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Sample records for muscle tendon allografts

  1. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R.

  2. Chronic Achilles Tendon Rupture Treated with Allograft: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Restuccia, Giuseppe; Lippi, Alessandro; Casella, Francesco; Citarelli, Carmine; Sacchetti, Federico; Benifei, Maurizio

    2017-02-07

    In clinical practice, chronic Achilles tendon ruptures are uncommon. Usually, these lesions are discovered four to six weeks after injuries. More frequently, Achilles tendon ruptures are acute and treated with tendon sutures.1 Many surgical techniques are available to treat chronic lesions such as sutures or V-Y elongation with or without augments.2-3 Our case is about a chronic Achilles tendon rupture discovered two years after injury. Our patient came to our attention with a 6 cm tendon gap. We performed tendon repair with cadaver allograft. After four years of follow-up, our patient has a complete functional recovery and he can normally perform daily and working tasks without pain.

  3. Utility of an allograft tendon for scoliosis correction via the costo-transverse foreman.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong; McCarthy, Michael; Dooley, Adam C; Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H; Shelton, R Shane; McLaren, Sandra G; Skinner, Robert A; Suva, Larry J; McCarthy, Richard E

    2017-01-01

    Current convex tethering techniques for treatment of scoliosis have centered on anterior convex staples or polypropylene tethers. We hypothesized that an allograft tendon tether inserted via the costo-transverse foramen would correct an established spinal deformity. In the pilot study, six 8-week-old pigs underwent allograft tendon tethering via the costo-transverse foreman or sham to test the strength of the transplanted tendon to retard spine growth. After 4 months, spinal deformity in three planes was induced in all animals with allograft tendons. In the treatment study, the allograft tendon tether was used to treat established scoliosis in 11 8-week-old pigs (spinal deformity > 50°). Once the deformity was observed (4 months) animals were assigned to either no treatment group or allograft tendon tether group and progression assessed by monthly radiographs. At final follow-up, coronal Cobb angle and maximum vertebral axial rotation of the treatment group was significantly smaller than the non-treatment group, whereas sagittal kyphosis of the treatment group was significantly larger than the non-treatment group. In sum, a significant correction was achieved using a unilateral allograft tendon spinal tether, suggesting that an allograft tendon tethering approach may represent a novel fusion-less procedure to correct idiopathic scoliosis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:183-192, 2017.

  4. Peroneal Tendon Reconstruction and Coverage for Treatment of Septic Peroneal Tenosynovitis: A Devastating Complication of Lateral Ankle Ligament Reconstruction With a Tendon Allograft.

    PubMed

    Schade, Valerie L; Harsha, Wayne; Rodman, Caitlin; Roukis, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Septic peroneal tenosynovitis is a rare and significant challenge. A search of peer-reviewed published studies revealed only 5 case reports to guide treatment, none of which resulted in significant loss of both peroneal tendons necessitating reconstruction. No clear guidance is available regarding how to provide reliable reconstruction of both peroneal tendons after a significant loss secondary to septic tenosynovitis. In the present report, we describe the case of a young, active-duty soldier who underwent lateral ankle ligament reconstruction with a tendon allograft whose postoperative course was complicated by septic peroneal tenosynovitis resulting in significant loss of both peroneal tendons. Reconstruction was achieved in a staged fashion with the use of silicone rods and external fixation to maintain physiologic tension and preserve peroneal tendon function, followed by reconstruction of both peroneal tendons and the superior peroneal retinaculum with a tensor fascia lata autograft. Soft tissue coverage was obtained with an anterolateral thigh free tissue transfer and a split-thickness skin graft. The patient returned to full activity as an active-duty soldier with minimal pain and no instability of the right lower extremity. The muscle strength of both peroneal tendons remained at 5 of 5, and no objective findings of ankle instability were seen at 3.5 years postoperatively.

  5. Passive mechanical properties of human gastrocnemius muscle tendon units, muscle fascicles and tendons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hoang, P D; Herbert, R D; Todd, G; Gorman, R B; Gandevia, S C

    2007-12-01

    This study provides the first in vivo measures of the passive length-tension properties of relaxed human muscle fascicles and their tendons. A new method was used to derive passive length-tension properties of human gastrocnemius muscle-tendon units from measures of ankle stiffness obtained at a range of knee angles. Passive length-tension curves of the muscle-tendon unit were then combined with ultrasonographic measures of muscle fascicle length and pennation to determine passive length-tension curves of the muscle fascicles and tendons. Mean slack lengths of the fascicles, tendons and whole muscle-tendon units were 3.3+/-0.5 cm, 39.5+/-1.6 cm and 42.3+/-1.5 cm, respectively (means +/- s.d., N=6). On average, the muscle-tendon units were slack (i.e. their passive tension was zero) over the shortest 2.3+/-1.2 cm of their range. With combined changes of knee and ankle angles, the maximal increase in length of the gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit above slack length was 6.7+/-1.9 cm, of which 52.4+/-11.7% was due to elongation of the tendon. Muscle fascicles and tendons underwent strains of 86.4+/-26.8% and 9.2+/-4.1%, respectively, across the physiological range of lengths. We conclude that the relaxed human gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit falls slack over about one-quarter of its in vivo length and that muscle fascicle strains are much greater than tendon strains. Nonetheless, because the tendons are much longer than the muscle fascicles, tendons contribute more than half of the total compliance of the muscle-tendon unit.

  6. Regulation of tendon differentiation by scleraxis distinguishes force-transmitting tendons from muscle-anchoring tendons.

    PubMed

    Murchison, Nicholas D; Price, Brian A; Conner, David A; Keene, Douglas R; Olson, Eric N; Tabin, Clifford J; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2007-07-01

    The scleraxis (Scx) gene, encoding a bHLH transcription factor, is expressed in the progenitors and cells of all tendon tissues. To determine Scx function, we produced a mutant null allele. Scx-/- mice were viable, but showed severe tendon defects, which manifested in a drastically limited use of all paws and back muscles and a complete inability to move the tail. Interestingly, although the differentiation of all force-transmitting and intermuscular tendons was disrupted, other categories of tendons, the function of which is mainly to anchor muscles to the skeleton, were less affected and remained functional, enabling the viability of Scx-/- mutants. The force-transmitting tendons of the limbs and tail varied in the severity to which they were affected, ranging from dramatic failure of progenitor differentiation resulting in the loss of segments or complete tendons, to the formation of small and poorly organized tendons. Tendon progenitors appeared normal in Scx-/- embryos and a phenotype resulting from a failure in the condensation of tendon progenitors to give rise to distinct tendons was first detected at embryonic day (E)13.5. In the tendons that persisted in Scx-/- mutants, we found a reduced and less organized tendon matrix and disorganization at the cellular level that led to intermixing of tenocytes and endotenon cells. The phenotype of Scx-/- mutants emphasizes the diversity of tendon tissues and represents the first molecular insight into the important process of tendon differentiation.

  7. Biomechanical Evaluation of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Quadriceps Versus Achilles Tendon Bone Block Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Forsythe, Brian; Haro, Marc S.; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Collins, Michael J.; Arns, Thomas A.; Trella, Katie J.; Shewman, Elizabeth F.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Long-term studies of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction suggest that normal stability is not restored in the majority of patients. The Achilles tendon allograft is frequently utilized, although recently, the quadriceps tendon has been introduced as an alternative option due to its size and high patellar bone density. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare the biomechanical strength of PCL reconstructions using a quadriceps versus an Achilles allograft. The hypothesis was that quadriceps bone block allograft has comparable mechanical properties to those of Achilles bone block allograft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Twenty-nine fresh-frozen cadaveric knees were assigned to 1 of 3 groups: (1) intact PCL, (2) PCL reconstruction with Achilles tendon allograft, or (3) PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon allograft. After reconstruction, all supporting capsular and ligamentous tissues were removed. Posterior tibial translation was measured at neutral and 20° external rotation. Each specimen underwent a preload, 2 cyclic loading protocols of 500 cycles, then load to failure. Results: Construct creep deformation was significantly lower in the intact group compared with both Achilles and quadriceps allograft (P = .008). The intact specimens reached the greatest ultimate load compared with both reconstructions (1974 ± 752 N, P = .0001). The difference in ultimate load for quadriceps versus Achilles allograft was significant (P = .048), with the quadriceps group having greater maximum force during failure testing. No significant differences were noted between quadriceps versus Achilles allograft for differences in crosshead excursion during cyclic testing (peak-valley [P-V] extension stretch), creep deformation, or stiffness. Construct stiffness measured during the failure test was greatest in the intact group (117 ± 9 N/mm, P = .0001) compared with the Achilles (43 ± 11 N/mm) and quadriceps (43

  8. Effects of Trypsinization and Mineralization on Intrasynovial Tendon Allograft Healing to Bone

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jin; van Alphen, Nick A.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Schmid, Thomas M.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to develop a novel technology to enhance tendon-to-bone interface healing by trypsinizing and mineralizing (TM) an intrasynovial tendon allograft in a rabbit bone tunnel model. Eight rabbit flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were used to optimize the trypsinization process. An additional 24 FDP tendons were stratified into control and TM groups; in each group, 4 tendons were used for in vitro evaluation of TM and 8 were transplanted into proximal tibial bone tunnels in rabbits. The samples were evaluated histologically and with mechanical testing at postoperative week 8. Maximum failure strength and linear stiffness were not significantly different between the control and TM tendons. A thin fibrous band of scar tissue formed at the graft-to-bone interface in the control group. However, only the TM group showed obvious new bone formation inside the tendon graft and a visible fibrocartilage layer at the bone tunnel entrance. This study is the first to explore effects of TM on the intrasynovial allograft healing to a bone tunnel. TM showed beneficial effects on chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and integration of the intrasynovial tendon graft, but mechanical strength was the same as the control tendons in this short-term in vivo study. PMID:25611186

  9. Effects of trypsinization and mineralization on intrasynovial tendon allograft healing to bone.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jin; van Alphen, Nick A; Thoreson, Andrew R; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Schmid, Thomas M; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to develop a novel technology to enhance tendon-to-bone interface healing by trypsinizing and mineralizing (TM) an intrasynovial tendon allograft in a rabbit bone tunnel model. Eight rabbit flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were used to optimize the trypsinization process. An additional 24 FDP tendons were stratified into control and TM groups; in each group, 4 tendons were used for in vitro evaluation of TM and 8 were transplanted into proximal tibial bone tunnels in rabbits. The samples were evaluated histologically and with mechanical testing at postoperative week 8. Maximum failure strength and linear stiffness were not significantly different between the control and TM tendons. A thin fibrous band of scar tissue formed at the graft-to-bone interface in the control group. However, only the TM group showed obvious new bone formation inside the tendon graft and a visible fibrocartilage layer at the bone tunnel entrance. This study is the first to explore effects of TM on the intrasynovial allograft healing to a bone tunnel. TM showed beneficial effects on chondrogenesis, osteogenesis, and integration of the intrasynovial tendon graft, but mechanical strength was the same as the control tendons in this short-term in vivo study.

  10. The Effects of Bio-Lubricating Molecules on Flexor Tendon Reconstruction in A Canine Allograft Model In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Wei, Zhuang; Kirk, Ramona L.; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Jay, Gregory D.; Moran, Steven L.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Using allograft is an attractive alternative for flexor tendon reconstruction because of the lack of donor morbidity, and better matching to the intrasynovial environment. The purpose of this study was to use biolubricant molecules to modify the graft surface to decrease adhesions and improve digit function. Methods 28 flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons from the 2nd and 5th digits of 14 dogs were first lacerated and repaired to create a model with repair failure and scar digit for tendon reconstruction. Six weeks after the initial surgery, the tendons were reconstructed with FDP allograft tendons obtained from canine cadavers. One graft tendon in each dog was treated with saline as a control and the other was treated with gelatin, carbodiimide derivatized, hyaluronic acid and lubricin (cd-HA-Lubricin). Six weeks postoperatively, digit function, graft mechanics, and biology were analyzed. Results Allograft tendons treated with cd-HA-Lubricin had decreased adhesions at the proximal tendon/graft repair and within flexor sheath, improved digit function, and increased graft gliding ability. The treatment also reduced the strength at the distal tendon to bone repair, but the distal attachment rupture rate was similar for both graft types. Histology showed that viable cells migrated to the allograft, but these were limited to the tendon surface. Conclusion cd-HA-Lubricin treatment of tendon allograft improves digit functional outcomes after flexor tendon reconstruction. However, delayed bone-tendon healing should be a caution. Furthermore, the cell infiltration into the allograft tendons substance should be a target for future studies, to shorten the allograft self-regeneration period. PMID:24445876

  11. Ethanol treatment of tendon allografts: a potential HIV inactivating procedure.

    PubMed

    Anastasescou, M; Cornu, O; Banse, X; König, J; Hassoun, A; Delloye, C

    1998-01-01

    The penetration rate of ethanol in human tendons was studied to in order to define the conditions which were necessary to achieve an inactivating concentration against the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) within the tendon. The rate of alcohol penetration was found to be slow and did not differ with different types of tendons. An average ethanol concentration of 14% (v/v) was measured in human tendons after they had been immersed for 2 h in 70% (v/v) ethanol, and a concentration of 19% (v/v) was reached after 3 h. Ethanol immersion of human tendons may represent an additional safety procedure in inactivating the HIV virus provided the duration is at least 3 h.

  12. In vivo passive mechanical behaviour of muscle fascicles and tendons in human gastrocnemius muscle-tendon units.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Robert D; Clarke, Jillian; Kwah, Li Khim; Diong, Joanna; Martin, Josh; Clarke, Elizabeth C; Bilston, Lynne E; Gandevia, Simon C

    2011-11-01

    Ultrasound imaging was used to measure the length of muscle fascicles in human gastrocnemius muscles while the muscle was passively lengthened and shortened by moving the ankle. In some subjects the muscle belly 'buckled' at short lengths. When the gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit was passively lengthened from its shortest in vivo length by dorsiflexing the ankle, increases in muscle-tendon length were not initially accompanied by increases in muscle fascicle lengths (fascicle length remained constant), indicating muscle fascicles were slack at short muscle-tendon lengths. The muscle-tendon length at which slack is taken up differs among fascicles: some fascicles begin to lengthen at very short muscle-tendon lengths whereas other fascicles remain slack over a large range of muscle-tendon lengths. This suggests muscle fascicles are progressively 'recruited' and contribute sequentially to muscle-tendon stiffness during passive lengthening of the muscle-tendon unit. Even above their slack lengths muscle fascicles contribute only a small part (<~30%) of the total change in muscle-tendon length. The contribution of muscle fascicles to muscle-tendon length increases with muscle length. The novelty of this work is that it reveals a previously unrecognised phenomenon (buckling at short lengths), posits a new mechanism of passive mechanical properties of muscle (recruitment of muscle fascicles), and confirms with high-resolution measurements that the passive compliance of human gastrocnemius muscle-tendon units is due largely to the tendon. It would be interesting to investigate if adaptations of passive properties of muscles are associated with changes in the distribution of muscle lengths at which fascicles fall slack.

  13. An Artificial Tendon with Durable Muscle Interface

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Alan; Litsky, Alan; Mayerson, Joel; Witte, David; Melvin, David; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    A coupling mechanism that can permanently fix a forcefully contracting muscle to a bone anchor or any totally inert prosthesis would meet a serious need in orthopaedics. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device to satisfy these demands. The objective of this study was to test OrthoCoupler’s performance in vitro and in vivo in the goat semitendinosus tendon model. For in vitro evaluation, 40 samples were fatigue-tested, cycling at 10 load levels, n=4 each. For in vivo evaluation, the semitendinosus tendon was removed bilaterally in 8 goats. Left sides were reattached with an OrthoCoupler, and right sides were reattached using the Krackow stitch with #5 braided polyester sutures. Specimens were harvested 60 days post-surgery and assigned for biomechanics and histology. Fatigue strength of the devices in vitro was several times the contractile force of the semitendinosus muscle. The in vivo devices were built equivalent to two of the in vitro devices, providing an additional safety factor. In strength testing at necropsy, suture controls pulled out at 120.5 ± 68.3 N, whereas each OrthoCoupler was still holding after the muscle tore, remotely, at 298±111.3N (mean ± SD)(p<0.0003). Muscle tear strength was reached with the fiber-muscle composite produced in healing still soundly intact. This technology may be of value for orthopaedic challenges in oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and sports-injury reconstruction. PMID:19639642

  14. Analysis of predisposing factors for contamination of bone and tendon allografts.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Thomas; Bigaré, Elisa; Van Isacker, Tom; Gigi, Jacques; Delloye, Christian; Cornu, Olivier

    2012-08-01

    Bone and tissue allografts are widely used in transplantation. The increasing demand for safe allografts must be met, while minimizing disease transmission. We analysed the incidence and potential risk factors of allograft contamination and the effectiveness of disinfection, by reviewing 22 years of tissue bank activity and 474 donor procurements. We also compared different disinfection procedures used over the 22 years. The overall contamination rate was 10.1%. Risk factors were related to the donor or procurement method. Immediate culture at the tissue recovery site diminished the rate of false positives by reducing later sample manipulation. High-virulence allograft contamination was mainly related to donor factors, while low-virulence contamination was related to procurement methods. Analysis of donor-related risk factors showed no statistical differences for age, sex, or cause of death. An intensive care unit stay was associated with less contamination with high-virulence microbes. Procurement in a setting other than an operating theatre was associated with higher contamination rate. Team experience reduced contamination. Pelvic and tendon allografts were most frequently contaminated. Proper disinfection considerably reduced the contamination rate to 3.6%. We conclude that procurement must be performed under aseptic conditions, with short delays, and by trained personnel. Grafts should be disinfected and packed as soon as possible.

  15. Muscle - tendon unit mechanical and morphological properties and sprint performance.

    PubMed

    Stafilidis, Savvas; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether sprint performance is related to the mechanical (elongation - force relationship of the tendon and aponeurosis, muscle strength) and morphological (fascicle length, pennation angle, muscle thickness) properties of the quadriceps femoris and triceps surae muscle - tendon units. Two groups of sprinters (slow, n = 11; fast, n = 17) performed maximal isometric knee extension and plantar flexion contractions on a dynamometer at 11 different muscle - tendon unit lengths. Elongation of the tendon and aponeurosis of the gastrocnemius medialis and the vastus lateralis was measured using ultrasonography. We observed no significant differences in maximal joint moments at the ankle and knee joints or morphological properties of the gastrocnemius medialis and vastus lateralis between groups (P > 0.05). The fast group exhibited greater elongation of the vastus lateralis tendon and aponeurosis at a given tendon force, and greater maximal elongation of the vastus lateralis tendon and aponeurosis during maximum voluntary contraction (P < 0.05). Furthermore, maximal elongation of the vastus lateralis tendon and aponeurosis showed a significant correlation with 100-m sprint times (r = -0.567, P = 0.003). For the elongation - force relationship at the gastrocnemius medialis tendon and aponeurosis, the two groups recorded similar values. It is suggested that the greater elongation of the vastus lateralis tendon and aponeurosis of the fast group benefits energy storage and return as well as the shortening velocity of the muscle - tendon unit.

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone allografts. A biological and biomechanical evaluation in goats.

    PubMed

    Drez, D J; DeLee, J; Holden, J P; Arnoczky, S; Noyes, F R; Roberts, T S

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-eight goats underwent ACL reconstruction with freeze-dried bone-patellar tendon-bone allografts in one knee, the opposite knee serving as a control. One group of 16 knees was evaluated, in groups of four, at 6, 12, 26, and 52 weeks by histologic and vascular injection techniques. The other group of 12 knees was evaluated in two groups of six at 26 and 52 weeks by morphological and biomechanical techniques of analysis. Within the first 12 weeks these allografts were revascularized; in the first 26 weeks they had matured to resemble normal connective tissue. Graft stiffness was 29% of the control value and maximum force to failure was 43% of the control value. The results of this study indicated that freeze-dried bone-patellar tendon-bone allografts are biomechanically and biologically similar to patellar tendon autografts.

  17. Tendon biomechanical properties enhance human wrist muscle specialization.

    PubMed

    Loren, G J; Lieber, R L

    1995-07-01

    Biomechanical properties of human wrist tendons were measured under loads predicted to be experienced by those tendons under physiological conditions. This was accomplished by measuring the architectural properties of the five prime wrist movers--extensors carpi radialis brevis (ECRB), extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL), extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU), flexor carpi radials (FCR), flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU)--and predicting their maximum tension (P0) using a specific tension value (22.5 N cm-2. Loading the corresponding tendons to P0 resulted in significantly different strain among tendons (p < 0.01) with the largest strain observed in the FCU (3.68 +/- 0.31%) and the smallest strain observed in the ECRL (1.78 +/- 0.14%). Further, strain magnitude was significantly positively correlated with the tendon length-to-fiber length ratio of the muscle-tendon unit, a measure of the intrinsic compliance of the muscle-tendon unit. Theoretical modeling of the magnitude of muscle sarcomere shortening expected based on the measured biomechanical properties revealed a maximum sarcomere length decrease of about 0.6 micron for the FCU to a minimum of about 0.2 micron for the ECRB at P0. Thus, tendon compliance may, but does not necessarily, result in significant modification of muscle force generation. The significant variation in tendon biomechanical properties was not observed using traditional elongation-to-failure methods on the same specimens. Thus, the use of elongation-to-failure experiments for determination of tendon properties may not be reasonable when the purpose of such studies is to infer physiological function. These data indicate that muscle-tendon units show remarkable specialization and that tendon intrinsic properties accentuate the muscle architectural specialization already present.

  18. Effects of a peracetic acid disinfection protocol on the biocompatibility and biomechanical properties of human patellar tendon allografts.

    PubMed

    Lomas, R J; Jennings, L M; Fisher, J; Kearney, J N

    2004-01-01

    Patellar tendon allografts, retrieved from cadaveric human donors, are widely used for replacement of damaged cruciate ligaments. In common with other tissue allografts originating from cadaveric donors, there are concerns regarding the potential for disease transmission from the donor to the recipient. Additionally, retrieval and subsequent processing protocols expose the graft to the risk of environmental contamination. For these reasons, disinfection or sterilisation protocols are necessary for these grafts before they are used clinically. A high-level disinfection protocol, utilising peracetic acid (PAA), has been developed and investigated for its effects on the biocompatibility and biomechanics of the patellar tendon allografts. PAA disinfection did not render the grafts either cytotoxic or liable to provoke an inflammatory response as assessed in vitro . However, the protocol was shown to increase the size of gaps between the tendon fibres in the matrix and render the grafts more susceptible to digestion with collagenase. Biomechanical studies of the tendons showed that PAA treatment had no effect on the ultimate tensile stress or Young's modulus of the tendons, and that ultimate strain was significantly higher in PAA treated tendons.

  19. Chest wall reconstruction using iliac bone allografts and muscle flaps.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tutor, Emilio; Yeste, Luis; Murillo, Julio; Aubá, Cristina; Sanjulian, Mikel; Torre, Wenceslao

    2004-01-01

    Technically we can divide full-thickness thoracic reconstruction into 2 parts: providing a rigid support and ensuring well-vascularized coverage. Since 1986, the authors' center has had ample experience with bone banks and the use of cryopreserved bone grafts, which led them to consider the possibility of using these grafts for full-thickness chest wall reconstruction. They describe 3 patients in whom resection of the tumor and reconstruction of the thorax were carried out using iliac bone allografts covered with muscle flaps (1 pectoralis major and 2 rectus abdominis). None of the patients experienced breathing difficulties, pain, or instability after 14 months, 18 months, and 11 years of follow-up. The result of the reconstruction was excellent in all 3 patients in terms of function and aesthetics. The advantage of allografts compared with synthetic materials is their potential integration; they can become part of the host patient's living tissue.

  20. LRT, a tendon-specific leucine-rich repeat protein, promotes muscle-tendon targeting through its interaction with Robo.

    PubMed

    Wayburn, Bess; Volk, Talila

    2009-11-01

    Correct muscle migration towards tendon cells, and the adhesion of these two cell types, form the basis for contractile tissue assembly in the Drosophila embryo. While molecules promoting the attraction of muscles towards tendon cells have been described, signals involved in the arrest of muscle migration following the arrival of myotubes at their corresponding tendon cells have yet to be elucidated. Here, we describe a novel tendon-specific transmembrane protein, which we named LRT due to the presence of a leucine-rich repeat domain (LRR) in its extracellular region. Our analysis suggests that LRT acts non-autonomously to better target the muscle and/or arrest its migration upon arrival at its corresponding tendon cell. Muscles in embryos lacking LRT exhibited continuous formation of membrane extensions despite arrival at their corresponding tendon cells, and a partial failure of muscles to target their correct tendon cells. In addition, overexpression of LRT in tendon cells often stalled muscles located close to the tendon cells. LRT formed a protein complex with Robo, and we detected a functional genetic interaction between Robo and LRT at the level of muscle migration behavior. Taken together, our data suggest a novel mechanism by which muscles are targeted towards tendon cells as a result of LRT-Robo interactions. This mechanism may apply to the Robo-dependent migration of a wide variety of cell types.

  1. Carbon fibres and plasma-preserved tendon allografts for gap repair of flexor tendon in bovines: gross, microscopic and scanning electron microscopic observations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N; Sharma, A K; Sharma, A K; Kumar, S

    2002-06-01

    The efficacy of carbon fibres and plasma-preserved tendon allografts for gap repair in the superficial digital flexor tendon in the mid-metatarsal region was evaluated in 12 crossbred calves. Experimental tenectomies were performed, followed by implantation of carbon fibres in group I (12 legs) and plasma-preserved tendon allografts in group II (12 legs). Gross observations in group I showed filling of the defect with granulation tissue with more vascularity on day 7, which was less prominent at day 14. On day 30, the neotendon formed was slightly thicker and comparable to normal tendon in appearance and texture. On day 90, it exhibited all the characteristics of a fully developed tendon. Whereas, in group II increased vascularity at the site and encapsulation of the graft with connective tissue in early periods was observed. The gap between graft and host was filled with fibrous connective tissue. Peritendinous adhesions were maximum on day 7 which were gradually reduced in both groups. Microscopically, an acute inflammatory reaction in the periphery of carbon fibres was observed on day 7. Immature fibroblasts were arranged in a haphazard pattern at this stage. By day 14, numerous newly formed capillaries and comparatively more mature fibroblasts were present in between and around the carbon fibres which were aligning parallel to the longitudinal axis of the tendon. By day 30 the healing tissue exhibited longitudinal orientation of collagen fibres and was at a more advance stage of maturation. By day 90, the neotendon formed simulated the picture of normal tendon. In the grafted tendon group, there was normal healing tissue at the functional sites between host and grafted tendon. The fibroblastic activity appeared to be both extrinsic and intrinsic in origin. The connective tissue had invaded the graft to a variable distance and there was resorption of graft which was replaced by newly formed connective tissue on day 90. Scanning electron microscopic observation

  2. Structure-function considerations of muscle-tendon junctions.

    PubMed

    Trotter, John A

    2002-12-01

    Skeletal muscle cells transmit force across the cell membrane to the extracellular matrix and ultimately to tendons. Force transmission may occur both along the lateral surfaces of muscle fibers and at their ends. Forces within muscles may follow the path of greatest resistance. Sites of force transmission are morphologically and compositionally specialized for this function. They are also specialized to provide stress-information that feeds into the synthetic programs of the muscle cell. A detailed analysis of the structures and functions of muscle-tendon junctions is essential to a comprehensive understanding of the way in which muscles and their connective tissues are controlled to move joints and to respond to mechanical stresses.

  3. Acellular and glutaraldehyde-preserved tendon allografts for reconstruction of superficial digital flexor tendon in bovines: Part I--Clinical, radiological and angiographical observations.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, R; Kumar, N; Sharma, A K; Maiti, S K; Singh, G R

    2003-12-01

    Sixteen tenorrhaphies were performed at the mid-metatarsal region in eight buffalo calves under lignocaine epidural analgesia. A 2 cm long gap was created in the superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendon and immediately repaired with acellular grafts in animals of group I, 1% glutaraldehyde-preserved tendon allografts in group II. In group III, the defect was repaired with autografts. This group served as control. The contralateral limb in each animal was operated after an interval of 60 days and the animals underwent the same procedure according to the designed groups. Diclofenac sodium and Enrofloxacin was given post-operatively for 5 days. Clinical examination revealed significant increase (P < 0.05) in rectal temperature, heart and respiratory rate for 3-4 postoperative days in all the animals. Mild pain and exudation as well as early restoration of tendon gliding movements and weight-bearing were observed earlier in group I in comparison with group II. Air-tendograms revealed early organization, minimal adhesion formation and lesser thickening of tendon at the reconstructive site in the acellular group whereas in the glutaraldehyde group dense homogenous swelling with adhesions was seen along the flexors. Angiography on day 30 showed that the area of proximal and distal host tendon graft junction appeared hypervascularized, whereas the area occupied by the graft appeared relatively less vascularized. Normal vascularization was observed on day 90 in all the three groups.

  4. Fetal development of the pulley for muscle insertion tendons: A review and new findings related to the tensor tympani tendon.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco; Honkura, Yohei; Katori, Yukio; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The existence of hard tissue pulleys that act to change the direction of a muscle insertion tendon is well known in the human body. These include (1) the trochlea for the extraocular obliquus superior muscle, (2) the pterygoid hamulus for the tensor veli palatini muscle, (3) the deep sulcus on the plantar aspect of the cuboid bone for the peroneus longus tendon, (4) the lesser sciatic notch for the obturator internus muscle, and (5) the bony trochleariformis process for the tensor tympani muscle tendon. In addition, (6) the stapedius muscle tendon shows a lesser or greater angulation at the pyramidal eminence of the temporal bone. Our recent studies have shown that the development of pulleys Nos. 1 and 2 can be explained by a change in the topographical relationship between the pulley and the tendon, that of pulley No. 3 by the rapidly growing calcaneus pushing the tendon, and that of pulley No. 4 by migration of the insertion along the sciatic nerve and gluteus medius tendon. Therefore, in Nos. 1-4, an initially direct tendon curves secondarily and obtains an attachment to the pulley. In case No. 6, the terminal part of the stapedius tendon originates secondarily from the interzone mesenchymal tissue of the incudostapedial joint. In the case of pulley No. 5, we newly demonstrated that its initial phase of development was similar to No. 6, but the tensor tympani tendon achieved a right-angled turn under guidance by a specific fibrous tissue and it migrated along the growing malleus manubrium.

  5. Strain and elongation of the human semitendinosus muscle - tendon unit.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Eleftherios; Patsika, Glykeria; Karagiannidis, Evaggelos

    2013-12-01

    The semitendinosus (ST) consists of a long distal tendon and it is divided in two parts by a tendinous inscription (TI). The purpose of this study was to quantify strain and elongation of the TI and the distal tendon of ST. Fourteen subjects performed ramp isometric contractions of the knee flexors at 0°, 45° and 90° of knee flexion. Two ultrasound probes were used to visualize the displacement of the distal tendon and selected points across the TI and aponeuroses. Three-way analysis of variance designs indicated that: (a) strain and elongation of the ST distal muscle-tendon junction were higher than that of the aponeurosis - TI junction points (p < 0.05) (b) the long arm of the TI reach strain of 49.86 ± 7.77% which was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than that displayed by the short arm (28.35 ± 0.59%) (c) Strain of tendinous and TI-aponeuroses segments significantly increased from 90° to 0° of knee flexion while the inverse was observed for the TI arm length (p < 0.05). (d) Tendon strain was significantly higher than strain of the TI-aponeuroses segments at 45° and 90° of knee flexion while the opposite was observed at 0° of knee flexion. The arrangement of TI along ST length results in differential local strains, indicating that the mechanical properties of the ST muscle are affected by tendon, aponeuroses and tendinous inscription interactions.

  6. Effect of muscle contraction levels on the force-length relationship of the human Achilles tendon during lengthening of the triceps surae muscle-tendon unit.

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, Norihide; Kawakami, Yasuo; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2011-07-28

    Findings from animal experiments are sometimes contradictory to the idea that the tendon structure is a simple elastic spring in series with muscle fibers, and suggest influence of muscle contraction on the tendon mechanical properties. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of muscle contraction levels on the force-length relationship of the human Achilles tendon during lengthening of the triceps surae muscle-tendon unit. For seven subjects, ankle dorsiflexion was performed without (passive condition) and with contraction of plantar flexor muscles (eccentric conditions, at 3 contraction levels) on an isokinetic dynamometer. Deformation of the Achilles tendon during each trial was measured using ultrasonography. The Achilles tendon force corresponding to the tendon elongation of 10mm in the passive condition was significantly smaller than those in the eccentric conditions (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Within the eccentric conditions, the Achilles tendon force corresponding to the tendon elongation of 10mm was significantly greater in the maximal contraction level than those in submaximal eccentric conditions (p<0.05 or p<0.01). In addition, the tendon stiffness was greater in higher contraction levels (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Present results suggest that the human tendon structure is not a simple elastic spring in series with muscle fibers.

  7. Repositioning forelimb superficialis muscles: tendon attachment and muscle activity enable active relocation of functional myofibers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alice H; Riordan, Timothy J; Wang, Lingyan; Eyal, Shai; Zelzer, Elazar; Brigande, John V; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2013-09-16

    The muscles that govern hand motion are composed of extrinsic muscles that reside within the forearm and intrinsic muscles that reside within the hand. We find that the extrinsic muscles of the flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) first differentiate as intrinsic muscles within the hand and then relocate as myofibers to their final position in the arm. This remarkable translocation of differentiated myofibers across a joint is dependent on muscle contraction and muscle-tendon attachment. Interestingly, the intrinsic flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles of the foot are identical to the FDS in tendon pattern and delayed developmental timing but undergo limited muscle translocation, providing strong support for evolutionary homology between the FDS and FDB muscles. We propose that the intrinsic FDB pattern represents the original tetrapod limb and that translocation of the muscles to form the FDS is a mammalian evolutionary addition.

  8. Reconstruction of compound loss of lateral malleolus and lateral ankle ligaments with double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft.

    PubMed

    Ko, Dukhwan; Jung, Hong-Geun; Kim, Hyeung-June; Cha, Seung-Han; Nam, Kyoung-Mo

    2014-01-01

    Open ankle fracture, including compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and overlying skin, is a severe injury and can result in ankle instability and permanent disability. Treatment of this injury is challenging and requires bone grafting and soft tissue reconstruction. In the present report, we describe a unique reconstruction technique for compound loss of the lateral malleolus, lateral ankle ligaments, and the overlying skin using a double-bundle Achilles tendon-bone allograft combined with a reverse sural fasciocutaneous flap. The patient obtained a stable ankle with nearly full range of motion and displayed satisfactory function during the follow-up period.

  9. Effects of gamma irradiation on the initial mechanical and material properties of goat bone-patellar tendon-bone allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, M.J.; Butler, D.L.; Grood, E.S.; Bylski-Austrow, D.I.; Levy, M.S.; Noyes, F.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The effects of {sup 60}Co gamma irradiation on the initial mechanical properties of the composite bone-patellar tendon-bone unit (CU) and the tendon midsubstance (TM) were studied. Frozen specimens were exposed to either 2 or 3 Mrad of gamma irradiation. Paired frozen specimens served as intraanimal controls. Treatment effects on the CU were assessed using four mechanical parameters. Effects on the TM were assessed using four material parameters measured using an optical surface-strain analysis system. The maximum force and strain energy to maximum force of the composite unit were significantly reduced 27% and 40%, respectively, after 3 Mrad of irradiation (p less than .05). Mechanical properties of the CU were not significantly altered, however, following 2 Mrad of irradiation. Based on individual paired contrasts between treatment and control, significant differences were also found in the material properties of the tendon midsubstance. The maximum stress, maximum strain, and strain energy density to maximum stress were significantly reduced following 3 Mrad, but not 2 Mrad, of irradiation. The results provide important time zero material property data, which will be useful for later anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction studies using irradiated allograft patellar tendons in the goat model and other animal models as well.

  10. Age-related differences in Achilles tendon properties and triceps surae muscle architecture in vivo.

    PubMed

    Stenroth, Lauri; Peltonen, Jussi; Cronin, Neil J; Sipilä, Sarianna; Finni, Taija

    2012-11-01

    This study examined the concurrent age-related differences in muscle and tendon structure and properties. Achilles tendon morphology and mechanical properties and triceps surae muscle architecture were measured from 100 subjects [33 young (24 ± 2 yr) and 67 old (75 ± 3 yr)]. Motion analysis-assisted ultrasonography was used to determine tendon stiffness, Young's modulus, and hysteresis during isometric ramp contractions. Ultrasonography was used to measure muscle architectural features and size and tendon cross-sectional area. Older participants had 17% lower (P < 0.01) Achilles tendon stiffness and 32% lower (P < 0.001) Young's modulus than young participants. Tendon cross-sectional area was also 16% larger (P < 0.001) in older participants. Triceps surae muscle size was smaller (P < 0.05) and gastrocnemius medialis muscle fascicle length shorter (P < 0.05) in old compared with young. Maximal plantarflexion force was associated with tendon stiffness and Young's modulus (r = 0.580, P < 0.001 and r = 0.561, P < 0.001, respectively). Comparison between old and young subjects with similar strengths did not reveal a difference in tendon stiffness. The results suggest that regardless of age, Achilles tendon mechanical properties adapt to match the level of muscle performance. Old people may compensate for lower tendon material properties by increasing tendon cross-sectional area. Lower tendon stiffness in older subjects might be beneficial for movement economy in low-intensity locomotion and thus optimized for their daily activities.

  11. Effects of Postmortem Freezing on Passive Properties of Rabbit Extensor Digtorum Longus Muscle Tendon Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-14

    AD-A266 429 INSTITUTE REPORT NO. 483 Effects of Postmortem Freezing on Passive Properties of Rabbit Extensor Digtorum Longus Muscle Tendon Complex D...Extensor Digtorum Longus Muscle Tendon Complex -- Paul H. Leitschuh, Tammy J. Doherty, Dean C. Taylor, Daniel E. Brooks, John B. Ryan This document has...ABSTRACT The tensile properties of the extensor digitorum longus muscle tendon unit (EDL MTU) were studied in 16 white male New Zealand rabbits in both

  12. Rat rotator cuff muscle responds differently from hindlimb muscle to a combined tendon-nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael R; Ravishankar, Bharat; Laron, Dominique; Kim, Hubert T; Liu, Xuhui; Feeley, Brian T

    2015-07-01

    Rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries seen by orthopaedic surgeons. Clinically, massive cuff tears lead to unique pathophysiological changes in rotator cuff muscle, including atrophy, and massive fatty infiltration, which are rarely seen in other skeletal muscles. Studies in a rodent model for RCT have demonstrated that these histologic findings are accompanied by activation of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways following combined tendon-nerve injury. The purpose of this study was to compare the histologic and molecular features of rotator cuff muscle and gastrocnemius muscle--a major hindlimb muscle, following combined tendon-nerve injury. Six weeks after injury, the rat gastrocnemius did not exhibit notable fatty infiltration compared to the rotator cuff. Likewise, the adipogenic markers SREBP-1 and PPARγ as well as the TGF-β canonical pathway were upregulated in the rotator cuff, but not the gastrocnemius. Our study suggests that the rat rotator cuff and hindlimb muscles differ significantly in their response to a combined tendon-nerve injury. Clinically, these findings highlight the unique response of the rotator cuff to injury, and may begin to explain the poor outcomes of massive RCTs compared to other muscle-tendon injuries.

  13. Temporalis Muscle Tendon Unit Transfer for Smile Restoration After Facial Paralysis.

    PubMed

    Owusu Boahene, Kofi D

    2016-02-01

    Temporalis muscle tendon unit (MTU) transfer may be used as a single-stage procedure for dynamic reanimation of the paralyzed face. Principles and biomechanics of muscle function and tendon transposition are essential in optimizing outcome. Critical steps and pearls for success include minimizing scarring, maintaining glide plains, mobilizing adequate tendon length, insertion of MTU at ideal tension based on intraoperative dynamic tension-excursion relationship, and insertion of tendon as close to the lip margin as possible. Because muscles adapt to tension, load, and task changes by altering their sarcomere arrangement and muscle fiber composition, physiotherapy should be initiated to use the repurposed temporalis MTU for smile restoration.

  14. The series elastic shock absorber: tendon elasticity modulates energy dissipation by muscle during burst deceleration.

    PubMed

    Konow, Nicolai; Roberts, Thomas J

    2015-04-07

    During downhill running, manoeuvring, negotiation of obstacles and landings from a jump, mechanical energy is dissipated via active lengthening of limb muscles. Tendon compliance provides a 'shock-absorber' mechanism that rapidly absorbs mechanical energy and releases it more slowly as the recoil of the tendon does work to stretch muscle fascicles. By lowering the rate of muscular energy dissipation, tendon compliance likely reduces the risk of muscle injury that can result from rapid and forceful muscle lengthening. Here, we examine how muscle-tendon mechanics are modulated in response to changes in demand for energy dissipation. We measured lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscle activity, force and fascicle length, as well as leg joint kinematics and ground-reaction force, as turkeys performed drop-landings from three heights (0.5-1.5 m centre-of-mass elevation). Negative work by the LG muscle-tendon unit during landing increased with drop height, mainly owing to greater muscle recruitment and force as drop height increased. Although muscle strain did not increase with landing height, ankle flexion increased owing to increased tendon strain at higher muscle forces. Measurements of the length-tension relationship of the muscle indicated that the muscle reached peak force at shorter and likely safer operating lengths as drop height increased. Our results indicate that tendon compliance is important to the modulation of energy dissipation by active muscle with changes in demand and may provide a mechanism for rapid adjustment of function during deceleration tasks of unpredictable intensity.

  15. Concurrent deficits of soleus and gastrocnemius muscle fascicles and Achilles tendon post stroke.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Roth, Elliot J; Harvey, Richard L; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2015-04-01

    Calf muscles and Achilles tendon play important roles in functional activities. However, it is not clear how biomechanical properties of the uniarticular soleus (SOL) and biarticular gastrocnemius muscle and Achilles tendon, including the fascicle length, pennation angle, and stiffness, change concurrently post stroke. Biomechanical properties of the medial gastrocnemius (GM) and soleus muscles were evaluated bilaterally in 10 hemiparetic stroke survivors using combined ultrasonography-biomechanical measurements. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon including the length, cross-sectional area (CSA), stiffness, and Young's modulus were evaluated, together with calf muscle biomechanical properties. Gastrocnemius and SOL contributions were separated using flexed and extended knee positions. The impaired side showed decreased fascicle length (GM: 6%, P = 0.002 and SOL: 9%, P = 0.03, at full knee extension and 0° ankle dorsiflexion) and increased fascicular stiffness (GM: 64%, P = 0.005 and SOL: 19%, P = 0.012, at a common 50 N force level). In contrast, Achilles tendon on the impaired side showed changes in the opposite direction as the muscle fascicles with increased tendon length (5%, P < 0.001), decreased tendon CSA (5%, P = 0.04), decreased tendon stiffness (42%, P < 0.001) and Young's modulus (30%, P < 0.001) compared with the unimpaired side. The fascicle and tendon stiffness changes were correlated negatively to the corresponding fascicle and tendon length changes, and decrease in Achilles tendon stiffness was correlated to the increases of SOL and GM fascicular stiffness (P < 0.05). Characterizations of calf muscle fascicles and Achilles tendon biomechanical properties help us better understand concurrent changes of fascicles and tendon as part of the calf muscle-tendon unit and facilitate development of more effective treatments.

  16. Tendon material properties vary and are interdependent among turkey hindlimb muscles.

    PubMed

    Matson, Andrew; Konow, Nicolai; Miller, Samuel; Konow, Pernille P; Roberts, Thomas J

    2012-10-15

    The material properties of a tendon affect its ability to store and return elastic energy, resist damage, provide mechanical feedback and amplify or attenuate muscle power. While the structural properties of a tendon are known to respond to a variety of stimuli, the extent to which material properties vary among individual muscles remains unclear. We studied the tendons of six different muscles in the hindlimb of Eastern wild turkeys to determine whether there was variation in elastic modulus, ultimate tensile strength and resilience. A hydraulic testing machine was used to measure tendon force during quasi-static lengthening, and a stress-strain curve was constructed. There was substantial variation in tendon material properties among different muscles. Average elastic modulus differed significantly between some tendons, and values for the six different tendons varied nearly twofold, from 829±140 to 1479±106 MPa. Tendons were stretched to failure, and the stress at failure, or ultimate tensile stress, was taken as a lower-limit estimate of tendon strength. Breaking tests for four of the tendons revealed significant variation in ultimate tensile stress, ranging from 66.83±14.34 to 112.37±9.39 MPa. Resilience, or the fraction of energy returned in cyclic length changes was generally high, and one of the four tendons tested was significantly different in resilience from the other tendons (range: 90.65±0.83 to 94.02±0.71%). An analysis of correlation between material properties revealed a positive relationship between ultimate tensile strength and elastic modulus (r(2)=0.79). Specifically, stiffer tendons were stronger, and we suggest that this correlation results from a constrained value of breaking strain, which did not vary significantly among tendons. This finding suggests an interdependence of material properties that may have a structural basis and may explain some adaptive responses observed in studies of tendon plasticity.

  17. Muscle and tendon adaptation in adolescent athletes: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, F; Bohm, S; Schroll, A; Boeth, H; Duda, G N; Arampatzis, A

    2017-01-01

    There is evidence that a non-uniform adaptation of muscle and tendon in young athletes results in increased tendon stress during mid-adolescence. The present longitudinal study investigated the development of the morphological and mechanical properties of muscle and tendon of volleyball athletes in a time period of 2 years from mid-adolescence to late adolescence. Eighteen elite volleyball athletes participated in magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound-dynamometry sessions to determine quadriceps femoris muscle strength, vastus lateralis, medialis and intermedius morphology, and patellar tendon mechanical and morphological properties in mid-adolescence (16 ± 1 years) and late adolescence (18 ± 1 years). Muscle strength, anatomical cross-sectional area (CSA), and volume showed significant (P < 0.05) but moderate increases of 13%, 6%, and 6%, respectively. The increase of patellar tendon CSA (P < 0.05) was substantially greater (27%) and went in line with increased stiffness (P < 0.05; 25%) and reduced stress (P < 0.05; 9%). During late adolescence, a pronounced hypertrophy of the patellar tendon led to a mechanical strengthening of the tendon in relation to the functional and morphological development of the muscle. These adaptive processes may compensate the unfavorable relation of muscle strength and tendon loading capacity in mid-adolescence and might have implications on athletic performance and tendon injury risk.

  18. The energetic benefits of tendon springs in running: is the reduction of muscle work important?

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Natalie C.; Roberts, Thomas J.; Askew, Graham N.

    2014-01-01

    The distal muscle-tendon units of cursorial species are commonly composed of short muscle fibres and long, compliant tendons. It is assumed that the ability of these tendons to store and return mechanical energy over the course of a stride, thus avoiding the cyclic absorption and regeneration of mechanical energy by active muscle, offers some metabolic energy savings during running. However, this assumption has not been tested directly. We used muscle ergometry and myothermic measurements to determine the cost of force production in muscles acting isometrically, as they could if mechanical energy was stored and returned by tendon, and undergoing active stretch–shorten cycles, as they would if mechanical energy was absorbed and regenerated by muscle. We found no detectable difference in the cost of force production in isometric cycles compared with stretch–shorten cycles. This result suggests that replacing muscle stretch–shorten work with tendon elastic energy storage and recovery does not reduce the cost of force production. This calls into question the assumption that reduction of muscle work drove the evolution of long distal tendons. We propose that the energetic benefits of tendons are derived primarily from their effect on muscle and limb architecture rather than their ability to reduce the cyclic work of muscle. PMID:25394624

  19. Tendonitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tendon. It can occur as a result of injury, overuse, or with aging as the tendon loses elasticity. Any action that places prolonged repetitive strain on the forearm muscles can cause tendonitis. The ...

  20. Spring or string: does tendon elastic action influence wing muscle mechanics in bat flight?

    PubMed Central

    Konow, Nicolai; Cheney, Jorn A.; Roberts, Thomas J.; Waldman, J. Rhea S.; Swartz, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon springs influence locomotor movements in many terrestrial animals, but their roles in locomotion through fluids as well as in small-bodied mammals are less clear. We measured muscle, tendon and joint mechanics in an elbow extensor of a small fruit bat during ascending flight. At the end of downstroke, the tendon was stretched by elbow flexion as the wing was folded. At the end of upstroke, elastic energy was recovered via tendon recoil and extended the elbow, contributing to unfurling the wing for downstroke. Compared with a hypothetical ‘string-like’ system lacking series elastic compliance, the tendon spring conferred a 22.5% decrease in muscle fascicle strain magnitude. Our findings demonstrate tendon elastic action in a small flying mammal and expand our understanding of the occurrence and action of series elastic actuator mechanisms in fluid-based locomotion. PMID:26423848

  1. IMPROVEMENT OF TENDON REPAIR USING MUSCLE GRAFTS TRANSDUCED WITH TGF-β1 cDNA

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Martin; Porter, Ryan M.; Betz, Oliver B.; Betz, Volker M.; Clahsen, Harald; Flückiger, Rudolf; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon rupture is a common injury. Inadequate endogenous repair often leaves patients symptomatic, with tendons susceptible to re-rupture. Administration of certain growth factors improves tendon healing in animal models, but their delivery remains a challenge. Here we evaluated the delivery of TGF-β1 to tendon defects by the implantation of genetically modified muscle grafts. Rat muscle biopsies were transduced with recombinant adenovirus encoding TGF-β1 and grafted onto surgically transected Achilles tendons in recipient animals. Tissue regenerates were compared to those of controls by biomechanical testing as well as histochemical and immunohistochemical analyses. Healing was greatly accelerated when genetically modified grafts were implanted into tendon defects, with the resulting repair tissue gaining nearly normal histological appearance as early as 2 weeks postoperatively. This was associated with decreased deposition of type III collagen in favour of large fibre bundles indicative of type I collagen. These differences in tendon composition coincided with accelerated restoration of mechanical strength. Tendon thickness increased in gene-treated animals at weeks 1 and 2, but by week 8 became significantly lower than that of controls suggesting accelerated remodelling. Thus localised TGF-β1 delivery via adenovirus-modified muscle grafts improved tendon healing in this rat model and holds promise for clinical application. PMID:22354460

  2. Re-emergence of hand-muscle representations in human motor cortex after hand allograft

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Claudia D.; Aballéa, Antoine; Rodrigues, Érika C.; Reilly, Karen T.; Mercier, Catherine; Petruzzo, Palmina; Dubernard, Jean M.; Sirigu, Angela

    2009-01-01

    The human primary motor cortex (M1) undergoes considerable reorganization in response to traumatic upper limb amputation. The representations of the preserved arm muscles expand, invading portions of M1 previously dedicated to the hand, suggesting that former hand neurons are reassigned to the control of remaining proximal upper limb muscles. Hand allograft offers a unique opportunity to study the reversibility of such long-term cortical changes. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation in patient LB, who underwent bilateral hand transplantation 3 years after a traumatic amputation, to longitudinally track both the emergence of intrinsic (from the donor) hand muscles in M1 as well as changes in the representation of stump (upper arm and forearm) muscles. The same muscles were also mapped in patient CD, the first bilateral hand allograft recipient. Newly transplanted intrinsic muscles acquired a cortical representation in LB's M1 at 10 months postgraft for the left hand and at 26 months for the right hand. The appearance of a cortical representation of transplanted hand muscles in M1 coincided with the shrinkage of stump muscle representations for the left but not for the right side. In patient CD, transcranial magnetic stimulation performed at 51 months postgraft revealed a complete set of intrinsic hand-muscle representations for the left but not the right hand. Our findings show that newly transplanted muscles can be recognized and integrated into the patient's motor cortex. PMID:19366678

  3. Shortening behavior of the different components of muscle-tendon unit during isokinetic plantar flexions.

    PubMed

    Hauraix, Hugo; Nordez, Antoine; Dorel, Sylvain

    2013-10-01

    The torque-velocity relationship has been widely considered as reflecting the mechanical properties of the contractile apparatus, and the influence of tendinous tissues on this relationship obtained during in vivo experiments remains to be determined. This study describes the pattern of shortening of various muscle-tendon unit elements of the triceps surae at different constant angular velocities and quantifies the contributions of fascicles, tendon, and aponeurosis to the global muscle-tendon unit shortening. Ten subjects performed isokinetic plantar flexions at different preset angular velocities (i.e., 30, 90, 150, 210, 270, and 330°/s). Ultrafast ultrasound measurements were performed on the muscle belly and on the myotendinous junction of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscles. The contributions of fascicles, tendon, and aponeurosis to global muscle-tendon unit shortening velocity were calculated for velocity conditions for four parts of the total range of motion. For both muscles, the fascicles' contribution decreased throughout the motion (73.5 ± 21.5% for 100-90° angular range to 33.7 ± 20.2% for 80-70°), whereas the tendon contribution increased (25.8 ± 15.4 to 55.6 ± 16.8%). In conclusion, the tendon contribution to the global muscle-tendon unit shortening is significant even during a concentric contraction. However, this contribution depends on the range of motion analyzed. The intersubject variability found in the maximal fascicle shortening velocity, for a given angular velocity, suggests that some subjects might possess a more efficient musculoarticular complex to produce the movement velocity. These findings are of great interest for understanding the ability of muscle-tendon shortening velocity.

  4. Fatigue-induced changes in synergistic muscle force do not match tendon elongation.

    PubMed

    Mitsukawa, Naotoshi; Sugisaki, Norihide; Miyamoto, Naokazu; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2010-05-28

    This study aimed to investigate whether fatigue-induced changes in synergistic muscle forces match their tendon elongation. The medial gastrocnemius muscle (MG) was fatigued by repeated electrical stimulation (1 min x 5 times: interval 30 s, intensity: 20-30% of maximal voluntary plantar flexion torque) applied at the muscle belly under a partial occlusion of blood vessels. Before and after the MG fatigue task, ramp isometric contractions were performed voluntarily, during which tendon elongations were determined by ultrasonography, along with recordings of the surface EMG activities of MG, the soleus (SOL) and the lateral gastrocnemius (LG) muscles. The tendon elongation of MG and SOL in post-fatigue ramp was similar, although evoked MG forces dropped nearly to zero. In addition, for a given torque output, the tendon elongation of SOL significantly decreased while that of LG did not, although the activation levels of both muscles had increased. Results suggest that the fatigue-induced changes in force of the triceps surae muscles do not match their tendon elongation. These results imply that the tendons of the triceps surae muscles are mechanically coupled even after selective fatigue of a single muscle.

  5. Muscle-tendon mechanics explain unexpected effects of exoskeleton assistance on metabolic rate during walking.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rachel W; Dembia, Christopher L; Delp, Scott L; Collins, Steven H

    2017-03-24

    The goal of this study was to gain insight into how ankle exoskeletons affect the behavior of the plantarflexor muscles during walking. Using data from previous experiments, we performed electromyography-driven simulations of musculoskeletal dynamics to explore how changes in exoskeleton assistance affected plantarflexor muscle-tendon mechanics, particularly for the soleus. We used a model of muscle energy consumption to estimate individual muscle metabolic rate. As average exoskeleton torque was increased, while no net exoskeleton work was provided, a reduction in tendon recoil led to an increase in positive mechanical work performed by the soleus muscle fibers. As net exoskeleton work was increased, both soleus muscle fiber force and positive mechanical work decreased. Trends in the sum of the metabolic rates of the simulated muscles correlated well with trends in experimentally-observed whole-body metabolic rate (R(2) = 0.9), providing confidence in our model estimates. Our simulation results suggest that different exoskeleton behaviors can alter the functioning of the muscles and tendons acting at the assisted joint. Furthermore, our results support the idea that the series tendon helps reduce positive work done by the muscle fibers by storing and returning energy elastically. We expect the results from this study to promote the use of electromyography-driven simulations to gain insight into the operation of muscle-tendon units and to guide the design and control of assistive devices.

  6. The Tendons and Muscles of the Mouse Forelimb during Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Spencer S.; Riordan, Timothy J.; Pryce, Brian A.; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2009-01-01

    The range and precision of limb movements are dependent on the specific patterns of muscles and tendons. To facilitate analyses of tendon and muscle phenotypes we compiled a description of these tissues in the forelimb of developing mouse embryos. Individual tendons, muscles and ligaments were annotated in a series of transverse sections through the forelimb of an embryo at day 18.5 of embryonic development (E18.5). Transverse sections present a distinctive and highly reproducible pattern of the muscles and tendons at different limb levels that can be used as a simple reference in analyses of mutant phenotypes. A comparable set of sections from an embryo at E14.5 was included to highlight structural features that change during the maturation of the musculoskeletal system. The ability to define the precise position of transverse sections along the proximal-distal axis of the limb may also be useful in studies of other features in developing limbs. PMID:19235726

  7. Semitendinosus and gracilis free muscle-tendon graft for repair of massive rotator cuff tears: surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    GIGANTE, ANTONIO; BOTTEGONI, CARLO; MILANO, GIUSEPPE; RICCIO, MICHELE; DEI GIUDICI, LUCA

    2016-01-01

    Massive rotator cuff tears are difficult to treat surgically due to retraction, degeneration and fraying of the ends of torn tendons, severe fatty infiltration and atrophy of the respective muscles. Procedures developed to close the gap between the rotator cuff and the greater tuberosity of the humerus, such as soft tissue release may be inadequate for large tears. Human or porcine dermal allografts still have uncertain benefits, and tendon transfers seem to be associated with poor outcomes, donor site morbidity and altered mechanics. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty has limited durability and is not indicated in young patients with high functional demands. We developed a new technique for repairing massive rotator cuff tears by semitendinosus and gracilis myotendinous grafting. This novel therapeutic option allows massive rotator cuff tears to be repaired using autologous material that is adequate and adaptable, making it possible to cover any width of defect. The technique is low-invasive and not technically demanding, with minimal donor site morbidity. PMID:27900313

  8. Proteomics-based identification of novel proteins in temporal tendons of patients with masticatory muscle tendon--aponeurosis hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, A; Sato, T; Hirosawa, N; Nakamoto, N; Enoki, Y; Chida, D; Usui, M; Takeda, S; Nagai, T; Sasaki, A; Sakamoto, Y; Yoda, T

    2014-01-01

    Masticatory muscle tendon-aponeurosis hyperplasia (MMTAH) is a new disease associated with limited mouth opening that is often misdiagnosed as a temporomandibular disorder; subsequently, patients are mistakenly treated with irreversible operations. Due to the poor presentation and characterization of symptoms, the underlying pathological conditions remain unclear. We have previously conducted a proteomic analysis of tendons derived from one MMTAH subject and one facial deformity subject using two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. However, the results were obtained for only one subject. The aim of the present study was to confirm the expression of specific molecules in tendon tissues from multiple subjects with MMTAH by applying two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of the 19 proteins identified in tendons from both MMTAH and facial deformity patients, fibrinogen fragment D and beta-crystallin A4 were up-regulated, whereas myosin light chain 4 was down-regulated in MMTAH. We also found fibrinogen to be expressed robustly in tendon tissues of MMTAH patients. Our data provide the possibility that the distinctive expression of these novel proteins is associated with the pathology of MMTAH.

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using a Combination of Autograft and Allograft Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Darnley, James E.; Léger-St-Jean, Benjamin; Pedroza, Angela D.; Flanigan, David C.; Kaeding, Christopher C.; Magnussen, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with hamstring autografts less than 8.5 mm in diameter is associated with worse patient-reported outcome scores and increased risk of revision surgery compared with reconstructions performed with larger grafts. One proposed solution to small autograft harvest is to create a hybrid graft by augmenting autografts with allograft tissue to increase graft diameter. Purpose: To compare hybrid autograft/allograft ACL reconstruction to autograft ACL reconstruction, specifically analyzing the patient-reported outcome scores and the risk of revision surgery at 2 years postoperative. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: From the years 2002 to 2009, a total of 34 patients were identified from a prospectively collected database as having undergone hybrid ACL reconstruction. Twenty-seven of 34 (79.4%) patients had a 2-year follow-up. These 27 patients were matched by age (within 1 year) and sex to 27 patients who underwent hamstring autograft ACL reconstruction during the same period. At the 2-year mark, revision surgery risk and patient-reported outcome scores were compared between the 2 groups. Results: The mean age for the hybrid and matched groups (±SD) was 20.9 ± 7.0 years. Both the hybrid and control groups had 17 males and 10 females. There was no significant difference in preoperative patient-reported outcome scores, meniscus tears, or cartilage lesions between the 2 groups. Graft size was larger in the hybrid group (9.5 ± 0.6 mm) than in the autograft group (8.4 ± 0.9 mm) (P < .001). At 2 years postoperative, patient-reported outcome scores were similar between the hybrid and autograft groups. Revision surgery was required in 5 (18.5%) patients who underwent hybrid reconstruction compared with 2 (7.4%) of those who underwent autograft reconstruction (P = .26). Conclusion: Patients who undergo ACL reconstruction with hybrid hamstring grafts and hamstring autografts report similar

  10. Variations in tendon stiffness due to diets with different glycotoxins affect mechanical properties in the muscle-tendon unit.

    PubMed

    Grasa, J; Calvo, B; Delgado-Andrade, C; Navarro, M P

    2013-03-01

    Passive elastic behavior of tendon tissue from rats subjected to different dietary treatments was characterized. For that purpose, twenty-four weanling Wistar rats (41.02 ± 0.16 g) were randomly distributed into four groups. During 88 days each group was fed on different diets: control diet and diets containing advanced glycation end products (AGEs) from glucose-lysine model system, from bread crust and bread dough, respectively. After the trial animals were sacrificed and tendon samples were extracted and tested mechanically to fracture in a uniaxial tensile test machine. A transversely-hyperelastic model was formulated based on stress-strain relationships and its parameters were fit to the experimental data using the Levenberg-Marquardt optimization algorithm. Material parameters were incorporated in a finite element model to study different stress-strain distributions in a muscle-tendon unit. Results show higher strains and stresses in the muscle belly when properties of a stiffer tendon associated with a diet rich in AGEs are included in the model. A real increase in this mechanical response of the tissue could imply possible pain in joint mobility.

  11. Mechanical properties of tendon and aponeurosis of human gastrocnemius muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, T; Muraoka, T; Takeshita, D; Kawakami, Y; Hirano, Y; Fukunaga, T

    2001-05-01

    Load-strain characteristics of tendinous tissues (Achilles tendon and aponeurosis) were determined in vivo for human medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle. Seven male subjects exerted isometric plantar flexion torque while the elongation of tendinous tissues of MG was determined from the tendinous movements by using ultrasonography. The maximal strain of the Achilles tendon and aponeurosis, estimated separately from the elongation data, was 5.1 +/- 1.1 and 5.9 +/- 1.6%, respectively. There was no significant difference in strain between the Achilles tendon and aponeurosis. In addition, no significant difference in strain was observed between the proximal and distal regions of the aponeurosis. The results indicate that tendinous tissues of the MG are homogeneously stretched along their lengths by muscle contraction, which has functional implications for the operation of the human MG muscle-tendon unit in vivo.

  12. Reflex inhibition of normal cramp following electrical stimulation of the muscle tendon.

    PubMed

    Khan, Serajul I; Burne, John A

    2007-09-01

    Muscle cramp was induced in one head of the gastrocnemius muscle (GA) in eight of thirteen subjects using maximum voluntary contraction when the muscle was in the shortened position. Cramp in GA was painful, involuntary, and localized. Induction of cramp was indicated by the presence of electromyographic (EMG) activity in one head of GA while the other head remained silent. In all cramping subjects, reflex inhibition of cramp electrical activity was observed following Achilles tendon electrical stimulation and they all reported subjective relief of cramp. Thus muscle cramp can be inhibited by stimulation of tendon afferents in the cramped muscle. When the inhibition of cramp-generated EMG and voluntary EMG was compared at similar mean EMG levels, the area and timing of the two phases of inhibition (I(1), I(2)) did not differ significantly. This strongly suggests that the same reflex pathway was the source of the inhibition in both cases. Thus the cramp-generated EMG is also likely to be driven by spinal synaptic input to the motorneurons. We have found that the muscle conditions that appear necessary to facilitate cramp, a near to maximal contraction of the shortened muscle, are also the conditions that render the inhibition generated by tendon afferents ineffective. When the strength of tendon inhibition in cramping subjects was compared with that in subjects that failed to cramp, it was found to be significantly weaker under the same experimental conditions. It is likely that reduced inhibitory feedback from tendon afferents has an important role in generating cramp.

  13. Reconstruction of long digital extensor tendon by cranial tibial muscle fascia graft in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Sabiza, Soroush; Khajeh, Ahmad; Naddaf, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Tendon rupture in dogs is generally the result of a direct trauma. This report described the use of adjacent muscle autogenic fascial graft for reconstruction of distal rupture of long digital extensor tendon in a dog. A two-year-old male mix breed dog, was presented with a non-weight bearing lameness of the right hind limb and a deep rupture of lateral side of right tarsus. History taking revealed that this rupture appeared without any apparent cause, when walking around the farm, three days before. Radiography was done and no fracture was observed. Hyperextension of right tarsal joint compared to left limb was observed. Under general anesthesia, after dissections of the ruptured area, complete rupture of long digital extensor tendon was revealed. Then, we attempted to locate the edge of the tendon, however, the tendon length was shortened approximately 1 cm. Hence, a strip of 1 cm length from fascia of cranial tibial muscle was harvested to fill the defect. The graft was sutured to the two ends of tendon using locking loop pattern. Subcutaneous layers and the skin were sutured routinely. Ehmer sling bandage was applied to prevent weight bearing on the surgical region. Re-examination and phone contact with the owner eight weeks and six months postoperatively revealed a poor lameness and excellent function of the dog, respectively. It could be concluded that the fascia of adjacent muscles can be used as an autogenic graft for reconstruction of some tendon ruptures. PMID:27872726

  14. The series-elastic shock absorber: tendons attenuate muscle power during eccentric actions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Thomas J; Azizi, Emanuel

    2010-08-01

    Elastic tendons can act as muscle power amplifiers or energy-conserving springs during locomotion. We used an in situ muscle-tendon preparation to examine the mechanical function of tendons during lengthening contractions, when muscles absorb energy. Force, length, and power were measured in the lateral gastrocnemius muscle of wild turkeys. Sonomicrometry was used to measure muscle fascicle length independently from muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length, as measured by a muscle lever system (servomotor). A series of ramp stretches of varying velocities was applied to the MTU in fully activated muscles. Fascicle length changes were decoupled from length changes imposed on the MTU by the servomotor. Under most conditions, muscle fascicles shortened on average, while the MTU lengthened. Energy input to the MTU during the fastest lengthenings was -54.4 J/kg, while estimated work input to the muscle fascicles during this period was only -11.24 J/kg. This discrepancy indicates that energy was first absorbed by elastic elements, then released to do work on muscle fascicles after the lengthening phase of the contraction. The temporary storage of energy by elastic elements also resulted in a significant attenuation of power input to the muscle fascicles. At the fastest lengthening rates, peak instantaneous power input to the MTU reached -2,143.9 W/kg, while peak power input to the fascicles was only -557.6 W/kg. These results demonstrate that tendons may act as mechanical buffers by limiting peak muscle forces, lengthening rates, and power inputs during energy-absorbing contractions.

  15. Development of the stapedius muscle and unilateral agenesia of the tendon of the stapedius muscle in a human fetus.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-López, S

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to analyze the development of the stapedius muscle to understand an isolated unilateral absence of the tendon of the stapedius muscle in a human fetus. The study was made on 50 human embryos and fetuses aged 38 days to 17 weeks post-conception. The stapedius muscle was formed by two anlagen, one for the tendon, which derives from the internal segment of the interhyale and another for the belly, located in the second pharyngeal arch, medially to the facial nerve and near the interhyale. In the interhyale, two segments were observed forming an angle and delimited by the attachment of the belly of the stapedius muscle. The internal segment will form the tendon. The lateral segment of the interhyale was attached to the cranial end of the Reichert's cartilage (laterohyale), and normally it disappears at the beginning of the fetal period. The right unilateral agenesia of the tendon of the stapedius muscle, observed for the first time in a human fetus of 14 weeks post-conception development (PCd), was brought about by the lack of formation or the regression of the internal segment of the interhyale. It presented a belly of the stapedius muscle with an anomalous arrangement, and with a pseudo tendon originated by the persistence of the external segment of the interhyale.

  16. The effect of muscle loading on flexor tendon-to-bone healing in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Thomopoulos, Stavros; Zampiakis, Emmanouil; Das, Rosalina; Silva, Matthew J; Gelberman, Richard H

    2008-12-01

    Previous tendon and ligament studies have demonstrated a role for mechanical loading in tissue homeostasis and healing. In uninjured musculoskeletal tissues, increased loading leads to an increase in mechanical properties, whereas decreased loading leads to a decrease in mechanical properties. The role of loading on healing tissues is less clear. We studied tendon-to-bone healing in a canine flexor tendon-to-bone injury and repair model. To examine the effect of muscle loading on tendon-to-bone healing, repaired tendons were either cut proximally (unloaded group) to remove all load from the distal phalanx repair site or left intact proximally (loaded group). All paws were casted postoperatively and subjected to daily passive motion rehabilitation. Specimens were tested to determine functional properties, biomechanical properties, repair-site gapping, and bone mineral density. Loading across the repair site led to improved functional and biomechanical properties (e.g., stiffness for the loaded group was 8.2 +/- 3.9 versus 5.1 +/- 2.5 N/mm for the unloaded group). Loading did not affect bone mineral density or gapping. The formation of a gap between the healing tendon and bone correlated with failure properties. Using a clinically relevant model of flexor tendon injury and repair, we found that muscle loading was beneficial to healing. Complete removal of load by proximal transection resulted in tendon-to-bone repairs with less range of motion and lower biomechanical properties compared to repairs in which the muscle-tendon-bone unit was left intact.

  17. Triceps surae muscle-tendon properties in older endurance- and sprint-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Stenroth, Lauri; Cronin, Neil J; Peltonen, Jussi; Korhonen, Marko T; Sipilä, Sarianna; Finni, Taija

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that aging is associated with alterations in muscle architecture and tendon properties (Morse CI, Thom JM, Birch KM, Narici MV. Acta Physiol Scand 183: 291-298, 2005; Narici MV, Maganaris CN, Reeves ND, Capodaglio P. J Appl Physiol 95: 2229-2234, 2003; Stenroth L, Peltonen J, Cronin NJ, Sipila S, Finni T. J Appl Physiol 113: 1537-1544, 2012). However, the possible influence of different types of regular exercise loading on muscle architecture and tendon properties in older adults is poorly understood. To address this, triceps surae muscle-tendon properties were examined in older male endurance (OE, n = 10, age = 74.0 ± 2.8 yr) and sprint runners (OS, n = 10, age = 74.4 ± 2.8 yr), with an average of 42 yr of regular training experience, and compared with age-matched [older control (OC), n = 33, age = 74.8 ± 3.6 yr] and young untrained controls (YC, n = 18, age = 23.7 ± 2.0 yr). Compared with YC, Achilles tendon cross-sectional area (CSA) was 22% (P = 0.022), 45% (P = 0.001), and 71% (P < 0.001) larger in OC, OE, and OS, respectively. Among older groups, OS had significantly larger tendon CSA compared with OC (P = 0.033). No significant between-group differences were observed in Achilles tendon stiffness. In older groups, Young's modulus was 31-44%, and maximal tendon stress 44-55% lower, than in YC (P ≤ 0.001). OE showed shorter soleus fascicle length than both OC (P < 0.05) and YC (P < 0.05). These data suggest that long-term running does not counteract the previously reported age-related increase in tendon CSA, but, instead, may have an additive effect. The greatest Achilles tendon CSA was observed in OS followed by OE and OC, suggesting that adaptation to running exercise is loading intensity dependent. Achilles tendon stiffness was maintained in older groups, even though all older groups displayed larger tendon CSA and lower tendon Young's modulus. Shorter soleus muscle fascicles in OE runners may be an adaptation to life

  18. Exact moment of tendon of pectoralis major muscle rupture captured on video.

    PubMed

    de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Pochini, Alberto Castro; Ejnisman, Benno; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Monteiro, Gustavo Cara; Fleury, Anna Maria; Faloppa, Flavio; Cohen, Moises; Albertoni, Walter Manna

    2007-09-01

    A powerlifting athlete ruptured his left tendon of the pectoralis major muscle while attempting to lift 160 kg in a Brazilian bench press championship. The injury seemed to occur in the concentric phase of exercise; however, the more common mechanism of rupture is during the eccentric phase. The tendon was reinserted to the humerus 3 weeks later with screws and washers. The athlete returned to competitive activities after 5 months. One year later he lifted 170 kg and won the national championship.

  19. Plyometric Training Favors Optimizing Muscle-Tendon Behavior during Depth Jumping.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Kuniaki; Iwanuma, Soichiro; Ikeda, Naoki; Yoshikawa, Ayumi; Ema, Ryoichi; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate how plyometric training improves stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) exercise performance in terms of muscle strength, tendon stiffness, and muscle-tendon behavior during SSC exercise. Eleven men were assigned to a training group and ten to a control group. Subjects in the training group performed depth jumps (DJ) using only the ankle joint for 12 weeks. Before and after the period, we observed reaction forces at foot, muscle-tendon behavior of the gastrocnemius, and electromyographic activities of the triceps surae and tibialis anterior during DJ. Maximal static plantar flexion strength and Achilles tendon stiffness were also determined. In the training group, maximal strength remained unchanged while tendon stiffness increased. The force impulse of DJ increased, with a shorter contact time and larger reaction force over the latter half of braking and initial half of propulsion phases. In the latter half of braking phase, the average electromyographic activity (mEMG) increased in the triceps surae and decreased in tibialis anterior, while fascicle behavior of the gastrocnemius remained unchanged. In the initial half of propulsion, mEMG of triceps surae and shortening velocity of gastrocnemius fascicle decreased, while shortening velocity of the tendon increased. These results suggest that the following mechanisms play an important role in improving SSC exercise performance through plyometric training: (1) optimization of muscle-tendon behavior of the agonists, associated with alteration in the neuromuscular activity during SSC exercise and increase in tendon stiffness and (2) decrease in the neuromuscular activity of antagonists during a counter movement.

  20. Subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition in Hill-type model predicts higher muscle forces in dynamic tasks.

    PubMed

    Gerus, Pauline; Rao, Guillaume; Berton, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Neuromusculoskeletal models are a common method to estimate muscle forces. Developing accurate neuromusculoskeletal models is a challenging task due to the complexity of the system and large inter-subject variability. The estimation of muscles force is based on the mechanical properties of tendon-aponeurosis complex. Most neuromusculoskeletal models use a generic definition of the tendon-aponeurosis complex based on in vitro test, perhaps limiting their validity. Ultrasonography allows subject-specific estimates of the tendon-aponeurosis complex's mechanical properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of subject-specific mechanical properties of the tendon-aponeurosis complex on a neuromusculoskeletal model of the ankle joint. Seven subjects performed isometric contractions from which the tendon-aponeurosis force-strain relationship was estimated. Hopping and running tasks were performed and muscle forces were estimated using subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis and generic tendon properties. Two ultrasound probes positioned over the muscle-tendon junction and the mid-belly were combined with motion capture to estimate the in vivo tendon and aponeurosis strain of the medial head of gastrocnemius muscle. The tendon-aponeurosis force-strain relationship was scaled for the other ankle muscles based on tendon and aponeurosis length of each muscle measured by ultrasonography. The EMG-driven model was calibrated twice - using the generic tendon definition and a subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis force-strain definition. The use of subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition leads to a higher muscle force estimate for the soleus muscle and the plantar-flexor group, and to a better model prediction of the ankle joint moment compared to the model estimate which used a generic definition. Furthermore, the subject-specific tendon-aponeurosis definition leads to a decoupling behaviour between the muscle fibre and muscle-tendon unit in agreement with

  1. Control of Organization and Function of Muscle and Tendon by Thrombospondin-4

    PubMed Central

    Frolova, Ella G.; Drazba, Judith; Krukovets, Irene; Kostenko, Volodymyr; Blech, Lauren; Harry, Christy; Vasanji, Amit; Drumm, Carla; Sul, Pavel; Jenniskens, Guido J.; Plow, Edward F.; Stenina-Adognravi, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Thrombospondins (TSP) are multifunctional proteins that are deposited in the extracellular matrix where they directly affect the function of vascular and other cell types. TSP-4, one of the 5 TSP family members, is expressed abundantly in tendon and muscle. We have examined the effect of TSP-4 deficiency on tendon collagen and skeletal muscle morphology and function. In Thbs4−/− mice, tendon collagen fibrils are significantly larger than in wild-type mice, and there is no compensatory over-expression of TSP-3 and TSP-5, the two TSPs most highly homologous to TSP-4, in the deficient mice. TSP-4 is expressed in skeletal muscle, and higher levels of TSP-4 protein are associated with the microvasculature of red skeletal muscle with high oxidative metabolism. Lack of TSP-4 in Medial soleus, red skeletal muscle with predominant oxidative metabolism, is associated with decreased levels of several specific glycosaminoglycan modifications, decreased expression of a TGFβ receptor beta-glycan, decreased activity of lipoprotein lipase, which associates with vascular cell surfaces by binding to glycosaminoglycans, and decreased uptake of VLDL. The soleus muscle is smaller and hind- and fore-limb grip strength is reduced in Thbs4−/− mice compared to wild-type mice. These observations suggest that TSP-4 regulates the composition of the ECM at major sites of its deposition, tendon and muscle, and the absence of TSP-4 alters the organization, composition and physiological functions of these tissues. PMID:24589453

  2. Development and evaluation of a removable tissue-engineered muscle with artificial tendons.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tomohiro; Takagi, Shunya; Kamon, Takafumi; Yamasaki, Ken-Ichi; Fujisato, Toshia

    2017-02-01

    Tissue-engineered skeletal muscles were potentially useful as physiological and biochemical in vitro models. Currently, most of the similar models were constructed without tendons. In this study, we aimed to develop a simple, highly versatile tissue-engineered muscle with artificial tendons, and to evaluate the contractile, histological and molecular dynamics during differentiation. C2C12 cells were embedded in a cold type-І collagen gel and placed between two artificial tendons on a silicone sheet. The construct shrank and tightly attached to the artificial tendons with differentiation, finally detaching from the silicone sheet within 1 week of culture onset. We successfully developed a tissue-engineered skeletal muscle with two artificial tendons from C2C12 myoblasts embedded in type-І collagen gel. The isometric twitch contractile force (TCF) significantly increased during differentiation. Time to Peak Tension (TPT) and Half-Relaxation Time (1/2RT) were significantly shortened during differentiation. Myogenic regulatory factors were maximally expressed at 2 weeks, and subsequently decreased at 3 weeks of culture. Histological analysis indicated that myotube formation increased markedly from 2 weeks and well-ordered sarcomere structures were observed on the surface of the 3D engineered muscle at 3 weeks of culture. These results suggested that robust muscle structure occurred by 3 weeks in the tissue-engineered skeletal muscle. Moreover, during the developmental process, the artificial tendons might contribute to well-ordered sarcomere formation. Our results indicated that this simple culture system could be used to evaluate the effects of various pharmacological and mechanical cues on muscle contractility in a variety of research areas.

  3. Achilles Tendonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Prevent Achilles Tendonitis? Take these steps to reduce your risk of Achilles tendonitis: Stay in good shape year-round and try to keep your muscles as strong as they can be. Strong, flexible muscles work more efficiently and put less stress on your tendon. Increase the intensity and length ...

  4. Presynaptic inhibition of muscle spindle and tendon organ afferents in the mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P

    1990-12-01

    More than 30 years ago, Frank and Fuortes proposed that the synaptic effectiveness of muscle spindle afferents associated with spinal motoneurones could be diminished by the activation of nerves from flexor muscles. Since that time, research has focused on disclosing the mode of operation and the spinal pathways involved in this presynaptic inhibitory control. Initially, it was assumed that the same last-order interneurones mediated presynaptic inhibition of both muscle spindle and tendon organ afferent fibres. More recent evidence indicates that the synaptic effectiveness of these two groups of afferents is controlled by separate sets of GABAergic interneurones synapsing directly with the intraspinal terminals of the afferent fibres. This unique arrangement allows for selective control of the information on muscle length or muscle tension, despite the convergence of muscle spindle and tendon organ afferents on second-order interneurones.

  5. Measurement of rectus femoris muscle velocities during patellar tendon jerk using vector tissue doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Sikdar, Siddhartha; Lebiedowska, Maria; Eranki, Avinash; Garmirian, Lindsay; Damiano, Diane

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a vector tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) system based on a clinical scanner that can be used to measure muscle velocities independent of the direction of motion. This method overcomes the limitations of conventional Doppler ultrasound, which can only measure velocity components along the ultrasound beam. In this study, we utilized this method to investigate the rectus femoris muscle velocities during a patellar tendon jerk test. Our goal was to investigate whether the muscle elongation velocities during a brisk tendon tap fall within the normal range of velocities that are expected due to rapid stretch of limb segments. In a preliminary study, we recruited six healthy volunteers (three men and three women) following informed consent. The stretch reflex response to tendon tap was evaluated by measuring: (1) the tapping force using an accelerometer instrumented to the neurological hammer (2) the angular velocities of the knee extension and flexion using a electrogoniometer (3) reflex activation using electromyography (EMG) and (4) muscle elongation, extension and flexion velocities using vector TDI. The passive joint angular velocity was linearly related to the passive muscle elongation velocity (R(2)=0.88). The maximum estimated joint angular velocity corresponding to muscle elongation due to tendon tap was less than 8.25 radians/s. This preliminary study demonstrates the feasibility of vector TDI for measuring longitudinal muscle velocities and indicates that the muscle elongation velocities during a clinical tendon tap test are within the normal range of values for rapid limb stretch encountered in daily life. With further refinement, vector TDI could become a powerful method for quantitative evaluation of muscle motion in musculoskeletal disorders.

  6. The effect of muscle loading on flexor tendon-to-bone healing in a canine model

    PubMed Central

    Thomopoulos, Stavros; Zampiakis, Emmanouil; Das, Rosalina; Silva, Matthew J.; Gelberman, Richard H.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Previous tendon and ligament studies demonstrated a role for mechanical loading in tissue homeostasis and healing. In uninjured musculoskeletal tissues, increased loading leads to an increase in mechanical properties, while decreased loading leads to a decrease in properties. The role of loading on healing tissues is less clear. We studied tendon-to-bone healing in a canine flexor tendon-to-bone injury and repair model. To examine the effect of muscle loading on healing, repaired tendons were either cut proximally to remove all load from the distal phalanx repair site (unloaded group) or left intact proximally (loaded group). All paws were cast post-operatively and subjected to daily passive motion rehabilitation. Specimens were tested to determine functional properties, biomechanical properties, repair-site gapping, and bone mineral density. Loading across the repair site led to improved functional and biomechanical properties (e.g., stiffness for the loaded group was 8.2 ± 3.9 vs. 5.1 ± 2.5 N/mm for the unloaded group). Loading did not affect bone mineral density or gapping. The formation of a gap between the healing tendon and bone correlated with failure properties. Using a clinically relevant model of flexor tendon injury and repair, we found that muscle loading was beneficial to healing. Complete removal of load by proximal transection resulted in tendon-to-bone repairs with less range of motion and lower biomechanical properties compared to repairs in which the muscle-tendon-bone unit was left intact. PMID:18524009

  7. Effects of muscle contraction on the load-strain properties of frog aponeurosis and tendon.

    PubMed

    Lieber, R L; Leonard, M E; Brown-Maupin, C G

    2000-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the frog semitendinosus (ST) tendon and aponeurosis were measured during passive tensile loading to a force equal to ST maximum tetanic tension and during active isometric muscle contraction. During active contraction, both the tendon and aponeurosis regions initially strained at rates exceeding 400%/s while near the end of the muscle contraction, strain rates were nearly zero. At this point, the strain in the tendon region was equal to that observed during slow passive loading to the same tension level. However, for the aponeurosis, even near the zero strain rate, strain at the end of the active contraction was significantly below that observed during slow passive loading (p < 0. 001). Specifically, when aponeurosis strain rate was almost zero, aponeurosis strain was 13.8 +/- 3% (means +/- SEM, n = 10), which was significantly below that measured during passive loading (23.7 +/- 5%) suggesting that active contraction actually altered aponeurosis material properties. These data demonstrate that, while the tendon and aponeurosis regions have different passive biomechanical properties and both demonstrate viscosity typical of other connective tissues, the aponeurosis region of the frog ST actually changed its intrinsic properties during muscle contraction. Thus, extrapolation of biomechanical data obtained at nonphysiological strain rates or under conditions where the muscle-tendon junction has been interrupted should be made with caution.

  8. Changes in skeletal muscle and tendon structure and function following genetic inactivation of myostatin in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mendias, Christopher L; Lynch, Evan B; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Flood, Michael D; Rittman, Danielle S; Van Pelt, Douglas W; Roche, Stuart M; Davis, Carol S

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle and tendon mass. Myostatin deficiency has been well studied in mice, but limited data are available on how myostatin regulates the structure and function of muscles and tendons of larger animals. We hypothesized that, in comparison to wild-type (MSTN+/+) rats, rats in which zinc finger nucleases were used to genetically inactivate myostatin (MSTNΔ/Δ) would exhibit an increase in muscle mass and total force production, a reduction in specific force, an accumulation of type II fibres and a decrease and stiffening of connective tissue. Overall, the muscle and tendon phenotype of myostatin-deficient rats was markedly different from that of myostatin-deficient mice, which have impaired contractility and pathological changes to fibres and their extracellular matrix. Extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of MSTNΔ/Δ rats demonstrated 20–33% increases in mass, 35–45% increases in fibre number, 20–57% increases in isometric force and no differences in specific force. The insulin-like growth factor-1 pathway was activated to a greater extent in MSTNΔ/Δ muscles, but no substantial differences in atrophy-related genes were observed. Tendons of MSTNΔ/Δ rats had a 20% reduction in peak strain, with no differences in mass, peak stress or stiffness. The general morphology and gene expression patterns were similar between tendons of both genotypes. This large rodent model of myostatin deficiency did not have the negative consequences to muscle fibres and extracellular matrix observed in mouse models, and suggests that the greatest impact of myostatin in the regulation of muscle mass may not be to induce atrophy directly, but rather to block hypertrophy signalling. PMID:25640143

  9. Changes in skeletal muscle and tendon structure and function following genetic inactivation of myostatin in rats.

    PubMed

    Mendias, Christopher L; Lynch, Evan B; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Flood, Michael D; Rittman, Danielle S; Van Pelt, Douglas W; Roche, Stuart M; Davis, Carol S

    2015-04-15

    Myostatin is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle and tendon mass. Myostatin deficiency has been well studied in mice, but limited data are available on how myostatin regulates the structure and function of muscles and tendons of larger animals. We hypothesized that, in comparison to wild-type (MSTN(+/+) ) rats, rats in which zinc finger nucleases were used to genetically inactivate myostatin (MSTN(Δ/Δ) ) would exhibit an increase in muscle mass and total force production, a reduction in specific force, an accumulation of type II fibres and a decrease and stiffening of connective tissue. Overall, the muscle and tendon phenotype of myostatin-deficient rats was markedly different from that of myostatin-deficient mice, which have impaired contractility and pathological changes to fibres and their extracellular matrix. Extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of MSTN(Δ/Δ) rats demonstrated 20-33% increases in mass, 35-45% increases in fibre number, 20-57% increases in isometric force and no differences in specific force. The insulin-like growth factor-1 pathway was activated to a greater extent in MSTN(Δ/Δ) muscles, but no substantial differences in atrophy-related genes were observed. Tendons of MSTN(Δ/Δ) rats had a 20% reduction in peak strain, with no differences in mass, peak stress or stiffness. The general morphology and gene expression patterns were similar between tendons of both genotypes. This large rodent model of myostatin deficiency did not have the negative consequences to muscle fibres and extracellular matrix observed in mouse models, and suggests that the greatest impact of myostatin in the regulation of muscle mass may not be to induce atrophy directly, but rather to block hypertrophy signalling.

  10. Effects of Growth on Muscle, Tendon, and Aponeurosis Tissues in Rabbit Shank Musculature.

    PubMed

    Böl, Markus; Leichsenring, Kay; Siebert, Tobias

    2016-12-20

    There exist several studies using morphological analyses of skeletal muscles to obtain a better understanding of muscle structure. The structural information obtained are primarily determined from single muscle components using individual animals of discrete ages. Further, little is known about changing dimensions of the aponeurosis, which is an important load-transferring interface in muscle mechanics. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine how the muscle, tendon, and particularly the aponeurosis geometry of the rabbit shank musculature (M. soleus, M. extensor digitorum longus, and M. plantaris) change during growth. In doing so, morphological studies on muscles of eighty-nine female rabbits aged between 18 and 108 days were conducted. We found an almost linear increase over time in all of the geometrical parameters observed. The aponeurosis of the muscles exhibited lower growth rates in width than in length. The distal and proximal aponeurosis areas were nearly identical. The ratio of aponeurosis area to the physiological cross-sectional area was 2.54, 2.54, and 1.88 for M. soleus, M. extensor digitorum longus, and M. plantaris, respectively. M. extensor digitorum longus and M. soleus exhibited a nearly similar tendon-muscle fascicle length ratio during growth, increasing from 2.86 to 5.30 and 3.48 to 6.16, respectively. Interestingly, the tendon-muscle fascicle length ratio of the M. plantaris started initially with a much higher value (∼8) and increased to ∼18. Taken together, these results provide insight into the structure of the muscle-tendon complex and thus, a general understanding of muscle growth. Anat Rec, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Ultrasound Changes in Achilles Tendon and Gastrocnemius Medialis Muscle on Squat Eccentric Overload and Running Performance.

    PubMed

    Sanz-López, Fernando; Berzosa Sánchez, César; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Cruz-Diaz, David; Martínez-Amat, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Sanz-López, F, Berzosa Sánchez, C, Hita-Contreras, F, Cruz-Diaz, D, and Martínez-Amat, A. Ultrasound changes in Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius medialis muscle on squat eccentric overload and running performance. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2015-Previous studies have proven the adaptation to load in the Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius muscle after different types of exercise, such as running, heel drop training, and a variety of sports. These findings have been applied to improve performance and in the treatment and prevention of overuse injuries. However, the effects that squat performance may have on the Achilles tendon and gastrocnemius muscle are still unknown. Squats are a widely used training exercise that involves calf-muscle activation. Similarly, no reports have been published regarding the adaptation to load of trained and untrained subjects during several consecutive days of running. The purpose of this study was to analyze changes in the Achilles tendon and in the pennation angles of the gastrocnemius medialis after eccentric overload training and within 3 days of running. Twenty healthy males who volunteered for this study were divided into 2 groups. Subjects in the eccentric overload training (ECC) group performed 6 weeks of eccentric overload training (twice weekly, 4 sets of 7 repetitions in a Yoyo squat device) before the running intervention. All participants, ECC and control (CONT) groups, ran on 3 consecutive days. After the eccentric training, an increase in the cross-sectional area of the Achilles tendon and in the pennation angle was observed. As for the running intervention, the behavior of tissues in both groups was similar. These results suggest that eccentric overload training with squats promotes changes in the Achilles tendon and in the pennation angle of the gastrocnemius medialis muscle. Nevertheless, significant changes in the tissue do not appear between the running performance of trained and untrained subjects.

  12. Method for anchoring biomechanical implants to muscle tendon and chest wall.

    PubMed

    Trumble, Dennis R; Melvin, David B; Magovern, James A

    2002-01-01

    Reliable tissue fixation is of fundamental importance to the successful development of muscle powered motor prostheses. This report describes a series of canine implant trials used to develop stable tissue-device interface mechanisms. Muscle pumps were fitted with prototype tendon and chest wall anchoring schemes and secured to the ribs and humeral insertion of latissimus dorsi (LD) muscles. LD stimulation was initiated 1 week postimplantation and continued throughout the implant period to stress these fixation sites. Design modification and implant testing were continued until both muscle and chest wall attachment points were found to be stable. Chest wall fixation was best achieved using perforated metallic plates wired to the ribs, as opposed to bone screws or wire mesh, which were subject to degradation. Direct attachment of the native tendon by means of spiked clamping plates proved ineffective. Stable muscle attachment was ultimately achieved by replacing the humeral tendon with an artificial substitute formed from fine polyester fibers gathered into 6-8 bundles and sewn into the LD insertion. Braided into a single cord, these fibers were fixed to the device by means of spiked clamping plates. Based on these findings, we conclude that perforated anchor plates and multifibrous artificial tendons can function as effective tissue-device interface mechanisms.

  13. Effects of acute static, ballistic, and PNF stretching exercise on the muscle and tendon tissue properties.

    PubMed

    Konrad, A; Stafilidis, S; Tilp, M

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of a single static, ballistic, or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching exercise on the various muscle-tendon parameters of the lower leg and to detect possible differences in the effects between the methods. Volunteers (n = 122) were randomly divided into static, ballistic, and PNF stretching groups and a control group. Before and after the 4 × 30 s stretching intervention, we determined the maximum dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM) with the corresponding fascicle length and pennation angle of the gastrocnemius medialis. Passive resistive torque (PRT) and maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) were measured with a dynamometer. Observation of muscle-tendon junction (MTJ) displacement with ultrasound allowed us to determine the length changes in the tendon and muscle, respectively, and hence to calculate stiffness. Although RoM increased (static: +4.3%, ballistic: +4.5%, PNF: +3.5%), PRT (static: -11.4%, ballistic: -11.5%, PNF: -13,7%), muscle stiffness (static: -13.1%, ballistic: -20.3%, PNF: -20.2%), and muscle-tendon stiffness (static: -11.3%, ballistic: -10.5%, PNF: -13.7%) decreased significantly in all the stretching groups. Only in the PNF stretching group, the pennation angle in the stretched position (-4.2%) and plantar flexor MVC (-4.6%) decreased significantly. Multivariate analysis showed no clinically relevant difference between the stretching groups. The increase in RoM and the decrease in PRT and muscle-tendon stiffness could be explained by more compliant muscle tissue following a single static, ballistic, or PNF stretching exercise.

  14. Active finite element analysis of skeletal muscle-tendon complex during isometric, shortening and lengthening contraction.

    PubMed

    Tsui, C P; Tang, C Y; Leung, C P; Cheng, K W; Ng, Y F; Chow, D H K; Li, C K

    2004-01-01

    An active finite element model was developed to predict the mechanical behaviors of skeletal muscle-tendon complex during isometric, shortening and lengthening contraction. The active finite element was created through incorporation of a user-defined material property into ABAQUS finite element code. The active finite element is controlled by a motor element that is activated by a mathematical function. The nonlinear passive behavior of the muscle was defined by the viscoelastic elements and can be easily altered to other properties by using other elements in the material library without the need of re-defining the constitutive relation of the muscle. The isometric force-length relationship, force-strain relations of the muscle-tendon complex during both shortening and lengthening contraction and muscle relaxation response were predicted using the proposed finite element model. The predicted results were found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. In addition, the stress distribution in the muscle-tendon complex during isometric, shortening and lengthening contractions was simulated. The location of the maximum stress may provide useful information for studying muscle damage and fatigue in the future.

  15. Control of position and movement is simplified by combined muscle spindle and Golgi tendon organ feedback.

    PubMed

    Kistemaker, Dinant A; Van Soest, Arthur J Knoek; Wong, Jeremy D; Kurtzer, Isaac; Gribble, Paul L

    2013-02-01

    Whereas muscle spindles play a prominent role in current theories of human motor control, Golgi tendon organs (GTO) and their associated tendons are often neglected. This is surprising since there is ample evidence that both tendons and GTOs contribute importantly to neuromusculoskeletal dynamics. Using detailed musculoskeletal models, we provide evidence that simple feedback using muscle spindles alone results in very poor control of joint position and movement since muscle spindles cannot sense changes in tendon length that occur with changes in muscle force. We propose that a combination of spindle and GTO afferents can provide an estimate of muscle-tendon complex length, which can be effectively used for low-level feedback during both postural and movement tasks. The feasibility of the proposed scheme was tested using detailed musculoskeletal models of the human arm. Responses to transient and static perturbations were simulated using a 1-degree-of-freedom (DOF) model of the arm and showed that the combined feedback enabled the system to respond faster, reach steady state faster, and achieve smaller static position errors. Finally, we incorporated the proposed scheme in an optimally controlled 2-DOF model of the arm for fast point-to-point shoulder and elbow movements. Simulations showed that the proposed feedback could be easily incorporated in the optimal control framework without complicating the computation of the optimal control solution, yet greatly enhancing the system's response to perturbations. The theoretical analyses in this study might furthermore provide insight about the strong physiological couplings found between muscle spindle and GTO afferents in the human nervous system.

  16. [Bursitis with severe tendon and muscle necrosis on the lateral stifle area in cattle].

    PubMed

    Nuss, K; Räber, M; Sydler, T; Muggli, E; Hässig, M; Guscetti, F

    2011-11-01

    In 21 animals, chronic swelling on the lateral aspect of the stifle also known as «perigonitis», «stable-syndrome» or «bursitis bicipitalis femoris» were evaluated. Ultrasonography showed increased fluid in the distal subtendinous bursa of the biceps femoris muscle and structural changes in the tendons, muscles, subcutis and fasciae. Soft tissue swelling and an irregular contour of the lateral tibial condyle were typical signs on radiographs. Macroscopic changes were found at the insertion of the biceps femoris muscle, the distal subtendinous bursa of the biceps femoris muscle, the lateral collateral ligament of the stifle, the origin of muscles on the lateral femoral condyle and the lateral tibial condyle. They mainly consisted of tendon and muscle tissue necrosis with granulation tissue. Histology revealed areas of coagulation necrosis in tendons and ligaments, in which occasionally Onchocerca spp. were seen. The severity of lesions correlated well with the clinical signs, which were associated with a poor prognosis in advanced cases.

  17. ‘Serious thigh muscle strains’: beware the intramuscular tendon which plays an important role in difficult hamstring and quadriceps muscle strains

    PubMed Central

    Brukner, Peter; Connell, David

    2016-01-01

    Why do some hamstring and quadriceps strains take much longer to repair than others? Which injuries are more prone to recurrence? Intramuscular tendon injuries have received little attention as an element in ‘muscle strain’. In thigh muscles, such as rectus femoris and biceps femoris, the attached tendon extends for a significant distance within the muscle belly. While the pathology of most muscle injures occurs at a musculotendinous junction, at first glance the athlete appears to report pain within a muscle belly. In addition to the musculotendinous injury being a site of pathology, the intramuscular tendon itself is occasionally injured. These injuries have a variety of appearances on MRIs. There is some evidence that these injuries require a prolonged rehabilitation time and may have higher recurrence rates. Therefore, it is important to recognise the tendon component of a thigh ‘muscle strain’. PMID:26519522

  18. Long-term results of allograft composite total hip prostheses for tumors.

    PubMed

    Langlais, F; Lambotte, J C; Collin, P; Thomazeau, H

    2003-09-01

    The functional results of standard reconstruction prostheses are impaired by instability because of poor muscular reinsertion, especially of the gluteal muscles. In 21 patients, composite hip prostheses including proximal femoral allografts were used after primary malignant tumor resection. Ten reconstructions used combined bone-tendon allografts that allowed reinsertion of the gluteal muscles to the allograft tendons. None of the 21 patients had dislocation or infection. Ten patients died within 2 years of surgery without complications requiring reoperations. The mean followup in the 11 other patients was 10 years. Eight patients had reoperation: four for loosening (two at 3 years, two at 11 and 12 years), and four had autologous graftings for nonunion of the trochanter or of the distal graft-bone interface. Evaluation of function in the 11 patients with follow-ups ranging from 4 to 15 years showed an average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 77%. Satisfactory strength of the abductor muscles was achieved by reinsertion of the trochanter or by suture of the patients gluteal muscles with the combined tendon-bone allograft. At long-term, radiologically, the bony allograft showed no change in five patients, very mild resorption in five, and severe resorption in one. Stem fixation was excellent in 10 patients and fair in one. Comparison between the functional results of reconstruction prostheses versus composite prostheses showed a significant improvement with the composite prosthesis. In the authors' institution, at 10 years, the mechanical survival of composite prostheses was 81%, as compared with only 65% for reconstruction prostheses.

  19. Exact moment of tendon of pectoralis major muscle rupture captured on video

    PubMed Central

    Pochini, Alberto Castro; Ejnisman, Benno; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Monteiro, Gustavo Cara; Fleury, Anna Maria; Faloppa, Flavio; Cohen, Moises; Albertoni, Walter Manna

    2007-01-01

    A powerlifting athlete ruptured his left tendon of the pectoralis major muscle while attempting to lift 160 kg in a Brazilian bench press championship. The injury seemed to occur in the concentric phase of exercise; however, the more common mechanism of rupture is during the eccentric phase. The tendon was reinserted to the humerus 3 weeks later with screws and washers. The athlete returned to competitive activities after 5 months. One year later he lifted 170 kg and won the national championship. PMID:17337486

  20. Permanent disabilities in the displaced muscle from rupture of the long head tendon of the biceps.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Søren R; Gelineck, John; Johannsen, Hans Viggo; Sneppen, Otto

    2005-06-01

    Patients with a displaced muscle belly because of rupture of the long head biceps tendon were investigated for local pain and other disabilities, together with strength and endurance loss. Eleven patients (median age 59 years, minimum follow-up 6 months) were included, and minimum follow-up was 6 months. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of both upper arms allowed investigation of muscle atrophy and evaluation of any other degenerative signs in the displaced muscle. All patients reported pain or disability locally in the displaced muscle in certain situations, and strength and endurance were reduced by 25%. MRI revealed the displaced muscle to be unreduced in size and with no signs of degeneration. Generally, operative reattachment of the displaced muscle is not advocated in middle-aged or older patients. In order to elucidate this subject, we present a retrospective consecutive series of patients with considerable disabilities in the displaced muscle belly independent of shoulder disabilities.

  1. The effects of dynamic stretching on plantar flexor muscle-tendon tissue properties.

    PubMed

    Samukawa, Mina; Hattori, Masaki; Sugama, Naoko; Takeda, Naoki

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic stretching is commonly used in warm-up routines for athletic activities. Even though several positive effects of dynamic stretching on athletic performance have been reported, the effects on the muscle-tendon unit (MTU) itself are still unclear. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of dynamic stretching on the ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon properties by use of ultrasonography. Twenty healthy male subjects participated in the present study. The subjects were asked to engage in dynamic stretching of plantar flexors for 30 s and to repeat for 5 sets. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM was measured before and after the dynamic stretching. Changes in the displacement of the myotendinous junction (MTJ), pennation angle, and fascicle length were also determined by using ultrasonography. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM increased significantly after the dynamic stretching (p < 0.0001). A significant distal displacement of the MTJ was observed until the second stretching set (p < 0.001) with no significant changes thereafter. Pennation angle, and fascicle length were unaffected by the dynamic stretching. Dynamic stretching was shown to be effective in increasing ankle joint flexibility. Outcomes that could have indicated changes in muscle tissue (such as the pennation angle and fascicle length) were unaltered. However, a significant displacement of the MTJ was found, indicating some change in the tendon tissues. Therefore, dynamic stretching of the plantar flexors was considered an effective means of lengthening the tendon tissues.

  2. Ultrasound of tibialis anterior muscle and tendon: anatomy, technique of examination, normal and pathologic appearance.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Ajay; Bianchi, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    Lesions of the tibialis anterior muscle and tendon are not frequently reported in international literature although pathology is not rare. Pathology can be spontaneous, associated with arthropathy or more generalized conditions. Clinical assessment may not be sufficient for distinguishing conditions like tendinopathy, tears, bursitis, etc. Therefore, imaging studies are necessary to plan appropriate therapy. US has a number of advantages, including widespread availability, absence of contraindications and low cost. It can also be used for dynamic studies of the muscle during contraction and relaxation. This article reviews the anatomy of the tibialis anterior, normal variants, the technique used for standard US examination of this muscle and tendon, its normal appearance on US and the sonographic characteristics of the most common lesions that affect it including tips on US-guided injections used for treatment.

  3. Modulatory effect of gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on angiogenesis in muscle and tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Brcic, L; Brcic, I; Staresinic, M; Novinscak, T; Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S

    2009-12-01

    Angiogenesis is a natural and complex process controlled by angiogenic and angiostatic molecules, with a central role in healing process. One of the most important modulating factors in angiogenesis is the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 promotes healing demonstrating particular angiogenic/angiomodulatory potential. We correlated the angiogenic effect of BPC 157 with VEGF expression using in vitro (cell culture) and in vivo (crushed muscle and transected muscle and tendon) models. Results revealed that there is no direct angiogenic effect of BPC 157 on cell cultures. On the other hand, immunohistochemical analysis of muscle and tendon healing using VEGF, CD34 and FVIII antibodies showed adequately modulated angiogenesis in BPC 157 treated animals, resulting in a more adequate healing. Therefore the angiogenic potential of BPC 157 seems to be closely related to the healing process in vivo with BPC 157 stimulating angiogenesis by up-regulating VEGF expression.

  4. Adipogenic and myogenic gene expression in rotator cuff muscle of the sheep after tendon tear.

    PubMed

    Frey, Eric; Regenfelder, Felix; Sussmann, Patrick; Zumstein, Matthias; Gerber, Christian; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2009-04-01

    Chronic rotator cuff tendon tears lead to fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy with impaired physiological functions of the affected muscles. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of corresponding pathophysiological processes remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to characterize the expression pattern of adipogenic (PPARgamma, C/EBPbeta) and myogenic (myostatin, myogenin, Myf-5) transcription factors in infraspinatus muscle of sheep after tenotomy, implantation of a tension device, refixation of the tendon, and rehabilitation, reflecting a model of chronic rotator cuff tears. In contrast to human patients, the presented sheep model allows a temporal evaluation of the expression of a given marker in the same individual over time. Semiquantitative RT/PCR analysis of PPARgammaã, myostatin, myogenin, Myf-5, and C/EBPbeta transcript levels was carried out with sheep muscle biopsy-derived total RNA. We found a significantly increased expression of Myf-5 and PPARgamma after tenotomy and a significant change for Myf-5 and C/EBPbeta after continuous traction and refixation. This experimental sheep model allows the molecular analysis of pathomechanisms of muscular changes after rotator cuff tear. The results point to a crucial role of the transcription factors PPARgamma, C/EBPbeta, and Myf-5 in impairment and regeneration of rotator cuff muscles after tendon tears in sheep.

  5. Calf muscle atrophy and muscle function after non-operative vs operative treatment of achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Häggmark, T; Liedberg, H; Eriksson, E; Wredmark, T

    1986-02-01

    Fifteen operatively and eight non-operatively treated subcutaneous achilles tendon ruptures were randomly selected from 120 surgically and 35 non-surgically treated patients. Their calf muscle function was studied three to five years after treatment. Non-operatively treated patients were found to have a significantly impaired dynamic muscle function of the calf muscles when tested in a specially constructed heel-raise test device. Operatively treated patients did not show any significant impairment of their muscle function. Measurement of muscle area with CT-scanning showed a significant reduction of the calf muscle in the non-operatively treated patient while no such difference could be found in the operatively treated patients. Isokinetic muscle torque did not differ in the two groups of patients, thus Cybex-measurements do not seem to be a discriminating method in studying muscle function after achilles ruptures. On the basis of our findings we recommend that all athletes with achilles tendon ruptures be treated surgically. In non-athletes and older patients non-operative treatment might be considered.

  6. Muscle excursion does not correlate with increased serial sarcomere number after muscle adaptation to stretched tendon transfer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Ward, Samuel R; Fridén, Jan; Lieber, Richard L

    2012-11-01

    Chronic skeletal muscle stretch typically increases serial muscle fiber sarcomere number. Since serial sarcomere number correlates with functional excursion in normal muscle, observed changes in sarcomere number are often extrapolated to their new assumed function. However, this has not been well demonstrated experimentally. Thus, we measured the functional properties of muscles stretched due to tendon transfer surgery. Muscle active and passive length-tension curves were measured 1 week and 4 weeks after surgery, and then each muscle was further examined to determine structural adaptation as well as single fiber and fiber bundle passive mechanical properties. We found a disconnect between the functional and structural muscle properties. Specifically, muscle excursion was significantly lower in the transferred muscle compared to controls, even though serial sarcomere number had increased. Furthermore, maximum tetanic tension was significantly reduced, though the two groups had similar physiological cross sectional areas. Passive tension increased in the transferred muscle, which was deemed to be due to proliferation of extracellular matrix. These data are the first to report that muscle morphological adaptation after chronic stretch does not accurately predict the muscle's functional properties. These data have significant implications for examining muscle physiological properties under surgical interventions.

  7. Molecular mechanism of fatty degeneration in rotator cuff muscle with tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Koshi N; Sano, Hirotaka; Kaneko, Kazuo; Itoi, Eiji

    2011-06-01

    Fatty degeneration often occurs in rotator cuff muscle with tendon rupture. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this change has not been fully clarified yet. We investigated the gene expression of Wnt10b and adipogenic marker gene, PPARγ and C/EBPα in C2C12 myogenic cell line under inhibition of Wnt10b by adipogenic induction medium, isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). The role of Wnt-signal was confirmed by adding Lithium chloride (LiCl), which mimics Wnt signaling to the cultured cell with MDI. We also assessed the expression profiles of same genes in the rat rotator cuff tear model in vivo. MDI induced Oil red-O staining positive adipocytes and upregulated PPARγ and C/EBPα expression. LiCl inhibited adipogenic induction of MDI. Rotator cuff muscle with tendon rupture showed positive staining for Oil red-O. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed decreased expression of Wnt10b followed by increased PPARγ and C/EBPα gene expression in the supraspinatus muscle. Fatty degeneration and its molecular events were remarkably seen in the distal one-third of the detached supraspinatus muscle versus control. Wnt signaling may regulate adipogenic differentiation both in the myoblasts in vitro and the muscle in vivo. Our results indicate that the reduction of Wnt10b in muscle with a rotator cuff tear is a key signal in fatty degeneration of the muscle.

  8. Extensor tendon ruptures after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, M; Lustig, S; Huten, D

    2016-02-01

    Extensor tendon rupture is a rare but serious complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that impairs active knee extension, thereby severely affecting knee function. Surgery is usually required. Surgical options range from simple suturing to allograft reconstruction of the entire extensor mechanism and include intermediate methods such as reconstruction using neighbouring tendons or muscles, synthetic ligament implantation, and partial allograft repair. Simple suturing carries a high failure rate and should therefore be routinely combined with tissue augmentation using a neighbouring tendon or a synthetic ligament. After allograft reconstruction, outcomes are variable and long-term complications common. Salvage procedures for managing the most severe cases after allograft failure involve reconstruction using gastrocnemius or vastus flaps. Regardless of the technique used, suturing must be performed under tension, with the knee fully extended, and rehabilitation must be conducted with great caution. Weaknesses of available case-series studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity, and inadequate follow-up duration. All treatment options are associated with substantial failure rates. The patient should be informed of this fact and plans made for a salvage option. Here, the main techniques and their outcomes are discussed, and a therapeutic strategy is suggested.

  9. Tendon's ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Tresoldi, Ilaria; Oliva, Francesco; Benvenuto, Monica; Fantini, Massimo; Masuelli, Laura; Bei, Roberto; Modesti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The structure of a tendon is an important example of complexity of ECM three-dimensional organization. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a macromolecular network with both structural and regulatory functions. ECM components belong to four major types of macromolecules: the collagens, elastin, proteoglycans, and noncollagenous glycoproteins. Tendons are made by a fibrous, compact connective tissue that connect muscle to bone designed to transmit forces and withstand tension during muscle contraction. Here we show the ultrastructural features of tendon's components.

  10. Use of polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine solution for sterilisation and preservation improves mechanical properties and osteogenesis of allografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yantao; Hu, Xiantong; Li, Zhonghai; Wang, Fuli; Xia, Yang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Zhang, Feimin; Gu, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Allografts eliminate the disadvantages associated with autografts and synthetic scaffolds but are associated with a disease-transmission risk. Therefore, allograft sterilisation is crucial. We aimed to determine whether polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine (PVP-I) can be used for sterilisation and as a new wet-preservation method. PVP-I–sterilised and preserved allografts demonstrated improved mechanical property, osteogenesis, and excellent microbial inhibition. A thigh muscle pouch model of nude mice showed that PVP-I–preserved allografts demonstrated better ectopic formation than Co60-sterilised allografts (control) in vivo (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the PVP-I–preserved group showed no difference between 24 h and 12 weeks of allograft preservation (P > 0.05). PVP-I–preserved allografts showed more hydrophilic surfaces and PVP-I–sterilised tendons showed higher mechanical strength than Co60-sterilised tendons (P < 0.05). The level of residual PVP-I was higher without washing and with prolonged preservation (P < 0.05). In vitro cellular tests showed that appropriate PVP-I concentration was nontoxic to preosteoblast cells, and cellular differentiation measured by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic gene markers was enhanced (P < 0.05). Therefore, the improved biological performance of implanted allografts may be attributable to better surface properties and residual PVP-I, and PVP-I immersion can be a simple, easy method for allograft sterilisation and preservation.

  11. Use of polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine solution for sterilisation and preservation improves mechanical properties and osteogenesis of allografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yantao; Hu, Xiantong; Li, Zhonghai; Wang, Fuli; Xia, Yang; Hou, Shuxun; Zhong, Hongbin; Zhang, Feimin; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Allografts eliminate the disadvantages associated with autografts and synthetic scaffolds but are associated with a disease-transmission risk. Therefore, allograft sterilisation is crucial. We aimed to determine whether polyvinylpyrrolidone-iodine (PVP-I) can be used for sterilisation and as a new wet-preservation method. PVP-I–sterilised and preserved allografts demonstrated improved mechanical property, osteogenesis, and excellent microbial inhibition. A thigh muscle pouch model of nude mice showed that PVP-I–preserved allografts demonstrated better ectopic formation than Co60-sterilised allografts (control) in vivo (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the PVP-I–preserved group showed no difference between 24 h and 12 weeks of allograft preservation (P > 0.05). PVP-I–preserved allografts showed more hydrophilic surfaces and PVP-I–sterilised tendons showed higher mechanical strength than Co60-sterilised tendons (P < 0.05). The level of residual PVP-I was higher without washing and with prolonged preservation (P < 0.05). In vitro cellular tests showed that appropriate PVP-I concentration was nontoxic to preosteoblast cells, and cellular differentiation measured by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic gene markers was enhanced (P < 0.05). Therefore, the improved biological performance of implanted allografts may be attributable to better surface properties and residual PVP-I, and PVP-I immersion can be a simple, easy method for allograft sterilisation and preservation. PMID:27934929

  12. Role of extracellular matrix in adaptation of tendon and skeletal muscle to mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, Michael

    2004-04-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM), and especially the connective tissue with its collagen, links tissues of the body together and plays an important role in the force transmission and tissue structure maintenance especially in tendons, ligaments, bone, and muscle. The ECM turnover is influenced by physical activity, and both collagen synthesis and degrading metalloprotease enzymes increase with mechanical loading. Both transcription and posttranslational modifications, as well as local and systemic release of growth factors, are enhanced following exercise. For tendons, metabolic activity, circulatory responses, and collagen turnover are demonstrated to be more pronounced in humans than hitherto thought. Conversely, inactivity markedly decreases collagen turnover in both tendon and muscle. Chronic loading in the form of physical training leads both to increased collagen turnover as well as, dependent on the type of collagen in question, some degree of net collagen synthesis. These changes will modify the mechanical properties and the viscoelastic characteristics of the tissue, decrease its stress, and likely make it more load resistant. Cross-linking in connective tissue involves an intimate, enzymatical interplay between collagen synthesis and ECM proteoglycan components during growth and maturation and influences the collagen-derived functional properties of the tissue. With aging, glycation contributes to additional cross-linking which modifies tissue stiffness. Physiological signaling pathways from mechanical loading to changes in ECM most likely involve feedback signaling that results in rapid alterations in the mechanical properties of the ECM. In developing skeletal muscle, an important interplay between muscle cells and the ECM is present, and some evidence from adult human muscle suggests common signaling pathways to stimulate contractile and ECM components. Unaccostumed overloading responses suggest an important role of ECM in the adaptation of myofibrillar

  13. Achilles Tendonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... up. Tight calf muscles or muscles that lack flexibility decrease a person's range of motion and put an extra strain on the tendon. Running or exercising on a hard or uneven surface or doing lunges or plyometrics without adequate training. A traumatic injury to the Achilles tendon. How ...

  14. Frequency characteristics of human muscle and cortical responses evoked by noisy Achilles tendon vibration.

    PubMed

    Mildren, Robyn Lynne; Peters, Ryan M; Hill, Aimee J; Blouin, Jean-Sebastien; Carpenter, Mark Gregory; Inglis, J Timothy

    2017-02-16

    Noisy stimuli, along with linear systems analysis, have proven to be effective for mapping functional neural connections. We explored the use of noisy (10-115 Hz) Achilles tendon vibration to examine proprioceptive reflexes in the triceps surae muscles in standing healthy young adults (n = 8). We also examined the association between noisy vibration and electrical activity recorded over the sensorimotor cortex using electroencephalography. We applied two-minutes of vibration and recorded ongoing muscle activity of the soleus and gastrocnemii using surface electromyography (EMG). Vibration amplitude was varied to characterize reflex scaling and to examine how different stimulus levels affected postural sway. Muscle activity from the soleus and gastrocnemii were significantly correlated with the tendon vibration across a broad frequency range (~10-80 Hz), with a peak located at ~40 Hz. Vibration-EMG coherence positively scaled with stimulus amplitude in all three muscles, with soleus displaying the strongest coupling and steepest scaling. EMG responses lagged the vibration by ~38 ms, a delay that paralleled observed response latencies to tendon taps. Vibration-evoked cortical oscillations were observed at frequencies ~40-70 Hz (peak ~54 Hz) in most subjects, a finding in line with previous reports of sensory evoked γ-band oscillations. Further examination of the method revealed a) accurate reflex estimates could be obtained with <60 s of low-level (RMS=10 m/s(2)) vibration, b) responses did not habituate over two-minutes of exposure, and importantly c) noisy vibration had a minimal influence on standing balance. Our findings suggest noisy tendon vibration is an effective novel approach to characterize proprioceptive reflexes.

  15. Sensory Integration during Vibration of Postural Muscle Tendons When Pointing to a Memorized Target.

    PubMed

    Teasdale, Normand; Furmanek, Mariusz P; Germain Robitaille, Mathieu; de Oliveira, Fabio Carlos Lucas; Simoneau, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Vibrating ankle muscles in freely standing persons elicits a spatially oriented postural response. For instance, vibrating the Achilles tendons induces a backward displacement of the body while vibrating the tibialis anterior muscle tendons induces a forward displacement. These displacements have been called vibration induced falling (VIF) responses and they presumably are automatic. Because of the long delay between the onset of the vibration and the onset of the VIF (about 700 ms), and the widespread cortical activation following vibration, there is a possibility that the sensory signals available before the VIF can be used by the central nervous system to plan a hand pointing action. This study examined this suggestion. Ten healthy young participants stood on a force platform and initially were trained to point with and without vision to a target located in front of them. Then, they were exposed to conditions with vibration of the Achilles tendons or tibialis anterior muscle tendons and pointed at the target without vision. The vibration stopped between each trial. Trials with vision (without vibration) were given every five trials to maintain an accurate perception of the target's spatial location. Ankle vibrations did not have an effect on the position of the center of foot pressure (COP) before the onset of the pointing actions. Furthermore, reaction and movement times of the pointing actions were unaffected by the vibration. The hypotheses were that if proprioceptive information evoked by ankle vibrations alters the planning of a pointing action, the amplitude of the movement should scale according to the muscle tendons that are vibrated. For Achilles tendon vibration, participants undershot the target indicating the planning of the pointing action was influenced by the vibration-evoked proprioceptive information (forward displacement of the body). When the tibialis anterior were vibrated (backward displacement of the body), however, shorter movements were

  16. Sensory Integration during Vibration of Postural Muscle Tendons When Pointing to a Memorized Target

    PubMed Central

    Teasdale, Normand; Furmanek, Mariusz P.; Germain Robitaille, Mathieu; de Oliveira, Fabio Carlos Lucas; Simoneau, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Vibrating ankle muscles in freely standing persons elicits a spatially oriented postural response. For instance, vibrating the Achilles tendons induces a backward displacement of the body while vibrating the tibialis anterior muscle tendons induces a forward displacement. These displacements have been called vibration induced falling (VIF) responses and they presumably are automatic. Because of the long delay between the onset of the vibration and the onset of the VIF (about 700 ms), and the widespread cortical activation following vibration, there is a possibility that the sensory signals available before the VIF can be used by the central nervous system to plan a hand pointing action. This study examined this suggestion. Ten healthy young participants stood on a force platform and initially were trained to point with and without vision to a target located in front of them. Then, they were exposed to conditions with vibration of the Achilles tendons or tibialis anterior muscle tendons and pointed at the target without vision. The vibration stopped between each trial. Trials with vision (without vibration) were given every five trials to maintain an accurate perception of the target’s spatial location. Ankle vibrations did not have an effect on the position of the center of foot pressure (COP) before the onset of the pointing actions. Furthermore, reaction and movement times of the pointing actions were unaffected by the vibration. The hypotheses were that if proprioceptive information evoked by ankle vibrations alters the planning of a pointing action, the amplitude of the movement should scale according to the muscle tendons that are vibrated. For Achilles tendon vibration, participants undershot the target indicating the planning of the pointing action was influenced by the vibration-evoked proprioceptive information (forward displacement of the body). When the tibialis anterior were vibrated (backward displacement of the body), however, shorter movements were

  17. Changes in Indirect Markers of Muscle Damage and Tendons After Daily Drop Jumping Exercise with Rapid Load Increase

    PubMed Central

    Paleckis, Vidas; Mickevičius, Mantas; Snieckus, Audrius; Streckis, Vytautas; Pääsuke, Mati; Rutkauskas, Saulius; Steponavičiūtė, Rasa; Skurvydas, Albertas; Kamandulis, Sigitas

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess changes in indirect markers of muscle damage and type I collagen degradation, as well as, patellar and Achilles tendon morphological differences during nine daily drop-jumps sessions with constant load alternated with rapid increases in load to test the hypothesis that frequent drop-jump training results in negative muscular and tendon adaptation. Young men (n = 9) performed daily drop jump workouts with progression every 3 days in terms of number of jumps, platform height and squat amplitude. Voluntary and electrically evoked knee extensor torque, muscle soreness, blood plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity and carboxyterminal cross-linked telopeptide (ICTP), patellar and Achilles tendon thickness and cross-sectional area (CSA) were assessed at different time points during the training period and again on days 1, 3, 10 and 17 after the training. The findings were as follows: (1) steady decline in maximal muscle strength with major recovery within 24 hours after the first six daily training sessions; (2) larger decline in electrically induced muscle torque and prolonged recovery during last three training sessions; (3) increase in patellar and Achilles tendons CSA without change in thickness towards the end of training period; (4) increase in jump height but not in muscle strength after whole training period. Our findings suggest that frequent drop-jump sessions with constant load alternated with rapid increases in load do not induce severe muscle damage or major changes in tendons, nonetheless, this type of loading is not advisable for muscle strength improvement. Key points Frequent drop jump training induces activation mode dependent muscle torque depression late in the training period. No significant changes in the thickness of patellar and Achilles tendons are observed during frequent training, while CSA increases towards the end of training period. Longitudinal effect for jump height but not for muscle strength is evident

  18. Site of impulse initiation in tendon organs of cat soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Gregory, J E; Morgan, D L; Proske, U

    1985-12-01

    A continuing controversy surrounds the question of whether Golgi tendon organs are examples of receptors in which impulses may be generated at more than one site. This paper reports a systematic examination of a number of models incorporating single or multiple impulse generators and of the compatibility of their predictions with experimental observations. Two phenomena, in particular, that must be accounted for are nonlinear summation and cross-adaptation. When two motor units each with a direct effect on the tendon organ are stimulated together, the rate of discharge is greater than either individual rate but is less than their sum. In cross-adaptation a conditioning response elicited by one motor unit contraction produces adaptation of the discharge associated with stimulation of a second motor unit. A model with a central impulse generator can be modified to account for nonlinear summation by postulating a nonlinear transformation in the generator current-to-impulse rate conversion. Experiments measuring summation of responses to stimulation of three inputs produced results that did not support this model. Another variation of the model, which had a nonlinearity in the tension-to-current step and cross-connections (mechanical or neural) between tendon strands stressed by contracting muscle fibers, was able to account for the observations. A second model that provided the right predictions was a multiple impulse generator with cross-connections. Which of the two models best fits the experimental observations can be decided by comparing the calculated summation coefficients and cross-adaptation coefficients. A central impulse generator predicts a negative correlation, the multiple impulse generator a positive correlation. All of the observations were made using tendon organs of cat soleus muscle. Responses were recorded to stimulation of filaments of ventral root. In a comparison between 20 pairs of responses from six tendon organs the correlation between

  19. Whey protein hydrolysate augments tendon and muscle hypertrophy independent of resistance exercise contraction mode.

    PubMed

    Farup, J; Rahbek, S K; Vendelbo, M H; Matzon, A; Hindhede, J; Bejder, A; Ringgard, S; Vissing, K

    2014-10-01

    In a comparative study, we investigated the effects of maximal eccentric or concentric resistance training combined with whey protein or placebo on muscle and tendon hypertrophy. 22 subjects were allocated into either a high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate + carbohydrate group (WHD) or a carbohydrate group (PLA). Subjects completed 12 weeks maximal knee extensor training with one leg using eccentric contractions and the other using concentric contractions. Before and after training cross-sectional area (CSA) of m. quadriceps and patellar tendon CSA was quantified with magnetic resonance imaging and a isometric strength test was used to assess maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) and rate of force development (RFD). Quadriceps CSA increased by 7.3 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001) in WHD and 3.4 ± 0.8% (P < 0.01) in PLA, with a greater increase in WHD compared to PLA (P < 0.01). Proximal patellar tendon CSA increased by 14.9 ± 3.1% (P < 0.001) and 8.1 ± 3.2% (P = 0.054) for WHD and PLA, respectively, with a greater increase in WHD compared to PLA (P < 0.05), with no effect of contraction mode. MVC and RFD increased by 15.6 ± 3.5% (P < 0.001) and 12-63% (P < 0.05), respectively, with no group or contraction mode effects. In conclusion, high-leucine whey protein hydrolysate augments muscle and tendon hypertrophy following 12 weeks of resistance training - irrespective of contraction mode.

  20. Quantitative sodium magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage, muscle, and tendon

    PubMed Central

    Tarbox, Grayson J.; Taylor, Meredith D.; Kaggie, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    Sodium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or imaging of the 23Na nucleus, has been under exploration for several decades, and holds promise for potentially revealing additional biochemical information about the health of tissues that cannot currently be obtained from conventional hydrogen (or proton) MRI. This additional information could serve as an important complement to conventional MRI for many applications. However, despite these exciting possibilities, sodium MRI is not yet used routinely in clinical practice, and will likely remain strictly in the domain of exploratory research for the coming decade. This paper begins with a technical overview of sodium MRI, including the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal characteristics of the sodium nucleus, the challenges associated with sodium MRI, and the specialized pulse sequences, hardware, and reconstruction techniques required. Various applications of sodium MRI for quantitative analysis of the musculoskeletal system are then reviewed, including the non-invasive assessment of cartilage degeneration in vivo, imaging of tendinopathy, applications in the assessment of various muscular pathologies, and assessment of muscle response to exercise. PMID:28090447

  1. Improving postural control by applying mechanical noise to ankle muscle tendons.

    PubMed

    Borel, Liliane; Ribot-Ciscar, Edith

    2016-08-01

    The application of subthreshold mechanical vibrations with random frequencies (white mechanical noise) to ankle muscle tendons is known to increase muscle proprioceptive information and to improve the detection of ankle movements. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of this mechanical noise on postural control, its possible modulation according to the sensory strategies used for postural control, and the consequences of increasing postural difficulty. The upright stance of 20 healthy young participants tested with their eyes closed was analyzed during the application of four different levels of noise and compared to that in the absence of noise (control) in three conditions: static, static on foam, and dynamic (sinusoidal translation). The quiet standing condition was conducted with the eyes open and closed to determine the subjects' visual dependency to maintain postural stability. Postural performance was assessed using posturographic and motion analysis evaluations. The results in the static condition showed that the spectral power density of body sway significantly decreased with an optimal level of noise and that the higher the spectral power density without noise, the greater the noise effect, irrespective of visual dependency. Finally, noise application was ineffective in the foam and dynamic conditions. We conclude that the application of mechanical noise to ankle muscle tendons is a means to improve quiet standing only. These results suggest that mechanical noise stimulation may be more effective in more impaired populations.

  2. Amontillado is required for Drosophila Slit processing and for tendon-mediated muscle patterning

    PubMed Central

    Ordan, Elly

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Slit cleavage into N-terminal and C-terminal polypeptides is essential for restricting the range of Slit activity. Although the Slit cleavage site has been characterized previously and is evolutionally conserved, the identity of the protease that cleaves Slit remains elusive. Our previous analysis indicated that Slit cleavage is essential to immobilize the active Slit-N at the tendon cell surfaces, mediating the arrest of muscle elongation. In an attempt to identify the protease required for Slit cleavage we performed an RNAi-based assay in the ectoderm and followed the process of elongation of the lateral transverse muscles toward tendon cells. The screen led to the identification of the Drosophila homolog of pheromone convertase 2 (PC2), Amontillado (Amon), as an essential protease for Slit cleavage. Further analysis indicated that Slit mobility on SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) is slightly up-shifted in amon mutants, and its conventional cleavage into the Slit-N and Slit-C polypeptides is attenuated. Consistent with the requirement for amon to promote Slit cleavage and membrane immobilization of Slit-N, the muscle phenotype of amon mutant embryos was rescued by co-expressing a membrane-bound form of full-length Slit lacking the cleavage site and knocked into the slit locus. The identification of a novel protease component essential for Slit processing may represent an additional regulatory step in the Slit signaling pathway. PMID:27628033

  3. The influence of loading intensity on muscle-tendon unit behavior during maximal knee extensor stretch shortening cycle exercise.

    PubMed

    Earp, Jacob E; Newton, Robert U; Cormie, Prue; Blazevich, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Tendon stiffness increases as the magnitude and rate of loading increases, according to its viscoelastic properties. Thus, under some loading conditions tendons should become exceptionally stiff and act almost as rigid force transducers. Nonetheless, observations of tendon behavior during multi-joint sprinting and jumping tasks have shown that tendon strain increases whilst muscle strain decreases as the loading intensity increases. The purpose of the current study was to examine the influence of external loading intensity on muscle-tendon unit (MTU) behavior during a high-speed single-joint, stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) knee extension task. Eighteen men (n = 9) and women (n = 9) performed single-leg, maximum intensity SSC knee extensions at loads of 20, 60 and 90% of their one repetition maximum. Vastus lateralis fascicle length (L(f)) and velocity (v(f)) as well as MTU (L(MTU)) and tendinous tissue (L(t)) length were measured using high-speed ultrasonography (96 Hz). Patellar tendon force (F(t)) and rate of force development (RFDt) were estimated using inverse dynamics. Results showed that as loading intensity increased, concentric joint velocity and shortening v f decreased whilst F t and RFDt increased, but no significant differences were observed in eccentric joint velocity or peak L(MTU) or L(f). In addition, the tendon lengthened significantly less at the end of the eccentric phase at heavier loads. This is the first observation that tendon strain decreases significantly during a SSC movement as loading intensity increases in vivo, resulting in a shift in the tendon acting as a power amplifier at light loads to a more rigid force transducer at heavy loads.

  4. Altered Protein Composition and Gene Expression in Strabismic Human Extraocular Muscles and Tendons

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Andrea B.; Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Altick, Amy L.; Quilici, David R.; Wen, Dan; Johnson, L. Alan; von Bartheld, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether structural protein composition and expression of key regulatory genes are altered in strabismic human extraocular muscles. Methods Samples from strabismic horizontal extraocular muscles were obtained during strabismus surgery and compared with normal muscles from organ donors. We used proteomics, standard and customized PCR arrays, and microarrays to identify changes in major structural proteins and changes in gene expression. We focused on muscle and connective tissue and its control by enzymes, growth factors, and cytokines. Results Strabismic muscles showed downregulation of myosins, tropomyosins, troponins, and titin. Expression of collagens and regulators of collagen synthesis and degradation, the collagenase matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)2 and its inhibitors, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)1 and TIMP2, was upregulated, along with tumor necrosis factor (TNF), TNF receptors, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), as well as proteoglycans. Growth factors controlling extracellular matrix (ECM) were also upregulated. Among 410 signaling genes examined by PCR arrays, molecules with downregulation in the strabismic phenotype included GDNF, NRG1, and PAX7; CTGF, CXCR4, NPY1R, TNF, NTRK1, and NTRK2 were upregulated. Signaling molecules known to control extraocular muscle plasticity were predominantly expressed in the tendon rather than the muscle component. The two horizontal muscles, medial and lateral rectus, displayed similar changes in protein and gene expression, and no obvious effect of age. Conclusions Quantification of proteins and gene expression showed significant differences in the composition of extraocular muscles of strabismic patients with respect to important motor proteins, elements of the ECM, and connective tissue. Therefore, our study supports the emerging view that the molecular composition of strabismic muscles is substantially altered. PMID:27768799

  5. Effects of low-load resistance training with vascular occlusion on the mechanical properties of muscle and tendon.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Komuro, Teruaki; Ishiguro, Noriko; Tsunoda, Naoya; Sato, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Naokata; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2006-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of low-load resistance training with vascular occlusion on the specific tension and tendon properties by comparing with those of high-load training. Nine participants completed 12 weeks (3 days/week) of a unilateral isotonic training program on knee extensors. One leg was trained using low load (20% of 1 RM) with vascular occlusion (LLO) and other leg using high load (80% of 1 RM) without vascular occlusion (HL). Before and after training, maximal isometric knee extension torque (MVC) and muscle volume were measured. Specific tension of vastus lateralis muscle (VL) was calculated from MVC, muscle volume, and muscle architecture measurements. Stiffness of tendon-aponeurosis complex in VL was measured using ultrasonography during isometric knee extension. Both protocols significantly increased MVC and muscle volume of quadriceps femoris muscle. Specific tension of VL increased significantly 5.5% for HL, but not for LLO. The LLO protocol did not alter the stiffness of tendon-aponeurosis complex in knee extensors, while the HL protocol increased it significantly. The present study demonstrated that the specific tension and tendon properties were found to remain following low-load resistance training with vascular occlusion, whereas they increased significantly after high-load training.

  6. Functional adaptation of tendon and skeletal muscle to resistance training in three patients with genetically verified classic Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Mathias Bech; Kjær, Michael; Svensson, René Brüggebusch; Andersen, Jesper Lovind; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Nielsen, Rie Harboe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: tendon and skeletal muscle function adapts to physical training of resistive nature, but it is unknown to what extent persons with genetically altered connective tissue – who have a higher than normal tendon extensibility – will obtain any effect upon their tendon and muscle when undergoing muscle strength training. We investigated patients with classical Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS) (collagen type V defect) who display articular hypermobility, skin extensibility and tissue fragility. Methods: subjects underwent strength training 3 times a week for 4 months and were tested before and after intervention in regards to muscle strength, tendon mechanical properties, and muscle function. Results: three subjects completed the scheduled 48 sessions and had no major adverse events. Mean isometric leg extension force and leg extensor power both increased by 8 and 11% respectively (358 to 397 N, and 117 to 123 W). The tendon stiffness was tested and an average increase in response to physical training, from 1795 to 2519 N/mm was found. On average, the training loads both in upper and lower body exercises increased by around 30% over the training period. When testing balance, the average sway-area of the participants decreased by 26% (0.144 to 0.108 m2). On the subscale of CIS20 the participants lowered their average subjective fatigue score from 33 to 25. Conclusion: in this small pilot study, heavy resistance training was both feasible and effective in classic Ehlers Danlos patients, and the results indicated that both tendon and skeletal muscle properties can be improved also in this patient group when they are subjected to resistance training. PMID:25489549

  7. Eccentric and concentric loading of the triceps surae: an in vivo study of dynamic muscle and tendon biomechanical parameters.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Saira; Morrissey, Dylan; Woledge, Roger C; Bader, Dan L; Screen, Hazel R C

    2015-04-01

    Triceps surae eccentric exercise is more effective than concentric exercise for treating Achilles tendinopathy, however the mechanisms underpinning these effects are unclear. This study compared the biomechanical characteristics of eccentric and concentric exercises to identify differences in the tendon load response. Eleven healthy volunteers performed eccentric and concentric exercises on a force plate, with ultrasonography, motion tracking, and EMG applied to measure Achilles tendon force, lower limb movement, and leg muscle activation. Tendon length was ultrasonographically tracked and quantified using a novel algorithm. The Fourier transform of the ground reaction force was also calculated to investigate for tremor, or perturbations. Tendon stiffness and extension did not vary between exercise types (P = .43). However, tendon perturbations were significantly higher during eccentric than concentric exercises (25%-40% higher, P = .02). Furthermore, perturbations during eccentric exercises were found to be negatively correlated with the tendon stiffness (R2 = .59). The particular efficacy of eccentric exercise does not appear to result from variation in tendon stiffness or extension within a given session. However, varied perturbation magnitude may have a role in mediating the observed clinical effects. This property is subject-specific, with the source and clinical time-course of such perturbations requiring further research.

  8. Anesthetic considerations for masticatory muscle tendon-aponeurosis hyperplasia: a report of 24 cases.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Ikumi; Inoue, Satoki; Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Kawakami, Tetsuji; Kirita, Tadaaki; Furuya, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Masticatory muscle tendon-aponeurosis hyperplasia (MMTAH) is a new disease entity characterized by limited mouth opening due to contracture of the masticatory muscles, resulting from hyperplasia of tendons and aponeuroses. In this case series, we report what methods of airway establishment were conclusively chosen after rapid induction of anesthesia. We had 24 consecutive patients with MMTAH who underwent surgical release of its contracture under general anesthesia. Rapid induction of anesthesia with propofol and rocuronium was chosen for all the cases. In 7 cases, intubation using the Macintosh laryngoscopy was attempted; however, 2 of those cases failed to be intubated on the first attempt. Finally, intubation using the McCoy laryngoscopy or fiber-optic intubation was alternatively used in these 2 cases. In 7 cases, the Trachlight was used. In the remaining 10 cases, fiber-optic intubation was used. Limited mouth opening in patients with MMTAH did not improve with muscular relaxation. "Square mandible" has been reported to be one of the clinical features in this disease; however, half of these 24 patients lacked this characteristic, which might affect a definitive diagnosis of this disease for anesthesiologists. An airway problem in patients with MMTAH should not be underestimated, which means that other intubation methods rather than direct laryngoscopy had better be considered.

  9. Scleraxis-Lineage Cells Contribute to Ectopic Bone Formation in Muscle and Tendon.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shailesh; Loder, Shawn J; Cholok, David; Peterson, Joshua; Li, John; Breuler, Christopher; Cameron Brownley, R; Hsin Sung, Hsiao; Chung, Michael T; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Li, Shuli; Zhao, Bin; Kaartinen, Vesa; Davis, Thomas A; Qureshi, Ammar T; Schipani, Ernestina; Mishina, Yuji; Levi, Benjamin

    2017-03-01

    The pathologic development of heterotopic ossification (HO) is well described in patients with extensive trauma or with hyperactivating mutations of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor ACVR1. However, identification of progenitor cells contributing to this process remains elusive. Here we show that connective tissue cells contribute to a substantial amount of HO anlagen caused by trauma using postnatal, tamoxifen-inducible, scleraxis-lineage restricted reporter mice (Scx-creERT2/tdTomato(fl/fl) ). When the scleraxis-lineage is restricted specifically to adults prior to injury marked cells contribute to each stage of the developing HO anlagen and coexpress markers of endochondral ossification (Osterix, SOX9). Furthermore, these adult preinjury restricted cells coexpressed mesenchymal stem cell markers including PDGFRα, Sca1, and S100A4 in HO. When constitutively active ACVR1 (caACVR1) was expressed in scx-cre cells in the absence of injury (Scx-cre/caACVR1(fl/fl) ), tendons and joints formed HO. Postnatal lineage-restricted, tamoxifen-inducible caACVR1 expression (Scx-creERT2/caACVR1(fl/fl) ) was sufficient to form HO after directed cardiotoxin-induced muscle injury. These findings suggest that cells expressing scleraxis within muscle or tendon contribute to HO in the setting of both trauma or hyperactive BMP receptor (e.g., caACVR1) activity. Stem Cells 2017;35:705-710.

  10. Botulinum Neurotoxin A injections influence stretching of the gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Haubruck, Patrick; Mannava, Sandeep; Plate, Johannes F; Callahan, Michael F; Wiggins, Walter F; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Tuohy, Christopher J; Saul, Katherine R; Smith, Thomas L

    2012-08-01

    Botulinum Neurotoxin A (BoNT-A) injections have been used for the treatment of muscle contractures and spasticity. This study assessed the influence of (BoNT-A) injections on passive biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit. Mousegastrocnemius muscle (GC) was injected with BoNT-A (n = 18) or normal saline (n = 18) and passive, non-destructive, in vivo load relaxation experimentation was performed to examine how the muscle-tendon unit behaves after chemical denervation with BoNT-A. Injection of BoNT-A impaired passive muscle recovery (15% vs. 35% recovery to pre-stretching baseline, p < 0.05) and decreased GC stiffness (0.531 ± 0.061 N/mm vs. 0.780 ± 0.037 N/mm, p < 0.05) compared to saline controls. The successful use of BoNT-A injections as an adjunct to physical therapy may be in part attributed to the disruption of the stretch reflex; thereby modulating in vivo passive muscle properties. However, it is also possible that BoNT-A injection may alter the structure of skeletal muscle; thus modulating the in vivo passive biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit.

  11. Expression of extracellular matrix components and related growth factors in human tendon and muscle after acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, K M; Bjerrum, S S; Schjerling, P; Kjaer, M

    2013-06-01

    Acute kicking exercise induces collagen synthesis in both tendon and muscle in humans, but it is not known if this relates to increased collagen transcription and if other matrix genes are regulated. Young men performed 1 h of one-leg kicking at 67% of max workload. Biopsies were taken from the patellar tendon and vastus lateralis muscle of each leg at 2 (n = 10), 6 (n = 11), or 26 h (n = 10) after exercise. Levels of messenger ribonucleic acid mRNA for collagens, noncollagenous matrix proteins, and growth factors were measured with real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. In tendon, gene expression was unchanged except for a decrease in insulin-like growth factor-IEa (IGF-IEa; P < 0.05). In muscle, collagen expression was not significantly altered, while levels of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), IGF-IEa, transforming growth factor-β1, -2 (TGF-β), and the TGF-β receptor II mRNA were increased (P < 0.05). Matrix components tenascin-C, fibronectin, and decorin were also induced in loaded muscle (P < 0.05), while fibromodulin was unaffected. In conclusion, the relatively robust changes in matrix components and related growth factors in muscle indicate a stimulation of extracellular matrix even with moderate exercise. However, in tendon tissue, this exercise model does not appear to induce any anabolic response on the transcriptional level.

  12. Noninvasive ultrasonic monitoring of the mechanical properties of selected muscles and connected tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakir Hossain, M.; Grill, W.

    2012-04-01

    The force-length relation is one of the most important mechanical properties of skeletal muscular tissue. Due to the rather limited availability of non-invasive methods suitable to quantify the in-vivo biomechanical properties of activated human muscles and connected tendons, the quantification of the bio-mechanical properties is difficult. The measurement principle applied here is based on the detection of the dynamics of the muscle under observation by an ultrasonic caliper and monitoring of the externally present forces by a synchronously operated ultrasonic force sensor. The developed monitoring scheme is exemplified for gradual increasing voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of the gastrocnemius muscle up to maximum contraction, with the force sensor restricting the flexion of the joint. The temporal resolution for the monitoring is 0.01 s, relating to a monitoring rate of 100 Hz and is achieved with a spatial resolution concerning the observed lateral extension of the muscle of 0.01 mm. The employed low power, economic and non-intrusive detection scheme and respective instrumentation have the demonstrated potential to quantify the in-vivo hysteretic behavior of the observed force-length relation for MVIC of the human gastrocnemius muscle for the first time. The purpose of this study was to determine in-vivo the force-length relations for the human gastrocnemius and biceps muscles noninvasively by suitable experimental techniques with high temporal and spatial resolution concerning monitoring of the biomechanical relevant parameters involved in the dynamics of activated muscle. The data is collected and analyzed to derive quantitative information on force-length relations, essential for the analysis of muscle performance and interpretation by musculoskeletal models. The involved technologies are demonstrated and the respective results are presented and discussed.

  13. Exercise-induced changes in triceps surae tendon stiffness and muscle strength affect running economy in humans.

    PubMed

    Albracht, Kirsten; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether increased tendon-aponeurosis stiffness and contractile strength of the triceps surae (TS) muscle-tendon units induced by resistance training would affect running economy. Therefore, an exercise group (EG, n = 13) performed a 14-week exercise program, while the control group (CG, n = 13) did not change their training. Maximum isometric voluntary contractile strength and TS tendon-aponeurosis stiffness, running kinematics and fascicle length of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle during running were analyzed. Furthermore, running economy was determined by measuring the rate of oxygen consumption at two running velocities (3.0, 3.5 ms(-1)). The intervention resulted in a ∼7 % increase in maximum plantarflexion muscle strength and a ∼16 % increase in TS tendon-aponeurosis stiffness. The EG showed a significant ∼4 % reduction in the rate of oxygen consumption and energy cost, indicating a significant increase in running economy, while the CG showed no changes. Neither kinematics nor fascicle length and elongation of the series-elastic element (SEE) during running were affected by the intervention. The unaffected SEE elongation of the GM during the stance phase of running, in spite of a higher tendon-aponeurosis stiffness, is indicative of greater energy storage and return and a redistribution of muscular output within the lower extremities while running after the intervention, which might explain the improved running economy.

  14. Rupture of the distal biceps tendon combined with a supinator muscle tear in a 51-year-old woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nayyar, Samir; Quirno, Martin; Hasan, Saqib; Rybak, Leon; Meislin, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Distal biceps tendon rupture is a relatively uncommon occurrence in the general female population, and to our knowledge, has not been reported in association with a supinator muscle tear. We report a case of 51-year-old woman who experienced sharp pain in her forearm and elbow after lifting a heavy object. History and physical examination raised suspicion for a distal biceps tendon rupture. MRI imaging determined a combined distal biceps tendon tear with a supinator muscle tear with subsequent confirmation at surgery. Surgical repair was performed for the distal biceps tendon only through a single incision approach using the Endobutton technique.

  15. Full-tendon nasal transposition of the vertical rectus muscles: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Emma L M; Boyle, Natalie J; Lee, John P

    2007-01-01

    The authors report the results of a retrospective review of patients who underwent nasal transposition of the vertical rectus muscles between 1997 and 2004. Eight patients were identified, 4 males and 4 females. There was an average age at surgery of 37 years, with a range from 8 to 79 years. The aetiologies included 6 patients with trauma to their medial rectus (4 following endoscopic sinus surgery) and 2 patients with paralytic medial rectus muscles secondary to 3rd nerve palsy. All patients underwent whole tendon transposition of the superior and inferior rectus muscles, with resection of both muscles in 7 cases, before reattachment adjacent to the upper and lower borders of the medial rectus, respectively. One patient had a reduced amount of resection and this was combined with inferior oblique disinsertion and traction sutures. All patients had a reduction in deviation in the primary position and in 5 patients there was some improvement in adduction. A consequence of surgery was a degree of limitation of abduction, elevation and depression in some patients. Overall, patients were satisfied with the improvement in their appearance.

  16. Dissection of a single rat muscle-tendon complex changes joint moments exerted by neighboring muscles: implications for invasive surgical interventions.

    PubMed

    Maas, Huub; Baan, Guus C; Huijing, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate mechanical functioning of a single skeletal muscle, active within a group of (previously) synergistic muscles. For this purpose, we assessed wrist angle-active moment characteristics exerted by a group of wrist flexion muscles in the rat for three conditions: (i) after resection of the upper arm skin; (ii) after subsequent distal tenotomy of flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU); and (iii) after subsequent freeing of FCU distal tendon and muscle belly from surrounding tissues (MT dissection). Measurements were performed for a control group and for an experimental group after recovery (5 weeks) from tendon transfer of FCU to extensor carpi radialis (ECR) insertion. To assess if FCU tenotomy and MT dissection affects FCU contributions to wrist moments exclusively or also those of neighboring wrist flexion muscles, these data were compared to wrist angle-moment characteristics of selectively activated FCU. FCU tenotomy and MT dissection decreased wrist moments of the control group at all wrist angles tested, including also angles for which no or minimal wrist moments were measured when activating FCU exclusively. For the tendon transfer group, wrist flexion moment increased after FCU tenotomy, but to a greater extent than can be expected based on wrist extension moments exerted by selectively excited transferred FCU. We conclude that dissection of a single muscle in any surgical treatment does not only affect mechanical characteristics of the target muscle, but also those of other muscles within the same compartment. Our results demonstrate also that even after agonistic-to-antagonistic tendon transfer, mechanical interactions with previously synergistic muscles do remain present.

  17. Timing matters: tuning the mechanics of a muscle-tendon unit by adjusting stimulation phase during cyclic contractions.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Gregory S; Robertson, Benjamin D; Azizi, Emanuel; Roberts, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    A growing body of research on the mechanics and energetics of terrestrial locomotion has demonstrated that elastic elements acting in series with contracting muscle are critical components of sustained, stable and efficient gait. Far fewer studies have examined how the nervous system modulates muscle-tendon interaction dynamics to optimize 'tuning' or meet varying locomotor demands. To explore the fundamental neuromechanical rules that govern the interactions between series elastic elements (SEEs) and contractile elements (CEs) within a compliant muscle-tendon unit (MTU), we used a novel work loop approach that included implanted sonomicrometry crystals along muscle fascicles. This enabled us to decouple CE and SEE length trajectories when cyclic strain patterns were applied to an isolated plantaris MTU from the bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus). Using this approach, we demonstrate that the onset timing of muscle stimulation (i.e. stimulation phase) that involves a symmetrical MTU stretch-shorten cycle during active force production results in net zero mechanical power output, and maximal decoupling of CE and MTU length trajectories. We found it difficult to 'tune' the muscle-tendon system for strut-like isometric force production by adjusting stimulation phase only, as the zero power output condition involved significant positive and negative mechanical work by the CE. A simple neural mechanism - adjusting muscle stimulation phase - could shift an MTU from performing net zero to net positive (energy producing) or net negative (energy absorbing) mechanical work under conditions of changing locomotor demand. Finally, we show that modifications to the classical work loop paradigm better represent in vivo muscle-tendon function during locomotion.

  18. Relationship between tendon stiffness and failure: a metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    LaCroix, Andrew S; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E; Lakes, Roderic S; Vanderby, Ray

    2013-07-01

    Tendon is a highly specialized, hierarchical tissue designed to transfer forces from muscle to bone; complex viscoelastic and anisotropic behaviors have been extensively characterized for specific subsets of tendons. Reported mechanical data consistently show a pseudoelastic, stress-vs.-strain behavior with a linear slope after an initial toe region. Many studies report a linear, elastic modulus, or Young's modulus (hereafter called elastic modulus) and ultimate stress for their tendon specimens. Individually, these studies are unable to provide a broader, interstudy understanding of tendon mechanical behavior. Herein we present a metaanalysis of pooled mechanical data from a representative sample of tendons from different species. These data include healthy tendons and those altered by injury and healing, genetic modification, allograft preparation, mechanical environment, and age. Fifty studies were selected and analyzed. Despite a wide range of mechanical properties between and within species, elastic modulus and ultimate stress are highly correlated (R(2) = 0.785), suggesting that tendon failure is highly strain-dependent. Furthermore, this relationship was observed to be predictable over controlled ranges of elastic moduli, as would be typical of any individual species. With the knowledge gained through this metaanalysis, noninvasive tools could measure elastic modulus in vivo and reasonably predict ultimate stress (or structural compromise) for diseased or injured tendon.

  19. Superficial aponeurosis of human gastrocnemius is elongated during contraction: implications for modeling muscle-tendon unit.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Tadashi; Muraoka, Tetsuro; Kawakami, Yasuo; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2002-02-01

    Two questions were addressed in this study: (1) how much strain of the superficial aponeurosis of the human medial gastrocnemius muscle (MG) was obtained during voluntary isometric contractions in vivo, (2) whether there existed inhomogeneity of the strain along the superficial aponeurosis. Seven male subjects, whose knees were extended and ankles were flexed at right angle, performed isometric plantar flexion while elongation of superficial aponeurosis of MG was determined from the movements of the intersections made by the superficial aponeurosis and fascicles using ultrasonography. The strain of the superficial aponeurosis at the maximum voluntary contraction, estimated from the elongation and length data, was 5.6+/-1.2%. There was no significant difference in strain between the proximal and distal parts of the superficial aponeurosis. Based on the present result and that of our previous study for the same subjects (J. Appl. Physiol 90 (2001) 1671), a model was formulated for a contracting uni-pennate muscle-tendon unit. This model, which could be applied to isometric contractions at other angles and therefore of wide use, showed that similar strain between superficial and deep aponeuroses of MG contributed to homogeneous fascicle length change within MG during contractions. These findings would contribute to clarifying the functions of the superficial aponeurosis and the effects of the superficial aponeurosis elongation on the whole muscle behavior.

  20. Muscle and tendon connective tissue adaptation to unloading, exercise and NSAID.

    PubMed

    Dideriksen, Kasper

    2014-04-01

    The extracellular matrix network of skeletal muscle and tendon connective tissue is primarily composed of collagen and connects the muscle contractile protein to the bones in the human body. The mechanical properties of the connective tissue are important for the effectiveness of which the muscle force is transformed into movement. Periods of unloading and exercise affect the synthesis rate of connective tissue collagen protein, whereas only sparse information exits regarding collagen protein degradation. It is likely, though, that changes in both collagen protein synthesis and degradation are required for remodeling of the connective tissue internal structure that ultimately results in altered mechanical properties of the connective tissue. Both unloading and exercise lead to increased production of growth factors and inflammatory mediators that are involved in connective tissue remodeling. Despite the fact that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs seem to inhibit the healing process of connective tissue and the stimulating effect of exercise on connective tissue protein synthesis, these drugs are often consumed in relation to connective tissue injury and soreness. However, the potential effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on connective tissue needs further investigation.

  1. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  2. Muscle-tendon unit stiffness does not independently affect voluntary explosive force production or muscle intrinsic contractile properties.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Ricci; Folland, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of muscle-tendon unit (MTU) stiffness and explosive force production during voluntary and evoked contractions of the knee extensors. Thirty-four untrained participants performed a series of explosive voluntary and electrically evoked (octets (8 pulses, 300 Hz) via femoral nerve stimulation) isometric contractions. Maximum voluntary force (MVF) was assessed during maximum voluntary contractions. Explosive force production was assessed as the time taken, from force onset (0 N), to achieve specific levels of absolute (25-300 N) and relative force (5%-75% MVF) during the explosive contractions. Ultrasonic images of the vastus lateralis were recorded during 10-s ramp contractions to assess MTU stiffness, which was expressed in absolute (N · mm(-1)) and relative (to MVF and resting tendon-aponeurosis length) terms. Bivariate correlations suggested that absolute MTU stiffness was associated with voluntary explosive force (time to achieve 150-300 N: r = -0.35 to -0.54, P < 0.05). However, no relationships between stiffness and voluntary explosive force were observed when the influence of MVF was removed, either via partial correlations of absolute values (P ≥ 0.49) or considering relative values (P ≥ 0.14). Similarly, absolute MTU stiffness was related to explosive force during evoked octet contractions (r = -0.41 to -0.64, P < 0.05), but these correlations were no longer present when accounting for the influence of MVF (P ≥ 0.15). Therefore, once maximum strength was considered, MTU stiffness had no independent relationship with voluntary explosive force production or the evoked capacity for explosive force.

  3. Quantitative second harmonic generation imaging and modeling of the optical clearing mechanism in striated muscle and tendon.

    PubMed

    LaComb, Ronald; Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Carey, Shawn; Campagnola, Paul J

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanisms and capabilities of optical clearing in conjunction with second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging in tendon and striated muscle. Our approach combines three-dimensional (3-D) SHG imaging of the axial attenuation and directional response with Monte Carlo simulation (based on measured bulk optical properties) of the creation intensity and propagation through the tissues. Through these experiments and simulations, we show that reduction of the primary filter following glycerol treatment dominates the axial attenuation response in both muscle and tendon. However, these disparate tissue types are shown to clear through different mechanisms of the glycerol-tissue interaction. In the acellular tendon, glycerol application reduces scattering by both index matching as well as increasing the interfibril separation. This results in an overall enhancement of the 3-D SHG intensity, where good agreement is found between experiment and simulation. Through analysis of the axial response as a function of glycerol concentration in striated muscle, we conclude that the mechanism in this tissue arises from matching of the refractive index of the cytoplasm of the muscle cells with that of the surrounding higher-index collagenous perimysium. We further show that the proportional decrease in the scattering coefficient mu(s) with increasing glycerol fraction can be well-approximated by Mie theory.

  4. The theoretical limits to the power output of a muscle-tendon complex with inertial and gravitational loads.

    PubMed Central

    Galantis, Apostolos; Woledge, Roger C

    2003-01-01

    When a muscle delivers power to an inertial load through a spring, the peak power can exceed the maximum that the muscle alone could produce. Using normalized differential equations relating dimensionless quantities we show, by solving the equations either analytically or numerically, that one dimensionless constant (Xi), representing the inertial load, is sufficient to specify the behaviour during shortening of a muscle-tendon complex with linear force-velocity and force-extension properties. In the presence of gravity, an additional constant (Gamma), representing the gravitational acceleration, is required. Nonlinear force-velocity and force-extension relationships each introduce an additional constant, representing their curvature. In the absence of gravity the power output delivered to an inertial load is limited to approximately 1.4 times the maximum power of the muscle alone, and when gravity is present the power delivered is limited to approximately twice the power of muscle alone. These limits are found for the purely inertial load at Xi ca. 1 and with gravity acting at XiGamma = 0.5 with Xi arbitrarily small. The effects of nonlinear muscle and tendon properties tend to cancel each other out and do not produce large deviations from these optima. A lever system of constant ratio between muscle and load does not alter these limits. Cams and catches are required to exceed these limits and attain the high power outputs sometimes observed during explosive animal movement. PMID:12965015

  5. Exploratory factor analysis for differentiating sensory and mechanical variables related to muscle-tendon unit elongation

    PubMed Central

    Chagas, Mauro H.; Magalhães, Fabrício A.; Peixoto, Gustavo H. C.; Pereira, Beatriz M.; Andrade, André G. P.; Menzel, Hans-Joachim K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Stretching exercises are able to promote adaptations in the muscle-tendon unit (MTU), which can be tested through physiological and biomechanical variables. Identifying the key variables in MTU adaptations is crucial to improvements in training. Objective To perform an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) involving the variables often used to evaluate the response of the MTU to stretching exercises. Method Maximum joint range of motion (ROMMAX), ROM at first sensation of stretching (FSTROM), peak torque (torqueMAX), passive stiffness, normalized stiffness, passive energy, and normalized energy were investigated in 36 participants during passive knee extension on an isokinetic dynamometer. Stiffness and energy values were normalized by the muscle cross-sectional area and their passive mode assured by monitoring the EMG activity. Results EFA revealed two major factors that explained 89.68% of the total variance: 53.13% was explained by the variables torqueMAX, passive stiffness, normalized stiffness, passive energy, and normalized energy, whereas the remaining 36.55% was explained by the variables ROMMAX and FSTROM. Conclusion This result supports the literature wherein two main hypotheses (mechanical and sensory theories) have been suggested to describe the adaptations of the MTU to stretching exercises. Contrary to some studies, in the present investigation torqueMAX was significantly correlated with the variables of the mechanical theory rather than those of the sensory theory. Therefore, a new approach was proposed to explain the behavior of the torqueMAX during stretching exercises. PMID:27437715

  6. Exploratory factor analysis for differentiating sensory and mechanical variables related to muscle-tendon unit elongation.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Mauro H; Magalhães, Fabrício A; Peixoto, Gustavo H C; Pereira, Beatriz M; Andrade, André G P; Menzel, Hans-Joachim K

    2016-03-22

    Background Stretching exercises are able to promote adaptations in the muscle-tendon unit (MTU), which can be tested through physiological and biomechanical variables. Identifying the key variables in MTU adaptations is crucial to improvements in training. Objective To perform an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) involving the variables often used to evaluate the response of the MTU to stretching exercises. Method Maximum joint range of motion (ROMMAX), ROM at first sensation of stretching (FSTROM), peak torque (torqueMAX), passive stiffness, normalized stiffness, passive energy, and normalized energy were investigated in 36 participants during passive knee extension on an isokinetic dynamometer. Stiffness and energy values were normalized by the muscle cross-sectional area and their passive mode assured by monitoring the EMG activity. Results EFA revealed two major factors that explained 89.68% of the total variance: 53.13% was explained by the variables torqueMAX, passive stiffness, normalized stiffness, passive energy, and normalized energy, whereas the remaining 36.55% was explained by the variables ROMMAX and FSTROM. Conclusion This result supports the literature wherein two main hypotheses (mechanical and sensory theories) have been suggested to describe the adaptations of the MTU to stretching exercises. Contrary to some studies, in the present investigation torqueMAX was significantly correlated with the variables of the mechanical theory rather than those of the sensory theory. Therefore, a new approach was proposed to explain the behavior of the torqueMAX during stretching exercises.

  7. Relationships Between Lower-Body Muscle Structure and Lower-Body Strength, Power, and Muscle-Tendon Complex Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Secomb, Josh L; Lundgren, Lina E; Farley, Oliver R L; Tran, Tai T; Nimphius, Sophia; Sheppard, Jeremy M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether any relationships were present between lower-body muscle structure and strength and power qualities. Fifteen elite male surfing athletes performed a battery of lower-body strength and power tests, including countermovement jump (CMJ), squat jump (SJ), isometric midthigh pull (IMTP), and had their lower-body muscle structure assessed with ultrasonography. In addition, lower-body muscle-tendon complex (MTC) stiffness and dynamic strength deficit (DSD) ratio were calculated from the CMJ and IMTP. Significant relationships of large to very large strength were observed between the vastus lateralis (VL) thickness of the left (LVL) and right (RVL) leg and peak force (PF) (r = 0.54-0.77, p < 0.01-0.04), peak velocity (PV) (r = 0.66-0.83, p < 0.01), and peak jump height (r = 0.62-0.80, p < 0.01) in the CMJ and SJ, as well as IMTP PF (r = 0.53-0.60, p = 0.02-0.04). Furthermore, large relationships were found between left lateral gastrocnemius (LG) pennation angle and SJ and IMTP PF (r = 0.53, p = 0.04, and r = 0.70, p < 0.01, respectively) and between LG and IMTP relative PF (r = 0.63, p = 0.01). Additionally, large relationships were identified between lower-body MTC stiffness and DSD ratio (r = 0.68, p < 0.01), right (LG) pennation angle (r = 0.51, p = 0.05), CMJ PF (r = 0.60, p = 0.02), and jump height (r = 0.53, p = 0.04). These results indicate that greater VL thickness and increased LG pennation angle are related to improved performance in the CMJ, SJ, and IMTP. Furthermore, these results suggest that lower-body MTC stiffness explains a large amount of variance in determining an athlete's ability to rapidly apply force during a dynamic movement.

  8. Calf muscle-tendon lengths before and after Tendo-Achilles lengthenings and gastrocnemius lengthenings for equinus in cerebral palsy and idiopathic toe walking.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Jessica; Vasavada, Anita N; McMulkin, Mark L

    2009-06-01

    The calf muscle-tendon lengths in children exhibiting equinus gait in two clinical populations, cerebral palsy (CP) and idiopathic toe walking (ITW), were examined to compare the effects of diagnosis and two different surgical procedures, Tendo-Achilles lengthening (TAL) versus Vulpius procedure (VP) gastrocnemius recession. Pre- and post-surgical gait data were obtained from 38 subjects (58 limbs) and 38 age-matched controls. Peak muscle-tendon lengths increased following surgery in 84% of limbs. For medial gastrocnemius (MGAS) and lateral gastrocnemius (LGAS) in stance, muscle-tendon lengths increased significantly following TAL surgeries but were not significantly different pre- and post-VP surgeries. For soleus (SOL) (swing and stance) and MGAS and LGAS (swing), muscle-tendon lengths increased significantly following both TAL and VP surgeries. Pre-operatively, muscle-tendon lengths were significantly shorter for the TAL group compared to the VP group; however, post-operatively the lengths were not significantly different between the surgeries. There were no significant differences between CP and ITW patients or indications that the surgery affected the groups differently. The change in length following surgery was well correlated to the subjects' initial muscle-tendon length.

  9. Tendon gradient mineralization for tendon to bone interface integration.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jin; Thoreson, Andrew R; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2013-11-01

    Tendon-to-bone integration is a great challenge for tendon or ligament reconstruction regardless of use of autograft or allograft tendons. We mineralized the tendon, thus transforming the tendon-to-bone into a "bone-to-bone" interface for healing. Sixty dog flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were divided randomly into five groups: (1) normal FDP tendon, (2) CaP (non-extraction and mineralization without fetuin), (3) CaPEXT (Extraction by Na2 HPO4 and mineralization without fetuin), (4) CaPFetuin (non-extraction and mineralization with fetuin), and (5) CaPEXTFetuin (extraction and mineralization with fetuin). The calcium and phosphate content significantly increased in tendons treated with combination of extraction and fetuin compared to the other treatments. Histology also revealed a dense mineral deposition throughout the tendon outer layers and penetrated into the tendon to a depth of 200 µm in a graded manner. Compressive moduli were significantly lower in the four mineralized groups compared with normal control group. No significant differences in maximum failure strength or stiffness were found in the suture pull-out test among all groups. Mineralization of tendon alters the interface from tendon to bone into mineralized tendon to bone, which may facilitate tendon-to-bone junction healing following tendon or ligament reconstruction.

  10. Extended healing validation of an artificial tendon to connect the quadriceps muscle to the Tibia: 180-day study.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Alan J; Litsky, Alan S; Mayerson, Joel L; Stringer, Keith; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2012-07-01

    Whenever a tendon or its bone insertion is disrupted or removed, existing surgical techniques provide a temporary connection or scaffolding to promote healing, but the interface of living to non-living materials soon breaks down under the stress of these applications, if it must bear the load more than acutely. Patients are thus disabled whose prostheses, defect size, or mere anatomy limit the availability or outcomes of such treatments. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device to join skeletal muscle to prosthetic or natural structures without this interface breakdown. In this study, the goat knee extensor mechanism (quadriceps tendon, patella, and patellar tendon) was removed from the right hind limb in 16 goats. The device connected the quadriceps muscle to a stainless steel bone plate on the tibia. Mechanical testing and histology specimens were collected from each operated leg and contralateral unoperated control legs at 180 days. Maximum forces in the operated leg (vs. unoperated) were 1,400 ± 93 N (vs. 1,179 ± 61 N), linear stiffnesses were 33 ± 3 N/mm (vs. 37 ± 4 N/mm), and elongations at failure were 92.1 ± 5.3 mm (vs. 68.4 ± 3.8 mm; mean ± SEM). Higher maximum forces (p = 0.02) and elongations at failure (p=0.008) of legs with the device versus unoperated controls were significant; linear stiffnesses were not (p=0.3). We believe this technology will yield improved procedures for clinical challenges in orthopedic oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and tendon injury reconstruction.

  11. Age-related greater Achilles tendon compliance is not associated with larger plantar flexor muscle fascicle strains in senior women

    PubMed Central

    Csapo, R.; Malis, V.; Hodgson, J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the age-associated decrease of tendon stiffness would necessitate greater muscle fascicle strains to produce similar levels of force during isometric contraction. Greater fascicle strains could force sarcomeres to operate in less advantageous regions of their force-length and force-velocity relationships, thus impairing the capacity to generate strong and explosive contractions. To test this hypothesis, sagittal-plane dynamic velocity-encoded phase-contrast magnetic resonance images of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle and Achilles tendon (AT) were acquired in six young (YW; 26.1 ± 2.3 yr) and six senior (SW; 76.7 ± 8.3 yr) women during submaximal isometric contraction (35% maximum voluntary isometric contraction) of the plantar flexor muscles. Multiple GM fascicle lengths were continuously determined by automatically tracking regions of interest coinciding with the end points of muscle fascicles evenly distributed along the muscle's proximo-distal length. AT stiffness and Young's modulus were measured as the slopes of the tendon's force-elongation and stress-strain curves, respectively. Despite significantly lower AT stiffness at older age (YW: 120.2 ± 52.3 N/mm vs. SW: 53.9 ± 44.4 N/mm, P = 0.040), contraction-induced changes in GM fascicle lengths were similar in both age groups at equal levels of absolute muscular force (4–5% fascicle shortening in both groups), and even significantly larger in YW (YW: 11–12% vs. SW: 6–8% fascicle shortening) at equal percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. These results suggest that factors other than AT stiffness, such as age-associated changes in muscle composition or fascicle slack, might serve as compensatory adaptations, limiting the degree of fascicle strains upon contraction. PMID:24505104

  12. Do Golgi tendon organs really inhibit muscle activity at high force levels to save muscles from injury, and adapt with strength training?

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Gordon

    2002-07-01

    Introductory textbooks commonly state that Golgi tendon organs (GTOs) are responsible for a reflex response that inhibits a muscle producing dangerously high tension (autogenic inhibition). Review of the relevant data from animal studies demonstrates that there is wide variability in the magnitude of, and even the presence of, GTO autogenic effects among locomotor hindlimb muscles, and that data on GTO effects under conditions of voluntary maximal muscle activation are lacking. A single available study on GTO function in humans, during a moderate contraction, surprisingly shows a reduction in autogenic inhibition during muscle-force production. Further, it is not possible to find experimental evidence supporting the idea that strength training may produce a decrease in GTO mediated autogenic inhibition, allowing greater muscle activation levels and hence greater force production.

  13. Relationship between muscle-tendon length, range of motion, and resistance to passive movement in children with normal and increased tone

    PubMed Central

    Matsukiyo, Ayumi; Goh, Ah-Cheng; Asagai, Yoshimi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to quantify the resistance to passive movement by measuring changes in muscle-tendon length and joint range of motion (ROM), before and after applying a standardized 5-kilogram tension force, and to correlate and compare these changes to muscle tone. [Subjects and Methods] Children with cerebral palsy (n=29) and typically developed children (n=12) participated in this observational study. The modified Ashworth scale (MAS) was used to assess tone in the right plantarflexor muscle. An ultrasound-imaging device was used to measure Δmuscle-tendon length in the right medial gastrocnemius muscle, and a goniometer was used to measure right ankle ΔROM. [Results] Compared with the MAS, the results showed that ΔROM had the highest construct validity (convergent and discriminant) followed by Δmuscle-tendon unit length. Therefore, these parameters may be better alternatives to the MAS for the quantitative assessment of resistance to passive movement in patients with increased tone. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that measuring the change in the passive properties of the muscle-tendon unit, as well as the corresponding change in ROM, might provide better options for assessing resistance to passive movement or muscle tone. PMID:28265172

  14. Musculoskeletal diseases—tendon

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, Tomoya; Sakai, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Tendons establish specific connections between muscles and the skeleton by transferring contraction forces from skeletal muscle to bone thereby allowing body movement. Tendon physiology and pathology are heavily dependent on mechanical stimuli. Tendon injuries clinically represent a serious and still unresolved problem since damaged tendon tissues heal very slowly and no surgical treatment can restore a damaged tendon to its normal structural integrity and mechanical strength. Understanding how mechanical stimuli regulate tendon tissue homeostasis and regeneration will improve the treatment of adult tendon injuries that still pose a great challenge in today's medicine. Source of data This review summarizes the current status of tendon treatment and discusses new directions from the point of view of cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine approach. We searched the available literature using PubMed for relevant original articles and reviews. Growing points Identification of tendon cell markers has enabled us to study precisely tendon healing and homeostasis. Clinically, tissue engineering for tendon injuries is an emerging technology comprising elements from the fields of cellular source, scaffold materials, growth factors/cytokines and gene delivering systems. Areas timely for developing research The clinical settings to establish appropriate microenvironment for injured tendons with the combination of these novel cellular- and molecular-based scaffolds will be critical for the treatment. PMID:21729872

  15. Muscle-tendon units localization and activation level analysis based on high-density surface EMG array and NMF algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chengjun; Chen, Xiang; Cao, Shuai; Zhang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Objective. Some skeletal muscles can be subdivided into smaller segments called muscle-tendon units (MTUs). The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework to locate the active region of the corresponding MTUs within a single skeletal muscle and to analyze the activation level varieties of different MTUs during a dynamic motion task. Approach. Biceps brachii and gastrocnemius were selected as targeted muscles and three dynamic motion tasks were designed and studied. Eight healthy male subjects participated in the data collection experiments, and 128-channel surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals were collected with a high-density sEMG electrode grid (a grid consists of 8 rows and 16 columns). Then the sEMG envelopes matrix was factorized into a matrix of weighting vectors and a matrix of time-varying coefficients by nonnegative matrix factorization algorithm. Main results. The experimental results demonstrated that the weightings vectors, which represent invariant pattern of muscle activity across all channels, could be used to estimate the location of MTUs and the time-varying coefficients could be used to depict the variation of MTUs activation level during dynamic motion task. Significance. The proposed method provides one way to analyze in-depth the functional state of MTUs during dynamic tasks and thus can be employed on multiple noteworthy sEMG-based applications such as muscle force estimation, muscle fatigue research and the control of myoelectric prostheses. This work was supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China under Grant 61431017 and 61271138.

  16. Short-term strength training and the expression of myostatin and IGF-I isoforms in rat muscle and tendon: differential effects of specific contraction types.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, K M; Olesen, J L; Schjerling, P; Haddad, F; Langberg, H; Baldwin, K M; Kjaer, M

    2007-02-01

    In skeletal muscle, an increased expression of insulin like growth factor-I isoforms IGF-IEa and mechano-growth factor (MGF) combined with downregulation of myostatin is thought to be essential for training-induced hypertrophy. However, the specific effects of different contraction types on regulation of these factors in muscle are still unclear, and in tendon the functions of myostatin, IGF-IEa, and MGF in relation to training are unknown. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 4 days of concentric, eccentric, or isometric training (n = 7-9 per group) of the medial gastrocnemius, by stimulation of the sciatic nerve during general anesthesia. mRNA levels for myostatin, IGF-IEa, and MGF in muscle and Achilles' tendon were measured by real-time RT-PCR. Muscle myostatin mRNA decreased in response to all types of training (2- to 8-fold) (P < 0.05), but the effect of eccentric training was greater than concentric and isometric training (P < 0.05). In tendon, myostatin mRNA was detected, but no changes were seen after exercise. IGF-IEa and MGF increased in muscle (up to 15-fold) and tendon (up to 4-fold) in response to training (P < 0.01). In tendon no difference was seen between training types, but in muscle the effect of eccentric training was greater than concentric training for both IGF-IEa and MGF (P < 0.05), and for IGF-IEa isometric training had greater effect than concentric (P < 0.05). The results indicate a possible role for IGF-IEa and MGF in adaptation of tendon to training, and the combined changes in myostatin and IGF-IEa/MGF expression could explain the important effect of eccentric actions for muscle hypertrophy.

  17. Evolution of Skin Temperature after the Application of Compressive Forces on Tendon, Muscle and Myofascial Trigger Point

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Marina Figueiredo; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; de Oliveira Guirro, Elaine Caldeira; Girasol, Carlos Eduardo; de Oliveira, Alessandra Kelly; Dias, Fabiana Rodrigues Cancio; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Some assessment and diagnosis methods require palpation or the application of certain forces on the skin, which affects the structures beneath, we highlight the importance of defining possible influences on skin temperature as a result of this physical contact. Thus, the aim of the present study is to determine the ideal time for performing thermographic examination after palpation based on the assessment of skin temperature evolution. Randomized and crossover study carried out with 15 computer-user volunteers of both genders, between 18 and 45 years of age, who were submitted to compressive forces of 0, 1, 2 and 3 kg/cm2 for 30 seconds with a washout period of 48 hours using a portable digital dynamometer. Compressive forces were applied on the following spots on the dominant upper limb: myofascial trigger point in the levator scapulae, biceps brachii muscle and palmaris longus tendon. Volunteers were examined by means of infrared thermography before and after the application of compressive forces (15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes). In most comparisons made over time, a significant decrease was observed 30, 45 and 60 minutes after the application of compressive forces (p < 0.05) on the palmaris longus tendon and biceps brachii muscle. However, no difference was observed when comparing the different compressive forces (p > 0.05). In conclusion, infrared thermography can be used after assessment or diagnosis methods focused on the application of forces on tendons and muscles, provided the procedure is performed 15 minutes after contact with the skin. Regarding to the myofascial trigger point, the thermographic examination can be performed within 60 minutes after the contact with the skin. PMID:26070073

  18. Tendon organ sensitivity to steady-state isotonic contraction of in-series motor units in feline peroneus tertius muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Petit, J; Scott, J J; Reynolds, K J

    1997-01-01

    1. Measurements have been made of the sensitivity of tendon organs to steady-state, isotonic contractions of single and groups of in-series motor units in the peroneus tertius muscle of the cat hindlimb. 2. Linear relationships were found between the Ib afferent discharge and the contractile tension generated by tetanic stimulation of single motor units. These relationships held for the fast, fatiguable (FF) units and for all but the lowest tensions generated by the slow (S) and some fast, fatigue resistant (FR) units. The sensitivity of the organs was independent of the contractile properties of the units. 3. Groups of three motor units were stimulated isotonically at low rates (around 30 Hz), but asynchronously to produce a smooth tension profile. Again, linear relationships pertained between the discharge rate and the tension, and the sensitivity was the same for different motor unit types. 4. Under isotonic conditions, therefore, the tendon organs showed linear responses to the tension with similar sensitivities, indicating that tendon organs may have the capacity to signal faithfully steady-state contractile tensions. PMID:9097946

  19. SDF-1/CXCR4/CXCR7 is pivotal for vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and chronic allograft vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael N; Kalnins, Aivars; Andrassy, Martin; Wagner, Anne; Klussmann, Sven; Rentsch, Markus; Habicht, Antje; Pratschke, Sebastian; Stangl, Manfred; Bazhin, Alexandr V; Meiser, Bruno; Fischereder, Michael; Werner, Jens; Guba, Markus; Andrassy, Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Chronic rejection remains a major obstacle in transplant medicine. Recent studies suggest a crucial role of the chemokine SDF-1 on neointima formation after injury. Here, we investigate the potential therapeutic effect of inhibiting the SDF-1/CXCR4/CXCR7 axis with an anti-SDF-1 Spiegelmer (NOX-A12) on the development of chronic allograft vasculopathy. Heterotopic heart transplants from H-2bm12 to B6 mice and aortic transplants from Balb/c to B6 were performed. Mice were treated with NOX-A12. Control animals received a nonfunctional Spiegelmer (revNOX-A12). Samples were retrieved at different time points and analysed by histology, RT-PCR and proliferation assay. Blockade of SDF-1 caused a significant decrease in neointima formation as measured by intima/media ratio (1.0 ± 0.1 vs. 1.8 ± 0.1, P < 0.001 AoTx; 0.35 ± 0.05 vs. 1.13 ± 0.27, P < 0.05 HTx). In vitro treatment of primary vascular smooth muscle cells with NOX-A12 showed a significant reduction in proliferation (0.42 ± 0.04 vs. 0.24 ± 0.03, P < 0.05). TGF-β, TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly reduced under SDF-1 inhibition (3.42 ± 0.37 vs. 1.67 ± 0.33, P < 0.05; 2.18 ± 0.37 vs. 1.0 ± 0.39, P < 0.05; 2.18 ± 0.26 vs. 1.6 ± 0.1, P < 0.05). SDF-1/CXCR4/CXCR7 plays a critical role in the development of chronic allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of SDF-1 with NOX-A12 may represent a therapeutic option to ameliorate chronic rejection changes.

  20. Changes of calf muscle-tendon properties due to stretching and active movement of children with cerebral palsy--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Heng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Liu, Jie; Ren, Yupeng; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah J; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2009-01-01

    A portable ankle rehabilitation robot with intelligent stretching and game-based active movement training was used to treat the spastic impaired ankle of children with cerebral palsy over six weeks. The subject's calf muscles and Achilles tendon properties were evaluated before and after treatment using ultrasonography and biomechanical measures. It was found that there were decreased Achilles tendon resting length (2.5%), increased cross-sectional area (5.5%), increased stiffness (22.9%), increased Young's modulus (13.8%), decreased soleus muscle fascicular stiffness (53.7%), and decreased medial gastrocnemius fascicular stiffness (46.1%).

  1. Influence of muscle-tendon unit structure on rate of force development during the squat, countermovement, and drop jumps.

    PubMed

    Earp, Jacob E; Kraemer, William J; Cormie, Prue; Volek, Jeffery S; Maresh, Carl M; Joseph, Michael; Newton, Robert U

    2011-02-01

    Previous research has highlighted the importance of muscle and tendon structure to stretch shortening cycle performance. However, the relationships between muscle and tendon structure to performance are highly dependent on the speed and intensity of the movement. The purpose of this study was to determine if muscle and tendon structure is associated with the rate of force development (RFD) throughout static squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and drop jump (DJ; 30-cm height). Twenty-five strength- and power-trained men participated in the study. Using ultrasonography, vastus lateralis (VL) and gastrocnemius (GAS) pennation (PEN) and fascicle length (FL), and Achilles tendon (AT) thickness and length were measured. Subjects then performed SJ, CMJ, and DJ, during which RFD was calculated over time 5 distinct time intervals. During CMJs, early RFD could be predicted between 0 and 10 milliseconds by both GAS-FL (r² = 0.213, β = 0.461) and AT-length (r² = 0.191, β = 20.438). Between 10 and 30 milliseconds GAS-FL was a significant predictor of CMJ-RFD (r² = 0.218, β = 0.476). During DJ, initial RFD (0-10 milliseconds) could be significantly predicted by GAS-FL (r² = 0.185, β = 20.434), VL-PEN (r² = 0.189, β = 0.435), and GAS-PEN (r² = 0.188, β = 0.434). These findings suggest that longer ATs may have increased elasticity, which can decrease initial RFD during CMJ; thus, their use in talent identification is not recommended. The GAS fascicle length had an intensity-dependent relationship with RFD, serving to positively predict RFD during early CMJs and an inverse predictor during early DJs. During DDJs, subjects with greater PEN were better able to redirected initial impact forces. Although both strength and plyometric training have been shown to increase FL, only heavy strength training has been shown to increase PEN. Thus, when a high eccentric load or multiple jumps are required, heavy strength training might be used to elicit muscular adaptations

  2. Effect of muscle fatigue on the compliance of the gastrocnemius medialis tendon and aponeurosis.

    PubMed

    Mademli, Lida; Arampatzis, Adamantios; Walsh, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether or not the compliance of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) tendon and aponeurosis is influenced by submaximal fatiguing efforts. Fourteen elderly male subjects performed isometric maximal voluntary plantarflexion contractions (MVC) on a dynamometer before and after two fatiguing protocols. The protocols consisted of: (1) submaximal concentric isokinetic contractions (70% isokinetic MVC) at 60 degrees /s and (2) a sustained isometric contraction (40% isometric MVC) until failure to hold the defined moment. Ultrasonography was used to determine the elongation and strain of the GM tendon and aponeurosis. To account for the axis misalignment between ankle and dynamometer, the kinematics of the leg were captured at 120 Hz. The maximum moment decreased from 85.9+/-17.9 Nm prior fatigue to 79.2+/-19 Nm after isokinetic fatigue and to 69.9+/-16.4 Nm after isometric fatigue. The maximal strain of the GM tendon and aponeurosis before fatigue, after isokinetic and after isometric fatigue were 4.9+/-1.1%, 4.4+/-1.1% and 4.3+/-1.1% respectively. Neither the strain nor the elongation showed significant differences before and after each fatiguing task at any 100 N step of the calculated tendon force. This implies that the compliance was not altered after either the isokinetic or the isometric fatiguing task. Therefore it was concluded that the strains during the performed submaximal fatiguing tasks, were too small to provoke any structural changes in tendon and aponeurosis.

  3. Sensitivity of subject-specific models to Hill muscle-tendon model parameters in simulations of gait.

    PubMed

    Carbone, V; van der Krogt, M M; Koopman, H F J M; Verdonschot, N

    2016-06-14

    Subject-specific musculoskeletal (MS) models of the lower extremity are essential for applications such as predicting the effects of orthopedic surgery. We performed an extensive sensitivity analysis to assess the effects of potential errors in Hill muscle-tendon (MT) model parameters for each of the 56 MT parts contained in a state-of-the-art MS model. We used two metrics, namely a Local Sensitivity Index (LSI) and an Overall Sensitivity Index (OSI), to distinguish the effect of the perturbation on the predicted force produced by the perturbed MT parts and by all the remaining MT parts, respectively, during a simulated gait cycle. Results indicated that sensitivity of the model depended on the specific role of each MT part during gait, and not merely on its size and length. Tendon slack length was the most sensitive parameter, followed by maximal isometric muscle force and optimal muscle fiber length, while nominal pennation angle showed very low sensitivity. The highest sensitivity values were found for the MT parts that act as prime movers of gait (Soleus: average OSI=5.27%, Rectus Femoris: average OSI=4.47%, Gastrocnemius: average OSI=3.77%, Vastus Lateralis: average OSI=1.36%, Biceps Femoris Caput Longum: average OSI=1.06%) and hip stabilizers (Gluteus Medius: average OSI=3.10%, Obturator Internus: average OSI=1.96%, Gluteus Minimus: average OSI=1.40%, Piriformis: average OSI=0.98%), followed by the Peroneal muscles (average OSI=2.20%) and Tibialis Anterior (average OSI=1.78%) some of which were not included in previous sensitivity studies. Finally, the proposed priority list provides quantitative information to indicate which MT parts and which MT parameters should be estimated most accurately to create detailed and reliable subject-specific MS models.

  4. The role of human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon interaction and architecture in maximal vertical jumping examined in vivo.

    PubMed

    Farris, Dominic James; Lichtwark, Glen A; Brown, Nicholas A T; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2016-02-01

    Humans utilise elastic tendons of lower limb muscles to store and return energy during walking, running and jumping. Anuran and insect species use skeletal structures and/or dynamics in conjunction with similarly compliant structures to amplify muscle power output during jumping. We sought to examine whether human jumpers use similar mechanisms to aid elastic energy usage in the plantar flexor muscles during maximal vertical jumping. Ten male athletes performed maximal vertical squat jumps. Three-dimensional motion capture and a musculoskeletal model were used to determine lower limb kinematics that were combined with ground reaction force data in an inverse dynamics analysis. B-mode ultrasound imaging of the lateral gastrocnemius (GAS) and soleus (SOL) muscles was used to measure muscle fascicle lengths and pennation angles during jumping. Our results highlighted that both GAS and SOL utilised stretch and recoil of their series elastic elements (SEEs) in a catapult-like fashion, which likely serves to maximise ankle joint power. The resistance of supporting of body weight allowed initial stretch of both GAS and SOL SEEs. A proximal-to-distal sequence of joint moments and decreasing effective mechanical advantage early in the extension phase of the jumping movement were observed. This facilitated a further stretch of the SEE of the biarticular GAS and delayed recoil of the SOL SEE. However, effective mechanical advantage did not increase late in the jump to aid recoil of elastic tissues.

  5. Kank Is an EB1 Interacting Protein that Localises to Muscle-Tendon Attachment Sites in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Clohisey, Sara M. R.; Dzhindzhev, Nikola S.; Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about how microtubules are regulated in different cell types during development. EB1 plays a central role in the regulation of microtubule plus ends. It directly binds to microtubule plus ends and recruits proteins which regulate microtubule dynamics and behaviour. We report the identification of Kank, the sole Drosophila orthologue of human Kank proteins, as an EB1 interactor that predominantly localises to embryonic attachment sites between muscle and tendon cells. Human Kank1 was identified as a tumour suppressor and has documented roles in actin regulation and cell polarity in cultured mammalian cells. We found that Drosophila Kank binds EB1 directly and this interaction is essential for Kank localisation to microtubule plus ends in cultured cells. Kank protein is expressed throughout fly development and increases during embryogenesis. In late embryos, it accumulates to sites of attachment between muscle and epidermal cells. A kank deletion mutant was generated. We found that the mutant is viable and fertile without noticeable defects. Further analysis showed that Kank is dispensable for muscle function in larvae. This is in sharp contrast to C. elegans in which the Kank orthologue VAB-19 is required for development by stabilising attachment structures between muscle and epidermal cells. PMID:25203404

  6. The reflex excitation of the soleus muscle of the decerebrate cat caused by vibration applied to its tendon

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, P. B. C.

    1966-01-01

    1. Vibration was applied longitudinally to the fully innervated soleus muscle of the decerebrate cat by attaching its tendon to a vibrator. Vibration at frequencies of 50-500/sec with amplitudes of 10 μ upwards caused the muscle to contract reflexly for as long as the vibration was maintained. The response was recorded myographically by a myograph mounted upon the vibrator, and electromyographically by gross `belly-tendon' leads. The reflex contraction produced several hundred g wt. of tension and involved too many motor units for their discharges to be separable. The maintained reflex was abolished by making the preparation spinal or by anaesthetizing it with pentobarbitone, but it persisted after removing the cerebellum. 2. The minimum latency for the appearance of the reflex response at the beginning of a period of vibration was about 10 msec. The latency of cessation of the response at the end of vibration was similarly short. 3. On increasing the amplitude of vibration at any particular frequency in the range 100-300/sec the resulting reflex tension increased to an approximate plateau for amplitudes of vibration of 100-200 μ. Further increase in the amplitude decreased the size of the contraction, though there was no such reduction in records of the `integrated' electromyogram. 4. Such large amplitudes of vibration also reduced the tension, and shortened the duration, of a twitch contraction of the muscle elicited by stimulating its nerve. The strength of a tetanic contraction was much less affected by vibration than was that of the twitch contraction, and the muscle action potential elicited by stimulation of the nerve was unaffected. Thus, large-amplitude vibration influenced the contractile mechanism of the muscle (cf. Buchtal & Kaiser, 1951). 5. Increasing the frequency of vibration increased the value of the plateau tension reached on increasing the amplitude. The effect was, however, relatively small and the largest increase seen was 3 g wt. of

  7. Anatomically remote muscle contraction facilitates patellar tendon reflex reinforcement while mental activity does not: a within-participants experimental trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Jendrassik maneuver (JM) is a remote facilitation muscular contraction shown to affect amplitude and temporal components of the human stretch reflex. Conflicting theoretical models exist regarding the neurological mechanism related to its ability to reinforce reflex parameters. One mechanism involves the gamma motoneurons of the fusimotor system, which are subject to both physical and mental activity. A second mechanism describes reduced alpha motoneuron presynaptic inhibition, which is not subject to mental activity. In the current study, we determined if mental activity could be used to create a reflex facilitation comparable to a remote muscle contraction. Method Using a within-participants design, we investigated the relative effect of the JM and a successfully employed mental task (Stroop task) on the amplitude and temporal components of the patellar tendon reflex. Results We found that the addition of mental activity had no influence on the patellar tendon reflex parameters measured, while the JM provided facilitation (increased reflex amplitude, decreased total reflex time). Conclusion The findings from this study support the view that the mechanism for the JM is a reduction in presynaptic inhibition of alpha motoneurons as it is influenced by physical and not mental activity. PMID:22958619

  8. Changes in illusory ankle movements induced by tendon vibrations during the delayed recovery phase of stretch-shortening cycle fatigue: an indirect study of muscle spindle sensitivity modifications.

    PubMed

    Regueme, S C; Barthèlemy, J; Gauthier, G M; Nicol, C

    2007-12-14

    This study examined the perceived movement velocity induced by tendon vibrations during the delayed recovery phase of a stretch-shortening cycle (SSC)-type exercise characterized by 2 to 4 days of neuromuscular and proprioceptive impairments. Seven subjects performed until exhaustion series of unilateral rebounds involving mostly the triceps surae muscle group. Fatigue effects were quantified for the exercised and non-exercised legs through muscle soreness and maximal voluntary plantarflexion test (MVC) performed immediately before (PRE) and after the SSC exercise, and repeated 2 days later (D2). At PRE and D2, mechanical vibrations at 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 Hz were applied to distal tendons of the exercised ankle. For each vibration, the subjects had to reproduce the perceived movement velocity with the non-exercised ankle. According to previous studies, the sole exercised leg was characterized by a D2 peak of muscle soreness associated, in the MVC test, with significant decreases in maximal force and mean soleus muscle activity. As compared to the PRE test and in all subjects, the vibrations applied at D2 to the tendon of the fatigued ankle extensor muscles led to significant decreases in the perceived movement velocity at 80 and 100 Hz, but to an increased one at 40 Hz. In contrast, vibrations applied to the tendon of the non-fatigued ankle flexor muscle did not result in any significant change. These results suggest that the delayed recovery phase of SSC fatigue is characterized by changes in muscle proprioception, which may partly result from a decreased sensitivity of the primary endings.

  9. Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal – Basic principles and recommendations in clinical and field Science Research: 2016 Update

    PubMed Central

    Padulo, Johnny; Oliva, Francesco; Frizziero, Antonio; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Summary The proper design and implementation of a study as well as a balanced and well-supported evaluation and interpretation of its main findings are of crucial importance when reporting and disseminating research. Also accountability, funding acknowledgement and adequately declaring any conflict of interest play a major role in science. Since the Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal (MLTJ) is committed to the highest scientific and ethical standards, we encourage all Authors to take into account and to comply, as much as possible, to the contents and issues discussed in this official editorial. This could be useful for improving the quality of the manuscripts, as well as to stimulate interest and debate and to promote constructive change, reflecting upon uses and misuses within our disciplines belonging to the field of “Clinical and Sport - Science Research”. PMID:27331026

  10. Inflamed shoulder tendons (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tearing and inflammation of the tendons of the shoulder muscles can occur in sports which require the ... pitching, swimming, and lifting weights. Most often the shoulder will heal if a break is taken from ...

  11. Influence of intramuscular fiber orientation on the Achilles tendon curvature using three-dimensional finite element modeling of contracting skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Kinugasa, Ryuta; Yamamura, Naoto; Sinha, Shantanu; Takagi, Shu

    2016-10-03

    Tendon curvature plays a key role in mechanical gain (amplifying the joint excursion relative to fiber length change) during joint motion, but the mechanism remains unresolved. A three-dimensional finite element (FE) model was used to investigate the influence of intramuscular fiber orientation upon the curvature pattern of the Achilles tendon during active muscular contraction. Two simulation models, with fiber pennation angles of θ = 25° and 47° were tested for the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. A smaller pennation angle (25°) of the soleus muscle fibers was accompanied by a large change in curvature whereas a larger pennation angle (47°) of the soleus muscle was accompanied by small effects. These results suggest that the fiber pennation angle determines the curvature of the tendon, and the magnitude of the curvature varies along the length of the aponeurosis. Such FE modeling has the potential of determining changes in force output consequent to changes in intramuscular fiber orientation arising from resistance training or unloading, and provides mechanism for predicting the risk of Achilles tendon ruptures.

  12. Effects of leg muscle tendon vibration on group Ia and group II reflex responses to stance perturbation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Marco; Nardone, Antonio; Schieppati, Marco

    2003-01-01

    Stretching the soleus (Sol) muscle during sudden toe-up rotations of the supporting platform in a standing subject evokes a short-latency response (SLR) and a medium-latency response (MLR). The aim of the present investigation was to further explore the afferent and spinal pathways mediating the SLR and MLR in lower limb muscles by means of tendon vibration. In seven subjects, toe-up or toe-down rotations were performed under: (1) control, (2) continuous bilateral vibration at 90 Hz of Achilles' tendon or tibialis anterior (TA) tendon, and (3) post-vibration conditions. Sol and TA background EMG activity and reflex responses were bilaterally recorded and analysed. Toe-up rotations induced SLRs and MLRs in Sol at average latencies of 40 and 66 ms, respectively. During vibration, the latency of both responses increased by about 2 ms. The area of the SLR significantly decreased during vibration, regardless of the underlying background activity, and almost returned to control value post-vibration. The area of Sol MLR was less influenced by vibration than SLR, the reduction being negligible with relatively high background activity. However, contrary to SLR, MLR was even more reduced post-vibration. Toe-down rotations induced no SLR in the TA, while a MLR was evoked at about 81 ms. The area of TA MLR decreased slightly during vibration but much more post-vibration. SLRs and MLRs were differently affected by changing the vibration frequency to 30 Hz: vibration had a negligible effect on the SLR, but still produced a significant effect on the MLR. The independence from the background EMG of the inhibitory effect of vibration upon the SLR suggests that vibration removes a constant amount of the Ia afferent input. This can be accounted for by either presynaptic inhibition of group Ia fibres or a ‘busy-line' phenomenon. The differential effect of vibration on SLRs and MLRs is compatible with the notions that spindle primaries have a higher sensitivity to vibration than

  13. Fresh-frozen Complete Extensor Mechanism Allograft versus Autograft Reconstruction in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanyin; Zhang, Hongtao; Ma, Qiong; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Yinglong; Fan, Qingyu; Ma, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Different clinical results have been reported in the repair of extensor mechanism disruption using fresh-frozen complete extensor mechanism (CEM) allograft, creating a need for a better understanding of fresh-frozen CME allograft reconstruction. Here, we perform histological and biomechanical analyses of fresh-frozen CEM allograft or autograft reconstruction in an in vivo rabbit model. Our histological results show complete incorporation of the quadriceps tendon into the host tissues, patellar survival and total integration of the allograft tibia, with relatively fewer osteocytes, into the host tibia. Vascularity and cellularity are reduced and delayed in the allograft but exhibit similar distributions to those in the autograft. The infrapatellar fat pad provides the main blood supply, and the lowest cellularity is observed in the patellar tendon close to the tibia in both the allograft and autograft. The biomechanical properties of the junction of quadriceps tendon and host tissues and those of the allograft patellar tendon are completely and considerably restored, respectively. Therefore, fresh-frozen CEM allograft reconstruction is viable, but the distal patellar tendon and the tibial block may be the weak links of the reconstruction. These findings provide new insight into the use of allograft in repairing disruption of the extensor mechanism. PMID:26911538

  14. Three-Dimensional Gait Analysis Following Achilles Tendon Rupture With Nonsurgical Treatment Reveals Long-Term Deficiencies in Muscle Strength and Function

    PubMed Central

    Tengman, Tine; Riad, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Background: Precise long-term assessment of movement and physical function following Achilles tendon rupture is required for the development and evaluation of treatment, including different regimens of physical therapy. Purpose: To assess intermediate-term (<10 years by conventional thinking) objective measures of physical function following Achilles tendon rupture treated nonsurgically and to compare these with self-reported measures of physical function. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Two to 5 years after Achilles tendon rupture, 9 women and 43 men (mean age, 49.2 years; range, 26-68 years) were assessed by physical examination, performance of 1-legged jumps, and 3-dimensional gait analysis (including calculation of muscle work). Self-reported scores for foot function (Achilles tendon rupture score) and level of physical activity were collected. Twenty age- and sex-matched controls were assessed in the same manner. Results: Physical examination of patients with the knee extended revealed 11.1° of dorsiflexion on the injured side and 9.2° on the uninjured side (P = .020), indicating gastrocnemius muscle lengthening. The 1-legged jump distance was shorter on the injured side (89.5 vs 96.2 cm; P < .001). Gait analysis showed higher peak dorsiflexion (14.3° vs 13.3°; P = .016) and lower concentric (positive) plantar flexor work (16.6 vs 19.9 J/kg; P = .001) in the ankle on the uninjured side. At the same time, eccentric (negative) dorsiflexor work was higher on the injured side (13.2 vs 11.9 J/kg; P = .010). Self-perceived foot function and physical activity were lower in patients than in healthy controls (mean Achilles tendon rupture score, 78.6 and 99.8, respectively). Conclusion: Nonsurgically treated patients with Achilles tendon rupture showed signs of both anatomic and functional lengthening of the tendon. Attenuated muscle strength and function were present during walking as long as 2 to 5 years after rupture, as

  15. Contribution of calf muscle-tendon properties to single-leg stance ability in the absence of visual feedback in relation to ageing.

    PubMed

    Onambélé, Gladys L; Narici, Marco V; Rejc, Enrico; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2007-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the importance of calf muscle-tendon properties for maintaining balance during single-leg stance increases in the absence of visual feedback. Trial duration, centre of pressure displacement normalized for trial duration (nD), electromyographic (EMG) activity of the main ankle plantarflexors and dorsiflexors, and ground reaction forces (F(P)), were measured in 20 younger (aged 18+/-1 years; mean+/-S.E.M.) and 28 older (aged 68+/-1 years) healthy participants during single-leg stance in eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) conditions. Plantarflexor muscle strength, activation capacity and tendon stiffness were assessed by dynamometry, electrical stimulation and ultrasonography, respectively. Muscle-tendon characteristics in the older participants were up to 55% (P<0.0001) lower compared with their younger counterparts. Trial duration, F(P), nD and EMG changed in EC compared with EO by 21% and up to approximately 4.6 times (P<0.01) in the two population groups. Multiple linear regression with age and the three muscle-tendon properties showed a substantial increment in EC compared to EO for trial duration (R(2)=0.86 versus R(2)=0.72), but a similarity for nD (R(2)=0.36 versus R(2)=0.33). These results suggest that factors other than the ones that we examined become important when steadiness rather than stance duration is the object of single-leg stance in the absence of vision.

  16. Persisting side-to-side differences in bone mineral content, but not in muscle strength and tendon stiffness after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rittweger, Jörn; Reeves, Neil D; Narici, Marco V; Belavý, Daniel L; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Maffulli, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    Tendon stiffness may be involved in limiting peak musculoskeletal forces and thus may constitute an upper limit for bone strength. The patellar tendon bone (PTB) graft, which is harvested from the patellar tendon during surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), is an ideal scenario to test this hypothesis. Eleven participants were recruited who had undergone surgical reconstruction of the ACL with a PTB graft 1-10 years prior to study inclusion. As previously reported, there was no side-to-side difference in thigh muscle cross-sectional area, in maximum voluntary knee extension torque, or in patellar tendon stiffness, suggesting full recovery of musculature and tendon. However, in the present study bone mineral content (BMC), assessed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography, was lower on the operated side than on the control side in four regions studied (P = 0·0019). Differences were less pronounced in the two sites directly affected by the operation (patella and tibia epiphysis) when compared to the more remote sites. Moreover, significant side-to-side differences were found in BMC in the trabecular compartment in the femoral and tibial epiphysis (P = 0·004 and P = 0·047, respectively) with reductions on the operated side, but increased in the patella (P = 0·00016). Cortical BMC, by contrast, was lower on the operated side at all sites except the tibia epiphysis (P = 0·09). These findings suggest that impaired recovery of BMC following ACL reconstruction is not because of lack of recovery of knee extensor strength or patellar tendon stiffness. The responsible mechanisms still remain to be determined.

  17. Tissue characteristics in tendon-to-bone healing change after rotator cuff repair using botulinumneurotoxin A for temporary paralysis of the supraspinatus muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Ficklscherer, A; Scharf, M; Hartl, T K; Schröder, C; Milz, S; Roßbach, B P; Gülecyüz, M F; Pietschmann, M F; Müller, P E

    2014-04-01

    We hypothesized that botulinumneurotoxin A (BoNtA) positively influences tissue characteristics at the re-insertion site when used as an adjuvant prior to rotator cuff repair. One hundred and sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a BoNtA or saline-injected control group. BoNtA or saline solution was injected into the supraspinatus muscle one week prior to repair of an artificially created supraspinatus tendon defect. Post-operatively, one subgroup was immobilized using a cast on the operated shoulder while the other had immediate mobilization. Histologically, the fibrocartilage transition zone was more prominent and better organized in the BoNtA groups when compared to the saline control group. In the immediately mobilized BoNtA groups significantly more collagen 2 at the insertion was detected than in the control groups (p<0.05). Fiber orientation of all BoNtA groups was better organized and more perpendicular to the epiphysis compared with control groups. Tendon stiffness differed significantly (p<0.05) between casted BoNtA and casted saline groups. Tendon viscoelasticity was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the immobilized saline groups no matter if repaired with increased or normal repair load. The results of this study suggest that reduction of load at the healing tendon-to-bone interface leads to improved repair tissue properties.

  18. ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF SMALL AND MEDIUM TEARS OF THE SUPRASPINATUS MUSCLE TENDON: EVALUATION OF THE CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER TWO YEARS OF FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovsky, Joel; Nascimento, Luís Gustavo Prata; Bueno, Rogério Serpone; Almeida, Luis Henrique; Strose, Eric; Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes from arthroscopic repairs on small and medium-sized tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon. Methods: 129 cases of isolated small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon were evaluated retrospectively. The average duration of pain was 29 months. The average joint range of motion comprised active elevation of 136°, lateral rotation of 58° and medial rotation at T12 level; and the preoperative functional UCLA score averaged 17 points. In all the cases, complete repair could be achieved. Results: The average score on the UCLA functional scale in the postoperative period was 32 points. The average length of follow-up was 39 months. Seventy-five cases (58%) had excellent results and 42 (32%) had good results. The average final active elevation was 156° with an average gain of 20°, and the average final lateral rotation was 57° with an average gain of 9°. Both of these were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The patients who underwent tenotomy of the long head of the biceps (LHB), with or without tenodesis, did not present statistically inferior functional outcomes, in comparison with the patients who only underwent decompression and lesion repair (P = 1.00). Fourteen cases (10.8%) presented complications during the postoperative period. Six (4.6%) developed adhesive capsulitis and four (3.1%) presented re-rupture of the tendon, proven by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions: Arthroscopic repair of small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon provided a functional clinical improvement, with good and excellent results in 90% of the cases. PMID:27047846

  19. The effect of tendon surface treatment on cell attachment for potential enhancement of tendon graft healing: an ex vivo model.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takahiro; Sun, Yu-Long; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2012-12-01

    For both tendon allografts and autografts, the surface, initially optimized for gliding, may not be ideal to facilitate tissue integration for graft healing to host tendon or bone. As a prelude to studying tendon-bone integration, we investigated the effect of surface treatments with trypsin or mechanical abrasion on cell attachment to the tendon surface in a canine ex vivo intrasynovial tendon tissue culture model. Intrasynovial tendon allograft surfaces were seeded with cells after the following treatments: (1) no treatment, (2) mechanical abrasion, (3) trypsin, and (4) abrasion and trypsin. The area covered by cells was determined using confocal laser microscopy at one and two weeks. Results were compared to untreated extrasynovial tendon. Additional tendons were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Tendons with trypsin treatment had significantly more surface coverage with cells than the other groups, after both one and two weeks of culture. In terms of the cellular shape and size, cells on tendons with trypsin treatment spread more and were more polygonal in shape, whereas tendons with mechanical abrasion with/without trypsin treatment contained smaller, more spindle-like cells. Surface roughening can affect cell behavior with topographical stimulation. Trypsin surface digestion exposes a mesh-like structure on the tendon surface, which could enhance cell adherence and, possibly, tendon/bone healing.

  20. Muscle-tendon unit scaling methods of Hill-type musculoskeletal models: An overview.

    PubMed

    Heinen, Frederik; Lund, Morten E; Rasmussen, John; de Zee, Mark

    2016-10-01

    This article gives an overview of the state of the art in scaling methods of generic Hill-type muscle model parameters in view of different applications and implementation of experimental data. This article establishes the requirements used to alter a generic model toward subject-specific musculoskeletal models. This article aims to improve model transparency by a structured description of scaling methods and the associated limitations in musculoskeletal models and highlight the importance of selecting a scaling method supporting the purpose of the model.

  1. Effect of Exercise-Induced Enhancement of the Leg-Extensor Muscle-Tendon Unit Capacities on Ambulatory Mechanics and Knee Osteoarthritis Markers in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Karamanidis, Kiros; Oberländer, Kai Daniel; Niehoff, Anja; Epro, Gaspar; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Leg-extensor muscle weakness could be a key component in knee joint degeneration in the elderly because it may result in altered muscular control during locomotion influencing the mechanical environment within the joint. This work aimed to examine whether an exercise-induced enhancement of the triceps surae (TS) and quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle-tendon unit (MTU) capacities would affect mechanical and biological markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. Methods Twelve older women completed a 14-week TS and QF MTU exercise intervention, which had already been established as increasing muscle strength and tendon stiffness. Locomotion mechanics and serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) levels were examined during incline walking. MTU mechanical properties were assessed using simultaneously ultrasonography and dynamometry. Results Post exercise intervention, the elderly had higher TS and QF contractile strength and tendon-aponeurosis stiffness. Regarding the incline gait task, the subjects demonstrated a lower external knee adduction moment and lower knee adduction angular impulse during the stance phase post-intervention. Furthermore, post-intervention compared to pre-intervention, the elderly showed lower external hip adduction moment, but revealed higher plantarflexion pushoff moment. The changes in the external knee adduction moment were significantly correlated with the improvement in ankle pushoff function. Serum COMP concentration increased in response to the 0.5-h incline walking exercise with no differences in the magnitude of increment between pre- and post-intervention. Conclusions This work emphasizes the important role played by the ankle pushoff function in knee joint mechanical loading during locomotion, and may justify the inclusion of the TS MTU in prevention programs aiming to positively influence specific mechanical markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. However, the study was unable to show that COMP is amenable

  2. RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT WITH THE CENTRAL THIRD OF THE QUADRICEPS MUSCLE TENDON: ANALYSIS OF 10-YEAR RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Marcus Valladares; Junior, Lúcio Honório de Carvalho; Terra, Dalton Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Assess clinical results using two different protocols, 10 years after ACL reconstruction surgery with the central third of quadriceps muscle tendon (QT). Method: Between November /1997 and April/1998, 25 patients were submitted to 25 ACL reconstructions with QT by transtibial technique. The bone portion of the graft was fixated on femoral tunnel with interference screw and the tendinous portion of tibial tunnel with screw with washer. Two patients injured the new when playing soccer. Six patients were not available for follow-up (24%). Seventeen patients were evaluated, 15 men and two women, with mean age at surgery time of 28.53 ± 6.64 years. All patients were examined at six months, one year, and ten years after surgery. Clinical evaluation was made by the Lysholm scale, and the knee evaluation, with the Hospital for Special Surgery scale. Results: The patients had their injuries operated after 9.87 ± 14.42 months of the accident. According to Lysholm scale, the results at the end of the first year were 98.71 ± 2.47 and, after 10 years, 97.35 ± 3.12. Using the Hospital for Special Surgery scale, the mean score was 95.07 ± 5.23 in one year, and 94.87 ± 4.16 in 10 years. All patients returned to their professional activities with the same previous status. Fifteen (88.24%) patients were able to return to their sports activities, one by modifying the practice, while another one switched to another sport. No patient complained of pain on the donor area in the medium and long term. The sports return rate was excellent, and no changes were found on the femoropatellar joint. PMID:27022511

  3. Induction of periostin-like factor and periostin in forearm muscle, tendon, and nerve in an animal model of work-related musculoskeletal disorder.

    PubMed

    Rani, Shobha; Barbe, Mary F; Barr, Ann E; Litvin, Judith

    2009-11-01

    Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), also known as repetitive strain injuries of the upper extremity, frequently cause disability and impairment of the upper extremities. Histopathological changes including excess collagen deposition around myofibers, cell necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, and increased cytokine expression result from eccentric exercise, forced lengthening, exertion-induced injury, and repetitive strain-induced injury of muscles. Repetitive tasks have also been shown to result in tendon and neural injuries, with subsequent chronic inflammatory responses, followed by residual fibrosis. To identify mechanisms that regulate tissue repair in WMSDs, we investigated the induction of periostin-like factor (PLF) and periostin, proteins induced in other pathologies but not expressed in normal adult tissue. In this study, we examined the level of PLF and periostin in muscle, tendon, and nerve using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. PLF increased with continued task performance, whereas periostin was constitutively expressed. PLF was located in satellite cells and/or myoblasts, which increased in number with continued task performance, supporting our hypothesis that PLF plays a role in muscle repair or regeneration. Periostin, on the other hand, was not present in satellite cells and/or myoblasts.

  4. Selective effects of vibration on monosynaptic and late EMG responses in human soleus muscle after stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve or a tendon tap.

    PubMed Central

    Van Boxtel, A

    1979-01-01

    In normal subjects it was possible to evoke tendon and Hoffman reflexes which were followed by late EMG responses with a latency of 150-250 ms after the reflex stimuli. Analysis of the covariations of reflexes and late responses revealed that muscle spindle sensitivity and strength of the preceding twitch are not essential factors in determining the occurrence of the late responses as opposed to excitability changes within the spinal cord. Inhibition of monosynaptic reflexes and facilitation of late EMG responses to vibration indicate a difference in central pathways. A polysynaptic pathway may be involved in the late responses. PMID:159346

  5. Isokinetic dynamometer evaluation of the effects of early thigh diameter difference on thigh muscle strength in patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Kılınç, Bekir Eray; Kara, Adnan; Camur, Savas; Oc, Yunus; Celik, Haluk

    2015-04-01

    After anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, which muscle groups are more affected from frequently developing thigh muscle atrophy is a matter of debate. We evaluate the effect of thigh circumference difference between patients' knees who were administered the ACL reconstruction with hamstring tendon autograft and intact knees, on torque between the hamstring and quadriceps muscles. Fifty-five patients at least 6 months follow-up period available were included in our study. Power measurements of quadriceps and hamstring muscle groups in patients' extremities were done by using isokinetic dynamometer. The maximum torque values at 60°/sec, 240°/sec in frequency, positions of flexion and extension were determined. In accordance with our findings it is still possible to encounter the thigh atrophy in average 28 months after ACL reconstruction surgery even under physical rehabilitation programs and appropriate follow-up. It is inevitable for the clinician to consider these changes in diagnosis and rehabilitation stages. It can't be ignored that muscle weakness mechanisms developing in the thigh circumference vary according to the thigh muscle group and knee flexors play an important role in thigh atrophy when determining an appropriate rehabilitation program after reconstruction application.

  6. Rupture of the distal biceps brachii tendon: isokinetic power analysis and complications after anatomic reinsertion compared with fixation to the brachialis muscle.

    PubMed

    Klonz, Andreas; Loitz, Dietmar; Wöhler, Peter; Reilmann, Heinrich

    2003-01-01

    Anatomic reattachment of the distal biceps tendon is well established but bears the risk of complications including loss of motion and nerve damage. We questioned whether nonanatomic repair by tenodesis to the brachialis muscle is able to accomplish similar results with less risk. We compared the results of anatomic repair with suture anchors (n = 6) with the results of nonanatomic repair (n = 8). Anatomic reattachment of the biceps tendon can restore full power of flexion in most cases as determined by isokinetic muscle tests (mean, 96.8% compared with the contralateral side). Nonanatomic repair also restores flexion strength to a mean of 96%. Supination power averaged 91% after anatomic repair. Supination strength after nonanatomic repair did not improve in 4 of 8 patients (42%-56% of the uninjured arm). The other 4 patients were able to produce 80% to 150% of the strength of the contralateral side. Major complications such as radioulnar synostosis or motor nerve damage were not encountered in either group. Heterotopic ossification was seen in 4 cases after reinsertion to the tuberosity. One of these patients was not satisfied with the procedure because of anterior elbow pain, even at rest. After tenodesis to the brachialis, one patient was unsatisfied because of considerable weakness. We concluded that major complications after anatomic repair are rare but must not be ignored. Tenodesis of the distal biceps tendon is a safe alternative procedure. We inform our patients about the benefits and risks of anatomic and nonanatomic repair as well as those of nonoperative treatment. The decision concerning the type of therapy best suited for an individual patient should be made on an informed consent basis.

  7. Hoffmann reflex is increased after 14 days of daily repeated Achilles tendon vibration for the soleus but not for the gastrocnemii muscles.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Pérot, Chantal

    2012-02-01

    In a previous study, Achilles tendon vibrations were enough to improve the triceps surae (TS) activation capacities and also to slightly increase TS Hoffmann reflex (H-reflex) obtained by summing up soleus (Sol) and gastrocnemii (GM and GL) EMGs. The purpose of the present study was to analyze separately Sol and GM or GL reflexes to account for different effects of the vibrations on the reflex excitability of the slow soleus and of the gastrocnemii muscles. A control group (n = 13) and a vibration group (n = 16) were tested in pre-test and post-test conditions. The Achilles tendon vibration program consisted of 1 h of daily vibration (frequency: 50 Hz) applied during 14 days. Maximal Sol, GM and GL H-reflexes, and M-waves were recorded, and their H(max)/M(max) ratios gave the index of reflex excitability. After the vibration protocol, only Sol H(max)/M(max) was enhanced (p < 0.001). The enhanced Sol reflex excitability after vibration is in favor of a decrease in the pre-synaptic inhibition due to the repeated vibrations and the high solicitation of the reflex pathway. Those results of a short period of vibration applied at rest may be limited to the soleus because of its high density in muscle spindles and slow motor units, both structures being very sensitive to vibrations.

  8. Structural and mechanical integrity of tendon-to-tendon attachments used in upper limb tendon transfer surgery.

    PubMed

    Tsiampa, Vassiliki A; Ignatiadis, Ioannis; Papalois, Apostolos; Givissis, Panayiotis; Christodoulou, Anastasios; Fridén, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Improved tendon-to-tendon suturing techniques allow for consistent and immediate activation of transferred muscle after surgery. A pre-requisite for early training after tendon transfer surgery is sufficient mechanical integrity of the tendon-to-tendon attachment. This in vitro study compared the mechanisms and magnitudes of load-to-failure response of two different repair techniques (side-to-side running, n = 7) and weave sutures (n = 8) in sheep front foot tendons. Tensile tests were performed by placing pre-conditioned tendons in a testing machine and stretching at a constant speed to failure. The length of the tendons overlap was the same (50 mm) for both repair techniques. The results of the load to failure tests showed that the side-to-side repairs were significantly stronger than the weave repairs. The failure mechanisms were also different. While the side-to-side attachment failed by longitudinal separation of tendon material of the donor tendon but with the fibres locked to the running sutures attached to the recipient tendon, the weave repairs failed by knot slipping or by suture pullout from the tendon substance. It is concluded that use of the side-to-side repair technique can provide early active training of new motors that not only prevent the formation of adhesions but also facilitate the voluntary recruitment of motors powering new functions before immobilisation-related swelling and stiffness restrain muscle contractions.

  9. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Clinical Outcomes of Patella Tendon and Hamstring Tendon Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Gulick, Dawn T.; Yoder, Heather N.

    2002-01-01

    An injury to the ACL can result in significant functional impairment. It has been estimated that more than 100,000 new ACL injuries occur each year. Surgeons employ numerous techniques for reconstruction of the ACL. Of critical importance is the source of the graft to replace the damaged ACL. The graft choices include autografts (the patient's own tissue), allografts (donor tendon), and synthetic/prosthetic ligaments. Tissue harvest sites for autografting include the middle third of the patella tendon, the quadriceps tendon, semitendinosus tendon, gracilis tendon, iliotibial band, tensor fascia lata, and the Achilles tendon. Selection of the type of graft material is predicated upon the tissue's ability to tolerate high levels of stress. Likewise, the clinical presentation and functional outcome is related to the graft material selected. This manuscript specifically examined the patella tendon and hamstring tendon grafts. Numerous manuscripts that studied the outcomes of these graft materials were compiled to help the clinician appreciate the advantages and disadvantages of each of the graft materials. Outcome measures such as thigh circumference, knee range of motion, isokinetic strength, knee stability, pain, and vertical jump/1-leg hop were incorporated. The purpose of this manuscript was to compare and contrast the clinical presentation of patients who underwent an ACL reconstruction using the patella tendon versus the hamstring tendons. This information can be valuable to the clinician when considering the rehabilitation protocol after ACL reconstruction. PMID:24701126

  10. Percutaneous techniques for tendon transfers in the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Panchbhavi, Vinod Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are useful for replacing a dysfunctional or diseased tendon or for restoring muscle imbalance. The tendon to be transferred is harvested as distal as is necessary to provide adequate length for rerouting and attachment at the different site. The harvesting of tendon itself can be attained using an open surgical approach or minimally invasive percutaneous techniques that limit surgical exposure. This article describes percutaneous techniques for tendon transfer procedures used to address foot and ankle disorders.

  11. Reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture using graft from contralateral patella graft together with reinforcement from flexor tendons. Case report.

    PubMed

    Frois Temponi, Eduardo; de Carvalho, Lúcio Honório; da Silva Bernardes, Cláudio Otávio; Presses Teixeira, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendon rupture is a rare disabling injury that is technically difficult to repair. The true prevalence of this injury is unknown. Delayed reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture has yielded suboptimal clinical and functional results. Many different surgical methods for reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon injury have been reported. In this report, we present a case with chronic patellar tendon injury that was addressed using a technique that had not previously been described in the literature, through combining procedures that had been described separately. The reconstruction method presented in this article has the advantages of being easy and reproducible, without a requirement of allografts.

  12. Micro-organisms isolated from cadaveric samples of allograft musculoskeletal tissue.

    PubMed

    Varettas, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    Allograft musculoskeletal tissue is commonly used in orthopaedic surgical procedures. Cadaveric donors of musculoskeletal tissue supply multiple allografts such as tendons, ligaments and bone. The microbiology laboratory of the South Eastern Area Laboratory Services (SEALS, Australia) has cultured cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples for bacterial and fungal isolates since 2006. This study will retrospectively review the micro-organisms isolated over a 6-year period, 2006-2011. Swab and tissue samples were received for bioburden testing and were inoculated onto agar and/or broth culture media. Growth was obtained from 25.1 % of cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples received. The predominant organisms isolated were coagulase-negative staphylococci and coliforms, with the heaviest bioburden recovered from the hemipelvis. The rate of bacterial and fungal isolates from cadaveric allograft musculoskeletal tissue samples is higher than that from living donors. The type of organism isolated may influence the suitability of the allograft for transplant.

  13. Tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... is pain-free) Regional anesthesia (the local and surrounding areas are pain-free) General anesthesia (the patient ... used. If needed, tendons are reattached to the surrounding tissue. The surgeon examines the area to see ...

  14. Human tendon behaviour and adaptation, in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, S Peter; Narici, Marco V; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Kjaer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Tendon properties contribute to the complex interaction of the central nervous system, muscle–tendon unit and bony structures to produce joint movement. Until recently limited information on human tendon behaviour in vivo was available; however, novel methodological advancements have enabled new insights to be gained in this area. The present review summarizes the progress made with respect to human tendon and aponeurosis function in vivo, and how tendons adapt to ageing, loading and unloading conditions. During low tensile loading or with passive lengthening not only the muscle is elongated, but also the tendon undergoes significant length changes, which may have implications for reflex responses. During active loading, the length change of the tendon far exceeds that of the aponeurosis, indicating that the aponeurosis may more effectively transfer force onto the tendon, which lengthens and stores elastic energy subsequently released during unloading, in a spring-like manner. In fact, data recently obtained in vivo confirm that, during walking, the human Achilles tendon provides elastic strain energy that can decrease the energy cost of locomotion. Also, new experimental evidence shows that, contrary to earlier beliefs, the metabolic activity in human tendon is remarkably high and this affords the tendon the ability to adapt to changing demands. With ageing and disuse there is a reduction in tendon stiffness, which can be mitigated with resistance exercises. Such adaptations seem advantageous for maintaining movement rapidity, reducing tendon stress and risk of injury, and possibly, for enabling muscles to operate closer to the optimum region of the length–tension relationship. PMID:17855761

  15. Treatment of a Complex Distal Triceps Tendon Rupture With a New Technique: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Aunon-Martin, Ismael; Prada-Canizares, Alfonso; Jimenez-Diaz, Veronica; Vidal-Bujanda, Carlos; Leon-Baltasar, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The distal triceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. The acute treatment is well-defined, but when a delayed diagnosis is made or when a tendon retraction is present the alternatives or reconstruction are limited and sometimes complex. Case Presentation: In this case, we report on a 28-year-old man who presented with a chronic disruption of the distal triceps tendon with a gap of approximately 15 cm. The patient was diagnosed in another center with an inveterate breakage of the distal triceps tendon and was initially treated with an Achilles allograft that was complicated by a wound infection and required more than ten surgeries. Nearly 22 months after the initial trauma, and 12 months after the first surgery, we performed a reconstruction with an Achilles tendon allograft using the new technique of distal attachment. At the 12-month follow-up the patient presented a joint balance from -5º to 110º and presented with no pain. Conclusions: The use of an Achilles tendon allograft provides excellent results in complex distal triceps tendon ruptures. We report the use of a new technique to anchor a distal Achilles allograft. PMID:27148500

  16. Tendon crimps and peritendinous tissues responding to tensional forces.

    PubMed

    Franchi, M; Quaranta, M; De Pasquale, V; Macciocca, M; Orsini, E; Trirè, A; Ottani, V; Ruggeri, A

    2007-01-01

    Tendons transmit forces generated from muscle to bone making joint movements possible. Tendon collagen has a complex supramolecular structure forming many hierarchical levels of association; its main functional unit is the collagen fibril forming fibers and fascicles. Since tendons are enclosed by loose connective sheaths in continuity with muscle sheaths, it is likely that tendon sheaths could play a role in absorbing/transmitting the forces created by muscle contraction. In this study rat Achilles tendons were passively stretched in vivo to be observed at polarized light microscope (PLM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). At PLM tendon collagen fibers in relaxed rat Achilles tendons ran straight and parallel, showing a periodic crimp pattern. Similarly tendon sheaths showed apparent crimps. At higher magnification SEM and TEM revealed that in each tendon crimp large and heterogeneous collagen fibrils running straight and parallel suddenly changed their direction undergoing localized and variable modifications. These fibril modifications were named fibrillar crimps. Tendon sheaths displayed small and uniform fibrils running parallel with a wavy course without any ultrastructural aspects of crimp. Since in passively stretched Achilles tendons fibrillar crimps were still observed, it is likely that during the tendon stretching, and presumably during the tendon elongation in muscle contraction, the fibrillar crimp may be the real structural component of the tendon crimp acting as shock absorber. The peritendinous sheath can be stretched as tendon, but is not actively involved in the mechanism of shock absorber as the fibrillar crimp. The different functional behaviour of tendons and sheaths may be due to the different structural and molecular arrangement of their fibrils.

  17. ACL reconstruction with BPTB autograft and irradiated fresh frozen allograft*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kang; Tian, Shao-qi; Zhang, Ji-hua; Xia, Chang-suo; Zhang, Cai-long; Yu, Teng-bo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with irradiated bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allograft compared with non-irradiated allograft and autograft. Methods: All BPTB allografts were obtained from a single tissue bank and the irradiated allografts were sterilized with 2.5 mrad of irradiation prior to distribution. A total of 68 patients undergoing arthroscopic ACL reconstruction were prospectively randomized consecutively into one of the two groups (autograft and irradiated allograft groups). The same surgical technique was used in all operations done by the same senior surgeon. Before surgery and at the average of 31 months of follow-up (ranging from 24 to 47 months), patients were evaluated by the same observer according to objective and subjective clinical evaluations. Results: Of these patients, 65 (autograft 33, irradiated allograft 32) were available for full evaluation. When the irradiated allograft group was compared to the autograft group at the 31-month follow-up by the Lachman test, the anterior drawer test (ADT), the pivot shift test, and KT-2000 arthrometer test, statistically significant differences were found. Most importantly, 87.8% of patients in the autograft group and just only 31.3% in the irradiated allograft group had a side-to-side difference of less than 3 mm according to KT-2000. The failure rate of the ACL reconstruction with irradiated allograft (34.4%) was higher than that with autograft (6.1%). The anterior and rotational stabilities decreased significantly in the irradiated allograft group. According to the overall International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), functional and subjective evaluations, and activity level testing, no statistically significant differences were found between the two groups. Besides, patients in the irradiated allograft group had a shorter operation time and a longer duration of postoperative fever. When the patients had a fever, the

  18. Informing tendon tissue engineering with embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Glass, Zachary A; Schiele, Nathan R; Kuo, Catherine K

    2014-06-27

    Tendon is a strong connective tissue that transduces muscle-generated forces into skeletal motion. In fulfilling this role, tendons are subjected to repeated mechanical loading and high stress, which may result in injury. Tissue engineering with stem cells offers the potential to replace injured/damaged tissue with healthy, new living tissue. Critical to tendon tissue engineering is the induction and guidance of stem cells towards the tendon phenotype. Typical strategies have relied on adult tissue homeostatic and healing factors to influence stem cell differentiation, but have yet to achieve tissue regeneration. A novel paradigm is to use embryonic developmental factors as cues to promote tendon regeneration. Embryonic tendon progenitor cell differentiation in vivo is regulated by a combination of mechanical and chemical factors. We propose that these cues will guide stem cells to recapitulate critical aspects of tenogenesis and effectively direct the cells to differentiate and regenerate new tendon. Here, we review recent efforts to identify mechanical and chemical factors of embryonic tendon development to guide stem/progenitor cell differentiation toward new tendon formation, and discuss the role this work may have in the future of tendon tissue engineering.

  19. Informing tendon tissue engineering with embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Zachary A.; Schiele, Nathan R.; Kuo, Catherine K.

    2014-01-01

    Tendon is a strong connective tissue that transduces muscle-generated forces into skeletal motion. In fulfilling this role, tendons are subjected to repeated mechanical loading and high stress, which may result in injury. Tissue engineering with stem cells offers the potential to replace injured/damaged tissue with healthy, new living tissue. Critical to tendon tissue engineering is the induction and guidance of stem cells towards the tendon phenotype. Typical strategies have relied on adult tissue homeostatic and healing factors to influence stem cell differentiation, but have yet to achieve tissue regeneration. A novel paradigm is to use embryonic developmental factors as cues to promote tendon regeneration. Embryonic tendon progenitor cell differentiation in vivo is regulated by a combination of mechanical and chemical factors. We propose that these cues will guide stem cells to recapitulate critical aspects of tenogenesis and effectively direct the cells to differentiate and regenerate new tendon. Here, we review recent efforts to identify mechanical and chemical factors of embryonic tendon development to guide stem/progenitor cell differentiation toward new tendon formation, and discuss the role this work may have in the future of tendon tissue engineering. PMID:24484642

  20. The effect of soft tissue mobilisation techniques on flexibility and passive resistance in the hamstring muscle-tendon unit: a pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Alison; Spencer, Simon

    2011-04-01

    The growing evidence suggests that physiological mobilisation techniques influence the passive properties of the muscle-tendon unit (MTU). Techniques that combine a transverse directed force to the physiological technique attempt greater influence on biomechanical properties. No research has investigated the biomechanical effects of a technique with addition of a transverse directed force. This pilot study aimed to explore preliminary data of effectiveness of two techniques on longitudinal load (extensibility and passive resistance) in the hamstring MTU. A counterbalanced quasi-experimental same subject design using fifteen healthy subjects compared two conditions: physiological technique and a technique with addition of a transverse directed force. Passive resistance (torque, Nm) and extensibility (knee extension range of movement) of the hamstring MTU were recorded during and following both conditions. Paired t tests explored within and across condition comparisons, with Bonferroni adjustment to account for multiple analyses. Passive resistance demonstrated a significant reduction for the technique with addition of a transverse directed force (t = 4.26, p < 0.05) that may have contributed to the significant increase in extensibility (t = 8.48, p < 0.05). The data suggest that longitudinal load through the hamstring MTU during a physiological mobilisation can be increased by the application of a transverse directed force. This merits further research.

  1. A coincidental variation of the axillary artery: the brachioradial artery and the aberrant posterior humeral circumflex artery passing under the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle

    PubMed Central

    Konarik, Marek; Kachlik, David; Baca, Vaclav

    2014-01-01

    A case of anomalous terminal branching of the axillary artery was encountered and described in a left upper limb of a male cadaver. A series of 214 upper limbs of Caucasian race was dissected. A variant artery, stemming from the very end of the axillary artery followed a superficial course distally. It passed the cubital fossa, ran on the lateral side of the forearm as usual radial artery, crossed ventrally to the palm and terminated in the deep palmar arch. This vessel is a case of the brachioradial artery (incorrectly termed as the “radial artery with high origin”). Moreover, it was associated with another variation, concerning the aberrant posterior humeral circumflex artery passing under the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle. The anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is essential for radiodiagnostic, surgical and traumatologic procedures. The superficially located artery brings an elevated danger of heavy bleeding in all unexpected situations, its variant branching can cause problems in radial catheterization procedures and the anomalously coursing other arterial variant poses an elevated danger in surgical procedures concerning the surgical neck of humerus. PMID:25428677

  2. A coincidental variation of the axillary artery: the brachioradial artery and the aberrant posterior humeral circumflex artery passing under the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle.

    PubMed

    Konarik, Marek; Kachlik, David; Baca, Vaclav

    2014-09-11

    A case of anomalous terminal branching of the axillary artery was encountered and described in a left upper limb of a male cadaver. A series of 214 upper limbs of Caucasian race was dissected. A variant artery, stemming from the very end of the axillary artery followed a superficial course distally. It passed the cubital fossa, ran on the lateral side of the forearm as usual radial artery, crossed ventrally to the palm and terminated in the deep palmar arch. This vessel is a case of the brachioradial artery (incorrectly termed as the "radial artery with high origin"). Moreover, it was associated with another variation, concerning the aberrant posterior humeral circumflex artery passing under the tendon of the latissimus dorsi muscle. The anatomical knowledge of the axillary region is essential for radiodiagnostic, surgical and traumatologic procedures. The superficially located artery brings an elevated danger of heavy bleeding in all unexpected situations, its variant branching can cause problems in radial catheterization procedures and the anomalously coursing other arterial variant poses an elevated danger in surgical procedures concerning the surgical neck of humerus.

  3. Structure and function of tuna tail tendons.

    PubMed

    Shadwick, Robert E; Rapoport, H Scott; Fenger, Joelle M

    2002-12-01

    The caudal tendons in tunas and other scombrid fish link myotomal muscle directly to the caudal fin rays, and thus serve to transfer muscle power to the hydrofoil-like tail during swimming. These robust collagenous tendons have structural and mechanical similarity to tendons found in other vertebrates, notably the leg tendons of terrestrial mammals. Biochemical studies indicate that tuna tendon collagen is composed of the (alpha1)(2),alpha2 heterotrimer that is typical of vertebrate Type I collagen, while tuna skin collagen has the unusual alpha1,alpha2,alpha3 trimer previously described in the skin of some other teleost species. Tuna collagen, like that of other fish, has high solubility due to the presence of an acid-labile intermolecular cross-link. Unlike collagen in mammalian tendons, no differences related to cross-link maturation were detected among tendons in tuna ranging from 0.05 to 72 kg (approx. 0.25-6 years). Tendons excised post-mortem were subjected to load cycling to determine the modulus of elasticity and resilience (mean of 1.3 GPa and 90%, respectively). These material properties compare closely to those of leg tendons from adult mammals that can function as effective biological springs in terrestrial locomotion, but the breaking strength is substantially lower. Peak tendon forces recorded during steady swimming appear to impose strains of much less than 1% of tendon length, and no more than 1.5% during bursts. Thus, the caudal tendons in tunas do not appear to function as elastic storage elements, even at maximal swimming effort.

  4. Management of Extensor Tendon Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, M; Hindocha, S; Jordan, D; Saleh, M; Khan, W

    2012-01-01

    Extensor tendon injuries are very common injuries, which inappropriately treated can cause severe lasting impairment for the patient. Assessment and management of flexor tendon injuries has been widely reviewed, unlike extensor injuries. It is clear from the literature that extensor tendon repair should be undertaken immediately but the exact approach depends on the extensor zone. Zone I injuries otherwise known as mallet injuries are often closed and treated with immobilisaton and conservative management where possible. Zone II injuries are again conservatively managed with splinting. Closed Zone III or ‘boutonniere’ injuries are managed conservatively unless there is evidence of displaced avulsion fractures at the base of the middle phalanx, axial and lateral instability of the PIPJ associated with loss of active or passive extension of the joint or failed non-operative treatment. Open zone III injuries are often treated surgically unless splinting enable the tendons to come together. Zone V injuries, are human bites until proven otherwise requires primary tendon repair after irrigation. Zone VI injuries are close to the thin paratendon and thin subcutaneous tissue which strong core type sutures and then splinting should be placed in extension for 4-6 weeks. Complete lacerations to zone IV and VII involve surgical primary repair followed by 6 weeks of splinting in extension. Zone VIII require multiple figure of eight sutures to repair the muscle bellies and static immobilisation of the wrist in 45 degrees of extension. To date there is little literature documenting the quality of repairing extensor tendon injuries however loss of flexion due to extensor tendon shortening, loss of flexion and extension resulting from adhesions and weakened grip can occur after surgery. This review aims to provide a systematic examination method for assessing extensor injuries, presentation and management of all type of extensor tendon injuries as well as guidance on

  5. Temporal features of human tendon vibration illusions.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Christina T; Gomi, Hiroaki; Haggard, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Muscle spindles provide information about the position and movement of our bodies. One method for investigating spindle signals is tendon vibration. Vibration of flexor tendons can produce illusions of extension, and vibration of extensor tendons can produce illusions of flexion. Here we estimate the temporal resolution and persistence of these illusions. In Experiments 1 and 2, sequences of alternating vibration of wrist flexor and extensor tendons produced position illusions that varied with alternation period. When vibrations alternated at 1 Hz or slower, perceived position at the end of the sequence depended on the last vibration. When vibrations alternated every 0.3 s, perceived position was independent of the last vibration. Experiment 2 verified and extended these results using more trials and concurrent electromyographic recording. Although tendon vibrations sometimes induce reflexive muscle activity, we found no evidence that such activity contributed to these effects. Experiment 3 investigated how long position sense is retained when not updated by current information from spindles. Our first experiments suggested that vibrating antagonistic tendons simultaneously could produce conflicting inputs, leaving position sense reliant on memory of position prior to vibration onset. We compared variability in position sense after different durations of such double vibration. After 12 s of double vibration, variability across trials exceeded levels predicted from vibrations of flexor or extensor tendons alone. This suggests that position sense memory had decayed too much to substitute for the current conflicting sensory information. Together, our results provide novel, quantitative insight into the temporal properties of tendon vibration illusions.

  6. Stretching Your Energetic Budget: How Tendon Compliance Affects the Metabolic Cost of Running

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Thomas K.; Hicks, Jennifer L.; Dembia, Christopher L.; Delp, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    Muscles attach to bones via tendons that stretch and recoil, affecting muscle force generation and metabolic energy consumption. In this study, we investigated the effect of tendon compliance on the metabolic cost of running using a full-body musculoskeletal model with a detailed model of muscle energetics. We performed muscle-driven simulations of running at 2–5 m/s with tendon force–strain curves that produced between 1 and 10% strain when the muscles were developing maximum isometric force. We computed the average metabolic power consumed by each muscle when running at each speed and with each tendon compliance. Average whole-body metabolic power consumption increased as running speed increased, regardless of tendon compliance, and was lowest at each speed when tendon strain reached 2–3% as muscles were developing maximum isometric force. When running at 2 m/s, the soleus muscle consumed less metabolic power at high tendon compliance because the strain of the tendon allowed the muscle fibers to operate nearly isometrically during stance. In contrast, the medial and lateral gastrocnemii consumed less metabolic power at low tendon compliance because less compliant tendons allowed the muscle fibers to operate closer to their optimal lengths during stance. The software and simulations used in this study are freely available at simtk.org and enable examination of muscle energetics with unprecedented detail. PMID:26930416

  7. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  8. Musculoskeletal integration at the wrist underlies the modular development of limb tendons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alice H.; Riordan, Timothy J.; Pryce, Brian; Weibel, Jennifer L.; Watson, Spencer S.; Long, Fanxin; Lefebvre, Veronique; Harfe, Brian D.; Stadler, H. Scott; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Tufa, Sara F.; Keene, Douglas R.; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    The long tendons of the limb extend from muscles that reside in the zeugopod (arm/leg) to their skeletal insertions in the autopod (paw). How these connections are established along the length of the limb remains unknown. Here, we show that mouse limb tendons are formed in modular units that combine to form a functional contiguous structure; in muscle-less limbs, tendons develop in the autopod but do not extend into the zeugopod, and in the absence of limb cartilage the zeugopod segments of tendons develop despite the absence of tendons in the autopod. Analyses of cell lineage and proliferation indicate that distinct mechanisms govern the growth of autopod and zeugopod tendon segments. To elucidate the integration of these autopod and zeugopod developmental programs, we re-examined early tendon development. At E12.5, muscles extend across the full length of a very short zeugopod and connect through short anlagen of tendon progenitors at the presumptive wrist to their respective autopod tendon segment, thereby initiating musculoskeletal integration. Zeugopod tendon segments are subsequently generated by proximal elongation of the wrist tendon anlagen, in parallel with skeletal growth, underscoring the dependence of zeugopod tendon development on muscles for tendon anchoring. Moreover, a subset of extensor tendons initially form as fused structures due to initial attachment of their respective wrist tendon anlage to multiple muscles. Subsequent individuation of these tendons depends on muscle activity. These results establish an integrated model for limb tendon development that provides a framework for future analyses of tendon and musculoskeletal phenotypes. PMID:26062940

  9. Musculoskeletal integration at the wrist underlies the modular development of limb tendons.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alice H; Riordan, Timothy J; Pryce, Brian; Weibel, Jennifer L; Watson, Spencer S; Long, Fanxin; Lefebvre, Veronique; Harfe, Brian D; Stadler, H Scott; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Tufa, Sara F; Keene, Douglas R; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2015-07-15

    The long tendons of the limb extend from muscles that reside in the zeugopod (arm/leg) to their skeletal insertions in the autopod (paw). How these connections are established along the length of the limb remains unknown. Here, we show that mouse limb tendons are formed in modular units that combine to form a functional contiguous structure; in muscle-less limbs, tendons develop in the autopod but do not extend into the zeugopod, and in the absence of limb cartilage the zeugopod segments of tendons develop despite the absence of tendons in the autopod. Analyses of cell lineage and proliferation indicate that distinct mechanisms govern the growth of autopod and zeugopod tendon segments. To elucidate the integration of these autopod and zeugopod developmental programs, we re-examined early tendon development. At E12.5, muscles extend across the full length of a very short zeugopod and connect through short anlagen of tendon progenitors at the presumptive wrist to their respective autopod tendon segment, thereby initiating musculoskeletal integration. Zeugopod tendon segments are subsequently generated by proximal elongation of the wrist tendon anlagen, in parallel with skeletal growth, underscoring the dependence of zeugopod tendon development on muscles for tendon anchoring. Moreover, a subset of extensor tendons initially form as fused structures due to initial attachment of their respective wrist tendon anlage to multiple muscles. Subsequent individuation of these tendons depends on muscle activity. These results establish an integrated model for limb tendon development that provides a framework for future analyses of tendon and musculoskeletal phenotypes.

  10. Triceps surae muscle-tendon unit length changes as a function of ankle joint angles and contraction levels: the effect of foot arch deformation.

    PubMed

    Iwanuma, Soichiro; Akagi, Ryota; Hashizume, Satoru; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Yanai, Toshimasa; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2011-09-23

    The purpose of this study was to clarify how foot deformation affects the relationship between triceps surae muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length and ankle joint angle. For six women and six men a series of sagittal magnetic resonance (MR) images of the right foot were taken, and changes in MTU length (the displacement of the calcaneal tuberosity), foot arch angle, and ankle joint angle were measured. In the passive session, each subject's ankle joint was secured at 10° dorsiflexed position, neutral position (NP), and 10° and 20° plantar flexed positions while MR images were acquired. In the active session, each subject was requested to perform submaximal isometric plantar flexions (30%, 60%, and 80% of voluntary maximum) at NP. The changes in MTU length in each trial were estimated by two different formulae reported previously. The changes of the measured MTU length as a function of ankle joint angles observed in all trials of the active session were significantly (p<0.05) larger than corresponding values in the passive session and by the estimation formulae. In the passive session, MTU length changes were significantly smaller than the estimated values when the ankle was plantar flexed. The foot arch angle increased as the contraction level increased from rest (117 ± 4°) to 80% (125 ± 3°), and decreased as the ankle was positioned further into plantar flexion in the passive session (115 ± 3°). These results indicate that foot deformation profoundly affects the triceps surae MTU length-ankle joint angle relationship during plantar flexion.

  11. Inferring Muscle-Tendon Unit Power from Ankle Joint Power during the Push-Off Phase of Human Walking: Insights from a Multiarticular EMG-Driven Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Inverse dynamics joint kinetics are often used to infer contributions from underlying groups of muscle-tendon units (MTUs). However, such interpretations are confounded by multiarticular (multi-joint) musculature, which can cause inverse dynamics to over- or under-estimate net MTU power. Misestimation of MTU power could lead to incorrect scientific conclusions, or to empirical estimates that misguide musculoskeletal simulations, assistive device designs, or clinical interventions. The objective of this study was to investigate the degree to which ankle joint power overestimates net plantarflexor MTU power during the Push-off phase of walking, due to the behavior of the flexor digitorum and hallucis longus (FDHL)–multiarticular MTUs crossing the ankle and metatarsophalangeal (toe) joints. Methods We performed a gait analysis study on six healthy participants, recording ground reaction forces, kinematics, and electromyography (EMG). Empirical data were input into an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model to estimate ankle power. This model enabled us to parse contributions from mono- and multi-articular MTUs, and required only one scaling and one time delay factor for each subject and speed, which were solved for based on empirical data. Net plantarflexing MTU power was computed by the model and quantitatively compared to inverse dynamics ankle power. Results The EMG-driven model was able to reproduce inverse dynamics ankle power across a range of gait speeds (R2 ≥ 0.97), while also providing MTU-specific power estimates. We found that FDHL dynamics caused ankle power to slightly overestimate net plantarflexor MTU power, but only by ~2–7%. Conclusions During Push-off, FDHL MTU dynamics do not substantially confound the inference of net plantarflexor MTU power from inverse dynamics ankle power. However, other methodological limitations may cause inverse dynamics to overestimate net MTU power; for instance, due to rigid-body foot assumptions. Moving

  12. Specialization of tendon mechanical properties results from interfascicular differences

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Udeze, Chineye P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Tendons transfer force from muscle to bone. Specific tendons, including the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), also store and return energy. For efficient function, energy-storing tendons need to be more extensible than positional tendons such as the common digital extensor tendon (CDET), and when tested in vitro have a lower modulus and failure stress, but a higher failure strain. It is not known how differences in matrix organization contribute to distinct mechanical properties in functionally different tendons. We investigated the properties of whole tendons, tendon fascicles and the fascicular interface in the high-strain energy-storing SDFT and low-strain positional CDET. Fascicles failed at lower stresses and strains than tendons. The SDFT was more extensible than the CDET, but SDFT fascicles failed at lower strains than CDET fascicles, resulting in large differences between tendon and fascicle failure strain in the SDFT. At physiological loads, the stiffness at the fascicular interface was lower in the SDFT samples, enabling a greater fascicle sliding that could account for differences in tendon and fascicle failure strain. Sliding between fascicles prior to fascicle extension in the SDFT may allow the large extensions required in energy-storing tendons while protecting fascicles from damage. PMID:22764132

  13. Tendon neuroplastic training: changing the way we think about tendon rehabilitation: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Ebonie; Kidgell, Dawson; Moseley, G Lorimer; Docking, Sean; Purdam, Craig; Cook, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathy can be resistant to treatment and often recurs, implying that current treatment approaches are suboptimal. Rehabilitation programmes that have been successful in terms of pain reduction and return to sport outcomes usually include strength training. Muscle activation can induce analgesia, improving self-efficacy associated with reducing one's own pain. Furthermore, strength training is beneficial for tendon matrix structure, muscle properties and limb biomechanics. However, current tendon rehabilitation may not adequately address the corticospinal control of the muscle, which may result in altered control of muscle recruitment and the consequent tendon load, and this may contribute to recalcitrance or symptom recurrence. Outcomes of interest include the effect of strength training on tendon pain, corticospinal excitability and short interval cortical inhibition. The aims of this concept paper are to: (1) review what is known about changes to the primary motor cortex and motor control in tendinopathy, (2) identify the parameters shown to induce neuroplasticity in strength training and (3) align these principles with tendon rehabilitation loading protocols to introduce a combination approach termed as tendon neuroplastic training. Strength training is a powerful modulator of the central nervous system. In particular, corticospinal inputs are essential for motor unit recruitment and activation; however, specific strength training parameters are important for neuroplasticity. Strength training that is externally paced and akin to a skilled movement task has been shown to not only reduce tendon pain, but modulate excitatory and inhibitory control of the muscle and therefore, potentially tendon load. An improved understanding of the methods that maximise the opportunity for neuroplasticity may be an important progression in how we prescribe exercise-based rehabilitation in tendinopathy for pain modulation and potentially restoration of the corticospinal

  14. The development of zebrafish tendon and ligament progenitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jessica W; Galloway, Jenna L

    2014-05-01

    Despite the importance of tendons and ligaments for transmitting movement and providing stability to the musculoskeletal system, their development is considerably less well understood than that of the tissues they serve to connect. Zebrafish have been widely used to address questions in muscle and skeletal development, yet few studies describe their tendon and ligament tissues. We have analyzed in zebrafish the expression of several genes known to be enriched in mammalian tendons and ligaments, including scleraxis (scx), collagen 1a2 (col1a2) and tenomodulin (tnmd), or in the tendon-like myosepta of the zebrafish (xirp2a). Co-expression studies with muscle and cartilage markers demonstrate the presence of scxa, col1a2 and tnmd at sites between the developing muscle and cartilage, and xirp2a at the myotendinous junctions. We determined that the zebrafish craniofacial tendon and ligament progenitors are neural crest derived, as in mammals. Cranial and fin tendon progenitors can be induced in the absence of differentiated muscle or cartilage, although neighboring muscle and cartilage are required for tendon cell maintenance and organization, respectively. By contrast, myoseptal scxa expression requires muscle for its initiation. Together, these data suggest a conserved role for muscle in tendon development. Based on the similarities in gene expression, morphology, collagen ultrastructural arrangement and developmental regulation with that of mammalian tendons, we conclude that the zebrafish tendon populations are homologous to their force-transmitting counterparts in higher vertebrates. Within this context, the zebrafish model can be used to provide new avenues for studying tendon biology in a vertebrate genetic system.

  15. Tendon Reattachment to Bone in an Ovine Tendon Defect Model of Retraction Using Allogenic and Xenogenic Demineralised Bone Matrix Incorporated with Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Tendon-bone healing following rotator cuff repairs is mainly impaired by poor tissue quality. Demineralised bone matrix promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface but its role in the treatment of tendon tears with retraction has not been investigated. We hypothesized that cortical demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells will result in improved function and restoration of the tendon-bone interface with no difference between xenogenic and allogenic scaffolds. Materials and Methods In an ovine model, the patellar tendon was detached from the tibial tuberosity and a complete distal tendon transverse defect measuring 1 cm was created. Suture anchors were used to reattach the tendon and xenogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5), or allogenic demineralised bone matrix + minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells (n = 5) were used to bridge the defect. Graft incorporation into the tendon and its effect on regeneration of the enthesis was assessed using histomorphometry. Force plate analysis was used to assess functional recovery. Results Compared to the xenograft, the allograft was associated with significantly higher functional weight bearing at 6 (P = 0.047), 9 (P = 0.028), and 12 weeks (P = 0.009). In the allogenic group this was accompanied by greater remodeling of the demineralised bone matrix into tendon-like tissue in the region of the defect (p = 0.015), and a more direct type of enthesis characterized by significantly more fibrocartilage (p = 0.039). No failures of tendon-bone healing were noted in either group. Conclusion Demineralised bone matrix used with minimally manipulated mesenchymal stem cells promotes healing of the tendon-bone interface in an ovine model of acute tendon retraction, with superior mechanical and histological results associated with use of an allograft. PMID:27606597

  16. EGR1 Regulates Transcription Downstream of Mechanical Signals during Tendon Formation and Healing

    PubMed Central

    Delalande, Antony; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Pichon, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Background Tendon is a mechanical tissue that transmits forces generated by muscle to bone in order to allow body motion. The molecular pathways that sense mechanical forces during tendon formation, homeostasis and repair are not known. EGR1 is a mechanosensitive transcription factor involved in tendon formation, homeostasis and repair. We hypothesized that EGR1 senses mechanical signals to promote tendon gene expression. Methodology/Principal findings Using in vitro and in vivo models, we show that the expression of Egr1 and tendon genes is downregulated in 3D-engineered tendons made of mesenchymal stem cells when tension is released as well as in tendon homeostasis and healing when mechanical signals are reduced. We further demonstrate that EGR1 overexpression prevents tendon gene downregulation in 3D-engineered tendons when tension is released. Lastly, ultrasound and microbubbles mediated EGR1 overexpression prevents the downregulation of tendon gene expression during tendon healing in reduced load conditions. Conclusion/Significance These results show that Egr1 expression is sensitive to mechanical signals in tendon cells. Moreover, EGR1 overexpression prevents the downregulation of tendon gene expression in the absence of mechanical signals in 3D-engineered tendons and tendon healing. These results show that EGR1 induces a transcriptional response downstream of mechanical signals in tendon cells and open new avenues to use EGR1 to promote tendon healing in reduced load conditions. PMID:27820865

  17. Measuring Regional Changes in Damaged Tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Catherine Kayt Vincent

    Mechanical properties of tendon predict tendon health and function, but measuring these properties in vivo is difficult. An ultrasound-based (US) analysis technique called acoustoelastography (AE) uses load-dependent changes in the reflected US signal to estimate tissue stiffness non-invasively. This thesis explores whether AE can provide information about stiffness alteration resulting from tendon tears both ex vivo and in vivo. An ex vivo ovine infraspinatus tendon model suggests that the relative load transmitted by the different tendon layers transmit different fractions of the load and that ultrasound echo intensity change during cyclic loading decreases, becoming less consistent once the tendon is torn. An in vivo human tibialis anterior tendon model using electrically stimulated twitch contractions investigated the feasibility of measuring the effect in vivo. Four of the five subjects showed the expected change and that the muscle contraction times calculated using the average grayscale echo intensity change compared favorably with the times calculated based on the force data. Finally an AE pilot study with patients who had rotator cuff tendon tears found that controlling the applied load and the US view of the system will be crucial to a successful in vivo study.

  18. Bilateral Patellar Tendon Rupture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    within the tendon or systemic disorders such as lupus erythematosus , diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, rheumatologic disease, and local or...factors for patellar tendon rupture include obesity, male gender, age 30-40, activities that increase patellar stress, systemic lupus erythematosus ...patellar tendon rupture is a rare occurrence usually associated with chronic degeneration of tendon fibers, use of steroids, or systemic illness. Our

  19. Mechanical properties of radiation-sterilised human Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts preserved by different methods.

    PubMed

    Kamiński, A; Gut, G; Marowska, J; Lada-Kozłowska, M; Biwejnis, W; Zasacka, M

    2009-08-01

    Patellar tendon auto- and allo-grafts are commonly used in orthopedic surgery for reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). Autografts are mainly used for primary reconstruction, while allografts are useful for revision surgery. To avoid the risk of infectious disease transmission allografts should be radiation-sterilised. As radiation-sterilisation supposedly decreases the mechanical strength of tendon it is important to establish methods of allograft preservation and sterilisation assuring the best quality of grafts and their safety at the same time. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the tensile strength of human patellar tendon (cut out as for ACL reconstruction), preserved by various methods (deep fresh freezing, glycerolisation, lyophilisation) and subsequently radiation-sterilised with doses of 0, 25, 50 or 100 kGy. Bone-Tendon-Bone grafts (BTB) were prepared from cadaveric human patella tendons with both patellar and tibial attachments. BTB grafts were preserved by deep freezing, glycerolisation or lyophilisation and were subsequently radiation-sterilised with doses of 0 (control), 25, 50 or 100 kGy. All samples were subjected to mechanical failure tensile tests with the use of Instron system in order to estimate their mechanical properties. All lyophilised grafts were rehydrated before performing of those tests. Obtained mechanical tests results of examined grafts suggest that deep-frozen irradiated grafts retain their initial mechanical properties to an extent which does not exclude their clinical application.

  20. Ultrasonic evaluations of Achilles tendon mechanical properties poststroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Liu, Shu Q.; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2009-01-01

    Spasticity, contracture, and muscle weakness are commonly observed poststroke in muscles crossing the ankle. However, it is not clear how biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon change poststroke, which may affect functions of the impaired muscles directly. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon, including the length and cross-sectional area, in the impaired and unimpaired sides of 10 hemiparetic stroke survivors were evaluated using ultrasonography. Elongation of the Achilles tendon during controlled isometric ramp-and-hold and ramping up then down contractions was determined using a block-matching method. Biomechanical changes in stiffness, Young's modulus, and hysteresis of the Achilles tendon poststroke were investigated by comparing the impaired and unimpaired sides of the 10 patients. The impaired side showed increased tendon length (6%; P = 0.04), decreased stiffness (43%; P < 0.001), decreased Young's modulus (38%; P = 0.005), and increased mechanical hysteresis (1.9 times higher; P < 0.001) compared with the unimpaired side, suggesting Achilles tendon adaptations to muscle spasticity, contracture, and/or disuse poststroke. In vivo quantitative characterizations of the tendon biomechanical properties may help us better understand changes of the calf muscle-tendon unit as a whole and facilitate development of more effective treatments. PMID:19118156

  1. Ultrasonic evaluations of Achilles tendon mechanical properties poststroke.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Liu, Shu Q; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2009-03-01

    Spasticity, contracture, and muscle weakness are commonly observed poststroke in muscles crossing the ankle. However, it is not clear how biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon change poststroke, which may affect functions of the impaired muscles directly. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon, including the length and cross-sectional area, in the impaired and unimpaired sides of 10 hemiparetic stroke survivors were evaluated using ultrasonography. Elongation of the Achilles tendon during controlled isometric ramp-and-hold and ramping up then down contractions was determined using a block-matching method. Biomechanical changes in stiffness, Young's modulus, and hysteresis of the Achilles tendon poststroke were investigated by comparing the impaired and unimpaired sides of the 10 patients. The impaired side showed increased tendon length (6%; P = 0.04), decreased stiffness (43%; P < 0.001), decreased Young's modulus (38%; P = 0.005), and increased mechanical hysteresis (1.9 times higher; P < 0.001) compared with the unimpaired side, suggesting Achilles tendon adaptations to muscle spasticity, contracture, and/or disuse poststroke. In vivo quantitative characterizations of the tendon biomechanical properties may help us better understand changes of the calf muscle-tendon unit as a whole and facilitate development of more effective treatments.

  2. Distal biceps tendon injuries: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, M L

    1999-01-01

    Rupture of the distal biceps tendon occurs most commonly in the dominant extremity of men between 40 and 60 years of age when an unexpected extension force is applied to the flexed arm. Although previously thought to be an uncommon injury, distal biceps tendon ruptures are being reported with increasing frequency. The rupture typically occurs at the tendon insertion into the radial tuberosity in an area of preexisting tendon degeneration. The diagnosis is made on the basis of a history of a painful, tearing sensation in the antecubital region. Physical examination demonstrates a palpable and visible deformity of the distal biceps muscle belly with weakness in flexion and supination. The ability to palpate the tendon in the antecubital fossa may indicate partial tearing of the biceps tendon. Plain radiographs may show hypertrophic bone formation at the radial tuberosity. Magnetic resonance imaging is generally not required to diagnose a complete rupture but may be useful in the case of a partial rupture. Early surgical reattachment to the radial tuberosity is recommended for optimal results. A modified two-incision technique is the most widely used method of repair, but anterior single-incision techniques may be equally effective provided the radial nerve is protected. The patient with a chronic rupture may benefit from surgical reattachment, but proximal retraction and scarring of the muscle belly can make tendon mobilization difficult, and inadequate length of the distal biceps tendon may necessitate tendon augmentation. Postoperative rehabilitation must emphasize protected return of motion for the first 8 weeks after repair. Formal strengthening may begin as early as 8 weeks, with a return to unrestricted activities, including lifting, by 5 months.

  3. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles reduce the survival rate of osteocytes in bone-tendon constructs without affecting the mechanical properties of tendons.

    PubMed

    Suto, Kaori; Urabe, Ken; Naruse, Kouji; Uchida, Kentaro; Matsuura, Terumasa; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Suto, Mitsutoshi; Nemoto, Noriko; Kamiya, Kentaro; Itoman, Moritoshi

    2012-03-01

    Frozen bone-patellar tendon bone allografts are useful in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction as the freezing procedure kills tissue cells, thereby reducing immunogenicity of the grafts. However, a small portion of cells in human femoral heads treated by standard bone-bank freezing procedures survive, thus limiting the effectiveness of allografts. Here, we characterized the survival rates and mechanisms of cells isolated from rat bones and tendons that were subjected to freeze-thaw treatments, and evaluated the influence of these treatments on the mechanical properties of tendons. After a single freeze-thaw cycle, most cells isolated from frozen bone appeared morphologically as osteocytes and expressed both osteoblast- and osteocyte-related genes. Transmission electron microscopic observation of frozen cells using freeze-substitution revealed that a small number of osteocytes maintained large nuclei with intact double membranes, indicating that these osteocytes in bone matrix were resistant to ice crystal formation. We found that tendon cells were completely killed by a single freeze-thaw cycle, whereas bone cells exhibited a relatively high survival rate, although survival was significantly reduced after three freeze-thaw cycles. In patella tendons, the ultimate stress, Young's modulus, and strain at failure showed no significant differences between untreated tendons and those subjected to five freeze-thaw cycles. In conclusion, we identified that cells surviving after freeze-thaw treatment of rat bones were predominantly osteocytes. We propose that repeated freeze-thaw cycles could be applied for processing bone-tendon constructs prior to grafting as the treatment did not affect the mechanical property of tendons and drastically reduced surviving osteocytes, thereby potentially decreasing allograft immunogenecity.

  4. Diseases of the tendons and tendon sheaths.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Adrian; Anderson, David E; Desrochers, André

    2014-03-01

    Contracted flexor tendon leading to flexural deformity is a common congenital defect in cattle. Arthrogryposis is a congenital syndrome of persistent joint contracture that occurs frequently in Europe as a consequence of Schmallenberg virus infection of the dam. Spastic paresis has a hereditary component, and affected cattle should not be used for breeding purposes. The most common tendon avulsion involves the deep digital flexor tendon. Tendon disruptions may be successfully managed by tenorrhaphy and external coaptation or by external coaptation alone. Medical management alone is unlikely to be effective for purulent tenosynovitis.

  5. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon.

  6. Multiple variations of the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox

    PubMed Central

    Thwin, San San; Zaini, Fazlin; Than, Myo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Multiple tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) in the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist can lead to the development of de Quervain's syndrome, which is caused by stenosing tenosynovitis. A cadaveric study was performed to establish the variations present in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox in a Malaysian population, in the hope that this knowledge would aid clinical investigation and surgical treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. METHODS Routine dissection of ten upper limbs was performed to determine the variations in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist. RESULTS In all the dissected upper limbs, the APL tendon of the first extensor compartment was found to have several (3–14) tendon slips. The insertion of the APL tendon slips in all upper limbs were at the base of the first metacarpal bone, trapezium and fascia of the opponens pollicis muscle; however, in seven specimens, they were also found to be attached to the fleshy belly of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. In two specimens, double tendons of the extensor pollicis longus located in the third extensor compartment were inserted into the capsule of the proximal interphalangeal joints before being joined to the extensor expansion. In two other specimens, the first extensor compartment had two osseofibrous tunnels divided by a septum that separated the APL tendon from the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. CONCLUSION Multiple variations were found in the anatomical snuffbox region of the dissected upper limbs. Knowledge of these variations would be useful in interventional radiology and orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24452976

  7. A passive exoskeleton with artificial tendons: design and experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Wietse; van der Kooij, Herman; Hekman, Edsko

    2011-01-01

    We developed a passive exoskeleton that was designed to minimize joint work during walking. The exoskeleton makes use of passive structures, called artificial tendons, acting in parallel with the leg. Artificial tendons are elastic elements that are able to store and redistribute energy over the human leg joints. The elastic characteristics of the tendons have been optimized to minimize the mechanical work of the human leg joints. In simulation the maximal reduction was 40 percent. The performance of the exoskeleton was evaluated in an experiment in which nine subjects participated. Energy expenditure and muscle activation were measured during three conditions: Normal walking, walking with the exoskeleton without artificial tendons, and walking with the exoskeleton with the artificial tendons. Normal walking was the most energy efficient. While walking with the exoskeleton, the artificial tendons only resulted in a negligibly small decrease in energy expenditure.

  8. Macrophage-to-Myofibroblast Transition Contributes to Interstitial Fibrosis in Chronic Renal Allograft Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Ying; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Jun; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Wang, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Hong-Feng; To, Ka-Fai; Nikolic-Paterson, David J; Lan, Hui-Yao; Chen, Jiang-Hua

    2017-02-16

    Interstitial fibrosis is an important contributor to graft loss in chronic renal allograft injury. Inflammatory macrophages are associated with fibrosis in renal allografts, but how these cells contribute to this damaging response is not clearly understood. Here, we investigated the role of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition in interstitial fibrosis in human and experimental chronic renal allograft injury. In biopsy specimens from patients with active chronic allograft rejection, we identified cells undergoing macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition by the coexpression of macrophage (CD68) and myofibroblast (α-smooth muscle actin [α-SMA]) markers. CD68(+)/α-SMA(+) cells accounted for approximately 50% of the myofibroblast population, and the number of these cells correlated with allograft function and the severity of interstitial fibrosis. Similarly, in C57BL/6J mice with a BALB/c renal allograft, cells coexpressing macrophage markers (CD68 or F4/80) and α-SMA composed a significant population in the interstitium of allografts undergoing chronic rejection. Fate-mapping in Lyz2-Cre/Rosa26-Tomato mice showed that approximately half of α-SMA(+) myofibroblasts in renal allografts originated from recipient bone marrow-derived macrophages. Knockout of Smad3 protected against interstitial fibrosis in renal allografts and substantially reduced the number of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells. Furthermore, the majority of macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition cells in human and experimental renal allograft rejection coexpressed the M2-type macrophage marker CD206, and this expression was considerably reduced in Smad3-knockout recipients. In conclusion, our studies indicate that macrophage-to-myofibroblast transition contributes to interstitial fibrosis in chronic renal allograft injury. Moreover, the transition of bone marrow-derived M2-type macrophages to myofibroblasts in the renal allograft is regulated via a Smad3-dependent mechanism.

  9. Re-revision of a patellar tendon rupture in a young professional martial arts athlete.

    PubMed

    Vadalà, A; Iorio, R; Bonifazi, A M; Bolle, G; Ferretti, A

    2012-09-01

    A 27-year-old professional martial arts athlete experienced recurrent right knee patellar tendon rupture on three occasions. He underwent two operations for complete patellar tendon rupture: an end-to-end tenorrhaphy the first time, and revision with a bone-patellar-tendon (BPT) allograft. After the third episode, he was referred to our department, where we performed a surgical reconstruction with the use of hamstring pro-patellar tendon, in a figure-of-eight configuration, followed by a careful rehabilitation protocol. Clinical and radiological follow-ups were realized at 1, 3, and 6 months and 1 and 2 years postop, with an accurate physical examination, the use of recognized international outcome scores, and radiograph and MRI studies. As far as we know, this is the first paper to report a re-revision of a patellar tendon rupture.

  10. Elastographic characteristics of the metacarpal tendons in horses without clinical evidence of tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Meghann; Redding, W Rich; Labens, Raphael; Morgan, Michel; Davis, Weston; Seiler, Gabriela S

    2014-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injuries are common causes of impaired performance in equine athletes. Gray-scale ultrasonography is the current standard method for diagnosing and monitoring these injuries, however this modality only provides morphologic information. Elastography is an ultrasound technique that allows detection and measurement of tissue strain, and may provide valuable mechanical information about equine tendon and ligament injuries. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, reproducibility, and repeatability of elastography; and to describe elastographic characteristics of metacarpal tendons in sound horses. Nineteen legs for 17 clinically sound horses without evidence of musculoskeletal pathology were included. Elastographic images of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons and the branches of the suspensory ligament (tendon of the interosseous muscle) were described quantitatively and qualitatively. There was no statistically significant difference between operators (P = 0.86) nor within operators (P = 0.93). For qualitative assessments, reproducibility (0.46) was moderate and repeatability (0.78) was good. Similar to human Achilles tendons, equine tendons were classified as predominantly hard using elastography. There was no statistically significant difference in stiffness of the flexor tendons (P = 0.96). No significant difference in stiffness was found with altered leg position during standing (P = 0.84) and while nonweight bearing (P = 0.61). The flexor tendons were softer when imaged in longitudinal versus transverse planes (P < 0.01) however, the suspensory branches were not (P = 0.67). Findings supported future clinical application of elastography as a noninvasive "stall-side" imaging modality for evaluation of the tendons and ligaments of the distal forelimb in horses.

  11. New anchoring method for tarsal tendon transfers in myelomeningocele patients.

    PubMed

    Tomonori, Kenmoku; Makoto, Kamegaya; Takashi, Saisu

    2007-12-01

    We describe a new anchoring method for tarsal tendon transfers in myelomeningocele patients to protect the sole of the foot from pressure sores and skin necrosis and to loosen the tension of the transferred tendon.Tendon transfer procedures were performed in 51 feet (33 patients) with myelomeningocele. We transferred tibialis anterior tendons to the second or third cuneiform in 19 with equinovarus deformities, and transferred tibialis anterior tendons to the calcaneus through the interosseous membrane in 32 with talipes calcaneus. Clinical results were evaluated with the muscle power of transferred tendons using manual muscle testing 6 months after surgery. The muscle test result was classified as good, fair, and poor.After passing the tendon through the bony hole, a 2.0-mm Kirschner wire was inserted from the sole to the tibia through the ankle joint at neutral. (It extended from the sole through the posterior cortex of the tibia.) The remaining part of the wire was bent and formed into a loop shaped like the Greek letter "zeta" (zeta). The thread was then tied to the loop of the wire as tightly as possible. In this way, there was no contact with the sole during anchoring, thus avoiding ulcers. In addition, the transferred tendon could be kept stable because the patient's ankle was fixed by the Kirschner wire.No cases of wound infection or skin necrosis of the sole occurred. In 49 of the 51 cases, transferred tendons were firmly anchored to tarsal bones. Muscle strength was good for 83%, fair for 13%, and poor for 4%. Consequently, 45 feet could obtain plantigrade pattern during their walking with shoe inserts or occasional use of ankle-foot orthoses.Our anchoring method has the advantage of protecting the sole of the foot from pressure sores and skin necrosis, as well as maintaining tension on the transferred tendon until it settles down in an anchor hole.

  12. Fibrillins in Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Betti; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2016-01-01

    Tendons among connective tissue, mainly collagen, contain also elastic fibers (EF) made of fibrillin 1, fibrillin 2 and elastin that are broadly distributed in tendons and represent 1–2% of the dried mass of the tendon. Only in the last years, studies on structure and function of EF in tendons have been performed. Aim of this review is to revise data on the organization of EF in tendons, in particular fibrillin structure and function, and on the clinical manifestations associated to alterations of EF in tendons. Indeed, microfibrils may contribute to tendon mechanics; therefore, their alterations may cause joint hypermobility and contractures which have been found to be clinical features in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Beals syndrome. The two diseases are caused by mutations in genes FBN1 and FBN2 encoding fibrillin 1 and fibrillin 2, respectively. PMID:27812333

  13. Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer with GraftJacket® Augmentation to Increase Tendon Length for an Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears can be reconstructed with latissimus dorsi tendon transfers (LDTT). Although uncommon, the natural length of the latissimus dorsi tendon (LDT) could be insufficient for transfer even after adequate soft tissue releases. Descriptions of cases where grafts were needed to lengthen the LDT are therefore rare. We located only two reports of the use of an acellular dermal matrix to increase effective tendon length in tendon transfers about the shoulder: (1) GraftJacket patch for a pectoralis major tendon reconstruction and (2) ArthroFlex® patch for LDTT. Both of these brands of allograft patches are obtained from human cadavers. These products are usually used to cover soft tissue repairs and offer supplemental support rather than for increasing tendon length. Extending the LDTT with GraftJacket to achieve adequate length, to our knowledge, has not been reported in the literature. We report the case of a 50-year-old male who had a massive, irreparable left shoulder rotator cuff tear that was reconstructed with a LDTT. The natural length of his LDT was insufficient for transfer. This unexpected situation was rectified by sewing two patches of GraftJacket to the LDT. The patient had greatly improved shoulder function at two-year follow-up. PMID:28194290

  14. The biceps tendons: From the top and from the bottom

    PubMed Central

    Brasseur, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    The biceps brachii muscle, which inserts proximally onto the scapula and distally onto the forearm, has several tendons with numerous anatomic peculiarities, which render their sonographic examination highly variable. Proximally, the tendon of the short head of the biceps inserts onto the coracoid process and that of the long head on the superior aspect of the glenoid. The distal biceps tendon is bifurcated, and it generally inserts on the radial tuberosity, around which it rolls during pronation/supination. There is a third distal structure, the Lacertus fibrosus, an aponeurosis that branches off from the medial aspect of the tendon, crossing the median artery and median nerve, and inserting on the superficial aponeurosis of the flexor muscles. The sonographic examination of these tendons focuses on nine separate zones of interest: the glenoid insertion of the long head, its extension to the upper pole of the humeral head, the rotator interval, the reflection to the upper bicipital groove, the bicipital groove, the upper myotendinous junction, the lower myotendinous junction, the distal tendon(s), and the inferior enthesis. Because of their morphological and topographical characteristics, the biceps tendons are subject to a variety of lesions, some of which are frequently misdiagnosed on the basis of clinical findings. Ultrasound plays an important role in detecting and characterizing these lesions. Proper examination of the biceps (the distal portion in particular) is a difficult task that cannot be improvised. PMID:23397031

  15. Estimation of Musculotendon Kinematics under Controlled Tendon Indentation

    PubMed Central

    Chardon, Matthieu K.; Dhaher, Yasin Y.; Suresh, Nina I.; Jaramillo, Giselle; Rymer, W. Zev

    2015-01-01

    The effects of tendon indentation on musculotendon unit mechanics have been left largely unexplored. Tendon indentation is however routinely used in the tendon reflex exam to diagnose the state of reflex pathways. Because muscle mechanoreceptors are sensitive to mechanical changes of the musculotendon unit, this gap in knowledge could potentially impact our understanding of these neurological exams. Accordingly, we have used ultrasound (US) imaging to compare the effects of tendon indentation with the effects angular rotation of the elbow in six neurologically intact individuals. We used sagittal ultrasound movies of the biceps brachii to compare length changes induced by each of these perturbations. Length changes were quantified using a pixel-tracking protocol. Our results show that a 20 mm indentation of the distal tendon is broadly equivalent to a 15° elbow rotation. We also show that within the imaging window the strain differences between the two stretching protocols are statistically insignificant. Finally, we show that there exists a significant linear relationship between the two stretching techniques and that this relationship spans a large rotational angle to indentation depth. We have used a novel tendon probe to administer controlled tendon indentations as a way to characterize musculotendon kinematics. Using this probe, we confirm that tendon indentation can be physiologically equated with joint rotation, and can thus be used as an input for muscle stretching protocols. Furthermore, this is potentially a simpler and more practical alternative to externally imposed angular joint motion. PMID:26321363

  16. Tendon synovial cells secrete fibronectin in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Banes, A.J.; Link, G.W.; Bevin, A.G.; Peterson, H.D.; Gillespie, Y.; Bynum, D.; Watts, S.; Dahners, L.

    1988-01-01

    The chemistry and cell biology of the tendon have been largely overlooked due to the emphasis on collagen, the principle structural component of the tendon. The tendon must not only transmit the force of muscle contraction to bone to effect movement, but it must also glide simultaneously over extratendonous tissues. Fibronectin is classified as a cell attachment molecule that induces cell spreading and adhesion to substratum. The external surface of intact avian flexor tendon stained positively with antibody to cellular fibronectin. However, if the surface synovial cells were first removed with collagenase, no positive reaction with antifibronectin antibody was detected. Analysis of immunologically stained frozen sections of tendon also revealed fibronectin at the tendon synovium, but little was associated with cells internal in tendon. The staining pattern with isolated, cultured synovial cells and fibroblasts from the tendon interior substantiated the histological observations. Analysis of polyacrylamide gel profiles of /sup 35/S-methionine-labeled proteins synthesized by synovial cells and internal fibroblasts indicated that fibronectin was synthesized principally by synovial cells. Fibronectin at the tendon surface may play a role in cell attachment to prevent cell removal by the friction of gliding. Alternatively, fibronectin, with its binding sites for hyaluronic acid and collagen, may act as a complex for boundary lubrication.

  17. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Youngstrom, Daniel W.; Barrett, Jennifer G.

    2016-01-01

    Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems. PMID:26839559

  18. Rat Achilles tendon healing: mechanical loading and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Andersson, Therese; Aspenberg, Per

    2009-08-01

    Injured tendons require mechanical tension for optimal healing, but it is unclear which genes are upregulated and responsible for this effect. We unloaded one Achilles tendon in rats by Botox injections in the calf muscles. The tendon was then transected and left to heal. We studied mechanical properties of the tendon calluses, as well as mRNA expression, and compared them with loaded controls. Tendon calluses were studied 3, 8, 14, and 21 days after transection. Intact tendons were studied similarly for comparison. Altogether 110 rats were used. The genes were chosen for proteins marking inflammation, growth, extracellular matrix, and tendon specificity. In intact tendons, procollagen III and tenascin-C were more expressed in loaded than unloaded tendons, but none of the other genes was affected. In healing tendons, loading status had small effects on the selected genes. However, TNF-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta1, and procollagens I and III were less expressed in loaded callus tissue at day 3. At day 8 procollagens I and III, lysyl oxidase, and scleraxis had a lower expression in loaded calluses. However, by days 14 and 21, procollagen I, cartilage oligomeric matrix protein, tenascin-C, tenomodulin, and scleraxis were all more expressed in loaded calluses. In healing tendons, the transverse area was larger in loaded samples, but material properties were unaffected, or even impaired. Thus mechanical loading is important for growth of the callus but not its mechanical quality. The main effect of loading during healing might thereby be sought among growth stimulators. In the late phase of healing, tendon-specific genes (scleraxis and tenomodulin) were upregulated with loading, and the healing tissue might to some extent represent a regenerate rather than a scar.

  19. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Godinho, Marta S C; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2015-12-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury.

  20. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Godinho, Marta S.C.; Riley, Graham P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R.C.

    2015-01-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury. PMID:25958330

  1. Tendon and ligament imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  2. Use of the semitendinosus tendon for foot and ankle tendon reconstructions☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Lutti Guerra de Aguiar Zink, Frederico; Glória Mendonça, Danilo; Kelly Bittar, Cintia; Luís Amim Zabeu, José; Salomão, Osny; Egydio de Carvalho Junior, Antonio; Tarso Torquato, Marcelo; Cerqueira de Moraes Filho, Décio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the results obtained from foot and ankle tendon reconstructions using the tendon of the semitendinosus muscle. The clinical results, the patient's degree of satisfaction and complications in the graft donor and recipient areas were evaluated. Methods This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of 38 patients who underwent this surgical procedure between 2006 and 2010 were surveyed. The functional results from this technique, the complications in the donor and recipient areas and the patients’ degree of satisfaction were evaluated. Results Three patients presented complications in the recipient area (skin necrosis); one patient showed complications in the donor area (pain and insensitivity); and all patients had satisfactory functional results, with complete range of motion. Conclusion The semitendinosus muscle is a good option for treatments for foot and ankle tendon injuries. PMID:26229856

  3. Specialisation of extracellular matrix for function in tendons and ligaments.

    PubMed

    Birch, Helen L; Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Rumian, Adam P

    2013-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments are similar structures in terms of their composition, organisation and mechanical properties. The distinction between them stems from their anatomical location; tendons form a link between muscle and bone while ligaments link bones to bones. A range of overlapping functions can be assigned to tendon and ligaments and each structure has specific mechanical properties which appear to be suited for particular in vivo function. The extracellular matrix in tendon and ligament varies in accordance with function, providing appropriate mechanical properties. The most useful framework in which to consider extracellular matrix differences therefore is that of function rather than anatomical location. In this review we discuss what is known about the relationship between functional requirements, structural properties from molecular to gross level, cellular gene expression and matrix turnover. The relevance of this information is considered by reviewing clinical aspects of tendon and ligament repair and reconstructive procedures.

  4. Interaction between gastrocnemius medialis fascicle and Achilles tendon compliance: a new insight on the quick-release method.

    PubMed

    Farcy, Stevy; Nordez, Antoine; Dorel, Sylvain; Hauraix, Hugo; Portero, Pierre; Rabita, Giuseppe

    2014-02-01

    The insufficient temporal resolution of imaging devices has made the analysis of very fast movements, such as those required to measure active muscle-tendon unit stiffness, difficult. Thus the relative contributions of tendon, aponeurosis, and fascicle to muscle-tendon unit compliance remain to be determined. The present study analyzed the dynamic interactions of fascicle, tendon, and aponeurosis in human gastrocnemius medialis during the first milliseconds of an ankle quick-release movement, using high-frame-rate ultrasonography (2,000 frames/s). Nine subjects performed the tests in random order at six levels of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) (30% to 80% of MVC). These tests were carried out with the ultrasound probe placed on the muscle belly and on the myotendinous junction. Tendon, muscle fascicle, and aponeurosis length changes were quantified in relation to shortening of the muscle-tendon unit during the first few milliseconds following the release. The tendon was the main contributor (around 72%) to the shortening of the muscle-tendon unit, whereas the muscle fascicle and aponeurosis contributions were 18% and 10%, respectively. Because these structures can be considered in series, the quantified contributions can be regarded as relative contributions to muscle-tendon compliance. These contributions were not modified with the level of MVC or the time range used for the analysis between 10 and 25 ms. The constant contribution of tendon, muscle fascicle, and aponeurosis to muscle-tendon unit compliance may help to simplify the mechanism of compliance regulation and to maintain the important role of tendons in enhancing work output and movement efficiency.

  5. The treatment of peripheral nerve injuries using irradiated allografts and temporary host immunosuppression (in a rat model)

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, K.J.; Trumble, T.E. )

    1990-10-01

    Irradiation of allografts prior to transplantation and host immunosuppression with cyclosporin-A were studied separately and in combination as means of lessening the rejection of transplanted peripheral nerve tissue. Lewis and Brown Norway rats were used in the animal model, as they differ at both major and minor histocompatibility loci. Sciatic nerve grafts (2.5 cm) were used and the animals were followed for 16 weeks after nerve grafting. The outcome was studied by functional measurements (sensory testing, gait analysis, joint flexion contracture, and muscle weight), as well as by measurements of biochemical and histologic parameters (hydroxyproline concentration and axon counts, respectively). Sensory testing was not reliable because of crossover innervation by the saphenous nerve. Evaluation by standard gait-testing techniques was found to be unsatisfactory. However, the allografted animals receiving cyclosporin-A had significantly smaller flexion contractures, compared to the allografted animals without immunosuppression (17 degrees +/- 12 degrees vs. 44 degrees +/- 13 degrees and 51 degrees +/- 13 degrees, p less than 0.005). Allografted animals receiving short-term cyclosporin-A had contractures that were not significantly different from those seen in isografted control animals (17 degrees +/- 12 degrees vs. 22 degrees +/- 15 degrees, NS). Muscle hydroxyproline concentration analysis revealed a lower hydroxyproline concentration among the allografted groups that received irradiated allografts, compared to groups receiving nonirradiated allogeneic grafts. The studies of muscle hydroxyproline concentration and muscle weight both showed substantial reinnervation, even in allografted animals without pretreatment of the grafts or immunosuppression of the recipient animal.

  6. Changes in the Achilles tendon reflexes following Skylab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, J. T.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hoffler, G. W.; Johnson, R. L.; Hordinsky, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Postflight measurements of Achilles tendon reflex duration on Skylab crewmen indicate a state of disequilibrium between the flexor and extensor muscle groups with an initial decrease in reflex duration. As the muscles regain strength and mass there occurs an overcompensation reflected by increased reflex duration. Finally, when a normal neuromuscular state is reached the reflex duration returns to baseline value.

  7. Sport-Specific Capacity to Use Elastic Energy in the Patellar and Achilles Tendons of Elite Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger, Hans-Peter; Rieder, Florian; Kösters, Alexander; Müller, Erich; Seynnes, Olivier R.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: During running and jumping activities, elastic energy is utilized to enhance muscle mechanical output and efficiency. However, training-induced variations in tendon spring-like properties remain under-investigated. The present work extends earlier findings on sport-specific profiles of tendon stiffness and cross-sectional area to examine whether years of distinct loading patterns are reflected by tendons' ability to store and return energy. Methods:Ultrasound scans were performed to examine the morphological features of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscle-tendon units in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players, and sedentary controls. Tendon strain energy and hysteresis were measured with combined motion capture, ultrasonography, and dynamometry. Results: Apart from the fractional muscle-to-tendon cross-sectional area ratio being lower in the knee extensors of ski jumpers (−31%) and runners (−33%) than in water polo players, no difference in the considered muscle-tendon unit morphological features was observed between groups. Similarly, no significant difference in tendon energy storage or energy return was detected between groups. In contrast, hysteresis was lower in the patellar tendon of ski jumpers (−33%) and runners (−30%) compared to controls, with a similar trend for the Achilles tendon (significant interaction effect and large effect sizes η2 = 0.2). Normalized to body mass, the recovered strain energy of the patellar tendon was ~50% higher in ski jumpers than in water polo players and controls. For the Achilles tendon, recovered strain energy was ~40% higher in ski jumpers and runners than in controls. Discussion: Advantageous mechanical properties related to tendon spring-like function are observed in elite athletes whose sport require effective utilization of elastic energy. However, the mechanisms underpinning the better tendon capacity of some athletes to retain elastic energy could not be ascribed to

  8. Sport-Specific Capacity to Use Elastic Energy in the Patellar and Achilles Tendons of Elite Athletes.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, Hans-Peter; Rieder, Florian; Kösters, Alexander; Müller, Erich; Seynnes, Olivier R

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: During running and jumping activities, elastic energy is utilized to enhance muscle mechanical output and efficiency. However, training-induced variations in tendon spring-like properties remain under-investigated. The present work extends earlier findings on sport-specific profiles of tendon stiffness and cross-sectional area to examine whether years of distinct loading patterns are reflected by tendons' ability to store and return energy. Methods:Ultrasound scans were performed to examine the morphological features of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscle-tendon units in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players, and sedentary controls. Tendon strain energy and hysteresis were measured with combined motion capture, ultrasonography, and dynamometry. Results: Apart from the fractional muscle-to-tendon cross-sectional area ratio being lower in the knee extensors of ski jumpers (-31%) and runners (-33%) than in water polo players, no difference in the considered muscle-tendon unit morphological features was observed between groups. Similarly, no significant difference in tendon energy storage or energy return was detected between groups. In contrast, hysteresis was lower in the patellar tendon of ski jumpers (-33%) and runners (-30%) compared to controls, with a similar trend for the Achilles tendon (significant interaction effect and large effect sizes η(2) = 0.2). Normalized to body mass, the recovered strain energy of the patellar tendon was ~50% higher in ski jumpers than in water polo players and controls. For the Achilles tendon, recovered strain energy was ~40% higher in ski jumpers and runners than in controls. Discussion: Advantageous mechanical properties related to tendon spring-like function are observed in elite athletes whose sport require effective utilization of elastic energy. However, the mechanisms underpinning the better tendon capacity of some athletes to retain elastic energy could not be ascribed to intrinsic or

  9. Distal Biceps Tendon Rupture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    distal tendon. Although these findings overlap with those seen in tendinopathy , the presence of bone marrow edema at the radial tuberosity and fluid in...the bicipitoradial bursa suggests a partial tear rather than tendinopathy .3 When the distal biceps tendon tear is complete, MR imaging shows

  10. Forefoot tendon transfers.

    PubMed

    Veljkovic, Andrea; Lansang, Edward; Lau, Johnny

    2014-03-01

    Flexible forefoot deformities, such as hallux varus, clawed hallux, hammer toes, and angular lesser toe deformities, can be treated effectively with tendon transfers. Based on the presentation of the flexible forefoot deformities, tendon transfers can be used as the primary treatment or as adjuncts to bony procedures when there are components of fixed deformities.

  11. Nonlinear optical imaging characteristics in rat tail tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Zhang, X. Z.; Qiu, Y. S.; Chen, R.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the characteristics of skeletal muscle fibers in tail tendons, explore the content of intrinsic components at different depths and ascertain the optimum excitation wavelength, which will help to establish a relationship between diagnosis and therapy and the tendon injury. A multiphoton microscopic imaging system was used to achieve the images and spectra via an imaging mode and a Lambda mode, respectively. This work demonstrates that the skeletal muscle fibers of the tail tendon are in good order. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals originating from certain intrinsic components are varied with depth, and the SHG/TPEF intensity ratios are varied at different excitation wavelengths. Below 800 nm is the optimum for cell TPEF, while above 800 nm is the optimum for SHG. With the development of imaging techniques, a nonlinear optical imaging system will be helpful to represent the functional behaviors of tissue related to tendon injury.

  12. The tibialis posterior tendon.

    PubMed

    Lhoste-Trouilloud, A

    2012-02-01

    The tibialis posterior tendon is the largest and anteriormost tendon in the medial ankle. It produces plantar flexion and supination of the ankle and stabilizes the plantar vault. Sonographic assessment of this tendon is done with high-frequency, linear-array transducers; an optimal examination requires transverse retromalleolar, longitudinal retromalleolar, and distal longitudinal scans, as well as dynamic studies. Disorders of the posterior tibial tendon include chronic tendinopathy with progressive rupture, tenosynovitis, acute rupture, dislocation and instability, enthesopathies. The most common lesion is a progressive "chewing gum" lesion that develops in a setting of chronic tendinopathy; it is usually seen in overweight women over 50 years of age with valgus flat feet. Medial ankle pain must also be carefully investigated, and the presence of instability assessed with dynamic maneuvers (forced inversion, or dorsiflexion) of the foot. Sonography plays an important role in the investigation of disorders involving the posterior tibial tendon.

  13. Stem Cell Applications in Tendon Disorders: A Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Tendon injuries are a common cause of morbidity and a significant health burden on society. Tendons are structural tissues connecting muscle to bone and are prone to tearing and tendinopathy, an overuse or degenerative condition that is characterized by failed healing and cellular depletion. Current treatments, for tendon tear are conservative, surgical repair or surgical scaffold reconstruction. Tendinopathy is treated by exercises, injection therapies, shock wave treatments or surgical tendon debridement. However, tendons usually heal with fibrosis and scar tissue, which has suboptimal tensile strength and is prone to reinjury, resulting in lifestyle changes with activity restriction. Preclinical studies show that cell therapies have the potential to regenerate rather than repair tendon tissue, a process termed tenogenesis. A number of different cell lines, with varying degrees of differentiation, have being evaluated including stem cells, tendon derived cells and dermal fibroblasts. Even though cellular therapies offer some potential in treating tendon disorders, there have been few published clinical trials to determine the ideal cell source, the number of cells to administer, or the optimal bioscaffold for clinical use. PMID:22448174

  14. Surgical Treatment of Neglected Traumatic Quadriceps Tendon Rupture with Knee Ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hun; Seon, Jong-Keun; Woo, Seong-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury. This disabling condition is the result of direct or indirect trauma. It requires surgical repair to avoid poor outcomes in cases of neglected or chronic rupture. In most acute cases, simple tendon suture or reinsertion is suitable for an extensor mechanism reconstruction of the knee joint. However, chronic lesions often require a tendon graft or flap reconstruction. We report a case of a 15-year-old male who was diagnosed with a chronic quadriceps rupture with a patellar superior pole fracture. We performed quadriceps reconstruction using tibialis anterior allograft tendon and additional screw fixation to reconstruct the extensor mechanism and recover knee joint range of motion to prevent a high-level functional restriction. The treatment was difficult and limited due to neglect for 9-months that led to ankylosis accompanied with nonunion of tibial fracture. Our surgical treatment using allograft tendon resulted in a very good outcome after 30 months of follow-up. PMID:27274474

  15. Rehabilitating Psoas Tendonitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    This case report describes the examination and physical therapy intervention for a woman with anterior hip pain whose medical diagnosis following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was bilateral labral tears and psoas tendinitis. Her physical therapy evaluation revealed findings consistent with psoas tendonitis. Utilizing theories of neuromuscular patterning and knowledge of normal muscle function, the patient was successfully treated in physical therapy following six physical therapy sessions, once a week for 6 weeks. The patient was found to have an overactive psoas muscle, as indicated by hip flexion being the primary mover in her movement patterns, and dysfunctional abdominal and pelvic floor muscles. Functionally based therapeutic exercise and electrical stimulation were used to reeducate the muscles of the abdomen, pelvic floor, and hips in order to create muscular balance and correct muscle dysfunction. PMID:19048347

  16. Ruptures of the distal biceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Ward, James P; Shreve, Mark C; Youm, Thomas; Strauss, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Distal biceps ruptures occur most commonly in middle-aged males and result from eccentric contraction of the biceps tendon. The injury typically presents with pain and a tearing sensation in the antecubital fossa with resultant weakness in flexion and supination strength. Physical exam maneuvers and diagnostic imaging aid in determining the diagnosis. Nonoperative management is reserved for elderly, low demand patients, while operative intervention is generally pursued for younger patients and can consist of nonanatomic repair to the brachialis or anatomic repair to the radial tuberosity. Anatomic repair through a one-incision or two-incision approach is commonplace, while the nonanatomic repairs are rarely performed. No clear advantage exists in operative management with a one-incision versus two-incision techniques. Chronic ruptures present a more difficult situation, and allograft augmentation is often necessary. Common complications after repair include transient nerve palsy, which often resolves, and heterotopic ossification. Despite these possible complications, most studies suggest that better patient outcomes are obtained with operative, anatomic reattachment of the distal biceps tendon.

  17. Bilateral Congenital Agenesis of the Long Head of the Biceps Tendon: The Beginning

    PubMed Central

    Rego Costa, Francisco; Esteves, Cátia; Melão, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The biceps brachii muscle is prone to variants but absence of the long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon is an exceptionally rare anomaly. This report concerns the fourth case of bilateral congenital absence of the LHB tendon and presents the ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) findings. Our case has the peculiarity of being the first in which bilateral LHB tendon agenesis is not associated with rotator cuff or labral tears. PMID:26904345

  18. Morphology of deltoid origin and end tendons – a generic model

    PubMed Central

    Leijnse, J N A L; Han, S-H; Kwon, Y H

    2008-01-01

    This study provides a model of the complex deltoid origin and end tendons, as a basis for further anatomical, biomechanical and clinical research. Although the deltoid is used in transpositions with upper limb paralysis, its detailed morphology and segmentation has not been object of much study. Morphologically, the deltoid faces two distinct challenges. It closely envelops a ball joint, and it reduces its width over a short distance from a very wide origin along clavicle, acromion and spina scapula, to an insertion as narrow as the humerus. These challenges necessitate specific morphological tendon adaptations. A qualitative model for these tendons is developed by the stepwise transformation of a unipennate muscle model into a functional deltoid muscle. Each step is the solution to one of the mentioned morphological challenges. The final model is of an end tendon consisting of a continuous succession of bipennate end tendon blades centrally interspaced by unipennate tendon parts. The origin tendon consists of lamellae that interdigitate with the end tendon blades, creating a natural segmentation. The model is illustrated by qualitative dissection results. In addition, in view of a proliferation of terms found in the literature to describe deltoid tendons, tendon concepts are reviewed and the systematic use of the unique and simple terminology of ‘origin and end tendons’ is proposed. PMID:19094189

  19. Proximal Biceps Tendonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... teens, biceps tendonitis is usually an overuse injury. Baseball pitchers, swimmers, tennis players, and people who have ... But if you swim or play tennis or baseball, that might not be an option! If your ...

  20. Tendon vs. ligament (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eyeball. A tendon serves to move the bone or structure. A ligament is a fibrous connective tissue which attaches bone to bone, and usually serves to hold structures together and keep them stable.

  1. Characterization of mechanical and biochemical properties of developing embryonic tendon

    PubMed Central

    Marturano, Joseph E.; Arena, Jeffrey D.; Schiller, Zachary A.; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kuo, Catherine K.

    2013-01-01

    Tendons have uniquely high tensile strength, critical to their function to transfer force from muscle to bone. When injured, their innate healing response results in aberrant matrix organization and functional properties. Efforts to regenerate tendon are challenged by limited understanding of its normal development. Consequently, there are few known markers to assess tendon formation and parameters to design tissue engineering scaffolds. We profiled mechanical and biological properties of embryonic tendon and demonstrated functional properties of developing tendon are not wholly reflected by protein expression and tissue morphology. Using force volume-atomic force microscopy, we found that nano- and microscale tendon elastic moduli increase nonlinearly and become increasingly spatially heterogeneous during embryonic development. When we analyzed potential biochemical contributors to modulus, we found statistically significant but weak correlation between elastic modulus and collagen content, and no correlation with DNA or glycosaminoglycan content, indicating there are additional contributors to mechanical properties. To investigate collagen cross-linking as a potential contributor, we inhibited lysyl oxidase-mediated collagen cross-linking, which significantly reduced tendon elastic modulus without affecting collagen morphology or DNA, glycosaminoglycan, and collagen content. This suggests that lysyl oxidase-mediated cross-linking plays a significant role in the development of embryonic tendon functional properties and demonstrates that changes in cross-links alter mechanical properties without affecting matrix content and organization. Taken together, these data demonstrate the importance of functional markers to assess tendon development and provide a profile of tenogenic mechanical properties that may be implemented in tissue engineering scaffold design to mechanoregulate new tendon regeneration. PMID:23576745

  2. Adenohypophysitis in rat pituitary allografts

    PubMed Central

    Rotondo, Fabio; Quintanar-Stephano, Andres; Asa, Sylvia L; Lombardero, Matilde; Berczi, Istvan; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Horvath, Eva; Kovacs, Kalman

    2010-01-01

    The histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural alterations in 81 pituitary allografts from Lewis rats transplanted beneath the renal capsule of Wistar rats were investigated. Intrasellar pituitaries of rats bearing allografts were also examined. Recipient rats were sacrificed at various time points after transplantation. Two days after transplantation, the central portion of the allografts demonstrated ischaemic necrosis. A week later, massive mononuclear cell infiltrates consisting primarily of lymphocytes and to a lesser extent, macrophages, plasma cells and granulocytes became prominent. At about three to four weeks after transplantation, the mononuclear cell infiltrate diminished; the surviving adenohypophysial cells, mainly prolactin (PRL) cells, increased in number and necrosis was replaced by connective tissue. No histological changes were noted in the intrasellar pituitaries of rats bearing allografts. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the surviving adenohypophysial cells were mainly PRL-producing cells. Electron microscopy revealed adenohypophysial cell destruction, a spectrum of inflammatory cells and, in late phase, accumulation of fibroblasts and collagen fibres. PRL cells were the prominent cell types; they increased in number. It appears that pituitary allografts are ‘foreign’ and evoke an immune response, suggesting that they may be used as an experimental animal model for morphological investigation of the development and progression of adenohypophysitis, a rare disease occurring mainly in young women often associated with pregnancy. PMID:20586813

  3. Osteochondral Allograft of the Talus

    PubMed Central

    Bisicchia, Salvatore; Rosso, Federica; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are being recognized as an increasingly common injury. They are most commonly located postero-medially or antero-laterally, while centrally located lesions are uncommon. Large osteochondral lesions have significant biomechanical consequences and often require resurfacing with osteochondral autograft transfer, mosaicplasty, autologous chondrocyte implantation (or similar methods) or osteochondral allograft transplantation. Allograft procedures have become popular due to inherent advantages over other resurfacing techniques. Cartilage viability is one of the most important factors for successful clinical outcomes after transplantation of osteochondral allografts and is related to storage length and intra-operative factors. While there is abundant literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation in the knee, there are few papers about this procedure in the talus. Failure of non-operative management, initial debridement, curettage or microfractures are an indication for resurfacing. Patients should have a functional ankle motion, closed growth plates, absence of cartilage lesions on the tibial side. This paper reviews the published literature about osteochondral allograft transplantation of the talus focusing on indications, pre-operative planning, surgical approaches, postoperative management, results and complications of this procedure. PMID:25328456

  4. Alterations of tendons in diabetes mellitus: what are the current findings?

    PubMed

    Shi, Liu; Rui, Yun-Feng; Li, Gang; Wang, Chen

    2015-08-01

    As a connective tissue, tendon connects the muscle and bone, and plays the key role in the locomotor system. Some previous studies have shown the pathological alternations in diabetic tendons, which might result in the structural and functional changes, and even accelerate the process of diabetic foot. In this review, we examined the current findings of the diabetic tendons in the form of various aspects, and summarized the clinical presentation, imaging, biomechanical, histopathological, cellular and molecular abnormalities in the diabetic tendons. The progress of diabetic tendon damage is complicated and the main hypotheses include the excessive accumulation of AGEs, the altered inflammatory response, neovascularization and insensitive neuropathy. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of these alterations are still ambiguous. Tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSPCs) have been discovered to play important roles in both tendon physiology and tendon pathology. Recently, we identified TSPCs from patellar tendons in our well-established diabetic rat model and found impaired tenogenic differentiation potential of these cells. We proposed a new hypothesis that the impaired cell functions of diabetic TSPCs might be the underlying cellular and molecular mechanism of the diabetic tendon alternations. These findings should be helpful to establish a better therapeutic strategy for diabetic tendon repair and regeneration.

  5. Biochemical and Anatomical Characteristics of Dolphin Muscles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    these tendinous bundles can be teased into fine individual tendons and traced to its muscle fiber attachment. Figure A6. The lattice arrangement of...connective tissue in which the fibers are intermeshed. Note: The unique tendinous convergence begins as fine individual tendons branched throughout the... tendon arrangement in muscles from the dorsal compartment of the axial musculature. Note: The tendinous arrangements are illustrated with a trichrome

  6. Tissue allografts and health risks.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C

    1994-01-01

    Like vascularized transplants, tissue allografts are able to transmit viral and bacterial diseases. Transmission of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) and HCV (Hepatitis C virus) has been proved for sterilized, unprocessed and deep-frozen allografts. It is the prime responsibility of the tissue bank to select the donor correctly and to perform careful biological screening. However, standard screening is not enough to detect a seronegative but contaminated donor. It is necessary to quarantine the tissues until complementary screening confirms the absence of viral disease. If secondary screening is not possible, the tissues should be discarded or should be processed. If donor selection, relevant and appropriate screening tests and adequate procurement of tissues are carefully made, then the risk of disease transmission from tissue allografts will remain remote.

  7. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient’s tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient’s tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient’s tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies. PMID:27375477

  8. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient's tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient's tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient's tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies.

  9. [Tendon ruptures of the shoulder].

    PubMed

    Habermeyer, P

    1989-08-01

    Common sports, involving raising the arms above the head, i.e., throwing, racquet games and swimming, often result in rotator cuff tendinitis. During the throwing motion, the humeral head and its overlying biceps tendon and rotator cuff must pass rapidly under the coraco-acromial arch. Damage to these structures can occur by several mechanism. First, an increase in the size of the structures passing underneath the arch may lead to impingement. This can occur either by way of hypertrophy of the musculotendinous cuff or by way of inflammation of the cuff. Second, a decreased space available underneath the arch secondary to osteophyte formation of the acromion and fibrosis of the subacromial space may lead to impingement. Third, weakness or incompetence of the rotator cuff allows the humerus to ride up and impinge on the coracoacromial arch with motion of the shoulder. Tendinitis can be combined with increased laxity of the glenohumeral joint and/or acquired instability due to a labral tear. Prevention of overuse injuries is a cornerstone of our treatment concept. The muscle tendon unit requires passive and neuromuscular facilitated streching after warming-up exercises. Muscular imbalance and weakness are prevented by balanced eccentric strenthening with particular attention to the external rotators and scapular muscles. Knowledge of the mechanics of the pitching motion, tennis serve, swimming stroke, etc. is of paramount importance in the prevention of injuries. As the onset of shoulder problems contributes to a particularly fatiguing situation, extreme fatique performance severity should be avoided. Every effort must be made to apply conservative treatment when overuse problems arise in the athlete's shoulder.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Tendon transfer or tendon graft for ruptured finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid hands.

    PubMed

    Chung, U S; Kim, J H; Seo, W S; Lee, K H

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the clinical outcome of tendon reconstruction using tendon graft or tendon transfer and the parameters related to clinical outcome in 51 wrists of 46 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with finger extensor tendon ruptures. At a mean follow-up of 5.6 years, the mean metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint extension lag was 8 degrees (range, 0-45) and the mean visual analogue satisfaction scale was 74 (range, 10-100). Clinical outcome did not differ significantly between tendon grafting and tendon transfer. The MP joint extension lag correlated with the patient's satisfaction score, but the pulp-to-palm distance did not correlate with patient satisfaction. We conclude that both tendon grafting and tendon transfer are reliable reconstruction methods for ruptured finger extensor tendons in rheumatoid hands.

  11. [The influence of HX- I on rabbit thyroid allografts].

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Shen, W; Tan, J; Du, C; Li, K; Huang, X

    1996-03-01

    We studied the anti-rejection effect of HX- I, a preparation of traditional Chinese herbs, on rabbit thyroid allografts. The transplantations were performed on 28 rabbits after total thyroidectomies. The grafting sites were in their pretrachial muscles. These animals were divided into four groups, namely, Group I: homografts: Group I: allografts without medication; Group II: allografts with dexamethason (0.25 mg/(kg.d) intramuscularly), and Group IV: allografts with HX-I water solution, (5g/(kg.d), peros). The medication lasted 28 days. Blood samples were drawn every week postoperatively. Serum T3 and T4 were tested by RIA. The grafts were removed for histopathological evaluation on the 28th day postoperatively. The histopathology of rejection and survival were scored and classified. On the 7th and 14th days, serum T3 and T4 levels were almost the same between groups. On the 21st and 28th days, the T3 and T4 levels were higher in Groups I and IV than those in Group II (P < 0.05). The histopathological findings were; in Group I, damaged follicles with much lymphocytes infiltration and fibrosis, and 6 cases being rejected; in Group II, two deaths and three cases with damaged thyroid tissue and much lymphocytes infiltration; in Group IV, three cases with damaged thyroid tissue and four intact grafts. Our results indicate that HX-I and dexamethason both can inhibit rejection in thyroid allografts in rabbits, but dexamethason has more side effects HX-I has many components and the machanism of its early anti-rejection effect is worthy of further study.

  12. Biomechanical properties of bone allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Pelker, R.R.; Friedlaender, G.E.; Markham, T.C.

    1983-04-01

    The biomechanical properties of allograft bone can be altered by the methods chosen for its preservation and storage. These effects are minimal with deep-freezing or low-level radiation. Freeze-drying, however, markedly diminishes the torsional and bending strength of bone allografts but does not deleteriously affect the compressive or tensile strength. Irradiation of bone with more than 3.0 megarad or irradiation combined with freeze-drying appears to cause a significant reduction in breaking strength. These factors should be considered when choosing freeze-dried or irradiated allogeneic bone that will be subjected to significant loads following implantation.

  13. Complete Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Landvater, S J; Renström, P A

    1992-10-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures can be treated nonsurgically in the nonathletic or low-end recreational athletic patient, particularly those more than 50 years of age, provided the treating physician does not delay in the diagnosis and treatment (preferably less than 48 hrs and possibly less than 1 week). The patient should be advised of the higher incidence of re-rupture of the tendon when treated nonsurgically. Surgical treatment is recommended for patients who are young and athletic. This is particularly true because the major criticism of surgical treatment has been the complication rate, which has decreased to a low level and to a mild degree, usually not significantly affecting the repair over time. Surgical treatment in these individuals seems to be superior not only in regard to re-rupture but also in assuring the correct apposition of the tendon ends and in placing the necessary tension on the tendon to secure appropriate orientation of the collagen fibers. This in turn allows them to regain full strength, power, endurance, and an early return to sports. Surgery is also recommended for late diagnosed ruptures where there is significant lengthening of the tendon. Surgical technique should involve a medial incision to avoid the sural nerve, absorbable suture, and augmentation with fascia or tendon where there is a gap or late rupture. Postoperatively, the immobilization should be 7 to 10 days in a splint. A walking boot with early motion in plantar flexion or a short leg cast with the tendon under slight tension should thereafter be used for 4 to 5 weeks. An early and well-supervised rehabilitation program should be initiated to restore the patient to the preinjury activity level.

  14. Autonomy of tendon development in the embryonic chick wing.

    PubMed

    Kieny, M; Chevallier, A

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this study performed in the embryonic chick wing is to test the ability of the tendons to form and develop in the absence of the muscle bellies. The experiments were performed on 2-day chick embryos by destroying a portion of the somitic mesoderm by local X-irradiation. The irradiated part included the wing somite level 15-20 and extended three somites (or presumptive somites) in front and two to six presumptive somites in the rear of the wing somite levels. The wings of the operated side were examined histologically 3-8 days after the X-irradiation. The radio-destruction of the somitic mesoderm totally inhibited or severely impaired the development of the forearm muscles. But, despite the absence of the flexor and extensor muscles the differentiation of the distal manus tendons could be observed. This differentiation occurred at the same time and in the same positions as in controls. However, these tendons were transient structures. They disappeared within three days after their individuation. Two mechanisms that progressed in proximo-distal direction were involved in their resorption: cellular dislocation and cell death. We conclude that tendons start to develop autonomously from the muscle bulks, but for their maintenance and further development they require connexion to a muscle belly.

  15. Steroid injections - tendon, bursa, joint

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/article/007678.htm Steroid injections - tendon, bursa, joint To use the sharing features on this page, ... often painful. It can be injected into a joint, tendon, or bursa. Description Your health care provider ...

  16. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  17. The time course of the effects of constant-angle and constant-torque stretching on the muscle-tendon unit.

    PubMed

    Herda, T J; Costa, P B; Walter, A A; Ryan, E D; Cramer, J T

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the time course of passive range of motion (PROM), passive torque (PASTQ), and musculo-tendinous stiffness (MTS) responses during constant-angle (CA) and constant-torque (CT) stretching of the leg flexors. Eleven healthy men [mean ± standard deviation (SD): age = 21.5 ± 2.3 years] performed 16 30-s bouts of CA and CT stretching of the leg flexors. PROM, PASTQ , and MTS were measured during stretches 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16. For PROM and PASTQ , there were no differences between CA and CT stretching treatments (P > 0.05); however, there were stretch-related differences (P < 0.001). PROM increased following one 30-s bout of stretching (collapsed across CA and CT stretching) with additional increases up to 8 min of stretching. PASTQ decreased following one 30-s bout of stretching (collapsed across CA and CT stretching) and continued to decrease up to 4 min of stretching. In contrast, only the CT stretching treatment resulted in changes to MTS (P < 0.001). MTS decreased after one 30-s bout of CT stretching, with subsequent decreases in MTS up to 6 min of stretching. These results suggested that CT stretching may be more appropriate than a stretch held at a constant muscle length for decreasing MTS.

  18. Emphysema in the renal allograft

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.L.; Sullivan, B.M.; Fluornoy, J.G.; Gerza, C.

    1985-04-01

    Two diabetic patients in whom emphysematous pyelonephritis developed after renal transplantation are described. Clinical recognition of this unusual and serious infection is masked by the effects of immunosuppression. Abdominal radiographic, ultrasound, and computed tomography findings are discussed. The clinical presentation includes urinary tract infection, sepsis, and acute tubular malfunction of the allograft in insulin-dependent diabetics.

  19. Expression of growth arrest-specific gene 6 and its receptors in dysfunctional human renal allografts.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jian L; Hambly, Brett D; Bao, Shi S; Painter, Dorothy; Bishop, G Alex; Eris, Josette M

    2003-09-01

    Growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and its receptors Rse, Axl and Mer have recently been found to be involved in a rat model of chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). Thus, in this study we investigated the function of Gas6 and its receptors in human renal allograft dysfunction. Expression of Gas6 and its receptors was detected by immunohistochemical staining. Gas6 and its receptors were widely expressed in glomeruli, tubules and vessels of renal allografts. Gas6 expression was detected in normal-functioning allografts and was increased in acute rejection ( P<0.05), acute tubular necrosis ( P<0.05) and CAN ( P<0.01). Gas6 receptors were not upregulated in any of the allograft groups, except for the Axl receptor, which increased only in acute tubular necrosis ( P<0.01). Gas6 expression was also found to correspond with the expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, a general marker of CAN ( r(2)=0.21, P<0.01). These findings suggest that Gas6, acting as a growth factor, is increased in the process of kidney allograft dysfunction and in CAN.

  20. Systemic overexpression of matricellular protein CCN1 exacerbates obliterative bronchiolitis in mouse tracheal allografts.

    PubMed

    Raissadati, Alireza; Nykänen, Antti I; Tuuminen, Raimo; Syrjälä, Simo O; Krebs, Rainer; Arnaudova, Ralica; Rouvinen, Eeva; Wang, Xiaomin; Poller, Wolfgang; Lemström, Karl B

    2015-12-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) involves airway epithelial detachment, fibroproliferation, and inflammation, resulting in chronic rejection and transplant failure. Cysteine-rich 61 (CCN1) is an integrin receptor antagonist with a context-dependent role in inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes. We used a mouse tracheal OB model to investigate the role of CCN1 in the development of lung allograft OB. C57Bl/6 mice received a systemic injection of CCN1-expressing adenoviral vectors 2 days prior to subcutaneous implantation of tracheal allografts from major MHC-mismatched BALB/c mice. We treated another group of tracheal allograft recipients with cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptide to dissect the role of αvβ3-integrin signaling in mediating CCN1 effects in tracheal allografts. Allografts were removed 4 weeks after transplantation and analyzed for luminal occlusion, inflammation, and vasculogenesis. CCN1 overexpression induced luminal occlusion (P < 0.05), fibroproliferation, and smooth muscle cell proliferation (P < 0.05). Selective activation of αvβ3-integrin receptor failed to mimic the actions of CCN1, and blocking failed to inhibit the effects of CCN1 in tracheal allografts. In conclusion, CCN1 exacerbates tracheal OB by enhancing fibroproliferation via an αvβ3-integrin-independent pathway. Further experiments are required to uncover its potentially harmful role in the development of OB after lung transplantation.

  1. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the (14)C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of (14)C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955-1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of (14)C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945-1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of (14)C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of (14)C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, (14)C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue.

  2. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders.

  3. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:23718724

  4. A minimally invasive "overwrapping" technique for repairing neglected ruptures of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    About 10% to 25% of acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon go undiagnosed for some time beyond what would be optimal for repair and a return to optimal function. Managing these chronic or neglected ruptures is a surgical challenge, because the tendon ends retract and atrophy and could develop a short, fibrous distal stump. In the present report, a patient with a ruptured right Achilles tendon, neglected for approximately 10 years, is described. The chronically injured tendon was successfully treated by overwrapping the interposed scar at the rupture site. This minimally invasive technique restored tension to the tendon, a prerequisite for which was the presence of functional triceps surae, confirmed by identification of gross contraction of the muscle during tiptoeing. The procedure is contraindicated when the scar tissue is not intact and does not have sufficient laxity to allow adequate dorsiflexion of the ankle after overwrapping the tendon or when the triceps surae are nonfunctional.

  5. [Treatment of traumatic sections of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Orfanu, N

    1977-01-01

    The author maintains that the atrophy of the sural triceps muscle, the retraction of the Achille tendon and the osteoporosis of the calcaneum and of the tarsian bones, occurring after the traumatic sectioning of the Achille tendon, are the results of an inadequate treatment. The cause of these sequellae is the immobilization of the foot in an equinus position, which relaxes the sural triceps and as a result of the lack of mechanical traction factor, leads to local circulatory disturbances followed by a modification in the structure of the bone and of the muscle. On the basis of this pathophysiological concept the author has excluded post-operative immobilization in the equinus position, and in fact any type of immobilization, recommending in contrast a mobilization of the foot from the very first days after the suture of the tendon. The clinical results obtained confirm the value of the hypothesis.

  6. Delayed Reconstruction by Total Calcaneal Allograft following Calcanectomy: Is It an Option?

    PubMed Central

    Degeorge, Benjamin; Forget, David; Gaillard, Florent; Canovas, François

    2016-01-01

    Many options are available in literature for the management of delayed reconstruction following calcanectomy. In cases of low-grade tumor lesions, conservative surgery can be considered. We describe a case of delayed reconstruction by calcaneal allograft after calcanectomy for low-grade chondrosarcoma. At 12-month follow-up, the patient had no pain; MSTS score and AOFAS score were satisfactory. Subtalar nonunion was observed with no secondary displacement or graft necrosis. The aim of conservative treatment for this patient was to restore normal gait with plantigrade locomotion and function of the Achilles tendon. Calcaneal reconstruction by total allograft is an alternative approach following calcanectomy for calcaneal tumors. We also discussed other options of calcaneal reconstruction. PMID:27990308

  7. Tendon development and musculoskeletal assembly: emerging roles for the extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Arul; Schilling, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Tendons and ligaments are extracellular matrix (ECM)-rich structures that interconnect muscles and bones. Recent work has shown how tendon fibroblasts (tenocytes) interact with muscles via the ECM to establish connectivity and strengthen attachments under tension. Similarly, ECM-dependent interactions between tenocytes and cartilage/bone ensure that tendon-bone attachments form with the appropriate strength for the force required. Recent studies have also established a close lineal relationship between tenocytes and skeletal progenitors, highlighting the fact that defects in signals modulated by the ECM can alter the balance between these fates, as occurs in calcifying tendinopathies associated with aging. The dynamic fine-tuning of tendon ECM composition and assembly thus gives rise to the remarkable characteristics of this unique tissue type. Here, we provide an overview of the functions of the ECM in tendon formation and maturation that attempts to integrate findings from developmental genetics with those of matrix biology. PMID:26672092

  8. Adaptive Remodeling of Achilles Tendon: A Multi-scale Computational Model

    PubMed Central

    Rubenson, Jonas; Umberger, Brian

    2016-01-01

    While it is known that musculotendon units adapt to their load environments, there is only a limited understanding of tendon adaptation in vivo. Here we develop a computational model of tendon remodeling based on the premise that mechanical damage and tenocyte-mediated tendon damage and repair processes modify the distribution of its collagen fiber lengths. We explain how these processes enable the tendon to geometrically adapt to its load conditions. Based on known biological processes, mechanical and strain-dependent proteolytic fiber damage are incorporated into our tendon model. Using a stochastic model of fiber repair, it is assumed that mechanically damaged fibers are repaired longer, whereas proteolytically damaged fibers are repaired shorter, relative to their pre-damage length. To study adaptation of tendon properties to applied load, our model musculotendon unit is a simplified three-component Hill-type model of the human Achilles-soleus unit. Our model results demonstrate that the geometric equilibrium state of the Achilles tendon can coincide with minimization of the total metabolic cost of muscle activation. The proposed tendon model independently predicts rates of collagen fiber turnover that are in general agreement with in vivo experimental measurements. While the computational model here only represents a first step in a new approach to understanding the complex process of tendon remodeling in vivo, given these findings, it appears likely that the proposed framework may itself provide a useful theoretical foundation for developing valuable qualitative and quantitative insights into tendon physiology and pathology. PMID:27684554

  9. Power amplification in an isolated muscle–tendon unit is load dependent

    PubMed Central

    Sawicki, Gregory S.; Sheppard, Peter; Roberts, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During rapid movements, tendons can act like springs, temporarily storing work done by muscles and then releasing it to power body movements. For some activities, such as frog jumping, energy is released from tendon much more rapidly than it is stored, thus amplifying muscle power output. The period during which energy is loaded into a tendon by muscle work may be aided by a catch mechanism that restricts motion, but theoretical studies indicate that power can be amplified in a muscle–tendon load system even in the absence of a catch. To explore the limits of power amplification with and without a catch, we studied the bullfrog plantaris muscle–tendon during in vitro contractions. A novel servomotor controller allowed us to measure muscle–tendon unit (MTU) mechanical behavior during contractions against a variety of simulated inertial-gravitational loads, ranging from zero to 1× the peak isometric force of the muscle. Power output of the MTU system was load dependent and power amplification occurred only at intermediate loads, reaching ∼1.3× the peak isotonic power output of the muscle. With a simulated anatomical catch mechanism in place, the highest power amplification occurred at the lowest loads, with a maximum amplification of more than 4× peak isotonic muscle power. At higher loads, the benefits of a catch for MTU performance diminished sharply, suggesting that power amplification >2.5× may come at the expense of net mechanical work delivered to the load. PMID:26449973

  10. Effect of joint rotation correction when measuring elongation of the gastrocnemius medialis tendon and aponeurosis.

    PubMed

    Arampatzis, Adamantios; Monte, Gianpiero De; Karamanidis, Kiros

    2008-06-01

    It is well known that during maximal plantar flexion contractions the ankle joint rotation overestimates the actual elongation of the tendon and aponeurosis. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of the curve length changes of the Achilles tendon on the joint rotation corrected elongation and strain of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) tendon and aponeurosis. Nine subjects (age: 29.4+/-5.7 years, body mass: 78.8+/-6.8 kg, body height: 178+/-4 cm) participated in the study. The subjects performed maximal voluntary isometric plantarflexion contractions in the prone position on a Biodex-dynamometer. Ultrasonography (Aloka SSD 4000) was used to visualize the muscle belly of the GM muscle-tendon unit. To calculate the curve length changes of the Achilles tendon its surface contour was reconstructed using a series of small reflective skin markers having a diameter of 2.5mm. The elongation of the GM tendon and aponeurosis was calculated (a) as the difference of the measured and the passive (due to joint rotation) displacement of the tendon and aponeurosis and (b) as the difference of the measured displacement and the length changes of the reconstructed Achilles tendon surface contour. The absolute difference between the elongation obtained by both methods were 1.2+/-0.4mm. These differences were due to the higher changes in length obtained by the reconstruction of the tendon curved surface contour as compared to the changes observed in the passive displacement of the digitised point at the aponeurosis. Without correcting for angle joint rotation, the measured elongation clearly overestimates the actual elongation of the GM tendon and aponeurosis. After the passive displacement correction the calculated elongation still overestimates the actual elongation of the GM tendon and aponeurosis. However, this overestimation has a negligible effect on the examined in vivo strain ( approximately 0.3%) of the tendon and aponeurosis.

  11. Computed tomography in the evaluation of Brown syndrome of the superior oblique tendon sheath

    SciTech Connect

    Mafee, M.F.; Folk, E.R.; Langer, B.G.; Miller, M.T.; Lagouros, P.; Mittleman, D.

    1985-03-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings in 4 patients with superior oblique tendon sheath syndrome (congenital or acquired Brown syndrome) are described. When the inferior oblique muscle moves the eye upward, the superior oblique muscle normally relaxes, while its tendon lengthens and slides freely through the trochlea. In Brown syndrome this process is somehow restricted, which is most apparent during attempts at elevation when the eye is adducted, resulting in an apparent inferior oblique palsy (pseudopalsy). CT is a valuable tool in understanding the pathophysiology and management of acquired Brown syndrome, showing thickening and inflammatory changes of the reflected portion of the superior oblique tendon.

  12. Skeletal muscle-smooth muscle interaction: an unusual myoelastic system.

    PubMed

    Hikida, R S; Peterson, W J

    1983-09-01

    The serratus superficialis metapatagialis (SSM) of pigeons is a skeletal muscle with unusual properties. It lies between the ribs and the trailing edge of the wing, where it is attached to the skin by a system of smooth muscles having elastic tendons. Wing movements during flight induce marked changes in this muscle's length. The SSM inserts onto the deep fascia, and at its termination the skeletal muscle contains large numbers of microtubules. Many myofibrils attach to leptomeric organelles, which then attach to the terminal end of the skeletal muscle fiber. The deep fascia next connects to the dermis of the skin by bundles of smooth muscles that have elastic tendons at both ends. This system allows large movements of the muscle while preventing its fibers from overstretching. The movements and presumed forces acting at this muscle make the presence of sensory receptors such as muscle spindles unlikely. Spindles are absent in this muscle.

  13. US imaging in operated tendons.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M

    2012-02-01

    Ultrasound (US) plays an essential role in the follow-up of operated tendons. The US operator must keep in mind three main elements: healing of traumatic injuries of the tendons seems to follow the biological model of histologic healing, surgical repair of a tendon rupture improves the structural parameters of the operated tendon, but it does not grant restitutio ad integrum, and US findings therefore seem poorly correlated with the functional evolution.Before examination, the US operator should be familiar with the nature of the tendon injury that has led to surgery including location, severity, time elapsed between tendon injury and surgical repair, surgical technique, postoperative course and possible complications. US findings in operated as well as non-operated tendons depend on several factors: morphology, structure, vascularization of the tendon, mobility of the tendon and mobility of the peritendinous tissues. Particular features are therefore considered according to the location: shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, knee, ankle and foot. Interpretation of the US image requires knowledge of the surgical technique and "normal" postoperative appearance of the operated tendon in order to detect pathological findings such as thinning, persistent fluid collections within or around the tendon, persistent hypervascularization, intratendinous calcifications and adhesions.

  14. Allometry of the Tendon Enthesis: Mechanisms of Load Transfer Between Tendon and Bone

    PubMed Central

    Deymier-Black, Alix C.; Pasteris, Jill D.; Genin, Guy M.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Several features of the tendon-to-bone attachment were examined allometrically to determine load transfer mechanisms. The humeral head diameter increased geometrically with animal mass. Area of the attachment site exhibited a near isometric increase with muscle physiological cross section. In contrast, the interfacial roughness as well as the mineral gradient width demonstrated a hypoallometric relationship with physiologic cross-sectional area (PCSA). The isometric increase in attachment area indicates that as muscle forces increase, the attachment area increases accordingly, thus maintaining a constant interfacial stress. Due to the presence of constant stresses at the attachment, the micrometer-scale features may not need to vary with increasing load. PMID:26355607

  15. Should we think about wrist extensor after flexor tendon repair?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline M; Tanaka, Denise M; Barbosa, Rafael I; Marcolino, Alexandre M; Elui, Valeria MC; Mazzer, Nilton

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the activity of wrist extensor muscle, correlating with wrist motion during gripping after flexor tendon repair. Design: Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Setting: Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Subjects: A total of 11 patients submitted to rehabilitation by early passive motion of the fingers with wrist flexion position were evaluated after 8 weeks of fingers flexor tendon repair and 11 healthy volunteers, all ranging from 20 to 37 years of age. Intervention: Volunteers performed an isometric standardized gripping task. Main measures: We used electrogoniometry to analyze wrist range of motion and surface electromyography, considering 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis. Results: Patients with flexor tendon repair showed co-activation deficit between wrist extensor (extensor carpi radialis) and flexor finger muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis) during gripping in the intermediate phase of rehabilitation, despite some recovering mobility for wrist extension (p ≤ 0.05). A moderate correlation between range of motion and extensor carpi radialis was present only for injured group (r = 0.32). Total active motion score, which represents finger active excursion, was regular or poor in 65% of cases, all with nerve repair associated. Conclusion: Wrist extensors have an important synergist role at handgrip, although some imbalance can be present after flexor tendon repair. These preliminary findings suggest that emphasis could be directed to add synergistic wrist motion in rehabilitation protocols after flexor tendon repair. Future studies with early active rehabilitation are necessary. PMID:26770674

  16. Osteochondral allografts in arm and forearm surgery.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; De Nayer, P; Vincent, A

    1991-01-01

    Osteochondral allografting can restore the skeletal continuity anatomically after a limb salvage procedure. Evaluation of the clinical function indicates that a good result can be anticipated. Fracture was the most frequent complication, and the fixation technique we used initially predisposed the problem. The major advantage of allograft is the possibility of reinsertion of soft tissue to help stabilize the new joint. In addition, any part of the limb can potentially be reconstructed with an allograft.

  17. Tendon injuries of the hand

    PubMed Central

    Schöffl, Volker; Heid, Andreas; Küpper, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Tendon injuries are the second most common injuries of the hand and therefore an important topic in trauma and orthopedic patients. Most injuries are open injuries to the flexor or extensor tendons, but less frequent injuries, e.g., damage to the functional system tendon sheath and pulley or dull avulsions, also need to be considered. After clinical examination, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have proved to be important diagnostic tools. Tendon injuries mostly require surgical repair, dull avulsions of the distal phalanges extensor tendon can receive conservative therapy. Injuries of the flexor tendon sheath or single pulley injuries are treated conservatively and multiple pulley injuries receive surgical repair. In the postoperative course of flexor tendon injuries, the principle of early passive movement is important to trigger an “intrinsic” tendon healing to guarantee a good outcome. Many substances were evaluated to see if they improved tendon healing; however, little evidence was found. Nevertheless, hyaluronic acid may improve intrinsic tendon healing. PMID:22720265

  18. New Imaging Methods for Non-invasive Assessment of Mechanical, Structural, and Biochemical Properties of Human Achilles Tendon: A Mini Review

    PubMed Central

    Fouré, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of tendon play a fundamental role to passively transmit forces from muscle to bone, withstand sudden stretches, and act as a mechanical buffer allowing the muscle to work more efficiently. The use of non-invasive imaging methods for the assessment of human tendon's mechanical, structural, and biochemical properties in vivo is relatively young in sports medicine, clinical practice, and basic science. Non-invasive assessment of the tendon properties may enhance the diagnosis of tendon injury and the characterization of recovery treatments. While ultrasonographic imaging is the most popular tool to assess the tendon's structural and indirectly, mechanical properties, ultrasonographic elastography, and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (UHF MRI) have recently emerged as potentially powerful techniques to explore tendon tissues. This paper highlights some methodological cautions associated with conventional ultrasonography and perspectives for in vivo human Achilles tendon assessment using ultrasonographic elastography and UHF MRI. PMID:27512376

  19. An unusual array of extensor musculature and tendons of the hand clinico-anatomical insight.

    PubMed

    Dave, V; Gandhi, S; Mehta, V; Kumar, A; Arora, J; Suri, R K; Rath, G

    2014-01-01

    Extensor tendon injury is a frequent finding in clinical practice. During a routine dissection class of undergraduate medical students examining the extensor aspect of the right hand, they found an interesting pattern of extensor tendons. The extensor digitorum (ED) exhibited three tendons for the middle and ring fingers. The intermediate tendon of the ED was found to pass to the junctura connecting the tendons of the ring and middle fingers. Additionally the Extensor carpi ulnaris displayed two tendinus slips. The lateral slip was inserted on the base of fifth metacarpal as usual, whereas the medial slip divided into two strands- proximal and distal. Apart from the above findings in the current case specimen, there was an accessory muscle belly for the index finger and the extensor digiti minimi bifurcated into two tendinus slips which gained attachment to the dorsal digital expansion of the little finger. These accessory muscle bellies and tendons could possibly be utilized for tendon reconstructions such as repairs, tenoplasties or tendon transfers.

  20. Normal variants and diseases of the peroneal tendons and superior peroneal retinaculum: MR imaging features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Tian; Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka; Mechlin, Michael B; Schweitzer, Mark E

    2005-01-01

    Diseases of the peroneal tendons and superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR) are frequently underdiagnosed causes of lateral ankle pain and instability. Common diseases include tenosynovitis, rupture, and dislocation of the peroneal tendons as well as injuries to the SPR. Many anatomic variants, such as a flat or convex retromalleolar fibular groove, hypertrophy of the peroneal tubercle, an accessory peroneus quartus muscle, a low-lying peroneus brevis muscle belly, or an os peroneum, may be associated with or predispose to lateral ankle disease. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is excellent for detecting soft-tissue and bone variants and abnormalities related to the lateral ankle. Knowledge of the MR imaging appearances of these entities aids radiologists in making the precise diagnosis of disorders of the peroneal tendons and SPR. Pitfalls and normal variants of the peroneal tendons, including magic angle phenomenon, pseudosubluxation of the peroneus brevis tendon, a bifurcated or mildly crescentic peroneus brevis tendon, insertion of the peroneus quartus tendon into the peroneus brevis tendon, and the presence of an os peroneum are important to recognize. It is also useful to be familiar with the MR imaging appearances of SPR injuries, which can be an overlooked but treatable cause of lateral ankle pain and instability.

  1. Retropharyngeal calcific tendonitis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Razon, Rhea Victoria B; Nasir, Asad; Wu, George S; Soliman, Manal; Trilling, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Retropharyngeal calcific tendonitis is an inflammatory process of the superior oblique tendons of the longus colli muscle, a neck flexor in the upper cervical spine, caused by deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals; the definitive diagnostic test is computed tomography (CT). Presented in this article are two cases seen at our institution. Patients typically present with acute onset of neck pain/spasm, odynophagia, dysphagia, and/or low grade fevers. Leukocytosis and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate may be noted. It is important to understand this entity because its signs and symptoms are mimickers of those of the more serious condition of retropharyngeal space abscess. Calcific tendonitis is managed conservatively whereas retropharyngeal abscess requires incision and drainage. Some may argue that this entity is a zebra because its reported incidence in the literature is low. However, most of these studies were done in an era when CT was not yet in vogue. With today's widespread use of CT and its superb ability to visualize the calcification, the true incidence of this condition is probably higher and, thus, it is important for the family practitioner to be aware of this entity. The astute clinician may save the patient from unnecessary diagnostic workup, undue anxiety, and delays in hospital discharge.

  2. Effects of resistance training on tendon mechanical properties and rapid force production in prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Waugh, C M; Korff, T; Fath, F; Blazevich, A J

    2014-08-01

    Children develop lower levels of muscle force, and at slower rates, than adults. Although strength training in children is expected to reduce this differential, a synchronous adaptation in the tendon must be achieved to ensure forces continue to be transmitted to the skeleton with efficiency while minimizing the risk of strain-related tendon injury. We hypothesized that resistance training (RT) would alter tendon mechanical properties in children concomitantly with changes in force production characteristics. Twenty prepubertal children (age 8.9 ± 0.3 yr) were equally divided into control (nontraining) and experimental (training) groups. The training group completed a 10-wk RT intervention consisting of 2-3 sets of 8-15 plantar flexion contractions performed twice weekly on a recumbent calf-raise machine. Achilles tendon properties (cross-sectional area, elongation, stress, strain, stiffness, and Young's modulus), electromechanical delay (EMD; time between the onset of muscle activity and force), rate of force development (RFD; slope of the force-time curve), and rate of electromyographic (EMG) increase (REI; slope of the EMG time curve) were measured before and after RT. Tendon stiffness and Young's modulus increased significantly after RT in the experimental group only (∼29% and ∼25%, respectively); all other tendon properties were not significantly altered, although there were mean decreases in both peak tendon strain and strain at a given force level (14% and 24%, respectively; not significant) which may have implications for tendon injury risk and muscle fiber mechanics. A decrease of ∼13% in EMD was found after RT for the experimental group, which paralleled the increase in tendon stiffness (r = -0.59); however, RFD and REI were unchanged. The present data show that the Achilles tendon adapts to RT in prepubertal children and is paralleled by a change in EMD, although the magnitude of this change did not appear to be sufficient to influence RFD. These

  3. Variation in the human Achilles tendon moment arm during walking.

    PubMed

    Rasske, Kristen; Thelen, Darryl G; Franz, Jason R

    2017-02-01

    The Achilles tendon (AT) moment arm is an important determinant of ankle moment and power generation during locomotion. Load and depth-dependent variations in the AT moment arm are generally not considered, but may be relevant given the complex triceps surae architecture. We coupled motion analysis and ultrasound imaging to characterize AT moment arms during walking in 10 subjects. Muscle loading during push-off amplified the AT moment arm by 10% relative to heel strike. AT moment arms also varied by 14% over the tendon thickness. In walking, AT moment arms are not strictly dependent on kinematics, but exhibit important load and spatial dependencies.

  4. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 enhances the growth hormone receptor expression in tendon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Pang, Jong-Hwei Su

    2014-11-19

    BPC 157, a pentadecapeptide derived from human gastric juice, has been demonstrated to promote the healing of different tissues, including skin, muscle, bone, ligament and tendon in many animal studies. However, the underlying mechanism has not been fully clarified. The present study aimed to explore the effect of BPC 157 on tendon fibroblasts isolated from Achilles tendon of male Sprague-Dawley rat. From the result of cDNA microarray analysis, growth hormone receptor was revealed as one of the most abundantly up-regulated genes in tendon fibroblasts by BPC 157. BPC 157 dose- and time-dependently increased the expression of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts at both the mRNA and protein levels as measured by RT/real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. The addition of growth hormone to BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts dose- and time-dependently increased the cell proliferation as determined by MTT assay and PCNA expression by RT/real-time PCR. Janus kinase 2, the downstream signal pathway of growth hormone receptor, was activated time-dependently by stimulating the BPC 157-treated tendon fibroblasts with growth hormone. In conclusion, the BPC 157-induced increase of growth hormone receptor in tendon fibroblasts may potentiate the proliferation-promoting effect of growth hormone and contribute to the healing of tendon.

  5. Spontaneous Iliopsoas Tendon Tear

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Mary; Patnaik, Soumya; Wang, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hip pain is one of the most common reasons for the elderly to present to the emergency department, and the differential diagnosis spectrum is vast. Iliopsoas injury is a relatively uncommon condition that may present with hip or groin pain. It is usually seen in athletes due to trauma, particularly flexion injuries. However, spontaneous iliopsoas tendon tear is extremely rare, and only a small number of cases have been reported; it has an estimated prevalence of 0.66% in individuals from 7 to 95 years. Risk factors include aging, use of steroids, and chronic diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using its high soft-tissue contrast resolution remains the most valuable imaging modality. A prompt diagnosis and treatment, which is usually conservative, is important to improve the quality of life in this group of patients. We describe a case of spontaneous iliopsoas tendon tear in an elderly woman. PMID:26929854

  6. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  7. Achilles tendon injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kvist, M

    1994-09-01

    Two-thirds of Achilles tendon injuries in competitive athletes are paratenonitis and one-fifth are insertional complaints (bursitis and insertion tendinitis). The remaining afflictions consist of pain syndromes of the myotendineal junction and tendinopathies. The majority of Achilles tendon injuries from sport occur in males, mainly because of their higher rates of participation in sport, but also with tendinopathies a gender difference is probably indicated. Athletes in running sports have a high incidence of Achilles tendon overuse injuries. About 75% of total and the majority of partial tendon ruptures are related to sports activities usually involving abrupt repetitive jumping and sprinting movements. Mechanical factors and a sedentary lifestyle play a role in the pathology of these injuries. Achilles tendon overuse injuries occur at a higher rate in older athletes than most other typical overuse injuries. Recreational athletes with a complete Achilles tendon rupture are about 15 years younger than those with other spontaneous tendon ruptures. Following surgery, about 70 to 90% of athletes have a successful comeback after Achilles tendon injury. Surgery is required in about 25% of athletes with Achilles tendon overuse injuries and the frequency of surgery increases with patient age and duration of symptoms as well as occurrence of tendinopathic changes. However, about 20% of injured athletes require a re-operation for Achilles tendon overuse injuries, and about 3 to 5% are compelled to abandon their sports career because of these injuries. Myotendineal junction pain should be treated conservatively. Partial Achilles tendon ruptures are primarily treated conservatively, although the best treatment method of chronic partial rupture seems to be surgery. Complete Achilles tendon ruptures of athletes are treated surgically, because this increases the likelihood of athletes reaching preinjury activity levels and minimises the risk of re-ruptures. Marked forefoot

  8. [The Achilles tendon in sports].

    PubMed

    Segesser, B; Goesele, A; Renggli, P

    1995-06-01

    Achillodynia is a generic term for various types of ailments in the region of the Achilles tendon. For adequate therapy a specific diagnosis is absolutely necessary. Besides an accurate anamnesis and the right choice of terrain and shoes, as well as a clinical examination where one has to specifically keep an eye on muscular imbalance between the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscle and disorders of the ligamentous control of the calcaneus caused by fibular ligament instabilities, a procedure such as radiology, ultrasound, and MR imaging is inevitable. From the differential diagnosis point of view a distinction between peritendinitis, mechanically triggered bursitis (calcaneal and subachilles), bony alterations of the calcaneus (calcaneus spur, Haglund exostosis persistent nucleus of the apophysis, fatigue fracture, etc) and a partial or total rupture (a one-time occurrence or multiple occurrences) has to be made. Occasionally, entrapment of the ramus calcaneus of the sural nerve causes calcaneal pain. If clinically not confirmed, lumbar pain ought to be taken into consideration (discopathy, Bechterew disease, etc). Metabolic disorders (especially uric acid) and underlying rheumatic diseases must be excluded. The therapy of achillodynia includes local and peroral antiphlogistic medication as a concomitant measure. More important is the causal influence of etiological factors, i.e., the correction of muscular imbalance, ensuring control of the calcaneus through bandages and adjustment of sport shoes, changes in training buildup and exercise intensity, just to mention a few. If necessary, surgically splitting the peritendineum, sanitation of a partial rupture, bursectomy and removal of mechanically obstructive exostosis must be done.

  9. Evidence for a vertebrate catapult: elastic energy storage in the plantaris tendon during frog jumping.

    PubMed

    Astley, Henry C; Roberts, Thomas J

    2012-06-23

    Anuran jumping is one of the most powerful accelerations in vertebrate locomotion. Several species are hypothesized to use a catapult-like mechanism to store and rapidly release elastic energy, producing power outputs far beyond the capability of muscle. Most evidence for this mechanism comes from measurements of whole-body power output; the decoupling of joint motion and muscle shortening expected in a catapult-like mechanism has not been demonstrated. We used high-speed marker-based biplanar X-ray cinefluoroscopy to quantify plantaris muscle fascicle strain and ankle joint motion in frogs in order to test for two hallmarks of a catapult mechanism: (i) shortening of fascicles prior to joint movement (during tendon stretch), and (ii) rapid joint movement during the jump without rapid muscle-shortening (during tendon recoil). During all jumps, muscle fascicles shortened by an average of 7.8 per cent (54% of total strain) prior to joint movement, stretching the tendon. The subsequent period of initial joint movement and high joint angular acceleration occurred with minimal muscle fascicle length change, consistent with the recoil of the elastic tendon. These data support the plantaris longus tendon as a site of elastic energy storage during frog jumping, and demonstrate that catapult mechanisms may be employed even in sub-maximal jumps.

  10. Length change of human gastrocnemius aponeurosis and tendon during passive joint motion.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Tetsuro; Muramatsu, Tadashi; Takeshita, Daisuke; Kawakami, Yasuo; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2002-01-01

    The extent of elongation and slackness of aponeurosis and tendon, and muscle fiber length of human medial gastrocnemius muscle are determined in vivo using ultrasonography. The ankle joint is passively moved at 5 degrees /s within the joint range of -36 to 7 degrees (0 degrees = neutral anatomic position; positive values for dorsiflexion) by a dynamometer while the length change of the aponeurosis and tendon is determined using ultrasonography (n = 8 men). Strain is calculated as the length change relative to the reference length of aponeurosis and tendon when the passive joint moment is 0. Elongation (positive strain values) of aponeurosis and tendon at 7 degrees are 2.1 +/- 1.1 and 2.4 +/- 1.0%, respectively. The extent of slackness (negative strain values) of aponeurosis and tendon at -36 degrees are -1.8 +/- 1.1 and -3.5 +/- 1.6%, respectively, and there is a significant difference between them (p < 0.05). This may be related to the existence of muscle fibers that attach to the aponeurosis over its whole length and do not allow it to fold. The results indicate that the length change of aponeurosis and tendon of medial gastrocnemius muscle occurs over the range of ankle joint positions even during passive joint motions.

  11. Myofascial force transmission between transferred rat flexor carpi ulnaris muscle and former synergistic palmaris longus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Huub; Huijing, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary We investigated the extent of mechanical interaction between rat flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and palmaris longus (PL) muscles following transfer of FCU to the distal tendons of extensor carpi radialis brevis and longus (ECRB/L) muscles. Five weeks after recovery from surgery, isometric forces exerted at the distal tendons of FCU and PL were quantified at various FCU lengths. PL was kept at a constant length. Changing the muscle-tendon complex length of transferred FCU (by maximally 3.5 mm) decreased PL force significantly (by 7%). A linear relationship was found between changes in FCU muscle belly length, being a measure of muscle relative positions, and PL force. These results indicate that despite transfer of FCU muscle to the extensor side of the forearm, changing FCU length still affects force transmission of its, now, antagonistic PL muscle. We conclude that a transferred muscle may still be mechanically linked to its former synergistic muscles. PMID:23738260

  12. Osteochondral Allografts in the Ankle Joint

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Francesca; Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Cavallo, Marco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this systematic review is to report about the clinical use of partial and total fresh osteochondral allograft in the ankle joint. The state of the art of allografts with regard to basic science, procurement and storage methods, immunogenicity, generally accepted indications and contraindications, and the rationale of the allografting procedure have been described. Methods: All studies published in PubMed from 2000 to January 2012 addressing fresh osteochondral allograft procedures in the ankle joint were identified, including those that fulfilled the following criteria: (a) level I-IV evidence addressing the areas of interest outlined above; (b) measures of functional, clinical, or imaging outcome; and (c) outcome related to ankle cartilage lesions or ankle arthritis treated by allografts. Results: The analysis showed a progressively increasing number of articles from 2000. The number of selected articles was 14; 9 of those focused on limited dimension allografts (plugs, partial) and 5 on bipolar fresh osteochondral allografts. The evaluation of evidence level showed 14 case series and no randomized studies. Conclusions: Fresh osteochondral allografts are now a versatile and suitable option for the treatment of different degrees of osteochondral disease in the ankle joint and may even be used as total joint replacement. Fresh osteochondral allografts used for total joint replacement are still experimental and might be considered as a salvage procedure in otherwise unsolvable situations. A proper selection of the patients is therefore a key point. Moreover, the patients should be adequately informed about the possible risks, benefits, and alternatives to the allograft procedure. PMID:26069666

  13. Late Failing Heart Allografts: Pathology of Cardiac Allograft Vasculopathy and Association With Antibody-Mediated Rejection.

    PubMed

    Loupy, A; Toquet, C; Rouvier, P; Beuscart, T; Bories, M C; Varnous, S; Guillemain, R; Pattier, S; Suberbielle, C; Leprince, P; Lefaucheur, C; Jouven, X; Bruneval, P; Duong Van Huyen, J P

    2016-01-01

    In heart transplantation, there is a lack of robust evidence of the specific causes of late allograft failure. We hypothesized that a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts may be associated with antibody-mediated injury and immune-mediated coronary arteriosclerosis. We included all patients undergoing a retransplantation for late terminal heart allograft failure in three referral centers. We performed an integrative strategy of heart allograft phenotyping by assessing the heart vascular tree including histopathology and immunohistochemistry together with circulating donor-specific antibodies. The main analysis included 40 explanted heart allografts patients and 402 endomyocardial biopsies performed before allograft loss. Overall, antibody-mediated rejection was observed in 19 (47.5%) failing heart allografts including 16 patients (40%) in whom unrecognized previous episodes of subclinical antibody-mediated rejection occurred 4.5 ± 3.5 years before allograft loss. Explanted allografts with evidence of antibody-mediated rejection demonstrated higher endothelitis and microvascular inflammation scores (0.89 ± 0.26 and 2.25 ± 0.28, respectively) compared with explanted allografts without antibody-mediated rejection (0.42 ± 0.11 and 0.36 ± 0.09, p = 0.046 and p < 0.0001, respectively). Antibody-mediated injury was observed in 62.1% of failing allografts with pure coronary arteriosclerosis and mixed (arteriosclerosis and atherosclerosis) pattern, while it was not observed in patients with pure coronary atherosclerosis (p = 0.0076). We demonstrate that antibody-mediated rejection is operating in a substantial fraction of failing heart allografts and is associated with severe coronary arteriosclerosis. Unrecognized subclinical antibody-mediated rejection episodes may be observed years before allograft failure.

  14. Tendon Mechanobiology: Current Knowledge and Future Research Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, Michael; Wall, Michelle E.; Little, Dianne; Banes, Albert J.; Guilak, Farshid; Arnoczky, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Tendons mainly function as load-bearing tissues in the muscloskeletal system, transmitting loads from muscle to bone. Tendons are dynamic structures that respond to the magnitude, direction, frequency, and duration of physiologic as well as pathologic mechanical loads via complex interactions between cellular pathways and the highly specialized extracellular matrix. This paper reviews the evolution and current knowledge of mechanobiology in tendon development, homeostasis, disease, and repair. In addition, we review several novel mechanotransduction pathways that have been identified recently in other tissues and cell types, providing potential research opportunities in the field of tendon mechanobiology. We also highlight current methods, models, and technologies being used in a wide variety of mechanobiology research that could be investigated in the context of their potential applicability for answering some of the fundamental unanswered questions in this field. The article concludes with a review of the major questions and future goals discussed during the recent ORS/ISMMS New Frontiers in Tendon Research Conference held September 10–11, 2014 in New York City. PMID:25763779

  15. New technical procedure involving Achilles tendon rupture treatment through transcutaneous suture.

    PubMed

    TarniŢă, DănuŢ Nicolae; TarniŢă, Daniela; Grecu, Dan Cristian; Calafeteanu, Dan Marian; Căpitănescu, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the widest tendon of the human body. Achilles tendon belongs to the extrasynovial tendons group and this allows it a faster recovery, thanks to local hematoma from the peritenon, necessary for the scarification. We concluded that in Achilles tendon rupture treatment it is essential to maintain the tendon covering skin integrity, the peritendinous integrity, to maintain the local hematoma formed during and after tendon rupture, reattaching the ruptured tendon heads and maintain them in this position by suturing them and by relaxing the sural triceps muscle. The percutaneous suture requires five pairs of mirror micro-incisions (5 mm) on one side and the other of the tendon. It is necessary for one of the pairs to be placed to the rupture level. With a surgical needle, we arm the proximal and distal heads of the tendon by different threads. By traction and muscular relaxation, we bring in contact the two ruptured heads and then we knot together the arming threads. The inferior member was cast immobilized in relaxing position for the sural triceps muscle for a 45 days period. Using this technique, we have operated 15 cases in our Clinic. In all the cases, we obtained a healing by first intention of the tegument micro-incisions. After the cast immobilization suppression, during 30 days the patients were in a recovery program. At the end of this program, they have recovered completely the dorsal and plantar flexion and the walking. In four months after the surgery, the esthetic of the area is completely restored, this technique being the only surgical technique that realizes this recovery.

  16. Stretching Skeletal Muscle: Chronic Muscle Lengthening through Sarcomerogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zöllner, Alexander M.; Abilez, Oscar J.; Böl, Markus; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle responds to passive overstretch through sarcomerogenesis, the creation and serial deposition of new sarcomere units. Sarcomerogenesis is critical to muscle function: It gradually re-positions the muscle back into its optimal operating regime. Animal models of immobilization, limb lengthening, and tendon transfer have provided significant insight into muscle adaptation in vivo. Yet, to date, there is no mathematical model that allows us to predict how skeletal muscle adapts to mechanical stretch in silico. Here we propose a novel mechanistic model for chronic longitudinal muscle growth in response to passive mechanical stretch. We characterize growth through a single scalar-valued internal variable, the serial sarcomere number. Sarcomerogenesis, the evolution of this variable, is driven by the elastic mechanical stretch. To analyze realistic three-dimensional muscle geometries, we embed our model into a nonlinear finite element framework. In a chronic limb lengthening study with a muscle stretch of 1.14, the model predicts an acute sarcomere lengthening from 3.09m to 3.51m, and a chronic gradual return to the initial sarcomere length within two weeks. Compared to the experiment, the acute model error was 0.00% by design of the model; the chronic model error was 2.13%, which lies within the rage of the experimental standard deviation. Our model explains, from a mechanistic point of view, why gradual multi-step muscle lengthening is less invasive than single-step lengthening. It also explains regional variations in sarcomere length, shorter close to and longer away from the muscle-tendon interface. Once calibrated with a richer data set, our model may help surgeons to prevent muscle overstretch and make informed decisions about optimal stretch increments, stretch timing, and stretch amplitudes. We anticipate our study to open new avenues in orthopedic and reconstructive surgery and enhance treatment for patients with ill proportioned limbs, tendon

  17. Radiation sterilization of skin allograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kairiyama, E.; Horak, C.; Spinosa, M.; Pachado, J.; Schwint, O.

    2009-07-01

    In the treatment of burns or accidental loss of skin, cadaveric skin allografts provide an alternative to temporarily cover a wounded area. The skin bank facility is indispensable for burn care. The first human skin bank was established in Argentina in 1989; later, 3 more banks were established. A careful donor selection is carried out according to the national regulation in order to prevent transmissible diseases. As cadaveric human skin is naturally highly contaminated, a final sterilization is necessary to reach a sterility assurance level (SAL) of 10 -6. The sterilization dose for 106 batches of processed human skin was determined on the basis of the Code of Practice for the Radiation Sterilization of Tissue Allografts: Requirements for Validation and Routine Control (2004) and ISO 11137-2 (2006). They ranged from 17.6 to 33.4 kGy for bioburdens of >10-162.700 CFU/100 cm 2. The presence of Gram negative bacteria was checked for each produced batch. From the analysis of the experimental results, it was observed that the bioburden range was very wide and consequently the estimated sterilization doses too. If this is the case, the determination of a tissue-specific dose per production batch is necessary to achieve a specified requirement of SAL. Otherwise if the dose of 25 kGy is preselected, a standardized method for substantiation of this dose should be done to confirm the radiation sterilization process.

  18. Vancomycin iontophoresis of allograft bone

    PubMed Central

    Edmondson, M. C.; Day, R.; Wood, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The most concerning infection of allografts and operative procedures is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and no current iontophoresed antibiotics effectively combat this microbe. It was initially hypothesised that iontophoresis of vancomycin through bone would not be effective due to its large molecular size and lack of charge. The aim of this study was to determine whether this was a viable procedure and to find the optimum conditions for its use. Methods An iontophoresis cell was set up with varying concentrations of Vancomycin within the medulla of a section of sheep tibia, sealed from an external saline solution. The cell was run for varying times, Vancomycin concentrations and voltages, to gain information on optimisation of conditions for impregnating the graft. Each graft was then sectioned and dust ground from the exposed surface. The dust was serially washed to extract the Vancomycin and concentrations measured and plotted for all variables tested. Results Vancomycin was successfully delivered and impregnated to the graft using the iontophoresis technique. The first order fit to the whole data set gave a significant result (p = 0.0233), with a significant concentration (p = 0.02774) component. The time component was the next most significant (p = 0.0597), but did not exceed the 95% confidence level. Conclusions Iontophoresis is an effective method for delivering Vancomycin to allograft bone. The concentrations of the vancomycin solution affected the bone concentration, but results were highly variable. Further study should be done on the effectiveness of delivering different antibiotics using this method. PMID:24729101

  19. Open subpectoral biceps tenodesis: reliable treatment for all biceps tendon pathology.

    PubMed

    Kane, Patrick; Hsaio, Philip; Tucker, Bradford; Freedman, Kevin B

    2015-01-01

    Long head of the biceps (LHB) tendon pathology is a common cause of pain in the shoulder. Pathology encountered includes biceps tendon tears and tendonitis, biceps anchor or superior labral tears, and biceps subluxation or instability. Current surgical treatment options for LHB disorders include tenotomy and tenodesis. Tenodesis prevents cosmetic deformity and biceps cramping with activity. Open subpectoral tenodesis anatomically restores the length-tension relationship of the biceps muscle and removes all diseased biceps from the bicipital groove. The authors present their technique of open subpectoral tenodesis, which demonstrates a high success rate with consistent pain relief and dependable fixation.

  20. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using a tendon graft: a biomechanical study comparing a novel “sutured throughout” tendon graft to a standard tendon graft

    PubMed Central

    Naziri, Qais; Williams, Nadine; Hayes, Westley; Kapadia, Bhaveen H.; Chatterjee, Dipal; Urban, William P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: With a recurrence rate of over 30%, techniques that offer stronger acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction through increased graft strength may provide longevity. The purpose of our study was to determine the biomechanical strength of a novel tendon graft sutured throughout compared to a native tendon graft in Grade 3 anatomical AC joint reconstruction. Methods: For this in vitro experiment, nine paired (n = 18) embalmed cadaveric AC joints of three males and six females (age 86 years, range 51–94 years) were harvested. Anatomic repair with fresh bovine Achilles tendon grafts without bone block was simulated. Specimens were divided into two groups; with group 1 using grafts with ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) suture ran throughout the entire length. In group 2, reconstruction with only native allografts was performed. The distal scapula and humerus were casted in epoxy compound and mounted on the mechanical testing machine. Tensile tests were performed using a mechanical testing machine at the rate of 50 mm/min. Maximum load and displacement to failure were collected. Results: The average load to failure was significantly higher for group 1 compared to group 2, with mean values of 437.5 N ± 160.7 N and 94.4 N ± 43.6 N, (p = 0.001). The average displacement to failure was not significantly different, with 29.7 mm ± 10.6 mm in group 1 and 25 mm ± 9.1 mm in group 2 (p = 0.25). Conclusion: We conclude that a UHMWPE suture reinforced graft can provide a 3.6 times stronger AC joint reconstruction compared to a native graft. PMID:27163106

  1. Early changes in Achilles tendon behaviour in vivo following downhill backwards walking.

    PubMed

    Joseph, C W; Bradshaw, E J; Furness, T P; Kemp, J; Clark, R A

    2016-01-01

    Downhill backwards walking causes repeated, cyclical loading of the muscle-tendon unit. The effect this type of repeated loading has on the mechanical behaviour of the Achilles tendon is presently unknown. This study aimed to investigate the biomechanical response of the Achilles tendon aponeurosis complex following a downhill backwards walking protocol. Twenty active males (age: 22.3 ± 3.0 years; mass: 74.7 ± 5.6 kg; height: 1.8 ± 0.7 m) performed 60 min of downhill (8.5°), backwards walking on a treadmill at -0.67 m · s(-1). Data were collected before, immediately post, and 24-, 48- and 168-h post-downhill backwards walking. Achilles tendon aponeurosis elongation, strain and stiffness were measured using ultrasonography. Muscle force decreased immediately post-downhill backward walking (P = 0.019). There were increases in Achilles tendon aponeurosis stiffness at 24-h post-downhill backward walking (307 ± 179.6 N · mm(-1), P = 0.004), and decreases in Achilles tendon aponeurosis strain during maximum voluntary contraction at 24 (3.8 ± 1.7%, P = 0.008) and 48 h (3.9 ± 1.8%, P = 0.002) post. Repeated cyclical loading of downhill backwards walking affects the behaviour of the muscle-tendon unit, most likely by altering muscle compliance, and these changes result in tendon stiffness increases.

  2. Morphology and Histology of Lower Limb Tendons and Ligaments in Primates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-01

    dlllerent from Report) IS. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on revermo sidIft neceses end Identify by block ntmbe) Tendon Plantar Osseo-fibrous...ligaments were sanded smooth to facilitate the utilization of mechanical testing grips. Dissection of the Foot: The plantar aspect of the foot was...removed to expose the inner structures. The tendo-calcaneus tendon was dissected first and was freed of fascia from the gastrocnemius muscle to the

  3. Reducing allograft contamination and disease transmission: intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Chay-You; Yew, Andy Khye-Soon; Tay, Darren Keng-Jin; Chia, Shi-Lu; Yeo, Seng-Jin; Lo, Ngai-Nung; Chin, Pak-Lin

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Singapore General Hospital Bone Bank, which exclusively stores femoral head allografts, relies on flash sterilisation to prevent allograft-related disease transmission and wound infection. However, intraosseous temperatures during autoclaving may be lower than required to eliminate human immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis B and C viruses. The aim of this study is to determine the intraosseous temperatures of femoral head allografts during autoclaving and to assess the adequacy of autoclaving in preventing disease transmission. METHODS Six femoral heads were acquired from patients who underwent hip arthroplasty. The specimens were divided into two groups. The first group underwent flash sterilisation with a sterilisation time of 4 min, while a longer sterilisation time of 22 min was used for the second group. RESULTS The highest core temperature in the first group was 130°C, while the core temperatures in the second group plateaued at 133°C for all allografts. In the first group, only smaller allografts maintained temperatures sufficient for the inactivation of the clinically relevant viral pathogens. In contrast, all allografts in the second group were terminally sterilised. CONCLUSION There is an inverse correlation between the size of allografts and intraosseous temperatures achieved during autoclaving. Therefore, we recommend dividing large allografts into smaller pieces, in order to achieve intraosseous temperatures adequate for the elimination of transmissible pathogens during flash sterilisation. Allografts should not be terminally sterilised, as the resulting allografts will become unusable. Despite modern processing techniques, stringent donor selection remains vital in the effort to prevent allograft-related infections. Autoclaving is an economical and efficacious method of preventing allograft-related disease transmission. PMID:25631893

  4. Muscle strain injuries.

    PubMed

    Garrett, W E

    1996-01-01

    One of the most common injuries seen in the office of the practicing physician is the muscle strain. Until recently, little data were available on the basic science and clinical application of this basic science for the treatment and prevention of muscle strains. Studies in the last 10 years represent action taken on the direction of investigation into muscle strain injuries from the laboratory and clinical fronts. Findings from the laboratory indicate that certain muscles are susceptible to strain injury (muscles that cross multiple joints or have complex architecture). These muscles have a strain threshold for both passive and active injury. Strain injury is not the result of muscle contraction alone, rather, strains are the result of excessive stretch or stretch while the muscle is being activated. When the muscle tears, the damage is localized very near the muscle-tendon junction. After injury, the muscle is weaker and at risk for further injury. The force output of the muscle returns over the following days as the muscle undertakes a predictable progression toward tissue healing. Current imaging studies have been used clinically to document the site of injury to the muscle-tendon junction. The commonly injured muscles have been described and include the hamstring, the rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and adductor longus muscles. Injuries inconsistent with involvement of a single muscle-tendon junction proved to be at tendinous origins rather than within the muscle belly. Important information has also been provided regarding injuries with poor prognosis, which are potentially repairable surgically, including injuries to the rectus femoris muscle, the hamstring origin, and the abdominal wall. Data important to the management of common muscle injuries have been published. The risks of reinjury have been documented. The early efficacy and potential for long-term risks of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents have been shown. New data can also be applied to the field

  5. [Hand allograft transplantation: what are the implications?].

    PubMed

    Masquelet, Alain Charles

    2013-12-01

    The first hand allograft transplantation was performed in 1998 by a French surgeons team and has opened the era of functional allotransfers. In France, the authorized preliminary study included five patients who sustained traumatic amputation of both hands. All patients had bilateral hand allograft transplantation. Long-term results (follow-up ranging from 3 to 12 years) undoubtedly show a useful daily function, a good psychological acceptance and a physiological integration. Despite several obstacles as the need of immunosuppressive therapy for life, hand allograft transplantation is worthy of interest in some outstanding situations.

  6. A method to characterize in vivo tendon force-strain relationship by combining ultrasonography, motion capture and loading rates.

    PubMed

    Gerus, Pauline; Rao, Guillaume; Berton, Eric

    2011-08-11

    The ultrasonography contributes to investigate in vivo tendon force-strain relationship during isometric contraction. In previous studies, different methods are available to estimate the tendon strain, using different loading rates and models to fit the tendon force-strain relationship. This study was aimed to propose a standard method to characterize the in vivo tendon force-strain relationship. We investigated the influence on the force-strain relationship for medialis gastrocnemius (MG) of (1) one method which takes into account probe and joint movements to estimate the instantaneous tendon length, (2) models used to fit the force-strain relationship for uniaxial test (polynomial vs. Ogden), and (3) the loading rate on tendon strain. Subjects performed ramp-up contraction during isometric contractions at two different target speeds: 1.5s and minimal time with ultrasound probe fixed over the muscle-tendon junction of the MG muscle. The used method requires three markers on ultrasound probe and a marker on calcaneum to take into account all movements, and was compared to the strain estimated using ultrasound images only. The method using ultrasound image only overestimated the tendon strain from 40% of maximal force. The polynomial model showed similar fitting results than the Ogden model (R²=0.98). A loading rate effect was found on tendon strain, showing a higher strain when loading rate decreases. The characterization of tendon force-strain relationship needs to be standardized by taking into account all movements to estimate tendon strain and controlling the loading rate. The polynomial model appears to be appropriate to represent the tendon force-strain relationship.

  7. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  8. Mechanical Control of Myotendinous Junction Formation and Tendon Differentiation during Development

    PubMed Central

    Valdivia, Mauricio; Vega-Macaya, Franco; Olguín, Patricio

    2017-01-01

    The development of the musculoskeletal system is a great model to study the interplay between chemical and mechanical inter-tissue signaling in cell adhesion, tissue morphogenesis and differentiation. In both vertebrates and invertebrates (e.g., Drosophila melanogaster) the formation of muscle-tendon interaction generates mechanical forces which are required for myotendinous junction maturation and tissue differentiation. In addition, these forces must be withstood by muscles and tendons in order to prevent detachment from each other, deformation or even losing their integrity. Extracellular matrix remodeling at the myotendinous junction is key to resist mechanical load generated by muscle contraction. Recent evidences in vertebrates indicate that mechanical forces generated during junction formation regulate chemical signaling leading to extracellular matrix remodeling, however, the mechanotransduction mechanisms associated to this response remains elusive. In addition to extracellular matrix remodeling, the ability of Drosophila tendon-cells to bear mechanical load depends on rearrangement of tendon cell cytoskeleton, thus studying the molecular mechanisms involved in this process is critical to understand the contribution of mechanical forces to the development of the musculoskeletal system. Here, we review recent findings regarding the role of chemical and mechanical signaling in myotendinous junction formation and tendon differentiation, and discuss molecular mechanisms of mechanotransduction that may allow tendon cells to withstand mechanical load during development of the musculoskeletal system. PMID:28386542

  9. Using EMG data to constrain optimization procedure improves finger tendon tension estimations during static fingertip force production.

    PubMed

    Vigouroux, Laurent; Quaine, Franck; Labarre-Vila, Annick; Amarantini, David; Moutet, François

    2007-01-01

    Determining tendon tensions of the finger muscles is crucial for the understanding and the rehabilitation of hand pathologies. Since no direct measurement is possible for a large number of finger muscle tendons, biomechanical modelling presents an alternative solution to indirectly evaluate these forces. However, the main problem is that the number of muscles spanning a joint exceeds the number of degrees of freedom of the joint resulting in mathematical under-determinate problems. In the current study, a method using both numerical optimization and the intra-muscular electromyography (EMG) data was developed to estimate the middle finger tendon tensions during static fingertip force production. The method used a numerical optimization procedure with the muscle stress squared criterion to determine a solution while the EMG data of three extrinsic hand muscles serve to enforce additional inequality constraints. The results were compared with those obtained with a classical numerical optimization and a method based on EMG only. The proposed method provides satisfactory results since the tendon tension estimations respected the mechanical equilibrium of the musculoskeletal system and were concordant with the EMG distribution pattern of the subjects. These results were not observed neither with the classical numerical optimization nor with the EMG-based method. This study demonstrates that including the EMG data of the three extrinsic muscles of the middle finger as inequality constraints in an optimization process can yield relevant tendon tensions with regard to individual muscle activation patterns, particularly concerning the antagonist muscles.

  10. The role of stretching in tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Witvrouw, E; Mahieu, N; Roosen, P; McNair, P

    2007-04-01

    The function of tendons can be classified into two categories: tensile force transmission, and storage and release of elastic energy during locomotion. The action of tendons in storing and releasing energy is mainly seen in sports activities with stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs). The more intense the SSC movements are (jumping-like activities), the more frequently tendon problems are observed. High SSC movements impose high loads on tendons. Consequently, tendons that frequently deal with high SSC motion require a high energy-absorbing capacity to store and release this large amount of elastic energy. As the elasticity of tendon structures is a leading factor in the amount of stored energy, prevention and rehabilitation programmes for tendon injuries should focus on increasing this tendon elasticity in athletes performing high SSC movements. Recently, it has been shown that ballistic stretching can significantly increase tendon elasticity. These findings have important clinical implications for treatment and prevention of tendon injuries.

  11. Osmotic pressure induced tensile forces in tendon collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masic, Admir; Bertinetti, Luca; Schuetz, Roman; Chang, Shu-Wei; Metzger, Till Hartmut; Buehler, Markus J.; Fratzl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Water is an important component of collagen in tendons, but its role for the function of this load-carrying protein structure is poorly understood. Here we use a combination of multi-scale experimentation and computation to show that water is an integral part of the collagen molecule, which changes conformation upon water removal. The consequence is a shortening of the molecule that translates into tensile stresses in the range of several to almost 100 MPa, largely surpassing those of about 0.3 MPa generated by contractile muscles. Although a complete drying of collagen would be relevant for technical applications, such as the fabrication of leather or parchment, stresses comparable to muscle contraction already occur at small osmotic pressures common in biological environments. We suggest, therefore, that water-generated tensile stresses may play a role in living collagen-based materials such as tendon or bone.

  12. [Effects of Gravity on Attachment of Tendon to Bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Roger B.

    1997-01-01

    We have received and processed all samples for either light or scanning electron microscopic analysis and have completed the histomorphometric analysis. We have characterized the changes caused by spaceflight to tendon attachments to the calcaneus, tibia, fibula and femur and compared them to hindlimbs and forelimbs from NIH.RZ. Soleus muscle histomorphometry has also been completed. Our results suggest severe osteoporosis in the femur, fibula and tibia of animals coincident to spaceflight, which had not resolved after 4-5 days following return to earth. This was evident at all sites, including sites of tendon attachments. This atrophy was not evident in the calcaneus. No muscle atrophy was evident. Comparison of scanning photomicrographs of flight animals with other lactating animals demonstrated structural similarities and suggested that it might be worthwhile to assess whether lactation is a factor in development of the osteoporosis in the spaceflight animals. In addition, evaluation of total calcium utilization by spaceflight animals would be beneficial.

  13. Relative Echogenicity of Tendons and Ligaments of the Palmar Metacarpal Region in Foals from Birth to 4 Months of Age: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Britti, Domenico; Loprete, Giovanni; Musella, Vincenzo; Romagnoli, Noemi; Vilar, Jose M.; Valentini, Simona

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate relative echogenicity of superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, the accessory ligament of the deep digital flexor tendon and interosseous muscle of the metacarpal region in foals ages 1 week to 4 months; and assess the association between echogenicity and sex or side/laterality. Seven Standardbred trotter foals were examined. Right and left metacarpal regions (palmar surface) were ultrasonographically investigated, and four regions of interest were assessed. A significant increase in echogenicity was seen in superficial and deep digital flexor tendons, accessory ligament of deep digital flexor tendon, and interosseous muscle during growth from 1 week to 4 months of age. Echogenicity of examined tendons and ligaments was not influenced by gender nor laterality. Reference values for tendon and ligament echogenicity could function as a tool to discriminate between physiological and abnormal conditions such as congenital contractural conditions. PMID:27441630

  14. Bioscaffolds and the reconstruction of ligaments and tendons in the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jeremy J; Cook, Emily A

    2009-10-01

    Biologic scaffolds have become an integral part of surgical soft tissue reconstruction in recent years. The increased use of these materials can be partially attributed to poor long-term outcomes with synthetic products as well as the cost and morbidity associated with allografts and autografts. Bioscaffolds can augment natural healing processes of tendons and ligaments while providing additional structural support. Although these implants lack the mechanical strength of synthetics and other transplants, proper preparation can optimize their load-sharing capacity. This article presents methods that can improve these characteristics of bioscaffolds. Available studies in foot and ankle applications have shown minimal complications in a variety of techniques.

  15. Transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a skeletally immature knee using anterior tibialis allograft.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yool; Jang, Soo-Jin; Son, Jung-Hwan

    2011-05-18

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in the skeletally immature individual is being recognized with increasing frequency. Nonoperative treatment of ACL injuries in skeletally immature patients have not been favorable. Surgical treatment options for complete ACL tears include primary ligament repair, extraarticular tenodesis, transphyseal reconstruction, partial transphyseal reconstruction, and physeal-sparing reconstruction. The advantage of transphyseal reconstruction is placement of the graft tissue in an isometric position, which provides better results, according to the literature. The potential disadvantage is angular or limb-length discrepancy caused by physeal violation. Controversy exists in allograft selection about whether bone or soft tissue passes into physes. The use of standard tunnels provides reliable results, but carries the risk of iatrogenic growth disturbance from physeal injury.This article presents 4 cases of transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis allograft in skeletally immature patients that had satisfactory functional outcomes with no growth disturbances. This is the first report of transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis allograft in skeletally immature patients in the English-speaking literature. All patients underwent transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis tendon allograft. None of the patients had angular deformities. No early physeal arrest was measured between the preoperative and postoperative radiographs. At last follow-up, the results of the Lachman test were normal for 3 patients and nearly normal for 1 patient. All patients demonstrated full range of knee motion (comparing the reconstructed knee to the contralateral knee). The results of the pivot-shift test were normal for 3 patients and nearly normal for 1 patient. No patients reported giving way.

  16. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-01-01

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts. PMID:27158422

  17. Renal allograft rejection: sonography and scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Cohen, W.N.

    1980-07-01

    A total of 30 renal allograft patients who had sonographic B scanning and radionuclide studies of the transplant was studied as to whether: (1) the allograft rejection was associated with any consistent and reliable sonographic features and (2) the sonograms complemented the radionuclide studies. Focal areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistent sonographic finding in chymal echogenicity were the most striking and consistens sonographic finding in allograft rejection. This was observed in most of the patients exhibiting moderate or severe rejection, but was frequently absent with mild rejection. Areas of decreased parenchymal echogenicity were not seen during episodes of acute tubular necrosis. Therefore, sonography showing zones of decreased parenchymal echogenicity was complementary to radionuclide studies in the diagnosis of allograft rejection versus acute tubular necrosis. Corticomedullary demarcation was difficult to interpret because of technical variables, and was inconsistently related to rejection in this series.

  18. Radiation sterilization of tissue allografts: A review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rita; Singh, Durgeshwer; Singh, Antaryami

    2016-04-28

    Tissue substitutes are required in a number of clinical conditions for treatment of injured and diseased tissues. Tissues like bone, skin, amniotic membrane and soft tissues obtained from human donor can be used for repair or reconstruction of the injured part of the body. Allograft tissues from human donor provide an excellent alternative to autografts. However, major concern with the use of allografts is the risk of infectious disease transmission. Therefore, tissue allografts should be sterilized to make them safe for clinical use. Gamma radiation has several advantages and is the most suitable method for sterilization of biological tissues. This review summarizes the use of gamma irradiation technology as an effective method for sterilization of biological tissues and ensuring safety of tissue allografts.

  19. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, José Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  20. Rectus Femoris Tendon Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Zini, Raul; Panascì, Manlio; Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Vasta, Sebastiano; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Since it was developed, hip arthroscopy has become the favored treatment for femoroacetabular impingement. Due to recent considerable improvements, the indications for this technique have been widely extended. Injuries of the rectus femoris tendon origin, after an acute phase, could result in a chronic tendinopathy with calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition, leading to pain and loss of function. Traditionally, this condition is addressed by local injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids or, when conservative measures fail, by open excision of the calcific lesion by an anterior approach. Purpose: To assess whether arthroscopic excision of calcification of the proximal rectus is a safe and effective treatment. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Outcomes were studied from 6 top amateur athletes (age range, 30-43 years; mean, 32.6 years) affected by calcification of the proximal rectus who underwent arthroscopic excision of the calcification. Patients were preoperatively assessed radiographically, and diagnosis was confirmed by a 3-dimensional computed tomography scan. To evaluate the outcome, standardized hip rating scores were used pre- and postoperatively (at 6 and 12 months): the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, Oxford Hip Score, and Modified Harris Hip Score. Moreover, visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, sport activity level (SAL), and activities of daily living (ADL) were also used. Results: One year after surgery, all patients reported satisfactory outcomes, with 3 of 6 rating their return-to-sport level as high as preinjury level, and the remaining 3 with a percentage higher than 80%. Five patients ranked their ability to carry on daily activities at 100%. Statistical analysis showed significant improvement of the Oxford Hip Score, the Modified Harris Hip Score, and all 3 VAS subscales (pain, SAL, and ADL) from pre- to latest postoperative assessment (P < .05). Conclusion: Arthroscopic excision of

  1. Computational Biology: Modeling Chronic Renal Allograft Injury

    PubMed Central

    Stegall, Mark D.; Borrows, Richard

    2015-01-01

    New approaches are needed to develop more effective interventions to prevent long-term rejection of organ allografts. Computational biology provides a powerful tool to assess the large amount of complex data that is generated in longitudinal studies in this area. This manuscript outlines how our two groups are using mathematical modeling to analyze predictors of graft loss using both clinical and experimental data and how we plan to expand this approach to investigate specific mechanisms of chronic renal allograft injury. PMID:26284070

  2. Bone allografts in reconstructive middle ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Gersdorff, M; Vilain, J; Maisin, J P; Munting, E; Delloye, C

    1989-01-01

    The authors present their current experience with stored bone grafts, using allografts shaped from the cortices of long bones for reconstructing the tympano-ossicular chain. The materials and the methods are described. The anatomical results have been good in 97% of the cases, while the functional results are as satisfactory as those obtained with bioceramics. In addition to ossiculoplasty, the bone allografts can also be used in otology for reconstructing large bony defects of the temporal bone.

  3. Dynamometer Elbow Strength and Endurance Testing After Distal Biceps Reconstruction w/Allograft

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Alan; Strauss, Eric Jason; Jazrawi, Laith M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the current study is to investigate the functional strength outcomes of late distal biceps reconstruction using allograft tissue. Methods: Patients who underwent distal biceps reconstruction with allograft tissue between May 2007 and May 2013 were identified. Charts were retrospectively reviewed for post-operative complications, gross flexion and supination strength, and range of motion (ROM). Isokinetic strength and endurance in elbow flexion and forearm supination were measured in both arms. Tests were conducted using a dynamometer at 60o per second for isokinetic strength and 240o per second for endurance. Isometric strength testing was also measured for elbow flexion and forearm supination. Paired t tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: Ten patients with a mean age of 48 years (range 42 - 61 years) were included in the study. Distal biceps reconstruction was performed using an Achilles tendon allograft in 9 patients and a combination of tibialis anterior allograft and gracilis allograft in 1 patient. Of the reconstructions, 50% involved the dominant arm. Full ROM was observed in all patients at the time of their final follow up assessment. The mean follow-up for dynamometer strength testing was 34 months (range 13-81 months). No statistical differences were noted between data obtained from operative and contralateral extremities. The average peak torque of the operative limb (38.5± 5.9 Nm) was 91.7% of that of the contralateral limb (41.8±4.9 Nm) in flexion and 93.4% (operative, 5.7±1.3 Nm; contralateral, 6.1± 1.0 Nm) in supination. No significant differences were found in fatigue index between operative or contralateral limbs for flexion (operative, 34.1±17.1%; contralateral, 30.8±17.1%; p = 0.29) or supination (operative, 38.2±16.5%; contralateral, 42.1±11.9%; p = 0.65). . The only complication observed was a transient PIN palsy in one patient which resolved by 3 months post-operatively. All patients reported

  4. High-resolution US and MR imaging of peroneal tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Alcala, Jennifer N; Gimber, Lana H; Rieke, Joshua D; Chilvers, Margaret M; Latt, L Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Injuries of the peroneal tendon complex are common and should be considered in every patient who presents with chronic lateral ankle pain. These injuries occur as a result of trauma (including ankle sprains), in tendons with preexisting tendonopathy, and with repetitive microtrauma due to instability. The peroneus brevis and peroneus longus tendons are rarely torn simultaneously. Several anatomic variants, including a flat or convex fibular retromalleolar groove, hypertrophy of the peroneal tubercle at the lateral aspect of the calcaneus, an accessory peroneus quartus muscle, a low-lying peroneus brevis muscle belly, and an os peroneum, may predispose to peroneal tendon injuries. High-resolution 1.5-T and 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with use of dedicated extremity coils and high-resolution ultrasonography (US) with high-frequency linear transducers and dynamic imaging are proved to adequately depict the peroneal tendons for evaluation and can aid the orthopedic surgeon in injury management. An understanding of current treatment approaches for partial- and full-thickness peroneal tendon tears, subluxation and dislocation of these tendons with superior peroneal retinaculum (SPR) injuries, intrasheath subluxations, and peroneal tendonopathy and tenosynovitis can help physicians achieve a favorable outcome. Patients with low functional demands do well with conservative treatment, while those with high functional demands may benefit from surgery if nonsurgical treatment is unsuccessful. Radiologists should recognize the normal anatomy and specific pathologic conditions of the peroneal tendons at US and MR imaging and understand the various treatment options for peroneal tendon and SPR superior peroneal retinaculum injuries. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  5. General Overview and Summary of Concepts Regarding Tendon Disease Topics Addressed Related to Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W; Hart, David A

    2016-01-01

    Painful and non-healing musculoskeletal disorders, eg. tendinopathy, pose a tremendous burden on society and the quality of life for patients. New advances in the understanding of connective tissue disorders such as tendinopathy reveal that common health problems such as obesity, atherosclerosis, hormonal dysfunctions and diabetes mellitus are closely linked to the metabolism of components of the musculoskeletal system, particularly tendons. As tendons function as multi-component "organ systems" (Muscle-TMJ-Tendon-Enthesis to Bone), tendons can be influenced directly, or indirectly via, for instance, alterations to muscle. However, this volume/set of chapters focus mainly on the tendon.Emerging findings in musculoskeletal research have established important new links in our understanding of tendon metabolism. Thereby, the function of the neuroendocrine/-immune axis, as well as supply of neuro-vascular factors, can be directly linked to the quality of tendon metabolism.Since some conditions, eg. atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus, are more common in individuals as they age, and aging can also affect pain and tissue repair, convergence of such complications will potentially exert an increasingly significant impact on tendons as the demographics of many societies change with expanding percentages of the populations >60-65 years of age.Comorbidities related to metabolic dysfunction have to be identified early in patients with musculoskeletal disorders, such as acute tendon injuries or chronic tendinopathy, for therapeutic considerations regarding both operative and non-operative treatment protocols. Necessary interactions between researchers and clinicians with different subspecialties have to be initiated in order to optimize tissue metabolism for improved healing potentials.

  6. Strain and elongation of the vastus lateralis aponeurosis and tendon in vivo during maximal isometric contraction.

    PubMed

    Stafilidis, Savvas; Karamanidis, Kiros; Morey-Klapsing, Gaspar; Demonte, Gianpiero; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2005-06-01

    The strain and elongation of the vastus lateralis (VL) tendon, tendon plus aponeurosis, and aponeurosis were examined during maximal voluntary contractions on a Biodex-dynamometer (knee angle 115 degrees , hip angle 140 degrees ) in 12 sprinters. Following a warm-up phase, the subjects were instructed to perform a gradual maximal knee extension and hold it for about 3 s. The kinematics of the leg were recorded using a Vicon 512 system with eight cameras operating at 120 Hz. Ultrasonography images were taken simultaneously from the VL myotendinous junction and the mid lateral part of the VL muscle belly. During the maximal isometric knee extensions, the knee joint rotated (13.6+/-5.9 degrees ), leading to an overestimation of the elongation of the tendinous tissues. After correcting for this, the maximal elongation of the VL tendon examined at the myotendinous junction was lower (P<0.05) than the maximal elongation of the VL tendon plus aponeurosis examined at the muscle belly (15 vs. 27 mm, respectively). The maximal estimated strains of the tendon, tendon plus aponeurosis, and aponeurosis showed no statistical differences (8+/-2%, 8+/-1%, and 7+/-2%, respectively, P>0.05). It is concluded that the strains of the human VL tendon, VL tendon plus aponeurosis, and VL aponeurosis, as estimated in vivo by two dimensional ultrasound during maximal isometric contractions, do not differ from each other. The displacement measured at a cross point in the VL muscle belly is significantly greater than that measured at the VL myotendinous junction.

  7. Localized type Volkmann's contracture treated with tendon transfer and tension-reduced early mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Yoshio; Nakamura, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Konosuke; Tobiume, Sachiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuji

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: For localized type Volkmann's contracture, in which degeneration of the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) muscle to one or two fingers and restriction of finger extension occur, dissection or excision of the affected muscle is usually recommended. However, these surgical procedures need relatively wide exposure of the muscle, because the FDP muscle is in the deep portion of the forearm. Patient concerns: In this report, the case of a 35-year-old woman with localized type Volkmann's contracture is presented. Her left forearm had been compressed with an industrial roller 4 months earlier, and severe flexion contracture of the long finger and mild flexion contracture of the ring finger developed gradually. Diagnoses: localized type Volkmann's contracture. Intervention: Five months after the injury, transection of the FDP tendon to the long finger and transfer of the transected tendon to the FDP tendon to the index finger was performed after adjusting the tonus of these two tendons using a small skin incision. This procedure was followed by a tension-reduced early mobilization technique in which a tension-reduced position of the tendon suture site was maintained by taping the long finger to the volar side of the index finger, and then immediate active range of motion (ROM) exercise was started. Outcomes: Within 9 weeks after surgery, full ROM had been regained. Lessons: Using the treatment procedure presented in this case report, a good clinical result was obtained in a minimally invasive manner. PMID:28072735

  8. Bone Allografts: What Is the Risk of Disease Transmission with Bone Allografts?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety of Bone Allografts Used in Dentistry: A Review. JADA September 2008 vol. 139 no. 9 1192–1199. Mellonig JT. Donor selection, testing, and inactivation of the HIV virus in freeze-dried bone allografts. Pract Periodontics Aesthet Dent 1995;7:13–22. Mellonig JT, Prewett AB, Moyer ...

  9. Mechanical properties of the triceps surae tendon and aponeurosis in relation to intensity of sport activity.

    PubMed

    Arampatzis, Adamantios; Karamanidis, Kiros; Morey-Klapsing, Gaspar; De Monte, Gianpiero; Stafilidis, Savvas

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the mechanical properties (i.e. force strain relationship) of the triceps surae tendon and aponeurosis relate to the performed sport activity in an intensity-dependent manner. This was done by comparing sprinters with endurance runners and subjects not active in sports. Sixty-six young male subjects (26+/-5 yr; 183+/-6 cm; 77.6+/-6.7 kg) participated in the study. Ten of these subjects were adults not active in sports, 28 were endurance runners and 28 sprinters. All subjects performed isometric maximal voluntary plantar flexion contractions (MVC) on a dynamometer. The distal aponeuroses of the gastrocnemius medialis (GM) was visualised by ultrasound during the MVC. The results showed that only the sprinters had higher normalised stiffness (relationship between tendon force and tendon strain) of the triceps surae tendon and aponeurosis and maximal calculated tendon forces than the endurance runners and the subjects not active in sports. Furthermore, including the data of all 66 examined participants tendon stiffness correlated significantly (r=0.817, P<0.001) with the maximal tendon force achieved during the MVC. It has been concluded that the mechanical properties of the triceps surae tendon and aponeurosis do not show a graded response to the intensity of the performed sport activity but rather remain at control level in a wide range of applied strains and that strain amplitude and/or frequency should exceed a given threshold in order to trigger additional adaptation effects. The results further indicate that subjects with higher muscle strength possibly increase the margin of tolerated mechanical loading of the tendon due to the greater stiffness of their triceps surae tendon and aponeurosis.

  10. Repair of Double Head Pectoralis Major Tendon Avulsion into its Native Footprint Using Bi-cortical EndoButtons and Tendon Sliding Technique

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Jagadish; Faqi, Mohammed Khalid; Alkhalifa, Fahad; Tayara, Bader Kamal; Awad, Rashad Khamis

    2017-01-01

    Injuries to the pectoralis major muscle are relatively infrequent. The mechanism of injury is usually an eccentric shortening of the pectoralis major under heavy load, such as when performing a bench press exercise. We report a case that presented to us with a history of sudden pain in the left pectoral region while doing heavy bench press exercise. The patient sustained a type III D pectoralis muscletendon avulsion. Surgical repair was done through a bi-cortical tendon sliding technique using two cortical buttons. In this article we describe our modifications to the previously described surgical technique for the pectoralis major tendon repair using the EndoButton and tension – slide technique, aiming to overcome the possible complications. PMID:28217216

  11. Hyaluronic acid and tendon lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Samson, Antoine; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction recently, the viscoelastic properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) on liquid connective tissue have been proposed for the treatment of tendinopathies. Some fundamental studies show encouraging results on hyaluronic acid’s ability to promote tendon gliding and reduce adhesion as well as to improve tendon architectural organisation. Some observations also support its use in a clinical setting to improve pain and function. This literature review analyses studies relating to the use of hyaluronic acid in the treatment of tendinopathies. Methods this review was constructed using the Medline database via Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar. The key words hyaluronic acid, tendon and tendinopathy were used for the research. Results in total, 28 articles (in English and French) on the application of hyaluronic acid to tendons were selected for their relevance and scientific quality, including 13 for the in vitro part, 7 for the in vivo animal part and 8 for the human section. Conclusions preclinical studies demonstrate encouraging results: HA permits tendon gliding, reduces adhesions, creates better tendon architectural organisation and limits inflammation. These laboratory observations appear to be supported by limited but encouraging short-term clinical results on pain and function. However, controlled randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26958533

  12. Dynamics of goat distal hind limb muscle–tendon function in response to locomotor grade

    PubMed Central

    McGuigan, M. Polly; Yoo, Edwin; Lee, David V.; Biewener, Andrew A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The functional roles of the lateral gastrocnemius (LG), medial gastrocnemius (MG) and superficial digital flexor (SDF) muscle–tendon units (MTUs) in domestic goats (N=6) were studied as a function of locomotor grade, testing the hypothesis that changes in distal limb muscle work would reflect changes in mechanical work requirements while goats walked or trotted on the level, 15 deg. decline and 15 deg. incline. As steep terrain-adapted animals, changes in muscle work output are expected to be particularly important for goats. In vivo muscle–tendon forces, fascicle length changes and muscle activation were recorded via tendon force buckles, sonomicrometry and electromyography to evaluate the work performance and elastic energy recovery of the three distal MTUs. These recordings confirmed that fascicle strain and force within goat distal hind limb muscles are adjusted in response to changes in mechanical work demand associated with locomotor grade. In general, muscle work was modulated most consistently by changes in fascicle strain, with increased net shortening (P<0.001) observed as goats switched from decline to level to incline locomotion. Peak muscle stresses increased as goats increased speed from a walk to a trot within each grade condition (P<0.05), and also increased significantly with grade (P<0.05 to P<0.01). Due to the increase in net fascicle shortening and muscle force, net muscle work per cycle also increased significantly (P<0.05 to P<0.005) as goats switched from decline to level to incline conditions (LG work: 20 mJ to 56 mJ to 209 mJ; MG work: –7 mJ to 34 mJ to 179 mJ; SDF work: –42 mJ to 14 mJ to 71 mJ, at a 2.5 ms–1 trot). Although muscle work was modulated in response to changes in grade, the amount of work produced by these three distal pennate muscles was small (being <3%) in comparison with the change in mechanical energy required of the limb as a whole. Elastic energy recovery in the SDF and gastrocnemius (GA) tendons was

  13. Increased Expression of p-Akt correlates with Chronic Allograft Nephropathy in a Rat Kidney Model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li-Na; Wang, Ning; Dong, Yang; Zhang, Yiqin; Zou, Hequn; Li, Qingqin; Shi, Yangling; Chen, Ling; Zhou, Wenying; Han, Conghui; Wang, Yuxin

    2015-04-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is the most common cause of chronic graft dysfunction leading to graft failure, our study investigates the expression and significance of p-Akt in the pathogenesis of CAN in rats. Kidneys of Fisher (F344) rats were orthotopically transplanted into Lewis (LEW) rats. The animals were evaluated at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks post-transplantation for renal function and histopathology. Phosphorate Akt (p-Akt) protein expression was determined by Western blot and immunohistological assays. Our data show that 24-h urinary protein excretion in CAN rats increased significantly at week 16 as compared with F344/LEW controls. Allografts got severe interstitial infiltration of mononuclear cells at week 4 and week 8, but it was degraded as the time went on after week 16. Allografts markedly presented with severe interstitial fibrosis (IF) and tubular atrophy at 16 and 24 weeks. p-Akt expression was upregulated in rat kidneys with CAN, and the increase became more significant over time after transplantation. p-Akt expression correlated significantly with 24-h urinary protein excretion, serum creatinine levels, tubulointerstitial mononuclear cells infiltration, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) migration in vascular wall, and IF. It was concluded that p-Akt overexpression might be the key event that involved mononuclear cells infiltration and vascular SMCs migration at early stage, and IF and allograft nephroangiosclerosis at the late stage of CAN pathogenesis in rats.

  14. POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION WITH AUTOGRAFT OF THE DOUBLE SEMITENDINOSUS MUSCLES AND MIDDLE THIRD OF THE QUADRICEPS TENDON WITH DOUBLE FEMORAL AND SINGLE TIBIAL TUNNELS: CLINICAL RESULTS IN TWO YEARS FOLLOW UP

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Ricardo de Paula Leite; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; Avakian, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the surgical aspects that may offer good anatomic and functional results in posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction using an autologous graft of the quadriceps tendon and double semitendinosus through a double femoral tunnel. Methods: Fourteen patients with isolated PCL lesions, instability and pain were operated on by arthroscopy and evaluated according to the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm scales. Posterior knee laxity was examined with a KT1000 arthrometer. Results: The mean postoperative posterior side-to-side difference was between 0-2 mm in 57.1% of patients and between 3 and 5 mm in 35.7% of cases. The average Lysholm score was 93 points in the final follow-up. In the IKDC evaluation, 3 patients were graded A, 10 were graded B, and 1 patient was graded C. Conclusions: Double bundle arthroscopic PCL reconstruction based on the anatomical positioning of the tunnels, with double semitendinosus tendon and single quadriceps, provides a clinically evident reduction in symptoms and restores satisfactory stability, although no statistically significant difference was found due to the small sample. PMID:27027083

  15. Ciprofloxacin-induced tendinopathy of the gluteal tendons.

    PubMed

    Shimatsu, Kaumakaokalani; Subramaniam, Somasundaram; Sim, Helen; Aronowitz, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy most commonly affects the Achilles tendon; however, involvement of several other tendons has been described. This is a case report of ciprofloxacin-induced tendinopathy of the gluteal tendons with MRI findings. An obese 25-year-old woman with no significant past medical history was diagnosed with acute pyelonephritis and was treated with intravenous ciprofloxacin. Shortly after her first dose of ciprofloxacin, she developed severe left hip pain and decreased range of motion. MRI of the hips showed bilateral tendinopathy of the gluteal muscle insertion. A diagnosis of ciprofloxacin-induced tendinopathy was made based on her MRI and a Naranjo score of 7. Ciprofloxacin was stopped and her pain quickly resolved. Fluoroquinolones cause tendinopathy in 0.14 % to 0.4 % of patients using these agents. Fluoroquinolone-associated tendinopathy is a serious adverse reaction that can affect many tendons and should be considered in any patient presenting with new musculoskeletal complaints and in whom there is a history of fluoroquinolone use within the preceding 6 months.

  16. In-vitro tensile testing machine for vibration study of fresh rabbit Achilles tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revel, Gian M.; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo; Pianosi, Antonella

    2001-10-01

    A lot of people, overall athletic one suffer from tendinitis or complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. This structure becomes inflamed and damaged mainly from a variety of mechanical forces and sometimes due to metabolic problems, such as diabetes or arthritis. Over the past three decades extensive studies have been performed on the structural and mechanical properties of Achilles tendon trying to explain the constitutive equations to describe and foresee tendon behavior. Among the various mechanical parameters, the vibrational behavior is also of interest. Several investigations are performed in order to study how the Achilles tendon vibrations influence the response of the muscle proprioception and human posture. The present article describes how in vitro tensile experiments can be performed, taking into account the need to simulate physiological condition of Achilles tendon and thus approaching some opened problems in the design of the experimental set-up. A new system for evaluating tendon vibrations by non contact techniques is proposed. Preliminary simple elongation tests are made extracting the main mechanical parameters: stress and strain at different fixed stretches, in order to characterize the tissue. Finally, a vibration study is made at each pretensioned tendon level evaluating the oscillating curves caused by a small hammer.

  17. Parsonage-Turner syndrome and a localised swelling around the extensor tendons of the hand: a clinical sign indicating increased risk of rupture of the tendon.

    PubMed

    Vedung, Torbjörn

    2012-10-01

    Two patients presented with intense pain in the shoulder followed by weakness and paralysis of muscles in the shoulder and arm, together with a peculiar swelling on the hand. The swelling seems to predispose to rupture of the extensor tendon. If this tumour is a regular finding in Parsonage-Turner syndrome, it may also help in making a definitive diagnosis.

  18. Genetics and Epigenetics of Chronic Allograft Dysfunction in Kidney Transplants.

    PubMed

    Zununi Vahed, Sepideh; Samadi, Nasser; Mostafidi, Elmira; Ardalan, Mohammad Reza; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Chronic allograft dysfunction is the most common cause of allograft lost. Chronic allograft dysfunction happens as a result of complex interactions at the molecular and cellular levels. Genetic and environmental factors both influence the evolution and progression of the chronic allograft dysfunction. Epigenetic modification could be considered as a therapeutically modifiable element to pause the fibrosis process through novel strategies. In this review, the PubMed database was searched for English-language articles on these new areas.

  19. An assembly of anomalous extensor tendons of the hand--anatomical description and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vandana; Jyoti, Arora; Suri, Rajesh Kumar; Rath, Gayatri

    2009-01-01

    Innumerable descriptions about variations in the pattern of extensor tendons are recorded in the literature. The dorsum of the hand in an adult male cadaver revealed an unusual pattern of extensor arrangement during a gross anatomical practical session. The extensor digitorum, extensor indicis and extensor digiti minimi tendons displayed a variant pattern. Extensor digitorum contributed tendons only to the middle and ring fingers, with junctura tendinum present between the extensor digitorum for the ring finger and extensor digiti minimi. Interestingly, an accessory muscle was observed arising from the common extensor origin passing to the index finger, in addition to the usual extensor indicis. The origin and insertion of extensor digiti minimi was as usual with an accessory slip contributed from the extensor carpi ulnaris to the proximal phalanx of the fifth finger. The plethora of variations in this region is of paramount importance for the reconstructive surgeon, who may utilize the accessory tendons to restore functional capacity of the fingers.

  20. An Assembly of Anomalous Extensor Tendons of the Hand - Anatomical Description and Clinical Relevance.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vandana; Arora, Jyoti; Suri, Rajesh Kumar; Rath, Gayatri

    2009-01-01

    Innumerable descriptions about variations in the pattern of extensor tendons are recorded in the literature. The dorsum of the hand in an adult male cadaver revealed an unusual pattern of extensor arrangement during a gross anatomical practical session. The extensor digitorum, extensor indicis and extensor digiti minimi tendons displayed a variant pattern. Extensor digitorum contributed tendons only to the middle and ring fingers, with junctura tendinum present between the extensor digitorum for the ring finger and extensor digiti minimi. Interestingly, an accessory muscle was observed arising from the common extensor origin passing to the index finger, in addition to the usual extensor indicis. The origin and insertion of extensor digiti minimi was as usual with an accessory slip contributed from the extensor carpi ulnaris to the proximal phalanx of the fifth finger. The plethora of variations in this region is of paramount importance for the reconstructive surgeon, who may utilize the accessory tendons to restore functional capacity of the fingers.

  1. Achilles tendon vibration-induced changes in plantar flexor corticospinal excitability.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Temesi, John; Gimenez, Philippe; Arnal, Pierrick J; Millet, Guillaume Y; Petitjean, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Daily Achilles tendon vibration has been shown to increase muscle force, likely via corticospinal neural adaptations. The aim of the present study was to determine the extent by which corticospinal excitability is influenced during direct Achilles tendon vibration. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were elicited in the soleus (SOL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and tibialis anterior (TA) by transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortical area of the leg with and without Achilles tendon vibration at various frequencies (50, 80 and 110 Hz). Contralateral homologues were also investigated. SOL and GM MEP amplitude significantly increased by 226 ± 188 and 66 ± 39%, respectively, during Achilles tendon vibration, without any difference between the tested frequencies. No MEP changes were reported for TA or contralateral homologues. Increased SOL and GM MEP amplitude suggests increased vibration-induced corticospinal excitability independent of vibration frequency.

  2. Structural and Ultrastructural Characteristics of Bone-Tendon Junction of the Calcaneal Tendon of Adult and Elderly Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Diego Pulzatto; Dias, Fernando José; Miglino, Maria Angélica; Watanabe, Ii-sei

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are transition tissues that transfer the contractile forces generated by the muscles to the bones, allowing movement. The region where the tendon attaches to the bone is called bone-tendon junction or enthesis and may be classified as fibrous or fibrocartilaginous. This study aims to analyze the collagen fibers and the cells present in the bone-tendon junction using light microscopy and ultrastructural techniques as scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Forty male Wistar rats were used in the experiment, being 20 adult rats at 4 months-old and 20 elderly rats at 20 months-old. The hind limbs of the rats were removed, dissected and prepared to light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The aging process showed changes in the collagen fibrils, with a predominance of type III fibers in the elderly group, in addition to a decrease in the amount of the fibrocartilage cells, fewer and shorter cytoplasmic processes and a decreased synthetic capacity due to degradation of the organelles involved in synthesis. PMID:27078690

  3. Radionuclide surveillance of the allografted pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.A.; Salimi, Z.; Carney, K.; Castaneda, M.; Garvin, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphy to detect posttransplantation complications of the allografted pancreas, we retrospectively reviewed 209 scintigrams obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (/sup 99m/Tc-SC) and /sup 99m/Tc-glucoheptonate (/sup 99m/Tc-GH). The scintigraphic studies were performed in 37 recipients of simultaneous renal and pancreatic allografts harvested from the same donor. /sup 99m/Tc-SC was used as an indicator of thrombotic vasculitis; pancreatic perfusion and blood-pool parameters were monitored with /sup 99m/Tc-GH. In 11 of the 37 recipients, scintigraphic abnormalities suggested posttransplantation infarction. Recurrent episodes of acute rejection of the pancreatic allograft, which always coincided with acute rejection of the renal allograft, were monitored in 24 recipients. Rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis was suggested in 12 of the 24 recipients and persisted in 10 recipients for several weeks after improvement of renal allograft rejection. Pancreatic atrophy was suggested scintigraphically in 16 of the 24 recipients with recurrent episodes of rejection. Spontaneous pancreatic-duct obstruction and obstructive pancreatitis were associated with a scintigraphic pattern similar to that of rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis. We concluded that the specific radionuclides used in this series are useful for the surveillance and assessment of posttransplantation pancreatic infarction, acute rejection, pancreatitis, and atrophy

  4. Immediate retransplantation for pancreas allograft thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hollinger, E F; Powelson, J A; Mangus, R S; Kazimi, M M; Taber, T E; Goble, M L; Fridell, J A

    2009-04-01

    Early pancreas allograft failure most commonly results from thrombosis and requires immediate allograft pancreatectomy. Optimal timing for retransplantation remains undefined. Immediate retransplantation facilitates reuse of the same anatomic site before extensive adhesions have formed. Some studies suggest that early retransplantation is associated with a higher incidence of graft loss. This study is a retrospective review of immediate pancreas retransplants performed at a single center. All cases of pancreas allograft loss within 2 weeks were examined. Of 228 pancreas transplants, 12 grafts were lost within 2 weeks of surgery. Eleven of these underwent allograft pancreatectomy for thrombosis. One suffered anoxic brain injury and was not a retransplantation candidate, one was retransplanted at 3.5 months and nine patients underwent retransplantation 1-16 days following the original transplant. Of the nine early retransplants, one pancreas was lost to heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, one recipient died with function at 2.9 years and the other grafts continue to function at 76-1137 days (mean 572 days). One-year graft survival for early retransplantation was 89% compared to 91% for all pancreas transplants at our center. Immediate retransplantation following pancreatic graft thrombosis restores durable allograft function with outcomes comparable to first-time pancreas transplantation.

  5. Force estimation from ensembles of Golgi tendon organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileusnic, M. P.; Loeb, G. E.

    2009-06-01

    Golgi tendon organs (GTOs) located in the skeletal muscles provide the central nervous system with information about muscle tension. The ensemble firing of all GTO receptors in the muscle has been hypothesized to represent a reliable measure of the whole muscle force but the precision and accuracy of that information are largely unknown because it is impossible to record activity simultaneously from all GTOs in a muscle. In this study, we combined a new mathematical model of force sampling and transduction in individual GTOs with various models of motor unit (MU) organization and recruitment simulating various normal, pathological and neural prosthetic conditions. Our study suggests that in the intact muscle the ensemble GTO activity accurately encodes force information according to a nonlinear, monotonic relationship that has its steepest slope for low force levels and tends to saturate at the highest force levels. The relationship between the aggregate GTO activity and whole muscle tension under some pathological conditions is similar to one seen in the intact muscle during rapidly modulated, phasic excitation of the motor pool (typical for many natural movements) but quite different when the muscle is activated slowly or held at a given force level. Substantial deviations were also observed during simulated functional electrical stimulation.

  6. Bone allografts: What they can offer and what they cannot.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Cornu, O; Druez, V; Barbier, O

    2007-05-01

    Bone allografts can be used in any kind of surgery involving bone from minor defects to major bone loss after tumour resection. This review describes the various types of bone grafts and the current knowledge on bone allografts, from procurement and preparation to implantation. The surgical conditions for optimising the incorporation of bone are outlined, and surgeon expectations from a bone allograft discussed.

  7. Renal allograft eosinophilia: An unusual presentation of sudden graft dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yuvaraj, A.; Ghosh, S.; Abraham, G.; Koshy, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of sudden allograft dysfunction 11 months after renal transplantation which presented as severe peripheral and allograft eosinophilia and was managed as a case of an acute cellular rejection with significant interstitial graft eosinophilic infiltration. Patient had partial response to antirejection therapy and eventually ended up in a chronic allograft dysfunction. PMID:28356665

  8. Trichinella spiralis infection changes immune response in mice performed abdominal heterotopic cardiac transplantation and prolongs cardiac allograft survival time.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gengguo; Deng, Ronghai; Yao, Jianping; Liao, Bing; Chen, Yinghua; Wu, Zhongdao; Hu, Hongxing; Zhou, Xingwang; Ma, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Allograft rejection has been an obstacle for long-term survival of patients for many years. Current strategies for transplant rejection are not as optimal as we expected, especially for long-term treatments. Trichinella spiralis, a nematode parasitized in mammalian muscle and as an invader, maintains harmonious with host in the long term by evading host immune attack. To determine whether T. spiralis infection impacts on allograft rejection, we performed mice cardiac allograft transplantation model by using BALB/c (H-2(b)) mice as donors and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice orally infected with 300 muscle larvae for 28 days as recipients. Graft survival was monitored by daily palpation of the abdomen; histologic change was observed by H&E stain; and CD4(+), CD8(+), CD4(+)IFN-γ(+), and CD4(+)IL-17(+) T cells and regulatory T cells were examined with the use of flow cytometry. Serum cytokine levels were measured by Luminex. Finally, we found that mean survival time of cardiac allografts in T. spiralis group was 23.40 ± 1.99 days, while the vehicle control group was 10.60 ± 0.75 days. Furthermore, we observed alleviated histological changes in the heart allograft, decreased corresponding CD8(+) T cells, suppressed Th1 and Th17 responses, and increased regulatory T cell frequency in a murine cardiac transplantation model at day 7 post-transplantation in experimental group. These data suggest that T. spiralis infection resulted in prolonged allograft survival following murine cardiac transplantation, with suppressed Th1/Th17 responses and augmented regulatory T cells.

  9. Afferents contributing to autogenic inhibition of gastrocnemius following electrical stimulation of its tendon.

    PubMed

    Khan, Serajul I; Burne, John A

    2009-07-28

    Electrical stimulation of the Achilles tendon produced strong reflex inhibition of the ongoing voluntary EMG activity in the two heads of the gastrocnemius (GA) muscle in all tested subjects. The inhibition was seen clearly in both averaged and single sweep surface EMG records. The inhibitory response was produced without electrical (M wave) or mechanical, (muscle twitch) signs of direct muscle stimulation. The onset latency and duration for the first period of inhibition (I(1)) were 47-49 ms and 67 ms, respectively. A second inhibition (I(2)) had an onset latency of 187-193 ms and duration under 40 ms. Non-noxious stimuli in the range of 2.6-7.6 x mean perceptual threshold, when delivered to four locations over the GA tendon, all produced clear inhibition of the voluntary muscle activity. The inhibition was maximal when the cathode was a large metal plate located near the musculotendinous junction and decreased approximately linearly with distances more distal to that site. The effect of passive muscle stretch on the electrically induced tendon reflex inhibition (TRE) was tested at ankle joint angles incremented in steps of 20 degrees. It was found that TRE is strongly dependent on joint angle, being maximal in the fully stretched muscle. TRE was lost completely after partial tibial nerve block. In comparison, GA inhibition produced by cutaneous (sural) nerve stimulation was of a higher threshold, longer latency and persisted after partial tibial nerve block. We thus demonstrated a powerful autogenic inhibition in the lower limb arising from tendon afferents in conscious subjects that is increased by passive muscle stretch and likely to originate from group I tendon afferents.

  10. Effects of gamma irradiation on the biomechanical properties of peroneus tendons

    PubMed Central

    Aguila, Christopher M; Delcroix, Gaëtan J-R; Kaimrajh, David N; Milne, Edward L; Temple, H Thomas; Latta, Loren L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to investigate the biomechanical properties of nonirradiated (NI) and irradiated (IR) peroneus tendons to determine if they would be suitable allografts, in regards to biomechanical properties, for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction after a dose of 1.5–2.5 Mrad. Methods Seven pairs of peroneus longus (PL) and ten pairs of peroneus brevis (PB) tendons were procured from human cadavers. The diameter of each allograft was measured. The left side of each allograft was IR at 1.5–2.5 Mrad, whereas the right side was kept aseptic and NI. The allografts were thawed, kept wet with saline, and attached in a single-strand fashion to custom freeze grips using liquid nitrogen. A preload of 10 N was then applied and, after it had reached steady state, the allografts were pulled at 4 cm/sec. The parameters recorded were the displacement and force. Results The elongation at the peak load was 10.3±2.3 mm for the PB NI side and 13.5±3.3 mm for the PB IR side. The elongation at the peak load was 17.4±5.3 mm for the PL NI side and 16.3±2.0 mm for the PL IR side. For PL, the ultimate load was 2,091.6±148.7 N for NI and 2,122.8±380.0 N for IR. The ultimate load for the PB tendons was 1,485.7±209.3 N for NI and 1,318.4±296.9 N for the IR group. The ultimate stress calculations for PL were 90.3±11.3 MPa for NI and 94.8±21.0 MPa for IR. For the PB, the ultimate stress was 82.4±19.0 MPa for NI and 72.5±16.6 MPa for the IR group. The structural stiffness was 216.1±59.0 N/mm for the NI PL and 195.7±51.4 N/mm for the IR side. None of these measures were significantly different between the NI and IR groups. The structural stiffness was 232.1±45.7 N/mm for the NI PB and 161.9±74.0 N/mm for the IR side, and this was the only statistically significant difference found in this study (P=0.034). Conclusion Our statistical comparisons found no significant differences in terms of elongation, ultimate load, or ultimate stress between IR and NI

  11. Lineage tracing of resident tendon progenitor cells during growth and natural healing.

    PubMed

    Dyment, Nathaniel A; Hagiwara, Yusuke; Matthews, Brya G; Li, Yingcui; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rowe, David W

    2014-01-01

    Unlike during embryogenesis, the identity of tissue resident progenitor cells that contribute to postnatal tendon growth and natural healing is poorly characterized. Therefore, we utilized 1) an inducible Cre driven by alpha smooth muscle actin (SMACreERT2), that identifies mesenchymal progenitors, 2) a constitutively active Cre driven by growth and differentiation factor 5 (GDF5Cre), a critical regulator of joint condensation, in combination with 3) an Ai9 Cre reporter to permanently label SMA9 and GDF5-9 populations and their progeny. In growing mice, SMA9+ cells were found in peritendinous structures and scleraxis-positive (ScxGFP+) cells within the tendon midsubstance and myotendinous junction. The progenitors within the tendon midsubstance were transiently labeled as they displayed a 4-fold expansion from day 2 to day 21 but reduced to baseline levels by day 70. SMA9+ cells were not found within tendon entheses or ligaments in the knee, suggesting a different origin. In contrast to the SMA9 population, GDF5-9+ cells extended from the bone through the enthesis and into a portion of the tendon midsubstance. GDF5-9+ cells were also found throughout the length of the ligaments, indicating a significant variation in the progenitors that contribute to tendons and ligaments. Following tendon injury, SMA9+ paratenon cells were the main contributors to the healing response. SMA9+ cells extended over the defect space at 1 week and differentiated into ScxGFP+ cells at 2 weeks, which coincided with increased collagen signal in the paratenon bridge. Thus, SMA9-labeled cells represent a unique progenitor source that contributes to the tendon midsubstance, paratenon, and myotendinous junction during growth and natural healing, while GDF5 progenitors contribute to tendon enthesis and ligament development. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate the expansion and differentiation of these progenitors may prove crucial to improving future repair strategies.

  12. Triceps tendon rupture in weight lifters.

    PubMed

    Sollender, J L; Rayan, G M; Barden, G A

    1998-01-01

    Triceps tendon avulsion injuries are rare. We report four weight lifters with triceps tendon raptures, two of whom had received local steroid injections for pain in the triceps. All four patients had taken oral anabolic steroids before injury. All patients had closed avulsion of the triceps tendon from its insertion into the olecranon. Three patients were injured while bench pressing heavy weights, and one patient was injured while swinging a baseball bat. Satisfactory results were achieved after surgical reinsertion of the tendon.

  13. Congenital dystrophic medial rectus muscles

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    We report two patients, one with congenital dystrophic medial rectus muscles and one with absence of the medial rectus muscles; in addition, one of them had absence of the lateral rectus muscles. While absence of the superior oblique and superior rectus has been more commonly reported in literature, especially with craniofacial syndromes, our patients were nonsyndromic. Considering the risk of anterior segment ischemia, correction of the large-angle exotropia was performed by horizontal rectus muscle surgery where possible, along with transfer of the superior oblique tendon to the superior part of the normal medial rectus muscle insertion area to create a tethering effect with a good outcome. PMID:28300745

  14. Staged tendon grafts and soft tissue coverage.

    PubMed

    Elliot, David

    2011-05-01

    The objective of the two-staged flexor tendon method is to improve the predictability of final results in difficult problems dealing with tendon reconstruction. This article reviews the evolution and benefits of this procedure. It also considers the use of the technique to help deal with problems requiring pulley and skin reconstruction simultaneously with re-constituting the flexor tendon system.

  15. Muscle architecture and functional anatomy of the pelvic limb of the ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Smith, N C; Wilson, A M; Jespers, K J; Payne, R C

    2006-12-01

    The functional anatomy of the pelvic limb of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) was investigated in order to assess musculoskeletal specialization related to locomotor performance. The pelvic limbs of ten ostriches were dissected and detailed measurements of all muscle tendon units of the pelvic limb were made, including muscle mass, muscle length, fascicle length, pennation angle, tendon mass and tendon length. From these measurements other muscle properties such as muscle volume, physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), tendon cross-sectional area, maximum isometric muscle force and tendon stress were derived, using standard relationships and published muscle data. Larger muscles tended to be located more proximally and had longer fascicle lengths and lower pennation angles. This led to an expected proximal to distal reduction in total muscle mass. An exception to this trend was the gastrocnemius muscle, which was found to have the largest volume and PCSA and also had the highest capacity for both force and power production. Generally high-power muscles were located more proximally in the limb, while some small distal muscles (tibialis cranialis and flexor perforatus digiti III), with short fibres, were found to have very high force generation capacities. The greatest proportion of pelvic muscle volume was for the hip extensors, while the highest capacity for force generation was observed in the extensors of the ankle, many of which were also in series with long tendons and thus were functionally suited to elastic energy storage.

  16. Muscle architecture and functional anatomy of the pelvic limb of the ostrich (Struthio camelus)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, N C; Wilson, A M; Jespers, K J; Payne, R C

    2006-01-01

    The functional anatomy of the pelvic limb of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) was investigated in order to assess musculoskeletal specialization related to locomotor performance. The pelvic limbs of ten ostriches were dissected and detailed measurements of all muscle tendon units of the pelvic limb were made, including muscle mass, muscle length, fascicle length, pennation angle, tendon mass and tendon length. From these measurements other muscle properties such as muscle volume, physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), tendon cross-sectional area, maximum isometric muscle force and tendon stress were derived, using standard relationships and published muscle data. Larger muscles tended to be located more proximally and had longer fascicle lengths and lower pennation angles. This led to an expected proximal to distal reduction in total muscle mass. An exception to this trend was the gastrocnemius muscle, which was found to have the largest volume and PCSA and also had the highest capacity for both force and power production. Generally high-power muscles were located more proximally in the limb, while some small distal muscles (tibialis cranialis and flexor perforatus digiti III), with short fibres, were found to have very high force generation capacities. The greatest proportion of pelvic muscle volume was for the hip extensors, while the highest capacity for force generation was observed in the extensors of the ankle, many of which were also in series with long tendons and thus were functionally suited to elastic energy storage. PMID:17118064

  17. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  18. Optimization and Implementation of Long Nerve Allografts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    mimics the production of the human nerve allograft product used clinically. This includes detergent decellularization , treatment with...is  on  schedule.     The  early  Milestone  to  obtain  ACURO  approval  for   animal  use  was  accomplished...months  1-­‐6):       Task  1a.    Collect,  process  ( decellularize )  and  prepare  7  cm  acellular  allografts

  19. Spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon: clinical and imaging findings, with anatomic correlations.

    PubMed

    Lecouvet, Frederic E; Demondion, Xavier; Leemrijse, Thibaut; Vande Berg, Bruno C; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Malghem, Jacques

    2005-11-01

    We report the clinical and imaging findings in two elderly female patients with spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon from the lesser trochanter of the femur. We emphasize the key contribution of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to this diagnosis and provide an anatomic correlation. Spontaneous rupture of the distal iliopsoas tendon should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of acute groin pain in the elderly. MR imaging enables positive diagnosis, by showing mass effect on the anterior aspect of the hip joint, proximal muscle thickening, and abnormal signal intensity, and by demonstrating interruption of the psoas tendon, whereas the distal insertion of the lateral portion of the iliacus muscle remains muscular and is preserved.

  20. A Case of Reverse Palmaris Longus Muscle- An Additional Muscle in the Anterior Compartment of the Forearm

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ashwini Lagadamane Sathynarayana; Gadahad, Mohandas Rao Kappettu

    2016-01-01

    It is uncommon to have additional muscles in the upper limb. Some of them may restrict the movements or compress the nerves and vessels, while others may go unnoticed. During the routine dissection for undergraduate medical students, we observed an additional muscle in the anterior compartment of the forearm in about 60-year-old male cadaver. The muscle had a prominent belly and a long tendon. Distally, it was attached to the flexor retinaculum by a short and thick tendon. Proximally, long tendon of the muscle passed between the flexor carpi ulnaris and palmaris longus and was attached to the common aponeurosis shared by the extensor carpi ulnaris and flexor digitorum profundus muscles. The additional muscle belly was supplied by a branch from the anterior interosseous nerve. The ulnar nerve and artery was passing deep to the fleshy belly of the muscle. The muscle reported here might compress the ulnar nerve and artery and may produce neurovascular symptoms. On the other hand, the tendon and fleshy belly of the muscle could be useful in muscle/tendon grafts. The observations made by us in the present case will supplement our knowledge of variations of the muscles in this region which could be useful for surgeons during the forearm and hand surgeries. PMID:27134851

  1. Synthesis, development, characterization and effectiveness of bovine pure platelet gel-collagen-polydioxanone bioactive graft on tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2015-06-01

    Bovine platelet gel (BPG) is an accessible and cost-effective source of growth factors which may have a value in tendon regenerative medicine. We produced a collagen implant (CI) as a tendon proper, covered it with polydioxanone (PDS) sheath to simulate paratenon and finally embedded the BPG as an active source of growth factor within the bioimplant to test whether BPG would be able to accelerate and enhance tendon regeneration and repair. After in vitro characterization of the bioactive grafts, the grafts were implanted in rabbit large tendon defect model. Untreated tendons and tendons treated with either CI or CI-PDS were served as controls for the CI-PDS-BPG. The animals were investigated clinically, ultrasonographically and haematologically for 120 days. After euthanasia, dry matter content, water uptake and delivery characteristics and also gross morphological, histopathological and scanning electron microscopic features of the healing tendons were assessed. In vitro, the activated platelets in the scaffold, released their growth factors significantly more than the controls. BPG also increased cell viability, and enhanced cellular differentiation, maturation and proliferation inside the CI-PDS compared with the controls. In vivo, the BPG modulated inflammation, increased quality and rate of fibroplasia and produced a remodelled tendon that had significantly higher collagen content and superior collagen fibril and fibre differentiation than controls. Treatment also significantly improved tendon water uptake and delivery characteristics, animals' serum PDGF level, CI-PDS biocompatibility and biodegradability and reduced peritendinous adhesions, muscle fibrosis and atrophy. BPG was effective on tendon healing and CI-PDS-BPG may be a valuable bioscaffold in tendon reconstructive surgery.

  2. Tendon exhibits complex poroelastic behavior at the nanoscale as revealed by high-frequency AFM-based rheology.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2017-03-21

    Tendons transmit load from muscle to bone by utilizing their unique static and viscoelastic tensile properties. These properties are highly dependent on the composition and structure of the tissue matrix, including the collagen I hierarchy, proteoglycans, and water. While the role of matrix constituents in the tensile response has been studied, their role in compression, particularly in matrix pressurization via regulation of fluid flow, is not well understood. Injured or diseased tendons and tendon regions that naturally experience compression are known to have alterations in glycosaminoglycan content, which could modulate fluid flow and ultimately mechanical function. While recent theoretical studies have predicted tendon mechanics using poroelastic theory, no experimental data have directly demonstrated such behavior. In this study, we use high-bandwidth AFM-based rheology to determine the dynamic response of tendons to compressive loading at the nanoscale and to determine the presence of poroelastic behavior. Tendons are found to have significant characteristic dynamic relaxation behavior occurring at both low and high frequencies. Classic poroelastic behavior is observed, although we hypothesize that the full dynamic response is caused by a combination of flow-dependent poroelasticity as well as flow-independent viscoelasticity. Tendons also demonstrate regional dependence in their dynamic response, particularly near the junction of tendon and bone, suggesting that the structural and compositional heterogeneity in tendon may be responsible for regional poroelastic behavior. Overall, these experiments provide the foundation for understanding fluid-flow-dependent poroelastic mechanics of tendon, and the methodology is valuable for assessing changes in tendon matrix compressive behavior at the nanoscale.

  3. Achilles tendon injury in kendo players in junior and senior high schools: with a focus on foot function

    PubMed Central

    Kisi, Shinya; Yoshida, Munehito

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated Achilles tendon injury in Kendo players in junior and senior high schools to obtain a possible indicator for preventing an outbreak of Achilles tendon injury and tendonitis, possible risk factors concerning foot function and morphology were extracted. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 60 Kendo players aged 14–18 years from Wakayama Prefecture, Japan (33 boys and 27 girls). A questionnaire survey was conducted on the past history, current status, time of occurrence about Achilles tendon pain or rupture, and site of Achilles tendon pain or rupture. Based on the responses to the questionnaire, these students were divided into two groups, i.e., those who had a history of Achilles tendon pain (n=30) or rupture (n=3) (pain group) and those who had no history of Achilles tendon pain (no-pain group), and they were examined for foot alignment, flexion and extension Range of motion test of the first toe, flexion and extension muscle strength of the first toe, and opening movement of the toes. [Results] Achilles tendon pain had occurred in 53% of the Kendo players (including 3 who had suffered Achilles tendon rupture). Poor foot alignment and deterioration of opening movement of the toes were noted in the pain group. [Conclusion] Foot alignment was poor and opening function of the toes deteriorated in the pain group, suggesting that these may be some of factors for Achilles tendon injury. Training aimed at improving foot alignment and function is important to prevent and improve Achilles tendon injury. PMID:28265159

  4. Synthesis, development, characterization and effectiveness of bovine pure platelet gel-collagen-polydioxanone bioactive graft on tendon healing

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2015-01-01

    Bovine platelet gel (BPG) is an accessible and cost-effective source of growth factors which may have a value in tendon regenerative medicine. We produced a collagen implant (CI) as a tendon proper, covered it with polydioxanone (PDS) sheath to simulate paratenon and finally embedded the BPG as an active source of growth factor within the bioimplant to test whether BPG would be able to accelerate and enhance tendon regeneration and repair. After in vitro characterization of the bioactive grafts, the grafts were implanted in rabbit large tendon defect model. Untreated tendons and tendons treated with either CI or CI-PDS were served as controls for the CI-PDS-BPG. The animals were investigated clinically, ultrasonographically and haematologically for 120 days. After euthanasia, dry matter content, water uptake and delivery characteristics and also gross morphological, histopathological and scanning electron microscopic features of the healing tendons were assessed. In vitro, the activated platelets in the scaffold, released their growth factors significantly more than the controls. BPG also increased cell viability, and enhanced cellular differentiation, maturation and proliferation inside the CI-PDS compared with the controls. In vivo, the BPG modulated inflammation, increased quality and rate of fibroplasia and produced a remodelled tendon that had significantly higher collagen content and superior collagen fibril and fibre differentiation than controls. Treatment also significantly improved tendon water uptake and delivery characteristics, animals’ serum PDGF level, CI-PDS biocompatibility and biodegradability and reduced peritendinous adhesions, muscle fibrosis and atrophy. BPG was effective on tendon healing and CI-PDS-BPG may be a valuable bioscaffold in tendon reconstructive surgery. PMID:25702535

  5. Morphological examination of the intraorbital muscles (musculi bulbi) in Persian cats in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Klećkowska, J; Pospieszny, N

    2005-02-01

    The study involved 34 fetuses of Persian cats from eight uteruses, gestational day 58. The intraorbital muscles were analysed morphologically in respect of the location of the recti muscles, oblique muscles and retractor bulbi muscle, their length and breadth, the distance of the muscle tendon insertions from the corneal limbus and the line of insertions.

  6. Rupture sous-cutanée du tendon long extenseur du pouce: à propos de 5 cas

    PubMed Central

    Abdelillah, Rachid; Abbassi, Najib; Erraji, Moncef; Abdeljawad, Najib; Yacoubi, Hicham; Daoudi, Abdelkrim

    2014-01-01

    La rupture spontanée du muscle long extenseur du pouce (EPL) du tendon au niveau du poignet est rare et principalement rapportés après fracture du radius distal à tubercule de Lister, dans la synovite, ténosynovite ou la polyarthrite rhumatoïde. Nous rapportons 5 cas de rupture spontanée du tendon long extenseur du pouce, traités par une greffe ou un transfert tendineux. PMID:25317233

  7. Effects of prolonged patellar tendon vibration on force steadiness in quadriceps femoris during force-matching task.

    PubMed

    Saito, Akira; Ando, Ryosuke; Akima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The quadriceps femoris (QF) muscle group plays an essential role in human movement, such as standing, walking and running. The ability to maintain a steady force during physical activity of the human lower limb is important for mobility, postural control and balance. Although prolonged mechanical vibration of the muscle-tendon unit can moderate the efficacy of synaptic input from Ia afferent onto the α-motor neuron pathway, the effect of prolonged tendon vibration on fluctuations of knee extensor force has received little attention. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of prolonged patellar tendon vibration on the force steadiness of the QF muscle. Nine healthy men performed a submaximal force-matching task involving isometric knee extension before and after patellar tendon vibration or quiet seated rest (n = 7, control condition) for 30 min. The target force was 2.5, 10 and 30 % of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). Surface electromyography (EMG) of the four QF synergists was recorded and normalized to EMG amplitude during the MVC. The knee extension force and the EMG amplitude of vastus medialis during the MVC were significantly reduced after the vibration, but did not significantly decrease in the control condition. Fluctuations of force and normalized EMG of individual QF muscles at each submaximal force level did not significantly change after the vibration. We conclude that prolonged patellar tendon vibration does not influence the force steadiness of the QF muscle during an isometric force-matching task.

  8. Achilles tendon mechanical properties after both prolonged continuous running and prolonged intermittent shuttle running in cricket batting.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Laurence; Dawson, Brian; Rubenson, Jonas

    2013-08-01

    Effects of prolonged running on Achilles tendon properties were assessed after a 60 min treadmill run and 140 min intermittent shuttle running (simulated cricket batting innings). Before and after exercise, 11 participants performed ramp-up plantar flexions to maximum-voluntary-contraction before gradual relaxation. Muscle-tendon-junction displacement was measured with ultrasonography. Tendon force was estimated using dynamometry and a musculoskeletal model. Gradients of the ramp-up force-displacement curves fitted between 0-40% and 50-90% of the preexercise maximal force determined stiffness in the low- and high-force-range, respectively. Hysteresis was determined using the ramp-up and relaxation force-displacement curves and elastic energy storage from the area under the ramp-up curve. In simulated batting, correlations between tendon properties and shuttle times were also assessed. After both protocols, Achilles tendon force decreased (4% to 5%, P < .050), but there were no changes in stiffness, hysteresis, or elastic energy. In simulated batting, Achilles tendon force and stiffness were both correlated to mean turn and mean sprint times (r = -0.719 to -0.830, P < .050). Neither protocol resulted in fatigue-related changes in tendon properties, but higher tendon stiffness and plantar flexion force were related to faster turn and sprint times, possibly by improving force transmission and control of movement when decelerating and accelerating.

  9. Comparison of elasticity of human tendon and aponeurosis in knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Keitaro; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Fukunaga, Tetsuo

    2005-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to compare the elasticity of tendon and aponeurosis in human knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors in vivo and to examine whether the maximal strain of tendon was correlated to that of aponeurosis. The elongation of tendon and aponeurosis during isometric knee extension (n = 23) and ankle plantar flexion (n = 22), respectively, were determined using a real-time ultrasonic apparatus, while the participants performed ramp isometric contractions up to voluntary maximum. To calculate the strain values from the measured elongation, we measured the respective length of tendon and aponeurosis. For the knee extensors, the maximal strain of aponeurosis (12.1 +/- 2.8 %) was significantly greater than that of the patella tendon (8.3 +/- 2.4 %), p < 0.001. On the contrary, the maximal strain of Achilles tendon (5.9 +/- 1.4 %) was significantly greater than that of aponeurosis in ankle plantar flexors (2.7 +/- 1.4 %), p < 0.001. Furthermore, for both knee extensors and ankle plantar flexors there was no significant correlation between maximal strain of tendon and aponeurosis. These results would be important for understanding the different roles of tendon and aponeurosis during human movements and for more accurate muscle modeling.

  10. The clinical effect of tendon repair for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection in hands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Yang, Hu; Shen, Hui; Ye, Ganmin; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Corticosteroid injections for hand tendinitis can lead to a rare significant complication of tendon spontaneous rupture. However, only sporadic cases were reported in the literature before. This study was designed to gauge the clinical effect of tendon repair in patients of tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection and analyze our experience. This was a retrospective observational study of 13 patients (8 women and 5 men) operated between July 2011 and December 2015 for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection. Demographic data, clinical features, imaging data, and surgical treatments were carefully reviewed. The average age was 52.308 ± 15.381 years (range 29–71). The average injection times were 2.538 ± 1.664 times (range 1–6). The average rupture time (after last injection) was 10.923 ± 9.500 weeks (range 3–32). Nine patients were treated by tendon suture (69% of cases), and 4 patients were treated by tendon grafting (31% of cases). All patients received follow-up in our outpatient clinic. The sites of the tendon rupture (15 tendons of 13 patients had involved) include extensor pollicis longus (6 tendons, 40% of cases), extensor digiti quinti and extensor digiti minimi (4 tendons, 27% of cases), ring finger of extensor digitorum communis (3 tendons, 20% of cases), and middle finger of extensor digitorum communis (2 tendons, 13% of cases). Two patients who had tendon adhesion (15% of cases) were treated by tendon release. One patient who had tendon rerupture (8% of cases) was treated by tendon grafting. No patient had complications of infections, vascular, or nerve injury. Tendon spontaneous rupture is a serious complication after corticosteroid injection for tendinitis. Rigid standard of corticosteroid injection is very important. Magnetic resonance imaging was contributory to preoperative assess tendon defect and can be used to monitor healing quality of tendons during the follow-up. PMID:27741145

  11. Morphological study of the Golgi tendon organ in equine superficial digital flexor tendon.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takafumi; Hosaka, Yoshinao; Yamamoto, Etsuko; Ueda, Hiromi; Tangkawattana, Prasarn; Takehana, Kazushige

    2004-08-01

    The Golgi tendon organ (GTO) is an encapsulated fusiform mechanoreceptor siding in the musculo-tendinous junction of many animal species. Inhibitory function of afferent nerve fibers distributed from nearby motor units, the organ responds to active tension exerted onto the muscle. The morphological features of the equine GTO have not yet been elucidated. Additionally, there is some controversy regarding to the existence of the GTO in the equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT). Therefore, immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy using alcian blue (pH 2.5) staining and the silver-enhanced colloidal gold method were carried out to determine both the location and characteristics of the GTO at the musculo-tendinous junction of the SDFT. A GTO with a fusiform structure of approximately 3 mm in length was found in the tendinous part. The lumen of the GTO was divided into compartments by septal cells. Each compartment contained collagen fibrils, nerve fibers and Schwann cells. This is the first report of the equine GTO.

  12. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake

    2013-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments. PMID:23072472

  13. [Evaluation of surgical repair of distal biceps tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Behounek, J; Hrubina, M; Skoták, M; Krumpl, O; Zahálka, M; Dvorák, J; Fucík, M

    2009-02-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY To present the results of surgical repair of ruptures of the distal tendon of the biceps brachii muscle and thus show the adequacy of this treatment. MATERIAL Between 1987 and 2006, 19 patients had surgery for distal biceps tendon rupture. Only one side was affected in each patient. All patients were men between 28 and 69 years (average age, 47.5 years) at the time of injury (surgery). When the patients were evaluated at the end of 2007, 18 patients were included, because one died a year after surgery. METHODS The surgical repair always included a single-incision anatomical reattachment into the radial tuberosity. In 11 patients, a modified Mac Reynolds method with screw and washer fixation was used; in seven patients the insertion was fixed with Mitek anchors and, in one, it was sutured to the adjacent soft tissues. The average follow-up was 7 years (range, 1 to 20.5 years). The patients were evaluated for the cause of injury, their physical activity, age, dominance of the injured arm, surgical procedure and complications. RESULTS In 18 patients surgical repair was done early and, in one, at 16 days after injury. In all of them the tendon was detached from its site of insertion, but never torn. The intra-operative complications included, in one patient, bleeding owing to iatrogenic damage to a branch of the brachial artery, and difficult separation of the tendon due to its previous healed injury in another patient. Early post-operative complications included superficial skin necrosis in one patient and transient neurological deficit of the dorsal brand of the radial nerve and of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm in two and one patient, respectively. The late complications were heterotropic ossification in three patients and screw migration in the one treated by the Mac Reynolds method. Excellent results were recorded in 11 patients (61 %), and good outcomes with a slight restriction of motion or muscle strength not limiting the

  14. Biceps femoris and semitendinosus tendon/aponeurosis strain during passive and active (isometric) conditions.

    PubMed

    Kellis, Eleftherios

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify strain and elongation of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFlh) and the semitendinosus (ST) tendon/aponeurosis. Forty participants performed passive knee extension trials from 90° of knee flexion to full extension (0°) followed by ramp isometric contractions of the knee flexors at 0°, 45° and 90° of knee flexion. Two ultrasound probes were used to visualize the displacement of BFlh and ST tendon/aponeurosis. Three-way analysis of variance designs indicated that: (a) Tendon/aponeurosis (passive) elongation and strain were higher for the BFlh than the ST as the knee was passively extended (p<0.05), (b) contraction at each angular position was accompanied by a smaller BFlh tendon/aponeurosis (active) strain and elongation than the ST at higher levels of effort (p<0.05) and (c) combined (passive and active) strain was significantly higher for the BFlh than ST during ramp contraction at 0° but the opposite was observed for the 45° and 90° flexion angle tests (p<0.05). Passive elongation of tendon/aponeurosis has an important effect on the tendon/aponeurosis behavior of the hamstrings and may contribute to a different loading of muscle fibers and tendinous tissue between BFlh and ST.

  15. Quantification of Internal Stress-Strain Fields in Human Tendon: Unraveling the Mechanisms that Underlie Regional Tendon Adaptations and Mal-Adaptations to Mechanical Loading and the Effectiveness of Therapeutic Eccentric Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Maganaris, Constantinos N.; Chatzistergos, Panagiotis; Reeves, Neil D.; Narici, Marco V.

    2017-01-01

    By virtue of their anatomical location between muscles and bones, tendons make it possible to transform contractile force to joint rotation and locomotion. However, tendons do not behave as rigid links, but exhibit viscoelastic tensile properties, thereby affecting the length and contractile force in the in-series muscle, but also storing and releasing elastic stain energy as some tendons are stretched and recoiled in a cyclic manner during locomotion. In the late 90s, advancements were made in the application of ultrasound scanning that allowed quantifying the tensile deformability and mechanical properties of human tendons in vivo. Since then, the main principles of the ultrasound-based method have been applied by numerous research groups throughout the world and showed that tendons increase their tensile stiffness in response to exercise training and chronic mechanical loading, in general, by increasing their size and improving their intrinsic material. It is often assumed that these changes occur homogenously, in the entire body of the tendon, but recent findings indicate that the adaptations may in fact take place in some but not all tendon regions. The present review focuses on these regional adaptability features and highlights two paradigms where they are particularly evident: (a) Chronic mechanical loading in healthy tendons, and (b) tendinopathy. In the former loading paradigm, local tendon adaptations indicate that certain regions may “see,” and therefore adapt to, increased levels of stress. In the latter paradigm, local pathological features indicate that certain tendon regions may be “stress-shielded” and degenerate over time. Eccentric exercise protocols have successfully been used in the management of tendinopathy, without much sound understanding of the mechanisms underpinning their effectiveness. For insertional tendinopathy, in particular, it is possible that the effectiveness of a loading/rehabilitation protocol depends on the topography

  16. Measurement of tendon velocities using vector tissue Doppler imaging: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Eranki, Avinash; Bellini, Lindsey; Prosser, Laura; Stanley, Christopher; Bland, Daniel; Alter, Katharine; Damiano, Diane; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a vector Doppler ultrasound imaging method to directly quantify the magnitude and direction of muscle and tendon velocities during movement. The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using vector Tissue Doppler Imaging (vTDI) for estimating the tibialis anterior tendon velocities during dorsiflexion in children with cerebral palsy who have foot drop. Our preliminary results from this study show that tendon velocities estimated using vTDI have a strong linear correlation with the joint angular velocity estimated using a conventional 3D motion capture system. We observed a peak tendon velocity of 5.66±1.45 cm/s during dorsiflexion and a peak velocity of 8.83±2.13 cm/s during the passive relaxation phase of movement. We also obtained repeatable results from the same subject 3 weeks apart. Direct measurements of muscle and tendon velocities may be used as clinical outcome measures and for studying efficiency of movement control.

  17. Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons. Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 4-Stranded Constructs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Provencher Daniel K. Park, Harold A. Fogel, Sanjeev Bhatia, Bernard R. Bach , Jr, Aman Gupta, Elizabeth F. Shewman, Vincent Tibial Fixation of Anterior...Harold A. Fogel,* BA, Sanjeev Bhatia,* MD, Bernard R. Bach Jr,* MD, Aman Gupta,* Elizabeth F. Shewman,* PhD, Vincent Wang,* PhD, Nikhil Verma,* MD...knee laxity: a comparison of five arthrometers. Am J Sports Med. 1992;20:135-140. 3. Bach BR Jr. Revision anterior cruciate ligament surgery

  18. More resistant tendons obtained from the association of Heteropterys aphrodisiaca and endurance training

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Popular Brazilian medicine uses Heteropterys aphrodisiaca infusion as a tonic or stimulant, for the treatment of nervous debility and breakdown and for muscle and bone weakness. This study investigated the effects of Heteropterys aphrodisiaca infusion on the tendon properties and extracellular matrix of rats under endurance training. Methods Wistar rats were grouped as follows: CS- control sedentary, HS- H. aphrodisiaca sedentary, CT-control trained, HT- H. aphrodisiaca trained. The training protocol consisted in running on a motorized treadmill, five times a week, with weekly increase in treadmill speed and duration. Control groups received water while the HS and HT groups received H. aphrodisiaca infusion, daily, by gavage for the 8 weeks of training. Achilles tendons were frozen for biochemical and biomechanical analysis or preserved in Karnovsky's fixative, then processed for histomorphological analysis with light microscopy. Results Biomechanical analysis showed significant increase in maximum load, maximum stress, modulus of elasticity and stiffness of the HT animals' tendons. The metalloproteinase-2 activity was reduced in the HT group. The compression region of HT animals' tendons had a stronger and more intense metachromasy, which suggests an increase in glycosaminoglycan concentration in this region of the tendon. The most intense birefringence was observed in both compression and tension regions of HT animals' tendons, which may indicate a higher organizational level of collagen bundles. The hydroxyproline content increased in the HT group. Conclusions The association of endurance training with H. aphrodisiaca resulted in more organized collagen bundles and more resistant tendons to support higher loads from intense muscle contraction. Despite the clear anabolic effects of Heteropterys aphrodisiaca and the endurance exercise association, no side effects were observed, such as those found for synthetic anabolic androgenic steroids. PMID

  19. Varying whole body vibration amplitude differentially affects tendon and ligament structural and material properties.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin V; Davis, Matthew L; Thompson, William R; Dahners, Laurence E; Weinhold, Paul S

    2013-05-31

    Whole Body Vibration (WBV) is becoming increasingly popular for helping to maintain bone mass and strengthening muscle. Vibration regimens optimized for bone maintenance often operate at hypogravity levels (<1G) and regimens for muscle strengthening often employ hypergravity (>1G) vibrations. The effect of vibratory loads on tendon and ligament properties is unclear though excessive vibrations may be injurious. Our objective was to evaluate how tendon gene expression and the mechanical/histological properties of tendon and ligament were affected in response to WBV in the following groups: no vibration, low vibration (0.3G peak-to-peak), and high vibration (2G peak-to-peak). Rats were vibrated for 20 min a day, 5 days a week, for 5 weeks. Upon sacrifice, the medial collateral ligament (MCL), patellar tendon (PT), and the Achilles Tendon (AT) were isolated with insertion sites intact. All tissues were tensile tested to determine structural and material properties or used for histology. Patellar tendon was also subjected to quantitative RT-PCR to evaluate expression of anabolic and catabolic genes. No differences in biomechanical data between the control and the low vibration groups were found. There was evidence of significant weakness in the MCL with high vibration, but no significant effect on the PT or AT. Histology of the MCL and PT showed a hypercellular tissue response and some fiber disorganization with high vibration. High vibration caused an increase in collagen expression and a trend for an increase in IGF-1 expression suggesting a potential anabolic response to prevent tendon overuse injury.

  20. Plyometric Training Favors Optimizing Muscle–Tendon Behavior during Depth Jumping

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Kuniaki; Iwanuma, Soichiro; Ikeda, Naoki; Yoshikawa, Ayumi; Ema, Ryoichi; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate how plyometric training improves stretch–shortening cycle (SSC) exercise performance in terms of muscle strength, tendon stiffness, and muscle–tendon behavior during SSC exercise. Eleven men were assigned to a training group and ten to a control group. Subjects in the training group performed depth jumps (DJ) using only the ankle joint for 12 weeks. Before and after the period, we observed reaction forces at foot, muscle–tendon behavior of the gastrocnemius, and electromyographic activities of the triceps surae and tibialis anterior during DJ. Maximal static plantar flexion strength and Achilles tendon stiffness were also determined. In the training group, maximal strength remained unchanged while tendon stiffness increased. The force impulse of DJ increased, with a shorter contact time and larger reaction force over the latter half of braking and initial half of propulsion phases. In the latter half of braking phase, the average electromyographic activity (mEMG) increased in the triceps surae and decreased in tibialis anterior, while fascicle behavior of the gastrocnemius remained unchanged. In the initial half of propulsion, mEMG of triceps surae and shortening velocity of gastrocnemius fascicle decreased, while shortening velocity of the tendon increased. These results suggest that the following mechanisms play an important role in improving SSC exercise performance through plyometric training: (1) optimization of muscle–tendon behavior of the agonists, associated with alteration in the neuromuscular activity during SSC exercise and increase in tendon stiffness and (2) decrease in the neuromuscular activity of antagonists during a counter movement. PMID:28179885

  1. A study of the relationship between mineral content and mechanical properties of turkey gastrocnemius tendon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Librizzi, J. J.; Dunn, M. G.; Silver, F. H.

    1995-01-01

    The vertebrate skeletal system undergoes adaptation in response to external forces, but the relation between the skeletal changes and such forces is not understood. In this context, the variation in the amount and location of calcification has been compared with changes in mechanical properties of the normally mineralizing turkey gastrocnemius tendon using ash weight measurements, X-ray radiography, and mechanical testing. Radiographic evidence from 12- to 17-week-old birds showed calcification in only portions of gastrocnemius tendons proximal to the tarsometatarsal joint. Mechanical testing of these dissected proximal regions demonstrated an increased ultimate stress and modulus and a decreased maximum strain that appeared to parallel calcification. Further, stress-strain curves of portions of uncalcified turkey gastrocnemius tendon were shaped similar to those of other typical unmineralized tendon curves while highly calcified tendons yielded curves resembling those of bone. The proximal portions of the gastrocnemius where mineralization begins were observed to have a decreased tendon cross-sectional area compared with distal portions which do not mineralize. Based on the resultant measures of mineral content and location and mechanical properties, it is hypothesized that increased calcification is a result of increased stresses at certain locations of the tendon, perhaps the consequence of the natural forces exerted by the large leg muscles of the bird into which the gastrocnemius inserts. More specifically, tendon calcification may be the result of stress-induced exposure of charged sites on the surfaces of collagen molecules, fibrils, or fibers so that deposition of mineral and subsequent mechanical reinforcement occur in the tissue.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. Reflex responses at the human ankle: the importance of tendon compliance.

    PubMed Central

    Rack, P M; Ross, H F; Thilmann, A F; Walters, D K

    1983-01-01

    Subjects with active stretch reflexes responded to an imposed sinusoidal movement of the ankle joint with a reflex force whose amplitude and timing varied widely with changes in the frequency of movement. At some frequency between 6 and 8 Hz, the reflex force tended to offset the non-reflex component of resistance, and thus to reduce the total resistance to movement. At this frequency the reflex response was particularly vigorous, with a deep modulation of electromyogram (e.m.g.) activity and a displacement of the joint stiffness vectors far from their high frequency values. The total resistance to movement might then be small, or it might be zero, or the reflex might actually assist the movement. As the frequency of movement was decreased through this critical range, the timing of the reflex response to movement changed rapidly with an abrupt advancement of the triceps surae e.m.g. signal, and a wide separation of the joint stiffness vectors as they passed close to the origin. This result was attributed to a changing distribution of the movement between the muscle fibres and an elastic Achilles tendon. It was assumed that at most frequencies the muscle fibres resisted extension, so that a major part of the imposed movement went into stretching the tendon; when, however, at 6-8 Hz, the reflex response was so timed as to reduce or abolish the resistance of the muscle fibres, more of the movement would take place in them. The muscle spindles would 'see' this larger movement of the muscle fibres, and generate correspondingly more reflex activity. A simplified model of the muscle-tendon combination behaves in a way that supports this view, and the available information about the human Achilles tendon indicates that it is sufficiently compliant for such an explanation. Therefore, movements imposed on the ankle joint would not necessarily be 'seen' by the muscle spindles, since they would be modified by transmission through a compliant tendon. By assuming a value for the

  3. Mechanical Actuation Systems for the Phenotype Commitment of Stem Cell-Based Tendon and Ligament Tissue Substitutes.

    PubMed

    Govoni, Marco; Muscari, Claudio; Lovecchio, Joseph; Guarnieri, Carlo; Giordano, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    High tensile forces transmitted by tendons and ligaments make them susceptible to tearing or complete rupture. The present standard reparative technique is the surgical implantation of auto- or allografts, which often undergo failure.Currently, different cell types and biomaterials are used to design tissue engineered substitutes. Mechanical stimulation driven by dedicated devices can precondition these constructs to a remarkable degree, mimicking the local in vivo environment. A large number of dynamic culture instruments have been developed and many appealing results collected. Of the cells that have been used, tendon stem cells are the most promising for a reliable stretch-induced tenogenesis, but their reduced availability represents a serious limitation to upscaled production. Biomaterials used for scaffold fabrication include both biological molecules and synthetic polymers, the latter being improved by nanotechnologies which reproduce the architecture of native tendons. In addition to cell type and scaffold material, other variables which must be defined in mechanostimulation protocols are the amplitude, frequency, duration and direction of the applied strain. The ideal conditions seem to be those producing intermittent tension rather than continuous loading. In any case, all physical parameters must be adapted to the specific response of the cells used and the tensile properties of the scaffold. Tendon/ligament grafts in animals usually have the advantage of mechanical preconditioning, especially when uniaxial cyclic forces are applied to cells engineered into natural or decellularized scaffolds. However, due to the scarcity of in vivo research, standard protocols still need to be defined for clinical applications.

  4. Outcomes with respect to disabilities of the upper limb after hand allograft transplantation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Landin, Luis; Bonastre, Jorge; Casado-Sanchez, Cesar; Diez, Jesus; Ninkovic, Marina; Lanzetta, Marco; del Bene, Massimo; Schneeberger, Stefan; Hautz, Theresa; Lovic, Aleksandar; Leyva, Francisco; García-de-Lorenzo, Abelardo; Casado-Perez, Cesar

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work is to compare disabilities of the upper limb before and after hand allograft transplantation (HAT), and to describe the side effects of immunosuppressive (IS) agents given to recipients of hand allografts. Clinical cases of HAT published between 1999 and 2011 in English, French, or German were reviewed systematically, with emphasis on comparing disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) scores before and after transplantation. Duration of ischemia, extent of amputation, and time since amputation were evaluated for their effect on intrinsic musculature function. Infectious, metabolic, and oncological complications because of IS therapy were recorded. Twenty-eight patients were reported in 56 clinical manuscripts. Among these patients, disabilities of the upper limb dropped by a mean of 27.6 (±19.04) points on the DASH score after HAT (P = 0.005). Lower DASH scores (P = 0.036) were recorded after secondary surgery on hand allografts. The presence of intrinsic muscle function was observed in 57% of the recipients. Duration of ischemia, extent of transplantation, and time since amputation were not associated statistically with the return of intrinsic musculature function. Three grafts were lost to follow-up because of noncompliance with immunosuppression, rejection, and arterial thrombosis, respectively. Fifty-two complications caused by IS agents were reported, and they were successfully managed medically or surgically. HAT recipients showed notable functional gains, but most complications resulted from the IS protocols.

  5. Increase in passive muscle tension of the quadriceps muscle heads in jumping athletes with patellar tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z J; Ng, G Y F; Lee, W C; Fu, S N

    2016-08-19

    To investigate the passive muscle tension of the quadriceps muscle heads in male athletes clinically diagnosed with patellar tendinopathy (PT) with those of healthy controls and explore the interplay between passive muscle tension and patellar tendon stiffness. Between November 2012 and December 2013, 66 male athletes (mean age of 21.1 ± 4.4 years) were examined using supersonic shear wave imaging technology. The passive tension of the vastus lateralis (VL) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles and patellar tendon stiffness were assessed. The shear elastic modulus of the VL muscle was increased by 26.5% (P < 0.001) in the subjects with PT when compared with the controls. Greater passive tension in the VL was associated with higher patellar tendon stiffness (r = 0.38; P = 0.001). The vastus lateralis muscle of the quadriceps shows increase in passive muscle tension in jumping athletes with patellar tendinopathy. These findings suggest that increase in muscle tension is not similar in the individual muscles of the quadriceps muscle. Traditional stretching of the whole quadriceps muscle might not be targeted to the tight muscle heads.

  6. Comparison of tendon tensions estimated from two biomechanical models of the thumb.

    PubMed

    Vigouroux, Laurent; Domalain, Mathieu; Berton, Eric

    2009-08-07

    Despite the paramount function of the thumb in daily life, thumb biomechanical models have been little developed and studied. Moreover, only two studies provided quantitative anthropometric data of tendon moment arms. To investigate thumb tendon tensions, biomechanicians and clinicians have to know the performances and the limits of these two data sets. The aim of this study was thus to compare the results of these two models and evaluate their performances in regard to prior electromyographic measurements (EMG). Thumb posture was recorded during the classical key pinch and pulp pinch grips. Various fingertip forces applied at the distal segment were simulated in a range including extension, adduction, flexion, abduction. Input data of thumb postures and fingertip forces were used to compute tendon tensions with both models. Tendon tensions obtained using these two models were then compared and correlated to EMG measurements provided in the literature. The results showed that both models predicted relevant muscle coordination for five of the nine muscles modelled. Opponent and abductor longus muscle coordinations were badly estimated by both models. Each model was sensible to kinematic errors but not in the same proportion. This study pointed out the advantages/limits of the two models to use them more appropriately for clinical and/or research purposes.

  7. Bifurcated popliteus tendon: a descriptive arthroscopic study

    PubMed Central

    Ginés-Cespedosa, Albert; Monllau, Joan C.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to confirm the presence and frequency of a bifurcation of the popliteus tendon. The popliteus tendon has received attention due to its important function as a knee stabiliser. Several anatomical variants have recently been reported, one of them being a bifurcated tendon. However, the actual frequency as well as the possible role of this particular variant is still unknown. We prospectively analysed a series of 1,569 arthroscopies between January 2005 to December 2007. Six asymptomatic bifurcated popliteus tendons were found. No alterations in the magnetic resonance imaging were seen and no clinical signs (related to the popliteus tendon) were observed in these patients before surgery. In all cases the morphological variant was found by chance. Our results suggest that the presence of a bifurcated popliteus tendon is a fact and that its frequency, not previously reported, should not be ignored. PMID:18998130

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell applications to tendon healing

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Salma

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tendons are often subject to age related degenerative changes that coincide with a diminished regenerative capacity. Torn tendons often heal by forming scar tissue that is structurally weaker than healthy native tendon tissue, predisposing to mechanical failure. There is increasing interest in providing biological stimuli to increase the tendon reparative response. Stem cells in particular are an exciting and promising prospect as they have the potential to provide appropriate cellular signals to encourage neotendon formation during repair rather than scar tissue. Currently, a number of issues need to be investigated further before it can be determined whether stem cells are an effective and safe therapeutic option for encouraging tendon repair. This review explores the in-vitro and invivo evidence assessing the effect of stem cells on tendon healing, as well as the potential clinical applications. PMID:23738300

  9. Modulation of soleus corticospinal excitability during Achilles tendon vibration.

    PubMed

    Lapole, Thomas; Temesi, John; Arnal, Pierrick J; Gimenez, Philippe; Petitjean, Michel; Millet, Guillaume Y

    2015-09-01

    Soleus (SOL) corticospinal excitability has been reported to increase during Achilles tendon vibration. The aim of the present study was to further investigate SOL corticospinal excitability and elucidate the changes to intracortical mechanisms during Achilles tendon vibration. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) were elicited in the SOL by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the corresponding motor cortical area of the leg with and without 50-Hz Achilles tendon vibration. SOL input-output curves were determined. Paired-pulse protocols were also performed to investigate short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) by conditioning test TMS pulses with sub-threshold TMS pulses at inter-stimulus intervals of 3 and 13 ms, respectively. During Achilles tendon vibration, motor threshold was lower than in the control condition (43 ± 13 vs. 49 ± 11 % of maximal stimulator output; p = 0.008). Input-output curves were also influenced by vibration, i.e. there was increased maximal MEP amplitude (0.694 ± 0.347 vs. 0.268 ± 0.167 mV; p < 0.001), decreased TMS intensity to elicit a MEP of half the maximal MEP amplitude (100 ± 13 vs. 109 ± 9 % motor threshold; p = 0.009) and a strong tendency for decreased slope constant (0.076 ± 0.04 vs. 0.117 ± 0.04; p = 0.068). Vibration reduced ICF (98 ± 61 vs. 170 ± 105 % of test MEP amplitude; p = 0.05), but had no effect on SICI (53 ± 26 vs. 48 ± 22 % of test MEP amplitude; p = 0.68). The present results further document the increased vibration-induced corticospinal excitability in the soleus muscle and suggest that this increase is not mediated by changes in SICI or ICF.

  10. Mechanisms of allograft rejection of corneal endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Tagawa, Y.; Silverstein, A.M.; Prendergast, R.A.

    1982-07-01

    The local intraocular graft-vs.-host (GVH) reaction, involving the destruction of the corneal endothelial cells of the rabbit host by sensitized donor lymphoid cells, has been used to study the mechanism of corneal allograft rejection. Pretreatment of donor cells with a specific mouse monoclonal hybridoma anti-T cell antibody and complement suppresses the destructive reaction, suggesting that a cellular-immune mechanism is primarily involved. Pretreatment of donor cells with mitomycin-C completely abolishes the local GVH reaction, indicating that the effector lymphocytes must undergo mitosis within the eye before they can engage in target cell destruction. Finally, studies of the local GVH reaction in irradiated leukopenic recipients or in preinflamed rabbit eyes suggest that host leukocytes may contribute nonspecifically to enhance the destructive process. These studies show that the local ocular GVH reaction may provide a useful model for the study of the mechanisms involved in the rejection of corneal allografts.

  11. Cortical bone allografting in femoral head necrosis.

    PubMed

    Delloye, C; Cornu, O

    1999-01-01

    Ten femoral heads (six patients) with avascular necrosis were operated on using a fibular allograft. The procedure included core decompression followed by insertion of a cortical bone graft in order to relieve mechanical stresses from the overlying subchondral bone. The presence of the supporting graft should avoid an expected collapse or prevent its worsening if already present. A freeze-dried and processed cortical bone allograft was preferred to an autograft. Weightbearing was normally and fully resumed at the second postoperative month. There were three failures within the first year, four satisfactory results, in which the hip was replaced after 4 years while there are still 3 hips that have been preserved from arthroplasty in young patients after 5 years. The technique is easy and able to substantially delay an arthroplasty in an active patient.

  12. Allograft vasculopathy after allogeneic vascularized knee transplantation.

    PubMed

    Diefenbeck, Michael; Nerlich, Andreas; Schneeberger, Stefan; Wagner, Frithjof; Hofmann, Gunther O

    2011-01-01

    Composite tissue allotransplantation represents a new discipline in reconstructive surgery. Over the past 10 years, we have performed six human vascularized allogeneic knee transplantations. All of these grafts have been lost within the first 56 months. A histomorphologic assessment of the latest case resulted in the detection of diffuse concentric fibrous intimal thickening and occlusion of graft vessels. Findings are comparable with cardiac allograft vasculopathy. The lack of adequate tools for monitoring graft rejection might have allowed multiple untreated episodes of acute rejection, triggering myointimal proliferation and occlusion of graft vessels. Graft vasculopathy represents an obstacle to long-term vascularized bone and joint allograft survival, and adequate tools for monitoring need to be developed.

  13. Perforations of cortical bone allografts improve their incorporation.

    PubMed

    Delloye, Christian; Simon, Patrick; Nyssen-Behets, Catherine; Banse, Xavier; Bresler, Franck; Schmitt, Daniel

    2002-03-01

    The incorporation of perforated cortical bone allografts was compared with non-perforated allografts. A 5-cm circumferential defect in the middiaphysis at the tibia was created in adult sheep. A frozen tibial allograft was implanted and fixed with a locked nail for 6 months. There was no postoperative immobilization. Group I consisted of eight sheep with non-perforated allografts, whereas Group II was comprised of 10 sheep with perforated allografts. Union was evaluated radiographically, whereas the central part of the allograft had a densitometric evaluation. Creeping substitution was assessed on microradiographs from cross-sections of the central 3 cm of graft by measurement of porosity and percentage of new and old bone area within the confines of the graft. The width of periosteal and endosteal callus also was determined. There was no statistical difference between both groups for the union score and bone density. However, the cortical bone graft porosity and the amount of new bone within the cortical bone differed significantly between the perforated allografts and the non-perforated ones. Periosteal callus was similar in both groups, whereas endosteal callus was significantly more wide and extended in the perforated allografts. Perforation of a cortical bone substantially improved the amount of newly formed bone by the host when compared with a non-perforated bone. The creation of channels seemed to increase the interface between living soft tissues of the host and the allografted bone with a resulting enhanced incorporation.

  14. Osteoarticular and Total Elbow Allograft Reconstruction With Severe Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Busfield, Benjamin T.; Khorshad, Daniel S.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Mankin, Henry J.

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarticular allograft reconstruction is an option in patients with massive periarticular elbow bone loss secondary to tumor surgery or trauma. Our consecutive series consisted of 18 patients with tumors and one patient with trauma. Reconstruction consisted of 16 hemiarticular allografts and three total elbow osteoarticular allografts; patients had a minimum followup of 2 years (mean, 9.9 years; range, 2–12 years). For patients who had hemiarticular allografts, 14 of 16 were able to return to their preoperative level of occupational function, with one patient experiencing failure of the allograft from infection. For the three patients who had total elbow allograft reconstructions, all had degenerative changes develop after surgery and two of the allografts failed. Complications occurred in six of 19 patients. Hemiarticular elbow allograft reconstruction is useful for limb salvage with massive bone loss. Total elbow allograft reconstructions have a high failure rate in the mid-term. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196394

  15. A Prospective Study of Platelet-Rich Plasma as Biological Augmentation for Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jian; Mo, Xiaolian; Li, Tanzhu; Xue, Jianfeng; Mei, Guohua; Li, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture is one of the most common tendon injuries in adults. We hypothesized that Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) can be used as biological augmentation for surgical treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. Our study is a prospective randomized controlled trial. Patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture undergoing surgical repair were randomly assigned into either control group or PRP group. End-to-end modified Krackow suture was performed in both groups. In the PRP group, PRP was injected into the paratenon sheath and around the ruptured tissue after the tendon was repaired. Postoperatively we evaluated isokinetic muscle strength at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. In addition, ankle ROM, calf circumference, Leppilahti score, and the SF-36 score were evaluated at 6, 12, and 24 months after operation. At 3 months, the PRP group had better isokinetic muscle. The PRP group also achieved higher SF-36 and Leppilahti scores at 6 and 12 months. At 24 months, the PRP group had an improved ankle range of motion compared to the control group. Our study results suggest that PRP can serve as a biological augmentation to acute Achilles tendon rupture repair and improves both short and midterm functional outcomes. PMID:28116306

  16. Procurement of hand and arm allografts.

    PubMed

    Cetrulo, Curtis L; Kovach, Stephen J

    2013-12-01

    Upper extremity transplantation has been at the forefront of vascularized composite allotransplantation. There have been more hand and upper extremity transplants than any other kinds of vascularized composite allotransplantation. However, it is a new and evolving field. Reconstructive surgeons are relative newcomers to the field of transplantation, and the procurement of upper extremity allografts has many subtleties that will differ depending on the intended recipient. However, there are certain principles that can be adhered to that this review serves to elucidate.

  17. [Tubulointerstitial rejection of renal allografts].

    PubMed

    Malušková, Jana; Honsová, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Tubulo-intersticial rejection represents T-cell mediated rejection of kidney allografts with the morphology of immune-mediated interstitial nephritis. Diagnosis is dependent on the histopathological evaluation of a graft biopsy sample. The key morphological features are interstitial inflammatory infiltrate and damage to tubular epithelial cell which in severe cases can result in the ruptures of the tubular basement membranes. The differential diagnosis of tubulo-interstitial rejection includes acute interstitial nephritis and viral inflammatory kidney diseases, mainly polyomavirus nephropathy.

  18. Digital Reconstruction with a Nonfrozen Osteotendinous Allograft, Nerve Allografts, and Autogenous Radial Free Flap.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Martin; Butrón, Patricia; Palafox, Damian; Cruz-Reyes, Angel U

    2015-08-01

    A 21-year-old man underwent amputation of his second to fifth fingers at the proximal phalanx level on the right hand. The third and fourth fingers were reconstructed with 2 toe-to-hand free transfers. The fifth digit was reconstructed with a nonfrozen osteotendinous allograft, nerve allografts, and autogenous radial free flap without immunosuppression. The patient was lost to follow-up for 19 years. He received no rehabilitation. He reported that he had experienced no adverse reactions to the materials or the graft, or infection, or fractures. No additional surgical procedures were performed. Today, the digit is functional and has acceptable aesthetic appearance. This outcome is similar to those obtained in digits reconstructed with frozen osteotendinous allografts and autologous cutaneous covers and opens the possibility for future research.

  19. The Role of Lymphoid Neogenesis in Allografts.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, H-M; Li, W; Gelman, A E; Krupnick, A S; Kreisel, D

    2016-04-01

    De novo induction of organized lymphoid aggregates at nonlymphoid sites has been observed in many chronic inflammatory conditions where foreign antigens such as infectious agents, autoantigens or alloantigens, persist. The prevailing opinion in the field of transplantation is that lymphoid neogenesis within allografts is detrimental to the establishment of immune tolerance. These structures, commonly referred to as tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs), are thought to contribute to graft rejection by generating and propagating local alloimmune responses. However, recent studies have shown that TLOs rich in regulatory Foxp3(+) cells are present in long-term accepting allografts. The notion that TLOs can contribute to the local downregulation of immune responses has been corroborated in other chronic inflammation models. These findings suggest that contrary to previous suggestions that the induction of TLOs in allografts is necessarily harmful, the induction of "tolerogenic" TLOs may prove advantageous. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TLOs are induced and how they regulate immune responses with a particular focus on alloimmunity.

  20. The Role of Lymphoid Neogenesis in Allografts

    PubMed Central

    Hsao, Hsi-Min; Li, Wenjun; Gelman, Andrew E.; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Kreisel, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    De novo induction of organized lymphoid aggregates at non-lymphoid sites has been observed in many chronic inflammatory conditions where foreign antigens such as infectious agents, auto- or alloantigens, persist. The prevailing opinion in the field of transplantation is that lymphoid neogenesis within allografts is detrimental to the establishment of immune tolerance. These structures, commonly referred to as tertiary lymphoid organs (TLOs), are thought to contribute to graft rejection by generating and propagating local alloimmune responses. However, recent studies have shown that TLOs rich in regulatory Foxp3+ cells are present in long term accepting allografts. The notion that TLOs can contribute to the local downregulation of immune responses has been corroborated in other chronic inflammation models. These findings suggest that contrary to previous suggestions that the induction of TLOs in allografts is necessarily harmful, the induction of “tolerogenic” TLOs may prove advantageous. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of how TLOs are induced and how they regulate immune responses with a particular focus on alloimmunity. PMID:26614734

  1. The Enhancement of Bone Allograft Incorporation by the Local Delivery of the Sphingosine 1-phosphate Receptor Targeted Drug FTY720

    PubMed Central

    Aronin, Caren E Petrie; Shin, Soo J; Naden, Kimberly B; Rios, Peter D; Sefcik, Lauren S; Zawodny, Sarah R; Bagayoko, Namory D; Cui, Quanjun; Khan, Yusuf

    2010-01-01

    Poor vascularization coupled with mechanical instability is the leading cause of post-operative complications and poor functional prognosis of massive bone allografts. To address this limitation, we designed a novel continuous polymer coating system to provide sustained localized delivery of pharmacological agent, FTY720, a selective agonist for sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors, within massive tibial defects. In vitro drug release studies validated 64% loading efficiency with complete release of compound following 14 days. Mechanical evaluation following six weeks of healing suggested significant enhancement of mechanical stability in FTY720 treatment groups compared with unloaded controls. Furthermore, superior osseous integration across the host-graft interface, significant enhancement in smooth muscle cell investment, and reduction in leukocyte recruitment was evident in FTY720 treated groups compared with untreated groups. Using this approach, we can capitalize on the existing mechanical and biomaterial properties of devitalized bone, add a controllable delivery system while maintaining overall porous structure, and deliver a small molecule compound to constitutively target vascular remodeling, osseous remodeling, and minimize fibrous encapsulation within the allograft-host bone interface. Such results support continued evaluation of drug-eluting allografts as a viable strategy to improve functional outcome and long-term success of massive cortical allograft implants. PMID:20621764

  2. Posterior Deltoid-to-Triceps Tendon Transfer for Elbow Extension in a Tetraplegia Patient: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji Hun; Ahn, Dong Heun; Kim, Yong Rok; Hong, Mi Jin; Lee, Yung Jin; Park, Chang-il; Heo, Youn Moo

    2016-01-01

    In tetraplegia patients, activities of daily living are highly dependent on the remaining upper limb functions. In other countries, upper limb reconstruction surgery to improve function has been applied to diverse cases, but few cases have been reported in Korea. The current authors experienced a case of posterior deltoid-to-triceps tendon transfer and rehabilitation in a complete spinal cord injury with a C6 neurologic level, and we introduce the case—a 36-year-old man—with a literature review. The patient's muscle strength in C5 C6 muscles were normal, but C7 muscles were trace, and the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM III) score was 24. The tendon of the posterior deltoid was transferred to the triceps brachii muscle, and then the patient received comprehensive rehabilitative treatment. His C7 muscle strength in the right upper extremity was enhanced from trace to fair, and his SCIM III score improved to 29. PMID:27152287

  3. Effect of altering starting length and activation timing of muscle on fiber strain and muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A; Herzog, Walter

    2006-05-01

    Muscle strain injuries are some of the most frequent injuries in sports and command a great deal of attention in an effort to understand their etiology. These injuries may be the culmination of a series of subcellular events accumulated through repetitive lengthening (eccentric) contractions during exercise, and they may be influenced by a variety of variables including fiber strain magnitude, peak joint torque, and starting muscle length. To assess the influence of these variables on muscle injury magnitude in vivo, we measured fiber dynamics and joint torque production during repeated stretch-shortening cycles in the rabbit tibialis anterior muscle, at short and long muscle lengths, while varying the timing of activation before muscle stretch. We found that a muscle subjected to repeated stretch-shortening cycles of constant muscle-tendon unit excursion exhibits significantly different joint torque and fiber strains when the timing of activation or starting muscle length is changed. In particular, measures of fiber strain and muscle injury were significantly increased by altering activation timing and increasing the starting length of the muscle. However, we observed differential effects on peak joint torque during the cyclic stretch-shortening exercise, as increasing the starting length of the muscle did not increase torque production. We conclude that altering activation timing and muscle length before stretch may influence muscle injury by significantly increasing fiber strain magnitude and that fiber dynamics is a more important variable than muscle-tendon unit dynamics and torque production in influencing the magnitude of muscle injury.

  4. Lovastatin-Mediated Changes in Human Tendon Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuzma-Kuzniarska, Maria; Cornell, Hannah R; Moneke, Michael C; Carr, Andrew J; Hulley, Philippa A

    2015-10-01

    Statins are among the most widely prescribed drugs worldwide. Numerous studies have shown their beneficial effects in prevention of cardiovascular disease through cholesterol-lowering and anti-atherosclerotic properties. Although some statin patients may experience muscle-related symptoms, severe side effects of statin therapy are rare, primarily due to extensive first-pass metabolism in the liver. Skeletal muscles appear to be the main site of side effects; however, recently some statin-related adverse effects have been described in tendon. The mechanism behind these side effects remains unknown. This is the first study that explores tendon-specific effects of statins in human primary tenocytes. The cells were cultured with different concentrations of lovastatin for up to 1 week. No changes in cell viability or morphology were observed in tenocytes incubated with therapeutic doses. Short-term exposure to lovastatin concentrations outside the therapeutic range had no effect on tenocyte viability; however, cell migration was reduced. Simvastatin and atorvastatin, two other drug family members, also reduced the migratory properties of the cells. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of lovastatin induced changes in cytoskeleton leading to cell rounding and decreased levels of mRNA for matrix proteins, but increased BMP-2 expression. Gap junctional communication was impaired but due to cell shape change and separation rather than direct gap junction inhibition. These effects were accompanied by inhibition of prenylation of Rap1a small GTPase. Collectively, we showed that statins in a dose-dependent manner decrease migration of human tendon cells, alter their expression profile and impair the functional network, but do not inhibit gap junction function.

  5. Tendon mineralization is accelerated bilaterally and creep of contralateral tendons is increased after unilateral needle injury of murine achilles tendons.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Etienne John Ogilvy; Shrive, Nigel G; Rosvold, Joshua M; Thornton, Gail M; Frank, Cyril B; Hart, David A

    2013-10-01

    Heterotopic mineralization may result in tendon weakness, but effects on other biomechanical responses have not been reported. We used a needle injury, which accelerates spontaneous mineralization of murine Achilles tendons, to test two hypotheses: that injured tendons would demonstrate altered biomechanical responses; and that unilateral injury would accelerate mineralization bilaterally. Mice underwent left hind (LH) injury (I; n = 11) and were euthanized after 20 weeks along with non-injured controls (C; n = 9). All hind limbs were examined by micro computed tomography followed by biomechanical testing (I = 7 and C = 6). No differences were found in the biomechanical responses of injured tendons compared with controls. However, the right hind (RH) tendons contralateral to the LH injury exhibited greater static creep strain and total creep strain compared with those LH tendons (p ≤ 0.045) and RH tendons from controls (p ≤ 0.043). RH limb lesions of injured mice were three times larger compared with controls (p = 0.030). Therefore, despite extensive mineralization, changes to the responses we measured were limited or absent 20 weeks postinjury. These results also suggest that bilateral occurrence should be considered where tendon mineralization is identified clinically. This experimental system may be useful to study the mechanisms of bilateral new bone formation in tendinopathy and other conditions.

  6. Single-stage reconstruction of flexor tendons with vascularized tendon transfers.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, P C; Pérez-García, A; Thione, A; Lorca-García, C

    2015-03-01

    The reconstruction of finger flexor tendons with vascularized flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS) tendon grafts (flaps) based on the ulnar vessels as a single stage is not a popular technique. We reviewed 40 flexor tendon reconstructions (four flexor pollicis longus and 36 finger flexors) with vascularized FDS tendon grafts in 38 consecutive patients. The donor tendons were transferred based on the ulnar vessels as a single-stage procedure (37 pedicled flaps, three free flaps). Four patients required composite tendon and skin island transfer. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, and functional results were evaluated using a total active range of motion score. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the factors that could be associated with the postoperative total active range of motion. The average postoperative total active range of motion (excluding the thumbs) was 178.05° (SD 50°). The total active range of motion was significantly lower for patients who were reconstructed with free flaps and for those who required composite tendon and skin island flap. Age, right or left hand, donor/motor tendon and pulley reconstruction had no linear effect on total active range of motion. Overall results were comparable with a published series on staged tendon grafting but with a lower complication rate. Vascularized pedicled tendon grafts/flaps are useful in the reconstruction of defects of finger flexor tendons in a single stage, although its role in the reconstructive armamentarium remains to be clearly established.

  7. The Effect of Antagonist Muscle Sensory Input on Force Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Onushko, Tanya; Schmit, Brian D.; Hyngstrom, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how stretch-related sensory feedback from an antagonist muscle affects agonist muscle output at different contraction levels in healthy adults. Ten young (25.3 ± 2.4 years), healthy subjects performed constant isometric knee flexion contractions (agonist) at 6 torque levels: 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30%, and 40% of their maximal voluntary contraction. For half of the trials, subjects received patellar tendon taps (antagonist sensory feedback) during the contraction. We compared error in targeted knee flexion torque and hamstring muscle activity, with and without patellar tendon tapping, across the 6 torque levels. At lower torque levels (5%, 10%, and 15%), subjects produced greater knee torque error following tendon tapping compared with the same torque levels without tendon tapping. In contrast, we did not find any difference in torque output at higher target levels (20%, 30%, and 40%) between trials with and without tendon tapping. We also observed a load-dependent increase in the magnitude of agonist muscle activity after tendon taps, with no associated load-dependent increase in agonist and antagonist co-activation, or reflex inhibition from the antagonist tapping. The findings suggest that at relatively low muscle activity there is a deficiency in the ability to correct motor output after sensory disturbances, and cortical centers (versus sub-cortical) are likely involved. PMID:26186590

  8. Calcific tendonitis of the tibialis posterior tendon at the navicular attachment

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Luke; Kempson, Susan; Watura, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Calcific tendinosis (tendonosis/tendonitis) is a condition which results from the deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals in any tendon of the body. Calcific tendonitis usually presents with pain, which can be exacerbated by prolonged use of the affected tendon. We report a case of calcific tendinosis in the posterior tibialis tendon at the navicular insertion. The pathology is rare in the foot, and extremely rare in the tibialis posterior tendon, indeed there are only 2 reported in the published literature. This case report highlights the need to consider calcific tendinosis in the foot despite its rarity. If this diagnosis is considered early, appropriate investigations can then be requested and unnecessary biopsies, use of antibiotics and surgery can be avoided. We also discuss possible causes of calcific tendinosis in the tibialis posterior tendon, the role of imaging modalities and review treatment methods. PMID:22470798

  9. Therapeutics for tendon regeneration: a multidisciplinary review of tendon research for improved healing.

    PubMed

    Paredes, J J; Andarawis-Puri, Nelly

    2016-11-01

    Tendon injuries, known as tendinopathies, are common musculoskeletal injuries that affect a wide range of the population. Canonical tendon healing is characterized by fibrosis, scar formation, and the loss of tissue mechanical and structural properties. Understanding the regenerative tendon environment is an area of increasing interest in the field of musculoskeletal research. Previous studies have focused on utilizing individual elements from the fields of biomechanics, developmental biology, cell and growth factor therapy, and tissue engineering in an attempt to develop regenerative tendon therapeutics. Still, the specific mechanism for regenerative healing remains unknown. In this review, we highlight some of the current approaches of tendon therapeutics and elucidate the differences along the tendon midsubstance and enthesis, exhibiting the necessity of location-specific tendon therapeutics. Furthermore, we emphasize the necessity of further interdisciplinary research in order to reach the desired goal of fully understanding the mechanisms underlying regenerative healing.

  10. Pseudo-hyperelastic model of tendon hysteresis from adaptive recruitment of collagen type I fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ciarletta, Pasquale; Dario, Paolo; Micera, Silvestro

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the functional relationship between the viscoelasticity and the morphology of soft collagenous tissues is fundamental for many applications in bioengineering science. This work presents a pseudo-hyperelastic constitutive theory aiming at describing the time-dependant hysteretic response of tendons subjected to uniaxial tensile loads. A macroscopic tendon is modeled as a composite homogeneous tissue with the anisotropic reinforcement of collagen type I fibrils. The tissue microstructure is considered as an adaptive network of fibrillar units connected in temporary junctions. The processes of breakage and reformation of active fibrils are thermally activated, and are occurring at random times. An internal softening variable and a dissipation energy function account for the adaptive arrangement of the fibrillar network in the pseudo-hyperelastic model. Cyclic uniaxial tensile tests have been performed in vitro on porcine flexor digital tendons. The theoretical predictions fit accurately the experimental stress-strain data both for the loading and the unloading processes. The hysteresis behavior reflects the improvement in the efficiency and performance of the motion of the muscle-tendon unit at high strain rates. The results of the model demonstrate the microstructural importance of proteoglycans in determining the functional viscoelastic adaptability of the macroscopic tendon.

  11. Golgi tendon organ reflex inhibition following manually applied acute static stretching.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kevin C; Burne, John A

    2014-01-01

    Golgi tendon organ disinhibition may contribute to exercise-associated muscle cramp (henceforth referred to as "cramps") genesis. Static stretching pre-exercise is prescribed to prevent cramps based on the assumption golgi tendon organ inhibition remains elevated post-stretching. We determined whether stretching increased gastrocnemius golgi tendon organ inhibition and, if so, the time course of this inhibition post-stretching. Twelve participants' dominant limb medial gastrocnemius inhibition was measured before, and at 1, 5, 10, 15 and 30 min after investigators applied three, 1-min duration stretches. Participants maintained voluntary contraction intensities of 5% of their maximum while the Achilles tendon was stimulated transcutaneously 50 times. Five-hundred millisecond epochs of raw electromyographic activity were band-pass filtered, full-wave rectified and averaged. An algorithm identified inhibitory points and calculated the area, maximum and duration of inhibition. Area of inhibition (F1,14 = 1.5, P = 0.25), maximum inhibition (F1,14 = 0.2, P = 0.72) and duration of inhibition (F1,14 = 1.5, P = 0.24) were unaffected by static stretching over the 30-min post-stretching period. If pre-stretching does prevent fatigue-induced cramping, the mechanism is unlikely to involve the autoinhibition produced by the golgi tendon organ reflex. Further empirical research is needed to validate the proposed link between static stretching and cramping and then to investigate alternative mechanisms.

  12. The use of allografts in paediatric orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Paul, Laurent; Mousny, Maryline; Cornu, Olivier; Delloye, Christian

    2007-10-01

    Autograft harvesting in a growing child sometimes leads to disastrous consequences. Allograft can advantageously replace autograft in the majority of the cases. This overview presents the most frequently used allografts in paediatric orthopaedic surgery and discusses their benefits. Illustrative cases are presented to highlight specific indications.

  13. Duplication of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon.

    PubMed

    Barfred, T; Adamsen, S

    1986-05-01

    Three cases are presented, in which an anomalous tendon slip between the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon and the extensor apparatus of the fifth finger was found. One of the patients was a violinist, who had serious impairment of the left wrist joint and the small finger due to the anomaly. The symptoms disappeared after excision.

  14. Structure-mechanics relationships in mineralized tendons.

    PubMed

    Spiesz, Ewa M; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we review the hierarchical structure and the resulting elastic properties of mineralized tendons as obtained by various multiscale experimental and computational methods spanning from nano- to macroscale. The mechanical properties of mineralized collagen fibres are important to understand the mechanics of hard tissues constituted by complex arrangements of these fibres, like in human lamellar bone. The uniaxial mineralized collagen fibre array naturally occurring in avian tendons is a well studied model tissue for investigating various stages of tissue mineralization and the corresponding elastic properties. Some avian tendons mineralize with maturation, which results in a graded structure containing two zones of distinct morphology, circumferential and interstitial. These zones exhibit different amounts of mineral, collagen, pores and a different mineral distribution between collagen fibrillar and extrafibrillar space that lead to distinct elastic properties. Mineralized tendon cells have two phenotypes: elongated tenocytes placed between fibres in the circumferential zone and cuboidal cells with lower aspect ratios in the interstitial zone. Interestingly some regions of avian tendons seem to be predestined to mineralization, which is exhibited as specific collagen cross-linking patterns as well as distribution of minor tendon constituents (like proteoglycans) and loss of collagen crimp. Results of investigations in naturally mineralizing avian tendons may be useful in understanding the pathological mineralization occurring in some human tendons.

  15. Tendon Vasculature in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Tendons represent a bradytrophic tissue which is poorly vascularized and, compared to bone or skin, heal poorly. Usually, a vascularized connective scar tissue with inferior functional properties forms at the injury site. Whether the increased vascularization is the root cause of tissue impairments such as loss of collagen fiber orientation, ectopic formation of bone, fat or cartilage, or is a consequence of these pathological changes remains unclear. This review provides an overview of the role of tendon vasculature in healthy and chronically diseased tendon tissue as well as its relevance for tendon repair. Further, the nature and the role of perivascular tendon stem/progenitor cells residing in the vascular niche will be discussed and compared to multipotent stromal cells in other tissues. PMID:26635616

  16. Surgical techniques and radiological findings of meniscus allograft transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoseok; Lee, Sang Yub; Na, Young Gon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Lim, Jae Kwang; Lee, So Mi

    2016-08-01

    Meniscus allograft transplantation has been performed over the past 25 years to relieve knee pain and improve knee function in patients with an irreparable meniscus injury. The efficacy and safety of meniscus allograft transplantation have been established in numerous experimental and clinical researches. However, there is a lack of reviews to aid radiologists who are routinely interpreting images and evaluating the outcome of the procedures, and also meniscus allograft transplantation is not widely performed in most hospitals. This review focuses on the indications of the procedure, the different surgical techniques used for meniscus allograft transplantation according to the involvement of the lateral and medial meniscus, and the associated procedures. The postoperative radiological findings and surgical complications of the meniscus allograft transplantation are also described in detail.

  17. Nonuniform strain of human soleus aponeurosis-tendon complex during submaximal voluntary contractions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Finni, Taija; Hodgson, John A; Lai, Alex M; Edgerton, V Reggie; Sinha, Shantanu

    2003-08-01

    The distribution of strain along the soleus aponeurosis tendon was examined during voluntary contractions in vivo. Eight subjects performed cyclic isometric contractions (20 and 40% of maximal voluntary contraction). Displacement and strain in the apparent Achilles tendon and in the aponeurosis were calculated from cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance images acquired with a field of view of 32 cm. The apparent Achilles tendon lengthened 2.8 and 4.7% in 20 and 40% maximal voluntary contraction, respectively. The midregion of the aponeurosis, below the gastrocnemius insertion, lengthened 1.2 and 2.2%, but the distal aponeurosis shortened 2.1 and 2.5%, respectively. There was considerable variation in the three-dimensional anatomy of the aponeurosis and muscle-tendon junction. We suggest that the nonuniformity in aponeurosis strain within an individual was due to the presence of active and passive motor units along the length of the muscle, causing variable force along the measurement site. Force transmission along intrasoleus connective tissue may also be a significant source of nonuniform strain in the aponeurosis.

  18. The Role of Detraining in Tendon Mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Frizziero, Antonio; Salamanna, Francesca; Della Bella, Elena; Vittadini, Filippo; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Nicoli Aldini, Nicolò; Masiero, Stefano; Fini, Milena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several conditions such as training, aging, estrogen deficiency and drugs could affect the biological and anatomo-physiological characteristics of the tendon. Additionally, recent preclinical and clinical studies examined the effect of detraining on tendon, showing alterations in its structure and morphology and in tenocyte mechanobiology. However, few data evaluated the importance that cessation of training might have on tendon. Basically, we do not fully understand how tendons react to a phase of training followed by sudden detraining. Therefore, within this review, we summarize the studies where tendon detraining was examined. Materials and Methods: A descriptive systematic literature review was carried out by searching three databases (PubMed, Scopus and Web of Knowledge) on tendon detraining. Original articles in English from 2000 to 2015 were included. In addition, the search was extended to the reference lists of the selected articles. A public reference manager (www.mendeley.com) was adopted to remove duplicate articles. Results: An initial literature search yielded 134 references (www.pubmed.org: 53; www.scopus.com: 11; www.webofknowledge.com: 70). Fifteen publications were extracted based on the title for further analysis by two independent reviewers. Abstracts and complete articles were after that reviewed to evaluate if they met inclusion criteria. Conclusions: The revised literature comprised four clinical studies and an in vitro and three in vivo reports. Overall, the results showed that tendon structure and properties after detraining are compromised, with an alteration in the tissue structural organization and mechanical properties. Clinical studies usually showed a lesser extent of tendon alterations, probably because preclinical studies permit an in-depth evaluation of tendon modifications, which is hard to perform in human subjects. In conclusion, after a period of sudden detraining (e.g., after an injury), physical activity should

  19. Inducible nitric oxide synthase suppresses the development of allograft arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shears, L L; Kawaharada, N; Tzeng, E; Billiar, T R; Watkins, S C; Kovesdi, I; Lizonova, A; Pham, S M

    1997-01-01

    In cardiac transplantation, chronic rejection takes the form of an occlusive vasculopathy. The mechanism underlying this disorder remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role nitric oxide (NO) may play in the development of allograft arteriosclerosis. Rat aortic allografts from ACI donors to Wistar Furth recipients with a strong genetic disparity in both major and minor histocompatibility antigens were used for transplantation. Allografts collected at 28 d were found to have significant increases in both inducible NO synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein as well as in intimal thickness when compared with isografts. Inhibiting NO production with an iNOS inhibitor increased the intimal thickening by 57.2%, indicating that NO suppresses the development of allograft arteriosclerosis. Next, we evaluated the effect of cyclosporine (CsA) on iNOS expression and allograft arteriosclerosis. CsA (10 mg/kg/d) suppressed the expression of iNOS in response to balloon-induced aortic injury. Similarly, CsA inhibited iNOS expression in the aortic allografts, associated with a 65% increase in intimal thickening. Finally, we investigated the effect of adenoviral-mediated iNOS gene transfer on allograft arteriosclerosis. Transduction with iNOS using an adenoviral vector suppressed completely the development of allograft arteriosclerosis in both untreated recipients and recipients treated with CsA. These results suggest that the early immune-mediated upregulation in iNOS expression partially protects aortic allografts from the development of allograft arteriosclerosis, and that iNOS gene transfer strategies may prove useful in preventing the development of this otherwise untreatable disease process. PMID:9329968

  20. LYMPHATIC INJURY AND REGENERATION IN CARDIAC ALLOGRAFTS

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Thing Rinda; Pathak, Arvind; Asano, Hiroshi; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Baldwin, William M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Severed donor heart lymphatics are not anastomosed to recipient lymphatics in cardiac transplantation. We evaluated the effects of cellular infiltrates of T cells and macrophages on the morphology of lymphatics in heart grafts. Methods: Dark Agouti (DA) hearts were transplanted to Lewis or control DA rats on sub-therapeutic doses of cyclosporin. Transplants were examined by immunohistology and quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy using LYVE-1 as a lymphatic marker and CD8 and CD68 as markers for cellular infiltration at selected intervals from 1 to 8 weeks post-transplantation. Results: Allograft inner myocardial lymphatic density decreased by more than 30-fold at 1 week, and recovered to only 15% of the native level at 8 weeks post-transplantation. In contrast, allograft lymphatics in and near the epicardium showed no significant density decline, but increased in size by more than 5-fold at 2 weeks, and sustained about a 3-fold increase at 8 weeks post-transplantation. Lymphatic changes correlated temporally with the extent of T cell and macrophage infiltration in allografts, which peaked at 2-3 weeks post-transplantation. When grafts were retransplanted from allogeneic to isogeneic recipients at 3 weeks post-transplantation, inner lymphatic density returned close to native level within 2 weeks after retransplantation. Conclusions: This is the first characterization of regional and morphological effects of immunological responses on heart lymphatics after transplantation. Elimination of alloimmune responses produces rapid restoration of inner lymphatic vessels, suggesting that lymphatics injured during rejection can recover when rejection is reversed during the post-transplantation course. PMID:20118845

  1. Age-related effect of static and cyclic loadings on the strain-force curve of the vastus lateralis tendon and aponeurosis.

    PubMed

    Mademli, Lida; Arampatzis, Adamantios; Walsh, Mark

    2008-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the age-related effects of submaximal static and cyclic loading on the mechanical properties of the vastus lateralis (VL) tendon and aponeurosis in vivo. Fourteen old and 12 young male subjects performed maximal voluntary isometric knee extensions (MVC) on a dynamometer before and after (a) a sustained isometric contraction at 25% MVC and (b) isokinetic contractions at 50% isokinetic MVC, both until task failure. The elongation of the VL tendon and aponeurosis was examined using ultrasonography. To calculate the resultant knee joint moment, the kinematics of the leg were recorded with eight cameras (120 Hz). The old adults displayed significantly lower maximal moments but higher strain values at any given tendon force from 400 N and up in all tested conditions. Neither of the loading protocols influenced the strain-force relationship of the VL tendon and aponeurosis in either the old or young adults. Consequently, the capacity of the tendon and aponeurosis to resist force remained unaffected in both groups. It can be concluded that in vivo tendons are capable of resisting long-lasting static (~4.6 min) or cyclic (~18.5 min) mechanical loading at the attained strain levels (4-5%) without significantly altering their mechanical properties regardless of age. This implies that as the muscle becomes unable to generate the required force due to fatigue, the loading of the tendon is terminated prior to provoking any significant changes in tendon mechanical properties.

  2. An unusually medial axillary arch muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Dharap, A

    1994-01-01

    In the left upper limb of an adult male cadaver a triangular muscular slip, 3.5 cm long and 2.5 cm wide, arose from the lower border of latissimus dorsi just proximal to its tendon of insertion. It was inserted by a slender 6 cm long tendon mainly into the coracoid process of the scapula. Three short fibrous strands radiated from this slender tendon to gain attachments to pectoralis minor and the common tendon of origin of the short head of biceps brachii and coracobrachialis. In addition 2 flat tendinous bands attached the margin of this muscular slip to teres major. The thoracodorsal nerve entered the main bulk of latissimus dorsi close to the muscular slip but did not supply a separate branch to the latter. This is an axillary arch muscle in an unusually medial location. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7928652

  3. Hip Capsular Reconstruction Using Dermal Allograft.

    PubMed

    Chahla, Jorge; Dean, Chase S; Soares, Eduardo; Mook, William R; Philippon, Marc J

    2016-04-01

    Because hip arthroscopic procedures are increasing in number, complications related to the operation itself are starting to emerge. Whereas the capsule has been recognized as an important static stabilizer for the hip, it has not been until recently that surgeons have realized the importance of its preservation and restoration. Disruption of the capsule during arthroscopic procedures is a potential contributor to postoperative iatrogenic hip instability. In cases of a symptomatic deficient capsule, a capsular reconstruction is mandatory because instability may lead to detrimental chondral and labral changes. The purpose of this report was to describe our technique for arthroscopic hip capsular reconstruction using dermal allograft.

  4. Optimization and Implementation of Long Nerve Allografts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    decellularized allografts tested did not perform well in this repair model. Additional evaluations and...2c  was  completed.    All   animals  were  assessed  weekly  until  termination  26  weeks  after   receiving  the...the  engrafted  nerves  were  examined  for  nerve-­‐graft  continuity.     Animals  with  a  loss  of   continuity

  5. Is higher serum cholesterol associated with altered tendon structure or tendon pain? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Benjamin J; Cook, Jill L; Docking, Sean I; Gaida, James E

    2015-01-01

    Background Tendon pain occurs in individuals with extreme cholesterol levels (familial hypercholesterolaemia). It is unclear whether the association with tendon pain is strong with less extreme elevations of cholesterol. Objective To determine whether lipid levels are associated with abnormal tendon structure or the presence of tendon pain. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant articles were found through an electronic search of 6 medical databases—MEDLINE, Cochrane, AMED, EMBASE, Web of Science and Scopus. We included all case–control or cross-sectional studies with data describing (1) lipid levels or use of lipid-lowering drugs and (2) tendon structure or tendon pain. Results 17 studies (2612 participants) were eligible for inclusion in the review. People with altered tendon structure or tendon pain had significantly higher total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; with mean difference values of 0.66, 1.00, 0.33, and −0.19 mmol/L, respectively. Conclusions The results of this review indicate that a relationship exists between an individual’s lipid profile and tendon health. However, further longitudinal studies are required to determine whether a cause and effect relationship exists between tendon structure and lipid levels. This could lead to advancement in the understanding of the pathoaetiology and thus treatment of tendinopathy. PMID:26474596

  6. An experimental model for studying the biomechanics of embryonic tendon: Evidence that the development of mechanical properties depends on the actinomyosin machinery

    PubMed Central

    Kalson, Nicholas S.; Holmes, David F.; Kapacee, Zoher; Otermin, Iker; Lu, Yinhui; Ennos, Roland A.; Canty-Laird, Elizabeth G.; Kadler, Karl E.

    2010-01-01

    Tendons attach muscles to bone and thereby transmit tensile forces during joint movement. However, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms that establish the mechanical properties of tendon has remained elusive because of the practical difficulties of studying tissue mechanics in vivo. Here we have performed a study of tendon-like constructs made by culturing embryonic tendon cells in fixed-length fibrin gels. The constructs display mechanical properties (toe–linear–fail stress–strain curve, stiffness, ultimate tensile strength, and failure strain) as well as collagen fibril volume fraction and extracellular matrix (ECM)/cell ratio that are statistically similar to those of embryonic chick metatarsal tendons. The development of mechanical properties during time in culture was abolished when the constructs were treated separately with Triton X-100 (to solubilise membranes), cytochalasin (to disassemble the actin cytoskeleton) and blebbistatin (a small molecule inhibitor of non-muscle myosin II). Importantly, these treatments had no effect on the mechanical properties of the constructs that existed prior to treatment. Live-cell imaging and 14C-proline metabolic labeling showed that blebbistatin inhibited the contraction of the constructs without affecting cell viability, procollagen synthesis, or conversion of procollagen to collagen. In conclusion, the mechanical properties per se of the tendon constructs are attributable to the ECM generated by the cells but the improvement of mechanical properties during time in culture was dependent on non-muscle myosin II-derived forces. PMID:20736063

  7. Eccentric exercise in vivo: strain-induced muscle damage and adaptation in a stable system.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Timothy A

    2010-04-01

    The muscle tendon unit is a stable system, designed to operate eccentrically with efficiency and resiliency. Fiber strains, although minimized by tendon compliance during exercise, are essential components to decoding the mechanical and chemical signals during exercise. Subsequent cellular adaptations minimize the subsequent "dose" of stress and strain and serve to limit the exacerbation of damage into injury.

  8. [Connective tissue reinforcing structures of the digital tendon sheaths of the human hand].

    PubMed

    Knott, C; Schmidt, H M

    1986-01-01

    At a greater number of humid preparated human hands, all the ligamentous supports of the digital tendon sheath were exposed and their dimensions were determined. The osteofibrous channels, which contain the long flexor tendons of the digits, were bounded on the one hand by transversely concave shaft areas of the phalanges and the palmar ligaments and on the other side by the fibrous parts of the tendon sheath. From the second to the 5th finger, it has a regular extension of length, which begins proximal at the heads of the metacarpal bones and runs distal to the base of the nail phalanx. In some cases, there is a continuous communication between the digital tendon sheath of the little finger and the carpal synovial sheath. The tendon sheath of the flexor pollicis longus muscle in comparison with it is always in an open communication with the radial synovial sac of the wrist. At the fibrous supports of the digital tendon sheath, one can find constant and inconstant ligamentous structures. Regular shaped ligaments consist of annular fibers (A1 to A5). The proximal complex of fiber supports is a formation of the A1 and A2 ligaments. The band A1 can be divided into 2 ligaments both of roughly equal length, which lay between the head of the metacarpal bone and the base of the proximal phalanx. The strongest fibrous support of the whole digital tendon sheath represents the band A2. It is attached to the midth of the proximal phalanx and increases in strength from proximal to distal. The middle length varies between 6.7 mm at the thumb and 18.7 mm at the middle finger. The distal margin is strengthened by fibrocartilage tissue to be in accordance with the important function as a pulley. The annular band A4 forms the distal supporting complex height above the shaft of the middle phalanx. At the 2nd to the 5th finger it is, with a middle length of 6 to 7 mm, very much shorter than A2 and restrains first of all the tendon of the flexor digitorum profundus muscle. In the area

  9. Biological Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, David

    2008-01-01

    A histologically normal insertion site does not regenerate following rotator cuff tendon-to-bone repair, which is likely due to abnormal or insufficient gene expression and/or cell differentiation at the repair site. Techniques to manipulate the biologic events following tendon repair may improve healing. We used a sheep infraspinatus repair model to evaluate the effect of osteoinductive growth factors and BMP-12 on tendon-to-bone healing. Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed increased formation of new bone and fibrocartilage at the healing tendon attachment site in the treated animals, and biomechanical testing showed improved load-to-failure. Other techniques with potential to augment repair site biology include use of platelets isolated from autologous blood to deliver growth factors to a tendon repair site. Modalities that improve local vascularity, such as pulsed ultrasound, have the potential to augment rotator cuff healing. Important information about the biology of tendon healing can also be gained from studies of substances that inhibit healing, such as nicotine and antiinflammatory medications. Future approaches may include the use of stem cells and transcription factors to induce formation of the native tendon-bone insertion site after rotator cuff repair surgery. PMID:18264850

  10. Human Leg Model Predicts Muscle Forces, States, and Energetics during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, Jared; Herr, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Humans employ a high degree of redundancy in joint actuation, with different combinations of muscle and tendon action providing the same net joint torque. Both the resolution of these redundancies and the energetics of such systems depend on the dynamic properties of muscles and tendons, particularly their force-length relations. Current walking models that use stock parameters when simulating muscle-tendon dynamics tend to significantly overestimate metabolic consumption, perhaps because they do not adequately consider the role of elasticity. As an alternative, we posit that the muscle-tendon morphology of the human leg has evolved to maximize the metabolic efficiency of walking at self-selected speed. We use a data-driven approach to evaluate this hypothesis, utilizing kinematic, kinetic, electromyographic (EMG), and metabolic data taken from five participants walking at self-selected speed. The kinematic and kinetic data are used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths, muscle moment arms, and joint moments while the EMG data are used to estimate muscle activations. For each subject we perform an optimization using prescribed skeletal kinematics, varying the parameters that govern the force-length curve of each tendon as well as the strength and optimal fiber length of each muscle while seeking to simultaneously minimize metabolic cost and maximize agreement with the estimated joint moments. We find that the metabolic cost of transport (MCOT) values of our participants may be correctly matched (on average 0.36±0.02 predicted, 0.35±0.02 measured) with acceptable joint torque fidelity through application of a single constraint to the muscle metabolic budget. The associated optimal muscle-tendon parameter sets allow us to estimate the forces and states of individual muscles, resolving redundancies in joint actuation and lending insight into the potential roles and control objectives of the muscles of the leg throughout the gait cycle. PMID:27175486

  11. Urinary proteomic analysis of chronic allograft nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    O’Riordan, Edmond; Orlova, Tatyana N.; Mendelev, Natalia; Patschan, Daniel; Kemp, Rowena; Chander, Praveen N.; Hu, Rena; Hao, Gang; Gross, Steven S.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Delaney, Veronica; Goligorsky, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of progressive renal allograft injury, which is termed chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN), remains obscure and is currently defined by histology. Prospective protocolbiopsy trials have demonstrated that clinical and standard laboratory tests are insufficiently sensitive indicators of the development and progression of CAN. The study aim was to determine if CAN could be characterized by urinary proteomic data and identify the proteins associated with disease. The urinary proteome of 75 renal transplant recipients and 20 healthy volunteers was analyzed using surface enhanced laser desorption and ionization MS. Patients could be classified into subgroups with normal histology and Banff CAN grades 2-3 with a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 92% by applying the classification algorithm Adaboost to urinary proteomic data. Several urinary proteins associated with advanced CAN were identified including α1-micro-globulin, β2-micro-globulin, prealbumin, and endorepellin, the antiangiogenic C-terminal fragment of perlecan. Increased urinary endorepellin was confirmed by ELISA and increased tissue expression of the endorepellin/perlecan ratio by immunofluoresence analysis of renal biopsies. In conclusion, analysis of urinary proteomic data has further characterized the more severe CAN grades and identified urinary endorepellin, as a potential biomarker of advanced CAN. PMID:21136903

  12. Minimizing the risk of chronic allograft nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R; Wali, Ravinder K

    2009-04-27

    Chronic allograft nephropathy, now defined as interstital fibrosis and tubular atrophy not otherwise specified, is a near universal finding in transplant kidney biopsies by the end of the first decade posttransplantation. After excluding death with functioning graft, caused by cardiovascular disease or malignancy, chronic allograft nephropathy is the leading cause of graft failure. Original assumptions were that this was not a modifiable process but inexorable, likely due to past kidney injuries. However, newer understandings suggest that acute or subacute processes are involved, and with proper diagnosis, appropriate interventions can be instituted. Our method involved a review of the primary and secondary prevention trials in calcineurin inhibitor withdrawal. Some of the more important causes of progressive graft deterioration include subclinical cellular or humoral rejection, and chronic calcineurin inhibitor toxicity. Early graft biopsy, assessment of histology, and changes in immunosuppression may be some of the most important measures available to protect graft function. The avoidance of clinical inertia in pursuing subtle changes in graft function is critical. Modification in maintenance immunosuppression may benefit many patients with early evidence of graft deterioration.

  13. Development of the stapedius muscle and pyramidal eminence in humans.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to systematize the key developmental phases of the stapedius muscle and the pyramidal eminence to clarify their formation, as well as to understand the variations and anomalies that can affect these structures. Sixty human embryos and fetuses between 38 days and 17 weeks of development were studied. The stapedius muscle is formed by two anlagen, one for the tendon, which derives from the internal segment of the interhyale, and another for the belly, located in the second pharyngeal arch medial to the facial nerve and near the interhyale but forming a completely independent anlage. In the interhyale, two segments were differentiated, these forming an angle; at the vertex, the belly of the stapedius muscle is attached. The internal segment is located from the attachment of the belly of the stapedius muscle to the anlage of the stapes, forming the anlage of the tendon of the stapedius muscle. The external segment completely disappears at the beginning of the fetal period. The pyramidal eminence is formed by an anlage independent of Reichert's cartilage, from the mesenchymal tissue of the tympanic cavity, which condenses around the belly of the stapedius muscle from 12 weeks of post-conception development. The length of the tendon of the stapedius muscle in adults varies, depending on the attachment site of the belly of the stapedius muscle in the interhyale, which would determine the length of the internal segment (anlage of the tendon) and consequently the tendon length. This variation depends on the greater or lesser persistence of the angulation observed during development, between the tendon and the belly of the stapedius muscle.

  14. Development of the stapedius muscle and pyramidal eminence in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to systematize the key developmental phases of the stapedius muscle and the pyramidal eminence to clarify their formation, as well as to understand the variations and anomalies that can affect these structures. Sixty human embryos and fetuses between 38 days and 17 weeks of development were studied. The stapedius muscle is formed by two anlagen, one for the tendon, which derives from the internal segment of the interhyale, and another for the belly, located in the second pharyngeal arch medial to the facial nerve and near the interhyale but forming a completely independent anlage. In the interhyale, two segments were differentiated, these forming an angle; at the vertex, the belly of the stapedius muscle is attached. The internal segment is located from the attachment of the belly of the stapedius muscle to the anlage of the stapes, forming the anlage of the tendon of the stapedius muscle. The external segment completely disappears at the beginning of the fetal period. The pyramidal eminence is formed by an anlage independent of Reichert’s cartilage, from the mesenchymal tissue of the tympanic cavity, which condenses around the belly of the stapedius muscle from 12 weeks of post-conception development. The length of the tendon of the stapedius muscle in adults varies, depending on the attachment site of the belly of the stapedius muscle in the interhyale, which would determine the length of the internal segment (anlage of the tendon) and consequently the tendon length. This variation depends on the greater or lesser persistence of the angulation observed during development, between the tendon and the belly of the stapedius muscle. PMID:19531086

  15. Targeting Sirtuin-1 prolongs murine renal allograft survival and function.

    PubMed

    Levine, Matthew H; Wang, Zhonglin; Xiao, Haiyan; Jiao, Jing; Wang, Liqing; Bhatti, Tricia R; Hancock, Wayne W; Beier, Ulf H

    2016-05-01

    Current immunosuppressive medications used after transplantation have significant toxicities. Foxp3(+) T-regulatory cells can prevent allograft rejection without compromising protective host immunity. Interestingly, inhibiting the class III histone/protein deacetylase Sirtuin-1 can augment Foxp3(+) T-regulatory suppressive function through increasing Foxp3 acetylation. Here we determined whether Sirtuin-1 targeting can stabilize biological allograft function. BALB/c kidney allografts were transplanted into C57BL/6 recipients with a CD4-conditional deletion of Sirtuin-1 (Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre)) or mice treated with a Sirtuin-1-specific inhibitor (EX-527), and the native kidneys removed. Blood chemistries and hematocrit were followed weekly. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients showed markedly longer survival and improved kidney function. Sirt1(fl/fl)CD4(cre) recipients exhibited donor-specific tolerance, accepted BALB/c, but rejected third-party C3H cardiac allografts. C57BL/6 recipients of BALB/c renal allografts that were treated with EX-527 showed improved survival and renal function at 1, but not 10 mg/kg/day. Pharmacologic inhibition of Sirtuin-1 also improved renal allograft survival and function with dosing effects having relevance to outcome. Thus, inhibiting Sirtuin-1 can be a useful asset in controlling T-cell-mediated rejection. However, effects on non-T cells that could adversely affect allograft survival and function merit consideration.

  16. Allograft selection for distal femur through cutting contour registration.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Lihui; Niu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Li

    2016-12-01

    Allograft reconstruction is an acceptable procedure for the recovery of normal anatomy after the bone tumor resection. During the past few years, several automated methods have been proposed to select the best anatomically matching allograft from the virtual donor bone bank. The surface-based automated method uses the contralateral healthy bone to obtain the normal surface shape of the diseased bone, which could achieve good matching of the defect and the selected allograft. However, the surface-based method focuses on the matching of the whole bone so that the matching of the contact surface between the allograft and the recipient bone may not be optimal. To deal with the above problem, we propose a cutting contour based method for the allograft selection. Cutting contour from the recipient bone could reflect the structural information of the defect and is seldom influenced by tumor. Thus the cutting contour can be used as the matching template to find the optimal alignment of the recipient bone and the allograft. The proposed method is validated using the data of distal femurs where bone transplantation is commonly performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method generally outperforms the surface-based method within modest extra time. Overall, our contour-based method is an effective complementary technique for allograft selection in the virtual bone bank.

  17. Tendon injury and tendinopathy: healing and repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pankaj; Maffulli, Nicola

    2005-01-01

    Tendon disorders are frequent and are responsible for substantial morbidity both in sports and in the workplace. Tendinopathy, as opposed to tendinitis or tendinosis, is the best generic descriptive term for the clinical conditions in and around tendons arising from overuse. Tendinopathy is a difficult problem requiring lengthy management, and patients often respond poorly to treatment. Preexisting degeneration has been implicated as a risk factor for acute tendon rupture. Several physical modalities have been developed to treat tendinopathy. There is limited and mixed high-level evidence to support the, albeit common, clinical use of these modalities. Further research and scientific evaluation are required before biological solutions become realistic options.

  18. Fibromatosis of the flexor pollicus longus tendon

    PubMed Central

    Damkat-Thomas, L; Black, CE; Herbert, K

    2010-01-01

    An unusual case of fibromatosis of the dominant left flexor pollicus longus (FPL) in a thirteen year old schoolboy. Initially presenting with pain in the thenar eminence and difficulty flexing the metacarpal phalangeal joint (MPJ), other symptoms include locking, triggering and difficulty writing. MRI showed a 4cm segment of thickened abnormal tendon. Intra-operatively three 1cm nodules were excised from the FPL while preserving the tendon. Histopathology reported the nodules as fibromatosis. A literature search revealed that this has not previously been reported although symptomatic tendon sheath fibromas have. Our patient achieved a good result following surgical intervention and the two year review has shown no complications. PMID:24946359

  19. A review of work on artificial tendons.

    PubMed

    Murray, G A; Semple, J C

    1979-07-01

    Work done to date on artificial tendons by many authors is described in chronological order. A brief description of the techniques and materials is given in each case, with a summary of the results. The overall implications of the work are discussed in terms of prosthesis durability, the attachment to bone and tendon, mechanical properties and the volume of scar tissue generated. It is concluded that construction of a permanent artificial tendon is a realistic and worthwhile aim; further experimental work ought to include long term in vivo testing with means provided for monitoring any drift of the attachment points.

  20. Stem Cells for Augmenting Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gulotta, Lawrence V.; Chaudhury, Salma; Wiznia, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Tendon healing is fraught with complications such as reruptures and adhesion formation due to the formation of scar tissue at the injury site as opposed to the regeneration of native tissue. Stem cells are an attractive option in developing cell-based therapies to improve tendon healing. However, several questions remain to be answered before stem cells can be used clinically. Specifically, the type of stem cell, the amount of cells, and the proper combination of growth factors or mechanical stimuli to induce differentiation all remain to be seen. This paper outlines the current literature on the use of stem cells for tendon augmentation. PMID:22190960

  1. Ultrasonic stress measurements in prestressing tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washer, Glenn A.; Green, Robert E.

    2002-05-01

    The goal of this research was to examine ultrasonic stress measurement techniques for the condition assessment of prestressing tendons. Acoustoelastic measurements were made in prestressing rods and strands, and constants are reported that relate the change in ultrasonic velocity to the change in stress. The effects of dispersion in prestressing tendons, which act as circular wave guides for ultrasonic waves, were measured and evaluated. For this research, narrow-band, noncontact Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) were designed to launch and receive ultrasonic waves propagating within the tendons.

  2. Proximal Biceps Tendon and Rotator Cuff Tears.

    PubMed

    Virk, Mandeep S; Cole, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    The long head of biceps tendon (LHBT) is frequently involved in rotator cuff tears and can cause anterior shoulder pain. Tendon hypertrophy, hourglass contracture, delamination, tears, and tendon instability in the bicipital groove are common macroscopic pathologic findings affecting the LHBT in the presence of rotator cuff tears. Failure to address LHBT disorders in the setting of rotator cuff tear can result in persistent shoulder pain and poor satisfaction after rotator cuff repair. Tenotomy or tenodesis of the LHBT are effective options for relieving pain arising from the LHBT in the setting of reparable and selected irreparable rotator cuff tears.

  3. Imaging and simulation of Achilles tendon dynamics: Implications for walking performance in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Franz, Jason R; Thelen, Darryl G

    2016-06-14

    The Achilles tendon (AT) is a complex structure, consisting of distinct fascicle bundles arising from each triceps surae muscle that may act as mechanically independent structures. Advances in tissue imaging are rapidly accelerating our understanding of the complexities of functional Achilles tendon behavior, with potentially important implications for musculoskeletal injury and performance. In this overview of our recent contributions to these efforts, we present the results of complementary experimental and computational approaches to investigate AT behavior during walking and its potential relevance to reduced triceps surae mechanical performance due to aging. Our experimental evidence reveals that older tendons exhibit smaller differences in tissue deformations than young adults between regions of the AT presumed to arise from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. These observations are consistent with a reduced capacity for inter-fascicle sliding within the AT, which could have implications for the mechanical independence of the triceps surae muscles. More uniform AT deformations are also correlated with hallmark biomechanical features of elderly gait - namely, a loss of net ankle moment, power, and positive work during push-off. Simulating age-related reductions in the capacity for inter-fascicle sliding in the AT during walking predicts detriments in gastrocnemius muscle-tendon mechanical performance coupled with underlying shifts in fascicle kinematics during push-off. AT compliance, also suspected to vary due to age, systematically modulates those effects. By integrating in vivo imaging with computational modeling, we have gained theoretical insight into multi-scale biomechanical changes due to aging, hypotheses regarding their functional effects, and opportunities for experiments that validate or invalidate these assertions.

  4. Les plaies du tendon patellaire

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Mardy, Abdelhak; Elayoubi, Abdelghni; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Les plaies du tendon patellaire sont peu fréquentes et sont peu rapportés dans la littérature, contrairement aux ruptures sous cutanées. Les sections du tendon patellaire nécessitent une réparation immédiate afin de rétablir l'appareil extenseur et de permettre une récupération fonctionnelle précoce. A travers ce travail rétrospectif sur 13 cas, nous analysons les aspects épidémiologiques, thérapeutiques et pronostiques de ce type de pathologie en comparant différents scores. L’âge moyen est de 25 ans avec une prédominance masculine. Les étiologies sont dominées par les accidents de la voie publique (68%) et les agressions par agent tranchant (26%) et contendant (6 %). Tous nos patients ont bénéficié d'un parage chirurgical avec suture tendineuse direct protégée par un laçage au fils d'aciers en légère flexion. La rééducation est débutée après sédation des phénomènes inflammatoires. Au dernier recul les résultats sont excellents et bon à 92%. Nous n'avons pas noté de différence de force musculaire et d'amplitude articulaire entre le genou sain et le genou lésé. Les lésions ouvertes du tendon patellaire est relativement rare. La prise en charge chirurgicale rapide donne des résultats assez satisfaisants. La réparation est généralement renforcée par un semi-tendineux, synthétique ou métallique en forme de cadre de renfort pour faciliter la réadaptation et réduire le risque de récidive après la fin de l'immobilisation. PMID:25170379

  5. Impairment of muscle force transmission in spastic-paretic muscles of stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Xiaogang Hu; Afsharipour, Babak; Rymer, William Zev; Suresh, Nina L

    2016-08-01

    Hemispheric stroke survivors tend to have persistent motor impairments, with muscle weakness and muscle spasticity observed concurrently in the affected muscles. The objective of this preliminary study was to identify whether impairment of muscle force transmission could contribute to weakness in spastic-paretic muscles of chronic stroke survivors. To characterize the efficiency of the transmission of muscle forces to the tendon, we activated biceps brachii muscle electrically by stimulating the musculocutaneous nerve with maximum current. The ratio between the elicited maximum twitch force amplitude and the maximum M-wave peak-peak amplitude was calculated as a measure of the efficiency of force transmission. Based on the preliminary results of two stroke survivors, we show that the Force/M-wave ratio was reduced in the affected biceps brachii muscles in comparison with the contralateral muscles, indicating a potential impairment in the muscle force transmission in the affected muscles. Our findings suggest that disrupted muscle force transmission to the tendon could contribute to weakness in spastic muscles of chronic stroke survivors.

  6. Variability in Hoffmann and tendon reflexes in healthy male subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, E.; Do, S.; Jaweed, M.

    1992-01-01

    There is a time dependent decrease in amplitude of H- and T-reflexes during Zero-G exposure and subsequently an increase in the amplitude of the H-reflex 2-4 hours after return to a 1-G environment. These alterations have been attributed to the adaptation of the human neurosensory system to gravity. The Hoffman reflex (H-reflex) is an acknowledged method to determine the integrity of the monosynaptic reflex arc. However deep tendon reflexes (DTR's or T-reflexes), elicited by striking the tendon also utilize the entire reflex arc. The objective of this study was to compare the variability in latency and amplitude of the two reflexes in healthy subjects. Methods: Nine healthy male subjects, 27-43 years in age, 161-175 cm in height plus 60-86 Kg in weight, underwent weekly testing for four weeks with a Dan-Tec EMG counterpoint EMG system. Subjects were studied prone and surface EMG electrodes were placed on the right and left soleus muscles. The H-reflex was obtained by stimulating the tibial nerve in the politeal fossa with a 0.2 msec square wave pulse delivered at 2 Hz until the maximum H-reflex was obtained. The T-reflex was invoked by tapping the achilles tendon with a self triggering reflex hammer connected to the EMG system. The latencies and amplitudes for the H- and T-reflexes were measured. Results: These data indicate that the amplitudes of these reflexes varied considerably. However, latencies to invoked responses were consistent. The latency of the T-reflex was approximately 3-5 msec longer than the H-reflex. Conclusion: The T-reflex is easily obtained, requires less time, and is more comfortable to perform. Qualitative data can be obtained by deploying self triggering, force plated reflex hammers both in the 1-G and Zero-G environment.

  7. High-pressure saline washing of allografts reduces bacterial contamination.

    PubMed

    Hirn, M Y; Salmela, P M; Vuento, R E

    2001-02-01

    60 fresh-frozen bone allografts were contaminated on the operating room floor. No bacterial growth was detected in 5 of them after contamination. The remaining 55 grafts had positive bacterial cultures and were processed with three methods: soaking in saline, soaking in antibiotic solution or washing by high-pressure saline. After high-pressure lavage, the cultures were negative in three fourths of the contaminated allografts. The corresponding figures after soaking grafts in saline and antibiotic solution were one tenth and two tenths, respectively. High-pressure saline cleansing of allografts can be recommended because it improves safety by reducing the superficial bacterial bioburden.

  8. Famotidine suppresses osteogenic differentiation of tendon cells in vitro and pathological calcification of tendon in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenichi; Hojo, Hironori; Koshima, Isao; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2012-12-01

    Heterotopic ossification or calcification follows any type of musculoskeletal trauma and is known to occur after arthroplasties of hip, knee, shoulder, or elbow; fractures; joint dislocations; or tendon ruptures. Histamine receptor H2 (Hrh2) has been shown to be effective for reducing pain and decreasing calcification in patients with calcifying tendinitis, which suggested that H2 blockers were effective for the treatment of tendon ossification or calcification. However, the detailed mechanisms of its action on tendon remain to be clarified. We investigated the mechanisms underlying H2 blocker-mediated suppression of tendon calcification, with a focus on the direct action of the drug on tendon cells. Famotidine treatment suppressed the mRNA expressions of Col10a1 and osteocalcin, ossification markers, in a tendon-derived cell line TT-D6, as well as a preosteoblastic one MC3T3-E1. Both of the cell lines expressed Hrh2; histamine treatment induced osteocalcin expression in these cells. Famotidine administration suppressed calcification in the Achilles tendon of ttw mice, a mouse model of ectopic ossification. These data suggest that famotidine inhibits osteogenic differentiation of tendon cells in vitro, and this inhibition may underlie the anti-calcification effects of the drug in vivo. This study points to the use of H2 blockers as a promising strategy for treating heterotopic ossification or calcification in tendon, and provides evidence in support of the clinical use of famotidine.

  9. Assessment of Postoperative Tendon Quality in Patients With Achilles Tendon Rupture Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and Tendon Fiber Tracking.

    PubMed

    Sarman, Hakan; Atmaca, Halil; Cakir, Ozgur; Muezzinoglu, Umit Sefa; Anik, Yonca; Memisoglu, Kaya; Baran, Tuncay; Isik, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Although pre- and postoperative imaging of Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) has been well documented, radiographic evaluations of postoperative intratendinous healing and microstructure are still lacking. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an innovative technique that offers a noninvasive method for describing the microstructure characteristics and organization of tissues. DTI was used in the present study for quantitative assessment of fiber continuity postoperatively in patients with acute ATR. The data from 16 patients with ATR from 2005 to 2012 were retrospectively analyzed. The microstructure of ART was evaluated using tendon fiber tracking, tendon continuity, fractional anisotropy, and apparent diffusion coefficient values by way of DTI. The distal and proximal portions were measured separately in both the ruptured and the healthy extremities of each patient. The mean patient age was 41.56 ± 8.49 (range 26 to 56) years. The median duration of follow-up was 21 (range 6 to 80) months. The tendon fractional anisotropy values of the ruptured Achilles tendon were significantly lower statistically than those of the normal side (p = .001). However, none of the differences between the 2 groups with respect to the distal and proximal apparent diffusion coefficient were statistically significant (p = .358 and p = .899, respectively). In addition, the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient measurements were not significantly different in the proximal and distal regions of the ruptured tendons compared with the healthy tendons. The present study used DTI and fiber tracking to demonstrate the radiologic properties of postoperative Achilles tendons with respect to trajectory and tendinous fiber continuity. Quantifying DTI and fiber tractography offers an innovative and effective tool that might be able to detect microstructural abnormalities not appreciable using conventional radiologic techniques.

  10. Traumatic tibialis anterior tendon rupture: treatment with a two-stage silicone tube and an interposition hamstring tendons graft protocol.

    PubMed

    Kontogeorgakos, Vasileios; Koutalos, Antonios; Hantes, Michael; Manoudis, Gregory; Badras, Leonidas; Malizos, Konstantinos

    2015-03-01

    A novel technique for managing ruptured tibialis anterior tendon complicated by infection and tendon substance loss in a young adult is described. A two-stage reconstruction technique with a silicon tube and tendon autograft was performed. At first, after local control of the infection, scar excision and placement of a silicone tube was performed. Ten weeks later, ipsilateral hamstrings tendons were harvested and bridged the 7 cm tendon gap. Eighteen months later, the patient has excellent clinical and functional outcome.

  11. Effect of Tendon Vibration on Hemiparetic Arm Stability in Unstable Workspaces.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Megan O; Gadhoke, Bani; Scheidt, Robert A; Schmit, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    Sensory stimulation of wrist musculature can enhance stability in the proximal arm and may be a useful therapy aimed at improving arm control post-stroke. Specifically, our prior research indicates tendon vibration can enhance stability during point-to-point arm movements and in tracking tasks. The goal of the present study was to investigate the influence of forearm tendon vibration on endpoint stability, measured at the hand, immediately following forward arm movements in an unstable environment. Both proximal and distal workspaces were tested. Ten hemiparetic stroke subjects and 5 healthy controls made forward arm movements while grasping the handle of a two-joint robotic arm. At the end of each movement, the robot applied destabilizing forces. During some trials, 70 Hz vibration was applied to the forearm flexor muscle tendons. 70 Hz was used as the stimulus frequency as it lies within the range of optimal frequencies that activate the muscle spindles at the highest response rate. Endpoint position, velocity, muscle activity and grip force d