by 2 nursing scientists who had written a Master's thesis on the relaxation technique. The results of the study were summarized as follows; 1. The meaning of the relaxation concept; From 298 statements, 107 concepts were extracted and then 5 categories "Physical domain", "Psychological domain", "Complex domain", "Situation", and "environment" were organized. 'Don't have discomforts, 'don't have muscle tension', 'don't have energy (him in Korean)', 'don't have activities' subcategories were included in "Physical domain". 'Don't have anxiety', 'feel good', 'emotional stability', 'don't have wordly thoughts', 'feel one's brain muddled', 'loss of desire' subcategories were included in "physical domain" 'Comfort body and mind', 'don't have tension of body and mind', 'be sagged' 'liveliness of thoughts' subcategories were included in "Complex domain". 'Rest', 'sleep', 'others' subcategories were included in "Situation domain". And 'quite environment' & 'comfortable environment' subcategories were included in "Environmental domain". 2. The experiences of the relaxation; From 151

  6. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Your Muscles KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Muscles A A A ... and skeletal (say: SKEL-uh-tul) muscle. Smooth Muscles Smooth muscles — sometimes also called involuntary muscles — are ...

  7. TEACHING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NORRIS, JEANNE E.; STEINHAUS, ARTHUR H.

    THIS STUDY ATTEMPTED TO FIND OUT WHETHER (1) THE METHODS FOR ATTAINING NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION THAT HAVE PROVED FRUITFUL IN THE ONE-TO-ONE RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLINIC CAN BE SUCCESSFULLY ADAPTED TO THE TEACHER-CLASS RELATIONSHIP OF THE CLASSROOM AND GYMNASIUM, AND (2) NEUROMUSCULAR RELAXATION CAN BE TAUGHT SUCCESSFULLY BY AN APPROPRIATELY TRAINED…

  8. Relaxation of magnetotail plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.

    1987-01-01

    A quasi-thermodynamic model is presented for the relaxation of magnetotail plasmas during substorms, followed by quiet times. It is proposed that the plasma relaxes to a state of low-potential energy subject to a small number of global constraints. The constraints are exactly preserved by all ideal motions and, approximately, by a wide class of motions of the plasma undergoing magnetic reconnection. A variational principle which minimizes the free energy predicts the relaxed state. Exact, two-dimensional solutions of the relaxed state are obtained. A universal feature of the exact solutions is a chain of magnetic islands along the tail axis. Sufficient conditions for the stability of relaxed states are obtained from the second variation of the free-energy functional.

  9. Hysteresis in Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Jorgelina; Lynch, Stephen; Jones, David; Degens, Hans

    This paper presents examples of hysteresis from a broad range of scientific disciplines and demonstrates a variety of forms including clockwise, counterclockwise, butterfly, pinched and kiss-and-go, respectively. These examples include mechanical systems made up of springs and dampers which have been the main components of muscle models for nearly one hundred years. For the first time, as far as the authors are aware, hysteresis is demonstrated in single fibre muscle when subjected to both lengthening and shortening periodic contractions. The hysteresis observed in the experiments is of two forms. Without any relaxation at the end of lengthening or shortening, the hysteresis loop is a convex clockwise loop, whereas a concave clockwise hysteresis loop (labeled as kiss-and-go) is formed when the muscle is relaxed at the end of lengthening and shortening. This paper also presents a mathematical model which reproduces the hysteresis curves in the same form as the experimental data.

  10. Incomplete Relaxation between Beats after Myocardial Hypoxia and Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Weisfeldt, Myron L.; Armstrong, Paul; Scully, Hugh E.; Sanders, Charles A.; Daggett, Willard M.

    1974-01-01

    Recovery from hypoxia has been shown to prolong cardiac muscle contraction, particularly the relaxation phase. The present studies were designed to examine whether incomplete relaxation between beats can result from this prolongation of contraction and relaxation in isolated muscle after hypoxia and in the canine heart after both hypoxia and acute ischemia. The relationship between heart rate and the extent of incomplete relaxation is emphasized in view of the known enhancement of the velocity of contraction caused by increasing heart rate. The extent of incomplete relaxation during 10-s periods of pacing at increasing rates was examined before and after hypoxia in isometric cat right ventricular papillary muscle (12-120 beats/min) and in the canine isovolumic left ventricle (120-180 beats/min). Incomplete relaxation was quantified by measuring the difference between the lowest diastolic tension or pressure during pacing and the true resting tension or pressure determined by interruption of pacing at each rate. In eight cat papillary muscles (29°C), there was significantly greater incomplete relaxation 5 min after hypoxia at rates of 96 and 120 beats/min (P < 0.02 vs. before hypoxia). In seven canine isovolumic left ventricles, recovery from hypoxia and higher heart rates also resulted in incomplete relaxation. Incomplete relaxation before hypoxia at a rate of 180 beats/min was 0.8±0.5 cm H2O and at 5 min of recovery from hypoxia was 12.6±3.5 cm H2O (P < 0.01). 12 hearts were subjected to a 1.5-3-min period of acute ischemia and fibrillation. There was significant incomplete relaxation at a rate of 140 beats/min for 5 min after defibrillation and reperfusion. These data indicate that incomplete relaxation is an important determinant of diastolic hemodynamics during recovery from ischemia or hypoxia. The extent of incomplete relaxation appears to be a function of the rate of normalization of the velocity of relaxation and tension development after ischemia or

  11. Relaxation techniques for stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems such as high blood pressure, stomachaches, headaches, anxiety, and depression. Using relaxation techniques can help you feel calm. These exercises can also help you manage stress and ease ...

  12. Skeletal muscle tensile strain dependence: hyperviscoelastic nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Benjamin B; Morrow, Duane A; Odegard, Gregory M; Kaufman, Kenton R; Donahue, Tammy L Haut

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Computational modeling of skeletal muscle requires characterization at the tissue level. While most skeletal muscle studies focus on hyperelasticity, the goal of this study was to examine and model the nonlinear behavior of both time-independent and time-dependent properties of skeletal muscle as a function of strain. Materials and Methods Nine tibialis anterior muscles from New Zealand White rabbits were subject to five consecutive stress relaxation cycles of roughly 3% strain. Individual relaxation steps were fit with a three-term linear Prony series. Prony series coefficients and relaxation ratio were assessed for strain dependence using a general linear statistical model. A fully nonlinear constitutive model was employed to capture the strain dependence of both the viscoelastic and instantaneous components. Results Instantaneous modulus (p<0.0005) and mid-range relaxation (p<0.0005) increased significantly with strain level, while relaxation at longer time periods decreased with strain (p<0.0005). Time constants and overall relaxation ratio did not change with strain level (p>0.1). Additionally, the fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic constitutive model provided an excellent fit to experimental data, while other models which included linear components failed to capture muscle function as accurately. Conclusions Material properties of skeletal muscle are strain-dependent at the tissue level. This strain dependence can be included in computational models of skeletal muscle performance with a fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic model. PMID:26409235

  13. The Effects of Relaxation Training with Cognitive or Nondirective Therapy and the Role of Relaxation-Induced Anxiety in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkovec, T. D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Provided 30 volunteers with generalized anxiety disorder with training in progressive muscle relaxation. Clients were also given cognitive or nondirective therapy. All showed substantial reductions in anxiety measured by psychiatric assessor ratings, questionnaires, and daily self-monitoring. Relaxation plus cognitive therapy produced…

  14. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Newman, Diane K

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been recommended for urinary incontinence since first described by obstetrician gynecologist Dr. Arnold Kegel more than six decades ago. These exercises are performed to strengthen pelvic floor muscles, provide urethral support to prevent urine leakage, and suppress urgency. In clinical urology practice, expert clinicians also teach patients how to relax the muscle to improve bladder emptying and relieve pelvic pain caused by muscle spasm. When treating lower urinary tract symptoms, an exercise training program combined with biofeedback therapy has been recommended as first-line treatment. This article provides clinical application of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback as a technique to enhance pelvic floor muscle training.

  15. Viscoelastic properties of laryngeal posturing muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Fariborz; Hunter, Eric; Titze, Ingo

    2003-10-01

    Viscoelastic properties of canine laryngeal muscles were measured in a series of in vitro experiments. Laryngeal posturing that controls vocal fold length and adduction/abduction is an essential component of the voice production. The dynamics of posturing depends on the viscoelastic and physiological properties of the laryngeal muscles. The time-dependent and nonlinear behaviors of these tissues are also crucial in the voice production and pitch control theories. The lack of information on some of these muscles such as posterior cricoarytenoid muscle (PCA), lateral cricoarytenoid muscle (LCA), and intraarytenoid muscle (IA) was the major incentive for this study. Samples of PCA and LCA muscles were made from canine larynges and mounted on a dual-servo system (Ergometer) as described in our previous works. Two sets of experiments were conducted on each muscle, a 1-Hz stretch and release experiment that provides stress-strain data and a stress relaxation test. Data from these muscles were fitted to viscoelastic models and Young's modulus and viscoelastic constants are obtained for each muscle. Preliminary data indicates that elastics properties of these muscles are similar to those of thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles. The relaxation response of these muscles also shows some similarity to other laryngeal muscles in terms of time constants.

  16. Effects of Static Flexion-relaxation on Paraspinal Reflex Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Kevin P.; Rogers, Ellen; Moorhouse, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Background. Static trunk flexion working postures and disturbed trunk muscle reflexes are related to increased risk of low-back pain. Animal studies conclude that these factors may be related; passive tissue strain in spinal ligaments causes subsequent short-term changes in reflex. Although studies have documented changes in the myoelectric onset angle of flexion-relaxation following prolonged static flexion and cyclic flexion we could find no published evidence related to the human reflex response of the trunk extensor muscles following a period of static flexion-relaxation loading. Methods. Eighteen subjects maintained static lumbar flexion for 15 min. Paraspinal muscle reflexes were elicited both before and after the flexion-relaxation protocol using pseudorandom stochastic force disturbances while recording EMG. Reflex gain was computed from the peak value of the impulse response function relating input force perturbation to EMG response using time-domain deconvolution analyses. Findings. Reflexes showed a trend toward increased gain after the period of flexion-relaxation (P < 0.055) and were increased with trunk extension exertion (P < 0.021). Significant gender differences in reflex gain were observed (P < 0.01). Interpretations. Occupational activities requiring extended periods of trunk flexion contribute to changes in reflex behavior of the paraspinal muscles. Results suggest potential mechanisms by which flexed posture work may contribute to low-back pain. Significant gender differences indicate risk analyses should consider personal factors when considering neuromuscular behavior. PMID:15567532

  17. A Comparison of Meditation with Other Relaxation Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fling, Sheila

    This paper critiques a negative 1984 review, "Meditation and Somatic Arousal Reduction" (Holmes), on the absolute effectiveness of meditation in reducing somatic arousal and reviews research on the relative effectiveness of meditation compared to techniques such as biofeedback, hypnosis, progressive muscle relaxation, and autogenics in…

  18. Reducing Anxiety in Gifted Children by Inducing Relaxation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roome, John R.; Romney, David M.

    1985-01-01

    Thirty gifted children (grades six to eight) were allocated to either progressive muscle relaxation or biofeedback treatment groups or to a no-treament, control group. Biofeedback Ss evinced a significant decrease in anxiety and both groups moved towards more internal locus of control compared with controls. There was no change in trait anxiety.…

  19. Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation Training in the Elementary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaichkowsky, Linda B.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined feasibility of training young elementary school children in stress responses and coping techniques. Findings indicated children can learn to control heart rate, respiration rate, and skin temperature responses by participating in a program that includes instruction on proper breathing; modified, progressive muscle relaxation; visual…

  20. Relaxation Training and Covert Positive Reinforcement with Elementary School Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vacc, Nicholas A.; Greenleaf, Susan M.

    1980-01-01

    Variations of systematic desensitization that include deep muscle relaxation (DMR) seem useful in remediating some behavior problems of children. Studied the effects of DMR and DMR with Covert Positive Reinforcement (CPR) in reducing maladaptive behavior of children, ages 6 to 12. (Author)

  1. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  2. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  3. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart because it controls the heartbeat. Skeletal Muscle Now, let's talk about the kind of muscle ... soccer ball into the goal. These are your skeletal muscles — sometimes called striated (say: STRY-ay-tud) muscle ...

  4. Relaxation in quantum glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancona Torres, Carlos E.

    The Ising model in transverse field provides the simplest description of a quantum glass. I study two systems that are realizations of the Ising model in transverse field, LiHoxY1-- xF4 and Rb1-- x(NH4)xH2PO 4. In the spin glass LiHoxY1-- xF4, applying a magnetic field Ht transverse to the Ising direction introduces tunneling between the bare Ising eigenstates. In addition, the coupling between the transverse dipolar interaction and the transverse field introduces entanglement or tunable random fields depending on the concentration. By comparing the classical and quantum transitions in LiHo0.198Y0.802F4 and LiHo 0.167Y0.833F4, I characterize the crossover from random field dominated behavior in the 19.8% sample to entanglement dominated behavior in the 16.7% sample. The quantum transition in the 19.8% sample is dominated by the limit on its correlation length caused by the random fields, while the dominant effect in the 16.7% sample is the enhanced tunneling rate introduced by entanglement. The proton glass Rb1--x(NH 4)xH2PO4 relaxes through tunneling of protons in the hydrogen bonds of the crystal, yielding an effective Ising model in transverse field. Since this field cannot be tuned directly, I combine bulk dielectric susceptibility measurements with neutron Compton scattering measurements of the local tunneling potential in two different concentrations, x = 35% and 72%. I find that tunneling drives the fastest relaxation processes at temperatures as high as 20 K and explicitly calculate the tunneling rate from the tunneling potential of the hydrogen bond. Moreover, the structural mechanism for the glassy relaxation allows a real-space picture of the relaxation dynamics to be correlated to the free energy description of aging. I find that the glassy relaxation is driven by the sequential diffusion of defects called Takagi configurations with a classical to quantum crossover in the relaxation at 3 K. I relate the relaxation rate to the quantum action of tunneling

  5. The Effects of Two Types of Relaxation Training on Students' Levels of Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasid, Zulkifli Mohamed; Parish, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on a study in which high school students who received training in either behavioral relaxation or progressive muscle relaxation demonstrated significantly lower state-anxiety scores than did those who had received no such training. No significant differences were found on trait-anxiety scores, for gender or for state/trait anxiety.…

  6. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    Dilation of blood vessels in response to a large number of agents has been shown to be dependent on an intact vascular endothelium. The present studies examine some aspects of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in blood vessels of the rabbit and rat. Using the rabbit ear artery and the subtype-selective muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine, muscarinic receptors of the endothelium and smooth muscle cells were shown to be of the low affinity M/sub 2/ subtype. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate was used to determine affinity for the smooth muscle receptors while antagonism of methacholine induced vasodilation yielded the endothelial cell receptor affinity. The effect of increasing age (1-27 months) on endothelium-dependent relaxation was studied in aortic rings, perfused tail artery and perfused mesenteric bed of the Fisher 344 rat. The influence of endothelium on contractile responses was examined using the perfused caudal artery.

  7. Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Hair Dye and Hair Relaxers Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... products. If you have a bad reaction to hair dyes and relaxers, you should: Stop using the ...

  8. A Comparison of Relaxation Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.

    Some researchers argue that all relaxation techniques produce a single relaxation response while others support a specific-effects hypothesis which suggests that progressive relaxation affects the musculoskeletal system and that guided imagery affects cognitive changes. Autogenics is considered a technique which is both somatic and cognitive. This…

  9. Relaxation from particle production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Anson; Marques-Tavares, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    We consider using particle production as a friction force by which to implement a "Relaxion" solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem. Using this approach, we are able to avoid superplanckian field excursions and avoid any conflict with the strong CP problem. The relaxation mechanism can work before, during or after inflation allowing for inflationary dynamics to play an important role or to be completely decoupled.

  10. Skeletal muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  11. Ryanodine receptors in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín; Gómez-Viquez, Leticia; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; Rueda, Angélica

    2002-07-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of smooth muscle is endowed with two different types of Ca2+ release channels, i.e. inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In general, both release channels mobilize Ca2+ from the same internal store in smooth muscle. While the importance of IP3Rs in agonist-induced contraction is well established, the role of RyRs in excitation-contraction coupling of smooth muscle is not clear. The participation of smooth muscle RyRs in the amplification of Ca2+ transients induced by either opening of Ca2+-permeable channels or IP3-triggered Ca2+ release has been studied. The efficacy of both processes to activate RyRs by calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is highly variable and not widely present in smooth muscle. Although RyRs in smooth muscle generate Ca2+ sparks that are similar to those observed in striated muscles, the contribution of these local Ca2+ events to depolarization-induced global rise in [Ca2+]i is rather limited. Recent data suggest that RyRs are involved in regulating the luminal [Ca2+] of SR and also in smooth muscle relaxation. This review summarizes studies that were carried out mainly in muscle strips or in freshly isolated myocytes, and that were aimed to determine the physiological role of RyRs in smooth muscle.

  12. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  13. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  14. Muscle aches

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of muscle aches and pain is fibromyalgia , a condition that causes tenderness in your muscles ... imbalance, such as too little potassium or calcium Fibromyalgia Infections, including the flu, Lyme disease , malaria , muscle ...

  15. Toll-like Receptor 7 Rapidly Relaxes Human Airways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Gregory D.; Proskocil, Becky J.; Fryer, Allison D.; Jacoby, David B.; Kaufman, Elad H.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 8 detect respiratory virus single-stranded RNA and trigger an innate immune response. We recently described rapid TLR7-mediated bronchodilation in guinea pigs. Objectives: To characterize TLR7 expression and TLR7-induced airway relaxation in humans and in eosinophilic airway inflammation in guinea pigs. To evaluate the relaxant effects of other TLRs. Methods: Human airway smooth muscle strips were contracted with methacholine in vitro, and responses to TLR7 and TLR8 agonists were assessed. TLR7-mediated nitric oxide production was measured using a fluorescent indicator, and TLR7 expression was characterized using immunofluorescence. TLR7 signaling was also evaluated in ovalbumin-challenged guinea pigs. Measurements and Main Results: The TLR7 agonist imiquimod (R837) caused rapid dose-dependent relaxation of methacholine-contracted human airways in vitro. This was blocked by the TLR7 antagonist IRS661 and by inhibiting nitric oxide production but not by inhibiting prostaglandin production. TLR7 activation markedly increased fluorescence of a nitric oxide detector. TLR7 was expressed on airway nerves, but not airway smooth muscle, implicating airway nerves as the source of TLR7-induced nitric oxide production. TLR7-mediated relaxation persisted in inflamed guinea pigs airways in vivo. The TLR8 agonists polyuridylic acid and polyadenylic acid also relaxed human airways, and this was not blocked by the TLR7 antagonist or by blocking nitric oxide or prostaglandin production. No other TLRs relaxed the airways. Conclusions: TLR7 is expressed on airway nerves and mediates relaxation of human and animal airways through nitric oxide production. TLR7-mediated bronchodilation may be a new therapeutic strategy in asthma. PMID:23924358

  16. EP2 receptors mediate airway relaxation to substance P, ATP, and PGE2.

    PubMed

    Fortner, C N; Breyer, R M; Paul, R J

    2001-08-01

    Substance P (SP) and ATP evoke transient, epithelium-dependent relaxation of constricted mouse tracheal smooth muscle. Relaxation to either SP or ATP is blocked by indomethacin, but the specific eicosanoid(s) involved have not been definitively identified. SP and ATP are reported to release PGE2 from airway epithelium in other species, suggesting PGE2 as a likely mediator in epithelium-dependent airway relaxation. Using mice homozygous for a gene-targeted deletion of the EP2 receptor [EP2(-/-)], one of the PGE2 receptors, we tested the hypothesis that PGE2 is the primary mediator of relaxation to SP or ATP. Relaxation in response to SP or ATP was significantly reduced in tracheas from EP2(-/-) mice. There were no differences between EP2(-/-) and wild-type tracheas in their physical dimensions, contraction to ACh, or relaxation to isoproterenol, thus ruling out any general alterations of smooth muscle function. There were also no differences between EP2(-/-) and wild-type tracheas in basal or stimulated PGE2 production. Exogenous PGE2 produced significantly less relaxation in EP2(-/-) tracheas compared with the wild type. Taken together, this experimental evidence supports the following two conclusions: EP2 receptors are of primary importance in airway relaxation to PGE2 and relaxation to SP or ATP is mediated through PGE2 acting on EP2 receptors.

  17. End-tidal PCO2 as an index of psychophysiological activity during VDT data-entry work and relaxation.

    PubMed

    Schleifer, L M; Ley, R

    1994-02-01

    The present study was designed to assess the utility of end-tidal PCO2 (peak concentration of carbon dioxide in a single breath of exhaled air) as an index of psychophysiological activity during performance of a computer-based task and during relaxation. Eleven data-entry operators were monitored continuously for three consecutive, 6 hour work days under the following conditions: (a) during a self-relaxation baseline period; (b) during an abbreviated progressive muscle relaxation period; and (c) during a period of computer-based data-entry work. End-tidal PCO2, respiration frequency, and cardiac inter-beat interval (a measure of heart rate and its variability) were monitored continuously during the three conditions of the study. Self-ratings of relaxation and tension were also monitored at periodic intervals. Consistent with a decrease in psychophysiological arousal, end-tidal PCO2 and self-ratings of relaxation were significantly higher during progressive muscle relaxation than during baseline relaxation. Consistent with an increase in psychophysiological arousal, end-tidal PCO2, cardiac inter-beat interval, and relaxation ratings during data-entry work were significantly lower than during either baseline relaxation or progressive muscle relaxation, while respiration frequency and tension ratings were higher. The findings indicate that end-tidal PCO2 discriminates among different psychophysiological states, and that end-tidal PCO2 may be useful in indexing the stress-health effects of human-computer interactions.

  18. Ultrafast Relaxation in Conjugated Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * EXPERIMENTAL * Samples * Femtosecond experimental apparatus * RESULTS AND DISCUSSION * Poly(phenylacetylenes) * Blue-phase PDA-3BCMU * Red-phase PDA-4BCMU * Blue-phase PDA-DFMP * P3MT * P3DT * PTV * RELAXATION MECHANISMS * Review of the previous works * Symmetry of the lower electronic excited states * Primary relaxation processes * Theoretical studies of nonlinear excitations * Mechanism of relaxation in polymers with a weakly nondegenerate ground state (poly(phenylacetylene)s) * Dual peak component with power-law decay * Single-peak component with an exponential decay * Hot self-trapped exciton * Transition to the electron-hole threshold * Transition to a biexciton state * Mechanism of relaxation in polymers with a strongly or moderately nondegenerate ground state * Classifications of polymers * Femtosecond relaxation * Picosecond relaxation * CONCLUSION * Acknowledgments * REFERENCES

  19. Relaxing music for anxiety control.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Dave; Polman, Remco; McGregor, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the characteristics of relaxing music for anxiety control. Undergraduate students (N=84) were instructed to imagine themselves in an anxiety producing situation while listening to a selection of 30 music compositions. For each composition, level of relaxation, the factors that either enhanced or detracted from its relaxing potential and the emotional labels attached were assessed. Participants were also asked to state which music components (e.g., tempo, melody) were most conducive to relaxation. Additional information was obtained through the use of a focus group of 6 undergraduate music students. This paper presents details on the characteristics of relaxing-music for anxiety control and emotional labels attached to the relaxing compositions. Furthermore, an importance value has been attached to each of the music components under scrutiny, thus providing an indication of which music components should receive greatest attention when selecting music for anxiety control.

  20. ABC relaxation theory and the factor structure of relaxation states, recalled relaxation activities, dispositions, and motivations.

    PubMed

    Smith, J C; Wedell, A B; Kolotylo, C J; Lewis, J E; Byers, K Y; Segin, C M

    2000-06-01

    ABC Relaxation Theory proposes 15 psychological relaxation-related states (R-States): Sleepiness, Disengagement, Physical Relaxation, Mental Quiet, Rested/Refreshed, At Ease/At Peace, Energized, Aware, Joy, Thankfulness and Love, Prayerfulness, Childlike Innocence, Awe and Wonder, Mystery, and Timeless/Boundless/Infinite. The present study summarizes the results of 13 separate factor analyses of immediate relaxation-related states, states associated with recalled relaxation activities, relaxation dispositions, and relaxation motivations on a combined sample of 1,904 individuals (group average ages ranged from 28-40 yr.). Four exploratory factor analyses of Smith Relaxation Inventories yielded 15 items that most consistently and exclusively load (generally at least .70) on six replicated factors. These items included happy, joyful, energized, rested, at peace, warm, limp, silent, quiet, dozing, drowsy, prayerful, mystery, distant, and indifferent. Subsequent factor analyses restricted to these items and specifying six factors were performed on 13 different data sets. Each yielded the same six-factor solution: Factor 1: Centered Positive Affect, Factor 2: Sleepiness, Factor 3: Disengagement, Factor 4: Physical Relaxation, Factor 5: Mental Quiet, and Factor 6: Spiritual. Implications for ABC Relaxation Theory are discussed.

  1. Rat gastroduodenal motility in vivo: interaction of GABA and VIP in control of spontaneous relaxations.

    PubMed

    Krantis, A; Mattar, K; Glasgow, I

    1998-11-01

    Spontaneous relaxations occurring within motor activity in the rat gastroduodenum in vivo can be distinguished by their dependence on either nitric oxide (NO) or ATP. We examined the interaction of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) within pathways controlling this activity in the antrum (S) and duodenum (D) of anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, using miniaturized extraluminal foil strain gauges oriented perpendicular to (S1, D1) or in the axis of (S2) the circular smooth muscle. The NO synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10 mg/kg iv) attenuated (P < 0.05) antral relaxations and, in the duodenum, nonpropagating "intergroup" relaxations. The GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (350 micrograms/kg sc) had similar effects. The GABAA agonist 3-amino-1-propanesulfonic acid stimulated L-NAME-sensitive relaxations at S1 and D1. Propagating "grouped" responses were unchanged. VIP (6 micrograms/kg iv) always induced a relaxation of the duodenum, which was attenuated by bicuculline and L-NAME. VIP caused simultaneous responses at S1 and S2; however, the antrum displayed either contraction or relaxation in response to VIP. All antral relaxations in response to VIP were attenuated (P < 0. 05) by L-NAME; however, only VIP-induced relaxations at S1 were sensitive to bicuculline. VIP-induced contractions were also unaffected. GABAA receptors mediate the pathway(s) controlling NO-related spontaneous relaxations of the antrum and duodenal circular muscle. All VIP-induced relaxations are mediated by NO. Spontaneous relaxations of the rat gastroduodenum include responses that involve a GABAAergic NO-related pathway, which is targeted by VIP. In addition, VIP can target NO relaxations of the antrum via other pathways.

  2. Calcium diffusion in uterine smooth muscle sheets

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The potassium contracture in the longitudinal muscle of estrogen- treated rat uterus was kinetically investigated. The rates of tension development after Ca addition and relaxation after Ca removal were measured under the high-potassium depolarization. Both rates decreased with an increase in preparation thickness. The relaxation rate had only a slight dependence on temperature. On the contrary, both relaxation and contraction rates in a contraction induced by an electrical stimulation strongly depended on temperature, but not on preparation size. These results suggest that the Ca diffusion process in the extracellular space is the rate-limiting step in relaxation of Ca- dependent contracture under potassium depolarization. The diffusion model, in which the effect of the unstirred layer was considered, could quantitatively explain the experimental results. The apparent diffusion coefficient in the muscle sheet was estimated to be approximately 3 x 10(-7) cm2/s. The difference from that in aqueous solution is discussed. PMID:7119732

  3. Effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine on the dorsal muscle of the leech (hirudo medicinalis)

    PubMed Central

    Schain, R. J.

    1961-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine has an inhibiting effect on the leech muscle. It reduces the contractions produced by acetylcholine or nicotine and accelerates the relaxation of the muscle when these substances are washed out. This acceleration of relaxation allows a more rapid assay of acetylcholine in this preparation. PMID:13747232

  4. A Fresh Look at Potential Mechanisms of Change in Applied Relaxation for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes-Skelton, Sarah A.; Usmani, Aisha; Lee, Jonathan K.; Roemer, Lizabeth; Orsillo, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Applied relaxation (AR), which involves noticing early signs of anxiety and responding with a relaxation response, is an empirically supported treatment for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). However, research on hypothesized mechanisms of AR (e.g., reduced muscle tension) has been mixed, making it likely that additional mechanisms are…

  5. Development of relaxation turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    Relaxation turbulence models have been intensively studied. The complete time dependent mass averaged Navier-Stokes equations have been solved for flow into a two dimensional compression corner. A new numerical scheme has been incorporated into the developed computed code with an attendant order of magnitude reduction in computation time. Computed solutions are compared with experimental measurements of Law for supersonic flow. Details of the relaxation process have been studied; several different relaxation models, including different relaxation processes and varying relaxation length, are tested and compared. Then a parametric study has been conducted in which both Reynolds number and wedge angle are varied. To assess effects of Reynolds number and wedge angle, the parametric study includes the comparison of computed separation location and upstream extent of pressure rise; numerical results are also compared with the measurements of surface pressure, skin friction and mean velocity field.

  6. THE EXCRETION OF CARBON DIOXIDE BY RELAXED AND CONTRACTED SEA ANEMONES

    PubMed Central

    Parker, G. H.

    1922-01-01

    1. The metabolism of the sea anemone Metridium marginatum Edw. was measured in four states, relaxed, relaxing, contracted, and contracting, by means of an Osterhout respiratory apparatus. The basis of measurement was the number of hundred-thousandths of a milligram of carbon dioxide excreted per second by a gram of living sea anemone. 2. In the relaxed state this varied from 6.1 to 4.4+ and averaged 5.43–. 3. In a comparison of the relaxed and contracted states the amount of carbon dioxide excreted was found to beabout the same; in one instance in relaxation 4.2 and in contraction 4.1+; in another in relaxation 7.8+ and 7.9– and in contraction 8.1–. 4. In a comparison of the three states relaxed, relaxing, and contracting, the first two were found to average about the same, 4.8+ and 4.6– respectively and the last proved to be appreciably higher 7.1–. 5. It is, therefore, concluded that the process of relaxing and the states of relaxation and of contraction are accompanied by no unusual metabolism, but that in the operation of contracting the metabolism becomes about half again as intense as that characteristic of the other states. 6. The maintenance of the contracted state in Metridium for days at a time without an increase of metabolism indicates that its musculature is of the type known as tonus muscle. 7. In tonus muscle, contraction is accomplished by an active shortening of the myofibrils, extension by a passive drawing out of these fibrils through the distension of the adjacent cavities, etc., and the continued maintenance of any particular state of shortening by some form of catch mechanism in the muscle, such, possibly, as the gelation of its sarcoplasm. PMID:19871978

  7. Energetics, mechanics and molecular engineering of calcium cycling in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Rall, Jack A

    2005-01-01

    During muscle contraction and relaxation, Ca2+ moves through a cycle. About 20 to 40% of the ATP utilized in a twitch or a tetanus is utilized by the SR Ca2+ pump to sequester Ca2+. Parvalbumin is a soluble Ca2+ binding protein that functions in parallel with the SR Ca2+ pump to promote relaxation in rapidly contracting and relaxing skeletal muscles, especially at low temperatures. The rate of Ca2+ dissociation from troponin C, once thought to be much more rapid than the rate of relaxation, is likely to be similar to the rate of cross-bridge detachment and to the rate of muscle relaxation under some conditions. During the past fifty years, great progress has been made in understanding the Ca2+ cycle during skeletal muscle contraction and relaxation. Nonetheless, there are still mysteries waiting to be unraveled.

  8. Synchronous monitoring of muscle dynamics and muscle force for maximum isometric tetanus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakir Hossain, M.; Grill, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Skeletal muscle is a classic example of a biological soft matter . At both macro and microscopic levels, skeletal muscle is exquisitely oriented for force generation and movement. In addition to the dynamics of contracting and relaxing muscle which can be monitored with ultrasound, variations in the muscle force are also expected to be monitored. To observe such force and sideways expansion variations synchronously for the skeletal muscle a novel detection scheme has been developed. As already introduced for the detection of sideways expansion variations of the muscle, ultrasonic transducers are mounted sideways on opposing positions of the monitored muscle. To detect variations of the muscle force, angle of pull of the monitored muscle has been restricted by the mechanical pull of the sonic force sensor. Under this condition, any variation in the time-of-flight (TOF) of the transmitted ultrasonic signals can be introduced by the variation of the path length between the transducers. The observed variations of the TOF are compared to the signals obtained by ultrasound monitoring for the muscle dynamics. The general behavior of the muscle dynamics and muscle force shows almost an identical concept. Since muscle force also relates the psychological boosting-up effects, the influence of boosting-up on muscle force and muscle dynamics can also be quantified form this study. Length-tension or force-length and force-velocity relationship can also be derived quantitatively with such monitoring.

  9. Phentolamine mesylate relaxes rabbit corpus cavernosum by a nonadrenergic, noncholinergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Vemulapalli, S; Kurowski, S

    2001-02-01

    The contribution of NO-cGMP dependent pathway to phentolamine mesylate-evoked nonadrenergic, noncholinergic relaxation of rabbit corpus cavernosum was investigated in vitro. Stimulation of nonadrenergic, noncholinergic neurons of the rabbit corpus cavernosum elicited frequency-related relaxation that was significantly attenuated by L-NAME (NO synthase inhibitor) or ODQ (an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase). Moreover, tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, abolished the electrical field stimulation-induced relaxation of rabbit corpus cavernosum, suggesting that neuronal release of NO mediates relaxation to electrical field stimulation. Phentolamine mesylate (30 and 100 nM) dose-dependently enhanced electrical field stimulation-induced relaxation of the rabbit corpus cavernosum. Prazosin (30 microM) and yohimbine (30 microM) failed to affect phentolamine mesylate-mediated nonadrenergic, noncholinergic rabbit penile smooth muscle relaxation, suggesting that phentolamine relaxes rabbit corpus cavernosum independent of alpha-adrenergic receptor blockade. In contrast, pretreatment of the rabbit cavernosal strips with L-NAME significantly-attenuated electrical field stimulation produced relaxations to phentolamine mesylate, suggesting that phentolamine mesylate relaxes rabbit corpus cavernosum by activating NO synthase. The data suggest that phentolamine mesylate relaxes nonadrenergic noncholinergic neurons of the rabbit corpus cavernosum by activating NO synthase and is independent of alpha-adrenergic receptor blockade.

  10. Pelvic muscles during rest: responses to pelvic muscle exercise.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C; Dougherty, M C; Yarandi, H

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study pelvic muscle changes in the resting phase between voluntary contractions (during pelvic muscle assessment) and in response to pelvic muscle exercise (PME) through secondary analysis of data. The sample consisted of healthy women (N = 38) aged 35 to 54. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference in resting pressure within each assessment (F = 2.92, p < .04). A significant difference in resting pressures within subjects was found (F = 3.54, p < .02). Within-subject variance suggests exercises performed without a warmup may result in incomplete relaxation prior to contraction. Significant change between baseline and Level 1 of the graded PME program suggests slow relaxation of untrained muscles. Increases in resting pressure at Levels 3 and 4 may be a more accurate reflection of muscle hypertrophy. The results of this research indicate that care should be taken in establishing the point from which changes during contractions are measured. It is recommended that the resting pressure be used. Exercise continued for more than 3 or 4 weeks accounts for nearly all strength gains and explains the increases in resting pressure at PME Levels 3 and 4.

  11. The influence of external compression on muscle blood flow during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Styf, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Intramuscular pressures and muscle blood flow were measured in the anterior tibial muscle during dynamic concentric exercise in 14 subjects. Pressures were recorded by the microcapillary infusion method and muscle blood flow by the 133-Xenon clearance technique. Muscle blood flow during constant exercise decreased from 34.5 (SD = 10.3) to 10.6 (SD = 4.9) ml/100 g/min (P less than 0.001) when muscle relaxation pressure was increased from 13.5 (SD = 2.7) to 39.9 (SD = 9.0) mm Hg by external compression. Muscle relaxation pressure during exercise is the intramuscular pressure between contractions. External compression of the lower limb during exercise impedes muscle blood flow by increasing muscle relaxation pressure. The experimental model seems suitable to study the influence of external compression by knee braces on intramuscular pressure during exercise.

  12. Stress relaxation in heterogeneous polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witten, T. A.

    1992-05-01

    When heterogeneous polymers such as diblock copolymers form a microdomain phase, an imposed strain gives rise to stress from two sources, and several mechanisms of stress relaxation. The release of stress by disentanglement is strongly influenced by the effective confinement of the junction points to the domain boundaries and by the stretching of the chains. Using accepted notions of entangled chain kinetics, it is argued that the relaxation time for sliding stress is exponential in the chainlength to the 7/9 power. A method for calculating the frequency-dependent dynamic modulus is sketched. Despite the slow relaxation implied by these mechanisms, it appears possible to create domains of high energy.

  13. Improved Characterization of Healthy and Malignant Tissue by NMR Line-Shape Relaxation Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Peemoeller, H.; Shenoy, R.K.; Pintar, M.M.; Kydon, D.W.; Inch, W.R.

    1982-01-01

    We performed a relaxation-line-shape correlation NMR experiment on muscle, liver, kidney, and spleen tissues of healthy mice and of mouse tumor tissue. In each tissue studied, five spin groups were resolved and characterized by their relaxation parameters. We report a previously uncharacterized semi-solid spin group and discuss briefly the value of this method for the identification of malignant tissues. PMID:7104438

  14. Relaxation of intrapulmonary artery and vein by nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators and cyclic GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J.C.; Ignarro, L.J.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    The present study examines the relationship between tissue cyclic nucleotide levels and relaxation of bovine intrapulmonary arterial and venous smooth muscle in response to nitroglycerin, nitroprusside, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine and isoproterenol. Recent studies have suggested that cyclic GMP may be involved in the relaxation of vascular smooth muscle produced by nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators and that S-nitrosothiols may act as intermediates of the latter agents. In the present study, nitroglycerin, nitroprusside and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine were more potent as relaxants of venous than arterial segments. Each of these agents elevated tissue cyclic GMP levels, but not cyclic AMP levels, before relaxation. These nitrogen oxide-containing agents were more potent as elevators of cyclic GMP levels in venous than arterial tissue and this correlated generally with their effects on vascular smooth muscle tone. Methylene blue antagonized both relaxation and increased cyclic GMP levels elicited by nitroglycerin, nitroprusside and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine. In contrast to the nitrogen oxide vasodilators, 8-bromo-cyclic GMP was equally effective in reducing induced tone in arterial or venous segments. Similarly, isoproterenol relaxed arterial and venous segments with equivalent sensitivities. Relaxation by isoproterenol was preceded by or occurred concomitantly with increased levels of cyclic AMP but not cyclic GMP and both effects were antagonized by propranolol. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that vascular smooth muscle relaxation in response to nitrogen oxide-containing vasodilators or isoproterenol may be mediated or modulated by the intracellular accumulation of cyclic GMP or cyclic AMP, respectively.

  15. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammatory diseases of muscle (such as polymyositis or dermatomyositis ) Diseases of the connective tissue and blood vessels ( ... disease that involves inflammation and a skin rash ( dermatomyositis ) Inherited muscle disorder ( Duchenne muscular dystrophy ) Inflammation of ...

  16. Evaluation of muscle injury using magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBlanc, A. D.; Jaweed, M.; Evans, H.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate spin echo T2 relaxation time changes in thigh muscles after intense eccentric exercise in healthy men. Spin echo and calculated T2 relaxation time images of the thighs were obtained on several occasions after exercise of one limb; the contralateral limb served as control. Muscle damage was verified by elevated levels of serum creatine kinase (CK). Thirty percent of the time no exercise effect was discernible on the magnetic resonance (MR) images. In all positive MR images (70%) the semitendinosus muscle was positive, while the biceps femoris, short head, and gracilis muscles were also positive in 50% and 25% of the total cases, respectively. The peak T2 relaxation time and serum CK were correlated (r = 0.94, p<0.01); temporal changes in muscle T2 relaxation time and serum CK were similar, although T2 relaxation time remained positive after serum CK returned to background levels. We conclude that magnetic resonance imaging can serve as a useful tool in the evaluation of eccentric exercise muscle damage by providing a quantitative indicator of damage and its resolution as well as the specific areas and muscles.

  17. [Tensiomyography as method of evaluating muscles status].

    PubMed

    Markulincić, Branko; Muraja, Sonja

    2007-01-01

    Sports results, as well as results of rehabilitation treatments are closely related to a detailed, strictly individualized programme of sports and rehabilitation training. It is vitally important to monitor and evaluate results constantly. Along with already standardized methods of evaluating neuromuscular system, such as electrodinamometry and isokinetic dinamometry on Cybex; tensiomyography (TMG) as method of assessing muscles status has been introduced. TMG is non-invasive, selective, objective method designed to measure time of activation, delay time as well as contraction time, relaxation time and intesity of muscle contraction in conditions of submaximum electrostimulation. The method is based on measuring the muscle belly enlargements by a superficialy placed precise electromagnetic sensor.TMG enables the examination of some otherwise inaccessible muscles like gluteus maximus muscle and also selective evaluation of single muscle head (for example m. vastus medialis, m. vastus lateralis and m. rectus femoris of m. quadriceps). Estimation of harmonisation between agonistic and antagonistic muscles, synergistic muscles and same muscles on left and right side of the body, is based on muscles biomechanical properties i.e. parameters, calculated from TMG response. Total harmonization (100%) is hardly ever the case, the lowest level sufficient muscle groups functionality is defined by 80% for lateral and 65% for agonistic/synergistic harmonisation. Harmonization below this level either reflects past injures, muscle adaptation or indicates increased exposure to injury.

  18. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  19. Stress Relaxation of Interim Restoratives.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-18

    unmodified zinc oxide- eugenol cement were more favorable than those of IRM and Cavit. The plastic behavior of gutta-percha temporary stopping precluded assessment of its relaxation at temperatures in excess of 22P C. (Author)

  20. Relaxation labeling using modular operators

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, J.S.; Frei, W.

    1983-01-01

    Probabilistic relaxation labeling has been shown to be useful in image processing, pattern recognition, and artificial intelligence. The approaches taken to date have been encumbered with computationally extensive summations which generally prevent real-time operation and/or easy hardware implementation. The authors present a new and unique approach to the relaxation labeling problem using modular, VLSI-oriented hierarchical complex operators. One of the fundamental concepts of this work is the representation of the probability distribution of the possible labels for a given object (pixel) as an ellipse, which may be summed with neighboring object's distribution ellipses, resulting in a new, relaxed label space. The mathematical development of the elliptical approach will be presented and compared to more classical approaches, and a hardware block diagram that shows the implementation of the relaxation scheme using vlsi chips will be presented. Finally, results will be shown which illustrate applications of the modular scheme, iteratively, to both edges and lines. 13 references.

  1. Noninvasive analysis of human neck muscle function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, M. S.; Meyer, R. A.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Feeback, D. L.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Muscle use evoked by exercise was determined by quantifying shifts in signal relaxation times of T2-weighted magnetic resonance images. Images were collected at rest and after exercise at each of two intensities (moderate and intense) for each of four head movements: 1) extension, 2) flexion, 3) rotation, and 4) lateral flexion. OBJECTIVE. This study examined the intensity and pattern of neck muscle use evoked by various movements of the head. The results will help elucidate the pathophysiology, and thus methods for treating disorders of the cervical musculoskeletal system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Exercise-induced contrast shifts in T2 has been shown to indicate muscle use during the activity. The noninvasive nature of magnetic resonance imaging appears to make it an ideal approach for studying the function of the complex neuromuscular system of the neck. METHODS. The extent of T2 increase was examined to gauge how intensely nine different neck muscles or muscle pairs were used in seven subjects. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation was assessed to infer the pattern of use among and within individual neck muscles or muscle pairs. RESULTS. Signal relaxation increased with exercise intensity for each head movement. The absolute and relative cross-sectional area of muscle showing a shift in signal relaxation also increased with exercise load. Neck muscles or muscle pairs extensively used to perform each head movement were: extension--semispinalis capitis and cervicis and splenius capitis; flexion--sternocleidomastoid and longus capitis and colli; rotation--splenius capitis, levator scapulae, scalenus, semispinalis capitis ipsilateral to the rotation, and sternocleidomastoid contralateral; and lateral flexion--sternocleidomastoid CONCLUSION. The results of this study, in part, agree with the purported functions of neck muscles derived from anatomic location. This also was true for the few

  2. Unaltered caffeine-induced relaxation in the aorta of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP).

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Miyake, Yoshimasa; Kashimoto, Takafumi; Sunano, Satoru

    2002-04-01

    Caffeine-induced relaxation was studied in aortic segments from Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) and stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Although acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent relaxation was impaired in preparations from SHRSP, the relaxation induced by caffeine was identical in both groups. In addition, caffeine-induced relaxation was not affected by removal of the endothelium in either group. The relaxation induced by N6,2'-O-dibutyryladenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (db-cAMP), a membrane-permeable analog of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was identical in both groups. No significant difference was observed in the increase in cAMP content induced by caffeine in the aortic smooth muscle between the groups, although the basal content was significantly higher in preparations from SHRSP. These results suggest that the relaxation induced by caffeine in these preparations is brought about by its direct effect on smooth muscle and that the response of the smooth muscle to caffeine, including cAMP production, is not altered in preparations from SHRSP compared with those from WKY.

  3. Laparoscopic surgery and muscle relaxants: is deep block helpful?

    PubMed

    Kopman, Aaron F; Naguib, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that providing deep neuromuscular block (a posttetanic count of 1 or more, but a train-of-four [TOF] count of zero) when compared with moderate block (TOF counts of 1-3) for laparoscopic surgery would allow for the use of lower inflation pressures while optimizing surgical space and enhancing patient safety. We conducted a literature search on 6 different medical databases using 3 search strategies in each database in an attempt to find data substantiating this proposition. In addition, we studied the reference lists of the articles retrieved in the search and of other relevant articles known to the authors. There is some evidence that maintaining low inflation pressures during intra-abdominal laparoscopic surgery may reduce postoperative pain. Unfortunately most of the studies that come to these conclusions give few if any details as to the anesthetic protocol or the management of neuromuscular block. Performing laparoscopic surgery under low versus standard pressure pneumoperitoneum is associated with no difference in outcome with respect to surgical morbidity, conversion to open cholecystectomy, hemodynamic effects, length of hospital stay, or patient satisfaction. There is a limit to what deep neuromuscular block can achieve. Attempts to perform laparoscopic cholecystectomy at an inflation pressure of 8 mm Hg are associated with a 40% failure rate even at posttetanic counts of 1 or less. Well-designed studies that ask the question "is deep block superior to moderate block vis-à-vis surgical operating conditions" are essentially nonexistent. Without exception, all the peer-reviewed studies we uncovered which state that they investigated this issue have such serious flaws in their protocols that the authors' conclusions are suspect. However, there is evidence that abdominal compliance was not increased by a significant amount when deep block was established when compared with moderate neuromuscular block. Maintenance of deep block for the duration of the pneumoperitoneum presents a problem for clinicians who do not have access to sugammadex. Reversal of block with neostigmine at a time when no response to TOF stimulation can be elicited is slow and incomplete and increases the potential for postoperative residual neuromuscular block. The obligatory addition of sugammadex to any anesthetic protocol based on the continuous maintenance of deep block is not without associated caveats. First, monitoring of neuromuscular function is still essential and second, antagonism of deep block necessitates doses of sugammadex of ≥4.0 mg/kg. Thus, maintenance of deep block has substantial economic repercussions. There are little objective data to support the proposition that deep neuromuscular block (when compared with less intense block; TOF counts of 1-3) contributes to better patient outcome or improves surgical operating conditions.

  4. Vacancy Relaxation in Cubic Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girifalco, L. A.; Weizer, V. G.

    1960-01-01

    The configuration of the atoms surrounding a vacancy in four face-centered cubic and three body-centered cubic metals has been computed, using a pairwise, central-force model in which the energy of interaction between two atoms was taken to have the form of a Morse function. Only radial relaxations were considered. The first and second nearest-neighbor relaxations for the face-centered systems were found to be: Pb (1.42,-0.43), Ni (2.14,-0.39), Cu(2.24,-0.40) and Ca (2.73,-0.41, expressed in percentages of normal distances. For the body-centered systems the relaxations out to the fourth nearest neighbors to the vacancy were: Fe (6.07,-2.12, -0.25, -), Ba (7.85, -2.70, 0.70, -0.33) and Na (10.80, -3.14, 3.43, -0.20). The positive signs indicate relaxation toward the vacancy and the negative signs indicate relaxation away from the vacancy. The energies of relaxation (eV) are: Pb (0.162), Ni (0.626), Cu (0.560), Ca (0.400), Fe (1.410), Ba (0.950) and Na (0.172).

  5. A study of molecular dynamics and freezing phase transition in tissues by proton spin relaxation.

    PubMed Central

    Rustgi, S N; Peemoeller, H; Thompson, R T; Kydon, D W; Pintar, M M

    1978-01-01

    Muscle, spleen, and kidney tissues from 4-wk-old C57 black mice were studied by proton magnetic resonance. Spin-lattice relaxation times at high fields and in the rotating frame, as well as the spin-spin relaxation times, are reported as a function of temperature in the liquid and frozen phase. Motions of large molecules and of water molecules and their changes at the freezing phase transition are studied. The shortcomings of the two-state fast-exchange relaxation model are discussed. PMID:667294

  6. Relaxation of Isolated Ventricular Cardiomyocytes by a Voltage-Dependent Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridge, John H. B.; Spitzer, Kenneth W.; Ershler, Philip R.

    1988-08-01

    Cell contraction and relaxation were measured in single voltage-clamped guinea pig cardiomyocytes to investigate the contribution of sarcolemmal Na+-Ca2+ exchange to mechanical relaxation. Cells clamped from -80 to 0 millivolts displayed initial phasic and subsequent tonic contractions; caffeine reduced or abolished the phasic and enlarged the tonic contraction. The rate of relaxation from tonic contractions was steeply voltage-dependent and was significantly slowed in the absence of a sarcolemmal Na+ gradient. Tonic contractions elicited in the absence of a Na+ gradient promptly relaxed when external Na+ was applied, reflecting activation of Na+-Ca2+ exchange. It appears that a voltage-dependent Na+-Ca2+ exchange can rapidly mechanically relax mammalian heart muscle.

  7. Longitudinal Muscle Dysfunction in Achalasia Esophagus and Its Relevance

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Bhargava, Valmik

    2013-01-01

    Muscularis propria of the esophagus is organized into circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Goal of this review is to summarize the role of longitudinal muscle in physiology and pathophysiology of esophageal sensory and motor function. Simultaneous manometry and ultrasound imaging that measure circular and longitudinal muscle contraction respectively reveal that during peristalsis 2 layers of the esophagus contract in perfect synchrony. On the other hand, during transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES), longitudinal muscle contracts independently of circular muscle. Recent studies provide novel insights, i.e., longitudinal muscle contraction of the esophagus induces LES relaxation and possibly descending relaxation of the esophagus. In achalasia esophagus and other motility disorders there is discoordination between the 2 muscle layers. Longitudinal muscle contraction patterns are different in the recently described three types of achalasia identified by high-resolution manometry. Robust contraction of the longitudinal muscle in type II achalasia causes pan-esophageal pressurization and is the mechanism of whatever little esophageal emptying that take place in the absence of peristalsis and impaired LES relaxation. It may be that preserved longitudinal muscle contraction is also the reason for superior outcome to medical/surgical therapy in type II achalasia esophagus. Prolonged contractions of longitudinal muscles of the esophagus is a possible mechanism of heartburn and "angina like" pain seen in esophageal motility disorders and possibly achalasia esophagus. Novel techniques to record longitudinal muscle contraction are on the horizon. Neuro-pharmacologic control of circular and longitudinal muscles is different, which provides an important opportunity for the development of novel pharmacological therapies to treat sensory and motor disorders of the esophagus. PMID:23667744

  8. Bio-inspired Hybrid Carbon Nanotube Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyeob; Kwon, Cheong Hoon; Lee, Changsun; An, Jieun; Phuong, Tam Thi Thanh; Park, Sun Hwa; Lima, Márcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kang, Tong Mook; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2016-01-01

    There has been continuous progress in the development for biomedical engineering systems of hybrid muscle generated by combining skeletal muscle and artificial structure. The main factor affecting the actuation performance of hybrid muscle relies on the compatibility between living cells and their muscle scaffolds during cell culture. Here, we developed a hybrid muscle powered by C2C12 skeletal muscle cells based on the functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) sheets coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) to achieve biomimetic actuation. This hydrophilic hybrid muscle is physically durable in solution and responds to electric field stimulation with flexible movement. Furthermore, the biomimetic actuation when controlled by electric field stimulation results in movement similar to that of the hornworm by patterned cell culture method. The contraction and relaxation behavior of the PEDOT/MWCNT-based hybrid muscle is similar to that of the single myotube movement, but has faster relaxation kinetics because of the shape-maintenance properties of the freestanding PEDOT/MWCNT sheets in solution. Our development provides the potential possibility for substantial innovation in the next generation of cell-based biohybrid microsystems. PMID:27220918

  9. Bio-inspired Hybrid Carbon Nanotube Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Hyeob; Kwon, Cheong Hoon; Lee, Changsun; An, Jieun; Phuong, Tam Thi Thanh; Park, Sun Hwa; Lima, Márcio D.; Baughman, Ray H.; Kang, Tong Mook; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2016-05-01

    There has been continuous progress in the development for biomedical engineering systems of hybrid muscle generated by combining skeletal muscle and artificial structure. The main factor affecting the actuation performance of hybrid muscle relies on the compatibility between living cells and their muscle scaffolds during cell culture. Here, we developed a hybrid muscle powered by C2C12 skeletal muscle cells based on the functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) sheets coated with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) to achieve biomimetic actuation. This hydrophilic hybrid muscle is physically durable in solution and responds to electric field stimulation with flexible movement. Furthermore, the biomimetic actuation when controlled by electric field stimulation results in movement similar to that of the hornworm by patterned cell culture method. The contraction and relaxation behavior of the PEDOT/MWCNT-based hybrid muscle is similar to that of the single myotube movement, but has faster relaxation kinetics because of the shape-maintenance properties of the freestanding PEDOT/MWCNT sheets in solution. Our development provides the potential possibility for substantial innovation in the next generation of cell-based biohybrid microsystems.

  10. An analysis on muscle tone of lower limb muscles on flexible flat foot.

    PubMed

    Um, Gi-Mai; Wang, Joong-San; Park, Si-Eun

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine differences in the muscle tone and stiffness of leg muscles according to types of flexible flat foot. [Subjects and Methods] For 30 subjects 10 in a normal foot group (NFG), 10 in group with both flexible flat feet (BFFG), and 10 in a group with flexible flat feet on one side (OFFG), myotonometry was used to measure the muscle tone and stiffness of the tibialis anterior muscle (TA), the rectus femoris muscle (RF), the medial gastrocnemius (MG), and the long head of the biceps femoris muscle (BF) of both lower extremities. [Results] In the measurement results, only the stiffness of TA and MG of the NFG and the BFFG showed significant differences. The muscle tone and stiffness were highest in the BFFG, followed by the OFFG and NFG, although the difference was insignificant. In the case of the OFFG, there was no significant difference in muscle tone and stiffness compared to that in the NGF and the BFFG. Furthermore, in the NFG, the non-dominant leg showed greater muscle tone and stiffness than the dominant leg, although the difference was insignificant. [Conclusion] During the relax condition, the flexible flat foot generally showed a greater muscle tone and stiffness of both lower extremities compared to the normal foot. The stiffness was particularly higher in the TA and MG muscles. Therefore, the muscle tone and stiffness of the lower extremity muscles must be considered in the treatment of flat foot.

  11. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  12. CPMG relaxation rate dispersion in dipole fields around capillaries.

    PubMed

    Kurz, F T; Kampf, T; Buschle, L R; Heiland, S; Schlemmer, H-P; Bendszus, M; Ziener, C H

    2016-09-01

    Transverse relaxation rates for Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequences increase with inter-echo time in presence of microscopic magnetic field inhomogeneities due to nuclear spin diffusion. For a weak field approximation that includes diffusion effects, the CPMG relaxation rate shift for proton diffusion around capillaries in muscle tissue can be expressed in terms of a frequency correlation function and the inter-echo time. The present work provides an analytical expression for the local relaxation rate shift that is dependent on local blood volume fraction, diffusion coefficient, capillary radius, susceptibility difference and inter-echo time. Asymptotic regions of the model are in agreement with previous modeling results of Brooks et al., Luz et al. and Ziener et al. In comparison with simulation data, the model shows an equal or better accuracy than established approximations. Also, model behavior coincides with experimental data for rat heart and skeletal muscle. The present work provides analytical tools to extract sub-voxel information about uniform capillary networks that can be used to study capillary organization or micro-circulatory remodeling.

  13. Correlation between neck slope angle and deep cervical flexor muscle thickness in healthy participants.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Suehiro, Tadanobu; Kurozumi, Chiharu; Ono, Koji; Ando, Suguru; Watanabe, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the correlation between neck slope angle and deep cervical flexor muscle thickness in healthy subjects. Forty-two healthy male (20.7 ± 2.6 years old) participated in this study. Neck slope angle was measured in a relaxed sitting posture. The deep cervical flexor muscle thickness was measured in a relaxed supine posture. The correlations between neck slope angle and normalized muscle thickness relative to body mass index were determined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. There was a moderate positive correlation between neck slope angle and normalized muscle thickness (r = 0.414, P = 0.006). The result demonstrated that participants with lower neck slope angles had smaller muscle thicknesses of the deep cervical flexor muscles. It appears that the deep cervical flexor muscle thickness might be associated with neck slope angle in a relaxed sitting posture.

  14. High-speed cinematography of muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    HAUPT, R E; WALL, D M

    1962-07-13

    Motion pictures of the "twitch" of an excised frog gastrocnemius muscle taken at rates of 6000 frames per second provide a means of very accurately timing the phases. The extreme "slow motion" reveals surface phenomena not observable by other techniques. Evidence of "active relaxation" is suggested by results of frame-by-frame analysis.

  15. A cellular control architecture for compliant artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Odhner, Lael U; Ueda, Jun; Asada, H Harry

    2006-01-01

    Dividing an artificial muscle material into a network of small cells could provide performance benefits and eliminate unwanted behaviors such as hysteresis. This paper presents a scheme for the position control or compliance control of an artificial muscle having this kind of cellular structure. Each cell contracts or relaxes probabilistically in response to a global feedback control loop, which measures only the aggregate force and displacement of the muscle. The stochastic nature of the cells produces smooth, reliable global behavior in the artificial muscle. By choosing a control law such that the expected response of the artificial muscle is equal to the desired response, good tracking control is achieved.

  16. Ellipsoidal Relaxation of Deformed Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Lira, Rafael B.; Riske, Karin A.; Dimova, Rumiana; Lin, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Theoretical analysis and experimental quantification on the ellipsoidal relaxation of vesicles are presented. The current work reveals the simplicity and universal aspects of this process. The Helfrich formula is shown to apply to the dynamic relaxation of moderate-to-high tension membranes, and a closed-form solution is derived which predicts the vesicle aspect ratio as a function of time. Scattered data are unified by a time scale, which leads to a similarity behavior, governed by a distinctive solution for each vesicle type. Two separate regimes in the relaxation are identified, namely, the "entropic" and the "constant-tension" regimes. The bending rigidity and the initial membrane tension can be simultaneously extracted from the data analysis, posing the current approach as an effective means for the mechanical analysis of biomembranes.

  17. Relaxed Poisson cure rate models.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cordeiro, Gauss M; Cancho, Vicente G; Balakrishnan, N

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to make the standard promotion cure rate model (Yakovlev and Tsodikov, ) more flexible by assuming that the number of lesions or altered cells after a treatment follows a fractional Poisson distribution (Laskin, ). It is proved that the well-known Mittag-Leffler relaxation function (Berberan-Santos, ) is a simple way to obtain a new cure rate model that is a compromise between the promotion and geometric cure rate models allowing for superdispersion. So, the relaxed cure rate model developed here can be considered as a natural and less restrictive extension of the popular Poisson cure rate model at the cost of an additional parameter, but a competitor to negative-binomial cure rate models (Rodrigues et al., ). Some mathematical properties of a proper relaxed Poisson density are explored. A simulation study and an illustration of the proposed cure rate model from the Bayesian point of view are finally presented.

  18. Arsenic-induced dysfunction in relaxation of blood vessels.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Moo-Yeol; Jung, Byung-In; Chung, Seung-Min; Bae, Ok-Nam; Lee, Joo-Young; Park, Jung-Duck; Yang, Ji-Sun; Lee, Hyomin; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2003-01-01

    Several epidemiological studies have suggested that exposure to arsenic is strongly correlated with the development of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. To determine whether arsenic affects vasomotor tone in blood vessels, we investigated the effect of arsenic on vasorelaxation using isolated rat aortic rings in an organ-bath system. Treatment with arsenite inhibited acetylcholine-induced relaxation of the aortic rings in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas several other arsenic species did not have any effect. Consistent with these findings, the levels of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in the aortic rings were significantly reduced by arsenite treatment. In cultured human aortic endothelial cells, treatment with arsenite resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In addition, higher concentrations of arsenite decreased the relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside (an NO donor) and 8-Br-cGMP (a cGMP analog) in aortic rings without endothelium. These in vitro results indicate that arsenite is capable of suppressing relaxation in blood vessels by inhibiting eNOS activity in endothelial cells and by impairing the relaxation machinery in smooth muscle cells. In vivo studies revealed that the reduction of blood pressure by acetylcholine infusion was significantly suppressed after arsenite was administered intravenously to rats. These data suggest that an impairment of vasomotor tone due to arsenite exposure may be a contributing factor in the development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:12676608

  19. A mixed relaxed clock model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks’. PMID:27325829

  20. A mixed relaxed clock model.

    PubMed

    Lartillot, Nicolas; Phillips, Matthew J; Ronquist, Fredrik

    2016-07-19

    Over recent years, several alternative relaxed clock models have been proposed in the context of Bayesian dating. These models fall in two distinct categories: uncorrelated and autocorrelated across branches. The choice between these two classes of relaxed clocks is still an open question. More fundamentally, the true process of rate variation may have both long-term trends and short-term fluctuations, suggesting that more sophisticated clock models unfolding over multiple time scales should ultimately be developed. Here, a mixed relaxed clock model is introduced, which can be mechanistically interpreted as a rate variation process undergoing short-term fluctuations on the top of Brownian long-term trends. Statistically, this mixed clock represents an alternative solution to the problem of choosing between autocorrelated and uncorrelated relaxed clocks, by proposing instead to combine their respective merits. Fitting this model on a dataset of 105 placental mammals, using both node-dating and tip-dating approaches, suggests that the two pure clocks, Brownian and white noise, are rejected in favour of a mixed model with approximately equal contributions for its uncorrelated and autocorrelated components. The tip-dating analysis is particularly sensitive to the choice of the relaxed clock model. In this context, the classical pure Brownian relaxed clock appears to be overly rigid, leading to biases in divergence time estimation. By contrast, the use of a mixed clock leads to more recent and more reasonable estimates for the crown ages of placental orders and superorders. Altogether, the mixed clock introduced here represents a first step towards empirically more adequate models of the patterns of rate variation across phylogenetic trees.This article is part of the themed issue 'Dating species divergences using rocks and clocks'.

  1. Tonic muscle pain does not increase fusimotor drive to human leg muscles: implications for chronic muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Macefield, Vaughan G; Birznieks, Ingvars

    2013-06-01

    Experimental pain induced in animals has shown that noxious stimulation of group III and IV afferents increases the firing of muscle spindles via a reflex excitation of fusimotor (γ) motoneurones. Chronic muscle pain has been hypothesized to develop as a result of a vicious cycle involving this mechanism. In order to explore the effects of long-lasting muscle pain on the fusimotor system, single unit muscle spindle afferents were recorded from 15 subjects. Afferent activity was recorded from foot and ankle extensor muscles whilst infusing hypertonic saline into the tibialis anterior muscle of the ipsilateral leg, producing moderate-strong pain lasting for ∼60 min. A change in fusimotor drive was inferred by observing changes in the mean discharge rate of spontaneously active muscle spindle afferents. Homonymous and heteronymous muscles remained relaxed and showed no increase in activity, arguing against any fusimotor-driven increase in motor activity, and there was no net change in the firing of muscle spindle afferents. We conclude that long-lasting stimulation of group III and IV afferents fails to excite fusimotor neurones and increase muscle spindle discharge. Accordingly, the vicious cycle theory has no functional basis for the development of myalgia in human subjects.

  2. Passive mechanical properties of human gastrocnemius muscle tendon units, muscle fascicles and tendons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hoang, P D; Herbert, R D; Todd, G; Gorman, R B; Gandevia, S C

    2007-12-01

    This study provides the first in vivo measures of the passive length-tension properties of relaxed human muscle fascicles and their tendons. A new method was used to derive passive length-tension properties of human gastrocnemius muscle-tendon units from measures of ankle stiffness obtained at a range of knee angles. Passive length-tension curves of the muscle-tendon unit were then combined with ultrasonographic measures of muscle fascicle length and pennation to determine passive length-tension curves of the muscle fascicles and tendons. Mean slack lengths of the fascicles, tendons and whole muscle-tendon units were 3.3+/-0.5 cm, 39.5+/-1.6 cm and 42.3+/-1.5 cm, respectively (means +/- s.d., N=6). On average, the muscle-tendon units were slack (i.e. their passive tension was zero) over the shortest 2.3+/-1.2 cm of their range. With combined changes of knee and ankle angles, the maximal increase in length of the gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit above slack length was 6.7+/-1.9 cm, of which 52.4+/-11.7% was due to elongation of the tendon. Muscle fascicles and tendons underwent strains of 86.4+/-26.8% and 9.2+/-4.1%, respectively, across the physiological range of lengths. We conclude that the relaxed human gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit falls slack over about one-quarter of its in vivo length and that muscle fascicle strains are much greater than tendon strains. Nonetheless, because the tendons are much longer than the muscle fascicles, tendons contribute more than half of the total compliance of the muscle-tendon unit.

  3. Analog circuits for relaxation networks.

    PubMed

    Card, H

    1993-12-01

    Selected examples are presented of recent advances, primarily from the U.S. and Canada, in analog circuits for relaxation networks. Relaxation networks having feedback connections exhibit potentially greater computational power per neuron than feedforward networks. They are also more poorly understood especially with respect to learning algorithms. Examples are described of analog circuits for (i) supervised learning in deterministic Boltzmann machines, (ii) unsupervised competitive learning and feature maps and (iii) networks with resistive grids for vision and audition tasks. We also discuss recent progress on in-circuit learning and synaptic weight storage mechanisms.

  4. Artificial muscle: facts and fiction.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Marcus C

    2011-12-19

    Mechanical devices are sought to support insufficient or paralysed striated muscles including the failing heart. Nickel-titanium alloys (nitinol) present the following two properties: (i) super-elasticity, and (ii) the potential to assume different crystal structures depending on temperature and/or stress. Starting from the martensite state nitinol is able to resume the austenite form (state of low potential energy and high entropy) even against an external resistance. This one-way shape change is deployed in self-expanding vascular stents. Heating induces the force generating transformation from martensite to the austenite state while cooling induces relaxation back to the martensite state. This two-way shape change oscillating between the two states may be used in cyclically contracting support devices of silicon-coated nitinol wires. Such a contractile device sutured to the right atrium has been tested in vitro in a bench model and in vivo in sheep. The contraction properties of natural muscles, specifically of the myocardium, and the tight correlation with ATP production by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria is briefly outlined. Force development by the nitinol device cannot be smoothly regulated as in natural muscle. Its mechanical impact is forced onto the natural muscle regardless of the actual condition with regard to metabolism and Ca2+-homeostasis. The development of artificial muscle on the basis of nitinol wires is still in its infancy. The nitinol artificial muscle will have to prove its viability in the various clinical settings.

  5. Nitrergic relaxation of the horse corpus cavernosum. Role of cGMP.

    PubMed

    Recio, P; López, P G; Hernández, M; Prieto, D; Contreras, J; García-Sacristán, A

    1998-06-12

    The involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and the mechanisms mediating neurogenic relaxation were investigated in the horse corpus cavernosum. NADPH-diaphorase activity was expressed in nerve fibres around arteries and muscular bundles in the horse trabecular tissue. Relaxations in response to electrical field stimulation were tetrodotoxin (10(-6) M)-sensitive, indicating their neurogenic origin. The NO synthase inhibitor, L-NO-arginine (L-NO-Arg, 3 x 10(-5) M), abolished the electrically induced relaxations, which were significantly reversed by L-arginine (3 x 10(-3) M). Exogenous NO (10(-6)-10(-3) M) evoked relaxations which were unaffected by L-NO-Arg. 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 5 x 10(-6) M), an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase activation by NO, reduced the relaxations in response to electrical stimulation and exogenous NO. Iberiotoxin (3 x 10(-8) M) or apamin (5 x 10(-7) M), inhibitors of large and small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, respectively, and glibenclamide (3 x 10(-6) M), a blocker of ATP-sensitive K+ channels, failed to modify the relaxations with NO. It is suggested that NO is present in nerve fibres of the horse corpus cavernosum and relaxes smooth muscle through a guanylate cyclase-dependent mechanism. Neither Ca2+-activated nor ATP-sensitive K+ channels seem to be involved in these relaxations.

  6. Phospholemman does not participate in forskolin-induced swine carotid artery relaxation.

    PubMed

    Meeks, M K; Han, S; Tucker, A L; Rembold, C M

    2008-01-01

    Phosphorylation of phospholemman (PLM) on ser68 has been proposed to at least partially mediate cyclic AMP (cAMP) mediated relaxation of arterial smooth muscle. We evaluated the time course of the phosphorylation of phospholemman (PLM) on ser68, myosin regulatory light chains (MRLC) on ser19, and heat shock protein 20 (HSP20) on ser16 during a transient forskolin-induced relaxation of histamine-stimulated swine carotid artery. We also evaluated the dose response for forskolin- and nitroglycerin-induced relaxation in phenylephrine-stimulated PLM-/- and PLM+/+ mice. The time course for changes in ser19 MRLC dephosphorylation and ser16 HSP20 phosphorylation was appropriate to explain the forskolin-induced relaxation and the recontraction observed upon washout of forskolin. However, the time course for changes in ser68 PLM phosphorylation was too slow to explain forskolin-induced changes in force. There was no difference in the phenylephrine contractile dose response or in forskolin-induced relaxation dose response observed in PLM-/- and PLM+/+ aortae. In aortae precontracted with phenylephrine, nitroglycerin induced a slightly, but significantly greater relaxation in PLM-/- compared to PLM+/+ aortae. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that ser19 MRLC dephosphorylation and ser16 HSP20 phosphorylation are involved in forskolin-induced relaxation. Our data suggest that PLM phosphorylation is not significantly involved in forskolin-induced arterial relaxation.

  7. Hydrostatic compression in glycerinated rabbit muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ranatunga, K W; Fortune, N S; Geeves, M A

    1990-12-01

    Glycerinated muscle fibers isolated from rabbit psoas muscle, and a number of other nonmuscle elastic fibers including glass, rubber, and collagen, were exposed to hydrostatic pressures of up to 10 MPa (100 Atm) to determine the pressure sensitivity of their isometric tension. The isometric tension of muscle fibers in the relaxed state (passive tension) was insensitive to increased pressure, whereas the muscle fiber tension in rigor state increased linearly with pressure. The tension of all other fiber types (except rubber) also increased with pressure; the rubber tension was pressure insensitive. The pressure sensitivity of rigor tension was 2.3 kN/m2/MPa and, in comparison with force/extension relation determined at atmospheric pressure, the hydrostatic compression in rigor muscle fibers was estimated to be 0.03% Lo/MPa. As reported previously, the active muscle fiber tension is depressed by increased pressure. The possible underlying basis of the different pressure-dependent tension behavior in relaxed, rigor, and active muscle is discussed.

  8. Paroxetine inhibited the relaxations induced by EFS in mice corpus cavernosum: is it a NOS inhibition?

    PubMed

    Kadioglu, Mine; Muci, Efnan; Ozyavuz, Rasin; Yaris, Ersin; Kesim, Murat; Kalyoncu, Nuri I

    2010-02-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders but are associated with high incidence of sexual dysfunction such as ejaculation disorders by sertraline and fluoxetine, erection disorders by paroxetine. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of paroxetine, sertraline and fluoxetine on relaxation of smooth muscle of corpus cavernosum on the basis of nitric oxide (NO). Male mice were killed by cervical dislocation and their penile tissues were immediately removed. The tissues were incubated in organ baths containing Krebs solution at 37 degrees C and bubbled with 95% O(2) and 5% CO(2). The corpus cavernosum strips were contracted with 10(-5 )m phenylephrine (PHE) and relaxed with either paroxetine, sertraline, fluoxetine (10(-8)-10(-4 )m) or electrical field stimulation (EFS). The effects of paroxetine, sertraline and fluoxetine were examined on EFS-induced relaxations. While paroxetine did not show any effect on the corpus cavernosum strips precontracted with PHE, sertraline and fluoxetine caused a relaxation at concentrations of 3 x 10(-5)-10(-4 )m. The relaxations induced by sertraline and fluoxetine were completely abolished by L-NAME, but not D-NAME. The relaxations induced by EFS could be inhibited by L-NAME but not D-NAME. Paroxetine inhibited the relaxations at high concentrations. L-arginine potentiated the relaxations induced by EFS; however in the presence of paroxetine these relaxations were not observed. In contrast, sertraline (10(-8)-10(-5 )m) and fluoxetine (10(-8)-10(-5)m) increased the relaxations induced by EFS. Sertraline and fluoxetine seem to be releasing some relaxing factor(s) and this factor may be NO. Paroxetine probably has a NOS inhibitory activity either on nNOS or eNOS, in contrast to sertraline and fluoxetine.

  9. The Role of Regular Home Practice in the Relaxation Treatment of Tension Headache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Edward B.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Gave 27 tension headache sufferers progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) training, with 14 of those subjects also receiving home practice and application instructions. Compared to third group of sufferers (n=6) who merely monitored headache activity, both treated groups showed significant reduction in headache activity. Treatment groups did not…

  10. 5-hydroxytryptamine induced relaxation in the pig urinary bladder neck

    PubMed Central

    Recio, Paz; Barahona, María Victoria; Orensanz, Luis M; Bustamante, Salvador; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Hernández, Medardo

    2009-01-01

    the pig urinary bladder neck through muscle 5-HT7 receptors linked to the cAMP-PKA pathway. Prejunctional 5-HT1A receptors and Kv channels modulated 5-HT-induced relaxations whereas postjunctional K+ channels were not involved in such responses. 5-HT7 receptor antagonists could be useful in the therapy of urinary incontinence produced by intrinsic sphincter deficiency. PMID:19309355

  11. "Stressing" Relaxation in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prager-Decker, Iris

    A rationale is offered for incorporating relaxation training in elementary school classroom activities. Cited are research studies which focus on the reaction of children to stressful life changes and resulting behavioral and physical disorders. A list is given of significant life events which may be factors in causing diseases or misbehavior in…

  12. Theory of nuclear magnetic relaxation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, J.

    1983-01-01

    A theory of nuclear magnetic interaction is based on the study of the stochastic rotation operator. The theory is applied explicitly to relaxation by anisotropic chemical shift and to spin-rotational interactions. It is applicable also to dipole-dipole and quadrupole interactions.

  13. Relaxation properties in classical diamagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carati, A.; Benfenati, F.; Galgani, L.

    2011-06-01

    It is an old result of Bohr that, according to classical statistical mechanics, at equilibrium a system of electrons in a static magnetic field presents no magnetization. Thus a magnetization can occur only in an out of equilibrium state, such as that produced through the Foucault currents when a magnetic field is switched on. It was suggested by Bohr that, after the establishment of such a nonequilibrium state, the system of electrons would quickly relax back to equilibrium. In the present paper, we study numerically the relaxation to equilibrium in a modified Bohr model, which is mathematically equivalent to a billiard with obstacles, immersed in a magnetic field that is adiabatically switched on. We show that it is not guaranteed that equilibrium is attained within the typical time scales of microscopic dynamics. Depending on the values of the parameters, one has a relaxation either to equilibrium or to a diamagnetic (presumably metastable) state. The analogy with the relaxation properties in the Fermi Pasta Ulam problem is also pointed out.

  14. Distributed Relaxation for Conservative Discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2001-01-01

    A multigrid method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work that is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in one target-grid residual evaluation. The way to achieve this efficiency is the distributed relaxation approach. TME solvers employing distributed relaxation have already been demonstrated for nonconservative formulations of high-Reynolds-number viscous incompressible and subsonic compressible flow regimes. The purpose of this paper is to provide foundations for applications of distributed relaxation to conservative discretizations. A direct correspondence between the primitive variable interpolations for calculating fluxes in conservative finite-volume discretizations and stencils of the discretized derivatives in the nonconservative formulation has been established. Based on this correspondence, one can arrive at a conservative discretization which is very efficiently solved with a nonconservative relaxation scheme and this is demonstrated for conservative discretization of the quasi one-dimensional Euler equations. Formulations for both staggered and collocated grid arrangements are considered and extensions of the general procedure to multiple dimensions are discussed.

  15. The Effect of Relaxation Interventions on Cortisol Levels in HIV-Sero-Positive Women

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Deborah; Owens, Mary; Kumar, Mahendra; Cook, Ryan; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, assessed in terms of cortisol levels, may enhance the ability of HIV to infect lymphocytes and downregulate the immune system, accelerating disease progression. This study sought to determine the effects of relaxation techniques on cortisol levels in HIV-sero-positive women. Methods Women (n = 150) were randomized to a group cognitive–behavioral stress management (CBSM) condition or an individual information condition and underwent 3 types of relaxation training (progressive muscle relaxation, imagery, and autogenic training). Cortisol levels were obtained pre- and postrelaxation. Results Guided imagery was effective in reducing cortisol in the group condition (t = 3.90, P < .001), and muscle relaxation reduced cortisol in the individual condition (t = 3.11, P = .012). Among participants in the group condition attending all sessions, the magnitude of pre- to postsession reduction became greater over time. Conclusions Results suggest that specific relaxation techniques may be partially responsible for cortisol decreases associated with relaxation and CBSM. PMID:23715264

  16. Relaxation processes in non-Debye dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turik, A. V.; Bogatin, A. S.; Andreev, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    The specific features of the relaxation processes in non-Debye dielectrics have been investigated. The nature of the difference between the relaxation frequencies of the dielectric constant and dielectric loss (conductivity) has been explained. It has been shown that the average relaxation frequency of the conductivity is considerably (in some cases, by several orders of magnitude) higher than the relaxation frequency of the dielectric constant owing to an increase in the conductivity spectra of the statistical weight of the relaxation processes with short relaxation times.

  17. Radix angelica elicits both nitric oxide-dependent and calcium influx-mediated relaxation in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Young

    2005-07-01

    This study examined the vascular relaxation produced by Radix Angelica (AG; Dong Quai) and its possible mechanisms in isolated rat aortic rings precontracted with norepinephrine. The butanolic fraction (AgBt) of the crude extract of AG causes gradual endothelium-independent relaxation, which was unaffected by five different potassium channel inhibitors. AgBt attenuated the CaCl2-induced vasoconstriction in high-potassium depolarized medium; this required less than one-tenth the concentration needed to elicit vascular relaxation. An aqueous fraction (AgDw) of the crude extract induced transient acute relaxation, which was virtually abolished by endothelial ablation and pretreatment with L-NNA. L-Arginine fully reversed the action of L-NNA. Methylene blue and atropine significantly attenuated the relaxation, but indomethacin did not. Ferulic acid, the main active component in AG, relaxed both endothelium-intact and -denuded rings, while L-NNA, methylene blue, or atropine did not modify the relaxation. Ferulic acid also did not attenuate the CaCl2-induced contraction in high-potassium depolarized medium. In conclusion, Radix Angelica leads to both endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation of isolated rat aorta. Increased formation of NO might contribute to the endothelium-mediated relaxation, while inhibition of the calcium influx might be an important mechanism in direct smooth muscle relaxation. A substance other than ferulic acid might create these effects.

  18. Force summation between muscles: are muscles independent actuators?

    PubMed

    Sandercock, Thomas G; Maas, Huub

    2009-01-01

    Muscle force can be transmitted via connective tissues to neighboring muscles. The goal of this research is to determine the extent to which this effects force summation between synergists during physiological conditions. This manuscript reviews two studies examining the interaction between synergists in cat hindlimb. Deeply anesthetized cats were mounted in a rigid frame with the foot secured to a six-degree-of-freedom load cell coupled to a robotic arm. Muscles were stimulated by implanted nerve cuff electrodes. In the first study, force summation was measured during isometric contractions. Interactions were studied between the lateral gastrocnemius (LG)/soleus (SOL) and the medial gastrocnemius (MG) as well as between rectus femoris and vastus lateralis. Invariably, nonlinear force summation was less than 10% of maximum force for all three translational directions and all three rotational directions. The second study investigated if force transmission from SOL fibers was affected by length changes of its two-joint synergists. Ankle plantar flexor moment, upon activation of only SOL, was measured for various knee angles (70 degrees -140 degrees ), which involved substantial length changes of LG, MG, and plantaris muscles. Ankle angle was kept constant (80 degrees -90 degrees ). SOL ankle moment was not significantly (P = 0.11) affected by changes in knee angle, neither were the half-relaxation time and the maximal rate of relaxation. The connective tissue links between SOL and LG were further studied during a tenotomy of the SOL and demonstrated that the connective links can transmit approximately 50% of the force from the SOL to the LG in nonphysiological conditions. In conclusion, despite strong connective tissue linkages, in cat hindlimb synergistic muscles appear to be independent actuators if acting in physiological conditions.

  19. Exercise-induced muscle cramp. Proposed mechanisms and management.

    PubMed

    Bentley, S

    1996-06-01

    Muscle cramp is a common, painful, physiological disturbance of skeletal muscle. Many athletes are regularly frustrated by exercise-induced muscle cramp yet the pathogenesis remains speculative with little scientific research on the subject. This has resulted in a perpetuation of myths as to the cause and treatment of it. There is a need for scientifically based protocols for the management of athletes who suffer exercise-related muscle cramp. This article reviews the literature and neurophysiology of muscle cramp occurring during exercise. Disturbances at various levels of the central and peripheral nervous system and skeletal muscle are likely to be involved in the mechanism of cramp and may explain the diverse range of conditions in which cramp occurs. The activity of the motor neuron is subject to a multitude of influences including peripheral receptor sensory input, spinal reflexes, inhibitory interneurons in the spinal cord, synaptic and neurotransmitter modulation and descending CNS input. The muscle spindle and golgi tendon organ proprioceptors are fundamental to the control of muscle length and tone and the maintenance of posture. Disturbance in the activity of these receptors may occur through faulty posture, shortened muscle length, intense exercise and exercise to fatigue, resulting in increased motor neuron activity and motor unit recruitment. The relaxation phase of muscle contraction is prolonged in a fatigued muscle, raising the likelihood of fused summation of action potentials if motor neuron activity delivers a sustained high firing frequency. Treatment of cramp is directed at reducing muscle spindle and motor neuron activity by reflex inhibition and afferent stimulation. There are no proven strategies for the prevention of exercise-induced muscle cramp but regular muscle stretching using post-isometric relaxation techniques, correction of muscle balance and posture, adequate conditioning for the activity, mental preparation for competition and

  20. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  1. Acute effects of psychological relaxation techniques between two physical tasks.

    PubMed

    Pelka, M; Kölling, S; Ferrauti, A; Meyer, T; Pfeiffer, M; Kellmann, M

    2017-02-01

    The concept of recovery strategies includes various ways to achieve a state of well-being, prevent underrecovery syndromes from occurring and re-establish pre-performance states. A systematic application of individualised relaxation techniques is one of those. Following a counterbalanced cross-over design, 27 sport science students (age 25.22 ± 1.08 years; sports participation 8.08 ± 3.92 h/week) were randomly assigned to series of progressive muscle relaxation, systematic breathing, power nap, yoga, and a control condition. Once a week, over the course of five weeks, their repeated sprint ability was tested. Tests (6 sprints of 4 s each with 20 s breaks between them) were executed on a non-motorised treadmill twice during that day intermitted by 25 min breaks. RM-ANOVA revealed significant interaction effects between the relaxation conditions and the two sprint sessions with regard to average maximum speed over all six sprints, F(4,96) = 4.06, P = 0.004, [Formula: see text] = 0.15. Post-hoc tests indicated that after systematic breathing interventions, F(1,24) = 5.02, P = 0.033, [Formula: see text] = 0.18, participants performed significantly better compared to control sessions. As the focus of this study lied on basic mechanisms of relaxation techniques in sports, this randomised controlled trial provides us with distinct knowledge on their effects, i.e., systematic breathing led to better performances, and therefore, seems to be a suited relaxation method during high-intensity training.

  2. Plasmon-mediated energy relaxation in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ferry, D. K.; Somphonsane, R.; Ramamoorthy, H.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-12-28

    Energy relaxation of hot carriers in graphene is studied at low temperatures, where the loss rate may differ significantly from that predicted for electron-phonon interactions. We show here that plasmons, important in the relaxation of energetic carriers in bulk semiconductors, can also provide a pathway for energy relaxation in transport experiments in graphene. We obtain a total loss rate to plasmons that results in energy relaxation times whose dependence on temperature and density closely matches that found experimentally.

  3. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique.

    PubMed

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  4. Models of violently relaxed galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, David; Tremaine, Scott; Johnstone, Doug

    1989-02-01

    The properties of spherical self-gravitating models derived from two distribution functions that incorporate, in a crude way, the physics of violent relaxation are investigated. The first distribution function is identical to the one discussed by Stiavelli and Bertin (1985) except for a change in the sign of the 'temperature', i.e., e exp(-aE) to e exp(+aE). It is shown that these 'negative temperature' models provide a much better description of the end-state of violent relaxation than 'positive temperature' models. The second distribution function is similar to the first except for a different dependence on angular momentum. Both distribution functions yield single-parameter families of models with surface density profiles very similar to the R exp 1/4 law. Furthermore, the central concentration of models in both families increases monotonically with the velocity anisotropy, as expected in systems that formed through cold collapse.

  5. Kinetic activation-relaxation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béland, Laurent Karim; Brommer, Peter; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Joly, Jean-François; Mousseau, Normand

    2011-10-01

    We present a detailed description of the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (k-ART), an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm with on-the-fly event search. Combining a topological classification for local environments and event generation with ART nouveau, an efficient unbiased sampling method for finding transition states, k-ART can be applied to complex materials with atoms in off-lattice positions or with elastic deformations that cannot be handled with standard KMC approaches. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, we demonstrate the general character of k-ART by applying the algorithm to three challenging systems: self-defect annihilation in c-Si (crystalline silicon), self-interstitial diffusion in Fe, and structural relaxation in a-Si (amorphous silicon).

  6. Resonant relaxation in electroweak baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Christopher; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J.

    2005-04-01

    We compute the leading, chiral charge-changing relaxation term in the quantum transport equations that govern electroweak baryogenesis using the closed time path formulation of nonequilibrium quantum field theory. We show that the relaxation transport coefficients may be resonantly enhanced under appropriate conditions on electroweak model parameters and that such enhancements can mitigate the impact of similar enhancements in the CP-violating source terms. We also develop a power counting in the time and energy scales entering electroweak baryogenesis and include effects through second order in ratios ɛ of the small and large scales. We illustrate the implications of the resonantly enhanced O(ɛ2) terms using the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, focusing on the interplay between the requirements of baryogenesis and constraints obtained from collider studies, precision electroweak data, and electric dipole moment searches.

  7. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage caused by injury, diabetes, toxins, or alcohol Polio ( poliomyelitis ) Spinal cord injury Although people can adapt to ... Guillain-Barré syndrome Hypotonia Muscle cramps Muscular dystrophy Polio Review Date 1/5/2016 Updated by: Joseph ...

  8. Getting Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscular as a superhero or your favorite professional athlete? Well, the big muscles you're thinking about ... Superheroes, of course, aren't real, and professional athletes are grownups, whose bodies are different from kids' ...

  9. Muscle twitching

    MedlinePlus

    ... patient with neurologic disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Selcen D. Muscle diseases. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  10. Arresting relaxation in Pickering Emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atherton, Tim; Burke, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Pickering emulsions consist of droplets of one fluid dispersed in a host fluid and stabilized by colloidal particles absorbed at the fluid-fluid interface. Everyday materials such as crude oil and food products like salad dressing are examples of these materials. Particles can stabilize non spherical droplet shapes in these emulsions through the following sequence: first, an isolated droplet is deformed, e.g. by an electric field, increasing the surface area above the equilibrium value; additional particles are then adsorbed to the interface reducing the surface tension. The droplet is then allowed to relax toward a sphere. If more particles were adsorbed than can be accommodated by the surface area of the spherical ground state, relaxation of the droplet is arrested at some non-spherical shape. Because the energetic cost of removing adsorbed colloids exceeds the interfacial driving force, these configurations can remain stable over long timescales. In this presentation, we present a computational study of the ordering present in anisotropic droplets produced through the mechanism of arrested relaxation and discuss the interplay between the geometry of the droplet, the dynamical process that produced it, and the structure of the defects observed.

  11. Effects of Various Forms of Relaxation Training on Physiological and Self-Report Measures of Relaxation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, Richard H.; Kohl, Marilyn L.

    1975-01-01

    Examines relative effectiveness of four types of relaxation training including Jacobson-Wolpe and electromyograph (EMG) feedback. Dependent measures are EMG recordings and self-report measures of relaxation. All groups reported increased relaxation, but EMG groups were superior in EMG measures of speed of learning and depth of relaxation.…

  12. Relation between Direct Observation of Relaxation and Self-Reported Mindfulness and Relaxation States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hites, Lacey S.; Lundervold, Duane A.

    2013-01-01

    Forty-four individuals, 18-47 (MN 21.8, SD 5.63) years of age, took part in a study examining the magnitude and direction of the relationship between self-report and direct observation measures of relaxation and mindfulness. The Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS), a valid direct observation measure of relaxation, was used to assess relaxed behavior…

  13. Effects of Progressive Relaxation versus Biofeedback-Assisted Relaxation with College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    See, John D.; Czerlinsky, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    Examined use of biofeedback, relaxation training, or both in a college relaxation class with an enrollment of 33 students. Results indicated students receiving relaxation training plus biofeedback improved significantly more on psychological variables than did students receiving only relaxation training. (Author/ABL)

  14. Nitrergic Pathway Is the Main Contributing Mechanism in the Human Gastric Fundus Relaxation: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Ju; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Ki Duck; Bae, Je Moon; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2016-01-01

    Background Human gastric fundus relaxation is mediated by intrinsic inhibitory pathway. We investigated the roles of nitrergic and purinergic pathways, two known inhibitory factors in gastric motility, on spontaneous and nerve-evoked contractions in human gastric fundus muscles. Methods Gastric fundus muscle strips (12 circular and 13 longitudinal) were obtained from patients without previous gastrointestinal motility disorder who underwent gastrectomy for stomach cancer. Using these specimens, we examined basal tone, peak, amplitude, and frequency of spontaneous contractions, and peak and nadir values under electrical field stimulation (EFS, 150 V, 0.3 ms, 10 Hz, 20 s). To examine responses to purinergic and nitrergic inhibition without cholinergic innervation, atropine (muscarinic antagonist, 1 μM), MRS2500 (a purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonist, 1 μM), and N-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 100 μM) were added sequentially for spontaneous and electrically-stimulated contractions. Tetrodotoxin was used to confirm any neuronal involvement. Results In spontaneous contraction, L-NNA increased basal tone and peak in both muscle layers, while amplitude and frequency were unaffected. EFS (up to 10 Hz) uniformly induced initial contraction and subsequent relaxation in a frequency-dependent manner. Atropine abolished initial on-contraction and induced only relaxation during EFS. While MRS2500 showed no additional influence, L-NNA reversed relaxation (p = 0.012 in circular muscle, and p = 0.006 in longitudinal muscle). Tetrodotoxin abolished any EFS-induced motor response. Conclusions The relaxation of human gastric fundus muscle is reduced by nitrergic inhibition. Hence, nitrergic pathway appears to be the main mechanism for the human gastric fundus relaxation. PMID:27589594

  15. Dynamics of Glass Relaxation at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Roger C.; Smith, John R.; Potuzak, Marcel; Guo, Xiaoju; Bowden, Bradley F.; Kiczenski, T. J.; Allan, Douglas C.; King, Ellyn A.; Ellison, Adam J.; Mauro, John C.

    2013-06-01

    The problem of glass relaxation under ambient conditions has intrigued scientists and the general public for centuries, most notably in the legend of flowing cathedral glass windows. Here we report quantitative measurement of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that Corning® Gorilla® Glass shows measurable and reproducible relaxation at room temperature. Remarkably, this relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay rather than simple exponential relaxation, and the value of the stretching exponent (β=3/7) follows a theoretical prediction made by Phillips for homogeneous glasses.

  16. Time of relaxation in dusty plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Dust particles in plasma may have different values of average kinetic energy for vertical and horizontal motion. The partial equilibrium of the subsystems and the relaxation processes leading to this asymmetry are under consideration. A method for the relaxation time estimation in nonideal dusty plasma is suggested. The characteristic relaxation times of vertical and horizontal motion of dust particles in gas discharge are estimated by analytical approach and by analysis of simulation results. These relaxation times for vertical and horizontal subsystems appear to be different. A single hierarchy of relaxation times is proposed.

  17. Effect of chronic knee osteoarthritis on flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae in elderly females

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Yeon-Gyu; Jeong, Yeon-Jae; Koo, Jung-Wan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the flexion-relaxation phenomenon of the erector spinae in elderly women with chronic knee osteoarthritis and determined whether the flexion-relaxation phenomenon can be used as a pain evaluation tool in such cases. [Subjects and Methods] Seventeen elderly females with chronic knee osteoarthritis and 13 healthy young females voluntarily participated in this study. They performed three postural positions in 15 s: trunk flexion, complete trunk flexion, and trunk extension, each for 5 s. While these positions were held, muscle activation of the thoracic and lumbar erector spinae were measured using surface electromyography. The flexion-relaxation rate was determined by dividing the values for trunk extension by those of complete trunk flexion and by dividing the values for trunk flexion by those of complete trunk flexion. [Results] According to our results, the flexion-relaxation phenomenon was different between healthy young and elderly females with chronic knee osteoarthritis. Specifically, there was a difference in the left thoracic erector spinae muscle, but not in the left and right lumbar erector spinae or right thoracic spinae muscle. [Conclusion] Our study demonstrated that the erector spinae muscle flexion-relaxation phenomenon can be used as a pain evaluation tool in elderly females with chronic knee osteoarthritis. PMID:27512244

  18. Evaluation of the relaxant effect of levetiracetam on isolated rat duodenum.

    PubMed

    Salem, Hesham A; Al-Shorbagy, Muhammad Y

    2017-02-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV) is an approved drug for the treatment of some epileptic disorders. With few and controversial reports addressing its possible pharmacodynamic interactions, the current study aimed at studying the effect of LEV on isolated rat duodenal strips to enlighten its possible intestinal adverse effects using the isolated smooth muscle strips of rat duodenum. LEV showed a dose-dependent inhibition in KCl (80 mm)-induced contractions in normal Tyrode's solution. Moreover, preincubation with LEV (3 mm) in K(+) -rich/Ca(2+) -free medium led to a significant decrease in the maximum contractions (Emax ) coupled to a right shift of the cumulative CaCl2 concentration curves implying a possible Ca(2+) channel blocking potential. In addition, LEV exhibited a typical noncompetitive inhibition in the cumulative carbachol concentration curves evidenced as a decrease in Emax without the alteration of EC50 , thus eliminating any possible role of the muscarinic receptors in the relaxant effect. To rule out other possible relaxant mechanisms, tests were conveyed in Tyrode's solution containing either 100 μm l-NAME or 10 μm glimepiride to test the possible relaxant roles exhibited by nitric oxide (NO) and KATP channel opening, respectively. None of the tested pathways was involved in LEV-mediated relaxation. Taken altogether, the results of the current study entail that LEV might exert a relaxant effect on intestinal smooth muscles through blocking L-type voltage-operated calcium channels, but not involving either NO release or KATP channel opening.

  19. Role of endogenous hydrogen sulfide in nerve-evoked relaxation of pig terminal bronchioles.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Vítor S; Recio, Paz; López-Oliva, Elvira; Martínez, María Pilar; Ribeiro, Ana Sofía; Barahona, María Victoria; Martínez, Ana Cristina; Benedito, Sara; Agis-Torres, Ángel; Cabañero, Alberto; Muñoz, Gemma M; García-Sacristán, Albino; Orensanz, Luis M; Hernández, Medardo

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a gasotransmitter employed for intra- and inter-cellular communication in almost all organ systems. This study investigates the role of endogenous H2S in nerve-evoked relaxation of pig terminal bronchioles with 260 μm medium internal lumen diameter. High expression of the H2S synthesis enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) in the bronchiolar muscle layer and strong CSE-immunoreactivity within nerve fibers distributed along smooth muscle bundles were observed. Further, endogenous H2S generated in bronchiolar membranes was reduced by CSE inhibition. In contrast, cystathionine β-synthase expression, another H2S synthesis enzyme, however was not consistently detected in the bronchiolar smooth muscle layer. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) and the H2S donor P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinylphosphinodithioic acid (GYY4137) evoked smooth muscle relaxation. Inhibition of CSE, nitric oxide (NO) synthase, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and of ATP-dependent K(+), transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels reduced the EFS relaxation but failed to modify the GYY4137 response. Raising extracellular K(+) concentration inhibited the GYY4137 relaxation. Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blockade reduced both EFS and GYY4137 responses. GYY4137 inhibited the contractions induced by histamine and reduced to a lesser extent the histamine-induced increases in intracellular [Ca(2+)]. These results suggest that relaxation induced by EFS in the pig terminal bronchioles partly involves the H2S/CSE pathway. H2S response is produced via NO/sGC-independent mechanisms involving K(+) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) desensitization-dependent pathways. Thus, based on our current results H2S donors might be useful as bronchodilator agents for the treatment of lung diseases with persistent airflow limitation, such as asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease.

  20. Vascular smooth muscle phenotypic diversity and function

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The control of force production in vascular smooth muscle is critical to the normal regulation of blood flow and pressure, and altered regulation is common to diseases such as hypertension, heart failure, and ischemia. A great deal has been learned about imbalances in vasoconstrictor and vasodilator signals, e.g., angiotensin, endothelin, norepinephrine, and nitric oxide, that regulate vascular tone in normal and disease contexts. In contrast there has been limited study of how the phenotypic state of the vascular smooth muscle cell may influence the contractile response to these signaling pathways dependent upon the developmental, tissue-specific (vascular bed) or disease context. Smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle lineages are traditionally classified into fast or slow sublineages based on rates of contraction and relaxation, recognizing that this simple dichotomy vastly underrepresents muscle phenotypic diversity. A great deal has been learned about developmental specification of the striated muscle sublineages and their phenotypic interconversions in the mature animal under the control of mechanical load, neural input, and hormones. In contrast there has been relatively limited study of smooth muscle contractile phenotypic diversity. This is surprising given the number of diseases in which smooth muscle contractile dysfunction plays a key role. This review focuses on smooth muscle contractile phenotypic diversity in the vascular system, how it is generated, and how it may determine vascular function in developmental and disease contexts. PMID:20736412

  1. Myosin light chain phosphatase activation is involved in the hydrogen sulfide-induced relaxation in mouse gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Dhaese, Ingeborg; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2009-03-15

    The relaxant effect of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) in the vascular tree is well established but its influence and mechanism of action in gastrointestinal smooth muscle was hardly investigated. The influence of H(2)S on contractility in mouse gastric fundus was therefore examined. Sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS; H(2)S donor) was administered to prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha))-contracted circular muscle strips of mouse gastric fundus, before and after incubation with interfering drugs. NaHS caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the pre-contracted mouse gastric fundus strips. The K(+) channels blockers glibenclamide, apamin, charybdotoxin, 4-aminopyridin and barium chloride had no influence on the NaHS-induced relaxation. The relaxation by NaHS was also not influenced by L-NAME, ODQ and SQ 22536, inhibitors of the cGMP and cAMP pathway, by nerve blockers capsazepine, omega-conotoxin and tetrodotoxin or by several channel and receptor blockers (ouabain, nifedipine, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate, ryanodine and thapsigargin). The myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) inhibitor calyculin-A reduced the NaHS-induced relaxation, but the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 had no influence. We show that NaHS is able to relax PGF(2alpha)-contracted mouse gastric fundus strips. The results suggest that in the mouse gastric fundus, H(2)S causes relaxation at least partially via activation of MLCP.

  2. Parvalbumin gene transfer impairs skeletal muscle contractility in old mice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kate T; Ham, Daniel J; Church, Jarrod E; Naim, Timur; Trieu, Jennifer; Williams, David A; Lynch, Gordon S

    2012-08-01

    Sarcopenia is the progressive age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with functional impairments that reduce mobility and quality of life. Overt muscle wasting with sarcopenia is usually preceded by a slowing of the rate of relaxation and a reduction in maximum force production. Parvalbumin (PV) is a cytosolic Ca(2+) buffer thought to facilitate relaxation in muscle. We tested the hypothesis that restoration of PV levels in muscles of old mice would increase the magnitude and hasten relaxation of submaximal and maximal force responses. The tibialis anterior (TA) muscles of young (6 month), adult (13 month), and old (26 month) C57BL/6 mice received electroporation-assisted gene transfer of plasmid encoding PV or empty plasmid (pcDNA3.1). Contractile properties of TA muscles were assessed in situ 14 days after transfer. In old mice, muscles with increased PV expression had a 40% slower rate of tetanic force development (p<0.01), and maximum twitch and tetanic force were 22% and 16% lower than control values, respectively (p<0.05). Muscles with increased PV expression from old mice had an 18% lower maximum specific (normalized) force than controls, and absolute force was `26% lower at higher stimulation frequencies (150-300 Hz, p<0.05). In contrast, there was no effect of increased PV expression on TA muscle contractile properties in young and adult mice. The impairments in skeletal muscle function in old mice argue against PV overexpression as a therapeutic strategy for ameliorating aspects of contractile dysfunction with sarcopenia and help clarify directions for therapeutic interventions for age-related changes in skeletal muscle structure and function.

  3. Net calcium fluxes in anterior byssus retractor muscle with phasic and catch contraction.

    PubMed

    Bloomquist, E; Curtis, B A

    1975-11-01

    Calcium in the artificial seawater bathing whole Mytilus anterior byssus retractor muscles (ABRM) was measured by a specific Ca electrode under various conditions of activation, catch, and catch relaxation. Activation in response to ACh was associated with uptake of Ca by the muscles. Phasic contractions produced a small Ca uptake; catch contractions produced a larger and sustained Ca uptake. After tension relaxation, the muscle lost an amount of Ca roughly equal to that gained. Catch relaxation by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) was associated with Ca release. ACh at identical concentrations, applied to the muscle for increasingly longer times, produced increasing amounts of Ca uptake. Regardless of the previous gain of Ca by the muscle, 5HT applied for a constant interval caused release of the same amount of Ca. A model for the Ca control system in ABRM based on this and previously obtained 45Ca efflux data is proposed.

  4. Potentiation increases peak twitch torque by enhancing rates of torque development and relaxation.

    PubMed

    Froyd, Christian; Beltrami, Fernando Gabe; Jensen, Jørgen; Noakes, Timothy David

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the extent to which potentiation changes in response to an isometric maximal voluntary contraction. Eleven physically active subjects participated in two separate studies. Single stimulus of electrical stimulation of the femoral nerve was used to measure torque at rest in unpotentiated quadriceps muscles (study 1 and 2), and potentiated quadriceps muscles torque in a 10 min period after a 5 s isometric maximal voluntary contraction of the quadriceps muscles (study 1). Additionally, potentiated quadriceps muscles torque was measured every min after a further 10 maximal voluntary contractions repeated every min (study 2). Electrical stimulation repeated several times without previous maximal voluntary contraction showed similar peak twitch torque. Peak twitch torque 4 s after a 5 s maximal voluntary contraction increased by 45±13% (study 1) and by 56±10% (study 2), the rate of torque development by 53±13% and 82±29%, and the rate of relaxation by 50±17% and 59±22%, respectively, but potentiation was lost already two min after a 5 s maximal voluntary contraction. There was a tendency for peak twitch torque to increase for the first five repeated maximal voluntary contractions, suggesting increased potentiation with additional maximal voluntary contractions. Correlations for peak twitch torque vs the rate of torque development and for the rate of relaxation were r(2)= 0.94 and r(2)=0.97. The correlation between peak twitch torque, the rate of torque development and the rate of relaxation suggests that potentiation is due to instantaneous changes in skeletal muscle contractility and relaxation.

  5. Relaxant effects of antidepressants on human isolated mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Vila, José Ma; Medina, Pascual; Segarra, Gloria; Lluch, Paloma; Pallardó, Federico; Flor, Blas; Lluch, Salvador

    1999-01-01

    Aims The therapeutic action of tricyclic agents may be accompanied by unwanted effects on the cardiovascular system. The evidence for the effects on vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle comes from animal studies. Whether these studies can be extrapolated to human vessels remains to be determined. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the influence of amitriptyline, nortriptyline and sertraline on the contractile responses of human isolated mesenteric arteries to electrical field stimulation, noradrenaline and potassium chloride. Methods Arterial segments (lumen diameter 0.8–1.2 mm) were obtained from portions of the human omentum during the course of 41 abdominal operations (22 men and 19 women), and rings 3 mm long were mounted in organ baths for isometric recording of tension. In some artery rings the endothelium was removed mechanically. Results In precontracted artery rings amitriptyline, nortriptyline and sertraline (3×10−7–10−4 m) produced concentration-dependent relaxation that was independent of the presence or absence of vascular endothelium. Incubation with indomethacin (3×10−6 m) reduced the pD2 values thus indicating the participation of dilating prostanoid substances in this response. Amitriptyline and nortriptyline inhibited both the neurogenic-and noradrenaline-induced contractions. In contrast, only the highest concentration of sertraline reduced the adrenergic responses. Amitriptyline, nortriptyline and sertraline inhibited contractions elicited by KCl and produced rightward shifts of the concentration-response curve to CaCl2 following incubation in calcium-free solution. Conclusions These results indicate that amitriptyline and nortriptyline could act as adrenoceptor antagonists and direct inhibitors of smooth muscle contraction of human mesenteric arteries, whereas sertraline might principally exert its action only as direct inhibitor of smooth muscle contraction. This relaxant mechanism involves an interference

  6. Relaxation damping in oscillating contacts

    PubMed Central

    Popov, M.; Popov, V.L.; Pohrt, R.

    2015-01-01

    If a contact of two purely elastic bodies with no sliding (infinite coefficient of friction) is subjected to superimposed oscillations in the normal and tangential directions, then a specific damping appears, that is not dependent on friction or dissipation in the material. We call this effect “relaxation damping”. The rate of energy dissipation due to relaxation damping is calculated in a closed analytic form for arbitrary axially-symmetric contacts. In the case of equal frequency of normal and tangential oscillations, the dissipated energy per cycle is proportional to the square of the amplitude of tangential oscillation and to the absolute value of the amplitude of normal oscillation, and is dependent on the phase shift between both oscillations. In the case of low frequency tangential oscillations with superimposed high frequency normal oscillations, the dissipation is proportional to the ratio of the frequencies. Generalization of the results for macroscopically planar, randomly rough surfaces as well as for the case of finite friction is discussed. PMID:26549011

  7. Upper esophageal sphincter mechanical states analysis: a novel methodology to describe UES relaxation and opening.

    PubMed

    Omari, Taher I; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Dinning, Philip; Costa, Marcello; Rommel, Nathalie; Cock, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The swallowing muscles that influence upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening are centrally controlled and modulated by sensory information. Activation of neural inputs to these muscles, the intrinsic cricopharyngeus muscle and extrinsic suprahyoid muscles, results in their contraction or relaxation, which changes the diameter of the lumen, alters the intraluminal pressure and ultimately inhibits or promotes flow of content. This relationship that exists between the changes in diameter and concurrent changes in intraluminal pressure has been used previously to calculate the "mechanical states" of the muscle; that is when the muscles are passively or actively, relaxing or contracting. Diseases that alter the neural pathways to these muscles can result in weakening the muscle contractility and/or decreasing the muscle compliance, all of which can cause dysphagia. Detecting these changes in the mechanical state of the muscle is difficult and as the current interpretation of UES motility is based largely upon pressure measurement (manometry), subtle changes in the muscle function during swallow can be missed. We hypothesized that quantification of mechanical states of the UES and the pressure-diameter properties that define them, would allow objective characterization of the mechanisms that govern the timing and extent of UES opening during swallowing. To achieve this we initially analyzed swallows captured by simultaneous videofluoroscopy and UES pressure with impedance recording. From these data we demonstrated that intraluminal impedance measurements could be used to determine changes in the internal diameter of the lumen when compared to videofluoroscopy. Then using a database of pressure-impedance studies, recorded from young and aged healthy controls and patients with motor neuron disease, we calculated the UES mechanical states in relation to a standardized swallowed bolus volume, normal aging and dysphagia pathology. Our results indicated that eight different

  8. Effect of neuromuscular electrical stimulation on motor cortex excitability upon release of tonic muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kenichi; Tanabe, Shigeo; Suzuki, Tomotaka; Higashi, Toshio

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the neurophysiological triggers underlying muscle relaxation from the contracted state, and to examine the mechanisms involved in this process and their subsequent modification by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES). Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to produce motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) and short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) in 23 healthy participants, wherein motor cortex excitability was examined at the onset of voluntary muscle relaxation following a period of voluntary tonic muscle contraction. In addition, the effects of afferent input on motor cortex excitability, as produced by NMES during muscle contraction, were examined. In particular, two NMES intensities were used for analysis: 1.2 times the sensory threshold and 1.2 times the motor threshold (MT). Participants were directed to execute constant wrist extensions and to release muscle contraction in response to an auditory "GO" signal. MEPs were recorded from the flexor carpi radialis (FCR) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscles, and TMS was applied at three different time intervals (30, 60, and 90 ms) after the "GO" signal. Motor cortex excitability was greater during voluntary ECR and FCR relaxation using high-intensity NMES, and relaxation time was decreased. Each parameter differed significantly between 30 and 60 ms. Moreover, in both muscles, SICI was larger in the presence than in the absence of NMES. Therefore, the present findings suggest that terminating a muscle contraction triggers transient neurophysiological mechanisms that facilitate the NMES-induced modulation of cortical motor excitability in the period prior to muscle relaxation. High-intensity NMES might facilitate motor cortical excitability as a function of increased inhibitory intracortical activity, and therefore serve as a transient trigger for the relaxation of prime mover muscles in a therapeutic context.

  9. Muscle strain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A muscle strain is the stretching or tearing of muscle fibers. A muscle strain can be caused by sports, exercise, a ... something that is too heavy. Symptoms of a muscle strain include pain, tightness, swelling, tenderness, and the ...

  10. Cross relaxation in nitroxide spin labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-11-01

    Cross relaxation, and mI -dependence of the intrinsic electron spin-lattice relaxation rate We , are incorporated explicitly into the rate equations for the electron-spin population differences that govern the saturation behaviour of 14N- and 15N-nitroxide spin labels. Both prove important in spin-label EPR and ELDOR, particularly for saturation recovery studies. Neither for saturation recovery, nor for CW-saturation EPR and CW-ELDOR, can cross relaxation be described simply by increasing the value of We , the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate. Independence of the saturation recovery rates from the hyperfine line pumped or observed follows directly from solution of the rate equations including cross relaxation, even when the intrinsic spin-lattice relaxation rate We is mI -dependent.

  11. Relaxation of liquid bridge after droplets coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jiangen; Shi, Haiyang; Chen, Guo; Huang, Yingzhou; Wei, Hua; Wang, Shuxia; Wen, Weijia

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the relaxation of liquid bridge after the coalescence of two sessile droplets resting on an organic glass substrate both experimentally and theoretically. The liquid bridge is found to relax to its equilibrium shape via two distinct approaches: damped oscillation relaxation and underdamped relaxation. When the viscosity is low, damped oscillation shows up, in this approach, the liquid bridge undergoes a damped oscillation process until it reaches its stable shape. However, if the viscous effects become significant, underdamped relaxation occurs. In this case, the liquid bridge relaxes to its equilibrium state in a non-periodic decay mode. In depth analysis indicates that the damping rate and oscillation period of damped oscillation are related to an inertial-capillary time scale τc. These experimental results are also testified by our numerical simulations with COMSOL Multiphysics.

  12. Capsaicin-induced, capsazepine-insensitive relaxation of the guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Seigo; Mori, Mayumi; Tsushima, Hiromi; Kunimatsu, Mitoshi

    2006-01-13

    The mechanisms underlying transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1)-independent relaxation elicited by capsaicin were studied by measuring isometric force and phosphorylation of 20-kDa regulatory light chain subunit of myosin (MLC(20)) in ileum longitudinal smooth muscles of guinea-pigs. In acetylcholine-stimulated tissues, capsaicin (1-100 microM) and resiniferatoxin (10 nM-1 microM) produced a concentration-dependent relaxation. The relaxant response was attenuated by 4-aminopyridine and high-KCl solution, but not by capsazepine, tetraethylammonium, Ba(2+), glibenclamide, charybdotoxin plus apamin nor antagonists of cannabinoid receptor type 1 and calcitonin-gene related peptide. A RhoA kinase inhibitor reduced the relaxant effect of capsaicin at 30 microM. Capsaicin and resiniferatoxin reduced acetylcholine- and caffeine-induced transient contractions in a Ca(2+)-free, EGTA solution. Capsaicin at 30 microM for 20 min did not alter basal levels of MLC(20) phosphorylation, but abolished an increase by acetylcholine in MLC(20) phosphorylation. It is suggested that the relaxant effect of capsaicin at concentrations used is not mediated by TRPV1, but by 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(+) channels, and that capsaicin inhibits contractile mechanisms involving Ca(2+) release from intracellular storage sites. The relaxation could be explained by a decrease in phosphorylation of MLC(20).

  13. Evaluating Swallowing Muscles Essential for Hyolaryngeal Elevation by Using Muscle Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, William G.; Hindson, David F.; Langmore, Susan E.; Zumwalt, Ann C.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions

  14. Conservation of magnetic helicity during plasma relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, H.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.

    1994-07-01

    Decay of the total magnetic helicity during the sawtooth relaxation in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch is much larger than the MHD prediction. However, the helicity decay (3--4%) is smaller than the magnetic energy decay (7--9%), modestly supportive of the helicity conservation hypothesis in Taylor`s relaxation theory. Enhanced fluctuation-induced helicity transport during the relaxation is observed.

  15. Dielectric relaxation in a protein matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.W.; Boxer, S.G.

    1992-06-25

    The dielectric relaxation of a sperm whale ApoMb-DANCA complex is measured by the fluorescence dynamic Stokes shift method. Emission energy increases with decreasing temperature, suggesting that the relaxation activation energies of the rate-limiting motions either depend on the conformational substrate or different types of protein motions with different frequencies participate in the reaction. Experimental data suggest that there may be relaxations on a scale of <100 ps. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Paley-Wiener criterion for relaxation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.; Rajagopal, A. K.; Rendell, R. W.; Teitler, S.

    1983-11-01

    It is shown how the Paley-Wiener theorem in Fourier-transform theory can provide the bound for physically acceptable relaxation functions for long times. In principle the linear exponential decay function, and hence also a superposition of linear exponential decay functions, does not provide an acceptable description of relaxation phenomenon although the Paley-Wiener bound can be made to approach arbitrarily close to linear exponential. A class of relaxation functions proposed recently obeys the Paley-Wiener bound. The general necessity for time-dependent relaxation rates is emphasized and discussed.

  17. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuan Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    some patients with asthma. - Highlights: • Nicotine from smoking impaired epithelial COX-2-mediated airway relaxation. • Nicotine's effects were at least partially mediated by α7-nicotinic receptors. • Kinin-receptor-mediated airway relaxations are mediated by EP2 receptors in mice. • Nicotine reduced mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions in airway smooth muscle. • Dexamethasone could not restore nicotine-impaired airway relaxations.

  18. Involvement of Potassium Channels and Calcium-Independent Mechanisms in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Relaxation of Rat Mesenteric Small Arteries.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Gouliaev, Anja; Winther, Anna K; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Aalling, Mathilde; Renaltan, Nirthika S; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Skovgaard, Nini; Simonsen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in the regulation of vascular tone. We hypothesized that the lowering of calcium and opening of potassium (K) channels as well as calcium-independent mechanisms are involved in H2S-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric small arteries. Amperometric recordings revealed that free [H2S] after addition to closed tubes of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), Na2S, and GYY4137 [P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinyl-phosphinodithioic acid] were, respectively, 14%, 17%, and 1% of added amount. The compounds caused equipotent relaxations in isometric myographs, but based on the measured free [H2S], GYY4137 caused more relaxation in relation to released free H2S than NaHS and Na2S in rat mesenteric small arteries. Simultaneous measurements of [H2S] and tension showed that 15 µM of free H2S caused 61% relaxation in superior mesenteric arteries. Simultaneous measurements of smooth muscle calcium and tension revealed that NaHS lowered calcium and caused relaxation of NE-contracted arteries, while high extracellular potassium reduced NaHS relaxation without corresponding calcium changes. In NE-contracted arteries, NaHS (1 mM) lowered the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, while phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 remained unchanged. Protein kinase A and G, inhibitors of guanylate cyclase, failed to reduce NaHS relaxation, whereas blockers of voltage-gated KV7 channels inhibited NaHS relaxation, and blockers of mitochondrial complex I and III abolished NaHS relaxation. Our findings suggest that low micromolar concentrations of free H2S open K channels followed by lowering of smooth muscle calcium, and by another mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I and III leads to uncoupling of force, and hence vasodilation.

  19. Effects of hydrogen sulphide in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Dunn, William R; Alexander, Stephen P H; Ralevic, Vera; Roberts, Richard E

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that the gaseous pollutant, hydrogen sulphide (H2S) can be synthesised in the body and has a multitude of biological actions. This review summarizes some of the actions of this 'gasotransmitter' in influencing the smooth muscle that is responsible for controlling muscular activity of hollow organs. In the vasculature, while H2S can cause vasoconstriction by complex interactions with other biologically important gases, such as nitric oxide, the prevailing response is vasorelaxation. While most vasorelaxation responses occur by a direct action of H2S on smooth muscle cells, it has recently been proposed to be an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. H2S also promotes relaxation in other smooth muscle preparations including bronchioles, the bladder, gastrointestinal tract and myometrium, opening up the opportunity of exploiting the pharmacology of H2S in the treatment of conditions where smooth muscle tone is excessive. The original concept, that H2S caused smooth muscle relaxation by activating ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, has been supplemented with observations that H2S can also modify the activity of other potassium channels, intracellular pH, phosphodiesterase activity and transient receptor potential channels on sensory nerves. While the enzymes responsible for generating endogenous H2S are widely expressed in smooth muscle preparations, it is much less clear what the physiological role of H2S is in determining smooth muscle contractility. Clarification of this requires the development of potent and selective inhibitors of H2S-generating enzymes.

  20. Distinct mechanisms of relaxation to bioactive components from chamomile species in porcine isolated blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Roberts, R E; Allen, S; Chang, A P Y; Henderson, H; Hobson, G C; Karania, B; Morgan, K N; Pek, A S Y; Raghvani, K; Shee, C Y; Shikotra, J; Street, E; Abbas, Z; Ellis, K; Heer, J K; Alexander, S P H

    2013-11-01

    German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.), a widely-used herbal medicine, has been reported to have a wide range of biological effects, including smooth muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of representative compounds from chamomile (apigenin, luteolin, (-)-α-bisabolol, farnesene, umbelliferone; 3-30 μM) on vascular tone using porcine coronary and splenic arteries mounted for isometric tension recording in isolated tissue baths and precontracted with the thromboxane-mimetic U46619. Apigenin, luteolin, and (-)-α-bisabolol produced slow, concentration-dependent relaxations in both the coronary and splenic arteries that were not blocked by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase or potassium channels. Removal of extracellular calcium inhibited the relaxations to all three compounds, and these compounds also inhibited calcium re-addition-evoked contractions, indicating that the relaxation response may be mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Apigenin and luteolin, but not (-)-α-bisabolol, enhanced the relaxation to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, indicating that apigenin and luteolin may act to regulate cyclic GMP levels. Umbelliferone produced a rapid, transient relaxation in the splenic artery, but not the coronary artery, that was inhibited by L-NAME and removal of the endothelium, suggesting an influence on nitric oxide production. Farnesene, at concentrations up to 30 μM, was without effect in either blood vessel. In conclusion, hydroxylated compounds (apigenin, luteolin and (-)-α-bisabolol) found in chamomile all caused a slow relaxation of isolated blood vessels through an effect on calcium influx. Umbelliferone, on the other hand, produced a rapid, transient relaxation dependent upon release of nitric oxide from the endothelium.

  1. A Simple, Inexpensive Model to Demonstrate How Contraction of GI Longitudinal Smooth Muscle Promotes Propulsion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lujan, Heidi L.; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Peristalis is a propulsive activity that involves both circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the esophagus, distal stomach, and small and large intestines. During peristalsis, the circular smooth muscle contracts behind (on the orad side) the bolus and relaxes in front (on the aborad side) of the bolus. At the same time, the longitudinal…

  2. [Spin-lattice relaxation of water protons in plant and animal cells].

    PubMed

    Samuilov, F D; Nikiforov, E A; Nikiforova, V I

    2012-01-01

    NMR-spin echo method has been used to study spin-lattice relaxation time of protons T1 in plant and animal cells - muscle tissue of fish, the cells of which unlike plant cells have no developed system of vacuoles, plastids and a solid cell wall. According to the values of T1 time a new NMR parameter K, a coefficient of relaxation effectiveness of a cell structure, has been calculated. This parameter can be used for quantitative characterization of the influence of different cell structures, the tissue water interact with, for a time of spin-lattice relaxation of water protons. It has been ascertained that the values of K coefficient in animal tissue and in storing tissues of some plants differ little; it may be stipulated by permanent transmembrane water exchange which occurs at high rate in the living cell. It has been concluded that there exists a certain similarity between water state in protoplast of plant and animal cells.

  3. Pharmacology of Casimiroa edulis; III. Relaxant and contractile effects in rat aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Magos, G A; Vidrio, H; Enríquez, R

    1995-06-23

    The relaxant and contractile effects of an aqueous extract of the seeds of the hypotensive plant Casimiroa edulis were investigated in rat aortic rings. The extract inhibited contractions elicited by noradrenaline, serotonin and prostaglandin F2 alpha, but did not affect responses to KCl. Inhibition did not require the presence of intact vascular endothelium and was not affected by histamine antagonists. In this preparation, the extract also elicited concentration-related contractions which were more marked in the absence of endothelium, were not blocked by histamine antagonists, and were completely suppressed by alpha-adrenergic blockade. It was concluded that the relaxant effect of the extract is not exerted through release of an endothelial relaxing factor nor through blockade of calcium channels or of specific smooth muscle receptors, and does not involve histaminergic mechanisms. The contractile effect is modulated by vascular endothelium and is alpha-adrenergic in nature.

  4. Molecular Basis of Passive Stress Relaxation in Human Soleus Fibers: Assessment of the Role of Immunoglobulin-Like Domain Unfolding

    PubMed Central

    Trombitás, K.; Wu, Y.; McNabb, M.; Greaser, M.; Kellermayer, M. S. Z.; Labeit, S.; Granzier, H.

    2003-01-01

    Titin (also known as connectin) is the main determinant of physiological levels of passive muscle force. This force is generated by the extensible I-band region of the molecule, which is constructed of the PEVK domain and tandem-immunoglobulin segments comprising serially linked immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. It is unresolved whether under physiological conditions Ig domains remain folded and act as “spacers” that set the sarcomere length at which the PEVK extends or whether they contribute to titin's extensibility by unfolding. Here we focused on whether Ig unfolding plays a prominent role in stress relaxation (decay of force at constant length after stretch) using mechanical and immunolabeling studies on relaxed human soleus muscle fibers and Monte Carlo simulations. Simulation experiments using Ig-domain unfolding parameters obtained in earlier single-molecule atomic force microscopy experiments recover the phenomenology of stress relaxation and predict large-scale unfolding in titin during an extended period (>∼20 min) of relaxation. By contrast, immunolabeling experiments failed to demonstrate large-scale unfolding. Thus, under physiological conditions in relaxed human soleus fibers, Ig domains are more stable than predicted by atomic force microscopy experiments. Ig-domain unfolding did not become more pronounced after gelsolin treatment, suggesting that the thin filament is unlikely to significantly contribute to the mechanical stability of the domains. We conclude that in human soleus fibers, Ig unfolding cannot solely explain stress relaxation. PMID:14581214

  5. Molecular basis of passive stress relaxation in human soleus fibers: assessment of the role of immunoglobulin-like domain unfolding.

    PubMed

    Trombitás, K; Wu, Y; McNabb, M; Greaser, M; Kellermayer, M S Z; Labeit, S; Granzier, H

    2003-11-01

    Titin (also known as connectin) is the main determinant of physiological levels of passive muscle force. This force is generated by the extensible I-band region of the molecule, which is constructed of the PEVK domain and tandem-immunoglobulin segments comprising serially linked immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. It is unresolved whether under physiological conditions Ig domains remain folded and act as "spacers" that set the sarcomere length at which the PEVK extends or whether they contribute to titin's extensibility by unfolding. Here we focused on whether Ig unfolding plays a prominent role in stress relaxation (decay of force at constant length after stretch) using mechanical and immunolabeling studies on relaxed human soleus muscle fibers and Monte Carlo simulations. Simulation experiments using Ig-domain unfolding parameters obtained in earlier single-molecule atomic force microscopy experiments recover the phenomenology of stress relaxation and predict large-scale unfolding in titin during an extended period (> approximately 20 min) of relaxation. By contrast, immunolabeling experiments failed to demonstrate large-scale unfolding. Thus, under physiological conditions in relaxed human soleus fibers, Ig domains are more stable than predicted by atomic force microscopy experiments. Ig-domain unfolding did not become more pronounced after gelsolin treatment, suggesting that the thin filament is unlikely to significantly contribute to the mechanical stability of the domains. We conclude that in human soleus fibers, Ig unfolding cannot solely explain stress relaxation.

  6. Endomorphins 1 and 2 reduce relaxant non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic neurotransmission in rat gastric fundus.

    PubMed

    Storr, M; Gaffal, E; Schusdziarra, V; Allescher, H-D

    2002-06-14

    It is now well established that opioids modulate cholinergic excitatory neurotransmission in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of the present study was to characterize a possible effect of endomorphins on nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) relaxant neurotransmission in the rat gastric fundus in vitro. The drugs used in the experiments were the endogenous mu-opioid receptors (MORs) endomorphin 1 and 2 and the mu-opioid receptor antagonist CTAP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2). CTAP left the basal tonus and the spontaneous activity of the preparation unchanged. Electrical field stimulation (EFS) under NANC conditions at frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 16 Hz caused a frequency-dependent relaxant response on the 5-hydoxytryptamine (5-HT) (10(-7) M) precontracted smooth-muscle strip. Both endomorphin 1 and endomorphin 2 significantly reduced this relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner. Endomorphin 1 proved to be more potent in reducing the relaxant responses. The endomorphin effects were significantly reversed by the MOR antagonist CTAP. CTAP itself did not influence the EFS-induced relaxation. In summary, these data provide evidence that the endogenous MOR agonists endomorphin 1 and 2 can reduce nonadrenergic, noncholinergic neurotransmission in the rat gastric fundus smooth muscle via a pathway involving MORs. The physiological relevance of these findings remains to be established, since the data presented suggest that the endomorphins act as neuromodulators within NANC relaxant neurotransmission.

  7. Task-specific design of skeletal muscle: balancing muscle structural composition.

    PubMed

    Lindstedt, S L; McGlothlin, T; Percy, E; Pifer, J

    1998-05-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are composed of three structural elements, each contributing a unique aspect of muscle function, yet each 'competing' in a sense for space inside the cell. The volume occupied by myofibrils determines the force of contraction, the volume of sarcoplasmic reticulum sets the rate of onset and relaxation of a fiber's contraction and hence contraction frequency, and the volume of mitochondria sets the level of sustained performance. The entirety of functional outcomes in muscle, from sustained isometric to high frequency contractions, and from high power output to high endurance, are all primarily attributable to shifts in the proportions (and relationships) of those three structures. This paper examines and reviews these components of muscle first to identify and summarize structure-function 'rules', and second to examine the balance between sometimes competing demands. In particular, we focus on those muscles in which power, endurance and frequency are all simultaneously high (flight muscles), and examine how muscle has 'solved' problems of space and energy demand. From these results and observations it would appear that for flight to have evolved in small animals, the double packing of inner mitochondrial membranes may be expected in animals under 50-80 g in mass, and asynchronous muscle is structurally essential for flight in small insects with wing beat frequencies above about 100 Hz.

  8. Stem Cell Antigen-1 in Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Harold S.; Samad, Tahmina; Cholsiripunlert, Sompob; Khalifian, Saami; Gong, Wenhui; Ritner, Carissa; Aurigui, Julian; Ling, Vivian; Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Bennett, Stephen; Hoffman, Julien; Oishi, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) is a member of the Ly-6 multigene family encoding highly homologous, glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane proteins. Sca-1 is expressed on muscle-derived stem cells and myogenic precursors recruited to sites of muscle injury. We previously reported that inhibition of Sca-1 expression stimulated myoblast proliferation in vitro and regulated the tempo of muscle repair in vivo. Despite its function in myoblast expansion during muscle repair, a role for Sca-1 in normal, post-natal muscle has not been thoroughly investigated. We systematically compared Sca-1-/- (KO) and Sca-1+/+ (WT) mice and hindlimb muscles to elucidate the tissue, contractile, and functional effects of Sca-1 in young and aging animals. Comparison of muscle volume, fibrosis, myofiber cross-sectional area, and Pax7+ myoblast number showed little differences between ages or genotypes. Exercise protocols, however, demonstrated decreased stamina in KO versus WT mice, with young KO mice achieving results similar to aging WT animals. In addition, KO mice did not improve with practice, while WT animals demonstrated conditioning over time. Surprisingly, myomechanical analysis of isolated muscles showed that KO young muscle generated more force and experienced less fatigue. However, KO muscle also demonstrated incomplete relaxation with fatigue. These findings suggest that Sca-1 is necessary for muscle conditioning with exercise, and that deficient conditioning in Sca-1 KO animals becomes more pronounced with age. PMID:24042315

  9. Mechanical spectroscopy of Snoek type relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, S. A.; Golovin, I. S.

    2012-09-01

    A review is presented for work in the area of elasticity for metals and alloys with a body-centered cubic lattice caused by diffusion under stress of interstitial atoms, i.e., Snoek relaxation in metals and Snoek type relaxation in alloys. Practical possibilities in analyzing materials of this class by mechanical spectroscopy are demonstrated.

  10. Analysis of sawtooth relaxation oscillations in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, K.; McGuire, K.; Okabayashi, M.

    1982-07-01

    Sawtooth relaxation oscillations are analyzed using the Kadomtsev's disruption model and a thermal relaxation model. The sawtooth period is found to be very sensitive to the thermal conduction loss. Qualitative agreement between these calculations and the sawtooth period observed in several tokamaks is demonstrated.

  11. Dielectric relaxations in partly deuterated ammonium dichromate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilchrist, John le G.

    1987-12-01

    Two dielectric relaxations in partly deuterated ammonium dichromate are attributed to reorientations of mixed-isotope ammonium ions. Loss peaks were observed between 20 and 40 K and obey the Arrhenius law with activation energy 1.5 kcal/mol for the stronger relaxation. The dipole moment is of the order of 0.015 D.

  12. On the mechanism of the relaxing adrenaline effect on cat jejunum.

    PubMed

    Petkov, V; Radomirov, R

    1975-01-01

    The effect of propranolol, phentolamine, papaverine, theophyline and Ca++, administered in different combinations of their threshold doses, on the relaxing effect of adrenaline was studied on an isolated segment of proximal jejunum of male cats. It was established that phentolamine weakened the relaxing effect of adrenaline, while propranolol had no effect on it. Papaverine potentiated the relaxinf effects of adrenaline both when administered alone and in combination with propranolol or with phentolamine. Theophylline weakened the relaxing effect of adfrenaline and of the combination phentolamine-adrenaline. Ca++ increased the smooth-muscle tone. The interpretation of the results obtained leads to the fundamental conclusions that the relaxing effect of adrenaline on cat jejunum is more alpha- than beta-adrenergically determined and that the system of the cyclic AMP participates in its realization. At the smae time, however, the possibility of participation of other mechanisms is not excluded. The smooth-muscle effect of papaverine and theophylline is not determined only by their inhibitory effect on phosphodiesterase.

  13. Relaxation of mammalian single cardiac cells after pretreatment with the detergent Brij-58.

    PubMed Central

    Brutsaert, D L; Claes, V A; De Clerck, N M

    1978-01-01

    1. The influence of load and activation on relaxation of heart muscle has been studied. 2. Cardiac cells devoid of functioning sarcolemma were isolated from rat and cat ventricular myocardium. Pretreatment with the detergent Brij-58 destroyed residual sarcoplasmic reticulum function. In order to analyse the mechanical properties of relaxation in these cells, a new miniature transducer was designed which could measure force by feedback sensing (resolution of 1 microgram). Contraction was induced by ionophoretically released calcium ions. Activation, sequestration of calcium and loading conditions could be controlled independently. 3. The time course of relaxation was shown to be governed by the amount of calcium released, and unlike intact preparations from rat or cat heart (but like those from frog), to be independent of load and of alterations in load. 4. We conclude that relaxation of the cardiac contractile system is determined basically by an activation-dependent mechanism, which is masked by load dependence in intact muscle preparations with a well developed calcium sequestering membraneous system. PMID:102766

  14. On relaxations and aging of various glasses

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Ariel; Oreg, Yuval; Imry, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Slow relaxation occurs in many physical and biological systems. “Creep” is an example from everyday life. When stretching a rubber band, for example, the recovery to its equilibrium length is not, as one might think, exponential: The relaxation is slow, in many cases logarithmic, and can still be observed after many hours. The form of the relaxation also depends on the duration of the stretching, the “waiting time.” This ubiquitous phenomenon is called aging, and is abundant both in natural and technological applications. Here, we suggest a general mechanism for slow relaxations and aging, which predicts logarithmic relaxations, and a particular aging dependence on the waiting time. We demonstrate the generality of the approach by comparing our predictions to experimental data on a diverse range of physical phenomena, from conductance in granular metals to disordered insulators and dirty semiconductors, to the low temperature dielectric properties of glasses. PMID:22315418

  15. Enthalpy relaxation and annealing effect in polystyrene.

    PubMed

    Sakatsuji, Waki; Konishi, Takashi; Miyamoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-07-01

    The effects of thermal history on the enthalpy relaxation in polystyrene are studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The temperature dependence of the specific heat in the liquid and the glassy states, that of relaxation time, and the exponent of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function are determined by measurements of the thermal response against sinusoidal temperature variation. A phenomenological model equation previously proposed to interpret the memory effect in the frozen state is applied to the enthalpy relaxation and the evolution of entropy under a given thermal history is calculated. The annealing below the glass transition temperature produces two effects on enthalpy relaxation: the decay of excess entropy with annealing time in the early stage of annealing and the increase in relaxation time due to physical aging in the later stage. The crossover of these effects is reflected in the variation of temperature of the maximum specific heat observed in the heating process after annealing and cooling.

  16. Neurotransmitters and neuromodulators controlling the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis.

    PubMed

    Muneoka, Y; Fujisawa, Y; Matsuura, M; Ikeda, T

    1991-01-01

    1. The anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis is innervated by at least two kinds of nerves, excitatory and relaxing nerves. The principal neurotransmitters released from these nerves have been shown to be acetylcholine and serotonin, respectively. 2. Some other monoamines, such as dopamine and octopamine, and various peptides, such as FMRFamide-related peptides, Mytilus inhibitory peptides, SCP-related peptides and a catch-relaxing peptide, may also be involved in the regulation of the muscle as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators. 3. The ABRM seems to be typical of invertebrate muscles controlled by multiple neurotransmitters and neuromodulators.

  17. Distinct mechanisms of relaxation to bioactive components from chamomile species in porcine isolated blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.E. Allen, S.; Chang, A.P.Y.; Henderson, H.; Hobson, G.C.; Karania, B.; Morgan, K.N.; Pek, A.S.Y.; Raghvani, K.; Shee, C.Y.; Shikotra, J.; Street, E.; Abbas, Z.; Ellis, K.; Heer, J.K.; Alexander, S.P.H.

    2013-11-01

    German chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.), a widely-used herbal medicine, has been reported to have a wide range of biological effects, including smooth muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of representative compounds from chamomile (apigenin, luteolin, (−)-α-bisabolol, farnesene, umbelliferone; 3–30 μM) on vascular tone using porcine coronary and splenic arteries mounted for isometric tension recording in isolated tissue baths and precontracted with the thromboxane-mimetic U46619. Apigenin, luteolin, and (−)-α-bisabolol produced slow, concentration-dependent relaxations in both the coronary and splenic arteries that were not blocked by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase or potassium channels. Removal of extracellular calcium inhibited the relaxations to all three compounds, and these compounds also inhibited calcium re-addition-evoked contractions, indicating that the relaxation response may be mediated through inhibition of calcium influx. Apigenin and luteolin, but not (−)-α-bisabolol, enhanced the relaxation to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, indicating that apigenin and luteolin may act to regulate cyclic GMP levels. Umbelliferone produced a rapid, transient relaxation in the splenic artery, but not the coronary artery, that was inhibited by L-NAME and removal of the endothelium, suggesting an influence on nitric oxide production. Farnesene, at concentrations up to 30 μM, was without effect in either blood vessel. In conclusion, hydroxylated compounds (apigenin, luteolin and (−)-α-bisabolol) found in chamomile all caused a slow relaxation of isolated blood vessels through an effect on calcium influx. Umbelliferone, on the other hand, produced a rapid, transient relaxation dependent upon release of nitric oxide from the endothelium. - Highlights: • Apigenin, luteolin, and (-)-α-bisabolol are present in chamomile. • They produced slow, concentration-dependent relaxations in arteries. • These

  18. Postseismic relaxation and transient creep

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Svarc, J.L.; Yu, S.-B.

    2005-01-01

    Postseismic deformation has been observed in the epicentral area following the 1992 Landers (M = 7.3), 1999 Chi-Chi (M = 7.6), 1999 Hector Mine (M = 7.1), 2002 Denali (M = 7.9), 2003 San Simeon (M = 6.5), and 2004 Parkfield (M = 6.0) earthquakes. The observations consist of repeated GPS measurements of the position of one monument relative to another (separation ???100 km). The early observations (t < 0.1 year) are well fit by the function a' + c'log(t), where t is the time after the earthquake and a' and c' are constants chosen to fit the data. Because a log(t) time dependence is characteristic of transient (primary) creep, the early postseismic response may be governed by transient creep as Benioff proposed in 1951. That inference is provisional as the stress conditions prevailing in postseismic relaxation are not identical to the constant stress condition in creep experiments. The observed logarithmic time dependence includes no characteristic time that might aid in identifying the micromechanical cause.

  19. Supervised Discrete Hashing With Relaxation.

    PubMed

    Gui, Jie; Liu, Tongliang; Sun, Zhenan; Tao, Dacheng; Tan, Tieniu

    2016-12-29

    Data-dependent hashing has recently attracted attention due to being able to support efficient retrieval and storage of high-dimensional data, such as documents, images, and videos. In this paper, we propose a novel learning-based hashing method called ''supervised discrete hashing with relaxation'' (SDHR) based on ''supervised discrete hashing'' (SDH). SDH uses ordinary least squares regression and traditional zero-one matrix encoding of class label information as the regression target (code words), thus fixing the regression target. In SDHR, the regression target is instead optimized. The optimized regression target matrix satisfies a large margin constraint for correct classification of each example. Compared with SDH, which uses the traditional zero-one matrix, SDHR utilizes the learned regression target matrix and, therefore, more accurately measures the classification error of the regression model and is more flexible. As expected, SDHR generally outperforms SDH. Experimental results on two large-scale image data sets (CIFAR-10 and MNIST) and a large-scale and challenging face data set (FRGC) demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of SDHR.

  20. Nonlinear electrochemical relaxation around conductors.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kevin T; Bazant, Martin Z

    2006-07-01

    We analyze the simplest problem of electrochemical relaxation in more than one dimension-the response of an uncharged, ideally polarizable metallic sphere (or cylinder) in a symmetric, binary electrolyte to a uniform electric field. In order to go beyond the circuit approximation for thin double layers, our analysis is based on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations of dilute solution theory. Unlike most previous studies, however, we focus on the nonlinear regime, where the applied voltage across the conductor is larger than the thermal voltage. In such strong electric fields, the classical model predicts that the double layer adsorbs enough ions to produce bulk concentration gradients and surface conduction. Our analysis begins with a general derivation of surface conservation laws in the thin double-layer limit, which provide effective boundary conditions on the quasineutral bulk. We solve the resulting nonlinear partial differential equations numerically for strong fields and also perform a time-dependent asymptotic analysis for weaker fields, where bulk diffusion and surface conduction arise as first-order corrections. We also derive various dimensionless parameters comparing surface to bulk transport processes, which generalize the Bikerman-Dukhin number. Our results have basic relevance for double-layer charging dynamics and nonlinear electrokinetics in the ubiquitous PNP approximation.

  1. Role of Telokin in Regulating Murine Gastric Fundus Smooth Muscle Tension.

    PubMed

    An, Changlong; Bhetwal, Bhupal P; Sanders, Kenton M; Somlyo, Avril V; Perrino, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Telokin phosphorylation by cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase facilitates smooth muscle relaxation. In this study we examined the relaxation of gastric fundus smooth muscles from basal tone, or pre-contracted with KCl or carbachol (CCh), and the phosphorylation of telokin S13, myosin light chain (MLC) S19, MYPT1 T853, T696, and CPI-17 T38 in response to 8-Bromo-cGMP, the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP), or nitrergic neurotransmission. We compared MLC phosphorylation and the contraction and relaxation responses of gastric fundus smooth muscles from telokin-/- mice and their wild-type littermates to KCl or CCh, and 8-Bromo-cGMP, SNP, or nitrergic neurotransmission, respectively. We compared the relaxation responses and telokin phosphorylation of gastric fundus smooth muscles from wild-type mice and W/WV mice which lack ICC-IM, to 8-Bromo-cGMP, SNP, or nitrergic neurotransmission. We found that telokin S13 is basally phosphorylated and that 8-Bromo-cGMP and SNP increased basal telokin phosphorylation. In muscles pre-contracted with KCl or CCh, 8-Bromo-cGMP and SNP had no effect on CPI-17 or MYPT1 phosphorylation, but increased telokin phosphorylation and reduced MLC phosphorylation. In telokin-/- gastric fundus smooth muscles, basal tone and constitutive MLC S19 phosphorylation were increased. Pre-contracted telokin-/- gastric fundus smooth muscles have increased contractile responses to KCl, CCh, or cholinergic neurotransmission and reduced relaxation to 8-Bromo-cGMP, SNP, and nitrergic neurotransmission. However, basal telokin phosphorylation was not increased when muscles were stimulated with lower concentrations of SNP or when the muscles were stimulated by nitrergic neurotransmission. SNP, but not nitrergic neurotransmission, increased telokin Ser13 phosphorylation in both wild-type and W/WV gastric fundus smooth muscles. Our findings indicate that telokin may play a role in attenuating constitutive MLC phosphorylation and provide an additional mechanism to

  2. Carbon-13 and proton magnetic resonance of mouse muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Fung, B M

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that roughly 4 mmol carbon atoms/g mouse muscle can give rise to a "high resolution" 13C NMR spectrum. From the 13C spectrum, it is estimated that the protons from mobile organic molecules or molecular segments amount to 6-8%of total nonrigid protons (organic plus water) in muscle. Their spin-spin relaxation times (T2) are of the order of 0.4-2 ms. At 37 degrees C, the proton spin-echo decay of mouse muscle changes rapidly with time after death, while that of mouse brain does not. PMID:890043

  3. Relaxation training affects success and activation on a teaching test.

    PubMed

    Helin, P; Hänninen, O

    1987-12-01

    We studied the effects of an audiocassette-relaxation training period (ART) and its timing on success at a teaching test (lecture type), on observed tension and on a number of physiological responses. The electrical activity of the upper trapezius muscle (EMG), heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), of female and male instructor candidates, were examined before, during and after the teaching test as well as during its critique. The relaxation period (18 min) was presented either on the preceding night (ARTnt) or immediately before the teaching test (ARTimm). The influence of personality (types A-B and extrovert-introvert) was also studied. ART improved success at the teaching test in both sexes. In males (but not in females), ARTimm decreased EMG level during the test, but ARTnt increased EMG at the test period as compared to the control group. In females, both ARTnt and ARTimm lowered HR more than in the control group. ARTimm lowered systolic BP in both sexes. Personality types affected the ART responses; ART was more beneficial for type A than B subjects.

  4. Channelopathies of skeletal muscle excitability

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Familial disorders of skeletal muscle excitability were initially described early in the last century and are now known to be caused by mutations of voltage-gated ion channels. The clinical manifestations are often striking, with an inability to relax after voluntary contraction (myotonia) or transient attacks of severe weakness (periodic paralysis). An essential feature of these disorders is fluctuation of symptoms that are strongly impacted by environmental triggers such as exercise, temperature, or serum K+ levels. These phenomena have intrigued physiologists for decades, and in the past 25 years the molecular lesions underlying these disorders have been identified and mechanistic studies are providing insights for therapeutic strategies of disease modification. These familial disorders of muscle fiber excitability are “channelopathies” caused by mutations of a chloride channel (ClC-1), sodium channel (NaV1.4), calcium channel (CaV1.1) and several potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir2.6, Kir3.4). This review provides a synthesis of the mechanistic connections between functional defects of mutant ion channels, their impact on muscle excitability, how these changes cause clinical phenotypes, and approaches toward therapeutics. PMID:25880512

  5. Non-muscle contractile proteins in the organ of corti

    SciTech Connect

    Thalmann, I.; Giometti, C.S.; Thalmann, R. )

    1985-01-01

    Evidence indicates that an active contractile process exists in the outer hair cells of the mammalian cochlea. Proteins ordinarily associated with muscle contraction have been identified in the outer hair cells by immunohistologic techniques. On this basis a muscle-like mechanism of contraction/relaxation has been postulated by several investigators. The possibility must be considered, however, that the contractile proteins identified thus far in inner ear structures may be nonmuscle rather than muscle forms. In skeletal muscle, actin and myosin are responsible for the physical movement of the muscle fibers, and tropomyosin and troponin are involved in regulating this movement; these four proteins, as well as a variety of proteins involved with the normal cell maintenance functions are all of a muscle-specific type. Non-muscle-like motion also depends upon the interaction of actin with myosin; however, not only are these proteins structurally different from those specific to skeletal muscle but their proportions are also different. We have used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to study the proteins in freeze dried preparations of whole organ of Corti from the guinea pig. The identified proteins include non-muscle actin, three forms of non-muscle tropomyosin, alpha- and beta-tubulin, alpha-actinin, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH B). Myosin heavy and light chains were not detected in the organ of Corti preparation, but the levels of those proteins might be too low to be detected with the protein load used of those proteins might be too low to be detected with the protein load used for this analysis. Although troponin could not be detected, calmodulin was present. All of these findings tend to indicate that the contraction/relaxation processes that have been associated with the organ of Corti by others are of the non-muscle variety.

  6. Plasma Relaxation Dynamics Moderated by Current Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewar, Robert; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Yoshida, Zensho

    2014-10-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamics (IMHD) is strongly constrained by an infinite number of microscopic constraints expressing mass, entropy and magnetic flux conservation in each infinitesimal fluid element, the latter preventing magnetic reconnection. By contrast, in the Taylor-relaxed equilibrium model all these constraints are relaxed save for global magnetic flux and helicity. A Lagrangian is presented that leads to a new variational formulation of magnetized fluid dynamics, relaxed MHD (RxMHD), all static solutions of which are Taylor equilibrium states. By postulating that some long-lived macroscopic current sheets can act as barriers to relaxation, separating the plasma into multiple relaxation regions, a further generalization, multi-relaxed MHD (MRxMHD), is developed. These concepts are illustrated using a simple two-region slab model similar to that proposed by Hahm and Kulsrud--the formation of an initial shielding current sheet after perturbation by boundary rippling is calculated using MRxMHD and the final island state, after the current sheet has relaxed through a reconnection sequence, is calculated using RxMHD. Australian Research Council Grant DP110102881.

  7. Relaxation processes in disaccharide sugar glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Yoon-Hwae; Kwon, Hyun-Joung; Seo, Jeong-Ah; Shin, Dong-Myeong; Ha, Ji-Hye; Kim, Hyung-Kook

    2013-02-01

    We represented relaxation processes of disaccharide sugars (anhydrous trehalose and maltose) in supercooled and glassy states by using several spectroscopy techniques which include a broadband dielectric loss spectroscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (Retvield analysis) methods which are powerful tools to measure the dynamics in glass forming materials. In a dielectric loss spectroscopy study, we found that anhydrous trehalose and maltose glasses have an extra relaxation process besides α-, JG β- and γ-relaxations which could be related to a unique property of glycoside bond in disaccharides. In photon correlation spectroscopy study, we found an interesting compressed exponential relaxation at temperatures above 140°C. The q-1 dependence of its relaxation time corresponds to an ultraslow ballistic motion due to the local structure rearrangements. In the same temperature range, we found the glycosidic bond structure changes in trehalose molecule from the Raman and the Retvield X-ray diffraction measurements indicating that the observed compressed exponential relaxation in supercooled liquid trehalose could be resulted in the glycosidic bond structure change. Therefore, the overall results from this study might support the fact that the superior bioprotection ability of disaccharide sugar glasses might originate from this unique relaxation process of glycosidic bond.

  8. Relaxation of impact basins on icy satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Paul J.; Squyres, Steven W.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of relaxation of very large impact craters on icy satellites is addressed and the extent to which such studies can help place constraints on the nature of such satellite interiors is investigated. Very general calculations aimed at understanding the nature of relaxation of large impact structures, including the directions, relaxation velocities, and stress levels, are presented. The dependence of relaxation on such factors as silicate core size and viscosity gradients in the ice is examined. The general results are used to address whether comparing the current morphology of impact basins to estimates of their original shape will yield an understanding of the thermal and mechanical structure of the interiors of the icy satellites. It is found that the relaxation rates derived from models of satellite interiors can provide constraints on viscous layer thicknesses. High thermal gradients can permit substantial relaxation even in thin viscous layers. Finally, the constraints on the internal structure of Tethys arising from the extremely relaxed state of the Odysseus basin and the existence of Ithaca Chasma are discussed.

  9. Endothelium-dependent relaxation of the pig aorta: relationship to stimulation of 86Rb efflux from isolated endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, J. L.; Martin, W.

    1983-01-01

    Bradykinin, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and acetylcholine each relaxed histamine-contracted strips of pig aorta in a dose-dependent manner. These relaxations were abolished when the endothelium was removed. Relaxation induced by ATP was mimicked by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) but adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and adenosine were about 120 times less potent. Relaxation induced by acetylcholine was antagonized by atropine in a competitive manner, and carbachol induced the same degree of relaxation as acetylcholine, but was about 10 times less potent. The calcium ionophore, A23187, also induced a dose-dependent relaxation of pig aortic strips provided the endothelium was present, suggesting that a rise in the level of ionized calcium within the endothelial cells is one means by which vascular smooth muscle relaxation can be triggered. Bradykinin, ATP, ADP, AMP, adenosine and A23187 each induced a dose-dependent increase in 86Rb efflux from preloaded pig aortic endothelial cells. The dose-response curves for stimulation of 86Rb efflux and for endothelium-dependent relaxation were similar for each individual compound. ADP was equipotent with ATP, but AMP and adenosine were about 120 times less potent. Neither acetylcholine nor carbachol, in concentrations that induce endothelium-dependent relaxation, had any effect on 86Rb efflux from isolated aortic endothelial cells. Lanthanum, which blocks calcium influx, abolished the increases in 86Rb efflux induced by bradykinin and ATP, and the calcium ionophore A23187 was the most effective stimulant of 86Rb efflux, suggesting that the potassium transport induced by these agents is calcium-activated. It is concluded that endothelial responses to bradykinin and ATP can be assessed by monitoring 86Rb efflux, which probably reflects a calcium-activated efflux of potassium associated with the endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation induced by these agents. This pathway is apparently not involved in endothelial responses to

  10. Nitric oxide: Mediator of nonadrenergic noncholinergic nerve-induced responses of opossum esophageal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.; Du, C.; Conklin, J.L.; Ledlow, A.; Bates, J.N. )

    1991-03-15

    Nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC) nerves of the opossum esophagus mediate relaxation of circular muscle from the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and the off contraction of circular esophageal muscle. The latencies between the end of the stimulus and the off contraction describe a gradient such that the latency is longest in muscle from the caudad esophagus. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA), an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, and nitric oxide were used to test the hypothesis that NO is a mediator of these nerve-induced responses. Both electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic esophageal nerves and exogenous NO relaxed LES muscle. Only EFS-induced relaxation was inhibited by L-NNA. L-arginine, the substrate for NO synthase, antagonized the inhibitory effect of L-NNA. Exogenous NO neither relaxed nor contracted circular esophageal muscle. Both the amplitude and the latency of the off contraction were diminished by L-NNA. L-arginine antagonized the action of L-NNA. N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine also attenuated the gradient in the latency of the off response by shortening latencies in muscle form the caudad esophagus. It had no effect on cholinergic nerve-induced contraction of longitudinal esophageal muscle. These data support the hypothesis that NO or an NO-containing compound mediates NANC nerve-induced responses of the esophagus and LES.

  11. Le Chatelier's principle with multiple relaxation channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, R.; Levine, R. D.

    1986-05-01

    Le Chatelier's principle is discussed within the constrained variational approach to thermodynamics. The formulation is general enough to encompass systems not in thermal (or chemical) equilibrium. Particular attention is given to systems with multiple constraints which can be relaxed. The moderation of the initial perturbation increases as additional constraints are removed. This result is studied in particular when the (coupled) relaxation channels have widely different time scales. A series of inequalities is derived which describes the successive moderation as each successive relaxation channel opens up. These inequalities are interpreted within the metric-geometry representation of thermodynamics.

  12. Relaxation time in disordered molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Rodrigo P.; Freire, José A.

    2015-05-28

    Relaxation time is the typical time it takes for a closed physical system to attain thermal equilibrium. The equilibrium is brought about by the action of a thermal reservoir inducing changes in the system micro-states. The relaxation time is intuitively expected to increase with system disorder. We derive a simple analytical expression for this dependence in the context of electronic equilibration in an amorphous molecular system model. We find that the disorder dramatically enhances the relaxation time but does not affect its independence of the nature of the initial state.

  13. SGLT inhibitors attenuate NO-dependent vascular relaxation in the pulmonary artery but not in the coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ying; Cho, Young-Eun; Ayon, Ramon; Guo, Rui; Youssef, Katia D.; Pan, Minglin; Dai, Anzhi; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT)2 are a new class of oral drugs for type 2 diabetic patients that reduce plasma glucose levels by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption. There is increasing evidence showing the beneficial effect of SGLT2 inhibitors on glucose control; however, less information is available regarding the impact of SGLT2 inhibitors on cardiovascular outcomes. The present study was designed to determine whether SGLT inhibitors regulate vascular relaxation in mouse pulmonary and coronary arteries. Phlorizin (a nonspecific SGLT inhibitor) and canagliflozin (a SGLT2-specific inhibitor) relaxed pulmonary arteries in a dose-dependent manner, but they had little or no effect on coronary arteries. Pretreatment with phlorizin or canagliflozin significantly inhibited sodium nitroprusside (SNP; a nitric oxide donor)-induced vascular relaxation in pulmonary arteries but not in coronary arteries. Phlorizin had no effect on cGMP-dependent relaxation in pulmonary arteries. SNP induced membrane hyperpolarization in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, and pretreatment of cells with phlorizin and canagliflozin attenuated SNP-induced membrane hyperpolarization by decreasing K+ activities induced by SNP. Contrary to the result observed in ex vivo experiments with SGLT inhibitors, SNP-dependent relaxation in pulmonary arteries was not altered by chronic administration of canagliflozin. On the other hand, canagliflozin administration significantly enhanced SNP-dependent relaxation in coronary arteries in diabetic mice. These data suggest that SGLT inhibitors differentially regulate vascular relaxation depending on the type of arteries, duration of the treatment, and health condition, such as diabetes. PMID:26361875

  14. 1H relaxation dispersion in solutions of nitroxide radicals: influence of electron spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Kruk, D; Korpała, A; Kubica, A; Kowalewski, J; Rössler, E A; Moscicki, J

    2013-03-28

    The work presents a theory of nuclear ((1)H) spin-lattice relaxation dispersion for solutions of (15)N and (14)N radicals, including electron spin relaxation effects. The theory is a generalization of the approach presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)]. The electron spin relaxation is attributed to the anisotropic part of the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine interaction modulated by rotational dynamics of the paramagnetic molecule, and described by means of Redfield relaxation theory. The (1)H relaxation is caused by electron spin-proton spin dipole-dipole interactions which are modulated by relative translational motion of the solvent and solute molecules. The spectral density characterizing the translational dynamics is described by the force-free-hard-sphere model. The electronic relaxation influences the (1)H relaxation by contributing to the fluctuations of the inter-molecular dipolar interactions. The developed theory is tested against (1)H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion data for glycerol solutions of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(15)N and 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(14)N covering the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz. The studies are carried out as a function of temperature starting at 328 K and going down to 290 K. The theory gives a consistent overall interpretation of the experimental data for both (14)N and (15)N systems and explains the features of (1)H relaxation dispersion resulting from the electron spin relaxation.

  15. 1H relaxation dispersion in solutions of nitroxide radicals: Influence of electron spin relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruk, D.; Korpała, A.; Kubica, A.; Kowalewski, J.; Rössler, E. A.; Moscicki, J.

    2013-03-01

    The work presents a theory of nuclear (1H) spin-lattice relaxation dispersion for solutions of 15N and 14N radicals, including electron spin relaxation effects. The theory is a generalization of the approach presented by Kruk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 137, 044512 (2012)], 10.1063/1.4736854. The electron spin relaxation is attributed to the anisotropic part of the electron spin-nitrogen spin hyperfine interaction modulated by rotational dynamics of the paramagnetic molecule, and described by means of Redfield relaxation theory. The 1H relaxation is caused by electron spin-proton spin dipole-dipole interactions which are modulated by relative translational motion of the solvent and solute molecules. The spectral density characterizing the translational dynamics is described by the force-free-hard-sphere model. The electronic relaxation influences the 1H relaxation by contributing to the fluctuations of the inter-molecular dipolar interactions. The developed theory is tested against 1H spin-lattice relaxation dispersion data for glycerol solutions of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N and 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-14N covering the frequency range of 10 kHz-20 MHz. The studies are carried out as a function of temperature starting at 328 K and going down to 290 K. The theory gives a consistent overall interpretation of the experimental data for both 14N and 15N systems and explains the features of 1H relaxation dispersion resulting from the electron spin relaxation.

  16. Myofilament Calcium Sensitivity: Role in Regulation of In vivo Cardiac Contraction and Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae-Hoon; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Ziolo, Mark T.; Davis, Jonathan P.; Janssen, Paul M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Myofilament calcium sensitivity is an often-used indicator of cardiac muscle function, often assessed in disease states such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). While assessment of calcium sensitivity provides important insights into the mechanical force-generating capability of a muscle at steady-state, the dynamic behavior of the muscle cannot be sufficiently assessed with a force-pCa curve alone. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of the force-pCa curve depends on the ratio of the apparent calcium association rate constant (kon) and apparent calcium dissociation rate constant (koff) of calcium on TnC and as a stand-alone parameter cannot provide an accurate description of the dynamic contraction and relaxation behavior without the additional quantification of kon or koff, or actually measuring dynamic twitch kinetic parameters in an intact muscle. In this review, we examine the effect of length, frequency, and beta-adrenergic stimulation on myofilament calcium sensitivity and dynamic contraction in the myocardium, the effect of membrane permeabilization/mechanical- or chemical skinning on calcium sensitivity, and the dynamic consequences of various myofilament protein mutations with potential implications in contractile and relaxation behavior. PMID:28018228

  17. Muscle strain treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment - muscle strain ... Question: How do you treat a muscle strain ? Answer: Rest the strained muscle and apply ice for the first few days after the injury. Anti-inflammatory medicines or acetaminophen ( ...

  18. Eye muscle repair - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lazy eye repair - discharge; Strabismus repair - discharge; Extraocular muscle surgery - discharge ... You or your child had eye muscle repair surgery to correct eye muscle ... term for crossed eyes is strabismus. Children most often ...

  19. Muscle Fatigue Affects the Interpolated Twitch Technique When Assessed Using Electrically-Induced Contractions in Human and Rat Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Neyroud, Daria; Cheng, Arthur J.; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The interpolated twitch technique (ITT) is the gold standard to assess voluntary activation and central fatigue. Yet, its validity has been questioned. Here we studied how peripheral fatigue can affect the ITT. Repeated contractions at submaximal frequencies were produced by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the human adductor pollicis muscle in vivo and of isolated rat soleus fiber bundles; an extra stimulation pulse was given during contractions to induce a superimposed twitch. Human muscles fatigued by repeated 30-Hz stimulation trains (3 s on–1 s off) showed an ~80% reduction in the superimposed twitch force accompanied by a severely reduced EMG response (M-wave amplitude), which implies action potential failure. Subsequent experiments combined a less intense stimulation protocol (1.5 s on–3 s off) with ischemia to cause muscle fatigue, but which preserved M-wave amplitude. However, the superimposed twitch force still decreased markedly more than the potentiated twitch force; with ITT this would reflect increased “voluntary activation.” In contrast, the superimposed twitch force was relatively spared when a similar protocol was performed in rat soleus bundles. Force relaxation was slowed by >150% in fatigued human muscles, whereas it was unchanged in rat soleus bundles. Accordingly, results similar to those in the human muscle were obtained when relaxation was slowed by cooling the rat soleus muscles. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that muscle fatigue can confound the quantification of central fatigue using the ITT. PMID:27445844

  20. The vestibular system does not modulate fusimotor drive to muscle spindles in contracting leg muscles of seated subjects.

    PubMed

    Bent, L R; Sander, M; Bolton, P S; Macefield, V G

    2013-06-01

    We previously showed that sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) does not modulate the firing of spontaneously active muscle spindles in relaxed human leg muscles. However, given that there is little, if any, fusimotor drive to relaxed human muscles, we tested the hypothesis that vestibular modulation of muscle spindles becomes apparent during volitional contractions at levels that engage the fusimotor system. Unitary recordings were made from 28 muscle spindle afferents via tungsten microelectrodes inserted percutaneously into the common peroneal nerve of seated awake human subjects. Twenty-one of the spindle afferents were spontaneously active at rest and each increased its firing rate during a weak static contraction; seven were silent at rest and were recruited during the contraction. Sinusoidal bipolar binaural galvanic vestibular stimulation (±2 mA, 100 cycles) was applied to the mastoid processes at 0.8 Hz. This continuous stimulation produced a sustained illusion of "rocking in a boat" or "swinging in a hammock" but no entrainment of EMG. Despite these robust vestibular illusions, none of the fusimotor-driven muscle spindles exhibited phase-locked modulation of firing during sinusoidal GVS. We conclude that this dynamic vestibular input was not sufficient to modulate the firing of fusimotor neurones recruited during a voluntary steady-state contraction, arguing against a significant role of the vestibular system in adjusting the sensitivity of muscle spindles via fusimotor neurones.

  1. Muscle Fatigue Affects the Interpolated Twitch Technique When Assessed Using Electrically-Induced Contractions in Human and Rat Muscles.

    PubMed

    Neyroud, Daria; Cheng, Arthur J; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Place, Nicolas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    The interpolated twitch technique (ITT) is the gold standard to assess voluntary activation and central fatigue. Yet, its validity has been questioned. Here we studied how peripheral fatigue can affect the ITT. Repeated contractions at submaximal frequencies were produced by supramaximal electrical stimulations of the human adductor pollicis muscle in vivo and of isolated rat soleus fiber bundles; an extra stimulation pulse was given during contractions to induce a superimposed twitch. Human muscles fatigued by repeated 30-Hz stimulation trains (3 s on-1 s off) showed an ~80% reduction in the superimposed twitch force accompanied by a severely reduced EMG response (M-wave amplitude), which implies action potential failure. Subsequent experiments combined a less intense stimulation protocol (1.5 s on-3 s off) with ischemia to cause muscle fatigue, but which preserved M-wave amplitude. However, the superimposed twitch force still decreased markedly more than the potentiated twitch force; with ITT this would reflect increased "voluntary activation." In contrast, the superimposed twitch force was relatively spared when a similar protocol was performed in rat soleus bundles. Force relaxation was slowed by >150% in fatigued human muscles, whereas it was unchanged in rat soleus bundles. Accordingly, results similar to those in the human muscle were obtained when relaxation was slowed by cooling the rat soleus muscles. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that muscle fatigue can confound the quantification of central fatigue using the ITT.

  2. Changes in contractile properties by androgen hormones in sexually dimorphic muscles of male frogs (Xenopus laevis).

    PubMed

    Regnier, M; Herrera, A A

    1993-02-01

    1. Male frogs (Xenopus laevis) were castrated then given either empty or testosterone-filled implants to produce animals with low or high levels of circulating testosterone. Eight weeks later the contractile properties of an androgen-sensitive forelimb flexor, the flexor carpi radialis muscle (FCR), were measured in vitro. Another forelimb flexor muscle, the coracoradialis, and a hindlimb muscle, the iliofibularis, were analysed similarly. 2. Plasma testosterone levels were 0.9 +/- 0.3 ng/ml (+/- S.E.M.) in castrated frogs with blank implants (C) and 61.3 +/- 4.7 ng/ml in castrates with testosterone implants (CT). Unoperated males, sampled at various times of the year, ranged between 10.8 and 51.0 ng/ml. 3. With direct electrical stimulation of the FCR, contraction time of the isometric twitch was not affected by testosterone levels. Relaxation times were affected, however. Half- and 90% relaxation times were 27 and 42% longer, respectively, for CT compared to C muscles. 4. Testosterone also had no effect on the contraction time of twitches elicited by stimulation of the FCR nerve. Half- and 90% relaxation times were 51 and 76% longer, respectively, for CT compared to C muscles. 5. Tetanus tension, elicited by direct stimulation of the FCR at 50 Hz, was 86% greater in CT compared to C muscles. The average cross-sectional area of FCR muscle fibres was 84% greater in CT muscles. These results implied that testosterone treatment had no effect on specific muscle tension. 6. Stimulation of the FCR nerve at 50 Hz resulted in 53% less tension than the same stimulus applied directly to CT muscles. In C muscles the difference was only 14%. This suggested that testosterone treatment reduced synaptic efficacy. 7. In CT muscles, direct or nerve stimulation of fibres in the shoulder region of the FCR elicited twitches that contracted and relaxed more slowly than fibres in the elbow region. In C muscles there was no difference in contraction or relaxation time between fibres in

  3. Involvement of large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels in both nitric oxide and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization-type relaxation in human penile small arteries.

    PubMed

    Király, István; Pataricza, János; Bajory, Zoltán; Simonsen, Ulf; Varro, András; Papp, Julius Gy; Pajor, Lászlo; Kun, Attila

    2013-07-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+) -activated K(+) channels (BKC a ), located on the vascular smooth muscle, play an important role in regulation of vascular tone. In penile corpus cavernosum tissue, opening of BKC a channels leads to relaxation of corporal smooth muscle, which is essential during erection; however, there is little information on the role of BKC a channels located in penile vascular smooth muscle. This study was designed to investigate the involvement of BKC a channels in endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation of human intracavernous penile arteries. In human intracavernous arteries obtained in connection with transsexual operations, change in isometric force was recorded in microvascular myographs, and endothelium-dependent [nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH)-type] and endothelium-independent (NO-donor) relaxations were measured in contracted arteries. In penile small arteries contracted with phenylephrine, acetylcholine evoked NO- and EDH-type relaxations, which were sensitive to iberiotoxin (IbTX), a selective blocker of BKC a channels. Iberiotoxin also inhibited relaxations induced by a NO-donor, sodium nitroprusside. NS11021, a selective opener of BKC a channels, evoked pronounced relaxations that were inhibited in the presence of IbTX. NS13558, a BKC a -inactive analogue of NS11021, failed to relax human penile small arteries. Our results show that BKC a channels are involved in both NO- and EDH-type relaxation of intracavernous penile arteries obtained from healthy men. The effect of a selective opener of BKC a channels also suggests that direct activation of the channel may be an advantageous approach for treatment of impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation often associated with erectile dysfunction.

  4. Vibrational energy relaxation in liquid oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, K. F.; Egorov, S. A.; Skinner, J. L.

    1998-09-01

    We consider theoretically the relaxation from the first excited vibrational state to the ground state of oxygen molecules in neat liquid oxygen. The relaxation rate constant is related in the usual way to the Fourier transform of a certain quantum mechanical force-force time-correlation function. A result from Egelstaff allows one instead to relate the rate constant (approximately) to the Fourier transform of a classical force-force time-correlation function. This Fourier transform is then evaluated approximately by calculating three equilibrium averages from a classical molecular dynamics simulation. Our results for the relaxation times (at two different temperatures) are within a factor of 5 of the experimental relaxation times, which are in the ms range.

  5. Energy landscape of relaxed amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiquette, Francis; Mousseau, Normand

    2003-09-01

    We analyze the structure of the energy landscape of a well-relaxed 1000-atom model of amorphous silicon using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau). Generating more than 40 000 events starting from a single minimum, we find that activated mechanisms are local in nature, that they are distributed uniformly throughout the model, and that the activation energy is limited by the cost of breaking one bond, independently of the complexity of the mechanism. The overall shape of the activation-energy-barrier distribution is also insensitive to the exact details of the configuration, indicating that well-relaxed configurations see essentially the same environment. These results underscore the localized nature of relaxation in this material.

  6. Relaxation dynamics of a multihierarchical polymer network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurjiu, Aurel; Biter, Teodor Lucian; Turcu, Flaviu

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we study the relaxation dynamics of a multihierarchical polymer network built by replicating the Vicsek fractal in dendrimer shape. The relaxation dynamics is investigated in the framework of the generalized Gaussian structure model by employing both Rouse and Zimm approaches. In the Rouse-type approach, we show the iterative procedure whereby the whole eigenvalue spectrum of the connectivity matrix of the multihierarchical structure can be obtained. Remarkably, the general picture that emerges from both approaches, even though we have a mixed growth algorithm, is that the obtained multihierarchical structure preserves the individual relaxation behaviors of its components. The theoretical findings with respect to the splitting of the intermediate domain of the relaxation quantities are well supported by experimental results.

  7. The Irreversible Thermodynamics of Chemical Relaxation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schelly, Z. A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the thermodynamics of relaxation methods, considering (1) mode of perturbation of chemical equilibria, (2) enforced change of the concentrations, and (3) chemical contributions to equations of state. (CS)

  8. Slow spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orendac, Martin; Sedlakova, Lucia; Orendacova, Alzbeta; Vrabel, Peter; Feher, Alexander; Pajerowski, Daniel M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Meisel, Mark W.; Shirai, Masae; Bramwell, Steven T.

    2009-03-01

    Spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7 was investigated using the magnetocaloric effect and susceptibility. The magnetocaloric behavior of Dy2Ti2O7 at temperatures where the orientation of spins is governed by ``ice rules`` (T < Tice) revealed thermally activated relaxation; however, the resulting temperature dependence of the relaxation time is more complicated than anticipated by a mere extrapolation of the corresponding high temperature data [1]. A susceptibility study of Ho2Ti2O7 was performed at T > Tice and in high magnetic fields, and the results suggest a slow relaxation of spins analogous to the behavior reported in a highly polarized cooperative paramagnet [2]. [1] J. Snyder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 107201. [2] B. G. Ueland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 027216.

  9. The effects of progressive muscular relaxation as a nursing procedure used for those who suffer from stress due to multiple sclerosis 1

    PubMed Central

    Novais, Paolla Gabrielle Nascimento; Batista, Karla de Melo; Grazziano, Eliane da Silva; Amorim, Maria Helena Costa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effect of progressive muscle relaxation as a nursing procedure on the levels of stress for sufferers of multiple sclerosis. Method: random clinical trials conducted at the Neurology outpatients unit at a University Hospital. The sample consisted of 40 patients who were being monitored as outpatients (20 in a control group and 20 in an experimental group). The Progressive Muscle Relaxation technique was used. The control variables were collected through interviews that were recorded on forms and on the Perceived Stress Scale that we used. Five meetings were held every fortnight covering a period of eight weeks. The experimental group was advised to carry out daily progressive muscle relaxation activities. After eight weeks of these activities, they were evaluated again to measure their levels of stress. In order to analyze the data used, the software package Statistics for Social Sciences version 19.0 was used. Results: the application of the t test showed a significant reduction in the Perceived Stress Scale scores in the experimental group (p<0.001), which in turn proved that there was a reduction in the levels of stress after the application of the relaxation practic-es. Conclusion: the progressive muscle relaxation activities contributed to the reduction in stress levels for multiple sclerosis suffers and thus can be used in nursing for patients. Clinical Trials Identifier: NCT 02673827. PMID:27598379

  10. The properties of the extraocular muscles of the frog. I. Mechanical properties of the isolated superior oblique and superior rectus muscles.

    PubMed

    Asmussen, G

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two extraocular muscles (superior oblique and superior rectus muscles) of the frog were studied and compared with those of a frog's skeletal muscle (iliofibularis muscle) which contains the same types of muscle fibres as the oculorotatory muscles. The extraocular muscles are very fast twitching muscles. They exhibit a smaller contraction time, a smaller half-relaxation time, a higher fusion frequency, and a lower twitch-tetanus ratio than the skeletal muscles. The maximum isometric tetanic tension produced per unit cross-sectional area is lower in the extraocular muscles than in skeletal muscles. However, the extraocular muscles show a higher fatigue resistance than the skeletal muscles. With respect to the dynamic properties there are some differences between the various oculorotatory muscles of the frog. The superior rectus muscle exhibits a faster time-course of the contraction, a higher fusion frequency, and a higher fatigability than the superior oblique muscle. An increase of the extracellular K+-concentration evokes sustained contractures not only in the extraocular muscles but also in the iliofibularis muscle; between these muscles there are no striking differences in the mechanical threshold of the whole muscle preparation. The mechanical threshold depends on the Ca++-concentration of the bathing solution and it is found in a range between 12.5 and 17.5 mM K+ in a normal Ringer solution containing 1.8 mM Ca++. The static-mechanical properties of the extraocular muscles of the frog and the dependence of the active developed tension on the muscle extension are very similar to those which are known to exist in the extraocular muscles of other vertebrates. In tetanic activated frog's oculorotatory muscles a linear relationship exists between length and tension. A variation of the stimulation frequency does not change the slope of this curve but causes parallel shifts of the curve. The peculiar properties of the extraocular muscles

  11. Control of dipolar relaxation in external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquiou, B.; Bismut, G.; Beaufils, Q.; Crubellier, A.; Maréchal, E.; Pedri, P.; Vernac, L.; Gorceix, O.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.

    2010-04-01

    We study dipolar relaxation in both ultracold thermal and Bose-condensed Cr atom gases. We show three different ways to control dipolar relaxation, making use of either a static magnetic field, an oscillatory magnetic field, or an optical lattice to reduce the dimensionality of the gas from three-dimensional (3D) to two-dimensional (2D). Although dipolar relaxation generally increases as a function of a static magnetic-field intensity, we find a range of nonzero magnetic-field intensities where dipolar relaxation is strongly reduced. We use this resonant reduction to accurately determine the S=6 scattering length of Cr atoms: a6=103±4a0. We compare this new measurement to another new determination of a6, which we perform by analyzing the precise spectroscopy of a Feshbach resonance in d-wave collisions, yielding a6=102.5±0.4a0. These two measurements provide, by far, the most precise determination of a6 to date. We then show that, although dipolar interactions are long-range interactions, dipolar relaxation only involves the incoming partial wave l=0 for large enough magnetic-field intensities, which has interesting consequences on the stability of dipolar Fermi gases. We then study ultracold Cr gases in a one-dimensional (1D) optical lattice resulting in a collection of independent 2D gases. We show that dipolar relaxation is modified when the atoms collide in reduced dimensionality at low magnetic-field intensities, and that the corresponding dipolar relaxation rate parameter is reduced by a factor up to 7 compared to the 3D case. Finally, we study dipolar relaxation in the presence of rf oscillating magnetic fields, and we show that both the output channel energy and the transition amplitude can be controlled by means of the rf frequency and Rabi frequency.

  12. Cancer cachexia decreases specific force and accelerates fatigue in limb muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, B.M.; Frye, G.S.; Ahn, B.; Ferreira, L.F.; Judge, A.R.

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle absolute force. •C-26 cancer cachexia causes a significant decrease in limb muscle specific force. •C-26 cancer cachexia decreases fatigue resistance in the soleus muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs time to peak twitch tension in limb muscle. •C-26 cancer cachexia prolongs one half twitch relaxation time in limb muscle. -- Abstract: Cancer cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome that is characterized by the loss of skeletal muscle mass and weakness, which compromises physical function, reduces quality of life, and ultimately can lead to mortality. Experimental models of cancer cachexia have recapitulated this skeletal muscle atrophy and consequent decline in muscle force generating capacity. However, more recently, we provided evidence that during severe cancer cachexia muscle weakness in the diaphragm muscle cannot be entirely accounted for by the muscle atrophy. This indicates that muscle weakness is not just a consequence of muscle atrophy but that there is also significant contractile dysfunction. The current study aimed to determine whether contractile dysfunction is also present in limb muscles during severe Colon-26 (C26) carcinoma cachexia by studying the glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and the oxidative soleus muscle, which has an activity pattern that more closely resembles the diaphragm. Severe C-26 cancer cachexia caused significant muscle fiber atrophy and a reduction in maximum absolute force in both the EDL and soleus muscles. However, normalization to muscle cross sectional area further demonstrated a 13% decrease in maximum isometric specific force in the EDL and an even greater decrease (17%) in maximum isometric specific force in the soleus. Time to peak tension and half relaxation time were also significantly slowed in both the EDL and the solei from C-26 mice compared to controls. Since, in addition to postural control, the oxidative

  13. On convex relaxation of graph isomorphism

    PubMed Central

    Aflalo, Yonathan; Bronstein, Alexander; Kimmel, Ron

    2015-01-01

    We consider the problem of exact and inexact matching of weighted undirected graphs, in which a bijective correspondence is sought to minimize a quadratic weight disagreement. This computationally challenging problem is often relaxed as a convex quadratic program, in which the space of permutations is replaced by the space of doubly stochastic matrices. However, the applicability of such a relaxation is poorly understood. We define a broad class of friendly graphs characterized by an easily verifiable spectral property. We prove that for friendly graphs, the convex relaxation is guaranteed to find the exact isomorphism or certify its inexistence. This result is further extended to approximately isomorphic graphs, for which we develop an explicit bound on the amount of weight disagreement under which the relaxation is guaranteed to find the globally optimal approximate isomorphism. We also show that in many cases, the graph matching problem can be further harmlessly relaxed to a convex quadratic program with only n separable linear equality constraints, which is substantially more efficient than the standard relaxation involving 2n equality and n2 inequality constraints. Finally, we show that our results are still valid for unfriendly graphs if additional information in the form of seeds or attributes is allowed, with the latter satisfying an easy to verify spectral characteristic. PMID:25713342

  14. Ultrasonic relaxations in lanthanide phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, G.; D'angelo, G.; Federico, M.; Tripodo, G.; Saunders, G. A.; Senin, H. B.

    1994-08-01

    The attenuation and velocity of ultrasonic waves of frequencies in the range of 10 to 90 MHz have been measured in La2O3-P2O5 and Sm2O3-P2O5 glasses with high lanthanide concentrations as a function of temperature between 1.5 and 400 K. Two distinct features characterize the attenuation behavior: (i) a plateau at temperatures below 15 K and (ii) a broad high-temperature peak. The former feature is interpreted in terms of the phonon-assisted relaxation of two-level systems and the latter by assuming the existence of a distribution of thermally activated relaxing centers. For both these mechanisms the product of the deformation potential squared and the density of relaxing particles decreases with increasing lanthanide-ion concentration. This result, taken together with previous observations of the properties of oxide glasses, provides physical insight into the microscopic origin of the relaxation effects and suggests that the source of the low- and high-temperature attenuation mechanisms is the same. At temperatures below 100 K, the sound velocity, after the subtraction of the relaxation and anharmonic contributions, follows a linear law as predicted by the soft-potential model for the relaxation of soft harmonic oscillators. An encouraging agreement is obtained between the parameters regulating this mechanism and those determined from the acoustic attenuation plateau.

  15. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy of phlogopite mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Mohan; Singh, Anupinder; Awasthi, A. M.; Singh, Lakhwant

    2012-11-01

    An in-depth investigation of the dielectric characteristics of annealed phlogopite mica has been conducted in the frequency range 0.1 Hz-10 MHz and over the temperature range 653-873 K through the framework of dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. These formalisms show qualitative similarities in relaxation processes. The frequency dependence of the M″ and dc conductivity is found to obey an Arrhenius law and the activation energy of the phlogopite mica calculated both from dc conductivity and the modulus spectrum is similar, indicating that same type of charge carriers are involved in the relaxation phenomena. The electric modulus and conductivity data have been fitted with the Havriliak-Negami function. Scaling of M‧, M″, ac conductivity has also been performed in order to obtain insight into the relaxation mechanisms. The scaling behaviour indicates that the relaxation describes the same mechanism at different temperatures. The relaxation mechanism was also examined using the Cole-Cole approach. The study elaborates that the investigation regarding the temperature and frequency dependence of dielectric relaxation in the phlogopite mica will be helpful for various cutting edge applications of this material in electrical engineering.

  16. Fatigue and caffeine effects in fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscles of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Brust, M

    1976-12-28

    In excised, curarized and massively stimulated fast-twitch mouse gastrocnemius muscles the early twitch tension enhancements (treppe) during 1/s activity between 10 and 36 degrees C increase and affect more contractions as temperature increases. Tension output eventually declines at a temperature-independent rate. Half-relaxation time lengthens below 25 degrees C and shortens above 25 degrees C. During 1/0.63s twitches half-relaxation time lengthens even at 25 degrees C. In slow-twitch soleus muscles activity decreases twitch tension and half-relaxation time regardless of temperature. Activity shortens contraction times in both muscles. Oxygen lack induced by NaN3 cannot account satisfactorily for these results. Activation is apparently more plastic in the gastrocnemius than in the soleus, and the relationship between the rates of their activation and relaxation processes and the temperature sensitivities of these rates also seem to differ. In both muscles caffeine can convert activity-induced shortened of half-relaxation times into prolongations. In the soleus this effect is more pronounced at 30 than at 25 degrees C. At high temperature and twitch rates caffeine reduces treppe amplitude and duration without affecting the eventual twitch tension decline in the gastrocnemius while it greatly accelerates twitch tension decline in the soleus. In both muscles intrafiber Ca2+ movements are apparently major determinants of fatigue behavior.

  17. Muscle shape consistency and muscle volume prediction of thigh muscles.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, F; Bohm, S; Schroll, A; Boeth, H; Duda, G; Arampatzis, A

    2015-04-01

    The present study investigated the applicability of a muscle volume prediction method using only the muscle length (L(M)), the maximum anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA(max)), and a muscle-specific shape factor (p) on the quadriceps vastii. L(M), ACSA(max), muscle volume, and p were obtained from magnetic resonance images of the vastus intermedius (VI), lateralis (VL), and medialis (VM) of female (n = 20) and male (n = 17) volleyball athletes. The average p was used to predict muscle volumes (V(p)) using the equation V(p)  = p × ACSA(max)  × L(M). Although there were significant differences in the muscle dimensions between male and female athletes, p was similar and on average 0.582, 0.658, 0.543 for the VI, VL, and VM, respectively. The position of ACSA(max) showed low variability and was at 57%, 60%, and 81% of the thigh length for VI, VL, and VM. Further, there were no significant differences between measured and predicted muscle volumes with root mean square differences of 5-8%. These results suggest that the muscle shape of the quadriceps vastii is independent of muscle dimensions or sex and that the prediction method could be sensitive enough to detect changes in muscle volume related to degeneration, atrophy, or hypertrophy.

  18. Quadriceps and Hamstrings Morphology Is Related to Walking Mechanics and Knee Cartilage MRI Relaxation Times in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    KUMAR, DEEPAK; SUBBURAJ, KARUPPPASAMY; LIN, WILSON; KARAMPINOS, DIMITRIOS C.; MCCULLOCH, CHARLES E.; LI, XIAOJUAN; LINK, THOMAS M.; SOUZA, RICHARD B.; MAJUMDAR, SHARMILA

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Controlled laboratory study using a cross-sectional design. OBJECTIVES To analyze the relationship of quadriceps-hamstrings and medial-lateral quadriceps anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA) ratios with knee loads during walking and articular and meniscal cartilage composition in young, healthy subjects. BACKGROUND Muscle forces affect knee loading during walking, but it is not known if muscle morphology is associated with walking mechanics and cartilage composition in young subjects. METHODS Forty-two knees from 27 young, healthy, active volunteers (age, 20-35 years; body mass index, <28 kg/m2) underwent 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 3-D motion capture. Standard MRI sequences were used for articular and meniscal cartilage T1rho and T2 relaxation times and for quadriceps and hamstrings muscle ACSA. Frontal plane kinetics during the stance phase of walking was calculated. Generalized estimating equation models were used to identify muscle variables that predicted MRI and gait parameters. RESULTS Quadriceps-hamstrings and medial-lateral quadriceps ACSA ratios were positively related to frontal plane loading (β = .27-.54, P≤.006), global articular cartilage relaxation times (β = .22-.28, P≤.041), and the medial-lateral ratio of meniscus T1rho relaxation time (β = .26-.36, P≤.049). The medial-lateral quadriceps ACSA ratio was positively related to global meniscus T1rho relaxation times (β = .30, P = .046). CONCLUSION Higher quadriceps-hamstrings and medial-lateral quadriceps ACSA ratios were associated with higher frontal plane loading during walking and with articular and meniscal cartilage T1rho and T2 relaxation times. These findings highlight the relationships between different knee tissues and knee mechanics in young, healthy individuals. PMID:24175607

  19. Stress-induced muscle effort as a cause of repetitive strain injury?

    PubMed

    Rietveld, S; van Beest, I; Kamphuis, J H

    2007-12-01

    The influence of stress-induced muscle effort during computer utilization was tested in patients with repetitive strain injury (RSI). Twenty academic researchers with a formal medical diagnosis of RSI and 20 matched controls, randomly selected from a sample of 71 colleagues with and without RSI, typed after stress (induced via an intelligence/skill task under social pressure) and after relaxation. Results indicated that both groups had more electromyography (EMG) activity in the shoulder muscles during typing after stress than after relaxation, but that patients started with higher baseline muscle activity. Furthermore, EMG activity of different muscle groups during typing after stress correlated among controls, but not among patients. Finally, analysis of intake forms showed that patients scored higher than controls on neuroticism and alexithymia, but not on extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness. It was concluded that deviations in muscle activity during computer utilization, as well as neuroticism and alexithymia, may be risk factors for RSI.

  20. Electromyography of the pubococcygeus muscles in patients with obstructed defaecation.

    PubMed

    Lubowski, D Z; King, D W; Finlay, I G

    1992-12-01

    The function of the pubococcygeus muscles during defaecation straining was compared in 10 women with obstructed defaecation and 12 age-matched control subjects. Video-proctography in each patient showed failure to evacuate the rectum and sagging of the pelvic floor during attempted defaecation. Trans-perineal concentric needle electromyography in the puborectalis muscle and transvaginal electromyography in the pubococcygeus muscle was carried out during defaecation straining and during attempted rectal balloon expulsion. Contraction of the pubococcygeus muscle was observed in 10 of the 12 control subjects and in 2 of the 10 patients with obstructed defaecation (P < 0.005). Virtually equal proportions of subjects in each group showed relaxation or contraction of the puborectalis muscle during straining. There was significant perineal descent on straining in the patient group (P = 0.005). This group of patients with obstructed defaecation showed failure of the pubococcygeus muscles to contract, perhaps due to neuropathic weakness of the muscles. The puborectalis muscle did not cause obstructed defaecation in these patients, and the concept of "paradoxical" contraction of this muscle is questioned.

  1. Regulation of gastrointestinal motility--insights from smooth muscle biology.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Kenton M; Koh, Sang Don; Ro, Seungil; Ward, Sean M

    2012-11-01

    Gastrointestinal motility results from coordinated contractions of the tunica muscularis, the muscular layers of the alimentary canal. Throughout most of the gastrointestinal tract, smooth muscles are organized into two layers of circularly or longitudinally oriented muscle bundles. Smooth muscle cells form electrical and mechanical junctions between cells that facilitate coordination of contractions. Excitation-contraction coupling occurs by Ca(2+) entry via ion channels in the plasma membrane, leading to a rise in intracellular Ca(2+). Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin activates myosin light chain kinase; subsequent phosphorylation of myosin initiates cross-bridge cycling. Myosin phosphatase dephosphorylates myosin to relax muscles, and a process known as Ca(2+) sensitization regulates the activity of the phosphatase. Gastrointestinal smooth muscles are 'autonomous' and generate spontaneous electrical activity (slow waves) that does not depend upon input from nerves. Intrinsic pacemaker activity comes from interstitial cells of Cajal, which are electrically coupled to smooth muscle cells. Patterns of contractile activity in gastrointestinal muscles are determined by inputs from enteric motor neurons that innervate smooth muscle cells and interstitial cells. Here we provide an overview of the cells and mechanisms that generate smooth muscle contractile behaviour and gastrointestinal motility.

  2. BOOK REVIEW: Magnetohydrodynamics of Plasma Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. W.

    1998-06-01

    This monograph on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation in plasmas by Ortolani and Schnack occupies a fascinating niche in the plasma physics literature. It is rare in the complex and often technically sophisticated subject of plasma physics to be able to isolate a topic and deal with it comprehensively in a mere 180 pages. Furthermore, it brings a refreshingly original and personal approach to the treatment of plasma relaxation, synthesizing the experiences of the two authors to produce a very readable account of phenomena appearing in such diverse situations as laboratory reversed field pinches (RFPs) and the solar corona. Its novelty lies in that, while it does acknowledge the seminal Taylor theory of relaxation as a general guide, it emphasizes the role of large scale numerical MHD simulations in developing a picture for the relaxation phenomena observed in experiment and nature. Nevertheless, the volume has some minor shortcomings: a tendency to repetitiveness and some omissions that prevent it being entirely self-contained. The monograph is divided into nine chapters, with the first a readable, `chatty', introduction to the physics and phenomena of relaxation discussed in the later chapters. Chapter 2 develops the tools for describing relaxation processes, namely the resistive MHD model, leading to a discussion of resistive instabilities and the stability properties of RFPs. This chapter demonstrates the authors' confessed desire to avoid mathematical detail with a rather simplified discussion of Δ' and magnetic islands; it also sets the stage for their own belief, or thesis, that numerical simulation of the non-linear consequences of the MHD model is the best approach to explaining the physics of relaxation. Nevertheless, in Chapter 3 they provide a reasonably good account and critique of one analytic approach that is available, and which is the commonly accepted picture for relaxation in pinches - the Taylor relaxation theory based on the conservation of

  3. Viscoelasticity-based MR elastography of skeletal muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klatt, Dieter; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2010-11-01

    An in vivo multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) protocol was developed for studying the viscoelastic properties of human skeletal muscle in different states of contraction. Low-frequency shear vibrations in the range of 25-62.5 Hz were synchronously induced into the femoral muscles of seven volunteers and measured in a cross-sectional view by encoding the fast-transverse shear wave component parallel to the muscle fibers. The so-called springpot model was used for deriving two viscoelastic constants, μ and α, from the dispersion functions of the complex shear modulus in relaxed and in loaded muscle. Representing the shear elasticity parallel to the muscle fibers, μ increased in all volunteers upon contraction from 2.68 ± 0.23 kPa to 3.87 ± 0.50 kPa. Also α varied with load, indicating a change in the geometry of the mechanical network of muscle from relaxation (α = 0.253 ± 0.009) to contraction (α = 0.270 ± 0.009). These results provide a reference for a future assessment of muscular dysfunction using rheological parameters.

  4. Effects of shakuyakukanzoto and its absorbed components on twitch contractions induced by physiological Ca2+ release in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kaifuchi, Noriko; Omiya, Yuji; Kushida, Hirotaka; Fukutake, Miwako; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-07-01

    Shakuyakukanzoto (SKT) is a kampo medicine composed of equal proportions of Glycyrrhizae radix (G. radix) and Paeoniae radix (P. radix). A double-blind study reported that SKT significantly ameliorated painful muscle cramp in cirrhosis patients without the typical severe side effects of muscle weakness and central nervous system (CNS) depression. Previous basic studies reported that SKT and its active components induced relaxation by a direct action on skeletal muscle and that SKT did not depress CNS functions; however, why SKT has a lower incidence of muscle weakness remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated which components are absorbed into the blood of rats after a single oral administration of SKT to identify the active components of SKT. We also investigated the effects of SKT and its components on the twitch contraction induced by physiological Ca(2+) release. Our study demonstrated that SKT and five G. radix isolates, which are responsible for the antispasmodic effect of SKT, did not inhibit the twitch contraction in contrast to dantrolene sodium, a direct-acting peripheral muscle relaxant, indicating that the mechanisms of muscle contraction of SKT and dantrolene in skeletal muscle differ. These findings suggest that SKT does not reduce the contractile force in skeletal muscle under physiological conditions, i.e., SKT may have a low risk of causing muscle weakness in clinical use. Considering that most muscle relaxants and anticonvulsants cause various harmful side effects such as weakness and CNS depression, SKT appears to have a benign safety profile.

  5. Effects of endopeptidase inhibition on the contraction-relaxation response of isolated human vaginal tissue.

    PubMed

    Rahardjo, Harrina E; Uckert, Stefan; Taher, Akmal; Sonnenberg, Joachim E; Kauffels, Wolfgang; Rahardjo, Djoko; Kuczyk, Markus A

    2013-04-01

    INTRODUCTION.: Vasoactive peptides, such as bradykinin, C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), and endothelin 1 (ET-1), are assumed to be involved in the control of female genital vascular and nonvascular smooth muscle. Tissue levels of said peptides are controlled by the activity of endopeptidase enzymes. Theoretically, in female genital tissues, inhibiting the degradation of bradykinin, CNP, and VIP, or the conversion of Big ET-1 into ET-1 should result in an enhancement in smooth muscle relaxation and, thus, an improvement in sexual response. AIM.: Elucidate the effects of the endopeptidase inhibitor KC 12615 on the contraction/relaxation response of isolated human vaginal smooth muscle to Big ET-1, bradykinin, CNP, or VIP. METHODS.: Tissue bath experiments were carried out to ascertain the responses of human vaginal tissue challenged by ET-1 (0.1 μM) to increasing concentrations of bradykinin, CNP, and VIP (0.01 μM, 0.1 μM, and 1 μM, respectively). The effects were also evaluated following preexposure to KC 12615 (10 μM, for 20 minutes). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES.: Measure the effects of KC 12615 on the relaxation of isolated human vaginal smooth muscle brought about by bradykinin, CNP, or VIP and the contraction mediated by Big ET-1. RESULTS.: The tension induced by ET-1 was reversed by bradykinin, CNP, or VIP (-25 ± 6.6%, -13.3 ± 2.2%, and -17.6 ± 10%, respectively). Big ET-1 induced contraction of the vaginal tissue. Preexposure of the tissue to KC 12615 increased the relaxation exerted by bradykinin, CNP, or VIP (to -39.2 ± 5.8%, -40.7 ± 7.3%, and -44.6 ± 19%, respectively). The contraction induced by Big ET-1 was attenuated in the presence of KC 12615 (to approximately 25% of the initial response). CONCLUSION.: Inhibition of endopeptidase activity can antagonize the contraction of human vaginal tissue induced by Big ET-1 and increase the relaxation induced by vasoactive endogenous

  6. Further observations on the facilitation of muscle responses to cortical stimulation by voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P D; Day, B L; Rothwell, J C; Dressler, D; Maertens de Noordhout, A; Marsden, C D

    1991-10-01

    The effect of voluntary contraction on the discharge of single motor units following electrical and magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex was examined using the post-stimulus time histogram (PSTH) technique. The latencies of responses in single motor units of the first dorsal interosseous muscle to cortical stimulation were 2-4 msec shorter when the muscle was contracting than when at rest in 9 of 10 units studied. These latency differences are comparable with those recorded by surface electromyography for compound muscle action potentials following cortical stimulation in relaxed and active muscles. The new findings are that the intensity of cortical stimulation required to discharge a resting motor unit to produce a single PSTH peak produced multiple PSTH peaks when the same unit was contracting. The timing of the PSTH peak of relaxed motor unit discharge corresponded to one of the later PSTH peaks (usually the second) when the motor unit was voluntarily activated. These findings are in keeping with our previous suggestions that the longer latency of responses in relaxed muscles is due to the time taken for temporal summation of multiple descending corticospinal volleys at the cortico-motoneurone synapse. Facilitation produced by voluntary contraction occurs at least in part at the level of the spinal cord by lowering motoneurone threshold to enable discharge on the initial descending volley. The higher threshold of relaxed muscles is related to the higher intensities of stimulation needed to recruit multiple descending volleys and discharge resting motoneurones.

  7. Cobalt contraction of vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Dominiczak, A.; Clyde, E.; Bohr, D. )

    1991-03-11

    Although it has been reported that cobalt causes contraction of vascular smooth muscle, the mechanism responsible for this contraction has not been defined. The authors studied these contractions in rat aortic rings. Concentration-response studies indicated that the threshold for contraction was 10{sup {minus}8}M, maximum contraction occurred at 3 {times} 10{sup 7}M and relaxation began at 10{sup {minus}6}M. No contraction occurred in a calcium-free physiological salt solution and the contraction was not inhibited by H-7, a protein kinase C inhibitor. The authors conclude the cobalt in low concentrations causes contraction by activating calcium channels and that in high concentrations it causes relaxation by inactivating these same channels.

  8. A Comparative Evaluation of Three Relaxation Training Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Jeffrey E.

    Comparison was made between the effectiveness of three relaxation training procedures: (1) Behavioral Relaxation Training, which consisted of training in relaxing specific parts of the body and controlling breathing; (2) Meditation (based on Benson's procedure for eliciting the relaxation response); and (3) Seashore Sounds "Attention Focusing,"…

  9. Electrical Relaxation in Rare Earth Doped Cubic Lead Fluoride.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    PAGE (W v,. Data Fleted ) READ INSTRUCTIONSREPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFRE CMPETINGFORSORE OMPLETIN FO M 1. REPORT NUMBER j2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3...For the smallest rare earths, however, at least nine .* relaxations are found. The concentration studies indicate multiple relaxations for certain...relaxations are found. The concentration studies indicate multiple relaxations for certain sites. Both simple sites and clusters are observed for

  10. Fractal geometry impact on nuclear relaxation in irregular pores.

    PubMed

    Sapoval, B; Russ, S; Petit, D; Korb, J P

    1996-01-01

    We apply a fractal description of pore surface irregularity to study the nuclear relaxation of a confined liquid. From the introduction of a length characteristic of diffusive and surface relaxing properties we describe three different relaxation regimes. These regimes show that the nuclear relaxation can be drastically modified by pore surface irregularity.

  11. Muscle Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ryabykh, Sergey; Ochirova, Polina; Kenis, Vladimir; Hofstätter, Jochen G.; Grill, Franz; Ganger, Rudolf; Kircher, Susanne Gerit

    2017-01-01

    Marked ligamentous hyperlaxity and muscle weakness/wasting associated with awkward gait are the main deficits confused with the diagnosis of myopathy. Seven children (6 boys and 1 girl with an average age of 8 years) were referred to our department because of diverse forms of skeletal abnormalities. No definitive diagnosis was made, and all underwent a series of sophisticated investigations in other institutes in favor of myopathy. We applied our methodology through the clinical and radiographic phenotypes followed by targeted genotypic confirmation. Three children (2 boys and 1 girl) were compatible with the diagnosis of progressive pseudorheumatoid chondrodysplasia. The genetic mutation was correlated with the WISP 3 gene actively expressed by articular chondrocytes and located on chromosome 6. Klinefelter syndrome was the diagnosis in 2 boys. Karyotyping confirmed 47,XXY (aneuploidy of Klinefelter syndrome). And 2 boys were finally diagnosed with Morquio syndrome (MPS type IV A) as both showed missense mutations in the N-acetylgalactosamine-sulfate sulfatase gene. Misdiagnosis can lead to the initiation of a long list of sophisticated investigations. PMID:28210640

  12. Size of the Oblique Extraocular Muscles and Superior Oblique Muscle Contractility in Brown Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Soh Youn; Le, Alan; Demer, Joseph L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study employed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate possible size and contractility changes in the superior oblique (SO) muscle, and possible isometric hypertrophy in the inferior oblique (IO) muscle, resulting from abnormal mechanical loading in Brown syndrome (BrS). Methods High resolution orbital MRI was obtained in 4 congenital and 11 acquired cases of BrS, and compared with 44 normal subjects. Maximal cross-section areas and posterior partial volumes (PPVs) of the SO were analyzed in central gaze, supraduction, and infraduction for the SO, and in central gaze only for the IO. Results In congenital BrS, mean maximum SO cross-sectional areas were 24% and 20% less than normal in affected and unaffected eyes, respectively (P = 0.0002). Mean PPV in congenital BrS was also significantly subnormal bilaterally (29% and 34% less in affected and unaffected eyes, respectively, P = 0.001). However, SO muscle size and volume were normal in acquired cases. The SO muscle did not relax in supraduction in BrS, although there was normal contractile thickening in infraduction. The IO muscle had normal size bilaterally in BrS. Conclusions Congenital BrS may be associated with SO hypoplasia that could reflect hypoinnervation. However, unique isometric loading of oblique extraocular muscles due to restrictive hypotropia in adduction in BrS is generally not associated with changes in muscle bulk or in SO contractility. Unlike skeletal muscles, the bulk and contractility of extraocular muscles can therefore be regarded as independent of isometric exercise history. Restriction to elevation in BrS typically arises in the trochlea–tendon complex. PMID:26397461

  13. Novel treatment strategies for smooth muscle disorders: Targeting Kv7 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Haick, Jennifer M; Byron, Kenneth L

    2016-09-01

    Smooth muscle cells provide crucial contractile functions in visceral, vascular, and lung tissues. The contractile state of smooth muscle is largely determined by their electrical excitability, which is in turn influenced by the activity of potassium channels. The activity of potassium channels sustains smooth muscle cell membrane hyperpolarization, reducing cellular excitability and thereby promoting smooth muscle relaxation. Research over the past decade has indicated an important role for Kv7 (KCNQ) voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of the excitability of smooth muscle cells. Expression of multiple Kv7 channel subtypes has been demonstrated in smooth muscle cells from viscera (gastrointestinal, bladder, myometrial), from the systemic and pulmonary vasculature, and from the airways of the lung, from multiple species, including humans. A number of clinically used drugs, some of which were developed to target Kv7 channels in other tissues, have been found to exert robust effects on smooth muscle Kv7 channels. Functional studies have indicated that Kv7 channel activators and inhibitors have the ability to relax and contact smooth muscle preparations, respectively, suggesting a wide range of novel applications for the pharmacological tool set. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the physiological functions of Kv7 channels in smooth muscle, and highlights potential therapeutic applications based on pharmacological targeting of smooth muscle Kv7 channels throughout the body.

  14. Design and function of superfast muscles: new insights into the physiology of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Rome, Lawrence C

    2006-01-01

    Superfast muscles of vertebrates power sound production. The fastest, the swimbladder muscle of toadfish, generates mechanical power at frequencies in excess of 200 Hz. To operate at these frequencies, the speed of relaxation has had to increase approximately 50-fold. This increase is accomplished by modifications of three kinetic traits: (a) a fast calcium transient due to extremely high concentration of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)-Ca2+ pumps and parvalbumin, (b) fast off-rate of Ca2+ from troponin C due to an alteration in troponin, and (c) fast cross-bridge detachment rate constant (g, 50 times faster than that in rabbit fast-twitch muscle) due to an alteration in myosin. Although these three modifications permit swimbladder muscle to generate mechanical work at high frequencies (where locomotor muscles cannot), it comes with a cost: The high g causes a large reduction in attached force-generating cross-bridges, making the swimbladder incapable of powering low-frequency locomotory movements. Hence the locomotory and sound-producing muscles have mutually exclusive designs.

  15. Pharmacological dissociation of UTP- and ATP-elicited contractions and relaxations in isolated rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Velasco, G; Sanchez, M; Hidalgo, A; Garcia de Boto, M J

    1995-12-29

    Effects of UTP have been described in many tissues, but it is not clear whether these are due to purinoceptors. Specific receptors for UTP, 'pyrimidinoceptors', and 'nucleotide receptors' have also been proposed. We pharmacologically characterized the receptors involved in the ATP- and UTP-induced contraction under basal tone and the relaxation of raised tone elicited by noradrenaline in isolated rat aorta. The rank order of potency for the agonists for the contraction was alpha,beta-methylene ATP > > ATP, and the desensitization by alpha,beta-methylene ATP suggests that ATP contractions were mediated via P2X purinoceptors which were located on the vascular smooth muscle. The rank order of potency of the agonists for relaxation was 2-methyl-thio ATP > > ATP, which is suggestive of a P2Y purinoceptor. However, the relaxation seems to be unrelated to the classical P2Y subtype and a heterogeneous population of purinoceptors might therefore exist. The evidence comes from the distinct location and the different pharmacological effect of reactive blue 2 on 2-methyl-thio ATP and ATP receptors. 2-Methyl-thio ATP produced an endothelium-dependent relaxation while ATP-induced relaxation was produced via endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent mechanisms, unrelated to adenosine receptors. It is unlikely that UTP-induced contractions and the endothelium-dependent relaxation were produced via purinoceptors since the pharmacology is not consistent with that of the classical P2 purinoceptors studied. Furthermore, UTP-sensitive receptors showed a pharmacological property that was also distinct from that of the 'nucleotide' or P2U receptor reported. The results suggest the presence of a heterogeneous population of purinoceptors and pyrimidinoceptors pharmacologically different from the receptors for ATP.

  16. Relationship between bradykinin-induced relaxation and endogenous epoxyeicosanoid synthesis in human bronchi.

    PubMed

    Tabet, Yacine; Sirois, Marco; Sirois, Chantal; Rizcallah, Edmond; Rousseau, Éric

    2013-04-15

    Epoxyeicosanoids (EETs) are produced by cytochrome P-450 epoxygenase; however, it is not yet known what triggers their endogenous production in epithelial cells. The relaxing effects of bradykinin are known to be related to endogenous production of epithelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EpDHF). Because of their effects on membrane potential, EETs have been reported to be EpDHF candidates (Benoit C, Renaudon B, Salvail D, Rousseau E. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 280: L965-L973, 2001.). Thus, we hypothesized that bradykinin (BK) may stimulate endogenous EET production in human bronchi. To test this hypothesis, the relaxing and hyperpolarizing effects of BK and 14,15-EET were quantified on human bronchi, as well as the effects of various enzymatic inhibitors on these actions. One micromolar BK or 1 μM 14,15-EET induced a 45% relaxation on the tension induced by 30 nM U-46619 [a thromboxane-prostanoid (TP)-receptor agonist]. These BK-relaxing effects were reduced by 42% upon addition of 10 nM iberiotoxin [a large-conductance Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel blocker], by 27% following addition of 3 μM 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (an EET antagonist), and by 32% with 3 μM N-methanesulfonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (MS-PPOH, an epoxygenase inhibitor). Hence, BK and 14,15-EET display net hyperpolarizing effects on airway smooth muscle cells that are related to the activation of BK(Ca) channels and ultimately yielding to relaxation. Data also indicate that 3 μM MS-PPOH reduced the hyperpolarizing effects of BK by 43%. Together, the present data support the current hypothesis suggesting a direct relationship between BK and the production of EET regioisomers. Because of its potent anti-inflammatory and relaxing properties, epoxyeicosanoid signaling may represent a promising target in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  17. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    SciTech Connect

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; Hijazi, Hassan; Van Hentenryck, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutions to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution

  18. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  19. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-03-21

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures.

  20. Hot Electron Energy Relaxation in Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chia-Hung

    We present experimental results on hot electron relaxation in doped bulk GaAs and quantum wells. Using steady state photoluminescence we measured the electron -LO phonon scattering time for thermalized hot electrons in quantum wells. The results are in good agreement with our theoretical calculation of electron-LO phonon interaction in two dimensional systems. Within random phase approximation, the emitted LO phonons may couple to two dimensional plasmons. Both the screening and phonon reabsorption properties can be drastically changed as a function of electron density, temperature and phonon lifetime. Theoretical energy relaxation rates, including dynamical screening and phonon reabsorption effects, will be presented. For hot electrons with energies well above the LO phonon energy, we developed a two-beam, lock-in technique to measure the energy-resolved cooling rate. In the case of quantum wells, hot electrons relax at a constant rate. For heavily doped bulk GaAs, the relaxation rate is inversely proportional to electron kinetic energy. The new method demonstrates itself as a valuable way to study the fast initial relaxation which would otherwise need femtosecond pulse laser techniques.

  1. Doppler effect induced spin relaxation boom

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xinyu; Huang, Peihao; Hu, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    We study an electron spin qubit confined in a moving quantum dot (QD), with our attention on both spin relaxation, and the product of spin relaxation, the emitted phonons. We find that Doppler effect leads to several interesting phenomena. In particular, spin relaxation rate peaks when the QD motion is in the transonic regime, which we term a spin relaxation boom in analogy to the classical sonic boom. This peak indicates that a moving spin qubit may have even lower relaxation rate than a static qubit, pointing at the possibility of coherence-preserving transport for a spin qubit. We also find that the emitted phonons become strongly directional and narrow in their frequency range as the qubit reaches the supersonic regime, similar to Cherenkov radiation. In other words, fast moving excited spin qubits can act as a source of non-classical phonons. Compared to classical Cherenkov radiation, we show that quantum dot confinement produces a small but important correction on the Cherenkov angle. Taking together, these results have important implications to both spin-based quantum information processing and coherent phonon dynamics in semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:26996253

  2. Anomalous Enthalpy Relaxation in Vitreous Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-08-01

    It is a challenge to calorimetrically determine the glass transition temperature (Tg) of vitreous silica. Here we demonstrate that this challenge mainly arises from the extreme sensitivity of the Tg to the hydroxyl content in vitreous silica, but also from the irreversibility of its glass transition when repeating the calorimetric scans. It is known that the liquid fragility (i.e., the speed of the viscous slow-down of a supercooled liquid at its Tg during cooling) has impact on enthalpy relaxation in glass. Here we find that vitreous silica (as a strong system) exhibits striking anomalies in both glass transition and enthalpy relaxation compared to fragile oxide systems. The anomalous enthalpy relaxation of vitreous silica is discovered by performing the hperquenching-annealing-calorimetry experiments. We argue that the strong systems like vitreous silica and vitreous Germania relax in a structurally cooperative manner, whereas the fragile ones do in a structurally independent fashion. We discuss the origin of the anomalous enthalpy relaxation in the HQ vitreous silica.

  3. Convex relaxations for gas expansion planning

    DOE PAGES

    Borraz-Sanchez, Conrado; Bent, Russell Whitford; Backhaus, Scott N.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of natural gas networks is a critical process involving substantial capital expenditures with complex decision-support requirements. Here, given the non-convex nature of gas transmission constraints, global optimality and infeasibility guarantees can only be offered by global optimisation approaches. Unfortunately, state-of-the-art global optimisation solvers are unable to scale up to real-world size instances. In this study, we present a convex mixed-integer second-order cone relaxation for the gas expansion planning problem under steady-state conditions. The underlying model offers tight lower bounds with high computational efficiency. In addition, the optimal solution of the relaxation can often be used to derive high-quality solutionsmore » to the original problem, leading to provably tight optimality gaps and, in some cases, global optimal solutions. The convex relaxation is based on a few key ideas, including the introduction of flux direction variables, exact McCormick relaxations, on/off constraints, and integer cuts. Numerical experiments are conducted on the traditional Belgian gas network, as well as other real larger networks. The results demonstrate both the accuracy and computational speed of the relaxation and its ability to produce high-quality solution« less

  4. Airflow synchronous with oscillatory acceleration reflects involuntary respiratory muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard E; Lee, Hsueh-Tze; Loring, Stephen H

    2004-06-25

    To explore mechanisms causing involuntary airflow synchronous with oscillatory axial whole body acceleration (oscillatory axial acceleration, OAA) such as that during locomotion, we monitored airflow, acceleration, and electromyograms (EMGs) of the rib cage and abdominal muscles in standing subjects undergoing OAA at 3, 6, and 9 Hz at accelerations of 0.1-0.95 g. Subjects relaxed or performed static respiratory maneuvers at constant lung volume with glottis open. Oscillatory airflows (0.01-3.01 s(-1)) synchronous with OAA were not consistent with expectations for a passive respiratory system, and were larger during active respiratory efforts than during relaxation. Peak inspiratory airflow usually preceded peak upward acceleration by 90-180 degrees. In 80% of runs with respiratory muscles voluntarily activated or relaxed, EMGs showed activity synchronous with OAA. Changes in periodic muscle activity coincided with changes in oscillatory airflow. We conclude that periodic muscle activity, probably a reflex response to body wall deformation during OAA, strongly influences the involuntary airflow synchronous with OAA.

  5. Relaxant effect of Thymus vulgaris on guinea-pig tracheal chains and its possible mechanism(s).

    PubMed

    Boskabady, M H; Aslani, M R; Kiani, S

    2006-01-01

    Thymus vulgaris for the treatment of respiratory diseases is indicated widely, and relaxant effects on smooth muscle have been shown previously. In the present study, the relaxant effects of macerated and aqueous extracts of Thymus vulgaris on tracheal chains of guinea-pigs were examined using cumulative concentrations of macerated and aqueous extracts in comparison with saline (as the negative control) and theophylline (as the positive control). The relaxant effects of four cumulative concentrations of macerated and aqueous extracts (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 g %) in comparison with saline (as the negative control) and four cumulative concentrations of theophylline (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 mm; as the positive control) were examined for their relaxant effects on precontracted tracheal chains of guinea-pig by 60 mm KCl and 10 microm methacholine in two different conditions: non-incubated tissues and incubated tissues with 1 microm propranolol and 1 microm chlorphenamine. There were significant correlations between the relaxant effects and the concentrations for both extracts and theophylline in all experimental groups (p < 0.01 to p < 0.001). These results demonstrated a potent relaxant effect of Thymus vulgaris on guinea-pig tracheal chains that was comparable to theophylline at the concentrations used.

  6. The immediate effect of changing mandibular position on the EMG activity of the masseter, temporalis, sternocleidomastoid, and trapezius muscles.

    PubMed

    Ceneviz, Caroline; Mehta, Noshir R; Forgione, Albert; Sands, M J; Abdallah, Emad F; Lobo Lobo, Silvia; Mavroudi, Sofia

    2006-10-01

    This study investigated the immediate effect of changing mandibular position on the electromyographic (EMG) activity of the masseter (MS), temporalis (TM), sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and trapezius (TR) muscles. Thirty-three (33) asymptomatic subjects (16 males and 17 females), ages 23 to 52 were selected. Surface EMG recordings were obtained for all muscles bilaterally with the mandible in a relaxed open position (relaxed) and during maximal voluntary clenching (fullbite) for the following: a non-repositioning appliance (NONREPOS) and repositioning appliance (REPOS). REPOS significantly reduced EMG activity of all muscles bilaterally during fullbite. During relaxation, reduction in EMG activity was only found for TR bilaterally. NONREPOS decreased the EMG activity bilaterally for TM and TR and unilaterally (left) for MS and SCM during fullbite. During relaxation, NONREPOS decreased muscle activity bilaterally for TR and SCM. A unilateral reduction was found for TM (right). These findings suggest that immediate alterations in mandibular position affect the cranio-cervical system. Both mandibular positions tested lowered the EMG activity of masticatory and cervical muscles in the relaxed and fullbite positions. The trapezius muscle was the most responsive to alterations in mandibular position.

  7. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jonathan C; Joyce, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Smith's (2001) Attentional Behavioral Cognitive (ABC) relaxation theory proposes that all approaches to relaxation (including music) have the potential for evoking one or more of 15 factor-analytically derived relaxation states, or "R-States" (Sleepiness, Disengagement, Rested / Refreshed, Energized, Physical Relaxation, At Ease/Peace, Joy, Mental Quiet, Childlike Innocence, Thankfulness and Love, Mystery, Awe and Wonder, Prayerfulness, Timeless/Boundless/Infinite, and Aware). The present study investigated R-States and stress symptom-patterns associated with listening to Mozart versus New Age music. Students (N = 63) were divided into three relaxation groups based on previously determined preferences. Fourteen listened to a 28-minute tape recording of Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and 14 listened to a 28-minute tape of Steven Halpern's New Age Serenity Suite. Others (n = 35) did not want music and instead chose a set of popular recreational magazines. Participants engaged in their relaxation activity at home for three consecutive days for 28 minutes a session. Before and after each session, each person completed the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (Smith, 2001), a comprehensive questionnaire tapping 15 R-States as well as the stress states of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotion. Results revealed no differences at Session 1. At Session 2, those who listened to Mozart reported higher levels of At Ease/Peace and lower levels of Negative Emotion. Pronounced differences emerged at Session 3. Mozart listeners uniquely reported substantially higher levels of Mental Quiet, Awe and Wonder, and Mystery. Mozart listeners reported higher levels, and New Age listeners slightly elevated levels, of At Ease/Peace and Rested/Refreshed. Both Mozart and New Age listeners reported higher levels of Thankfulness and Love. In summary, those who listened to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik reported more psychological relaxation and less stress than either those who listened to

  8. Physiological features of the opercularis muscle and their effects on vibration sensitivity in the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Hetherington, T E

    1987-09-01

    The amphibian opercularis muscle connects a movable otic element (the operculum) to the pectoral girdle and can act in reception of ground vibrations. Various physiological parameters of the opercularis muscle of the bullfrog Rana catesbeiana were measured and compared with similar measurements on the iliofibularis muscle of the hindlimb. The opercularis muscle is a very slowly contracting muscle, with a Vmax of 1.81 muscle lengths s-1 compared to a Vmax of 6.24 muscle lengths s-1 for the iliofibularis muscle. The opercularis muscle develops tension slowly, taking about 10 s to attain maximum isometric tension when stimulated at 100 Hz. The muscle can retain high levels of tension for several minutes, and following stimulation has a time to half-relaxation of about 4-6 s. The slow velocity of contraction, slow rate of tension development, fatigue-resistance and slow rate of relaxation of the opercularis muscle support morphological evidence that it consists mostly of tonic muscle fibres. Experiments were also made to examine the effects of muscle tension on reception of ground vibrations as measured by inner ear microphonics. Severing the nerve supplying the opercularis muscle produced slight decreases of no more than 2 dB in responses to vibrations from 25 to 200 Hz. Artificial stimulation of the opercularis muscle after severing the nerve supplying the muscle increased responses to vibration across the entire frequency range. Higher tension levels produced greater increases in responses; at the highest tensions used (about 120 kN m-2) responses were increased by as much as 4.5 dB. The opercularis muscle is therefore specialized for slow but prolonged contractions, and tension is important in its sensory function. A tensed opercularis muscle appears to transmit faithfully motion of the forelimb, produced by vibrations, to the operculum such that the latter moves relative to the inner ear fluids.

  9. Structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.; Lee, Y.H.; Chen, C.; Pang, T.

    1997-07-01

    The authors have studied the structural relaxation of vacancies in amorphous silicon (a-Si) using a tight-binding molecular-dynamics method. The most significant difference between vacancies in a-Si and those in crystalline silicon (c-Si) is that the deep gap states do not show up in a-Si. This difference is explained through the unusual behavior of the structural relaxation near the vacancies in a-Si, which enhances the sp{sup 2} + p bonding near the band edges. They have also observed that the vacancies do not migrate below 450 K although some of them can still be annihilated, particularly at high defect density due to large structural relaxation.

  10. Swelling and Stress Relaxation in Portland Brownstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, I.; Scherer, G.

    2003-04-01

    Portland Brownstone (PB) is an arkose sandstone extensively used in the northeast-ern USA during the nineteenth century. This reddish-brown stone contains a fraction of swelling clays that are thought to contribute to its degradation upon cycles of wet-ting and drying. During drying events, contraction of the drying surface leads to stresses approaching the tensile strength of the stone. However, we have found that the magnitude of these stresses is limited by the ability of the stone to undergo stress relaxation. In this paper we describe novel methods to determine the magnitude of the stresses and the rate at which they develop and relax. We also discuss the influ-ence of surfactants on the magnitude of swelling and the rate of the stress relaxation of PB. The implications of our findings for the understanding of damage due to swelling of clays are discussed.

  11. A general relaxation theory of simple liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merilo, M.; Morgan, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    A relatively simple relaxation theory to account for the behavior of liquids under dynamic conditions was proposed. The general dynamical equations are similar in form to the phenomenological relaxation equations used in theories of viscoelasticity, however, they differ in that all the coefficients of the present equations are expressed in terms of thermodynamic and molecular quantities. The theory is based on the concept that flow in a liquid distorts both the radial and the velocity distribution functions, and that relaxation equations describing the return of these functions to their isotropic distributions, characterizing a stationary liquid, can be written. The theory was applied to the problems of steady and oscillatory shear flows and to the propagation of longitudinal waves. In all cases classical results are predicted for strain rates, and an expression for the viscosity of a liquid, simular to the Macedo-Litovitz equation, is obtained.

  12. Dielectric relaxation of high-k oxides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Frequency dispersion of high-k dielectrics was observed and classified into two parts: extrinsic cause and intrinsic cause. Frequency dependence of dielectric constant (dielectric relaxation), that is the intrinsic frequency dispersion, could not be characterized before considering the effects of extrinsic frequency dispersion. Several mathematical models were discussed to describe the dielectric relaxation of high-k dielectrics. For the physical mechanism, dielectric relaxation was found to be related to the degree of polarization, which depended on the structure of the high-k material. It was attributed to the enhancement of the correlations among polar nanodomain. The effect of grain size for the high-k materials' structure mainly originated from higher surface stress in smaller grain due to its higher concentration of grain boundary. PMID:24180696

  13. Dielectric relaxation in AC powder electroluminescent devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Su, Haibin; Tan, Chuan Seng; Wong, Terence Kin Shun; Teo, Ronnie Jin Wah

    2017-01-01

    The dielectric properties of AC powder electroluminescent devices were measured and analyzed using complex impedance spectroscopy to determine the relaxation processes occurring within the devices. The relaxation processes identified were ascribed to the electrode polarization caused by ion accumulation at the electrode/resin interfaces, the Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars effects at the (ZnS or BaTiO3) particle/resin interfaces, and the dipolar reorientation of polymer chains in the resin matrix. Each relaxation process was represented by its corresponding equivalent circuit component. Space charge polarization at the electrodes were represented by a Warburg element, a resistor, and a constant phase element. The resin matrix, ZnS/resin and BaTiO3/resin interfaces could each be modeled by a resistor and a capacitor in parallel. The simulated equivalent circuits for three different printed structures showed good fitting with their experimental impedance results.

  14. Stratospheric Relaxation in IMPACT's Radiation Code

    SciTech Connect

    Edis, T; Grant, K; Cameron-Smith, P

    2006-11-13

    While Impact incorporates diagnostic radiation routines from our work in previous years, it has not previously included the stratospheric relaxation required for forcing calculations. We have now implemented the necessary changes for stratospheric relaxation, tested its stability, and compared the results with stratosphere temperatures obtained from CAM3 met data. The relaxation results in stable temperature profiles in the stratosphere, which is encouraging for use in forcing calculations. It does, however, produce a cooling bias when compared to CAM3, which appears to be due to differences in radiation calculations rather than the interactive treatment of ozone. The cause of this bias is unclear as yet, but seems to be systematic and hence cancels out when differences are taken relative to a control simulation.

  15. Vibrational relaxation of chloroiodomethane in cold argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Amber; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2013-10-01

    Electronically exciting the C-I stretch in the molecule chloroiodomethane CH2ClI embedded in a matrix of argon at 12 K can lead to an isomer, iso-chloroiodomethane CH2Cl-I, that features a chlorine iodine bond. By temporally probing the isomer at two different frequencies of 435 nm and 485 nm, multiple timescales for isomerization and vibrational energy relaxation were inferred [T. J. Preston, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 114503 (2011)]. This relaxation is studied theoretically using molecular dynamics by considering 2 and 3 dimensional models. Multiple decay rate constants of the same order of magnitude as the experiment are observed. These decay rate constants are interpreted within the context of the Landau-Teller theory. Sensitivity of the decay rate constants on the bath and system parameters shed more light into the mechanism of vibrational energy relaxation.

  16. Proton relaxation times in cancer diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Santhana Mariappan, S.V.; Subramanian, S.; Chandrakumar, N.; Rajalakshmi, K.R.; Sukumaran, S.S.

    1988-10-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation parameters (T1, T2) were measured for over 100 malignant and normal tissue samples of various organs of the human body. The purpose of this study was to estimate the reliability of the NMR technique in discriminating normal from malignant tissues. Breast and cervix samples were analyzed by using the malignancy index concept and we were able to distinguish malignant and normal tissue in 17 out of 18 breast samples and 5 out of 7 cervix samples. Since the relaxation data of a normal control population of the other organs were not available, the data for these are reported without any further analysis. The distinction between carcinomas and sarcomas was also made by using the estimated relaxation parameters. Malignancy indices of breast tissue samples for linear least-squares and nonlinear two-parameter and three-parameter least-squares procedures were calculated and used to evaluate the relative efficiencies in discriminating malignant from normal tissues.

  17. A review of recent findings about stress-relaxation in the respiratory system tissues.

    PubMed

    Rubini, Alessandro; Carniel, Emanuele Luigi

    2014-12-01

    This article reviews the state of the art about an unclear physiological phenomenon interesting respiratory system tissues, i.e., stress-relaxation. Due to their visco-elastic properties, the tissues do not maintain constant stress under constant deformation. Rather, the stress slowly relaxes and falls to a lower value. The exact molecular basis of this complex visco-elastic behavior is not well defined, but it has been suggested that it may be generated because of the anisotropic mechanical properties of elastin and collagen fibers in the alveolar septa and their interaction phenomena, such as reciprocal sliding, also in relation to interstitial liquid movements. The effects on stress-relaxation of various biochemical and physical factors are reviewed, including the consequences of body temperature variations, respiratory system inflammations and hyperbaric oxygen exposure, endocrinal factors, circulating blood volume variations, changes in inflation volume and/or flow, changes in intra-abdominal pressure because of pneumoperitoneum or Trendelenburg position. The effects of these factors on stress-relaxation have practical consequences because, depending on visco-elastic pressure amount which is requested to inflate the respiratory system in different conditions, respiratory muscles have to produce different values of inspiratory pressure during spontaneous breathing. High inspiratory pressure values might increase the risk of respiratory failure development on mechanical basis.

  18. Muscle activation patterns when passively stretching spastic lower limb muscles of children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Bar-On, Lynn; Aertbeliën, Erwin; Molenaers, Guy; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-01-01

    The definition of spasticity as a velocity-dependent activation of the tonic stretch reflex during a stretch to a passive muscle is the most widely accepted. However, other mechanisms are also thought to contribute to pathological muscle activity and, in patients post-stroke and spinal cord injury can result in different activation patterns. In the lower-limbs of children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) these distinct activation patterns have not yet been thoroughly explored. The aim of the study was to apply an instrumented assessment to quantify different muscle activation patterns in four lower-limb muscles of children with CP. Fifty-four children with CP were included (males/females n = 35/19; 10.8 ± 3.8 yrs; bilateral/unilateral involvement n =  32/22; Gross Motor Functional Classification Score I-IV) of whom ten were retested to evaluate intra-rater reliability. With the subject relaxed, single-joint, sagittal-plane movements of the hip, knee, and ankle were performed to stretch the lower-limb muscles at three increasing velocities. Muscle activity and joint motion were synchronously recorded using inertial sensors and electromyography (EMG) from the adductors, medial hamstrings, rectus femoris, and gastrocnemius. Muscles were visually categorised into activation patterns using average, normalized root mean square EMG (RMS-EMG) compared across increasing position zones and velocities. Based on the visual categorisation, quantitative parameters were defined using stretch-reflex thresholds and normalized RMS-EMG. These parameters were compared between muscles with different activation patterns. All patterns were dominated by high velocity-dependent muscle activation, but in more than half, low velocity-dependent activation was also observed. Muscle activation patterns were found to be both muscle- and subject-specific (p<0.01). The intra-rater reliability of all quantitative parameters was moderate to good. Comparing RMS-EMG between incremental position

  19. How to make rapid eye movements “rapid”: the role of growth factors for muscle contractile properties

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tian; Feng, Cheng-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Different muscle functions require different muscle contraction properties. Saccade-generating extraocular muscles (EOMs) are the fastest muscles in the human body, significantly faster than limb skeletal muscles. Muscle contraction speed is subjected to plasticity, i.e., contraction speed can be adjusted to serve different demands, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms that control contraction speed. Therefore, we examined whether myogenic growth factors modulate contractile properties, including twitch contraction time (onset of force to peak force) and half relaxation time (peak force to half relaxation). We examined effects of three muscle-derived growth factors: insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), cardiotrophin-1 (CT1), and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In gain-of-function experiments, CT1 or GDNF injected into the orbit shortened contraction time, and IGF1 or CT1 shortened half relaxation time. In loss-of-function experiments with binding proteins or neutralizing antibodies, elimination of endogenous IGFs prolonged both contraction time and half relaxation time, while eliminating endogenous GDNF prolonged contraction time, with no effect on half relaxation time. Elimination of endogenous IGFs or CT1, but not GDNF, significantly reduced contractile force. Thus, IGF1, CT1, and GDNF have partially overlapping but not identical effects on muscle contractile properties. Expression of these three growth factors was measured in chicken and/or rat EOMs by real-time PCR. The “fast” EOMs express significantly more message encoding these growth factors and their receptors than skeletal muscles with slower contractile properties. Taken together, these findings indicate that EOM contractile kinetics is regulated by the amount of myogenic growth factors available to the muscle. PMID:21279379

  20. Quantifying the history dependency of muscle recovery from a fatiguing intermittent task.

    PubMed

    Rashedi, Ehsan; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2017-01-25

    Muscle fatigue and recovery are complex processes influencing muscle force generation capacity. While fatigue reduces this capacity, recovery acts to restore the unfatigued muscle state. Many factors can potentially affect muscle recovery, and among these may be a task dependency of recovery following an exercise. However, little has been reported regarding the history dependency of recovery after fatiguing contractions. We examined the dependency of muscle recovery subsequent to four different histories of fatiguing muscle contractions, imposed using two cycle times (30 and 60s) during low to moderate levels (15% and 25% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC)) of intermittent static exertions involving index finger abduction. MVC and low-frequency electrical stimulation (LFES) measures (i.e., magnitude, rise and relaxation rates) of muscle capacity were used, all of which indicated a dependency of muscle recovery on the muscle capacity state existing immediately after fatiguing exercise. This dependency did not appear to be modified by either the cycle time or exertion level leading to that state. These results imply that the post-exercise rate of recovery is primarily influenced by the immediate post-exercise muscle contractile status (estimated by MVC and LFES measures). Such results may help improve existing models of muscle recovery, facilitating more accurate predictions of localized muscle fatigue development and thereby helping to enhance muscle performance and reduce the risk of injury.

  1. Finite element model of intramuscular pressure during isometric contraction of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Jenkyn, Thomas R; Koopman, Bart; Huijing, Peter; Lieber, Richard L; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2002-11-21

    The measurement of in vivo intramuscular pressure (IMP) has recently become practical and IMP appears well correlated with muscle tension. A numerical model of skeletal muscle was developed to examine the mechanisms producing IMP. Unipennate muscle is modelled as a two-dimensional material continuum that is incompressible and nonlinearly anisotropic. The finite element technique is used to calculate IMP and muscle stress during passive stretch and during isometric contraction. A novel element models the contractile portion of muscle, incorporating sarcomere length-force and velocity-force relations. A range of unipennate muscle geometries can be modelled. The model was configured to simulate the rabbit tibialis anterior muscle over a range of lengths. Simulated IMP and stress results were validated against animal experimentation data. The simulation agreed well with the experimental data over the range of 0.8-1.1 of the optimal length. Severe pressure gradients were produced near the musculo-tendinous junctions while IMP was more uniform in the central muscle belly. IMP and muscle stress in relaxed (unstimulated) muscle increased nonlinearly with muscle length. IMP and stress in isometrically contracting muscle showed a local maximum at optimal length and were reduced at shorter lengths. At muscle lengths longer than optimal, stress and IMP increased predominately due to tension in the passive elastic structures.

  2. Relaxation Phenomena in Optically Pumped Mercury Isotopes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-15

    AD-AIFIG 332 SINGER CO LITTLE FALLS NJ KEARFOTT DIV F /G 20/10 RELAXATION PHENOMENA IN OPTICALLY PUMPED MERCURY ISOTOPES.(U) AUG 80 P A HEIMANN, J H...2. GVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 7 MOSRqr 80 - 7 44 1 j D,&s~ *> T4iTLE (and SubtUte; S. TYPE O F REPOR ൏ APER_2-VA Relaxation...Phenomena in Optically Interim SAticJepait./ Pupd__uyIooe. 1 Jul R79- Jun. l90 ’ 9 PEFORMNG OGANZA I ’AU!ANO C RSSEI. PORAM EMNd󈧰 T. NOJ ECT RS 7

  3. Synthetic aperture radar autofocus via semidefinite relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Wiesel, Ami; Munson, David C

    2013-06-01

    The autofocus problem in synthetic aperture radar imaging amounts to estimating unknown phase errors caused by unknown platform or target motion. At the heart of three state-of-the-art autofocus algorithms, namely, phase gradient autofocus, multichannel autofocus (MCA), and Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), is the solution of a constant modulus quadratic program (CMQP). Currently, these algorithms solve a CMQP by using an eigenvalue relaxation approach. We propose an alternative relaxation approach based on semidefinite programming, which has recently attracted considerable attention in other signal processing problems. Experimental results show that our proposed methods provide promising performance improvements for MCA and FMCA through an increase in computational complexity.

  4. A Bayesian method for analysing relaxation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciocci Brazzano, L.; Pellizza, L. J.; Matteo, C. L.; Sorichetti, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of electrical and mechanical properties of material, relies on a precise analysis of the relaxation spectra. We explore the ability of a Bayesian method to achieve an accurate estimation of spectral parameters. We implemented a parallel-tempering Markov-chain Monte Carlo algorithm and used it to fit simulated and measured spectra. An exhaustive testing of the code shows that it presents an extremely good performance, accurately fitting complex spectra under strong noise and overlapping components. We conclude that this technique is quite suitable for relaxation spectra analysis, complementing classical methods.

  5. Fast temperature relaxation model in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faussurier, Gérald; Blancard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    We present a fast model to calculate the temperature-relaxation rates in dense plasmas. The electron-ion interaction-potential is calculated by combining a Yukawa approach and a finite-temperature Thomas-Fermi model. We include the internal energy as well as the excess energy of ions using the QEOS model. Comparisons with molecular dynamics simulations and calculations based on an average-atom model are presented. This approach allows the study of the temperature relaxation in a two-temperature electron-ion system in warm and hot dense matter.

  6. Soft Sphere Suspensions: Flow and Relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workamp, Marcel; Dijksman, Joshua A.

    We experimentally study the role of particle elasticity on the rheology of soft sphere suspensions. Experiments consist of custom designed particles with tuneable stiffness. These particles allow us to probe the role of elastic timescales, relaxation and anisotropy in a custom 3D printed shear cell. We find robust rheological features, such as a flow instability, that are not well captured by existing models for suspension flows. In addition, we find relaxation effects after shear even in the absence of shear or thermal fluctuations. We aim to integrate these findings in the emerging unified framework for structured fluids.

  7. The efficacy of relaxation training with children.

    PubMed

    Richter, N C

    1984-06-01

    This paper reviews studies that have examined the efficacy of relaxation training techniques in the treatment of childhood disorders. Methodological problems encountered in doing research in this area resemble those found in working with an adult population: imprecise definitions of subject populations and use of a variety of dependent variables from one study to another. Findings suggest that relaxation training is at least as effective as other treatment approaches for a variety of learning, behavioral, and physiological disorders when it is continued over an extended period of time and is augmented by other supportive measures. Needs for future research include better follow-up studies and further investigations with a behaviorally disruptive population.

  8. Magnetic Relaxation Detector for Microbead Labels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Paul Peng; Skucha, Karl; Duan, Yida; Megens, Mischa; Kim, Jungkyu; Izyumin, Igor I.; Gambini, Simone; Boser, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    A compact and robust magnetic label detector for biomedical assays is implemented in 0.18-μm CMOS. Detection relies on the magnetic relaxation signature of a microbead label for improved tolerance to environmental variations and relaxed dynamic range requirement, eliminating the need for baseline calibration and reference sensors. The device includes embedded electromagnets to eliminate external magnets and reduce power dissipation. Correlated double sampling combined with offset servo loops and magnetic field modulation, suppresses the detector offset to sub-μT. Single 4.5-μm magnetic beads are detected in 16 ms with a probability of error <0.1%. PMID:25308988

  9. Vibrational relaxation in hypersonic flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Willard E.; Miner, Gilda A.; Heinbockel, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical formulations of vibrational relaxation are derived from first principles for application to fluid dynamic computations of hypersonic flow fields. Relaxation within and immediately behind shock waves is shown to be substantially faster than that described in current numerical codes. The result should be a significant reduction in nonequilibrium radiation overshoot in shock layers and in radiative heating of hypersonic vehicles; these results are precisely the trends needed to bring theoretical predictions more in line with flight data. Errors in existing formulations are identified and qualitative comparisons are made.

  10. Dielectric relaxation characteristics of muscovite mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Navjeet; Singh, Lakhwant; Singh, Mohan; Awasthi, A. M.; Kumar, Jitender

    2014-04-01

    In the present work, the dielectric relaxation phenomenon in muscovite mica has been studied over the frequency range 0.1 Hz-10 MHz and in the temperature range of 653-853K, using the dielectric permittivity, electric modulus and conductivity formalisms. The values of the activation energy obtained from electric modulus and conductivity data are found to be nearly similar, suggesting that same types of charge carriers are involved in the relaxation mechanism. This type of study will explore the potential of this material for various applications in electrical engineering.

  11. Nonlocal and collective relaxation in stellar systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Martin D.

    1993-01-01

    The modal response of stellar systems to fluctuations at large scales is presently investigated by means of analytic theory and n-body simulation; the stochastic excitation of these modes is shown to increase the relaxation rate even for a system which is moderately far from instability. The n-body simulations, when designed to suppress relaxation at small scales, clearly show the effects of large-scale fluctuations. It is predicted that large-scale fluctuations will be largest for such marginally bound systems as forming star clusters and associations.

  12. Assessment of Sleep Quality and Effects of Relaxation Exercise on Sleep Quality in Patients Hospitalized in Internal Medicine Services in a University Hospital: The Effect of Relaxation Exercises in Patients Hospitalized.

    PubMed

    Alparslan, Güler Balci; Orsal, Özlem; Unsal, Alaettin

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess sleep quality and determine the effects of relaxation exercise on sleep quality in patients hospitalized in internal medicine services. In total, 47 patients comprised the control group and did not engage in the exercise intervention--the progressive muscle relaxation exercise, whereas 235 patients were assigned to the intervention group (N = 282). In this study, Description Questionnaire Form and the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) were used. Most patients (73.8%) had poor sleep quality. The mean pre- and postexercise PSQI scores of the patients in the interventional group were 8.7 ± 4.0 and 6.1 ± 3.3, respectively. The mean pre- and postexercise PSQI scores of the control patients were 6.6 ± 3.5 and 5.6 ± 2.7, respectively. According to this study, the exercises significantly enhanced the quality of sleep. Patients should be encouraged by nurses to perform relaxation exercises.

  13. In vivo myosin step-size from zebrafish skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ajtai, Katalin; Sun, Xiaojing; Takubo, Naoko; Wang, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    Muscle myosins transduce ATP free energy into actin displacement to power contraction. In vivo, myosin side chains are modified post-translationally under native conditions, potentially impacting function. Single myosin detection provides the ‘bottom-up’ myosin characterization probing basic mechanisms without ambiguities inherent to ensemble observation. Macroscopic muscle physiological experimentation provides the definitive ‘top-down’ phenotype characterizations that are the concerns in translational medicine. In vivo single myosin detection in muscle from zebrafish embryo models for human muscle fulfils ambitions for both bottom-up and top-down experimentation. A photoactivatable green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged myosin light chain expressed in transgenic zebrafish skeletal muscle specifically modifies the myosin lever-arm. Strychnine induces the simultaneous contraction of the bilateral tail muscles in a live embryo, causing them to be isometric while active. Highly inclined thin illumination excites the GFP tag of single lever-arms and its super-resolution orientation is measured from an active isometric muscle over a time sequence covering many transduction cycles. Consecutive frame lever-arm angular displacement converts to step-size by its product with the estimated lever-arm length. About 17% of the active myosin steps that fall between 2 and 7 nm are implicated as powerstrokes because they are beyond displacements detected from either relaxed or ATP-depleted (rigor) muscle. PMID:27249818

  14. Assessment of muscle fatigue after an ultra-endurance triathlon using tensiomyography (TMG).

    PubMed

    García-Manso, Juan Manuel; Rodríguez-Ruiz, David; Rodríguez-Matoso, Dario; de Saa, Yves; Sarmiento, Samuel; Quiroga, Miriam

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we used tensiomyography (TMG) to assess muscle status immediately after an ultra-endurance triathlon. Maximal radial displacement or deformation of the muscle belly, contraction time, delay time, sustain time, and relaxation time were measured for both legs, and dependent t-tests were used to compare means between the beginning and end of the race. The 19 men assessed (age 37.9 ± 7.1 years; height 177.5 ± 4.6 cm; weight: 73.6 ± 6.5 kg) participated in the 2009 edition of the Lanzarote Ironman. Deterioration in the neural response was observed for contraction time (P = 0.008) and relaxation time (P = 0.011), with a moderate decrease in the response time (sustain time) and a loss in muscle stiffness (deformation of the muscle belly). The effect of muscle fatigue on the rectus femoris and biceps femoris was different. Barely any changes in contraction time, relaxation time, sustain time, and deformation of the muscle belly were observed, while only the contraction response time decreased to a significant extent (reduction in delay time; P = 0.003). The considerable loss in contractile capacity induced by a long-distance race was reflected in changes in the neuromuscular response and fluctuations in the contractile capacity of the muscle. These modifications, derived from a prolonged, exhausting effort, can be assessed in a simple, non-aggressive, non-invasive way using tensiomyography.

  15. [HYDROGEN SULFIDE DONOR, NAHS, RECOVERS CONSTITUTIVE NO SYNTHESIS AND ENDOTHELIUM-DEPENDENT RELAXATION OF ISOLATED AORTA IN OLD RATS].

    PubMed

    Drachuk, K O; Kotsjuruba, A V; Sagach, V F

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to show the effect of H₂S donor, NaHS on the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, free radical state and cNOS uncoupling in old rats. In the aorta of old rats a combined oxidative and nitrosative stress develops that leads to cNOS uncoupling and decreased constitutive synthesis of the NO. That biochemical changes correlate with lowering of the endothelium-dependent relaxation of aortic smooth muscles (7.5 ± 1.4%, compared with 64.9 ± 3.5% in adults). It was found that, due to the combined inhibition of oxidative and nitrosative stress, NaHS restores constitutive de novo synthesis of NO by restoring cNOS coupling. Additionally, NaHS improves endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation by increasing (by 6.5 times) Ach-induced relaxation of aortic smooth muscles.

  16. Phenomenological consequences of sectioning and bathing on passive muscle mechanics of the New Zealand white rabbit tibialis anterior

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Adam C.; Kaufman, Kenton R.; Haut Donahue, Tammy L.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue provides support and mobility of the musculoskeletal system. Numerical modeling of muscle tissue aids in understanding disease pathophysiology, however, the effectiveness is dependent on accurately accounting for various tissue phenomena. Muscle modeling is made difficult due to the multitude of constituents that contribute to elastic and viscous mechanisms. Often, deterministic single fiber or fiber bundle studies are undertaken to examine these contributions. However, examination of whole, intact and structurally altered tissue and comparison to findings at the myofibril scale can help elucidate tissue mechanics. Stress relaxation tests at 10% strain were performed on 28 New Zealand White rabbits tibialis anterior muscles for whole, intact muscle and sub-sectioned muscle samples. Additionally, to aid in examining viscous effects sub groups were tested with and without a phosphate buffered saline bath. The steady-state elastic modulus was not significantly different between groups. Interestingly, sectioning did result in a negative Poisson’s ratio. Additionally, sectioning resulted in altering the viscous tissue response as the time to reach steady-state was significantly faster than whole muscle samples (p < 0.05), as well as the linear relaxation rate from 0 to 0.1 (p < 0.01), 1 to 10 (p < 0.05), and 10 to 100 seconds (p < 0.05). Bathing tissue resulted in a significantly greater amount of percent stress relaxation for whole muscle (p < 0.01). These findings provide new insight into the differing mechanical characteristics of whole and sectioned muscle tissue. PMID:23127626

  17. Effect of tobacco smoke on hydrogen sulfide-induced rat thoracic aorta relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, H.T.; Zhang, T.; Chai, M.; Sun, J.J.; Yu, X.Y.; Liu, C.Z.; Huang, C.C.

    2017-01-01

    Levels of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous signaling molecule, are reduced in the serum of individuals who smoke. We hypothesized that tobacco smoke influenced smooth muscle relaxation by decreasing H2S levels and this effect could also influence expression of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and sulfonylurea receptor-2 (SUR-2). The aim of this study was to explore the effect of tobacco smoke on H2S-mediated rat thoracic aorta relaxation and its possible mechanism. Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: control (C) group, short-term smoker (SS) group, mid-term smoker (MS) group, and long-term smoker (LS) group. H2S concentrations in serum, action of H2S on rat aortic vascular relaxation, and expression of CSE and SUR-2 in thoracic aortic smooth muscle were measured. Although there was no significant difference in H2S between the C and the SS groups, concentration of H2S was significantly reduced in both the LS and MS groups compared to control (P<0.01). Furthermore, H2S was significantly lower in the LS than in the MS group (P<0.05). Rat aortic vascular relaxation was lower in all three treatment groups compared to the control, with the most significant decrease observed in the LS group (P<0.05 compared to the MS group). Expression of CSE and SUR-2 was reduced in the LS and MS groups compared to control (P<0.05), with the lowest levels observed in the LS group (P<0.05). Therefore, tobacco smoke reduced expression of CSE and SUR-2 in rat thoracic aorta, which may inhibit H2S production and vascular dilation. PMID:28177058

  18. High relaxivity MRI contrast agents part 2: Optimization of inner- and second-sphere relaxivity

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, Vincent; Dumas, Stephane; Sun, Wei-Chuan; Troughton, Jeffrey S.; Greenfield, Matthew T.; Caravan, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and objectives The observed relaxivity of gadolinium based contrast agents has contributions from the water molecule(s) that bind directly to the gadolinium ion (inner-sphere water), long lived water molecules and exchangeable protons that make up the second-sphere of coordination, and water molecules that diffuse near the contrast agent (outer-sphere). Inner- and second-sphere relaxivity can both be increased by optimization of the lifetimes of the water molecules and protons in these coordination spheres, the rotational motion of the complex, and the electronic relaxation of the gadolinium ion. We sought to identify new high relaxivity contrast agents by systematically varying the donor atoms that bind directly to gadolinium to increase inner-sphere relaxivity and concurrently including substituents that influence the second-sphere relaxivity. Methods Twenty GdDOTA derivatives were prepared and their relaxivity determined in presence and absence of human serum albumin as a function of temperature and magnetic field. Data was analyzed to extract the underlying molecular parameters influencing relaxivity. Each compound had a common albumin-binding group and an inner-sphere donor set comprising the 4 tertiary amine N atoms from cyclen, an α-substituted acetate oxygen atom, two amide oxygen atoms, an inner-sphere water oxygen atom, and a variable donor group. Each amide nitrogen was substituted with different groups to promote hydrogen bonding with second-sphere water molecules. Results Relaxivites at 0.47T and 1.4T, 37 °C, in serum albumin ranged from 16.0 to 58.1 mM−1s−1 and from 12.3 to 34.8 mM−1s−1 respectively. The reduction of inner-sphere water exchange typical of amide donor groups could be offset by incorporating a phosphonate or phenolate oxygen atom donor in the first coordination sphere resulting in higher relaxivity. Amide nitrogen substitution with pendant phosphonate or carboxylate groups increased relaxivity by as much as 88

  19. Regional thermal specialisation in a mammal: temperature affects power output of core muscle more than that of peripheral muscle in adult mice (Mus musculus).

    PubMed

    James, Rob S; Tallis, Jason; Angilletta, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    In endotherms, such as mammals and birds, internal organs can specialise to function within a narrow thermal range. Consequently, these organs should become more sensitive to changes in body temperature. Yet, organs at the periphery of the body still experience considerable fluctuations in temperature, which could select for lower thermal sensitivity. We hypothesised that the performance of soleus muscle taken from the leg would depend less on temperature than would the performance of diaphragm muscle taken from the body core. Soleus and diaphragm muscles were isolated from mice and subjected to isometric and work-loop studies to analyse mechanical performance at temperatures between 15 and 40 °C. Across this thermal range, soleus muscle took longer to generate isometric force and longer to relax, and tended to produce greater normalised maximal force (stress) than did diaphragm muscle. The time required to produce half of maximal force during isometric tetanus and the time required to relax half of maximal force were both more sensitive to temperature in soleus than they were in diaphragm. However, thermal sensitivities of maximal force during isometric tetani were similar for both muscles. Consistent with our hypothesis, power output (the product of speed and force) was greater in magnitude and more thermally sensitive in diaphragm than it was in soleus. Our findings, when combined with previous observations of muscles from regionally endothermic fish, suggest that endothermy influences the thermal sensitivities of power output in core and peripheral muscles.

  20. Relaxation dynamics of multilayer triangular Husimi cacti.

    PubMed

    Galiceanu, Mircea; Jurjiu, Aurel

    2016-09-14

    We focus on the relaxation dynamics of multilayer polymer structures having, as underlying topology, the Husimi cactus. The relaxation dynamics of the multilayer structures is investigated in the framework of generalized Gaussian structures model using both Rouse and Zimm approaches. In the Rouse type-approach, we determine analytically the complete eigenvalues spectrum and based on it we calculate the mechanical relaxation moduli (storage and loss modulus) and the average monomer displacement. First, we monitor these physical quantities for structures with a fixed generation number and we increase the number of layers, such that the linear topology will smoothly come into play. Second, we keep constant the size of the structures, varying simultaneously two parameters: the generation number of the main layer, G, and the number of layers, c. This fact allows us to study in detail the crossover from a pure Husimi cactus behavior to a predominately linear chain behavior. The most interesting situation is found when the two limiting topologies cancel each other. For this case, we encounter in the intermediate frequency/time domain regions of constant slope for different values of the parameter set (G, c) and we show that the number of layers follows an exponential-law of G. In the Zimm-type approach, which includes the hydrodynamic interactions, the quantities that describe the mechanical relaxation dynamics do not show scaling behavior as in the Rouse model, except the limiting case, namely, a very high number of layers and low generation number.