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Sample records for muscle resident macrophages

  1. Regular physical activity prevents chronic pain by altering resident muscle macrophage phenotype and increasing IL-10 in mice

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Audrey; Gregory, Nicholas S.; Allen, Lee-Ann H.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity in healthy individuals prevents development of chronic musculoskeletal pain; however, the mechanisms underlying this exercise-induced analgesia are not well understood. Interleukin-10(IL-10), an anti-inflammatory cytokine which can reduce nociceptor sensitization, increases during regular physical activity. Since macrophages play a major role in cytokine production and are present in muscle tissue, we propose that physical activity alters macrophage phenotype to increase IL-10 and prevent chronic pain. Physical activity was induced by allowing C57BL/6J mice free access to running wheels for 8 weeks and compared to sedentary mice with no running wheels. Using immunohistochemical staining of the gastrocnemius muscle to label regulatory (M2, secretes anti-inflammatory cytokines) and classical (M1, secretes proinflammatory cytokines) macrophages, the percentage of M2-macrophages increased significantly in physically active mice (68.5±4.6% of total) compared to sedentary mice (45.8±7.1% of total). Repeated acid injections into the muscle enhanced mechanical sensitivity of the muscle and paw in sedentary animals that does not occur in physically active mice; no sex differences occur in either sedentary or physically active mice. Blockade of IL-10 systemically or locally prevented the analgesia in physically active mice, i.e. mice developed hyperalgesia. Conversely, sedentary mice pretreated systemically or locally with IL-10 had reduced hyperalgesia after repeated acid injections. Thus, these results suggest that regular physical activity increases the percentage of regulatory macrophages in muscle and that IL-10 is an essential mediator in the analgesia produced by regular physical activity. PMID:26230740

  2. Macrophage Plasticity in Skeletal Muscle Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rigamonti, Elena; Sciorati, Clara; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are one of the first barriers of host defence against pathogens. Beyond their role in innate immunity, macrophages play increasingly defined roles in orchestrating the healing of various injured tissues. Perturbations of macrophage function and/or activation may result in impaired regeneration and fibrosis deposition as described in several chronic pathological diseases. Heterogeneity and plasticity have been demonstrated to be hallmarks of macrophages. In response to environmental cues they display a proinflammatory (M1) or an alternative anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype. A lot of evidence demonstrated that after acute injury M1 macrophages infiltrate early to promote the clearance of necrotic debris, whereas M2 macrophages appear later to sustain tissue healing. Whether the sequential presence of two different macrophage populations results from a dynamic shift in macrophage polarization or from the recruitment of new circulating monocytes is a subject of ongoing debate. In this paper, we discuss the current available information about the role that different phenotypes of macrophages plays after injury and during the remodelling phase in different tissue types, with particular attention to the skeletal muscle. PMID:24860823

  3. Fate of conidia of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis after ingestion by resident macrophages or cytokine-treated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Cano, L E; Brummer, E; Stevens, D A; Restrepo, A

    1992-01-01

    Conidia ingested by resident macrophages had an enhanced percentage of transformation to yeast cells compared with those in culture medium without macrophages. The yeast cells subsequently grew intracellularly by budding. Macrophages treated with cytokines from antigen-stimulated spleen cells from immunized mice significantly inhibited transformation of ingested conidia. PMID:1563800

  4. Fate of conidia of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis after ingestion by resident macrophages or cytokine-treated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Cano, L E; Brummer, E; Stevens, D A; Restrepo, A

    1992-05-01

    Conidia ingested by resident macrophages had an enhanced percentage of transformation to yeast cells compared with those in culture medium without macrophages. The yeast cells subsequently grew intracellularly by budding. Macrophages treated with cytokines from antigen-stimulated spleen cells from immunized mice significantly inhibited transformation of ingested conidia.

  5. Origin, Development, and Homeostasis of Tissue-resident Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Malay; Murphy, Kenneth M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Macrophages are versatile cells of the hematopoietic system that display remarkable functional diversity encompassing innate immune responses, tissue development, and tissue homeostasis. Macrophages are present in almost all tissues of the body and display distinct location-specific phenotypes and gene expression profiles. Recent studies also demonstrate distinct origins of tissue-resident macrophages. This emerging picture of ontological, functional, and phenotypic heterogeneity within tissue macrophages has altered our understanding of these cells, which play important roles in many human diseases. In this review, we discuss the different origins of tissue macrophages, the transcription factors regulating their development, and the mechanisms underlying their homeostasis at steady state. PMID:25319325

  6. Development and maintainance of resident macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Perdiguero, Elisa Gomez; Geissmann, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    The molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie the many roles of macrophages in health and disease states in vivo remain poorly understood. The purpose of this Review is to present and discuss current knowledge on the developmental biology of macrophages, as it underlies the concept of a layered myeloid system composed of ‘resident’ macrophages that mostly originate from yolk sac progenitors and of ‘passenger’ or ‘transitory’ myeloid cells that originate and renew from bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, and to provide a framework to investigate the functions of macrophages in vivo. PMID:26681456

  7. Tissue resident macrophages: Key players in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and its complications.

    PubMed

    Meshkani, Reza; Vakili, Sanaz

    2016-11-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that chronic inflammation is an important pathogenic mediator of the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). It is now generally accepted that tissue-resident macrophages play a major role in regulation of tissue inflammation. T2D-associated inflammation is characterized by an increased abundance of macrophages in different tissues along with production of inflammatory cytokines. The complexity of macrophage phenotypes has been reported from different human tissues. Macrophages exhibit a phenotypic range that is intermediate between two extremes, M1 (pro-inflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory). Cytokines and chemokines produced by macrophages generate local and systemic inflammation and this condition leads to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance in liver, adipose and skeletal muscle tissues. Data from human and animal studies also suggest that macrophages contribute to T2D complications such as nephropathy, neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases through cell-cell interactions and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and proteases to induce inflammatory cell recruitment, cell apoptosis, angiogenesis, and matrix protein remodeling. In this review we focus on the functions of macrophages and the importance of these cells in the pathogenesis of T2D. In addition, the contribution of macrophages to diabetes complications such as nephropathy, neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular diseases is discussed.

  8. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  9. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  10. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine inhibits macrophage adhesion to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wirrig, Christiane; McKean, Jenny S; Wilson, Heather M; Nixon, Graeme F

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation in de-endothelialised arteries contributes to the development of cardiovascular diseases. The process that initiates this inflammatory response is the adhesion of monocytes/macrophages to exposed vascular smooth muscle cells, typically stimulated by cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the sphingolipid sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on the interaction of monocytes/macrophages with vascular smooth muscle cells. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells and rat bone marrow-derived macrophages were co-cultured using an in vitro assay following incubation with sphingolipids to assess inter-cellular adhesion. We reveal that SPC inhibits the TNF-induced adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This anti-adhesive effect was the result of SPC-induced changes to the smooth muscle cells (but not the macrophages) and was mediated, at least partly, via the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 2. Lipid raft domains were also required. Although SPC did not alter expression or membrane distribution of the adhesion proteins intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cellular adhesion protein-1 in smooth muscle cells, SPC preincubation inhibited the TNF-induced increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) resulting in a subsequent decrease in nitric oxide production. Inhibiting NOS2 activation in smooth muscle cells led to a decrease in the adhesion of macrophages to smooth muscle cells. This study has therefore delineated a novel pathway which can inhibit the interaction between macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells via SPC-induced repression of NOS2 expression. This mechanism could represent a potential drug target in vascular disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Altered Macrophage Phenotype Transition Impairs Skeletal Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hanzhou; Melton, David W.; Porter, Laurel; Sarwar, Zaheer U.; McManus, Linda M.; Shireman, Paula K.

    2015-01-01

    Monocyte/macrophage polarization in skeletal muscle regeneration is ill defined. We used CD11b-diphtheria toxin receptor transgenic mice to transiently deplete monocytes/macrophages at multiple stages before and after muscle injury induced by cardiotoxin. Fat accumulation within regenerated muscle was maximal when ablation occurred at the same time as cardiotoxin-induced injury. Early ablation (day 1 after cardiotoxin) resulted in the smallest regenerated myofiber size together with increased residual necrotic myofibers and fat accumulation. However, muscle regeneration after late (day 4) ablation was similar to controls. Levels of inflammatory cells in injured muscle following early ablation and associated with impaired muscle regeneration were determined by flow cytometry. Delayed, but exaggerated, monocyte [CD11b+(CD90/B220/CD49b/NK1.1/Ly6G)−(F4/80/I-Ab/CD11c)−Ly6C+/−] accumulation occurred; interestingly, Ly6C+ and Ly6C− monocytes were present concurrently in ablated animals and control mice. In addition to monocytes, proinflammatory, Ly6C+ macrophage accumulation following early ablation was delayed compared to controls. In both groups, CD11b+F4/80+ cells exhibited minimal expression of the M2 markers CD206 and CD301. Nevertheless, early ablation delayed and decreased the transient accumulation of CD11b+F4/80+Ly6C−CD301− macrophages; in control animals, the later tissue accumulation of these cells appeared to correspond to that of anti-inflammatory macrophages, determined by cytokine production and arginase activity. In summary, impairments in muscle regeneration were associated with exaggerated monocyte recruitment and reduced Ly6C− macrophages; the switch of macrophage/monocyte subsets is critical to muscle regeneration. PMID:24525152

  12. Macrophage depletion impairs skeletal muscle regeneration: The roles of regulatory factors for muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Linlin; Zeng, Zhigang; Xiao, Weihua; Chen, Peijie

    2017-03-01

    Though macrophages are essential for skeletal muscle regeneration, which is a complex process, the roles and mechanisms of the macrophages in the process of muscle regeneration are still not fully understood. The objective of this study is to explore the roles of macrophages and the mechanisms involved in the regeneration of injured skeletal muscle. One hundred and twelve C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into muscle contusion and macrophages depleted groups. Their gastrocnemius muscles were harvested at the time points of 12 h, 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 d post-injury. The changes in skeletal muscle morphology were assessed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) stain. The gene expression was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The data showed that CL-liposomes treatment did affect the expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MyoD, myogenin) after injury. In addition, CL-liposomes treatment decreased the expression of regulatory factors of muscle regeneration (HGF, uPA, COX-2, IGF-1, MGF, FGF6) and increased the expression of inflammatory cytokines (TGF-β1, TNF-α, IL-1β, RANTES) in the late stage of regeneration. Moreover, there were significant correlations between macrophages and some regulatory factors (such as HGF, uPA) for muscle regeneration. These results suggested that macrophages depletion impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and that the regulatory factors for muscle regeneration may play important roles in this process.

  13. Macrophage-released ADAMTS1 promotes muscle stem cell activation.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongqing; Shih, Chung-Hsuan; Wosczyna, Michael N; Mueller, Alisa A; Cho, Joonseok; Aggarwal, Abhishek; Rando, Thomas A; Feldman, Brian J

    2017-09-22

    Coordinated activation of muscle stem cells (known as satellite cells) is critical for postnatal muscle growth and regeneration. The muscle stem cell niche is central for regulating the activation state of satellite cells, but the specific extracellular signals that coordinate this regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that macrophages at sites of muscle injury induce activation of satellite cells via expression of Adamts1. Overexpression of Adamts1 in macrophages in vivo is sufficient to increase satellite cell activation and improve muscle regeneration in young mice. We demonstrate that NOTCH1 is a target of ADAMTS1 metalloproteinase activity, which reduces Notch signaling, leading to increased satellite cell activation. These results identify Adamts1 as a potent extracellular regulator of satellite cell activation and have significant implications for understanding the regulation of satellite cell activity and regeneration after muscle injury.Satellite cells are crucial for growth and regeneration of skeletal muscle. Here the authors show that in response to muscle injury, macrophages secrete Adamts1, which induces satellite cell activation by modulating Notch1 signaling.

  14. Nicotine attenuates activation of tissue resident macrophages in the mouse stomach through the β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Nemethova, Andrea; Michel, Klaus; Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J; Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Schemann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is an endogenous mechanism by which the autonomic nervous system attenuates macrophage activation via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). This concept has however not been demonstrated at a cellular level in intact tissue. To this end, we have studied the effect of nicotine on the activation of resident macrophages in a mouse stomach preparation by means of calcium imaging. Calcium transients ([Ca(2+)]i) in resident macrophages were recorded in a mouse stomach preparation containing myenteric plexus and muscle layers by Fluo-4. Activation of macrophages was achieved by focal puff administration of ATP. The effects of nicotine on activation of macrophages were evaluated and the nAChR involved was pharmacologically characterized. The proximity of cholinergic nerves to macrophages was quantified by confocal microscopy. Expression of β2 and α7 nAChR was evaluated by β2 immunohistochemistry and fluorophore-tagged α-bungarotoxin. In 83% of macrophages cholinergic varicose nerve fibers were detected at distances <900 nm. The ATP induced [Ca(2+)]i increase was significantly inhibited in 65% or 55% of macrophages by 100 µM or 10 µM nicotine, respectively. This inhibitory effect was reversed by the β2 nAChR preferring antagonist dihydro-β-eryhtroidine but not by hexamethonium (non-selective nAChR-antagonist), mecamylamine (α3β4 nAChR-preferring antagonist), α-bungarotoxin or methyllycaconitine (both α7 nAChR-preferring antagonist). Macrophages in the stomach express β2 but not α7 nAChR at protein level, while those in the intestine express both receptor subunits. This study is the first in situ demonstration of an inhibition of macrophage activation by nicotine suggesting functional signaling between cholinergic neurons and macrophages in the stomach. The data suggest that the β2 subunit of the nAChR is critically involved in the nicotine-induced inhibition of these resident macrophages.

  15. Nicotine Attenuates Activation of Tissue Resident Macrophages in the Mouse Stomach through the β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Nemethova, Andrea; Michel, Klaus; Gomez-Pinilla, Pedro J.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Schemann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway is an endogenous mechanism by which the autonomic nervous system attenuates macrophage activation via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). This concept has however not been demonstrated at a cellular level in intact tissue. To this end, we have studied the effect of nicotine on the activation of resident macrophages in a mouse stomach preparation by means of calcium imaging. Methods Calcium transients ([Ca2+]i) in resident macrophages were recorded in a mouse stomach preparation containing myenteric plexus and muscle layers by Fluo-4. Activation of macrophages was achieved by focal puff administration of ATP. The effects of nicotine on activation of macrophages were evaluated and the nAChR involved was pharmacologically characterized. The proximity of cholinergic nerves to macrophages was quantified by confocal microscopy. Expression of β2 and α7 nAChR was evaluated by β2 immunohistochemistry and fluorophore-tagged α-bungarotoxin. Results In 83% of macrophages cholinergic varicose nerve fibers were detected at distances <900nm. The ATP induced [Ca2+]i increase was significantly inhibited in 65% or 55% of macrophages by 100µM or 10µM nicotine, respectively. This inhibitory effect was reversed by the β2 nAChR preferring antagonist dihydro-β-eryhtroidine but not by hexamethonium (non-selective nAChR-antagonist), mecamylamine (α3β4 nAChR-preferring antagonist), α-bungarotoxin or methyllycaconitine (both α7 nAChR-preferring antagonist). Macrophages in the stomach express β2 but not α7 nAChR at protein level, while those in the intestine express both receptor subunits. Conclusion This study is the first in situ demonstration of an inhibition of macrophage activation by nicotine suggesting functional signaling between cholinergic neurons and macrophages in the stomach. The data suggest that the β2 subunit of the nAChR is critically involved in the nicotine-induced inhibition of these resident

  16. A thrombin receptor in resident rat peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kudahl, K.; Fisker, S.; Sonne, O. )

    1991-03-01

    Resident rat peritoneal macrophages possess 6 x 10(2) high-affinity binding sites per cell for bovine thrombin with a Kd of 11 pM, and 7.5 x 10(4) low-affinity sites with a Kd of 5.8 nM. These binding sites are highly specific for thrombin. Half-maximal binding of {sup 125}I-labeled bovine thrombin is achieved after 1 min at 37{degrees}C, and after 12 min at 4 degrees C. The reversibly bound fraction of the ligand dissociates according to a biexponential time course with the rate constants 0.27 and 0.06 min-1 at 4 degrees C. Part of the tracer remains cell-associated even after prolonged incubation, but all cell-associated radio-activity migrates as intact thrombin upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The bound thrombin is minimally endocytosed as judged by the resistance to pH 3 treatment, and the receptor does not mediate a quantitatively important degradation of the ligand. The binding is not dependent on the catalytic site of thrombin, since irreversibly inactivated thrombin also binds to the receptor. {sup 125}I-labeled thrombin covalently cross-linked to its receptor migrates in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a Mr 160,000, corresponding to an approximate receptor size of Mr 120,000.

  17. Development and Functional Differentiation of Tissue-Resident Versus Monocyte-Derived Macrophages in Inflammatory Reactions.

    PubMed

    Italiani, Paola; Boraschi, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes are key cells in tissue integrity and defense. Tissue-resident macrophages are abundantly present in all tissues of the body and have a complex role in ensuring tissue functions and homeostatic balance. Circulating blood monocytes can enter tissue both in steady-state conditions, for helping in replenishing the tissue-resident macrophage pool and, in particular, for acting as potent effector cells during inflammatory events such as infections, traumas, and diseases. The heterogeneity of monocytes and macrophages depends on their ontogeny, their tissue location, and their functional programming, with both monocytes and macrophages able to exert distinct or similar functions depending on the tissue-specific and stimulus-specific microenvironment. In this short review, we will review the current hypotheses on tissue-resident macrophage ontogeny and functions, as compared to blood-derived monocytes, with a particular focus on inflammatory conditions.

  18. Shifts in macrophage phenotypes and macrophage competition for arginine metabolism affect the severity of muscle pathology in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Villalta, S Armando; Nguyen, Hal X; Deng, Bo; Gotoh, Tomomi; Tidball, James G

    2009-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common, lethal, muscle-wasting disease of childhood. Previous investigations have shown that muscle macrophages may play an important role in promoting the pathology in the mdx mouse model of DMD. In the present study, we investigate the mechanism through which macrophages promote mdx dystrophy and assess whether the phenotype of the macrophages changes between the stage of peak muscle necrosis (4 weeks of age) and muscle regeneration (12 weeks). We find that 4-week-old mdx muscles contain a population of pro-inflammatory, classically activated M1 macrophages that lyse muscle in vitro by NO-mediated mechanisms. Genetic ablation of the iNOS gene in mdx mice also significantly reduces muscle membrane lysis in 4-week-old mdx mice in vivo. However, 4-week mdx muscles also contain a population of alternatively activated, M2a macrophages that express arginase. In vitro assays show that M2a macrophages reduce lysis of muscle cells by M1 macrophages through the competition of arginase in M2a cells with iNOS in M1 cells for their common, enzymatic substrate, arginine. During the transition from the acute peak of mdx pathology to the regenerative stage, expression of IL-4 and IL-10 increases, either of which can deactivate the M1 phenotype and promote activation of a CD163+, M2c phenotype that can increase tissue repair. Our findings further show that IL-10 stimulation of macrophages activates their ability to promote satellite cell proliferation. Deactivation of the M1 phenotype is also associated with a reduced expression of iNOS, IL-6, MCP-1 and IP-10. Thus, these results show that distinct subpopulations of macrophages can promote muscle injury or repair in muscular dystrophy, and that therapeutic interventions that affect the balance between M1 and M2 macrophage populations may influence the course of muscular dystrophy.

  19. Incorporation of resident macrophages in engineered tissues: Multiple cell type response to microenvironment controlled macrophage-laden gelatine hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Dollinger, Camille; Ciftci, Sait; Knopf-Marques, Helena; Guner, Rabia; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Debry, Christian; Barthes, Julien; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    2017-05-08

    The success of tissue engineering strategy is strongly related to the inflammatory response, mainly through the activity of macrophages that are key cells in initial immune response to implants. For engineered tissues, the presence of resident macrophages can be beneficial for maintenance of homeostasis and healing. Thus, incorporation of macrophages in engineered tissues can facilitate the integration upon implantation. In this study, an in-vitro model of interaction was developed between encapsulated naive monocytes, macrophages induced with M1/M2 stimulation and incoming cells for immune assisted tissue engineering applications. To mimic the wound healing cascade, naive THP-1 monocytes, endothelial cells and fibroblasts were seeded on the gels as incoming cells. The interaction was first monitored in the absence of the gels. To mimic resident macrophages, THP-1 cells were encapsulated in the presence or absence of IL-4 to control their phenotype and then these hydrogels were seeded with incoming cells. Without encapsulation, activated macrophages induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. Once encapsulated no adverse effects were seen. Macrophage-laden hydrogels attracted more endothelial cells and fibroblasts compared to monocytes-laden hydrogels. The induction (M2 stimulation) of encapsulated macrophages did not change the overall number of attracted cells; but significantly affected their morphology. M1 stimulation by a defined media resulted in more secretion of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines compared to M2 stimulation. It was demonstrated that there is a distinct effect of encapsulated macrophages on the behaviour of the incoming cells; this effect can be harnessed to establish a microenvironment more prone to regeneration upon implantation. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Embryonic and adult-derived resident cardiac macrophages are maintained through distinct mechanisms at steady state and during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Epelman, Slava; Lavine, Kory J.; Beaudin, Anna E.; Sojka, Dorothy K.; Carrero, Javier A.; Calderon, Boris; Brija, Thaddeus; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Ivanov, Stoyan; Satpathy, Ansuman T.; Schilling, Joel D.; Schwendener, Reto; Sergin, Ismail; Razani, Babak; Forsberg, E. Camilla; Yokoyama, Wayne; Unanue, Emil R.; Colonna, Marco; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cardiac macrophages are crucial for tissue repair after cardiac injury but have not been well characterized. Here we identify four populations of cardiac macrophages. At steady state, resident macrophages were primarily maintained through local proliferation. However, after macrophage depletion or during cardiac inflammation, Ly6chi monocytes contributed to all four macrophage populations, whereas resident macrophages also expanded numerically through proliferation. Genetic fate mapping revealed that yolk-sac and fetal monocyte progenitors gave rise to the majority of cardiac macrophages, and the heart was among a minority of organs in which substantial numbers of yolk-sac macrophages persisted in adulthood. CCR2 expression and dependence distinguished cardiac macrophages of adult monocyte versus embryonic origin. Transcriptional and functional data revealed that monocyte-derived macrophages coordinate cardiac inflammation, while playing redundant but lesser roles in antigen sampling and efferocytosis. These data highlight the presence of multiple cardiac macrophage subsets, with different functions, origins and strategies to regulate compartment. PMID:24439267

  1. Tissue-resident versus monocyte-derived macrophages in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Lahmar, Qods; Keirsse, Jiri; Laoui, Damya; Movahedi, Kiavash; Van Overmeire, Eva; Van Ginderachter, Jo A

    2016-01-01

    The tumor-promoting role of macrophages has been firmly established in most cancer types. However, macrophage identity has been a matter of debate, since several levels of complexity result in considerable macrophage heterogeneity. Ontogenically, tissue-resident macrophages derive from yolk sac progenitors which either directly or via a fetal liver monocyte intermediate differentiate into distinct macrophage types during embryogenesis and are maintained throughout life, while a disruption of the steady state mobilizes monocytes and instructs the formation of monocyte-derived macrophages. Histologically, the macrophage phenotype is heavily influenced by the tissue microenvironment resulting in molecularly and functionally distinct macrophages in distinct organs. Finally, a change in the tissue microenvironment as a result of infectious or sterile inflammation instructs different modes of macrophage activation. These considerations are relevant in the context of tumors, which can be considered as sites of chronic sterile inflammation encompassing subregions with distinct environmental conditions (for example, hypoxic versus normoxic). Here, we discuss existing evidence on the role of macrophage subpopulations in steady state tissue and primary tumors of the breast, lung, pancreas, brain and liver.

  2. Macrophage invasion does not contribute to muscle membrane injury during inflammation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidball, J. G.; Berchenko, E.; Frenette, J.

    1999-01-01

    Previous observations have shown that neutrophil invasion precedes macrophage invasion during muscle inflammation and that peak muscle injury is observed at the peak of ED1+ macrophage invasion. We tested the hypothesis that neutrophil invasion causes subsequent invasion by ED1+ macrophages and that ED1+ macrophages then contribute significantly to muscle membrane injury during modified muscle use. Rat hindlimbs were unloaded for 10 days followed by reloading by normal ambulation to induce inflammation. Membrane injury was measured by assaying Evans blue-bound serum protein influx through membrane lesions. Muscle neutrophil populations increased significantly during the first 2 h of reloading but ED1+ macrophages did not increase until 24 h. Neutrophil invasion was uncoupled from subsequent macrophage invasion by reloading rat hindlimbs for 2 h to cause neutrophil invasion, followed by resuspension for hours 2-24. This produced similar increases in neutrophil concentration as measured in muscles continuously reloaded for 24 h without causing an increase in macrophages. However, resuspension did not reduce the extent of muscle damage compared with that occurring in muscles that were reloaded continuously for 24 h. Thus, muscle invasion by neutrophils is not sufficient to cause invasion by ED1+ macrophages. In addition, muscle membrane injury that occurs during reloading is independent of invasion by ED1+ macrophages.

  3. Macrophage invasion does not contribute to muscle membrane injury during inflammation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidball, J. G.; Berchenko, E.; Frenette, J.

    1999-01-01

    Previous observations have shown that neutrophil invasion precedes macrophage invasion during muscle inflammation and that peak muscle injury is observed at the peak of ED1+ macrophage invasion. We tested the hypothesis that neutrophil invasion causes subsequent invasion by ED1+ macrophages and that ED1+ macrophages then contribute significantly to muscle membrane injury during modified muscle use. Rat hindlimbs were unloaded for 10 days followed by reloading by normal ambulation to induce inflammation. Membrane injury was measured by assaying Evans blue-bound serum protein influx through membrane lesions. Muscle neutrophil populations increased significantly during the first 2 h of reloading but ED1+ macrophages did not increase until 24 h. Neutrophil invasion was uncoupled from subsequent macrophage invasion by reloading rat hindlimbs for 2 h to cause neutrophil invasion, followed by resuspension for hours 2-24. This produced similar increases in neutrophil concentration as measured in muscles continuously reloaded for 24 h without causing an increase in macrophages. However, resuspension did not reduce the extent of muscle damage compared with that occurring in muscles that were reloaded continuously for 24 h. Thus, muscle invasion by neutrophils is not sufficient to cause invasion by ED1+ macrophages. In addition, muscle membrane injury that occurs during reloading is independent of invasion by ED1+ macrophages.

  4. Paracrine cross-talk between skeletal muscle and macrophages in exercise by PGC-1α-controlled BNP

    PubMed Central

    Furrer, Regula; Eisele, Petra S.; Schmidt, Alexander; Beer, Markus; Handschin, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Activation of resident and infiltrating immune cells is a central event in training adaptation and other contexts of skeletal muscle repair and regeneration. A precise orchestration of inflammatory events in muscle fibers and immune cells is required after recurrent contraction-relaxation cycles. However, the mechanistic aspects of this important regulation remain largely unknown. We now demonstrate that besides a dominant role in controlling cellular metabolism, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α) also has a profound effect on cytokine expression in muscle tissue. Muscle PGC-1α expression results in activation of tissue-resident macrophages, at least in part mediated by PGC-1α-dependent B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) production and secretion. Positive effects of exercise in metabolic diseases and other pathologies associated with chronic inflammation could accordingly involve the PGC-1α-BNP axis and thereby provide novel targets for therapeutic approaches. PMID:28091624

  5. Critical role of Trib1 in differentiation of tissue-resident M2-like macrophages.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takashi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Naito, Hisamichi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Takemura, Naoki; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Morii, Eiichi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo

    2013-03-28

    Macrophages consist of at least two subgroups, M1 and M2 (refs 1-3). Whereas M1 macrophages are proinflammatory and have a central role in host defence against bacterial and viral infections, M2 macrophages are associated with responses to anti-inflammatory reactions, helminth infection, tissue remodelling, fibrosis and tumour progression. Trib1 is an adaptor protein involved in protein degradation by interacting with COP1 ubiquitin ligase. Genome-wide association studies in humans have implicated TRIB1 in lipid metabolism. Here we show that Trib1 is critical for the differentiation of F4/80(+)MR(+) tissue-resident macrophages--that share characteristics with M2 macrophages (which we term M2-like macrophages)--and eosinophils but not for the differentiation of M1 myeloid cells. Trib1 deficiency results in a severe reduction of M2-like macrophages in various organs, including bone marrow, spleen, lung and adipose tissues. Aberrant expression of C/EBPα in Trib1-deficient bone marrow cells is responsible for the defects in macrophage differentiation. Unexpectedly, mice lacking Trib1 in haematopoietic cells show diminished adipose tissue mass accompanied by evidence of increased lipolysis, even when fed a normal diet. Supplementation of M2-like macrophages rescues the pathophysiology, indicating that a lack of these macrophages is the cause of lipolysis. In response to a high-fat diet, mice lacking Trib1 in haematopoietic cells develop hypertriglyceridaemia and insulin resistance, together with increased proinflammatory cytokine gene induction. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Trib1 is critical for adipose tissue maintenance and suppression of metabolic disorders by controlling the differentiation of tissue-resident M2-like macrophages.

  6. Tissue-Resident Macrophages in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Originate from Embryonic Hematopoiesis and Promote Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Herndon, John M; Sojka, Dorothy K; Kim, Ki-Wook; Knolhoff, Brett L; Zuo, Chong; Cullinan, Darren R; Luo, Jingqin; Bearden, Audrey R; Lavine, Kory J; Yokoyama, Wayne M; Hawkins, William G; Fields, Ryan C; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; DeNardo, David G

    2017-08-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are essential components of the cancer microenvironment and play critical roles in the regulation of tumor progression. Optimal therapeutic intervention requires in-depth understanding of the sources that sustain macrophages in malignant tissues. In this study, we investigated the ontogeny of TAMs in murine pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) models. We identified both inflammatory monocytes and tissue-resident macrophages as sources of TAMs. Unexpectedly, significant portions of pancreas-resident macrophages originated from embryonic development and expanded through in situ proliferation during tumor progression. Whereas monocyte-derived TAMs played more potent roles in antigen presentation, embryonically derived TAMs exhibited a pro-fibrotic transcriptional profile, indicative of their role in producing and remodeling molecules in the extracellular matrix. Collectively, these findings uncover the heterogeneity of TAM origin and functions and could provide therapeutic insight for PDAC treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Macrophage activation and muscle remodeling at myotendinous junctions after modifications in muscle loading.

    PubMed Central

    St Pierre, B. A.; Tidball, J. G.

    1994-01-01

    Modifications in muscle loading have been reported previously to result in increased numbers of mononucleated cells and changes in myofibril organization at myotendinous junctions (MTJs). The goals of this study were to determine the identity of those mononucleated cells and to examine the relationships between changes in their structure, location, and number with structural aspects of remodeling at MTJs experiencing modified loading. Soleus muscles from rats subjected to 10 days of hindlimb suspension were analyzed 0, 2, 4, and 7 days after return to weight bearing. Immunohistochemistry showed that ED1+, ED2+ and Ia+ macrophages were present at the MTJ and microtendon of control muscle. After reloading, ED2+ macrophages increased in number and size at MTJs and microtendons, indicating their activation. ED1+ cells showed no change in size or number whereas Ia+ cells were increased in size at day 7 of reloading. Electron microscopic observations showed that mononucleated cells near MTJs of control or suspended muscle were not highly active in protein synthesis or secretion. However, in reloaded muscle, mononucleated cells were found to be in close proximity to MTJs and to contain a high concentration of organelles associated with protein secretion. During these stages of reloading, extensive remodeling of myofibril-membrane associations occurred and nascent sarcomeres appeared in the MTJ regions of muscle fibers. Immunohistochemistry showed that during these stages of nascent sarcomere formation, there was renewed expression of developmental myosin heavy chain at MTJs, with this heavy chain appearing most prominently at the MTJ at day 7 of reloading. The activation and increased numbers of macrophages at MTJs and the close apposition of secretory cells to the MTJ membrane during remodeling lead us to propose that macrophage-derived factors may influence remodeling of MTJs in muscles experiencing modified loading. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5

  8. Fetal liver endothelium regulates the seeding of tissue-resident macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rantakari, Pia; Jäppinen, Norma; Lokka, Emmi; Mokkala, Elias; Gerke, Heidi; Peuhu, Emilia; Ivaska, Johanna; Elima, Kati; Auvinen, Kaisa; Salmi, Marko

    2016-10-20

    Macrophages are required for normal embryogenesis, tissue homeostasis and immunity against microorganisms and tumours. Adult tissue-resident macrophages largely originate from long-lived, self-renewing embryonic precursors and not from haematopoietic stem-cell activity in the bone marrow. Although fate-mapping studies have uncovered a great amount of detail on the origin and kinetics of fetal macrophage development in the yolk sac and liver, the molecules that govern the tissue-specific migration of these cells remain completely unknown. Here we show that an endothelium-specific molecule, plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein (PLVAP), regulates the seeding of fetal monocyte-derived macrophages to tissues in mice. We found that PLVAP-deficient mice have completely normal levels of both yolk-sac- and bone-marrow-derived macrophages, but that fetal liver monocyte-derived macrophage populations were practically missing from tissues. Adult PLVAP-deficient mice show major alterations in macrophage-dependent iron recycling and mammary branching morphogenesis. PLVAP forms diaphragms in the fenestrae of liver sinusoidal endothelium during embryogenesis, interacts with chemoattractants and adhesion molecules and regulates the egress of fetal liver monocytes to the systemic vasculature. Thus, PLVAP selectively controls the exit of macrophage precursors from the fetal liver and, to our knowledge, is the first molecule identified in any organ as regulating the migratory events during embryonic macrophage ontogeny.

  9. Neutrophil Migration into the Infected Uroepithelium Is Regulated by the Crosstalk between Resident and Helper Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Zec, Kristina; Volke, Julia; Vijitha, Nirojah; Thiebes, Stephanie; Gunzer, Matthias; Kurts, Christian; Engel, Daniel Robert

    2016-01-01

    The antibacterial defense against infections depends on the cooperation between distinct phagocytes of the innate immune system, namely macrophages and neutrophils. However, the mechanisms driving this cooperation are incompletely understood. In this study we describe the crosstalk between Ly6C+ and Ly6C− macrophage-subtypes and neutrophils in the context of urinary tract infection (UTI) with uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). Ly6C− macrophages acted as tissue resident sentinels and attracted circulating phagocytes by chemokines. Ly6C+ macrophages produced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) that licensed Ly6C− macrophages to release preformed CXCL2, which in turn caused matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9) secretion by neutrophils to enable transepithelial migration. PMID:26861402

  10. Gallium Disrupts Iron Metabolism of Mycobacteria Residing within Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Olakanmi, Oyebode; Britigan, Bradley E.; Schlesinger, Larry S.

    2000-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium complex (MAC) enter and multiply within monocytes and macrophages in phagosomes. In vitro growth studies using standard culture media indicate that siderophore-mediated iron (Fe) acquisition plays a critical role in the growth and metabolism of both M. tuberculosis and MAC. However, the applicability of such studies to conditions within the macrophage phagosome is unclear, due in part to the absence of experimental means to inhibit such a process. Based on the ability of gallium (Ga3+) to concentrate within mononuclear phagocytes and on evidence that Ga disrupts cellular Fe-dependent metabolic pathways by substituting for Fe3+ and failing to undergo redox cycling, we hypothesized that Ga could disrupt Fe acquisition and Fe-dependent metabolic pathways of mycobacteria. We find that Ga(NO3)3 and Ga-transferrin produce an Fe-reversible concentration-dependent growth inhibition of M. tuberculosis strains and MAC grown extracellularly and within human macrophages. Ga is bactericidal for M. tuberculosis growing extracellularly and within macrophages. Finally, we provide evidence that exogenously added Fe is acquired by intraphagosomal M. tuberculosis and that Ga inhibits this Fe acquisition. Thus, Ga(NO3)3 disruption of mycobacterial Fe metabolism may serve as an experimental means to study the mechanism of Fe acquisition by intracellular mycobacteria and the role of Fe in intracellular survival. Furthermore, given the inability of biological systems to discriminate between Ga and Fe, this approach could have broad applicability to the study of Fe metabolism of other intracellular pathogens. PMID:10992462

  11. Chemotherapeutic agent CPT-11 eliminates peritoneal resident macrophages by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mei-Yun; Pan, Hao; Liang, Yi-Dan; Wei, Hong-Xia; Xu, Li-Hui; Zha, Qing-Bing; He, Xian-Hui; Ouyang, Dong-Yun

    2016-02-01

    CPT-11 (Irinotecan) is a first-line chemotherapeutic agent in clinic, but it may induce side effects including diarrhea and enteritis in patients. The underlying mechanism of CPT-11's intestinal toxicity is unclear. Peritoneal resident macrophages have been reported to be important for the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxic effects of CPT-11 on mouse peritoneal resident macrophages. CPT-11 was administered intraperitoneally to mice and their peritoneal exudate cells were isolated for evaluation. CPT-11 treatment strikingly decreased the ratio of F4/80(hi)MHCII(low) large peritoneal macrophages (LPMs), which are regarded as prenatally-originated peritoneal resident macrophages. Consistent with this, the transcription factor GATA6 specifically expressed in LPMs was barely detectable in the macrophages from CPT-11-treated mice, indicative of elimination of LPMs. Such elimination of LPMs was at least partly due to CPT-induced apoptosis in macrophages, because inhibition of apoptosis by caspase-3 inhibitor z-DEVD-fmk significantly diminished the loss of GATA6(+) LPMs. As GATA6 is a transcription factor that controls expression of multiple genes regulating peritoneal B-1 cell development and translocation, elimination of GATA6(+) LPMs led to a great reduction in B-1 cells in the peritoneal cavity after CPT-11 treatment. These results indicated that CPT-11-induced apoptosis contributed to the elimination of peritoneal resident macrophages, which might in turn impair the function of peritoneal B-1 cells in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Our findings may at least partly explain why CPT-11 treatment in cancer patients induces diarrhea and enteritis, which may provide a novel avenue to prevent such side effects.

  12. Ionized calcium‐binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO‐1 up‐regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Huizinga, Jan D.; Larsen, Jytte O.; Kirkeby, Svend

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Small intestinal muscularis externa macrophages have been associated with interstitial cells of Cajal. They have been proposed to play various roles in motility disorders and to take part in a microbiota‐driven regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Our objective was to understand the reaction of resident macrophages of the musculature to a pro‐inflammatory stimulator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice were injected with LPS or saline and sacrificed after 6 hr. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies toward CD169, ionized calcium‐binding adaptor molecule 1 (iba1) (microglial/macrophage marker) and heme oxygenase‐1 (HO‐1). Cell densities were measured using unbiased stereology. Results: iba1pos cells showed an overall higher density than CD169pos and HO‐1pos cells. Most HO‐1pos and iba1pos cells were positive for CD 169 in serosa and at Auerbach's plexus (AP). At the deep muscular plexus, mainly iba1pos cells were present, and were mostly CD169neg; a few HO‐1pos cells were present. Conclusions: A new subset of resident macrophages in the intestinal muscularis externa was discovered, identified as iba1pos CD169neg. HO‐1 is constitutively present in most macrophages in serosa and at AP, suggesting a M2 phenotype. LPS‐treatment results in an up‐regulation of HO‐1pos/CD169neg cells in serosa and at AP. Anat Rec, 300:1114–1122, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. The Anatomical Record published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists PMID:27860408

  13. Ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 positive macrophages and HO-1 up-regulation in intestinal muscularis resident macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Hanne B; Huizinga, Jan D; Larsen, Jytte O; Kirkeby, Svend

    2017-06-01

    Small intestinal muscularis externa macrophages have been associated with interstitial cells of Cajal. They have been proposed to play various roles in motility disorders and to take part in a microbiota-driven regulation of gastrointestinal motility. Our objective was to understand the reaction of resident macrophages of the musculature to a pro-inflammatory stimulator, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Mice were injected with LPS or saline and sacrificed after 6 hr. Whole mounts were stained with antibodies toward CD169, ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (iba1) (microglial/macrophage marker) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Cell densities were measured using unbiased stereology. iba1(pos) cells showed an overall higher density than CD169(pos) and HO-1(pos) cells. Most HO-1(pos) and iba1(pos) cells were positive for CD 169 in serosa and at Auerbach's plexus (AP). At the deep muscular plexus, mainly iba1(pos) cells were present, and were mostly CD169(neg) ; a few HO-1(pos) cells were present. A new subset of resident macrophages in the intestinal muscularis externa was discovered, identified as iba1(pos) CD169(neg) . HO-1 is constitutively present in most macrophages in serosa and at AP, suggesting a M2 phenotype. LPS-treatment results in an up-regulation of HO-1(pos) /CD169(neg) cells in serosa and at AP. Anat Rec, 300:1114-1122, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. The Anatomical Record published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 The Authors. The Anatomical Record published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists.

  14. Contribution of resident and recruited macrophages to the photodynamic intervention of colorectal tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Pansa, María Florencia; Lamberti, María Julia; Cogno, Ingrid Sol; Correa, Silvia Graciela; Rumie Vittar, Natalia Belén; Rivarola, Viviana Alicia

    2016-01-01

    The study of cellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment has become one of the main areas of research in the fight against cancer. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) influence tumor progression and therapy response due to its functional plasticity. Regarding cancer treatment, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a minimally invasive and clinically approved procedure that involves the administration of a photosensitizer (PS), a nontoxic photosensitizing drug which is selectively retained in neoplastic tissue. Here, we investigated the role of resident and nonresident macrophages in the context of a PDT-treated colorectal tumor by developing a combination of 2-D and three-dimensional (3-D) experimental platform, recreating tumor-stroma interactions in vitro. Enhancement of cytotoxicity of PDT was achieved in the presence of nonresident macrophages which had a strong anti-tumor phenotype mediated by the production of nitric oxide, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). On the contrary, tumor resident macrophages induced a pro-tumor phenotype promoting tumor cell migration and endothelial stimulation. Due to their plasticity, tumor-resident or tumor-recruited macrophages can differentially influence the response of tumors to PDT, so their multifactorial roles should be considered in the overall design of anti-tumor therapeutic.

  15. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor-induced macrophage differentiation promotes regrowth in atrophied skeletal muscles and C2C12 myotubes.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Nicolas A; Frenette, Jérôme

    2013-02-01

    Skeletal muscle injury and regeneration are closely associated with an inflammatory reaction that is usually characterized by sequential recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes or macrophages. Selective macrophage depletion models have shown that macrophages are essential for complete regeneration of muscle fibers after freeze injuries, toxin injuries, ischemia-reperfusion, and hindlimb unloading and reloading. Although there is growing evidence that macrophages possess major myogenic capacities, it is not known whether the positive effects of macrophages can be optimized to stimulate muscle regrowth. We used in vivo and in vitro mouse models of atrophy to investigate the effects of stimulating macrophages with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on muscle regrowth. When atrophied soleus muscles were injected intramuscularly with M-CSF, we observed a 1.6-fold increase in macrophage density and a faster recovery in muscle force (20%), combined with an increase in muscle fiber diameter (10%), after 7 days of reloading, compared with PBS-injected soleus muscles. Furthermore, coculture of atrophied myotubes with or without bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) and/or M-CSF revealed that the combination of BMDMs and M-CSF was required to promote myotube growth (15%). More specifically, M-CSF promoted the anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype, which in turn decreased protein degradation and MuRF-1 expression by 25% in growing myotubes. These results indicate that specific macrophage subsets can be stimulated to promote muscle cell regrowth after atrophy.

  16. Tissue-resident macrophages can contain replication-competent virus in antiretroviral-naive, SIV-infected Asian macaques

    PubMed Central

    DiNapoli, Sarah R.; Ortiz, Alexandra M.; Wu, Fan; Matsuda, Kenta; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Knox, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    SIV DNA can be detected in lymphoid tissue–resident macrophages of chronically SIV-infected Asian macaques. These macrophages also contain evidence of recently phagocytosed SIV-infected CD4+ T cells. Here, we examine whether these macrophages contain replication-competent virus, whether viral DNA can be detected in tissue-resident macrophages from antiretroviral (ARV) therapy–treated animals and humans, and how the viral sequences amplified from macrophages and contemporaneous CD4+ T cells compare. In ARV-naive animals, we find that lymphoid tissue–resident macrophages contain replication-competent virus if they also contain viral DNA in ARV-naive Asian macaques. The genetic sequence of the virus within these macrophages is similar to those within CD4+ T cells from the same anatomic sites. In ARV-treated animals, we find that viral DNA can be amplified from lymphoid tissue–resident macrophages of SIV-infected Asian macaques that were treated with ARVs for at least 5 months, but we could not detect replication-competent virus from macrophages of animals treated with ARVs. Finally, we could not detect viral DNA in alveolar macrophages from HIV-infected individuals who received ARVs for 3 years and had undetectable viral loads. These data demonstrate that macrophages can contain replication-competent virus, but may not represent a significant reservoir for HIV in vivo. PMID:28239657

  17. Unloading stress disturbs muscle regeneration through perturbed recruitment and function of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Shohei; Yamashita, Yui; Abe, Tomoki; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Oarada, Motoko; Ohno, Ayako; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Higashibata, Akira; Choi, Inho; Mills, Edward M; Okumura, Yuushi; Terao, Junji; Nikawa, Takeshi

    2012-05-01

    Skeletal muscle is one of the most sensitive tissues to mechanical loading, and unloading inhibits the regeneration potential of skeletal muscle after injury. This study was designed to elucidate the specific effects of unloading stress on the function of immunocytes during muscle regeneration after injury. We examined immunocyte infiltration and muscle regeneration in cardiotoxin (CTX)-injected soleus muscles of tail-suspended (TS) mice. In CTX-injected TS mice, the cross-sectional area of regenerating myofibers was smaller than that of weight-bearing (WB) mice, indicating that unloading delays muscle regeneration following CTX-induced skeletal muscle damage. Delayed infiltration of macrophages into the injured skeletal muscle was observed in CTX-injected TS mice. Neutrophils and macrophages in CTX-injected TS muscle were presented over a longer period at the injury sites compared with those in CTX-injected WB muscle. Disturbance of activation and differentiation of satellite cells was also observed in CTX-injected TS mice. Further analysis showed that the macrophages in soleus muscles were mainly Ly-6C-positive proinflammatory macrophages, with high expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β, indicating that unloading causes preferential accumulation and persistence of proinflammatory macrophages in the injured muscle. The phagocytic and myotube formation properties of macrophages from CTX-injected TS skeletal muscle were suppressed compared with those from CTX-injected WB skeletal muscle. We concluded that the disturbed muscle regeneration under unloading is due to impaired macrophage function, inhibition of satellite cell activation, and their cooperation.

  18. Immune Monitoring of Trans-endothelial Transport by Kidney-Resident Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Stamatiades, Efstathios G; Tremblay, Marie-Eve; Bohm, Mathieu; Crozet, Lucile; Bisht, Kanchan; Kao, Daniela; Coelho, Carolina; Fan, Xiying; Yewdell, William T; Davidson, Anne; Heeger, Peter S; Diebold, Sandra; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Geissmann, Frederic

    2016-08-11

    Small immune complexes cause type III hypersensitivity reactions that frequently result in tissue injury. The responsible mechanisms, however, remain unclear and differ depending on target organs. Here, we identify a kidney-specific anatomical and functional unit, formed by resident macrophages and peritubular capillary endothelial cells, which monitors the transport of proteins and particles ranging from 20 to 700 kDa or 10 to 200 nm into the kidney interstitium. Kidney-resident macrophages detect and scavenge circulating immune complexes "pumped" into the interstitium via trans-endothelial transport and trigger a FcγRIV-dependent inflammatory response and the recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils. In addition, FcγRIV and TLR pathways synergistically "super-activate" kidney macrophages when immune complexes contain a nucleic acid. These data identify a physiological function of tissue-resident kidney macrophages and a basic mechanism by which they initiate the inflammatory response to small immune complexes in the kidney. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Self-renewing resident arterial macrophages arise from embryonic CX3CR1(+) precursors and circulating monocytes immediately after birth.

    PubMed

    Ensan, Sherine; Li, Angela; Besla, Rickvinder; Degousee, Norbert; Cosme, Jake; Roufaiel, Mark; Shikatani, Eric A; El-Maklizi, Mahmoud; Williams, Jesse W; Robins, Lauren; Li, Cedric; Lewis, Bonnie; Yun, Tae Jin; Lee, Jun Seong; Wieghofer, Peter; Khattar, Ramzi; Farrokhi, Kaveh; Byrne, John; Ouzounian, Maral; Zavitz, Caleb C J; Levy, Gary A; Bauer, Carla M T; Libby, Peter; Husain, Mansoor; Swirski, Filip K; Cheong, Cheolho; Prinz, Marco; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Epelman, Slava; Gramolini, Anthony O; Cybulsky, Myron I; Rubin, Barry B; Robbins, Clinton S

    2016-02-01

    Resident macrophages densely populate the normal arterial wall, yet their origins and the mechanisms that sustain them are poorly understood. Here we use gene-expression profiling to show that arterial macrophages constitute a distinct population among macrophages. Using multiple fate-mapping approaches, we show that arterial macrophages arise embryonically from CX3CR1(+) precursors and postnatally from bone marrow-derived monocytes that colonize the tissue immediately after birth. In adulthood, proliferation (rather than monocyte recruitment) sustains arterial macrophages in the steady state and after severe depletion following sepsis. After infection, arterial macrophages return rapidly to functional homeostasis. Finally, survival of resident arterial macrophages depends on a CX3CR1-CX3CL1 axis within the vascular niche.

  20. Suppression of macrophage functions impairs skeletal muscle regeneration with severe fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Segawa, Masashi; Fukada, So-ichiro Yamamoto, Yukiko; Yahagi, Hiroshi; Kanematsu, Masanori; Sato, Masaki; Ito, Takahito; Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Hayashi, Shin'ichi; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2008-10-15

    When damaged, skeletal muscle regenerates. In the early phases of regeneration, inflammatory cells such as neutrophils/granulocytes and macrophages infiltrate damaged muscle tissue. To reveal the roles of macrophages during skeletal muscle regeneration, we injected an antibody, AFS98 that blocks the binding of M-CSF to its receptor into normal mice that received muscle damages. Anti-M-CSF receptor administration suppressed macrophage but not neutrophil infiltration. Histological study indicated that suppression of macrophages function leads to the incomplete muscle regeneration. In addition FACS and immunohistochemical study showed that the acute lack of macrophages delayed proliferation and differentiation of muscle satellite cells in vivo. Furthermore, mice injected with the anti-M-CSF receptor antibody exhibited not only adipogenesis, but also significant collagen deposition, i.e., fibrosis and continuous high expression of connective tissue growth factor. Finally we indicate that these fibrosis markers were strongly enriched in CD90(+) cells that do not include myogenic cells. These results indicate that macrophages directly affect satellite cell proliferation and that a macrophage deficiency severely impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and causes fibrosis.

  1. Transplantable Subcutaneous Hepatoma 22a Affects Functional Activity of Resident Tissue Macrophages in Periphery

    PubMed Central

    Kisseleva, Ekaterina P.; Krylov, Andrei V.; Stepanova, Olga I.; Lioudyno, Victoria I.

    2011-01-01

    Tumors spontaneously develop central necroses due to inadequate blood supply. Recent data indicate that dead cells and their products are immunogenic to the host. We hypothesized that macrophage tumor-dependent reactions can be mediated differentially by factors released from live or dead tumor cells. In this study, functional activity of resident peritoneal macrophages was investigated in parallel with tumor morphology during the growth of syngeneic nonimmunogenic hepatoma 22a. Morphometrical analysis of tumor necroses, mitoses and leukocyte infiltration was performed in histological sections. We found that inflammatory potential of peritoneal macrophages in tumor-bearing mice significantly varied depending on the stage of tumor growth and exhibited two peaks of activation as assessed by nitroxide and superoxide anion production, 5′-nucleotidase activity and pinocytosis. Increased inflammatory reactions were not followed by the enhancement of angiogenic potential as assessed by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor mRNA expression. Phases of macrophage activity corresponded to the stages of tumor growth characterized by high proliferative potential. The appearance and further development of necrotic tissue inside the tumor did not coincide with changes in macrophage behavior and therefore indirectly indicated that activation of macrophages was a reaction mostly to the signals produced by live tumor cells. PMID:21760797

  2. Comparison of activities of rifapentine and rifampin against Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing in human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Mor, N; Simon, B; Mezo, N; Heifets, L

    1995-01-01

    The activities of rifapentine and rifampin against Mycobacterium tuberculosis residing in human monocyte-derived macrophages were determined. The MICs and MBCs of rifapentine for intracellular bacteria were two- to fourfold lower than those of rifampin. For extracellular bacteria, this difference was less noticeable. Nevertheless, the more favorable pharmacokinetics of rifapentine over rifampin was addressed in other experimental models. These models showed substantial differences after short pulsed exposures of the infected macrophages to the drugs and when the infected macrophages were exposed to changing drug concentrations that imitated the pharmacokinetic curves observed in blood. Once-a-week exposures to rifapentine concentrations equivalent to those attained in blood after one 600-mg dose resulted during the first week in a dramatic decline in the number of bacteria, and this decline was maintained at a minimal level for a period of four weeks. The results of this study have shown the suitability of rifapentine for intermittent-treatment regimens. The prolonged effect of rifapentine found in this study may be associated with high ratios of intracellular accumulation, which were four- to fivefold higher than those found for rifampin. Further studies on the intracellular distribution of rifamycins and on the sites of actual interaction between the drugs and bacteria residing in macrophages are necessary. PMID:8540718

  3. Cyclosporin A inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of superoxide production in resident mouse peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Chiara, M D; Bedoya, F; Sobrino, F

    1989-01-01

    Peritoneal resident macrophages from mice are sensitive to inhibition by cyclosporin A (CsA) of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated oxidative burst. Inhibition was assessed in terms of superoxide anion (O2.-) and H2O2 production. Key findings were as follows. (a) CsA inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the production of O2.- when cells were stimulated with PMA. CsA did not alter the respiratory burst induced by other stimuli (zymosan, concanavalin A and fMet-Leu-Phe). It was verified that CsA itself had no scavenger effect. (b) A concomitant decrease in H2O2 liberation following CsA exposure was found. This inhibition was observed both in the initial rate of synthesis and in the accumulation after 15 min of incubation. (c) NADPH oxidase activity in the crude supernatant was unaffected by the previous incubation of macrophages with CsA. CsA does not inhibit glucose transport measured as 14CO2 production. (d) The production of O2.- was strongly dependent on the glucose concentration. Sodium oleate also stimulated O2.- production in resident macrophages. These data might be correlated with the inhibitory effect of CsA upon other functions of macrophages. PMID:2557828

  4. Local Inhibition of Macrophage and Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation to Suppress Plaque Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sukhovershin, Roman A.; Toledano Furman, Naama E.; Tasciotti, Ennio; Trachtenberg, Barry H.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex process responsible for a major burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are abundant within atherosclerotic plaques. This review discusses the role of macrophages and SMCs in plaque progression and provides an overview of nanoparticle-based approaches and other current methods for local targeting of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27826367

  5. Myelopotentiating effect of curcumin in tumor-bearing host: Role of bone marrow resident macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Vishvakarma, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Anjani; Kumar, Ajay; Kant, Shiva; Bharti, Alok Chandra; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2012-08-15

    The present investigation was undertaken to study if curcumin, which is recognized for its potential as an antineoplastic and immunopotentiating agent, can also influence the process of myelopoiesis in a tumor-bearing host. Administration of curcumin to tumor-bearing host augmented count of bone marrow cell (BMC) accompanied by an up-regulated BMC survival and a declined induction of apoptosis. Curcumin administration modulated expression of cell survival regulatory molecules: Bcl2, p53, caspase-activated DNase (CAD) and p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) along with enhanced expression of genes of receptors for M-CSF and GM-CSF in BMC. The BMC harvested from curcumin-administered hosts showed an up-regulated colony forming ability with predominant differentiation into bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), responsive for activation to tumoricidal state. The number of F4/80 positive bone marrow resident macrophages (BMM), showing an augmented expression of M-CSF, was also augmented in the bone marrow of curcumin-administered host. In vitro reconstitution experiments indicated that only BMM of curcumin-administered hosts, but not in vitro curcumin-exposed BMM, augmented BMC survival. It suggests that curcumin-dependent modulation of BMM is of indirect nature. Such prosurvival action of curcumin is associated with altered T{sub H1}/T{sub H2} cytokine balance in serum. Augmented level of serum-borne IFN-γ was found to mediate modulation of BMM to produce enhanced amount of monokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α), which are suggested to augment the BMC survival. Taken together the present investigation indicates that curcumin can potentiate myelopoiesis in a tumor-bearing host, which may have implications in its therapeutic utility. Highlights: ► Curcumin augments myelopoiesis in tumor-bearing host. ► Bone marrow resident macrophages mediate curcumin-dependent augmented myelopoiesis. ► Serum borne cytokine are implicated in modulation of bone marrow resident

  6. Crosstalk of mesenchymal stem cells and macrophages promotes cardiac muscle repair.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Zhang, Guoru; Wang, Yaling; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yang; An, Yu; Li, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has potential therapeutic effects on cardiac muscle repair. However, the underlying mechanism remains not completely clarified. Here we show that transplantation of MSCs significantly increased local recruitment of macrophages to facilitate cardiac muscle repair. MSCs-induced recovery of cardiac function and attenuation of fibrosis after injury were all abolished by either impaired macrophage infiltration, or by MSCs depletion after macrophage recruitment. However, angiogenesis seemed to be only affected by depletion of macrophages, but not by depletion of MSCs, suggesting that macrophages are responsible for the augmented angiogenesis after MSCs transplantation, while MSCs do not directly contribute to angiogenesis in the functional cardiac repair. Moreover, high level of transforming growth factor β 1 (TGFβ1) was detected in macrophages and high level of BMP7 was detected in MSCs, suggesting that MSCs not only may recruit macrophages to enhance angiogenesis to promote regeneration, but also may secrete BMP7 to contradict the fibrogenic effect of TGFβ1 by macrophages. Our study thus sheds new insight on the interaction of MSCs and macrophages in a functional cardiac repair triggered by MSCs transplantation.

  7. Anti-atherogenic activity of wild grape (Vitis thunbergii) extract antagonizing smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration promoted by neighboring macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sang-Wook; Kim, Min Soo; Kim, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Yong-Jin; Kang, Young-Hee

    2012-06-01

    The proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) play critical roles in intimal thickening and neointimal hyperplasia in early-phase atherosclerosis. This study tested whether wild grape extract (WGE) suppressed the proliferation and migration of human aortic SMCs induced by neighboring macrophages. Cellular expression of fibrogenic connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and secretion of collagen IV and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 were determined in SMCs exposed to THP-1-differentiated macrophage-conditioned media. Proliferation was enhanced in SMCs exposed to macrophage-conditioned media collected during the early stage of differentiation, which was attenuated by treatment with ≥ 10 µg/ml WGE. Increased secretion of CTGF and collagen IV macrophage-conditioned media was suppressed in WGE-supplemented SMCs. TGF-β1-promoted production of CTGF and collagen IV was suppressed by blocking TGF-β receptors of R1 and R2 in SMCs. WGE repressed macrophage-conditioned media-upregulated MMP-2 secretion, indicating that WGE had an ability to encumber plaque rupture within atherosclerotic lesions. In addition, ≥ 1 µg/ml WGE ameliorated the migration of SMCs promoted by neighboring macrophages. These results demonstrate that WGE retarded neointimal hyperplasia and thickening within atherosclerotic plaques largely comprising of macrophages and SMCs. Therefore, WGE may be developed as an anti-proliferative and anti-migratory agent targeting SMCs in the proximity of newly differentiated and resident macrophages.

  8. Piperine metabolically regulates peritoneal resident macrophages to potentiate their functions against bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mei-Yun; Zha, Qing-Bing; Zhao, Gao-Xiang; Hou, Xiao-Feng; Shi, Zi-Jian; Lin, Qiu-Ru; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Pepper, a daily-used seasoning for promoting appetite, is widely used in folk medicine for treating gastrointestinal diseases. Piperine is the major alkaloid in pepper and possesses a wide range of pharmacological activities. However, the mechanism for linking metabolic and medicinal activities of piperine remains unknown. Here we report that piperine robustly boosts mTORC1 activity by recruiting more system L1 amino acid transporter (SLC7A5/SLC3A2) to the cell membrane, thus promoting amino acid metabolism. Piperine-induced increase of mTORC1 activity in resident peritoneal macrophages (pMΦs) is correlated with enhanced production of IL-6 and TNF-α upon LPS stimulation. Such an enhancement of cytokine production could be abrogated by inhibitors of the mTOR signaling pathway, indicating mTOR's action in this process. Moreover, piperine treatment protected resident pMΦs from bacterium-induced apoptosis and disappearance, and increased their bacterial phagocytic ability. Consequently, piperine administration conferred mice resistance against bacterial infection and even sepsis. Our data highlight that piperine has the capacity to metabolically reprogram peritoneal resident macrophages to fortify their innate functions against bacterial infection. PMID:26439699

  9. Macrophage density in pharyngeal and laryngeal muscles greatly exceeds that in other striated muscles: an immunohistochemical study using elderly human cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Sunki; Kitamura, Kei; Masaaki, Kasahara; Katori, Yukio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in aging-related muscle atrophy (i.e., sarcopenia). We examined macrophage density in six striated muscles (cricopharyngeus muscle, posterior cricoarytenoideus muscle, genioglossus muscle, masseter muscle, infraspinatus muscle, and external anal sphincter). We examined 14 donated male cadavers and utilized CD68 immunohistochemistry to clarify macrophage density in muscles. The numbers of macrophages per striated muscle fiber in the larynx and pharynx (0.34 and 0.31) were 5–6 times greater than those in the tongue, shoulder, and anus (0.05–0.07) with high statistical significance. Thick muscle fibers over 80 µm in diameter were seen in the pharynx, larynx, and anal sphincter of two limited specimens. Conversely, in the other sites or specimens, muscle fibers were thinner than 50 µm. We did not find any multinuclear muscle cells suggestive of regeneration. At the beginning of the study, we suspected that mucosal macrophages might have invaded into the muscle layer of the larynx and pharynx, but we found no evidence of inflammation in the mucosa. Likewise, the internal anal sphincter (a smooth muscle layer near the mucosa) usually contained fewer macrophages than the external sphincter. The present result suggest that, in elderly men, thinning and death of striated muscle fibers occur more frequently in the larynx and pharynx than in other parts of the body. PMID:27722010

  10. Bone marrow chimeric rats reveal the unique distribution of resident and recruited macrophages in the contused rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Popovich, P G; Hickey, W F

    2001-07-01

    Brain and spinal cord inflammation that develops after traumatic injury is believed to differentially influence the structural and/or physiological integrity of surviving neurons and glia. It is possible that the functional dichotomy of CNS inflammation results from the activity of a heterogeneous macrophage population elicited by trauma. Indeed, unique functions have been attributed to macrophages derived from resident microglia versus those originating from infiltrating monocytes. Thus, whether progressive tissue injury or repair is favored could be explained by the disproportionate contributions of one macrophage subset relative to the other. Descriptive neuroanatomical studies are a reasonable first approach to revealing a relationship between microglia, recruited blood monocytes/macrophages, and regions of tissue degeneration and/or repair. Unfortunately, it is not possible to differentiate between CNS macrophage subsets using conventional immunohistochemical approaches. In the present study, we have used radiation bone marrow chimeric rats to definitively characterize the macrophage reaction elicited by experimental spinal contusion injury. In chimeric animals, antibodies raised against unique cell surface molecules expressed on bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) were used to distinguish infiltrating BMCs from resident microglial-derived macrophages. Our findings indicate that the onset and plateau of macrophage activation (previously shown to be 3 and 7 days postinjury, respectively) is dominated initially by microglial-derived macrophages and then is supplanted by hematogenous cells. While resident macrophages are ubiquitously distributed throughout the injury site, leukocyte-derived monocytes exclusively infiltrate the gray matter and to a lesser extent subpial white matter. Generally, monocyte foci in white matter remain associated with the lumen or abluminal surface of blood vessels, i.e. few cells actually infiltrate the parenchyma. If functional

  11. Role of hepatic resident and infiltrating macrophages in liver repair after acute injury.

    PubMed

    You, Qiang; Holt, Michael; Yin, Hao; Li, Guiying; Hu, Cheng-Jun; Ju, Cynthia

    2013-09-15

    Treatment of liver disease, caused by hepatotoxins, viral infections, alcohol ingestion, or autoimmune conditions, remains challenging and costly. The liver has a powerful capacity to repair and regenerate, thus a thorough understanding of this tightly orchestrated process will undoubtedly improve clinical means of restoring liver function after injury. Using a murine model of acute liver injury caused by overdose of acetaminophen (APAP), our studies demonstrated that the combined absence of liver resident macrophages (Kupffer cells, KCs), and infiltrating macrophages (IMs) resulted in a marked delay in liver repair, even though the initiation and extent of peak liver injury was not impacted. This delay was not due to impaired hepatocyte proliferation but rather prolonged vascular leakage, which is caused by APAP-induced liver sinusoidal endothelial cell (LSEC) injury. We also found that KCs and IMs express an array of angiogenic factors and induce LSEC proliferation and migration. Our mechanistic studies suggest that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) may be involved in regulating the angiogenic effect of hepatic macrophages (Macs), as we found that APAP challenge resulted in hypoxia and stabilization of HIF in the liver and hepatic Macs. Together, these data indicate an important role for hepatic Macs in liver blood vessel repair, thereby contributing to tissue recovery from acute injury.

  12. Macrophage Depletion Impairs Skeletal Muscle Regeneration: the Roles of Pro-fibrotic Factors, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Weihua; Liu, Yu; Chen, Peijie

    2016-12-01

    Muscle contusion is one of the most common muscle injuries in sports medicine. Macrophages play complex roles in the regeneration of skeletal muscle. However, the roles of macrophages, especially the mechanisms involved, in the regeneration of muscle contusion are still not fully understood. We hypothesize that the depletion of macrophages impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and that pro-fibrotic factors, inflammation, and oxidative stress may be involved in the process. To test these hypotheses, we constructed a muscle contusion injury and a macrophage depletion model and followed it up with morphological and gene expression analyses. The data showed that fibrotic scars were formed in the muscle of contusion injury, and they deteriorated in the mice of macrophage depletion. Furthermore, the sizes of regenerating myofibers were significantly reduced by macrophage depletion. Pro-fibrotic factors, inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and oxidative stress-related enzymes increased significantly after muscle injury. Moreover, the expression of these factors was delayed by macrophage depletion. Most of them were still significantly higher in the later stage of regeneration. These results suggest that macrophage depletion impairs skeletal muscle regeneration and that pro-fibrotic factors, inflammation, and oxidative stress may play important roles in the process.

  13. Macrophages protect against muscle atrophy and promote muscle recovery in vivo and in vitro: a mechanism partly dependent on the insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling molecule.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Nicolas; Frenette, Jérôme

    2010-05-01

    Hindlimb unloading and reloading are characterized by a major loss of muscle force and are associated with classic leukocyte infiltration during recovery from muscle atrophy. Macrophages act as a cellular cornerstone by playing both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles during muscle recovery from atrophy. In the present study, we investigated the role of macrophages in muscle atrophy and regrowth using in vivo and in vitro models. Mice depleted in monocytes/macrophages and submitted to a hindlimb unloading and reloading protocol experienced a significant delay in muscle force recovery compared with matched placebo mice at 7 and 14 days after reloading. Furthermore, an in vitro myotube/macrophage coculture showed that anti-inflammatory macrophages, which contain apoptotic neutrophils and express low levels of cyclooxygenase-2, completely prevented the loss of protein content and the myotube atrophy observed after 2 days in low serum medium. The presence of macrophages also protected against the decrease in myosin heavy chain content in myotubes exposed to low serum medium for 1 day. Interestingly, the addition of an anti-IGF-1 antibody to the coculture significantly decreased the ability of macrophages to protect against myotube atrophy and myosin heavy chain loss after 2 days in low serum medium. These results clearly indicate that macrophages and, more precisely, the release of IGF-1 by macrophages, play an important role in recovery from muscle atrophy.

  14. MicroRNA-155 facilitates skeletal muscle regeneration by balancing pro- and anti-inflammatory macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Nie, M; Liu, J; Yang, Q; Seok, H Y; Hu, X; Deng, Z-L; Wang, D-Z

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has remarkable regeneration capacity and regenerates in response to injury. Muscle regeneration largely relies on muscle stem cells called satellite cells. Satellite cells normally remain quiescent, but in response to injury or exercise they become activated and proliferate, migrate, differentiate, and fuse to form multinucleate myofibers. Interestingly, the inflammatory process following injury and the activation of the myogenic program are highly coordinated, with myeloid cells having a central role in modulating satellite cell activation and regeneration. Here, we show that genetic deletion of microRNA-155 (miR-155) in mice substantially delays muscle regeneration. Surprisingly, miR-155 does not appear to directly regulate the proliferation or differentiation of satellite cells. Instead, miR-155 is highly expressed in myeloid cells, is essential for appropriate activation of myeloid cells, and regulates the balance between pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages and anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages during skeletal muscle regeneration. Mechanistically, we found that miR-155 suppresses SOCS1, a negative regulator of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway, during the initial inflammatory response upon muscle injury. Our findings thus reveal a novel role of miR-155 in regulating initial immune responses during muscle regeneration and provide a novel miRNA target for improving muscle regeneration in degenerative muscle diseases. PMID:27277683

  15. Resident corneal c-fms+ macrophages and dendritic cells mediate early cellular infiltration in adenovirus keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Ramke, Mirja; Zhou, Xiaohong; Materne, Emma Caroline; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James

    2016-01-01

    The cornea contains a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells with the capacity to contribute to immune responses. Adenovirus keratitis is a severe corneal infection with acute and chronic phases. The role of resident corneal antigen-presenting cells in adenovirus keratitis has not been studied. We utilized transgenic MaFIA mice in which c-fms expressing macrophages and dendritic cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis, in a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis. Clinical keratitis and recruitment of myeloperoxidase and CD45+ cells were diminished in c-fms depleted, adenovirus infected mice, as compared to controls, consistent with a role for myeloid-lineage cells in adenovirus keratitis. PMID:27185163

  16. Resident corneal c-fms(+) macrophages and dendritic cells mediate early cellular infiltration in adenovirus keratitis.

    PubMed

    Ramke, Mirja; Zhou, Xiaohong; Materne, Emma Caroline; Rajaiya, Jaya; Chodosh, James

    2016-06-01

    The cornea contains a heterogeneous population of antigen-presenting cells with the capacity to contribute to immune responses. Adenovirus keratitis is a severe corneal infection with acute and chronic phases. The role of resident corneal antigen-presenting cells in adenovirus keratitis has not been studied. We utilized transgenic MaFIA mice in which c-fms expressing macrophages and dendritic cells can be induced to undergo apoptosis, in a mouse model of adenovirus keratitis. Clinical keratitis and recruitment of myeloperoxidase and CD45(+) cells were diminished in c-fms depleted, adenovirus infected mice, as compared to controls, consistent with a role for myeloid-lineage cells in adenovirus keratitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Distinct development and functions of resident and recruited liver Kupffer cells/macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ikarashi, Masami; Nakashima, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Manabu; Sato, Atsushi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Miyazaki, Hiromi; Nishiyama, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Junji; Seki, Shuhji

    2013-12-01

    Although mouse liver F4/80(+) Kupffer cells consist of cytokine-producing CD11b(+) cells and phagocytic CD68(+) cells, an undefined CD11b(-) CD68(-) subset (30%) also exists. We herein demonstrate a more fundamental classification by adding CD32 (FcγRII), which covers most liver F4/80(+) cells and the distinct functions of them. Among the F4/80(+) cells, 50%, 40%, and 30% of cells were CD32(+), CD68(+), and CD11b(+), respectively, and one-half of the CD68(+) cells coexpressed CD32. CD68(+) and CD32(+) cells, but not CD11b(+) cells, expressed a phagocytosis-related CRIg. Gy (6) irradiation depleted liver CD11b(+) cells and those in the spleen, bone marrow, and peripheral blood but not liver CD32/CD68(+) cells. Transfer of bone marrow cells into the irradiated mice reconstituted liver CD11b(+) cells. Conversely, clodronate pretreatment depleted only liver CD32/CD68(+) cells but not liver CD11b(+) cells and peripheral blood or spleen CD11b(+) monocytes/macrophages. Moreover, the CD32(+) cells might be precursors of CD68(+) cells, as a large proportion of CD32(+) cells expressed the c-kit (CD117), and CD34 and CD32(+) cells acquired CD68 immediately after bacteria administration. CD32/CD68(+) cells, but not CD11b(+) cells, expressed resident macrophage-specific MerTK and CD64 (FcγRI). Challenge with Staphylococcus aureus or liver metastatic EL-4 tumor cells indicated that the CD68(+) subset is engaged in systemic bactericidal activity, whereas the CD11b(+) subset is pivotal for liver antitumor immunity. Human liver CD14(+) Kupffer cells could also be classified into three similar subsets. These results suggest that liver CD68(+) Kupffer cells and CD11b(+) Kupffer cells/macrophages are developmentally and functionally distinct subsets.

  18. Prolonged Ischemia Triggers Necrotic Depletion of Tissue-Resident Macrophages To Facilitate Inflammatory Immune Activation in Liver Ischemia Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Yue, Shi; Zhou, Haoming; Wang, Xuehao; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Zhai, Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Although mechanisms of immune activation against liver ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury (IRI) have been studied extensively, questions regarding liver-resident macrophages, that is, Kupffer cells (KCs), remain controversial. Recent progress in the biology of tissue-resident macrophages implicates homeostatic functions of KCs. This study aims to dissect responses and functions of KCs in liver IRI. In a murine liver partial warm ischemia model, we analyzed liver-resident versus infiltrating macrophages by FACS and immunofluorescence staining. Our data showed that liver immune activation by IR was associated with not only infiltrations/activations of peripheral macrophages, but also necrotic depletion of KCs. Inhibition of receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) by necrostatin-1s protected KCs from ischemia-induced depletion, resulting in the reduction of macrophage infiltration, suppression of proinflammatory immune activation, and protection of livers from IRI. The depletion of KCs by clodronate liposomes abrogated the effect of necrostatin-1s. Additionally, liver reconstitutions with KCs postischemia exerted anti-inflammatory/cytoprotective effects against IRI. These results reveal a unique response of KCs against liver IR, that is, RIP1-dependent necrosis, which constitutes a novel mechanism of liver inflammatory immune activation in the pathogenesis of liver IRI. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. The roles of blood-derived macrophages and resident microglia in the neuroinflammatory response to implanted intracortical microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Sunil, Smrithi; Black, James; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Haung, Alex Y; Miller, Robert H; Selkirk, Stephen M; Capadona, Jeffrey R

    2014-09-01

    Resident microglia and blood-borne macrophages have both been implicated to play a dominant role in mediating the neuroinflammatory response affecting implanted intracortical microelectrodes. However, the distinction between each cell type has not been demonstrated due to a lack of discriminating cellular markers. Understanding the subtle differences of each cell population in mediating neuroinflammation can aid in determining the appropriate therapeutic approaches to improve microelectrode performance. Therefore, the goal of this study is to characterize the role of infiltrating blood-derived cells, specifically macrophages, in mediating neuroinflammation following intracortical microelectrode implantation. Interestingly, we found no correlation between microglia and neuron populations at the microelectrode-tissue interface. On the other hand, blood-borne macrophages consistently dominated the infiltrating cell population following microelectrode implantation. Most importantly, we found a correlation between increased populations of blood-derived cells (including the total macrophage population) and neuron loss at the microelectrode-tissue interface. Specifically, the total macrophage population was greatest at two and sixteen weeks post implantation, at the same time points when we observed the lowest densities of neuronal survival in closest proximity to the implant. Together, our results suggest a dominant role of infiltrating macrophages, and not resident microglia, in mediating neurodegeneration following microelectrode implantation.

  20. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, I.J.; Wagner, W.D.; Owens, R.T. )

    1990-03-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with (35S)sulfate and (3H)serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in (35S)sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of (3H)serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion.

  1. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells express lipoprotein lipase in human and rabbit atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, S; Lipton, B A; Rosenfeld, M E; Goldberg, I J; Steinberg, D; Witztum, J L

    1991-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL; EC 3.1.1.34) may promote atherogenesis by producing remnant lipoproteins on the endothelial surface and by acting on lipoproteins in the artery wall. In vitro, smooth muscle cells and macrophages synthesize LPL, but in human carotid lesions only a few smooth muscle cells were reported to contain LPL protein. Endothelial cells do not synthesize LPL in vitro, but in normal arteries intense immunostaining for LPL is present on the endothelium. We used Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemistry of human and rabbit arteries to determine cellular distribution and the site of the synthesis of LPL in atherosclerotic lesions. Northern blot analysis showed that LPL mRNA was detectable in macrophage-derived foam cells isolated from arterial lesions of "ballooned" cholesterol-fed rabbits. In situ hybridization studies of atherosclerotic lesions with an antisense riboprobe showed a strong hybridization signal for LPL mRNA in some, but not all, lesion macrophages, which were mostly located in the subendothelial and edge areas of the lesions. Also, some smooth muscle cells in lesion areas also expressed LPL mRNA. Immunocytochemistry of frozen sections of rabbit lesions with a monoclonal antibody to human milk LPL showed intense staining for LPL protein in macrophage-rich intimal lesions. The results suggest that lesion macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells express LPL mRNA and protein. Some smooth muscle cells in the lesion areas also synthesize LPL. These data are consistent with an important role for LPL in atherogenesis. Images PMID:1719546

  2. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, I. J.; Wagner, W. D.; Owens, R. T.

    1990-01-01

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H]serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in [35S]sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of [3H]serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion. Images Figure 6 PMID:2316626

  3. OPN‐a induces muscle inflammation by increasing recruitment and activation of pro‐inflammatory macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Many, Gina M.; Yokosaki, Yasuyuki; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Nghiem, Peter P.; Bello, Luca; Dadgar, Sherry; Yin, Ying; Damsker, Jesse M.; Cohen, Heather B.; Kornegay, Joe N.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Mosser, David M.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2016-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? What is the functional relevance of OPN isoform expression in muscle pathology? What is the main finding and its importance? The full‐length human OPN‐a isoform is the most pro‐inflammatory isoform in the muscle microenvironment, acting on macrophages and myoblasts in an RGD‐integrin‐dependent manner. OPN‐a upregulates expression of tenascin‐C (TNC), a known Toll‐like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist. Blocking TLR4 signalling inhibits the pro‐inflammatory effects of OPN‐a, suggesting that a potential mechanism of OPN action is by promoting TNC–TLR4 signalling. Although osteopontin (OPN) is an important mediator of muscle remodelling in health and disease, functional differences in human spliced OPN variants in the muscle microenvironment have not been characterized. We thus sought to define the pro‐inflammatory activities of human OPN isoforms (OPN‐a, OPN‐b and OPN‐c) on cells present in regenerating muscle. OPN transcripts were quantified in normal and dystrophic human and dog muscle. Human macrophages and myoblasts were stimulated with recombinant human OPN protein isoforms, and cytokine mRNA and protein induction was assayed. OPN isoforms were greatly increased in dystrophic human (OPN‐a > OPN‐b > OPN‐c) and dog muscle (OPN‐a = OPN‐c). In healthy human muscle, mechanical loading also upregulated OPN‐a expression (eightfold; P < 0.01), but did not significantly upregulate OPN‐c expression (twofold; P > 0.05). In vitro, OPN‐a displayed the most pronounced pro‐inflammatory activity among isoforms, acting on both macrophages and myoblasts. In vitro and in vivo data revealed that OPN‐a upregulated tenascin‐C (TNC), a known Toll‐like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonist. Inhibition of TLR4 signalling attenuated OPN‐mediated macrophage cytokine production. In summary, OPN‐a is the most abundant and functionally active human spliced isoform in the skeletal muscle

  4. Increased expression of fatty acid binding protein 4 and leptin in resident macrophages characterises atherosclerotic plaque rupture

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K.; Santibanez-Koref, M.; Polvikoski, T.; Birchall, D.; Mendelow, A.D.; Keavney, B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Resident macrophages play an important role in atheromatous plaque rupture. The macrophage gene expression signature associated with plaque rupture is incompletely defined due to the complex cellular heterogeneity in the plaque. We aimed to characterise differential gene expression in resident plaque macrophages from ruptured and stable human atheromatous lesions. Methods and results We performed genome-wide expression analyses of isolated macrophage-rich regions of stable and ruptured human atherosclerotic plaques. Plaques present in carotid endarterectomy specimens were designated as stable or ruptured using clinical, radiological and histopathological criteria. Macrophage-rich regions were excised from 5 ruptured and 6 stable plaques by laser micro-dissection. Transcriptional profiling was performed using Affymetrix microarrays. The profiles were characteristic of activated macrophages. At a false discovery rate of 10%, 914 genes were differentially expressed between stable and ruptured plaques. The findings were confirmed in fourteen further stable and ruptured samples for a subset of eleven genes with the highest expression differences (p < 0.05). Pathway analysis revealed that components of the PPAR/Adipocytokine signaling pathway were the most significantly upregulated in ruptured compared to stable plaques (p = 5.4 × 10−7). Two key components of the pathway, fatty-acid binding-protein 4 (FABP4) and leptin, showed nine-fold (p = 0.0086) and five-fold (p = 0.0012) greater expression respectively in macrophages from ruptured plaques. Conclusions We found differences in gene expression signatures between macrophages isolated from stable and ruptured human atheromatous plaques. Our findings indicate the involvement of FABP4 and leptin in the progression of atherosclerosis and plaque rupture, and suggest that down-regulation of PPAR/adipocytokine signaling within plaques may have therapeutic potential. PMID:23122912

  5. Increases of M2a macrophages and fibrosis in aging muscle are influenced by bone marrow aging and negatively regulated by muscle-derived nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle; Samengo, Giuseppina; Tidball, James G

    2015-08-01

    Muscle aging is associated with changes in myeloid cell phenotype that may influence age-related changes in muscle structure. We tested whether preventing age-related reductions in muscle neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) would obviate age-related changes in myeloid cells in muscle. Our findings show that muscle aging is associated with elevations of anti-inflammatory M2a macrophages that can increase muscle fibrosis. Expression of a muscle-specific nNOS transgene in mice prevented age-related increases in M2a macrophages. Transgene expression also reduced expression of collagens and decreased muscle fibrosis. The nNOS transgene prevented age-related increases in arginase-1 but did not influence TGFβ expression, indicating that the transgene may prevent age-related muscle fibrosis by inhibiting the arginase-dependent profibrotic pathway. Although aged satellite cells or fibro-adipogenic precursor (FAPs) cells also promote fibrosis, transgene expression had no effect on the expression of key signaling molecules that regulate fibrogenic activity of those cells. Finally, we tested whether increases in M2a macrophages and the associated increase in fibrosis were attributable to aging of myeloid lineage cells. Young bone marrow cells (BMCs) were transplanted into young or old mice, and muscles were collected 8 months later. Muscles of young mice receiving young BMCs showed no effect on M2a macrophage number or collagen accumulation compared to age-matched, nontransplanted controls. However, muscles of old mice receiving young BMCs showed fewer M2a macrophages and less accumulation of collagen. Thus, the age-related increase in M2a macrophages in aging muscle and the associated muscle fibrosis are determined in part by the age of bone marrow cells.

  6. Design and utilization of macrophage and vascular smooth muscle cell co-culture systems in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease investigation.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Mary C; White, Sharla L Powell; Zhou, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease has been acknowledged as a chronic inflammatory condition. Monocytes and macrophages lead the inflammatory pathology of atherosclerosis whereas changes in atheromatous plaque thickness and matrix composition are attributed to vascular smooth muscle cells. Because these cell types are key players in atherosclerosis progression, it is crucial to utilize a reliable system to investigate their interaction. In vitro co-culture systems are useful platforms to study specific molecular mechanisms between cells. This review aims to summarize the various co-culture models that have been developed to investigate vascular smooth muscle cell and monocyte/macrophage interactions, focusing on the monocyte/macrophage effects on vascular smooth muscle cell function.

  7. A novel association between resident tissue macrophages and nerves in the peripheral stroma of the murine cornea.

    PubMed

    Seyed-Razavi, Yashar; Chinnery, Holly R; McMenamin, Paul G

    2014-03-03

    To characterize the interactions between resident macrophage populations and nerves in naïve and injured corneas of the mouse eye. Corneas from wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J, BALB/cJ, and transgenic Cx3cr1-eGFP mice were subjected to a 1-mm central epithelial debridement injury. The eyes were fixed and immunostained as flat mounts with a range of antibodies to identify macrophages, neurons, and Schwann cells. Interactions between nerves and immune cells were analyzed and quantitated using three-dimensional reconstructions of confocal microscopy images. Naïve eyes acted as controls. A distinctive association between resident immune cells and corneal nerves was noted in the peripheral or perilimbal stromal nerve trunks. These epineurial cells were mostly Cx3cr1(+) Iba-1(+) major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II(+) F4/80(+) CD11b(+) macrophages. The number of nerve-associated macrophages was greater in WT BALB/c mice than in C57BL/6J mice. There were no qualitative or quantitative differences in the circumferential distribution of nerve-associated macrophages in the cornea. Sterile corneal epithelial debridement led to a dissociation of macrophages from peripheral nerve trunks as early as 2 hours postinjury, with numbers returning to baseline after 72 hours. This dissociation was Cx3cr1 dependent. This study is the first to highlight a direct physical association between nerves and resident immune cells in the murine cornea. Furthermore, we reveal that this association in normal eyes is responsive to central corneal epithelial injury and is partly mediated by Cx3cr1 signaling. This association may serve as an indicator of malfunctioning neuroimmune communication in disease states such as neurotrophic keratitis and peripheral neuropathy.

  8. In situ macrophage phenotypic transition is affected by altered cellular composition prior to acute sterile muscle injury.

    PubMed

    Patsalos, Andreas; Pap, Attila; Varga, Tamas; Trencsenyi, Gyorgy; Contreras, Gerardo Alvarado; Garai, Ildiko; Papp, Zoltan; Dezso, Balazs; Pintye, Eva; Nagy, Laszlo

    2017-09-01

    The in situ phenotypic switch of macrophages is delayed in acute injury following irradiation. The combination of bone marrow transplantation and local muscle radiation protection allows for the identification of a myeloid cell contribution to tissue repair. PET-MRI allows monitoring of myeloid cell invasion and metabolism. Altered cellular composition prior to acute sterile injury affects the in situ phenotypic transition of invading myeloid cells to repair macrophages. There is reciprocal intercellular communication between local muscle cell compartments, such as PAX7 positive cells, and recruited macrophages during skeletal muscle regeneration. Skeletal muscle regeneration is a complex interplay between various cell types including invading macrophages. Their recruitment to damaged tissues upon acute sterile injuries is necessary for clearance of necrotic debris and for coordination of tissue regeneration. This highly dynamic process is characterized by an in situ transition of infiltrating monocytes from an inflammatory (Ly6C(high) ) to a repair (Ly6C(low) ) macrophage phenotype. The importance of the macrophage phenotypic shift and the cross-talk of the local muscle tissue with the infiltrating macrophages during tissue regeneration upon injury are not fully understood and their study lacks adequate methodology. Here, using an acute sterile skeletal muscle injury model combined with irradiation, bone marrow transplantation and in vivo imaging, we show that preserved muscle integrity and cell composition prior to the injury is necessary for the repair macrophage phenotypic transition and subsequently for proper and complete tissue regeneration. Importantly, by using a model of in vivo ablation of PAX7 positive cells, we show that this radiosensitive skeletal muscle progenitor pool contributes to macrophage phenotypic transition following acute sterile muscle injury. In addition, local muscle tissue radioprotection by lead shielding during irradiation preserves

  9. Resident peritoneal leukocytes are important sources of MMP-9 during zymosan peritonitis: superior contribution of macrophages over mast cells.

    PubMed

    Kolaczkowska, Elzbieta; Lelito, Monika; Kozakiewicz, Elzbieta; van Rooijen, Nico; Plytycz, Barbara; Arnold, Bernd

    2007-11-15

    Metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) is crucial for normal neutrophil infiltration into zymosan-inflamed peritoneum. During the course of zymosan peritonitis MMP-9 is produced in a biphasic-manner as its presence is detectable as early as 30 min post zymosan and then between 2 and 8 h of inflammation. As inflammatory leukocytes were shown to produce MMP-9 we asked if also resident leukocytes, mast cells and macrophages, contribute to its production. And furthermore, if their contribution is limited only to the early phase of inflammation or extends to the later stages. For this purpose some mice were depleted of either resident macrophages or functional mast cells and expression of MMP-9 in peritoneal leukocytes and its release to the exudate were monitored. It turned out that depletion of peritoneal macrophages decreased both MMP-9 content in the leukocytes and its release to the inflammatory exudate at 30 min and 6h of peritonitis. The functional depletion of mast cells also caused a significant decrease in the production/release of MMP-9 that was especially apparent at the early time point (30 min). Moreover, the study shows concomitant kinetics of MMP-9 expression in leukocytes and its release to the exudatory fluid. The findings indicate that resident tissue leukocytes, and among them especially macrophages, constitute an important source of MMP-9 during acute peritoneal inflammation. Overall, the study shows that resident tissue leukocytes, mostly macrophages, constitute an important cellular source(s) of inflammation-related factors and should be regarded as possible targets of anti-inflammatory treatment.

  10. CX3CR1 deficiency promotes muscle repair and regeneration by enhancing macrophage ApoE production

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ludovic; Perrin, Hélène; de Chanville, Camille Baudesson; Saclier, Marielle; Hermand, Patricia; Poupel, Lucie; Guyon, Elodie; Licata, Fabrice; Carpentier, Wassila; Vilar, José; Mounier, Rémi; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Benhabiles, Nora; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Combadiere, Béhazine; Combadiere, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Muscle injury triggers inflammation in which infiltrating mononuclear phagocytes are crucial for tissue regeneration. The interaction of the CCL2/CCR2 and CX3CL1/CX3CR1 chemokine axis that guides phagocyte infiltration is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CX3CR1 deficiency promotes muscle repair and rescues Ccl2−/− mice from impaired muscle regeneration as a result of altered macrophage function, not infiltration. Transcriptomic analysis of muscle mononuclear phagocytes reveals that Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is upregulated in mice with efficient regeneration. ApoE treatment enhances phagocytosis by mononuclear phagocytes in vitro, and restores phagocytic activity and muscle regeneration in Ccl2−/− mice. Because CX3CR1 deficiency may compensate for defective CCL2-dependant monocyte recruitment by modulating ApoE-dependent macrophage phagocytic activity, targeting CX3CR1 expressed by macrophages might be a powerful therapeutic approach to improve muscle regeneration. PMID:26632270

  11. CX3CR1 deficiency promotes muscle repair and regeneration by enhancing macrophage ApoE production.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Ludovic; Perrin, Hélène; de Chanville, Camille Baudesson; Saclier, Marielle; Hermand, Patricia; Poupel, Lucie; Guyon, Elodie; Licata, Fabrice; Carpentier, Wassila; Vilar, José; Mounier, Rémi; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Benhabiles, Nora; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Combadiere, Béhazine; Combadiere, Christophe

    2015-12-03

    Muscle injury triggers inflammation in which infiltrating mononuclear phagocytes are crucial for tissue regeneration. The interaction of the CCL2/CCR2 and CX3CL1/CX3CR1 chemokine axis that guides phagocyte infiltration is incompletely understood. Here, we show that CX3CR1 deficiency promotes muscle repair and rescues Ccl2(-/-) mice from impaired muscle regeneration as a result of altered macrophage function, not infiltration. Transcriptomic analysis of muscle mononuclear phagocytes reveals that Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is upregulated in mice with efficient regeneration. ApoE treatment enhances phagocytosis by mononuclear phagocytes in vitro, and restores phagocytic activity and muscle regeneration in Ccl2(-/-) mice. Because CX3CR1 deficiency may compensate for defective CCL2-dependant monocyte recruitment by modulating ApoE-dependent macrophage phagocytic activity, targeting CX3CR1 expressed by macrophages might be a powerful therapeutic approach to improve muscle regeneration.

  12. Lung-resident tissue macrophages generate Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and promote airway tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Soroosh, Pejman; Doherty, Taylor A.; Duan, Wei; Mehta, Amit Kumar; Choi, Heonsik; Adams, Yan Fei; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Broide, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Airway tolerance is the usual outcome of inhalation of harmless antigens. Although T cell deletion and anergy are likely components of tolerogenic mechanisms in the lung, increasing evidence indicates that antigen-specific regulatory T cells (inducible Treg cells [iTreg cells]) that express Foxp3 are also critical. Several lung antigen-presenting cells have been suggested to contribute to tolerance, including alveolar macrophages (MØs), classical dendritic cells (DCs), and plasmacytoid DCs, but whether these possess the attributes required to directly promote the development of Foxp3+ iTreg cells is unclear. Here, we show that lung-resident tissue MØs coexpress TGF-β and retinal dehydrogenases (RALDH1 and RALDH 2) under steady-state conditions and that their sampling of harmless airborne antigen and presentation to antigen-specific CD4 T cells resulted in the generation of Foxp3+ Treg cells. Treg cell induction in this model depended on both TGF-β and retinoic acid. Transfer of the antigen-pulsed tissue MØs into the airways correspondingly prevented the development of asthmatic lung inflammation upon subsequent challenge with antigen. Moreover, exposure of lung tissue MØs to allergens suppressed their ability to generate iTreg cells coincident with blocking airway tolerance. Suppression of Treg cell generation required proteases and TLR-mediated signals. Therefore, lung-resident tissue MØs have regulatory functions, and strategies to target these cells might hold promise for prevention or treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:23547101

  13. Rotator cuff tear reduces muscle fiber specific force production and induces macrophage accumulation and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Gumucio, Jonathan P; Davis, Max E; Bradley, Joshua R; Stafford, Patrick L; Schiffman, Corey J; Lynch, Evan B; Claflin, Dennis R; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2012-01-01

    Summary Full-thickness tears to the rotator cuff can cause severe pain and disability. Untreated tears progress in size and are associated with muscle atrophy and an infiltration of fat to the area, a condition known as “fatty degeneration.” To improve the treatment of rotator cuff tears, a greater understanding of the changes in the contractile properties of muscle fibers and the molecular regulation of fatty degeneration is essential. Using a rat model of rotator cuff injury, we measured the force generating capacity of individual muscle fibers and determined changes in muscle fiber type distribution that develop after a full thickness rotator cuff tear. We also measured the expression of mRNA and miRNA transcripts involved in muscle atrophy, lipid accumulation, and matrix synthesis. We hypothesized that a decrease in specific force of rotator cuff muscle fibers, an accumulation of type IIb fibers, an upregulation in fibrogenic, adipogenic, and inflammatory gene expression occur in torn rotator cuff muscles. Thirty days following rotator cuff tear, we observed a reduction in muscle fiber force production, an induction of fibrogenic, adipogenic and autophagocytic mRNA and miRNA molecules, and a dramatic accumulation of macrophages in areas of fat accumulation. PMID:22696414

  14. Rotator cuff tear reduces muscle fiber specific force production and induces macrophage accumulation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Gumucio, Jonathan P; Davis, Max E; Bradley, Joshua R; Stafford, Patrick L; Schiffman, Corey J; Lynch, Evan B; Claflin, Dennis R; Bedi, Asheesh; Mendias, Christopher L

    2012-12-01

    Full-thickness tears to the rotator cuff can cause severe pain and disability. Untreated tears progress in size and are associated with muscle atrophy and an infiltration of fat to the area, a condition known as "fatty degeneration." To improve the treatment of rotator cuff tears, a greater understanding of the changes in the contractile properties of muscle fibers and the molecular regulation of fatty degeneration is essential. Using a rat model of rotator cuff injury, we measured the force generating capacity of individual muscle fibers and determined changes in muscle fiber type distribution that develop after a full thickness rotator cuff tear. We also measured the expression of mRNA and miRNA transcripts involved in muscle atrophy, lipid accumulation, and matrix synthesis. We hypothesized that a decrease in specific force of rotator cuff muscle fibers, an accumulation of type IIb fibers, and an upregulation in fibrogenic, adipogenic, and inflammatory gene expression occur in torn rotator cuff muscles. Thirty days following rotator cuff tear, we observed a reduction in muscle fiber force production, an induction of fibrogenic, adipogenic, and autophagocytic mRNA and miRNA molecules, and a dramatic accumulation of macrophages in areas of fat accumulation. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  15. Relationship between membrane potential changes and superoxide-releasing capacity in resident and activated mouse peritoneal macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kitagawa, S.; Johnston, R.B. Jr.

    1985-11-01

    To understand better the molecular basis for the enhanced respiratory burst of activated macrophages (M phi), the relationship between the stimulus-induced changes in membrane potential and release of superoxide anion (O/sub 2//sup -/) in mouse peritoneal M phi was investigated. Resident M phi and M phi elicited by injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-M phi) or obtained from animals infected with bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG-M phi) were used. LPS-M phi and BCG-M phi showed more pronounced changes in membrane potential (depolarization) and greater release of O/sub 2//sup -/ on contact with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) than did resident macrophages. The lag time between addition of stimulus and onset of release of O/sub 2//sup -/ was reduced in activated compared with resident cells. Membrane potential changes began 60 to 90 sec before release of O/sub 2//sup -/ could be detected in each cell type. The dose-response curves for triggering of membrane potential changes and O/sub 2//sup -/ release by PMA were identical. The magnitude of membrane potential changes and of O/sub 2//sup -/ release in LPS-M phi and BCG-M phi declined progressively during in vitro culture, and values on day 3 approached those in resident macrophages (deactivation). Extracellular glucose was required for effective stimulated change in membrane potential and O/sub 2//sup -/ release. These findings indicate that membrane potential changes are closely associated with O/sub 2//sup -/-releasing capacity in macrophages, and that the systems that mediate membrane potential changes and production of O/sub 2//sup -/ develop or decline concomitantly during activation or deactivation of the cells.

  16. Phosphatidylserine receptor Tim-4 is essential for the maintenance of the homeostatic state of resident peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kit; Valdez, Patricia A; Tan, Christine; Yeh, Sherry; Hongo, Jo-Anne; Ouyang, Wenjun

    2010-05-11

    Tim-4 is a phosphatidylserine (PS) receptor that is expressed on various macrophage subsets. It mediates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by peritoneal macrophages. The in vivo functions of Tim-4 in phagocytosis and immune responses, however, are still unclear. In this study, we show that Tim-4 quickly forms punctate caps on contact with apoptotic cells, in contrast to its normal diffused expression on the surface of phagocytes. Despite its expression in marginal zone and tingible body macrophages, Tim-4 deficiency only minimally affects outcomes of several acute immune challenges, including the trapping of apoptotic cells in the marginal zone, the clearance apoptotic cells by tingible body macrophages, and the formation of germinal centers and elicitation of antibody responses against sheep red blood cells (SRBCs). In addition, Tim-4(-/-) resident peritoneal macrophages (rPMs) phagocytose necrotic cells and other opsonized targets normally. However, their ability to bind and engulf apoptotic cells is significantly compromised both in vitro and in vivo. Most importantly, Tim-4 deficiency results in increased cellularity in the peritoneum. Resting rPMs produce higher TNF-alpha in culture. Their response to LPS, on the contrary, is dampened. Our data support an indispensible role of Tim-4 in maintaining the homeostasis of rPMs.

  17. Subcellular localization of the PGE2 synthesis activity in mouse resident peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish, on a quantitative basis, the subcellular distribution of the enzyme system that converts arachidonic acid into prostaglandin (PG) E2 in mouse resident peritoneal (MRP) macrophages. Kinetic studies were conducted on cell-free extracts derived from cells cultivated for 1 d, using [1-14C]arachidonic acid as substrate and measuring the label in PGE2 after extraction and thin layer chromatography. The activity was synergistically enhanced by L- adrenaline and reduced glutathione, inhibited by indomethacin, and linearly related to the concentration of the cell-free extract. It was labile at 0 degrees C in the medium used for homogenization and fractionation of the cells (half-life less than 2 h). Addition of catalase (0.15 mg/ml) to the suspension medium increased the initial activity (by congruent to 70%) and the stability (half-life congruent to 6 h) of the enzyme in cytoplasmic extracts. It enabled us to establish the density distribution after isopycnic centrifugation in a linear gradient of sucrose. The sample centrifuged consisted of untreated cytoplasmic extracts, or cytoplasmic extracts treated with digitonin and Na pyrophosphate. Comparison of the centrifugation behavior of PGE2 synthesis activity with that of various enzymes used as reference for the major subcellular entities has revealed that PGE2 synthesis fairly fits the density profile of sulfatase C in each case. The conclusion is that at least the rate-limiting reaction in the conversion of arachidonic acid into PGE2 is catalyzed by an enzyme associated with the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:6420497

  18. IFN-γ promotes muscle damage in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by suppressing M2 macrophage activation and inhibiting muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Villalta, S Armando; Deng, Bo; Rinaldi, Chiara; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle; Tidball, James G

    2011-11-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a degenerative disorder that leads to death by the third decade of life. Previous investigations have shown that macrophages that invade dystrophic muscle are a heterogeneous population consisting of M1 and M2 macrophages that promote injury and repair, respectively. In the present investigation, we tested whether IFN-γ worsens the severity of mdx dystrophy by activating macrophages to a cytolytic M1 phenotype and by suppressing the activation of proregenerative macrophages to an M2 phenotype. IFN-γ is a strong inducer of the M1 phenotype and is elevated in mdx dystrophy. Contrary to our expectations, null mutation of IFN-γ caused no reduction of cytotoxicity of macrophages isolated from mdx muscle and did not reduce muscle fiber damage in vivo or improve gross motor function of mdx mice at the early, acute peak of pathology. In contrast, ablation of IFN-γ reduced muscle damage in vivo during the regenerative stage of the disease and increased activation of the M2 phenotype and improved motor function of mdx mice at that later stage of the disease. IFN-γ also inhibited muscle cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro, and IFN-γ mutation increased MyoD expression in mdx muscle in vivo, showing that IFN-γ can have direct effects on muscle cells that could impair repair. Taken together, the findings show that suppression of IFN-γ signaling in muscular dystrophy reduces muscle damage and improves motor performance by promoting the M2 macrophage phenotype and by direct actions on muscle cells.

  19. The Development of Macrophage-Mediated Cell Therapy to Improve Skeletal Muscle Function after Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rybalko, Viktoriya; Hsieh, Pei-Ling; Merscham-Banda, Melissa; Suggs, Laura J.; Farrar, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration following acute injury is a multi-step process involving complex changes in tissue microenvironment. Macrophages (MPs) are one of the key cell types involved in orchestration and modulation of the repair process. Multiple studies highlight the essential role of MPs in the control of the myogenic program and inflammatory response during skeletal muscle regeneration. A variety of MP phenotypes have been identified and characterized in vitro as well as in vivo. As such, MPs hold great promise for cell-based therapies in the field of regenerative medicine. In this study we used bone-marrow derived in vitro LPS/IFN-y-induced M1 MPs to enhance functional muscle recovery after tourniquet-induced ischemia/reperfusion injury (TK-I/R). We detected a 15% improvement in specific tension and force normalized to mass after M1 (LPS/IFN-γ) MP transplantation 24 hours post-reperfusion. Interestingly, we found that M0 bone marrow-derived unpolarized MPs significantly impaired muscle function highlighting the complexity of temporally coordinated skeletal muscle regenerative program. Furthermore, we show that delivery of M1 (LPS/IFN-γ) MPs early in regeneration accelerates myofiber repair, decreases fibrotic tissue deposition and increases whole muscle IGF-I expression. PMID:26717325

  20. Heart-resident CCR2(+) macrophages promote neutrophil extravasation through TLR9/MyD88/CXCL5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjun; Hsiao, Hsi-Min; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Saunders, Brian T; Bharat, Ankit; Goldstein, Daniel R; Krupnick, Alexander S; Gelman, Andrew E; Lavine, Kory J; Kreisel, Daniel

    2016-08-04

    It is well established that maladaptive innate immune responses to sterile tissue injury represent a fundamental mechanism of disease pathogenesis. In the context of cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury, neutrophils enter inflamed heart tissue, where they play an important role in potentiating tissue damage and contributing to contractile dysfunction. The precise mechanisms that govern how neutrophils are recruited to and enter the injured heart are incompletely understood. Using a model of cardiac transplant-mediated ischemia reperfusion injury and intravital 2-photon imaging of beating mouse hearts, we determined that tissue-resident CCR2(+) monocyte-derived macrophages are essential mediators of neutrophil recruitment into ischemic myocardial tissue. Our studies revealed that neutrophil extravasation is mediated by a TLR9/MyD88/CXCL5 pathway. Intravital 2-photon imaging demonstrated that CXCL2 and CXCL5 play critical and nonredundant roles in guiding neutrophil adhesion and crawling, respectively. Together, these findings uncover a specific role for a tissue-resident monocyte-derived macrophage subset in sterile tissue inflammation and support the evolving concept that macrophage ontogeny is an important determinant of function. Furthermore, our results provide the framework for targeting of cell-specific signaling pathways in myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury.

  1. Heart-resident CCR2+ macrophages promote neutrophil extravasation through TLR9/MyD88/CXCL5 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjun; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Saunders, Brian T.; Bharat, Ankit; Goldstein, Daniel R.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Gelman, Andrew E.; Lavine, Kory J.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that maladaptive innate immune responses to sterile tissue injury represent a fundamental mechanism of disease pathogenesis. In the context of cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury, neutrophils enter inflamed heart tissue, where they play an important role in potentiating tissue damage and contributing to contractile dysfunction. The precise mechanisms that govern how neutrophils are recruited to and enter the injured heart are incompletely understood. Using a model of cardiac transplant–mediated ischemia reperfusion injury and intravital 2-photon imaging of beating mouse hearts, we determined that tissue-resident CCR2+ monocyte–derived macrophages are essential mediators of neutrophil recruitment into ischemic myocardial tissue. Our studies revealed that neutrophil extravasation is mediated by a TLR9/MyD88/CXCL5 pathway. Intravital 2-photon imaging demonstrated that CXCL2 and CXCL5 play critical and nonredundant roles in guiding neutrophil adhesion and crawling, respectively. Together, these findings uncover a specific role for a tissue-resident monocyte-derived macrophage subset in sterile tissue inflammation and support the evolving concept that macrophage ontogeny is an important determinant of function. Furthermore, our results provide the framework for targeting of cell-specific signaling pathways in myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury. PMID:27536731

  2. Central Role of CD169+ Lymph Node Resident Macrophages in the Adjuvanticity of the QS-21 Component of AS01

    PubMed Central

    Detienne, Sophie; Welsby, Iain; Collignon, Catherine; Wouters, Sandrine; Coccia, Margherita; Delhaye, Sophie; Van Maele, Laurye; Thomas, Séverine; Swertvaegher, Maëlle; Detavernier, Aurélie; Elouahabi, Abdelatif; Goriely, Stanislas; Didierlaurent, Arnaud M.

    2016-01-01

    Saponins represent a promising class of vaccine adjuvant. Together with the TLR4-ligand MPL, QS-21 is part of the Adjuvant System AS01, a key component of the malaria and zoster candidate vaccines that display demonstrated clinical efficacy. However, the mechanism of action of QS-21 in this liposomal formulation is poorly understood. Upon intra-muscular immunisation, we observed that QS-21 rapidly accumulated in CD169+ resident macrophages of the draining lymph node where it elicited a local innate immune response. Depletion of these cells abrogated QS-21-mediated innate cell recruitment to the lymph node, dendritic cell (DC) phenotypic maturation as well as the adjuvant effect on T-cell and antibody responses to co-administered antigens. DCs rather than lymph node-resident macrophages were directly involved in T-cell priming by QS-21, as revealed by the decrease in antigen-specific T-cell response in Batf3−/− mice. Further analysis showed that the adjuvant effect of QS-21 depended on the integration of Caspase-1 and MyD88 pathways, at least in part through the local release of HMGB1. Taken together, this work unravels the key role of lymph node sentinel macrophage in controlling the adjuvant effect of a molecule proven to improve vaccine response in humans. PMID:27996000

  3. Relation between hand grip strength, respiratory muscle strength and spirometric measures in male nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Bahat, Gulistan; Tufan, Asli; Ozkaya, Hilal; Tufan, Fatih; Akpinar, Timur Selçuk; Akin, Sibel; Bahat, Zumrut; Kaya, Zuleyha; Kiyan, Esen; Erten, Nilgün; Karan, Mehmet Akif

    2014-09-01

    Adverse-outcomes related to sarcopenia are mostly mentioned as physical disability. As the other skeletal muscles, respiratory muscles may also be affected by sarcopenia. Respiratory muscle strength is known to affect pulmonary functions. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the relations between extremity muscle strength, respiratory muscle strengths and spirometric measures in a group of male nursing home residents. Among a total of 104 male residents, residents with obstructive measures were excluded and final study population was composed of 62 residents. Mean age was 70.5 ± 6.7 years, body mass index: 27.7 ± 5.3 kg/m2 and dominant hand grip strength: 29.7 ± 6.5 kg. Hand grip strength was positively correlated with maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) (r = 0.35, p < 0.01 and r = 0.26, p < 0.05, respectively). In regression analysis, the only factor related to MIP was hand grip strength; among spirometric measures only parameter significantly related to grip strength was peak cough flow (PCF). The association of PCF with grip strength disappeared when MIP alone or "MIP and MEP" were included in the regression analysis. In the latter case, PCF was significantly associated only with MIP. We found peripheric muscle strength be associated with MIP and PCF but not with MEP or any other spirometric parameters. The relation between peripheral muscle strength and PCF was mediated by MIP. Our findings suggest that sarcopenia may affect inspiratory muscle strength earlier or more than the expiratory muscle strength. Sarcopenia may cause decrease in PCF in the elderly, which may stand for some common adverse respiratory complications.

  4. Macrophage PPARγ, a Lipid Activated Transcription Factor Controls the Growth Factor GDF3 and Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Varga, Tamas; Mounier, Rémi; Patsalos, Andreas; Gogolák, Péter; Peloquin, Matthew; Horvath, Attila; Pap, Attila; Daniel, Bence; Nagy, Gergely; Pintye, Eva; Póliska, Szilárd; Cuvellier, Sylvain; Larbi, Sabrina Ben; Sansbury, Brian E; Spite, Matthew; Brown, Chester W; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Nagy, Laszlo

    2016-11-15

    Tissue regeneration requires inflammatory and reparatory activity of macrophages. Macrophages detect and eliminate the damaged tissue and subsequently promote regeneration. This dichotomy requires the switch of effector functions of macrophages coordinated with other cell types inside the injured tissue. The gene regulatory events supporting the sensory and effector functions of macrophages involved in tissue repair are not well understood. Here we show that the lipid activated transcription factor, PPARγ, is required for proper skeletal muscle regeneration, acting in repair macrophages. PPARγ controls the expression of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family member, GDF3, which in turn regulates the restoration of skeletal muscle integrity by promoting muscle progenitor cell fusion. This work establishes PPARγ as a required metabolic sensor and transcriptional regulator of repair macrophages. Moreover, this work also establishes GDF3 as a secreted extrinsic effector protein acting on myoblasts and serving as an exclusively macrophage-derived regeneration factor in tissue repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A muscle resident cell population promotes fibrosis in hindlimb skeletal muscles of mdx mice through the Wnt canonical pathway.

    PubMed

    Trensz, Frédéric; Haroun, Sonia; Cloutier, Alexandre; Richter, Martin V; Grenier, Guillaume

    2010-11-01

    Previous work has pointed to a role for the Wnt canonical pathway in fibrosis formation in aged skeletal muscles. In the present study, we studied the dystrophic mdx mouse, which displays skeletal muscle fibrosis. Our results indicated that the muscle resident stromal cell (mrSC) population in the muscles of dystrophic mice is higher than in the muscles of age-matched wild-type mice. Wnt3a promoted the proliferation of and collagen expression by cultured mrSCs but arrested the growth of and collagen expression by cultured myoblasts. Injections of Wnt3A in the tibialis anterior muscles of adult wild-type mice significantly enhanced the mrSC population and collagen deposition compared with the contralateral muscles. Conversely, an injection of the Wnt antagonist Dickkof protein (DKK1) into the skeletal muscles of mdx mice significantly reduced collagen deposition. These results suggested that the Wnt canonical pathway expands the population of mrSCs and stimulates their production of collagen as observed during aging and in various myopathies.

  6. Bone marrow-derived macrophages distinct from tissue-resident macrophages play a pivotal role in Concanavalin A-induced murine liver injury via CCR9 axis

    PubMed Central

    Amiya, Takeru; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Chu, Po-sung; Teratani, Toshiaki; Nakajima, Hideaki; Fukuchi, Yumi; Taniki, Nobuhito; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Shiba, Shunsuke; Miyake, Rei; Katayama, Tadashi; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Kanai, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism how heterogeneous hepatic macrophage (Mφ) subsets fulfill diverse functions in health and disease has not been elucidated. We recently reported that CCR9+ inflammatory Mφs play a critical role in the course of acute liver injury. To clarify the origin and differentiation of CCR9+Mφs, we used a unique partial bone marrow (BM) chimera model with liver shielding for maintaining hepatic resident Mφs. First, irradiated mice developed less liver injury with less Mφs accumulation by Concanavalin A (Con A) regardless of liver shielding. In mice receiving further BM transplantation, CD11blowF4/80high hepatic-resident Mφs were not replaced by transplanted donors under steady state, while under inflammatory state by Con A, CCR9+Mφs were firmly replaced by donors, indicating that CCR9+Mφs originate from BM, but not from hepatic-resident cells. Regarding the mechanism of differentiation and proliferation, EdU+CCR9+Mφs with a proliferative potential were detected specifically in the inflamed liver, and in vitro study revealed that BM-derived CD11b+ cells co-cultured with hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) or stimulated with retinoic acids could acquire CCR9 with antigen-presenting ability. Collectively, our study demonstrates that inflammatory Mφs originate from BM and became locally differentiated and proliferated by interaction with HSCs via CCR9 axis during acute liver injury. PMID:27725760

  7. Immunostaining of macrophages, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic mouse aorta

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Prashanthi; Fisher, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The atherosclerotic mouse aorta consists of a heterogeneous population of cells, including macrophages, endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC), that play critical roles in cardiovascular disease. Identification of these vascular cells in the vessel wall is important to understanding their function in pathological conditions. Immunohistochemistry is an invaluable technique used to detect the presence of cells in different tissues. Here, we describe immunohistochemical techniques commonly used for the detection of the vascular cells in the atherosclerotic mouse aorta using cell specific markers. PMID:26445786

  8. Role of Macrophages in the Repair Process during the Tissue Migrating and Resident Helminth Infections

    PubMed Central

    Faz-López, Berenice

    2016-01-01

    The Th1/Th2/Th17 balance is a fundamental feature in the regulation of the inflammatory microenvironment during helminth infections, and an imbalance in this paradigm greatly contributes to inflammatory disorders. In some cases of helminthiasis, an initial Th1 response could occur during the early phases of infection (acute), followed by a Th2 response that prevails in chronic infections. During the late phase of infection, alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) are important to counteract the inflammation caused by the Th1/Th17 response and larval migration, limiting damage and repairing the tissue affected. Macrophages are the archetype of phagocytic cells, with the primary role of pathogen destruction and antigen presentation. Nevertheless, other subtypes of macrophages have been described with important roles in tissue repair and immune regulation. These types of macrophages challenge the classical view of macrophages activated by an inflammatory response. The role of these subtypes of macrophages during helminthiasis is a controversial topic in immunoparasitology. Here, we analyze some of the studies regarding the role of AAMs in tissue repair during the tissue migration of helminths. PMID:27648452

  9. Human lung-resident macrophages express CB1 and CB2 receptors whose activation inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Staiano, Rosaria I; Loffredo, Stefania; Borriello, Francesco; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Orlando, Pierangelo; Secondo, Agnese; Granata, Francescopaolo; Lepore, Maria Teresa; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Varricchi, Gilda; Santini, Mario; Triggiani, Massimo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Marone, Gianni

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages are pivotal effector cells in immune responses and tissue remodeling by producing a wide spectrum of mediators, including angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors. Activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 has been suggested as a new strategy to modulate angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We investigated whether human lung-resident macrophages express a complete endocannabinoid system by assessing their production of endocannabinoids and expression of cannabinoid receptors. Unstimulated human lung macrophage produce 2-arachidonoylglycerol,N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine,N-palmitoyl-ethanolamine, and N-oleoyl-ethanolamine. On LPS stimulation, human lung macrophages selectively synthesize 2-arachidonoylglycerol in a calcium-dependent manner. Human lung macrophages express cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2, and their activation induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species generation. Cannabinoid receptor activation by the specific synthetic agonists ACEA and JWH-133 (but not the endogenous agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol) markedly inhibits LPS-induced production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and angiopoietins and modestly affects IL-6 secretion. No significant modulation of TNF-α or IL-8/CXCL8 release was observed. The production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A by human monocyte-derived macrophages is not modulated by activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2. Given the prominent role of macrophage-assisted vascular remodeling in many tumors, we identified the expression of cannabinoid receptors in lung cancer-associated macrophages. Our results demonstrate that cannabinoid receptor activation selectively inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors from human lung macrophage but not from monocyte-derived macrophages. Activation of cannabinoid receptors on tissue-resident macrophages might be a novel strategy to modulate macrophage-assisted vascular remodeling

  10. Human lung-resident macrophages express CB1 and CB2 receptors whose activation inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Staiano, Rosaria I.; Loffredo, Stefania; Borriello, Francesco; Iannotti, Fabio Arturo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Orlando, Pierangelo; Secondo, Agnese; Granata, Francescopaolo; Lepore, Maria Teresa; Fiorelli, Alfonso; Varricchi, Gilda; Santini, Mario; Triggiani, Massimo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Marone, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are pivotal effector cells in immune responses and tissue remodeling by producing a wide spectrum of mediators, including angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors. Activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 has been suggested as a new strategy to modulate angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. We investigated whether human lung-resident macrophages express a complete endocannabinoid system by assessing their production of endocannabinoids and expression of cannabinoid receptors. Unstimulated human lung macrophage produce 2-arachidonoylglycerol, N-arachidonoyl-ethanolamine, N-palmitoyl-ethanolamine, and N-oleoyl-ethanolamine. On LPS stimulation, human lung macrophages selectively synthesize 2-arachidonoylglycerol in a calcium-dependent manner. Human lung macrophages express cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2, and their activation induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species generation. Cannabinoid receptor activation by the specific synthetic agonists ACEA and JWH-133 (but not the endogenous agonist 2-arachidonoylglycerol) markedly inhibits LPS-induced production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and angiopoietins and modestly affects IL-6 secretion. No significant modulation of TNF-α or IL-8/CXCL8 release was observed. The production of vascular endothelial growth factor-A by human monocyte-derived macrophages is not modulated by activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2. Given the prominent role of macrophage-assisted vascular remodeling in many tumors, we identified the expression of cannabinoid receptors in lung cancer-associated macrophages. Our results demonstrate that cannabinoid receptor activation selectively inhibits the release of angiogenic and lymphangiogenic factors from human lung macrophage but not from monocyte-derived macrophages. Activation of cannabinoid receptors on tissue-resident macrophages might be a novel strategy to modulate macrophage-assisted vascular

  11. Shrimp Protein Hydrolysate Modulates the Timing of Proinflammatory Macrophages in Bupivacaine-Injured Skeletal Muscles in Rats.

    PubMed

    Dort, Junio; Leblanc, Nadine; Bryl, Piotr; Fortin, Marie-Gil; Carbonneau, Marie-Elise; Lavigne, Charles; Jacques, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether marine-derived proteins other than cod could have beneficial effects on inflammation following muscle injury. Macrophage and neutrophil densities were measured from bupivacaine-injured tibialis anterior muscle of rats fed isoenergetic diets containing either shrimp hydrolysate (Shr), casein hydrolysate (CaH), or whole casein (Ca). In this study, Shr reduced ED(1+)-macrophages at day 2 (p = 0.013), day 5 (p = 0.006), and day 14 after injury (p = 0.038) compared with Ca, indicating faster resolution of inflammation in Shr. Except for day 2 after injury where Shr led to lower ED(1+)-macrophages compared with CaH (p = 0.006), both Shr and CaH responded similarly at days 5, 14, and 28 after injury. This findings suggest that beneficial effects of Shr on ED(1+)-cells might be related to generation of anti-inflammatory peptides through the hydrolysis process, in addition to its high content of anti-inflammatory amino acids. However, while increasing myofiber cross-sectional area in noninjured muscles compared with both Ca and CaH, Shr failed to have a positive effect in corresponding injured muscles. These data indicate that shrimp hydrolysate can facilitate resolution of inflammation after muscle injury mainly through modulating proinflammatory macrophage accumulation but have less effect on optimal recovery in terms of muscle mass and fiber size.

  12. Shrimp Protein Hydrolysate Modulates the Timing of Proinflammatory Macrophages in Bupivacaine-Injured Skeletal Muscles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Leblanc, Nadine; Bryl, Piotr; Fortin, Marie-Gil; Carbonneau, Marie-Elise; Lavigne, Charles

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether marine-derived proteins other than cod could have beneficial effects on inflammation following muscle injury. Macrophage and neutrophil densities were measured from bupivacaine-injured tibialis anterior muscle of rats fed isoenergetic diets containing either shrimp hydrolysate (Shr), casein hydrolysate (CaH), or whole casein (Ca). In this study, Shr reduced ED1+-macrophages at day 2 (p = 0.013), day 5 (p = 0.006), and day 14 after injury (p = 0.038) compared with Ca, indicating faster resolution of inflammation in Shr. Except for day 2 after injury where Shr led to lower ED1+-macrophages compared with CaH (p = 0.006), both Shr and CaH responded similarly at days 5, 14, and 28 after injury. This findings suggest that beneficial effects of Shr on ED1+-cells might be related to generation of anti-inflammatory peptides through the hydrolysis process, in addition to its high content of anti-inflammatory amino acids. However, while increasing myofiber cross-sectional area in noninjured muscles compared with both Ca and CaH, Shr failed to have a positive effect in corresponding injured muscles. These data indicate that shrimp hydrolysate can facilitate resolution of inflammation after muscle injury mainly through modulating proinflammatory macrophage accumulation but have less effect on optimal recovery in terms of muscle mass and fiber size. PMID:27868064

  13. Influence of Rhodococcus equi on the respiratory burst of resident alveolar macrophages from horses

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbaugh, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is the etiologic agent of a devastating pneumonia of sporadic incidence in foals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of R. equi on the superoxide anion production, measured spectrophotometrically as the reduction of cytochrome C, and hexose monophosphate shunt activity, measured by /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ liberation from /sup 14/C-1-D-glucose, of alveolar macrophages from horses. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from 6 anesthetized, healthy, light-breed, adult horses by bronchoalveolar lavage. Following a randomized complete block design, the suspension of cells was divided into aliquots of 10/sup 6/ viable alveolar macrophages which were exposed to 1, 10 or 100 g. of opsonized R. equi or opsonized zymosan A at 37 C for 2 hours. In this study the respiratory burst of equine alveolar macrophages was only evidenced by the hexose monophosphate shunt activity and superoxide anion was not coincidentally produced. Rhodococcus equi did not adversely affect that response. The insignificant superoxide anion production by the alveolar macrophages suggests that this may not be a significant oxygen metabolite in those cells.

  14. Alternate radiolabeled markers for detecting metabolic activity of Mycobacterium leprae residing in murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, H.K.; Hastings, R.C.

    1985-05-01

    This study demonstrated the utility of using 4% NaOH as a murine macrophage cell-solubilizing agent to discriminate between host macrophage metabolism and that of intracellular Mycobacterium leprae. A 4% concentration of NaOH had no deleterious effect on labeled mycobacteria. Thereby, alternate radiolabeled indicators of the metabolic activity of intracellular M. leprae could be experimented with. Significant incorporation of /sup 14/C-amino acid mixture, (/sup 14/C)leucine, (/sup 14/C)uridine, and carrier-free /sup 32/P was observed in cultures containing freshly extracted (''live'') strains of M. leprae as compared with control cultures containing autoclaved bacilli.

  15. Macrophages are comprised of resident brain microglia not infiltrating peripheral monocytes acutely after neonatal stroke

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Sheryl P.; Ji, Shaoquan; Dingman, Andra; Lee, Sarah Y.; Derugin, Nikita; Wendland, Michael F.; Vexler, Zinaida S.

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages can be both beneficial and detrimental after CNS injury. We previously showed rapid accumulation of macrophages in injured immature brain acutely after ischemia-reperfusion. To determine whether these macrophages are microglia or invading monocytes, we subjected post-natal day 7 (P7) rats to transient 3 h middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion and used flow cytometry at 24 and 48 h post-reperfusion to distinguish invading monocytes (CD45high/CD11b+) from microglia (CD45low/medium/CD11b+). Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were determined in plasma, injured and contralateral tissue 1–24 h post-reperfusion using ELISA-based cytokine multiplex assays. At 24 h, the number of CD45+/CD11b+ cells increased 3-fold in injured compared to uninjured brain tissue and CD45 expression shifted from low to medium with less than 10% of the population expressing CD45high. MCA occlusion induced rapid and transient asynchronous increases in the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-β and chemokines cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant protein 1 (CINC-1) and monocyte-chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), first in systemic circulation and then in injured brain. Double immunofluorescence with cell-type specific markers showed that multiple cell types in the injured brain produce MCP-1. Our findings show that despite profound increases in MCP-1 in injured regions, monocyte infiltration is low and the majority of macrophages in acutely injured regions are microglia. PMID:17212701

  16. Palmitoleic acid prevents palmitic acid-induced macrophage activation and consequent p38 MAPK-mediated skeletal muscle insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Nicola A; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Cleasby, Mark E

    2014-08-05

    Obesity and saturated fatty acid (SFA) treatment are both associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance (IR) and increased macrophage infiltration. However, the relative effects of SFA and unsaturated fatty acid (UFA)-activated macrophages on muscle are unknown. Here, macrophages were treated with palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid or both and the effects of the conditioned medium (CM) on C2C12 myotubes investigated. CM from palmitic acid-treated J774s (palm-mac-CM) impaired insulin signalling and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis, reduced Inhibitor κBα and increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in myotubes. p38 MAPK inhibition or siRNA partially ameliorated these defects, as did addition of tumour necrosis factor-α blocking antibody to the CM. Macrophages incubated with both FAs generated CM that did not induce IR, while palmitoleic acid-mac-CM alone was insulin sensitising. Thus UFAs may improve muscle insulin sensitivity and counteract SFA-mediated IR through an effect on macrophage activation.

  17. Macrophage PPARγ is required for normal skeletal muscle and hepatic insulin sensitivity and full antidiabetic effects of thiazolidinediones

    PubMed Central

    Hevener, Andrea L.; Olefsky, Jerrold M.; Reichart, Donna; Nguyen, M.T. Audrey; Bandyopadyhay, Gautam; Leung, Ho-Yin; Watt, Matthew J.; Benner, Chris; Febbraio, Mark A.; Nguyen, Anh-Khoi; Folian, Brian; Subramaniam, Shankar; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Glass, Christopher K.; Ricote, Mercedes

    2007-01-01

    PPARγ is required for fat cell development and is the molecular target of antidiabetic thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which exert insulin-sensitizing effects in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and liver. Unexpectedly, we found that inactivation of PPARγ in macrophages results in the development of significant glucose intolerance plus skeletal muscle and hepatic insulin resistance in lean mice fed a normal diet. This phenotype was associated with increased expression of inflammatory markers and impaired insulin signaling in adipose tissue, muscle, and liver. PPARγ-deficient macrophages secreted elevated levels of factors that impair insulin responsiveness in muscle cells in a manner that was enhanced by exposure to FFAs. Consistent with this, the relative degree of insulin resistance became more severe in mice lacking macrophage PPARγ following high-fat feeding, and these mice were only partially responsive to TZD treatment. These findings reveal an essential role of PPARγ in macrophages for the maintenance of whole-body insulin action and in mediating the antidiabetic actions of TZDs. PMID:17525798

  18. IL-4 directly signals tissue-resident macrophages to proliferate beyond homeostatic levels controlled by CSF-1

    PubMed Central

    Ruckerl, Dominik; Thomas, Graham D.; Hewitson, James P.; Duncan, Sheelagh; Brombacher, Frank; Maizels, Rick M.; Hume, David A.; Allen, Judith E.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦs) colonize tissues during inflammation in two distinct ways: recruitment of monocyte precursors and proliferation of resident cells. We recently revealed a major role for IL-4 in the proliferative expansion of resident MΦs during a Th2-biased tissue nematode infection. We now show that proliferation of MΦs during intestinal as well as tissue nematode infection is restricted to sites of IL-4 production and requires MΦ-intrinsic IL-4R signaling. However, both IL-4Rα–dependent and –independent mechanisms contributed to MΦ proliferation during nematode infections. IL-4R–independent proliferation was controlled by a rise in local CSF-1 levels, but IL-4Rα expression conferred a competitive advantage with higher and more sustained proliferation and increased accumulation of IL-4Rα+ compared with IL-4Rα− cells. Mechanistically, this occurred by conversion of IL-4Rα+ MΦs from a CSF-1–dependent to –independent program of proliferation. Thus, IL-4 increases the relative density of tissue MΦs by overcoming the constraints mediated by the availability of CSF-1. Finally, although both elevated CSF1R and IL-4Rα signaling triggered proliferation above homeostatic levels, only CSF-1 led to the recruitment of monocytes and neutrophils. Thus, the IL-4 pathway of proliferation may have developed as an alternative to CSF-1 to increase resident MΦ numbers without coincident monocyte recruitment. PMID:24101381

  19. Exercise mitigates the adverse effects of hyperhomocysteinemia on macrophages, MMP-9, skeletal muscle, and white adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Winchester, Lee; Veeranki, Sudhakar; Givvimani, Srikanth; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2014-07-01

    Regular exercise is a great medicine with its benefits encompassing everything from prevention of cardiovascular risk to alleviation of different muscular myopathies. Interestingly, elevated levels of homocysteine (Hcy), also known as hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), antagonizes beta-2 adrenergic receptors (β2AR), gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) receptors. HHcy also stimulates an elevation of the M1/M2 macrophage ratio, resulting in a more inflammatory profile. In this review we discuss several potential targets altered by HHcy that result in myopathy and excessive fat accumulation. Several of these HHcy mediated changes can be countered by exercise and culminate into mitigation of HHcy induced myopathy and metabolic syndrome. We suggest that exercise directly impacts levels of Hcy, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), macrophages, and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, especially Gs). While HHcy promotes the M1 macrophage phenotype, it appears that exercise may diminish the M1/M2 ratio, resulting in a less inflammatory phenotype. HHcy through its influence on GPCRs, specifically β₂AR, PPARγ and GABA receptors, promotes accumulation of white fat, whereas exercise enhances the browning of white fat and counters HHcy-mediated effects on GPCRs. Alleviation of HHcy-associated pathologies with exercise also includes reversal of excessive MMP-9 activation. Moreover, exercise, by reducing plasma Hcy levels, may prevent skeletal muscle myopathy, improve exercise capacity and rescue the obese phenotype. The purpose of this review is to summarize the pathological conditions surrounding HHcy and to clarify the importance of regular exercise as a method of disease prevention.

  20. Neurological heterotopic ossification following spinal cord injury is triggered by macrophage-mediated inflammation in muscle.

    PubMed

    Genêt, François; Kulina, Irina; Vaquette, Cedryck; Torossian, Frédéric; Millard, Susan; Pettit, Allison R; Sims, Natalie A; Anginot, Adrienne; Guerton, Bernadette; Winkler, Ingrid G; Barbier, Valérie; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Le Bousse-Kerdilès, Marie-Caroline; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Levesque, Jean-Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Neurological heterotopic ossification (NHO) is the abnormal formation of bone in soft tissues as a consequence of spinal cord or traumatic brain injury. NHO causes pain, ankyloses, vascular and nerve compression and delays rehabilitation in this high-morbidity patient group. The pathological mechanisms leading to NHO remain unknown and consequently there are no therapeutic options to prevent or reduce NHO. Genetically modified mouse models of rare genetic forms of heterotopic ossification (HO) exist, but their relevance to NHO is questionable. Consequently, we developed the first model of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced NHO in genetically unmodified mice. Formation of NHO, measured by micro-computed tomography, required the combination of both SCI and localized muscular inflammation. Our NHO model faithfully reproduced many clinical features of NHO in SCI patients and both human and mouse NHO tissues contained macrophages. Muscle-derived mesenchymal progenitors underwent osteoblast differentiation in vitro in response to serum from NHO mice without additional exogenous osteogenic stimuli. Substance P was identified as a candidate NHO systemic neuropeptide, as it was significantly elevated in the serum of NHO patients. However, antagonism of substance P receptor in our NHO model only modestly reduced the volume of NHO. In contrast, ablation of phagocytic macrophages with clodronate-loaded liposomes reduced the size of NHO by 90%, supporting the conclusion that NHO is highly dependent on inflammation and phagocytic macrophages in soft tissues. Overall, we have developed the first clinically relevant model of NHO and demonstrated that a combined insult of neurological injury and soft tissue inflammation drives NHO pathophysiology. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Modulation of functional characteristics of resident and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal murine macrophages by a recombinant banana lectin

    PubMed Central

    Marinkovic, Emilija; Djokic, Radmila; Lukic, Ivana; Filipovic, Ana; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Kosanovic, Dejana; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija; Stojanovic, Marijana

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrated that a recombinant banana lectin (rBanLec), which structural characteristics and physiological impacts highly resemble those reported for its natural counterparts, binds murine peritoneal macrophages and specifically modulates their functional characteristics. By using rBanLec in concentrations ranging from 1 μg to 10 μg to stimulate resident (RMs) and thioglycollate-elicited (TGMs) peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, we have shown that effects of rBanLec stimulation depend on its concentration but also on the functional status of macrophages and their genetic background. rBanLec, in a positive dose-dependent manner, promotes the proliferation of TGMs from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, while its mitogenic influence on RMs is significantly lower (BALB/c mice) or not detectable (C57BL/6 mice). In all peritoneal macrophages, irrespective of their type and genetic background, rBanLec, in a positive dose dependent manner, enhances the secretion of IL-10. rBanLec stimulation of RMs from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 resulted in a positive dose-dependent promotion of proinflammatory phenotype (enhancement of NO production and IL-12 and TNFα secretion, reduction of arginase activity). Positive dose-dependent skewing toward proinflammatory phenotype was also observed in TGMs from C57BL/6 mice. However, the enhancement of rBanLec stimulation promotes skewing of TGMs from BALB/c mice towards anti-inflammatory profile (reduction of NO production and IL-12 secretion, enhancement of arginase activity and TGFβ and IL-4 secretion). Moreover, we established that rBanLec binds oligosaccharide structures of TLR2 and CD14 and that blocking of signaling via these receptors significantly impairs the production of TNFα and NO in BALB/c macrophages. Since the outcome of rBanLec stimulation depends on rBanLec concentration as well as on the functional characteristics of its target cells and their genetic background, further studies are needed to investigate

  2. Modulation of functional characteristics of resident and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal murine macrophages by a recombinant banana lectin.

    PubMed

    Marinkovic, Emilija; Djokic, Radmila; Lukic, Ivana; Filipovic, Ana; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Kosanovic, Dejana; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija; Stojanovic, Marijana

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrated that a recombinant banana lectin (rBanLec), which structural characteristics and physiological impacts highly resemble those reported for its natural counterparts, binds murine peritoneal macrophages and specifically modulates their functional characteristics. By using rBanLec in concentrations ranging from 1 μg to 10 μg to stimulate resident (RMs) and thioglycollate-elicited (TGMs) peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, we have shown that effects of rBanLec stimulation depend on its concentration but also on the functional status of macrophages and their genetic background. rBanLec, in a positive dose-dependent manner, promotes the proliferation of TGMs from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, while its mitogenic influence on RMs is significantly lower (BALB/c mice) or not detectable (C57BL/6 mice). In all peritoneal macrophages, irrespective of their type and genetic background, rBanLec, in a positive dose dependent manner, enhances the secretion of IL-10. rBanLec stimulation of RMs from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 resulted in a positive dose-dependent promotion of proinflammatory phenotype (enhancement of NO production and IL-12 and TNFα secretion, reduction of arginase activity). Positive dose-dependent skewing toward proinflammatory phenotype was also observed in TGMs from C57BL/6 mice. However, the enhancement of rBanLec stimulation promotes skewing of TGMs from BALB/c mice towards anti-inflammatory profile (reduction of NO production and IL-12 secretion, enhancement of arginase activity and TGFβ and IL-4 secretion). Moreover, we established that rBanLec binds oligosaccharide structures of TLR2 and CD14 and that blocking of signaling via these receptors significantly impairs the production of TNFα and NO in BALB/c macrophages. Since the outcome of rBanLec stimulation depends on rBanLec concentration as well as on the functional characteristics of its target cells and their genetic background, further studies are needed to investigate

  3. Interkeukin-34, a cytokine crucial for the differentiation and maintenance of tissue resident macrophages and Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaming; Colonna, Marco

    2014-01-01

    IL-34 is a recently discovered cytokine that acts on tissue resident macrophages and Langerhans cells upon binding the receptor for CSF-1, CSF-1R. The existence of two ligands for CSF-1R, IL-34, and CSF-1, raises several intriguing questions. Are IL-34 and CSF-1 redundant or does each perform temporally and spatially distinct functions? Is IL-34 involved in human pathology? Would therapeutic strategies based on selective inhibition or administration of either IL-34 or CSF-1 be advantageous for preventing human pathology? Recent in vivo studies indicate that IL-34 promotes the development, survival, and function of microglia and Langerhans cells; therefore, this cytokine may predominately function in brain and skin biology. Here, we review the evidence for IL-34 as a key cytokine in the development and function of these two diverse cell types and discuss its potential role in pathological conditions. PMID:24737461

  4. Interkeukin-34, a cytokine crucial for the differentiation and maintenance of tissue resident macrophages and Langerhans cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaming; Colonna, Marco

    2014-06-01

    IL-34 is a recently discovered cytokine that acts on tissue resident macrophages and Langerhans cells upon binding the receptor for CSF-1, CSF-1R. The existence of two ligands for CSF-1R, IL-34, and CSF-1, raises several intriguing questions. Are IL-34 and CSF-1 redundant or does each perform temporally and spatially distinct functions? Is IL-34 involved in human pathology? Would therapeutic strategies based on selective inhibition or administration of either IL-34 or CSF-1 be advantageous for preventing human pathology? Recent in vivo studies indicate that IL-34 promotes the development, survival, and function of microglia and Langerhans cells; therefore, this cytokine may predominately function in brain and skin biology. Here, we review the evidence for IL-34 as a key cytokine in the development and function of these two diverse cell types and discuss its potential role in pathological conditions.

  5. Horizontal Gene Transfer from Macrophages to Ischemic Muscles upon Delivery of Naked DNA with Pluronic Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Vivek; Gaymalov, Zagit; Alakhova, Daria; Gupta, Richa; Zucker, Irving H.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2015-01-01

    Intramuscular administration of plasmid DNA (pDNA) with non-ionic Pluronic block copolymers increases gene expression in injected muscles and lymphoid organs. We studied the role of immune cells in muscle transfection upon inflammation. Local inflammation in murine hind limb ischemia model (MHLIM) drastically increased DNA, RNA and expressed protein levels in ischemic muscles injected with pDNA/Pluronic. The systemic inflammation (MHLIM or peritonitis) also increased expression of pDNA/Pluronic in the muscles. When pDNA/Pluronic was injected in ischemic muscles the reporter gene, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) co-localized with desmin+ muscle fibers and CD11b+ macrophages (MØs), suggesting transfection of MØs along with the muscle cells. P85 enhanced (~4 orders) transfection of MØs with pDNA in vitro. Moreover, adoptively transferred MØs were shown to pass the transgene to inflamed muscle cells in MHLIM. Using a co-culture of myotubes (MTs) and transfected MØs expressing a reporter gene under constitutive (cmv-luciferase) or muscle specific (desmin-luciferase) promoter we demonstrated that P85 enhances horizontal gene transfer from MØ to MTs. Therefore, MØs can play an important role in muscle transfection with pDNA/Pluronic during inflammation, with both inflammation and Pluronic contributing to the increased gene expression. pDNA/Pluronic has potential for therapeutic gene delivery in muscle pathologies that involve inflammation. PMID:26480472

  6. Horizontal gene transfer from macrophages to ischemic muscles upon delivery of naked DNA with Pluronic block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vivek; Gaymalov, Zagit; Alakhova, Daria; Gupta, Richa; Zucker, Irving H; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Intramuscular administration of plasmid DNA (pDNA) with non-ionic Pluronic block copolymers increases gene expression in injected muscles and lymphoid organs. We studied the role of immune cells in muscle transfection upon inflammation. Local inflammation in murine hind limb ischemia model (MHLIM) drastically increased DNA, RNA and expressed protein levels in ischemic muscles injected with pDNA/Pluronic. The systemic inflammation (MHLIM or peritonitis) also increased expression of pDNA/Pluronic in the muscles. When pDNA/Pluronic was injected in ischemic muscles the reporter gene, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) co-localized with desmin(+) muscle fibers and CD11b(+) macrophages (MØs), suggesting transfection of MØs along with the muscle cells. P85 enhanced (∼ 4 orders) transfection of MØs with pDNA in vitro. Moreover, adoptively transferred MØs were shown to pass the transgene to inflamed muscle cells in MHLIM. Using a co-culture of myotubes (MTs) and transfected MØs expressing a reporter gene under constitutive (cmv-luciferase) or muscle specific (desmin-luciferase) promoter we demonstrated that P85 enhances horizontal gene transfer from MØ to MTs. Therefore, MØs can play an important role in muscle transfection with pDNA/Pluronic during inflammation, with both inflammation and Pluronic contributing to the increased gene expression. pDNA/Pluronic has potential for therapeutic gene delivery in muscle pathologies that involve inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Embryonic Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Reside in Muscle before Bone Marrow Hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuka; Inoue-Yokoo, Tomoko; Kulkeaw, Kasem; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Shirasawa, Senji; Nakanishi, Yoichi; Sugiyama, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    In mice, hematopoietic cells home to bone marrow from fetal liver prenatally. To elucidate mechanisms underlying homing, we performed immunohistochemistry with the hematopoietic cell marker c-Kit, and observed c-Kit(+) cells localized inside muscle surrounding bone after 14.5 days post coitum. Flow cytometric analysis showed that CD45(+) c-Kit(+) hematopoietic cells were more abundant in muscle than in bone marrow between 14.5 and 17.5 days post coitum, peaking at 16.5 days post coitum. CD45(+) c-Kit(+) cells in muscle at 16.5 days post coitum exhibited higher expression of Gata2, among several hematopoietic genes, than did fetal liver or bone marrow cells. Colony formation assays revealed that muscle hematopoietic cells possess hematopoietic progenitor activity. Furthermore, exo utero transplantation revealed that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells home to muscle and then to BM. Our findings demonstrate that hematopoietic progenitor cell homing occurs earlier than previously reported and that hematopoietic progenitor cells reside in muscle tissue before bone marrow hematopoiesis occurs during mouse embryogenesis.

  8. Pro-inflammatory macrophages increase in skeletal muscle of high fat-fed mice and correlate with metabolic risk markers in humans.

    PubMed

    Fink, Lisbeth N; Costford, Sheila R; Lee, Yun S; Jensen, Thomas E; Bilan, Philip J; Oberbach, Andreas; Blüher, Matthias; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Sams, Anette; Klip, Amira

    2014-03-01

    In obesity, immune cells infiltrate adipose tissue. Skeletal muscle is the major tissue of insulin-dependent glucose disposal, and indices of muscle inflammation arise during obesity, but whether and which immune cells increase in muscle remain unclear. Immune cell presence in quadriceps muscle of wild type mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) was studied for 3 days to 10 weeks, in CCL2-KO mice fed HFD for 1 week, and in human muscle. Leukocyte presence was assessed by gene expression of lineage markers, cyto/chemokines and receptors; immunohistochemistry; and flow cytometry. After 1 week HFD, concomitantly with glucose intolerance, muscle gene expression of Ly6b, Emr1 (F4/80), Tnf, Ccl2, and Ccr2 rose, as did pro- and anti-inflammatory markers Itgax (CD11c) and Mgl2. CD11c+ proinflammatory macrophages in muscle increased by 76%. After 10 weeks HFD, macrophages in muscle increased by 47%. Quadriceps from CCL2-KO mice on HFD did not gain macrophages and maintained insulin sensitivity. Muscle of obese, glucose-intolerant humans showed elevated CD68 (macrophage marker) and ITGAX, correlating with poor glucose disposal and adiposity. Mouse and human skeletal muscles gain a distinct population of inflammatory macrophages upon HFD or obesity, linked to insulin resistance in humans and CCL2 availability in mice. © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  9. FACS Fractionation and Differentiation of Skeletal-Muscle Resident Multipotent Tie2+ Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Arpita A; Goldhamer, David J

    2016-01-01

    The skeletal muscle niche is complex and heterogeneous. Over the past few decades, various groups have reported the existence of multiple adult stem cell populations within this environment. Techniques commonly used to identify and assess the differentiation capacities of these cellular fractions, oftentimes rare populations, include the use of lineage tracers, immunofluorescence and histochemistry, flow cytometry, gene expression assays, and phenotypic analysis in culture or in vivo. In 2012, our lab identified and characterized a skeletal-muscle resident Tie2+ progenitor that exhibits adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation potentials (Wosczyna et al., J Bone Miner Res 27:1004-1017, 2012). This Tie2+ progenitor also expresses the markers PDGFRα and Sca-1 which in turn label a population of muscle-resident fibro/adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) (Joe et al., Nat Cell Biol 12:153-163, 2010; Uezumi et al., Nat Cell Biol 12:143-152, 2010), suggesting similar identities or overlap in the two mesenchymal progenitor populations. Our study demonstrated that these Tie2-expressing mesenchymal progenitors contribute robustly to BMP-induced heterotopic ossification (HO) in mice, and therefore could represent a key cellular target for therapeutic intervention in HO treatment (Wosczyna et al., J Bone Miner Res 27:1004-1017, 2012). In this chapter, we provide a detailed description of our updated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) strategy and describe cell culture methods for differentiation of Tie2+ progenitors to adipogenic and osteogenic fates. This strategy is easily adaptable for the prospective isolation of other rare subpopulations resident in skeletal muscle.

  10. Identification of inducible brown adipocyte progenitors residing in skeletal muscle and white fat

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Tim J.; Huang, Tian Lian; Tran, Thien T.; Zhang, Hongbin; Townsend, Kristy L.; Shadrach, Jennifer L.; Cerletti, Massimiliano; McDougall, Lindsay E.; Giorgadze, Nino; Tchkonia, Tamara; Schrier, Denis; Falb, Dean; Kirkland, James L.; Wagers, Amy J.; Tseng, Yu-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Brown fat is specialized for energy expenditure and has therefore been proposed to function as a defense against obesity. Despite recent advances in delineating the transcriptional regulation of brown adipocyte differentiation, cellular lineage specification and developmental cues specifying brown-fat cell fate remain poorly understood. In this study, we identify and isolate a subpopulation of adipogenic progenitors (Sca-1+/CD45−/Mac1−; referred to as Sca-1+ progenitor cells, ScaPCs) residing in murine brown fat, white fat, and skeletal muscle. ScaPCs derived from different tissues possess unique molecular expression signatures and adipogenic capacities. Importantly, although the ScaPCs from interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) are constitutively committed brown-fat progenitors, Sca-1+ cells from skeletal muscle and subcutaneous white fat are highly inducible to differentiate into brown-like adipocytes upon stimulation with bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP7). Consistent with these findings, human preadipocytes isolated from subcutaneous white fat also exhibit the greatest inducible capacity to become brown adipocytes compared with cells isolated from mesenteric or omental white fat. When muscle-resident ScaPCs are re-engrafted into skeletal muscle of syngeneic mice, BMP7-treated ScaPCs efficiently develop into adipose tissue with brown fat-specific characteristics. Importantly, ScaPCs from obesity-resistant mice exhibit markedly higher thermogenic capacity compared with cells isolated from obesity-prone mice. These data establish the molecular characteristics of tissue-resident adipose progenitors and demonstrate a dynamic interplay between these progenitors and inductive signals that act in concert to specify brown adipocyte development. PMID:21173238

  11. Administration of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen increases macrophage concentrations but reduces necrosis during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, E. V.; Tidball, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that ibuprofen administration during modified muscle use reduces muscle necrosis and invasion by select myeloid cell populations. METHODS: Rats were subjected to hindlimb unloading for 10 days, after which they experienced muscle reloading by normal weight-bearing to induce muscle inflammation and necrosis. Some animals received ibuprofen by intraperitoneal injection 8 h prior to the onset of muscle reloading, and then again at 8 and 16 h following the onset of reloading. Other animals received buffer injection at 8 h prior to reloading and then ibuprofen at 8 and 16 h following the onset of reloading. Control animals received buffer only at each time point. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis was used to assess the presence of necrotic muscle fibers, total inflammatory infiltrate, neutrophils, ED1+ macrophages and ED2+ macrophages at 24 h following the onset of reloading. RESULT: Administration of ibuprofen beginning 8 h prior to reloading caused significant reduction in the concentration of necrotic fibers, but increased the concentration of inflammatory cells in muscle. The increase in inflammatory cells was attributable to a 2.6-fold increase in the concentration of ED2+ macrophages. Animals treated with ibuprofen 8 h following the onset of reloading showed no decrease in muscle necrosis or increase in ED2+ macrophage concentrations. CONCLUSION: Administration of ibuprofen prior to increased muscle loading reduces muscle damage, but increases the concentration of macrophages that express the ED2 antigen. The increase in ED2+ macrophage concentration and decrease in necrosis may be mechanistically related because ED2+ macrophages have been associated with muscle regeneration and repair.

  12. Administration of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen increases macrophage concentrations but reduces necrosis during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, E. V.; Tidball, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that ibuprofen administration during modified muscle use reduces muscle necrosis and invasion by select myeloid cell populations. METHODS: Rats were subjected to hindlimb unloading for 10 days, after which they experienced muscle reloading by normal weight-bearing to induce muscle inflammation and necrosis. Some animals received ibuprofen by intraperitoneal injection 8 h prior to the onset of muscle reloading, and then again at 8 and 16 h following the onset of reloading. Other animals received buffer injection at 8 h prior to reloading and then ibuprofen at 8 and 16 h following the onset of reloading. Control animals received buffer only at each time point. Quantitative immunohistochemical analysis was used to assess the presence of necrotic muscle fibers, total inflammatory infiltrate, neutrophils, ED1+ macrophages and ED2+ macrophages at 24 h following the onset of reloading. RESULT: Administration of ibuprofen beginning 8 h prior to reloading caused significant reduction in the concentration of necrotic fibers, but increased the concentration of inflammatory cells in muscle. The increase in inflammatory cells was attributable to a 2.6-fold increase in the concentration of ED2+ macrophages. Animals treated with ibuprofen 8 h following the onset of reloading showed no decrease in muscle necrosis or increase in ED2+ macrophage concentrations. CONCLUSION: Administration of ibuprofen prior to increased muscle loading reduces muscle damage, but increases the concentration of macrophages that express the ED2 antigen. The increase in ED2+ macrophage concentration and decrease in necrosis may be mechanistically related because ED2+ macrophages have been associated with muscle regeneration and repair.

  13. Monocyte/macrophage cytokine activity regulates vascular smooth muscle cell function within a degradable polyurethane scaffold.

    PubMed

    Battiston, K G; Ouyang, B; Labow, R S; Simmons, C A; Santerre, J P

    2014-03-01

    Tissue engineering strategies rely on the ability to promote cell proliferation and migration into porous biomaterial constructs, as well as to support specific phenotypic states of the cells in vitro. The present study investigated the use of released factors from monocytes and their derived macrophages (MDM) and the mechanism by which they regulate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) response in a VSMC-monocyte co-culture system within a porous degradable polyurethane (D-PHI) scaffold. VSMCs cultured in monocyte/MDM-conditioned medium (MCM), generated from the culture of monocytes/MDM on D-PHI scaffolds for up to 28 days, similarly affected VSMC contractile marker expression, growth and three-dimensional migration when compared to direct VSMC-monocyte co-culture. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were identified as two cytokines present in MCM, at concentrations that have previously been shown to influence VSMC phenotype. VSMCs cultured alone on D-PHI scaffolds and exposed to MCP-1 (5 ng ml(-1)) or IL-6 (1 ng ml(-1)) for 7 days experienced a suppression in contractile marker expression (with MCP-1 or IL-6) and increased growth (with MCP-1) compared to no cytokine medium supplementation. These effects were also observed in VSMC-monocyte co-culture on D-PHI. Neutralization of IL-6, but not MCP-1, was subsequently shown to decrease VSMC growth and enhance calponin expression for VSMC-monocyte co-cultures on D-PHI scaffolds for 7 days, implying that IL-6 mediates VSMC response in monocyte-VSMC co-cultures. This study highlights the use of monocytes and their derived macrophages in conjunction with immunomodulatory biomaterials, such as D-PHI, as agents for regulating VSMC response, and demonstrates the importance of monocyte/MDM-released factors, such as IL-6 in particular, in this process.

  14. IL-10 Cytokine Released from M2 Macrophages Is Crucial for Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Acupuncture in a Model of Inflammatory Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Morgana D.; Bobinski, Franciane; Sato, Karina L.; Kolker, Sandra J.; Sluka, Kathleen A.; Santos, Adair R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle pain is a common medical problem that is difficult to treat. One nonpharmacological treatment used is acupuncture, a procedure in which fine needles are inserted into body points with the intent of relieving pain and other symptoms. Here we investigated the effects of manual acu-puncture (MA) on modulating macrophage phenotype and interleukin-10 (IL-10) concentrations in animals with muscle inflammation. Carrageenan, injected in the gastrocnemius muscle of mice, induces an inflammatory response characterized by mechanical hyperalgesia and edema. The inflammation is initially a neutrophilic infiltration that converts to a macrophage-dominated inflammation by 48 h. MA of the Sanyinjiao or Spleen 6 (SP6) acupoint reduces nociceptive behaviors, heat, and mechanical hyperalgesia and enhanced escape/avoidance and the accompanying edema. SP6 MA increased muscle IL-10 levels and was ineffective in reducing pain behaviors and edema in IL-10 knockout (IL-10−/−) mice. Repeated daily treatments with SP6 MA induced a phenotypic switch of muscle macrophages with reduced M1 macrophages (pro-inflammatory cells) and an increase of M2 macrophages (anti-inflammatory cells and important IL-10 source). These findings provide new evidence that MA produces a phenotypic switch in macrophages and increases IL-10 concentrations in muscle to reduce pain and inflammation. PMID:24961568

  15. Soluble β-glucan from Grifola frondosa induces proliferation and Dectin-1/Syk signaling in resident macrophages via the GM-CSF autocrine pathway.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yuki; Togo, Takuya; Mizuno, Shigeto; Konishi, Morichika; Nanba, Hiroaki

    2012-04-01

    MD-Fraction, a highly purified, soluble β-(1,3) (1,6)-glucan obtained from Grifola frondosa (an oriental edible mushroom), has been reported to inhibit tumor growth by modulating host immunity. β-Glucan, a major component of the fungal cell wall, is generally recognized by PRRs expressed on macrophages and DCs, such as Dectin-1, and the ability of β-glucans to modulate host immunity is influenced by their structure and purity. Most cellular studies have used particulate β-glucans, such as yeast zymosan (crude β-glucan) and curdlan (purified β-glucan). However, little is known about the cellular mechanism of soluble β-glucans, including MD-Fraction, despite significant therapeutic implications. In this study, we investigated the cellular mechanism of MD-Fraction in murine resident macrophages and compared it with two well-known β-glucan particles. MD-Fraction induced GM-CSF production rapidly through Dectin-1-independent ERK and p38 MAPK activation. Subsequently, MD-Fraction-induced GM-CSF enhanced proliferation and Dectin-1 expression, which permitted Dectin-1-mediated TNF-α induction through the Syk pathway. Curdlan induced not only the proliferation and activation of Dectin-1/Syk signaling in a manner similar to MD-Fraction but also the uncontrolled, proinflammatory cytokine response. Contrastingly, zymosan reduced proliferation and Dectin-1 expression significantly, indicating that the mechanism of macrophage activation by MD-Fraction differs from that of zymosan. This is the first study to demonstrate that purified β-glucans, such as MD-Fraction and curdlan, induce GM-CSF production directly, resulting in Dectin-1/Syk activation in resident macrophages. In conclusion, we demonstrated that MD-Fraction induces cell proliferation and cytokine production without excessive inflammation in resident macrophages, supporting its immunotherapeutic potential.

  16. IL-17A induces hypo-contraction of intestinal smooth muscle via induction of iNOS in muscularis macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mori, Daisuke; Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kaminuma, Osamu; Murata, Takahisa; Hiroi, Takachika; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Hori, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation causes disorder in bowel motility. Th17 cytokines are involved in intestinal inflammation. To understand the role of interleukin (IL)-17 in intestinal motility, we examined effects of IL-17A on contractile activities of organ-cultured ileum. Rat ileal smooth muscle strips were organ cultured with IL-17A. Muscle contraction was measured, and cells expressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were identified with immunohistochemistry. Creating Th17-transferred colitis model mice, in vivo effects of IL-17 on contractile activities, and iNOS mRNA expression in colonic smooth muscle were investigated. Treatment with IL-17A for 12 h and 3 days attenuated carbachol- and membrane depolarization-induced contractions in organ-cultured rat ileum. N(G)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (100 μM), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, completely reversed the IL-17A-induced inhibition of contractile force. Ileal tissue cultured in the presence of IL-17A showed increased expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. Immunohistochemical analysis using an iNOS antibody revealed that iNOS protein was expressed on ED2-positive muscularis macrophages. The level of iNOS mRNA was also increased in inflamed colonic smooth muscle of Th17-transferred colitis model mice. In intestinal inflammation, IL-17A induces an intestinal motility disorder through iNOS expression in muscularis macrophages.

  17. Evaluating the evidence for macrophage presence in skeletal muscle and its relation to insulin resistance in obese mice and humans: a systematic review protocol.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Meha; Rudrapatna, Srikesh; Banfield, Laura; Bierbrier, Rachel; Wang, Pei-Wen; Wang, Kuan-Wen; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, M Constantine

    2017-08-08

    The current global rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes are staggering. In order to implement effective management strategies, it is imperative to understand the mechanisms of obesity-induced insulin resistance and diabetes. Macrophage infiltration and inflammation of the adipose tissue in obesity is a well-established paradigm, yet the role of macrophages in muscle inflammation, insulin resistance and diabetes is not adequately studied. In this systematic review, we will examine the evidence for the presence of macrophages in skeletal muscle of obese humans and mice, and will assess the association between muscle macrophages and insulin resistance. We will identify published studies that address muscle macrophage content and phenotype, and its association with insulin resistance. We will search MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science for eligible studies. Grey literature will be searched in ProQuest. Quality assessment will be conducted using the Systematic Review Centre for Laboratory Animal Experimentation risk of bias Tool for animal studies. The findings of this systematic review will shed light on immune-metabolic crosstalk in obesity, and allow the consideration of targeted therapies to modulate muscle macrophages in the treatment and prevention of diabetes. The review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at conferences.

  18. Inhibition of human arterial smooth muscle cell growth by human monocyte/macrophages: a co-culture study.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, D; Fitzsimmons, C; Torzewski, J; Bowyer, D E

    1999-07-01

    Monocyte/macrophages produce a variety of substances which may influence the function of smooth muscle cells (SMC). During atherogenesis, macrophages are thought to modulate SMC migration, proliferation and synthesis of extracellular matrix. Such modulation is the balance between stimulatory and inhibitory influences. Thus, for example, our earlier studies have shown that macrophages not only secrete mitogens, but also produce small molecular weight inhibitors of SMC proliferation. In the present study, we have used a co-culture system in which human monocyte/macrophages were separated from human arterial SMC (hSMC) by a filter with the optional addition of a 12 kDa cut-off dialysis membrane, in order to assess their effect on hSMC growth. We have found that human peripheral blood-derived monocytes produced a substance of < 12 kDa that inhibited hSMC growth in the co-culture system. The monocyte-derived factor causing this effect was completely blocked by indomethacin, indicating that growth-inhibitory factors produced by the monocytes were cyclooxygenase products. We have shown that PGE1 and PGE2 inhibit hSMC growth, making them likely candidates for the effector molecules released from monocytes in our co-culture system.

  19. Gene expression of endoplasmic reticulum resident selenoproteins correlates with apoptosis in various muscles of se-deficient chicks.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hai-Dong; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Zi-Wei; Zhang, Jiu-Li; Li, Shu; Huang, Jia-Qiang; Ren, Fa-Zheng; Xu, Shi-Wen; Wang, Xiao-Long; Lei, Xin Gen

    2013-05-01

    Dietary selenium (Se) deficiency causes muscular dystrophy in various species, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Our objectives were to investigate: 1) if dietary Se deficiency induced different amounts of oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and cell apoptosis in 3 skeletal muscles; and 2) if the distribution and expression of 4 endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident selenoprotein genes (Sepn1, Selk, Sels, and Selt) were related to oxidative damages in these muscles. Two groups of day-old layer chicks (n = 60/group) were fed a corn-soy basal diet (33 μg Se/kg; produced in the Se-deficient area of Heilongjiang, China) or the diet supplemented with Se (as sodium selenite) at 0.15 mg/kg for 55 d. Dietary Se deficiency resulted in accelerated (P < 0.05) cell apoptosis that was associated with decreased glutathione peroxidase activity and elevated lipid peroxidation in these muscles. All these responses were stronger in the pectoral muscle than in the thigh and wing muscles (P < 0.05). Relative distribution of the 4 ER resident selenoprotein gene mRNA amounts and their responses to dietary Se deficiency were consistent with the resultant oxidative stress and cell apoptosis in the 3 muscles. Expression of Sepn1, Sels, and Selt in these muscles was correlated with (r > 0.72; P < 0.05) that of Sepsecs encoding a key enzyme for biosynthesis of selenocysteine (selenocysteinyl-tRNA synthase). In conclusion, the pectoral muscle demonstrated unique expression patterns of the ER resident selenoprotein genes and GPx activity, along with elevated susceptibility to oxidative cell death, compared with the other skeletal muscles. These features might help explain why it is a primary target of Se deficiency diseases in chicks.

  20. Relationship between Isometric Strength of Six Lower Limb Muscle Groups and Motor Skills among Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Buckinx, F; Croisier, J L; Reginster, J Y; Petermans, J; Goffart, E; Bruyère, O

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to assess the correlation between isometric muscle strength of the lower limb and motor skills. This is a cross sectional study performed among volunteer nursing home residents included in the SENIOR (Sample of Elderly Nursing home Individuals: an Observational Research) cohort. The present analysis focused on isometric muscle strength of 6 lower limb muscle groups (i.e. knee extensors, knee flexors, hip abductors, hip extensors, ankle flexors and ankle extensors), assessed using a validated hand-held dynamometer (i.e. the MicroFET2 device), and motor skills evaluated using the Tinetti test, the Timed Up and Go test, the Short Physical Performance Battery test (SPPB) and the walking speed. The relationship between all these parameters was tested by means of a multiple correlation, adjusted on age, sex and body mass index. 450 nursing home residents (69.8% of women) with a mean age of 83.1±9.4 years were included in this study. Our results showed a significant inverse correlation between lower limb muscle strength and the time required to perform the TUG test or gait speed, except for ankle flexors and ankle extensors. The relationship between the Tinetti test or the SPPB score, and lower limb muscle strength was significant, except for ankle flexors and ankle extensors. In conclusion, a positive association between lower limb muscle strength of the four main muscle groups and motor skills of the elderly nursing residents was found in this research. Therefore, special attention should be given to these muscle groups during rehabilitation programs.

  1. CD163L1 and CLEC5A discriminate subsets of human resident and inflammatory macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Érika; Samaniego, Rafael; Flores-Sevilla, José Luis; Campos-Campos, Salvador F; Gómez-Campos, Guillermo; Salas, Azucena; Campos-Peña, Victoria; Corbí, Ángel L; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Sánchez-Torres, Carmen

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages (Mϕ) can be differentiated and polarized in vitro from human CD14(+) monocytes under the influence of GM-CSF (GM-Mϕ) and M-CSF (M-Mϕ). GM-Mϕs are proinflammatory and M-Mϕs have an anti-inflammatory phenotype. We found selective expression of the lectin C-type lectin domain family 5 member A (CLEC5A) transcripts in GM-Mϕs and the scavenger receptor CD163 molecule-like 1 (CD163L1) in M-Mϕs by microarray assay. In vitro, CD163L1 expression was induced by IL-10 and M-CSF and CLEC5A by inflammatory cytokines and cell adherence. In secondary lymphoid organs, their respective expression was restricted to CD68(+)/CD163(+) Mϕs that preferentially produced either TNF (CLEC5A(+)) or IL-10 (CD163L1(+)). Mϕs from healthy liver and colon tissue were mostly CD163L1(+), and CLEC5A(+) cells were scarce. In contrast, CLEC5A(+) Mϕs were abundant in the intestinal lamina propria from patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), with higher numbers of CLEC5A(+)CD163L1(+) found compared with those in secondary lymphoid organs. CLEC5A(+) cells were CD14(+)CD209(-)CD11b(+)CD11c(+)TNF(+)IL-10(+), and single positive CD163L1(+) cells were CD14(-)CD209(+)CD11b(-)CD11c(-)TNF(-)IL-10(+) in healthy donors and had lost the ability to produce IL-10 and to express CD209 in those with IBD. In melanomas, CLEC5A(+) tumor-associated Mϕs (TAMs) were not detected in 42% of the cases evaluated, but CD163L1(+) TAMs were found in 100%. Similar to IBD, CD163L1(+) TAMs expressed high levels of CD209 and produced significant amounts of IL-10, and CLEC5A(+) TAMs were CD14(hi) and produced enhanced levels of TNF in metastases. Overall, these results suggest that CD163L1 expression is associated with tissue-resident Mϕs with an anti-inflammatory or anergic phenotype and that CLEC5A(+) Mϕs exhibit TNF-producing ability and might display a proinflammatory effect. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  2. High-resolution intravital imaging reveals that blood derived macrophages but not resident microglia facilitate secondary axonal dieback in traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Teresa A.; Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Myers, Jay; Hare, Elisabeth G.; You, Jingquang; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Huang, Alex Y.; Silver, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury, functional deficits increase as axons die back from the center of the lesion and the glial scar forms. Axonal die back occurs in two phases: an initial axon intrinsic stage that occurs over the first several hours and a secondary phase which takes place over the first few weeks after injury. Here, we examine the secondary phase, which is marked by infiltration of macrophages. Using powerful time lapse multi-photon imaging, we captured images of interactions between Cx3cr1+/GFP macrophages and microglia and Thy-1YFP axons in a mouse dorsal column crush spinal cord injury model. Over the first few weeks after injury, axonal retraction bulbs within the lesion are static except when axonal fragments are lost by a blebbing mechanism in response to physical contact followed by phagocytosis by mobile Cx3Cr1+/GFP cells. Utilizing a radiation chimera model to distinguish marrow-derived cells from radio-resistant CNS resident microglia, we determined that the vast majority of accumulated cells in the lesion are derived from the blood and only these are associated with axonal damage. Interestingly, CNS-resident Cx3Cr1+/GFP microglia did not increasingly accumulate nor participate in neuronal destruction in the lesion during this time period. Additionally, we found that the blood-derived cells consisted mainly of singly labeled Ccr2+/RFP macrophages, singly labeled Cx3Cr1+/GFP macrophages and a small population of double-labeled cells. Since all axon destructive events were seen in contact with a Cx3Cr1+/GFP cell, we infer that the CCR2 single positive subset is likely not robustly involved in axonal dieback. Finally, in our model, deletion of CCR2, a chemokine receptor, did not alter the position of axons after dieback. Understanding the in vivo cellular interactions involved in secondary axonal injury may lead to clinical treatment candidates involving modulation of destructive infiltrating blood monocytes. PMID:24468477

  3. Amendment of the cytokine profile in macrophages subsequent to their interaction with smooth muscle cells: Differential modulation by fractalkine and resistin.

    PubMed

    Tucureanu, Monica Madalina; Butoi, Elena; Gan, Ana-Maria; Stan, Daniela; Constantinescu, Cristina Ana; Calin, Manuela; Simionescu, Maya; Manduteanu, Ileana

    2016-07-01

    In atherosclerotic plaques, macrophages (MAC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) frequently reside in close proximity and resistin (Rs) and fractalkine (Fk) are present at increased levels, resistin being associated with CD68 macrophages and fractalkine predominantly associated with intimal SMC; however, their role in this location is not clear, yet. The objective of this study was to determine whether the cross-talk between MAC-SMC induces changes in MAC cytokine phenotype and if Fk and Rs have a role in the process. To this purpose, macrophages (THP-1 monocytes differentiated with phorbol myristate acetate) were interacted with SMC cultured on the membrane inserts in the presence or absence of Rs or Fk. After 24h, MAC were removed from the co-culture and the gene and protein expression of 57 cytokines was assessed by QPCR and Proteome Profiler™ Array. Fk secreted in the culture medium following MAC-SMC interaction was determined (ELISA assay) and the role of Fk in MAC cytokine gene expression was assessed by silencing the Fk receptor in both cell types. The results showed that subsequent to the interaction with SMC, MAC exhibit: (1) a general increased expression of chemokines (the highest fold increase: VCC-1 and GRO-α) and of some interleukins, such as interleukins IL-5 (∼8-fold) and IL-6; (2) an increased Fk expression that in turn induces expression of: CXCL17, CCL19, CCL2, CXCL10, CXCL12, CXCL4, CXCL7, CCL4, CCL18, CXCL16, CXCL1 and IL-27; (3) in the presence of Rs, a predominant increased expression of interleukins (the highest fold increase: IL-6, IL-27, IL-23 and IL-5) and an augmented expression of some chemokines such as MIP-1β, GRO-α and CCL1. In addition, the secretome collected from the SMC-MAC co-culture increased human monocytes chemotaxis. DAVID analysis of the data revealed that the switch of MAC to a pro-inflammatory phenotype, prime the cells to intervene in the immune response, chemotaxis and inflammatory response. In conclusion, MAC

  4. Short-term high-fat diet increases macrophage markers in skeletal muscle accompanied by impaired insulin signalling in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Boon, Mariëtte R; Bakker, Leontine E H; Haks, Mariëlle C; Quinten, Edwin; Schaart, Gert; Van Beek, Lianne; Wang, Yanan; Van Schinkel, Linda; Van Harmelen, Vanessa; Meinders, A Edo; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Van Dijk, Ko Willems; Guigas, Bruno; Jazet, Ingrid M; Rensen, Patrick C N

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage markers in skeletal muscle of obese subjects are elevated and inversely relate to insulin sensitivity. The present study aimed to investigate whether short-term high-fat high-calorie (HFHC) diet already increases macrophage markers and affects glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle of healthy lean subjects. Muscle biopsies were obtained from 24 healthy lean young men before and after a 5-day HFHC-diet. mRNA expression levels of relevant genes in muscle and glucose, insulin, C-peptide and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) levels in plasma were measured. In addition, we assessed hepatic triacylglycerol ('triglyceride') (HTG) content by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT) biopsies were analysed histologically from a subset of subjects (n=8). A 5-day HFHC-diet markedly increased skeletal muscle mRNA expression of the general macrophage markers CD68 (3.7-fold, P<0.01) and CD14 (3.2-fold, P<0.01), as well as the M1 macrophage markers MARCO (11.2-fold, P<0.05), CD11c (1.8-fold, P<0.05) and MRC1 (1.7-fold, P<0.05). This was accompanied by down-regulation of SLC2A4 and GYS1 mRNA expression, and elevated plasma glucose (+4%, P<0.001) and insulin (+55%, P<0.001) levels together with homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (+48%, P<0.001), suggesting development of insulin resistance (IR). Furthermore, the HFHC-diet markedly increased HTG (+118%, P<0.001) and plasma CETP levels (+21%, P<0.001), a marker of liver macrophage content, whereas sWAT macrophage content remained unchanged. In conclusion, short-term HFHC-diet increases expression of macrophage markers in skeletal muscle of healthy men accompanied by reduced markers of insulin signalling and development of IR. Therefore, recruitment of macrophages into muscle may be an early event in development of IR in response to short-term HFHC-feeding.

  5. Th2 cytokine-induced alterations in intestinal smooth muscle function depend on alternatively activated macrophages

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enteric nematode infection induces a strong Th2 cytokine response and is characterized by increased infiltration of various immune cells including macrophages. The role of these immune cells in host defense against enteric nematode infection, however, remains poorly defined. The present study invest...

  6. The roles of supernatant of macrophage treated by excretory-secretory products from muscle larvae of Trichinella spiralis on the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The excretory-secretory products (ESPs) released by the muscle-larvae (ML) stage of Trichinella spiralis have been suggested to be involved in nurse cell formation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ML-ESPs modulate nurse cell formation remain unclear. Macrophages exert either beneficial or...

  7. Effect of T-2 toxin-injected shrimp muscle extracts on mouse macrophage cells (RAW264.7).

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhanrui; Wang, Yaling; Qiu, Mei; Sun, Lijun; Liao, Jianmeng; Wang, Rundong; Sun, Xiaodong; Bi, Siyuan; Gooneratne, Ravi

    2017-02-10

    Following intramuscular injections of 0.1 mL, 3 mg kg(-1 )BW(-1)(1/10 LD50) T-2 toxin (T-2), the tissue concentration of T-2 in shrimp was quantitatively detected using LC-MS/MS. The biological half-time (t1/2) of T-2 in blood was 40.47 ± 0.24 min. The highest number of intramuscular T-2 shrimp could tolerate when given at blood t1/2 intervals was 4. The shrimps which were injected 5 T-2 died. The T-2 toxin highest accumulation was 0.471 ± 0.012 ng g(-1 )BW(-1). The effect of toxic shrimp muscle subjected to different processing conditions (high pressure, trifluoroacetic acid, acid and alkali digestions, artificial digestive juice [to simulate exposure to gastric and intestinal juices]) on mouse macrophage cells (RAW267.4) were evaluated by the MTT assay. The inhibition ratio of 2% muscle extract on RAW267.4 was 85.70 ± 2.63%. The immunocytotoxicity of muscle extracts to RAW264.7 was highest in muscle extracts subjected to physical and chemical digestion (high pressure > NaOH > trifluoroacetic acid > 0.02 M HCl > 0.2 M HCl > controls), and also artificial digestion (artificial intestinal juice > artificial gastric juice > N type intestinal juice > N type gastric liquid > controls). Results showed that high-pressure and artificial intestinal juice were most effective in the release of modified T-2 to free T-2 thus enhancing toxicity. These results can be interpreted as measurement of T-2 in food being of little value because of enhanced toxicity of T-2-contaminated food as they pass through the gastrointestinal tract.

  8. High-resolution intravital imaging reveals that blood-derived macrophages but not resident microglia facilitate secondary axonal dieback in traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Evans, Teresa A; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Myers, Jay T; Hare, Elisabeth G; You, Jing Qiang; Ransohoff, Richard M; Huang, Alex Y; Silver, Jerry

    2014-04-01

    After traumatic spinal cord injury, functional deficits increase as axons die back from the center of the lesion and the glial scar forms. Axonal dieback occurs in two phases: an initial axon intrinsic stage that occurs over the first several hours and a secondary phase which takes place over the first few weeks after injury. Here, we examine the secondary phase, which is marked by infiltration of macrophages. Using powerful time-lapse multi-photon imaging, we captured images of interactions between Cx3cr1(+/GFP) macrophages and microglia and Thy-1(YFP) axons in a mouse dorsal column crush spinal cord injury model. Over the first few weeks after injury, axonal retraction bulbs within the lesion are static except when axonal fragments are lost by a blebbing mechanism in response to physical contact followed by phagocytosis by mobile Cx3Cr1(+/GFP) cells. Utilizing a radiation chimera model to distinguish marrow-derived cells from radio-resistant CNS-resident microglia, we determined that the vast majority of accumulated cells in the lesion are derived from the blood and only these are associated with axonal damage. Interestingly, CNS-resident Cx3Cr1(+/GFP) microglia did not increasingly accumulate nor participate in neuronal destruction in the lesion during this time period. Additionally, we found that the blood-derived cells consisted mainly of singly labeled Ccr2(+/RFP) macrophages, singly labeled Cx3Cr1(+/GFP) macrophages and a small population of double-labeled cells. Since all axon destructive events were seen in contact with a Cx3Cr1(+/GFP) cell, we infer that the CCR2 single positive subset is likely not robustly involved in axonal dieback. Finally, in our model, deletion of CCR2, a chemokine receptor, did not alter the position of axons after dieback. Understanding the in vivo cellular interactions involved in secondary axonal injury may lead to clinical treatment candidates involving modulation of destructive infiltrating blood monocytes. Copyright © 2014

  9. Satellite cells attract monocytes and use macrophages as a support to escape apoptosis and enhance muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Chazaud, Bénédicte; Sonnet, Corinne; Lafuste, Peggy; Bassez, Guillaume; Rimaniol, Anne-Cécile; Poron, Françoise; Authier, François-Jerome; Dreyfus, Patrick A; Gherardi, Romain K

    2003-12-08

    Once escaped from the quiescence niche, precursor cells interact with stromal components that support their survival, proliferation, and differentiation. We examined interplays between human myogenic precursor cells (mpc) and monocyte/macrophages (MP), the main stromal cell type observed at site of muscle regeneration. mpc selectively and specifically attracted monocytes in vitro after their release from quiescence, chemotaxis declining with differentiation. A DNA macroarray-based strategy identified five chemotactic factors accounting for 77% of chemotaxis: MP-derived chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, fractalkine, VEGF, and the urokinase system. MP showed lower constitutive chemotactic activity than mpc, but attracted monocytes much strongly than mpc upon cross-stimulation, suggesting mpc-induced and predominantly MP-supported amplification of monocyte recruitment. Determination of [3H]thymidine incorporation, oligosomal DNA levels and annexin-V binding showed that MP stimulate mpc proliferation by soluble factors, and rescue mpc from apoptosis by direct contacts. We conclude that once activated, mpc, which are located close by capillaries, initiate monocyte recruitment and interplay with MP to amplify chemotaxis and enhance muscle growth.

  10. Satellite cells attract monocytes and use macrophages as a support to escape apoptosis and enhance muscle growth

    PubMed Central

    Chazaud, Bénédicte; Sonnet, Corinne; Lafuste, Peggy; Bassez, Guillaume; Rimaniol, Anne-Cécile; Poron, Françoise; Authier, François-Jérôme; Dreyfus, Patrick A.; Gherardi, Romain K.

    2003-01-01

    Once escaped from the quiescence niche, precursor cells interact with stromal components that support their survival, proliferation, and differentiation. We examined interplays between human myogenic precursor cells (mpc) and monocyte/macrophages (MP), the main stromal cell type observed at site of muscle regeneration. mpc selectively and specifically attracted monocytes in vitro after their release from quiescence, chemotaxis declining with differentiation. A DNA macroarray–based strategy identified five chemotactic factors accounting for 77% of chemotaxis: MP-derived chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, fractalkine, VEGF, and the urokinase system. MP showed lower constitutive chemotactic activity than mpc, but attracted monocytes much strongly than mpc upon cross-stimulation, suggesting mpc-induced and predominantly MP-supported amplification of monocyte recruitment. Determination of [3H]thymidine incorporation, oligosomal DNA levels and annexin-V binding showed that MP stimulate mpc proliferation by soluble factors, and rescue mpc from apoptosis by direct contacts. We conclude that once activated, mpc, which are located close by capillaries, initiate monocyte recruitment and interplay with MP to amplify chemotaxis and enhance muscle growth. PMID:14662751

  11. CD8 T cells are involved in skeletal muscle regeneration through facilitating MCP-1 secretion and Gr1(high) macrophage infiltration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Xiao, Zhicheng; Qu, Chao; Cui, Wei; Wang, Xiaonan; Du, Jie

    2014-11-15

    Inflammatory microenvironments play a key role in skeletal muscle regeneration. The infiltration of CD8 T cells into injured muscle has been reported. However, the role of CD8 T cells during skeletal muscle regeneration remains unclear. In this study, we used cardiotoxin-induced mouse skeletal muscle injury/regeneration model to investigate the role of CD8 T cells. Muscle regeneration was impaired and matrix deposit was increased in CD8α-deficient mice compared with wild-type (WT) mice whose CD8 T cells were infiltrated into damaged muscle after cardiotoxin injection. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells to CD8α-deficient mice improved muscle regeneration and inhibited matrix remodeling. Compared with WT mice, CD8α deficiency limited the recruitment of Gr1(high) macrophages (MPs) into muscle, resulting in the reduction of satellite cell number. The expression of MCP-1 (MCP-1/CCL2), which regulates the migration of Gr1(high) MPs, was reduced in CD8α-deficient mice compared with WT mice. Coculture CD8 T cells with MPs promoted MCP-1 secretion. The i.m. injection of MCP-1 markedly promoted the recruitment of Gr1(high) MPs and improved muscle regeneration in CD8α-deficient mice. We conclude that CD8 T cells are involved in skeletal muscle regeneration by regulating the secretion of MCP-1 to recruit Gr1(high) MPs, which facilitate myoblast proliferation. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. A MicroRNA93-IRF9-IRG1-Itaconic Acid Pathway Modulates M2-like-Macrophage Polarization to Revascularize Ischemic Muscle.

    PubMed

    Ganta, Vijay Chaitanya; Choi, Min Hyub; Kutateladze, Anna; Fox, Todd E; Farber, Charles R; Annex, Brian H

    2017-03-29

    Background -Currently no therapies exist for treating, and improving outcomes in patients with severe peripheral arterial disease (PAD). MicroRNA93 (miR93) has been shown to favorably modulate angiogenesis and reduce tissue loss in genetic PAD models. However, the cell specific function, downstream mechanisms or signaling involved in miR93 mediated ischemic muscle neovascularization is not clear. Macrophages were best known to modulate arteriogenic response in PAD and the extent of arteriogenic response induced by macrophages is dependent on greater M2 to M1-activation/polarization state. In the current study, we identified a novel mechanism by which miR93 regulates macrophage-polarization to promote angiogenesis and arteriogenesis to revascularize ischemic muscle in experimental-PAD. Methods -In vitro (macrophages, endothelial cells, skeletal muscle cells under normal and hypoxia serum starvation (HSS) conditions) and in vivo experiments in preclinical-PAD models (unilateral femoral artery ligation and resection) were conducted to examine the role of miR93-interferon regulatory factor-9 (IRF9)-immune responsive gene-1 (IRG1)-itaconic acid pathway in macrophage-polarization, angiogenesis, arteriogenesis and perfusion recovery. Results -In vivo, compared to wild type (WT) controls, miR106b-93-25 cluster deficient mice (miR106b-93-25(-/-)) showed decreased angiogenesis and arteriogenesis correlating with increased M1-like-macrophages following experimental-PAD. Intra-muscular delivery of miR93 in miR106b-93-25(-/-) PAD mice increased angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, the extent of perfusion which correlated with more M2-like-macrophages in the proximal and distal hind-limb muscles. In vitro, miR93 promotes and sustains M2-like-polarization even under M1-like-polarizing conditions (HSS). Delivery of bone marrow derived macrophages from miR106b-93-25(-/-) to WT ischemic-muscle decreased angiogenesis, arteriogenesis and perfusion, while transfer of wild-type macrophages to

  13. Monocytes/Macrophages Upregulate the Hyaluronidase HYAL1 and Adapt Its Subcellular Trafficking to Promote Extracellular Residency upon Differentiation into Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Puissant, Emeline; Boonen, Marielle

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts are giant bone-resorbing cells originating from monocytes/macrophages. During their differentiation, they overexpress two lysosomal enzymes, cathepsin K and TRAP, which are secreted into the resorption lacuna, an acidified sealed area in contact with bone matrix where bone degradation takes place. Here we report that the acid hydrolase HYAL1, a hyaluronidase able to degrade the glycosaminoglycans hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate, is also upregulated upon osteoclastogenesis. The mRNA expression and protein level of HYAL1 are markedly increased in osteoclasts differentiated from RAW264.7 mouse macrophages or primary mouse bone marrow monocytes compared to these precursor cells. As a result, the HYAL1-mediated HA hydrolysis ability of osteoclasts is strongly enhanced. Using subcellular fractionation, we demonstrate that HYAL1 proteins are sorted to the osteoclast lysosomes even though, in contrast to cathepsin K and TRAP, HYAL1 is poorly mannose 6-phosphorylated. We reported previously that macrophages secrete HYAL1 proforms by constitutive secretion, and that these are recaptured by the cell surface mannose receptor, processed in endosomes and sorted to lysosomes. Present work highlights that osteoclasts secrete HYAL1 in two ways, through lysosomal exocytosis and constitutive secretion, and that these cells promote the extracellular residency of HYAL1 through downregulation of the mannose receptor. Interestingly, the expression of the other main hyaluronidase, HYAL2, and of lysosomal exoglycosidases involved in HA degradation, does not increase similarly to HYAL1 upon osteoclastogenesis. Taken together, these findings point out the predominant involvement of HYAL1 in bone HA metabolism and perhaps bone remodeling via the resorption lacuna. PMID:27755597

  14. Cholesterol loading re-programs the miR-143/145-myocardin axis to convert aortic smooth muscle cells to a dysfunctional macrophage-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vengrenyuk, Yuliya; Nishi, Hitoo; Long, Xiaochun; Ouimet, Mireille; Savji, Nazir; Martinez, Fernando O.; Cassella, Courtney P.; Moore, Kathryn J.; Ramsey, Stephen A.; Miano, Joseph M.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We previously showed that cholesterol loading in vitro converts mouse aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from a contractile state to one resembling macrophages. In human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques it has become appreciated that ~40% of cells classified as macrophages by histological markers may be of VSMC origin. We therefore sought to gain insight into the molecular regulation of this clinically relevant process. Approach and Results VSMC of mouse (or human) origin were incubated with cyclodextrin-cholesterol complexes for 72 hours, at which time the expression at the protein and mRNA levels of contractile-related proteins were reduced and of macrophage markers increased. Concurrent was down regulation of miR-143/145, which positively regulate the master VSMC-differentiation transcription factor myocardin (MYOCD). Mechanisms were further probed in mouse VSMC. Maintaining the expression of MYOCD or miR-143/145 prevented and reversed phenotypic changes caused by cholesterol loading. Reversal was also seen when cholesterol efflux was stimulated after loading. Notably, despite expression of macrophage markers, bioinformatic analyses showed that cholesterol-loaded cells remained closer to the VSMC state, consistent with impairment in classical macrophage functions of phagocytosis and efferocytosis. In apoE-deficient atherosclerotic plaques, cells positive for VSMC and macrophage markers were found lining the cholesterol-rich necrotic core. Conclusions Cholesterol loading of VSMC converts them to a macrophage–appearing state by downregulating the miR-143/145-myocardin axis. Though these cells would be classified by immunohistochemistry as macrophages in human and mouse plaques, their transcriptome and functional properties imply that their contributions to atherogenesis would not be those of classical macrophages. PMID:25573853

  15. Resident microglia, rather than blood‐derived macrophages, contribute to the earlier and more pronounced inflammatory reaction in the immature compared with the adult hippocampus after hypoxia‐ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Umekawa, Takashi; Osman, Ahmed M.; Han, Wei; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal injury after hypoxia–ischemia (HI) are different in the immature and the adult brain, but microglia activation has not been compared. The purpose of this study was to phenotype resident microglia and blood‐derived macrophages in the hippocampus after HI in neonatal (postnatal day 9, P9) or adult (3 months of age, 3mo) mice. Unilateral brain injury after HI was induced in Cx3cr1GFP/+Ccr2RFP/+ male mice on P9 (n = 34) or at 3mo (n = 53) using the Vannucci model. Resident microglia (Cx3cr1‐GFP+) proliferated and were activated earlier after HI in the P9 (1–3 days) than that in the 3mo hippocampus, but remained longer in the adult brain (3–7 days). Blood‐derived macrophages (Ccr2‐RFP+) peaked 3 days after HI in both immature (P9) and adult (3mo) hippocampi but were twice as frequent in adult brains, 41% vs. 21% of all microglia/macrophages. CCL2 expression was three times higher in the P9 hippocampi, indicating that the proinflammatory response was more pronounced in the immature brain after HI. This corresponded well with the higher numbers of galectin‐3‐positive resident microglia in the P9 hippocampi, but did not correlate with CD16/32‐ or CD206‐positive resident microglia or blood‐derived macrophages. In conclusion, resident microglia, rather than infiltrating blood‐derived macrophages, proliferate and are activated earlier in the immature than in the adult brain, but remain increased longer in the adult brain. The inflammatory response is more pronounced in the immature brain, and this correlate well with galectin‐3 expression in resident microglia. GLIA 2015;63:2220–2230 PMID:26179283

  16. Polarization of Tissue-Resident TFH-Like Cells in Human Hepatoma Bridges Innate Monocyte Inflammation and M2b Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Min; Xiao, Xiao; Lao, Xiang-Ming; Wei, Yuan; Liu, Rui-Xian; Zeng, Qiu-Hui; Wang, Jun-Cheng; Ouyang, Fang-Zhu; Chen, Dong-Ping; Chan, Ka-Wo; Shi, Dai-Chao; Zheng, Limin; Kuang, Dong-Ming

    2016-10-01

    The existence, regulation, and functions of IL21(+) immune cells are poorly defined in human cancers. Here, we identified a subset of protumorigenic IL21(+) TFH-like cells in human hepatocellular carcinoma. These cells were the major source of IL21 in tumors and represented about 10% of the CD4(+) T-cell population at levels comparable with the TFH cells present in lymph nodes. However, these TFH-like cells displayed a unique CXCR5(-)PD-1(lo/-)BTLA(-)CD69(hi) tissue-resident phenotype with substantial IFNγ production, which differed from the phenotype of TFH cells. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-elicited innate monocyte inflammation was important for IL21(+) TFH-like cell induction in tumors, and activation of STAT1 and STAT3 was critical for TFH-like cell polarization in this process. Importantly, the TFH-like cells operated in IL21-IFNγ-dependent pathways to induce plasma cell differentiation and thereby create conditions for protumorigenic M2b macrophage polarization and cancer progression. Thus, induction of TFH-like cells links innate inflammation to immune privilege in tumors. We identified a novel protumorigenic IL21(+) TFH-like cell subset with a CXCR5(-)PD-1(-) BTLA(-)CD69(hi) tissue-resident phenotype in hepatoma. TLR4-mediated monocyte inflammation and subsequent T-cell STAT1 and STAT3 activation are critical for TFH-like cell induction. TFH-like cells operate via IL21-IFNγ pathways to induce plasma cells and create conditions for M2b macrophage polarization. Cancer Discov; 6(10); 1182-95. ©2016 AACR.This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1069. 2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Tissues Use Resident Dendritic Cells and Macrophages to Maintain Homeostasis and to Regain Homeostasis upon Tissue Injury: The Immunoregulatory Role of Changing Tissue Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Maciej; Gröbmayr, Regina; Weidenbusch, Marc; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Most tissues harbor resident mononuclear phagocytes, that is, dendritic cells and macrophages. A classification that sufficiently covers their phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity during homeostasis and disease does not yet exist because cell culture-based phenotypes often do not match those found in vivo. The plasticity of mononuclear phagocytes becomes obvious during dynamic or complex disease processes. Different data interpretation also originates from different conceptual perspectives. An immune-centric view assumes that a particular priming of phagocytes then causes a particular type of pathology in target tissues, conceptually similar to antigen-specific T-cell priming. A tissue-centric view assumes that changing tissue microenvironments shape the phenotypes of their resident and infiltrating mononuclear phagocytes to fulfill the tissue's need to maintain or regain homeostasis. Here we discuss the latter concept, for example, why different organs host different types of mononuclear phagocytes during homeostasis. We further discuss how injuries alter tissue environments and how this primes mononuclear phagocytes to enforce this particular environment, for example, to support host defense and pathogen clearance, to support the resolution of inflammation, to support epithelial and mesenchymal healing, and to support the resolution of fibrosis to the smallest possible scar. Thus, organ- and disease phase-specific microenvironments determine macrophage and dendritic cell heterogeneity in a temporal and spatial manner, which assures their support to maintain and regain homeostasis in whatever condition. Mononuclear phagocytes contributions to tissue pathologies relate to their central roles in orchestrating all stages of host defense and wound healing, which often become maladaptive processes, especially in sterile and/or diffuse tissue injuries. PMID:23251037

  18. EPA protects against muscle damage in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by promoting a shift from the M1 to M2 macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Samara Camaçari de; Apolinário, Leticia Montanholi; Matheus, Selma Maria Michelin; Santo Neto, Humberto; Marques, Maria Julia

    2013-11-15

    In dystrophic mdx mice and in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, inflammation contributes to myonecrosis. Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) decreased inflammation and necrosis in dystrophic muscle. In the present study, we examined the effects of EPA and the corticoid deflazacort (DFZ) as modulators of M1 (iNOS-expressing cells) and M2 (CD206-expressing cells) macrophages. Mdx mice (14 days old) received EPA or DFZ for 16 days. The diaphragm, biceps brachii and quadriceps muscles were studied. Immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and ELISA assays showed that EPA increased interleucin-10, reduced interferon-γ and was more effective than DFZ in promoting a shift from M1 to M2.

  19. Inhibition of macrophage function prevents intestinal inflammation and postoperative ileus in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wehner, Sven; Behrendt, Florian F; Lyutenski, Boris N; Lysson, Mariola; Bauer, Anthony J; Hirner, Andreas; Kalff, Jörg C

    2007-01-01

    Background Abdominal surgery results in a molecular and cellular inflammatory response in the intestine, leading to postoperative ileus. It was hypothesised that resident macrophages within the intestinal muscularis have an important role in this local inflammation. Aims To investigate whether chemical or genetic depletion of resident muscularis macrophages would lead to a reduction in the local inflammation and smooth‐muscle dysfunction. Methods Two rodent models were used to deplete and inactivate macrophages: (1) a rat model in which resident macrophages were depleted by chlodronate liposomes; (2) a model of mice with osteopetrosis mice, completely lacking the resident muscularis macrophages, used as an additional genetic approach. Animals with normal or altered intestinal macrophages underwent surgical intestinal manipulation. The inflammatory response was investigated by quantitative reverse transcriptase‐polymerase chain reaction for mRNA of MIP‐1α, interleukin (IL)1β, IL6, intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM‐1) and monocyte chemotractant protein 1 (MCP)‐1 in the isolated small bowel muscularis. In addition, muscularis whole mounts were used for histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis to quantify leucocyte infiltration and detect cytokine expression. Subsequently, in vitro muscle contractility and in vivo gastrointestinal transit were measured. Results Both models resulted in markedly decreased expression of MIP‐1α, IL1β, IL6, ICAM‐1 and MCP‐1 after manipulation compared with controls. In addition to this decrease in inflammatory mediators, recruitment of leucocytes into the muscularis was also diminished. Macrophage‐altered animals had near normal in vitro jejunal circular muscle function and gastrointestinal transit despite surgical manipulation. Conclusions Resident intestinal muscularis macrophages are initially involved in inflammatory responses resulting in postoperative ileus. Depletion and inactivation of the

  20. Low skeletal muscle mass index is associated with function and nutritional status in residents in a Turkish nursing home.

    PubMed

    Tufan, Asli; Bahat, Gulistan; Ozkaya, Hilal; Taşcıoğlu, Didem; Tufan, Fatih; Saka, Bülent; Akin, Sibel; Karan, Mehmet Akif

    2016-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of low muscle mass (LMM) and the relationship between LMM with functional and nutritional status as defined using the LMM evaluation method of European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) criteria among male residents in a nursing home. Male residents aged >60 years of a nursing home located in Turkey were included in our study. Their body mass index (BMI) kg/m(2), skeletal muscle mass (SMM-kg) and skeletal muscle mass index (SMMI-kg/m(2)) were calculated. The participants were regarded as having low SMMI if they had SMMI <9.2 kg/m(2) according to our population specific cut-off point. Functional status was evaluated with Katz activities of daily living (ADL) and Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL). Nutritional assessment was performed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). The number of drugs taken and chronic diseases were recorded. One hundred fifty-seven male residents were enrolled into the study. Their mean age was 73.1 ± 6.7 years with mean ADL score of 8.9 ± 2.0 and IADL score of 8.7 ± 4.6. One hundred twelve (71%) residents were aged >70 years. Thirty-five men (23%) had low SMMI in group aged >60 years, and twenty-eight subjects (25%) in the group aged >70 years. MNA scores were significantly lower in residents with low SMMI compared with having normal SMMI (17.1 ± 3.4 versus 19.6 ± 2.5, p = 0.005). BMI was significantly lower in the residents with low SMMI compared with normal SMMI (19.6 ± 2.7 versus 27.1 ± 4.1, p< 0.001). ADL scores were significantly different between residents with low SMMI and normal SMMI in those aged >70 years (8.1 ± 2.6 versus 9.1 ± 1.6, p = 0.014). In regression analyses, the only factor associated with better functional status was the lower age (p = 0.04) while the only factor associated with better nutrition was higher SMMI (p = 0.01). Low SMMI detected by LMM evaluation method of EWGSOP

  1. Characterization of adipocytes derived from fibro/adipogenic progenitors resident in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Arrighi, N; Moratal, C; Clément, N; Giorgetti-Peraldi, S; Peraldi, P; Loubat, A; Kurzenne, J-Y; Dani, C; Chopard, A; Dechesne, C A

    2015-01-01

    A population of fibro/adipogenic but non-myogenic progenitors located between skeletal muscle fibers was recently discovered. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which these progenitors differentiate into fully functional adipocytes. The characterization of muscle progenitor-derived adipocytes is a central issue in understanding muscle homeostasis. They are considered as being the cellular origin of intermuscular adipose tissue that develops in several pathophysiological situations. Here fibro/adipogenic progenitors were isolated from a panel of 15 human muscle biopsies on the basis of the specific cell-surface immunophenotype CD15+/PDGFRα+CD56−. This allowed investigations of their differentiation into adipocytes and the cellular functions of terminally differentiated adipocytes. Adipogenic differentiation was found to be regulated by the same effectors as those regulating differentiation of progenitors derived from white subcutaneous adipose tissue. Similarly, basic adipocyte functions, such as triglyceride synthesis and lipolysis occurred at levels similar to those observed with subcutaneous adipose tissue progenitor-derived adipocytes. However, muscle progenitor-derived adipocytes were found to be insensitive to insulin-induced glucose uptake, in association with the impairment of phosphorylation of key insulin-signaling effectors. Our findings indicate that muscle adipogenic progenitors give rise to bona fide white adipocytes that have the unexpected feature of being insulin-resistant. PMID:25906156

  2. Masseter muscle tension, chewing ability, and selected parameters of physical fitness in elderly care home residents in Lodz, Poland.

    PubMed

    Gaszynska, Ewelina; Godala, Malgorzata; Szatko, Franciszek; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining good physical fitness and oral function in old age is an important element of good quality of life. Disability-related impairment of oral function contributes to a deterioration of the diet of older people and to the reduction of their social activity. Investigate the association between masseter muscle tension, dental status, and physical fitness parameters. Two hundred fifty-nine elderly care home residents (97 men, 162 women; mean age, 75.3±8.9 years) were involved in this cross-sectional study. Their chewing ability was evaluated by masseter muscle tension palpation, differences of masseter muscle thickness, self-reported chewing ability, number of present and functional teeth, and number of posterior tooth pairs. Masseter muscle thickness was measured by ultrasonography. To assess physical fitness, hand grip strength and the timed up-and-go test were performed. Nutritional status was assessed using body mass index and body cell mass index (BCMI), calculated on the basis of electrical bioimpedance measurements. Medical records were used to collect information on systemic diseases and the number of prescribed medications. Subjects were also evaluated for their ability to perform ten activities of daily living. Ninety-seven percent of the subjects suffered from systemic diseases. The three most prevalent illnesses were cardiac/circulatory 64.5%, musculoskeletal 37.3%, and endocrine/metabolic/nutritional 29.3%. Of the participants, 1.5% were underweight and more than one third (34.4%) were overweight. Malnutrition (BCMI below normal) was found in almost half (45.2%) of the subjects. Only 5.8% had a sufficient number of functional natural teeth. Statistically significant correlations were found between palpation of masseter muscle tension and perceived chewing ability, number of present teeth, number of functional teeth, number of posterior tooth pairs, timed up-and-go, hand grip strength, body mass index, BCMI, and activities of daily living. In a

  3. Masseter muscle tension, chewing ability, and selected parameters of physical fitness in elderly care home residents in Lodz, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Gaszynska, Ewelina; Godala, Malgorzata; Szatko, Franciszek; Gaszynski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Background Maintaining good physical fitness and oral function in old age is an important element of good quality of life. Disability-related impairment of oral function contributes to a deterioration of the diet of older people and to the reduction of their social activity. Objectives Investigate the association between masseter muscle tension, dental status, and physical fitness parameters. Materials and methods Two hundred fifty-nine elderly care home residents (97 men, 162 women; mean age, 75.3±8.9 years) were involved in this cross-sectional study. Their chewing ability was evaluated by masseter muscle tension palpation, differences of masseter muscle thickness, self-reported chewing ability, number of present and functional teeth, and number of posterior tooth pairs. Masseter muscle thickness was measured by ultrasonography. To assess physical fitness, hand grip strength and the timed up-and-go test were performed. Nutritional status was assessed using body mass index and body cell mass index (BCMI), calculated on the basis of electrical bioimpedance measurements. Medical records were used to collect information on systemic diseases and the number of prescribed medications. Subjects were also evaluated for their ability to perform ten activities of daily living. Results Ninety-seven percent of the subjects suffered from systemic diseases. The three most prevalent illnesses were cardiac/circulatory 64.5%, musculoskeletal 37.3%, and endocrine/metabolic/nutritional 29.3%. Of the participants, 1.5% were underweight and more than one third (34.4%) were overweight. Malnutrition (BCMI below normal) was found in almost half (45.2%) of the subjects. Only 5.8% had a sufficient number of functional natural teeth. Statistically significant correlations were found between palpation of masseter muscle tension and perceived chewing ability, number of present teeth, number of functional teeth, number of posterior tooth pairs, timed up-and-go, hand grip strength, body mass

  4. Prostaglandin E2 affects differently the release of inflammatory mediators from resident macrophages by LPS and muramyl tripeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Dieter, P; Hempel, U; Kamionka, S; Kolada, A; Malessa, B; Fitzke, E; Tran-Thi, T A

    1999-01-01

    LPS and MTP-PE (liposome-encapsulated N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutaminyl-L-alanine-2-:[1',2'dipalmitoyl -sni-glycero-3-(hydroxy-phosphoryl-oxyl)] etylamide) induce in liver macrophages a synthesis and release of TNF-alpha, nitric oxide and prostanoids. Both agents induce an expression of mRNA's encoding TNF-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and of corresponding proteins. LPS and MTP-PE induce a rapid activation of the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) isoenzymes-1 and -2. Inhibition of map kinase isoenzymes leads to a decreased release of TNF-alpha, nitric oxide and prostaglandin (PG) E2 after both agents. The transcription factors NF-kappaB and AP-1 are strongly activated by LPS within 30 minutes. MTP-PE induces a weak activation of both transcription factors only after 5 hours. Inhibition of NF-kappaB inhibits the LPS- but not the MTP-PE-induced release of TNF-alpha, nitric oxide and PGE2. PGE2 release after LPS is higher than after MTP-PE. Exogenously added PGE2 inhibits the activation of map kinase and TNF-alpha release by LPS, but not by MTP-PE. Release of nitric oxide after LPS and MTP-PE is enhanced after prior addition of PGE2. PGD2 is without any effect. MTP-PE, but not LPS, induces a cytotoxicity of Kupffer cells against P815 tumor target cells. The MTP-PE-induced cytotoxicity is reduced by TNF-alpha neutralizing antibodies, indicating the involvement of TNF-alpha. Thus our results suggest that the different potencies of LPS and MTP-PE as immunomodulators probably result from different actions on Kupffer cells, resulting in differences in the amounts and kinetics of released TNF-alpha and PGE2, and that PGE2 plays an important regulatory role in the action of LPS, but not in the actions of MTP-PE. PMID:10815618

  5. Cross-talk between macrophages and smooth muscle cells impairs collagen and metalloprotease synthesis and promotes angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Butoi, E; Gan, A M; Tucureanu, M M; Stan, D; Macarie, R D; Constantinescu, C; Calin, M; Simionescu, M; Manduteanu, I

    2016-07-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis complicated by plaque disruption and thrombosis is a critical event in myocardial infarction and stroke, the major causes of cardiovascular death. In atherogenesis, macrophages (MAC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) are key actors; they synthesize matrix components and numerous factors involved in the process. Here, we design experiments to investigate whether SMC-MAC communication induces changes in ECM protein composition and/or neo-angiogenesis. Cell to cell communication was achieved using trans-well chambers, where SMCs were grown in the upper chamber and differentiated MAC in the bottom chamber for 24 or 72h. We found that cross-talk between MAC and SMC during co-culture: (i) significantly decreased the expression of ECM proteins (collagen I, III, elastin) in SMC; (ii) increased the expression and activity of metalloprotease MMP-9 and expression of collagenase MMP-1, in both MAC and SMC; (iii) augmented the secretion of soluble VEGF in the conditioned media of cell co-culture and VEGF gene expression in both cell types, compared with control cells. Moreover, the conditioned media collected from MAC-SMC co-culture promoted endothelial cell tube formation in Matrigel, signifying an increased angiogenic effect. In addition, the MAC-SMC communication led to an increase in inflammatory IL-1β and TLR-2, which could be responsible for cellular signaling. In conclusion, MAC-SMC communication affects factors and molecules that could alter ECM composition and neo-angiogenesis, features that could directly dictate the progression of atheroma towards the vulnerable plaque. Targeting the MAC-SMC cross-talk may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow-down or retard the plaque progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Induction of bone-type alkaline phosphatase in human vascular smooth muscle cells: roles of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and oncostatin M derived from macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shioi, Atsushi; Katagi, Miwako; Okuno, Yasuhisa; Mori, Katsuhito; Jono, Shuichi; Koyama, Hidenori; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2002-07-12

    Inflammatory cells such as macrophages and T lymphocytes play an important role in vascular calcification associated with atherosclerosis and cardiac valvular disease. In particular, macrophages activated with cytokines derived from T lymphocytes such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) may contribute to the development of vascular calcification. Moreover, we have shown the stimulatory effect of 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) on in vitro calcification through increasing the expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an ectoenzyme indispensable for bone mineralization, in vascular smooth muscle cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that macrophages may induce calcifying phenotype, especially the expression of ALP in human vascular smooth muscle cells (HVSMCs) in the presence of IFN-gamma and 1,25(OH)2D3. To test this hypothesis, we used cocultures of HVSMCs with human monocytic cell line (THP-1) or peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs) in the presence of IFN-gamma and 1,25(OH)2D3. THP-1 cells or PBMCs induced ALP activity and its gene expression in HVSMCs and the cells with high expression of ALP calcified their extracellular matrix by the addition of beta-glycerophosphate. Thermostability and immunoassay showed that ALP induced in HVSMCs was bone-specific enzyme. We further identified tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and oncostatin M (OSM) as major factors inducing ALP in HVSMCs in the culture supernatants of THP-1 cells. TNF-alpha and OSM, only when applied together, increased ALP activities and in vitro calcification in HVSMCs in the presence of IFN-gamma and 1,25(OH)2D3. These results suggest that macrophages may contribute to the development of vascular calcification through producing various inflammatory mediators, especially TNF-alpha and OSM.

  7. Monosodium Urate Crystals Induce Upregulation of NK1.1-Dependent Killing by Macrophages and Support Tumor-Resident NK1.1+ Monocyte/Macrophage Populations in Antitumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Stefanie; Kuhn, Sabine; Ronchese, Franca; Harper, Jacquie L

    2015-12-01

    Macrophages display phenotypic and functional heterogeneity dependent on the changing inflammatory microenvironment. Under some conditions, macrophages can acquire effector functions commonly associated with NK cells. In the current study, we investigated how the endogenous danger signal monosodium urate (MSU) crystals can alter macrophage functions. We report that naive, primary peritoneal macrophages rapidly upregulate the expression of the NK cell-surface marker NK1.1 in response to MSU crystals but not in response to LPS or other urate crystals. NK1.1 upregulation by macrophages was associated with mechanisms including phagocytosis of crystals, NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and autocrine proinflammatory cytokine signaling. Further analysis demonstrated that MSU crystal-activated macrophages exhibited NK cell-like cytotoxic activity against target cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of tumor hemopoietic cell populations showed that effective, MSU-mediated antitumor activity required coadministration with Mycobacterium smegmatis to induce IL-1β production and significant accumulation of monocytes and macrophages (but not granulocytes or dendritic cells) expressing elevated levels of NK1.1. Our findings provide evidence that MSU crystal-activated macrophages have the potential to develop tumoricidal NK cell-like functions that may be exploited to boost antitumor activity in vivo. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Culture media-based selection of endothelial cells, pericytes, and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes from the young mouse vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Cai, Jing; Hou, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaohan; Kachelmeier, Allan; Shi, Xiaorui

    2017-03-01

    The vestibular blood-labyrinth barrier (BLB) is comprised of perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes (PVM/Ms) and pericytes (PCs), in addition to endothelial cells (ECs) and basement membrane (BM), and bears strong resemblance to the cochlear BLB in the stria vascularis. Over the past few decades, in vitro cell-based models have been widely used in blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-retina barrier (BRB) research, and have proved to be powerful tools for studying cell-cell interactions in their respective organs. Study of both the vestibular and strial BLB has been limited by the unavailability of primary culture cells from these barriers. To better understand how barrier component cells interact in the vestibular system to control BLB function, we developed a novel culture medium-based method for obtaining EC, PC, and PVM/M primary cells from tiny explants of the semicircular canal, sacculus, utriculus, and ampullae tissue of young mouse ears at post-natal age 8-12 d. Each phenotype is grown in a specific culture medium which selectively supports the phenotype in a mixed population of vestibular cell types. The unwanted phenotypes do not survive passaging. The protocol does not require additional equipment or special enzyme treatment. The harvesting process takes less than 2 h. Primary cell types are generated within 7-10 d. The primary culture ECs, PCs, and PVM/M shave consistent phenotypes more than 90% pure after two passages (∼ 3 weeks). The highly purified primary cell lines can be used for studying cell-cell interactions, barrier permeability, and angiogenesis.

  9. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with normal air on macrophage number and infiltration during rat skeletal muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Naoto; Ono, Miharu; Tomioka, Tomoka; Deie, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Use of mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute (2026.54 hPa) with normal air is emerging as a common complementary treatment for severe muscle injury. Although hyperbaric oxygen at over 2 atmospheres absolute with 100% O2 promotes healing of skeletal muscle injury, it is not clear whether mild hyperbaric oxygen is equally effective. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute (1266.59 hPa) with normal air on muscle regeneration. The tibialis anterior muscle of male Wistar rats was injured by injection of bupivacaine hydrochloride, and rats were randomly assigned to a hyperbaric oxygen experimental group or to a non-hyperbaric oxygen control group. Immediately after the injection, rats were exposed to hyperbaric oxygen, and the treatment was continued for 28 days. The cross-sectional area of centrally nucleated muscle fibers was significantly larger in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 and 7 days after injury. The number of CD68- or CD68- and CD206-positive cells was significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. Additionally, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. The number of Pax7- and MyoD- or MyoD- and myogenin-positive nuclei per mm2 and the expression levels of these proteins were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 days after injury. These results suggest that mild hyperbaric oxygen promotes skeletal muscle regeneration in the early phase after injury, possibly due to reduced hypoxic conditions leading to accelerated macrophage infiltration and phenotype transition. In conclusion, mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute with normal air is an appropriate support therapy for severe muscle injuries.

  10. The roles of supernatant of macrophage treated by excretory-secretory products from muscle larvae of Trichinella spiralis on the differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Bai, X; Wang, X L; Tang, B; Shi, H N; Boireau, P; Rosenthal, B; Wu, X P; Liu, M Y; Liu, X L

    2016-11-15

    The excretory-secretory products (ESPs) released by the muscle-larvae (ML) stage of Trichinella spiralis have been suggested to be involved in nurse cell formation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ML-ESPs modulate nurse cell formation remain unclear. Macrophages exert either beneficial or deleterious effects on tissue repair, depending on their activation/polarization state. They are crucial for skeletal muscle repair, notably, via their actions on myogenic precursor cells. However, these interactions during T. spiralis infection have not been characterized. In the present study, the ability of conditioned medium (CM) from J774A.1 macrophages treated with ML-ESPs to influence the differentiation of murine myoblasts, and the mechanisms of this influence, were investigated in vitro. The results showed that the expression of Myogenic Regulatory Factors (MRFs) MyoD and myogenin, myosin heavy chain (MyHC), and the p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor were reduced in CM treated cells compared to their expression in the control group. These findings indicated that CM inhibited myoblast differentiation. Conversely, CM promoted myoblast proliferation and increased cyclin D1 levels. Taken together, results of our study suggested that CM can indirectly influence myoblast differentiation and proliferation, which provides a new method for the elucidation of the complex mechanisms involved in cell-parasite and cell-cell interactions during T. spiralis infection.

  11. Adult vascular smooth muscle cells in culture express neural stem cell markers typical of resident multipotent vascular stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Eimear; Mooney, Ciaran J; Hakimjavadi, Roya; Fitzpatrick, Emma; Guha, Shaunta; Collins, Laura E; Loscher, Christine E; Morrow, David; Redmond, Eileen M; Cahill, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    Differentiation of resident multipotent vascular stem cells (MVSCs) or de-differentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) might be responsible for the SMC phenotype that plays a major role in vascular diseases such as arteriosclerosis and restenosis. We examined vSMCs from three different species (rat, murine and bovine) to establish whether they exhibit neural stem cell characteristics typical of MVSCs. We determined their SMC differentiation, neural stem cell marker expression and multipotency following induction in vitro by using immunocytochemistry, confocal microscopy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. MVSCs isolated from rat aortic explants, enzymatically dispersed rat SMCs and rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells served as controls. Murine carotid artery lysates and primary rat aortic vSMCs were both myosin-heavy-chain-positive but weakly expressed the neural crest stem cell marker, Sox10. Each vSMC line examined expressed SMC differentiation markers (smooth muscle α-actin, myosin heavy chain and calponin), neural crest stem cell markers (Sox10(+), Sox17(+)) and a glia marker (S100β(+)). Serum deprivation significantly increased calponin and myosin heavy chain expression and decreased stem cell marker expression, when compared with serum-rich conditions. vSMCs did not differentiate to adipocytes or osteoblasts following adipogenic or osteogenic inductive stimulation, respectively, or respond to transforming growth factor-β1 or Notch following γ-secretase inhibition. Thus, vascular SMCs in culture express neural stem cell markers typical of MVSCs, concomitant with SMC differentiation markers, but do not retain their multipotency. The ultimate origin of these cells might have important implications for their use in investigations of vascular proliferative disease in vitro.

  12. Differential Promoter Methylation of Macrophage Genes Is Associated With Impaired Vascular Growth in Ischemic Muscles of Hyperlipidemic and Type 2 Diabetic Mice: Genome-Wide Promoter Methylation Study.

    PubMed

    Babu, Mohan; Durga Devi, Thota; Mäkinen, Petri; Kaikkonen, Minna; Lesch, Hanna P; Junttila, Sini; Laiho, Asta; Ghimire, Bishwa; Gyenesei, Attila; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2015-07-17

    Hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) severely impair adaptive vascular growth responses in ischemic muscles. This is largely attributed to dysregulated gene expression, although details of the changes are unknown. To define the role of promoter methylation in adaptive vascular growth in hyperlipidemia (LDLR(-/-)ApoB(100/100)) and T2DM (IGF-II/LDLR(-/-)ApoB(100/100)) mouse models of hindlimb ischemia. Unilateral hindlimb ischemia was induced by ligating femoral artery. Perfusion was assessed using ultrasound, and capillary and arteriole parameters were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Genome-wide methylated DNA sequencing was performed with DNA isolated from ischemic muscle, tissue macrophages (Mϕs), and endothelial cells. Compared with the controls, hyperlipidemia and T2DM mice showed impaired perfusion recovery, which was associated with impaired angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. Genome-wide proximal promoter DNA methylation analysis suggested differential patterns of methylation in Mϕ genes in ischemic muscles. Classically activated M1-Mϕ gene promoters, including Cfb, Serping1, and Tnfsf15, were significantly hypomethylated, whereas alternatively activated M2-Mϕ gene promoters, including Nrp1, Cxcr4, Plxnd1, Arg1, Cdk18, and Fes, were significantly hypermethylated in Mϕs isolated from hyperlipidemia and T2DM ischemic muscles compared with controls. These results combined with mRNA expression and immunohistochemistry showed the predominance of proinflammatory M1-Mϕs, compared with anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic M2-Mϕs in hyperlipidemia and T2DM ischemic muscles. We found significant promoter hypomethylation of genes typical for proinflammatory M1-Mϕs and hypermethylation of anti-inflammatory, proangiogenic M2-Mϕ genes in hyperlipidemia and T2DM ischemic muscles. Epigenetic alterations modify Mϕ phenotype toward proinflammatory M1 as opposed to anti-inflammatory, proangiogenic, and tissue repair M2 phenotype, which may contribute to

  13. Tissue macrophage identity and self-renewal.

    PubMed

    Gentek, Rebecca; Molawi, Kaaweh; Sieweke, Michael H

    2014-11-01

    Macrophages are cellular components of the innate immune system that reside in virtually all tissues and contribute to immunity, repair, and homeostasis. The traditional view that all tissue-resident macrophages derive from the bone marrow through circulating monocyte intermediates has dramatically shifted recently with the observation that macrophages from embryonic progenitors can persist into adulthood and self-maintain by local proliferation. In several tissues, however, monocytes also contribute to the resident macrophage population, on which the local environment can impose tissue-specific macrophage functions. These observations have raised important questions: What determines resident macrophage identity and function, ontogeny or environment? How is macrophage proliferation regulated? In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the identity, proliferation, and turnover of tissue-resident macrophages and how they differ from freshly recruited short-lived monocyte-derived cells. We examine whether macrophage proliferation can be qualified as self-renewal of mature differentiated cells and whether the concepts and molecular pathways are comparable to self-renewal mechanisms in stem cells. Finally, we discuss how improved understanding of macrophage identity and self-renewal could be exploited for therapeutic intervention of macrophage-mediated pathologies by selectively targeting freshly recruited or resident macrophages. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Physiological roles of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Siamon; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa

    2017-04-01

    Macrophages are present in mammals from midgestation, contributing to physiologic homeostasis throughout life. Macrophages arise from yolk sac and foetal liver progenitors during embryonic development in the mouse and persist in different organs as heterogeneous, self-renewing tissue-resident populations. Bone marrow-derived blood monocytes are recruited after birth to replenish tissue-resident populations and to meet further demands during inflammation, infection and metabolic perturbations. Macrophages of mixed origin and different locations vary in replication and turnover, but are all active in mRNA and protein synthesis, fulfilling organ-specific and systemic trophic functions, in addition to host defence. In this review, we emphasise selected properties and non-immune functions of tissue macrophages which contribute to physiologic homeostasis.

  15. Nucleotide oligomerization domain 1 is a dominant pathway for NOS2 induction in vascular smooth muscle cells: comparison with Toll-like receptor 4 responses in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, L; McMaster, SK; Gatheral, T; Bailey, LK; Harrington, LS; Cartwright, N; Armstrong, PCJ; Warner, TD; Paul-Clark, M; Mitchell, JA

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Gram-negative bacteria contain ligands for Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD) 1 receptors. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates TLR4, while peptidoglycan products activate NOD1. Activation of NOD1 by the specific agonist FK565 results in a profound vascular dysfunction and experimental shock in vivo. Experimental approach: Here, we have analysed a number of pharmacological inhibitors to characterize the role of key signalling pathways in the induction of NOS2 following TLR4 or NOD1 activation. Key results: Vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells expressed NOD1 mRNA and protein, and, after challenge with Escherichia coli or FK565, NOS2 protein and activity were induced. Macrophages had negligible levels of NOD1 and were unaffected by FK565, but responded to E. coli and LPS by releasing increased NO and expression of NOS2 protein. Classic pharmacological inhibitors for NF-κB (SC-514) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (SB203580, PD98059) signalling pathways inhibited responses in both cell types regardless of agonist. While TLR4-mediated responses in macrophages were specifically inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and the PKC inhibitor Gö6976, NOD1-mediated responses in VSM cells were inhibited by the Rip2 inhibitor PP2. Conclusions and implications: Our findings suggest a selective role for NOD1 in VSM cells, and highlight NOD1 as a potential novel therapeutic target for the treatment of vascular inflammation. PMID:20649597

  16. Role of bone marrow macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Simranpreet; Raggatt, Liza Jane; Batoon, Lena; Hume, David Arthur; Levesque, Jean-Pierre; Pettit, Allison Robyn

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages, named for their phagocytic ability, participate in homeostasis, tissue regeneration and inflammatory responses. Bone and adjacent marrow contain multiple functionally unique resident tissue macrophage subsets which maintain and regulate anatomically distinct niche environments within these interconnected tissues. Three subsets of bone-bone marrow resident tissue macrophages have been characterised; erythroblastic island macrophages, haematopoietic stem cell niche macrophages and osteal macrophages. The role of these macrophages in controlling homeostasis and repair in bone and bone marrow niches is reviewed in detail.

  17. Origins of Brain Tumor Macrophages.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Michele

    2016-12-12

    The ontogeny of brain-tumor-associated macrophages is poorly understood. New findings indicate that both resident microglia and blood-derived monocytes generate the pool of macrophages that infiltrate brain tumors of either primary or metastatic origin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Macrophages in Synovial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Aisling; Fearon, Ursula; Veale, Douglas J.; Godson, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Synovial macrophages are one of the resident cell types in synovial tissue and while they remain relatively quiescent in the healthy joint, they become activated in the inflamed joint and, along with infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, regulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enzymes involved in driving the inflammatory response and joint destruction. Synovial macrophages are positioned throughout the sub-lining layer and lining layer at the cartilage–pannus junction and mediate articular destruction. Sub-lining macrophages are now also considered as the most reliable biomarker for disease severity and response to therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is a growing understanding of the molecular drivers of inflammation and an appreciation that the resolution of inflammation is an active process rather than a passive return to homeostasis, and this has implications for our understanding of the role of macrophages in inflammation. Macrophage phenotype determines the cytokine secretion profile and tissue destruction capabilities of these cells. Whereas inflammatory synovial macrophages have not yet been classified into one phenotype or another it is widely known that TNFα and IL-l, characteristically released by M1 macrophages, are abundant in RA while IL-10 activity, characteristic of M2 macrophages, is somewhat diminished. Here we will briefly review our current understanding of macrophages and macrophage polarization in RA as well as the elements implicated in controlling polarization, such as cytokines and transcription factors like NFκB, IRFs and NR4A, and pro-resolving factors, such as LXA4 and other lipid mediators which may promote a non-inflammatory, pro-resolving phenotype, and may represent a novel therapeutic paradigm. PMID:22566842

  19. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  20. Macrophage elastase kills bacteria within murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Houghton, A McGarry; Hartzell, William O; Robbins, Clinton S; Gomis-Rüth, F Xavier; Shapiro, Steven D

    2009-07-30

    Macrophages are aptly positioned to function as the primary line of defence against invading pathogens in many organs, including the lung and peritoneum. Their ability to phagocytose and clear microorganisms has been well documented. Macrophages possess several substances with which they can kill bacteria, including reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide, and antimicrobial proteins. We proposed that macrophage-derived proteinases may contribute to the antimicrobial properties of macrophages. Macrophage elastase (also known as matrix metalloproteinase 12 or MMP12) is an enzyme predominantly expressed in mature tissue macrophages and is implicated in several disease processes, including emphysema. Physiological functions for MMP12 have not been described. Here we show that Mmp12(-/-) mice exhibit impaired bacterial clearance and increased mortality when challenged with both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria at macrophage-rich portals of entry, such as the peritoneum and lung. Intracellular stores of MMP12 are mobilized to macrophage phagolysosomes after the ingestion of bacterial pathogens. Once inside phagolysosomes, MMP12 adheres to bacterial cell walls where it disrupts cellular membranes resulting in bacterial death. The antimicrobial properties of MMP12 do not reside within its catalytic domain, but rather within the carboxy-terminal domain. This domain contains a unique four amino acid sequence on an exposed beta loop of the protein that is required for the observed antimicrobial activity. The present study represents, to our knowledge, the first report of direct antimicrobial activity by a matrix metallopeptidase, and describes a new antimicrobial peptide that is sequentially and structurally unique in nature.

  1. Macrophages Facilitate Electrical Conduction in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Hulsmans, Maarten; Clauss, Sebastian; Xiao, Ling; Aguirre, Aaron D; King, Kevin R; Hanley, Alan; Hucker, William J; Wülfers, Eike M; Seemann, Gunnar; Courties, Gabriel; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Sun, Yuan; Savol, Andrej J; Sager, Hendrik B; Lavine, Kory J; Fishbein, Gregory A; Capen, Diane E; Da Silva, Nicolas; Miquerol, Lucile; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Naxerova, Kamila; Mitchell, Richard N; Brown, Dennis; Libby, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K; Kohl, Peter; Vinegoni, Claudio; Milan, David J; Ellinor, Patrick T; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2017-04-20

    Organ-specific functions of tissue-resident macrophages in the steady-state heart are unknown. Here, we show that cardiac macrophages facilitate electrical conduction through the distal atrioventricular node, where conducting cells densely intersperse with elongated macrophages expressing connexin 43. When coupled to spontaneously beating cardiomyocytes via connexin-43-containing gap junctions, cardiac macrophages have a negative resting membrane potential and depolarize in synchrony with cardiomyocytes. Conversely, macrophages render the resting membrane potential of cardiomyocytes more positive and, according to computational modeling, accelerate their repolarization. Photostimulation of channelrhodopsin-2-expressing macrophages improves atrioventricular conduction, whereas conditional deletion of connexin 43 in macrophages and congenital lack of macrophages delay atrioventricular conduction. In the Cd11b(DTR) mouse, macrophage ablation induces progressive atrioventricular block. These observations implicate macrophages in normal and aberrant cardiac conduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Isolation and Differentiation of Murine Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rios, Francisco J; Touyz, Rhian M; Montezano, Augusto C

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages play a major role in inflammation, wound healing, and tissue repair. Infiltrated monocytes differentiate into different macrophage subtypes with protective or pathogenic activities in vascular lesions. In the heart and vascular tissues, pathological activation promotes cardiovascular inflammation and remodeling and there is increasing evidence that macrophages play important mechanisms in this environment. Primary murine macrophages can be obtained from: bone marrow by different treatments (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-GM-CSF, macrophage colony-stimulating factor-M-CSF or supernatant of murine fibroblast L929), peritoneal cavity (resident or thioglycolate elicit macrophages), from the lung (alveolar macrophages) or from adipose tissue. In this chapter we describe some protocols to obtain primary murine macrophages and how to identify a pure macrophage population or activation phenotypes using different markers.

  3. The application of adjuvant autologous antravesical macrophage cell therapy vs. BCG in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: a multicenter, randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction While adjuvant immunotherapy with Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) is effective in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (BC), adverse events (AEs) are considerable. Monocyte-derived activated killer cells (MAK) are discussed as essential in antitumoural immunoresponse, but their application may imply risks. The present trial compared autologous intravesical macrophage cell therapy (BEXIDEM®) to BCG in patients after transurethral resection (TURB) of BC. Materials and methods This open-label trial included 137 eligible patients with TaG1-3, T1G1-2 plurifocal or unifocal tumours and ≥ 2 occurrences within 24 months and was conducted from June 2004 to March 2007. Median follow-up for patients without recurrence was 12 months. Patients were randomized to BCG or mononuclear cells collected by apheresis after ex vivo cell processing and activation (BEXIDEM). Either arm treatment consisted of 6 weekly instillations and 2 cycles of 3 weekly instillations at months 3 and 6. Toxicity profile (primary endpoint) and prophylactic effects (secondary endpoint) were assessed. Results Patient characteristics were evenly distributed. Of 73 treated with BCG and 64 with BEXIDEM, 85% vs. 45% experienced AEs and 26% vs. 14% serious AEs (SAE), respectively (p < 0.001). Recurrence occurred significantly less frequent with BCG than with BEXIDEM (12% vs. 38%; p < 0.001). Discussion This initial report of autologous intravesical macrophage cell therapy in BC demonstrates BEXIDEM treatment to be safe. Recurrence rates were significantly lower with BCG however. As the efficacy of BEXIDEM remains uncertain, further data, e.g. marker lesions studies, are warranted. Trial registration The trial has been registered in the ISRCTN registry http://isrctn.org under the registration number ISRCTN35881130. PMID:20529333

  4. Skeletal muscle inflammation and atrophy in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lavine, Kory J; Sierra, Oscar L

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure represents a systemic disease with profound effects on multiple peripheral tissues including skeletal muscle. Within the context of heart failure, perturbations in skeletal muscle physiology, structure, and function strongly contribute to exercise intolerance and the morbidity of this devastating disease. There is growing evidence that chronic heart failure imparts specific pathological changes within skeletal muscle beds resulting in muscle dysfunction and tissue atrophy. Mechanistically, systemic and local inflammatory responses drive critical aspects of this pathology. In this review, we will discuss pathological mechanisms that drive skeletal muscle inflammation and highlight emerging roles for distinct innate immune subsets that reside within damage muscle tissue focusing on the recently described embryonic and monocyte-derived macrophage lineages. Within this context, we will discuss how immune mechanisms can be differentially targeted to stimulate skeletal muscle inflammation, catabolism, fiber atrophy, and regeneration.

  5. Expression of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor on vascular smooth muscle cells inhibits secretion of macrophage migration inhibitory factor and attenuates atherosclerosis in ApoE-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daxin; Xia, Min; Hayford, Claudia; Tham, El-Li; Semik, Vikki; Hurst, Stuart; Chen, Ying; Tam, Henry H; Pan, Jun; Wang, Yucheng; Tan, Xiaojin; Lan, Hui-Yao; Shen, Huahao; Kakkar, Vijay V; Xu, Qingbo; McVey, John H; Dorling, Anthony

    2015-04-14

    Tissue factor (TF) and coagulation proteases are involved in promoting atherosclerosis, but the molecular and cellular bases for their involvement are unknown. We generated a new strain (ApX4) of apolipoprotein E-deficient mice expressing a membrane-tethered human tissue factor pathway inhibitor fusion protein on smooth muscle actin-positive cells, including vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). ApX4 mice developed little atherosclerosis on either a normal chow or high-fat diet. Lipid levels were similar to those in parental ApoE(-/-) mice, and there was no detectable difference in systemic (circulating) tissue factor pathway inhibitor levels or activity. The small lipid-rich lesions that developed had markedly reduced leukocyte infiltrates, and in contrast to ApoE(-/-) mice, SMCs did not express macrophage migratory inhibitory factor (MIF), including at sites distant from atheromatous lesions. Low levels of circulating MIF in ApX4 mice normalized to levels seen in ApoE(-/-) mice after injection of an inhibitory anti-human tissue factor pathway inhibitor antibody, which also led to MIF expression by tissue factor-positive medial SMCs. MIF production by SMCs in ApoE(-/-) mice in vitro and in vivo was shown to be dependent on tissue factor and protease-activated receptor signaling, which were inhibited in ApX4 mice. Our data indicate that tissue factor plays a hitherto unreported role in the generation of MIF by SMCs in atherosclerosis-prone ApoE(-/-) mice, inhibition of which significantly prevents the development of atherosclerosis, through inhibition of leukocyte recruitment. These data significantly enhance our understanding of the pathophysiology of this important pathology and suggest new potential translational strategies to prevent atheroma formation. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Rosiglitazone Inhibits Acyl-CoA Synthetase Activity and Fatty Acid Partitioning to Diacylglycerol and Triacylglycerol via a Peroxisome Proliferator–Activated Receptor-γ–Independent Mechanism in Human Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Askari, Bardia; Kanter, Jenny E.; Sherrid, Ashley M.; Golej, Deidre L.; Bender, Andrew T.; Liu, Joey; Hsueh, Willa A.; Beavo, Joseph A.; Coleman, Rosalind A.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.

    2010-01-01

    Rosiglitazone is an insulin-sensitizing agent that has recently been shown to exert beneficial effects on atherosclerosis. In addition to peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, rosiglitazone can affect other targets, such as directly inhibiting recombinant long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL)-4 activity. Because it is unknown if ACSL4 is expressed in vascular cells involved in atherosclerosis, we investigated the ability of rosiglitazone to inhibit ACSL activity and fatty acid partitioning in human and murine arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages. Human and murine SMCs and human macrophages expressed Acsl4, and rosiglitazone inhibited Acsl activity in these cells. Furthermore, rosiglitazone acutely inhibited partitioning of fatty acids into phospholipids in human SMCs and inhibited fatty acid partitioning into diacylglycerol and triacylglycerol in human SMCs and macrophages through a PPAR-γ–independent mechanism. Conversely, murine macrophages did not express ACSL4, and rosiglitazone did not inhibit ACSL activity in these cells, nor did it affect acute fatty acid partitioning into cellular lipids. Thus, rosiglitazone inhibits ACSL activity and fatty acid partitioning in human and murine SMCs and in human macrophages through a PPAR-γ–independent mechanism likely to be mediated by ACSL4 inhibition. Therefore, rosiglitazone might alter the biological effects of fatty acids in these cells and in atherosclerosis. PMID:17259370

  7. Ethylacetate extract from Draconis Resina inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses in vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophages via suppression of ROS production.

    PubMed

    Heo, Sook-Kyoung; Yi, Hyo-Seung; Yun, Hyun-Jeong; Ko, Chang-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Woo; Park, Sun-Dong

    2010-05-01

    Draconis Resina (DR) is a type of dragon's blood resin obtained from Daemomorops draco BL. (Palmae). DR has long been used as a traditional Korean herbal medicine, and is currently used in traditional clinics to treat wounds, tumors, diarrhea, and rheumatism, insect bites and other conditions. In this study, we evaluated fractionated extracts of DR to determine if they inhibited the production of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and the expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. The results of this analysis revealed that the ethylacetate extract of Draconis Resina (DREA) was more potent than that of other extracts. Moreover, DREA inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-8 and IL-6 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) and RAW 264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, treatment with an NADPH oxidase assembly inhibitor, AEBSF, efficiently blocked LPS-induced mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation, as did DREA. These findings indicate that DREA inhibits the production of NO, PGE(2), TNF-alpha, IL-8, and IL-6 by LPS via the inhibition of ROS production, which demonstrates that DREA inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses via the suppression of ROS production. Taken together, these results indicate that DREA has the potential for use as an anti-atherosclerosis agent. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Semiautomatic High-Content Analysis of Complex Images from Cocultures of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Macrophages: A CellProfiler Showcase.

    PubMed

    Roeper, Matthias; Braun-Dullaeus, Ruediger C; Weinert, Sönke

    2017-08-01

    Automatization in microscopy, cell culture, and the ease of digital imagery allow obtainment of more information from single samples and upscaling of image-based analysis to high-content approaches. Simple segmentation algorithms of biological imagery are nowadays widely spread in biomedical research, but processing of complex sample structures, for example, variable sample compositions, cell shapes, and sizes, and rare events remains a difficult task. As there is no perfect method for image segmentation and fully automatic image analysis of complex content, we aimed to succeed by identification of unique and reliable features within the sample. Through exemplary use of a coculture of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and macrophages (MPs), we demonstrate how rare interactions within this highly variable sample type can be analyzed. Because of limitations in immunocytochemistry in our specific setup, we developed a semiautomatic approach to examine the interaction of lipid-laden MPs with VSMCs under hypoxic conditions based on nuclei morphology by high-content analysis using the open-source software CellProfiler ( www.cellprofiler.org ). We provide evidence that, in comparison with fully automatic analysis, a low threshold within the analysis workflow and subsequent manual control save time, while providing more objective and reliable results.

  9. Functionally deficient mesenchymal stem cells reside in the bone marrow niche with M2-macrophages and amyloid-β protein adjacent to loose total joint implants.

    PubMed

    Margulies, Bryan S; DeBoyace, Sean D; Parsons, Adrienne M; Policastro, Connor G; Ee, Jessica S S; Damron, Timothy S

    2015-05-01

    We sought to demonstrate whether there is a difference in the local mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) niche obtained from patients undergoing their first total joint replacement surgery versus those patients undergoing a revision surgery for an failing total joint implant. Bone marrow aspirates collected from patients undergoing revision total joint arthroplasty were observed to be less clonal and the expression of PDGFRα, CD51, ALCAM, endoglin, CXCL12, nestin, and nucleostemin were decreased. Revision MSC were also less able to commit to an osteoblast-lineage or an adipocyte-lineage. Further, in revision MSC, OPG, and IL6 expression were increased. Monocytes, derived from revision whole marrow aspirates, were less capable of differentiating into osteoclasts, the cells implicated in the pathologic degradation of bone. Osteoclasts were also not observed in tissue samples collected adjacent to the implants of revision patients; however, the alternatatively activated M2-macrophage phenotype was observed in parallel with pathologic accumulations of amyloid-β, τ-protien and 3-nitrotyrosine. Despite the limited numbers of patients examined, our data suggest that nucleostemin may be a useful functional marker for MSC while the observation of M2-macrophage infiltration around the implant lays the foundation for future investigation into a novel mechanism that we propose is associated with loose total joint implants.

  10. Pulmonary Macrophage Transplantation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takuji; Arumugam, Paritha; Sakagami, Takuro; Lachmann, Nico; Chalk, Claudia; Sallese, Anthony; Abe, Shuichi; Trapnell, Cole; Carey, Brenna; Moritz, Thomas; Malik, Punam; Lutzko, Carolyn; Wood, Robert E.; Trapnell, Bruce C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bone marrow transplantation is an effective cell therapy but requires myeloablation, which increases infection-risk and mortality. Recent lineage-tracing studies documenting that resident macrophage populations self-maintain independent of hematologic progenitors prompted us to consider organ-targeted, cell-specific therapy. Here, using GM-CSF receptor-β deficient (Csf2rb−/−) mice that develop a myeloid cell disorder identical to hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (hPAP) in children with CSF2RA/CSF2RB mutations, we show that pulmonary macrophage transplantation (PMT) of either wild-type or Csf2rb-gene-corrected macrophages without myeloablation was safe, well-tolerated, and that one administration corrected the lung disease, secondary systemic manifestations, normalized disease-related biomarkers, and prevented disease-specific mortality. PMT-derived alveolar macrophages persisted for at least one year as did therapeutic effects. Results identify mechanisms regulating alveolar macrophage population size in health and disease, indicate that GM-CSF is required for phenotypic determination of alveolar macrophages, and support translation of PMT as the first specific therapy for children with hPAP. PMID:25274301

  11. The Elusive Antifibrotic Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Adhyatmika, Adhyatmika; Putri, Kurnia S. S.; Beljaars, Leonie; Melgert, Barbro N.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic diseases, especially of the liver, the cardiovascular system, the kidneys, and the lungs, account for approximately 45% of deaths in Western societies. Fibrosis is a serious complication associated with aging and/or chronic inflammation or injury and cannot be treated effectively yet. It is characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by myofibroblasts and impaired degradation by macrophages. This ultimately destroys the normal structure of an organ, which leads to loss of function. Most efforts to develop drugs have focused on inhibiting ECM production by myofibroblasts and have not yielded many effective drugs yet. Another option is to stimulate the cells that are responsible for degradation and uptake of excess ECM, i.e., antifibrotic macrophages. However, macrophages are plastic cells that have many faces in fibrosis, including profibrotic behavior-stimulating ECM production. This can be dependent on their origin, as the different organs have tissue-resident macrophages with different origins and a various influx of incoming monocytes in steady-state conditions and during fibrosis. To be able to pharmacologically stimulate the right kind of behavior in fibrosis, a thorough characterization of antifibrotic macrophages is necessary, as well as an understanding of the signals they need to degrade ECM. In this review, we will summarize the current state of the art regarding the antifibrotic macrophage phenotype and the signals that stimulate its behavior. PMID:26618160

  12. Macrophage Responses to Epithelial Dysfunction Promote Lung Fibrosis in Aging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    tissue-resident macrophages or bone marrow -derived macrophages that prevent or promote fibrosis, respectively so they can be targeted for prevention or...guide therapy and factors released from tissue-resident macrophages or bone marrow -derived macrophages that prevent or promote fibrosis...aging? Subtask 1: Generate cohorts of shielded bone marrow chimeric mice. Dr. Misharin will perform the procedure, Drs. Chen and Soberanes will

  13. Tumor associated macrophages polarization dictates the efficacy of BCG instillation in non-muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate the prognostic role of TAMs in patients affected by non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), undergone Trans Urethral Resection of Bladder (TURB) and Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) therapy. Methods Data from 40 patients (36 men, 4 women), mean age 69 years (40-83 years), treated for NMIBC with TURB and BCG instillation were collected. Two different groups were considered: group with and group without bladder cancer recurrence. Correlations between immunofluorescence measured Mtot, M1 and M2 infiltration and clinicopathological parameters were evaluated using Spearman and Mann–Whitney methods. The recurrence-free survival rate was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results CD68 positive cells (Mtot) were observed in all specimens tested. High Mtot, M1 and M2 infiltration was observed in patients with disease recurrence, even before endovescical BCG instillation. Significant value for M2 infiltration (p = 0,042) was found calculating significativity between two group medians before BCG therapy. p = 0,072 and p = 0,180 were observed correlating median of Mtot and M1 between two groups of patients respectively. Values of p = 0,44, p = 0,23 and p = 0,64 from correlation between DFS and Mtot, M1 and M2 median in patients before endovescical BCG instillation, were calculated respectively. Comparing DFS and Mtot, M1 and M2 median in patients group after endovescical BCG instillation significant values were obtained (p = 0,020; p = 0,02; and p = 0,029 respectively). Conclusions M2 tumor infiltration could be a prognostic value of recurrence in patients with NMIBC. PMID:24423367

  14. Intracellular multiplication of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in macrophages: killing and restriction of multiplication by activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Brummer, E; Hanson, L H; Restrepo, A; Stevens, D A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of coculturing yeast-form Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with murine cells was studied. Coculture of resident peritoneal or pulmonary macrophages with P. brasiliensis for 72 h dramatically enhanced fungal multiplication 19.3 +/- 2.4- and 4.7 +/- 0.8-fold, respectively, compared with cocultures with lymph node cells or complete tissue culture medium alone. Support of P. brasiliensis multiplication by resident peritoneal macrophages was macrophage dose dependent. Lysates of macrophages, supernatants from macrophage cultures, or McVeigh-Morton broth, like complete tissue culture medium, did not support multiplication of P. brasiliensis in 72-h cultures. Time course microscopic studies of cocultures in slide wells showed that macrophages ingested P. brasiliensis cells and that the ingested cells multiplied intracellularly. In sharp contrast to resident macrophages, lymphokine-activated peritoneal and pulmonary macrophages not only prevented multiplication but reduced inoculum CFU by 96 and 100%, respectively, in 72 h. Microscopic studies confirmed killing and digestion of P. brasiliensis ingested by activated macrophages in 48 h. These findings indicate that resident macrophages are permissive for intracellular multiplication of P. brasiliensis and that this could be a factor in pathogenicity. By contrast, activated macrophages are fungicidal for P. brasiliensis. Images PMID:2744848

  15. Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J

    2017-02-10

    Macrophage polarization refers to how macrophages have been activated at a given point in space and time. Polarization is not fixed, as macrophages are sufficiently plastic to integrate multiple signals, such as those from microbes, damaged tissues, and the normal tissue environment. Three broad pathways control polarization: epigenetic and cell survival pathways that prolong or shorten macrophage development and viability, the tissue microenvironment, and extrinsic factors, such as microbial products and cytokines released in inflammation. A plethora of advances have provided a framework for rationally purifying, describing, and manipulating macrophage polarization. Here, I assess the current state of knowledge about macrophage polarization and enumerate the major questions about how activated macrophages regulate the physiology of normal and damaged tissues.

  16. Macrophage heterogeneity and tissue lipids.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Siamon

    2007-01-01

    Macrophages are present as resident cells in adipose tissue, and blood monocytes are recruited in increased numbers to sites of lipid accumulation in atherosclerosis, a modified form of inflammation in the arterial wall. Recent findings reported by 3 separate groups in this issue of the JCI provide evidence for distinct monocyte subsets, differential chemokine receptor usage, and phenotypic modulation of macrophages in murine models of genetic and high-fat diet-induced disease (see the related articles beginning on pages 175, 185, and 195). These studies raise prospects for selective therapeutic targets to ameliorate macrophage hyperinflammatory responses, while sparing host defense and repair mechanisms.

  17. Effects of protease-treated royal jelly on muscle strength in elderly nursing home residents: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ge; Wang, Honglei; Pei, Yinghua; Li, Yanmei; Wu, Hongmei; Song, Yanqi; Guo, Qi; Guo, Hui; Fukushima, Shinobu; Tatefuji, Tomoki; Wang, Jiazhong; Du, Huanmin; Su, Qian; Zhang, Wen; Shen, Suxing; Wang, Xiuyang; Dong, Renwei; Han, Peipei; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Wang, Jianhua; Huang, Guowei; Sun, Zhong; Song, Kun; Niu, Kaijun

    2017-09-12

    Although we have found that protease-treated royal jelly (pRJ) benefit for the skeletal muscle mass and strength in the aged animals, the potential beneficial effects have not been evaluated in humans. The aim of this study was to determine whether pRJ intake had beneficial effects on muscle strength in elderly nursing home residents. One hundred and ninety-four subjects enrolled into this multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Subjects received either placebo(Group 1), pRJ 1.2 g/d(Group 2), or 4.8 g/d(Group 3). Data through 1 year are reported for 163 subjects. The primary outcome measure is handgrip strength. Secondary outcomes include several physical performance tests (six-minute walk test, timed up and go test, and standing on one leg with eyes closed). The dropout rate was 16.0%. The means (95% confidence interval) of change in handgrip strength for placebo, low-dose, and high-dose groups are -0.98(-2.04,0.08), 0.50(-0.65,1.65) and 1.03(-0.37,2.44) kg (P = 0.06, P for trend = 0.02), respectively. No significant effects of the interventions were observed for physical performances. These findings suggest that pRJ treatment might not improve, but rather attenuate the progression of decrease in muscle strength in elderly people. In addition, we have not found that pRJ intervention can achieve improvement or attenuating the decrease in physical performance.

  18. Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction in Obesity Is Driven by Macrophage-Dependent Hydrogen Sulfide Depletion.

    PubMed

    Candela, Joseph; Wang, Rui; White, Carl

    2017-05-01

    The function of perivascular adipose tissue as an anticontractile mediator in the microvasculature is lost during obesity. Obesity results in inflammation and recruitment of proinflammatory macrophages to the perivascular adipose tissue that is paralleled by depletion of the vasorelaxant signaling molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the vessel. The current objective was to assess the role of macrophages in determining vascular [H2S] and defining how this impinged on vasodilation. Contractility and [H2S] were measured in mesenteric resistance arterioles from lean and obese mice by using pressure myography and confocal microscopy, respectively. Vasodilation was impaired and smooth muscle and endothelial [H2S] decreased in vessels from obese mice compared with those from lean controls. Coculturing vessels from lean mice with macrophages from obese mice, or macrophage-conditioned media, recapitulated obese phenotypes in vessels. These effects were mediated by low molecular weight species and dependent on macrophage inducible nitric oxide synthase activity. The inducible nitric oxide synthase activity of perivascular adipose tissue-resident proinflammatory macrophages promotes microvascular endothelial dysfunction by reducing the bioavailability of H2S in the vessel. These findings support a model in which vascular H2S depletion underpins the loss of perivascular adipose tissue anticontractile function in obesity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Regenerative function of immune system: Modulation of muscle stem cells.

    PubMed

    Saini, Jasdeep; McPhee, Jamie S; Al-Dabbagh, Sarah; Stewart, Claire E; Al-Shanti, Nasser

    2016-05-01

    Ageing is characterised by progressive deterioration of physiological systems and the loss of skeletal muscle mass is one of the most recognisable, leading to muscle weakness and mobility impairments. This review highlights interactions between the immune system and skeletal muscle stem cells (widely termed satellite cells or myoblasts) to influence satellite cell behaviour during muscle regeneration after injury, and outlines deficits associated with ageing. Resident neutrophils and macrophages in skeletal muscle become activated when muscle fibres are damaged via stimuli (e.g. contusions, strains, avulsions, hyperextensions, ruptures) and release high concentrations of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors into the microenvironment. These localised responses serve to attract additional immune cells which can reach in excess of 1×10(5) immune cell/mm(3) of skeletal muscle in order to orchestrate the repair process. T-cells have a delayed response, reaching peak activation roughly 4 days after the initial damage. The cytokines and growth factors released by activated T-cells play a key role in muscle satellite cell proliferation and migration, although the precise mechanisms of these interactions remain unclear. T-cells in older people display limited ability to activate satellite cell proliferation and migration which is likely to contribute to insufficient muscle repair and, consequently, muscle wasting and weakness. If the factors released by T-cells to activate satellite cells can be identified, it may be possible to develop therapeutic agents to enhance muscle regeneration and reduce the impact of muscle wasting during ageing and disease.

  20. Biology of Bony Fish Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Hodgkinson, Jordan W.; Grayfer, Leon; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are found across all vertebrate species, reside in virtually all animal tissues, and play critical roles in host protection and homeostasis. Various mechanisms determine and regulate the highly plastic functional phenotypes of macrophages, including antimicrobial host defenses (pro-inflammatory, M1-type), and resolution and repair functions (anti-inflammatory/regulatory, M2-type). The study of inflammatory macrophages in immune defense of teleosts has garnered much attention, and antimicrobial mechanisms of these cells have been extensively studied in various fish models. Intriguingly, both similarities and differences have been documented for the regulation of lower vertebrate macrophage antimicrobial defenses, as compared to what has been described in mammals. Advances in our understanding of the teleost macrophage M2 phenotypes likewise suggest functional conservation through similar and distinct regulatory strategies, compared to their mammalian counterparts. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing teleost macrophage functional heterogeneity, including monopoetic development, classical macrophage inflammatory and antimicrobial responses as well as alternative macrophage polarization towards tissues repair and resolution of inflammation. PMID:26633534

  1. Macrophages in tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Thomas A.; Vannella, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory monocytes and resident tissue macrophages are key regulators of tissue repair, regeneration, and fibrosis. Following tissue injury, monocytes and macrophages undergo marked phenotypic and functional changes to play critical roles during the initiation, maintenance, and resolution phases of tissue repair. Disturbances in macrophage function can lead to aberrant repair, with uncontrolled inflammatory mediator and growth factor production, deficient generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages, or failed communication between macrophages and epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and stem or tissue progenitor cells all contributing to a state of persistent injury, which may lead to the development of pathological fibrosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms that instruct macrophages to adopt pro-inflammatory, pro-wound healing, pro-fibrotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic, pro-resolving, and tissue regenerating phenotypes following injury, and highlight how some of these mechanisms and macrophage activation states could be exploited therapeutically. PMID:26982353

  2. Responses of adventitial CD34(+) vascular wall-resident stem/progenitor cells and medial smooth muscle cells to carotid injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yan; Wu, Yan; Zheng, Yong; Ao, Feng; Kang, Kai; Wan, Yu; Song, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Cell culture and carotid injury studies with SD rats were performed to investigate the roles of CD34(+) vascular wall-resident stem/progenitor cells (VRS/Pcs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in neointimal formation. In vitro, the media-isolated SM MHC(+) SMCs occupied 93.92±8.62% of total BrdU(+) cells, whereas the CD34(+) cells, only 2.61±0.82%, indicating that the cell expansion in SMC culture was attributed to SM MHC(+) SMCs. The adventitia-isolated CD34(+) VRS/Pcs responded to PDGF-BB by differentiating into SMC-like cells which expressed SM22α (an early stage SMC marker), but seldom SM MHC (a late stage SMC marker). In carotid injury model, the CD34(+) VRS/Pcs differentiated SMC-like cells migrated in very few numbers into only the outer layer of the media, and this was further confirmed by a cell tracking analysis. While the neointimal cells were consistently SM MHC(+) and CD34(-) SMCs during whole course of the post-injury remodeling. Thus it is speculated that the adventitial CD34(+) VRS/Pcs, at least in rat model, do not directly participate in neointimal formation, but function to maintain homeostasis of the media during injury-induced vascular wall remodeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Monocyte and macrophage contributions to cardiac remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hulsmans, Maarten; Sam, Flora; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    The mammalian heart contains a population of resident macrophages that expands in response to myocardial infarction and hemodynamic stress. This expansion occurs likely through both local macrophage proliferation and monocyte recruitment. Given the role of macrophages in tissue remodeling, their contribution to adaptive processes in the heart is conceivable but currently poorly understood. In this review, we discuss monocyte and macrophage heterogeneity associated with cardiac stress, the cell's potential contribution to the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis, and describe different tools to study and characterize these innate immune cells. Finally, we highlight their potential role as therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation of macrophage functions by L-arginine

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Sites of inflammation with prominent macrophage infiltration, such as wounds and certain tumors, are uniquely deficient in free arginine. The effects of arginine availability on macrophage physiology were investigated. When cultured in media containing less than 0.1 mM L- arginine, rat resident peritoneal macrophages exhibited enhanced spreading, tumor cytotoxicity, superoxide production, phagocytosis, and protein synthesis. Thus, arginine concentrations similar to those found in sites of inflammation can augment macrophage functions, while those found in plasma (approximately 0.1 mM) and in commonly used culture media (0.4 to 1.2 mM) are inhibitory. Culture in homoarginine, but not D-arginine, ornithine, citrulline, urea, histidine, or lysine also inhibited macrophage tumor cytotoxicity, indicating the specificity of the effect. In contrast to resident macrophages, the tumor cytotoxicity of peritoneal macrophages obtained after C. parvum injection was suppressed by culture in arginine-deficient media. However, L-arginine- deficient media enhanced all other activation-associated functions in C. parvum-elicited macrophages as in resident cells. Arginine-free wound fluid promoted resident macrophage tumoricidal activity when compared with rat serum, and again, the addition of L-arginine was inhibitory. The marked effects of L-arginine availability on macrophage functions, together with the knowledge that these cells modify the extracellular arginine concentration in sites of inflammation through arginase, provide evidence for an autoregulatory mechanism of macrophage activation. PMID:2538541

  5. Recently infiltrating MAC387(+) monocytes/macrophages a third macrophage population involved in SIV and HIV encephalitic lesion formation.

    PubMed

    Soulas, Caroline; Conerly, Cecily; Kim, Woong-Ki; Burdo, Tricia H; Alvarez, Xavier; Lackner, Andrew A; Williams, Kenneth C

    2011-05-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are critical components of HIV and SIV encephalitic lesions. We used in vivo BrdU labeling and markers specific to stages of macrophage differentiation or inflammation to define macrophage heterogeneity and to better define the role of macrophage populations in lesion formation and productive infection. Lesions were heterogeneously composed of resident macrophages (CD68(+)HAM56(+)), perivascular macrophages (CD163(+) CD68(+)MAC387(-)), and recently infiltrated MAC387(+) CD68(-)CD163(-) monocytes/macrophages. At 24 and 48 hours after BrdU inoculation, 30% of MAC387(+) monocytes/macrophages were BrdU(+), consistent with their being recently infiltrated. In perivascular cuffs with low-level SIV replication, MAC387(+) monocytes/macrophages outnumbered CD68(+) macrophages. Conversely, lesions with numerous SIV-p28(+) macrophages and multinucleated giant cells had fewer MAC387(+) monocytes/macrophages. The MAC387(+) cells were not productively infected nor did they express detectable CCR2, unlike perivascular macrophages. Overall, we found that the proportion of MAC387(+) cells tends to be higher than the proportion of CD68(+) macrophages in the brain of animals with mild encephalitis; the ratio was reversed with more severe encephalitis. These results suggest that development of SIV and HIV encephalitis is an active and ongoing process that involves the recruitment and accumulation of: i) nonproductively infected MAC387(+) monocytes/macrophages that are present with inflammation (potentially M1-like macrophages), ii) CD163(+) perivascular macrophages (consistent with M2-like macrophages), and iii) CD68(+) or HAM56(+) resident macrophages. The latter two populations are cellular reservoirs for productive infection. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Macrophages: Their Emerging Roles in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Sinder, Benjamin P; Pettit, Allison R; McCauley, Laurie K

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are present in nearly all tissues and are critical for development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Resident tissue macrophages of bone, termed osteal macrophages, are recently classified myeloid cells that are distinct from osteoclasts. Osteal macrophages are located immediately adjacent to osteoblasts, regulate bone formation, and play diverse roles in skeletal homeostasis. Genetic or pharmacological modulation of macrophages in vivo results in significant bone phenotypes, and these phenotypes depend on which macrophage subsets are altered. Macrophages are also key mediators of osseous wound healing and fracture repair, with distinct roles at various stages of the repair process. A central function of macrophages is their phagocytic ability. Each day, billions of cells die in the body and efferocytosis (phagocytosis of apoptotic cells) is a critical process in both clearing dead cells and recruitment of replacement progenitor cells to maintain homeostasis. Recent data suggest a role for efferocytosis in bone biology and these new mechanisms are outlined. Finally, although macrophages have an established role in primary tumors, emerging evidence suggests that macrophages in bone support cancers which preferentially metastasize to the skeleton. Collectively, this developing area of osteoimmunology raises new questions and promises to provide novel insights into pathophysiologic conditions as well as therapeutic and regenerative approaches vital for skeletal health. PMID:26531055

  7. Macrophages: Their Emerging Roles in Bone.

    PubMed

    Sinder, Benjamin P; Pettit, Allison R; McCauley, Laurie K

    2015-12-01

    Macrophages are present in nearly all tissues and are critical for development, homeostasis, and regeneration. Resident tissue macrophages of bone, termed osteal macrophages, are recently classified myeloid cells that are distinct from osteoclasts. Osteal macrophages are located immediately adjacent to osteoblasts, regulate bone formation, and play diverse roles in skeletal homeostasis. Genetic or pharmacological modulation of macrophages in vivo results in significant bone phenotypes, and these phenotypes depend on which macrophage subsets are altered. Macrophages are also key mediators of osseous wound healing and fracture repair, with distinct roles at various stages of the repair process. A central function of macrophages is their phagocytic ability. Each day, billions of cells die in the body and efferocytosis (phagocytosis of apoptotic cells) is a critical process in both clearing dead cells and recruitment of replacement progenitor cells to maintain homeostasis. Recent data suggest a role for efferocytosis in bone biology and these new mechanisms are outlined. Finally, although macrophages have an established role in primary tumors, emerging evidence suggests that macrophages in bone support cancers which preferentially metastasize to the skeleton. Collectively, this developing area of osteoimmunology raises new questions and promises to provide novel insights into pathophysiologic conditions as well as therapeutic and regenerative approaches vital for skeletal health. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  8. Mucosal macrophages in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mowat, Allan McI; Bain, Calum C

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal macrophages are essential for local homeostasis and in keeping a balance between commensal microbiota and the host. However, they also play essential roles in inflammation and protective immunity, when they change from peaceful regulators to powerful aggressors. As a result, activated macrophages are important targets for treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease. Until recently, the complexity and heterogeneity of intestinal macrophages have been underestimated and here we review current evidence that there are distinct populations of resident and inflammatory macrophages in the intestine. We describe the mechanisms that ensure macrophages remain partially inert in the healthy gut and cannot promote inflammation despite constant exposure to bacteria and other stimuli. This may be because the local environment 'conditions' macrophage precursors to become unresponsive after they arrive in the gut. Nevertheless, this permits some active, physiological functions to persist. A new population of pro-inflammatory macrophages appears in inflammation and we review the evidence that this involves recruitment of a distinct population of fully responsive monocytes, rather than alterations in the existing cells. A constant balance between these resident and inflammatory macrophages is critical for maintaining the status quo in healthy gut and ensuring protective immunity when required. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Pathophysiological relevance of macrophage subsets in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liberale, Luca; Dallegri, Franco; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Carbone, Federico

    2017-01-05

    Macrophages are highly heterogeneous and plastic cells. They were shown to play a critical role in all stages of atherogenesis, from the initiation to the necrotic core formation and plaque rupture. Lesional macrophages primarily derive from blood monocyte, but local macrophage proliferation as well as differentiation from smooth muscle cells have also been described. Within atherosclerotic plaques, macrophages rapidly respond to changes in the microenvironment, shifting between pro- (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) functional phenotypes. Furthermore, different stimuli have been associated with differentiation of newly discovered M2 subtypes: IL-4/IL-13 (M2a), immune-complex (M2b), IL-10/glucocorticoids (M2c), and adenosine receptor agonist (M2d). More recently, additional intraplaque macrophage phenotypes were also recognized in response to CXCL4 (M4), oxidized phospholipids (Mox), haemoglobin/haptoglobin complexes (HA-mac/M(Hb)), and heme (Mhem). Such macrophage polarization was described as a progression among multiple phenotypes, which reflect the activity of different transcriptional factors and the cross-talk between intracellular signalling. Finally, the distribution of macrophage subsets within different plaque areas was markedly associated with cardiovascular (CV) vulnerability. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge on the role of macrophage subsets in atherogenesis. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying macrophage phenotypic shift will be summarised and discussed. Finally, the role of intraplaque macrophages as predictors of CV events and the therapeutic potential of these cells will be discussed.

  10. Muscle repair and regeneration: stem cells, scaffolds, and the contributions of skeletal muscle to amphibian limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Milner, Derek J; Cameron, Jo Ann

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle possesses a robust innate capability for repair of tissue damage. Natural repair of muscle damage is a stepwise process that requires the coordinated activity of a number of cell types, including infiltrating macrophages, resident myogenic and non-myogenic stem cells, and connective tissue fibroblasts. Despite the proficiency of this intrinsic repair capability, severe injuries that result in significant loss of muscle tissue overwhelm the innate repair process and require intervention if muscle function is to be restored. Recent advances in stem cell biology, regenerative medicine, and materials science have led to attempts at developing tissue engineering-based methods for repairing severe muscle defects. Muscle tissue also plays a role in the ability of tailed amphibians to regenerate amputated limbs through epimorphic regeneration. Muscle contributes adult stem cells to the amphibian regeneration blastema, but it can also contribute blastemal cells through the dedifferentiation of multinucleate myofibers into mononuclear precursors. This fascinating plasticity and its contributions to limb regeneration have prompted researchers to investigate the potential for mammalian muscle to undergo dedifferentiation. Several works have shown that mammalian myotubes can be fragmented into mononuclear cells and induced to re-enter the cell cycle, but mature myofibers are resistant to fragmentation. However, recent works suggest that there may be a path to inducing fragmentation of mature myofibers into proliferative multipotent cells with the potential for use in muscle tissue engineering and regenerative therapies.

  11. Genome-wide approaches to defining macrophage identity and function

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Gregory J; Seidman, Jason S; Glass, Christopher K

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play essential roles in the response to injury and infection and contribute to the development and/or homeostasis of the various tissues they reside in. Conversely, macrophages also influence the pathogenesis of metabolic, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic diseases. Mechanisms that contribute to the phenotypic diversity of macrophages in health and disease remain poorly understood. Here we review the recent application of genome-wide approaches to characterize the transcriptomes and epigenetic landscapes of tissue-resident macrophages. These studies are beginning to provide insights into how distinct tissue environments are interpreted by transcriptional regulatory elements to drive specialized programs of gene expression. PMID:28087927

  12. Bone marrow macrophages support prostate cancer growth in bone

    PubMed Central

    Soki, Fabiana N.; Cho, Sun Wook; Kim, Yeo Won; Jones, Jacqueline D.; Park, Serk In; Koh, Amy J.; Entezami, Payam; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Roca, Hernan; McCauley, Laurie K.

    2015-01-01

    Resident macrophages in bone play important roles in bone remodeling, repair, and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, yet their role in skeletal metastasis remains under investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of macrophages in prostate cancer skeletal metastasis, using two in vivo mouse models of conditional macrophage depletion. RM-1 syngeneic tumor growth was analyzed in an inducible macrophage (CSF-1 receptor positive cells) ablation model (MAFIA mice). There was a significant reduction in tumor growth in the tibiae of macrophage-ablated mice, compared with control non-ablated mice. Similar results were observed when macrophage ablation was performed using liposome-encapsulated clodronate and human PC-3 prostate cancer cells where tumor-bearing long bones had increased numbers of tumor associated-macrophages. Although tumors were consistently smaller in macrophage-depleted mice, paradoxical results of macrophage depletion on bone were observed. Histomorphometric and micro-CT analyses demonstrated that clodronate-treated mice had increased bone volume, while MAFIA mice had reduced bone volume. These results suggest that the effect of macrophage depletion on tumor growth was independent of its effect on bone responses and that macrophages in bone may be more important to tumor growth than the bone itself. In conclusion, resident macrophages play a pivotal role in prostate cancer growth in bone. PMID:26459393

  13. Bone marrow macrophages support prostate cancer growth in bone.

    PubMed

    Soki, Fabiana N; Cho, Sun Wook; Kim, Yeo Won; Jones, Jacqueline D; Park, Serk In; Koh, Amy J; Entezami, Payam; Daignault-Newton, Stephanie; Pienta, Kenneth J; Roca, Hernan; McCauley, Laurie K

    2015-11-03

    Resident macrophages in bone play important roles in bone remodeling, repair, and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance, yet their role in skeletal metastasis remains under investigated. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of macrophages in prostate cancer skeletal metastasis, using two in vivo mouse models of conditional macrophage depletion. RM-1 syngeneic tumor growth was analyzed in an inducible macrophage (CSF-1 receptor positive cells) ablation model (MAFIA mice). There was a significant reduction in tumor growth in the tibiae of macrophage-ablated mice, compared with control non-ablated mice. Similar results were observed when macrophage ablation was performed using liposome-encapsulated clodronate and human PC-3 prostate cancer cells where tumor-bearing long bones had increased numbers of tumor associated-macrophages. Although tumors were consistently smaller in macrophage-depleted mice, paradoxical results of macrophage depletion on bone were observed. Histomorphometric and micro-CT analyses demonstrated that clodronate-treated mice had increased bone volume, while MAFIA mice had reduced bone volume. These results suggest that the effect of macrophage depletion on tumor growth was independent of its effect on bone responses and that macrophages in bone may be more important to tumor growth than the bone itself. In conclusion, resident macrophages play a pivotal role in prostate cancer growth in bone.

  14. Macrophage-mediated inflammation and glial response in the skeletal muscle of a rat model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, Jonathan M.; Smit-Oistad, Ivy M.; Macrander, Corey; Krakora, Dan; Meyer, Michael G.; Suzuki, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor dysfunction and loss of large motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain stem. While much research has focused on mechanisms of motor neuron cell death in the spinal cord, degenerative processes in skeletal muscle and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) are also observed early in disease development. Although recent studies support the potential therapeutic benefits of targeting the skeletal muscle in ALS, relatively little is known about inflammation and glial responses in skeletal muscle and near NMJs, or how these responses contribute to motor neuron survival, neuromuscular innervation, or motor dysfunction in ALS. We recently showed that human mesenchymal stem cells modified to release glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (hMSC-GDNF) extend survival and protect NMJs and motor neurons in SOD1G93A rats when delivered to limb muscles. In this study, we evaluate inflammatory and glial responses near NMJs in the limb muscle collected from a rat model of familial ALS (SOD1G93A transgenic rats) during disease progression and following hMSC-GDNF transplantation. Muscle samples were collected from pre-symptomatic, symptomatic, and end-stage animals. A significant increase in the expression of microglial inflammatory markers (CD11b and CD68) occurred in the skeletal muscle of symptomatic and end-stage SOD1G93A rats. Inflammation was confirmed by ELISA for inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in muscle homogenates of SOD1G93A rats. Next, we observed active glial responses in the muscle of SOD1G93A rats, specifically near intramuscular axons and NMJs. Interestingly, strong expression of activated glial markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and nestin, was observed in the areas adjacent to NMJs. Finally, we determined whether ex vivo trophic factor delivery influences inflammation and terminal Schwann cell

  15. Macrophage-mediated inflammation and glial response in the skeletal muscle of a rat model of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Van Dyke, Jonathan M; Smit-Oistad, Ivy M; Macrander, Corey; Krakora, Dan; Meyer, Michael G; Suzuki, Masatoshi

    2016-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor dysfunction and loss of large motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain stem. While much research has focused on mechanisms of motor neuron cell death in the spinal cord, degenerative processes in skeletal muscle and neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) are also observed early in disease development. Although recent studies support the potential therapeutic benefits of targeting the skeletal muscle in ALS, relatively little is known about inflammation and glial responses in skeletal muscle and near NMJs, or how these responses contribute to motor neuron survival, neuromuscular innervation, or motor dysfunction in ALS. We recently showed that human mesenchymal stem cells modified to release glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (hMSC-GDNF) extend survival and protect NMJs and motor neurons in SOD1(G93A) rats when delivered to limb muscles. In this study, we evaluate inflammatory and glial responses near NMJs in the limb muscle collected from a rat model of familial ALS (SOD1(G93A) transgenic rats) during disease progression and following hMSC-GDNF transplantation. Muscle samples were collected from pre-symptomatic, symptomatic, and end-stage animals. A significant increase in the expression of microglial inflammatory markers (CD11b and CD68) occurred in the skeletal muscle of symptomatic and end-stage SOD1(G93A) rats. Inflammation was confirmed by ELISA for inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in muscle homogenates of SOD1(G93A) rats. Next, we observed active glial responses in the muscle of SOD1(G93A) rats, specifically near intramuscular axons and NMJs. Interestingly, strong expression of activated glial markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and nestin, was observed in the areas adjacent to NMJs. Finally, we determined whether ex vivo trophic factor delivery influences inflammation and terminal

  16. Interleukin-10 reduces the pathology of mdx muscular dystrophy by deactivating M1 macrophages and modulating macrophage phenotype.

    PubMed

    Villalta, S Armando; Rinaldi, Chiara; Deng, Bo; Liu, Grace; Fedor, Brian; Tidball, James G

    2011-02-15

    M1 macrophages play a major role in worsening muscle injury in the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, mdx muscle also contains M2c macrophages that can promote tissue repair, indicating that factors regulating the balance between M1 and M2c phenotypes could influence the severity of the disease. Because interleukin-10 (IL-10) modulates macrophage activation in vitro and its expression is elevated in mdx muscles, we tested whether IL-10 influenced the macrophage phenotype in mdx muscle and whether changes in IL-10 expression affected the pathology of muscular dystrophy. Ablation of IL-10 expression in mdx mice increased muscle damage in vivo and reduced mouse strength. Treating mdx muscle macrophages with IL-10 reduced activation of the M1 phenotype, assessed by iNOS expression, and macrophages from IL-10 null mutant mice were more cytolytic than macrophages isolated from wild-type mice. Our data also showed that muscle cells in mdx muscle expressed the IL-10 receptor, suggesting that IL-10 could have direct effects on muscle cells. We assayed whether ablation of IL-10 in mdx mice affected satellite cell numbers, using Pax7 expression as an index, but found no effect. However, IL-10 mutation significantly increased myogenin expression in vivo during the acute and the regenerative phase of mdx pathology. Together, the results show that IL-10 plays a significant regulatory role in muscular dystrophy that may be caused by reducing M1 macrophage activation and cytotoxicity, increasing M2c macrophage activation and modulating muscle differentiation.

  17. Monocyte and macrophage heterogeneity in the heart.

    PubMed

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K

    2013-06-07

    Monocytes and macrophages are innate immune cells that reside and accumulate in the healthy and injured heart. The cells and their subsets pursue distinct functions in steady-state and disease, and their tenure may range between hours and months. Some subsets are highly inflammatory, whereas others support tissue repair. This review discusses current concepts of lineage relationships and crosstalk of systems, highlights open questions, and describes tools for studying monocyte and macrophage subsets in the murine and human heart.

  18. Monocyte and macrophage heterogeneity in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Nahrendorf, Matthias; Swirski, Filip K.

    2013-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are innate immune cells that reside and accumulate in the healthy and injured heart. The cells and their subsets pursue distinct functions in steady state and disease, and their tenure may range between hours to months. Some subsets are highly inflammatory, while others support tissue repair. This review discusses current concepts of lineage relationships and systems’ cross talk, highlights open questions, and describes tools for studying monocyte and macrophage subsets in the murine and human heart. PMID:23743228

  19. Liver macrophages in healthy and diseased liver.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Zeinab; Knolle, Percy A

    2017-04-01

    Kupffer cells, the largest tissue resident macrophage population, are key for the maintenance of liver integrity and its restoration after injury and infections, as well as the local initiation and resolution of innate and adaptive immunity. These important roles of Kupffer cells were recently identified in healthy and diseased liver revealing diverse functions and phenotypes of hepatic macrophages. High-level phenotypic and genomic analysis revealed that Kupffer cells are not a homogenous population and that the hepatic microenvironment actively shapes both phenotype and function of liver macrophages. Compared to macrophages from other organs, hepatic macrophages bear unique properties that are instrumental for their diverse roles in local immunity as well as liver regeneration. The diverse and, in part, contradictory roles of hepatic macrophages in anti-tumor and inflammatory immune responses as well as regulatory and regenerative processes have been obscured by the lack of appropriate technologies to specifically target or ablate Kupffer cells or monocyte-derived hepatic macrophages. Future studies will need to dissect the exact role of the hepatic macrophages with distinct functional properties linked to their differentiation status and thereby provide insight into the functional plasticity of hepatic macrophages.

  20. Monocyte and Macrophage Dynamics during Atherogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ley, Klaus; Miller, Yury I.; Hedrick, Catherine C.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular inflammation is associated with and in large part driven by changes in the leukocyte compartment of the vessel wall. Here, we focus on monocyte influx during atherosclerosis, the most common form of vascular inflammation. Although the arterial wall contains a large number of resident macrophages and some resident dendritic cells, atherosclerosis drives a rapid influx of inflammatory monocytes (Ly-6C+ in mice) and other monocytes (Ly-6C− in mice, also known as patrolling monocytes). Once in the vessel wall, Ly-6C+ monocytes differentiate to a phenotype consistent with inflammatory macrophages and inflammatory dendritic cells. The phenotype of these cells is modulated by lipid uptake, Toll-like receptor ligands, hematopoietic growth factors, cytokines and chemokines. In addition to newly recruited macrophages, it is likely that resident macrophages also change their phenotype. Monocyte-derived inflammatory macrophages have a short half-life. After undergoing apoptosis, they may be taken up by surrounding macrophages or, if the phagocytic capacity is overwhelmed, can undergo secondary necrosis, a key event in forming the necrotic core of atherosclerotic lesions. In this review, we discuss these and other processes associated with monocytic cell dynamics in the vascular wall and their role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:21677293

  1. Monocyte/macrophage differentiation in dermatomyositis and polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, Kevin M; Piepkorn, Martin; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Menck, Sylvia; Hanefeld, Folker; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J

    2004-08-01

    Recent advances have revealed significant differences in the pathogenesis of inflammatory myopathies. To determine whether different patterns of macrophage differentiation are a useful tool to delineate the major groups of inflammatory myopathies, the muscle biopsies of 11 patients with dermatomyositis and 12 patients with polymyositis were studied using different macrophage markers. In polymyositis, the early-activation markers MRP14 and 27E10 stained the majority of macrophages, which were recognized by the pan-macrophage marker Ki-M1P and which were located primarily in the endomysium. In dermatomyositis, macrophages predominantly expressed the late-activation marker 25F9 and were found mainly in the perimysium. Thus, the location and presence of different subsets of macrophages distinguish dermatomyositis and polymyositis. The predominance of early-activated macrophages in polymyositis indicates a more acute disease process. The findings in dermatomyositis, by contrast, suggest a role of persistent monocytes/macrophages in the disease process.

  2. Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling Requires Recruitment of Circulating Mesenchymal Precursors of a Monocyte/Macrophage Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Frid, Maria G.; Brunetti, Jacqueline A.; Burke, Danielle L.; Carpenter, Todd C.; Davie, Neil J.; Reeves, John T.; Roedersheimer, Mark T.; van Rooijen, Nico; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2006-01-01

    Vascular remodeling in chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension includes marked fibroproliferative changes in the pulmonary artery (PA) adventitia. Although resident PA fibroblasts have long been considered the primary contributors to these processes, we tested the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling requires recruitment of circulating mesenchymal precursors of a monocyte/macrophage lineage, termed fibrocytes. Using two neonatal animal models (rats and calves) of chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, we demonstrated a dramatic perivascular accumulation of mononuclear cells of a monocyte/macrophage lineage (expressing CD45, CD11b, CD14, CD68, ED1, ED2). Many of these cells produced type I collagen, expressed α-smooth muscle actin, and proliferated, thus exhibiting mesenchymal cell characteristics attributed to fibrocytes. The blood-borne origin of these cells was confirmed in experiments wherein circulating monocytes/macrophages of chronically hypoxic rats were in vivo-labeled with DiI fluorochrome via liposome delivery and subsequently identified in the remodeled pulmonary, but not systemic, arterial adventitia. The DiI-labeled cells that appeared in the vessel wall expressed monocyte/macrophage markers and procollagen. Selective depletion of this monocytic cell population, using either clodronate-liposomes or gadolinium chloride, prevented pulmonary adventitial remodeling (ie, production of collagen, fibronectin, and tenascin-C and accumulation of myofibroblasts). We conclude that circulating mesenchymal precursors of a monocyte/macrophage lineage, including fibrocytes, are essential contributors to hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. PMID:16436679

  3. Macrophage skewing by Phd2 haplodeficiency prevents ischaemia by inducing arteriogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yukiji; Costa, Sandra; Delamarre, Estelle; Roncal, Carmen; Leite de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Finisguerra, Veronica; Deschoemaeker, Sofie; Bruyère, Françoise; Wenes, Mathias; Hamm, Alexander; Serneels, Jens; Magat, Julie; Bhattacharyya, Tapan; Anisimov, Andrey; Jordan, Benedicte F; Alitalo, Kari; Maxwell, Patrick; Gallez, Bernard; Zhuang, Zhen W; Saito, Yoshihiko; Simons, Michael; De Palma, Michele; Mazzone, Massimiliano

    2011-10-09

    PHD2 serves as an oxygen sensor that rescues blood supply by regulating vessel formation and shape in case of oxygen shortage. However, it is unknown whether PHD2 can influence arteriogenesis. Here we studied the role of PHD2 in collateral artery growth by using hindlimb ischaemia as a model, a process that compensates for the lack of blood flow in case of major arterial occlusion. We show that Phd2 (also known as Egln1) haplodeficient (Phd2(+/-)) mice displayed preformed collateral arteries that preserved limb perfusion and prevented tissue necrosis in ischaemia. Improved arteriogenesis in Phd2(+/-) mice was due to an expansion of tissue-resident, M2-like macrophages and their increased release of arteriogenic factors, leading to enhanced smooth muscle cell (SMC) recruitment and growth. Both chronic and acute deletion of one Phd2 allele in macrophages was sufficient to skew their polarization towards a pro-arteriogenic phenotype. Mechanistically, collateral vessel preconditioning relied on the activation of canonical NF-κB pathway in Phd2(+/-) macrophages. These results unravel how PHD2 regulates arteriogenesis and artery homeostasis by controlling a specific differentiation state in macrophages and suggest new treatment options for ischaemic disorders.

  4. Developmental origin of lung macrophage diversity

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Serena Y. S.; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are specialized phagocytic cells, present in all tissues, which engulf and digest pathogens, infected and dying cells, and debris, and can recruit and regulate other immune cells and the inflammatory response and aid in tissue repair. Macrophage subpopulations play distinct roles in these processes and in disease, and are typically recognized by differences in marker expression, immune function, or tissue of residency. Although macrophage subpopulations in the brain have been found to have distinct developmental origins, the extent to which development contributes to macrophage diversity between tissues and within tissues is not well understood. Here, we investigate the development and maintenance of mouse lung macrophages by marker expression patterns, genetic lineage tracing and parabiosis. We show that macrophages populate the lung in three developmental waves, each giving rise to a distinct lineage. These lineages express different markers, reside in different locations, renew in different ways, and show little or no interconversion. Thus, development contributes significantly to lung macrophage diversity and targets each lineage to a different anatomical domain. PMID:26952982

  5. Latest perspectives on macrophages in bone homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Bozec, Aline; Soulat, Didier

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge about macrophages residing in the bone, also known as osteal macrophages or osteomacs, is still limited. A hallmark of this peculiar myeloid population is the expression of macrophage markers distinct from the markers found on osteoclast surface. In bone, osteomacs are in contact with osteoblasts, where they are involved in regulating bone homeostasis. However, additional macrophage subtypes already present in the bone marrow or recruited from the blood circulation could have further functions, which could be all important for the maintenance of the bone architecture and its associated functions. Indeed, bone marrow macrophages have been found to eliminate apoptotic cells, particularly apoptotic osteoblasts through a process named efferocytosis. This phagocytic process plays an essential role in bone tissue homeostasis and new bone formation. In addition, bone marrow macrophages can influence the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches. They contribute to the regulation of the HSC progenitor cell maintenance, mobilization, and function. To do so, macrophages secrete cytokines in steady state or during stress conditions. These cytokines influence hematopoiesis either by a direct effect on HSCs or through the control of stromal cells that are essential for the HSC niches. Interestingly, the similarities between the niches for HSCs and the niche for metastatic tumor cells support the possibility that bone-resident macrophages could control the homing of tumor cells and their proliferation within the bone. In general, macrophage role during metastatic processes is well described; however, their direct involvement in bone metastasis is a rising research area. In this review, we will highlight the macrophage functions in the skeleton, in the maintenance of the HCS niches, and their importance in bone metastasis.

  6. Avian macrophage: effector functions in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, M A; Heggen, C L; Hussain, I

    2000-01-01

    Monocytes-macrophages, cells belonging to the mononuclear phagocytic system, are considered as the first line of immunological defense. Being mobile scavenger cells, macrophages participate in innate immunity by serving as phagocytic cells. These cells arise in the bone marrow and subsequently enter the blood circulation as blood monocytes. Upon migration to various tissues, monocytes mature and differentiate into tissue macrophages. Macrophages then initiate the 'acquired' immune response in their capacity as antigen processing and presenting cells. While responding to their tissue microenvironment or exogenous antigenic challenge, macrophages may secrete several immunoregulatory cytokines or metabolites. Being the first line of immunological defense, macrophages therefore represent an important step during interaction with infectious agents. The outcome of the macrophage-pathogen interaction depends upon several factors including the stage of macrophage activation, the nature of the infectious agent, the level of genetic control on macrophage function as well as environmental and nutritional factors that may modulate macrophage activation and functions. Research in avian macrophages has lagged behind that in mammals. This has been largely due to the lack of harvestable resident macrophages from the chicken peritoneal cavity. However, the development of elicitation protocols to harvest inflammatory abdominal macrophages and the availability of transformed chicken macrophage cell lines, has enabled researchers to address several questions related to chicken macrophage biology and function in health and disease. In this manuscript the basic profiles of several macrophage effector functions are described. In addition, the interaction of macrophages with various pathogens as well as the effect of genetic and environmental factors on macrophage functional modulation is described.

  7. Diversity of Intestinal Macrophages in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Anja A.; Erben, Ulrike; Kredel, Lea I.; Siegmund, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages as innate immune cells and fast responders to antigens play a central role in protecting the body from the luminal content at a huge interface. Chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases massively alters the number and the subset diversity of intestinal macrophages. We here address the diversity within the human intestinal macrophage compartment at the level of similarities and differences between homeostasis and chronic intestinal inflammation as well as between UC and CD, including the potential role of macrophage subsets for intestinal fibrosis. Hallmark of macrophages is their enormous plasticity, i.e., their capacity to integrate signals from their environment thereby changing their phenotype and functions. Tissue-resident macrophages located directly beneath the surface epithelium in gut homeostasis are mostly tolerogenic. The total number of macrophages increases with luminal contents entering the mucosa through a broken intestinal barrier in ulcerative colitis (UC) as well as in Crohn’s disease (CD). Although not fully understood, the resulting mixtures of tissue-resident and tissue-infiltrating macrophages in both entities are diverse with respect to their phenotypes and their distribution. Macrophages in UC mainly act within the intestinal mucosa. In CD, macrophages can also be found in the muscularis and the mesenteric fat tissue compartment. Taken together, the present knowledge on human intestinal macrophages so far provides a good starting point to dig deeper into the similarities and differences of functional subsets and to finally use their phenotypical diversity as markers for complex local milieus in health and disease. PMID:26697009

  8. Diversity of Intestinal Macrophages in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Anja A; Erben, Ulrike; Kredel, Lea I; Siegmund, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages as innate immune cells and fast responders to antigens play a central role in protecting the body from the luminal content at a huge interface. Chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel diseases massively alters the number and the subset diversity of intestinal macrophages. We here address the diversity within the human intestinal macrophage compartment at the level of similarities and differences between homeostasis and chronic intestinal inflammation as well as between UC and CD, including the potential role of macrophage subsets for intestinal fibrosis. Hallmark of macrophages is their enormous plasticity, i.e., their capacity to integrate signals from their environment thereby changing their phenotype and functions. Tissue-resident macrophages located directly beneath the surface epithelium in gut homeostasis are mostly tolerogenic. The total number of macrophages increases with luminal contents entering the mucosa through a broken intestinal barrier in ulcerative colitis (UC) as well as in Crohn's disease (CD). Although not fully understood, the resulting mixtures of tissue-resident and tissue-infiltrating macrophages in both entities are diverse with respect to their phenotypes and their distribution. Macrophages in UC mainly act within the intestinal mucosa. In CD, macrophages can also be found in the muscularis and the mesenteric fat tissue compartment. Taken together, the present knowledge on human intestinal macrophages so far provides a good starting point to dig deeper into the similarities and differences of functional subsets and to finally use their phenotypical diversity as markers for complex local milieus in health and disease.

  9. Regulatory interactions between muscle and the immune system during muscle regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tidball, James G; Villalta, S Armando

    2010-05-01

    Recent discoveries reveal complex interactions between skeletal muscle and the immune system that regulate muscle regeneration. In this review, we evaluate evidence that indicates that the response of myeloid cells to muscle injury promotes muscle regeneration and growth. Acute perturbations of muscle activate a sequence of interactions between muscle and inflammatory cells. The initial inflammatory response is a characteristic Th1 inflammatory response, first dominated by neutrophils and subsequently by CD68(+) M1 macrophages. M1 macrophages can propagate the Th1 response by releasing proinflammatory cytokines and cause further tissue damage through the release of nitric oxide. Myeloid cells in the early Th1 response stimulate the proliferative phase of myogenesis through mechanisms mediated by TNF-alpha and IL-6; experimental prolongation of their presence is associated with delayed transition to the early differentiation stage of myogenesis. Subsequent invasion by CD163(+)/CD206(+) M2 macrophages attenuates M1 populations through the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-10. M2 macrophages play a major role in promoting growth and regeneration; their absence greatly slows muscle growth following injury or modified use and inhibits muscle differentiation and regeneration. Chronic muscle injury leads to profiles of macrophage invasion and function that differ from acute injuries. For example, mdx muscular dystrophy yields invasion of muscle by M1 macrophages, but their early invasion is accompanied by a subpopulation of M2a macrophages. M2a macrophages are IL-4 receptor(+)/CD206(+) cells that reduce cytotoxicity of M1 macrophages. Subsequent invasion of dystrophic muscle by M2c macrophages is associated with progression of the regenerative phase in pathophysiology. Together, these findings show that transitions in macrophage phenotype are an essential component of muscle regeneration in vivo following acute or chronic muscle damage.

  10. Regulatory interactions between muscle and the immune system during muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Villalta, S. Armando

    2010-01-01

    Recent discoveries reveal complex interactions between skeletal muscle and the immune system that regulate muscle regeneration. In this review, we evaluate evidence that indicates that the response of myeloid cells to muscle injury promotes muscle regeneration and growth. Acute perturbations of muscle activate a sequence of interactions between muscle and inflammatory cells. The initial inflammatory response is a characteristic Th1 inflammatory response, first dominated by neutrophils and subsequently by CD68+ M1 macrophages. M1 macrophages can propagate the Th1 response by releasing proinflammatory cytokines and cause further tissue damage through the release of nitric oxide. Myeloid cells in the early Th1 response stimulate the proliferative phase of myogenesis through mechanisms mediated by TNF-α and IL-6; experimental prolongation of their presence is associated with delayed transition to the early differentiation stage of myogenesis. Subsequent invasion by CD163+/CD206+ M2 macrophages attenuates M1 populations through the release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-10. M2 macrophages play a major role in promoting growth and regeneration; their absence greatly slows muscle growth following injury or modified use and inhibits muscle differentiation and regeneration. Chronic muscle injury leads to profiles of macrophage invasion and function that differ from acute injuries. For example, mdx muscular dystrophy yields invasion of muscle by M1 macrophages, but their early invasion is accompanied by a subpopulation of M2a macrophages. M2a macrophages are IL-4 receptor+/CD206+ cells that reduce cytotoxicity of M1 macrophages. Subsequent invasion of dystrophic muscle by M2c macrophages is associated with progression of the regenerative phase in pathophysiology. Together, these findings show that transitions in macrophage phenotype are an essential component of muscle regeneration in vivo following acute or chronic muscle damage. PMID:20219869

  11. Macrophages: Regulators of the Inflammatory Microenvironment during Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brady, Nicholas J; Chuntova, Pavlina; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are critical mediators of inflammation and important regulators of developmental processes. As a key phagocytic cell type, macrophages evolved as part of the innate immune system to engulf and process cell debris and pathogens. Macrophages produce factors that act directly on their microenvironment and also bridge innate immune responses to the adaptive immune system. Resident macrophages are important for acting as sensors for tissue damage and maintaining tissue homeostasis. It is now well-established that macrophages are an integral component of the breast tumor microenvironment, where they contribute to tumor growth and progression, likely through many of the mechanisms that are utilized during normal wound healing responses. Because macrophages contribute to normal mammary gland development and breast cancer growth and progression, this review will discuss both resident mammary gland macrophages and tumor-associated macrophages with an emphasis on describing how macrophages interact with their surrounding environment during normal development and in the context of cancer.

  12. Macrophages: Regulators of the Inflammatory Microenvironment during Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Nicholas J.; Chuntova, Pavlina; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are critical mediators of inflammation and important regulators of developmental processes. As a key phagocytic cell type, macrophages evolved as part of the innate immune system to engulf and process cell debris and pathogens. Macrophages produce factors that act directly on their microenvironment and also bridge innate immune responses to the adaptive immune system. Resident macrophages are important for acting as sensors for tissue damage and maintaining tissue homeostasis. It is now well-established that macrophages are an integral component of the breast tumor microenvironment, where they contribute to tumor growth and progression, likely through many of the mechanisms that are utilized during normal wound healing responses. Because macrophages contribute to normal mammary gland development and breast cancer growth and progression, this review will discuss both resident mammary gland macrophages and tumor-associated macrophages with an emphasis on describing how macrophages interact with their surrounding environment during normal development and in the context of cancer. PMID:26884646

  13. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  14. Resident resistance.

    PubMed

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  15. A central role for CD68(+) macrophages in hepatopulmonary syndrome. Reversal by macrophage depletion.

    PubMed

    Thenappan, Thenappan; Goel, Ankush; Marsboom, Glenn; Fang, Yong-Hu; Toth, Peter T; Zhang, Hannah J; Kajimoto, Hidemi; Hong, Zhigang; Paul, Jonathan; Wietholt, Christian; Pogoriler, Jennifer; Piao, Lin; Rehman, Jalees; Archer, Stephen L

    2011-04-15

    The etiology of hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), a common complication of cirrhosis, is unknown. Inflammation and macrophage accumulation occur in HPS; however, their importance is unclear. Common bile duct ligation (CBDL) creates an accepted model of HPS, allowing us to investigate the cause of HPS. We hypothesized that macrophages are central to HPS and investigated the therapeutic potential of macrophage depletion. Hemodynamics, alveolar-arterial gradient, vascular reactivity, and histology were assessed in CBDL versus sham rats (n = 21 per group). The effects of plasma on smooth muscle cell proliferation and endothelial tube formation were measured. Macrophage depletion was used to prevent (gadolinium) or regress (clodronate) HPS. CD68(+) macrophages and capillary density were measured in the lungs of patients with cirrhosis versus control patients (n = 10 per group). CBDL increased cardiac output and alveolar-arterial gradient by causing capillary dilatation and arteriovenous malformations. Activated CD68(+)macrophages (nuclear factor-κB+) accumulated in HPS pulmonary arteries, drawn by elevated levels of plasma endotoxin and lung monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. These macrophages expressed inducible nitric oxide synthase, vascular endothelial growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor. HPS plasma increased endothelial tube formation and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. Macrophage depletion prevented and reversed the histological and hemodynamic features of HPS. CBDL lungs demonstrated increased medial thickness and obstruction of small pulmonary arteries. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition unmasked exaggerated pulmonary vasoconstrictor responses in HPS. Patients with cirrhosis had increased pulmonary intravascular macrophage accumulation and capillary density. HPS results from intravascular accumulation of CD68(+)macrophages. An occult proliferative vasculopathy may explain the occasional transition to portopulmonary hypertension

  16. CRIg-expressing peritoneal macrophages are associated with disease severity in patients with cirrhosis and ascites

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Katharine M.; Banh, Xuan; Gadd, Victoria L.; Wojcik, Kyle K.; Ariffin, Juliana K.; Jose, Sara; Lukowski, Samuel; Baillie, Gregory J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Powell, Elizabeth E.

    2016-01-01

    Infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and ascites. Hypothesizing that innate immune dysfunction contributes to susceptibility to infection, we assessed ascitic fluid macrophage phenotype and function. The expression of complement receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily (CRIg) and CCR2 defined two phenotypically and functionally distinct peritoneal macrophage subpopulations. The proportion of CRIghi macrophages differed between patients and in the same patient over time, and a high proportion of CRIghi macrophages was associated with reduced disease severity (model for end-stage liver disease) score. As compared with CRIglo macrophages, CRIghi macrophages were highly phagocytic and displayed enhanced antimicrobial effector activity. Transcriptional profiling by RNA sequencing and comparison with human macrophage and murine peritoneal macrophage expression signatures highlighted similarities among CRIghi cells, human macrophages, and mouse F4/80hi resident peritoneal macrophages and among CRIglo macrophages, human monocytes, and mouse F4/80lo monocyte-derived peritoneal macrophages. These data suggest that CRIghi and CRIglo macrophages may represent a tissue-resident population and a monocyte-derived population, respectively. In conclusion, ascites fluid macrophage subset distribution and phagocytic capacity is highly variable among patients with chronic liver disease. Regulating the numbers and/or functions of these macrophage populations could provide therapeutic opportunities in cirrhotic patients. PMID:27699269

  17. Mechanisms of Organ Injury and Repair by Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vannella, Kevin M; Wynn, Thomas A

    2017-02-10

    Macrophages regulate tissue regeneration following injury. They can worsen tissue injury by producing reactive oxygen species and other toxic mediators that disrupt cell metabolism, induce apoptosis, and exacerbate ischemic injury. However, they also produce a variety of growth factors, such as IGF-1, VEGF-α, TGF-β, and Wnt proteins that regulate epithelial and endothelial cell proliferation, myofibroblast activation, stem and tissue progenitor cell differentiation, and angiogenesis. Proresolving macrophages in turn restore tissue homeostasis by functioning as anti-inflammatory cells, and macrophage-derived matrix metalloproteinases regulate fibrin and collagen turnover. However, dysregulated macrophage function impairs wound healing and contributes to the development of fibrosis. Consequently, the mechanisms that regulate these different macrophage activation states have become active areas of research. In this review, we discuss the common and unique mechanisms by which macrophages instruct tissue repair in the liver, nervous system, heart, lung, skeletal muscle, and intestine and illustrate how macrophages might be exploited therapeutically.

  18. Antimicrobial proteins of murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, P S; Eisenhauer, P B; Harwig, S S; van den Barselaar, M T; van Furth, R; Lehrer, R I

    1993-01-01

    Three murine microbicidal proteins (MUMPs) were purified from cells of the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 that had been activated by gamma interferon. Similar proteins were also present in nonactivated RAW264.7 cells, in cells of the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1, and in resident and activated murine peritoneal macrophages. MUMP-1, MUMP-2, and MUMP-3 killed Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Mycobacterium fortuitum, and Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro. MUMP-1 resembled an H1 histone but was unusual because its N-terminal residue (serine) was not N acetylated. Although MUMP-2 was N terminally blocked, its high lysine/arginine ratio and its reactivity with an antibody to H1 histones suggested that it also belonged to the H1 histone family. MUMP-3 was identical to histone H2B in 30 of 30 amino-terminal residues. Although the antimicrobial properties of histones have been recognized for decades, this is the first evidence that such proteins may endow the lysosomal apparatus of macrophages with nonoxidative antimicrobial potential. Other MUMPs, including some with a more restricted antimicrobial spectrum and one that appeared to be induced in RAW264.7 cells after gamma interferon stimulation, were noted but remain to be characterized. Images PMID:8514411

  19. The Effects of Increased Cardiac Output, Surgical Isolation and Countercurrent Exchange at the Femoral Artery on the Residence Time of Xenon in Muscle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    Correct positioning was confirmed by a continuous pressure recording (Gould). We removed the skin and subcutaneous tissues of the left gastrocnemius muscle...hypoxemia persisted and was resistant to efforts to correct it ( recessing the endotracheal tube, increasing airway pressures) for the duration of the

  20. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  1. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Matthew E; Pavlath, Grace K

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  2. Macrophage origin limits functional plasticity in helminth-bacterial co-infection

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Sharon M.; Duncan, Sheelagh; Hewitson, James P.; Barr, Tom A.; Jackson-Jones, Lucy H.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2017-01-01

    Rapid reprogramming of the macrophage activation phenotype is considered important in the defense against consecutive infection with diverse infectious agents. However, in the setting of persistent, chronic infection the functional importance of macrophage-intrinsic adaptation to changing environments vs. recruitment of new macrophages remains unclear. Here we show that resident peritoneal macrophages expanded by infection with the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri altered their activation phenotype in response to infection with Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium in vitro and in vivo. The nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages efficiently upregulated bacterial induced effector molecules (e.g. MHC-II, NOS2) similarly to newly recruited monocyte-derived macrophages. Nonetheless, recruitment of blood monocyte-derived macrophages to Salmonella infection occurred with equal magnitude in co-infected animals and caused displacement of the nematode-expanded, tissue resident-derived macrophages from the peritoneal cavity. Global gene expression analysis revealed that although nematode-expanded resident F4/80high macrophages made an anti-bacterial response, this was muted as compared to newly recruited F4/80low macrophages. However, the F4/80high macrophages adopted unique functional characteristics that included enhanced neutrophil-stimulating chemokine production. Thus, our data provide important evidence that plastic adaptation of MΦ activation does occur in vivo, but that cellular plasticity is outweighed by functional capabilities specific to the tissue origin of the cell. PMID:28334040

  3. Macrophages in diabetic gastroparesis– the missing link?

    PubMed Central

    Neshatian, Leila; Gibbons, Simon J.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic gastroparesis results in significant morbidity for patients and major economic burden for society. Treatment options for diabetic gastroparesis are currently directed at symptom control rather than the underlying disease and are limited. The pathophysiology of diabetic gastroparesis includes damage to intrinsic and extrinsic neurons, smooth muscle and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC). Oxidative damage in diabetes appears to be one of the primary insults involved in the pathogenesis of several complications of diabetes, including gastroparesis. Recent studies have highlighted the potential role of macrophages as key cellular elements in the pathogenesis of diabetic gastroparesis. Macrophages are important for both homeostasis and defense against a variety of pathogens. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), an enzyme expressed in a subset of macrophages has emerged as a major protective mechanism against oxidative stress. Activation of macrophages with high levels of HO1 expression protects against development of delayed gastric emptying in animal models of diabetes, while activation of macrophages that do not express HO1 are linked to neuromuscular cell injury. Targeting macrophages and HO1 may therefore be a therapeutic option in diabetic gastroparesis. Purpose This report briefly reviews the pathophysiology of diabetic gastroparesis with a focus on oxidative damage and how activation and polarization of different subtypes of macrophages in the muscularis propria determines development of delay in gastric emptying or protects against its development. PMID:25168158

  4. Macrophage physiology in the eye.

    PubMed

    Chinnery, Holly R; McMenamin, Paul G; Dando, Samantha J

    2017-04-01

    The eye is a complex sensory organ composed of a range of tissue types including epithelia, connective tissue, smooth muscle, vascular and neural tissue. While some components of the eye require a high level of transparency to allow light to pass through unobstructed, other tissues are characterized by their dense pigmentation, which functions to absorb light and thus control its passage through the ocular structures. Macrophages are present in all ocular tissues, from the cornea at the anterior surface through to the choroid/sclera at the posterior pole. This review will describe the current understanding of the distribution, phenotype, and physiological role of ocular macrophages, and provide a summary of evidence pertaining to their proposed role during pathological conditions.

  5. Gap junctional communication between vascular cells. Induction of connexin43 messenger RNA in macrophage foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Polacek, D.; Lal, R.; Volin, M. V.; Davies, P. F.

    1993-01-01

    The structure and function of blood vessels depend on the ability of vascular cells to receive and transduce signals and to communicate with each other. One means by which vascular cells have been shown to communicate is via gap junctions, specifically connexin43. In atherosclerosis, the normal physical patterns of communication are disrupted by the subendothelial infiltration and accumulation of blood monocytes, which in turn can differentiate into resident foam cells. In this paper we report that neither freshly isolated human peripheral blood monocytes nor differentiated monocytes/macrophages exhibit functional gap junctional dye transfer in homo-cellular culture or in co-culture with endothelial cells or smooth muscle cells. By Northern analysis, neither freshly isolated blood monocytes nor pure cultures of differentiated monocyte/macrophages expressed gap junction messenger RNA. However, immunohistochemical staining followed by in situ hybridization on sections of human atherosclerotic carotid arteries revealed strong expression of gap junction connexin43 messenger RNA by macrophage foam cells. These results suggest that tissue-specific conditions present in atherosclerotic arteries induce expression of connexin43 messenger RNA in monocyte/macrophages. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8382009

  6. Functional modifications of macrophage activity after sublethal irradiation. [Toxoplasma gondii

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The modifications of macrophage activity following sublethal irradiation, both in vivo and in vitro, were studied using spreading and C3b-receptor-mediated ingestion assays. Nonelicited peritoneal washout cells were examined for changes in activity and selected population characteristics. The cells from irradiated mice were from a resident peritoneal population and not immigrating cells. The macrophage population showed enhanced activity early with a refractory period (24-48) when the macrophages were unresponsive to stimulation by irradiated lymphocytes. The enhanced activity was inversely dose dependent on macrophage. The lymphocytes showed a regulatory function(s) on the time post irradiation at which they were examined. Early lymphocytes exhibited the ability to enhance the activity of normal macrophages while lymphocytes removed 24 hours post irradiation could suppress the activity of already activated macrophages. The effect(s) of the various lymphocyte populations were reproduced with cell-free supernatants which was indicative of the production of lymphokines. Separation on nylon wool columns indicated that the activity resided primarily in the T-cell population of lymphocytes. In vitro irradiation indicated that stimulation of the lymphocytes is macrophage dependent. Additional work indicated that sublethally irradiated macrophages did not inhibit replication of the coccidian protozoon Toxoplasma gondii although they did show increased phagocytosis. Examination of the serum from whole body irradiated mice showed the presence of a postirradiation substance which enhanced the phagocytosis of normal macrophages. It was not present in the serum of normal mice and was not endotoxin.

  7. Origins and Hallmarks of Macrophages: Development, Homeostasis, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Thomas A.; Chawla, Ajay; Pollard, Jeffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Preface Macrophages the most plastic cells of the hematopoietic system are found in all tissues and exhibit great functional diversity. They have roles in development, homeostasis, tissue repair, and immunity. While anatomically distinct, resident tissue macrophages exhibit different transcriptional profiles, and functional capabilities, they are all required for the maintenance of homeostasis. However, these reparative and homeostatic functions can be subverted by chronic insults, resulting in a causal association of macrophages with disease states. In this review, we discuss how macrophages regulate normal physiology and development and provide several examples of their pathophysiologic roles in disease. We define the “hallmarks” of macrophages performing particular functions, taking into account novel insights into the diversity of their lineages, identity, and regulation. This diversity is essential to understand because macrophages have emerged as important therapeutic targets in many important human diseases. PMID:23619691

  8. Macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    Initiation and progression of atherosclerosis depend on local inflammation and accumulation of lipids in the vascular wall. Although many cells are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, macrophages are fundamental contributors. For nearly a decade, the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages has been studied. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages are submitted to a large variety of micro-environmental signals, such as oxidized lipids and cytokines, which influence the phenotypic polarization and activation of macrophages resulting in a dynamic plasticity. The macrophage phenotype spectrum is characterized, at the extremes, by the classical M1 macrophages induced by T-helper 1 (Th-1) cytokines and by the alternative M2 macrophages induced by Th-2 cytokines. M2 macrophages can be further classified into M2a, M2b, M2c, and M2d subtypes. More recently, additional plaque-specific macrophage phenotypes have been identified, termed as Mox, Mhem, and M4. Understanding the mechanisms and functional consequences of the phenotypic heterogeneity of macrophages will contribute to determine their potential role in lesion development and plaque stability. Furthermore, research on macrophage plasticity could lead to novel therapeutic approaches to counteract cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on macrophage subsets in atherosclerotic plaques and mechanism behind the modulation of the macrophage phenotype.

  9. Resident vascular progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Torsney, Evelyn; Xu, Qingbo

    2011-02-01

    Homeostasis of the vessel wall is essential for maintaining its function, including blood pressure and patency of the lumen. In physiological conditions, the turnover rate of vascular cells, i.e. endothelial and smooth muscle cells, is low, but markedly increased in diseased situations, e.g. vascular injury after angioplasty. It is believed that mature vascular cells have an ability to proliferate to replace lost cells normally. On the other hand, recent evidence indicates stem/progenitor cells may participate in vascular repair and the formation of neointimal lesions in severely damaged vessels. It was found that all three layers of the vessels, the intima, media and adventitia, contain resident progenitor cells, including endothelial progenitor cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, Sca-1+ and CD34+ cells. Data also demonstrated that these resident progenitor cells could differentiate into a variety of cell types in response to different culture conditions. However, collective data were obtained mostly from in vitro culture assays and phenotypic marker studies. There are many unanswered questions concerning the mechanism of cell differentiation and the functional role of these cells in vascular repair and the pathogenesis of vascular disease. In the present review, we aim to summarize the data showing the presence of the resident progenitor cells, to highlight possible signal pathways orchestrating cell differentiation toward endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and to discuss the data limitations, challenges and controversial issues related to the role of progenitors. This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".

  10. Pivotal role for skin transendothelial radio-resistant anti-inflammatory macrophages in tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Barreiro, Olga; Cibrian, Danay; Clemente, Cristina; Alvarez, David; Moreno, Vanessa; Valiente, Íñigo; Bernad, Antonio; Vestweber, Dietmar; Arroyo, Alicia G; Martín, Pilar; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Sánchez Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and functional specialization among skin-resident macrophages are incompletely understood. In this study, we describe a novel subset of murine dermal perivascular macrophages that extend protrusions across the endothelial junctions in steady-state and capture blood-borne macromolecules. Unlike other skin-resident macrophages that are reconstituted by bone marrow-derived progenitors after a genotoxic insult, these cells are replenished by an extramedullary radio-resistant and UV-sensitive Bmi1+ progenitor. Furthermore, they possess a distinctive anti-inflammatory transcriptional profile, which cannot be polarized under inflammatory conditions, and are involved in repair and remodeling functions for which other skin-resident macrophages appear dispensable. Based on all their properties, we define these macrophages as Skin Transendothelial Radio-resistant Anti-inflammatory Macrophages (STREAM) and postulate that their preservation is important for skin homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15251.001 PMID:27304075

  11. Metabolism Supports Macrophage Activation

    PubMed Central

    Langston, P. Kent; Shibata, Munehiko; Horng, Tiffany

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are found in most tissues of the body, where they have tissue- and context-dependent roles in maintaining homeostasis as well as coordinating adaptive responses to various stresses. Their capacity for specialized functions is controlled by polarizing signals, which activate macrophages by upregulating transcriptional programs that encode distinct effector functions. An important conceptual advance in the field of macrophage biology, emerging from recent studies, is that macrophage activation is critically supported by metabolic shifts. Metabolic shifts fuel multiple aspects of macrophage activation, and preventing these shifts impairs appropriate activation. These findings raise the exciting possibility that macrophage functions in various contexts could be regulated by manipulating their metabolism. Here, we review the rapidly evolving field of macrophage metabolism, discussing how polarizing signals trigger metabolic shifts and how these shifts enable appropriate activation and sustain effector activities. We also discuss recent studies indicating that the mitochondria are central hubs in inflammatory macrophage activation. PMID:28197151

  12. Dissociation of skeletal muscle for flow cytometric characterization of immune cells in macaques.

    PubMed

    Liang, Frank; Ploquin, Aurélie; Hernández, José DelaO; Fausther-Bovendo, Hugues; Lindgren, Gustaf; Stanley, Daphne; Martinez, Aiala Salvador; Brenchley, Jason M; Koup, Richard A; Loré, Karin; Sullivan, Nancy J

    2015-10-01

    The majority of vaccines and several treatments are administered by intramuscular injection. The aim is to engage and activate immune cells, although they are rare in normal skeletal muscle. The phenotype and function of resident as well as infiltrating immune cells in the muscle after injection are largely unknown. While methods for obtaining and characterizing murine muscle cell suspensions have been reported, protocols for nonhuman primates (NHPs) have not been well defined. NHPs comprise important in vivo models for studies of immune cell function due to their high degree of resemblance with humans. In this study, we developed and systematically compared methods to collect vaccine-injected muscle tissue to be processed into single cell suspensions for flow cytometric characterization of immune cells. We found that muscle tissue processed by mechanical disruption alone resulted in significantly lower immune cell yields compared to enzymatic digestion using Liberase. Dendritic cell subsets, monocytes, macrophages, neutrophils, B cells, T cells and NK cells were readily detected in the muscle by the classic human markers. The methods for obtaining skeletal muscle cell suspension established here offer opportunities to increase the understanding of immune responses in the muscle, and provide a basis for defining immediate post-injection vaccine responses in primates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Macrophage heterogeneity in the context of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Udalova, Irina A; Mantovani, Alberto; Feldmann, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Macrophages are very important in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The increase in the number of sublining macrophages in the synovium is an early hallmark of active rheumatic disease, and high numbers of macrophages are a prominent feature of inflammatory lesions. The degree of synovial macrophage infiltration correlates with the degree of joint erosion, and depletion of these macrophages from inflamed tissue has a profound therapeutic benefit. Research has now uncovered an unexpectedly high level of heterogeneity in macrophage origin and function, and has emphasized the role of environmental factors in their functional specialization. Although the heterogeneous populations of macrophages in RA have not been fully characterized, preliminary results in mouse models of arthritis have contributed to our understanding of the phenotype and ontogeny of synovial macrophages, and to deciphering the properties of monocyte-derived infiltrating and tissue-resident macrophages. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive polarization of macrophages towards proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory phenotypes could lead to identification of signalling pathways that inform future therapeutic strategies.

  14. Differential contribution of monocytes to heart macrophages in steady-state and after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Heidt, Timo; Courties, Gabriel; Dutta, Partha; Sager, Hendrik B; Sebas, Matt; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Sun, Yuan; Da Silva, Nicolas; Panizzi, Peter; van der Laan, Anja M; van der Lahn, Anja M; Swirski, Filip K; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-07-07

    Macrophages populate the steady-state myocardium. Previously, all macrophages were thought to arise from monocytes; however, it emerged that, in several organs, tissue-resident macrophages may self-maintain through local proliferation. Our aim was to study the contribution of monocytes to cardiac-resident macrophages in steady state, after macrophage depletion in CD11b(DTR/+) mice and in myocardial infarction. Using in vivo fate mapping and flow cytometry, we estimated that during steady state the heart macrophage population turns over in ≈1 month. To explore the source of cardiac-resident macrophages, we joined the circulation of mice using parabiosis. After 6 weeks, we observed blood monocyte chimerism of 35.3±3.4%, whereas heart macrophages showed a much lower chimerism of 2.7±0.5% (P<0.01). Macrophages self-renewed locally through proliferation: 2.1±0.3% incorporated bromodeoxyuridine 2 hours after a single injection, and 13.7±1.4% heart macrophages stained positive for the cell cycle marker Ki-67. The cells likely participate in defense against infection, because we found them to ingest fluorescently labeled bacteria. In ischemic myocardium, we observed that tissue-resident macrophages died locally, whereas some also migrated to hematopoietic organs. If the steady state was perturbed by coronary ligation or diphtheria toxin-induced macrophage depletion in CD11b(DTR/+) mice, blood monocytes replenished heart macrophages. However, in the chronic phase after myocardial infarction, macrophages residing in the infarct were again independent from the blood monocyte pool, returning to the steady-state situation. In this study, we show differential contribution of monocytes to heart macrophages during steady state, after macrophage depletion or in the acute and chronic phase after myocardial infarction. We found that macrophages participate in the immunosurveillance of myocardial tissue. These data correspond with previous studies on tissue-resident macrophages

  15. Permanent resident.

    PubMed

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  16. Single-cell analysis reveals new subset markers of murine peritoneal macrophages and highlights macrophage dynamics upon Staphylococcus aureus peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Accarias, Solène; Genthon, Clémence; Rengel, David; Boullier, Séverine; Foucras, Gilles; Tabouret, Guillaume

    2016-07-01

    Resident macrophages play a central role in maintaining tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance. Here, we used single cell-based qPCR coupled with flow cytometry analysis to further define the phenotypes of large and small resident peritoneal macrophages (LPMs and SPMs, respectively) in mice. We demonstrated that the expression of Cxcl13, IfngR1, Fizz-1 and Mrc-1 clearly distinguished between LPMs and SPMs subsets. Using these markers, the dynamics of peritoneal macrophages in a Staphylococcus aureus-induced peritonitis model were analyzed. We found that S. aureus infection triggers a massive macrophage disappearance reaction in both subsets. Thereafter, inflammatory monocytes rapidly infiltrated the cavity and differentiated to replenish the SPMs. Although phenotypically indistinguishable from resident SPMs by flow cytometry, newly recruited SPMs had a different pattern of gene expression dominated by M2 markers combined with M1 associated features (inos expression). Interestingly, S. aureus elicited SPMs showed a robust expression of Cxcl13, suggesting that these cells may endorse the role of depleted LPMs and contribute to restoring peritoneal homeostasis. These data provide information on both resident and recruited macrophages dynamics upon S. aureus infection and demonstrate that single-cell phenotyping is a promising and highly valuable approach to unraveling macrophage diversity and plasticity.

  17. Targeting hepatic macrophages to treat liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Tacke, Frank

    2017-06-01

    Our view on liver macrophages in the context of health and disease has been reformed by the recognition of a remarkable heterogeneity of phagocytes in the liver. Liver macrophages consist of ontogenically distinct populations termed Kupffer cells and monocyte-derived macrophages. Kupffer cells are self-renewing, resident and principally non-migratory phagocytes, serving as sentinels for liver homeostasis. Liver injury triggers Kupffer cell activation, leading to inflammatory cytokine and chemokine release. This fosters the infiltration of monocytes into the liver, which give rise to large numbers of inflammatory monocyte-derived macrophages. Liver macrophages are very plastic and adapt their phenotype according to signals derived from the hepatic microenvironment (e.g. danger signals, fatty acids, phagocytosis of cellular debris), which explains their manifold and even opposing functions during disease. These central functions include the perpetuation of inflammation and hepatocyte injury, activation of hepatic stellate cells with subsequent fibrogenesis, and support of tumor development by angiogenesis and T cell suppression. If liver injury ceases, specific molecular signals trigger hepatic macrophages to switch their phenotype towards reparative phagocytes that promote tissue repair and regression of fibrosis. Novel strategies to treat liver disease aim at targeting macrophages. These interventions modulate Kupffer cell activation (e.g. via gut-liver axis or inflammasome formation), monocyte recruitment (e.g. via inhibiting chemokine pathways like CCR2 or CCL2) or macrophage polarization and differentiation (e.g. by nanoparticles). Evidence from mouse models and early clinical studies in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis support the notion that pathogenic macrophage subsets can be successfully translated into novel treatment options for patients with liver disease. Macrophages (Greek for "big eaters") are a frequent non-parenchymal cell

  18. Macrophage depletion disrupts immune balance and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bonggi; Qiao, Liping; Kinney, Brice; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Shao, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Increased macrophage infiltration in tissues including white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle has been recognized as a pro-inflammatory factor that impairs insulin sensitivity in obesity. However, the relationship between tissue macrophages and energy metabolism under non-obese physiological conditions is not clear. To study a homeostatic role of macrophages in energy homeostasis, we depleted tissue macrophages in adult mice through conditional expression of diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor and DT-induced apoptosis. Macrophage depletion robustly reduced body fat mass due to reduced energy intake. These phenotypes were reversed after macrophage recovery. As a potential mechanism, severe hypothalamic and systemic inflammation was induced by neutrophil (NE) infiltration in the absence of macrophages. In addition, macrophage depletion dramatically increased circulating granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) which is indispensable for NE production and tissue infiltration. Our in vitro study further revealed that macrophages directly suppress G-CSF gene expression. Therefore, our study indicates that macrophages may play a critical role in integrating immune balance and energy homeostasis under physiological conditions.

  19. Do inflammatory cells influence skeletal muscle hypertrophy?

    PubMed

    Koh, Timothy J; Pizza, Francis X

    2009-06-01

    Most research on muscle hypertrophy has focused on the responses of muscle cells to mechanical loading; however, a number of studies also suggest that inflammatory cells may influence muscle hypertrophy. Neutrophils and macrophages accumulate in skeletal muscle following increased mechanical loading, and we have demonstrated that macrophages are essential for hypertrophy following synergist ablation. Whether neutrophils are required remains to be determined. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs impair adaptive responses of skeletal muscle in both human and animal experiments suggesting that the routine use of such drugs could impair muscle performance. Much remains to be learned about the role of inflammatory cells in muscle hypertrophy, including the molecular signals involved in calling neutrophils and macrophages to skeletal muscle as well as those that regulate their function in muscle. In addition, although we have demonstrated that macrophages produce growth promoting factors during muscle hypertrophy, the full range of functional activities involved in muscle hypertrophy remains to be determined. Further investigation should provide insight into the intriguing hypothesis that inflammatory cells play integral roles in regulating muscle hypertrophy.

  20. Pulmonary and thoracic macrophage subpopulations and clearance of particles from the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, B E

    1992-01-01

    Pulmonary macrophages consist of several subpopulations that can be defined by their anatomical locations as well as by other criteria. In addition to the well-known alveolar macrophages that reside on the alveolar surface, pulmonary macrophages also occur in the conducting airways, in various pulmonary interstitial regions, and, in some mammalian species, in the lung's intravascular compartment. Other thoracic macrophages of relevance to pulmonary defense and some lung disease processes are the pleural macrophages resident in the pleural space and macrophages present in regional lymph nodes that receive lymphatic drainage from the lung. Of the above subpopulations of pulmonary and thoracic macrophages, the alveolar macrophages have received the most experimental attention in the context of the pulmonary clearance and retention of deposited particles. Accordingly, less information is currently available regarding the roles other pulmonary and thoracic populations of macrophages may play in the removal of particles from the lower respiratory tract and associated tissue compartments. This report provides an overview of the various subpopulations of pulmonary and thoracic macrophages, as defined by their anatomical locations. The known and postulated roles of macrophages in the pulmonary clearance and retention of particles are reviewed, with particular emphasis on macrophage-associated processes involved in the pulmonary clearance of relatively insoluble particles. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 12. FIGURE 14. FIGURE 15. FIGURE 16. FIGURE 17. FIGURE 18. FIGURE 19. A FIGURE 19. B FIGURE 21. FIGURE 22. PMID:1396454

  1. Peroxidase activity in monocytes and tissue macrophages of mice.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, T; Koerten, H K; Daems, W T

    1978-04-28

    A description is given of the distribution of peroxidatic (PO) activity in murine monocytes of blood and peritoneal cavity, and in murine macrophages residing in the unstimulated peritoneal cavity as well as in liver, spleen, bone marrow, and small intestine. In the monocytes, PO activity is restricted to some of the cytoplasmic granules; in the tissue (or resident) macrophages present in peritoneal cavity, liver, spleen, and small intestine, the PO activity is located in the nuclear envelope and the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Macrophages in the bone marrow are PO-negative. In the spleen and bone marrow, reticulum cells show PO activity in the nuclear envelope and the RER. Transitional forms between monocytes and tissue macrophages were not observed.

  2. The major myosin-binding domain of skeletal muscle MyBP-C (C protein) resides in the COOH-terminal, immunoglobulin C2 motif.

    PubMed

    Okagaki, T; Weber, F E; Fischman, D A; Vaughan, K T; Mikawa, T; Reinach, F C

    1993-11-01

    A common feature shared by myosin-binding proteins from a wide variety of species is the presence of a variable number of related internal motifs homologous to either the Ig C2 or the fibronectin (Fn) type III repeats. Despite interest in the potential function of these motifs, no group has clearly demonstrated a function for these sequences in muscle, either intra- or extracellularly. We have completed the nucleotide sequence of the fast type isoform of MyBP-C (C protein) from chicken skeletal muscle. The deduced amino acid sequence reveals seven Ig C2 sets and three Fn type III motifs in MyBP-C. alpha-chymotryptic digestion of purified MyBP-C gives rise to four peptides. NH2-terminal sequencing of these peptides allowed us to map the position of each along the primary structure of the protein. The 28-kD peptide contains the NH2-terminal sequence of MyBP-C, including the first C2 repeat. It is followed by two internal peptides, one of 5 kD containing exclusively spacer sequences between the first and second C2 motifs, and a 95-kD fragment containing five C2 domains and three fibronectin type III motifs. The C-terminal sequence of MyBP-C is present in a 14-kD peptide which contains only the last C2 repeat. We examined the binding properties of these fragments to reconstituted (synthetic) myosin filaments. Only the COOH-terminal 14-kD peptide is capable of binding myosin with high affinity. The NH2-terminal 28-kD fragment has no myosin-binding, while the long internal 100-kD peptide shows very weak binding to myosin. We have expressed and purified the 14-kD peptide in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein exhibits saturable binding to myosin with an affinity comparable to that of the 14-kD fragment obtained by proteolytic digestion (1/2 max binding at approximately 0.5 microM). These results indicate that the binding to myosin filaments is mainly restricted to the last 102 amino acids of MyBP-C. The remainder of the molecule (1,032 amino acids) could interact

  3. Smooth Muscle Cells Derived From Second Heart Field and Cardiac Neural Crest Reside in Spatially Distinct Domains in the Media of the Ascending Aorta-Brief Report.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Hisashi; Rateri, Debra L; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Majesky, Mark W; Daugherty, Alan

    2017-09-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of the proximal thoracic aorta are embryonically derived from the second heart field (SHF) and cardiac neural crest (CNC). However, distributions of these embryonic origins are not fully defined. The regional distribution of SMCs of different origins is speculated to cause region-specific aortopathies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the distribution of SMCs of SHF and CNC origins in the proximal thoracic aorta. Mice with repressed LacZ in the ROSA26 locus were bred to those expressing Cre controlled by either the Wnt1 or Mef2c (myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2c) promoter to trace CNC- and SHF-derived SMCs, respectively. Thoracic aortas were harvested, and activity of β-galactosidase was determined. Aortas from Wnt1-Cre mice had β-galactosidase-positive areas throughout the region from the proximal ascending aorta to just distal of the subclavian arterial branch. Unexpectedly, β-galactosidase-positive areas in Mef2c-Cre mice extended from the aortic root throughout the ascending aorta. This distribution occurred independent of sex and aging. Cross and sagittal aortic sections demonstrated that CNC-derived cells populated the inner medial aspect of the anterior region of the ascending aorta and transmurally in the media of the posterior region. Interestingly, outer medial cells throughout anterior and posterior ascending aortas were derived from the SHF. β-Galactosidase-positive medial cells of both origins colocalized with an SMC marker, α-actin. Both CNC- and SHF-derived SMCs populate the media throughout the ascending aorta. The outer medial cells of the ascending aorta form a sleeve populated by SHF-derived SMCs. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Macrophages Subvert Adaptive Immunity to Urinary Tract Infection.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bau, Gabriela; Platt, Andrew M; van Rooijen, Nico; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Albert, Matthew L; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2015-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections with frequent recurrence being a major medical challenge. Development of effective therapies has been impeded by the lack of knowledge of events leading to adaptive immunity. Here, we establish conclusive evidence that an adaptive immune response is generated during UTI, yet this response does not establish sterilizing immunity. To investigate the underlying deficiency, we delineated the naïve bladder immune cell compartment, identifying resident macrophages as the most populous immune cell. To evaluate their impact on the establishment of adaptive immune responses following infection, we measured bacterial clearance in mice depleted of either circulating monocytes, which give rise to macrophages, or bladder resident macrophages. Surprisingly, mice depleted of resident macrophages, prior to primary infection, exhibited a nearly 2-log reduction in bacterial burden following secondary challenge compared to untreated animals. This increased bacterial clearance, in the context of a challenge infection, was dependent on lymphocytes. Macrophages were the predominant antigen presenting cell to acquire bacteria post-infection and in their absence, bacterial uptake by dendritic cells was increased almost 2-fold. These data suggest that bacterial uptake by tissue macrophages impedes development of adaptive immune responses during UTI, revealing a novel target for enhancing host responses to bacterial infection of the bladder.

  5. Macrophages Subvert Adaptive Immunity to Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Bau, Gabriela; Platt, Andrew M.; van Rooijen, Nico; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Albert, Matthew L.; Ingersoll, Molly A.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections with frequent recurrence being a major medical challenge. Development of effective therapies has been impeded by the lack of knowledge of events leading to adaptive immunity. Here, we establish conclusive evidence that an adaptive immune response is generated during UTI, yet this response does not establish sterilizing immunity. To investigate the underlying deficiency, we delineated the naïve bladder immune cell compartment, identifying resident macrophages as the most populous immune cell. To evaluate their impact on the establishment of adaptive immune responses following infection, we measured bacterial clearance in mice depleted of either circulating monocytes, which give rise to macrophages, or bladder resident macrophages. Surprisingly, mice depleted of resident macrophages, prior to primary infection, exhibited a nearly 2-log reduction in bacterial burden following secondary challenge compared to untreated animals. This increased bacterial clearance, in the context of a challenge infection, was dependent on lymphocytes. Macrophages were the predominant antigen presenting cell to acquire bacteria post-infection and in their absence, bacterial uptake by dendritic cells was increased almost 2-fold. These data suggest that bacterial uptake by tissue macrophages impedes development of adaptive immune responses during UTI, revealing a novel target for enhancing host responses to bacterial infection of the bladder. PMID:26182347

  6. Macrophage heterogeneity in tissues: phenotypic diversity and functions

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Siamon; Plüddemann, Annette; Martinez Estrada, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    During development and throughout adult life, macrophages derived from hematopoietic progenitors are seeded throughout the body, initially in the absence of inflammatory and infectious stimuli as tissue-resident cells, with enhanced recruitment, activation, and local proliferation following injury and pathologic insults. We have learned a great deal about macrophage properties ex vivo and in cell culture, but their phenotypic heterogeneity within different tissue microenvironments remains poorly characterized, although it contributes significantly to maintaining local and systemic homeostasis, pathogenesis, and possible treatment. In this review, we summarize the nature, functions, and interactions of tissue macrophage populations within their microenvironment and suggest questions for further investigation. PMID:25319326

  7. Transcriptional control of monocyte and macrophage development.

    PubMed

    Kurotaki, Daisuke; Sasaki, Haruka; Tamura, Tomohiko

    2017-03-01

    Monocytes and macrophages play critical roles in immune responses, tissue homeostasis and disease progression. There are a number of functionally and phenotypically distinct subpopulations throughout the body. However, the mechanisms by which macrophage and monocyte heterogeneity is established remain unclear. Recent studies have suggested that most tissue-resident macrophages originate from fetal progenitors but not from hematopoietic stem cells, whereas some subpopulations are derived from adult monocytes. In addition, transcription factors specifically required for the development of each subpopulation have been identified. Interestingly, local environmental factors such as heme, retinoic acid and RANKL induce the expression and/or activation of tissue-specific transcription factors, thereby controlling transcriptional programs specific for the subpopulations. Thus, distinct differentiation pathways and local microenvironments appear to contribute to the determination of macrophage transcriptional identities. In this review, we highlight recent advances in our knowledge of the transcriptional control of macrophage and monocyte development. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Macrophages: Master Regulators of Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Thomas A.; Barron, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Macrophages are found in close proximity with collagen-producing myofibroblasts and indisputably play a key role in fibrosis. They produce profibrotic mediators that directly activate fibroblasts, including transforming growth factor-β1 and platelet-derived growth factor, and control extracellular matrix turnover by regulating the balance of various matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases. Macrophages also regulate fibrogenesis by secreting chemokines that recruit fibroblasts and other inflammatory cells. With their potential to act in both a pro- and antifibrotic capacity, as well as their ability to regulate the activation of resident and recruited myofibroblasts, macrophages and the factors they express are integrated into all stages of the fibrotic process. These various, and sometimes opposing, functions may be performed by distinct macrophage subpopulations, the identification of which is a growing focus of fibrosis research. Although collagen-secreting myofibroblasts once were thought of as the master “producers” of fibrosis, this review will illustrate how macrophages function as the master “regulators” of fibrosis. PMID:20665377

  9. Crosstalk between Muscularis Macrophages and Enteric Neurons Regulates Gastrointestinal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Paul Andrew; Koscsó, Balázs; Rajani, Gaurav Manohar; Stevanovic, Korey; Berres, Marie-Luise; Hashimoto, Daigo; Mortha, Arthur; Leboeuf, Marylene; Li, Xiu-Min; Mucida, Daniel; Stanley, E. Richard; Dahan, Stephanie; Margolis, Kara Gross; Gershon, Michael David; Merad, Miriam; Bogunovic, Milena

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Intestinal peristalsis is a dynamic physiologic process influenced by dietary and microbial changes. It is tightly regulated by complex cellular interactions; however, our understanding of these controls is incomplete. A distinct population of macrophages is distributed in the intestinal muscularis externa. We demonstrate that in the steady state muscularis macrophages regulate peristaltic activity of the colon. They change the pattern of smooth muscle contractions by secreting bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), which activates BMP receptor (BMPR) expressed by enteric neurons. Enteric neurons, in turn, secrete colony stimulatory factor 1 (CSF1), a growth factor required for macrophage development. Finally, stimuli from microbial commensals regulate BMP2 expression by macrophages and CSF1 expression by enteric neurons. Our findings identify a plastic, microbiota-driven, crosstalk between muscularis macrophages and enteric neurons, which controls gastrointestinal motility. PMID:25036630

  10. Participation of different macrophage populations and myofibroblastic cells in chronically developed renal interstitial fibrosis after cisplatin-induced renal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamate, J; Sato, K; Ide, M; Nakanishi, M; Kuwamura, M; Sakuma, S; Nakatsuji, S

    2002-05-01

    To shed some light on the mechanisms behind renal fibrogenesis, the present study immunohistochemically investigated the participation of different macrophage populations and myofibroblastic cells in rat renal interstitial fibrosis developed chronically after repeated injection of cisplatin (2 mg/kg body weight, once weekly for 7 weeks). During the 19-week recovery period after the final injection, fibrotic lesions progressively developed in the corticomedullary junction, with the greatest level at post-final injection (FPI) week 5, and then the lesions were gradually repaired by PFI week 19, indicative of a healing process. In conformity with the development of fibrotic lesions, the number of myofibroblastic cells reacting with an anti-alpha-smooth muscle actin antibody was increased, with a peak at PFI week 3, and collagens (types I, III, and IV), fibronection, and laminin were excessively accumulated in these areas. Interstitial cells forming the fibrotic lesions showed mitotic activity at the early stages, whereas they disappeared by apoptosis in the healing process. A large number of cells reacting with an antibody of ED1 (for exudate macrophages), ED2 (for resident macrophages), or OX6 (for major histocompatibility complex class II-presenting macrophages and interstitial dendritic cells) had already appeared at PF1 week 1, and then their numbers increased, with a peak at PFI weeks 7, 3, and 9 in ED1-, ED2-, and OX6-positive cells, respectively. Thereafter, the number of ED1- and ED2-positive cells decreased, whereas the number of OX6-positive cells persisted at a high level until PFI week 19. In the healing process, clusters of lymphocytes were present, the development of which might have been related to OX6-positive cells. The present study demonstrated that chronically developing rat renal interstitial fibrosis might be produced by the complicated mechanisms evoked by interactions between different macrophage populations and myofibroblastic cells, because

  11. Molecular and epigenetic basis of macrophage polarized activation.

    PubMed

    Porta, Chiara; Riboldi, Elena; Ippolito, Alessandro; Sica, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are unique cells for origin, heterogeneity and plasticity. At steady state most of macrophages are derived from fetal sources and maintained in adulthood through self-renewing. Despite sharing common progenitors, a remarkable heterogeneity characterized tissue-resident macrophages indicating that local signals educate them to express organ-specific functions. Macrophages are extremely plastic: chromatin landscape and transcriptional programs can be dynamically re-shaped in response to microenvironmental changes. Owing to their ductility, macrophages are crucial orchestrators of both initiation and resolution of immune responses and key supporters of tissue development and functions in homeostatic and pathological conditions. Herein, we describe current understanding of heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages using the M1-M2 dichotomy as operationally useful simplification of polarized activation. We focused on the complex network of signaling cascades, metabolic pathways, transcription factors, and epigenetic changes that control macrophage activation. In particular, this network was addressed in sepsis, as a paradigm of a pathological condition determining dynamic macrophage reprogramming.

  12. Macrophage proliferation, provenance, and plasticity in macroparasite infection.

    PubMed

    Rückerl, Dominik; Allen, Judith E

    2014-11-01

    Macrophages have long been center stage in the host response to microbial infection, but only in the past 10-15 years has there been a growing appreciation for their role in helminth infection and the associated type 2 response. Through the actions of the IL-4 receptor α (IL-4Rα), type 2 cytokines result in the accumulation of macrophages with a distinctive activation phenotype. Although our knowledge of IL-4Rα-induced genes is growing rapidly, the specific functions of these macrophages have yet to be established in most disease settings. Understanding the interplay between IL-4Rα-activated macrophages and the other cellular players is confounded by the enormous transcriptional heterogeneity within the macrophage population and by their highly plastic nature. Another level of complexity is added by the new knowledge that tissue macrophages can be derived either from a resident prenatal population or from blood monocyte recruitment and that IL-4 can increase macrophage numbers through proliferative expansion. Here, we review current knowledge on the contribution of macrophages to helminth killing and wound repair, with specific attention paid to distinct cellular origins and plasticity potential.

  13. Macrophages are critical effectors of antibody therapies for cancer.

    PubMed

    Weiskopf, Kipp; Weissman, Irving L

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are innate immune cells that derive from circulating monocytes, reside in all tissues, and participate in many states of pathology. Macrophages play a dichotomous role in cancer, where they promote tumor growth but also serve as critical immune effectors of therapeutic antibodies. Macrophages express all classes of Fcγ receptors, and they have immense potential to destroy tumors via the process of antibody-dependent phagocytosis. A number of studies have demonstrated that macrophage phagocytosis is a major mechanism of action of many antibodies approved to treat cancer. Consequently, a number of approaches to augment macrophage responses to therapeutic antibodies are under investigation, including the exploration of new targets and development of antibodies with enhanced functions. For example, the interaction of CD47 with signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα) serves as a myeloid-specific immune checkpoint that limits the response of macrophages to antibody therapies, and CD47-blocking agents overcome this barrier to augment phagocytosis. The response of macrophages to antibody therapies can also be enhanced with engineered Fc variants, bispecific antibodies, or antibody-drug conjugates. Macrophages have demonstrated success as effectors of cancer immunotherapy, and further investigation will unlock their full potential for the benefit of patients.

  14. Involvement of Macrophages in the Pathogenesis of Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy and Efficacy of Human iPS Cell-Derived Macrophages in Its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takamatsu, Koutaro; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Misumi, Yohei; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Ito, Takaaki; Senju, Satoru; Ando, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that tissue-resident macrophages in familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) patients will exhibit qualitative or quantitative abnormalities, that may accelerate transthyretin (TTR)-derived amyloid deposition. To evaluate this, we examined the number and subset of tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue from amyloid-deposited FAP and control patients. In both FAP and control patients, tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue were all Iba+/CD163+/CD206+ macrophages. However, the number of macrophages was significantly decreased in FAP patients compared with control patients. Furthermore, the proportion of intracellular TTR in CD14+ monocytes was reduced in peripheral blood compared with healthy donors. Based on these results, we next examined degradation and endocytosis of TTR in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived myeloid lineage cells (MLs), which function like macrophages. iPS-MLs express CD163 and CD206, and belong to the inhibitory macrophage category. In addition, iPS-MLs degrade both native and aggregated TTR in a cell-dependent manner in vitro. Further, iPS-MLs endocytose aggregated, and especially polymerized, TTR. These results suggest that decreased tissue-localized macrophages disrupt clearance of TTR-derived amyloid deposits, leading to progression of a pathological condition in FAP patients. To improve this situation, clinical application of pluripotent stem cell-derived MLs may be useful as an approach for FAP therapy. PMID:27695122

  15. Macrophage Functions in Early Dissemination and Dormancy of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    are co- injected with breast cancer cells in an experimental metastasis assay in vivo, this significantly reduced lung metastasis formation...production in the lung microenvironment. We further demonstrated that when bone resident macrophages are co-injected with breast cancer cells in an...As further proposed, we tested the direct effect of lung and BM resident MΦs on cancer cell proliferation by performing a direct 3D co-culture

  16. Stromal down-regulation of macrophage CD4/CCR5 expression and NF-κB activation mediates HIV-1 non-permissiveness in intestinal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ruizhong; Meng, Gang; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Clapham, Paul R; Grams, Jayleen; Novak, Lea; Kappes, John C; Smythies, Lesley E; Smith, Phillip D

    2011-05-01

    Tissue macrophages are derived exclusively from blood monocytes, which as monocyte-derived macrophages support HIV-1 replication. However, among human tissue macrophages only intestinal macrophages are non-permissive to HIV-1, suggesting that the unique microenvironment in human intestinal mucosa renders lamina propria macrophages non-permissive to HIV-1. We investigated this hypothesis using blood monocytes and intestinal extracellular matrix (stroma)-conditioned media (S-CM) to model the exposure of newly recruited monocytes and resident macrophages to lamina propria stroma, where the cells take up residence in the intestinal mucosa. Exposure of monocytes to S-CM blocked up-regulation of CD4 and CCR5 expression during monocyte differentiation into macrophages and inhibited productive HIV-1 infection in differentiated macrophages. Importantly, exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages simultaneously to S-CM and HIV-1 also inhibited viral replication, and sorted CD4+ intestinal macrophages, a proportion of which expressed CCR5+, did not support HIV-1 replication, indicating that the non-permissiveness to HIV-1 was not due to reduced receptor expression alone. Consistent with this conclusion, S-CM also potently inhibited replication of HIV-1 pseudotyped with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein, which provides CD4/CCR5-independent entry. Neutralization of TGF-β in S-CM and recombinant TGF-β studies showed that stromal TGF-β inhibited macrophage nuclear translocation of NF-κB and HIV-1 replication. Thus, the profound inability of intestinal macrophages to support productive HIV-1 infection is likely the consequence of microenvironmental down-regulation of macrophage HIV-1 receptor/coreceptor expression and NF-κB activation.

  17. Intracellular survival of Clostridium chauvoei in bovine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pires, Prhiscylla Sadanã; Santos, Renato Lima; da Paixão, Tatiane Alves; de Oliveira Bernardes, Laura Cristina; de Macêdo, Auricélio Alves; Gonçalves, Luciana Aramuni; de Oliveira Júnior, Carlos Augusto; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2017-02-01

    Clostridium chauvoei is the etiological agent of blackleg, a severe disease of domestic ruminants, causing myonecrosis and serious toxemia with high mortality. Despite the known importance of this agent, studies evaluating its pathogenesis of blackleg are scarce, and many are based on an unproven hypothesis that states that macrophages are responsible for carrying C. chauvoei spores from the intestines to muscles in the early stages of blackleg. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the survival of C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores after phagocytosis by a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7) and bovine monocyte-derived macrophages and to profile inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokine transcripts of bovine macrophages infected with C. chauvoei vegetative cells or spores. Both vegetative cells and spores of C. chauvoei remain viable after internalization by murine and bovine macrophages. Bovine macrophages infected with vegetative cells showed a pro-inflammatory profile, while those infected with spores displayed an anti-inflammatory profile. Together, these results corroborate the classical hypothesis that macrophages may play a role in the early pathogenesis of blackleg. Moreover, this is the first study to evaluate the infection kinetics and cytokine profile of bovine monocyte-derived macrophages infected with a Clostridium species.

  18. Killing of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis conidia by pulmonary macrophages and the effect of cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cano, L E; Arango, R; Salazar, M E; Brummer, E; Stevens, D A; Restrepo, A

    1992-01-01

    The ability of conidia, the infectious form of the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, to be killed in vitro by murine pulmonary macrophages was studied. Mice were immunized by intravenous injection of killed conidia, which resulted in cellular immunity demonstrated by delayed type hypersensitivity in vivo and macrophage migration inhibition factor production in vitro. Resident pulmonary macrophages from non-immune mice were able to significantly kill the conidia (28%). Such macrophages treated with supernatants (cytokines) from antigen-stimulated immune mononuclears had a markedly enhanced ability to kill conidia (73%). These results show that activated pulmonary macrophages are potent killers of conidia of P. brasiliensis and that immune mononuclears play a role in activation of macrophages. Activated macrophages may be important for pulmonary defense against the initial stages of infection with this fungus.

  19. Gallium arsenide differentially affects processing of phagolysosomal targeted antigen by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T A; Hartmann, C B; McCoy, K L

    1998-03-01

    Gallium arsenide, a semiconductor utilized in the electronics industry, causes immunosuppression in animals. The chemical's effect on macrophages to process antigen for activating pigeon cytochrome-specific helper T cell hybridoma was investigated. Mice were administered 200 mg/kg gallium arsenide or vehicle intraperitoneally. Five-day exposure suppressed processing by splenic macrophages but augmented processing by thioglycollate-elicited and resident peritoneal macrophages. Cytochrome coupled to latex beads was targeted to phagolysosomes to examine processing in lysosomes. Cytochrome beads required phagocytosis for processing and were located in phagolysosomes. Gallium arsenide did not alter the phagocytic ability of macrophages. Peritoneal macrophages normally processed the targeted antigen, indicating that gallium arsenide influenced compartment(s) preceding lysosomes. However, the processing efficiency of exposed splenic macrophages depended on the size of particulate cytochrome, suggesting that processing varied in phagolysosomes of different sizes. Gallium arsenide impacted different intracellular compartments in these macrophages, perhaps contributing to systemic immunotoxicity and local inflammation caused by exposure.

  20. Macrophages and CSF-1

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christina V; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-01-01

    Recent focus on the diversity of macrophage phenotype and function signifies that these trophic cells are no longer of exclusive interest to the field of immunology. As key orchestrators of organogenesis, the contribution of macrophages to fetal development is worthy of greater attention. This review summarizes the key functions of macrophages and their primary regulator, colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1, during development; highlighting trophic mechanisms beyond phagocytosis and outlining their roles in a range of developing organ systems. Advances in the understanding of macrophage polarization and functional heterogeneity are discussed from a developmental perspective. In addition, this review highlights the relevance of CSF-1 as a pleiotropic developmental growth factor and summarizes recent experimental evidence and clinical advancements in the area of CSF-1 and macrophage manipulation in reproduction and organogenic settings. Interrogation of embryonic macrophages also has implications beyond development, with recent attention focused on yolk sac macrophage ontogeny and their role in homeostasis and mediating tissue regeneration. The regulatory networks that govern development involve a complex range of growth factors, signaling pathways and transcriptional regulators arising from epithelial, mesenchymal and stromal origins. A component of the organogenic milieu common to the majority of developing organs is the tissue macrophage. These hemopoietic cells are part of the mononuclear phagocyte system regulated primarily by colony-stimulating factor (CSF)-1 1, 2. There is a resurgence in the field of CSF-1 and macrophage biology; where greater understanding of the heterogeneity of these cells is revealing contributions to tissue repair and regeneration beyond the phagocytic and inflammatory functions for which they were traditionally ascribed 3–6. The accumulation of macrophages during tissue injury is no longer viewed as simply a surrogate for disease

  1. F4/80 as a Major Macrophage Marker: The Case of the Peritoneum and Spleen.

    PubMed

    Dos Anjos Cassado, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Tissue macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population residing in all body tissues that contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis and trigger immune activation in response to injurious stimuli. This heterogeneity may be associated with tissue-specific functions; however, the presence of distinct macrophage populations within the same microenvironment indicates that macrophage heterogeneity may also be influenced outside of tissue specialization. The F4/80 molecule was established as a unique marker of murine macrophages when a monoclonal antibody was found to recognize an antigen exclusively expressed by these cells. However, recent research has shown that F4/80 is expressed by other immune cells and is not equivalently expressed across tissue-specific macrophage lineages, including those residing in the same microenvironment, such as the peritoneum and spleen. In this context, two murine macrophage subtypes with distinct F4/80 expression patterns were recently found to coexist in the peritoneum, termed large peritoneal macrophages (LPMs) and small peritoneal macrophages (SPMs). However, the presence of phenotypic and functional heterogeneous macrophage subpopulations in the spleen was already known. Thus, although F4/80 surface expression continues to be the best method to identify tissue macrophages, additional molecules must also be examined to distinguish these cells from other immune cells.

  2. Specific binding sites for muramyl peptides on murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.H.S.; Krueger, J.M.; Karnovsky, M.L.

    1986-03-15

    Two radiolabeled (/sup 125/I) muramyl peptide derivatives of high specific activity were prepared: a tripeptide with an iodinated C-terminal tyrosine methyl ester (Ligand I), and a muramyl tripeptide with a C-terminal lysine derivatized with Bolton-Hunter reagent (Ligand II). These were used to characterize binding of muramyl peptides to monolayers of murine macrophages. Saturable high-affinity binding to resident, caseinate-elicited, and Listeria-activated peritoneal cells was observed with both radioligands. Binding affinities varied with the state of activation of the macrophages, and K/sub D/ values ranged from 48 +/- 33 pM (for resident macrophages, Ligand I) to 1020 +/- 90 pM (for activated macrophages, Ligand II). Specific binding sites were also found on a macrophage-derived cell line. The ability of several unlabeled muramyl peptides to compete with Ligands I and II for their binding sites was tested. Competition was stereospecific and correlated with known biological activities of these compounds (i.e., immunoadjuvanticity, pyrogenicity, and somnogenicity). The sites identified here for Ligands I and II may mediate some of the effects that muramyl peptides have previously been demonstrated to have on macrophages.

  3. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J; Schilling, Joel D

    2016-04-12

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli.

  4. Glutamine Modulates Macrophage Lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    He, Li; Weber, Kassandra J.; Schilling, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and diabetes are associated with excessive inflammation and impaired wound healing. Increasing evidence suggests that macrophage dysfunction is responsible for these inflammatory defects. In the setting of excess nutrients, particularly dietary saturated fatty acids (SFAs), activated macrophages develop lysosome dysfunction, which triggers activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and cell death. The molecular pathways that connect lipid stress to lysosome pathology are not well understood, but may represent a viable target for therapy. Glutamine uptake is increased in activated macrophages leading us to hypothesize that in the context of excess lipids glutamine metabolism could overwhelm the mitochondria and promote the accumulation of toxic metabolites. To investigate this question we assessed macrophage lipotoxicity in the absence of glutamine using LPS-activated peritoneal macrophages exposed to the SFA palmitate. We found that glutamine deficiency reduced lipid induced lysosome dysfunction, inflammasome activation, and cell death. Under glutamine deficient conditions mTOR activation was decreased and autophagy was enhanced; however, autophagy was dispensable for the rescue phenotype. Rather, glutamine deficiency prevented the suppressive effect of the SFA palmitate on mitochondrial respiration and this phenotype was associated with protection from macrophage cell death. Together, these findings reveal that crosstalk between activation-induced metabolic reprogramming and the nutrient microenvironment can dramatically alter macrophage responses to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:27077881

  5. Macrophage activation and polarization.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Fernando Oneissi; Sica, Antonio; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Macrophages are widely distributed immune system cells that play an indispensable role in homeostasis and defense. They can be phenotypically polarized by the microenvironment to mount specific functional programs. Polarized macrophages can be broadly classified in two main groups: classically activated macrophages (or M1), whose prototypical activating stimuli are IFNgamma and LPS, and alternatively activated macrophages (or M2), further subdivided in M2a (after exposure to IL-4 or IL-13), M2b (immune complexes in combination with IL-1beta or LPS) and M2c (IL-10, TGFbeta or glucocorticoids). M1 exhibit potent microbicidal properties and promote strong IL-12-mediated Th1 responses, whilst M2 support Th2-associated effector functions. Beyond infection M2 polarized macrophages play a role in resolution of inflammation through high endocytic clearance capacities and trophic factor synthesis, accompanied by reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Similar functions are also exerted by tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), which also display an alternative-like activation phenotype and play a detrimental pro-tumoral role. Here we review the main functions of polarized macrophages and discuss the perspectives of this field.

  6. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  7. Interaction with Epithelial Cells Modifies Airway Macrophage Response to Ozone

    EPA Science Inventory

    The initial innate immune response to ozone (03) in the lung is orchestrated by structural cells, such as epithelial cells, and resident immune cells, such as airway macrophages (Macs). We developed an epithelial cell-Mac coculture model to investigate how epithelial cell-derived...

  8. Characterization of Distinct Macrophage Subpopulations during Nitrogen Mustard-Induced Lung Injury and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Venosa, Alessandro; Malaviya, Rama; Choi, Hyejeong; Gow, Andrew J; Laskin, Jeffrey D; Laskin, Debra L

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is an alkylating agent known to cause extensive pulmonary injury progressing to fibrosis. This is accompanied by a persistent macrophage inflammatory response. In these studies, we characterized the phenotype of macrophages accumulating in the lung over time following NM exposure. Treatment of rats with NM (0.125 mg/kg, intratracheally) resulted in an increase in CD11b(+) macrophages in histologic sections. These cells consisted of inducible nitric oxide synthase(+) (iNOS) proinflammatory M1 macrophages, and CD68(+), CD163(+), CD206(+), YM-1(+), and arginase-II(+)antiinflammatory M2 macrophages. Although M1 macrophages were prominent 1-3 days after NM, M2 macrophages were most notable at 28 days. At this time, they were enlarged and vacuolated, consistent with a profibrotic phenotype. Flow cytometric analysis of isolated lung macrophages identified three phenotypically distinct subpopulations: mature CD11b(-), CD43(-), and CD68(+) resident macrophages, which decreased in numbers after NM; and two infiltrating (CD11b(+)) macrophage subsets: immature CD43(+) M1 macrophages and mature CD43(-) M2 macrophages, which increased sequentially. Time-related increases in M1 (iNOS, IL-12α, COX-2, TNF-α, matrix metalloproteinase-9, matrix metalloproteinase-10) and M2 (IL-10, pentraxin-2, connective tissue growth factor, ApoE) genes, as well as chemokines/chemokine receptors associated with trafficking of M1 (CCR2, CCR5, CCL2, CCL5) and M2 (CX3CR1, fractalkine) macrophages to sites of injury, were also noted in macrophages isolated from the lung after NM. The appearance of M1 and M2 macrophages in the lung correlated with NM-induced acute injury and the development of fibrosis, suggesting a potential role of these macrophage subpopulations in the pathogenic response to NM.

  9. Characterization of Distinct Macrophage Subpopulations during Nitrogen Mustard–Induced Lung Injury and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Venosa, Alessandro; Malaviya, Rama; Choi, Hyejeong; Gow, Andrew J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is an alkylating agent known to cause extensive pulmonary injury progressing to fibrosis. This is accompanied by a persistent macrophage inflammatory response. In these studies, we characterized the phenotype of macrophages accumulating in the lung over time following NM exposure. Treatment of rats with NM (0.125 mg/kg, intratracheally) resulted in an increase in CD11b+ macrophages in histologic sections. These cells consisted of inducible nitric oxide synthase+ (iNOS) proinflammatory M1 macrophages, and CD68+, CD163+, CD206+, YM-1+, and arginase-II+antiinflammatory M2 macrophages. Although M1 macrophages were prominent 1–3 days after NM, M2 macrophages were most notable at 28 days. At this time, they were enlarged and vacuolated, consistent with a profibrotic phenotype. Flow cytometric analysis of isolated lung macrophages identified three phenotypically distinct subpopulations: mature CD11b−, CD43−, and CD68+ resident macrophages, which decreased in numbers after NM; and two infiltrating (CD11b+) macrophage subsets: immature CD43+ M1 macrophages and mature CD43− M2 macrophages, which increased sequentially. Time-related increases in M1 (iNOS, IL-12α, COX-2, TNF-α, matrix metalloproteinase-9, matrix metalloproteinase-10) and M2 (IL-10, pentraxin-2, connective tissue growth factor, ApoE) genes, as well as chemokines/chemokine receptors associated with trafficking of M1 (CCR2, CCR5, CCL2, CCL5) and M2 (CX3CR1, fractalkine) macrophages to sites of injury, were also noted in macrophages isolated from the lung after NM. The appearance of M1 and M2 macrophages in the lung correlated with NM-induced acute injury and the development of fibrosis, suggesting a potential role of these macrophage subpopulations in the pathogenic response to NM. PMID:26273949

  10. Macrophage Stimulating Protein (MSP) evokes superoxide anion production by human macrophages of different origin

    PubMed Central

    Brunelleschi, Sandra; Penengo, Lorenza; Lavagno, Luisa; Santoro, Claudio; Colangelo, Donato; Viano, Ilario; Gaudino, Giovanni

    2001-01-01

    Macrophage Stimulating Protein (MSP), a serum factor related to Hepatocyte Growth Factor, was originally discovered to stimulate chemotaxis of murine resident peritoneal macrophages. MSP is the ligand for Ron, a member of the Met subfamily of tyrosine kinase receptors. The effects of MSP on human macrophages and the role played in human pathophysiology have long been elusive.We show here that human recombinant MSP (hrMSP) evokes a dose-dependent superoxide anion production in human alveolar and peritoneal macrophages as well as in monocyte-derived macrophages, but not in circulating human monocytes. Consistently, the mature Ron protein is expressed by the MSP responsive cells but not by the unresponsive monocytes. The respiratory burst evoked by hrMSP is quantitatively higher than the one induced by N-formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and similar to phorbol myristate acetate-evoked one.To investigate the mechanisms involved in NADPH oxidase activation, leading to superoxide anion production, different signal transduction inhibitors were used. By using the non selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, the selective c-Src inhibitor PP1, the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin, the p38 inhibitor SB203580, the MEK inhibitor PD098059, we demonstrate that hrMSP-evoked superoxide production is mediated by tyrosine kinase activity, requires the activation of Src but not of PI 3-kinase. We also show that MAP kinase and p38 signalling pathways are involved.These results clearly indicate that hrMSP induces the respiratory burst in human macrophages but not in monocytes, suggesting for the MSP/Ron complex a role of activator as well as of possible marker for human mature macrophages. PMID:11704649

  11. Genetic and genomic approaches to understanding macrophage identity and function.

    PubMed

    Glass, Christopher K

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of our laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development and functions of diverse macrophage phenotypes in health and disease. Recent studies using genetic and genomic approaches suggest a relatively simple model of collaborative and hierarchical interactions between lineage-determining and signal-dependent transcription factors that enable selection and activation of transcriptional enhancers that specify macrophage identity and function. In addition, we have found that it is possible to use natural genetic variation as a powerful tool for advancing our understanding of how the macrophage deciphers the information encoded by the genome to attain specific phenotypes in a context-dependent manner. Here, I will describe our recent efforts to extend genetic and genomic approaches to investigate the roles of distinct tissue environments in determining the phenotypes of different resident populations of macrophages.

  12. Osteal macrophages: a new twist on coupling during bone dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Allison R; Chang, Ming K; Hume, David A; Raggatt, Liza-Jane

    2008-12-01

    Osteoimmunological interactions are central to maintaining bone homeostasis and are key mechanisms in bone pathology. Macrophages are highly adaptable cells with pleiotropic actions. They have important roles in development, homeostasis and both innate and adaptive immunity. Macrophages can have broad ranging effects on bone, particularly in pathologic situations, but they are most commonly considered for their in vitro potential as an osteoclast precursor. We have recently shown that, like most tissues, the endosteum and periosteum contain a population of resident tissue macrophages (OsteoMacs) that impact on the bone formation process and are likely to play important roles in the bone niche. This review discusses the wider impact of macrophages in bone homeostasis and disease and proposes novel roles for OsteoMacs in bone modelling and remodelling.

  13. Gadolinium induces macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mizgerd, J P; Molina, R M; Stearns, R C; Brain, J D; Warner, A E

    1996-02-01

    Gadolinium (Gd) suppresses reticuloendothelial functions in vivo by unknown mechanisms. In vitro exposure of rat alveolar macrophages to GdCl3.6H20 caused cell death, as measured by trypan blue permeability, in both dose- and time-dependent fashions. Even a 10-min exposure to Gd caused significant cell death by 24 h. The morphology of Gd-treated cells, pyknosis and karyorrhexis prior to loss of membrane integrity, suggested apoptosis. Upon flow cytometric examination, Gd-treated propidium iodide-excluding cells demonstrated light scatter changes characteristic of apoptotic cells (decreased forward and increased right angle scatter). Gel electrophoresis of DNA from Gd-treated macrophages clearly showed the ladder pattern unique to apoptotic cells. Electron-dense structures containing Gd were observed via electron spectroscopic imaging within phagosomes and also within nuclei (associated with condensed chromatin). Gadolinium, endocytosed by macrophages and distributed to nuclei, causes apoptosis of macrophages in vitro.

  14. Pulmonary Chlamydia muridarum challenge activates lung interstitial macrophages which correlate with IFN-γ production and infection control in mice.

    PubMed

    Gracey, Eric; Baglaenko, Yuriy; Prayitno, Nadia; Van Rooijen, Nico; Akram, Ali; Lin, Aifeng; Chiu, Basil; Inman, Robert D

    2015-12-01

    Protective immunity to the pathogen Chlamydia is dependent on a robust IFN-γ response generated by innate and adaptive lymphocytes. Here we assess the role of the macrophage in orchestrating a protective response in vivo to the murine pathogen, Chlamydia muridarum. During acute pulmonary and peritoneal infection, resident macrophages in both sites are infected with C. muridarum and adopt an inflammatory phenotype. In the lung, this activation is restricted to interstitial macrophages, which harbor higher levels of C. muridarum 16sRNA than alveolar macrophages. We examined innate and adaptive lymphocyte activation in the peritoneal cavity with macrophage depletion and with adoptive transfer of infected macrophages. These experiments demonstrate macrophage activation correlates with a protective IFN-γ response and effective control of C. muridarum. These studies suggest that a quantitative or qualitative alteration in macrophages may play a key role in the development of Chlamydia-associated diseases.

  15. Morin Stain Detects Aluminum-Containing Macrophages in Macrophagic Myofasciitis and Vaccination Granuloma With High Sensitivity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Chkheidze, Rati; Burns, Dennis K; White, Charles L; Castro, Diana; Fuller, Julie; Cai, Chunyu

    2017-04-01

    Macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) is an inflammatory condition associated with the intramuscular (i.m.) injection of aluminum adjuvant-containing vaccines. It is clinically characterized by myalgia, weakness, and chronic fatigue and histologically by aggregates of cohesive macrophages with abundant basophilic, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive, diastase-resistant granules that percolate through the peri- and endomysium without eliciting substantial myofiber damage. The definitive diagnosis of MMF requires demonstration of aluminum within these macrophages. We evaluated the Morin stain, a simple, 2-step histochemical stain for aluminum, as a confirmatory diagnostic tool for MMF. Among 2270 muscle biopsies processed at UTSW between 2010 and 2015, a total of 12 MMF cases and 1 subcutaneous vaccination granuloma case were identified (11 pediatric, 2 adults). With the Morin stain, all 13 cases showed strong granular reactivity within the cytoplasm of macrophages but not in myofibers or connective tissue. Three cases of inflammatory myopathy with abundant macrophages (IMAM), 8 cases of granulomatous inflammation and 23 other deltoid muscle biopsies used as controls were all negative. Morin stain could be used in both formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded and cryostat sections. Thus, Morin stain detects aluminum with high sensitivity and specificity in human muscle and soft tissue and may improve the diagnostic yield of MMF and vaccination granuloma. © 2017 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi: modification of macrophage function during infection

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Infection of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi and subsequent intraperitoneal challenge with heat-killed trypanosomes elicits peritoneal macrophages which display in vitro microbicidal activity against trypomastigotes of T. cruzi. These cells also display other activated properties including rapid spreading, intense membrane activity, secretion of high levels of plasminogen activator, and ingestion mediated by the C3 receptor. An intravenous infection with BCG, followed by an intraperitoneal challenge with mycobacterial antigens brings about macrophages with similar properties. These criteria of macrophage activation were compared in normal and BCG- or T. cruzi-immune mice, with or without an intraperitoneal challenge with specific or unrelated antigens. Trypanocidal activity is displayed by both BCG- and T. cruzi-immune macrophages after intraperitoneal challenge with either antigen. Resident-immune macrophages from both T. cruzi- and BCG-infected mice show a trypanostatic, rather than trypanocidal activity. Macrophages from noninfected mice, challenged with the same antigens, show neither trypanostatic nor trypanocidal activity. Increased secretion of plasminogen activator shows a definite immunological specificity. Challenge with the specific antigen induces the appearance of macrophages secreting high levels of plasminogen activator, while unrelated antigens induce much smaller levels. Noninfected mice challenged with the same antigens do not display any enchancement in secretion. In contrast, increased spreading and phagocytosis mediated by the complement receptor are also displayed by cells from noninfected mice challenged with any of the agents tested. PMID:327012

  17. Measuring autophagy in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Harris, James; Hanrahan, Orla; De Haro, Sergio A

    2009-11-01

    Macroautophagy is a conserved intracellular homeostatic mechanism for the degradation of cytosolic constituents. Autophagy can promote cell survival by providing essential amino acids from the breakdown of macromolecules during periods of nutrient deprivation, and can remove damaged or excess organelles, such as mitochondria and peroxisomes. More recently, autophagy has been shown to play an important role in innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogenic bacteria in macrophages and dendritic cells. This unit presents protocols for the measurement of autophagy in macrophages.

  18. Macrophage Phenotype and Function in Different Stages of Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tabas, Ira; Bornfeldt, Karin E

    2016-02-19

    The remarkable plasticity and plethora of biological functions performed by macrophages have enticed scientists to study these cells in relation to atherosclerosis for >50 years, and major discoveries continue to be made today. It is now understood that macrophages play important roles in all stages of atherosclerosis, from initiation of lesions and lesion expansion, to necrosis leading to rupture and the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis, to resolution and regression of atherosclerotic lesions. Lesional macrophages are derived primarily from blood monocytes, although recent research has shown that lesional macrophage-like cells can also be derived from smooth muscle cells. Lesional macrophages take on different phenotypes depending on their environment and which intracellular signaling pathways are activated. Rather than a few distinct populations of macrophages, the phenotype of the lesional macrophage is more complex and likely changes during the different phases of atherosclerosis and with the extent of lipid and cholesterol loading, activation by a plethora of receptors, and metabolic state of the cells. These different phenotypes allow the macrophage to engulf lipids, dead cells, and other substances perceived as danger signals; efflux cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein; proliferate and migrate; undergo apoptosis and death; and secrete a large number of inflammatory and proresolving molecules. This review article, part of the Compendium on Atherosclerosis, discusses recent advances in our understanding of lesional macrophage phenotype and function in different stages of atherosclerosis. With the increasing understanding of the roles of lesional macrophages, new research areas and treatment strategies are beginning to emerge. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Pirfenidone inhibits macrophage infiltration in 5/6 nephrectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Feng; Ni, Hai-Feng; Pan, Ming-Ming; Liu, Hong; Xu, Min; Zhang, Ming-Hui; Liu, Bi-Cheng

    2013-03-15

    Tubulointerstitial macrophage infiltration is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease involved in the progression of renal fibrosis. Pirfenidone is a newly identified antifibrotic drug, the potential mechanism of which remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pirfenidone on M1/M2 macrophage infiltration in nephrectomized rats. Nephrectomized rats were treated with pirfenidone by gavage for 12 wk. Twenty-four hour urinary protein, N-acetyl-β-D-glycosaminidase (NAG) activity, systolic blood pressure, and C-reactive protein were determined. Paraffin-embedded sections were stained for CD68, CCR7, and CD163 macrophages. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α), as well as M1 and M2 macrophages secretory markers, were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting analysis. Pirfenidone significantly improved the elevated proteinuria and NAG activity from week 2 onward after surgery. Pirfenidone attenuated interstitial fibrosis and decreased expression of fibrotic markers including transforming growth factor-β(1), connective tissue growth factor, α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and fibroblast-specific protein-1. Pirfenidone significantly decreased the infiltrating macrophages. The number of M1 and M2 macrophages was significantly lower after pirfenidone treatment. MCP-1 and MIP-1α were increased in nephrectomized rats at mRNA and protein levels. Pirfenidone treatment significantly inhibited their expression. The TNF-α, IL-6, and nitric oxide synthases-2 expressed by M1 macrophages were increased in nephrectomized rats, and pirfenidone significantly attenuated their expression. Pirfenidone treatment also significantly decreased arginase-1, dectin-1, CD206, and CD86 expressed by M2 macrophages. Thus pirfenidone inhibits M1 and M2 macrophage infiltration in 5/6 nephrectomized rats, which suggests its efficacy in the early and late periods of renal fibrosis.

  20. Satellite cells: the architects of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha C; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The outstanding regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle is attributed to the resident muscle stem cell termed satellite cell. Satellite cells are essential for skeletal muscle regeneration as they ultimately provide the myogenic precursors that rebuild damaged muscle tissue. Satellite cells characteristically are a heterogeneous population of stem cells and committed progenitor cells. Delineation of cellular hierarchy and understanding how lineage fate choices are determined within the satellite cell population will be invaluable for the advancement of muscle regenerative therapies.

  1. Macrophage polarization in pathology.

    PubMed

    Sica, Antonio; Erreni, Marco; Allavena, Paola; Porta, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Macrophages are cells of the innate immunity constituting the mononuclear phagocyte system and endowed with remarkable different roles essential for defense mechanisms, development of tissues, and homeostasis. They derive from hematopoietic precursors and since the early steps of fetal life populate peripheral tissues, a process continuing throughout adult life. Although present essentially in every organ/tissue, macrophages are more abundant in the gastro-intestinal tract, liver, spleen, upper airways, and brain. They have phagocytic and bactericidal activity and produce inflammatory cytokines that are important to drive adaptive immune responses. Macrophage functions are settled in response to microenvironmental signals, which drive the acquisition of polarized programs, whose extremes are simplified in the M1 and M2 dichotomy. Functional skewing of monocyte/macrophage polarization occurs in physiological conditions (e.g., ontogenesis and pregnancy), as well as in pathology (allergic and chronic inflammation, tissue repair, infection, and cancer) and is now considered a key determinant of disease development and/or regression. Here, we will review evidence supporting a dynamic skewing of macrophage functions in disease, which may provide a basis for macrophage-centered therapeutic strategies.

  2. Repositioning forelimb superficialis muscles: tendon attachment and muscle activity enable active relocation of functional myofibers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alice H; Riordan, Timothy J; Wang, Lingyan; Eyal, Shai; Zelzer, Elazar; Brigande, John V; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2013-09-16

    The muscles that govern hand motion are composed of extrinsic muscles that reside within the forearm and intrinsic muscles that reside within the hand. We find that the extrinsic muscles of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) first differentiate as intrinsic muscles within the hand and then relocate as myofibers to their final position in the arm. This remarkable translocation of differentiated myofibers across a joint is dependent on muscle contraction and muscle-tendon attachment. Interestingly, the intrinsic flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles of the foot are identical to the FDS in tendon pattern and delayed developmental timing but undergo limited muscle translocation, providing strong support for evolutionary homology between the FDS and FDB muscles. We propose that the intrinsic FDB pattern represents the original tetrapod limb and that translocation of the muscles to form the FDS is a mammalian evolutionary addition. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the modulation of the mitochondrial activity of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Nadhia H. C.; Ferrari, Raquel A. M.; Silva, Daniela F. T.; Nunes, Fabio D.; Bussadori, Sandra K.; Fernandes, Kristianne P. S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophages play a major role among the inflammatory cells that invade muscle tissue following an injury. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has long been used in clinical practice to accelerate the muscle repair process. However, little is known regarding its effect on macrophages. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effect of LLLT on the mitochondrial activity (MA) of macrophages. METHOD: J774 macrophages were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon - gamma (IFN-γ) (activation) for 24 h to simulate an inflammatory process, then irradiated with LLLT using two sets of parameters (780 nm; 70 mW; 3 J/cm2 and 660 nm; 15 mW; 7.5 J/cm2). Non-activated/non-irradiated cells composed the control group. MA was evaluated by the cell mitochondrial activity (MTT) assay (after 1, 3 and 5 days) in three independent experiments. The data were analyzed statistically. RESULTS: After 1 day of culture, activated and 780 nm irradiated macrophages showed lower MA than activated macrophages, but activated and 660 nm irradiated macrophages showed MA similar to activated cells. After 3 days, activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed greater MA than activated macrophages, and after 5 days, the activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed similar MA to the activated macrophages. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that 660 nm and 780 nm LLLT can modulate the cellular activation status of macrophages in inflammation, highlighting the importance of this resource and of the correct determination of its parameters in the repair process of skeletal muscle. PMID:25076002

  4. Effect of low-level laser therapy on the modulation of the mitochondrial activity of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Souza, Nadhia H C; Ferrari, Raquel A M; Silva, Daniela F T; Nunes, Fabio D; Bussadori, Sandra K; Fernandes, Kristianne P S

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages play a major role among the inflammatory cells that invade muscle tissue following an injury. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has long been used in clinical practice to accelerate the muscle repair process. However, little is known regarding its effect on macrophages. This study evaluated the effect of LLLT on the mitochondrial activity (MA) of macrophages. J774 macrophages were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon - gamma (IFN-γ) (activation) for 24 h to simulate an inflammatory process, then irradiated with LLLT using two sets of parameters (780 nm; 70 mW; 3 J/cm2 and 660 nm; 15 mW; 7.5 J/cm2). Non-activated/non-irradiated cells composed the control group. MA was evaluated by the cell mitochondrial activity (MTT) assay (after 1, 3 and 5 days) in three independent experiments. The data were analyzed statistically. After 1 day of culture, activated and 780 nm irradiated macrophages showed lower MA than activated macrophages, but activated and 660 nm irradiated macrophages showed MA similar to activated cells. After 3 days, activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed greater MA than activated macrophages, and after 5 days, the activated and irradiated (660 nm and 780 nm) macrophages showed similar MA to the activated macrophages. These results show that 660 nm and 780 nm LLLT can modulate the cellular activation status of macrophages in inflammation, highlighting the importance of this resource and of the correct determination of its parameters in the repair process of skeletal muscle.

  5. Antigen presentation by peritoneal macrophages from young adult and old mice

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, E.H.; Massucci, J.M.; Glover, P.L.

    1982-01-01

    Macrophages perform vital inductive and regulatory functions in immune processes and host defense mechanisms. However, macrophage function during senescence has not been extensively studied. Although antibody response is dramatically reduced in old animals, antigen presentation has never been directly assessed. Therefore, the antigen-presenting capabilities of purified peritoneal macrophages from young adult and old mice were studied by quantitatively measuring their ability to induce antigen specific proliferation of lymph node T lymphocytes. Increasing numbers (10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 5/) of macrophages from nonimmunized young adult (3 to 6 months) or aged (27 to 36 months) animals were cultured in the presence of antigen with a constant number (2 x 10/sup 5/) of column-separated popliteal lymph node cells from young adult mice. The latter had been immunized with the dinitrophenyl conjugate of bovine ..gamma..-globulin in complete Freund's adjuvant by footpad injection. Macrophages from old animals were equal to macrophages from young adult in stimulating T-lymphocyte proliferation, and the kinetics of incorporation was identical with increasing numbers of macrophages from either young adult or old animals. However, greater numbers of resident or induced peritoneal macrophages were always harvested from old animals. Differences in macrophage activity as assessed by different functional parameters may be reconciled by implicating subpopulations of macrophages that perform separate functions, e.g. Ia-positive antigen presenter and Ia-negative scavenger macrophages.

  6. Delineation of Diverse Macrophage Activation Programs in Response to Intracellular Parasites and Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Kim, Charles C.; Batra, Sajeev; McKerrow, James H.; Loke, P'ng

    2010-01-01

    Background The ability to reside and proliferate in macrophages is characteristic of several infectious agents that are of major importance to public health, including the intracellular parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (the etiological agent of Chagas disease) and Leishmania species (etiological agents of Kala-Azar and cutaneous leishmaniasis). Although recent studies have elucidated some of the ways macrophages respond to these pathogens, the relationships between activation programs elicited by these pathogens and the macrophage activation programs elicited by bacterial pathogens and cytokines have not been delineated. Methodology/Principal Findings To provide a global perspective on the relationships between macrophage activation programs and to understand how certain pathogens circumvent them, we used transcriptional profiling by genome-wide microarray analysis to compare the responses of mouse macrophages following exposure to the intracellular parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania mexicana, the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the cytokines IFNG, TNF, IFNB, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17. We found that LPS induced a classical activation state that resembled macrophage stimulation by the Th1 cytokines IFNG and TNF. However, infection by the protozoan pathogen L. mexicana produced so few transcriptional changes that the infected macrophages were almost indistinguishable from uninfected cells. T. cruzi activated macrophages produced a transcriptional signature characterized by the induction of interferon-stimulated genes by 24 h post-infection. Despite this delayed IFN response by T. cruzi, the transcriptional response of macrophages infected by the kinetoplastid pathogens more closely resembled the transcriptional response of macrophages stimulated by the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17 than macrophages stimulated by Th1 cytokines. Conclusions/Significance This study provides global gene expression data for a diverse set of biologically significant pathogens and

  7. Functional and phenotypic characteristics of testicular macrophages in experimental autoimmune orchitis.

    PubMed

    Rival, C; Theas, M S; Suescun, M O; Jacobo, P; Guazzone, V; van Rooijen, N; Lustig, L

    2008-06-01

    Testicular inflammation with compromised fertility can occur despite the fact that the testis is considered an immunoprivileged organ. Testicular macrophages have been described as cells with an immunosuppressor profile, thus contributing to the immunoprivilege of the testis. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is a model of organ-specific autoimmunity and testicular inflammation. EAO is characterized by an interstitial inflammatory mononuclear cell infiltration, damage of the seminiferous tubules and germ cell apoptosis. Here we studied the phenotype and functions of testicular macrophages during the development of EAO. By stereological analysis, we detected an increased number of resident (ED2+) and non-resident (ED1+) macrophages in the testicular interstitium of rats with orchitis. We showed that this increase was mainly due to monocyte recruitment. The in vivo administration of liposomes containing clodronate in rats undergoing EAO led to a reduction in the number of testicular macrophages, which correlated with a decreased incidence and severity of the testicular damage and suggests a pathogenic role of macrophages in EAO. By immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry we detected an increased number of testicular macrophages expressing MHC class II, CD80 and CD86 costimulatory molecules in rats with orchitis. Also, testicular macrophages from rats with EAO showed a higher production of IFNgamma (ELISA). We conclude that testicular macrophages participate in EAO development, and the ED1+ macrophage subset is the main pathogenic subpopulation. They stimulate the immune response through the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and antigen presentation and thus activation of T cells in the target organ.

  8. Macrophage polarization in inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Cun; Zou, Xian-Biao; Chai, Yan-Fen; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Diversity and plasticity are two hallmarks of macrophages. M1 macrophages (classically activated macrophages) are pro-inflammatory and have a central role in host defense against infection, while M2 macrophages (alternatively activated macrophages) are associated with responses to anti-inflammatory reactions and tissue remodeling, and they represent two terminals of the full spectrum of macrophage activation. Transformation of different phenotypes of macrophages regulates the initiation, development, and cessation of inflammatory diseases. Here we reviewed the characters and functions of macrophage polarization in infection, atherosclerosis, obesity, tumor, asthma, and sepsis, and proposed that targeting macrophage polarization and skewing their phenotype to adapt to the microenvironment might hold great promise for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  9. Integrating Immunometabolism and Macrophage Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Artyomov, Maxim; Sergushichev, Alexey; Schilling, Joel D.

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous cells that play a key role in inflammatory and tissue reparative responses. Over the past decade it has become clear that shifts in cellular metabolism are important determinants of macrophage function and phenotype. At the same time, our appreciation of macrophage diversity in vivo has also been increasing. Factors such as cell origin and tissue localization are now recognized as important variables that influence macrophage biology. Whether different macrophage populations also have unique metabolic phenotypes has not been extensively explored. In this article, we will discuss the importance of understanding how macrophage origin can modulate metabolic programming and influence inflammatory responses. PMID:27771140

  10. "Pumping iron"-how macrophages handle iron at the systemic, microenvironmental, and cellular levels.

    PubMed

    Nairz, Manfred; Theurl, Igor; Swirski, Filip K; Weiss, Guenter

    2017-04-01

    Macrophages reside in virtually every organ. First arising during embryogenesis, macrophages replenish themselves in the adult through a combination of self-renewal and influx of bone marrow-derived monocytes. As large phagocytic cells, macrophages participate in innate immunity while contributing to tissue-specific homeostatic functions. Among the key metabolic tasks are senescent red blood cell recycling, free heme detoxification, and provision of iron for de novo hemoglobin synthesis. While this systemic mechanism involves the shuttling of iron between spleen, liver, and bone marrow through the concerted function of defined macrophage populations, similar circuits appear to exist within the microenvironment of other organs. The high turnover of iron is the prerequisite for continuous erythropoiesis and tissue integrity but challenges macrophages' ability to maintain cellular iron homeostasis and immune function.This review provides a brief overview of systemic, microenvironmental, and cellular aspects of macrophage iron handling with a focus on exciting and unresolved questions in the field.

  11. Minireview: Emerging Concepts in Islet Macrophage Biology in Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Chronic systemic inflammation is a hallmark feature of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Both resident and recruited islet macrophages contribute to the proinflammatory milieu of the diabetic islet. However, macrophages also appear to be critical for β-cell formation during development and support β-cell replication in experimental models of pancreas regeneration. In light of these findings, perhaps macrophages in the islet need to be viewed more as a fulcrum where deleterious inflammatory activation is balanced with beneficial tissue repair processes. Undoubtedly, defining the factors that contribute to the ontogeny, heterogeneity, and functionality of macrophages in normal, diseased, and regenerating islets will be necessary to determine whether that fulcrum can be moved to preserve functional β-cell mass in persons with diabetes. The intent of this review is to introduce the reader to emerging concepts of islet macrophage biology that may challenge the perception that macrophage accumulation in islets is merely a pathological feature of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26001058

  12. Distinct Hepatic Macrophage Populations in Lean and Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mayoral Monibas, Rafael; Johnson, Andrew M. F.; Osborn, Olivia; Traves, Paqui G.; Mahata, Sushil K.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a complex metabolic disorder associated with the development of non-communicable diseases such as cirrhosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and type 2 diabetes. In humans and rodents, obesity promotes hepatic steatosis and inflammation, which leads to increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and acute-phase proteins. Liver macrophages (resident as well as recruited) play a significant role in hepatic inflammation and insulin resistance (IR). Interestingly, depletion of hepatic macrophages protects against the development of high-fat-induced steatosis, inflammation, and IR. Kupffer cells (KCs), liver-resident macrophages, are the first-line defense against invading pathogens, clear toxic or immunogenic molecules, and help to maintain the liver in a tolerogenic immune environment. During high fat diet feeding and steatosis, there is an increased number of recruited hepatic macrophages (RHMs) in the liver and activation of KCs to a more inflammatory or M1 state. In this review, we will focus on the role of liver macrophages (KCs and RHMs) during obesity. PMID:27999564

  13. Lipoprotein lipase is synthesized by macrophage-derived foam cells in human coronary atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, K D; Gordon, D; Deeb, S; Ferguson, M; Chait, A

    1992-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL), hydrolyzes the core triglycerides of lipoproteins, thereby playing a role in their maturation. LPL may be important in the metabolic pathways that lead to atherosclerosis, since it is secreted in vitro by both of the predominant cell types of the atherosclerotic plaque, i.e., macrophages and smooth muscle cells. Because of uncertainty concerning the primary cellular source of LPL in atherosclerotic lesions, in situ hybridization assays for LPL mRNA were performed on 12 coronary arteries obtained from six cardiac allograft recipients. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells were identified on adjacent sections with cell-specific antibodies and foam cells were identified morphologically. LPL protein was localized using a polyclonal antibody. LPL mRNA was produced by a proportion of plaque macrophages, particularly macrophage-derived foam cells, but was not detected in association with any intimal or medial smooth muscle cells. These findings were confirmed by combined immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization on the same tissue sections. LPL protein was detected in association with macrophage-derived foam cells, endothelial cells, adventitial adipocytes, and medial smooth muscle cells, and, to a lesser extent, in intimal smooth muscle cells and media underlying well-developed plaque. These results indicate that macrophage-derived foam cells are the primary source of LPL in atherosclerotic plaques and are consistent with a role for LPL in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Images PMID:1569193

  14. Proliferation and Recruitment Contribute to Myocardial Macrophage Expansion in Chronic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sager, Hendrik B; Hulsmans, Maarten; Lavine, Kory J; Moreira, Marina B; Heidt, Timo; Courties, Gabriel; Sun, Yuan; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tricot, Benoit; Khan, Omar F; Dahlman, James E; Borodovsky, Anna; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Anderson, Daniel G; Weissleder, Ralph; Libby, Peter; Swirski, Filip K; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2016-09-16

    Macrophages reside in the healthy myocardium, participate in ischemic heart disease, and modulate myocardial infarction (MI) healing. Their origin and roles in post-MI remodeling of nonischemic remote myocardium, however, remain unclear. This study investigated the number, origin, phenotype, and function of remote cardiac macrophages residing in the nonischemic myocardium in mice with chronic heart failure after coronary ligation. Eight weeks post MI, fate mapping and flow cytometry revealed that a 2.9-fold increase in remote macrophages results from both increased local macrophage proliferation and monocyte recruitment. Heart failure produced by extensive MI, through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, expanded medullary and extramedullary hematopoiesis. Circulating Ly6C(high) monocytes rose from 64±5 to 108±9 per microliter of blood (P<0.05). Cardiac monocyte recruitment declined in Ccr2(-/-) mice, reducing macrophage numbers in the failing myocardium. Mechanical strain of primary murine and human macrophage cultures promoted cell cycle entry, suggesting that the increased wall tension in post-MI heart failure stimulates local macrophage proliferation. Strained cells activated the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, whereas specific inhibitors of this pathway reduced macrophage proliferation in strained cell cultures and in the failing myocardium (P<0.05). Steady-state cardiac macrophages, monocyte-derived macrophages, and locally sourced macrophages isolated from failing myocardium expressed different genes in a pattern distinct from the M1/M2 macrophage polarization paradigm. In vivo silencing of endothelial cell adhesion molecules curbed post-MI monocyte recruitment to the remote myocardium and preserved ejection fraction (27.4±2.4 versus 19.1±2%; P<0.05). Myocardial failure is influenced by an altered myeloid cell repertoire. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Macrophage Responses to Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Claire; Murdoch, Craig

    2005-01-01

    The presence of multiple areas of hypoxia (low oxygen tension) is a hallmark feature of human and experimental tumors. Monocytes are continually recruited into tumors, differentiate into tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and then accumulate in these hypoxic areas. A number of recent studies have shown that macrophages respond to the levels of hypoxia found in tumors by up-regulating such transcription factors as hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2, which in turn activate a broad array of mitogenic, proinvasive, proangiogenic, and prometastatic genes. This could explain why high numbers of TAMs correlate with poor prognosis in various forms of cancer. In this review, we assess the evidence for hypoxia activating a distinct, protumor phenotype in macrophages and the possible effect of this on the growth, invasion, angiogenesis, and immune evasion of tumors. We also discuss current attempts to selectively target TAMs for destruction or to use them to deliver gene therapy specifically to hypoxic tumor sites. PMID:16127144

  16. Macrophages and iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Miguel P.; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Iron is a transition metal that due to its inherent ability to exchange electrons with a variety of molecules is essential to support life. In mammals, iron exists mostly in the form of heme, enclosed within an organic protoporphyrin ring and functioning primarily as a prosthetic group in proteins. Paradoxically, free iron also has the potential to become cytotoxic when electron exchange with oxygen is unrestricted and catalyzes the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological properties demand that iron metabolism is tightly regulated such that iron is available for core biological functions whilst preventing its cytotoxic effects. Macrophages play a central role in establishing this delicate balance. Here, we review the impact of macrophages on heme-iron metabolism and, reciprocally, how heme-iron modulates macrophage function. PMID:26982356

  17. [Macrophages in asthma].

    PubMed

    Medina Avalos, M A; Orea Solano, M

    1997-01-01

    Every time they exist more demonstrations of the paper than performs the line monocytes-macrophage in the patogenesis of the bronchial asthma. The mononuclear phagocytes cells, as the alveolar macrophages, also they can be activated during allergic methods. The monocytes macrophages are possible efficient inductors of the inflammation; this due to the fact that they can secrete inflammatory mediators, between those which are counted the pre-forming granules of peptides, metabolites of oxidation activation, activator of platelets activator and metabolites of the arachidonic acid. The identification of IL-1 in the liquidate of the bronchial ablution of sick asthmatic, as well as the identification of IL-1 in the I bronchioalveolar washing of places of allergens cutaneous prick, supports the activation concept mononuclear of phagocytic cells in allergic sufferings.

  18. Monocyte and macrophage heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Siamon; Taylor, Philip R

    2005-12-01

    Heterogeneity of the macrophage lineage has long been recognized and, in part, is a result of the specialization of tissue macrophages in particular microenvironments. Circulating monocytes give rise to mature macrophages and are also heterogeneous themselves, although the physiological relevance of this is not completely understood. However, as we discuss here, recent studies have shown that monocyte heterogeneity is conserved in humans and mice, allowing dissection of its functional relevance: the different monocyte subsets seem to reflect developmental stages with distinct physiological roles, such as recruitment to inflammatory lesions or entry to normal tissues. These advances in our understanding have implications for the development of therapeutic strategies that are targeted to modify particular subpopulations of monocytes.

  19. Influence of icing on muscle regeneration after crush injury to skeletal muscles in rats.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Ryo; Fujita, Naoto; Arakawa, Takamitsu; Kawada, Shigeo; Ishii, Naokata; Miki, Akinori

    2011-02-01

    The influence of icing on muscle regeneration after crush injury was examined in the rat extensor digitorum longus. After the injury, animals were randomly divided into nonicing and icing groups. In the latter, ice packs were applied for 20 min. Due to the icing, degeneration of the necrotic muscle fibers and differentiation of satellite cells at early stages of regeneration were retarded by ∼1 day. In the icing group, the ratio of regenerating fibers showing central nucleus at 14 days after the injury was higher, and cross-sectional area of the muscle fibers at 28 days was evidently smaller than in the nonicing group. Besides, the ratio of collagen fibers area at 14 and 28 days after the injury in the icing group was higher than in the nonicing group. These findings suggest that icing applied soon after the injury not only considerably retarded muscle regeneration but also induced impairment of muscle regeneration along with excessive collagen deposition. Macrophages were immunohistochemically demonstrated at the injury site during degeneration and early stages of regeneration. Due to icing, chronological changes in the number of macrophages and immunohistochemical expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and IGF-I were also retarded by 1 to 2 days. Since it has been said that macrophages play important roles not only for degeneration, but also for muscle regeneration, the influence of icing on macrophage activities might be closely related to a delay in muscle regeneration, impairment of muscle regeneration, and redundant collagen synthesis.

  20. Conditioned medium from alternatively activated macrophages induce mesangial cell apoptosis via the effect of Fas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yuan; Luo, Fangjun; Li, Hui; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Nong

    2013-11-15

    During inflammation in the glomerulus, the proliferation of myofiroblast-like mesangial cells is commonly associated with the pathological process. Macrophages play an important role in regulating the growth of resident mesangial cells in the glomeruli. Alternatively activated macrophage (M2 macrophage) is a subset of macrophages induced by IL-13/IL-4, which is shown to play a repair role in glomerulonephritis. Prompted by studies of development, we performed bone marrow derived macrophage and rat mesangial cell co-culture study. Conditioned medium from IL-4 primed M2 macrophages induced rat mesangial cell apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic effect of M2 macrophages was demonstrated by condensed nuclei stained with Hoechst 33258, increased apoptosis rates by flow cytometry analysis and enhanced caspase-3 activation by western blot. Fas protein was up-regulated in rat mesangial cells, and its neutralizing antibody ZB4 partly inhibited M2 macrophage-induced apoptosis. The up-regulated arginase-1 expression in M2 macrophage also contributed to this apoptotic effect. These results indicated that the process of apoptosis triggered by conditioned medium from M2 macrophages, at least is partly conducted through Fas in rat mesangial cells. Our findings provide compelling evidence that M2 macrophages control the growth of mesangial cells in renal inflammatory conditions. - Highlights: • Conditioned-medium from M2 macrophages induces rat mesangial cell (MsC) apoptosis. • M2 macrophage conditioned medium exerts its pro-apoptotic effects via Fas ligand. • Arginase-1 activity in M2 macrophages plays a role in inducing apoptosis in rat MsC.

  1. Functional polarization of tumour-associated macrophages by tumour-derived lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Colegio, Oscar R; Chu, Ngoc-Quynh; Szabo, Alison L; Chu, Thach; Rhebergen, Anne Marie; Jairam, Vikram; Cyrus, Nika; Brokowski, Carolyn E; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Phillips, Gillian M; Cline, Gary W; Phillips, Andrew J; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-09-25

    Macrophages have an important role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. To perform this function, macrophages must have the capacity to monitor the functional states of their 'client cells': namely, the parenchymal cells in the various tissues in which macrophages reside. Tumours exhibit many features of abnormally developed organs, including tissue architecture and cellular composition. Similarly to macrophages in normal tissues and organs, macrophages in tumours (tumour-associated macrophages) perform some key homeostatic functions that allow tumour maintenance and growth. However, the signals involved in communication between tumours and macrophages are poorly defined. Here we show that lactic acid produced by tumour cells, as a by-product of aerobic or anaerobic glycolysis, has a critical function in signalling, through inducing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the M2-like polarization of tumour-associated macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this effect of lactic acid is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Finally, we show that the lactate-induced expression of arginase 1 by macrophages has an important role in tumour growth. Collectively, these findings identify a mechanism of communication between macrophages and their client cells, including tumour cells. This communication most probably evolved to promote homeostasis in normal tissues but can also be engaged in tumours to promote their growth.

  2. Coordinated Regulation of Signaling Pathways during Macrophage Activation.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Toby

    2016-10-01

    The functional and phenotypic diversity of macrophages has long been appreciated, and it is now clear that it reflects a complex interplay between hard-wired differentiation pathways and instructive signals in specific tissues (Lawrence T, Natoli G. 2011, Nat Rev Immunol11:750-761). Recent studies have begun to unravel the molecular basis for the integration of these intrinsic developmental pathways with extracellular signals from the tissue microenvironment that confer the distinct phenotypes of tissue-resident macrophages (Lavin Y et al. 2014. Cell159:1312-1326; Gosselin D et al. 2014. Cell159:1327-1340). Macrophage phenotype and function is particularly dynamic during inflammation or infection, as blood monocytes are recruited into tissues and differentiate into macrophages, and depending on the nature of the inflammatory stimulus, they may acquire distinct functional phenotypes (Xue J et al. 2014. Immunity40:274-288; Murray PJ et al. 2014. Immunity41:14-20). Furthermore, these functional activation states can be rapidly modified in response to a changing microenvironment. Here we will discuss several key signaling pathways that drive macrophage activation during the inflammatory response and discuss how these pathways are integrated to "fine-tune" macrophage phenotype and function.

  3. Neuro-immune interactions drive tissue programming in intestinal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gabanyi, Ilana; Muller, Paul A; Feighery, Linda; Oliveira, Thiago Y; Costa-Pinto, Frederico A; Mucida, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proper adaptation to environmental perturbations is essential for tissue homeostasis. In the intestine, diverse environmental cues can be sensed by immune cells, which must balance resistance to microorganisms with tolerance, avoiding excess tissue damage. By applying imaging and transcriptional profiling tools, we interrogated how distinct microenvironments in the gut regulate resident macrophages. We discovered that macrophages exhibit a high degree of gene-expression specialization dependent on their proximity to the gut lumen. Lamina propria macrophages (LpMs) preferentially expressed a pro-inflammatory phenotype when compared to muscularis macrophages (MMs), which displayed a tissue-protective phenotype. Upon luminal bacterial infection, MMs further enhanced tissue-protective programs, and this was attributed to swift activation of extrinsic sympathetic neurons innervating the gut muscularis and norepinephrine signaling to β2 adrenergic receptors on MMs. Our results reveal unique intra-tissue macrophage specialization and identify neuro-immune communication between enteric neurons and macrophages that induces rapid tissue-protective responses to distal perturbations. PMID:26777404

  4. Muscle Cramps

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after exercise or at night, ... to several minutes. It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves ...

  5. Muscle Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your muscles help you move and help your body work. Different types of muscles have different jobs. There are many problems that can affect muscles. Muscle disorders can cause weakness, pain or even ...

  6. Muscle atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  7. Your Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart because it controls the heartbeat. Skeletal Muscle Now, let's talk about the kind of muscle ... soccer ball into the goal. These are your skeletal muscles — sometimes called striated (say: STRY-ay-tud) muscle ...

  8. Regenerative Capacity of Macrophages for Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Rawji, Khalil S.; Mishra, Manoj K.; Yong, V. Wee

    2016-01-01

    White matter injury, consisting of loss of axons, myelin, and oligodendrocytes, is common in many neurological disorders and is believed to underlie several motor and sensory deficits. Remyelination is the process in which the insulative myelin sheath is restored to axons, thereby facilitating recovery from functional loss. Remyelination proceeds with oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) that differentiate into oligodendrocytes to synthesize the new myelin sheath after demyelination. This process is influenced by several factors, including trophic factors, inhibitory molecules in the lesion microenvironment, age of the subject, as well as the inflammatory response. Currently studied strategies that enhance remyelination consist of pharmacological approaches that directly induce OPC differentiation or using agents to neutralize the inhibitory microenvironment. Another strategy is to harness a reparative inflammatory response. This response, coordinated by central nervous system resident microglia and peripherally-derived infiltrating macrophages, has been shown to be important in the remyelination process. These innate immune cells perform important functions in remyelination, including the proteolysis and phagocytosis of inhibitory molecules present in the lesion microenvironment, the provision of trophic and metabolic factors to OPCs, in addition to iron handling capacity. Additionally, an initial pro-inflammatory phase followed by a regulatory/anti-inflammatory phase has been shown to be important for OPC proliferation and differentiation, respectively. This review will discuss the beneficial roles of macrophages/microglia in remyelination and discuss therapeutic strategies to obtain the optimal regenerative macrophage phenotype for enhanced remyelination. PMID:27243011

  9. Heterogeneity of macrophage populations and expression of galectin-3 in cutaneous wound healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Juniantito, V; Izawa, T; Yamamoto, E; Murai, F; Kuwamura, M; Yamate, J

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the properties of macrophages that infiltrated the sites of cutaneous wound healing in rats between 1 and 26 days post wounding (dpw). During the inflammation phase (1-3 dpw), ED1(+) (CD68(+)) macrophages with enhanced lysosomal activity dominated. From 5 to 7 dpw there was formation of granulation tissue as indicated by the presence of myofibroblasts expressing α-smooth muscle actin. At this stage, ED2(+) (CD163(+)) macrophages, capable of producing inflammatory factors, were dominant. The majority of ED1(+) macrophages expressed galectin-3, a regulator of fibrosis. Corresponding to the increased numbers of ED1(+) and ED2(+) macrophages at 3-9 dpw, there was increased expression of genes encoding transforming growth factor-β1 (a major fibrogenic factor), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and colony stimulating factor-1. These macrophage-related factors might contribute to inflammation and formation of granulation tissue. OX6(+) macrophages expressing class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex became predominant in the healing stages (15-26 dpw), indicating important roles for antigen-presenting cells in tissue remodelling. The OX6(+) macrophages were most likely derived from ED1(+) macrophages. The results of this study show that infiltration of phenotypically- and functionally-distinct macrophage populations characterizes different stages of the wound healing process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. PHD2 regulates arteriogenic macrophages through TIE2 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hamm, Alexander; Veschini, Lorenzo; Takeda, Yukiji; Costa, Sandra; Delamarre, Estelle; Squadrito, Mario Leonardo; Henze, Anne-Theres; Wenes, Mathias; Serneels, Jens; Pucci, Ferdinando; Roncal, Carmen; Anisimov, Andrey; Alitalo, Kari; De Palma, Michele; Mazzone, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Occlusion of the main arterial route redirects blood flow to the collateral circulation. We previously reported that macrophages genetically modified to express low levels of prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) display an arteriogenic phenotype, which promotes the formation of collateral vessels and protects the skeletal muscle from ischaemic necrosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that femoral artery occlusion induces a switch in macrophage phenotype through angiopoietin-1 (ANG1)-mediated Phd2 repression. ANG blockade by a soluble trap prevented the downregulation of Phd2 expression in macrophages and their phenotypic switch, thus inhibiting collateral growth. ANG1-dependent Phd2 repression initiated a feed-forward loop mediated by the induction of the ANG receptor TIE2 in macrophages. Gene silencing and cell depletion strategies demonstrate that TIE2 induction in macrophages is required to promote their proarteriogenic functions, enabling collateral vessel formation following arterial obstruction. These results indicate an indispensable role for TIE2 in sustaining in situ programming of macrophages to a proarteriogenic, M2-like phenotype, suggesting possible new venues for the treatment of ischaemic disorders. PMID:23616286

  11. Targeting macrophage Histone deacetylase 3 stabilizes atherosclerotic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Hoeksema, Marten A; Gijbels, Marion JJ; Van den Bossche, Jan; van der Velden, Saskia; Sijm, Ayestha; Neele, Annette E; Seijkens, Tom; Stöger, J Lauran; Meiler, Svenja; Boshuizen, Marieke CS; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M; Levels, Johannes HM; Boon, Louis; Mullican, Shannon E; Spann, Nathanael J; Cleutjens, Jack P; Glass, Chris K; Lazar, Mitchell A; de Vries, Carlie JM; Biessen, Erik AL; Daemen, Mat JAP; Lutgens, Esther; de Winther, Menno PJ

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are key immune cells found in atherosclerotic plaques and critically shape atherosclerotic disease development. Targeting the functional repertoire of macrophages may hold novel approaches for future atherosclerosis management. Here, we describe a previously unrecognized role of the epigenomic enzyme Histone deacetylase 3 (Hdac3) in regulating the atherosclerotic phenotype of macrophages. Using conditional knockout mice, we found that myeloid Hdac3 deficiency promotes collagen deposition in atherosclerotic lesions and thus induces a stable plaque phenotype. Also, macrophages presented a switch to anti-inflammatory wound healing characteristics and showed improved lipid handling. The pro-fibrotic phenotype was directly linked to epigenetic regulation of the Tgfb1 locus upon Hdac3 deletion, driving smooth muscle cells to increased collagen production. Moreover, in humans, HDAC3 was the sole Hdac upregulated in ruptured atherosclerotic lesions, Hdac3 associated with inflammatory macrophages, and HDAC3 expression inversely correlated with pro-fibrotic TGFB1 expression. Collectively, we show that targeting the macrophage epigenome can improve atherosclerosis outcome and we identify Hdac3 as a potential novel therapeutic target in cardiovascular disease. PMID:25007801

  12. Wormhole Travel for Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yasutaka; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2016-04-21

    Leukocyte recruitment is generally achieved by rapid migration of inflammatory cells out of circulation, through modified blood vessels, and into affected tissues. Now, Wang and Kubes show that macrophages can be rapidly recruited from body cavities to the liver, via a non-vascular route, where they help to coordinate tissue repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Monocytes and macrophages in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Raffort, Juliette; Lareyre, Fabien; Clément, Marc; Hassen-Khodja, Réda; Chinetti, Giulia; Mallat, Ziad

    2017-04-13

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a life-threatening disease associated with high morbidity, and high mortality in the event of aortic rupture. Major advances in open surgical and endovascular repair of AAA have been achieved during the past 2 decades. However, drug-based therapies are still lacking, highlighting a real need for better understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in AAA formation and progression. The main pathological features of AAA include extracellular matrix remodelling associated with degeneration and loss of vascular smooth muscle cells and accumulation and activation of inflammatory cells. The inflammatory process has a crucial role in AAA and substantially influences many determinants of aortic wall remodelling. In this Review, we focus specifically on the involvement of monocytes and macrophages, summarizing current knowledge on the roles, origin, and functions of these cells in AAA development and its complications. Furthermore, we show and propose that distinct monocyte and macrophage subsets have critical and differential roles in initiation, progression, and healing of the aneurysmal process. On the basis of experimental and clinical studies, we review potential translational applications to detect, assess, and image macrophage subsets in AAA, and discuss the relevance of these applications for clinical practice.

  14. Proliferation and recruitment contribute to myocardial macrophage expansion in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Sager, Hendrik B.; Hulsmans, Maarten; Lavine, Kory J.; Moreira, Marina B.; Heidt, Timo; Courties, Gabriel; Sun, Yuan; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Tricot, Benoit; Khan, Omar F.; Dahlman, James E.; Borodovsky, Anna; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Anderson, Daniel G.; Weissleder, Ralph; Libby, Peter; Swirski, Filip K.; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Rationale Macrophages reside in the healthy myocardium, participate in ischemic heart disease and modulate myocardial infarction (MI) healing. Their origin and roles in post-MI remodeling of non-ischemic remote myocardium, however, remain unclear. Objective This study investigated the number, origin, phenotype and function of remote cardiac macrophages residing in the non-ischemic myocardium in mice with chronic heart failure after coronary ligation. Methods and Results Eight weeks post-MI, fate mapping and flow cytometry revealed that a 2.9-fold increase in remote macrophages results from both increased local macrophage proliferation and monocyte recruitment. Heart failure produced by extensive MI, through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, expanded medullary and extramedullary hematopoiesis. Circulating Ly6Chigh monocytes rose from 64±5 to 108±9 /μl blood (p<0.05). Cardiac monocyte recruitment declined in Ccr2−/− mice, reducing macrophage numbers in the failing myocardium. Mechanical strain of primary murine and human macrophage cultures promoted cell cycle entry, suggesting that the increased wall tension in post-MI heart failure stimulates local macrophage proliferation. Strained cells activated the MAPK pathway, while specific inhibitors of this pathway reduced macrophage proliferation in strained cell cultures and in the failing myocardium (p<0.05). Steady-state cardiac macrophages, monocyte-derived and locally sourced macrophages isolated from failing myocardium expressed different genes in a pattern distinct from the M1/M2 macrophage polarization paradigm. In vivo silencing of endothelial cell adhesion molecules curbed post-MI monocyte recruitment to the remote myocardium and preserved ejection fraction (27.4±2.4 vs.19.1±2%, p<0.05). Conclusions Myocardial failure is influenced by an altered myeloid cell repertoire. PMID:27444755

  15. The transition of smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a migratory, phagocytic phenotype: direct demonstration of phenotypic modulation.

    PubMed

    Sandison, Mairi E; Dempster, John; McCarron, John G

    2016-11-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic conversion from a contractile to a migratory phenotype is proposed to underlie cardiovascular disease but its contribution to vascular remodelling and even its existence have recently been questioned. Tracking the fate of individual SMCs is difficult as no specific markers of migratory SMCs exist. This study used a novel, prolonged time-lapse imaging approach to continuously track the behaviour of unambiguously identified, fully differentiated SMCs. In response to serum, highly-elongated, contractile SMCs initially rounded up, before spreading and migrating and these migratory cells displayed clear phagocytic activity. This study provides a direct demonstration of the transition of fully contractile SMCs to a non-contractile, migratory phenotype with phagocytic capacity that may act as a macrophage-like cell. Atherosclerotic plaques are populated with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages. SMCs are thought to accumulate in plaques because fully differentiated, contractile SMCs reprogramme into a 'synthetic' migratory phenotype, so-called phenotypic modulation, whilst plaque macrophages are thought to derive from blood-borne myeloid cells. Recently, these views have been challenged, with reports that SMC phenotypic modulation may not occur during vascular remodelling and that plaque macrophages may not be of haematopoietic origin. Following the fate of SMCs is complicated by the lack of specific markers for the migratory phenotype and direct demonstrations of phenotypic modulation are lacking. Therefore, we employed long-term, high-resolution, time-lapse microscopy to track the fate of unambiguously identified, fully-differentiated, contractile SMCs in response to the growth factors present in serum. Phenotypic modulation was clearly observed. The highly elongated, contractile SMCs initially rounded up, for 1-3 days, before spreading outwards. Once spread, the SMCs became motile and displayed dynamic cell-cell communication

  16. Macrophage in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Flaquer, Maria; Cruzado, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a major health problem worldwide. This review describes the role of macrophages in CKD and highlights the importance of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage activation in both renal fibrosis and wound healing processes. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which M2 macrophages induce renal repair and regeneration are still under debate and currently demand more attention. The M1/M2 macrophage balance is related to the renal microenvironment and could influence CKD progression. In fact, an inflammatory renal environment and M2 plasticity can be the major hurdles to establishing macrophage cell-based therapies in CKD. M2 macrophage cell-based therapy is promising if the M2 phenotype remains stable and is ‘fixed’ by in vitro manipulation. However, a greater understanding of phenotype polarization is still required. Moreover, better strategies and targets to induce reparative macrophages in vivo should guide future investigations in order to abate kidney diseases. PMID:27994852

  17. Macrophage polarization in kidney diseases.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shaojiang; Chen, Shi-You

    Macrophage accumulation associates closely with the degree of renal structural injury and renal dysfunction in human kidney diseases. Depletion of macrophages reduces while adoptive transfer of macrophages worsens inflammation in animal models of the renal injury. However, emerging evidence support that macrophage polarization plays a critical role in the progression of a number of kidney diseases including obstructive nephropathy, ischemia-reperfusion injury, glomerulonephritis, diabetic nephropathy, and other kidney diseases. In this mini-review, we briefly summarize the macrophage infiltration and polarization in these inflammatory and fibrotic kidney diseases, discussing the results mostly from studies in animal models. In view of the critical role of macrophage in the progression of these diseases, manipulating macrophage phenotype may be a potential effective strategy to treat various kidney diseases.

  18. Iron homeostasis: a new job for macrophages in adipose tissue?

    PubMed Central

    Hubler, Merla J.; Peterson, Kristin R.; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated serum ferritin and increased cellular iron concentrations are risk factors for diabetes; however, the etiology of this association is unclear. Metabolic tissues such as pancreas, liver, and adipose tissue (AT), as well as the immune cells resident in these tissues, may be involved. Recent studies demonstrate that the polarization status of macrophages has important relevance to their iron handling capabilities. Furthermore, a subset of macrophages in AT have elevated iron concentrations and a gene expression profile indicative of iron handling, a capacity diminished in obesity. Because iron overload in adipocytes increases systemic insulin resistance, iron handling by AT macrophages may have relevance not only to adipocyte iron stores but also to local and systemic insulin sensitivity. PMID:25600948

  19. Macrophage heterogeneity in tissues: phenotypic diversity and functions.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Siamon; Plüddemann, Annette; Martinez Estrada, Fernando

    2014-11-01

    During development and throughout adult life, macrophages derived from hematopoietic progenitors are seeded throughout the body, initially in the absence of inflammatory and infectious stimuli as tissue-resident cells, with enhanced recruitment, activation, and local proliferation following injury and pathologic insults. We have learned a great deal about macrophage properties ex vivo and in cell culture, but their phenotypic heterogeneity within different tissue microenvironments remains poorly characterized, although it contributes significantly to maintaining local and systemic homeostasis, pathogenesis, and possible treatment. In this review, we summarize the nature, functions, and interactions of tissue macrophage populations within their microenvironment and suggest questions for further investigation. © 2014 The Authors. Immunological Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Osteopontin ablation ameliorates muscular dystrophy by shifting macrophages to a pro-regenerative phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Capote, Joana; Martinez, Leonel; Vetrone, Sylvia; Barton, Elisabeth R.; Sweeney, H. Lee; Miceli, M. Carrie

    2016-01-01

    In the degenerative disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy, inflammatory cells enter muscles in response to repetitive muscle damage. Immune factors are required for muscle regeneration, but chronic inflammation creates a profibrotic milieu that exacerbates disease progression. Osteopontin (OPN) is an immunomodulator highly expressed in dystrophic muscles. Ablation of OPN correlates with reduced fibrosis and improved muscle strength as well as reduced natural killer T (NKT) cell counts. Here, we demonstrate that the improved dystrophic phenotype observed with OPN ablation does not result from reductions in NKT cells. OPN ablation skews macrophage polarization toward a pro-regenerative phenotype by reducing M1 and M2a and increasing M2c subsets. These changes are associated with increased expression of pro-regenerative factors insulin-like growth factor 1, leukemia inhibitory factor, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Furthermore, altered macrophage polarization correlated with increases in muscle weight and muscle fiber diameter, resulting in long-term improvements in muscle strength and function in mdx mice. These findings suggest that OPN ablation promotes muscle repair via macrophage secretion of pro-myogenic growth factors. PMID:27091452

  1. Osteopontin ablation ameliorates muscular dystrophy by shifting macrophages to a pro-regenerative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Capote, Joana; Kramerova, Irina; Martinez, Leonel; Vetrone, Sylvia; Barton, Elisabeth R; Sweeney, H Lee; Miceli, M Carrie; Spencer, Melissa J

    2016-04-25

    In the degenerative disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy, inflammatory cells enter muscles in response to repetitive muscle damage. Immune factors are required for muscle regeneration, but chronic inflammation creates a profibrotic milieu that exacerbates disease progression. Osteopontin (OPN) is an immunomodulator highly expressed in dystrophic muscles. Ablation of OPN correlates with reduced fibrosis and improved muscle strength as well as reduced natural killer T (NKT) cell counts. Here, we demonstrate that the improved dystrophic phenotype observed with OPN ablation does not result from reductions in NKT cells. OPN ablation skews macrophage polarization toward a pro-regenerative phenotype by reducing M1 and M2a and increasing M2c subsets. These changes are associated with increased expression of pro-regenerative factors insulin-like growth factor 1, leukemia inhibitory factor, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Furthermore, altered macrophage polarization correlated with increases in muscle weight and muscle fiber diameter, resulting in long-term improvements in muscle strength and function in mdx mice. These findings suggest that OPN ablation promotes muscle repair via macrophage secretion of pro-myogenic growth factors.

  2. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging.

  3. Long-term insulin-like growth factor-I expression in skeletal muscles attenuates the enhanced in vitro proliferation ability of the resident satellite cells in transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Schwartz, R. J.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) overexpression for 1-month in mouse skeletal muscle increases satellite cell proliferation potential. However, it is unknown whether this beneficial enhancement by IGF-I expression would persist over a longer-term duration in aged mice. This is an important issue to address if a prolonged course of IGF-I is to be used clinically in muscle-wasting conditions where satellite cells may become limiting. Using the IGF-I transgenic (IGF-I Tg) mouse that selectively expresses the IGF-I transgene in striated muscles, we found that 18-months of continuous IGF-I overexpression led to a loss in the enhanced in vitro proliferative capacity of satellite cells from Tg skeletal muscles. Also 18-month-old IGF-I Tg satellite cells lost the enhanced BrdU incorporation, greater pRb and Akt phosphorylations, and decreased p27(Kip1) levels initially observed in cells from 1-month-old IGF-I Tg mice. The levels of those biochemical markers reverted to similar values seen in the 18-months WT littermates. These findings, therefore, suggest that there is no further beneficial effect on enhancing satellite cell proliferation ability with persistent long-term expression of IGF-I in skeletal muscles of these transgenic mice.

  4. Long-term insulin-like growth factor-I expression in skeletal muscles attenuates the enhanced in vitro proliferation ability of the resident satellite cells in transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Schwartz, R. J.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) overexpression for 1-month in mouse skeletal muscle increases satellite cell proliferation potential. However, it is unknown whether this beneficial enhancement by IGF-I expression would persist over a longer-term duration in aged mice. This is an important issue to address if a prolonged course of IGF-I is to be used clinically in muscle-wasting conditions where satellite cells may become limiting. Using the IGF-I transgenic (IGF-I Tg) mouse that selectively expresses the IGF-I transgene in striated muscles, we found that 18-months of continuous IGF-I overexpression led to a loss in the enhanced in vitro proliferative capacity of satellite cells from Tg skeletal muscles. Also 18-month-old IGF-I Tg satellite cells lost the enhanced BrdU incorporation, greater pRb and Akt phosphorylations, and decreased p27(Kip1) levels initially observed in cells from 1-month-old IGF-I Tg mice. The levels of those biochemical markers reverted to similar values seen in the 18-months WT littermates. These findings, therefore, suggest that there is no further beneficial effect on enhancing satellite cell proliferation ability with persistent long-term expression of IGF-I in skeletal muscles of these transgenic mice.

  5. Studies on a novel macrophage-specific calmodulin binding glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlow, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The murine macrophage-like cell line J774 and peritoneal exudate cells elicited with thioglycollate or starch contain a major calmodulin-binding protein which is absent in trifluoperazine-resistant variants of J774, resident peritoneal macrophages and these elicited with concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, proteose peptone or Bacillus Clamette Guerin. Resident murine peritoneal cells maintained in tissue culture for 3 days begin to accumulate this protein as do human peripheral blood monocytes after 7 days of culture. A specific competitive displacement radioimmunoassay was developed using a rabbit antiserum raised to the partially purified calmodulin binding protein and (/sup 125/I) calmodulin covalently crosslinked to the principal calmodulin binding protein in the preparation. The radioimmunoassay confirmed the unique cellular distribution of this protein suggesting that it may be a marker for certain stages of macrophage differentiation. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared and one of these was used to further purify the protein by immunoaffinity chromatography. A protein of molecular weight 50,000 to 60,000 was isolated. It could be selectively adsorbed to wheat germ agglutinin agarose and subsequently eluted with N-acetyl glucosamine. This property plus its sensitivity to endoglycosidase F led to the conclusion that it is a glycoprotein. The cellular distribution, subcellular localization and evidence of glycosylation suggest that this protein may be a macrophage-specific receptor with a high affinity for calcium-calmodulin.

  6. Beyond macrophages: the diversity of mononuclear cells in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D; Desvignes, Ludovic

    2014-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. Although M. tuberculosis has traditionally been thought to survive and replicate in macrophages, recent work in our laboratory and others has revealed that M. tuberculosis infects multiple subsets of mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in vitro. In experimental animals, M. tuberculosis infects no fewer than five distinct cell subsets in the lungs, including resident alveolar macrophages and 4 types of cells that recruited to the lungs in response to inflammatory signals: neutrophils, monocytes, interstitial macrophages, and dendritic cells. A characteristic of the adaptive immune response in TB is that it is delayed for several weeks following infection, and we have determined that this delay is due to prolonged residence of the bacteria in lung phagocytes prior to acquisition of the bacteria by dendritic cells. Among the mechanisms used by M. tuberculosis to delay acquisition by dendritic cells is to inhibit apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, which sequester the bacteria and prevent their acquisition by dendritic cells in the early stages of infection. We hypothesize that each infected cell subset makes a distinct contribution to the overall biology of M. tuberculosis and allows the bacteria to evade elimination by T-cell responses and to avoid rapid killing by antimycobacterial drugs.

  7. Beyond macrophages: the diversity of mononuclear cells in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D.; Desvignes, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB), is an intracellular pathogen of mononuclear phagocytes. Although M. tuberculosis has traditionally been thought to survive and replicate in macrophages, recent work in our laboratory and others has revealed that M. tuberculosis infects multiple subsets of mononuclear phagocytes in vivo and in vitro. In experimental animals, M. tuberculosis infects no fewer than five distinct cell subsets in the lungs, including resident alveolar macrophages and 4 types of cells that recruited to the lungs in response to inflammatory signals: neutrophils, monocytes, interstitial macrophages, and dendritic cells. A characteristic of the adaptive immune response in TB is that it is delayed for several weeks following infection, and we have determined that this delay is due to prolonged residence of the bacteria in lung phagocytes prior to acquisition of the bacteria by dendritic cells. Among the mechanisms used by M. tuberculosis to delay acquisition by dendritic cells is to inhibit apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils, which sequester the bacteria and prevent their acquisition by dendritic cells in the early stages of infection. We hypothesize that each infected cell subset makes a distinct contribution to the overall biology of M. tuberculosis and allows the bacteria to evade elimination by T-cell responses and to avoid rapid killing by antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:25319335

  8. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J.; Aksoylar, H. Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26360589

  9. Control of macrophage metabolism and activation by mTOR and Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, H Ibrahim; Horng, Tiffany

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages are pleiotropic cells that assume a variety of functions depending on their tissue of residence and tissue state. They maintain homeostasis as well as coordinate responses to stresses such as infection and metabolic challenge. The ability of macrophages to acquire diverse, context-dependent activities requires their activation (or polarization) to distinct functional states. While macrophage activation is well understood at the level of signal transduction and transcriptional regulation, the metabolic underpinnings are poorly understood. Importantly, emerging studies indicate that metabolic shifts play a pivotal role in control of macrophage activation and acquisition of context-dependent effector activities. The signals that drive macrophage activation impinge on metabolic pathways, allowing for coordinate control of macrophage activation and metabolism. Here we discuss how mTOR and Akt, major metabolic regulators and targets of such activation signals, control macrophage metabolism and activation. Dysregulated macrophage activities contribute to many diseases, including infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases and cancer, thus a better understanding of metabolic control of macrophage activation could pave the way to the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  10. Macrophages in Progressive Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    DiNapoli, Sarah R.; Hirsch, Vanessa M.

    2016-01-01

    The cells that are targeted by primate lentiviruses (HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus [SIV]) are of intense interest given the renewed effort to identify potential cures for HIV. These viruses have been reported to infect multiple cell lineages of hematopoietic origin, including all phenotypic and functional CD4 T cell subsets. The two most commonly reported cell types that become infected in vivo are memory CD4 T cells and tissue-resident macrophages. Though viral infection of CD4 T cells is routinely detected in both HIV-infected humans and SIV-infected Asian macaques, significant viral infection of macrophages is only routinely observed in animal models wherein CD4 T cells are almost entirely depleted. Here we review the roles of macrophages in lentiviral disease progression, the evidence that macrophages support viral replication in vivo, the animal models where macrophage-mediated replication of SIV is thought to occur, how the virus can interact with macrophages in vivo, pathologies thought to be attributed to viral replication within macrophages, how viral replication in macrophages might contribute to the asymptomatic phase of HIV/SIV infection, and whether macrophages represent a long-lived reservoir for the virus. PMID:27307568

  11. Imaging macrophages with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Pittet, Mikael J.

    2014-02-01

    Nanomaterials have much to offer, not only in deciphering innate immune cell biology and tracking cells, but also in advancing personalized clinical care by providing diagnostic and prognostic information, quantifying treatment efficacy and designing better therapeutics. This Review presents different types of nanomaterial, their biological properties and their applications for imaging macrophages in human diseases, including cancer, atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, aortic aneurysm, diabetes and other conditions. We anticipate that future needs will include the development of nanomaterials that are specific for immune cell subsets and can be used as imaging surrogates for nanotherapeutics. New in vivo imaging clinical tools for noninvasive macrophage quantification are thus ultimately expected to become relevant to predicting patients' clinical outcome, defining treatment options and monitoring responses to therapy.

  12. Macrophage polarization following chitosan implantation.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Daniela P; Fonseca, Ana C; Costa, Madalena; Amaral, Isabel F; Barbosa, Mário A; Águas, Artur P; Barbosa, Judite N

    2013-12-01

    Macrophages are a key cell in the host response to implants and can be polarized into different phenotypes capable of inducing both detrimental and beneficial outcomes in tissue repair and remodeling, being important in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the macrophage response to 3D porous chitosan (Ch) scaffolds with different degrees of acetylation (DA, 5% and 15%). The M1/M2 phenotypic polarization profile of macrophages was investigated in vivo using a rodent air-pouch model. Our results show that the DA affects the macrophage response. Ch scaffolds with DA 5% induced the adhesion of lower numbers of inflammatory cells, being the M2 the predominant phenotypic profile among the adherent macrophages. In the inflammatory exudates F4/80(+)/CD206(+) cells (M2 macrophages) appeared in higher numbers then F4/80(+)/CCR7(+) cells (M1 macrophages), in addition, lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines together with higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines were found. Ch scaffolds with DA 15% showed opposite results, since M1 were the predominant macrophages both adherent to the scaffold and in the exudates, together with high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In conclusion, Ch scaffolds with DA 5% induced a benign M2 anti-inflammatory macrophage response, whereas Ch scaffolds with DA 15% caused a macrophage M1 pro-inflammatory response.

  13. Life After Residency.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Many residents don't receive any formal business training. The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School created a crash course to teach residents some of the business and job-hunting basics they'll need.

  14. Re-positioning forelimb superficialis muscles: tendon attachment and muscle activity enable active relocation of functional myofibers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alice H.; Riordan, Timothy J.; Wang, Lingyan; Eyal, Shai; Zelzer, Elazar; Brigande, John V.; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2013-01-01

    Summary The muscles that govern hand motion are composed of extrinsic muscles that reside within the forearm and intrinsic muscles that reside within the hand. We find that the extrinsic muscles of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) first differentiate as intrinsic muscles within the hand and then relocate as myofibers to their final position in the arm. This unique translocation of differentiated myofibers across a joint is dependent on muscle contraction and muscle-tendon attachment. Interestingly, the intrinsic flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles of the foot are identical to the FDS in tendon pattern and delayed developmental timing, but undergo limited muscle translocation, providing strong support for evolutionary homology between the FDS and FDB muscles. We propose that the intrinsic FDB pattern represents the original tetrapod limb and translocation of the muscles to form the FDS is a mammalian evolutionary addition. PMID:24044893

  15. Epigenomics of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, David; Glass, Christopher K

    2014-11-01

    Macrophages play essential roles in tissue homeostasis, pathogen elimination, and tissue repair. A defining characteristic of these cells is their ability to efficiently adapt to a variety of abruptly changing and complex environments. This ability is intrinsically linked to a capacity to quickly alter their transcriptome, and this is tightly associated with the epigenomic organization of these cells and, in particular, their enhancer repertoire. Indeed, enhancers are genomic sites that serve as platforms for the integration of signaling pathways with the mechanisms that regulate mRNA transcription. Notably, transcription is pervasive at active enhancers and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) are tightly coupled to regulated transcription of protein-coding genes. Furthermore, given that each cell type possesses a defining enhancer repertoire, studies on enhancers provide a powerful method to study how specialization of functions among the diverse macrophage subtypes may arise. Here, we review recent studies providing insights into the distinct mechanisms that contribute to the establishment of enhancers and their role in the regulation of transcription in macrophages.

  16. Skeletal muscle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are approximately 650-850 muscles in the human body these include skeletal (striated), smooth and cardiac muscle. The approximation is based on what some anatomists consider separate muscle or muscle systems. Muscles are classified based on their anatomy (striated vs. smooth) and if they are v...

  17. Obligatory participation of macrophages in an angiopoietin 2-mediated cell death switch

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sujata; Lobov, Ivan B.; Vallance, Jefferson E.; Tsujikawa, Kaoru; Shiojima, Ichiro; Akunuru, Shailaja; Walsh, Kenneth; Benjamin, Laura E.; Lang, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages have a critical function in the recognition and engulfment of dead cells. In some settings, macrophages also actively signal programmed cell death. Here we show that during developmentally scheduled vascular regression, resident macrophages are an obligatory participant in a signaling switch that favors death over survival. This switch occurs when the signaling ligand angiopoietin 2 has the dual effect of suppressing survival signaling in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and stimulating Wnt ligand production by macrophages. In response to the Wnt ligand, VECs enter the cell cycle and in the absence of survival signals, die from G1 phase of the cell cycle. We propose that this mechanism represents an adaptation to ensure that the macrophage and its disposal capability are on hand when cell death occurs. PMID:18039971

  18. Macrophages Contribute to the Cyclic Activation of Adult Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castellana, Donatello; Paus, Ralf; Perez-Moreno, Mirna

    2014-01-01

    Skin epithelial stem cells operate within a complex signaling milieu that orchestrates their lifetime regenerative properties. The question of whether and how immune cells impact on these stem cells within their niche is not well understood. Here we show that skin-resident macrophages decrease in number because of apoptosis before the onset of epithelial hair follicle stem cell activation during the murine hair cycle. This process is linked to distinct gene expression, including Wnt transcription. Interestingly, by mimicking this event through the selective induction of macrophage apoptosis in early telogen, we identify a novel involvement of macrophages in stem cell activation in vivo. Importantly, the macrophage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Wnt production delays hair follicle growth. Thus, perifollicular macrophages contribute to the activation of skin epithelial stem cells as a novel, additional cue that regulates their regenerative activity. This finding may have translational implications for skin repair, inflammatory skin diseases and cancer. PMID:25536657

  19. CX3CR1-dependent renal macrophage survival promotes Candida control and host survival

    PubMed Central

    Lionakis, Michail S.; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Fischer, Brett G.; Plantinga, Theo S.; Johnson, Melissa D.; Jaeger, Martin; Green, Nathaniel M.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Weigert, Roberto; Mikelis, Constantinos; Wan, Wuzhou; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Lim, Jean K.; Rivollier, Aymeric; Yang, John C.; Laird, Greg M.; Wheeler, Robert T.; Alexander, Barbara D.; Perfect, John R.; Gao, Ji-Liang; Kullberg, Bart-Jan; Netea, Mihai G.; Murphy, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic Candida albicans infection causes high morbidity and mortality and is associated with neutropenia; however, the roles of other innate immune cells in pathogenesis are poorly defined. Here, using a mouse model of systemic candidiasis, we found that resident macrophages accumulated in the kidney, the main target organ of infection, and formed direct contacts with the fungus in vivo mainly within the first few hours after infection. Macrophage accumulation and contact with Candida were both markedly reduced in mice lacking chemokine receptor CX3CR1, which was found almost exclusively on resident macrophages in uninfected kidneys. Infected Cx3cr1–/– mice uniformly succumbed to Candida-induced renal failure, but exhibited clearance of the fungus in all other organs tested. Renal macrophage deficiency in infected Cx3cr1–/– mice was due to reduced macrophage survival, not impaired proliferation, trafficking, or differentiation. In humans, the dysfunctional CX3CR1 allele CX3CR1-M280 was associated with increased risk of systemic candidiasis. Together, these data indicate that CX3CR1-mediated renal resident macrophage survival is a critical innate mechanism of early fungal control that influences host survival in systemic candidiasis. PMID:24177428

  20. The transcriptional signature of human ovarian carcinoma macrophages is associated with extracellular matrix reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Till; Wortmann, Annika; Hoffmann, Nathalie; Bieringer, Tim; Nist, Andrea; Stiewe, Thorsten; Jansen, Julia M.; Wagner, Uwe; Müller-Brüsselbach, Sabine; Müller, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages occur as resident cells of fetal origin or as infiltrating blood monocyte-derived cells. Despite the critical role of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in tumor progression, the contribution of these developmentally and functionally distinct macrophage subsets and their alteration by the tumor microenvironment are poorly understood. We have addressed this question by comparing TAMs from human ovarian carcinoma ascites, resident peritoneal macrophages (pMPHs) and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). Our study revealed striking a similarity between TAMs and pMPHs, which was considerably greater that the resemblance of TAMs and MDMs, including their transcriptomes, their inflammation-related activation state, the presence of receptors mediating immune functions and the expression of tumor-promoting mediators. Consistent with these results, TAMs phagocytized bacteria, presented peptide antigens and activated cytotoxic T cells within their pathophysiological environment. These observations support the notion that tumor-promoting properties of TAMs may reflect, at least to some extent, normal features of resident macrophages rather than functions induced by the tumor microenvironment. In spite of these surprising similarities between TAMs and pMPHs, bioinformatic analyses identified a TAM-selective signature of 30 genes that are upregulated relative to both pMPHs and MDMs. The majority of these genes is linked to extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, supporting a role for TAMs in cancer cell invasion and ovarian cancer progression. PMID:27659538

  1. Antihistoplasma effect of activated mouse splenic macrophages involves production of reactive nitrogen intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, T E; Wu-Hsieh, B A; Howard, D H

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism by which recombinant murine gamma interferon (rMuIFN-gamma) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activate mouse resident splenic macrophages to inhibit the intracellular growth of the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum was examined. Growth inhibition depended on L-arginine metabolism. The growth inhibitory state normally induced by rMuIFN-gamma and LPS in resident splenic macrophages did not occur when the macrophages were cultured in the presence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, a competitive inhibitor of L-arginine metabolism. Resident splenic macrophages treated with rMuIFN-gamma and LPS produced nitrite (NO2-), an end product of L-arginine metabolism. When macrophages were cultured in the presence of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine together with rMuIFN-gamma and LPS, only baseline levels of NO2- were detected. Spleen cells from H. capsulatum-infected mice produced high levels of NO2- in culture. The production of NO2- correlated with in vitro inhibition of the intracellular growth of H. capsulatum. Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha antibody did not block NO2- production by the immigrant splenic macrophages and did not abolish the antihistoplasma activity. PMID:8168960

  2. Molecular imaging of microglia/macrophages in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Venneti, Sriram; Lopresti, Brian J.; Wiley, Clayton A.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroinflammation perpetuates neuronal damage in many neurological disorders. Activation of resident microglia and infiltration of monocytes/macrophages contributes to neuronal injury and synaptic damage. Non-invasive imaging of these cells in vivo provides a means to monitor progression of disease as well as assess efficacies of potential therapeutics. This review provides an overview of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of microglia/macrophages in the brain. We describe the rationale behind PET imaging of microglia/macrophages with ligands that bind to translocator protein-18 kDa (TSPO). We discuss the prototype TSPO radioligand [11C]PK11195, its limitations, and the development of newer TSPO ligands as PET imaging agents. PET imaging agents for targets other than TSPO are emerging, and we outline the potential of these agents for imaging brain microglia/macrophage activity in vivo. Finally, we briefly summarize advances in MR imaging of microglia/macrophages using iron oxide nanoparticles and ultra-small super paramagnetic particles that are phagocytosed. Despite many technical advances, more sensitive agents are required to be useful indicators of neuroinflammation in brain. PMID:22615180

  3. Association of Legionella pneumophila with the macrophage endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, M S; Isberg, R R

    1995-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila replicates within a membrane-bounded compartment that is studded with ribosomes. In this study we investigated whether these ribosomes originate from the cytoplasmic pool or are associated with host endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopic localization studies of ER proteins in macrophages infected with L. pneumophila indicated that the bacteria reside in a compartment surrounded by ER. An L. pneumophila mutant that grows slowly in macrophages was slow to associate with host ER, providing genetic evidence in support of the hypothesis that this specialized vacuole is required for intracellular bacterial growth. Ultrastructural studies, in which the ER luminal protein BiP was labeled by immunoperoxidase cytochemistry, revealed that L. pneumophila replication vacuoles resemble nascent autophagosomes. Furthermore, short-term amino acid starvation of macrophages, which stimulated host autophagosomes. Furthermore, short-term amino acid starvation of macrophages, which stimulated host autophagy, increased association of the bacteria with the ER and enhanced bacterial growth. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that L. pneumophila exploits the autophagy machinery of macrophages to establish an intracellular niche favorable for replication. PMID:7642298

  4. The heterogeneity of lung macrophages in the susceptibility to disease.

    PubMed

    Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Misharin, Alexander V; Perlman, Harris; Budinger, G R Scott

    2015-09-01

    Alveolar macrophages are specialised resident phagocytes in the alveolus, constituting the first line of immune cellular defence in the lung. As the lung microenvironment is challenged and remodelled by inhaled pathogens and air particles, so is the alveolar macrophage pool altered by signals that maintain and/or replace its composition. The signals that induce the recruitment of circulating monocytes to the injured lung, as well as their distinct gene expression profile and susceptibility to epigenetic reprogramming by the local environment remain unclear. In this review, we summarise the unique characteristics of the alveolar macrophage pool ontogeny, phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity during homeostasis, tissue injury and normal ageing. We also discuss new evidence arising from recent studies where investigators described how the epigenetic landscape drives the specific gene expression profile of alveolar macrophages. Altogether, new analysis of macrophages by means of "omic" technologies will allow us to identify key pathways by which these cells contribute to the development and resolution of lung disease in both mice and humans. Copyright ©ERS 2015.

  5. Arachidonic acid metabolism in glutathione-deficient macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Rouzer, C A; Scott, W A; Griffith, O W; Hamill, A L; Cohn, Z A

    1982-01-01

    Mouse resident peritoneal macrophages were treated with the glutathione (GSH) synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine to deplete intracellular GSH. The arachidonic acid metabolites released by the GSH-depleted macrophages in response to a zymosan challenge were analyzed by HPLC. Buthionine sulfoximine treatment resulted in inhibition of both prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene C synthesis that was directly related to the degree of GSH depletion. Macrophages in which GSH levels were reduced to 3% of normal exhibited reductions to 4% and 1%, respectively, in PGE2 and LTC formation. The total quantity of cyclooxygenase metabolites secreted by GSH-deficient macrophages was identical to that of control cells as a result of increased synthesis of prostacyclin and, to a lesser extent, 12-L-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid. Total lipoxygenase products were decreased, however; increased formation of hydroxyicosatetraenoic acids only partially compensated for the deficit in leukotriene C production. These findings extent our earlier observations on the inhibition of leukotriene C synthesis in GSH-depleted macrophages and confirm with intact cells the previously suggested role of GSH in prostaglandin E2 formation. PMID:6803245

  6. Macrophage Apoptosis Triggered by IpaD from Shigella flexneri

    PubMed Central

    Arizmendi, Olivia; Picking, William D.

    2016-01-01

    Shigellosis, a potentially severe bacillary dysentery, is an infectious gastrointestinal disease caused by Shigella spp. Shigella invades the human colonic epithelium and avoids clearance by promoting apoptosis of resident immune cells in the gut. This process is dependent on the Shigella type III secretion system (T3SS), which injects effector proteins into target cells to alter their normal cellular functions. Invasion plasmid antigen D (IpaD) is a structural component that forms a complex at the tip of the T3SS apparatus needle. Recently, IpaD has also been shown to indirectly induce apoptosis in B lymphocytes. In this study, we explored the cytotoxicity profile during macrophage infection by Shigella and discovered that the pathogen induces macrophage cell death independent of caspase-1. Our results demonstrate that IpaD triggers apoptosis in macrophages through activation of host caspases accompanied by mitochondrial disruption. Additionally, we found that the IpaD N-terminal domain is necessary for macrophage killing and SipD, a structural homologue from Salmonella, was found to promote similar cytotoxicity. Together, these findings indicate that IpaD is a contributing factor to macrophage cell death during Shigella infection. PMID:27068089

  7. Mycobacteria manipulate macrophage recruitment through coordinated use of membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Cambier, C J; Takaki, Kevin K; Larson, Ryan P; Hernandez, Rafael E; Tobin, David M; Urdahl, Kevin B; Cosma, Christine L; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2014-01-09

    The evolutionary survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of human tuberculosis, depends on its ability to invade the host, replicate, and transmit infection. At its initial peripheral infection site in the distal lung airways, M. tuberculosis infects macrophages, which transport it to deeper tissues. How mycobacteria survive in these broadly microbicidal cells is an important question. Here we show in mice and zebrafish that M. tuberculosis, and its close pathogenic relative Mycobacterium marinum, preferentially recruit and infect permissive macrophages while evading microbicidal ones. This immune evasion is accomplished by using cell-surface-associated phthiocerol dimycoceroserate (PDIM) lipids to mask underlying pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In the absence of PDIM, these PAMPs signal a Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent recruitment of macrophages that produce microbicidal reactive nitrogen species. Concordantly, the related phenolic glycolipids (PGLs) promote the recruitment of permissive macrophages through a host chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)-mediated pathway. Thus, we have identified coordinated roles for PDIM, known to be essential for mycobacterial virulence, and PGL, which (along with CCR2) is known to be associated with human tuberculosis. Our findings also suggest an explanation for the longstanding observation that M. tuberculosis initiates infection in the relatively sterile environment of the lower respiratory tract, rather than in the upper respiratory tract, where resident microflora and inhaled environmental microbes may continually recruit microbicidal macrophages through TLR-dependent signalling.

  8. Evolutionary Aspects of Macrophages Polarization.

    PubMed

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Rhoo, Kun Hyoe; Robert, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages constitute a heterogeneous population of myeloid cells that are essential for maintaining homeostasis and as a first line of innate responders controlling and organizing host defenses against pathogens. Monocyte-macrophage lineage cells are among the most functionally diverse and plastic cells of the immune system. They undergo specific activation into functionally distinct phenotypes in response to immune signals and microbial products. In mammals, macrophage functional heterogeneity is defined by two activation states, M1 and M2, which represent two polar ends of a continuum exhibiting pro-inflammatory and tissue repair activities, respectively. While the ancient evolutionary origin of macrophages as phagocytic defenders is well established, the evolutionary roots of the specialized division of macrophages into subsets with polarized activation phenotypes is less well defined. Accordingly, this chapter focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the evolution of macrophage polarization and functional heterogeneity with a focus on ectothermic vertebrates.

  9. The macrophages in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Laria, Antonella; Lurati, Alfredomaria; Marrazza, Mariagrazia; Mazzocchi, Daniela; Re, Katia Angela; Scarpellini, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages belong to the innate immune system giving us protection against pathogens. However it is known that they are also involved in rheumatic diseases. Activated macrophages have two different phenotypes related to different stimuli: M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). M1 macrophages release high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen and oxygen intermediates killing microorganisms and tumor cells; while M2 macrophages are involved in resolution of inflammation through phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and increased synthesis of mediators important in tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and wound repair. The role of macrophages in the different rheumatic diseases is different according to their M1/M2 macrophages phenotype. PMID:26929657

  10. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  11. Muscle disorder

    MedlinePlus

    Myopathic changes; Myopathy; Muscle problem ... Blood tests sometimes show abnormally high muscle enzymes. If a muscle disorder might also affect other family members, genetic testing may be done. When someone has symptoms and signs ...

  12. Survival and replication of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inside the mice peritoneal macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mariri, Ayman

    2008-01-01

    The replication of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on the resident peritoneal macrophages of four mice strains (BALB/c, CD1, C57BL, and Swiss) has been investigated. Macrophagial bactericidal killing activity was estimated via studying their ability to internalize (gentamicin-protected) E. coli during 2, 4, 24, and 48 h assays. Host genetic background has been found to show no significant effect on the ability of resident peritoneal macrophages to kill E. coli O157:H7. PMID:24031167

  13. The Interaction between Candida krusei and Murine Macrophages Results in Multiple Outcomes, Including Intracellular Survival and Escape from Killing ▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodas, Rocío; González-Camacho, Fernando; Rodríguez-Tudela, Juan Luis; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Zaragoza, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Candida krusei is a fungal pathogen of interest for the scientific community for its intrinsic resistance to fluconazole. Little is known about the interaction of this yeast with host immune cells. In this work, we have characterized the outcome of the interaction between C. krusei and murine macrophages. Once C. krusei was internalized, we observed different phenomena. In a macrophage-like cell line, C. krusei survived in a significant number of macrophages and induced filamentation and macrophage explosion. Phagocytosis of C. krusei led to actin polymerization around the yeast cells at the site of entry. Fluorescent specific staining with anti-Lamp1 and LysoTracker indicated that after fungal internalization, there was a phagolysosome maturation defect, a phenomenon that was more efficient when the macrophages phagocytosed killed yeast cells. Using cell line macrophages, we also observed macrophage fusion after cell division. When we used primary resident peritoneal macrophages in addition to macrophage explosion, we also observed a strong chemotaxis of uninfected macrophages to regions where C. krusei-infected macrophages were present. We also noticed yeast transfer phenomena between infected macrophages. Primary macrophages inhibited pseudohypha elongation more efficiently than the macrophage-like cell line, suggesting that C. krusei infection was better controlled by the former macrophages. Primary macrophages induced more tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) than the macrophage-like cell line. Our results demonstrate that C. krusei can exploit the macrophages for replication, although other different outcomes are also possible, indicating that the interaction of this pathogen with phagocytic cells is very complex and regulated by multiple factors. PMID:21422181

  14. Atypical presentation of macrophagic myofasciitis 10 years post vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Aisling M; Bermingham, Niamh; Harrington, Hugh J; Keohane, Catherine

    2006-12-01

    Macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) is an uncommon inflammatory disorder of muscle believed to be due to persistence of vaccine-derived aluminium hydroxide at the site of injection. The condition is characterised by diffuse myalgias, arthralgia and fatigue. We describe a patient with histologically confirmed MMF whose presentation was atypical with left chest and upper limb pain beginning more than 10 years post vaccination. Treatment with steroids led to symptomatic improvement. Although rare, clinicians should consider MMF in cases of atypical myalgia.

  15. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  16. Macrophage Cryptococcus interactions: an update

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Michael K.; Reedy, Jennifer L.; Tam, Jenny M.; Vyas, Jatin M.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus species are fungal pathogens that are a leading cause of mortality. Initial inoculation is through the pulmonary route and, if disseminated, results in severe invasive infection including meningoencephalitis. Macrophages are the dominant phagocytic cell that interacts with Cryptococcus. Emerging theories suggest that Cryptococcus microevolution in macrophages is linked to survival and virulence within the host. In addition, Cryptococcus elaborates virulence factors as well as usurps host machinery to establish macrophage activation states that are permissive to intracellular survival and replication. In this review, we provide an update of the recent findings pertaining to macrophage interaction with Cryptococcus and focus on new avenues for biomedical research. PMID:24660045

  17. Macrophages in homeostatic immune function

    PubMed Central

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Binger, Katrina J.; Müller, Dominik N.; Titze, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are not only involved in inflammatory and anti-infective processes, but also play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent evidence investigating the role of macrophages in controlling angiogenesis, metabolism as well as salt and water balance. Particularly, we summarize the importance of macrophage tonicity enhancer binding protein (TonEBP, also termed nuclear factor of activated T-cells 5 [NFAT5]) expression in the regulation of salt and water homeostasis. Further understanding of homeostatic macrophage function may lead to new therapeutic approaches to treat ischemia, hypertension and metabolic disorders. PMID:24847274

  18. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2016-02-12

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells' resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  19. Stimulation of glycolysis as an activation signal in rat peritoneal macrophages. Effect of glucocorticoids on this process.

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, R; Sobrino, F

    1992-01-01

    1. Peritoneal macrophages were prepared from control, Escherichia coli-treated and triamcinolone acetonide-treated rats. Control and E. coli-treated rats produced resident and activated macrophages respectively. Glycolysis in these cells was studied by the fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (Fru-2,6-P2) content, lactate release and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK-1) and 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (PFK-2) activities. 2. In activated macrophages, lactate release and Fru-2,6-P2 content were increased several-fold compared with those in resident cells. Moreover, the response of these parameters to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in activated macrophages was greater than for resident cells. 3. PFK-2 activity was moderately increased (about 3-fold), but PFK-1 activity was increased 5-fold in activated macrophages compared with resident cells. Partially purified preparations of PFK-1 were sensitive to Fru-2,6-P2, with K0.5 about 0.25 microM in both control and activated cells. However, the Vmax. of PFK-1 from activated cells was increased. In addition, AMP stimulated PFK-1, but the kinetic pattern was different from that described for Fru-2,6-P2. Moreover there was no difference in the stimulation by AMP of PFK-1 from resident and activated cells. 4. Fru-2,6-P2 content and lactate release in macrophages from triamcinolone acetonide-treated rats were decreased in both resident and activated cells. Also, the glucocorticoid inhibited PFK-1 and PFK-2 activities in both resident and activated macrophages. PFK-1 from triamcinolone acetonide-treated rats was not stimulated by Fru-2,6-P2, whereas the effect of AMP was unchanged. The effects of glucocorticoid seem to be specific for phagocytic cells, since the glucocorticoid treatment increased PFK-1 and PFK-2 activities in liver. PMID:1311557

  20. Distinct inflammatory properties of late-activated macrophages in inflammatory myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rostasy, KM; Schmidt, J; Bahn, E; Pfander, T; Piepkorn, M; Wilichowski, E; Schulz-Schaeffer, J

    2008-01-01

    Summary Distinct mechanisms such as humeral immunity in dermatomyositis (DM) and T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity in polymyositis (PM) contribute to the pathology of inflammatory myopathies. In addition, different subsets of macrophages are present in both diseases. Herein, the characteristics of 25F9-positive macrophages in skeletal muscle inflammation are outlined. Muscle biopsies of subjects with DM and PM were studied by immunohistochemical multi-labelling using the late-activation marker 25F9, together with markers characterizing macrophage function including IFN-γ, iNOS, and TGF-β. In PM, a robust expression of IFN-γ, iNOS, and TGF-β was observed in inflammatory cells. Double- and serial-labelling revealed that a subset of 25F9-positive macrophages in the vicinity of injured muscle fibres expressed iNOS and TGF-β, but not IFN-γ. In DM, IFN-γ, iNOS and TGF-β were also expressed in inflammatory cells in the endomysium. Double- and serial-labelling studies in DM indicated that 25F9-positive macrophages expressed TGF-β and to a lesser degree iNOS, but not IFN-γ. In conclusion, our data suggest that late-activated macrophages contribute to the pathology of inflammatory myopathies. PMID:19364061

  1. Distinct inflammatory properties of late-activated macrophages in inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, K M; Schmidt, J; Bahn, E; Pfander, T; Piepkorn, M; Wilichowski, E; Schulz-Schaeffer, J

    2008-10-01

    Distinct mechanisms such as humeral immunity in dermatomyositis (DM) and T-cell-mediated cytotoxicity in polymyositis (PM) contribute to the pathology of inflammatory myopathies. In addition, different subsets of macrophages are present in both diseases. Herein, the characteristics of 25F9-positive macrophages in skeletal muscle inflammation are outlined. Muscle biopsies of subjects with DM and PM were studied by immunohistochemical multi-labelling using the late-activation marker 25F9, together with markers characterizing macrophage function including IFN-gamma, iNOS, and TGF-beta. In PM, a robust expression of IFN-gamma, iNOS, and TGF-beta was observed in inflammatory cells. Double- and serial-labelling revealed that a subset of 25F9-positive macrophages in the vicinity of injured muscle fibres expressed iNOS and TGF-beta, but not IFN-gamma. In DM, IFN-gamma, iNOS and TGF-beta were also expressed in inflammatory cells in the endomysium. Double- and serial-labelling studies in DM indicated that 25F9-positive macrophages expressed TGF-beta and to a lesser degree iNOS, but not IFN-gamma. In conclusion, our data suggest that late-activated macrophages contribute to the pathology of inflammatory myopathies.

  2. Comparative analysis of the internalization of the macrophage receptor sialoadhesin in human and mouse primary macrophages and cell lines.

    PubMed

    De Schryver, Marjorie; Leemans, Annelies; Pintelon, Isabel; Cappoen, Davie; Maes, Louis; Caljon, Guy; Cos, Paul; Delputte, Peter L

    2016-11-21

    Sialoadhesin (Sn) is a surface receptor expressed on resident macrophages with the ability to bind with sialic acids. During inflammation, an upregulation of Sn is observed. Upon binding of monoclonal antibodies to Sn, the receptor becomes internalized and this has been observed in multiple species. The latter characteristic, combined with the strong upregulation of Sn on inflammatory macrophages and the fact that Sn-positive macrophages contribute to certain inflammatory diseases, makes Sn an interesting entry portal for phenotype-modulating or cytotoxic drugs. Such drugs or toxins can be linked to Sn-specific antibodies which should enable their targeted uptake by macrophages. However, the activity of such drugs depends not only on their internalization but also on the intracellular trafficking and final fate in the endolysosomal system. Although information is available for porcine Sn, the detailed mechanisms of human and mouse Sn internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking are currently unknown. To allow development of Sn-targeted therapies, differences across species and cellular background need to be characterized in more detail. In the current report, we show that internalization of human and mouse Sn is dynamin-dependent and clathrin-mediated, both in primary macrophages and CHO cell lines expressing a recombinant Sn. In primary macrophages, internalized Sn-specific F(ab')2 fragments are located mostly in the early endosomes. With Fc containing Sn-specific antibodies, there is a slight shift towards lysosomal localization in mouse macrophages, possibly because of an interaction with Fc receptors. Surprisingly, in CHO cell lines expressing Sn, there is a predominant lysosomal localization. Our results show that the mechanism of Sn internalization and intracellular trafficking is concurrent in the tested species. The cellular background in which Sn is expressed and the type of antibody used can affect the intracellular fate, which in turn can

  3. Macrophage-targeted photodynamic detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Tawakol, Ahmed; Castano, Ana P.; Gad, Faten; Zahra, Touqir; Ahmadi, Atosa; Stern, Jeremy; Ortel, Bernhard; Chirico, Stephanie; Shirazi, Azadeh; Syed, Sakeena; Muller, James E.

    2003-06-01

    Rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque (VP) leading to coronary thrombosis is the chief cause of sudden cardiac death. VPs are angiographically insignificant lesions, which are excessively inflamed and characterized by dense macrophage infiltration, large necrotic lipid cores, thin fibrous caps, and paucity of smooth muscle cells. We have recently shown that chlorin(e6) conjugated with maleylated albumin can target macrophages with high selectivity via the scavenger receptor. We report the potential of this macrophage-targeted fluorescent probe to localize in VPs in a rabbit model of atherosclerosis, and allow detection and/or diagnosis by fluorescence spectroscopy or imaging. Atherosclerotic lesions were induced in New Zealand White rabbit aortas by balloon injury followed by administration of a high-fat diet. 24-hours after IV injection of the conjugate into atherosclerotic or normal rabbits, the animals were sacrificed, and aortas were removed, dissected and examined for fluorescence localization in plaques by fiber-based spectrofluorimetry and confocal microscopy. Dye uptake within the aortas was also quantified by fluorescence extraction of samples from aorta segments. Biodistribution of the dye was studied in many organs of the rabbits. Surface spectrofluorimetry after conjugate injection was able to distinguish between plaque and adjacent aorta, between atherosclerotic and normal aorta, and balloon-injured and normal iliac arteries with high significance. Discrete areas of high fluorescence (up to 20 times control were detected in the balloon-injured segments, presumably corresponding to macrophage-rich plaques. Confocal microscopy showed red ce6 fluorescence localized in plaques that showed abundant foam cells and macrophages by histology. Extraction data on aortic tissue corroborated the selectivity of the conjugate for plaques. These data support the strategy of employing macrophage-targeted fluorescent dyes to detect VP by intravascular

  4. Inflammatory macrophages can transdifferentiate into myofibroblasts during renal fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Shuang; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Yang, Chen; Xiao, Jun; Zhang, Yang; To, Ka-Fai; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Lan, Hui-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Myofibroblasts play a central role in renal fibrosis although the origin of these cells remains controversial. We recently reported that bone marrow-derived macrophages can give rise to myofibroblasts through macrophage to myofibroblast transition (MMT). However, several important issues remain to be addressed, including whether MMT occurs in human kidney disease and verification of the MMT process through lineage tracing. Biopsies from a cohort of 58 patients with various forms of kidney disease were examined for MMT cells that co-express macrophage (CD68) and myofibroblast (α-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA) markers. MMT cells were evident in active fibrotic lesions, but were largely absent in acute inflammatory or sclerotic lesions, suggesting that MMT cells contribute to progressive renal fibrosis. Fate-mapping studies in LysMCreTomato mice identified substantial numbers of Tomato+ myeloid cells with F4/80+ macrophage phenotype expressing α-SMA and collagen I in the unilateral ureteral obstructive model of renal fibrosis, providing direct evidence for the MMT process during the development of renal fibrosis. In addition, MMT cells had a predominant M2 phenotype in both human and mouse renal fibrosis. Finally, selective depletion of myeloid cells via diphtheria toxin in LysMCreiDTR mice largely abolished macrophage infiltration and MMT cells in the obstructed kidney and substantially reduced accumulation of α-SMA+ myofibroblasts and collagen deposition, revealing a pathogenic role for inflammatory macrophages in MMT and tissue fibrosis. In conclusion, these findings provide substantial new data to support the postulate that macrophages can directly transdifferentiate into collagen-producing myofibroblasts in human and experimental kidney disease. PMID:27906172

  5. Fracture healing via periosteal callus formation requires macrophages for both initiation and progression of early endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Raggatt, Liza J; Wullschleger, Martin E; Alexander, Kylie A; Wu, Andy C K; Millard, Susan M; Kaur, Simranpreet; Maugham, Michelle L; Gregory, Laura S; Steck, Roland; Pettit, Allison R

    2014-12-01

    The distribution, phenotype, and requirement of macrophages for fracture-associated inflammation and/or early anabolic progression during endochondral callus formation were investigated. A murine femoral fracture model [internally fixed using a flexible plate (MouseFix)] was used to facilitate reproducible fracture reduction. IHC demonstrated that inflammatory macrophages (F4/80(+)Mac-2(+)) were localized with initiating chondrification centers and persisted within granulation tissue at the expanding soft callus front. They were also associated with key events during soft-to-hard callus transition. Resident macrophages (F4/80(+)Mac-2(neg)), including osteal macrophages, predominated in the maturing hard callus. Macrophage Fas-induced apoptosis transgenic mice were used to induce macrophage depletion in vivo in the femoral fracture model. Callus formation was completely abolished when macrophage depletion was initiated at the time of surgery and was significantly reduced when depletion was delayed to coincide with initiation of early anabolic phase. Treatment initiating 5 days after fracture with the pro-macrophage cytokine colony stimulating factor-1 significantly enhanced soft callus formation. The data support that inflammatory macrophages were required for initiation of fracture repair, whereas both inflammatory and resident macrophages promoted anabolic mechanisms during endochondral callus formation. Overall, macrophages make substantive and prolonged contributions to fracture healing and can be targeted as a therapeutic approach for enhancing repair mechanisms. Thus, macrophages represent a viable target for the development of pro-anabolic fracture treatments with a potentially broad therapeutic window. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sex differences in resident immune cell phenotype underlie more efficient acute inflammatory responses in female mice.

    PubMed

    Scotland, Ramona S; Stables, Melanie J; Madalli, Shimona; Watson, Peter; Gilroy, Derek W

    2011-11-24

    Females are protected against mortality arising from severe sepsis; however, the precise mechanisms that confer this survival advantage in females over males are unclear. Resident leukocytes in resting tissues have a significant influence on circulating cytokine levels and recruitment of blood leukocytes during acute inflammatory responses. Whether the phenotype of resident leukocytes is distinct in females is unknown. In the present study, we show that the numbers of leukocytes occupying the naive peritoneal and pleural cavities is higher in female than in male mice and rats, comprising more T and B lymphocytes and macrophages. The altered immune cell composition of the female peritoneum is controlled by elevated tissue chemokine expression. Female resident macrophages also exhibit greater TLR expression and enhanced phagocytosis and NADPH oxidase-mediated bacterial killing. However, macrophage-derived cytokine production is diminished by proportionally more resident immunomodulatory CD4+ T lymphocytes. Ovarian hormones regulate macrophage phenotype, function, and numbers, but have no significant impact on T-lymphocyte populations in females. We have identified a fundamental sex difference in phenotype of resident leukocytes. We propose that the distinct resident leukocyte population in females allows aggressive recognition and elimination of diverse infectious stimuli without recruitment of circulating neutrophils or excessive cytokine production.

  7. The angiogenic response of the aorta to injury and inflammatory cytokines requires macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gelati, Maurizio; Aplin, Alfred C; Fogel, Eric; Smith, Kelly D; Nicosia, Roberto Francesco

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define early events during the angiogenic response of the aortic wall to injury. Rat aortic rings produced neovessels in collagen culture but lost this capacity over time. These quiescent rings responded to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) but not to a cocktail of macrophage-stimulatory cytokines and chemokines that was angiogenically active on fresh rings. Analysis of cytokine receptor expression revealed selective loss in quiescent rings of the proangiogenic chemokine receptor CXCR2, which was expressed predominantly in aortic macrophages. Pharmacologic inhibition of CXCR2 impaired angiogenesis from fresh rings but had no effect on VEGF-induced angiogenesis from quiescent explants. Angiogenesis was also impaired in cultures of aortic rings from CXCR2-deficient mice. Reduced CXCR2 expression in quiescent rat aortic rings correlated with marked macrophage depletion. Pharmacologic ablation of macrophages from aortic explants blocked formation of neovessels in vitro and reduced aortic ring-induced angiogenesis in vivo. The angiogenic response of macrophage-depleted rings was completely restored by adding exogenous macrophages. Moreover, angiogenesis from fresh rings was promoted by macrophage colony stimulating factor (CSF-1) and inhibited with anti-CSF-1 antibody. Thus aortic angiogenic sprouting following injury is strongly influenced by conditions that modulate resident macrophage numbers and function. PMID:18832730

  8. Phenotype Determines Nanoparticle Uptake by Human Macrophages from Liver and Blood.

    PubMed

    MacParland, Sonya A; Tsoi, Kim M; Ouyang, Ben; Ma, Xue-Zhong; Manuel, Justin; Fawaz, Ali; Ostrowski, Mario A; Alman, Benjamin A; Zilman, Anton; Chan, Warren C W; McGilvray, Ian D

    2017-01-17

    A significant challenge to delivering therapeutic doses of nanoparticles to targeted disease sites is the fact that most nanoparticles become trapped in the liver. Liver-resident macrophages, or Kupffer cells, are key cells in the hepatic sequestration of nanoparticles. However, the precise role that the macrophage phenotype plays in nanoparticle uptake is unknown. Here, we show that the human macrophage phenotype modulates hard nanoparticle uptake. Using gold nanoparticles, we examined uptake by human monocyte-derived macrophages that had been driven to a "regulatory" M2 phenotype or an "inflammatory" M1 phenotype and found that M2-type macrophages preferentially take up nanoparticles, with a clear hierarchy among the subtypes (M2c > M2 > M2a > M2b > M1). We also found that stimuli such as LPS/IFN-γ rather than with more "regulatory" stimuli such as TGF-β/IL-10 reduce per cell macrophage nanoparticle uptake by an average of 40%. Primary human Kupffer cells were found to display heterogeneous expression of M1 and M2 markers, and Kupffer cells expressing higher levels of M2 markers (CD163) take up significantly more nanoparticles than Kupffer cells expressing lower levels of surface CD163. Our results demonstrate that hepatic inflammatory microenvironments should be considered when studying liver sequestration of nanoparticles, and that modifying the hepatic microenvironment might offer a tool for enhancing or decreasing this sequestration. Our findings also suggest that models examining the nanoparticle/macrophage interaction should include studies with primary tissue macrophages.

  9. Detection of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA in macrophages by magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stuckey, D J; Anthony, D C; Lowe, J P; Miller, J; Palm, W M; Styles, P; Perry, V H; Blamire, A M; Sibson, N R

    2005-08-01

    Macrophages are key components of the inflammatory response to tissue injury, but their activities can exacerbate neuropathology. High-resolution magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to identify metabolite levels in perchloric acid extracts of cultured cells of the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage line under resting and lipopolysaccharide-activated conditions. Over 25 metabolites were identified including gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter not previously reported to be present in macrophages. The presence of GABA was also demonstrated in extracts of human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages. This finding suggests that there may be communication between damaged central nervous system (CNS) tissue and recruited macrophages and resident microglia, which could help orchestrate the immune response. On activation, lactate, glutamine, glutamate, and taurine levels were elevated significantly, and GABA and alanine were reduced significantly. Strong resonances from glutathione, evident in the macrophage two-dimensional 1H spectrum, suggest that this may have potential as a noninvasive marker of macrophages recruited to the CNS, as it is only present at low levels in normal brain. Alternatively, a specific combination of spectroscopic changes, such as lactate, alanine, glutathione, and polyamines, may prove to be the most accurate means of detecting macrophage recruitment to the CNS.

  10. Apoptotic neutrophils augment the inflammatory response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Henrik; Andersson, Blanka; Eklund, Daniel; Ngoh, Eyler; Persson, Alexander; Svensson, Kristoffer; Lerm, Maria; Blomgran, Robert; Stendahl, Olle

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages in the lung are the primary cells being infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) during the initial manifestation of tuberculosis. Since the adaptive immune response to Mtb is delayed, innate immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils mount the early immune protection against this intracellular pathogen. Neutrophils are short-lived cells and removal of apoptotic cells by resident macrophages is a key event in the resolution of inflammation and tissue repair. Since anti-inflammatory activity is not compatible with effective immunity to intracellular pathogens, we therefore investigated how uptake of apoptotic neutrophils modulates the function of Mtb-activated human macrophages. We show that Mtb infection exerts a potent proinflammatory activation of human macrophages with enhanced gene activation and release of proinflammatory cytokines and that this response was augmented by apoptotic neutrophils. The enhanced macrophage response is linked to apoptotic neutrophil-driven activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and subsequent IL-1β signalling. We also demonstrate that apoptotic neutrophils not only modulate the inflammatory response, but also enhance the capacity of infected macrophages to control intracellular growth of virulent Mtb. Taken together, these results suggest a novel role for apoptotic neutrophils in the modulation of the macrophage-dependent inflammatory response contributing to the early control of Mtb infection.

  11. The Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde complexity of the macrophage response in disease.

    PubMed

    Twum, Danielle Y F; Burkard-Mandel, Lauren; Abrams, Scott I

    2017-08-01

    Macrophages comprise a highly diverse cell population expressing a continuum of biologic activities dictated by exposure to a plethora of inflammatory cues. Moreover, in contrast to most other hematopoietic populations, macrophages can arise from multiple sites-namely, the bone marrow or yolk sac, adding to the complexity of macrophage biology during health and disease. Nonetheless, it is this very type of diversity that is indispensable for macrophages to respond effectively to pathologic insults. Most of the interest in macrophage biology has been devoted to bone marrow-derived populations, but it is now becoming clearer that tissue-resident populations, which arise from distinct hematopoietic compartments, serve critical roles in host defense, including protection against neoplastic disease. Depending on the inflammatory milieu, macrophages can behave as a "two-edged sword," playing either host-protective (i.e., antitumor) or host-destructive (i.e., protumor) roles. Accordingly, we review herein the mechanisms that instruct macrophage functional diversity within their microenvironments, with special emphasis on transcriptional regulation, which is less understood. Given their polarizing positions in disease processes, we will also provide an overview of strategies that target macrophages or their effector mechanisms for therapeutic purposes. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  12. Aging impairs peritoneal but not bone marrow-derived macrophage phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Linehan, Eimear; Dombrowski, Yvonne; Snoddy, Rachel; Fallon, Padraic G; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Fitzgerald, Denise C

    2014-08-01

    Aging results in deterioration of the immune system, which is associated with increased susceptibility to infection and impaired wound healing in the elderly. Phagocytosis is an essential process in both wound healing and immune defence. As such, age-related impairments in phagocytosis impact on the health of the elderly population. Phagocytic efficiency in peritoneal macrophages, bone marrow-derived macrophages and bone marrow monocytes from young and old mice was investigated. Aging significantly impaired phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages, both in vitro and in vivo. However, bone marrow-derived macrophages and bone marrow monocytes did not exhibit age-related impairments in phagocytosis, suggesting no intrinsic defect in these cells. We sought to investigate underlying mechanisms in age-related impairments in phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages. We hypothesized that microenvironmental factors in the peritoneum of old mice impaired macrophage phagocytosis. Indeed, macrophages from young mice injected into the peritoneum of old mice exhibited impaired phagocytosis. Proportions of peritoneal immune cells were characterized, and striking increases in numbers of T cells, B1 and B2 cells were observed in the peritoneum of old mice compared with young mice. In addition, B cell-derived IL-10 was increased in resting and LPS-activated peritoneal cell cultures from old mice. These data demonstrate that aging impairs phagocytosis by tissue-resident peritoneal macrophages, but not by bone marrow-derived macrophages/monocytes, and suggest that age-related defects in macrophage phagocytosis may be due to extrinsic factors in the tissue microenvironment. As such, defects may be reversible and macrophages could be targeted therapeutically in order to boost immune function in the elderly.

  13. Proinflammatory Macrophages Enhance the Regenerative Capacity of Human Myoblasts by Modifying Their Kinetics of Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bencze, Maximilien; Negroni, Elisa; Vallese, Denis; Yacoub–Youssef, Houda; Chaouch, Soraya; Wolff, Annie; Aamiri, Ahmed; Di Santo, James P; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Savino, Wilson; Mouly, Vincent; Riederer, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages have been shown to be essential for muscle repair by delivering trophic cues to growing skeletal muscle precursors and young fibers. Here, we investigated whether human macrophages, either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory, coinjected with human myoblasts into regenerating muscle of Rag2−/− γC−/− immunodeficient mice, could modify in vivo the kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of the transplanted human myogenic precursors. Our results clearly show that proinflammatory macrophages improve in vivo the participation of injected myoblasts to host muscle regeneration, extending the window of proliferation, increasing migration, and delaying differentiation. Interestingly, immunostaining of transplanted proinflammatory macrophages at different time points strongly suggests that these cells are able to switch to an anti-inflammatory phenotype in vivo, which then may stimulate differentiation during muscle regeneration. Conceptually, our data provide for the first time in vivo evidence strongly suggesting that proinflammatory macrophages play a supportive role in the regulation of myoblast behavior after transplantation into preinjured muscle, and could thus potentially optimize transplantation of myogenic progenitors in the context of cell therapy. PMID:23070116

  14. Proinflammatory macrophages enhance the regenerative capacity of human myoblasts by modifying their kinetics of proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bencze, Maximilien; Negroni, Elisa; Vallese, Denis; Yacoub-Youssef, Houda; Chaouch, Soraya; Wolff, Annie; Aamiri, Ahmed; Di Santo, James P; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Savino, Wilson; Mouly, Vincent; Riederer, Ingo

    2012-11-01

    Macrophages have been shown to be essential for muscle repair by delivering trophic cues to growing skeletal muscle precursors and young fibers. Here, we investigated whether human macrophages, either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory, coinjected with human myoblasts into regenerating muscle of Rag2(-/-) γC(-/-) immunodeficient mice, could modify in vivo the kinetics of proliferation and differentiation of the transplanted human myogenic precursors. Our results clearly show that proinflammatory macrophages improve in vivo the participation of injected myoblasts to host muscle regeneration, extending the window of proliferation, increasing migration, and delaying differentiation. Interestingly, immunostaining of transplanted proinflammatory macrophages at different time points strongly suggests that these cells are able to switch to an anti-inflammatory phenotype in vivo, which then may stimulate differentiation during muscle regeneration. Conceptually, our data provide for the first time in vivo evidence strongly suggesting that proinflammatory macrophages play a supportive role in the regulation of myoblast behavior after transplantation into preinjured muscle, and could thus potentially optimize transplantation of myogenic progenitors in the context of cell therapy.

  15. Immunohistological studies on macrophages in lymph nodes of onchocerciasis patients after treatment with ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Knab, J; Darge, K; Büttner, D W

    1997-12-01

    The role of macrophages in the killing and elimination of microfilariae (mf) was studied immunohistologically in 14 lymph nodes from 10 patients with generalized onchocerciasis 20-68 h after treatment with a single oral dose of 150 microg/kg ivermectin. Mf with signs of damage at light microscopical level were surrounded by a cellular infiltrate comprising macrophages, eosinophils and neutrophils, whereas light microscopically intact mf mostly showed no cellular reaction. Resident mature macrophages expressing the CD 68 epitope usually neither migrated nor attached to damaged mf, especially on the first and second day after ivermectin treatment. However, many young invading macrophages labelled for the L1 protein (antibodies 27 E 10, MAC 387, S 36.48 and 8.5C2) were found within the cellular infiltrate around damaged mf and in adherence to the mf in all lymph nodes after ivermectin treatment. Free L1 protein was observed on the cuticle of the mf. The attacking macrophages contained increased amounts of the enzymes lysozyme, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin and alpha-1-antitrypsin compared to resident macrophages. Free enzymes were found on the cuticle of the mf and around them, indicating a role of these enzymes in the inflammatory reaction to the parasites. The attacking macrophages were strongly labelled for human HLA-DR and they showed further an increased expression of the complement receptors CR1 (CD 35) for C3b and CR3 (CD 11b) for C3 bi in comparison to resident macrophages and thus were considered as activated macrophages. Rarely fragments of mf were seen within multinuclear macrophages. We conclude that young activated macrophages play a major role in the elimination of mf transported to the regional lymph nodes after ivermectin treatment. The immunohistological findings are in accordance with the assumption that these activated macrophages together with granulocytes contribute to the killing of the damaged mf. They also help to limit the damage of the host tissue

  16. MAFB Determines Human Macrophage Anti-Inflammatory Polarization: Relevance for the Pathogenic Mechanisms Operating in Multicentric Carpotarsal Osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Cuevas, Víctor D; Anta, Laura; Samaniego, Rafael; Orta-Zavalza, Emmanuel; Vladimir de la Rosa, Juan; Baujat, Geneviève; Domínguez-Soto, Ángeles; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Escribese, María M; Castrillo, Antonio; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Vega, Miguel A; Corbí, Ángel L

    2017-03-01

    Macrophage phenotypic and functional heterogeneity derives from tissue-specific transcriptional signatures shaped by the local microenvironment. Most studies addressing the molecular basis for macrophage heterogeneity have focused on murine cells, whereas the factors controlling the functional specialization of human macrophages are less known. M-CSF drives the generation of human monocyte-derived macrophages with a potent anti-inflammatory activity upon stimulation. We now report that knockdown of MAFB impairs the acquisition of the anti-inflammatory profile of human macrophages, identify the MAFB-dependent gene signature in human macrophages and illustrate the coexpression of MAFB and MAFB-target genes in CD163(+) tissue-resident and tumor-associated macrophages. The contribution of MAFB to the homeostatic/anti-inflammatory macrophage profile is further supported by the skewed polarization of monocyte-derived macrophages from multicentric carpotarsal osteolysis (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man #166300), a pathology caused by mutations in the MAFB gene. Our results demonstrate that MAFB critically determines the acquisition of the anti-inflammatory transcriptional and functional profiles of human macrophages.

  17. IL-1α induces CD11b(low) alveolar macrophage proliferation and maturation during granuloma formation.

    PubMed

    Huaux, François; Lo Re, Sandra; Giordano, Giulia; Uwambayinema, Francine; Devosse, Raynal; Yakoub, Yousof; Panin, Nadtha; Palmai-Pallag, Mihaly; Rabolli, Virginie; Delos, Monique; Marbaix, Etienne; Dauguet, Nicolas; Couillin, Isabelle; Ryffel, Bernhard; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Lison, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    Macrophages play a central role in immune and tissue responses of granulomatous lung diseases induced by pathogens and foreign bodies. Circulating monocytes are generally viewed as central precursors of these tissue effector macrophages. Here, we provide evidence that granulomas derive from alveolar macrophages serving as a local reservoir for the expansion of activated phagocytic macrophages. By exploring lung granulomatous responses to silica particles in IL-1-deficient mice, we found that the absence of IL-1α, but not IL-1β, was associated with reduced CD11b(high) phagocytic macrophage accumulation and fewer granulomas. This defect was associated with impaired alveolar clearance and resulted in the development of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). Reconstitution of IL-1α(-/-) mice with recombinant IL-1α restored lung clearance functions and the pulmonary accumulation of CD11b(high) phagocytic macrophages. Mechanistically, IL-1α induced the proliferation of CD11b(low) alveolar macrophages and differentiated these cells into CD11b(high) macrophages which perform critical phagocytic functions and organize granuloma. We newly discovered here that IL-1α triggers lung responses requiring macrophage proliferation and maturation from tissue-resident macrophages.

  18. Degradation of connective tissue matrices by macrophages. II. Influence of matrix composition on proteolysis of glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen by macrophages in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.A.; Werb, Z.

    1980-12-01

    Thioglycollate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages were cultured in contact with the mixture of extracellular matrix proteins produced by rat smooth muscle cells in culture. Both live macrophages and their conditioned media hydrolyzed glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen. Live macrophages also degraded extracellular connective tissue proteins secreted by endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The glycoproteins in the matrix markedly inhibited the rate of digestion of the other macromolecules, particularly elastin. When plasminogen was added to the matrix, activation of plasminogen to plasmin resulted in the hydrolysis of the glycoprotein components, which then allowed the macrophage elastase easier access to its substrate, elastin. Thus, although plasmin has no direct elastinolytic activity, its presence accelerated the rate of hydrolysis of elastin and therefore the rate of matrix degradation. These findings may be important in an understanding of disease states, such as emphysema and atherosclerosis, that are characterized by the destruction of connective tissue.

  19. Distinct regulatory networks control the development of macrophages of different origins in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tao; Guo, Weilin; Tian, Ye; Xu, Jin; Chen, Jiahao; Li, Li; Wen, Zilong

    2017-01-26

    Macrophages are key components of the innate immune system and play pivotal roles in immune response, organ development, and tissue homeostasis. Studies in mice and zebrafish have shown that tissue-resident macrophages derived from different hematopoietic origins manifest distinct developmental kinetics and colonization potential, yet the genetic programs controlling the development of macrophages of different origins remain incompletely defined. In this study, we use zebrafish, where tissue-resident macrophages arise from the rostral blood island (RBI) and ventral wall of dorsal aorta (VDA), the zebrafish hematopoietic tissue equivalents to the mouse yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros for myelopoiesis, to address this issue. We show that RBI- and VDA-born macrophages are orchestrated by distinctive regulatory networks formed by the E-twenty-six (Ets) transcription factors Pu.1 and Spi-b, the zebrafish ortholog of mouse spleen focus forming virus proviral integration oncogene B (SPI-B), and the helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain containing protein Irf8. Epistatic studies document that during RBI macrophage development, Pu.1 acts upstream of Spi-b, which, upon induction by Pu.1, partially compensates the function of Pu.1. In contrast, Pu.1 and Spi-b act in parallel and cooperatively to regulate the development of VDA-derived macrophages. Interestingly, these two distinct regulatory networks orchestrate the RBI- and VDA-born macrophage development largely by regulating a common downstream gene, Irf8. Our study indicates that macrophages derived from different origins are governed by distinct genetic networks formed by the same repertoire of myeloid-specific transcription factors. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. Redox Control of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Le Moal, Emmeran; Pialoux, Vincent; Juban, Gaëtan; Groussard, Carole; Zouhal, Hassane; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Mounier, Rémi

    2017-08-10

    Skeletal muscle shows high plasticity in response to external demand. Moreover, adult skeletal muscle is capable of complete regeneration after injury, due to the properties of muscle stem cells (MuSCs), the satellite cells, which follow a tightly regulated myogenic program to generate both new myofibers and new MuSCs for further needs. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have long been associated with skeletal muscle physiology, their implication in the cell and molecular processes at work during muscle regeneration is more recent. This review focuses on redox regulation during skeletal muscle regeneration. An overview of the basics of ROS/RNS and antioxidant chemistry and biology occurring in skeletal muscle is first provided. Then, the comprehensive knowledge on redox regulation of MuSCs and their surrounding cell partners (macrophages, endothelial cells) during skeletal muscle regeneration is presented in normal muscle and in specific physiological (exercise-induced muscle damage, aging) and pathological (muscular dystrophies) contexts. Recent advances in the comprehension of these processes has led to the development of therapeutic assays using antioxidant supplementation, which result in inconsistent efficiency, underlying the need for new tools that are aimed at precisely deciphering and targeting ROS networks. This review should provide an overall insight of the redox regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration while highlighting the limits of the use of nonspecific antioxidants to improve muscle function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 276-310.

  1. Macrophage podosomes go 3D.

    PubMed

    Van Goethem, Emeline; Guiet, Romain; Balor, Stéphanie; Charrière, Guillaume M; Poincloux, Renaud; Labrousse, Arnaud; Maridonneau-Parini, Isabelle; Le Cabec, Véronique

    2011-01-01

    Macrophage tissue infiltration is a critical step in the immune response against microorganisms and is also associated with disease progression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Macrophages are constitutively equipped with specialized structures called podosomes dedicated to extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation. We recently reported that these structures play a critical role in trans-matrix mesenchymal migration mode, a protease-dependent mechanism. Podosome molecular components and their ECM-degrading activity have been extensively studied in two dimensions (2D), but yet very little is known about their fate in three-dimensional (3D) environments. Therefore, localization of podosome markers and proteolytic activity were carefully examined in human macrophages performing mesenchymal migration. Using our gelled collagen I 3D matrix model to obligate human macrophages to perform mesenchymal migration, classical podosome markers including talin, paxillin, vinculin, gelsolin, cortactin were found to accumulate at the tip of F-actin-rich cell protrusions together with β1 integrin and CD44 but not β2 integrin. Macrophage proteolytic activity was observed at podosome-like protrusion sites using confocal fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The formation of migration tunnels by macrophages inside the matrix was accomplished by degradation, engulfment and mechanic compaction of the matrix. In addition, videomicroscopy revealed that 3D F-actin-rich protrusions of migrating macrophages were as dynamic as their 2D counterparts. Overall, the specifications of 3D podosomes resembled those of 2D podosome rosettes rather than those of individual podosomes. This observation was further supported by the aspect of 3D podosomes in fibroblasts expressing Hck, a master regulator of podosome rosettes in macrophages. In conclusion, human macrophage podosomes go 3D and take the shape of spherical podosome rosettes when the cells perform mesenchymal migration. This work

  2. Macrophage activation and its role in repair and pathology after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gensel, John C; Zhang, Bei

    2015-09-04

    The injured spinal cord does not heal properly. In contrast, tissue repair and functional recovery occur after skin or muscle injuries. The reason for this dichotomy in wound repair is unclear but inflammation, and specifically macrophage activation, likely plays a key role. Macrophages have the ability to promote the repair of injured tissue by regulating transitions through different phase of the healing response. In the current review we compare and contrast the healing and inflammatory responses between spinal cord injuries and tissues that undergo complete wound resolution. Through this comparison, we identify key macrophage phenotypes that are inaptly triggered or absent after spinal cord injury and discuss spinal cord stimuli that contribute to this maladaptive response. Sequential activation of classic, pro-inflammatory, M1 macrophages and alternatively activated, M2a, M2b, and M2c macrophages occurs during normal healing and facilitates transitions through the inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phases of repair. In contrast, in the injured spinal cord, pro-inflammatory macrophages potentiate a prolonged inflammatory phase and remodeling is not properly initiated. The desynchronized macrophage activation after spinal cord injury is reminiscent of the inflammation present in chronic, non-healing wounds. By refining the role macrophages play in spinal cord injury repair we bring to light important areas for future neuroinflammation and neurotrauma research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury.

  3. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  4. Complement activation promotes muscle inflammation during modified muscle use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenette, J.; Cai, B.; Tidball, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Modified muscle use can result in muscle inflammation that is triggered by unidentified events. In the present investigation, we tested whether the activation of the complement system is a component of muscle inflammation that results from changes in muscle loading. Modified rat hindlimb muscle loading was achieved by removing weight-bearing from the hindlimbs for 10 days followed by reloading through normal ambulation. Experimental animals were injected with the recombinant, soluble complement receptor sCR1 to inhibit complement activation. Assays for complement C4 or factor B in sera showed that sCR1 produced large reductions in the capacity for activation of the complement system through both the classical and alternative pathways. Analysis of complement C4 concentration in serum in untreated animals showed that the classical pathway was activated during the first 2 hours of reloading. Analysis of factor B concentration in untreated animals showed activation of the alternative pathway at 6 hours of reloading. Administration of sCR1 significantly attenuated the invasion of neutrophils (-49%) and ED1(+) macrophages (-52%) that occurred in nontreated animals after 6 hours of reloading. The presence of sCR1 also reduced significantly the degree of edema by 22% as compared to untreated animals. Together, these data show that increased muscle loading activated the complement system which then briefly contributes to the early recruitment of inflammatory cells during modified muscle loading.

  5. Macrophage-to-Myofibroblast Transition Contributes to Interstitial Fibrosis in Chronic Renal Allograft Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Jun; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Hong-Feng; To, Ka-Fai; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Lan, Hui-Yao; Chen, Jiang-Hua

    2017-02-16

    Interstitial fibrosis is an important contributor to graft loss in chronic renal allograft injury. Inflammatory macrophages are associated with fibrosis in renal allografts, but how these cells contribute to this damaging response is not clearly understood. Here, we investigated the role of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition in interstitial fibrosis in human and experimental chronic renal allograft injury. In biopsy specimens from patients with active chronic allograft rejection, we identified cells undergoing macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition by the coexpression of macrophage (CD68) and myofibroblast (α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) markers. CD68(+)/α-SMA(+) cells accounted for approximately 50% of the myofibroblast population, and the number of these cells correlated with allograft function and the severity of interstitial fibrosis. Similarly, in C57BL/6J mice with a BALB/c renal allograft, cells coexpressing macrophage markers (CD68 or F4/80) and α-SMA composed a significant population in the interstitium of allografts undergoing chronic rejection. Fate-mapping in Lyz2-Cre/Rosa26-Tomato mice showed that approximately half of α-SMA(+) myofibroblasts in renal allografts originated from recipient bone marrow-derived macrophages. Knockout of Smad3 protected against interstitial fibrosis in renal allografts and substantially reduced the number of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells. Furthermore, the majority of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells in human and experimental renal allograft rejection coexpressed the M2-type macrophage marker CD206, and this expression was considerably reduced in Smad3-knockout recipients. In conclusion, our studies indicate that macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition contributes to interstitial fibrosis in chronic renal allograft injury. Moreover, the transition of bone marrow-derived M2-type macrophages to myofibroblasts in the renal allograft is regulated via a Smad3-dependent mechanism.

  6. An unrestrained proinflammatory M1 macrophage population induced by iron impairs wound healing in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Sindrilaru, Anca; Peters, Thorsten; Wieschalka, Stefan; Baican, Corina; Baican, Adrian; Peter, Henriette; Hainzl, Adelheid; Schatz, Susanne; Qi, Yu; Schlecht, Andrea; Weiss, Johannes M.; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Sunderkötter, Cord; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Uncontrolled macrophage activation is now considered to be a critical event in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and chronic venous leg ulcers. However, it is still unclear which environmental cues induce persistent activation of macrophages in vivo and how macrophage-derived effector molecules maintain chronic inflammation and affect resident fibroblasts essential for tissue homeostasis and repair. We used a complementary approach studying human subjects with chronic venous leg ulcers, a model disease for macrophage-driven chronic inflammation, while establishing a mouse model closely reflecting its pathogenesis. Here, we have shown that iron overloading of macrophages — as was found to occur in human chronic venous leg ulcers and the mouse model — induced a macrophage population in situ with an unrestrained proinflammatory M1 activation state. Via enhanced TNF-α and hydroxyl radical release, this macrophage population perpetuated inflammation and induced a p16INK4a-dependent senescence program in resident fibroblasts, eventually leading to impaired wound healing. This study provides insight into the role of what we believe to be a previously undescribed iron-induced macrophage population in vivo. Targeting this population may hold promise for the development of novel therapies for chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic venous leg ulcers. PMID:21317534

  7. Effects of Activated Macrophages on Nocardia asteroides

    PubMed Central

    Filice, Gregory A.; Beaman, Blaine L.; Remington, Jack S.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism(s) of host resistance against Nocardia asteroides has not been well defined. Since disease due to N. asteroides frequently occurs in patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity, we studied the interaction of N. asteroides with activated and control mouse peritoneal macrophages. Activated macrophages were from mice infected with Toxoplasma gondii or injected with Corynebacterium parvum. N. asteroides in the early stationary phase (>99% in the coccobacillary form) was used for challenge of macrophage monolayers. Growth of two strains of N. asteroides was markedly inhibited in activated macrophages, whereas N. asteroides grew well in control macrophages. Quantitation of macrophage-associated N. asteroides indicated that activated macrophages killed 40 to 50% of N. asteroides within 6 h (P < 0.002). In control macrophage preparations, it appeared as if Nocardia filaments extended from within macrophages to the outside, and many of these filaments appeared to have extended to and then grown through neighboring macrophages. In activated macrophage preparations, Nocardia remained in the coccobacillary form in most macrophages. Control macrophage monolayers were almost completely overgrown with and destroyed by Nocardia 20 h after challenge, whereas activated macrophage monolayers remained intact. Nocardia that grew in control macrophages were not acid-alcohol fast or only weakly so, whereas the few Nocardia that grew in activated macrophages were strongly acid-alcohol fast. Our results indicate that activated macrophages may be important in host defense against N. asteroides. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6991421

  8. Optimizing the customized residency plan.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Holly; Wilkinson, Samaneh T; Buck, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Residents and residency program directors (RPDs) understand that the goal of the residency year is to earn a residency certificate through achievement of established goals and objectives. The customized residency plan provides a map for the resident and RPD to follow throughout the course of the residency year, helping to keep everyone on track to accomplish the established goals and objectives of the program. It also provides information that allows preceptors to take the individual resident's plan into consideration when customizing a learning experience. This article will focus on the process for developing a customized residency plan and implementing it over the course of the residency year.

  9. The Ron Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Regulates Macrophage Heterogeneity and Plays a Protective Role in Diet-Induced Obesity, Atherosclerosis, and Hepatosteatosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Allen, Joselyn N; Dey, Adwitia; Zhang, Limin; Balandaram, Gayathri; Kennett, Mary J; Xia, Mingcan; Xiong, Na; Peters, Jeffrey M; Patterson, Andrew; Hankey-Giblin, Pamela A

    2016-07-01

    Obesity is a chronic inflammatory disease mediated in large part by the activation of inflammatory macrophages. This chronic inflammation underlies a whole host of diseases including atherosclerosis, hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cancer, among others. Macrophages are generally classified as either inflammatory or alternatively activated. Some tissue-resident macrophages are derived from yolk sac erythromyeloid progenitors and fetal liver progenitors that seed tissues during embryogenesis and have the ability to repopulate through local proliferation. These macrophages tend to be anti-inflammatory in nature and are generally involved in tissue remodeling, repair, and homeostasis. Alternatively, during chronic inflammation induced by obesity, bone marrow monocyte-derived macrophages are recruited to inflamed tissues, where they produce proinflammatory cytokines and exacerbate inflammation. The extent to which these two populations of macrophages are plastic in their phenotype remains controversial. We have demonstrated previously that the Ron receptor tyrosine kinase is expressed on tissue-resident macrophages, where it limits inflammatory macrophage activation and promotes a repair phenotype. In this study, we demonstrate that Ron is expressed in a subpopulation of macrophages during chronic inflammation induced by obesity that exhibit a repair phenotype as determined by the expression of arginase 1. In addition, we demonstrate that the Ron receptor plays a protective role in the progression of diet-induced obesity, hepatosteatosis, and atherosclerosis. These results suggest that altering macrophage heterogeneity in vivo could have the potential to alleviate obesity-associated diseases. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Rain Forest Dance Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Dawn

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience as a dancer and choreographer artist-in-residence with third graders at a public elementary school, providing a cultural arts experience to tie in with a theme study of the rain forest. Details the residency and the insights she gained working with students, teachers, and theme. (SR)

  11. Rewarding the Resident Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Jennifer M.; Drake, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Residents routinely make significant contributions to the education of medical students. However, little attention has been paid to rewarding these individuals for their involvement in these academic activities. This report describes a program that rewards resident teachers with an academic appointment as a Clinical Instructor. The residents…

  12. Rewarding the Resident Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Jennifer M.; Drake, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Residents routinely make significant contributions to the education of medical students. However, little attention has been paid to rewarding these individuals for their involvement in these academic activities. This report describes a program that rewards resident teachers with an academic appointment as a Clinical Instructor. The residents…

  13. Metabolic Reprograming in Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Galván-Peña, Silvia; O’Neill, Luke A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Studying the metabolism of immune cells in recent years has emphasized the tight link existing between the metabolic state and the phenotype of these cells. Macrophages in particular are a good example of this phenomenon. Whether the macrophage obtains its energy through glycolysis or through oxidative metabolism can give rise to different phenotypes. Classically activated or M1 macrophages are key players of the first line of defense against bacterial infections and are known to obtain energy through glycolysis. Alternatively activated or M2 macrophages on the other hand are involved in tissue repair and wound healing and use oxidative metabolism to fuel their longer-term functions. Metabolic intermediates, however, are not just a source of energy but can be directly implicated in a particular macrophage phenotype. In M1 macrophages, the Krebs cycle intermediate succinate regulates HIF1α, which is responsible for driving the sustained production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL1β. In M2 macrophages, the sedoheptulose kinase carbohydrate kinase-like protein is critical for regulating the pentose phosphate pathway. The potential to target these events and impact on disease is an exciting prospect. PMID:25228902

  14. Obesity induces a phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Lumeng, Carey N; Bodzin, Jennifer L; Saltiel, Alan R

    2007-01-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) infiltrate adipose tissue during obesity and contribute to insulin resistance. We hypothesized that macrophages migrating to adipose tissue upon high-fat feeding may differ from those that reside there under normal diet conditions. To this end, we found a novel F4/80(+)CD11c(+) population of ATMs in adipose tissue of obese mice that was not seen in lean mice. ATMs from lean mice expressed many genes characteristic of M2 or "alternatively activated" macrophages, including Ym1, arginase 1, and Il10. Diet-induced obesity decreased expression of these genes in ATMs while increasing expression of genes such as those encoding TNF-alpha and iNOS that are characteristic of M1 or "classically activated" macrophages. Interestingly, ATMs from obese C-C motif chemokine receptor 2-KO (Ccr2-KO) mice express M2 markers at levels similar to those from lean mice. The antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10, which was overexpressed in ATMs from lean mice, protected adipocytes from TNF-alpha-induced insulin resistance. Thus, diet-induced obesity leads to a shift in the activation state of ATMs from an M2-polarized state in lean animals that may protect adipocytes from inflammation to an M1 proinflammatory state that contributes to insulin resistance.

  15. Obesity induces a phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lumeng, Carey N.; Bodzin, Jennifer L.; Saltiel, Alan R.

    2007-01-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) infiltrate adipose tissue during obesity and contribute to insulin resistance. We hypothesized that macrophages migrating to adipose tissue upon high-fat feeding may differ from those that reside there under normal diet conditions. To this end, we found a novel F4/80+CD11c+ population of ATMs in adipose tissue of obese mice that was not seen in lean mice. ATMs from lean mice expressed many genes characteristic of M2 or “alternatively activated” macrophages, including Ym1, arginase 1, and Il10. Diet-induced obesity decreased expression of these genes in ATMs while increasing expression of genes such as those encoding TNF-α and iNOS that are characteristic of M1 or “classically activated” macrophages. Interestingly, ATMs from obese C-C motif chemokine receptor 2–KO (Ccr2-KO) mice express M2 markers at levels similar to those from lean mice. The antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10, which was overexpressed in ATMs from lean mice, protected adipocytes from TNF-α–induced insulin resistance. Thus, diet-induced obesity leads to a shift in the activation state of ATMs from an M2-polarized state in lean animals that may protect adipocytes from inflammation to an M1 proinflammatory state that contributes to insulin resistance. PMID:17200717

  16. Macrophages and Tissue Injury: Agents of Defense or Destruction?

    PubMed Central

    Laskin, Debra L.; Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Gardner, Carol R.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    The past several years have seen the accumulation of evidence demonstrating that tissue injury induced by diverse toxicants is due not only to their direct effects on target tissues but also indirectly to the actions of resident and infiltrating macrophages. These cells release an array of mediators with cytotoxic, pro- and anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, fibrogenic, and mitogenic activity, which function to fight infections, limit tissue injury, and promote wound healing. However, following exposure to toxicants, macrophages can become hyperresponsive, resulting in uncontrolled or dysregulated release of mediators that exacerbate acute tissue injury and/or promote the development of chronic diseases such as fibrosis and cancer. Evidence suggests that the diverse activity of macrophages is mediated by distinct subpopulations that develop in response to signals within their microenvironment. Understanding the precise roles of these different macrophage populations in the pathogenic response to toxicants is key to designing effective treatments for minimizing tissue damage and chronic disease and for facilitating wound repair. PMID:20887196

  17. Highly efficient, functional engraftment of skeletal muscle stem cells in dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Cerletti, Massimiliano; Jurga, Sara; Witczak, Carol A; Hirshman, Michael F; Shadrach, Jennifer L; Goodyear, Laurie J; Wagers, Amy J

    2008-07-11

    Satellite cells reside beneath the basal lamina of skeletal muscle fibers and include cells that act as precursors for muscle growth and repair. Although they share a common anatomical localization and typically are considered a homogeneous population, satellite cells actually exhibit substantial heterogeneity. We used cell-surface marker expression to purify from the satellite cell pool a distinct population of skeletal muscle precursors (SMPs) that function as muscle stem cells. When engrafted into muscle of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, purified SMPs contributed to up to 94% of myofibers, restoring dystrophin expression and significantly improving muscle histology and contractile function. Transplanted SMPs also entered the satellite cell compartment, renewing the endogenous stem cell pool and participating in subsequent rounds of injury repair. Together, these studies indicate the presence in adult skeletal muscle of prospectively isolatable muscle-forming stem cells and directly demonstrate the efficacy of myogenic stem cell transplant for treating muscle degenerative disease.

  18. Macrophages and the Viral Dissemination Super Highway

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Arielle; Branch, Andrea D

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key components of the innate immune system yet they are often the victims of attack by infectious agents. This review examines the significance of viral infection of macrophages. The central hypothesis is that macrophage tropism enhances viral dissemination and persistence, but these changes may come at the cost of reduced replication in cells other than macrophages. PMID:26949751

  19. Genetic Control of the Innate Resistance of Mice to Salmonella typhimurium: Expression of the Ity Gene in Peritoneal Macrophages Isolated In Vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    typhoid fever -like disease by day 10 of infection. Animals that are homozygous or heterozygousfor the resistance allele, Ity(expn r), control net bacterial replication and survive the first phase of murine typhoid. Indirect studies have implicated the resident macrophage as the effector cell for regulation of early in vivo salmonellae growth. To verify this supposition and to evaluate the phenotypic expression of Ity, an in vitro assay was developed to compare the fate of S. typhimurium within Ity(expn r) and Ity(expn s) macrophages. Resident peritoneal macrophages were

  20. Intravital Imaging of Axonal Interactions with Microglia and Macrophages in a Mouse Dorsal Column Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Teresa A.; Barkauskas, Deborah S.; Myers, Jay T.; Huang, Alex Y.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury causes an inflammatory reaction involving blood-derived macrophages and central nervous system (CNS)-resident microglia. Intra-vital two-photon microscopy enables the study of macrophages and microglia in the spinal cord lesion in the living animal. This can be performed in adult animals with a traumatic injury to the dorsal column. Here, we describe methods for distinguishing macrophages from microglia in the CNS using an irradiation bone marrow chimera to obtain animals in which only macrophages or microglia are labeled with a genetically encoded green fluorescent protein. We also describe a injury model that crushes the dorsal column of the spinal cord, thereby producing a simple, easily accessible, rectangular lesion that is easily visualized in an animal through a laminectomy. Furthermore, we will outline procedures to sequentially image the animals at the anatomical site of injury for the study of cellular interactions during the first few days to weeks after injury. PMID:25489963

  1. Impairment of macrophage eicosanoid and nitric oxide production by an alkaloid from Sinomenium acutum.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Riese, J; Resch, K; Kaever, V

    1994-11-01

    The effects of sinomenine (7,8-didehydro-4-hydroxy-3,7-dimethoxy-17-methyl- 9 alpha,13 alpha,14 alpha-morphinan-6-one), a pure alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medical plant Sinomenium acutum, on different macrophage capacities were investigated in vitro using resident mouse peritoneal macrophages and the macrophage-like cell line RAW 264.7. Sinomenine markedly decreased prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene C4 synthesis of macrophages stimulated by zymosan or calcium ionophore and also significantly inhibited the nitric oxide production of RAW 264.7 cells activated by interferon-gamma/lipopolysaccharide. It can be considered that these effects are part of the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antirheumatic mechanisms of sinomenine.

  2. Bacterial phagocytosis by macrophages from lipopolysaccharide responder and nonresponder mouse strains.

    PubMed Central

    Cuffini, A; Carlone, N A; Forni, G

    1980-01-01

    The phagocytic capacity of macrophages from C3H/H3J mice was assessed against lipopolysaccharide-producing (Escherichia coli) and -nonproducing (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. Despite their gene-coded unresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide endotoxin and lymphokines and their defective tumoricidal activity, proteose peptone-induced C3H/HeJ macrophages did not display a defective phagocytic capacity, but rather displayed an enhanced phagocytosis of both bacterial strains compared with macrophages from closely related C3H/HeN mice. Unstimulated peritoneal resident C3H/HeJ macrophages, on the other hand, displayed a normal phagocytic activity toward E. coli and enhanced phagocytosis toward S. aureus. PMID:6995321

  3. Macrophage recruitment and epithelial repair following hair cell injury in the mouse utricle.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Tejbeer; Hirose, Keiko; Rubel, Edwin W; Warchol, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    The sensory organs of the inner ear possess resident populations of macrophages, but the function of those cells is poorly understood. In many tissues, macrophages participate in the removal of cellular debris after injury and can also promote tissue repair. The present study examined injury-evoked macrophage activity in the mouse utricle. Experiments used transgenic mice in which the gene for the human diphtheria toxin receptor (huDTR) was inserted under regulation of the Pou4f3 promoter. Hair cells in such mice can be selectively lesioned by systemic treatment with diphtheria toxin (DT). In order to visualize macrophages, Pou4f3-huDTR mice were crossed with a second transgenic line, in which one or both copies of the gene for the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 were replaced with a gene for GFP. Such mice expressed GFP in all macrophages, and mice that were CX3CR1(GFP/GFP) lacked the necessary receptor for fractalkine signaling. Treatment with DT resulted in the death of ∼70% of utricular hair cells within 7 days, which was accompanied by increased numbers of macrophages within the utricular sensory epithelium. Many of these macrophages appeared to be actively engulfing hair cell debris, indicating that macrophages participate in the process of 'corpse removal' in the mammalian vestibular organs. However, we observed no apparent differences in injury-evoked macrophage numbers in the utricles of CX3CR1(+/GFP) mice vs. CX3CR1(GFP/GFP) mice, suggesting that fractalkine signaling is not necessary for macrophage recruitment in these sensory organs. Finally, we found that repair of sensory epithelia at short times after DT-induced hair cell lesions was mediated by relatively thin cables of F-actin. After 56 days recovery, however, all cell-cell junctions were characterized by very thick actin cables.

  4. Adoptive transfer of macrophage from mice with depression-like behavior enhances susceptibility to colitis.

    PubMed

    Ghia, Jean-Eric; Park, Amber J; Blennerhassett, Patricia; Khan, Waliul I; Collins, Stephen M

    2011-07-01

    Depression is common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but the pathway is not well understood. We examined whether the locus of susceptibility to colitis in mice with depression-like behavior (DLB) resides with the macrophage and implicates the vagus nerve. Chronic colitis mimicking ulcerative colitis (UC) was induced by dextran sulfate sodium administered to C57BL/6-mice. Depression was induced by intracerebroventricular infusion of reserpine in healthy or vagotomized mice treated with antidepressant desmethylimipramine (DMI). Colitis was assessed macroscopically, histologically, and by C-reactive protein measurement in serum and by cytokines in colonic samples. Cytokine release was measured on macrophages isolated from these models. Naive macrophage colony-stimulating factor-deficient mice (op/op) were injected with peritoneal macrophages obtained from the different groups and acute colitis was induced. Vagotomy reactivated inflammation in mice with chronic colitis. DLB reactivated colitis and this was prevented by DMI only in mice with intact vagi. Macrophages isolated from vagotomized or DLB-mice showed a selective increase of proinflammatory cytokine release and this was not seen in macrophages isolated from DLB-DMI-treated mice; moreover, vagotomy abolished this beneficial effect. In op/op, adoptive transfer of macrophages from non-DLB mice significantly increased the inflammatory markers. These parameters were significantly increased when transferred with macrophages isolated from DLB or VXP mice. Op/op mice that received macrophages from DLB-DMI-treated mice showed a significant decrease of all parameters and vagotomy abolished this effect. These data identify the critical role of macrophage in linking depression and susceptibility to intestinal inflammation via the vagus nerve. The results provide a basis for developing new approaches to the management of UC patients with coexisting depression by rebalancing cytokine production by the cell

  5. The Macrophage Switch in Obesity Development

    PubMed Central

    Castoldi, Angela; Naffah de Souza, Cristiane; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Moraes-Vieira, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    Immune cell infiltration in (white) adipose tissue (AT) during obesity is associated with the development of insulin resistance. In AT, the main population of leukocytes are macrophages. Macrophages can be classified into two major populations: M1, classically activated macrophages, and M2, alternatively activated macrophages, although recent studies have identified a broad range of macrophage subsets. During obesity, AT M1 macrophage numbers increase and correlate with AT inflammation and insulin resistance. Upon activation, pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages induce aerobic glycolysis. By contrast, in lean humans and mice, the number of M2 macrophages predominates. M2 macrophages secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines and utilize oxidative metabolism to maintain AT homeostasis. Here, we review the immunologic and metabolic functions of AT macrophages and their different facets in obesity and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:26779183

  6. Muscle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... that affect the muscles (such as trichinosis or toxoplasmosis ) Inherited muscle disorders such as muscular dystrophy or ... nodosa Polymyalgia rheumatica Polymyositis - adult Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis Toxoplasmosis Trichinosis Review Date 7/21/2016 Updated by: ...

  7. ROS sets the stage for macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Anthony; Byles, Vanessa; Horng, Tiffany

    2013-08-01

    While M1 macrophages are highly pro-inflammatory and microbicidal, M2 macrophages and the related tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) regulate tissue remodeling and angiogenesis and can display immunomodulatory activity. In July issue of Cell Research, Zhang et al. show that ROS production, critical for the activation and functions of M1 macrophages, is necessary for the differentiation of M2 macrophages and TAMs, and that antioxidant therapy blocks TAM differentiation and tumorigenesis in mouse models of cancer.

  8. In vitro modulation of macrophage functions by 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH): Possible mechanism for UDMH-induced immuno-enhancement.

    PubMed

    Tarr, M J; Olsen, R G; Bowen, B L; Fertel, R H

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro effects of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) on prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) synthesis, chemiluminescence, phagocytosis, microbicidal activity and chemotaxis in murine enriched-macrophage populations were evaluated. PGE(2) synthesis by resident peritoneal macrophages and chemiluminescence by activated macrophages were markedly suppressed in the presence of UDMH; phagocytosis and microbicidal activity were slightly to moderately suppressed, and chemotaxis was not affected. Two of these functions (PGE(2) synthesis and chemiluminescence) reflect macrophage immunoregulatory properties, and the UDMH-induced abrogation of these functions may be related to the previously reported immuno-enhancing effects of UDMH.

  9. Histone deacetylases in monocyte/macrophage development, activation and metabolism: refining HDAC targets for inflammatory and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, Kaustav; Shakespear, Melanie R; Iyer, Abishek; Fairlie, David P; Sweet, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have central roles in danger detection, inflammation and host defense, and consequently, these cells are intimately linked to most disease processes. Major advances in our understanding of the development and function of macrophages have recently come to light. For example, it is now clear that tissue-resident macrophages can be derived from either blood monocytes or through local proliferation of phagocytes that are originally seeded during embryonic development. Metabolic state has also emerged as a major control point for macrophage activation phenotypes. Herein, we review recent literature linking the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of enzymes to macrophage development and activation, particularly in relation to these recent developments. There has been considerable interest in potential therapeutic applications for small molecule inhibitors of HDACs (HDACi), not only for cancer, but also for inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, the enormous range of molecular and cellular processes that are controlled by different HDAC enzymes presents a potential stumbling block to clinical development. We therefore present examples of how classical HDACs control macrophage functions, roles of specific HDACs in these processes and approaches for selective targeting of drugs, such as HDACi, to macrophages. Development of selective inhibitors of macrophage-expressed HDACs and/or selective delivery of pan HDACi to macrophages may provide avenues for enhancing efficacy of HDACi in therapeutic applications, while limiting unwanted side effects.

  10. Histone deacetylases in monocyte/macrophage development, activation and metabolism: refining HDAC targets for inflammatory and infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Das Gupta, Kaustav; Shakespear, Melanie R; Iyer, Abishek; Fairlie, David P; Sweet, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have central roles in danger detection, inflammation and host defense, and consequently, these cells are intimately linked to most disease processes. Major advances in our understanding of the development and function of macrophages have recently come to light. For example, it is now clear that tissue-resident macrophages can be derived from either blood monocytes or through local proliferation of phagocytes that are originally seeded during embryonic development. Metabolic state has also emerged as a major control point for macrophage activation phenotypes. Herein, we review recent literature linking the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of enzymes to macrophage development and activation, particularly in relation to these recent developments. There has been considerable interest in potential therapeutic applications for small molecule inhibitors of HDACs (HDACi), not only for cancer, but also for inflammatory and infectious diseases. However, the enormous range of molecular and cellular processes that are controlled by different HDAC enzymes presents a potential stumbling block to clinical development. We therefore present examples of how classical HDACs control macrophage functions, roles of specific HDACs in these processes and approaches for selective targeting of drugs, such as HDACi, to macrophages. Development of selective inhibitors of macrophage-expressed HDACs and/or selective delivery of pan HDACi to macrophages may provide avenues for enhancing efficacy of HDACi in therapeutic applications, while limiting unwanted side effects. PMID:26900475

  11. Real-time monitoring of mesangial cell-macrophage cross-talk using SEAP in vitro and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yiman; Kasai, Ayumi; Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Takeda, Masayuki; Shimizu, Fujio; Kawachi, Hiroshi; Yao, Jian; Kitamura, Masanori

    2005-08-01

    Macrophage-mesangial cell interaction plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis. We established a novel system for continuous, real-time monitoring of cross-talk between macrophages and mesangial cells in vitro and ex vivo. Rat mesangial cells were genetically engineered to produce secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) under the control of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) enhancer elements. The established sensor cells were exposed to macrophages or macrophage-derived factors, and the level of SEAP production was evaluated. In vitro, the established cells expressed and secreted SEAP when exposed to activated macrophages or to cytokines produced by macrophages. The kinetics of SEAP activity in culture media was closely correlated with the expression level of SEAP mRNA. The sensor cells also secreted SEAP in response to media conditioned by macrophage-accumulating, inflamed rat glomeruli. When the sensor cells were transferred adoptively into rat glomeruli subjected to acute anti-Thy 1 glomerulonephritis, the isolated glomeruli containing sensor cells secreted SEAP rapidly and progressively. These data suggested that the established system provides simple and useful tools for monitoring of cross-talk between macrophages and mesangial cells in vitro and ex vivo. This approach would be useful for investigation of molecular mechanisms involved in mesangial cell-macrophage interaction and also for screening of therapeutic agents that efficiently interfere with the link between infiltrating leukocytes and resident glomerular cells.

  12. Dormant 5-lipoxygenase in inflammatory macrophages is triggered by exogenous arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Sorgi, Carlos A; Zarini, Simona; Martin, Sarah A; Sanchez, Raphael L; Scandiuzzi, Rodrigo F; Gijón, Miguel A; Guijas, Carlos; Flamand, Nicolas; Murphy, Robert C; Faccioli, Lucia H

    2017-09-08

    The differentiation of resident tissue macrophages from embryonic precursors and that of inflammatory macrophages from bone marrow cells leads to macrophage heterogeneity. Further plasticity is displayed through their ability to be polarized as subtypes M1 and M2 in a cell culture microenvironment. However, the detailed regulation of eicosanoid production and its involvement in macrophage biology remains unclear. Using a lipidomics approach, we demonstrated that eicosanoid production profiles between bone marrow-derived (BMDM) and peritoneal macrophages differed drastically. In polarized BMDMs, M1 and M2 phenotypes were distinguished by thromboxane B2, prostaglandin (PG) E2, and PGD2 production, in addition to lysophospholipid acyltransferase activity. Although Alox5 expression and the presence of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) protein in BMDMs was observed, the absence of leukotrienes production reflected an impairment in 5-LO activity, which could be triggered by addition of exogenous arachidonic acid (AA). The BMDM 5-LO regulatory mechanism was not responsive to PGE2/cAMP pathway modulation; however, treatment to reduce glutathione peroxidase activity increased 5-LO metabolite production after AA stimulation. Understanding the relationship between the eicosanoids pathway and macrophage biology may offer novel strategies for macrophage-associated disease therapy.

  13. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-06-24

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis.

  14. Tumor-Infiltrating Macrophages in Post-Transplant, Relapsed Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Are Donor-Derived.

    PubMed

    Crane, Genevieve M; Samols, Mark A; Morsberger, Laura A; Yonescu, Raluca; Thiess, Michele L; Batista, Denise A S; Ning, Yi; Burns, Kathleen H; Vuica-Ross, Milena; Borowitz, Michael J; Gocke, Christopher D; Ambinder, Richard F; Duffield, Amy S

    Tumor-associated inflammatory cells in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) typically outnumber the neoplastic Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (H/RS) cells. The composition of the inflammatory infiltrate, particularly the fraction of macrophages, has been associated with clinical behavior. Emerging work from animal models demonstrates that most tissue macrophages are maintained by a process of self-renewal under physiologic circumstances and certain inflammatory states, but the contribution from circulating monocytes may be increased in some disease states. This raises the question of the source of macrophages involved in human disease, particularly that of CHL. Patients with relapsed CHL following allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) provide a unique opportunity to begin to address this issue. We identified 4 such patients in our archives. Through molecular chimerism and/or XY FISH studies, we demonstrated the DNA content in the post-BMT recurrent CHL was predominantly donor-derived, while the H/RS cells were derived from the patient. Where possible to evaluate, the cellular composition of the inflammatory infiltrate, including the percentage of macrophages, was similar to that of the original tumor. Our findings suggest that the H/RS cells themselves define the inflammatory environment. In addition, our results demonstrate that tumor-associated macrophages in CHL are predominantly derived from circulating monocytes rather than resident tissue macrophages. Given the association between tumor microenvironment and disease progression, a better understanding of macrophage recruitment to CHL may open new strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Cryptococcus neoformans-induced macrophage lysosome damage crucially contributes to fungal virulence.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael J; Eastman, Alison J; Qiu, Yafeng; Gregorka, Brian; Kozel, Thomas R; Osterholzer, John J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Swanson, Joel A; Olszewski, Michal A

    2015-03-01

    Upon ingestion by macrophages, Cryptococcus neoformans can survive and replicate intracellularly unless the macrophages become classically activated. The mechanism enabling intracellular replication is not fully understood; neither are the mechanisms that allow classical activation to counteract replication. C. neoformans-induced lysosome damage was observed in infected murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, increased with time, and required yeast viability. To demonstrate lysosome damage in the infected host, we developed a novel flow cytometric method for measuring lysosome damage. Increased lysosome damage was found in C. neoformans-containing lung cells compared with C. neoformans-free cells. Among C. neoformans-containing myeloid cells, recently recruited cells displayed lower damage than resident cells, consistent with the protective role of recruited macrophages. The magnitude of lysosome damage correlated with increased C. neoformans replication. Experimental induction of lysosome damage increased C. neoformans replication. Activation of macrophages with IFN-γ abolished macrophage lysosome damage and enabled increased killing of C. neoformans. We conclude that induction of lysosome damage is an important C. neoformans survival strategy and that classical activation of host macrophages counters replication by preventing damage. Thus, therapeutic strategies that decrease lysosomal damage, or increase resistance to such damage, could be valuable in treating cryptococcal infections.

  16. Tumor-Infiltrating Macrophages in Post-Transplant, Relapsed Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Are Donor-Derived

    PubMed Central

    Morsberger, Laura A.; Yonescu, Raluca; Thiess, Michele L.; Batista, Denise A. S.; Ning, Yi; Burns, Kathleen H.; Vuica-Ross, Milena; Borowitz, Michael J.; Gocke, Christopher D.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated inflammatory cells in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) typically outnumber the neoplastic Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (H/RS) cells. The composition of the inflammatory infiltrate, particularly the fraction of macrophages, has been associated with clinical behavior. Emerging work from animal models demonstrates that most tissue macrophages are maintained by a process of self-renewal under physiologic circumstances and certain inflammatory states, but the contribution from circulating monocytes may be increased in some disease states. This raises the question of the source of macrophages involved in human disease, particularly that of CHL. Patients with relapsed CHL following allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) provide a unique opportunity to begin to address this issue. We identified 4 such patients in our archives. Through molecular chimerism and/or XY FISH studies, we demonstrated the DNA content in the post-BMT recurrent CHL was predominantly donor-derived, while the H/RS cells were derived from the patient. Where possible to evaluate, the cellular composition of the inflammatory infiltrate, including the percentage of macrophages, was similar to that of the original tumor. Our findings suggest that the H/RS cells themselves define the inflammatory environment. In addition, our results demonstrate that tumor-associated macrophages in CHL are predominantly derived from circulating monocytes rather than resident tissue macrophages. Given the association between tumor microenvironment and disease progression, a better understanding of macrophage recruitment to CHL may open new strategies for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27685855

  17. Novel Action of Carotenoids on Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Macrophage Polarization and Liver Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yinhua; Zhuge, Fen; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease. It is characterized by a wide spectrum of hepatic changes, which may progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome; however, mechanisms underlying the onset and progression of NAFLD are still unclear. Resident and recruited macrophages are key players in the homeostatic function of the liver and in the progression of NAFLD to NASH. Progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the polarized activation of macrophages. New NAFLD therapies will likely involve modification of macrophage polarization by restraining M1 activation or driving M2 activation. Carotenoids are potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory micronutrients that have been used to prevent and treat NAFLD. In addition to their antioxidative action, carotenoids can regulate macrophage polarization and thereby halt the progression of NASH. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms of macrophage polarization and the function of liver macrophages/Kupffer cells in NAFLD. From our review, we propose that dietary carotenoids, such as β-cryptoxanthin and astaxanthin, be used to prevent or treat NAFLD through the regulation of macrophage polarization and liver homeostasis. PMID:27347998

  18. Brown-adipose-tissue macrophages control tissue innervation and homeostatic energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Yochai; Boura-Halfon, Sigalit; Cortese, Nina; Haimon, Zhana; Sar Shalom, Hadas; Kuperman, Yael; Kalchenko, Vyacheslav; Brandis, Alexander; David, Eyal; Segal-Hayoun, Yifat; Chappell-Maor, Louise; Yaron, Avraham; Jung, Steffen

    2017-06-01

    Tissue macrophages provide immunological defense and contribute to the establishment and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Here we used constitutive and inducible mutagenesis to delete the nuclear transcription regulator Mecp2 in macrophages. Mice that lacked the gene encoding Mecp2, which is associated with Rett syndrome, in macrophages did not show signs of neurodevelopmental disorder but displayed spontaneous obesity, which was linked to impaired function of brown adipose tissue (BAT). Specifically, mutagenesis of a BAT-resident Cx3Cr1(+) macrophage subpopulation compromised homeostatic thermogenesis but not acute, cold-induced thermogenesis. Mechanistically, malfunction of BAT in pre-obese mice with mutant macrophages was associated with diminished sympathetic innervation and local titers of norepinephrine, which resulted in lower expression of thermogenic factors by adipocytes. Mutant macrophages overexpressed the signaling receptor and ligand PlexinA4, which might contribute to the phenotype by repulsion of sympathetic axons expressing the transmembrane semaphorin Sema6A. Collectively, we report a previously unappreciated homeostatic role for macrophages in the control of tissue innervation. Disruption of this circuit in BAT resulted in metabolic imbalance.

  19. Posttranscriptional control of NLRP3 inflammasome activation in colonic macrophages.

    PubMed

    Filardy, A A; He, J; Bennink, J; Yewdell, J; Kelsall, B L

    2016-07-01

    Colonic macrophages (cMPs) are important for intestinal homeostasis as they kill microbes and yet produce regulatory cytokines. Activity of the NLRP3 (nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat-containing pyrin receptor 3) inflammasome, a major sensor of stress and microorganisms that results in pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cell death, must be tightly controlled in the intestine. We demonstrate that resident cMPs are hyporesponsive to NLRP3 inflammasome activation owing to a remarkable level of posttranscriptional control of NLRP3 and pro-interleukin-1β (proIL-1β) protein expression, which was also seen for tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6, but lost during experimental colitis. Resident cMPs rapidly degraded NLRP3 and proIL-1β proteins by the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Finally, blocking IL-10R-signaling in vivo enhanced NLRP3 and proIL-1β protein but not mRNA levels in resident cMPs, implicating a role for IL-10 in environmental conditioning of cMPs. These data are the first to show dramatic posttranscriptional control of inflammatory cytokine production by a relevant tissue-derived macrophage population and proteasomal degradation of proIL-1β and NLRP3 as a mechanism to control inflammasome activation, findings which have broad implications for our understanding of intestinal and systemic inflammatory diseases.

  20. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  1. Modeling Muscles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwyn, Lauren; Salm, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Teaching the anatomy of the muscle system to high school students can be challenging. Students often learn about muscle anatomy by memorizing information from textbooks or by observing plastic, inflexible models. Although these mediums help students learn about muscle placement, the mediums do not facilitate understanding regarding integration of…

  2. Macrophage activation in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Schultze, Joachim L; Schmieder, Astrid; Goerdt, S

    2015-08-01

    It is becoming increasingly accepted that macrophages play a crucial role in many diseases associated with chronic inflammation, including atherosclerosis, obesity, diabetes, cancer, skin diseases, and even neurodegenerative diseases. It is therefore not surprising that macrophages in human diseases have gained significant interest during the last years. Molecular analysis combined with more sophisticated murine disease models and the application of genome-wide technologies has resulted in a much better understanding of the role of macrophages in human disease. We highlight important gain of knowledge during the last years for tumor-associated macrophages, and for macrophages in atherosclerosis, obesity and wound healing. Albeit these exciting findings certainly pave the way to novel diagnostics and therapeutics, several hurdles still need to be overcome. We propose a general outline for future research and development in disease-related macrophage biology based on integrating (1) genome-wide technologies, (2) direct human sampling, and (3) a dedicated use of in vivo model systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Facility Focus: Residence Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Explores the designs of three university residence halls that are intended to stimulate social and academic interaction, create a sense of community, and foster a feeling of belonging among students. Includes eleven photographs and a typical floor plan. (GR)

  4. Facilty Focus: Residence Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunnewell, James F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Western Ridge Residence at Colorado College and Beard Hall at Wheaton College. The buildings feature multiple levels that take advantage of views and also help create a "homey" feeling. (EV)

  5. Facilty Focus: Residence Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunnewell, James F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Western Ridge Residence at Colorado College and Beard Hall at Wheaton College. The buildings feature multiple levels that take advantage of views and also help create a "homey" feeling. (EV)

  6. Technology in Residence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  7. Isolation of satellite cells from single muscle fibers from young, aged, or dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Di Foggia, Valentina; Robson, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contains an identified resident stem cell population called the satellite cells. This cell is responsible for the majority of the postnatal growth and regenerative potential of skeletal muscle. Other cells do contribute to skeletal muscle regeneration and in cultures of minced whole muscle these cells are cultured along with the satellite cells and it is impossible to dissect out their contribution compared to the satellite cells. Therefore, a method to culture pure satellite cells has been developed to study the signaling pathways that control their proliferation and differentiation. In our studies into the role of the resident myogenic stem cells in regeneration, myopathic conditions, and aging, we have optimized the established techniques that already exist to isolate pure satellite cell cultures from single muscle fibers. We have successfully isolated satellite cells from young adults through to 24-month-old muscles and obtained populations of cells that we are studying for the signaling events that regulate their proliferative potential.

  8. Fas-Fas ligand interactions are essential for the binding to and killing of activated macrophages by gamma delta T cells.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Jane E; Howell, Gareth; Pearson, Jayne; Scott, Phillip; Carding, Simon R

    2004-09-15

    Gammadelta T cells have a direct role in resolving the host immune response to infection by eliminating populations of activated macrophages. Macrophage reactivity resides within the Vgamma1/Vdelta6.3 subset of gammadelta T cells, which have the ability to kill activated macrophages following infection with Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). However, it is not known how gammadelta T cell macrophage cytocidal activity is regulated, or what effector mechanisms gammadelta T cells use to kill activated macrophages. Using a macrophage-T cell coculture system in which peritoneal macrophages from naive or Lm-infected TCRdelta-/- mice were incubated with splenocytes from wild-type and Fas ligand (FasL)-deficient mice (gld), the ability of Vgamma1 T cells to bind macrophages was shown to be dependent upon Fas-FasL interactions. Combinations of anti-TCR and FasL Abs completely abolished binding to and killing of activated macrophages by Vgamma1 T cells. In addition, confocal microscopy showed that Fas and the TCR colocalized on Vgamma1 T cells at points of contact with macrophages. Collectively, these studies identify an accessory or coreceptor-like function for Fas-FasL that is essential for the interaction of Vgamma1 T cells with activated macrophages and their elimination during the resolution stage of pathogen-induced immune responses. Copyright 2004 The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. The transition of smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a migratory, phagocytic phenotype: direct demonstration of phenotypic modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sandison, Mairi E.; Dempster, John

    2016-01-01

    Key points Smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic conversion from a contractile to a migratory phenotype is proposed to underlie cardiovascular disease but its contribution to vascular remodelling and even its existence have recently been questioned.Tracking the fate of individual SMCs is difficult as no specific markers of migratory SMCs exist.This study used a novel, prolonged time‐lapse imaging approach to continuously track the behaviour of unambiguously identified, fully differentiated SMCs.In response to serum, highly‐elongated, contractile SMCs initially rounded up, before spreading and migrating and these migratory cells displayed clear phagocytic activity.This study provides a direct demonstration of the transition of fully contractile SMCs to a non‐contractile, migratory phenotype with phagocytic capacity that may act as a macrophage‐like cell. Abstract Atherosclerotic plaques are populated with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages. SMCs are thought to accumulate in plaques because fully differentiated, contractile SMCs reprogramme into a ‘synthetic’ migratory phenotype, so‐called phenotypic modulation, whilst plaque macrophages are thought to derive from blood‐borne myeloid cells. Recently, these views have been challenged, with reports that SMC phenotypic modulation may not occur during vascular remodelling and that plaque macrophages may not be of haematopoietic origin. Following the fate of SMCs is complicated by the lack of specific markers for the migratory phenotype and direct demonstrations of phenotypic modulation are lacking. Therefore, we employed long‐term, high‐resolution, time‐lapse microscopy to track the fate of unambiguously identified, fully‐differentiated, contractile SMCs in response to the growth factors present in serum. Phenotypic modulation was clearly observed. The highly elongated, contractile SMCs initially rounded up, for 1–3 days, before spreading outwards. Once spread, the SMCs became motile and

  10. Residents' Perspectives on Professionalism

    PubMed Central

    Krain, Lewis P.; Lavelle, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Background Research defining professionalism exists, yet little is known about how residents view this important attribute for medical practice. Knowing more about residents' interpretations of professionalism and about how they value professionalism would enhance definitions and facilitate support for the development of professionalism skills and behaviors at the graduate level. Purpose The purpose of this phenomenological study was to investigate how residents think about professionalism, how they value it, and how it plays out in their educational lives. Methods This study uses qualitative methods, employing 5 focus groups representative of a range of disciplines. Methods include providing unstructured prompts, member checking and informant feedback to support credibility, and content analysis to discern significant patterns. Results Content analysis supported that residents highly value professionalism and see it as a complex construct, dependent on the situation, discipline, and on personal experience. Challenges to professionalism are common in graduate medical education and a great concern for residents. Conclusions Physician educators often discuss professionalism as an overarching concept in medicine, especially in classes during the preclinical years. Although some general principles are applicable, residents relate more deeply to aspects of professionalism that concern their own clinical practice, situation, and specialty. Implications for measurement of professional skills and for further research are included in this report. PMID:21975982

  11. Macrophage dynamics are regulated by local macrophage proliferation and monocyte recruitment in injured pancreas.

    PubMed

    Van Gassen, Naomi; Van Overmeire, Eva; Leuckx, Gunter; Heremans, Yves; De Groef, Sofie; Cai, Ying; Elkrim, Yvon; Gysemans, Conny; Stijlemans, Benoît; Van de Casteele, Mark; De Baetselier, Patrick; De Leu, Nico; Heimberg, Harry; Van Ginderachter, Jo A

    2015-05-01

    Pancreas injury by partial duct ligation (PDL) activates a healing response, encompassing β-cell neogenesis and proliferation. Macrophages (MΦs) were recently shown to promote β-cell proliferation after PDL, but they remain poorly characterized. We assessed myeloid cell diversity and the factors driving myeloid cell dynamics following acute pancreas injury by PDL. In naive and sham-operated pancreas, the myeloid cell compartment consisted mainly of two distinct tissue-resident MΦ types, designated MHC-II(lo) and MHC-II(hi) MΦs, the latter being predominant. MHC-II(lo) and MHC-II(hi) pancreas MΦs differed at the molecular level, with MHC-II(lo) MΦs being more M2-activated. After PDL, there was an early surge of Ly6C(hi) monocyte infiltration in the pancreas, followed by a transient MHC-II(lo) MΦ peak and ultimately a restoration of the MHC-II(hi) MΦ-dominated steady-state equilibrium. These intricate MΦ dynamics in PDL pancreas depended on monocyte recruitment by C-C chemokine receptor 2 and macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor as well as on macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor-dependent local MΦ proliferation. Functionally, MHC-II(lo) MΦs were more angiogenic. We further demonstrated that, at least in C-C chemokine receptor 2-KO mice, tissue MΦs, rather than Ly6C(hi) monocyte-derived MΦs, contributed to β-cell proliferation. Together, our study fully characterizes the MΦ subsets in the pancreas and clarifies the complex dynamics of MΦs after PDL injury. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Lipoprotein lipase regulates Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis by macrophages maintained in glucose-deficient medium.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, B; Loike, J D; Kako, Y; Weinstock, P H; Breslow, J L; Silverstein, S C; Goldberg, I J

    1997-01-01

    During periods of intense activity such as phagocytosis, macrophages are thought to derive most of their energy from glucose metabolism under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To determine whether fatty acids released from lipoproteins by macrophage lipoprotein lipase (LPL) could substitute for glucose as a source of energy for phagocytosis, we cultured peritoneal macrophages from normal and LPL knockout (LPL-KO) mice that had been rescued from neonatal demise by expression of human LPL via the muscle creatine kinase promoter. Normal and LPL-KO macrophages were cultured in medium containing normal (5 mM) or low (1 mM) glucose, and were tested for their capacity to phagocytose IgG-opsonized sheep erythrocytes. LPL-KO macrophages maintained in 1 and 5 mM glucose phagocytosed 67 and 79% fewer IgG-opsonized erythrocytes, respectively, than macrophages from normal mice. Addition of VLDL to LPL-expressing macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose enhanced the macrophages' phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes, but did not stimulate phagocytosis by LPL-KO macrophages. Inhibition of secreted LPL with a monoclonal anti-LPL antibody or with tetrahydrolipstatin blocked the ability of VLDL to enhance phagocytosis by LPL-expressing macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose. Addition of oleic acid significantly enhanced phagocytosis by both LPL-expressing and LPL-KO macrophages maintained in 1 mM glucose. Moreover, oleic acid stimulated phagocytosis in cells cultured in non-glucose-containing medium, and increased the intracellular stores of creatine phosphate. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, but not of glycolysis, blocked the capacity of oleic acid to stimulate phagocytosis. Receptor-mediated endocytosis of acetyl LDL by macrophages from LPL-expressing and LPL-KO mice was similar whether the cells were maintained in 5 or 1 mM glucose, and was not augmented by VLDL. We postulate that fatty acids derived from macrophage LPL-catalyzed hydrolysis of triglycerides and

  13. Macrophage Activation in Pediatric Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) Correlates with Hepatic Progenitor Cell Response via Wnt3a Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Anastasia; De Stefanis, Cristiano; Stronati, Laura; Franchitto, Antonio; Alisi, Anna; Onori, Paolo; De Vito, Rita; Alpini, Gianfranco; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is one of the most important causes of liver-related morbidity in children. In non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, the activation of liver resident macrophage pool is a central event in the progression of liver injury. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the polarization of liver macrophages and the possible role of Wnt3a production by macrophages in hepatic progenitor cell response in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. 32 children with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were included. 20 out of 32 patients were treated with docosahexaenoic acid for 18 months and biopsies at the baseline and after 18 months were included. Hepatic progenitor cell activation, macrophage subsets and Wnt/β-catenin pathway were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Our results indicated that in pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, pro-inflammatory macrophages were the predominant subset. Macrophage polarization was correlated with Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease Activity Score, ductular reaction, and portal fibrosis; docosahexaenoic acid treatment determined a macrophage polarization towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype in correlation with the reduction of serum inflammatory cytokines, with increased macrophage apoptosis, and with the up-regulation of macrophage Wnt3a expression; macrophage Wnt3a expression was correlated with β-catenin phosphorylation in hepatic progenitor cells and signs of commitment towards hepatocyte fate. In conclusion, macrophage polarization seems to have a key role in the progression of pediatric non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; the modulation of macrophage polarization could drive hepatic progenitor cell response by Wnt3a production. PMID:27310371

  14. Incomplete deletion of IL-4Rα by LysM(Cre) reveals distinct subsets of M2 macrophages controlling inflammation and fibrosis in chronic schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Vannella, Kevin M; Barron, Luke; Borthwick, Lee A; Kindrachuk, Kristen N; Narasimhan, Prakash Babu; Hart, Kevin M; Thompson, Robert W; White, Sandra; Cheever, Allen W; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Wynn, Thomas A

    2014-09-01

    Mice expressing a Cre recombinase from the lysozyme M-encoding locus (Lyz2) have been widely used to dissect gene function in macrophages and neutrophils. Here, we show that while naïve resident tissue macrophages from IL-4Rαf(lox/delta)LysM(Cre) mice almost completely lose IL-4Rα function, a large fraction of macrophages elicited by sterile inflammatory stimuli, Schistosoma mansoni eggs, or S. mansoni infection, fail to excise Il4rα. These F4/80(hi)CD11b(hi) macrophages, in contrast to resident tissue macrophages, express lower levels of Lyz2 explaining why this population resists LysM(Cre)-mediated deletion. We show that in response to IL-4 and IL-13, Lyz2(lo)IL-4Rα(+) macrophages differentiate into an arginase 1-expressing alternatively-activated macrophage (AAM) population, which slows the development of lethal fibrosis in schistosomiasis. In contrast, we identified Lyz2(hi)IL-4Rα(+) macrophages as the key subset of AAMs mediating the downmodulation of granulomatous inflammation in chronic schistosomiasis. Our observations reveal a limitation on using a LysMCre mouse model to study gene function in inflammatory settings, but we utilize this limitation as a means to demonstrate that distinct populations of alternatively activated macrophages control inflammation and fibrosis in chronic schistosomiasis.

  15. Alendronate inhalation ameliorates elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice by induction of apoptosis of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Manabu; Maeno, Toshitaka; Nishimura, Satoshi; Ogata, Fusa; Masubuchi, Hiroaki; Hara, Kenichiro; Yamaguchi, Kouichi; Aoki, Fumiaki; Suga, Tatsuo; Nagai, Ryozo; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-10

    Alveolar macrophages play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of emphysema, for which there is currently no effective treatment. Bisphosphonates are widely used to treat osteoclast-mediated bone diseases. Here we show that delivery of the nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate alendronate via aerosol inhalation ameliorates elastase-induced emphysema in mice. Inhaled, but not orally ingested, alendronate inhibits airspace enlargement after elastase instillation, and induces apoptosis of macrophages in bronchoalveolar fluid via caspase-3- and mevalonate-dependent pathways. Cytometric analysis indicates that the F4/80(+)CD11b(high)CD11c(mild) population characterizing inflammatory macrophages, and the F4/80(+)CD11b(mild)CD11c(high) population defining resident alveolar macrophages take up substantial amounts of the bisphosphonate imaging agent OsteoSense680 after aerosol inhalation. We further show that alendronate inhibits macrophage migratory and phagocytotic activities and blunts the inflammatory response of alveolar macrophages by inhibiting nuclear factor-κB signalling. Given that the alendronate inhalation effectively induces apoptosis in both recruited and resident alveolar macrophages, we suggest this strategy may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of emphysema.

  16. Satisfaction among residents in ASHP-accredited pharmacy residency programs.

    PubMed

    VanDenBerg, C; Murphy, J E

    1997-07-01

    The level of work satisfaction among pharmacists in ASHP-accredited residencies was studied. In March 1996 a questionnaire designed to measure residency satisfaction was mailed to 697 individuals in ASHP-accredited pharmacy practice and specialty practice residencies. Subjects responded to 16 statements relating to intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of work satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. Questionnaires were returned by 413 (59%) of the residents. The respondents were predominantly women (76%), and most (86%) had at least a Pharm. D. degree. Hospitals were the primary work setting (88%). Of the 413 residents, 305 were in pharmacy practice residencies and 108 were in specialized residencies. None of the mean scores indicated disagreement (scores < 3) with the positively worded statements or agreement (scores > 3) with the negatively worded statements. The median and mode were equal to 2 (disagree) for the three negatively worded items and 4 (agree) for all but three positively worded items. Only 8% of the residents indicated that they would not accept the residency again if given the chance. Specialized residents tended to rate positively worded statements higher and negatively worded statements lower than pharmacy practice residents. Female residents indicated greater satisfaction than male residents. Pay and benefits were rated slightly better than neutral. Pharmacy residents appeared generally satisfied with their residencies. Specialized ph